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Sample records for swine hearts underwent

  1. Glutaraldehyde Inactivation of Exotic Animal Viruses in Swine Heart Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cunliffe, H. R.; Blackwell, J. H.; Walker, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    Glutaraldehyde, 0.2%, in a 1:100 (wt/vol) ratio, inactivated four animal viruses (foot-and-mouth disease, swine vesicular disease, African swine fever, hog cholera) in swine heart tissues during 11-day exposures at 22 to 26°C. PMID:225989

  2. Mortality Risk Stratification in Fontan Patients Who Underwent Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Berg, Christopher J; Bauer, Brenton S; Hageman, Abbie; Aboulhosn, Jamil A; Reardon, Leigh C

    2017-03-01

    The number of patients who require orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT) for failing Fontan physiology continues to grow; however, the methods and tools to evaluate risk of OHT are limited. This study aimed to identify a set of preoperative variables and characteristics that were associated with a greater risk of postoperative mortality in patients who received OHT for failing Fontan physiology. Thirty-six Fontan patients were identified as having undergone OHT at University of California-Los Angeles Medical Center from 1991 to 2014. Data were collected retrospectively and analyzed. The primary end point was designated as postoperative mortality. After an average follow-up time of 3.5 years, 17 (44%) patients suffered postoperative mortality. Patient characteristics including (1) age <18 years at the time of OHT, (2) Fontan-OHT interval of <10 years, (3) systemic ventricular ejection fraction <20%, (4) moderate-to-severe atrioventricular valve insufficiency, (5) an elevated Model of End-stage Liver Disease, eXcluding INR score, or (6) need for advanced mechanical support before surgery were associated with an increased incidence of postoperative mortality. Using these risk factors, we present a theoretical framework to stratify risk of postoperative death in failing Fontan patients after OHT. In conclusion, a method such as this may aid in the transplantation evaluation and listing process of patients with failing Fontan physiology.

  3. Circulating S100B and Adiponectin in Children Who Underwent Open Heart Surgery and Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Varrica, Alessandro; Satriano, Angela; Frigiola, Alessandro; Giamberti, Alessandro; Tettamanti, Guido; Anastasia, Luigi; Conforti, Erika; Gavilanes, Antonio D. W.; Zimmermann, Luc J.; Vles, Hans J. S.; Li Volti, Giovanni; Gazzolo, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Background. S100B protein, previously proposed as a consolidated marker of brain damage in congenital heart disease (CHD) newborns who underwent cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), has been progressively abandoned due to S100B CNS extra-source such as adipose tissue. The present study investigated CHD newborns, if adipose tissue contributes significantly to S100B serum levels. Methods. We conducted a prospective study in 26 CHD infants, without preexisting neurological disorders, who underwent cardiac surgery and CPB in whom blood samples for S100B and adiponectin (ADN) measurement were drawn at five perioperative time-points. Results. S100B showed a significant increase from hospital admission up to 24 h after procedure reaching its maximum peak (P < 0.01) during CPB and at the end of the surgical procedure. Moreover, ADN showed a flat pattern and no significant differences (P > 0.05) have been found all along perioperative monitoring. ADN/S100B ratio pattern was identical to S100B alone with the higher peak at the end of CPB and remained higher up to 24 h from surgery. Conclusions. The present study provides evidence that, in CHD infants, S100B protein is not affected by an extra-source adipose tissue release as suggested by no changes in circulating ADN concentrations. PMID:26417594

  4. Partitioning of pyruvate between oxidation and anaplerosis in swine hearts.

    PubMed

    Panchal, A R; Comte, B; Huang, H; Kerwin, T; Darvish, A; des Rosiers, C; Brunengraber, H; Stanley, W C

    2000-11-01

    The goal of this study was to measure flux through pyruvate carboxylation and decarboxylation in the heart in vivo. These rates were measured in the anterior wall of normal anesthetized swine hearts by infusing [U-(13)C(3)]lactate and/or [U-(13)C(3)] pyruvate into the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. After 1 h, the tissue was freeze-clamped and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the mass isotopomer distribution of citrate and its oxaloacetate moiety. LAD blood pyruvate and lactate enrichments and concentrations were constant after 15 min of infusion. Under near-normal physiological concentrations of lactate and pyruvate, pyruvate carboxylation and decarboxylation accounted for 4.7 +/- 0.3 and 41.5 +/- 2.0% of citrate formation, respectively. Similar relative fluxes were found when arterial pyruvate was raised from 0.2 to 1.1 mM. Addition of 1 mM octanoate to 1 mM pyruvate inhibited pyruvate decarboxylation by 93% without affecting carboxylation. The absence of M1 and M2 pyruvate demonstrated net irreversible pyruvate carboxylation. Under our experimental conditions we found that pyruvate carboxylation in the in vivo heart accounts for at least 3-6% of the citric acid cycle flux despite considerable variation in the flux through pyruvate decarboxylation.

  5. [Cardiopulmonary exercise test and heart rate variability in patients with congestive heart failure who underwent physical rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Kubinyi, Aleksandra; Bacior, Bogumiła; Szot, Wojclech; Klecha, Artur; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina

    2003-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation of patients with heart diseases is a well-known therapeutical method used in patients with heart failure. However there is no consensus regarding rehabilitation program for these patients. The aim of this study was to assess tolerance of physical exercise and parameters of heart rate variability in patients with chronic heart failure who were exercised using different models of training. 42 patients (mean age 55.9 +/- 8.2) with chronic heart failure (NYHA class II and III) were included into this study. They were divided randomly into three groups, each number 14 patients: group A--patients who were trained according to model with progressive increase of workload, group B--patients with interval training, and group C--patients who were not trained at all. The study groups did not differ in average age, BMI, NYHA class, or pharmacological treatment. All patients from groups A and B were rehabilitated during six months, 3 times per week for 1.0 hour each time. All patients were submitted to the following examinations before and after six months of training: echocardiography, cardiopulmonary exercise test and 24-hour ECG recording with evaluation of time-domain HRV parameters. In groups A and B we observed an improvement in exercise capacity, which was more pronounced in group A. This improvement was observed as increase in total exercise time when compared with group B and C (839.1 +/- 98.3 sec vs 472.4 +/- 39.7 sec vs 347.92 +/- 61.0 sec respectively at p < 0.0001), and increase in workload (6.28 +/- 0.8 MET vs 3.9 +/- 0.2 MET vs 2.6 +/- 0.63 MET respectively in the study groups). We also found improved cardiopulmonary exercise test. After six months we observed significant differences in all parameters between group A and C, and in VO2max between group B and C (16.5 +/- 1.9 vs 14.1 +/- 1.9 ml/kg/min, p < 0.01) and in VE/VCO2 (37.8 +/- 4.2 vs 40.4 +/- 6.7 l/min, p < 0.01). After 6 months we also found significant differences between group A

  6. Resistance Pattern of Antibiotics in Patient Underwent Open Heart Surgery with Nosocomial Infection in North of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Alireza; Najafi, Narges; Alian, Shahriar; Tayebi, Atefe; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh; Rouhi, Samaneh; Heydari, Amirhosein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients who undergo cardiac surgery appear to be at increased risk for the development of Nosocomial infections (NIs). The development of antibiotic-resistant infections has been associated with significantly greater hospital mortality rates compared to similar infections caused by antibiotic-sensitive pathogens. Objectives: The purpose of this study is survey of Nis and antibiotic resistance patterns of causative bacteria among patients who underwent open heart surgery in the north of Iran during a 2-year period between September 2012 and September 2014. Methods: In this cross-sectional study we evaluated 187 patients that underwent open heart surgery with NIs. Demographic feature, clinical characteristics and risk factors of each infection were recorded. The antibiotic susceptibility test was performed using the Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method according to the standard protocol of Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Detection of Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria was performed by the double-disk synergy (DDS) test; also Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRSA) strains were identified by MRSA Screen Agar. The collected data were analyzed using the SPSS software (ver. 16) and, descriptive statistics were used. Results: Out Of total of 2253 hospitalized patients who underwent open heart surgery, 187(5.05%) patients had NIs. 51.9% of the patients were female. The rates of surgical site infection (SSI), respiratory tract infection, endocarditis, Urinary tract infection (UTI), blood Infection and mediastinitis were 27.80, 25.66%, 17.64, 17.11% 8.55% and 3.20% respectively. E.coli and S.aureus were the most causative agents of NIs. The rate of ESBL-producing bacteria was 14.28- 71.42% among enterobacteriaceae and the rate of MRSA was 54.2% among S.aureus strains. All isolated Acinetobacter.spp were Multi-drug resistance (MDR). Conclusions: We showed that the rate of NIs among these high-risk patients

  7. Resistance Pattern of Antibiotics in Patient Underwent Open Heart Surgery With Nosocomial Infection in North of Iran.

    PubMed

    Davoudi, Alireza; Najafi, Narges; Alian, Shahriar; Tayebi, Atefe; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh; Rouhi, Samaneh; Heydari, Amirhosein

    2015-08-06

    Patients who undergo cardiac surgery appear to be at increased risk for the development of Nosocomial infections (NIs). The development of antibiotic-resistant infections has been associated with significantly greater hospital mortality rates compared to similar infections caused by antibiotic-sensitive pathogens. The purpose of this study is survey of Nis and antibiotic resistance patterns of causative bacteria among patients who underwent open heart surgery in the north of Iran during a 2-year period between September 2012 and September 2014. In this cross-sectional study we evaluated 187 patients that underwent open heart surgery with NIs. Demographic feature, clinical characteristics and risk factors of each infection were recorded. The antibiotic susceptibility test was performed using the Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method according to the standard protocol of Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Detection of Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria was performed by the double-disk synergy (DDS) test; also Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRSA) strains were identified by MRSA Screen Agar. The collected data were analyzed using the SPSS software (ver. 16) and, descriptive statistics were used. Out Of total of 2253 hospitalized patients who underwent open heart surgery, 187(5.05%) patients had NIs. 51.9% of the patients were female. The rates of surgical site infection (SSI), respiratory tract infection, endocarditis, Urinary tract infection (UTI), blood Infection and mediastinitis were 27.80, 25.66%, 17.64, 17.11% 8.55% and 3.20% respectively. E.coli and S.aureus were the most causative agents of NIs. The rate of ESBL-producing bacteria was 14.28- 71.42% among enterobacteriaceae and the rate of MRSA was 54.2% among S.aureus strains. All isolated Acinetobacter.spp were Multi-drug resistance (MDR). We showed that the rate of NIs among these high-risk patients was in the average level. But the emergence of MRSA and

  8. Comparison of Estimations Versus Measured Oxygen Consumption at Rest in Patients With Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction Who Underwent Right-Sided Heart Catheterization.

    PubMed

    Chase, Paul J; Davis, Paul G; Wideman, Laurie; Starnes, Joseph W; Schulz, Mark R; Bensimhon, Daniel R

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac output during right-sided heart catheterization is an important variable for patient selection of advanced therapies (cardiac transplantation and left ventricular assist device implantation). The Fick method to determine cardiac output is commonly used and typically uses estimated oxygen consumption (VO2) from 1 of 3 published empirical formulas. However, these estimation equations have not been validated in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The objectives of the present study were to determine the accuracy of 3 equations for estimating VO2 compared with direct measurement of VO2 and determine the extent clinically significant error occurred in calculating cardiac output of patients with HFrEF. Breath-by-breath measurements of VO2 from 44 patients who underwent cardiac catheterization (66% men; age, 65 ± 11 years, left ventricular ejection fraction, 22 ± 6%) were compared with the derived estimations of LaFarge and Miettinen, Dehmer et al, and Bergstra et al. Single-sample t tests found only the mean difference between the estimation of LaFarge and Miettinen and the measured VO2 to be nonsignificant (-10.3 ml/min ± 6.2 SE, p = 0.053). Bland-Altman plots demonstrated unacceptably large limits of agreement for all equations. The rate of ≥25% error in the equations by LaFarge and Miettinen, Dehmer et al, and Bergstra et al occurred in 11%, 23%, and 45% of patients, respectively. Misclassification of cardiac index derived from each equation for 2 clinically important classifications: cardiogenic shock-21%, 23%, and 32% and hypoperfusion-16%, 16%, and 25%; respectively. In conclusion, these findings do not support the use of these empiric formulas to estimate the VO2 at rest in patients with HFrEF who underwent right-sided heart catheterization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Kaempferia parviflora Wall. Ex. Baker on electrophysiology of the swine hearts

    PubMed Central

    Weerateerangkul, Punate; Surinkaew, Sirirat; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C.; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Pre-clinical studies in swine have demonstrated that a supratherapeutic concentration of sildenafil citrate decreased defibrillation efficacy and facilitated cardiac arrhythmia. We therefore, decided to investigate the effects of Kaempferia parviflora (KP) extract on these parameters in the swine heart. The underlying assumption was that in the heart, KP might be producing effects similar to sildanafil citrate as KP has long been used in southeast Asian traditional medicine to correct erectile dysfunction. Methods: The study was conducted as the defibrillation study, and ventricular fibrillation (VF) induction study. In both studies, the defibrillation threshold (DFT), the upper limit of vulnerability (ULV) and VF threshold were determined before and after KP extract administration. Results: In both studies KP extract at high concentrations (100 and 50 mg/kg) significantly increased the DFT and ULV, without altering the VF threshold. At these concentrations, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were also attenuated. Interpretation & conclusions: High concentrations of KP extract attenuated defibrillation efficacy and increased cardiac vulnerability to arrhythmia in a normal swine heart. When used in appropriate concentrations, its blood pressure lowering effect may be useful in hypertensive states. Further studies need to be done to elucidate its mechanism of action. PMID:23481066

  10. Effects of Kaempferia parviflora Wall. Ex. Baker on electrophysiology of the swine hearts.

    PubMed

    Weerateerangkul, Punate; Surinkaew, Sirirat; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2013-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies in swine have demonstrated that a supratherapeutic concentration of sildenafil citrate decreased defibrillation efficacy and facilitated cardiac arrhythmia. We therefore, decided to investigate the effects of Kaempferia parviflora (KP) extract on these parameters in the swine heart. The underlying assumption was that in the heart, KP might be producing effects similar to sildanafil citrate as KP has long been used in southeast Asian traditional medicine to correct erectile dysfunction. The study was conducted as the defibrillation study, and ventricular fibrillation (VF) induction study. In both studies, the defibrillation threshold (DFT), the upper limit of vulnerability (ULV) and VF threshold were determined before and after KP extract administration. In both studies KP extract at high concentrations (100 and 50 mg/kg) significantly increased the DFT and ULV, without altering the VF threshold. At these concentrations, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were also attenuated. High concentrations of KP extract attenuated defibrillation efficacy and increased cardiac vulnerability to arrhythmia in a normal swine heart. When used in appropriate concentrations, its blood pressure lowering effect may be useful in hypertensive states. Further studies need to be done to elucidate its mechanism of action.

  11. Right ventricular metabolism during venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in immature swine heart in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R; Isern, Nancy G; Portman, Michael A

    2017-04-01

    Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) provides hemodynamic rescue for patients encountering right or left ventricular (RV or LV) decompensation, particularly after surgery for congenital heart defects. ECMO, supported metabolically by parenteral nutrition, provides reductions in myocardial work and energy demand and, therefore, enhances functional recovery. The RV must often assume systemic ventricular pressures and function on weaning from VA-ECMO. However the substrate utilization responses of the RV to VA-ECMO or stimulation are unknown. We determined RV and LV substrate utilization response to VA-ECMO in immature swine heart. Mixed-breed male Yorkshire pigs (33-49 days old) underwent normal pressure volume loading (control, n = 5) or were unloaded by VA-ECMO (ECMO, n = 10) for 8 h. Five pigs with ECMO received intravenous thyroid hormone [triiodothyronine (T3)] to alter substrate utilization. Carbon 13 ((13)C)-labeled substrates (lactate and medium-chain and long-chain fatty acids) were systemically infused as metabolic tracers. Analyses by nuclear magnetic resonance showed that both ventricles have similar trends of fractional (13)C-labeled substrate contributions to the citric acid cycle under control conditions. VA-ECMO produced higher long-chain fatty acids and lower lactate contribution to the citric acid cycle via inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, whereas T3 promoted lactate metabolism in both ventricles. However, these metabolic shifts were smaller in RV, and RV fatty acid contributions showed minimal response to perturbations. Furthermore, VA-ECMO and T3 also achieved high [phosphocreatine]/[ATP] and low [NADH]/[NAD(+)] in LV but not in RV. These data suggest that the RV shows decreased ability to modify substrate utilization and achieve improvements in energy supply/demand during VA-ECMO.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We showed that the right ventricle unloaded by venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) has diminished

  12. Epicardial wavefronts arise from widely distributed transient sources during ventricular fibrillation in the isolated swine heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. M.; Walcott, G. P.; Gladden, J. D.; Melnick, S. B.; Ideker, R. E.; Kay, M. W.

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed that ventricular fibrillation (VF) waves emanate from stable localized sources, often called 'mother rotors'. However, evidence for the existence of these rotors is conflicting. Using a new panoramic optical mapping system that can image nearly the entire ventricular epicardium, we recently excluded epicardial mother rotors as the drivers of Wiggers' stage II VF in the isolated swine heart. Furthermore, we were unable to find evidence that VF requires sustained intramural sources. The present study was designed to test the following hypotheses: (i) VF is driven by a specific region, and (ii) rotors that are long-lived, though not necessarily permanent, are the primary generators of VF wavefronts. Using panoramic optical mapping, we mapped VF wavefronts from six isolated swine hearts. Wavefronts were tracked to characterize their activation pathways and to locate their originating sources. We found that the wavefronts that participate in epicardial re-entry were not confined to a compact region; rather they activated the entire epicardial surface. New wavefronts feeding into the epicardial activation pattern were generated over the majority of the epicardium and almost all of them were associated with rotors or repetitive breakthrough patterns that lasted for less than 2 s. These findings indicate that epicardial wavefronts in this model are generated by many transitory epicardial sources distributed over the entire surface of the heart.

  13. Normal Values for Heart Electrophysiology Parameters of Healthy Swine Determined on Electrophysiology Study.

    PubMed

    Noszczyk-Nowak, Agnieszka; Cepiel, Alicja; Janiszewski, Adrian; Pasławski, Robert; Gajek, Jacek; Pasławska, Urszula; Nicpoń, Józef

    2016-01-01

    Swine are a well-recognized animal model for human cardiovascular diseases. Despite the widespread use of porcine model in experimental electrophysiology, still no reference values for intracardiac electrical activity and conduction parameters determined during an invasive electrophysiology study (EPS) have been developed in this species thus far. The aim of the study was to develop a set of normal values for intracardiac electrical activity and conduction parameters determined during an invasive EPS of swine. The study included 36 healthy domestic swine (24-40 kg body weight). EPS was performed under a general anesthesia with midazolam, propofol and isoflurane. The reference values for intracardiac electrical activity and conduction parameters were calculated as arithmetic means ± 2 standard deviations. The reference values were determined for AH, HV and PA intervals, interatrial conduction time at its own and imposed rhythm, sinus node recovery time (SNRT), corrected sinus node recovery time (CSNRT), anterograde and retrograde Wenckebach points, atrial, atrioventricular node and ventricular refractory periods. No significant correlations were found between body weight and heart rate of the examined pigs and their electrophysiological parameters. The hereby presented reference values can be helpful in comparing the results of various studies, as well as in more accurately estimating the values of electrophysiological parameters that can be expected in a given experiment.

  14. [Clinical improvement after physical training in patient with severe postinfarction heart failure, who underwent prosthetic heart valve implantation and numerous coronary interventional procedures].

    PubMed

    Smolis Bąk, Edyta; Rymuza, Hanna; Zera, Tymoteusz; Kraska, Alicja; Dąbrowski, Rafał

    2012-01-01

    The case of patient with advanced congestive heart failure, NYHA III, of ischaemic and valvular aetiology and concomitant diseases is presented. Introduction of 6-month, controlled physical training resulted in improvement of health status, exercise performance, ventilation and left ventricular function. Quality of life got significantly better. This aspect of treatment should be considered in majority of patients with heart failure.

  15. Longitudinal Hemodynamic Measurements in Swine Heart Failure Using a Fully Implantable Telemetry System

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Jenny S.; Zhang, Zhen-Du; Pitsillides, Koullis; Sosa, Margo; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic monitoring of heart rate, blood pressure, and flow in conscious free-roaming large animals can offer considerable opportunity to understand the progression of cardiovascular diseases and can test new diagnostics and therapeutics. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of chronic, simultaneous measurement of several hemodynamic parameters (left ventricular pressure, systemic pressure, blood flow velocity, and heart rate) using a totally implantable multichannel telemetry system in swine heart failure models. Two solid-state blood pressure sensors were inserted in the left ventricle and the descending aorta for pressure measurements. Two Doppler probes were placed around the left anterior descending (LAD) and the brachiocephalic arteries for blood flow velocity measurements. Electrocardiographic (ECG) electrodes were attached to the surface of the left ventricle to monitor heart rate. The telemeter body was implanted in the right side of the abdomen under the skin for approximately 4 to 6 weeks. The animals were subjected to various heart failure models, including volume overload (A-V fistula, n = 3), pressure overload (aortic banding, n = 2) and dilated cardiomyopathy (pacing-induced tachycardia, n = 3). Longitudinal changes in hemodynamics were monitored during the progression of the disease. In the pacing-induced tachycardia animals, the systemic blood pressure progressively decreased within the first 2 weeks and returned to baseline levels thereafter. In the aortic banding animals, the pressure progressively increased during the development of the disease. The pressure in the A-V fistula animals only showed a small increase during the first week and remained stable thereafter. The results demonstrated the ability of this telemetry system of long-term, simultaneous monitoring of blood flow, pressure and heart rate in heart failure models, which may offer significant utility for understanding cardiovascular disease

  16. Longitudinal hemodynamic measurements in swine heart failure using a fully implantable telemetry system.

    PubMed

    Choy, Jenny S; Zhang, Zhen-Du; Pitsillides, Koullis; Sosa, Margo; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2014-01-01

    Chronic monitoring of heart rate, blood pressure, and flow in conscious free-roaming large animals can offer considerable opportunity to understand the progression of cardiovascular diseases and can test new diagnostics and therapeutics. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of chronic, simultaneous measurement of several hemodynamic parameters (left ventricular pressure, systemic pressure, blood flow velocity, and heart rate) using a totally implantable multichannel telemetry system in swine heart failure models. Two solid-state blood pressure sensors were inserted in the left ventricle and the descending aorta for pressure measurements. Two Doppler probes were placed around the left anterior descending (LAD) and the brachiocephalic arteries for blood flow velocity measurements. Electrocardiographic (ECG) electrodes were attached to the surface of the left ventricle to monitor heart rate. The telemeter body was implanted in the right side of the abdomen under the skin for approximately 4 to 6 weeks. The animals were subjected to various heart failure models, including volume overload (A-V fistula, n = 3), pressure overload (aortic banding, n = 2) and dilated cardiomyopathy (pacing-induced tachycardia, n = 3). Longitudinal changes in hemodynamics were monitored during the progression of the disease. In the pacing-induced tachycardia animals, the systemic blood pressure progressively decreased within the first 2 weeks and returned to baseline levels thereafter. In the aortic banding animals, the pressure progressively increased during the development of the disease. The pressure in the A-V fistula animals only showed a small increase during the first week and remained stable thereafter. The results demonstrated the ability of this telemetry system of long-term, simultaneous monitoring of blood flow, pressure and heart rate in heart failure models, which may offer significant utility for understanding cardiovascular disease progression and

  17. Superior Cardiac Function Via Anaplerotic Pyruvate in the Immature Swine Heart After Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Reperfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Hyyti, Outi M.; Cohen, Gordon A.; Ning, Xue-Han; Sadilek, Martin; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2008-12-01

    Pyruvate produces inotropic responses in the adult reperfused heart. Pyruvate oxidation and anaplerotic entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) via carboxylation are linked to stimulation of contractile function. The goals of this study were to determine if these metabolic pathways operate and are maintained in the developing myocardium after reperfusion. Immature male swine (age 10-18 days) were subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Intracoronary infusion of [2]-13C-pyruvate (to achieve a final concentration of 8 mM) was given for 35 minutes starting either during weaning (Group I), after discontinuation (Group II) or without (Control) CPB. Hemodynamic data was collected. 13C NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the fraction of pyruvate entering the CAC via pyruvate carboxylation (PC) to total CAC entry (PC plus decarboxlyation via pyruvate dehydrogenase). Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to determine total glutamate enrichment.

  18. Panoramic optical mapping reveals continuous epicardial reentry during ventricular fibrillation in the isolated swine heart.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jack M; Walcott, Gregory P; Gladden, James D; Melnick, Sharon B; Kay, Matthew W

    2007-02-01

    During ventricular fibrillation (VF), activation waves are fragmented and the heart cannot contract synchronously. It has been proposed that VF waves emanate from stable sources ("mother rotors"). Previously, we used new optical mapping technology to image VF wavefronts from nearly the entire epicardial surface of six isolated swine hearts. We found that VF was not driven by epicardial rotors, but could not exclude the presence of stable rotors hidden within the ventricular walls. Here, we use graph theoretic analysis to show that, in all 17 VF episodes we analyzed, it was always possible to trace sequences of wavefronts through series of fragmentation and collision events from the beginning to the end of the episode. The set of wavefronts that were so related (the dominant component) consisted of 92%+/-1% of epicardial wavefronts. Because each such wavefront sequence constitutes a continuous activation front, this finding shows that complete reentrant pathways were always present on the epicardial surface and therefore, that wavefront infusion from nonepicardial sources was not strictly necessary for VF maintenance. These data suggest that VF in this model is not driven by localized sources; thus, new anti-VF treatments designed to target such sources may be less effective than global interventions.

  19. Multiacquisition T1-mapping MRI during tidal respiration for quantification of myocardial T1 in swine with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hood, Maureen N; Song, Ting; Bedocs, Peter; Capacchione, John F; Kasper, Christine E; Haigney, Mark C; Ho, Vincent B

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate a free-breathing pulse sequence to quantify myocardial T1 changes in a swine model of tachycardia-induced heart failure. Yorkshire swine were implanted with pacemakers and were ventricularly paced at 200 beats/min to induce heart failure. Animals were scanned twice with a 1.5-T MRI scanner, once at baseline and once at heart failure. A T1-mapping sequence was performed during tidal respiration before and 5 minutes after the administration of a gadolinium-chelate contrast agent. T1-mapping values were compared between the baseline and heart failure scans. The percentage of fibrosis of heart failure myocardial tissue was compared with similar left ventricular tissue from control animals using trichrome blue histologic analysis. In the study cohort, differences were found between the baseline and heart failure T1-mapping values before the administration of contrast agent (960 ± 96 and 726 ± 94 ms, respectively; p = 0.02) and after contrast agent administration (546 ± 180 and 300 ± 171 ms, respectively; p = 0.005). The animals with heart failure also had a difference histologically in the percentage of myocardial collagen compared with tissue from healthy control animals (control, 5.4% ± 1.0%; heart failure, 9.4% ± 1.6%; p < 0.001). The proposed T1-mapping technique can quantify diffuse myocardial changes associated with heart failure without the use of a contrast agent and without breath-holding. These T1 changes appear to be associated with increases in the percentage of myocardial collagen that in this study were not detected by traditional myocardial delayed enhancement imaging. T1 mapping may be a useful technique for detecting early but clinically significant myocardial fibrosis.

  20. Superior cardiac function via anaplerotic pyruvate in the immature swine heart after cardiopulmonary bypass and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Olson, Aaron K; Hyyti, Outi M; Cohen, Gordon A; Ning, Xue-Han; Sadilek, Martin; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A

    2008-12-01

    Pyruvate produces inotropic responses in the adult reperfused heart. Pyruvate oxidation and anaplerotic entry into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle via carboxylation are linked to the stimulation of contractile function. The goals of this study were to determine if these metabolic pathways operate and are maintained in the developing myocardium after reperfusion. Immature male swine (age: 10-18 days) were subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Intracoronary infusion of [2-(13)C]pyruvate (to achieve an estimated final concentration of 8 mM) was given for 35 min, starting either during weaning (group I) and after its discontinuation (group II) or without (control) CPB. Hemodynamic data were collected. 13C NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the fraction of pyruvate entering the TCA cycle via pyruvate carboxylation (PC) to total TCA cycle entry (PC plus decarboxlyation via pyruvate dehydrogenase). Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to determine total glutamate enrichment. Pyruvate infusion starting during the weaning of mechanical circulatory support improved maximum dP/dt (P<0.05) but waiting to start the infusion until after the discontinuation of CPB did not. Glutamate fractional enrichment was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy as adequate (>5%) to provide signal to noise in the NMR experiment in all groups. The ratio of pyruvate carboxylase to total pyruvate entry into the TCA cycle did not differ between groups (group I: 20+/-4%, group II: 23+/-7%, and control: 27+/-7%). These data show that robust PC operates in the neonatal pig heart and is maintained during reperfusion under conditions that emulate CPB and reperfusion in human infants.

  1. Isolated swine heart ventricle perfusion model for implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Misael O; Mangual, Jan O; Ebner, Armin D; Ritter, James A

    2008-09-01

    An isolated swine heart ventricle perfusion model was developed and used under physiologically relevant conditions to study implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT). A stent coil was fabricated from a ferromagnetic SS 430 wire and used to capture 100-nm diameter magnetite particles that mimicked magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs). Four key cases were studied: (1) no stent and no magnet (control), (2) no magnet but with a stent, (3) no stent but with a magnet (traditional MDT), and (4) with a stent and a magnet (IA-MDT). When applied, the magnetic field was fixed at 0.125T. The performance of the system was based on the capture efficiency (CE) of the magnetite nanoparticles. The experiments done in the absence of the magnetic field showed minimal retention of any nanoparticles whether the stent was present or not. The experiments done in the presence of the magnetic field showed a statistically significant increase in the retention of the nanoparticles, with a marked difference between the traditional and IA-MDT cases. Compared to the control case, in one case there was nearly an 11-fold increase in CE for the IA-MDT case compared to only a threefold increase in CE for the traditional MDT case. This enhanced performance by the IA-MDT case was typical of all the experiments. Histology images of the cross-section of the coronary artery revealed that the nanoparticles were captured mainly in the vicinity of the stent. Overall, the IA-MDT results from this work with actual tissue were very encouraging and similar to those obtained from other non-tissue and theoretical studies; but, they did point to the need for further studies of IA-MDT.

  2. Diabetes reduces right atrial beta-adrenergic signaling but not agonist stimulation of heart rate in swine.

    PubMed

    Stanley, W C; Dore, J J; Hall, J L; Hamilton, C D; Pizzurro, R D; Roth, D A

    2001-04-01

    This study assessed the effects of streptozotocin diabetes in swine on the heart rate response to beta-adrenergic stimulation the adenylyl cyclase signal transduction pathway. Diabetic animals (n = 9) were hyperglycemic compared to the control group (n = 10) (12.6 +/- 1.0 vs. 3.53 +/- 0.29 mM). There were no significant differences between the diabetic and nondiabetic groups in the heart rate response to isoproterenol, however, there was a significant reduction (14%) in beta-adrenergic receptor density in the right atrium in the diabetic (61 +/- 3 fmol/mg protein) versus the nondiabetic group (71 +/- 3) (P < 0.05). The content of guanosine triphosphate binding regulatory proteins (Gs and Gi) in the right atrium was not affected by diabetes, nor was adenylyl cyclase activity under unstimulated conditions or with receptor-dependent stimulation with isoproterenol. On the other hand, adenylyl cyclase activity was 34% lower when directly stimulated with forskolin, and it was reduced by 23% when stimulated through Gs with Gpp(NH)p. In conclusion, beta-adrenergic stimulation of heart rate with isoproteronol and the receptor-dependent signal transduction pathway remained intact in the right atrium of diabetic swine despite reduced beta-adrenergic receptor density, G-protein content, and direct stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity.

  3. Prevalence and Genotypes of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Patients Underwent Coronary Angiography and Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Mazandaran Heart Center, Sari, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Tahoora; Ziabakhsh-Tabary, Shervin; Ghaemiyan, Ali; Haghshenas, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major global health problem in the worldwide that associated with significant morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgery. The available data on HBV distribution and genotyping of HBV are very heterogeneous. Therefore in this study, we tried to indicate the prevalence of HBV infections in cardiac catheterization patients referred to health centers in the north of Iran and identified the HBV genotypes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we studied 2650 patients who underwent selective coronary artery angiography and coronary artery bypass grafting in Mazandaran heart center, Sari, Iran from 2011 to 2013. All serum samples were examined to detect HBsAg by ELISA test. HBV-DNA was extracted from HBsAg positive samples using Mini Elute Kit from Qiagen and determined the genotypes of HBV by PCR using the Master Mix kit with Taq-DNA polymerase enzyme and with type of specific primers. All samples were examined in the virology laboratory of Sari Medical School. Results: The mean age of patients was 59.7±10.9 (range, 20 to 81) year that 1590 (60%) patients were male and 1060 (40%) were female. Seventeen cases (0.08 %) were found with hepatitis B virus infection, and the highest rates of infection were reported among those aged 40–60 years old in this study. We found genotype D the predominant type in this study. Conclusion: This study indicates that the prevalence of HBV endemicity in the north of Iran is low and genotype D is the only genotype in patients infected with HBV. PMID:25568563

  4. Ultrasound-Targeted Microbubble Destruction Enhances Gene Expression of microRNA-21 in Swine Heart via Intracoronary Delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangchun; Li, Lang; Su, Qiang; Liu, Tao; Ma, Zhiying; Yang, Huafeng

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) has proved to be a promising method for gene delivery. However, the feasibility and efficacy of UTMD-mediated gene delivery to the heart of large animals remain unclear. The present study was to explore the probability of increasing the transfection of microRNA-21 (miR-21) in swine heart by UTMD, and to search for the most suitable transfection conditions. We first optimized ultrasound intensity for successful miR-21 delivery. After intravenous injection of miR-21/microbubble mixture (miR-21/MB), transthoracic ultrasound irradiation (US) was applied from the left anterior chest using different intensities (1, 2, and 3 W/cm(2)). Then the efficacy of UTMD-mediated miR-21 delivery into myocardium via intracoronary injection was explored. Solution of miR-21/MB was infused intravenously or intracoronarily with US over the heart. Swine undergoing phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) injection, miR-21/MB injection via ear vein or coronary artery without US served as the control. The dynamic changes of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and serum troponin I (cTnI) after UTMD were detected, then the left ventricular myocardium was harvested for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining 4 days later; the expression levels of miR-21 and programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) were detected by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. Results showed that pulse ultrasound at an intensity of 2 W/cm(2) and a 50% duty ratio for 20 minutes, there was no increase in serum cTnI, no histological sign of myocardial damage, and no noted cardiac dysfunction with relatively higher miR-21 expression (P < 0.05). Compared to miR-21/MB alone, UTMD significantly increased gene expression in myocardium regardless of the delivery routes (P < 0.05). Interestingly, the transfection efficiency was found to be a little bit higher with intracoronary injection than that with intravenous injection, though the dose

  5. Gene electro transfer of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor for enhanced expression and perfusion in the ischemic swine heart.

    PubMed

    Hargrave, Barbara; Strange, Robert; Navare, Sagar; Stratton, Michael; Burcus, Nina; Murray, Len; Lundberg, Cathryn; Bulysheva, Anna; Li, Fanying; Heller, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia can damage heart muscle and reduce the heart's pumping efficiency. This study used an ischemic swine heart model to investigate the potential for gene electro transfer of a plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor for improving perfusion and, thus, for reducing cardiomyopathy following acute coronary syndrome. Plasmid expression was significantly greater in gene electro transfer treated tissue compared to injection of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor alone. Higher gene expression was also seen in ischemic versus non-ischemic groups with parameters 20 Volts (p<0.03), 40 Volts (p<0.05), and 90 Volts (p<0.05), but not with 60 Volts (p<0.09) while maintaining a pulse width of 20 milliseconds. The group with gene electro transfer of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor had increased perfusion in the area at risk compared to control groups. Troponin and creatine kinase increased across all groups, suggesting equivalent ischemia in all groups prior to treatment. Echocardiography was used to assess ejection fraction, cardiac output, stroke volume, left ventricular end diastolic volume, and left ventricular end systolic volume. No statistically significant differences in these parameters were detected during a 2-week time period. However, directional trends of these variables were interesting and offer valuable information about the feasibility of gene electro transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor in the ischemic heart. The results demonstrate that gene electro transfer can be applied safely and can increase perfusion in an ischemic area. Additional study is needed to evaluate potential efficacy.

  6. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells (BM-MSCs) Improve Heart Function in Swine Myocardial Infarction Model through Paracrine Effects

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Min; Shen, Rui; Song, Lei; Lu, Minjie; Wang, Jianguang; Zhao, Shihua; Tang, Yue; Meng, Xianmin; Li, Zongjin; He, Zuo-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are promising for the treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) and large animal models should be used to better understand the full spectrum of stem cell actions and preclinical evidences. In this study, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) were transplanted into swine heart ischemia model. To detect glucose metabolism in global left ventricular myocardium and regional myocardium, combined with assessment of cardiac function, positron emission tomography-computer tomography (PET-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. To study the changes of glucose transporters and glucose metabolism-related enzymes and the signal transduction pathway, RT-PCR, Western-blot, and immunohistochemistry were carried out. Myocardium metabolic evaluation by PET-CT showed that mean signal intensity (MSI) increased in these segments at week 4 compared with that at week 1 after BM-MSCs transplantation. Moreover, MRI demonstrated significant function enhancement in BM-MSCs group. The gene expressions of glucose transporters (GLUT1, GLUT4), glucose metabolism-related enzymes phosphofructokinase (PFK), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)) and 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70s6k) in BM-MSCs injected areas were up-regulated at week 4 after BM-MSCs transplantation and this was confirmed by Western-blot and immunohistochemistry. In conclusions, BM-MSCs transplantation could improve cardiac function in swine MI model by activation of mTOR signal transduction pathway. PMID:27321050

  7. Human recombinant relaxin reduces heart injury and improves ventricular performance in a swine model of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Perna, Avio-Maria; Masini, Emanuela; Nistri, Silvia; Bani Sacchi, Tatiana; Bigazzi, Mario; Bani, Daniele

    2005-05-01

    This study shows that relaxin can be effective in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. In a swine model of heart ischemia-reperfusion currently used to test cardiotropic drugs because of its similarities with human myocardial infarction, human recombinant relaxin (2.5 and 5 microg/kg body weight), given at reperfusion after a 30-min ischemia, markedly reduced the main serum markers of myocardial damage (myoglobin, CK-MB, and troponin T) and the metabolic and histopathologic parameters of myocardial inflammation and cardiomyocyte injury, resulting in overall improvement of ventricular performance (increased cardiac index) compared to the controls. These results provide a background for future clinical trials with human relaxin as adjunctive therapy to catheter-based coronary angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  8. Genetic Similarity among One Aspergillus flavus Strain Isolated from a Patient Who Underwent Heart Surgery and Two Environmental Strains Obtained from the Operating Room

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Guerra, Teresa M.; Mellado, Emilia; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Gaztelurrutia, Lourdes; Navarro, Jose Ignacio Villate; Tudela, Juan L. Rodríguez

    2000-01-01

    We report the simultaneous isolation of one Aspergillus flavus strain from the aortic prosthesis of a heart surgery patient and another two isolates recovered from a dual-reservoir cooler-heater used in the operating room where this patient was operated on. Genetic typing of these three isolates by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) revealed identical genotypes. Eight unrelated control strains of A. flavus had eight different genotypes. These results clearly indicated the nosocomial origin of the A. flavus strain isolated from the patient. We suggest that the RAPD technique is a rapid and reliable tool to ascertain the epidemiology of infections caused by A. flavus. PMID:10835021

  9. Preventing Phrenic Nerve Stimulation by a Patch Insulation in an Intact Swine Heart Model

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yi-Wen; Hsieh, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Chien-Ming; Wang, Kuo-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Phrenic nerve stimulation (PNS) could be prevented by a silastic patch over the epicardial lead. We studied the effects in preventing PNS by placing a silastic patch directly over an epicardial lead or placing a graft around the phrenic nerve (PN). Methods and Results Fourteen Lanyu swine were enrolled. A bipolar lead was placed epicardially on the left ventricle (LV) inferior to the PN. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) lead was placed into the right ventricle (RV). The maximal influential distance (MID) was measured under 3 pacing configurations to express the influential electrical field on the PN. The threshold of the LV and PN were evaluated epicardially. Then, PTFE patches of different sizes (10×10 mm, 20×20 mm and 30×30 mm) were placed between the LV lead and PN to study the rise in PN threshold in 7 swine. On the other hand, the PN were surrounded by a PTFE graft of different lengths (10 mm, 20 mm, and 30 mm) in the remaining 7 swine. LV-bipolar pacing showed the shortest MID when compared to the other 2 unipolar pacing configurations at pacing voltage of 10 V. The patch was most effective in preventing PNS during LV-bipolar pacing. PNS was prevented under all circumstances with a larger PTFE patch (30×30 mm) or long graft (30 mm). Conclusions PNS was avoided by placing a PTFE patch over the LV lead or a graft around the PN despite pacing configurations. Hence if PNS persisted during CRT implantation, a PTFE patch on the LV lead or a graft around the PN could be considered. PMID:25033271

  10. Alcohol and the Heart: A Proteomics Analysis of Pericardium and Myocardium in a Swine Model of Myocardial Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Elmadhun, Nassrene Y; Sadek, Ahmed A; Sabe, Ashraf A; Lassaletta, Antonio D; Sellke, Frank W

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that moderate alcohol consumption is cardioprotective and reduces postoperative pericardial adhesions; however, the mechanism is not fully understood. Using proteomic analysis, we sought to objectively investigate the effects of daily moderate alcohol consumption in the pericardium and myocardium in a swine model of chronic myocardial ischemia. Fourteen swine underwent placement of an ameroid constrictor to induce chronic myocardial ischemia. Animals were supplemented with 90 mL of ethanol daily (ETOH) or 80 g of sucrose of equal caloric value (SUC). After 7 weeks, the ischemic myocardium and pericardium were harvested for proteomics analysis. Pericardial proteomics analysis yielded 397 proteins, of which 23 were unique to SUC and 52 were unique to ETOH. Of the 322 common proteins, 71 were statistically significant and 23 were characterized (p < 0.05). Alcohol supplementation increased structural proteins, and decreased immune protease inhibitors and coagulation proteins in the pericardium (p < 0.01). Myocardial proteomics analysis yielded 576 proteins, of which 32 were unique to SUC and 21 were unique to ETOH. Of the 523 common proteins, 85 were significant, and 32 were characterized (p < 0.05). Alcohol supplementation decreased cardiac remodeling proteins, cell death proteins and motor proteins, and increased metabolic proteins (p < 0.05). The results suggest that daily moderate alcohol consumption affects numerous pathways that contribute to cardioprotection, including cardiac remodeling, metabolism, and cell death. Our findings reveal the biosignature of myocardial and pericardial protein expression in the setting of chronic myocardial ischemia and daily moderate alcohol consumption. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Loss of Complexity Characterizes the Heart Rate Response to Experimental Hemorrhagic Shock in Swine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    Std Z39-18 (19–21). Decrease of RRI fractal scaling was documented in heart failure and in Chagas ’ disease (22); was predictive of mortality after...Ribeiro AL, Lombardi F, Sousa MR, et al: Power-law behavior of heart rate variability in Chagas ’ disease. Am J Cardiol 2002; 89: 414–418 23

  12. "Heart Team" decision making in elderly patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis who underwent AVR or TAVI - a look behind the curtain. Results of the prospective TAVI Calculation of Costs Trial (TCCT).

    PubMed

    Kaier, Klaus; Gutmann, Anja; Vach, Werner; Sorg, Stefan; Siepe, Matthias; von Zur Mühlen, Constantin; Moser, Martin; Blanke, Philipp; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Zehender, Manfred; Bode, Christoph; Reinöhl, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about how "Heart Team" treatment decisions among patients suitable for either surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) are made under routine conditions. The "Heart Team" decision-making process was analysed with respect to124 patients of a non-randomised prospective clinical trial that included patients aged ≥75 years: 41 patients underwent AVR and 83 underwent TAVI. By use of the non-parametric classification and regression tree (CART) methodology, 21 baseline parameters were tested to reconstruct the decision process retrospectively. Next, multivariate logistic and Cox regression models were fitted to evaluate the decision and outcome relevance (two-year survival) of the parameters as identified in the CART procedure. For patients with a baseline EuroSCORE I ≥13.48%, no further cut-off points were identified and the majority of these patients underwent TAVI. Among patients with a baseline EuroSCORE I <13.48%, age and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were identified as further relevant decision parameters. The decision relevance of EuroSCORE I (p=0.003), age (p=0.024) and LVEF (p=0.047) were confirmed by multivariate analysis; however, outcome relevance can be confirmed for EuroSCORE I (p=0.015) only, while treatment decision (TAVI or AVR) was not a significant predictor of mortality (p=0.655). Despite or even because of the systematic risk selection according to EuroSCORE I values, we observed two-year survival rates of about 75% regardless of whether the patient received TAVI or AVR, suggesting that the decisions made by the "Heart Team" were appropriate.

  13. Ex vivo perfusion of the swine heart as a method for pre-transplant assessment.

    PubMed

    Colah, S; Freed, D H; Mundt, P; Germscheid, S; White, P; Ali, A; Tian, G; Large, S; Falter, F

    2012-09-01

    We describe a cost-effective, reproducible circuit in a porcine, ex vivo, continuous warm-blood, bi-ventricular, working heart model that has future possibilities for pre-transplant assessment of marginal hearts donated from brain stem dead donors and hearts donated after circulatory determination of death (DCDD). In five consecutive experiments over five days, pressure volume loops were performed. During working mode, the left ventricular end systolic pressure volume relationship (LV ESPVR) was 23.1±11.1 mmHg/ml and the LV preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW) was 67.8±7.2. (Standard PVAN analysis software) (Millar Instruments, Houston, TX, USA) All five hearts were perfused for 219±64 minutes and regained normal cardiac function on the perfusion system.They displayed a significant upward and leftward shift of the end systolic pressure volume relationship, a significant increase in preload recruitable stroke work and minimal stiffness. These hearts could potentially be considered for transplantation. The circuit was effective during reperfusion and working modes whilst proving to be successful in maintaining cardiac function in excess of four hours. Using an autologous prime of approximately 20% haematocrit (Hct), electrolytes and blood gases were easy to control within this period using standard perfusion techniques.

  14. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation promotes long chain fatty acid oxidation in the immature swine heart in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-09-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) supports infants and children with severe cardiopulmonary compromise. Nutritional support for these children includes provision of medium- and long-chain fatty acids (FAs). However, ECMO induces a stress response, which could limit the capacity for FA oxidation. Metabolic impairment could induce new or exacerbate existing myocardial dysfunction. Using a clinically relevant piglet model, we tested the hypothesis that ECMO maintains the myocardial capacity for FA oxidation and preserves myocardial energy state. Provision of 13-Carbon labeled medium-chain FA (octanoate), longchain free FAs (LCFAs), and lactate into systemic circulation showed that ECMO promoted relative increases in myocardial LCFA oxidation while inhibiting lactate oxidation. Loading of these labeled substrates at high dose into the left coronary artery demonstrated metabolic flexibility as the heart preferentially oxidized octanoate. ECMO preserved this octanoate metabolic response, but also promoted LCFA oxidation and inhibited lactate utilization. Rapid upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4) protein appeared to participate in this metabolic shift during ECMO. ECMO also increased relative flux from lactate to alanine further supporting the role for pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition by PDK4. High dose substrate loading during ECMO also elevated the myocardial energy state indexed by phosphocreatine to ATP ratio. ECMO promotes LCFA oxidation in immature hearts, while maintaining myocardial energy state. These data support the appropriateness of FA provision during ECMO support for the immature heart.

  15. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation promotes long chain fatty acid oxidation in the immature swine heart in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O’Kelly Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy; Olson, Aaron K.; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) supports infants and children with severe cardiopulmonary compromise. Nutritional support for these children includes provision of medium- and long-chain fatty acids (FAs). However, ECMO induces a stress response, which could limit the capacity for FA oxidation. Metabolic impairment could induce new or exacerbate existing myocardial dysfunction. Using a clinically relevant piglet model, we tested the hypothesis that ECMO maintains the myocardial capacity for FA oxidation and preserves myocardial energy state. Provision of 13-Carbon labeled medium-chain FA (octanoate), long-chain free FAs (LCFAs), and lactate into systemic circulation showed that ECMO promoted relative increases in myocardial LCFA oxidation while inhibiting lactate oxidation. Loading of these labeled substrates at high dose into the left coronary artery demonstrated metabolic flexibility as the heart preferentially oxidized octanoate. ECMO preserved this octanoate metabolic response, but also promoted LCFA oxidation and inhibited lactate utilization. Rapid upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4) protein appeared to participate in this metabolic shift during ECMO. ECMO also increased relative flux from lactate to alanine further supporting the role for pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition by PDK4. High dose substrate loading during ECMO also elevated the myocardial energy state indexed by phosphocreatine to ATP ratio. ECMO promotes LCFA oxidation in immature hearts, while maintaining myocardial energy state. These data support the appropriateness of FA provision during ECMO support for the immature heart. PMID:23727393

  16. UPDATE ON SWINE DISEASE AND GENOMICS RESEARCH

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This review will summarize advances in swine genomics and how it has altered approaches for swine disease and vaccination research. The swine has been a major biomedical model species, for transplantation, heart disease, allergies and asthma, as well as normal neonatal development and reproductive p...

  17. Identification of low and high frequency ranges for heart rate variability and blood pressure variability analyses using pharmacological autonomic blockade with atropine and propranolol in swine.

    PubMed

    Poletto, Rosangela; Janczak, Andrew M; Marchant-Forde, Ruth M; Marchant-Forde, Jeremy N; Matthews, Donald L; Dowell, Carol A; Hogan, Daniel F; Freeman, Lynetta J; Lay, Donald C

    2011-05-03

    Understanding autonomic nervous system functioning, which mediates behavioral and physiological responses to stress, offers great potential for assessing farm animal stress and welfare. Evaluation of heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV), using time and frequency domain analyses may provide a sensitive and reliable measure of affective states and stress-mediated changes in sympathetic and parasympathetic tones. The aim of this research was to define low (LF) and high frequency (HF) power spectral ranges using pharmacological autonomic blockade, and to examine HRV and BPV parameter changes in response to atropine and propranolol in swine. Ten, 13-week old, barrows (n=6) and gilts (n=4) underwent surgery to place an intra-cardiac electrode and a blood pressure catheter attached to a biotelemetric transmitter; pigs had a 3-week recovery period prior to data collection. Each pig was subjected to administration of 4 intravenous (i.v.) drug treatments: a control treatment, 3 mL of saline, and 3 blockade treatments; 0.1 mg/kg of atropine, 1.0 mg/kg of propranolol, and .1 mg/kg of atropine together with 1.0 mg/kg of propranolol. All treatments were delivered by injection in the jugular vein with a minimum of 48 h between individual treatments. Behavior, ECG and blood pressure data were recorded continuously for a total of 1h, from 30 min pre-injection to 30 min post-injection. For data analyses, two 512-beat intervals were selected for each treatment while the pig was lying and inactive. The first interval was selected from the pre-injection period (baseline), and the second was selected between 10 and 30 min post-injection. Time and frequency domain (power spectral density) analyses were performed on each data interval. Subsequent, LF and HF bands from the power spectral densities were defined based on general linear and regression analyses. The HRV and BPV were computed with a covariate (baseline) factorial analysis of treatment by sex

  18. Cardiac I-1c overexpression with reengineered AAV improves cardiac function in swine ischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Fish, Kenneth M; Tilemann, Lisa; Rapti, Kleopatra; Aguero, Jaume; Santos-Gallego, Carlos G; Lee, Ahyoung; Karakikes, Ioannis; Xie, Chaoqin; Akar, Fadi G; Shimada, Yuichi J; Gwathmey, Judith K; Asokan, Aravind; McPhee, Scott; Samulski, Jade; Samulski, Richard Jude; Sigg, Daniel C; Weber, Thomas; Kranias, Evangelia G; Hajjar, Roger J

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac gene therapy has emerged as a promising option to treat advanced heart failure (HF). Advances in molecular biology and gene targeting approaches are offering further novel options for genetic manipulation of the cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to improve cardiac function in chronic HF by overexpressing constitutively active inhibitor-1 (I-1c) using a novel cardiotropic vector generated by capsid reengineering of adeno-associated virus (BNP116). One month after a large anterior myocardial infarction, 20 Yorkshire pigs randomly received intracoronary injection of either high-dose BNP116.I-1c (1.0 × 10(13) vector genomes (vg), n = 7), low-dose BNP116.I-1c (3.0 × 10(12) vg, n = 7), or saline (n = 6). Compared to baseline, mean left ventricular ejection fraction increased by 5.7% in the high-dose group, and by 5.2% in the low-dose group, whereas it decreased by 7% in the saline group. Additionally, preload-recruitable stroke work obtained from pressure-volume analysis demonstrated significantly higher cardiac performance in the high-dose group. Likewise, other hemodynamic parameters, including stroke volume and contractility index indicated improved cardiac function after the I-1c gene transfer. Furthermore, BNP116 showed a favorable gene expression pattern for targeting the heart. In summary, I-1c overexpression using BNP116 improves cardiac function in a clinically relevant model of ischemic HF.

  19. Effects of a high n-3 fatty acid diet on membrane lipid composition of heart and skeletal muscle in normal swine and in swine with the genetic mutation for malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Otten, W; Iaizzo, P A; Eichinger, H M

    1997-10-01

    Knowledge concerning the genetic defects underlying malignant hyperthermia (MH) has expanded rapidly in recent years. In contrast, our understanding of the accompanying physiological changes is less clear. In this regard, the aim of this study was to determine whether normal swine and swine susceptible to MH (both heterozygous and homozygous animals) differ in their abilities to incorporate n-3 (omega 3) fatty acids into their skeletal and heart muscles. Swine of each genotype were fed either a diet rich in n-3 fatty acids (i.e., 5% fish oil) or an equal caloric diet low in n-3 fatty acids (i.e., 5% coconut oil). All dietary supplementations were given over a 13-week period. Subsequently, for each muscle type the following was determined: 1) the relative fatty acid profiles of eight different phospholipid classes and of neutral lipids, and 2) the total phospholipid and the total lipid content. The incorporation of n-3 fatty acids (i.e., eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid) occurred within the various phospholipids and neutral lipids without influencing their total lipid content. The increased content of n-3 fatty acids in neutral lipids of skeletal muscle was related to a decreased content of medium-chain saturated fatty acids, whereas an increased incorporation of n-3 fatty acids into the membrane phospholipids was often related to a decreased content of linoleic acid and/or arachidonic acid. In general, the pattern of n-3 fatty acid incorporation was considerably different between the normal animals and the MH homozygous and heterozygous animals. The significant interaction between diet-induced n-3 fatty acid profiles and the stress-susceptible MH genotype may indicate an altered mechanism for fatty acid turnover and a repair mechanism to maintain cellular functions and structure.

  20. Quantification of fibrosis in infarcted swine hearts by ex vivo late gadolinium-enhancement and diffusion-weighted MRI methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Mihaela; Ghugre, Nilesh R.; Ramanan, Venkat; Morikawa, Lily; Stanisz, Greg; Dick, Alexander J.; Wright, Graham A.

    2013-08-01

    Many have speculated that MRI signal characteristics can be used to identify regions of heterogeneous infarct associated with an arrhythmogenic substrate; however, direct evidence of this relationship is limited. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the remodelling characteristics of fibrosis by means of histology and high-resolution MR imaging. For this purpose, we performed whole-mount histology in heart samples (n = 9) collected from five swine at six weeks post-infarction and compared the extent of fibrosis in the infarcted areas delineated in these histological images with that obtained ex vivo by MRI using late gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) methods. All MR images were obtained at a submillimetre resolution (i.e., voxel size of 0.6×0.6×1.2 mm3). Specifically, in the histology images, we differentiated moderate fibrosis (consisting of a mixture of viable and non-viable myocytes, known as border zone, BZ) from severe fibrosis (i.e., the dense scar). Correspondingly, tissue heterogeneities in the MR images were categorized by a Gaussian mixture model into healthy, BZ and scar. Our results showed that (a) both MRI methods were capable of qualitatively distinguishing sharp edges between dense scar and healthy tissue from regions of heterogeneous BZ; (b) the BZ and dense scar areas had intermediate-to-high increased values of signal intensity in the LGE images and of apparent diffusion coefficient in the DWI, respectively. In addition, as demonstrated by the Picrosirius Red and immunohistochemistry stains, the viable bundles in the BZ were clearly separated by thin collagen strands and had reduced expression of Cx43, whereas the core scar was composed of dense fibrosis. A quantitative analysis demonstrated that the comparison between BZ/scar extent in LGE and DWI to the corresponding areas identified in histology yielded very good correlations (i.e., for the scar identified by LGE, R2 was 0.96 compared to R2 = 0.93 for the

  1. Improvement in B1+ Homogeneity and Average Flip Angle Using Dual-Source Parallel RF Excitation for Cardiac MRI in Swine Hearts.

    PubMed

    Schär, Michael; Ding, Haiyan; Herzka, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac MRI may benefit from increased polarization at high magnetic field strength of 3 Tesla but is challenged by increased field inhomogeneity. Initial human studies have shown that the radiofrequency (RF) excitation field (B1+) used for signal excitation in the heart is both inhomogeneous and significantly lower than desired, potentially leading to image artifacts and biased quantitative measures. Recently, multi-channel transmit systems have been introduced allowing localized patient specific RF shimming based on acquired calibration B1+ maps. Some prior human studies have shown lower than desired mean flip angles in the hearts of large patients even after RF shimming. Here, 100 cardiac B1+ map pairs before and after RF shimming were acquired in 55 swine. The mean flip angle and the coefficient of variation (CV) of the flip angle in the heart were determined before and after RF shimming. Mean flip angle, CV, and RF shim values (power ratio and phase difference between the two transmit channels) were tested for correlation with cross sectional body area and the Right-Left/Anterior-Posterior ratio. RF shimming significantly increased the mean flip angle in swine heart from 74.4±6.7% (mean ± standard deviation) to 94.7±4.8% of the desired flip angle and significantly reduced CV from 0.11±0.03 to 0.07±0.02 (p<1e-10 for both). These results compare well with several previous human studies, except that the mean flip angle in the human heart only improved to 89% with RF shimming, possibly because the RF shimming routine does not consider safety constraints in very large patients. Additionally, mean flip angle decreased and CV increased with larger cross sectional body area, however, the RF shimming parameters did not correlate with cross sectional body area. RF shim power ratio correlated weakly with Right-Left/Anterior-Posterior ratio but phase difference did not, further substantiating the need for subject specific cardiac RF shimming.

  2. Improvement in B1+ Homogeneity and Average Flip Angle Using Dual-Source Parallel RF Excitation for Cardiac MRI in Swine Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Schär, Michael; Ding, Haiyan; Herzka, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac MRI may benefit from increased polarization at high magnetic field strength of 3 Tesla but is challenged by increased field inhomogeneity. Initial human studies have shown that the radiofrequency (RF) excitation field (B1+) used for signal excitation in the heart is both inhomogeneous and significantly lower than desired, potentially leading to image artifacts and biased quantitative measures. Recently, multi-channel transmit systems have been introduced allowing localized patient specific RF shimming based on acquired calibration B1+ maps. Some prior human studies have shown lower than desired mean flip angles in the hearts of large patients even after RF shimming. Here, 100 cardiac B1+ map pairs before and after RF shimming were acquired in 55 swine. The mean flip angle and the coefficient of variation (CV) of the flip angle in the heart were determined before and after RF shimming. Mean flip angle, CV, and RF shim values (power ratio and phase difference between the two transmit channels) were tested for correlation with cross sectional body area and the Right-Left/Anterior-Posterior ratio. RF shimming significantly increased the mean flip angle in swine heart from 74.4±6.7% (mean ± standard deviation) to 94.7±4.8% of the desired flip angle and significantly reduced CV from 0.11±0.03 to 0.07±0.02 (p<<1e-10 for both). These results compare well with several previous human studies, except that the mean flip angle in the human heart only improved to 89% with RF shimming, possibly because the RF shimming routine does not consider safety constraints in very large patients. Additionally, mean flip angle decreased and CV increased with larger cross sectional body area, however, the RF shimming parameters did not correlate with cross sectional body area. RF shim power ratio correlated weakly with Right-Left/Anterior-Posterior ratio but phase difference did not, further substantiating the need for subject specific cardiac RF shimming. PMID:26436658

  3. SWINE INFLUENZA

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1931-01-01

    1. It has been possible to demonstrate, in Berkefeld filtrates of infectious material from experimental cases of swine influenza, a virus which when administered intranasally to susceptible swine induced a mild, usually afebrile illness of short duration. The changes in the respiratory tract resembled those in swine influenza but were usually much less extensive. When the filtrable virus was mixed with pure cultures of H. influenzae suis and administered to swine a disease identical clinically and pathologically with swine influenza was induced. The data presented indicate that the filtrable virus of swine influenza and H. influenzae suis act in concert to produce swine influenza and that neither alone is capable of inducing the disease. 2. One attack of swine influenza usually renders an animal immune to reinfection. Blood serum from an animal made immune in this way neutralizes infectious material from swine influenza in vitro, as shown by the failure of the mixture to produce disease in a susceptible animal. 3. The virus can be stored in a dried state or in glycerol for several weeks at least. In one instance dried material apparently retained both the virus and H. influenzas suis in viable form for a period of 54 days. 4. Fatal cases of experimental swine influenza have been observed in which H. influenzae suis was the only organism that could be cultivated from the respiratory tract. 5. Attention has been called to some features of marked similarity between epizootic swine influenzae and epidemic influenzae in man. PMID:19869924

  4. [Effect of formula of removing both phlegm and blood stasis on Chinese medicine symptom complex score for coronary heart disease Chinese miniature swine model with phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Ren; Ren, Jian-Xun; Li, Lei; Ren, Jun-Guo; Liu, Guang-Yu; Liu, Jian-Xun

    2013-12-01

    To establish the "clinical-mimetic" Chinese medicine symptom complex score method for the coronary heart disease Chinese miniature swine model with phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome, in order to observe the effect of formula of removing both phlegm and blood stasis (TYTZ) on the Chinese medicine symptom complex score for the coronary heart disease Chinese miniature swine model with phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome. Totally 36 Chinese miniature swine were randomly divided to the normal control group, the model group, the Shujiangzhi group, and TYTZ groups with doses of 2.0, 1.0 and 0.5 g x kg(-1), with six in each group. Except for the normal control group, all of the other groups were fed with high fat diet for two weeks. The coronary heart disease model with phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome was established by injuring left anterior descending artery with interventional balloons and continuously feeding with high fat diet for eight weeks. After the operation, the groups were administered with drugs for eight weeks. Their main symptoms, accompanied symptoms, tongue and pulse signs of the coronary heart disease Chinese miniature swine with phlengm-stasis cementation syndrome were observed according to the symptom-graded scoring method. Compared with the model group, TYTZ in different doses could reduce the scores of main symptoms at the 6th and 10th week. Specifically, TYTZ in low dose could reduce the scores of tongue at the 6th week and the scores of accompanied symptoms, and tongue and pulse signs at the 10th week; And TYTZ in high dose could decrease all symptom scores at the 6th and 10th week (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). TYTZ can improve the scores of the main symptoms, accompanied symptoms, tongue and pulse signs in coronary heart disease Chinese miniature swine with phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome. It is suggested that the "clinical-mimetic" objective scoring for syndromes of Chinese miniature swine is of great significant to the development of new

  5. A single intracoronary injection of midkine reduces ischemia/reperfusion injury in Swine hearts: a novel therapeutic approach for acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Hisaaki; Horiba, Mitsuru; Takenaka, Hiroharu; Sumida, Arihiro; Opthof, Tobias; Ishiguro, Yuko S; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Murohara, Toyoaki; Kodama, Itsuo

    2011-01-01

    Several growth factors are effective for salvaging myocardium and limiting infarct size in experimental studies with small animals. Their benefit in large animals and feasibility in clinical practice remains to be elucidated. We investigated the cardioprotective effect of midkine (MK) in swine subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). I/R was created by left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion for 45 min using a percutaneous over-the-wire balloon catheter. MK protein was injected as a bolus through the catheter at the initiation of reperfusion [MK-treated (MKT) group]. Saline was injected in controls (CONT). Infarct size/area at risk (24 h after I/R) in MKT was almost five times smaller than in CONT. Echocardiography in MKT revealed a significantly higher percent wall thickening of the interventricular septum, a higher left ventricular (LV) fractional shortening, and a lower E/e(') (ratio of transmitral to annular flow) compared with CONT. LV catheterization in MKT showed a lower LV end-diastolic pressure, and a higher dP/dt(max) compared with CONT. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling-positive myocytes and CD45-positive cell infiltration in the peri-infarct area were significantly less in MKT than in CONT. Here, we demonstrate that a single intracoronary injection of MK protein in swine hearts at the onset of reperfusion dramatically reduces infarct size and ameliorates systolic/diastolic LV function. This beneficial effect is associated with a reduction of apoptotic and inflammatory reactions. MK application during percutaneous coronary intervention may become a promising adjunctive therapy in acute coronary syndromes.

  6. Global Intracoronary Infusion of Allogeneic Cardiosphere-Derived Cells Improves Ventricular Function and Stimulates Endogenous Myocyte Regeneration throughout the Heart in Swine with Hibernating Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Gen; Weil, Brian R.; Leiker, Merced M.; Ribbeck, Amanda E.; Young, Rebeccah F.; Cimato, Thomas R.; Canty, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) improve ventricular function and reduce fibrotic volume when administered via an infarct-related artery using the “stop-flow” technique. Unfortunately, myocyte loss and dysfunction occur globally in many patients with ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, necessitating an approach to distribute CDCs throughout the entire heart. We therefore determined whether global intracoronary infusion of CDCs under continuous flow improves contractile function and stimulates new myocyte formation. Methods and Results Swine with hibernating myocardium from a chronic LAD occlusion were studied 3-months after instrumentation (n = 25). CDCs isolated from myocardial biopsies were infused into each major coronary artery (∼33×106 icCDCs). Global icCDC infusion was safe and while ∼3% of injected CDCs were retained, they did not affect ventricular function or myocyte proliferation in normal animals. In contrast, four-weeks after icCDCs were administered to animals with hibernating myocardium, %LADWT increased from 23±6 to 51±5% (p<0.01). In diseased hearts, myocyte proliferation (phospho-histone-H3) increased in hibernating and remote regions with a concomitant increase in myocyte nuclear density. These effects were accompanied by reductions in myocyte diameter consistent with new myocyte formation. Only rare myocytes arose from sex-mismatched donor CDCs. Conclusions Global icCDC infusion under continuous flow is feasible and improves contractile function, regresses myocyte cellular hypertrophy and increases myocyte proliferation in diseased but not normal hearts. New myocytes arising via differentiation of injected cells are rare, implicating stimulation of endogenous myocyte regeneration as the primary mechanism of repair. PMID:25402428

  7. [Effect of short-term aerogenic hypoxia on the behavior of heart rate and blood pressure in newborn swine].

    PubMed

    Menzel, K; Buchenau, W; Artjuschenko, T; Nissel, C; Heitsch, J

    1986-01-01

    The adaption of the cardiovascular system to hypoxia has been examined in piglets aged 3 to 81 hour. The reaction of the piglets to a shorttime normobaric hypoxia was very different: In 50% there was an inadequate reaction with decrease of blood pressure, heart rate, pulse pressure and therefore of stroke volume, in 30% there was in compliance with the adult mechanism a compensatory increase of blood pressure, heart rate, pulse pressure and stroke volume. Only in 2 cases a compensatory increase of blood pressure could be observed in combination with a simultaneous decrease of heart rate. The results refer once more to the fact, that the reactions of the cardiovascular system of the neonate to hypoxia can be very variable and require an individual therapeutic regime provided that they are transferable to the human newborn and premature baby.

  8. Heart rate variability in conscious neonatal swine: spectral features and responses to short-term intermittent hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Sica, Anthony L; Zhao, Ning

    2006-01-01

    Background Spectral analysis of the cardiac time series has been used as a tool for assessing levels of parasympathetic and sympathetic modulation of the sinoatrial node. In the present investigation we evaluated daily changes in heart rate variability spectra in conscious neonatal piglets that were either neurally intact (n = 5) or had undergone right stellate ganglionectomy (n = 5). The partial stellectomized animals and their intact litter mates were exposed to four days of intermittent hypoxia, each day comprising nine episodes of hypoxia alternating with nine episodes of normoxia. A time control group (n = 7) comprised animals from different litters that were not exposed to intermittent hypoxia. We hypothesized that exposure to intermittent hypoxia would increase sympathetic efferent neuronal modulation of heart rate variability spectra in neurally intact animals and in those with right stellate ganglionectomy, and that his effect would be observed in heart rate variability spectra computed from baseline recordings. Results Overall, heart rate variability spectra during baseline conditions were dominated by high frequency activity, a reflection of parasympathetic efferent neuronal innervation and linkage to the ventilatory cycle manifested as respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Exposure to intermittent hypoxia did not alter daily baseline spectral features that would indicate an increase of sympathetic cardiac activity: low frequency (0.05 – 0.15 Hz) activity was unaffected and the ratio of low- to -high frequency activity remained less than unity indicating a predominance of high frequency activity. The resultant spectra were remarkably similar despite differences in cardiac sympathetic efferent neuronal innervation and experimental treatment. When spectra were computed from cardiac time series during representative hypoxic episodes, significant increases in activity across the low frequency region (0.05 – 0.15 Hz) of heart rate variability spectra were noted

  9. Swine Dysentery.

    PubMed

    Burrough, E R

    2017-01-01

    Swine dysentery is a severe enteric disease in pigs, which is characterized by bloody to mucoid diarrhea and associated with reduced growth performance and variable mortality. This disease is most often observed in grower-finisher pigs, wherein susceptible pigs develop a significant mucohemorrhagic typhlocolitis following infection with strongly hemolytic spirochetes of the genus Brachyspira. While swine dysentery is endemic in many parts of the world, the disease had essentially disappeared in much of the United States by the mid-1990s as a result of industry consolidation and effective treatment, control, and elimination methods. However, since 2007, there has been a reported increase in laboratory diagnosis of swine dysentery in parts of North America along with the detection of novel pathogenic Brachyspira spp worldwide. Accordingly, there has been a renewed interest in swine dysentery and Brachyspira spp infections in pigs, particularly in areas where the disease was previously eliminated. This review provides an overview of knowledge on the etiology, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of swine dysentery, with insights into risk factors and control.

  10. [Effect of formula of removing both phlegm and blood stasis in improving cardiac function of Chinese mini-swine with coronary heart disease of phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Lin, Cheng-Ren; Ren, Jian-Xun; Miao, Lan; Yao, Ming-Jiang; Li, Dan; Shi, Yue; Ma, Yan-Lei; Fu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Jian-Xun

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate that the effect of formula of removing both phlegm and blood stasis in improving cardiac function of Chinese mini-swine with coronary heart disease of phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome. Totally 36 Chinese mini-swine were randomly divided to six groups: the normal control group, the model group, the Danlou tablet group, and Tanyu Tonzhi Fang(TYTZ) groups with doses of 2. 0, 1. 0 and 0. 5 g kg-1, with six in each group. Except for the normal control group, all of other groups were fed with high-fat diet for 2 weeks. Interventional balloons are adopted to injure their left anterior descending artery endothelium. After the operation, they were fed with high-fat diet for 8 weeks to prepare the coronary heart disease model of phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome. After the operation, they were administered with drugs for 8 weeks. The changes in the myocardial ischemia were observed. The changes in the cardiac function and structure were detected by cardiac ultrasound and noninvasive hemodynamic method. Compared with the normal control group, the model group showed significant increase in myocardial ischemia and SVR and obvious decrease in CO, SV and LCW in noninvasive hemodynamic parameters (P <0.05 or P <0.01). The ultrasonic cardiogram indicated notable decrease in IVSd, LVPWs, EF and FS, and remarkable increase in LVIDs (P<0. 05 orP<0.01). Compared with the model group, TYTZ could reduce the myocardial ischemia, strengthen cardiac function, and improve the abnormal cardiac structure and function induced by ischemia (P <0. 05 or P <0. 01). TYTZ shows a significant effect in improving cardiac function of Chinese mini-swine with coronary heart disease of phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome. The clinical cardiac function detection method could be adopted to correctly evaluate the changes in the post-myocardial ischemia cardiac function, and narrow the gap between clinical application and basic experimental studies.

  11. Swine origin influenza (swine flu).

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Meghna R; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, S K

    2009-08-01

    Swine origin influenza was first recognized in the border area of Mexico and United States in April 2009 and during a short span of two months became the first pandemic. The currently circulating strain of swine origin influenza virus of the H1N1 strain has undergone triple reassortment and contains genes from the avian, swine and human viruses. It is transmitted by droplets or fomites. Incubation period is 2 to 7 days. Common clinical symptoms are indistinguishable by any viral respiratory illness, and include fever, cough, sore throat and myalgia. A feature seen more frequently with swine origin influenza is GI upset. Less than 10% of patients require hospitalization. Patients at risk of developing severe disease are - younger than five years, elderly, pregnant women, with chronic systemic illnesses, adolescents on aspirin. Of the severe manifestations of swine origin influenza, pneumonia and respiratory failure are the most common. Unusual symptoms reported are conjunctivitis, parotitis, hemophagocytic syndrome. Infants may present with fever and lethargy with no respiratory symptoms. Diagnosis is based on RT PCR, Viral culture or increasing neutralizing antibodies. Principle of treatment consist of isolation, universal precautions, good infection control practices, supportive care and use of antiviral drugs. Antiviral drugs effective against H1N1 virus include: oseltamivir and zamanavir. With good supportive care case fatality is less than 1%. Preventive measures include: social distancing, practicing respiratory etiquette, hand hygiene and use of chemoprohylaxis with antiviral drugs. Vaccine against H1N1 is not available at present, but will be available in near future.

  12. Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of illness at all. How common is swine flu among pigs? H1N1 and H3N2 swine flu viruses are endemic among pig populations in the ... and winter) , but can occur year round. While H1N1 swine viruses have been ... least 1930, H3N2 influenza viruses did not begin circulating among pigs in ...

  13. Swine production.

    PubMed

    Plain, Ronald L; Lawrence, John D

    2003-07-01

    The US swine industry is large and growing. The quantity of pork desired by consumers of US pork is growing at the rate of 1.5%/y. New production systems and new technology have enabled production per sow to grow at a rate of 4% annually in recent years. Consequently, the number of sows in the United States is declining. Because productivity growth is outpacing demand growth, the deflated price of hogs and pork is declining. Hog production and prices continue to exhibit strong seasonal and cyclic patterns. Pork production is usually lowest in the summer and highest in the fall. Production and prices tend to follow 4-year patterns. The US swine industry continues to evolve toward fewer and larger producers who rely on contracts for both hog production and marketing. In 2000, over half of the hogs marketed were from approximately 156 firms marketing more than 50,000 head annually. These producers finished 60% of their production in contract facilities. Over 90% of their marketings were under contract or were owned by a packer. These producers expressed a high level of satisfaction with hog production. Both they and their contract growers were satisfied with production contracts. These large producers were satisfied with their marketing contracts and planned to continue them in the future. The hog industry has changed a great deal in the last decade. There is little reason to believe this rapid rate of change will not continue. This swine industry is highly competitive and profit driven. Profit margins are too small to allow producers the luxury of ignoring new technology and innovative production systems. Consequently, hog production will continue its rapid evolution from traditional agriculture to typical industry.

  14. Geochemical fate of arsenic in swine litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quazi, S.; Makris, K.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Punamiya, P.

    2007-12-01

    Swine diet is often supplemented by organoarsenicals, such as roxarsone to treat diseases and to promote growth. Recent data reported roxarsone degradation under anaerobic conditions in poultry litter, but no such data exist for swine wastes typically stored in unprotected lagoons in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). However, serious environmental health risk may arise upon significant arsenic (As) release into solution. The problem may be exacerbated under certain environmental conditions where organoarsenicals, such as roxarsone transform into the more toxic inorganic As, posing serious health risk to the surrounding ecosystem. The objective of this study were to analyze swine wastes collected from 19 randomly selected CAFOs in the USA for As concentrations, and to determine the geochemical fate of As in the swine waste suspensions. Swine wastes were analyzed for total-recoverable, total soluble, and water-extractable As, which were measured by ICP-MS. Speciation of As was performed following a well-established hyphenated technique using HPLC- ICPMS. Swine waste suspensions differed in solids contents; thus, the particulate matters with varying As concentrations were spiked with roxarsone and incubated under dark/light and aerobic/anaerobic conditions. Findings show the prevalence of inorganic As [As(V)] in swine waste suspension solutions. Roxarsone underwent degradation to both organoarsenicals, such as p-ASA, as well as inorganic arsenate and to a number of unidentified metabolites. Roxarsone degradation kinetics was influenced by the solids content and the air conditions (anaerobic/aerobic) of the swine waste suspensions. Maximum degradation rates were observed under anaerobic conditions, in suspensions which were low in solids content. Roxarsone degradation was primarily microbially-mediated, but in certain cases abiotic degradation was also observed, which were significantly slower.

  15. Swine: Selection and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Designed for secondary vocational agriculture students, this text provides an overview of selecting and evaluating swine in Future Farmers of America livestock judging events. The first of four major sections addresses topics such as the main points in evaluating market hogs and breeding swine and provides an example class of swine. Section 2,…

  16. Swine: Selection and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Designed for secondary vocational agriculture students, this text provides an overview of selecting and evaluating swine in Future Farmers of America livestock judging events. The first of four major sections addresses topics such as the main points in evaluating market hogs and breeding swine and provides an example class of swine. Section 2,…

  17. Flu and Heart Disease and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Flu and Heart Disease & Stroke Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir People with Heart Disease* and Those Who Have Had a Stroke Are ...

  18. Effects of the Selective Stretch-Activated Channel Blocker GsMtx4 on Stretch-Induced Changes in Refractoriness in Isolated Rat Hearts and on Ventricular Premature Beats and Arrhythmias after Coronary Occlusion in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Barrabés, José A.; Inserte, Javier; Agulló, Luis; Rodríguez-Sinovas, Antonio; Alburquerque-Béjar, Juan J.; Garcia-Dorado, David

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical factors may contribute to ischemic ventricular arrhythmias. GsMtx4 peptide, a selective stretch-activated channel blocker, inhibits stretch-induced atrial arrhythmias. We aimed to assess whether GsMtx4 protects against ventricular ectopy and arrhythmias following coronary occlusion in swine. First, the effects of 170-nM GsMtx4 on the changes in the effective refractory period (ERP) induced by left ventricular (LV) dilatation were assessed in 8 isolated rat hearts. Then, 44 anesthetized, open-chest pigs subjected to 50-min left anterior descending artery occlusion and 2-h reperfusion were blindly allocated to GsMtx4 (57 μg/kg iv. bolus and 3.8 μg/kg/min infusion, calculated to attain the above concentration in plasma) or saline, starting 5-min before occlusion and continuing until after reflow. In rat hearts, LV distension induced progressive reductions in ERP (35±2, 32±2, and 29±2 ms at 0, 20, and 40 mmHg of LV end-diastolic pressure, respectively, P<0.001) that were prevented by GsMTx4 (33±2, 33±2, and 32±2 ms, respectively, P=0.002 for the interaction with LV end-diastolic pressure). Pigs receiving GsMtx4 had similar number of ventricular premature beats during the ischemic period as control pigs (110±28 vs. 103±21, respectively, P=0.842). There were not significant differences among treated and untreated animals in the incidence of ventricular fibrillation (13.6 vs. 22.7%, respectively, P=0.696) or tachycardia (36.4 vs. 50.0%, P=0.361) or in the number of ventricular tachycardia episodes during the occlusion period (1.8±0.7 vs. 5.5±2.6, P=0.323). Thus, GsMtx4 administered under these conditions does not suppress ventricular ectopy following coronary occlusion in swine. Whether it might protect against malignant arrhythmias should be tested in studies powered for these outcomes. PMID:25938516

  19. Effects of the Selective Stretch-Activated Channel Blocker GsMtx4 on Stretch-Induced Changes in Refractoriness in Isolated Rat Hearts and on Ventricular Premature Beats and Arrhythmias after Coronary Occlusion in Swine.

    PubMed

    Barrabés, José A; Inserte, Javier; Agulló, Luis; Rodríguez-Sinovas, Antonio; Alburquerque-Béjar, Juan J; Garcia-Dorado, David

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical factors may contribute to ischemic ventricular arrhythmias. GsMtx4 peptide, a selective stretch-activated channel blocker, inhibits stretch-induced atrial arrhythmias. We aimed to assess whether GsMtx4 protects against ventricular ectopy and arrhythmias following coronary occlusion in swine. First, the effects of 170-nM GsMtx4 on the changes in the effective refractory period (ERP) induced by left ventricular (LV) dilatation were assessed in 8 isolated rat hearts. Then, 44 anesthetized, open-chest pigs subjected to 50-min left anterior descending artery occlusion and 2-h reperfusion were blindly allocated to GsMtx4 (57 μg/kg iv. bolus and 3.8 μg/kg/min infusion, calculated to attain the above concentration in plasma) or saline, starting 5-min before occlusion and continuing until after reflow. In rat hearts, LV distension induced progressive reductions in ERP (35±2, 32±2, and 29±2 ms at 0, 20, and 40 mmHg of LV end-diastolic pressure, respectively, P<0.001) that were prevented by GsMTx4 (33±2, 33±2, and 32±2 ms, respectively, P=0.002 for the interaction with LV end-diastolic pressure). Pigs receiving GsMtx4 had similar number of ventricular premature beats during the ischemic period as control pigs (110±28 vs. 103±21, respectively, P=0.842). There were not significant differences among treated and untreated animals in the incidence of ventricular fibrillation (13.6 vs. 22.7%, respectively, P=0.696) or tachycardia (36.4 vs. 50.0%, P=0.361) or in the number of ventricular tachycardia episodes during the occlusion period (1.8±0.7 vs. 5.5±2.6, P=0.323). Thus, GsMtx4 administered under these conditions does not suppress ventricular ectopy following coronary occlusion in swine. Whether it might protect against malignant arrhythmias should be tested in studies powered for these outcomes.

  20. Identification of low and high frequency ranges for heart rate variability and blood pressure variability analyses using pharmacological autonomic blockade with atropine and propranolol in swine.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding autonomic nervous system functioning, which mediates behavioral and physiological responses to stress, offers great potential for evaluation of farm animal stress and welfare. Evaluation of heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV), using time and frequency doma...

  1. The autonomic effects of cardiopulmonary decompression sickness in swine using principal dynamic mode analysis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Selvaraj, Nandakumar; Petersen, Kyle; Mahon, Richard; Cronin, William A; White, Joseph; Brink, Peter R; Chon, Ki H

    2013-10-01

    Methods to predict onset of cardiopulmonary (CP) decompression sickness (DCS) would be of great benefit to clinicians caring for stricken divers. Principal dynamic mode (PDM) analysis of the electrocardiogram has been shown to provide accurate separation of the sympathetic and parasympathetic tone dynamics. Nine swine (Sus scrofa) underwent a 15-h saturation dive at 184 kPa (60 ft. of saltwater) in a hyperbaric chamber followed by dropout decompression, whereas six swine, used as a control, underwent a 15-h saturation dive at 15 kPa (5 ft. of saltwater). Noninvasive electrocardiograms were recorded throughout the experiment and autonomic nervous system dynamics were evaluated by heart rate series analysis using power spectral density (PSD) and PDM methods. We observed a significant increase in the sympathetic and parasympathetic tones using the PDM method on average 20 min before DCS onset following a sudden induction of decompression. Parasympathetic activities remained elevated, but the sympathetic modulation was significantly reduced at onset of cutis and CP DCS signs, as reported by a trained observer. Similar nonsignificant observations occurred during PSD analysis. PDM observations contrast with previous work showing that neurological DCS resulted in a >50% reduction in both sympathetic and parasympathetic tone. Therefore, tracking dynamics of the parasympathetic tones via the PDM method may allow discrimination between CP DCS and neurological DCS, and this significant increase in parasympathetic tone has potential use as a marker for early diagnosis of CP DCS.

  2. Mild coronary artery stenosis has no impact on cardiac and vascular parameters in miniature swine exposed to positive acceleration stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haitao; Luo, Huilan; Sun, Jinjin; Liu, Chaozhong; Tian, Yi; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Chao

    2016-10-01

    Exposure of pilots' heart to acceleration-associated stress (+Gz stress) is an adverse effect of high-performance aviation. The occurrence of coronary heart diseases is one of the most frequent medical causes leading to cessation of flying. To assess the effects of +Gz stress on coronary artery stenosis (CAS) in a minimally invasive miniature swine model with a fast recovery. The proximal left anterior descending branch was ligated in 20 swine using silk suture. CAS degree (mild, moderate, severe) was analyzed by quantitative computerized angiography. Five swine underwent a sham operation. +Gz stress exposure was performed and venous blood was collected before/after exposure. Plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), endothelin (ET)-1, angiotensin (Ang) II and urotensin 2 (U2) levels were measured. CAS models were successful in 18 animals. Two swine exhibited ventricular fibrillation during the procedure and died. Plasma CRP, ET-1, Ang II and U2 changed significantly after maximal tolerated +Gz stress exposure (all P < 0.05). After maximal tolerated +Gz stress exposure, plasma CRP, ET-1, Ang II and U2 levels increased in the moderate and severe stenosis groups, compared with the sham group (all P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between the mild stenosis group and the sham group (all P > 0.05). The fully endoscopic operation method successfully generated animal models of different degrees of CAS. Plasma CRP, ET-1, Ang II and U2 levels increased after +Gz stress exposure with increasing CAS severity. Animals with mild stenosis showed no ill effect under +Gz stress, suggesting that pilots with mild stenosis might be allowed to continue flying, but it must be confirmed in humans.

  3. Endotracheal intubation in swine.

    PubMed

    Chum, Helen; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2012-11-01

    Swine are commonly used as research models for cardiovascular surgery and disease, gastrointestinal disease, organ transplantation and intra-renal surgery. These surgical models require anesthesia and, consequently, endotracheal intubation in order to protect the airway; prevent aspiration of saliva, blood and foreign materials; and maintain positive pressure ventilation of the animal. Successful intubation is vital to the stable maintenance of swine under inhalational anesthesia. Here we discuss key features of swine anatomy that make intubation challenging, equipment necessary for successful intubation and techniques for endotracheal intubation in swine.

  4. Swine immune system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Probably no area of veterinary medicine has seen a greater explosion in knowledge then the immune system and its implications in disease and vaccination. In this chapter on the Swine Immune System for the 10th Edition of Diseases of Swine we expand on the information provided in past editions by in...

  5. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  6. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  7. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  8. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  9. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. 85.10 Section 85.10 Animals and Animal... and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved... collection of the semen or embryos or were members of a qualified pseudorabies negative herd, and had...

  10. Swine Fecal Metagenomics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metagenomic approaches are providing rapid and more robust means to investigate the composition and functional genetic potential of complex microbial communities. In this study, we utilized a metagenomic approach to further understand the functional diversity of the swine gut. To...

  11. Swine Fecal Metagenomics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metagenomic approaches are providing rapid and more robust means to investigate the composition and functional genetic potential of complex microbial communities. In this study, we utilized a metagenomic approach to further understand the functional diversity of the swine gut. To...

  12. Skin Lesions in Swine with Decompression Sickness: Clinical Appearance and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Qing, Long; Ariyadewa, Dinesh K; Yi, Hongjie; Wang, Yewei; Zhou, Quan; Xu, Weigang

    2017-01-01

    Skin lesions are visual clinical manifestations of decompression sickness (DCS). Comprehensive knowledge of skin lesions would give simple but strong clinical evidence to help diagnose DCS. The aim of this study was to systematically depict skin lesions and explore their pathophysiological basis in a swine DCS model. Thirteen Bama swine underwent simulated diving in a hyperbaric animal chamber with the profile of 40 msw-35 min exposure, followed by decompression in 11 min. After decompression, chronological changes in the appearance of skin lesions, skin ultrasound, temperature, tissue nitric oxide (NO) levels, and histopathology were studied. Meanwhile bubbles and central nervous system (CNS) function were monitored. All animals developed skin lesions and two died abruptly possibly due to cardiopulmonary failure. A staging approach was developed to divide the appearance into six consecutive stages, which could help diagnosing the progress of skin lesions. Bubbles were only seen in right but not left heart chambers. There were strong correlations between bubble load, lesion area, latency to lesion appearance and existence of cutaneous lesions (P = 0.007, P = 0.002, P = 0.004, respectively). Even though local skin temperature did not change significantly, skin thickness increased, NO elevated and histological changes were observed. Increased vessel echo-reflectors in lesion areas were detected ultrasonically. No CNS dysfunction was detected by treadmill walking and evoked potential. The present results suggest skin lesions mainly result from local bubbles and not CNS injuries or arterial bubbles.

  13. Skin Lesions in Swine with Decompression Sickness: Clinical Appearance and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Long; Ariyadewa, Dinesh K.; Yi, Hongjie; Wang, Yewei; Zhou, Quan; Xu, Weigang

    2017-01-01

    Skin lesions are visual clinical manifestations of decompression sickness (DCS). Comprehensive knowledge of skin lesions would give simple but strong clinical evidence to help diagnose DCS. The aim of this study was to systematically depict skin lesions and explore their pathophysiological basis in a swine DCS model. Thirteen Bama swine underwent simulated diving in a hyperbaric animal chamber with the profile of 40 msw-35 min exposure, followed by decompression in 11 min. After decompression, chronological changes in the appearance of skin lesions, skin ultrasound, temperature, tissue nitric oxide (NO) levels, and histopathology were studied. Meanwhile bubbles and central nervous system (CNS) function were monitored. All animals developed skin lesions and two died abruptly possibly due to cardiopulmonary failure. A staging approach was developed to divide the appearance into six consecutive stages, which could help diagnosing the progress of skin lesions. Bubbles were only seen in right but not left heart chambers. There were strong correlations between bubble load, lesion area, latency to lesion appearance and existence of cutaneous lesions (P = 0.007, P = 0.002, P = 0.004, respectively). Even though local skin temperature did not change significantly, skin thickness increased, NO elevated and histological changes were observed. Increased vessel echo-reflectors in lesion areas were detected ultrasonically. No CNS dysfunction was detected by treadmill walking and evoked potential. The present results suggest skin lesions mainly result from local bubbles and not CNS injuries or arterial bubbles. PMID:28790934

  14. Heart-Derived Stem Cells in Miniature Swine with Coronary Microembolization: Novel Ischemic Cardiomyopathy Model to Assess the Efficacy of Cell-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Young, Rebeccah F.; Leiker, Merced M.; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    A major problem in translating stem cell therapeutics is the difficulty of producing stable, long-term severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in a large animal model. For that purpose, extensive infarction was created in sinclair miniswine by injecting microspheres (1.5 × 106 microspheres, 45 μm diameter) in LAD. At 2 months after embolization, animals (n = 11) were randomized to receive allogeneic cardiosphere-derived cells derived from atrium (CDCs: 20 × 106, n = 5) or saline (untreated, n = 6). Four weeks after therapy myocardial function, myocyte proliferation (Ki67), mitosis (phosphor-Histone H3; pHH3), apoptosis, infarct size (TTC), myocyte nuclear density, and cell size were evaluated. CDCs injected into infarcted and remodeled remote myocardium (global infusion) increased regional function and global function contrasting no change in untreated animals. CDCs reduced infarct volume and stimulated Ki67 and pHH3 positive myocytes in infarct and remote regions. As a result, myocyte number (nuclear density) increased and myocyte cell diameter decreased in both infarct and remote regions. Coronary microembolization produces stable long-term ischemic cardiomyopathy. Global infusion of CDCs stimulates myocyte regeneration and improves left ventricular ejection fraction. Thus, global infusion of CDCs could become a new therapy to reverse LV dysfunction in patients with asymptomatic heart failure. PMID:27738436

  15. Heart-Derived Stem Cells in Miniature Swine with Coronary Microembolization: Novel Ischemic Cardiomyopathy Model to Assess the Efficacy of Cell-Based Therapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Gen; Young, Rebeccah F; Leiker, Merced M; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    A major problem in translating stem cell therapeutics is the difficulty of producing stable, long-term severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in a large animal model. For that purpose, extensive infarction was created in sinclair miniswine by injecting microspheres (1.5 × 10(6) microspheres, 45 μm diameter) in LAD. At 2 months after embolization, animals (n = 11) were randomized to receive allogeneic cardiosphere-derived cells derived from atrium (CDCs: 20 × 10(6), n = 5) or saline (untreated, n = 6). Four weeks after therapy myocardial function, myocyte proliferation (Ki67), mitosis (phosphor-Histone H3; pHH3), apoptosis, infarct size (TTC), myocyte nuclear density, and cell size were evaluated. CDCs injected into infarcted and remodeled remote myocardium (global infusion) increased regional function and global function contrasting no change in untreated animals. CDCs reduced infarct volume and stimulated Ki67 and pHH3 positive myocytes in infarct and remote regions. As a result, myocyte number (nuclear density) increased and myocyte cell diameter decreased in both infarct and remote regions. Coronary microembolization produces stable long-term ischemic cardiomyopathy. Global infusion of CDCs stimulates myocyte regeneration and improves left ventricular ejection fraction. Thus, global infusion of CDCs could become a new therapy to reverse LV dysfunction in patients with asymptomatic heart failure.

  16. Biotin in swine nutrition.

    PubMed

    Kornegay, E T

    1985-01-01

    For many years, it was believed that supplemental biotin was not needed in swine diets because of the wide distribution of biotin in feedstuffs used in the formulation of swine diets, and because of the known synthesis of biotin by the animal's intestinal microflora. However, interest in biotin nutrition for swine was rekindled in the mid-1970s when several field reports indicated a biotin deficiency in swine that was responsive to biotin supplementation in many cases. Results from university research are accumulating, especially from long-term sow studies (three to four parities), which suggest that supplemental biotin will improve litter size, conception rate, weaning-to-estrus interval, toe lesions, and haircoat condition. Milk biotin concentration and plasma biotin concentration of sows and piglets were also elevated when supplemental biotin was fed. Using presently available feedstuffs and under modern swine production conditions, a marginal biotin deficiency is possible. Swine producers experiencing poor reproductive performance in their sow herds, associated with excessive loss of hair and severe foot lesions, should evaluate the biotin content of their sow diet and consider supplemental biotin.

  17. Effects of continuous triiodothyronine infusion on the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the normal immature swine heart under extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Priddy, Colleen M O'Kelly; Ledee, Dolena R; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy; Olson, Aaron K; Portman, Michael A

    2014-04-15

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is frequently used in infants with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. ECMO also suppresses circulating triiodothyronine (T3) levels and modifies myocardial metabolism. We assessed the hypothesis that T3 supplementation reverses ECMO-induced metabolic abnormalities in the immature heart. Twenty-two male Yorkshire pigs (age: 25-38 days) with ECMO received [2-(13)C]lactate, [2,4,6,8-(13)C4]octanoate (medium-chain fatty acid), and [U-(13)C]long-chain fatty acids as metabolic tracers either systemically (totally physiological intracoronary concentration) or directly into the coronary artery (high substrate concentration) for the last 60 min of each protocol. NMR analysis of left ventricular tissue determined the fractional contribution of these substrates to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fifty percent of the pigs in each group received intravenous T3 supplement (bolus at 0.6 μg/kg and then continuous infusion at 0.2 μg·kg(-1)·h(-1)) during ECMO. Under both substrate loading conditions, T3 significantly increased the fractional contribution of lactate with a marginal increase in the fractional contribution of octanoate. Both T3 and high substrate provision increased the myocardial energy status, as indexed by phosphocreatine concentration/ATP concentration. In conclusion, T3 supplementation promoted lactate metabolism to the tricarboxylic acid cycle during ECMO, suggesting that T3 releases the inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Manipulation of substrate utilization by T3 may be used therapeutically during ECMO to improve the resting energy state and facilitate weaning.

  18. Effects of Continuous Triiodothyronine Infusion on Citric Acid Cycle in the Normal Immature Swine Heart under Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-02-13

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is frequently used in infants with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. ECMO also suppresses circulating triiodothyronine (T3) levels and modifies myocardial metabolism. We assessed the hypothesis that T3 supplementation reverses ECMO induced metabolic abnormalities in the immature heart. Twenty-two male Yorkshire pigs (age 25-38 days) with ECMO were received [2-13C]lactate, [2,4,6,8-13C]octanoate (medium chain fatty acid) and [U-13C]long-chain fatty acids as metabolic tracers either systemically (totally physiological intracoronary concentration) or directly into the coronary artery (high substrate concentration) for the last 60 minutes of each protocol. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of left ventricular tissue determined the fractional contribution (Fc) of these substrates to the citric acid cycle (CAC). Fifty percent of the pigs in each group received intravenous T3 supplement (bolus at 0.6 μg/kg and then continuous infusion at 0.2 μg/kg/hour) during ECMO. Under both substrate loading conditions T3 significantly increased lactate-Fc with a marginal increase in octanoate-Fc. Both T3 and high substrate provision increased myocardial energy status indexed by [Phosphocreatine]/[ATP]. In conclusion, T3 supplementation promoted lactate metabolism to the CAC during ECMO suggesting that T3 releases inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Manipulation of substrate utilization by T3 may be used therapeutically during ECMO to improve resting energy state and facilitate weaning.

  19. Bupivacaine Mandibular Nerve Block Affects Intraoperative Blood Pressure and Heart Rate in a Yucatan Miniature Swine Mandibular Condylectomy Model: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bova, Jonathan F.; da Cunha, Anderson F.; Stout, Rhett W.; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Alfi, David M.; Eisig, Sidney B.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Lopez, Mandi J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Aim The primary objective was to evaluate the effect of a bupivacaine mandibular nerve block on intraoperative blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) in response to surgical stimulation and the need for systemic analgesics postoperatively. We hypothesized that a mandibular nerve block would decrease the need for systemic analgesics both intraoperatively and postoperatively. Materials and Methods Fourteen adult male Yucatan pigs were purchased. Pigs were chemically restrained with ketamine, midazolam, and dexmedetomidine and anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane inhalant anesthesia. Pigs were randomized to receive a mandibular block with either bupivacaine (bupivacaine group) or saline (control group). A nerve stimulator was used for administration of the block with observation of masseter muscle twitch to indicate the injection site. Invasive BP and HR were measured with the aid of an arterial catheter in eight pigs. A rescue analgesic protocol consisting of fentanyl and lidocaine was administered if HR or BP values increased 20% from baseline. Postoperative pain was quantified with a customized ethogram. HR and BP were evaluated at base line, pre-rescue, 10 and 20 min post-rescue. Results Pre-rescue mean BP was significantly increased (p = .001) for the bupivacaine group. Mean intraoperative HR was significantly lower (p = .044) in the bupivacaine versus saline group. All other parameters were not significant. Conclusion Addition of a mandibular nerve block to the anesthetic regimen in the miniature pig condylectomy model may improve variations in intraoperative BP and HR. This study establishes the foundation for future studies with larger animal numbers to confirm these preliminary findings. PMID:25394295

  20. Swine flu vaccine: present status.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2009-11-01

    In early 2009, "swine flu", a new infectious disease, emerged in Mexico and further spread around the world. It is currently accepted as the most problematic infection at present. To control this new infection, the swine flu vaccine is the hope. The reasons that we need the swine flu vaccine will be discussed. Also, the present status, current attempts and problems of swine flu vaccine development will be presented in this commentary.

  1. Coronary risk factors in patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Nasser; Alikhah, Hossein; Abadan, Younes

    2011-01-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) risk increases with increasing number of risk factors. This study was aimed to assess different coronary risk factors among Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) surgery patients. A total of 700 patients younger than 45 or older than 65 years and underwent CABG in Tabriz Shahid Madani Heart Center since 2003 to 2007 were enrolled. We examined the probable differences of CAD risk factors between male and female groups and age groups. We also assessed the change of risk factors presentation in last 5 years. There was not significant difference between risk factor numbers in <45 and >65 years groups, but smoking and dyslipidemia was more prevalent in patients < 45 than > 65 years old. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus was more prevalent in patients > 65 old than < 45 years old; also differences were found between males and females patients, so that dyslipidemia, diabetes and hypertension were more prevalent in women than men. Some risk factors were recognized as acting more on one gender than the other. Also, the majority of patients have one or more risk factors, but different age and gender groups may have different risk factors that suggest the need for exact programming for appropriate prophylactic and therapeutic interventions in all groups.

  2. Adenovirus-vectored novel African Swine Fever Virus antigens elicit robust immune responses in swine.

    PubMed

    Lokhandwala, Shehnaz; Waghela, Suryakant D; Bray, Jocelyn; Sangewar, Neha; Charendoff, Chloe; Martin, Cameron L; Hassan, Wisam S; Koynarski, Tsvetoslav; Gabbert, Lindsay; Burrage, Thomas G; Brake, David; Neilan, John; Mwangi, Waithaka

    2017-01-01

    African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV) is a high-consequence transboundary animal pathogen that often causes hemorrhagic disease in swine with a case fatality rate close to 100%. Lack of treatment or vaccine for the disease makes it imperative that safe and efficacious vaccines are developed to safeguard the swine industry. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of seven adenovirus-vectored novel ASFV antigens, namely A151R, B119L, B602L, EP402RΔPRR, B438L, K205R and A104R. Immunization of commercial swine with a cocktail of the recombinant adenoviruses formulated in adjuvant primed strong ASFV antigen-specific IgG responses that underwent rapid recall upon boost. Notably, most vaccinees mounted robust IgG responses against all the antigens in the cocktail. Most importantly and relevant to vaccine development, the induced antibodies recognized viral proteins from Georgia 2007/1 ASFV-infected cells by IFA and by western blot analysis. The recombinant adenovirus cocktail also induced ASFV-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells that were recalled upon boosting. Evaluation of local and systemic effects of the recombinant adenovirus cocktail post-priming and post-boosting in the immunized animals showed that the immunogen was well tolerated and no serious negative effects were observed. Taken together, these outcomes showed that the adenovirus-vectored novel ASFV antigen cocktail was capable of safely inducing strong antibody and IFN-γ+ cell responses in commercial swine. The data will be used for selection of antigens for inclusion in a multi-antigen prototype vaccine to be evaluated for protective efficacy.

  3. Adenovirus-vectored novel African Swine Fever Virus antigens elicit robust immune responses in swine

    PubMed Central

    Waghela, Suryakant D.; Bray, Jocelyn; Sangewar, Neha; Charendoff, Chloe; Martin, Cameron L.; Hassan, Wisam S.; Koynarski, Tsvetoslav; Gabbert, Lindsay; Burrage, Thomas G.; Brake, David; Neilan, John; Mwangi, Waithaka

    2017-01-01

    African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV) is a high-consequence transboundary animal pathogen that often causes hemorrhagic disease in swine with a case fatality rate close to 100%. Lack of treatment or vaccine for the disease makes it imperative that safe and efficacious vaccines are developed to safeguard the swine industry. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of seven adenovirus-vectored novel ASFV antigens, namely A151R, B119L, B602L, EP402RΔPRR, B438L, K205R and A104R. Immunization of commercial swine with a cocktail of the recombinant adenoviruses formulated in adjuvant primed strong ASFV antigen-specific IgG responses that underwent rapid recall upon boost. Notably, most vaccinees mounted robust IgG responses against all the antigens in the cocktail. Most importantly and relevant to vaccine development, the induced antibodies recognized viral proteins from Georgia 2007/1 ASFV-infected cells by IFA and by western blot analysis. The recombinant adenovirus cocktail also induced ASFV-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells that were recalled upon boosting. Evaluation of local and systemic effects of the recombinant adenovirus cocktail post-priming and post-boosting in the immunized animals showed that the immunogen was well tolerated and no serious negative effects were observed. Taken together, these outcomes showed that the adenovirus-vectored novel ASFV antigen cocktail was capable of safely inducing strong antibody and IFN-γ+ cell responses in commercial swine. The data will be used for selection of antigens for inclusion in a multi-antigen prototype vaccine to be evaluated for protective efficacy. PMID:28481911

  4. Agriculture. Swine Livestock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for agricultural production, specifically for swine, is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a task sheet for developing leadership skills, and a task list. Each…

  5. Agriculture. Swine Livestock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for agricultural production, specifically for swine, is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a task sheet for developing leadership skills, and a task list. Each…

  6. Swine Brucellosis: Current Perspectives

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brucella suis is a significant zoonosis that is present in domestic livestock and wildlife in many countries worldwide. Transmission from animal reservoirs is the source of human infection as human to human transmission is very rare. Although swine brucellosis causes economic losses in domestic liv...

  7. Irreversible Electroporation in a Swine Lung Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, Damian E.; Aswad, Bassam; Ng, Thomas

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the safety and tissue effects of IRE in a swine lung model. Methods: This study was approved by the institutional animal care committee. Nine anesthetized domestic swine underwent 15 percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE) lesion creations (6 with bipolar and 3 with 3-4 monopolar electrodes) under fluoroscopic guidance and with pancuronium neuromuscular blockade and EKG gating. IRE electrodes were placed into the central and middle third of the right mid and lower lobes in all animals. Postprocedure PA and lateral chest radiographs were obtained to evaluate for pneumothorax. Three animals were sacrificed at 2 weeks and six at 4 weeks. Animals underwent high-resolution CT scanning and PA and lateral radiographs 1 h before sacrifice. The treated lungs were removed en bloc, perfused with formalin, and sectioned. Gross pathologic and microscopic changes after standard hematoxylin and eosin staining were analyzed within the areas of IRE lesion creation. Results: No significant adverse events were identified. CT showed focal areas of spiculated high density ranging in greatest diameter from 1.1-2.2 cm. On gross inspection of the sectioned lung, focal areas of tan discoloration and increased density were palpated in the areas of IRE. Histological analysis revealed focal areas of diffuse alveolar damage with fibrosis and inflammatory infiltration that respected the boundaries of the interlobular septae. No pathological difference could be discerned between the 2- and 4-week time points. The bronchioles and blood vessels within the areas of IRE were intact and did not show signs of tissue injury. Conclusion: IRE creates focal areas of diffuse alveolar damage without creating damage to the bronchioles or blood vessels. Short-term safety in a swine model appears to be satisfactory.

  8. Genotoxicity of swine effluents.

    PubMed

    Techio, V H; Stolberg, J; Kunz, A; Zanin, E; Perdomo, C C

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of genotoxic effects of swine effluents from different stages of a treatment system for swine wastes through bioassay of stamen hairs and micronuclei in Tradescantia (clone BNL 4430). No significant differences (p≥0.05) regarding the genic mutations were found in the bioassay of stamen hairs, independently of the effluent analysed. For the genotoxicity test with micronuclei, the plants exposed to raw wastes, to sludge, and to effluent of the biodigester have presented higher rates of chromosomal damages (micronuclei), with significant differences in relation to the control group and other effluent of the waste treatment system (p≤0.05). The association between the chemical parameters and the genotoxicity data have shown that the variables COD and TKN have presented significant correlation (p≤0.05) with the number of mutagenic events in the tetrads.

  9. Classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Moennig, V; Becher, P; Beer, M

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever is a serious and economically important transboundary disease threatening pig production globally. The infection may occur in backyard pigs, feral pig populations and domestic pigs. Whereas there are proven control strategies for the latter pig population, control in backyard pigs with poor biosecurity settings or in wild boar populations of high density still poses a problem in some parts of the world. Laboratory diagnostic methods, efficacious vaccines and contingency plans are in place in most industrialised countries. So far modified live vaccines (MLV) are still the first choice for rapid and reliable immune protection. Since antibodies elicited by conventional MLV cannot be distinguished from antibodies after natural infection, considerable efforts are put into the development of a live marker vaccine accompanied by a serological test. Nevertheless, some remaining gaps with respect to the diagnosis of and vaccination against classical swine fever have been identified.

  10. 9 CFR 94.10 - Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists. 94.10 Section 94.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY...

  11. 9 CFR 85.5 - Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. 85.5 Section 85.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS PSEUDORABIES § 85.5 Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. Infected swine or...

  12. 9 CFR 85.5 - Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. 85.5 Section 85.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS PSEUDORABIES § 85.5 Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. Infected swine or...

  13. 9 CFR 85.5 - Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. 85.5 Section 85.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS PSEUDORABIES § 85.5 Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. Infected swine or...

  14. 9 CFR 85.5 - Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. 85.5 Section 85.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS PSEUDORABIES § 85.5 Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. Infected swine or...

  15. 9 CFR 85.5 - Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. 85.5 Section 85.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS PSEUDORABIES § 85.5 Interstate movement of infected swine or exposed swine. Infected swine or...

  16. Swine Worker Precautions During Suspected Outbreaks of Influenza in Swine.

    PubMed

    Paccha, Blanca; Neira-Ramirez, Victor; Gibbs, Shawn; Torremorell, Montserrat; Rabinowitz, Peter M

    2016-05-01

    To assess the behavior and precautions that swine workers take during suspected influenza outbreaks in swine, six commercial swine farms in the Midwest U.S. region were visited when influenza outbreaks were suspected in herds during the fall/winter of 2012-2013. Use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and type of task performed by swine workers were recorded based on farm representative reports. Between one to two workers were working on the day of each visit and spent approximately 25 minutes performing work-related tasks that placed them in close contact with the swine. The most common tasks reported were walking the aisles (27%), handling pigs (21%), and handling equipment (21%). The most common PPE were boots (100%), heavy rubber gloves (75%), and dedicated nondisposable clothing (74%). Use of N95 respirators was reported at three farms. Hand hygiene practices were common in most of the farms, but reportedly performed for only 20% to 25% of tasks.

  17. 9 CFR 91.9 - Swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Swine. 91.9 Section 91.9 Animals and... EXPORTATION Diagnostic Tests, Treatments § 91.9 Swine. (a) No swine shall be exported if they were fed garbage at any time. The swine shall be accompanied by a certification from the owner stating that they were...

  18. 9 CFR 91.9 - Swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Swine. 91.9 Section 91.9 Animals and... EXPORTATION Diagnostic Tests, Treatments § 91.9 Swine. (a) No swine shall be exported if they were fed garbage at any time. The swine shall be accompanied by a certification from the owner stating that they were...

  19. 9 CFR 91.9 - Swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Swine. 91.9 Section 91.9 Animals and... EXPORTATION Diagnostic Tests, Treatments § 91.9 Swine. (a) No swine shall be exported if they were fed garbage at any time. The swine shall be accompanied by a certification from the owner stating that they were...

  20. Calpain Inhibition Improves Collateral Dependent Perfusion in a Hypercholesterolemic Swine Model of Chronic Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Sabe, Ashraf A.; Potz, Brittany A.; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y.; Liu, Yuhong; Feng, Jun; Abid, M. Ruhul; Abbott, Jinnette D; Senger, Donald R; Sellke, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Calpain over-expression is implicated in aberrant angiogenesis. We hypothesized that calpain inhibition (CI, MDL28170) would improve collateral perfusion in a swine model with hypercholesterolemia and chronic myocardial ischemia. Methods and Results Yorkshire swine fed a high cholesterol diet for 4 weeks underwent surgical placement of an ameroid constrictor to their left circumflex coronary artery. Three weeks later, animals received either: no drug, high cholesterol control group (HCC; n= 8); low dose CI (0.12 mg/kg; LCI, n= 9); or high dose CI (0.25 mg/kg; HCI, n= 8). The heart was harvested after 5 weeks. There was a trend toward increased right to left collateral vessels on angiography with HCI. Myocardial perfusion in ischemic myocardium significantly improved with HCI at rest and with demand pacing (p = 0.016 and 0.011). Endothelium-dependent microvessel relaxation was significantly improved with LCI (p = 0.001). There was a significant increase in capillary density, with LCI and HCI (p= 0.01 and 0.01), and arteriolar density with LCI (p= 0.001). CI significantly increased several proangiogenic proteins including VEGF (p= 0.02), VEGFR1 (p= 0.003), VEGFR2 (p= 0.003) and talin, a microvascular structural protein (p= 0.0002). There was a slight increase in proteins implicated in endothelial-dependent (NO Mediated) relaxation including ERK, p-ERK and iNOS with CI. Conclusions In the setting of hypercholesterolemia, CI improved perfusion, with a trend toward increased collateralization on angiography and increased capillary and arteriolar densities in ischemic myocardium. CI also improved endothelium-dependent microvessel relaxation and increased expression of proteins implicated in angiogenesis and vasodilatation. PMID:26478238

  1. UM206, a selective Frizzled antagonist, attenuates adverse remodeling after myocardial infarction in swine.

    PubMed

    Uitterdijk, André; Hermans, Kevin C M; de Wijs-Meijler, Daphne P M; Daskalopoulos, Evangelos P; Reiss, Irwin K; Duncker, Dirk J; Matthijs Blankesteijn, W; Merkus, Daphne

    2016-02-01

    Modulation of Wnt/Frizzled signaling with UM206 reduced infarct expansion and prevented heart failure development in mice, an effect that was accompanied by increased myofibroblast presence in the infarct, suggesting that Wnt/Frizzled signaling has a key role in cardiac remodeling following myocardial infarction (MI). This study investigated the effects of modulation of Wnt/Frizzled signaling with UM206 in a swine model of reperfused MI. For this purpose, seven swine with MI were treated with continuous infusion of UM206 for 5 weeks. Six control swine were treated with vehicle. Another eight swine were sham-operated. Cardiac function was determined by echo in awake swine. Infarct mass was estimated at baseline by heart-specific fatty acid-binding protein ELISA and at follow-up using planimetry. Components of Wnt/Frizzled signaling, myofibroblast presence, and extracellular matrix were measured at follow-up with qPCR and/or histology. Results show that UM206 treatment resulted in a significant decrease in infarct mass compared with baseline (-41±10%), whereas infarct mass remained stable in the Control-MI group (+3±17%). Progressive dilation of the left ventricle occurred in the Control-MI group between 3 and 5 weeks after MI, while adverse remodeling was halted in the UM206-treated group. mRNA expression for Frizzled-4 and the Frizzled co-receptor LRP5 was increased in UM206-treated swine as compared with Control-MI swine. Myofibroblast presence was significantly lower in infarcted tissue of the UM206-treated animals (1.53±0.43% vs 3.38±0.61%) at 5 weeks follow-up. This study demonstrates that UM206 treatment attenuates adverse remodeling in a swine model of reperfused MI, indicating that Wnt/Frizzled signaling is a promising target to improve infarct healing and limit post-MI remodeling.

  2. Effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in the patients that underwent CABG

    PubMed Central

    Özülkü, Mehmet; Aygün, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study investigated effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods A total of 256 patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in the Cardiovascular Surgery clinic were enrolled in the study. Jostra-Cobe (Model 043213 105, VLC 865, Sweden) heart-lung machine was used in on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting was performed using Octopus and Starfish. Proximal anastomoses to the aorta in both on-pump and off-pump techniques were performed by side clamps. The patients were discharged from the hospital between postoperative day 6 and day 11. Results The incidence of postoperative right pleural effusion and bilateral pleural effusion was found to be higher as a count in Group 1 (on-pump) as compared to Group 2 (off-pump). But the difference was not statistically significant [P>0.05 for right pleural effusion (P=0.893), P>0.05 for bilateral pleural effusion (P=0.780)]. Left pleural effusion was encountered to be lower in Group 2 (off-pump). The difference was found to be statistically significant (P<0.05, P=0.006). Conclusion Under the light of these results, it can be said that left pleural effusion is less prevalent in the patients that underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting when compared to the patients that underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. PMID:27163421

  3. Anesthetic management of patient with Sjogren's syndrome who underwent cesarean section: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Eun; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Chung, In Sun; Lee, Jun Yong

    2016-06-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is one of the most common autoimmune disorders and has a female predominance. Maternal circulating autoantibodies such as anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibodies can cause congenital heart block of fetus, and in severe case, emergency pacemaker implantation may be needed for neonate. Therefore, it is very important to understand maternal and fetal condition and pay attention to the status of the neonate during delivery. In this paper, we present a case of patient with Sjogren's syndrome who underwent cesarean section under spinal anesthesia.

  4. 9 CFR 94.10 - Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists. 94.10 Section 94.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE...

  5. 9 CFR 94.10 - Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists. 94.10 Section 94.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE...

  6. 9 CFR 94.10 - Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists. 94.10 Section 94.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE...

  7. [Skin diseases of swine].

    PubMed

    von Altrock, A; Höltig, D

    2013-01-01

    Skin alterations can be caused by both environmental conditions and diseases of the organism. Some diseases may only manifest in the skin while others represent signs of a generalized infection. Regarding their origin, skin diseases can be divided into congenital, infectious, and nutritional disorders, and those resulting from housing scarcities. Additionally, there are skin diseases with unknown causes. Skin diseases in a swine herd can result in economic losses through decreased feed efficiency and growth rate and increased mortality. The knowledge of causes and symptoms as well as the selection of appropriate further laboratory investigations provide a valid diagnosis and enable a quick and effective therapy. This description of several skin diseases should provide a background.

  8. Identification of Region-Specific Myocardial Gene Expression Patterns in a Chronic Swine Model of Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Charron, Sabine; Roubertie, François; Benoist, David; Dubes, Virginie; Gilbert, Stephen H; Constantin, Marion; Vieillot, Delphine; Elbes, Delphine; Quesson, Bruno; Bordachar, Pierre; Haissaguerre, Michel; Bernus, Olivier; Thambo, Jean-Benoit; Rooryck, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Surgical repair of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is highly successful but may be complicated in adulthood by arrhythmias, sudden death, and right ventricular or biventricular dysfunction. To better understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms of these delayed cardiac events, a chronic animal model of postoperative TOF was studied using microarrays to perform cardiac transcriptomic studies. The experimental study included 12 piglets (7 rTOF and 5 controls) that underwent surgery at age 2 months and were further studied after 23 (+/- 1) weeks of postoperative recovery. Two distinct regions (endocardium and epicardium) from both ventricles were analyzed. Expression levels from each localization were compared in order to decipher mechanisms and signaling pathways leading to ventricular dysfunction and arrhythmias in surgically repaired TOF. Several genes were confirmed to participate in ventricular remodeling and cardiac failure and some new candidate genes were described. In particular, these data pointed out FRZB as a heart failure marker. Moreover, calcium handling and contractile function genes (SLN, ACTC1, PLCD4, PLCZ), potential arrhythmia-related genes (MYO5B, KCNA5), and cytoskeleton and cellular organization-related genes (XIRP2, COL8A1, KCNA6) were among the most deregulated genes in rTOF ventricles. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive report on global gene expression profiling in the heart of a long-term swine model of repaired TOF.

  9. H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevent or treat swine flu. There is a vaccine available to protect against swine flu. You can help prevent the spread of germs that cause respiratory illnesses like influenza by Covering your nose and mouth with a ...

  10. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Other Variant Influenza Viruses: Background and CDC Risk Assessment and Reporting Language: ... Background CDC Assessment Reporting Background On Variant Influenza Viruses Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. ...

  11. Induction of Robust Immune Responses in Swine by Using a Cocktail of Adenovirus-Vectored African Swine Fever Virus Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Waghela, Suryakant D.; Bray, Jocelyn; Martin, Cameron L.; Sangewar, Neha; Charendoff, Chloe; Shetti, Rashmi; Ashley, Clay; Chen, Chang-Hsin; Berghman, Luc R.; Mwangi, Duncan; Dominowski, Paul J.; Foss, Dennis L.; Rai, Sharath; Vora, Shaunak; Gabbert, Lindsay; Burrage, Thomas G.; Brake, David; Neilan, John

    2016-01-01

    The African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a fatal hemorrhagic disease in domestic swine, and at present no treatment or vaccine is available. Natural and gene-deleted, live attenuated strains protect against closely related virulent strains; however, they are yet to be deployed and evaluated in the field to rule out chronic persistence and a potential for reversion to virulence. Previous studies suggest that antibodies play a role in protection, but induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) could be the key to complete protection. Hence, generation of an efficacious subunit vaccine depends on identification of CTL targets along with a suitable delivery method that will elicit effector CTLs capable of eliminating ASFV-infected host cells and confer long-term protection. To this end, we evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of an adenovirus-vectored ASFV (Ad-ASFV) multiantigen cocktail formulated in two different adjuvants and at two immunizing doses in swine. Immunization with the cocktail rapidly induced unprecedented ASFV antigen-specific antibody and cellular immune responses against all of the antigens. The robust antibody responses underwent rapid isotype switching within 1 week postpriming, steadily increased over a 2-month period, and underwent rapid recall upon boost. Importantly, the primed antibodies strongly recognized the parental ASFV (Georgia 2007/1) by indirect fluorescence antibody (IFA) assay and Western blotting. Significant antigen-specific gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ+) responses were detected postpriming and postboosting. Furthermore, this study is the first to demonstrate induction of ASFV antigen-specific CTL responses in commercial swine using Ad-ASFV multiantigens. The relevance of the induced immune responses in regard to protection needs to be evaluated in a challenge study. PMID:27628166

  12. Induction of swine dysentery in swine by the intravenous injection of filtered Treponema hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, L D

    1981-01-01

    Swine dysentery was induced in 18 swine exposed by intravenous injection of a filtrate which contained Treponema hyodysenteriae and was obtained from macerated colonic scrapings of swine dysentery. However, swine dysentery did not develop in swine injected intravenously with a pure culture of T. hyodysenteriae or when combined with a colonic filtrate from normal swine. Diarrheal feces from the swine injected intravenously with the filtered T. hyodysenteriae contained more mucus, and fecal smears contained more T. hyodysenteriae and fewer other bacteria than did swine exposed orally to colon infected with swine dysentery or filtered T. hyodysenteriae. In the colons of the 12 swine injected intravenously with filtered T. hyodysenteriae that died, there was a minimum amount of croupous membrane and, microscopically, the T. hyodysenteriae were located deep in the colonic crypts. Five of the six surviving swine injected intravenously with filtered T. hyodysenteriae developed serum anti-T. hyodysenteriae antibodies using the indirect fluorescent antibody test and four of these swine developed diarrhea when reexposed with swine dysentery infected colon six weeks after initial exposure. None of the swine injected intravenously with cultured T. hyodysenteriae developed serum anti-T. hyodysenteriae antibodies and all were highly susceptible to swine dysentery. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:7337868

  13. Scrapie in swine: a diagnostic challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A naturally occurring prion disease has not been recognized in swine, but the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy does transmit to swine by experimental routes. Swine are thought to have a robust species barrier when exposed to the naturally occurring prion diseases of other species, but the s...

  14. 9 CFR 91.9 - Swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... paragraph (c) of this section, all breeding swine shall be tested for and show negative test results to... Uniform Methods and Rules, chapter 2, part II, G, 1, 2, and 3. (c) Breeding swine exported to a country that does not require breeding swine from the United States to be tested for brucellosis need...

  15. 9 CFR 91.9 - Swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... paragraph (c) of this section, all breeding swine shall be tested for and show negative test results to... Uniform Methods and Rules, chapter 2, part II, G, 1, 2, and 3. (c) Breeding swine exported to a country that does not require breeding swine from the United States to be tested for brucellosis need...

  16. 9 CFR 309.9 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 309.9 Section 309.9... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.9 Swine erysipelas. All hogs plainly showing on ante-mortem inspection that they are affected with acute swine erysipelas shall be identified as U.S. Condemned and...

  17. 9 CFR 311.5 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 311.5 Section 311.5... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.5 Swine erysipelas. Carcasses affected with swine erysipelas which is acute or generalized, or which show systemic change, shall...

  18. 9 CFR 309.9 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 309.9 Section 309.9... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.9 Swine erysipelas. All hogs plainly showing on ante-mortem inspection that they are affected with acute swine erysipelas shall be identified as U.S. Condemned and...

  19. 9 CFR 311.5 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 311.5 Section 311.5... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.5 Swine erysipelas. Carcasses affected with swine erysipelas which is acute or generalized, or which show systemic change, shall...

  20. 9 CFR 309.9 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 309.9 Section 309.9... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.9 Swine erysipelas. All hogs plainly showing on ante-mortem inspection that they are affected with acute swine erysipelas shall be identified as U.S. Condemned and...

  1. 9 CFR 311.5 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 311.5 Section 311.5... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.5 Swine erysipelas. Carcasses affected with swine erysipelas which is acute or generalized, or which show systemic change, shall...

  2. 9 CFR 311.5 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 311.5 Section 311.5... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.5 Swine erysipelas. Carcasses affected with swine erysipelas which is acute or generalized, or which show systemic change, shall...

  3. 9 CFR 309.9 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 309.9 Section 309.9... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.9 Swine erysipelas. All hogs plainly showing on ante-mortem inspection that they are affected with acute swine erysipelas shall be identified as U.S. Condemned and...

  4. 9 CFR 309.9 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 309.9 Section 309.9... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.9 Swine erysipelas. All hogs plainly showing on ante-mortem inspection that they are affected with acute swine erysipelas shall be identified as U.S. Condemned and...

  5. 9 CFR 311.5 - Swine erysipelas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Swine erysipelas. 311.5 Section 311.5... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.5 Swine erysipelas. Carcasses affected with swine erysipelas which is acute or generalized, or which show systemic change, shall...

  6. Scrapie in swine: a diagnostic challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A naturally occurring prion disease has not been recognized in swine, but the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy does transmit to swine by experimental routes. Swine are thought to have a robust species barrier when exposed to the naturally occurring prion diseases of other species, but the s...

  7. Immunological and respiratory findings in swine farmers.

    PubMed

    Zuskin, E; Kanceljak, B; Schachter, E N; Mustajbegovic, J; Goswami, S; Maayani, S; Marom, Z; Rienzi, N

    1991-12-01

    The prevalence of respiratory symptoms and ventilatory capacity abnormalities in relation to immunological status was studied in 32 swine farmers and in 39 controls. A large number of swine farmers reacted to swine confinement building antigens (swine hair, 34%, swine confinement agents, 28%) but also to other extracts such as animal food (78%) and corn flour (37%). Control workers also reacted to these antigens in similar frequencies. Increased serum IgE levels were found in 3 swine farmers (9.4%) and all 3 had positive skin tests to at least one of the swine antigens. Among control workers one (2.6%) had an increased serum IgE level; this worker exhibited a positive skin reaction to swine food antigen. Swine farmers with positive skin reactions had across-shift reductions of FEF50 and FEF25 significantly larger than those with negative skin tests (P less than 0.01). Preshift measured ventilatory capacity data (FEV1, FEF50, FEF25) in swine farmers with positive skin tests were significantly lower (compared to predicted) than in those with negative skin tests. Additionally, we showed that a water-soluble swine confinement building antigen causes a dose-related contraction of nonsensitized guinea pig trachea smooth muscle studied in vitro. Our data indicate significant differences in lung function between swine workers with positive and negative skin tests. We suggest that skin testing may be helpful in identifying workers at risk for developing lung disease.

  8. Swine Flu -A Comprehensive View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vandana; Sood, Meenakshi

    2012-07-01

    The present article is aimed on comprehensive view of Swine flu. It was first isolated from pigs in 1930 in USA. Pandemic caused by H1N1 in 2009 brought it in limelight. Itís a viral respiratory disease caused by viruses that infects pigs, resulting in nasal secretions, barking cough, decreased appetite, and listless behavior. Swine virus consist of eight RNA strands, one strand derived from human flu strains, two from avian (bird) strains, and five from swine strains. Swine flu spreads from infected person to healthy person by inhalation or ingestion of droplets contaminated with virus while sneezing or coughing. Two antiviral agents have been reported to help prevent or reduce the effects of swine flu, flu shot and nasal spray. WHO recommended for pandemic period to prevent its future outbreaks through vaccines or non-vaccines means. Antiviral drugs effective against this virus are Tamiflu and Relenza. Rapid antigen testing (RIDT), DFA testing, viral culture, and molecular testing (RT-PCR) are used for its diagnosis in laboratory

  9. Recurrence factors in women underwent laparoscopic surgery for endometrioma.

    PubMed

    Guzel, A I; Topcu, H O; Ekilinc, S; Tokmak, A; Kokanali, M K; Cavkaytar, S; Doğanay, M

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess the risk factors for endometrioma recurrence in women underwent laparoscopic surgery for endometrioma. This retrospective designed study included 113 cases that underwent laparoscopic surgery for endometrioma; of these women, recurrent endometrioma was detected in 33 (29.20%) subjects and other showed no recurrence (70.80%). Age, gravidity, parity, diameter of the mass, bilaterality, previous pelvic surgery, operation type, presence of adhesions, Ca 125 levels and recurrence time was obtained from hospital records and special gynecology forms. Demographic and obstetric past history of the cases showed no statistically significant difference between the groups (P>0.05). Higher diameter of the mass, previous pelvic surgery, operation type, presence of adhesion and higher Ca 125 levels were risk factors for endometrioma recurrence (P<0.05). Receiver operator curve (ROC) analysis demonstrated that diameter of the mass, previous pelvic surgery and Ca 125 levels may be discriminative risk factors for endometrioma recurrence. Endometriomas ≥ 4.5 cm, especially in cases with pelvic adhesions, previous pelvic surgery and higher Ca 125 levels should be excised totally.

  10. Prostaglandins in swine reproduction.

    PubMed

    Kingston, D J

    1982-05-01

    A review is presented of the roles of prostaglandins in swine reproduction. PGE and PGF are both produced in the ovary. PGE is thought to mediate steroidogenic activity of L.H. on the development of the granulosa cells leading to increased progesterone production in the preovulatory phase of the oestrus cycle. PGF2 acts on the theca cells leading to increased oestradiol and oestrus manifestation. The PG blocker indomethacin prevents oocyte rupture, but not maturation. The L.H. surges in the follicular phase stimulate ovarian PG production which initiates oestrus and ovulation. The uterus produces PGF2alpha. Disorders leading to abortion usually result in excess PGF2alpha production at the endometrium leading to luteolysis. With normal gestation circulatory progesterone levels fall during the last two weeks of pregnancy associated with increased circulatory foetal corticoid levels. The foetal corticoids are thought to trigger endometrial PGF2alpha levels leading to luteolysis and parturition. The use of exogenous PGF2alpha for induction of oestrus and abortion, parturition, semen collection and resolution of anoestrus is reviewed.

  11. Engineered Swine Models of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Adrienne L.; Carlson, Daniel F.; Largaespada, David A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Fahrenkrug, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the technology to engineer genetically modified swine has seen many advancements, and because their physiology is remarkably similar to that of humans, swine models of cancer may be extremely valuable for preclinical safety studies as well as toxicity testing of pharmaceuticals prior to the start of human clinical trials. Hence, the benefits of using swine as a large animal model in cancer research and the potential applications and future opportunities of utilizing pigs in cancer modeling are immense. In this review, we discuss how pigs have been and can be used as a biomedical models for cancer research, with an emphasis on current technologies. We have focused on applications of precision genetics that can provide models that mimic human cancer predisposition syndromes. In particular, we describe the advantages of targeted gene-editing using custom endonucleases, specifically TALENs and CRISPRs, and transposon systems, to make novel pig models of cancer with broad preclinical applications. PMID:27242889

  12. Hepatic Iron in African Americans Who Underwent Liver Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Bertoli, Luigi F.; Alford, Thomas J.; Barton, J. Clayborn; Edwards, Corwin Q.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Primary iron overload in African Americans has been reported predominantly from autopsy studies. Methods: We characterized hepatic iron phenotypes in 83 African Americans who underwent liver biopsy during the interval 1990 to 1995. We tabulated pathology report form data, iron grades in hepatocytes (0–4) and Kupffer cells (0–3) and abnormal liver histology. Increased iron was defined as hepatocyte or Kupffer iron grades ≥2, respectively. Heavy iron was defined as hepatocyte iron grade 3 or 4. Primary iron overload was defined as the presence of grade 3 or 4 hepatocellular iron in the absence of evidence of chronic alcohol effect, viral hepatitis, steatosis, unexplained inflammation, chronic erythrocyte transfusion or chronic ingestion of iron supplements. Results: There were 37 men and 46 women (mean age: 53 ± 15 [SD] years). We observed heavy ethanol consumption, 12.0%; viral hepatitis, 26.5%; steatosis without heavy ethanol consumption, 43.4%; inflammation, 45.6%; fibrosis, 26.2% and bridging fibrosis/cirrhosis, 29.4%. Logistic regression on bridging fibrosis/cirrhosis revealed positive associations with heavy ethanol consumption (P = 0.0410) and viral hepatitis (P = 0.0044). The 22 patients (26.5%) with increased iron had greater mean age, proportion of men and heavy ethanol consumption. Five patients had heavy iron staining, among whom were 3 women (mean age: 54 years) with primary iron overload. Two of the 3 women had cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus. Conclusions: Among 83 adult African Americans who underwent liver biopsy, 3.6% had hepatic iron phenotypes consistent with primary iron overload. PMID:25559280

  13. Swine in biomedical research. Vol. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbleson, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents information on the following topics: hemodynamic characteristics of the conscious resting pig; cardiovascular and metabolic responses to acute and chronic exercise in swine (ILLEGIBLE) a large animal model for studies (ILLEGIBLE) effects of heparin-protamine interaction in swine - intravenous vs. intraarterial; swine as animal models in cardiovascular research; studies of coronary thrombosis in swine with von Willebrand's disease; role of plasma intermediate and low density lipoproteins in early atherogenesis in hyperlipidemic swine; swine as a model in renal physiology and nephrology; the pig as a model for studying kidney disease in man; hypertension of renal origin and the effects of Captopril in miniature pigs; porcine natural killer/killer cell system; the behavior of pig lymphocyte populations in vivo; a review of spontaneous and experimental porcine eperythrozoonosis; and Sinclair swine melanoma.

  14. 9 CFR 93.505 - Certificate for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Certificate for swine. 93.505 Section... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.505 Certificate for swine. (a) All swine... veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so, stating that such swine have been kept in said...

  15. 9 CFR 166.6 - Swine feeding area standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Swine feeding area standards. 166.6... AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.6 Swine feeding area standards. Untreated garbage shall not be allowed into swine feeding areas. Any equipment or material...

  16. 9 CFR 166.6 - Swine feeding area standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Swine feeding area standards. 166.6... AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.6 Swine feeding area standards. Untreated garbage shall not be allowed into swine feeding areas. Any equipment or material...

  17. 9 CFR 166.6 - Swine feeding area standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Swine feeding area standards. 166.6... AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.6 Swine feeding area standards. Untreated garbage shall not be allowed into swine feeding areas. Any equipment or material...

  18. 9 CFR 166.6 - Swine feeding area standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Swine feeding area standards. 166.6... AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.6 Swine feeding area standards. Untreated garbage shall not be allowed into swine feeding areas. Any equipment or material...

  19. 9 CFR 166.6 - Swine feeding area standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Swine feeding area standards. 166.6... AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.6 Swine feeding area standards. Untreated garbage shall not be allowed into swine feeding areas. Any equipment or material...

  20. 9 CFR 93.505 - Certificate for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Certificate for swine. 93.505 Section... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.505 Certificate for swine. (a) All swine... veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so, stating that such swine have been kept in said...

  1. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  2. 9 CFR 85.6 - Interstate movement of pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be..., except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be infected with or exposed to pseudorabies. Pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative...

  3. Control of African swine fever epidemics in industrialized swine populations.

    PubMed

    Halasa, Tariq; Bøtner, Anette; Mortensen, Sten; Christensen, Hanne; Toft, Nils; Boklund, Anette

    2016-12-25

    African swine fever (ASF) is a notifiable infectious disease with a high impact on swine health. The disease is endemic in certain regions in the Baltic countries and has spread to Poland constituting a risk of ASF spread toward Western Europe. Therefore, as part of contingency planning, it is important to explore strategies that can effectively control an epidemic of ASF. In this study, the epidemiological and economic effects of strategies to control the spread of ASF between domestic swine herds were examined using a published model (DTU-DADS-ASF). The control strategies were the basic EU and national strategy (Basic), the basic strategy plus pre-emptive depopulation of neighboring swine herds, and intensive surveillance of herds in the control zones, including testing live or dead animals. Virus spread via wild boar was not modelled. Under the basic control strategy, the median epidemic duration was predicted to be 21days (5th and 95th percentiles; 1-55days), the median number of infected herds was predicted to be 3 herds (1-8), and the total costs were predicted to be €326 million (€256-€442 million). Adding pre-emptive depopulation or intensive surveillance by testing live animals resulted in marginal improvements to the control of the epidemics. However, adding testing of dead animals in the protection and surveillance zones was predicted to be the optimal control scenario for an ASF epidemic in industrialized swine populations without contact to wild boar. This optimal scenario reduced the epidemic duration to 9days (1-38) and the total costs to €294 million (€257-€392 million). Export losses were the driving force of the total costs of the epidemics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of rFVIIa on Pro- and Anti-Inflamatory Cytokines in Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid in a Swine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    alpha expression and protein levels after fluid percussion injury in rats: the effect of injury severity and brain temperature. Neurosurgery ...Short Communication The effect of rFVIIa on pro- and anti-inflamatory cytokines in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in a swine model of traumatic brain...Tumor necrosis factor-ex lnterleukin-1 p lnterleukin-1 0 rfVlla TBl Twenty anesthetized immature Yorkshire swine underwent fluid percussion TBI. At

  5. Swine Influenza Virus: Emerging Understandings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: In March-April 2009, a novel pandemic H1N1 emerged in the human population in North America [1]. The gene constellation of the emerging virus was demonstrated to be a combination of genes from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages that had never before...

  6. Energy conservation in swine buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.D.; Friday, W.H.

    1980-05-01

    Saving energy in confinement swine buildings can be achieved by conserving existing animal heat through both proper building construction and control of the environment. Environmental management practices considered include building insulation and modifications, heating and cooling system selection, ventilation system adjustments, and proper building temperature. (MCW)

  7. Multiple-dose study of oral pyridostigmine in swine. Interim report, January 1986-January 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, C.E.; Waring, P.P.; Trail, D.S.; Williams, B.F.; Bonner, G.D.

    1987-03-01

    The hemodynamic, metabolic, and hormonal responses to pyridostigmine treatment were evaluated in immature swine(20.7 + or - 0.5 kg). Pyridostigmine bromide was administered orally three times per day at 60 mg per dose. Animals receiving treatment (n=12) were compared to a group with no treatment (n=14). After three days of treatment, plasma and erythrocyte cholinesterase activities were reduced by 31% and 47%, respectively. Blood gases, heart rate, and blood pressure were not different. Pyridostigmine tended to increase blood glucose levels and elevated hematocrits 26 to 29%. Treatment with 60 mg of pyridostigmine three times daily for three days reduced acetylcholinesterase activity as desired in man for prophylactic treatment against possible exposure to nerve agents. In swine this degree of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity was associated with an index of stress, a slight increase in hematocrit. Swine appear to offer an effective animal model in which to evaluate pyridostigmine treatment.

  8. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  9. Development of Aortic Valve Disease in Familial Hypercholesterolemic Swine: Implications for Elucidating Disease Etiology.

    PubMed

    Porras, Ana M; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan; Meudt, Jennifer J; Krueger, Christian G; Hacker, Timothy A; Rahko, Peter S; Reed, Jess D; Masters, Kristyn S

    2015-10-27

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a prevalent hereditary disease associated with increased atherosclerosis and calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). However, in both FH and non-FH individuals, the role of hypercholesterolemia in the development of CAVD is poorly understood. This study used Rapacz FH (RFH) swine, an established model of human FH, to investigate the role of hypercholesterolemia alone in the initiation and progression of CAVD. The valves of RFH swine have not previously been examined. Aortic valve leaflets were isolated from wild-type (0.25- and 1-year-old) and RFH (0.25-, 1-, 2-, and 3-year-old) swine. Adult RFH animals exhibited numerous hallmarks of early CAVD. Significant leaflet thickening was found in adult RFH swine, accompanied by extensive extracellular matrix remodeling, including proteoglycan enrichment, collagen disorganization, and elastin fragmentation. Increased lipid oxidation and infiltration of macrophages were also evident in adult RFH swine. Intracardiac echocardiography revealed mild aortic valve sclerosis in some of the adult RFH animals, but unimpaired valve function. Microarray analysis of valves from adult versus juvenile RFH animals revealed significant upregulation of inflammation-related genes, as well as several commonalities with atherosclerosis and overlap with human CAVD. Adult RFH swine exhibited several hallmarks of early human CAVD, suggesting potential for these animals to help elucidate CAVD etiology in both FH and non-FH individuals. The development of advanced atherosclerotic lesions, but only early-stage CAVD, in RFH swine supports the hypothesis of an initial shared disease process, with additional stimulation necessary for further progression of CAVD. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  10. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, NEWCASTLE DISEASE, HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND...

  11. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM...

  12. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM...

  13. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM...

  14. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM...

  15. African swine fever virus serotype-specific proteins are significant protective antigens for African swine fever

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African swine fever (ASF) is an emerging disease threat for the swine industry worldwide. No ASF vaccine is available and progress is hindered by lack of knowledge concerning the extent of African swine fever virus (ASFV) strain diversity and the viral antigens conferring type specific protective im...

  16. A possible outbreak of swine influenza, 1892.

    PubMed

    Morens, David M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2014-02-01

    Influenza A viruses are globally enzootic in swine populations. Swine influenza has been recognised only since 1918, but an anecdotal report suggests that a swine-influenza epizootic might have occurred in England in 1892, at the same time as an explosive epidemic (or pandemic recurrence) of human influenza. This outbreak suggests that the ecobiological association between human and swine influenza could extend to before 1918. By contrast with the recent documentation of swine influenza, influenza in horses has been well documented for hundreds of years, and was often linked temporally and geographically to epidemics of human influenza. Both decreased contact between people and horses, and the concomitant increase in swine production over the past century, might have altered the character and dynamics of influenza host-switch events between people and domestic mammals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A possible outbreak of swine influenza, 1892

    PubMed Central

    Morens, David M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are globally enzootic in swine populations. Swine influenza has been recognised only since 1918, but an anecdotal report suggests that a swine-influenza epizootic might have occurred in England in 1892, at the same time as an explosive epidemic (or pandemic recurrence) of human influenza. This outbreak suggests that the ecobiological association between human and swine influenza could extend to before 1918. By contrast with the recent documentation of swine influenza, influenza in horses has been well documented for hundreds of years, and was often linked temporally and geographically to epidemics of human influenza. Both decreased contact between people and horses, and the concomitant increase in swine production over the past century, might have altered the character and dynamics of influenza host-switch events between people and domestic mammals. PMID:24290840

  18. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  19. Purification of swine haptoglobin by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Eurell, T E; Hall, W F; Bane, D P

    1990-01-01

    A globin-agarose affinity chromatography technique was used to purify swine haptoglobin. This technique provides a highly specific, single-step purification method without the contamination of extraneous serum proteins reported by previous studies. Complex formation between the haptoglobin isolate and swine hemoglobin confirmed that biological activity was maintained during the purification process. Immunoelectrophoretic and Ouchterlony immunodiffusion methods revealed that the swine haptoglobin isolate cross-reacted with polyvalent antisera against human haptoglobin. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2123414

  20. Macular translocation: histopathologic findings in swine eyes.

    PubMed

    Roig-Melo, E A; Afaro, D V; Heredia-Elizondo, M L; Yarbrough, L M; Game, A B; Apple, D J; Quirol, H M

    2000-01-01

    Macular translocation has been proposed as an alternative technique in the treatment of some cases of choroidal neovascularization. The purpose of the paper is to report the histopathologic findings in the retina of swine eyes undergone macular translocation. Ten eyes of ten Yucatan pigs underwent posterior pars plana vitrectomy and scleral imbrication to achieve macular translocation. Mattress sutures were preplaced at the equator of the eyes. After a pars plana vitrectomy, balanced saline solution was injected under the temporal retina to produce a retinal detachment. Scleral imbrication was achieved by tightening the mattress sutures. An air-fluid exchange was performed and the eye was filled with sulfur hexafluoride 18%. The eyes were enucleated 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery and analyzed under light and electron microscopy. Macular translocation was achieved in all cases. The major findings consist of a minimal decrease in the number of photoreceptors outer segments; also a change in the morphology was noted. This included some degree of loss of vertical alignment and an increase in the interphotoreceptor space. There was a recovery in the morphology of the photoreceptors over time. Minimal changes in the photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium are observed when macular translocation is performed with recovery of these changes over time. Scleral imbrication is an effective technique to achieve translocation of the fovea.

  1. Swine in biomedical research. V. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbleson, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents information on the following topics: the history of pigs; conceptual and operational history of the development of miniature swine; breeding program and population standards of the Gottingen miniature swine; moral, social and scientific aspects of the use of swine in research; fertility in gilts inseminated with frozen boar semen stored at -196 C for eight years; ultrastructure of piglet liver; porcine models in surgical research; anesthesia in swine; pulse monitoring, intravascular and instramuscular injection sites in pigs; collagen biosynthesis and collagen content as a measure of dermal healing in experimental wounds in domestic swine; methods for hair removal; swine as a cardiac surgical model; bone marrow transplantation in miniature swine; technical aspects of small intestinal transplantation in young pigs; models; the pig in studies of diarrhea pathophysiology; use of swine to validate airflow perturbation device for airways resistance measurements in humans; swine as a model for human diabetes; and the weanling Yorkshire pig as an animal model for measuring percutaneous penetration.

  2. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  3. Vulnerability of the British swine industry to classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Porphyre, Thibaud; Correia-Gomes, Carla; Chase-Topping, Margo E; Gamado, Kokouvi; Auty, Harriet K; Hutchinson, Ian; Reeves, Aaron; Gunn, George J; Woolhouse, Mark E J

    2017-02-22

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a notifiable, highly contagious viral disease of swine which results in severe welfare and economic consequences in affected countries. To improve preparedness, it is critical to have some understanding of how CSF would spread should it be introduced. Based on the data recorded during the 2000 epidemic of CSF in Great Britain (GB), a spatially explicit, premises-based model was developed to explore the risk of CSF spread in GB. We found that large outbreaks of CSF would be rare and generated from a limited number of areas in GB. Despite the consistently low vulnerability of the British swine industry to large CSF outbreaks, we identified concerns with respect to the role played by the non-commercial sector of the industry. The model further revealed how various epidemiological features may influence the spread of CSF in GB, highlighting the importance of between-farm biosecurity in preventing widespread dissemination of the virus. Knowledge of factors affecting the risk of spread are key components for surveillance planning and resource allocation, and this work provides a valuable stepping stone in guiding policy on CSF surveillance and control in GB.

  4. Vulnerability of the British swine industry to classical swine fever

    PubMed Central

    Porphyre, Thibaud; Correia-Gomes, Carla; Chase-Topping, Margo E.; Gamado, Kokouvi; Auty, Harriet K.; Hutchinson, Ian; Reeves, Aaron; Gunn, George J.; Woolhouse, Mark E. J.

    2017-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a notifiable, highly contagious viral disease of swine which results in severe welfare and economic consequences in affected countries. To improve preparedness, it is critical to have some understanding of how CSF would spread should it be introduced. Based on the data recorded during the 2000 epidemic of CSF in Great Britain (GB), a spatially explicit, premises-based model was developed to explore the risk of CSF spread in GB. We found that large outbreaks of CSF would be rare and generated from a limited number of areas in GB. Despite the consistently low vulnerability of the British swine industry to large CSF outbreaks, we identified concerns with respect to the role played by the non-commercial sector of the industry. The model further revealed how various epidemiological features may influence the spread of CSF in GB, highlighting the importance of between-farm biosecurity in preventing widespread dissemination of the virus. Knowledge of factors affecting the risk of spread are key components for surveillance planning and resource allocation, and this work provides a valuable stepping stone in guiding policy on CSF surveillance and control in GB. PMID:28225040

  5. Swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) diversity in Sinclair and Hanford swine.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chak-Sum; Martens, Gregory W; Amoss, Max S; Gomez-Raya, Luis; Beattie, Craig W; Smith, Douglas M

    2010-03-01

    The swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) haplotype B is associated with increased penetrance of the tumor traits in Sinclair swine cutaneous melanoma (SSCM). We established a series of SinclairxHanford swine crosses to facilitate genetic mapping of the tumor-associated loci. In this study, the SLA diversity in the founding animals was characterized for effective selection of maximum tumor penetrance in the pedigrees. Using the sequence-based typing (SBT) method we identified a total of 29 alleles at five polymorphic SLA loci (SLA-1, SLA-3, SLA-2, DRB1 and DQB1) representing six class I and five class II haplotypes. We subsequently developed a rapid PCR-based typing assay using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) to efficiently follow the SLA types of the crossbred progeny. In a total of 469 animals we identified three crossovers within the class I region and three between the class I and class II regions, which corresponded to recombination frequencies of 0.39% and 0.56%, respectively. We also confirmed the presence of two expressed SLA-1 loci in three of the class I haplotypes and were able to determine the relative chromosomal arrangement of the duplicated loci in two haplotypes. This study furthers our understanding of the allelic architecture and polymorphism of the SLA system and will facilitate the mapping of loci associated with the expression of SSCM. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of route of breathing on response to exposure in a swine confinement building.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Y; Laviolette, M; Bedard, G; Dosman, J; Israel-Assayag, E

    1998-05-01

    Exposure of naive subjects to swine buildings results in acute nasal, lung, and peripheral blood inflammatory responses with an increase in nonallergic airway responsiveness. Because nasal passages filter large particles and soluble gases and because swine building exposure results in an acute inflammatory response at this level, we questioned what effect breathing through or avoiding this route would have on local and systemic inflammation. Nine normal young men 23 to 37 yr of age were exposed for 5 h to a swine building, once breathing normally and once with the mouth occluded (n = 8) (Protocol 1) or the nose occluded (n = 4) (Protocol 2); three subjects participated in both protocols. For each protocol each subject underwent a methacholine challenge for PC20 measurement, a nasal lavage, venous blood puncture, and a bronchoalveolor lavage (BAL) once before and once after each swine building exposure. Bronchial responsiveness as measured by PC20 decreased in most subjects after swine building exposure and was not influenced by the route of breathing. Nasal lavage neutrophils increased tenfold after each swine exposure, except when the nose was occluded where no alteration was observed. Total BAL cells significantly increased after each exposure to the swine building, this increase was not modified by the route of breathing. In Protocol 1, white blood cells increased from a baseline level of 7.0 to 10.5 x 10(9) cells/L after exposure with normal breathing and to 10.7 x 10(9) cells/L during nasal breathing exclusively. For Protocol 2, these respective values were: 5.6, 11.7 and 10.4 x 10(9)/L. Interleukins 6 and 8 levels in BAL, nasal washes, and serum were increased by swine building exposure, except in the nasal wash when the nose was occluded. In conclusion, the lung and blood responses to exposure in a swine confinement building are not modified by the route of breathing, suggesting that nasal inflammation and filtration are not important in the process and that

  7. 9 CFR 311.20 - Sexual odor of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sexual odor of swine. 311.20 Section... Sexual odor of swine. (a) Carcasses of swine which give off a pronounced sexual odor shall be condemned. (b) The meat of swine carcasses which give off a sexual odor less than pronounced may be passed...

  8. Introduction to Swine Production. Instructor Guide [and] Student Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Kevin

    This packet contains an instructor guide and student reference for a course in introduction to swine production. The curriculum contains the following seven lessons: (1) introduction to the swine industry; (2) breeds of swine; (3) principles of swine selection; (4) production systems; (5) herd health; (6) herd management; and (6) industry…

  9. 9 CFR 78.31 - Brucellosis reactor swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis reactor swine. 78.31... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.31 Brucellosis reactor swine. (a) Destination. Brucellosis reactor swine may be moved interstate only for immediate slaughter as follows:...

  10. 9 CFR 78.31 - Brucellosis reactor swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brucellosis reactor swine. 78.31... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.31 Brucellosis reactor swine. (a) Destination. Brucellosis reactor swine may be moved interstate only for immediate slaughter as follows:...

  11. 9 CFR 52.3 - Appraisal of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appraisal of swine. 52.3 Section 52.3... § 52.3 Appraisal of swine. (a) Herds of swine and individual breeding sows to be destroyed because they... an APHIS employee alone. (b) The appraisal of swine will be based on the fair market value...

  12. 9 CFR 93.517 - Swine from Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Swine from Canada. 93.517 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Canada 7 § 93.517 Swine from Canada. (a) For purposes other than immediate slaughter. Swine offered for importation from Canada for purposes other than immediate slaughter...

  13. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No litter..., or other things used for or about swine governed by the regulations in this part, shall be landed...

  14. 9 CFR 93.517 - Swine from Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Swine from Canada. 93.517 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Canada 7 § 93.517 Swine from Canada. (a) For purposes other than immediate slaughter. Swine offered for importation from Canada for purposes other than immediate slaughter...

  15. 9 CFR 78.32 - Brucellosis exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed swine. 78.32... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.32 Brucellosis exposed swine. (a) Brucellosis exposed swine may be moved interstate only if accompanied by a permit and only for immediate...

  16. 9 CFR 78.32 - Brucellosis exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed swine. 78.32... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.32 Brucellosis exposed swine. (a) Brucellosis exposed swine may be moved interstate only if accompanied by a permit and only for immediate...

  17. 9 CFR 78.31 - Brucellosis reactor swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brucellosis reactor swine. 78.31... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.31 Brucellosis reactor swine. (a) Destination. Brucellosis reactor swine may be moved interstate only for immediate slaughter as follows: (1...

  18. 9 CFR 311.20 - Sexual odor of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sexual odor of swine. 311.20 Section... Sexual odor of swine. (a) Carcasses of swine which give off a pronounced sexual odor shall be condemned. (b) The meat of swine carcasses which give off a sexual odor less than pronounced may be passed for...

  19. 9 CFR 93.514 - Manure from quarantined swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Manure from quarantined swine. 93.514... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.514 Manure from quarantined swine. No manure shall be removed from the quarantine premises until the release of the swine producing same. ...

  20. 9 CFR 93.521 - Declaration for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Declaration for swine. 93.521 Section... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Mexico 9 § 93.521 Declaration for swine. For all swine offered for importation from Mexico, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of...

  1. 9 CFR 311.20 - Sexual odor of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sexual odor of swine. 311.20 Section... Sexual odor of swine. (a) Carcasses of swine which give off a pronounced sexual odor shall be condemned. (b) The meat of swine carcasses which give off a sexual odor less than pronounced may be passed for...

  2. 9 CFR 93.517 - Swine from Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Swine from Canada. 93.517 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Canada 7 § 93.517 Swine from Canada. (a) For purposes other than immediate slaughter. Swine offered for importation from Canada for purposes other than immediate slaughter...

  3. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No litter..., or other things used for or about swine governed by the regulations in this part, shall be landed...

  4. 9 CFR 93.521 - Declaration for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Declaration for swine. 93.521 Section... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Mexico 9 § 93.521 Declaration for swine. For all swine offered for importation from Mexico, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of...

  5. 9 CFR 78.32 - Brucellosis exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed swine. 78.32... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.32 Brucellosis exposed swine. (a) Brucellosis exposed swine may be moved interstate only if accompanied by a permit and only for immediate...

  6. 9 CFR 311.20 - Sexual odor of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sexual odor of swine. 311.20 Section... Sexual odor of swine. (a) Carcasses of swine which give off a pronounced sexual odor shall be condemned. (b) The meat of swine carcasses which give off a sexual odor less than pronounced may be passed for...

  7. 9 CFR 93.521 - Declaration for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Declaration for swine. 93.521 Section... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Mexico 9 § 93.521 Declaration for swine. For all swine offered for importation from Mexico, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of...

  8. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No litter..., or other things used for or about swine governed by the regulations in this part, shall be landed...

  9. 9 CFR 78.32 - Brucellosis exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed swine. 78.32... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.32 Brucellosis exposed swine. (a) Brucellosis exposed swine may be moved interstate only if accompanied by a permit and only for immediate...

  10. 9 CFR 93.521 - Declaration for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Declaration for swine. 93.521 Section... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Mexico 9 § 93.521 Declaration for swine. For all swine offered for importation from Mexico, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of...

  11. 9 CFR 93.514 - Manure from quarantined swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Manure from quarantined swine. 93.514... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.514 Manure from quarantined swine. No manure shall be removed from the quarantine premises until the release of the swine producing same. ...

  12. 9 CFR 311.20 - Sexual odor of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sexual odor of swine. 311.20 Section... Sexual odor of swine. (a) Carcasses of swine which give off a pronounced sexual odor shall be condemned. (b) The meat of swine carcasses which give off a sexual odor less than pronounced may be passed for...

  13. 9 CFR 93.521 - Declaration for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Declaration for swine. 93.521 Section... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Mexico 9 § 93.521 Declaration for swine. For all swine offered for importation from Mexico, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of...

  14. 9 CFR 93.514 - Manure from quarantined swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Manure from quarantined swine. 93.514... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.514 Manure from quarantined swine. No manure shall be removed from the quarantine premises until the release of the swine producing same. ...

  15. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No litter..., or other things used for or about swine governed by the regulations in this part, shall be landed...

  16. 9 CFR 52.3 - Appraisal of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appraisal of swine. 52.3 Section 52.3... COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES SWINE DESTROYED BECAUSE OF PSEUDORABIES § 52.3 Appraisal of swine. (a) Herds of swine and individual breeding sows to be destroyed because they...

  17. 9 CFR 78.31 - Brucellosis reactor swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brucellosis reactor swine. 78.31... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.31 Brucellosis reactor swine. (a) Destination. Brucellosis reactor swine may be moved interstate only for immediate slaughter as follows: (1...

  18. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No litter..., or other things used for or about swine governed by the regulations in this part, shall be landed...

  19. 9 CFR 93.514 - Manure from quarantined swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Manure from quarantined swine. 93.514... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.514 Manure from quarantined swine. No manure shall be removed from the quarantine premises until the release of the swine producing same. ...

  20. 9 CFR 93.514 - Manure from quarantined swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Manure from quarantined swine. 93.514... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.514 Manure from quarantined swine. No manure shall be removed from the quarantine premises until the release of the swine producing same. ...

  1. Introduction to Swine Production. Instructor Guide [and] Student Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Kevin

    This packet contains an instructor guide and student reference for a course in introduction to swine production. The curriculum contains the following seven lessons: (1) introduction to the swine industry; (2) breeds of swine; (3) principles of swine selection; (4) production systems; (5) herd health; (6) herd management; and (6) industry…

  2. 9 CFR 78.31 - Brucellosis reactor swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brucellosis reactor swine. 78.31... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.31 Brucellosis reactor swine. (a) Destination. Brucellosis reactor swine may be moved interstate only for immediate slaughter as follows: (1...

  3. 9 CFR 93.517 - Swine from Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Swine from Canada. 93.517 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Canada 7 § 93.517 Swine from Canada. (a) For purposes other than immediate slaughter. Swine offered for importation from Canada for purposes other than immediate slaughter...

  4. 9 CFR 78.32 - Brucellosis exposed swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed swine. 78.32... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.32 Brucellosis exposed swine. (a) Brucellosis exposed swine may be moved interstate only if accompanied by a permit and only for immediate...

  5. 9 CFR 206.2 - Swine contract library.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Swine contract library. 206.2 Section... STOCKYARDS PROGRAMS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE CONTRACT LIBRARY § 206.2 Swine contract library. (a) Do..., Des Moines, Iowa 50309. (f) What information from the swine contract library will be made available...

  6. 9 CFR 206.2 - Swine contract library.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Swine contract library. 206.2 Section... STOCKYARDS PROGRAMS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE CONTRACT LIBRARY § 206.2 Swine contract library. (a) Do..., Des Moines, Iowa 50309. (f) What information from the swine contract library will be made available...

  7. 9 CFR 206.2 - Swine contract library.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Swine contract library. 206.2 Section... STOCKYARDS PROGRAMS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE CONTRACT LIBRARY § 206.2 Swine contract library. (a) Do..., Des Moines, Iowa 50309. (f) What information from the swine contract library will be made available...

  8. 9 CFR 206.2 - Swine contract library.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Swine contract library. 206.2 Section... STOCKYARDS PROGRAMS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE CONTRACT LIBRARY § 206.2 Swine contract library. (a) Do..., Des Moines, Iowa 50309. (f) What information from the swine contract library will be made available...

  9. 9 CFR 206.2 - Swine contract library.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Swine contract library. 206.2 Section... STOCKYARDS PROGRAMS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE CONTRACT LIBRARY § 206.2 Swine contract library. (a) Do... swine contract library will be made available to the public? GIPSA will summarize the information it...

  10. Summary of Control Issues for Swine Influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multiple subtypes of endemic swine influenza virus (SIV) co-circulate in the U.S. and Canada (H3N2, H1N1, and H1N2 with a triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) constellation derived from swine, avian and human influenza viruses). As a result of reassortment events and antigenic drift, four H1 SIV...

  11. Heart murmurs

    MedlinePlus

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... The heart has 4 chambers: Two upper chambers (atria) Two lower chambers (ventricles) The heart has valves that close ...

  12. 9 CFR 85.6 - Interstate movement of pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS PSEUDORABIES § 85.6 Interstate movement of pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be infected with or...

  13. 9 CFR 85.6 - Interstate movement of pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS PSEUDORABIES § 85.6 Interstate movement of pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be infected with or...

  14. 9 CFR 85.6 - Interstate movement of pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS PSEUDORABIES § 85.6 Interstate movement of pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be infected with or...

  15. 9 CFR 85.6 - Interstate movement of pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS PSEUDORABIES § 85.6 Interstate movement of pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be infected with or...

  16. Genetic evolution of recently emerged novel human-like swine H3 influenza A viruses (IAV) in United States swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major cause of respiratory disease in swine. IAV transmission from humans to swine is a major contributor to swine IAV diversity. In 2012, a novel H3N2 with an HA (hu-H3) and NA derived from human seasonal H3N2 was detected in United States (US) swine. The h...

  17. Carotid inflammation is unaltered by exercise in hypercholesterolemic swine

    PubMed Central

    Masseau, Isabelle; Davis, Michael J.; Bowles, Douglas K.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Reduction of vascular inflammation might contribute to the beneficial effects of exercise. We hypothesized that 1) exercise would reduce carotid endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and that 2) in vivo detection of carotid inflammation can be achieved in a large animal model using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) with VCAM-1 targeted microbubbles. Methods Familial Hypercholesterolemic (FH) swine were divided into sedentary (Sed) and exercise-trained (Ex) groups. Ex pigs underwent 16–20 wk of treadmill aerobic exercise. At the end of the study, in vivo CEU with VCAM-1 targeted microbubbles and assessment of endothelial-dependent dilation (EDD) were performed in carotid arteries. VCAM-1 mRNA and protein expression were compared to markers of atherosclerotic disease and health, and in vitro EDD was assessed in carotid arteries. Results Exercise training did not reduce inflammation nor did it improve EDD in carotid arteries of FH swine. Markers of atherosclerosis including VCAM-1 were prominent in the bifurcation compared to the proximal or distal common carotid artery (CCA) and inversely associated with phosphorylated- and total-eNOS. Signal intensity from VCAM-1-to-control microbubbles positively correlated with carotid VCAM-1 protein expression, validating our technique. Conclusion These results first demonstrate that aerobic exercise has no effect on carotid endothelial inflammatory markers and EDD in FH swine. Second, our findings indicate that CEU using VCAM-1 targeted microbubbles can detect inflammation in vivo, providing strong foundations for longitudinal studies examining the effect of therapeutic interventions on the inflammatory status of the endothelium. PMID:22776877

  18. Completion of the swine genome will simplify the production of swine as a large animal biomedical model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anatomic and physiological similarities to the human make swine an excellent large animal model for human health and disease. Methods Cloning from a modified somatic cell, which can be determined in cells prior to making the animal, is the only method available for the production of targeted modifications in swine. Results Since some strains of swine are similar in size to humans, technologies that have been developed for swine can be readily adapted to humans and vice versa. Here the importance of swine as a biomedical model, current technologies to produce genetically enhanced swine, current biomedical models, and how the completion of the swine genome will promote swine as a biomedical model are discussed. Conclusions The completion of the swine genome will enhance the continued use and development of swine as models of human health, syndromes and conditions. PMID:23151353

  19. Different evolutionary patterns of classical swine fever virus envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yang, Zexiao; Zhang, Mingwang

    2016-03-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever, which is a highly contagious disease of the domestic pig as well as wild boar. The proteins E(rns), E1, and E2 are components of the viral envelope membrane. They are also implicated in virus attachment and entry, replication, and (or) anti-immune response. Here, we studied the genetic variations of these envelope proteins in the evolution of CSFV. The results reveal that the envelope proteins underwent different evolutionary fates. In E(rns) and E1, but not E2, a number of amino acid sites experienced functional divergence. Furthermore, the diversification in E(rns) and E1 was generally episodic because the divergence-related changes of E1 only occurred with the separation of 2 major groups of CSFV and that of E(rns) took place with the division of 1 major group. The major divergence-related sites of E(rns) are located on one of the substrate-binding regions of the RNase domain and C-terminal extension. These functional domains have been reported to block activation of the innate immune system and attachment and entry into host cells, respectively. Our results may shed some light on the divergent roles of the envelope proteins.

  20. A direct fluorescent antibody test for large spirochetes in swine dysentery using hyperimmunized swine serum.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C H; Olson, L D

    1976-01-01

    A direct fluorescent antibody test was developed for the identification of large spirochetes which are considered to be the cause of swine dysentery. Sera from swine which had recovered from swine dysentery and had been hyperimmunized by the intravenous and intraperitoneal injection of filtered spirochetes were used for conjugation with fluorescein isothiocyanate. A bright greenish fluorescence of large spirochetes was observed with the conjugated serum from hyperimmunized pig No. 1 when diluted 1:8 and hyperimmunized pig No. 2 when diluted 1:2. Pig No. 1 had developed a serum titer of 1:64 using the indirect fluorescent antibody test for large spirochetes. The conjugated serum from the three swine which had recovered from swine dysentery fluoresced spirochetes only when undiluted. The conjugated serum from the two swine treated while having a hemorrhagic diarrhea did not fluoresce spirochetes. No immunofluorescence of Vibrio spp. was observed. Images Fig. 1. PMID:793697

  1. Combined heart-kidney transplantation after total artificial heart insertion.

    PubMed

    Ruzza, A; Czer, L S C; Ihnken, K A; Sasevich, M; Trento, A; Ramzy, D; Esmailian, F; Moriguchi, J; Kobashigawa, J; Arabia, F

    2015-01-01

    We present the first single-center report of 2 consecutive cases of combined heart and kidney transplantation after insertion of a total artificial heart (TAH). Both patients had advanced heart failure and developed dialysis-dependent renal failure after implantation of the TAH. The 2 patients underwent successful heart and kidney transplantation, with restoration of normal heart and kidney function. On the basis of this limited experience, we consider TAH a safe and feasible option for bridging carefully selected patients with heart and kidney failure to combined heart and kidney transplantation. Recent FDA approval of the Freedom driver may allow outpatient management at substantial cost savings. The TAH, by virtue of its capability of providing pulsatile flow at 6 to 10 L/min, may be the mechanical circulatory support device most likely to recover patients with marginal renal function and advanced heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular cloning and expression analyses of a novel swine gene--ARF4.

    PubMed

    Liu, G Y; Xiong, Y Z

    2009-03-01

    The mRNA differential display technique was performed to investigate the differences of gene expression in the longissimus muscle tissues from Meishan and Large White pigs. One novel gene that was differentially expressed was identified through semi-quantitative RT-PCR and the cDNA complete sequence was then obtained using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The nucleotide sequence of the gene is not homologous to any of the known porcine genes. The sequence prediction analysis revealed that the open reading frame of this gene encodes a protein of 180 amino acids that contains the putative conserved domain of ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) which has high homology with the ADP-ribosylation factor 4 (ARF4) of six species-bovine (98%), human and orangutan (96%), African clawed frog (96%), mouse and rat (98%)-so that it can be defined as swine ADP-ribosylation factor 4 (ARF4). This novel porcine gene was finally assigned to GeneID:595108. The phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that the swine ARF4 has a closer genetic relationship with the rat and mouse ARF4 than with those of human and African clawed frog. The tissue expression analysis indicated that the swine ARF4 gene is over expressed in muscle, fat, heart, spleen, liver, and ovary and moderately expressed in lung and kidney but weakly expressed in small intestine. Our experiment is the first to establish the primary foundation for further research on the swine ARF4 gene.

  3. Classical swine fever in China: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuzi; Li, Su; Sun, Yuan; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2014-08-06

    Classical swine fever (CSF), caused by Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), is an OIE-listed, highly contagious, often fatal disease of swine worldwide. Currently, the disease is controlled by prophylactic vaccination in China and many other countries using the modified live vaccines derived from C-strain, which was developed in China in the mid-1950s. This minireview summarizes the epidemiology, diagnostic assays, control and challenges of CSF in China. Though CSF is essentially under control, complete eradication of CSF in China remains a challenging task and needs long-term, joint efforts of stakeholders.

  4. Reduplication of swine spleen lobes.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, S; Makita, T

    1996-04-01

    In a search for the reduplication of the spleen, a total of 227,513 swine from 130 breeders were surveyed at a slaughterhouse (Ozu Health Center, Ehime Prefecture, Japan) between October 1993 and June 1995. They were 6 to 7 months old and their body weight ranged from 95 to 120 kg. Twenty swine had two lobed spleens. Of these, nine were males and 11 were females. The second or sub-lobe was generally smaller than the main lobe but was variable in size. Large ones were similar in size to the main lobe and small ones were approximately 1/4 of the length of the main lobe. One very small lobe was just a protrusion of the main one across the greater omentum. The two lobes were always attached to each other in the central portion, and fat and the greater omentum were always found between the lobes. The splenic artery, vein and nerve were shared between the two lobes. The main lobe was covered with peritoneum from the parietal surface of the stomach while the sub-lobe was covered with visceral peritoneum. Both peritonea joined to the greater omentum at the hilus in ordinary spleens, but at short distance from the hilus in double lobed spleens.

  5. Hepatitis E in Norway: seroprevalence in humans and swine.

    PubMed

    Lange, H; Øverbø, J; Borgen, K; Dudman, S; Hoddevik, G; Urdahl, A M; Vold, L; Sjurseth, S K

    2017-01-01

    In Norway, no published data on seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in humans and swine exists. Serum samples from blood donors, veterinarians, swine farm workers and swine were analysed by ELISA to estimate the seroprevalence of HEV in Norway and to investigate the association between direct contact with swine and HEV seroprevalence in humans. The seroprevalence of HEV IgG antibodies was 30% (24/79) in farm workers, 13% (21/163) in veterinarians, 14% (162/1200) in blood donors and 90% (137/153) in swine. Our results show a high seroprevalence of HEV in humans and swine in Norway. HEV seroprevalence in farm workers and blood donors increased with age, and veterinarians working with swine were twice as likely to be HEV seropositive compared to other veterinarians. High HEV seroprevalence in farm workers and veterinarians working with swine support previous reports suggesting swine as a reservoir for HEV infections in humans in Europe.

  6. [Effects of different fluid resuscitation program on renal function in swine during shock stage of severe burn].

    PubMed

    Su, G L; Huang, W X; Chen, J; Xue, D J; Zhou, J J

    2016-11-20

    Objective: To explore the effects of different fluid resuscitation program on renal function in swine during shock stage of severe burn. Methods: Twenty-four Guangxi Bama miniature swine were inflicted with 40% total body surface area on the back, and then they were divided into four groups according to the random number table, with 6 swine in each group. At post injury hour (PIH) 2, swine in succinylated gelatin group (S), hydroxyethyl starch group (H), and allogeneic plasma group (A) were respectively resuscitated with succinylated gelatin, hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4, and plasma according to burn shock " domestic general" resuscitation formula, and swine in Parkland group (P) were resuscitated with lactated Ringer's solution according to Parkland formula. Hemodynamic indexes including heart rate, blood pressure, urine volume, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and central venous pressure before injury, at the first and second PIH 24 were recorded. The volume of resuscitation fluid was calculated at the first and second PIH 24. Blood and urine samples were collected before injury and at PIH 4, 8, 24, and 48, and then serum creatinine and urea nitrogen were detected by automatic biochemical analyzer, urine microalbumin and urine creatinine were detected by automated urine analyzer and the ratio of which was calculated. The renal tissue of swine in each group was obtained at PIH 48, and the pathologic changes were observed by optical microscopy and electron microscope. Data were processed with analysis of variance of repeated measurement, one-way analysis of variance, and LSD test. Results: (1) The hemodynamic indexes of swine in each group were similar before injury and at the first and second PIH 24 (with P values above 0.05). Compared with those before injury, except that the heart rate of swine in group A had no significant change at the first PIH 24 (P>0.05), the heart rate of swine in each group was significantly increased at the first and second PIH 24

  7. Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of heart disease you have. Symptoms of heart disease in your blood vessels (atherosclerotic disease) Cardiovascular disease ... can sometimes be found early with regular evaluations. Heart disease symptoms caused by abnormal heartbeats (heart arrhythmias) A ...

  8. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Variant Other Information on Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Virus Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook ... disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses that regularly cause outbreaks of influenza in pigs. ...

  9. Metabolic Response to Hemorrhage in Swine.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    fatty acid, triglyceride growth hormone and glucagon response of swine to shock was completed. Results of a fourth study comparing venous and arterial lactate are also summarized. (Author Modified Abstract)

  10. Epicardial rotors in panoramic optical maps of fibrillating swine ventricles.

    PubMed

    Kay, Matthew W; Rogers, Jack M

    2006-01-01

    It has been proposed that VF waves emanate from stable periodic sources (often called "mother rotors"). Our objective was to determine if stable rotors are consistently present on the epicardial surface of hearts comparable in size to human hearts. Using new optical mapping technology, we imaged VF from nearly the entire ventricular surface of 6 isolated swine hearts. Using newly developed pattern analysis algorithms, we identified and tracked VF wavefronts and phase singularities (PS). We introduce the notion of a compound rotor in which the rotor's central PS can change and describe an algorithm for automatically identifying such patterns. This prevents rotor lifetimes from being inappropriately abbreviated by wavefront fragmentation and collision events near the PS. We found that stable epicardial rotors were not consistently present during VF: only 1 of 17 VF episodes contained a compound rotor that lasted for the entire mapped interval of 4s. However, shorter-lived rotors were common; 12.2+/-3.3 compound rotors with lifetime>200 ms were visible on the epicardium at any given instant. We conclude that epicardial mother rotors do not drive VF in this experimental model; if mother rotors do exist, they are intramural or septal. This paucity of persistent rotors suggests that individual rotors will eventually terminate by themselves and therefore the continual formation of new rotors is critical for VF maintenance.

  11. Expression of integrin-linked kinase improves cardiac function in a swine model of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wen; Xie, Jun; Gu, Rong; Xu, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have described the beneficial effects of overexpressing integrin-linked kinase (ILK) after myocardial infarction (MI) in small animal models. However, the effects of ILK in pre-clinical large animals are not known. To move closer to clinical translation, we examined the effects of ILK gene transfer in a swine model of ischemic heart disease. Swine received percutaneous intracoronary injections of adenoviral vector expressing ILK (n=10) or empty ad-null (n=10) in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) following LAD occlusion. Four weeks after transfection, we confirmed that transgene expression was restricted to the infarcted area in the cardiac tissue. Imaging studies demonstrated preserved cardiac function in the ILK group. ILK treatment was associated with reduced infarcted scar size and preserved left ventricular (LV) geometry (LV diameter and LV wall thickness). Enhanced angiogenesis was preserved in the ILK animals, along with reduction of apoptosis. ILK gene therapy improves cardiac remodeling and function in swine following MI associated with increased angiogenesis, reduced apoptosis, and increased cardiomyocyte proliferation with no signs of toxicity. These results may deliver a new approach to treat post-infarct remodeling and subsequent heart failure. PMID:28565779

  12. Non-Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Incidental Findings in Patients Who Underwent Transaortic Valve Implantation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Fathala, Ahmed; Bin Saeedan, Mnahi; Zulfiqar, Ali; Al Sergani, Hani

    2017-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new treatment option for patients with severe aortic stenosis. Pre-TAVI procedure workup includes computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the heart and aorta from aortic annulus to the iliofemoral arteries. Frequently, there are a number of incidental non-cardiac findings (INCFs) in pre-TAVI CTA. However, the frequency and clinical significance of these INCFs are unknown. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of INCFs and their clinical significance. Methods This was a retrospective review of 67 patients who underwent dedicated pre-TAVI CTA from 2010 till 2015. Non-cardiovascular INCFs were classified according to their clinical significance into three categories. The first category includes findings that may require urgent treatment. The second category includes findings that need further follow-up. The third category includes incidental findings that require no further follow-up or recommendation. Results The total number of patients was 67, and the mean age was 73 ± 8 years. All patients had INCFs and the total number was 248. Of the patients, 69% had chest findings, 85% had abdominal findings, and 33% had musculoskeletal findings. Results based on categorical classification were as follows: 9%, 25%, and 66% of these 248 findings belong to the first category, the second category, and the third category, respectively. Conclusion Non-cardiovascular INCFs are common in pre-TAVI CTA presumably due to increased age of such specific population. These findings have variable clinical significance and some of them might require acute treatment or additional evaluation, and should be managed properly taking into consideration patient’s life expectancy and comorbidities. PMID:28275420

  13. Eating behavior and nutritional status in patients who underwent coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Proença Vieira, L; Nobre, M Roberto; Gonçalves de Queiroz, G

    2012-01-01

    The identification of stages of dietary change and the factors affecting food choices can direct more effective nutritional intervention against coronary heart disease progression. Identify the stages of change of eating behavior and its relation with nutritional status, food consumption and previous cardiovascular events in patients who underwent coronary angioplasty. A cross-sectional study with 200 hospitalized patients from a specialized cardiology hospital, after elective coronary angioplasty. They were applied an algorithm that identifies the provision of change of eating habits for a healthier pattern. Variables measured were stages of change of eating behavior, nutritional status, food consumption and cardiovascular events (previous myocardial infarction or angioplasty). It was realized comparison of averages by analysis of variance or Student's test and Chi-square test for qualitative variables. Value of significance was taken at 5%. The patients were classified in the following stages: 36% maintenance, 26% preparation, 17% precontemplation, 12% action and 9% contemplation. It was observed higher cardiovascular events in maintenance/action group (p = 0.04), higher consumption of calories (p = 0.04), meat/eggs (p = 0.01) and sweets (p = 0.03) in preparation stage, comparing to maintenance group, and no association between nutritional status and stages of change (p = 0.13), although 62% of the individuals in maintenance stage were overweight. This work contributed to identifying the stages of change and conditions that favor changes in eating pattern. Even patients that classified themselves into the maintenance stage need to adjust their eating habits in order to reach a healthy weight.

  14. Swine in biomedical research. V. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbleson, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents information on the following topics: the effect of dietary fiber on growing pigs; preparation of a cerebral perfusion model in the pig - anatomic considerations; a review of the utilization of lactose, glucose, sucrose, and cornstarch by neonatal piglets reared artificially; histology of piglet liver, swine hematology; use of swine as a model of musculoskeletal growth in animals; boar and human sperm as cellular models for membrane phospholipiid biosynthesis and degradation; a stereotaxic atlas of the developing swine (Sus Scrofa) forebrain; the effect of ethanol on liver mitochondrial Ca++-uptake; control of feed intake in pigs; the pig as a model of abberations associated with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism; whey and cholesterol in swine; vitamin and mineral nutrition and malnutrition; cadmium absorption, distribution and excretion in young and adult minature swine; a piglet model for infant total parenteral nutrition studies; swine in perinatal research; the endocrine pancreas of the fetal pig; cardiovascular physiology of the pig fetus; and the effect of sow's milk versus formula on the superior mesenteric blood flow of newborn piglets.

  15. Eliminating Xenoantigen Expression on Swine RBC.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng-Yu; Martens, Gregory R; Blankenship, Ross L; Sidner, Richard A; Li, Ping; Estrada, Jose L; Tector, Matthew; Tector, A Joseph

    2017-03-01

    The rapidly improving tools of genetic engineering may make it possible to overcome the humoral immune barrier that prevents xenotransplantation. We hypothesize that levels of human antibody binding to donor tissues from swine must approximate the antibody binding occurring in allotransplantation. It is uncertain if this is an attainable goal. Here we perform an initial analysis of this issue by comparing human antibody binding to red blood cells (RBC) isolated from knockout swine and to allogeneic or autologous human RBC. Human sera were incubated with RBC isolated from various genetically engineered swine or from humans. The level of IgG and IgM binding to these cells were compared using either flow cytometry or a novel mass spectrometric assay. Mass spectroscopic quantitation of human antibody binding demonstrated that as few as 3 gene inactivations can reduce the levels human antibody binding to swine RBC that is as low as autologous human RBC. Flow cytometry showed that RBC from 2-gene knockout swine exhibited less human antibody binding than human blood group O allogeneic RBC in 22% of tested sera. Deletion of a third gene from pigs resulted in 30% of human samples having less IgG and IgM RBC xenoreactivity than alloreactivity. Xenoantigenicity of swine RBC can be eliminated via gene disruption. These results suggest that the gene knockout approach may be able reduce antigenicity in other pig tissues to levels that enable the xenotransplantation humoral barrier to be overcome.

  16. Reassortment patterns in Swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Khiabanian, Hossein; Trifonov, Vladimir; Rabadan, Raul

    2009-10-07

    Three human influenza pandemics occurred in the twentieth century, in 1918, 1957, and 1968. Influenza pandemic strains are the results of emerging viruses from non-human reservoirs to which humans have little or no immunity. At least two of these pandemic strains, in 1957 and in 1968, were the results of reassortments between human and avian viruses. Also, many cases of swine influenza viruses have reportedly infected humans, in particular, the recent H1N1 influenza virus of swine origin, isolated in Mexico and the United States. Pigs are documented to allow productive replication of human, avian, and swine influenza viruses. Thus it has been conjectured that pigs are the "mixing vessel" that create the avian-human reassortant strains, causing the human pandemics. Hence, studying the process and patterns of viral reassortment, especially in pigs, is a key to better understanding of human influenza pandemics. In the last few years, databases containing sequences of influenza A viruses, including swine viruses, collected since 1918 from diverse geographical locations, have been developed and made publicly available. In this paper, we study an ensemble of swine influenza viruses to analyze the reassortment phenomena through several statistical techniques. The reassortment patterns in swine viruses prove to be similar to the previous results found in human viruses, both in vitro and in vivo, that the surface glycoprotein coding segments reassort most often. Moreover, we find that one of the polymerase segments (PB1), reassorted in the strains responsible for the last two human pandemics, also reassorts frequently.

  17. Acute calcium homeostasis in MHS swine.

    PubMed

    Harrison, G G; Morrell, D F; Brain, V; Jaros, G G

    1987-07-01

    To elucidate a pathogenesis for the reduction in bone calcium content observed in MHS individuals, we studied the acute calcium homeostasis of MHS swine. This was achieved by the serial measurement, with a calcium selective electrode, of calcium transients in Landrace MHS (five) and control Landrace/large white cross MH negative (five) swine following IV bolus injection of calcium gluconate 0.1 mmol X kg-1--a dose which induced an acute 45 per cent increase in plasma ionised calcium. Experimental animals were anaesthetised with ketamine 10 mg X kg-1 IM, thiopentone (intermittent divided doses) 15-25 mg X kg-1 (total) IV and N2O/O2 (FIO2 0.3) by IPPV to maintain a normal blood gas, acid/base state. The plasma ionised calcium decay curve observed in MHS swine did not differ from that of control normal swine. Further it was noted that the induced acute rise in plasma ionised calcium failed to trigger the MH syndrome in any MHS swine. It is concluded that the mechanisms of acute calcium homeostasis in MHS swine are normal. An explanation for the reduction in bone calcium content observed in MHS individuals must be sought, therefore, through study of the slow long-term component of the calcium regulatory process. In addition, the conventional strictures placed on the use, in MHS patients, of calcium gluconate are called in question.

  18. Feral Swine in the United States Have Been Exposed to both Avian and Swine Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brigitte E; Sun, Hailiang; Carrel, Margaret; Cunningham, Fred L; Baroch, John A; Hanson-Dorr, Katie C; Young, Sean G; Schmit, Brandon; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Lutman, Mark W; Pedersen, Kerri; Lager, Kelly; Bowman, Andrew S; Slemons, Richard D; Smith, David R; DeLiberto, Thomas; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2017-10-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) in swine can cause sporadic infections and pandemic outbreaks among humans, but how avian IAV emerges in swine is still unclear. Unlike domestic swine, feral swine are free ranging and have many opportunities for IAV exposure through contacts with various habitats and animals, including migratory waterfowl, a natural reservoir for IAVs. During the period from 2010 to 2013, 8,239 serum samples were collected from feral swine across 35 U.S. states and tested against 45 contemporary antigenic variants of avian, swine, and human IAVs; of these, 406 (4.9%) samples were IAV antibody positive. Among 294 serum samples selected for antigenic characterization, 271 cross-reacted with ≥1 tested virus, whereas the other 23 did not cross-react with any tested virus. Of the 271 IAV-positive samples, 236 cross-reacted with swine IAVs, 1 with avian IAVs, and 16 with avian and swine IAVs, indicating that feral swine had been exposed to both swine and avian IAVs but predominantly to swine IAVs. Our findings suggest that feral swine could potentially be infected with both avian and swine IAVs, generating novel IAVs by hosting and reassorting IAVs from wild birds and domestic swine and facilitating adaptation of avian IAVs to other hosts, including humans, before their spillover. Continued surveillance to monitor the distribution and antigenic diversities of IAVs in feral swine is necessary to increase our understanding of the natural history of IAVs.IMPORTANCE There are more than 5 million feral swine distributed across at least 35 states in the United States. In contrast to domestic swine, feral swine are free ranging and have unique opportunities for contact with wildlife, livestock, and their habitats. Our serological results indicate that feral swine in the United States have been exposed to influenza A viruses (IAVs) consistent with those found in both domestic swine and wild birds, with the predominant infections consisting of swine-adapted IAVs. Our

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Heart Failure Using a Swine Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-21

    Bates S, Goetsch SC, Gallardo TD, Garry DJ. Persistent expression of the ATP-binding cassette transporter, Abcg2, identifies cardiac SP cells in the...myocyte apoptosis and regeneration. J Clin Invest 2003;111(10):1457-1459. 194. Oh H, Bradfute SB, Gallardo TD, Nakamura T, Gaussin V, Mishina Y

  20. Assessment of swine-specific bacteriophages of Bacteroides fragilis in swine farms with different antibiotic practices.

    PubMed

    Leknoi, Yuranan; Mongkolsuk, Skorn; Sirikanchana, Kwanrawee

    2017-04-01

    We assessed the occurrence and specificity of bacteriophages of Bacteroides fragilis in swine farms for their potential application in microbial source tracking. A local B. fragilis host strain, SP25 (DSM29413), was isolated from a pooled swine feces sample taken from a non-antibiotic farm. This strain was highly specific to swine fecal materials because it did not detect bacteriophages in any samples from human sewage, sheep, goats, cattle, dogs, and cats. The reference B. fragilis strain, RYC2056, could detect phages in swine samples but also detected phages in most human sewage and polluted urban canal samples. Phages of SP25 exist in the proximity of certain swine farms, regardless of their antibiotic use (p > 0.05). B. fragilis strain SP25 exhibited relatively high resistance to most of the veterinary antimicrobial agents tested. Interestingly, most farms that were positive for SP25 phages were also positive for RYC2056 phages. In conclusion, the swine-specific SP25 strain has the potential to indicate swine fecal contamination in certain bodies of water. Bacterial isolates with larger distributions are being studied and validated. This study highlights the importance of assessing the abundance of phages in local swine populations before determining their potential applicability for source tracking in local surface waters.

  1. Antimicrobial use in swine production and its effect on the swine gut microbiota and antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Holman, Devin B; Chénier, Martin R

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobials have been used in swine production at subtherapeutic levels since the early 1950s to increase feed efficiency and promote growth. In North America, a number of antimicrobials are available for use in swine. However, the continuous administration of subtherapeutic, low concentrations of antimicrobials to pigs also provides selective pressure for antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and resistance determinants. For this reason, subtherapeutic antimicrobial use in livestock remains a source of controversy and concern. The swine gut microbiota demonstrates a number of changes in response to antimicrobial administration depending on the dosage, duration of treatment, age of the pigs, and gut location that is sampled. Both culture-independent and -dependent studies have also shown that the swine gut microbiota contains a large number of antimicrobial resistance determinants even in the absence of antimicrobial exposure. Heavy metals, such as zinc and copper, which are often added at relatively high doses to swine feed, may also play a role in maintaining antimicrobial resistance and in the stability of the swine gut microbiota. This review focuses on the use of antimicrobials in swine production, with an emphasis on the North American regulatory context, and their effect on the swine gut microbiota and on antimicrobial resistance determinants in the gut microbiota.

  2. Patterns of gene expression in swine macrophages infected with classical swine fever virus detected by microarray

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical Swine Fever (CSF) is a highly contagious disease of swine that is characterized by fever, hemorrhage, leukopenia, abortion, and high mortality. The etiological agent, CSF virus (CSFV), is classified as a Pestivirus, along with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) and Border Disease Virus...

  3. Mutations in the classical swine fever virus NS4B protein affects virulence in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    NS4B is one of the non-structural proteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), the etiological agent of a severe, highly lethal disease of swine. Protein domain analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of the NS4B protein of highly pathogenic CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) identified a Toll/Inte...

  4. Pathogenesis and transmission studies: non-swine influenza A viruses in the swine host

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abstract Influenza A virus (IAV) causes disease in poultry, pigs, and people with wild waterfowl being the natural reservoir. IAV strains have been periodically transmitted between swine and humans in both directions and avian IAV have also sporadically infected swine. If an individual is infected w...

  5. 9 CFR 94.10 - Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Swine from regions where classical swine fever exists. 94.10 Section 94.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... to exist in all regions of the world, except Australia; Canada; Chile; Fiji; Iceland; the...

  6. Mutations in classical swine fever virus NS4B affect virulence in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    NS4B is one of the non-structural proteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), a virus causing a severe disease in swine. Protein domain analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of NS4B in highly pathogenic CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) identified a Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor like domain (TIR...

  7. Antibody Repertoire Development in Swine.

    PubMed

    Butler, J E; Wertz, Nancy; Sinkora, Marek

    2017-02-08

    We describe the domestication of the species, explore its value to agriculture and bioscience, and compare its immunoglobulin (Ig) genes to those of other vertebrates. For encyclopedic information, we cite earlier reviews and chapters. We provide current gene maps for the heavy and light chain loci and describe their polygeny and polymorphy. B-cell and antibody repertoire development is a major focus, and we present findings that challenge several mouse-centric paradigms. We focus special attention on the role of ileal Peyer's patches, the largest secondary lymphoid tissues in newborn piglets and a feature of all artiodactyls. We believe swine fetal development and early class switch evolved to provide natural secretory IgA antibodies able to prevent translocation of bacteria from the gut while the bacterial PAMPs drive development of adaptive immunity. We discuss the value of using the isolator piglet model to address these issues.

  8. A swine model of infarct-related reentrant ventricular tachycardia: Electroanatomic, magnetic resonance, and histopathological characterization

    PubMed Central

    Tschabrunn, Cory M.; Roujol, Sébastien; Nezafat, Reza; Faulkner-Jones, Beverly; Buxton, Alfred E.; Josephson, Mark E.; Anter, Elad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Human ventricular tachycardia (VT) after myocardial infarction usually occurs because of subendocardial reentrant circuits originating in scar tissue that borders surviving myocardial bundles. Several preclinical large animal models have been used to further study postinfarct reentrant VT, but with varied experimental methodologies and limited evaluation of the underlying substrate or induced arrhythmia mechanism. OBJECTIVE We aimed to develop and characterize a swine model of scar-related reentrant VT. METHODS Thirty-five Yorkshire swine underwent 180-minute occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Thirty-one animals (89%) survived the 6–8-week survival period. These animals underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging followed by electrophysiology study, detailed electroanatomic mapping, and histopathological analysis. RESULTS Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction measured using CMR imaging was 36% ± 6.6% with anteroseptal wall motion abnormality and late gadolinium enhancement across 12.5% ± 4.1% of the LV surface area. Low voltage measured using endocardial electroanatomic mapping encompassed 11.1% ± 3.5% of the LV surface area (bipolar voltage ≤1.5 mV) with anterior, anteroseptal, and anterolateral involvement. Reentrant circuits mapped were largely determined by functional rather than fix anatomical barriers, consistent with “pseudo-block” due to anisotropic conduction. Sustained monomorphic VT was induced in 28 of 31 swine (90%) (67 VTs; 2.4 ± 1.1; range 1–4) and characterized as reentry. VT circuits were subendocardial, with an arrhythmogenic substrate characterized by transmural anterior scar with varying degrees of fibrosis and myocardial fiber disarray on the septal and lateral borders. CONCLUSION This is a well-characterized swine model of scar-related subendocardial reentrant VT. This model can serve as the basis for further investigation in the physiology and therapeutics of humanlike postinfarction

  9. 9 CFR 94.25 - Restrictions on the importation of live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free of classical swine fever. 94.25 Section 94... DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE... the importation of live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free of classical swine...

  10. 9 CFR 94.25 - Restrictions on the importation of live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free of classical swine fever. 94.25 Section 94... DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE... the importation of live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free of classical swine...

  11. 9 CFR 94.25 - Restrictions on the importation of live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free of classical swine fever. 94.25 Section 94... DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE... the importation of live swine, pork, or pork products from certain regions free of classical swine...

  12. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky; Anderson, Tavis K; Berger, Kathryn; Bielejec, Filip; Burke, David F; Dudas, Gytis; Fonville, Judith M; Fouchier, Ron Am; Kellam, Paul; Koel, Bjorn F; Lemey, Philippe; Nguyen, Tung; Nuansrichy, Bundit; Peiris, Js Malik; Saito, Takehiko; Simon, Gaelle; Skepner, Eugene; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Webby, Richard J; Van Reeth, Kristien; Brookes, Sharon M; Larsen, Lars; Watson, Simon J; Brown, Ian H; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-04-15

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential. Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds complexity to the risk profiles for the movement of swine and the potential for swine-derived infections in humans.

  13. 9 CFR 52.3 - Appraisal of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 52.3 Appraisal of swine. (a) Herds of swine and individual breeding sows to be destroyed because they... determined by the meat or breeding value of the animals. Animals may be appraised in groups, provided...

  14. 9 CFR 52.3 - Appraisal of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 52.3 Appraisal of swine. (a) Herds of swine and individual breeding sows to be destroyed because they... determined by the meat or breeding value of the animals. Animals may be appraised in groups, provided...

  15. Source tracking swine fecal waste in surface water proximal to swine concentrated animal feeding operations

    PubMed Central

    Heaney, Christopher D.; Myers, Kevin; Wing, Steve; Hall, Devon; Baron, Dothula; Stewart, Jill R.

    2015-01-01

    Swine farming has gone through many changes in the last few decades, resulting in operations with a high animal density known as confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations produce a large quantity of fecal waste whose environmental impacts are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate microbial water quality in surface waters proximal to swine CAFOs including microbial source tracking of fecal microbes specific to swine. For one year, surface water samples at up- and downstream sites proximal to swine CAFO lagoon waste land application sites were tested for fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus) and candidate swine-specific microbial source-tracking (MST) markers (Bacteroidales Pig-1-Bac, Pig-2-Bac, and Pig-Bac-2, and methanogen P23-2). Testing of 187 samples showed high fecal indicator bacteria concentrations at both up- and downstream sites. Overall, 40%, 23%, and 61% of samples exceeded state and federal recreational water quality guidelines for fecal coliforms, E. coli, and Enterococcus, respectively. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac showed the highest specificity to swine fecal wastes and were 2.47 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03, 5.94) and 2.30 times (95% CI = 0.90, 5.88) as prevalent proximal down- than proximal upstream of swine CAFOs, respectively. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac were also 2.87 (95% CI = 1.21, 6.80) and 3.36 (95% CI = 1.34, 8.41) times as prevalent when 48 hour antecedent rainfall was greater than versus less than the mean, respectively. Results suggest diffuse and overall poor sanitary quality of surface waters where swine CAFO density is high. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac are useful for tracking off-site conveyance of swine fecal wastes into surface waters proximal to and downstream of swine CAFOs and during rain events. PMID:25600418

  16. Source tracking swine fecal waste in surface water proximal to swine concentrated animal feeding operations.

    PubMed

    Heaney, Christopher D; Myers, Kevin; Wing, Steve; Hall, Devon; Baron, Dothula; Stewart, Jill R

    2015-04-01

    Swine farming has gone through many changes in the last few decades, resulting in operations with a high animal density known as confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations produce a large quantity of fecal waste whose environmental impacts are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate microbial water quality in surface waters proximal to swine CAFOs including microbial source tracking of fecal microbes specific to swine. For one year, surface water samples at up- and downstream sites proximal to swine CAFO lagoon waste land application sites were tested for fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus) and candidate swine-specific microbial source-tracking (MST) markers (Bacteroidales Pig-1-Bac, Pig-2-Bac, and Pig-Bac-2, and methanogen P23-2). Testing of 187 samples showed high fecal indicator bacteria concentrations at both up- and downstream sites. Overall, 40%, 23%, and 61% of samples exceeded state and federal recreational water quality guidelines for fecal coliforms, E. coli, and Enterococcus, respectively. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac showed the highest specificity to swine fecal wastes and were 2.47 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.03, 5.94) and 2.30 times (95% CI=0.90, 5.88) as prevalent proximal down- than proximal upstream of swine CAFOs, respectively. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac were also 2.87 (95% CI=1.21, 6.80) and 3.36 (95% CI=1.34, 8.41) times as prevalent when 48 hour antecedent rainfall was greater than versus less than the mean, respectively. Results suggest diffuse and overall poor sanitary quality of surface waters where swine CAFO density is high. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac are useful for tracking off-site conveyance of swine fecal wastes into surface waters proximal to and downstream of swine CAFOs and during rain events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. 76 FR 28910 - Importation of Live Swine, Swine Semen, Pork, and Pork Products From Liechtenstein and Switzerland

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... are dangerous and destructive communicable diseases of ruminants and swine. Sections 94.9 and 94.10 of... ruminant and swine meat and products to the United States are subject to certain restrictions to...

  18. Immunofluorescence of spirochetes with serum from swine recovered from swine dysentery using an indirect fluorescent antibody test.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C H; Olson, L D

    1976-01-01

    Using an indirect fluorescent antibody test, immunofluorescence of large spirochetes was observed with serum from swine that had recovered from swine dysentery. The spirochetes were obtained from scrapings of the colonic mucosa on the first day of diarrhea which was the time when the spirochete population was observed to be the highest. Of 29 exposed nonmedicated swine which developed and recovered from a diarrhea characteristic of swine dysentery 27 had antispirochete serum titers which ranged from 1:2 to 1:16. None of the 50 nonexposes swine developed a titer. Of 19 swine with a serum titer and reexposed with infective swine dysentery inoculum, 18 did not develop a diarrhea and were presumed to be immune. Considering these findings it is possible that this test could be used to detect antispirochete antibody in unknown swine serum. Images Fig. 1. PMID:793698

  19. 9 CFR 113.44 - Swine safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Swine safety test. 113.44 Section 113.44 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Procedures § 113.44 Swine safety test. The swine safety test provided in this section shall be conducted...

  20. 9 CFR 113.44 - Swine safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Swine safety test. 113.44 Section 113... Procedures § 113.44 Swine safety test. The swine safety test provided in this section shall be conducted when prescribed in a Standard Requirement or in the filed Outline of Production for a product. (a) Test...

  1. 9 CFR 113.44 - Swine safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Swine safety test. 113.44 Section 113... Procedures § 113.44 Swine safety test. The swine safety test provided in this section shall be conducted when prescribed in a Standard Requirement or in the filed Outline of Production for a product. (a) Test...

  2. 9 CFR 113.44 - Swine safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Swine safety test. 113.44 Section 113... Procedures § 113.44 Swine safety test. The swine safety test provided in this section shall be conducted when prescribed in a Standard Requirement or in the filed Outline of Production for a product. (a) Test...

  3. 9 CFR 93.513 - Milk from quarantined swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Milk from quarantined swine. 93.513... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.513 Milk from quarantined swine. Milk or... restrictions as he or she may consider necessary to each instance. No milk or cream shall be removed from...

  4. 7 CFR 59.204 - Mandatory weekly reporting for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mandatory weekly reporting for swine. 59.204 Section 59.204 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING Swine Reporting § 59.204 Mandatory weekly reporting for swine. (a...

  5. 7 CFR 59.204 - Mandatory weekly reporting for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mandatory weekly reporting for swine. 59.204 Section 59.204 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING Swine Reporting § 59.204 Mandatory weekly reporting for swine. (a...

  6. 7 CFR 59.204 - Mandatory weekly reporting for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mandatory weekly reporting for swine. 59.204 Section 59.204 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING Swine Reporting § 59.204 Mandatory weekly reporting for swine. (a...

  7. 7 CFR 59.204 - Mandatory weekly reporting for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mandatory weekly reporting for swine. 59.204 Section 59.204 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING Swine Reporting § 59.204 Mandatory weekly reporting for swine. (a...

  8. 7 CFR 59.204 - Mandatory weekly reporting for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mandatory weekly reporting for swine. 59.204 Section 59.204 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK MANDATORY REPORTING Swine Reporting § 59.204 Mandatory weekly reporting for swine. (a...

  9. THE EFFECT OF HEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE SUIS VACCINES ON SWINE INFLUENZA

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1937-01-01

    Either living or heat-killed H. influenzae suis vaccines, given intramuscularly to swine, elicit an immune response capable of modifying the course of a later swine influenza infection. The protection afforded is only partial and is in no way comparable to the complete immunity afforded by swine influenza virus vaccines. PMID:19870654

  10. 9 CFR 93.505 - Certificate for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... freedom from the said diseases of the district of origin only: And provided further, That in the case of... disease of the district of origin only. For domestic swine, the certificate shall also show that the entire region of origin is free of African swine fever and swine vesicular disease and that, for 60...

  11. 9 CFR 93.513 - Milk from quarantined swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Milk from quarantined swine. 93.513... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.513 Milk from quarantined swine. Milk or... restrictions as he or she may consider necessary to each instance. No milk or cream shall be removed from the...

  12. 9 CFR 93.513 - Milk from quarantined swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Milk from quarantined swine. 93.513... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.513 Milk from quarantined swine. Milk or... restrictions as he or she may consider necessary to each instance. No milk or cream shall be removed from the...

  13. 9 CFR 93.513 - Milk from quarantined swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Milk from quarantined swine. 93.513... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.513 Milk from quarantined swine. Milk or... restrictions as he or she may consider necessary to each instance. No milk or cream shall be removed from the...

  14. 9 CFR 93.513 - Milk from quarantined swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Milk from quarantined swine. 93.513... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.513 Milk from quarantined swine. Milk or... restrictions as he or she may consider necessary to each instance. No milk or cream shall be removed from...

  15. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... Tiredness and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  16. Recoding classical swine fever virus (CSFV) structural glycoprotein E2 produces complete virus attenuation in swine and protects infected animals against disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Controlling classical swine fever (CSF) involves vaccination in endemic regions and preemptive slaughter of infected swine herds during epidemics. Generally, live attenuated vaccines induce solid immunity. Using diverse approaches, reverse genetics has been useful in developing classical swine fever...

  17. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Heart Attack Treatment of a Heart Attack Life After a Heart Attack Heart Failure About Heart Failure ... a Heart Attack • Treatment of a Heart Attack • Life After a Heart Attack Lifestyle Changes Recovery FAQs • Heart ...

  18. About Heart Attacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Heart Attack Treatment of a Heart Attack Life After a Heart Attack Heart Failure About Heart Failure ... a Heart Attack • Treatment of a Heart Attack • Life After a Heart Attack Lifestyle Changes Recovery FAQs • Heart ...

  19. Menopause and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Heart Attack Treatment of a Heart Attack Life After a Heart Attack Heart Failure About Heart Failure ... a Heart Attack • Treatment of a Heart Attack • Life After a Heart Attack Lifestyle Changes Recovery FAQs • Heart ...

  20. Triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) in humans in the United States, 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Vivek; Bridges, Carolyn B; Uyeki, Timothy M; Shu, Bo; Balish, Amanda; Xu, Xiyan; Lindstrom, Stephen; Gubareva, Larisa V; Deyde, Varough; Garten, Rebecca J; Harris, Meghan; Gerber, Susan; Vagasky, Susan; Smith, Forrest; Pascoe, Neal; Martin, Karen; Dufficy, Deborah; Ritger, Kathy; Conover, Craig; Quinlisk, Patricia; Klimov, Alexander; Bresee, Joseph S; Finelli, Lyn

    2009-06-18

    Triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) viruses--containing genes from avian, human, and swine influenza viruses--emerged and became enzootic among pig herds in North America during the late 1990s. We report the clinical features of the first 11 sporadic cases of infection of humans with triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) viruses reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, occurring from December 2005 through February 2009, until just before the current epidemic of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) among humans. These data were obtained from routine national influenza surveillance reports and from joint case investigations by public and animal health agencies. The median age of the 11 patients was 10 years (range, 16 months to 48 years), and 4 had underlying health conditions. Nine of the patients had had exposure to pigs, five through direct contact and four through visits to a location where pigs were present but without contact. In another patient, human-to-human transmission was suspected. The range of the incubation period, from the last known exposure to the onset of symptoms, was 3 to 9 days. Among the 10 patients with known clinical symptoms, symptoms included fever (in 90%), cough (in 100%), headache (in 60%), and diarrhea (in 30%). Complete blood counts were available for four patients, revealing leukopenia in two, lymphopenia in one, and thrombocytopenia in another. Four patients were hospitalized, two of whom underwent invasive mechanical ventilation. Four patients received oseltamivir, and all 11 recovered from their illness. From December 2005 until just before the current human epidemic of swine-origin influenza viruses, there was sporadic infection with triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) viruses in persons with exposure to pigs in the United States. Although all the patients recovered, severe illness of the lower respiratory tract and unusual influenza signs such as diarrhea were observed in some patients, including

  1. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction; Non-ST - elevation myocardial infarction; NSTEMI; CAD - heart attack; Coronary artery disease - heart attack ... made up of cholesterol and other cells. A heart attack may occur when: A tear in the ...

  2. 9 CFR 71.19 - Identification of swine in interstate commerce.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture backtags, when used on swine moving to slaughter; (3) Official swine tattoos, when used on swine moving to slaughter, when the use of the official swine tattoo has been requested by a... a determination that the tattoo will be retained and visible on the carcass of the swine after...

  3. 9 CFR 71.19 - Identification of swine in interstate commerce.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture backtags, when used on swine moving to slaughter; (3) Official swine tattoos, when used on swine moving to slaughter, when the use of the official swine tattoo has been requested by a... a determination that the tattoo will be retained and visible on the carcass of the swine after...

  4. 9 CFR 71.19 - Identification of swine in interstate commerce.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture backtags, when used on swine moving to slaughter; (3) Official swine tattoos, when used on swine moving to slaughter, when the use of the official swine tattoo has been requested by a... a determination that the tattoo will be retained and visible on the carcass of the swine after...

  5. 9 CFR 71.19 - Identification of swine in interstate commerce.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture backtags, when used on swine moving to slaughter; (3) Official swine tattoos, when used on swine moving to slaughter, when the use of the official swine tattoo has been requested by a... a determination that the tattoo will be retained and visible on the carcass of the swine after...

  6. 9 CFR 166.3 - Separation of swine from the garbage handling and treatment areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Separation of swine from the garbage... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.3 Separation of swine from the garbage handling and treatment areas. (a) Access by swine to...

  7. 9 CFR 166.3 - Separation of swine from the garbage handling and treatment areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Separation of swine from the garbage... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.3 Separation of swine from the garbage handling and treatment areas. (a) Access by swine to...

  8. 9 CFR 166.3 - Separation of swine from the garbage handling and treatment areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Separation of swine from the garbage... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.3 Separation of swine from the garbage handling and treatment areas. (a) Access by swine to...

  9. 9 CFR 166.3 - Separation of swine from the garbage handling and treatment areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Separation of swine from the garbage... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.3 Separation of swine from the garbage handling and treatment areas. (a) Access by swine to...

  10. 9 CFR 166.3 - Separation of swine from the garbage handling and treatment areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Separation of swine from the garbage... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.3 Separation of swine from the garbage handling and treatment areas. (a) Access by swine to...

  11. Influenza exposure in United States feral swine populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, J.S.; Minnis, R.B.; Campbell, T.A.; Barras, S.; DeYoung, R.W.; Pabilonia, K.; Avery, M.L.; Sullivan, H.; Clark, L.; McLean, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Swine play an important role in the disease ecology of influenza. Having cellular receptors in common with birds and humans, swine provide opportunities for mixed infections and potential for genetic reassortment between avian, human, and porcine influenza. Feral swine populations are rapidly expanding in both numbers and range and are increasingly coming into contact with waterfowl, humans, and agricultural operations. In this study, over 875 feral swine were sampled from six states across the United States for serologic evidence of exposure to influenza. In Oklahoma, Florida, and Missouri, USA, no seropositive feral swine were detected. Seropositive swine were detected in California, Mississippi, and Texas, USA. Antibody prevalences in these states were 1% in Mississippi, 5% in California, and 14.4% in Texas. All seropositive swine were exposed to H3N2 subtype, the predominant subtype currently circulating in domestic swine. The only exceptions were in San Saba County, Texas, where of the 15 seropositive samples, four were positive for H1N1 and seven for both H1N1 and H3N2. In Texas, there was large geographical and temporal variation in antibody prevalence and no obvious connection to domestic swine operations. No evidence of exposure to avian influenza in feral swine was uncovered. From these results it is apparent that influenza in feral swine poses a risk primarily to swine production operations. However, because feral swine share habitat with waterfowl, prey on and scavenge dead and dying birds, are highly mobile, and are increasingly coming into contact with humans, the potential for these animals to become infected with avian or human influenza in addition to swine influenza is a distinct possibility. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  12. [Comparison of body weight loss in gastrectomy patients who underwent only surgery and those who underwent surgery followed up with S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Toru; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Shirai, Junya; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Ogata, Takashi; Cho, Haruhiko; Yukawa, Norio; Oshima, Takashi; Rino, Yasushi; Ozawa, Yukihiro; Kitani, Yuichi; Wada, Hiroo; Masuda, Munetaka; Tsuburaya, Akira

    2012-11-01

    Body weight loss is a common outcome in patients with gastric cancer who have undergone gastrectomy. However, the rate of body weight loss after surgery is unknown. In this retrospective study, we selected patients who underwent radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer and were diagnosed with Stage II or III disease. Further, we compared the body weight loss after surgery between patients in the surgery alone group and the S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy group. We evaluated 163 patients, of which 81 underwent only surgery, and 82 underwent surgery followed up with S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy. The body weight loss rate at 1, 3, and 6 months in the surgery alone group were 93.1%, 92.9%, and 94.9%, while those in the S-1 adjuvant group were 92.9%, 90.4%,and 91.9%, which was a significant difference. Body weight loss after gastrectomy was higher in the S-1 adjuvant group than in the surgery alone group. Further, nutritional support is required for these patients to maintain body weight after surgery.

  13. Plateau in Muscle Blood Flow during Prolonged Exercise in Miniature Swine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-25

    133 + 18 Total Hindlimb 13 + 3 79 + 10 79 + 8 83 + 11 Cremaster 10 + 4 34 + 21 36 + 16 58 + 17 a Values are means + SE in ml’min-1.100g- 1 ; n-6...output matched this progressive time dependent response for the swine ( 3 ). In contrast, humans have exhibited a relatively constant muscle blood flow (1...during 󈧢 minutes of treadmill exercise was associated with 25% (62 b-min- I) and 22% increases in heart late and cardiac output, respectively ( 3 ). These

  14. [Haemodynamic effects of intoxication with bupivacaine and enantiomeric excess mixture. Experimental study in swine].

    PubMed

    Udelsmann, Artur; Lorena, Sílvia Elaine Rodolfo de Sá; Girioli, Samira Ubaid; Silva, William Adalberto; Moraes, Ana Cristina de

    2007-01-01

    Racemic bupivacaine has been the local anaesthetic of choice in regional blocks due to quality and duration of anesthesia. However its cardiovascular toxicity has been a source of concern and research has been made for lesser impact drugs. One choice is its levogyre isomer, levobupivacaine, apparently less cardiotoxic due a lower affinity to the heart sodium channels. In Brazil, a drug containing 75% of levogyre isomer and 25% of dextrogyre isomer, called enantiomeric excess mixture, is available. This study intends to evaluate haemodynamic effects of the intravascular injection of a toxic dose of both agents in swine. Large White pigs were anaesthetized with thiopental, intubated and placed on mechanical ventilation. Haemodynamic monitoring was performed with an invasive blood pressure and Swan-Ganz catheter on a pulmonary artery. After a 30 minute rest period, animals were randomly divided in two groups and the intoxication was performed on a double-blind method with 4 mg.kg-1 of one of the drugs. Haemodynamic parameters were then evaluated at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 minutes. The enantiomeric excess mixture caused greater haemodynamic effects than the racemic bupivacaine. These results diverge from those found in humans with levogyre isomer but are similar to recent results reported in animals. Care should be taken when extrapolating data obtained in swine to humans and further research is necessary. When high doses are injected in swine, the enantiomeric excess mixture was more toxic than the racemic bupivacaine.

  15. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  16. Heart Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  17. Serological Evidence and Risk Factors for Swine Influenza Infections among Chinese Swine Workers in Guangdong Province.

    PubMed

    Ma, Mengmeng; Anderson, Benjamin D; Wang, Tao; Chen, Yingan; Zhang, Dingmei; Gray, Gregory C; Lu, Jiahai

    2015-01-01

    During July to September 2014, we performed a controlled, cross-sectional, seroepidemiologic study among 203 swine workers and 115 control subjects in Guangdong Province. Sera were tested using a hemagglutination inhibition assay against locally-isolated swine H3N2 and H1N1 viruses and commercially-obtained human influenza viral antigens. We found swine workers had a greater prevalence and odds of seropositivity against the swine H3N2 virus (17.3% vs. 7.0%; adjusted OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.1 -10.7). Younger age, self-report of a respiratory illness during the last 12 months, and seropositivity against seasonal H3N2 virus were identified as significant risk factors for seropositivity against swine H3N2 virus. As swine workers in China may be exposed to novel influenza viruses, it seems prudent for China to conduct special surveillance for such viruses among them. It also seems wise to offer such workers seasonal influenza vaccines with a goal to reduce cross-species influenza virus transmission.

  18. Serological Evidence and Risk Factors for Swine Influenza Infections among Chinese Swine Workers in Guangdong Province

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Mengmeng; Anderson, Benjamin D.; Wang, Tao; Chen, Yingan; Zhang, Dingmei; Gray, Gregory C.; Lu, Jiahai

    2015-01-01

    During July to September 2014, we performed a controlled, cross-sectional, seroepidemiologic study among 203 swine workers and 115 control subjects in Guangdong Province. Sera were tested using a hemagglutination inhibition assay against locally-isolated swine H3N2 and H1N1 viruses and commercially-obtained human influenza viral antigens. We found swine workers had a greater prevalence and odds of seropositivity against the swine H3N2 virus (17.3% vs. 7.0%; adjusted OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.1 -10.7). Younger age, self-report of a respiratory illness during the last 12 months, and seropositivity against seasonal H3N2 virus were identified as significant risk factors for seropositivity against swine H3N2 virus. As swine workers in China may be exposed to novel influenza viruses, it seems prudent for China to conduct special surveillance for such viruses among them. It also seems wise to offer such workers seasonal influenza vaccines with a goal to reduce cross-species influenza virus transmission. PMID:26016740

  19. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Swine Production Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document contains 52 Occupational Skill Standards for the swine production occupational cluster, as required for the state of Illinois. Skill Standards, which were developed by committees that included educators, business, industry, and labor, are intended to promote education and training investment and ensure that students and workers are…

  20. AMMONIA EMISSION FACTORS FROM SWINE FINISHING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents results from two new studies at swine finishing facilities. (NOTE: Concentrated anaimal feeding operations (CAFOs) are being examined in several regions of the U.S. as major sources of ammonia and particulate matter precursors. EPA's National Risk Management Re...

  1. USMARC update on swine reproduction research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Swine research at USMARC has continued to focus on meat quality, improvement of genomic resources and reproduction, specifically estrus traits, sow longevity and lifetime productivity. This report will focus on research in behavioral anestrus in gilts. Gilts that reach puberty at an earlier age are ...

  2. Swine Influenza Viruses: a North American Perspective

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Influenza is a zoonotic viral disease that represents a health and economic threat to both humans and animals worldwide. Swine influenza was first recognized clinically in pigs in the Midwestern U.S. in 1918, coinciding with the human influenza pandemic known as the Spanish flu. Since that time swin...

  3. AMMONIA EMISSION FACTORS FROM SWINE FINISHING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents results from two new studies at swine finishing facilities. (NOTE: Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are being examined in several regions of the U,.S. as major sources of ammonia and particulate matter precursors. EPA's National Risk Management Re...

  4. AMMONIA EMISSION FACTORS FROM SWINE FINISHING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents results from two new studies at swine finishing facilities. (NOTE: Concentrated anaimal feeding operations (CAFOs) are being examined in several regions of the U.S. as major sources of ammonia and particulate matter precursors. EPA's National Risk Management Re...

  5. 75 FR 16641 - Swine Contract Library

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... includes long term contract agreements, fixed price contracts, cost of production formulas, and formula...) Carcass merit premium and discount schedules (including the determination of the lean percent or other..., the producer's current and projected swine inventories and planned production. (e) When do I change...

  6. Denitrification enzyme activity in swine wastewater lagoons

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anaerobic lagoons are typically used for treatment of swine wastewater. Although these anaerobic lagoons were once thought to be relatively simple in their physical, chemical, and biological processes, they are actually very sophisticated. Recent reports of high levels of di-nitrogen emissions and h...

  7. Strategies to improve fiber utilization in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Application of feed processing methods and use of exogenous feed additives in an effort to improve nutrient digestibility of plant-based feed ingredients for swine has been studied for decades. The following review will discuss several of these topics, including: fiber characterization, impact of di...

  8. Swine MRSA isolates form robust biofilms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. Measures to prevent, control, or eliminate MRSA in swine is of considerable public health concern. Bacterial colonization of both biol...

  9. Swine MRSA isolates form robust biofilms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. Measures to prevent, control, or eliminate MRSA in swine is of considerable public health concern. Bacterial colonization ...

  10. Swine Producer. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a comprehensive and verified employer competency list for a swine producer program. It contains units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability skills…

  11. Intracoronary artery transplantation of cardiomyoblast-like cells from human adipose tissue-derived multi-lineage progenitor cells improve left ventricular dysfunction and survival in a swine model of chronic myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Okura, Hanayuki; Saga, Ayami; Soeda, Mayumi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Daimon, Takashi; Ichinose, Akihiro; Matsuyama, Akifumi

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We administered human CLCs in a swine model of MI via intracoronary artery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Histological studies demonstrated engraftment of hCLCs into the scarred myocardium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Echocardiography showed rescue of cardiac function in the hCLCs transplanted swine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transplantation of hCLCs is an effective therapeutics for cardiac regeneration. -- Abstract: Transplantation of human cardiomyoblast-like cells (hCLCs) from human adipose tissue-derived multi-lineage progenitor cells improved left ventricular function and survival of rats with myocardial infarction. Here we examined the effect of intracoronary artery transplantation of human CLCs in a swine model of chronic heart failure. Twenty-four pigs underwent balloon-occlusion of the first diagonal branch followed by reperfusion, with a second balloon-occlusion of the left ascending coronary artery 1 week later followed by reperfusion. Four weeks after the second occlusion/reperfusion, 17 of the 18 surviving animals with severe chronic MI (ejection fraction <35% by echocardiography) were immunosuppressed then randomly assigned to receive either intracoronary artery transplantation of hCLCs hADMPCs or placebo lactic Ringer's solution with heparin. Intracoronary artery transplantation was followed by the distribution of DiI-stained hCLCs into the scarred myocardial milieu. Echocardiography at post-transplant days 4 and 8 weeks showed rescue and maintenance of cardiac function in the hCLCs transplanted group, but not in the control animals, indicating myocardial functional recovery by hCLCs intracoronary transplantation. At 8 week post-transplantation, 7 of 8 hCLCs transplanted animals were still alive compared with only 1 of the 5 control (p = 0.0147). Histological studies at week 12 post-transplantation demonstrated engraftment of the pre DiI-stained hCLCs into the scarred myocardium and their expression of

  12. The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) and hemodynamic effects of halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane in newborn swine.

    PubMed

    Lerman, J; Oyston, J P; Gallagher, T M; Miyasaka, K; Volgyesi, G A; Burrows, F A

    1990-10-01

    To determine the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) and hemodynamic responses to halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane in newborn swine, 36 fasting swine 4-10 days of age were anesthetized with one of the three volatile anesthetics in 100% oxygen. MAC was determined for each swine. Carotid artery and internal jugular catheters were inserted and each swine was allowed to recover for 48 h. After recovery, heart rate (HR), systemic systolic arterial pressure (SAP), and cardiac index (CI) were measured awake and then at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 MAC of the designated anesthetic in random sequence. The (mean +/- SD) MAC for halothane was 0.90 +/- 0.12%; the MAC for isoflurane was 1.48 +/- 0.21%; and the MAC for sevoflurane was 2.12 +/- 0.39%. Awake (mean +/- SD) measurements of HR, SAP, and CI did not differ significantly among the three groups. Compared to the awake HR, the mean HR decreased 35% at 1.5 MAC halothane (P less than 0.001), 19% at 1.5 MAC isoflurane (P less than 0.005), and 31% at 1.5 MAC sevoflurane (P less than 0.005). Compared to awake SAP, mean SAP measurements decreased 46% at 1.5 MAC halothane (P less than 0.001), 43% at 1.5 MAC isoflurane (P less than 0.001), and 36% at 1.5 MAC sevoflurane (P less than 0.005). Mean SAP at 1.0 and 1.5 MAC halothane and isoflurane were significantly less than those measured at equipotent concentrations of sevoflurane (P less than 0.005). Compared to awake CI, mean CI measurements decreased 53% at 1.5 MAC halothane (P less than 0.001) and 43% at 1.5 MAC isoflurane (P less than 0.005).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Short-term Safety and Efficiency of Cryoablation for Renal Sympathetic Denervation in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Meng; Shen, Li; Wu, Yi-Zhe; Yao, Zhi-Feng; Yin, Jia-Sheng; Chen, Jia-Hui; Jia, Jian-Guo; Qiao, Ling-Juan; Liu, Peng; Ge, Jun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Renal sympathetic nerves are involved in the reflective activation of the sympathetic nervous system in circulatory control. Catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) ameliorated treatment-resistant hypertension safely, but 10%–20% of treated patients are nonresponders to radiofrequency denervation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and efficiency of cryoablation for sympathetic denervation in a swine model and to explore a new way of RDN. Methods: Seven swines randomly assigned to two groups: Renal cryoablation (CR) group and control group. The control group underwent renal angiogram only. The CR group underwent renal angiogram plus bilateral renal cryoablation. Renal angiograms via femoral were performed before denervation, after denervation and prior to the sacrifice to access the diameter of renal arterial and the pressure of aorta abdominalis. Euthanasia of the swine was performed on 28-day to access norepinephrine (NE) changes of the renal cortex and the changes of renal nerves. Results: Cryoablation did not induce severe complications at any time point. There was no significant change in diameter of renal artery. CR reduced systolic blood pressure (BP) from 145.50 ± 9.95 mmHg at baseline to 119.00 ± 14.09 mmHg. There was a slight but insignificant decrease in diastolic BP. The main nerve changes at 28-day consisted of necrosis with perineurial fibrosis at the site of CR exposure in conjunction with the nerve vacuolation. Compared with the control group, renal tissue NE of CR group decreased by 89.85%. Conclusions: Percutaneous catheter-based cryoablation of the renal artery is safe. CR could effectively reduce NE storing in the renal cortex, and the efficiency could be maintained 28-day at least. PMID:25758274

  14. Swine (Sus scrofa) as a Model of Postinfarction Mitral Regurgitation and Techniques to Accommodate Its Effects during Surgical Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Eric L; Shi, Weiwei; Duara, Rajnish; Melone, Todd A; Kalra, Kanika; Strong, Ashley; Girish, Apoorva; McIver, Bryant V; Thourani, Vinod H; Guyton, Robert A; Padala, Muralidhar

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common heart-valve lesion after myocardial infarction in humans. Because it is considered a risk factor for accelerated heart failure and death, various surgical approaches and catheter-based devices to correct it are in development. Lack of a reproducible animal model of MR after myocardial infarction and reliable techniques to perform open-heart surgery in these diseased models led to the use of healthy animals to test new devices. Thus, most devices that are deemed safe in healthy animals have shown poor results in human efficacy studies, hampering progress in this area of research. Here we report our experience with a swine model of postinfarction MR, describe techniques to induce regurgitation and perform open-heart surgery in these diseased animals, and discuss our outcomes, complications, and solutions. PMID:27538860

  15. Swine (Sus scrofa) as a Model of Postinfarction Mitral Regurgitation and Techniques to Accommodate Its Effects during Surgical Repair.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Eric L; Shi, Weiwei; Duara, Rajnish; Melone, Todd A; Kalra, Kanika; Strong, Ashley; Girish, Apoorva; McIver, Bryant V; Thourani, Vinod H; Guyton, Robert A; Padala, Muralidhar

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common heart-valve lesion after myocardial infarction in humans. Because it is considered a risk factor for accelerated heart failure and death, various surgical approaches and catheter-based devices to correct it are in development. Lack of a reproducible animal model of MR after myocardial infarction and reliable techniques to perform open-heart surgery in these diseased models led to the use of healthy animals to test new devices. Thus, most devices that are deemed safe in healthy animals have shown poor results in human efficacy studies, hampering progress in this area of research. Here we report our experience with a swine model of postinfarction MR, describe techniques to induce regurgitation and perform open-heart surgery in these diseased animals, and discuss our outcomes, complications, and solutions.

  16. Feeding sodium arsanilate for exciting diarrhea and identifying carriers of swine dysentery.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, L D; Rodabaugh, D E

    1986-01-01

    Sodium arsanilate was fed to nondiarrhetic swine, previously exposed to and treated for swine dysentery, for the purpose of inducing them into developing a swine dysentery diarrhea. From 40 to 100% of these swine in each pen had previously had a swine dysentery diarrhea. The isolate of Treponema hyodysenteriae in the diced colon which was used to expose the swine was resistant to sodium arsanilate. After an interim of no treatment for swine dysentery, sodium arsanilate was fed at a level of 220 parts per million for 21 days. Of the 14 pens containing swine fed sodium arsanilate, ten pens had one or more swine that developed a swine dysentery diarrhea while being fed sodium arsanilate. This was significantly (P less than 0.05) greater than the three pens that each had one pig that developed a swine dysentery diarrhea of 13 pens containing similar swine not fed sodium arsanilate during a comparable period. In the 14 pens containing swine fed sodium arsanilate, 14 swine were the first to develop a swine dysentery diarrhea since in four pens, two swine in each pen developed diarrhea within 24 hours of each other. This also was significantly (P less than 0.01) greater than the three swine in the ten pens not fed sodium arsanilate. From these results, it was theorized that sodium arsanilate excited the nondiarrhetic carrier into developing a swine dysentery diarrhea and that this phenomenon may have potential in identifying the carrier state. PMID:3742372

  17. Subtotal hepatectomy in swine for studying small-for-size syndrome and portal inflow modulation: is it reliable?

    PubMed

    Darnis, Benjamin; Mohkam, Kayvan; Schmitt, Zoé; Ledochowski, Stanislas; Vial, Jean-Paul; Duperret, Serge; Vogt, Catherine; Demian, Hassan; Golse, Nicolas; Mezoughi, Salim; Ducerf, Christian; Mabrut, Jean-Yves

    2015-10-01

    Small-for-size syndrome (SFSS) is a feared complication of extended liver resection and partial liver transplantation. Swine models of extended hepatectomy have been developed for studying SFSS and its different treatment options. Although portal inflow modulation (PIM) by splenectomy or splenic artery ligation (SAL) has been proposed in humans to prevent SFSS, such procedures have not yet been evaluated in swine. The present study was designed to evaluate modifications in splanchnic haemodynamics yielded by extended hepatectomy with and without PIM in swine. Nineteen animals underwent 70% hepatectomy (H70, n = 7), 90% hepatectomy (H90, n = 7) or sham laparotomy (H0, n = 5). Haemodynamic measurements were performed at baseline, after hepatectomy and after PIM by SAL and splenectomy. Portal vein flow increased after both H70 (273 ml/min/100 g versus 123 ml/min/100 g; P = 0.016) and H90 (543 ml/min/100 g versus 124 ml/min/100 g; P = 0.031), but the hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) increased only after H90 (10.0 mmHg versus 3.7 mmHg; P = 0.016). Hepatic artery flow did not significantly decrease after either H70 or H90. In all three groups, neither splenectomy nor SAL induced any changes in splanchnic haemodynamics. Subtotal hepatectomy of 90% in swine is a reliable model for SFSS inducing a significant increase in HVPG. However, in view of the relevant differences between swine and human splanchnic anatomy, this model is inadequate for studying the effects of PIM by SAL and splenectomy. © 2015 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  18. Subtotal hepatectomy in swine for studying small-for-size syndrome and portal inflow modulation: is it reliable?

    PubMed Central

    Darnis, Benjamin; Mohkam, Kayvan; Schmitt, Zoé; Ledochowski, Stanislas; Vial, Jean-Paul; Duperret, Serge; Vogt, Catherine; Demian, Hassan; Golse, Nicolas; Mezoughi, Salim; Ducerf, Christian; Mabrut, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Background Small-for-size syndrome (SFSS) is a feared complication of extended liver resection and partial liver transplantation. Swine models of extended hepatectomy have been developed for studying SFSS and its different treatment options. Although portal inflow modulation (PIM) by splenectomy or splenic artery ligation (SAL) has been proposed in humans to prevent SFSS, such procedures have not yet been evaluated in swine. Objectives The present study was designed to evaluate modifications in splanchnic haemodynamics yielded by extended hepatectomy with and without PIM in swine. Methods Nineteen animals underwent 70% hepatectomy (H70, n = 7), 90% hepatectomy (H90, n = 7) or sham laparotomy (H0, n = 5). Haemodynamic measurements were performed at baseline, after hepatectomy and after PIM by SAL and splenectomy. Results Portal vein flow increased after both H70 (273 ml/min/100 g versus 123 ml/min/100 g; P = 0.016) and H90 (543 ml/min/100 g versus 124 ml/min/100 g; P = 0.031), but the hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) increased only after H90 (10.0 mmHg versus 3.7 mmHg; P = 0.016). Hepatic artery flow did not significantly decrease after either H70 or H90. In all three groups, neither splenectomy nor SAL induced any changes in splanchnic haemodynamics. Conclusions Subtotal hepatectomy of 90% in swine is a reliable model for SFSS inducing a significant increase in HVPG. However, in view of the relevant differences between swine and human splanchnic anatomy, this model is inadequate for studying the effects of PIM by SAL and splenectomy. PMID:26227804

  19. An Effective and Reproducible Model of Ventricular Fibrillation in Crossbred Yorkshire Swine (Sus scrofa) for Use in Physiologic Research.

    PubMed

    Burgert, James M; Johnson, Arthur D; Garcia-Blanco, Jose C; Craig, W John; O'Sullivan, Joseph C

    2015-10-01

    Transcutaneous electrical induction (TCEI) has been used to induce ventricular fibrillation (VF) in laboratory swine for physiologic and resuscitation research. Many studies do not describe the method of TCEI in detail, thus making replication by future investigators difficult. Here we describe a detailed method of electrically inducing VF that was used successfully in a prospective, experimental resuscitation study. Specifically, an electrical current was passed through the heart to induce VF in crossbred Yorkshire swine (n = 30); the current was generated by using two 22-gauge spinal needles, with one placed above and one below the heart, and three 9V batteries connected in series. VF developed in 28 of the 30 pigs (93%) within 10 s of beginning the procedure. In the remaining 2 swine, VF was induced successfully after medial redirection of the superior parasternal needle. The TCEI method is simple, reproducible, and cost-effective. TCEI may be especially valuable to researchers with limited access to funding, sophisticated equipment, or colleagues experienced in interventional cardiology techniques. The TCEI method might be most appropriate for pharmacologic studies requiring VF, VF resulting from the R-on-T phenomenon (as in prolonged QT syndrome), and VF arising from other ectopic or reentrant causes. However, the TCEI method does not accurately model the most common cause of VF, acute coronary occlusive disease. Researchers must consider the limitations of TCEI that may affect internal and external validity of collected data, when designing experiments using this model of VF.

  20. Advancing swine models for human health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Walters, Eric M; Prather, Randall S

    2013-01-01

    Swine models are relatively new kids on the block for modeling human health and diseases when compared to rodents and dogs. Because of the similarity to humans in size, physiology, and genetics, the pig has made significant strides in advancing the understanding of the human condition, and is thus an excellent choice for an animal model. Recent technological advances to genetic engineering of the swine genome enhance the utility of swine as models of human genetic diseases.

  1. Prognostic Impact of the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index on Long-Term Outcomes in Patients Who Underwent Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hideki; Dohi, Tomotaka; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Doi, Shinichiro; Naito, Ryo; Konishi, Hirokazu; Tsuboi, Shuta; Ogita, Manabu; Kasai, Takatoshi; Hassan, Ahmed; Okazaki, Shinya; Isoda, Kikuo; Suwa, Satoru; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-16

    Malnutrition has been identified as an important predictor of poor clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure. The aim of this study is to examine the prognostic impact of nutritional status in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The impact of nutrition, assessed using the geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) calculated by serum albumin and body mass index, was evaluated in 2,853 patients with CAD who underwent their first PCI between 2000 and 2011. Patients were assigned to tertiles based on their GNRI levels. The incidences of all-cause death and cardiac death were assessed. The median GNRI values were 101 (interquartile range 95 to 106). Lower GNRI levels were associated with older age and higher prevalence of acute coronary syndrome and chronic kidney disease. During the median follow-up period of 7.4 years, Kaplan-Meier curves showed ongoing divergence in rates of mortality among tertiles (GNRI <98: 35.1%; 98 to 104: 20.6%; ≥104: 12.1%; log-rank p <0.0001). Stratification analysis by age also showed that the lowest GNRI tertile was associated with mortality in both patients <65 years and those ≥65 years. After adjusting for established cardiovascular risk factors, lower GNRI was an independent predictor of all-cause death (hazard ratio 1.55 per 10 decrease, 95% confidence interval 1.30 to 1.84, p <0.0001) and cardiac death (hazard ratio 1.44, 95% confidence interval 1.08 to 1.90, p = 0.01). In conclusion, nutritional status was associated with long-term clinical outcomes in CAD patients after PCI. Evaluation of GNRI carries important prognostic information and may guide the therapeutic approach to such patients.

  2. [Clinical value of lung ultrasound in the late goal-directed fluid removal in critically ill patients underwent fluid resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Luhao; Guan, Xiangdong; Chen, Minying; Chen, Juan; Si, Xiang; Jiang, Zhiyi; Liu, Yongjun; Liu, Zimeng; Wu, Jianfeng; Ouyang, Bin

    2016-05-10

    To investigate the clinical value of lung ultrasound in the late goal -directed fluid removal in critically ill patients underwent fluid resuscitation. A prospective study was conducted. Forty patients underwent fluid resuscitation were enrolled in the Department of Surgical Intensive Care Unit of The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University from Jan 2015 to June 2015. Lung and heart ultrasound were conducted for lung B-lines and left ventricular ejection fraction (EF). Serum amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), central venous pressure (CVP) and serum creatinine were also measured and fluid balance was recorded in all patients enrolled. Among the 40 patients enrolled, 35 patients survived and 5 died. In patients survived, B-lines reached its peak at 12(30)h after admitted to ICU. It started to decrease instantly after the peak and reached zero at (39±34) h. A higher peak was followed with more fluids to be removed later and longer ICU stay (P<0.01). Moreover, when compared with the survivors, B-lines in death reached a higher peak[7(8) vs 3(4), P<0.01]and without the tendency to drop down. EF was lower in death than in survivor (44.5%±3.5% vs 69.2%±11.0%, P<0.05). A lower EF was found to be followed with a higher peak of B-lines. The peak time of NT-proBNP and clinical dehydration treatment were later than the peak time of B-lines in survivors. Fluid overloading occurs in late stage after resuscitation in critically ill patients. Lung ultrasound B-lines, which is more sensitive than the NT-proBNP and CVP, could help to monitor the patient's fluid status and guide the late goal-directed fluid removal.

  3. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... it as instructed while awaiting emergency help. Take aspirin, if recommended . Taking aspirin during a heart attack could reduce heart damage by helping to keep your blood from clotting. Aspirin can interact with other medications, however, so don' ...

  4. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... 28 grams). Most pacemakers have 2 parts: The generator contains the battery and the information to control ... are wires that connect the heart to the generator and carry the electrical messages to the heart. ...

  5. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body. An ejection fraction is an important measurement of how well your heart is pumping and ... catheterization and cardiac MRI. This is an important measurement of how well your heart is pumping and ...

  6. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... refers to the number of times your heart beats per minute. "Rhythm" refers to the pattern of regular or irregular pulses produced as the heart beats.) With each heartbeat, an electrical signal spreads across ...

  7. [An overview of swine influenza virus infection in humans].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-fei; Shu, Yue-long

    2013-09-01

    Since the first report of a swine influenza virus (SIV) infection in humans in 1958, cases have occurred continuously and increased significantly after the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Although exposure to swine is thought to be a risk factor for human SIVs infections, approximately half of the reported cases had no known exposure to pigs. Besides, epidemiological investigation showed that several cases had limited human-to-human transmission. Based on the analyses of data on swine influenza virus infection in humans in this review, both the improved SIVs surveillance in humans and swine population and wider vaccination coverage among occupational workers are critical strategies in pandemic preparedness and response.

  8. Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... wear to record a continuous ECG, usually for 24 to 72 hours. Holter monitoring is used to detect heart rhythm ... your doctor to make sure you're properly managing your heart condition. ... making the same lifestyle changes that can improve your heart disease, such ...

  9. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... a million people in the U.S. have a heart attack. About half of them die. Many people have permanent heart damage or die because they don't get ... It's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if someone ...

  10. Prevalence and Prognostic Value of Right Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction in Patients With Constrictive Pericarditis Who Underwent Pericardiectomy.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Muhammad W; Homsi, Mohamed; Mastouri, Ronald; Feigenbaum, Harvey; Sawada, Stephen G

    2015-08-01

    Impaired right ventricular systolic function (RVSF) may complicate the treatment of constrictive pericarditis (CP) by pericardiectomy, which is a procedure that remains with significant morbidity and mortality. We evaluated RVSF in patients with CP who underwent pericardiectomy to determine the prognostic value of RVSF. RVSF was assessed by measuring Tricuspid Annular Plane Systolic Excursion (TAPSE) in 35 patients (mean age 52 ± 15.4 years) who underwent pericardiectomy. Thirty-one patients (88.6%) had reduced RVSF (TAPSE ≤1.8 cm). Eight patients (23%) had postoperative events (heart failure 3 and hospital mortality 5). Logistic regression showed that concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) (p = 0.052), left ventricular ejection fraction (p = 0.059), left atrial diameter (p = 0.028), and TAPSE (p = 0.016) were borderline or significant univariate predictors of events. TAPSE (p = 0.018, odds ratio = 0.605 [0.40 to 0.92]) and CABG (p = 0.033, odds ratio = 20 [1.26 to 315]) were independent predictors of events on multivariate analysis. Stepwise analysis showed that TAPSE provided incremental prognostic value (p = 0.029, chi-square increase 11.6 to 16.3) to the combination of CABG, ejection fraction, and left atrial diameter. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.815 for TAPSE. TAPSE of 1.38 cm had a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 67% for identifying patients with events. TAPSE was also inversely related to the length of hospital stay after pericardiectomy (p = 0.02, R = -0.424). Hence, our study showed that RVSF is frequently reduced in patients with CP who underwent pericardiectomy. In conclusion, TAPSE is an independent predictor of events and provides incremental prognostic value to other clinical and echocardiographic variables.

  11. Discovering up-regulated VEGF-C expression in swine umbilical vein endothelial cells by classical swine fever virus Shimen.

    PubMed

    Ning, Pengbo; Zhang, Yanming; Guo, Kangkang; Chen, Ru; Liang, Wulong; Lin, Zhi; Li, Helin

    2014-04-23

    Infection of domestic swine with the highly virulent Shimen strain of classical swine fever virus causes hemorrhagic lymphadenitis and diffuse hemorrhaging in infected swine. We analyzed patterns of gene expression for CSFV Shimen in swine umbilical vein endothelial cells (SUVECs). Transcription of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) C gene (VEGF-C) and translation of the corresponding protein were significantly up-regulated in SUVECs. Our findings suggest that VEGF-C is involved in mechanisms of acute infection caused by virulent strains of CSFV.

  12. [An overview on swine influenza viruses].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuai; Zhu, Wen-Fei; Shu, Yue-Long

    2013-05-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIVs) are respiratory pathogens of pigs. They cause both economic bur den in livestock-dependent industries and serious global public health concerns in humans. Because of their dual susceptibility to human and avian influenza viruses, pigs are recognized as intermediate hosts for genetic reassortment and interspecies transmission. Subtypes H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 circulate in swine populations around the world, with varied origin and genetic characteristics among different continents and regions. In this review, the role of pigs in evolution of influenza A viruses, the genetic evolution of SIVs and interspecies transmission of SIVs are described. Considering the possibility that pigs might produce novel influenza viruses causing more outbreaks and pandemics, routine epidemiological surveillance of influenza viruses in pig populations is highly recommended.

  13. Modelling the Growth of Swine Flu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The spread of swine flu has been a cause of great concern globally. With no vaccine developed as yet, (at time of writing in July 2009) and given the fact that modern-day humans can travel speedily across the world, there are fears that this disease may spread out of control. The worst-case scenario would be one of unfettered exponential growth.…

  14. Microbial perspective on fiber utilization by swine.

    PubMed

    Varel, V H; Yen, J T

    1997-10-01

    Dietary fiber may contribute up to 30% of the maintenance energy needs of growing pigs. Higher energy contributions may be obtained from dietary fiber fed to sows, along with some improvements in reproduction, health, and well-being. As long as cereal grain supplies and high-quality protein supplements are abundant, the use of fibrous feeds for swine most likely will be limited. However, as the human demand for cereal grains increases, swine producers, especially those with reproductive animals, may be economically forced to incorporate alternative feedstuffs. These feedstuffs might include lignified plant cell wall material such as grasses and legumes, and feed-milling and distillery by-products that contain a high level of fiber residues. The microflora in swine large intestine will be able to adapt to these lignified forages and by-product feeds much better than the microflora in humans. Swine microflora contain highly active ruminal cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic bacterial species, which include Fibrobacter succinogenes (intestinalis), Ruminococcus albus, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Butyrivibrio spp., and Prevotella ruminicola. Additionally, a new highly active cellulolytic bacterium, Clostridium herbivorans, has been recently isolated from pig large intestine. The populations of these microorganisms are known to increase in response to the ingestion of diets high in plant cell wall material. The numbers of cellulolytic bacteria from adult animals are approximately 6.7 times greater than those found in growing pigs. None of these highly active cellulolytic bacterial species are found in the human large intestine. Thus, the pig large intestinal fermentation of fiber seems to more closely resemble that of ruminants than that of humans.

  15. Rapid Genotyping of Swine Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Polly W.Y.; Wong, Chloe K.S.; Li, Olive T.W.; Chan, Kwok Hung; Cheung, Chung Lam; Ma, Edward S.; Webby, Richard J.; Guan, Yi; Peiris, Joseph S. Malik

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus highlighted the need for enhanced surveillance of swine influenza viruses. We used real-time reverse–transcription PCR–based genotyping and found that this rapid and simple genotyping method may identify reassortants derived from viruses of Eurasian avian-like, triple reassortant-like, and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus lineages. PMID:21470462

  16. Intravenous magnesium in experimental stent thrombosis in swine.

    PubMed

    Rukshin, V; Azarbal, B; Shah, P K; Tsang, V T; Shechter, M; Finkelstein, A; Cercek, B; Kaul, S

    2001-09-01

    We investigated the effects of magnesium on acute platelet-dependent stent thrombosis in an ex vivo porcine arteriovenous shunt model of high-shear blood flow. Control nitinol stents were expanded to 2 mm in diameter in a tubular perfusion chamber interposed in the shunt and exposed to flowing arterial blood at a shear rate of 2100 s(-1) for 20 minutes (n=156 perfusion runs in 10 swine). Animals were treated with intravenous heparin or MgSO(4) alone (2 g bolus over 20 minutes, followed by 2 g/h infusion) and combined heparin plus MgSO(4) in random fashion. Effects on thrombus weight (TW), platelet aggregation, bleeding time, activated clotting time, mean arterial blood pressure, and heart rate were quantified. Data points in the magnesium-treated animals were examined within 20 minutes after bolus (Mg-early) and >40 minutes after bolus (Mg-late). Stent TW (20+/-3 mg, pretreatment) was reduced by 42+/-21%, 47+/-19%, 48+/-16%, 67+/-12%, and 86+/-8% in the groups treated with Mg-early alone, Mg-late alone, heparin alone, heparin+Mg-early, and heparin+Mg-late, respectively (all P<0.001 versus pretreatment, P<0.001 for heparin+Mg-early and Mg-late versus heparin or magnesium alone, and P<0.05 for heparin+Mg-late versus heparin+Mg-early, ANOVA). Magnesium had no significant effect on platelet aggregation, activated clotting time, or bleeding time. There were no significant effects on heart rate or mean arterial blood pressure. The serum magnesium level was inversely correlated with TW (r=-0.70, P=0.002). In conclusion, treatment with intravenous MgSO(4) produced a time-dependent inhibition of acute stent thrombosis under high-shear flow conditions without any hemostatic or significant hemodynamic complications. Thus, magnesium may be an effective agent for preventing stent thrombosis.

  17. Epidemiology of African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Costard, S; Mur, L; Lubroth, J; Sanchez-Vizcaino, J M; Pfeiffer, D U

    2013-04-01

    African swine fever virus used to occur primarily in Africa. There had been occasional incursions into Europe or America which apart from the endemic situation on the island of Sardinia always had been successfully controlled. But following an introduction of the virus in 2007, it now has expanded its geographical distribution into Caucasus and Eastern Europe where it has not been controlled, to date. African swine fever affects domestic and wild pig species, and can involve tick vectors. The ability of the virus to survive within a particular ecosystem is defined by the ecology of its wild host populations and the characteristics of livestock production systems, which influence host and vector species densities and interrelationships. African swine fever has high morbidity in naïve pig populations and can result in very high mortality. There is no vaccine or treatment available. Apart from stamping out and movement control, there are no control measures, thereby potentially resulting in extreme losses for producers. Prevention and control of the infection requires good understanding of its epidemiology, so that targeted measures can be instigated.

  18. [Metagenomics-based detection of swine viruses].

    PubMed

    Han, Wen; Luo, Yuzi; Zhao, Bibo; Sun, Yuan; Li, Su; Qiu, Huaji

    2013-02-04

    Extreme varieties of viruses exist in the environment and animals, some of which are unknown. However, many unknown viruses are barely detected by means of conventional virus isolation and PCR assay. To develop a technology platform for detecting unknown viruses. We established the technology based on viral metagenomics in combination with novel molecular diagnostics. The technology is consisted of removal of host nucleic acid, random PCR amplification, large-scale sequencing, and bioinformatics. The technology was applied to detect classical swine fever virus (CSFV)-infected cells and a tissue sample of a pig infected with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2). We amplified 13.7% sequences of CSFV genome and 47.2% those of PCV2 genome, respectively. Moreover, we amplified 16.4% sequences of the simian parainfluenza virus type 5 genome from an unknown virus cell culture using the developed method. In addition, using the developed method combined with the high-throughput sequencing, we detected 1.1% virus sequences, including CSFV, PCV2, torque teno sus virus (TTSuV), porcine bocavirus (PBoV) and human adenovirus type 6 (Ad6) from 7 clinical swine samples of unknown causative agents. The developed metagenomics-based method showed good sensitivity for detection of both DNA and RNA viruses from diverse swine samples, and has potential for universal detection of known and unknown viruses. It might facilitate the diagnosis of emerging viral diseases.

  19. History of Swine influenza viruses in Asia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huachen; Webby, Richard; Lam, Tommy T Y; Smith, David K; Peiris, Joseph S M; Guan, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The pig is one of the main hosts of influenza A viruses and plays important roles in shaping the current influenza ecology. The occurrence of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus demonstrated that pigs could independently facilitate the genesis of a pandemic influenza strain. Genetic analyses revealed that this virus was derived by reassortment between at least two parent swine influenza viruses (SIV), from the northern American triple reassortant H1N2 (TR) and European avian-like H1N1 (EA) lineages. The movement of live pigs between different continents and subsequent virus establishment are preconditions for such a reassortment event to occur. Asia, especially China, has the largest human and pig populations in the world, and seems to be the only region frequently importing pigs from other continents. Virological surveillance revealed that not only classical swine H1N1 (CS), and human-origin H3N2 viruses circulated, but all of the EA, TR and their reassortant variants were introduced into and co-circulated in pigs in this region. Understanding the long-term evolution and history of SIV in Asia would provide insights into the emergence of influenza viruses with epidemic potential in swine and humans.

  20. Serological and bacteriological study of swine brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lord, V R; Cherwonogrodzky, J W; Marcano, M J; Melendez, G

    1997-01-01

    A serological and bacteriological study was performed with sera taken from 2,228 swine from six states in Venezuela. None of the animals were vaccinated against brucellosis, and the prevalence of the disease varied from 5 to 89% on farms located in these states. Our studies indicated that the animals could be categorized into four groups depending on the degree of reactivity in serological tests. Brucella suis biovar 1 was isolated from the lymph nodes, spleens, and semen samples of seropositive animals and identified by oxidative metabolic techniques. B. suis could not be isolated from tissues of seronegative swine even from farms with cases of the disease (detected by serology). Results suggest that, although the immunodiffusion assay using Brucella melitensis B115 polysaccharide B or B. abortus 1119-3 O-polysaccharide could be useful in the detection of active infections, it is perhaps not as sensitive as some of the other standard serological tests used in this study for the detection of swine brucellosis. PMID:8968931

  1. Serological and bacteriological study of swine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Lord, V R; Cherwonogrodzky, J W; Marcano, M J; Melendez, G

    1997-01-01

    A serological and bacteriological study was performed with sera taken from 2,228 swine from six states in Venezuela. None of the animals were vaccinated against brucellosis, and the prevalence of the disease varied from 5 to 89% on farms located in these states. Our studies indicated that the animals could be categorized into four groups depending on the degree of reactivity in serological tests. Brucella suis biovar 1 was isolated from the lymph nodes, spleens, and semen samples of seropositive animals and identified by oxidative metabolic techniques. B. suis could not be isolated from tissues of seronegative swine even from farms with cases of the disease (detected by serology). Results suggest that, although the immunodiffusion assay using Brucella melitensis B115 polysaccharide B or B. abortus 1119-3 O-polysaccharide could be useful in the detection of active infections, it is perhaps not as sensitive as some of the other standard serological tests used in this study for the detection of swine brucellosis.

  2. Heart-to-Heart

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-26

    NASA didn’t miss a (heart)beat when the opportunity arose to study the cardiovascular systems of identical twin astronauts, one aboard the International Space Station and the other on Earth. Results from the Cardio Ox investigation, part of the research of the One Year Mission of astronaut Scott Kelly, may provide a better understanding of cardiovascular disease risk that astronauts encounter during and after long-duration spaceflight. Stuart Lee, the lead scientist for the Cardiovascular and Vision Laboratory at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, explains the importance of spaceflight weightlessness research on the cardiovascular system and how results could be used to create countermeasures, preventing potential health consequences for future space travelers as well as those of us on Earth. For more on ISS science, follow us on Twitter: @ISS_research or at https://twitter.com/ISS_Research or at: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/index.html

  3. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... where swine vesicular disease exists. 94.12 Section 94.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY:...

  4. 9 CFR 93.515 - Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appearance of disease among swine in...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.515 Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine. If any contagious disease appears among swine during the quarantine period...

  5. 9 CFR 93.515 - Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appearance of disease among swine in...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.515 Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine. If any contagious disease appears among swine during the quarantine period...

  6. 9 CFR 93.515 - Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appearance of disease among swine in...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.515 Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine. If any contagious disease appears among swine during the quarantine period...

  7. 9 CFR 93.515 - Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appearance of disease among swine in...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.515 Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine. If any contagious disease appears among swine during the quarantine period...

  8. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... where swine vesicular disease exists. 94.12 Section 94.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY:...

  9. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... where swine vesicular disease exists. 94.12 Section 94.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY:...

  10. 9 CFR 93.515 - Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appearance of disease among swine in...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.515 Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine. If any contagious disease appears among swine during the quarantine period...

  11. 9 CFR 71.19 - Identification of swine in interstate commerce.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... tattoos, when used on swine moving to slaughter, when the use of the official swine tattoo has been... based on a determination that the tattoo will be retained and visible on the carcass of the swine after slaughter, so as to provide identification of the swine; (4) Tattoos of at least 4-characters when used on...

  12. 9 CFR 93.516 - Import permit and declaration for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... swine. 93.516 Section 93.516 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Canada 7 § 93.516 Import permit and declaration for swine. (a) For swine intended for importation from Canada, the importer shall first apply for...

  13. 9 CFR 93.516 - Import permit and declaration for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... swine. 93.516 Section 93.516 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Canada 7 § 93.516 Import permit and declaration for swine. (a) For swine intended for importation from Canada, the importer shall first apply for...

  14. 9 CFR 93.518 - Swine from Canada for immediate slaughter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Swine from Canada for immediate...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Canada 7 § 93.518 Swine from Canada for immediate slaughter. Swine imported from Canada for immediate slaughter shall be consigned from the port of...

  15. 9 CFR 149.5 - Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of certified swine. 149.5 Section 149.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... § 149.5 Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine. Certified swine moved from a..., collection point, or slaughter facility, must remain segregated from noncertified swine at all times and...

  16. 9 CFR 93.516 - Import permit and declaration for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... swine. 93.516 Section 93.516 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Canada 7 § 93.516 Import permit and declaration for swine. (a) For swine intended for importation from Canada, the importer shall first apply for...

  17. 9 CFR 93.518 - Swine from Canada for immediate slaughter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Swine from Canada for immediate...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Canada 7 § 93.518 Swine from Canada for immediate slaughter. Swine imported from Canada for immediate slaughter shall be consigned from the port of...

  18. 9 CFR 93.518 - Swine from Canada for immediate slaughter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Swine from Canada for immediate...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Canada 7 § 93.518 Swine from Canada for immediate slaughter. Swine imported from Canada for immediate slaughter shall be consigned from the port of...

  19. 9 CFR 93.516 - Import permit and declaration for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... swine. 93.516 Section 93.516 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Canada 7 § 93.516 Import permit and declaration for swine. (a) For swine intended for importation from Canada, the importer shall first apply for...

  20. 9 CFR 93.520 - Import permit and declaration for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... swine. 93.520 Section 93.520 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Central America and West Indies 8 § 93.520 Import permit and declaration for swine. For all swine offered for importation from countries of Central...

  1. 9 CFR 310.23 - Identification of carcasses and parts of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of swine. 310.23 Section 310.23 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... and parts of swine. (a) The identification of the carcasses and parts of swine identified in... throughout post-mortem inspection. (b) If the establishment fails to provide required swine identification...

  2. 9 CFR 149.5 - Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of certified swine. 149.5 Section 149.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... § 149.5 Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine. Certified swine moved from a..., collection point, or slaughter facility, must remain segregated from noncertified swine at all times and...

  3. 9 CFR 93.518 - Swine from Canada for immediate slaughter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Swine from Canada for immediate...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Canada 7 § 93.518 Swine from Canada for immediate slaughter. Swine imported from Canada for immediate slaughter shall be consigned from the port of...

  4. 9 CFR 94.9 - Pork and pork products from regions where classical swine fever exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... where classical swine fever exists. 94.9 Section 94.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED...

  5. 9 CFR 310.23 - Identification of carcasses and parts of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of swine. 310.23 Section 310.23 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... and parts of swine. (a) The identification of the carcasses and parts of swine identified in... throughout post-mortem inspection. (b) If the establishment fails to provide required swine identification...

  6. 9 CFR 310.23 - Identification of carcasses and parts of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of swine. 310.23 Section 310.23 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... and parts of swine. (a) The identification of the carcasses and parts of swine identified in... throughout post-mortem inspection. (b) If the establishment fails to provide required swine identification...

  7. 9 CFR 310.23 - Identification of carcasses and parts of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of swine. 310.23 Section 310.23 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... and parts of swine. (a) The identification of the carcasses and parts of swine identified in... throughout post-mortem inspection. (b) If the establishment fails to provide required swine identification...

  8. 9 CFR 93.520 - Import permit and declaration for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... swine. 93.520 Section 93.520 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Central America and West Indies 8 § 93.520 Import permit and declaration for swine. For all swine offered for importation from countries of Central...

  9. 9 CFR 94.9 - Pork and pork products from regions where classical swine fever exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... where classical swine fever exists. 94.9 Section 94.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED...

  10. 9 CFR 93.520 - Import permit and declaration for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... swine. 93.520 Section 93.520 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Central America and West Indies 8 § 93.520 Import permit and declaration for swine. For all swine offered for importation from countries of Central...

  11. 9 CFR 93.520 - Import permit and declaration for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... swine. 93.520 Section 93.520 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Central America and West Indies 8 § 93.520 Import permit and declaration for swine. For all swine offered for importation from countries of Central...

  12. 9 CFR 93.516 - Import permit and declaration for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... swine. 93.516 Section 93.516 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Canada 7 § 93.516 Import permit and declaration for swine. (a) For swine intended for importation from Canada, the importer shall first apply for...

  13. 9 CFR 149.5 - Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of certified swine. 149.5 Section 149.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... § 149.5 Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine. Certified swine moved from a..., collection point, or slaughter facility, must remain segregated from noncertified swine at all times and...

  14. 9 CFR 310.23 - Identification of carcasses and parts of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of swine. 310.23 Section 310.23 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... and parts of swine. (a) The identification of the carcasses and parts of swine identified in... throughout post-mortem inspection. (b) If the establishment fails to provide required swine identification...

  15. 9 CFR 93.520 - Import permit and declaration for swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... swine. 93.520 Section 93.520 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Central America and West Indies 8 § 93.520 Import permit and declaration for swine. For all swine offered for importation from countries of Central...

  16. 9 CFR 149.5 - Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of certified swine. 149.5 Section 149.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... § 149.5 Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine. Certified swine moved from a..., collection point, or slaughter facility, must remain segregated from noncertified swine at all times and...

  17. 9 CFR 149.5 - Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of certified swine. 149.5 Section 149.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... § 149.5 Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine. Certified swine moved from a..., collection point, or slaughter facility, must remain segregated from noncertified swine at all times and...

  18. 9 CFR 93.518 - Swine from Canada for immediate slaughter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Swine from Canada for immediate...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Canada 7 § 93.518 Swine from Canada for immediate slaughter. Swine imported from Canada for immediate slaughter shall be consigned from the port...

  19. 78 FR 9028 - Notice of Availability of a Swine Brucellosis and Pseudorabies Proposed Action Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... affects both animals and humans. The disease mainly affects cattle, bison, and swine. Swine brucellosis... with antibiotics. Pseudorabies is a contagious, communicable disease of livestock, primarily swine, and... as free of the disease. The swine brucellosis regulations also specify requirements for the...

  20. Turning schedules influence final composition of composted swine manure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Liquid swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) manure is a high-moisture, low-nutrient product that limits economical transport to areas in proximity of its source, possibly contributing to localized high soil nutrient levels. Composting swine manure converts liquid slurries to solids at lower moisture conten...

  1. Economic losses to Iberian swine production from forest fires

    Treesearch

    Juan Ramon Molina Martinez; Miguel Herrera Machuca; Ricardo Zamora Diaz; Fancisco Rodriguez y Silva; Armando Gonzalez-Caban

    2011-01-01

    Most forestry property in Andalusia is privately held. One of the most important possibilities for economic development of rural areas is the use of pasture lands (dehesa in Spanish). During the spring–summer season, swine grazing takes advantage of grasses between the trees, and during winter (harsher times), they use Quercus tree fruit. Swine production has a direct...

  2. Lysozyme as an alternative to antibiotics in swine feed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotics have been fed at subtherapeutic levels to swine as growth promoters for more than 60 years, and the majority of swine produced in the U.S. receive antibiotics in their feed at some point in their production cycle. These compounds benefit the producers by minimizing production losses by ...

  3. Emergence of African swine fever virus, northwestern Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Pooneh; Sohrabi, Amir; Ashrafihelan, Javad; Edalat, Rosita; Alamdari, Mehran; Masoudi, Mohammadhossein; Mostofi, Saied; Azadmanesh, Kayhan

    2010-12-01

    In 2008, African swine fever was introduced into Georgia, after which it spread to neighboring Armenia, Azerbaijan, and the Russian Federation. That same year, PCR and sequence analysis identified African swine fever virus in samples from 3 dead female wild boars in northwestern Iran. Wild boars may serve as a reservoir.

  4. Evolutionary Dynamics of Influenza A Viruses in US Exhibition Swine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Wentworth, David E; Das, Suman R; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Killian, Mary L; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Slemons, Richard D; Bowman, Andrew S

    2016-01-15

    The role of exhibition swine in influenza A virus transmission was recently demonstrated by >300 infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant viruses among individuals who attended agricultural fairs. Through active influenza A virus surveillance in US exhibition swine and whole-genome sequencing of 380 isolates, we demonstrate that exhibition swine are actively involved in the evolution of influenza A viruses, including zoonotic strains. First, frequent introduction of influenza A viruses from commercial swine populations provides new genetic diversity in exhibition pigs each year locally. Second, genomic reassortment between viruses cocirculating in exhibition swine increases viral diversity. Third, viral migration between exhibition swine in neighboring states demonstrates that movements of exhibition pigs contributes to the spread of genetic diversity. The unexpected frequency of viral exchange between commercial and exhibition swine raises questions about the understudied interface between these populations. Overall, the complexity of viral evolution in exhibition swine indicates that novel viruses are likely to continually reemerge, presenting threats to humans.

  5. Quantifying the global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled wit...

  6. Pseudorabies virus in wild swine: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Müller, T; Hahn, E C; Tottewitz, F; Kramer, M; Klupp, B G; Mettenleiter, T C; Freuling, C

    2011-10-01

    Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV1, syn. Aujeszky's disease virus [ADV] or pseudorabies virus [PrV]), which belongs to the family Herpesviridae, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, genus Varicellovirus is the causative agent of Aujeszky's disease (AD, pseudorabies), a notifiable disease, that causes substantial economic losses to the swine industry in countries, where AD is present. Members of the family Suidae (true pigs) are the only natural hosts for PrV, although the virus can infect numerous other mammals including ruminants, carnivores and rodents. Despite the tremendous progress that has been made in controlling and eliminating PrV in domestic pigs, there is mounting evidence that PrV infections are more widespread in wild swine across the world than originally thought. Unfortunately, our understanding of the extent of PrV infections in these wild populations and of the threat to domestic swine is still fragmentary. This review aims at giving a global perspective on PrV infections in wild swine by scrutinizing the current state of knowledge concerning (i) the global occurrence of PrV infections in free-living populations of wild swine, e.g., wild boar and feral swine, (ii) the molecular characterization of wild swine PrV, (iii) infection characteristics of PrV in populations of wild swine, (iv) the risk of spillover infections to domestic pigs, (v) potential risk-mitigating measures, focusing on further research needs.

  7. THE INFECTION OF FERRETS WITH SWINE INFLUENZA VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1934-01-01

    The experiments described confirm the earlier observation of Smith, Andrewes, and Laidlaw that the swine influenza virus is pathogenic for ferrets when administered intranasally. A disease that is clinically more severe and pathologically more extensive than that described by the above workers is obtained if inoculation with the virus is performed under ether anesthesia. Animals infected in this way show at autopsy an edematous type of pneumonia of lobar distribution which may terminate fatally. The virus maintains its pathogenicity for ferrets when stored in 50 per cent glycerol at refrigerator temperature for as long as 75 days. After serial passage through 16 ferrets the virus is still capable of inducing swine influenza when mixed with H. influenzae suis and administered intranasally to swine. Ferret passage causes no apparent attenuation of the virus for swine. Serum from pigs recovered from swine influenza is capable of neutralizing the ferret-passaged virus for either swine or ferrets. Likewise serum from recovered ferrets neutralizes the swine influenza virus for either ferrets or swine. PMID:19870285

  8. An automated scraper system for swine confinement facilities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Odor and air emissions released by some commercial, large swine operations can be a nuisance. Research has shown that some swine confinement buildings can emit significant amounts of odors, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and other gases, especially from deep pit buildings with long-term manure storage. A m...

  9. Evolutionary Dynamics of Influenza A Viruses in US Exhibition Swine

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha I.; Wentworth, David E.; Das, Suman R.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Killian, Mary L.; Nolting, Jacqueline M.; Slemons, Richard D.; Bowman, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    The role of exhibition swine in influenza A virus transmission was recently demonstrated by >300 infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant viruses among individuals who attended agricultural fairs. Through active influenza A virus surveillance in US exhibition swine and whole-genome sequencing of 380 isolates, we demonstrate that exhibition swine are actively involved in the evolution of influenza A viruses, including zoonotic strains. First, frequent introduction of influenza A viruses from commercial swine populations provides new genetic diversity in exhibition pigs each year locally. Second, genomic reassortment between viruses cocirculating in exhibition swine increases viral diversity. Third, viral migration between exhibition swine in neighboring states demonstrates that movements of exhibition pigs contributes to the spread of genetic diversity. The unexpected frequency of viral exchange between commercial and exhibition swine raises questions about the understudied interface between these populations. Overall, the complexity of viral evolution in exhibition swine indicates that novel viruses are likely to continually reemerge, presenting threats to humans. PMID:26243317

  10. Global transmission of influenza viruses from humans to swine

    PubMed Central

    Gramer, Marie R.; Vincent, Amy L.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the extent to which influenza viruses jump between human and swine hosts, we undertook a large-scale phylogenetic analysis of pandemic A/H1N1/09 (H1N1pdm09) influenza virus genome sequence data. From this, we identified at least 49 human-to-swine transmission events that occurred globally during 2009–2011, thereby highlighting the ability of the H1N1pdm09 virus to transmit repeatedly from humans to swine, even following adaptive evolution in humans. Similarly, we identified at least 23 separate introductions of human seasonal (non-pandemic) H1 and H3 influenza viruses into swine globally since 1990. Overall, these results reveal the frequency with which swine are exposed to human influenza viruses, indicate that humans make a substantial contribution to the genetic diversity of influenza viruses in swine, and emphasize the need to improve biosecurity measures at the human–swine interface, including influenza vaccination of swine workers. PMID:22791604

  11. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky; Anderson, Tavis K; Berger, Kathryn; Bielejec, Filip; Burke, David F; Dudas, Gytis; Fonville, Judith M; Fouchier, Ron AM; Kellam, Paul; Koel, Bjorn F; Lemey, Philippe; Nguyen, Tung; Nuansrichy, Bundit; Peiris, JS Malik; Saito, Takehiko; Simon, Gaelle; Skepner, Eugene; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Webby, Richard J; Van Reeth, Kristien; Brookes, Sharon M; Larsen, Lars; Watson, Simon J; Brown, Ian H; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential. Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds complexity to the risk profiles for the movement of swine and the potential for swine-derived infections in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12217.001 PMID:27113719

  12. Effects of chemical amendments to swine manure on runoff quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Land-applied swine manure can be an environmental concern when runoff losses of manure constituents occur. The use of chemical amendments to mitigate these losses has been investigated for poultry litter, but materials such as swine manure have received less attention in this context, particularly ...

  13. Odorous VOC emission decay following land application of swine manure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A research project was conducted to determine how VOC emissions degrade with time after land application of swine manure slurry, and to determine how VOC emissions are affected by land application method (surface application vs. injection). Swine slurry from a pull-plug barn was applied to researc...

  14. Odorous VOC emissions following land application of swine manure slurry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Swine manure is often applied to crop land as a fertilizer source. Odor emissions from land-applied swine manure may pose a possible nuisance to downwind populations if not applied with sufficient forethought. A research project was conducted to assess the time decay of odorous volatile organic co...

  15. Global migration of influenza A viruses in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The emergence of the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic virus underscores the importance of understanding how influenza A viruses evolve in swine on a global scale. To reveal the frequency, patterns and drivers of the spread of swine influenza virus globally, we conducted the largest phylogenetic analysis of swin...

  16. Close Relationship of Ruminant Pestiviruses and Classical Swine Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Postel, Alexander; Schmeiser, Stefanie; Oguzoglu, Tuba Cigdem; Indenbirken, Daniela; Alawi, Malik; Fischer, Nicole; Grundhoff, Adam

    2015-01-01

    To determine why serum from small ruminants infected with ruminant pestiviruses reacted positively to classical swine fever virus (CSFV)–specific diagnostic tests, we analyzed 2 pestiviruses from Turkey. They differed genetically and antigenically from known Pestivirus species and were closely related to CSFV. Cross-reactions would interfere with classical swine fever diagnosis in pigs. PMID:25811683

  17. 9 CFR 52.3 - Appraisal of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... § 52.3 Appraisal of swine. (a) Herds of swine and individual breeding sows to be destroyed because they... determined by the meat or breeding value of the animals. Animals may be appraised in groups, provided that...

  18. 9 CFR 93.511 - Swine quarantine facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... quarantine facility and for the care, feed, and handling of the swine from the time of unloading at the... the swine from the time they arrive at the quarantine facility, and for the care, feed, and handling... CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS;...

  19. 9 CFR 93.511 - Swine quarantine facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... quarantine facility and for the care, feed, and handling of the swine from the time of unloading at the... the swine from the time they arrive at the quarantine facility, and for the care, feed, and handling... CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS;...

  20. 9 CFR 93.511 - Swine quarantine facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... quarantine facility and for the care, feed, and handling of the swine from the time of unloading at the... the swine from the time they arrive at the quarantine facility, and for the care, feed, and handling... CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS;...

  1. 9 CFR 93.511 - Swine quarantine facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... quarantine facility and for the care, feed, and handling of the swine from the time of unloading at the... the swine from the time they arrive at the quarantine facility, and for the care, feed, and handling... CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS;...

  2. 9 CFR 93.511 - Swine quarantine facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... quarantine facility and for the care, feed, and handling of the swine from the time of unloading at the... the swine from the time they arrive at the quarantine facility, and for the care, feed, and handling... CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS;...

  3. PREVALENCE OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE IN AN INTEGRATED SWINE OPERATION

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006 and to compare our isolates to other animal and human isolates. Isolation of C. difficile was performed u...

  4. Experimental study of temperature-sensitive chitosan/β-glycerophosphate embolic material in embolizing the basicranial rete mirabile in swines

    PubMed Central

    NING, XIANBIN; ZHAO, CHANGFU; PANG, JINFENG; DING, ZHAOYI; WANG, YUBO; XU, KAN; CHEN, HAO; LI, BINGWEI; LUO, QI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of the non-adhesive temperature-sensitive liquid embolic material, chitosan/β-glycerophosphate (C/GP), in embolizing the basicranial rete mirabile (REM) in a swine model of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (cAVM). A total of 24 domestic swines were used as the experimental animals, among which 12 pigs underwent direct embolization of one side of the REM, while the other 12 pigs underwent embolization of the bilateral REM following anastomosis of the carotid artery and jugular vein. A super-selective microcatheter was introduced into the REM during the embolization procedure, and the C/GP hydrogel was injected until an image of the REM disappeared in the angiography examination. Further angiography examinations were performed after 2 and 6 weeks, and histological examination of the REM was performed after 6 weeks. Of the 24 domestic swines, 23 cases underwent successful thrombosis. Convulsions occurred in one case and that pig died during the embolization procedure. Following embolization, the angiography observations revealed that the embolized REM was no longer able to be developed, and adhesion of the microcatheter tip with the embolic agent did not occur. In addition, no apparent revascularization was observed in the angiography examinations performed at weeks 2 and 6. Therefore, the current preliminary study indicated that use of the non-adhesive temperature-sensitive embolic material was feasible for the embolization of cAVM; thus, C/GP may be used as an ideal embolic material for the treatment of cAVM. PMID:26170955

  5. Experimental study of temperature-sensitive chitosan/β-glycerophosphate embolic material in embolizing the basicranial rete mirabile in swines.

    PubMed

    Ning, Xianbin; Zhao, Changfu; Pang, Jinfeng; Ding, Zhaoyi; Wang, Yubo; Xu, Kan; Chen, Hao; Li, Bingwei; Luo, Q I

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of the non-adhesive temperature-sensitive liquid embolic material, chitosan/β-glycerophosphate (C/GP), in embolizing the basicranial rete mirabile (REM) in a swine model of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (cAVM). A total of 24 domestic swines were used as the experimental animals, among which 12 pigs underwent direct embolization of one side of the REM, while the other 12 pigs underwent embolization of the bilateral REM following anastomosis of the carotid artery and jugular vein. A super-selective microcatheter was introduced into the REM during the embolization procedure, and the C/GP hydrogel was injected until an image of the REM disappeared in the angiography examination. Further angiography examinations were performed after 2 and 6 weeks, and histological examination of the REM was performed after 6 weeks. Of the 24 domestic swines, 23 cases underwent successful thrombosis. Convulsions occurred in one case and that pig died during the embolization procedure. Following embolization, the angiography observations revealed that the embolized REM was no longer able to be developed, and adhesion of the microcatheter tip with the embolic agent did not occur. In addition, no apparent revascularization was observed in the angiography examinations performed at weeks 2 and 6. Therefore, the current preliminary study indicated that use of the non-adhesive temperature-sensitive embolic material was feasible for the embolization of cAVM; thus, C/GP may be used as an ideal embolic material for the treatment of cAVM.

  6. Origin of the European avian-like swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Krumbholz, Andi; Lange, Jeannette; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Groth, Marco; Platzer, Matthias; Kanrai, Pumaree; Pleschka, Stephan; Scholtissek, Christoph; Büttner, Mathias; Dürrwald, Ralf; Zell, Roland

    2014-11-01

    The avian-like swine influenza viruses emerged in 1979 in Belgium and Germany. Thereafter, they spread through many European swine-producing countries, replaced the circulating classical swine H1N1 influenza viruses, and became endemic. Serological and subsequent molecular data indicated an avian source, but details remained obscure due to a lack of relevant avian influenza virus sequence data. Here, the origin of the European avian-like swine influenza viruses was analysed using a collection of 16 European swine H1N1 influenza viruses sampled in 1979-1981 in Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, Italy and France, as well as several contemporaneous avian influenza viruses of various serotypes. The phylogenetic trees suggested a triple reassortant with a unique genotype constellation. Time-resolved maximum clade credibility trees indicated times to the most recent common ancestors of 34-46 years (before 2008) depending on the RNA segment and the method of tree inference. © 2014 The Authors.

  7. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  8. Comparison of Voice Quality Between Patients Who Underwent Inferior Turbinoplasty or Radiofrequency Cauterization.

    PubMed

    Göker, Ayşe Enise; Aydoğdu, İmran; Saltürk, Ziya; Berkiten, Güler; Atar, Yavuz; Kumral, Tolgar Lütfi; Uyar, Yavuz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the vocal quality in patients who underwent either submucosal turbinectomy or radiofrequency cauterization. In this study, we enrolled 60 patients diagnosed with inferior concha hypertrophy. These patients were divided into two groups by using computer program "Research Randomizer." Of the 60 patients, 30 underwent submucosal inferior turbinoplasty and 30 underwent radiofrequency cauterization. The control group was composed of 30 healthy adults with no nasal or upper aerodigestive system pathology. The patients were checked at weeks 1, 2, and 4. Voice records were taken before the procedure and at week 4 postprocedure. The mean age of patients in the inferior turbinoplasty group was 29.4 years (range: 19-42 years); in the radiofrequency group, it was 30.30 years (range: 18-50 years). There was no statistical difference in age between groups. In the inferior turbinoplasty group, there were 16 male and 14 female patients, and in the radiofrequency group, there were 13 male and 17 female patients. There was no significant difference in the number of males and females between groups. Voice professionals, especially singers, actors, and actresses, should be informed about possible voice changes before undergoing endonasal surgery because these individuals are more sensitive to changes in resonance organs. We believe that voice quality should be regarded as a highly important parameter when measuring the success of endonasal surgery. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    HLHS; Congenital heart - hypoplastic left heart; Cyanotic heart disease - hypoplastic left heart ... Hypoplastic left heart is a rare type of congenital heart disease. It is more common in males than in females. As ...

  10. Patterns of Cellular Gene Expression in Swine Macrophages Infected with Highly Virulent Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Experimental exposure of swine to highly virulent Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) strain Brescia causes an invariably fatal disease of all infected animals by 8 to 14 days post-infection. Host mechanisms involved in this severe outcome of infection have not been clearly established. To understa...

  11. 9 CFR 93.504 - Import permits for swine and for swine specimens for diagnostic purposes; and reservation fees...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-mouth disease exists. (3) An application for permit to import swine may also be denied because of... be 100 percent of the cost of providing care, feed, and handling during quarantine, as estimated by... swine from regions where foot-and-mouth disease or rinderpest exists. This paragraph (c) applies to the...

  12. N-linked Glycosylation of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia Erns Glycoprotein Alters Virulence in Swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Erns is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). We recently reported the influence of glycosylation of E2 in the virulence of CSFV strain Brescia. Here, we studied the effect of Erns N-linked glycosylation pattern on virulence of CSFV strain Brescia in swine. ...

  13. Greenhouse gas emission and groundwater pollution potential of soils amended with raw swine manure, dry and wet pyrolyzed swine biochars

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this research is to study the greenhouse gas emission and groundwater pollution potentials of the soils amended with raw swine solid and swine biochars made from different thermochemical conditions. Triplicate sets of small pots were designed: 1) control soil with a 50/50 mixture of...

  14. Examination of the Aerobic Microflora of Swine Feces and Stored Swine Manure.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Terence R; Cotta, Michael A

    2016-03-01

    Understanding antibiotic resistance in agricultural ecosystems is critical for determining the effects of subtherapeutic and therapeutic uses of antibiotics for domestic animals. This study was conducted to ascertain the relative levels of antibiotic resistance in the aerobic bacterial population to tetracycline, tylosin, and erythromycin. Swine feces and manure samples were plated onto various agar media with and without antibiotics and incubated at 37°C. Colonies were counted daily. Randomly selected colonies were isolated and characterized by 16S rRNA sequence analyses and additional antibiotic resistance and biochemical analyses. Colonies were recovered at levels of 10 to 10 CFU mL for swine slurry and 10 to 10 CFU g swine feces, approximately 100-fold lower than numbers obtained under anaerobic conditions. Addition of antibiotics to the media resulted in counts that were 60 to 80% of those in control media without added antibiotics. Polymerase chain reaction analyses for antibiotic resistance genes demonstrated the presence of a number of different resistance genes from the isolates. The recoverable aerobic microflora of swine feces and manure contain high percentages of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which include both known and novel genera and species, and a variety of antibiotic resistance genes. Further analyses of these and additional isolates should provide additional information on these organisms as potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes in these ecosystems.

  15. Sumoylation of the Core Protein in Classical Swine Fever Virus is Essential for Virulence in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The classical swine fever virus core protein makes up the nucleocapsid of the virus, and is serves both as a protective function for the viral RNA and a transcriptional regulator in the host cell. To identify host proteins that interact with the viral Core protein we utilized the yeast two-hybrid to...

  16. Classical Swine Fever Virus p7 protein is a viroporin involved in virulence in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The non-structural protein p7 of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) is a hydrophobic polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 7 kDa. The protein contains two hydrophobic stretches of amino acids interrupted by a short charged segment that are predicted to form transmembrane helices and a cytos...

  17. Thermodynamic correction of particle concentrations measured by underwing probes on fast flying aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, R.; Spichtinger, P.; Mahnke, C.; Klingebiel, M.; Afchine, A.; Petzold, A.; Krämer, M.; Costa, A.; Molleker, S.; Jurkat, T.; Minikin, A.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Particle concentration measurements with underwing probes on aircraft are impacted by air compression upstream of the instrument body as a function of flight velocity. In particular for fast-flying aircraft the necessity arises to account for compression of the air sample volume. Hence, a correction procedure is needed to invert measured particle number concentrations to ambient conditions that is commonly applicable for different instruments to gain comparable results. In the compression region where the detection of particles occurs (i.e. under factual measurement conditions), pressure and temperature of the air sample are increased compared to ambient (undisturbed) conditions in certain distance away from the aircraft. Conventional procedures for scaling the measured number densities to ambient conditions presume that the particle penetration speed through the instruments' detection area equals the aircraft speed (True Air Speed, TAS). However, particle imaging instruments equipped with pitot-tubes measuring the Probe Air Speed (PAS) of each underwing probe reveal PAS values systematically below those of the TAS. We conclude that the deviation between PAS and TAS is mainly caused by the compression of the probed air sample. From measurements during two missions in 2014 with the German Gulfstream G-550 (HALO - High Altitude LOng range) research aircraft we develop a procedure to correct the measured particle concentration to ambient conditions using a thermodynamic approach. With the provided equation the corresponding concentration correction factor ξ is applicable to the high frequency measurements of each underwing probe which is equipped with its own air speed sensor (e.g. a pitot-tube). ξ-values of 1 to 0.85 are calculated for air speeds (i.e. TAS) between 60 and 260 m s-1. From HALO data it is found that ξ does not significantly vary between the different deployed instruments. Thus, for the current HALO underwing probe configuration a parameterisation of

  18. Heart palpitations

    MedlinePlus

    ... or longer Echocardiogram Electrophysiology study (EPS) Coronary angiography ... E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ...

  19. Tolerogenicity of Donor MHC-matched Skin Grafts in Previously Tolerant MGH Miniature Swine1

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Joshua; Scalea, Joseph; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Okumi, Masayoshi; Griesemer, Adam; Hirakata, Atsushi; Etter, Justin; Gillon, Bradford; Moran, Shannon; Shimizu, Akira; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Sachs, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Long-term tolerance (LTT) of class I disparate renal allografts in miniature swine can be induced by a short-course of cyclosporine and persists for 3 to 4 months after grafts are removed. Donor class I peptide immunization 6 weeks after graftectomy of tolerated kidneys leads to sensitization but, donor skin grafts do not. Here, we tested the hypothesis that skin grafts prevent rejection following simultaneous peptide administration and skin grafting. Methods Miniature swine underwent bilateral nephrectomy and class I mismatched renal transplantation with a 12-day course of CyA to induce LTT. Tolerated allografts were then replaced with recipient-matched kidneys, and animals were challenged with simultaneous donor-type skin grafts and peptide. Six-weeks later, second donor-matched kidneys were transplanted without immunosuppression and immune responses were characterized. Results Animals treated only with peptide (n=2) rejected subsequent renal transplants in 3–5 days with strong in-vitro anti-donor responses. Of five recipients of skin-plus-peptide, two accepted kidneys long-term, one demonstrated modestly prolonged survival (11 days) and two rejected rapidly (5–7 days). The two long-term acceptors maintained donor-specific hyporesponsiveness in vitro. Conclusions Sensitization by class I peptide in previously tolerant swine could be prevented by simultaneous class I skin grafts. These data suggest that skin grafts may actually augment rather than abrogate down-regulation in some cases. A mechanistic hypothesis for this surprising result is that recognition of class I antigens via the direct rather than indirect pathway of antigen presentation promotes tolerance by expanding regulatory T cells. PMID:23269447

  20. 75 FR 33574 - Notice of Revision and Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Swine Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-14

    ... interstate spread of swine diseases and protect swine health and to request extension of approval of the... INFORMATION CONTACT: For information on regulations to prevent the interstate spread of swine diseases and to... interstate movement of swine within a production system to prevent the spread of swine diseases, and Part 85...

  1. Heart Attack Symptoms in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Heart Attack Treatment of a Heart Attack Life After a Heart Attack Heart Failure About Heart Failure ... a Heart Attack • Treatment of a Heart Attack • Life After a Heart Attack Lifestyle Changes Recovery FAQs • Heart ...

  2. Quantitative approach for the risk assessment of African swine fever and Classical swine fever introduction into the United States through legal imports of pigs and swine products

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Ibatá, Diana María; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Quijada, Darla; Burton, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    The US livestock safety strongly depends on its capacity to prevent the introduction of Transboundary Animal Diseases (TADs). Therefore, accurate and updated information on the location and origin of those potential TADs risks is essential, so preventive measures as market restrictions can be put on place. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the current risk of African swine fever (ASF) and Classical swine fever (CSF) introduction into the US through the legal importations of live pigs and swine products using a quantitative approach that could be later applied to other risks. Four quantitative stochastic risk assessment models were developed to estimate the monthly probabilities of ASF and CSF release into the US, and the exposure of susceptible populations (domestic and feral swine) to these introductions at state level. The results suggest a low annual probability of either ASF or CSF introduction into the US, by any of the analyzed pathways (5.5*10−3). Being the probability of introduction through legal imports of live pigs (1.8*10−3 for ASF, and 2.5*10−3 for CSF) higher than the risk of legally imported swine products (8.90*10−4 for ASF, and 1.56*10−3 for CSF). This could be caused due to the low probability of exposure associated with this type of commodity (products). The risk of feral pigs accessing to swine products discarded in landfills was slightly higher than the potential exposure of domestic pigs through swill feeding. The identification of the months at highest risk, the origin of the higher risk imports, and the location of the US states most vulnerable to those introductions (Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin for live swine and California, Florida and Texas for swine products), is valuable information that would help to design prevention, risk-mitigation and early-detection strategies that would help to minimize the catastrophic consequences of potential ASF/CSF introductions into the US. PMID:28797058

  3. Quantitative approach for the risk assessment of African swine fever and Classical swine fever introduction into the United States through legal imports of pigs and swine products.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Ibatá, Diana María; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Quijada, Darla; Burton, Kenneth; Mur, Lina

    2017-01-01

    The US livestock safety strongly depends on its capacity to prevent the introduction of Transboundary Animal Diseases (TADs). Therefore, accurate and updated information on the location and origin of those potential TADs risks is essential, so preventive measures as market restrictions can be put on place. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the current risk of African swine fever (ASF) and Classical swine fever (CSF) introduction into the US through the legal importations of live pigs and swine products using a quantitative approach that could be later applied to other risks. Four quantitative stochastic risk assessment models were developed to estimate the monthly probabilities of ASF and CSF release into the US, and the exposure of susceptible populations (domestic and feral swine) to these introductions at state level. The results suggest a low annual probability of either ASF or CSF introduction into the US, by any of the analyzed pathways (5.5*10-3). Being the probability of introduction through legal imports of live pigs (1.8*10-3 for ASF, and 2.5*10-3 for CSF) higher than the risk of legally imported swine products (8.90*10-4 for ASF, and 1.56*10-3 for CSF). This could be caused due to the low probability of exposure associated with this type of commodity (products). The risk of feral pigs accessing to swine products discarded in landfills was slightly higher than the potential exposure of domestic pigs through swill feeding. The identification of the months at highest risk, the origin of the higher risk imports, and the location of the US states most vulnerable to those introductions (Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin for live swine and California, Florida and Texas for swine products), is valuable information that would help to design prevention, risk-mitigation and early-detection strategies that would help to minimize the catastrophic consequences of potential ASF/CSF introductions into the US.

  4. African swine fever: an epidemiological update.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Mur, L; Martínez-López, B

    2012-03-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is one of the most important swine diseases, mainly because of its significant sanitary and socioeconomic consequences. This review gives an update on the epidemiology of the disease and reviews key issues and strategies to improve control of the disease and promote its eradication. Several characteristics of ASF virus (ASFV) make its control and eradication difficult, including the absence of available vaccines, marked virus resistance in infected material and contaminated animal products, and a complex epidemiology and transmission involving tick reservoir virus interactions. The incidence of ASF has not only increased on the African continent over the last 15 years, so that it now affects West African countries, Mauritius and Madagascar, but it has also reached new areas, such as the Caucasus region in 2007. In fact, the rapid spread of the disease on the European continent and the uncontrolled situation in the Russian Federation places all countries at great risk as a result of intense global trade. The proximity of some affected areas to the European Union (EU) borders (<150 km) has increased concerns about the potential economic consequences of an ASF incursion into the EU pig sector. Establishing effective surveillance, control and eradication programmes that implicate all actors (veterinarians, farmers, and policy makers) is essential for controlling ASF. African swine fever -free countries should be aware of the potential risk of ASF incursion and implement risk reduction measures such as trade controls and other sanitary measures. This review will discuss lessons learnt so far about ASF control, current challenges to its control and future studies needed to support global efforts at prevention and control.

  5. Advances in Swine Biomedical Model Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Lunney, Joan K.

    2007-01-01

    This review is a short update on the diversity of swine biomedical models and the importance of genomics in their continued development. The swine has been used as a major mammalian model for human studies because of the similarity in size and physiology, and in organ development and disease progression. The pig model allows for deliberately timed studies, imaging of internal vessels and organs using standard human technologies, and collection of repeated peripheral samples and, at kill, detailed mucosal tissues. The ability to use pigs from the same litter, or cloned or transgenic pigs, facilitates comparative analyses and genetic mapping. The availability of numerous well defined cell lines, representing a broad range of tissues, further facilitates testing of gene expression, drug susceptibility, etc. Thus the pig is an excellent biomedical model for humans. For genomic applications it is an asset that the pig genome has high sequence and chromosome structure homology with humans. With the swine genome sequence now well advanced there are improving genetic and proteomic tools for these comparative analyses. The review will discuss some of the genomic approaches used to probe these models. The review will highlight genomic studies of melanoma and of infectious disease resistance, discussing issues to consider in designing such studies. It will end with a short discussion of the potential for genomic approaches to develop new alternatives for control of the most economically important disease of pigs, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), and the potential for applying knowledge gained with this virus for human viral infectious disease studies. PMID:17384736

  6. Heart Truth

    MedlinePlus

    ... overall health and will allow you to enjoy quality time with your loved ones. Make a commitment to yourself and share it with a loved one for support. Learn more about The Heart Truth program, the risk factors for heart disease, and the stories of other ...

  7. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... test your blood several times during the first 24 hours to 48 hours after yours symptoms start.Other ... do to help prevent heart attack?A healthy lifestyle can help prevent heart attack. This ... your stress.Controlling your blood pressure.Managing your ...

  8. Heart Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... español An Incredible Machine Bonus poster (PDF) The Human Heart Anatomy Blood The Conduction System The Coronary Arteries The Heart Valves The Heartbeat Vasculature of the Arm Vasculature of the Head Vasculature of the Leg Vasculature of the Torso ...

  9. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases.

  10. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A.; Zugck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  11. Surrogate pregnancy in a patient who underwent radical hysterectomy and bilateral transposition of ovaries.

    PubMed

    Azem, Foad; Yovel, Israel; Wagman, Israel; Kapostiansky, Rita; Lessing, Joseph B; Amit, Ami

    2003-05-01

    To evaluate IVF-surrogate pregnancy in a patient with ovarian transposition after radical hysterectomy for carcinoma of the cervix. Case report. A maternity hospital in Tel Aviv that is a major tertiary care and referral center. A 29-year-old woman who underwent Wertheim's hysterectomy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix and ovarian transposition before total pelvic irradiation. Standard IVF treatment, transabdominal oocyte retrieval, and transfer to surrogate mother. Outcome of IVF cycle. A twin pregnancy in the first cycle. This is the second reported case of controlled ovarian stimulation and oocyte retrieval performed on a transposed ovary.

  12. [Antigenic diversity of African swine fever viruses].

    PubMed

    Sereda, A D; Balyshev, V M

    2011-01-01

    Data on the seroimmunotypic and hemadsorbing characteristics of African swine fever virus (ASF) are summarized. According to the results of immunological sampling in pigs and those of hemagglutination inhibition test, the known ASFV strains and isolates were divided into 11 groups, 8 were characterized as seroimmunogroups having their specific reference strains. A 110-140-kD ASFV serotype-specific nonstructural major glycoprotein was identified. It is suggested that it is the glycoprotein that corresponds to the genetic engineering detected virus-specific homolog of lymphocyte membrane protein CD2, gene deletion of which results in the loss of hemadsorbing properties by ASFV.

  13. Myelogenous Leukemia in Adult Inbred MHC Defined Miniature Swine: a model for human myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Patricia S.; Teague, Alexander G.S.; Fishman, Brian; Fishman, Aaron S.; Hanekamp, John S.; Moran, Shannon G.; Wikiel, Krzysztof J.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Lo, Diana P.; Duggan, Michael; Arn, J. Scott; Billiter, Bob; Horner, Ben; Houser, Stuart; Yeap, Beow Yong; Westmoreland, Susan V.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; McMorrow, Isabel M.; Sachs, David H.; Bronson, Roderick T; Huang, Christene A.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript reports on five cases of spontaneous myelogenous leukemia, similar to human disease, occurring within highly inbred, histocompatible sublines of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) MHC-defined miniature swine. In cases where a neoplasm was suspected based on clinical observations, samples were obtained for complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, and flow cytometric analysis. Animals confirmed to have neoplasms were euthanized and underwent necropsy. Histological samples were obtained from abnormal tissues and suspect lesions. The phenotype of the malignancies was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of processed peripheral blood mononuclear cells and affected tissues. Five cases of spontaneous myeloid leukemia were identified in adult animals older than 30 months of age. All animals presented with symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, and marked leukocytosis. At autopsy, all animals had systemic disease involvement and presented with severe hepatosplenomegaly. Three of the five myelogenous leukemias have successfully been expanded in vitro. The clustered incidence of disease in this closed herd suggests that genetic factors may be contributing to disease development. Myelogenous leukemia cell lines established from inbred sublines of MGH MHC-defined miniature swine have the potential to be utilized as a model to evaluate therapies of human leukemia. PMID:20079939

  14. The emulsified perfluorocarbon Oxycyte improves spinal cord injury in a swine model of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Mahon, R T; Auker, C R; Bradley, S G; Mendelson, A; Hall, A A

    2013-03-01

    A prospective, animal model for pharmacological intervention of decompression sickness (DCS), including spinal cord (SC) injury. Signs and symptoms of DCS can include joint pain, skin discoloration, cardiopulmonary congestion and SC injury; severity ranges from trivial to fatal. Non-recompressive therapy for DCS may improve time-to-treatment and therefore impact mortality and morbidity. Oxycyte at 5 cc kg(-1) provides both SC protection and statistically significant survival benefit in a swine model of DCS. The purpose of this study was to test whether a reduced dose of Oxycyte (3 cc kg(-1)) would provide similar benefit. Silver Spring, MD, USA METHODS: Male Yorkshire swine (N=50) underwent a non-linear compression profile to 200 fsw (feet of sea water), which was identical to previous work using the 5 cc kg(-1) dose of Oxycyte. After 31 min of bottom time, decompression was initiated at 30 fsw per minute until surface pressure was reached. Following decompression and the onset of DCS, intravenous Oxycyte or saline was administered with concurrent 100% O(2) for 1 h. The primary end point was DCS-induced mortality, with Tarlov score and SC histopathology as secondary end points. Oxycyte administration of 3 cc kg(-1) following surfacing produced no significant detectable survival benefit. Animals that received Oxycyte, however, had reduced SC lesion area. Further studies to determine the lowest fully efficacious dose of Oxycyte for the adjunct treatment of DCS are warranted.

  15. Radiation hygienization of cattle and swine slurry with high energy electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, Krzysztof; Olszewska, Halina; Paluszak, Zbigniew; Zimek, Zbigniew; Kałuska, Iwona; Skowron, Karolina Jadwiga

    2013-06-01

    The research was carried out to assess the efficiency of radiation hygienization of cattle and swine slurry of different density using the high energy electron beam based on the inactivation rate of Salmonella ssp, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp and Ascaris suum eggs. The experiment was conducted with use of the linear electron accelerator Elektronika 10/10 in Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Warsaw. The inoculated slurry samples underwent hygienization with high energy electron beam of 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 kGy. Numbers of reisolated bacteria were determined according to the MPN method, using typical microbiological media. Theoretical lethal doses, D90 doses and hygienization efficiency of high energy electron beam were determined. The theoretical lethal doses for all tested bacteria ranged from 3.63 to 8.84 kGy and for A. suum eggs from 4.07 to 5.83 kGy. Salmonella rods turned out to be the most sensitive and Enterococcus spp were the most resistant to electron beam hygienization. The effectiveness or radiation hygienization was lower in cattle than in swine slurry and in thick than in thin one. Also the species or even the serotype of bacteria determined the dose needed to inactivation of microorganisms.

  16. Myelogenous leukemia in adult inbred MHC-defined miniature swine: a model for human myeloid leukemias.

    PubMed

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Cho, Patricia S; Teague, Alexander G S; Fishman, Brian; Fishman, Aaron S; Hanekamp, John S; Moran, Shannon G; Wikiel, Krzysztof J; Ferguson, Kelly K; Lo, Diana P; Duggan, Michael; Arn, J Scott; Billiter, Bob; Horner, Ben; Houser, Stuart; Yeap, Beow Yong; Westmoreland, Susan V; Spitzer, Thomas R; McMorrow, Isabel M; Sachs, David H; Bronson, Roderick T; Huang, Christene A

    2010-06-15

    This manuscript reports on five cases of spontaneous myelogenous leukemia, similar to human disease, occurring within highly inbred, histocompatible sublines of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) MHC-defined miniature swine. In cases where a neoplasm was suspected based on clinical observations, samples were obtained for complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, and flow cytometric analysis. Animals confirmed to have neoplasms were euthanized and underwent necropsy. Histological samples were obtained from abnormal tissues and suspect lesions. The phenotype of the malignancies was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of processed peripheral blood mononuclear cells and affected tissues. Five cases of spontaneous myeloid leukemia were identified in adult animals older than 30 months of age. All animals presented with symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, and marked leukocytosis. At autopsy, all animals had systemic disease involvement and presented with severe hepatosplenomegaly. Three of the five myelogenous leukemias have successfully been expanded in vitro. The clustered incidence of disease in this closed herd suggests that genetic factors may be contributing to disease development. Myelogenous leukemia cell lines established from inbred sublines of MGH MHC-defined miniature swine have the potential to be utilized as a model to evaluate therapies of human leukemia. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Juvenile Swine Surgical Alveolar Cleft Model to Test Novel Autologous Stem Cell Therapies.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Montserrat; Morse, Justin C; Halevi, Alexandra E; Emodi, Omri; Pharaon, Michael R; Wood, Jeyhan S; van Aalst, John A

    2015-09-01

    Reconstruction of craniofacial congenital bone defects has historically relied on autologous bone grafts. Engineered bone using mesenchymal stem cells from the umbilical cord on electrospun nanomicrofiber scaffolds offers an alternative to current treatments. This preclinical study presents the development of a juvenile swine model with a surgically created maxillary cleft defect for future testing of tissue-engineered implants for bone generation. Five-week-old pigs (n=6) underwent surgically created maxillary (alveolar) defects to determine critical-sized defect and the quality of treatment outcomes with rib, iliac crest cancellous bone, and tissue-engineered scaffolds. Pigs were sacrificed at 1 month. Computed tomography scans were obtained at days 0 and 30, at the time of euthanasia. Histological evaluation was performed on newly formed bone within the surgical defect. A 1 cm surgically created defect healed with no treatment, the 2 cm defect did not heal. A subsequently created 1.7 cm defect, physiologically similar to a congenitally occurring alveolar cleft in humans, from the central incisor to the canine, similarly did not heal. Rib graft treatment did not incorporate into adjacent normal bone; cancellous bone and the tissue-engineered graft healed the critical-sized defect. This work establishes a juvenile swine alveolar cleft model with critical-sized defect approaching 1.7 cm. Both cancellous bone and tissue engineered graft generated bridging bone formation in the surgically created alveolar cleft defect.

  18. Effects of tibial intraosseous and intravenous administration of Hextend on time of administration and hemodynamics in a hypovolemic swine model.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James; Passmore, Alex; Leger, Sephra; Lannan, Johnathon; Bentley, Michael; Johnson, Don

    2016-01-01

    To determine if there were significant differences between the tibial intraosseous (TIO) and intravenous (IV) administration of Hextend relative to time and in hemodynamics in a hypovolemic model. Vivarium. Yorkshire swine; sample size was based on a power of 80 percent, α of 0.05, and a large effect size of 0.6. Swine were randomly assigned to one of three groups: TIO (n = 7), IV (n = 7), and control (n = 7). Swine were exsanguinated 30 percent of their blood volume. Hextend (500 mL) was administered either by the TIO or IV route; the control group received none. Time of administration of Hextend; systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), and stroke volume (SV) data were collected every 2 minutes and compared by group over 8 minutes. An independent t test determined that there was no significant difference between groups relative to time of administration (p = 0.001). A repeated analysis of variance found that there were no significant differences in SBP, DBP, MAP, HR, CO, and SV between the TIO and IV groups over 8 minutes (p > 0.05) but significant differences between both TIO and IV compared to the control group (p < 0.05). TIO is an effective and easily used method to administer Hextend for patients in hypovolemic shock. Based upon the findings of this study, the TIO route might be considered the first choice for rapid vascular access and the administration of Hextend.

  19. Prevalence of swine viral and bacterial pathogens in rodents and stray cats captured around pig farms in Korea.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Seo, Tae Won; Yoon, Byung-Il; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Han, Jeong Hee; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2013-12-30

    In 2008, 102 rodents and 24 stray cats from the areas around 9 pig farms in northeast South Korea were used to determine the prevalence of the following selected swine pathogens: ten viral pathogens [porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), rotavirus, classical swine fever virus (CSFV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), pseudorabies virus (PRV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV)] and four bacterial pathogens (Brucella, Leptospira, Salmonella and Lawsonia intracellularis). In total, 1,260 tissue samples from 102 rodents and 24 stray cats were examined by specific PCR and RT-PCR assays, including tissue samples of the brain, tonsils, lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, small intestine, large intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes. The percentages of PCR-positive rodents for the porcine pathogens were as follows: 63.7% for Leptospira, 39.2% for Brucella, 6.8% for Salmonella, 15.7% for L. intracellularis, 14.7% for PCV2 and 3.9% for EMCV. The percentages of PCR-positive stray cats for the swine pathogens were as follows: 62.5% for Leptospira, 25% for Brucella, 12.5% for Salmonella, 12.5% for L. intracellularis and 4.2% for PEDV. These results may be helpful for developing control measures to prevent the spread of infectious diseases of pigs.

  20. In-situ pyrogenic production of biodiesel from swine fat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jechan; Tsang, Yiu Fai; Jung, Jong-Min; Oh, Jeong-Ik; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Kwon, Eilhann E

    2016-11-01

    In-situ production of fatty acid methyl esters from swine fat via thermally induced pseudo-catalytic transesterification on silica was investigated in this study. Instead of methanol, dimethyl carbonate (DMC) was used as acyl acceptor to achieve environmental benefits and economic viability. Thermo-gravimetric analysis of swine fat reveals that swine fat contains 19.57wt.% of water and impurities. Moreover, the fatty acid profiles obtained under various conditions (extracted swine oil+methanol+NaOH, extracted swine oil+DMC+pseudo-catalytic, and swine fat+DMC+pseudo-catalytic) were compared. These profiles were identical, showing that the introduced in-situ transesterification is technically feasible. This also suggests that in-situ pseudo-catalytic transesterification has a high tolerance against impurities. This study also shows that FAME yield via in-situ pseudo-catalytic transesterification of swine fat reached up to 97.2% at 380°C. Therefore, in-situ pseudo-catalytic transesterification can be applicable to biodiesel production of other oil-bearing biomass feedstocks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinicopathological characteristics of patients who underwent additional gastrectomy after incomplete endoscopic resection for early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Jin; Lee, Dong Ho; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Nayoung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the clinicopathological characteristics and factors that lead to residual tumors in patients who underwent additional gastrectomy for incomplete endoscopic resection (ER) for early gastric cancer (EGC). Between 2003 and 2013, the medical records of patients underwent additional gastrectomy after incomplete ER were retrospectively reviewed. Those diagnosed with the presence of histologic residual tumor in specimens obtained by gastrectomy were assigned to the residual tumor (RT) group (n = 47); those diagnosed with the absence of histologic residual tumor were assigned to the nonresidual tumor (NRT) group (n = 33). In the multivariate analysis, endoscopic piecemeal resection, Helicobacter pylori infection, large tumor size (>2 cm), and both (lateral and vertical) marginal involvement were independent factors of the presence of residual tumor in additional gastrectomy after incomplete resection ER for EGC and the rates of independent factors were significantly higher in the RT group than in the NRT group (P < 0.05). Before ER, preexamination to accurately determine the GC invasion depth and the presence of LN metastasis is very important. During ER, surgeons should attempt to perform en bloc resection and to resect the mucous membrane with adequate safety margins to prevent tumor invasion into the lateral and vertical margins. PMID:28207556

  2. Malnutrition and Clinical Outcome of 234 Head and Neck Cancer Patients who Underwent Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Jorge; Santos, Carla Adriana; Brito, José

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients who underwent percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) present malnutrition risk and speech impairments. Their assessment relies on objective anthropometric/laboratory data. Focusing on HNC PEG patients, our aims were to evaluate: 1) outcome; 2) nutritional status when the patients underwent PEG; and 3) association of nutritional status/outcome, creating a survival predictive model. We evaluated the outcome based on NRS 2002, dietary assessment, body mass index (BMI), mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), triceps skinfold thickness (TSF), mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC), albumin, transferrin, and cholesterol on the day of gastrostomy. Using BMI, TSF, MAMC, and laboratory data, a survival predictive model was created. Of the 234 patients (cancer stages III-IV), 149 died, 33 were still PEG-fed, and 36 resumed oral intake (NRS-2002≥3, caloric needs <50% in all). BMI was 12.7-43. 189, 197, and 168 patients displayed, respectively, low MUAC, TSF, and MAMC. 91, 155, and 119 patients displayed low albumin, transferrin, and cholesterol. Albumin, cholesterol, and transferrin were strongly associated with the outcome. A predictive model was created, discriminating between short-term survivors (<4 months) and long-term survivors. HNC patients were malnourished. Using anthropometric/laboratory parameters, a predictive model provides discrimination between patients surviving PEG for <4 months and long-term survivors. Teams taking care of PEG patients may provide special support to potential short-term survivors.

  3. Sarcopenia: a new predictor of postoperative complications for elderly gastric cancer patients who underwent radical gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong-Jun; Zhang, Feng-Min; Zhang, Fei-Yu; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Shen, Xian; Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Chen, Xiao-Xi

    2017-05-01

    A geriatric assessment is needed to identify high-risk elderly patients with gastric cancer. However, the current geriatric assessment has been considered to be either time-consuming or subjective. The present study aimed to investigate the predictive effect of sarcopenia on the postoperative complications for elderly patients who underwent radical gastrectomy. We conducted a prospective study of patients who underwent radical gastrectomy from August 2014 to December 2015. Computed tomography-assessed lumbar skeletal muscle, handgrip strength, and gait speed were measured to define sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was present in 69 of 240 patients (28.8%) and was associated with lower body mass index, lower serum albumin, lower hemoglobin, and higher nutritional risk screening 2002 scores. Postoperative complications significantly increased in the sarcopenic patients (49.3% versus 24.6%, P < 0.001), compared with nonsarcopenic patients. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that sarcopenia (odds ratio: 2.959, 95% CI: 1.629-5.373, P < 0.001) and the Charlson comorbidity index ≥2 (odds ratio: 3.357, 95% CI: 1.144-9.848, P = 0.027) were independent risk factors for postoperative complications. Sarcopenia, presented as a new geriatric assessment factor, was a strong and independent risk factor for postoperative complications of elderly patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Spectrum analysis of Chinese vowels formant in patients with tongue carcinoma underwent hemiglossectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yujie; Numan, Fahmi Ahmed; Li, Kan; Liao, Guiqing

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Tongue is the most important phonatory organ in stomatognathic system. Radical resection of tongue squamous cell carcinoma can cause tongue defect and result in serious oral dysfunction, especially in phonetic function. This study aims to reveal the influence of tongue cancer, tongue defect and tongue reconstructions to phonetic function of tongue cancer patients. Study design: Formant spectrum analysis of Chinese vowels was performed by linear predictive coding (LPC) in tongue squamous cell carcinoma patients (before surgery and 3 months, 9 months and 2 years after surgery) and normal people. Patients with tongue squamous cell carcinoma were divided into reconstruction group and non-reconstruction group. In reconstruction group, patients underwent tongue reconstruction with radial forearm free flap (RFFF) and lateral arm free flap (LAFF), respectively. Results: 45 patients and 40 normal people were included. Differences were statistically significant between patients and normal persons, between patients before surgery and after surgery, between non-reconstruction group and construction group 2 years after operation. No statistical significance was found between patients underwent tongue reconstruction with RFFF or LAFF 2 years after operation. Conclusions: This study showed that tongue cancer and tongue defect after radical resections affected phonetic function of patients. Tongue reconstruction with free flaps could restore phonetic function to some extent. The efficiency of tongue reconstruction with RFFF and LAFF respectively were similar. PMID:25932247

  5. [Analgesic effect of TES therapy in the early postoperative period in patients who underwent tonsillectomy].

    PubMed

    Semënov, F V; Kade, A Kh; Banashek-Meshchiarkova, T V; Vartanian, M S

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study peculiarities of the analgesic action of therapeutic electrical stimulation (TES therapy) in the early postoperative period in the patients who underwent tonsillectomy. A total of 60 patients admitted for this surgery to the specialized otorhinolaryngological department were available for observation. They were divided into two groups depending on the pain relief strategy. The patients of the study group (n=30) underwent courses of transcranial electrical stimulation on a daily basis (from the onset of hospitalization) in addition to the administration of a standard analgetic. The standard dose of tramadol (2.0 ml) was given to the patients of the control group (n=30) who complained of strong pain. The results of the objective and subjective estimations indicate that the degree of pharyngeal pain in the patients treated with TES therapy and the standard analgetic was significantly different. The patients receiving TES therapy could sooner resume their habitual diet and required smaller amounts of the analgetic which makes this modality a cost-effective supplement to the standard postoperative treatment.

  6. Spectrum analysis of Chinese vowels formant in patients with tongue carcinoma underwent hemiglossectomy.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yujie; Numan, Fahmi Ahmed; Li, Kan; Liao, Guiqing

    2015-01-01

    Tongue is the most important phonatory organ in stomatognathic system. Radical resection of tongue squamous cell carcinoma can cause tongue defect and result in serious oral dysfunction, especially in phonetic function. This study aims to reveal the influence of tongue cancer, tongue defect and tongue reconstructions to phonetic function of tongue cancer patients. Formant spectrum analysis of Chinese vowels was performed by linear predictive coding (LPC) in tongue squamous cell carcinoma patients (before surgery and 3 months, 9 months and 2 years after surgery) and normal people. Patients with tongue squamous cell carcinoma were divided into reconstruction group and non-reconstruction group. In reconstruction group, patients underwent tongue reconstruction with radial forearm free flap (RFFF) and lateral arm free flap (LAFF), respectively. 45 patients and 40 normal people were included. Differences were statistically significant between patients and normal persons, between patients before surgery and after surgery, between non-reconstruction group and construction group 2 years after operation. No statistical significance was found between patients underwent tongue reconstruction with RFFF or LAFF 2 years after operation. This study showed that tongue cancer and tongue defect after radical resections affected phonetic function of patients. Tongue reconstruction with free flaps could restore phonetic function to some extent. The efficiency of tongue reconstruction with RFFF and LAFF respectively were similar.

  7. Single-session baseline virtual reality simulator scores predict technical performance for laparoscopic colectomy: a study in the swine model.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor E; Bertoncini, Alexandre B; Horcel, Lucas A; Nahas, Sergio C; Cecconello, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) simulation helps reducing the learning curve of laparoscopic colectomy. Moreover, it may be used to ascertain surgeons' pretraining skills. It was aimed to establish predictive validity of specific parameters gathered during VR simulation training on sigmoid colectomy and whether simulator parameters correlate with technical performance during the same operation in a swine model. Surgeons novice to laparoscopic colectomy underwent a single VR simulation session on sigmoid colectomy. Next, all participants performed a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in the swine. Operations were recorded. Performance evaluation was conducted by 2 board-certified colorectal surgeons blinded to surgeons' simulator scores using an instrument specific to laparoscopic colectomy. For each participant, a mean score of specific skills was calculated. Linear regression analysis was used to identify simulator parameters that were best related to the score. The stepwise method was used to select parameters. The magnitude of the regression model was measured by the coefficient of determination (R(2)) value. The University of Sao Paulo Medical Center is a high-volume, public practice, university-affiliated hospital. A total of 14 first-year residents in digestive tract surgery were included. Analysis of variance demonstrated that the regression model was significant (p = 0.0001), and an association between simulation scores and specific skills was confirmed. The R(2) value was 99%. The VR simulator parameters that strongly correlated with specific skills during laparoscopic colectomy in the swine were safe use of electrosurgery/energy device and safety of medial-to-lateral dissection. A single VR simulation session for novice surgeons in the sigmoid colectomy module generates baseline scores that highly correlated with performance of specific skills during a laparoscopic colectomy in the swine. This information may be useful in an attempt to tailor VR simulator practice according

  8. Heart rate profile during exercise in patients with early repolarization.

    PubMed

    Cay, Serkan; Cagirci, Goksel; Atak, Ramazan; Balbay, Yucel; Demir, Ahmet Duran; Aydogdu, Sinan

    2010-09-01

    Both early repolarization and altered heart rate profile are associated with sudden death. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate an association between early repolarization and heart rate profile during exercise. A total of 84 subjects were included in the study. Comparable 44 subjects with early repolarization and 40 subjects with normal electrocardiogram underwent exercise stress testing. Resting heart rate, maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and decrement were analyzed. Both groups were comparable for baseline characteristics including resting heart rate. Maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and heart rate decrement of the subjects in early repolarization group had significantly decreased maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and heart rate decrement compared to control group (all P < 0.05). The lower heart rate increment (< 106 beats/min) and heart rate decrement (< 95 beats/min) were significantly associated with the presence of early repolarization. After adjustment for age and sex, the multiple-adjusted OR of the risk of presence of early repolarization was 2.98 (95%CI 1.21-7.34) (P = 0.018) and 7.73 (95%CI 2.84-21.03) (P < 0.001) for the lower heart rate increment and heart rate decrement compared to higher levels, respectively. Subjects with early repolarization have altered heart rate profile during exercise compared to control subjects. This can be related to sudden death.

  9. Thermodynamic correction of particle concentrations measured by underwing probes on fast-flying aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, Ralf; Spichtinger, Peter; Mahnke, Christoph; Klingebiel, Marcus; Afchine, Armin; Petzold, Andreas; Krämer, Martina; Costa, Anja; Molleker, Sergej; Reutter, Philipp; Szakáll, Miklós; Port, Max; Grulich, Lucas; Jurkat, Tina; Minikin, Andreas; Borrmann, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Particle concentration measurements with underwing probes on aircraft are impacted by air compression upstream of the instrument body as a function of flight velocity. In particular, for fast-flying aircraft the necessity arises to account for compression of the air sample volume. Hence, a correction procedure is needed to invert measured particle number concentrations to ambient conditions that is commonly applicable to different instruments to gain comparable results. In the compression region where the detection of particles occurs (i.e. under factual measurement conditions), pressure and temperature of the air sample are increased compared to ambient (undisturbed) conditions in certain distance away from the aircraft. Conventional procedures for scaling the measured number densities to ambient conditions presume that the air volume probed per time interval is determined by the aircraft speed (true air speed, TAS). However, particle imaging instruments equipped with pitot tubes measuring the probe air speed (PAS) of each underwing probe reveal PAS values systematically below those of the TAS. We conclude that the deviation between PAS and TAS is mainly caused by the compression of the probed air sample. From measurements during two missions in 2014 with the German Gulfstream G-550 (HALO - High Altitude LOng range) research aircraft we develop a procedure to correct the measured particle concentration to ambient conditions using a thermodynamic approach. With the provided equation, the corresponding concentration correction factor ξ is applicable to the high-frequency measurements of the underwing probes, each of which is equipped with its own air speed sensor (e.g. a pitot tube). ξ values of 1 to 0.85 are calculated for air speeds (i.e. TAS) between 60 and 250 m s-1. For different instruments at individual wing position the calculated ξ values exhibit strong consistency, which allows for a parameterisation of ξ as a function of TAS for the current HALO

  10. Serologic Evidence of Human and Swine Influenza in Mayan Persons

    PubMed Central

    Cadavieco-Burgos, Juan Manuel; Canul-Armas, Alejandro Bernardino

    2005-01-01

    Antibodies against influenza viruses were detected in 115 serum samples from indigenous Mayan persons from Kochol, Yucatán. Seropositivity rates were 26.9% to A/Bayern/7/95, 40.8% to A/Sydney/5/97, 1.7% to A/Swine/Wisconsin/238/97, and 79.1% to A/Swine/Minnesota/593/99. This report is the first in Mexico of the prevalence of antibodies to swine influenza virus in humans. PMID:15705345

  11. Binding characteristics of swine erythrocyte insulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Dieberg, G.; Bryan, G.S.; Sartin, J.L.; Williams, J.C.; Prince, T.J.; Kemppainen, R.J.

    1985-09-01

    Crossbred gilts had 8.8 +/- 1.1% maximum binding of ( SVI)insulin to insulin receptors on erythrocytes. The number of insulin-binding sites per cell was 137 +/- 19, with a binding affinity ranging from 7.4 X 10(7)M-1 to 11.2 X 10(7)M-1 and mean of 8.8 X 10(7)M-1. Pregnant sows had a significant increase in maximum binding due to an increase in number of receptor sites per cell. Lactating sows fed a high-fiber diet and a low-fiber diet did not develop a significant difference in maximum binding of insulin. Sows fed the low-fiber diet had a significantly higher number of binding sites and a significantly lower binding affinity than did sows fed a high-fiber diet. Receptor-binding affinity was lower in the low-fiber diet group than in cycling gilts, whereas data from sows fed the high-fiber diet did not differ from data for cycling gilts. Data from this study indicated that insulin receptors of swine erythrocytes have binding characteristics similar to those in other species. Pregnancy and diet will alter insulin receptor binding in swine.

  12. Strategies to improve fiber utilization in swine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Application of feed processing methods and use of exogenous feed additives in an effort to improve nutrient digestibility of plant-based feed ingredients for swine has been studied for decades. The following review will discuss several of these topics, including: fiber characterization, impact of dietary fiber on gastrointestinal physiology, energy, and nutrient digestibility, mechanical processing of feed on fiber and energy digestibility, and the use of exogenous enzymes in diets fed to growing pigs. Taken together, the diversity and concentration of chemical characteristics that exists among plant-based feed ingredients, as well as interactions among constituents within feed ingredients and diets, suggests that improvements in nutrient digestibility and pig performance from mechanical processing or adding exogenous enzymes to diets fed to swine depends on a better understanding of these characteristics, but also relating enzyme activity to targeted substrates. It may be that an enzyme must not only match a target substrate(s), but there may also need to be a ′cocktail′ of enzymes to effectively breakdown the complex matrixes of fibrous carbohydrates, such that the negative impact of these compounds on nutrient digestibility or voluntary feed intake are alleviated. With the inverse relationship between fiber content and energy digestibility being well described for several feed ingredients, it is only logical that development of processing techniques or enzymes that degrade fiber, and thereby improve energy digestibility or voluntary feed intake, will be both metabolically and economically beneficial to pork production. PMID:23497595

  13. Eliminating swine dysentery from selected herds.

    PubMed

    Glock, R D

    1984-08-01

    In attempts to eliminate swine dysentery from a herd, the total cost of nitroimidazole medication in the water can be estimated at 16/gal over 3-4 weeks and for carbadox in the feed at 70/100 lb over 6-8 weeks. Use of dimetridazole or ipronidazole in the water for 3-4 weeks or carbadox in the feed for 6-8 weeks eliminates Treponema hyodysenteriae from the porcine gut. A 30-day (10 weeks with carbadox) preslaughter withdrawal time should be provided. Impervious surfaces should be thoroughly sanitized, while permeable surfaces and lots should be cleaned, dried and aired well for 2-3 weeks in warm, dry weather and for at least 60 days in cool, damp weather. Animal vectors and fomites must be controlled. Isolation of new breeding stock for 3-4 weeks helps prevent recontamination. While elimination of swine dysentery is not practical in many herds because of poor facilities or lack of producer commitment, a properly designed program can result in economic benefits.

  14. Classical Swine Fever—An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Blome, Sandra; Staubach, Christoph; Henke, Julia; Carlson, Jolene; Beer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) remains one of the most important transboundary viral diseases of swine worldwide. The causative agent is CSF virus, a small, enveloped RNA virus of the genus Pestivirus. Based on partial sequences, three genotypes can be distinguished that do not, however, directly correlate with virulence. Depending on both virus and host factors, a wide range of clinical syndromes can be observed and thus, laboratory confirmation is mandatory. To this means, both direct and indirect methods are utilized with an increasing degree of commercialization. Both infections in domestic pigs and wild boar are of great relevance; and wild boars are a reservoir host transmitting the virus sporadically also to pig farms. Control strategies for epidemic outbreaks in free countries are mainly based on classical intervention measures; i.e., quarantine and strict culling of affected herds. In these countries, vaccination is only an emergency option. However, live vaccines are used for controlling the disease in endemically infected regions in Asia, Eastern Europe, the Americas, and some African countries. Here, we will provide a concise, updated review on virus properties, clinical signs and pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and immune responses, diagnosis and vaccination possibilities. PMID:28430168

  15. Swine influenza viruses: an Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Ki; Pascua, Phillippe Noriel Q; Song, Min-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIVs) are respiratory viral pathogens of pigs that are capable of causing serious global public health concerns in human. Because of their dual susceptibility to mammalian and avian influenza A viruses, pigs are the leading intermediate hosts for genetic reassortment and interspecies transmission and serve as reservoirs of antigenically divergent human viruses from which zoonotic stains with pandemic potential may arise. Pandemic influenza viruses emerging after the 1918 Spanish flu have originated in asia. Although distinct lineages of North American and European SIVs of the H1N1, H3N2, and HiN2 subtypes have been widely studied, less is known about the porcine viruses that are circulating among pig populations throughout Asia. The current review understanding of Contemporary viruses, human infection with SIVs, and the potential threat of novel pandemic strains are described, Furthermore, to best use the limited resources that are available for comprehensive genetic assessment of influenza, consensus efforts among Asian nations to increase epidemiosurveillance of swine herds is also strongly promoted.

  16. African Swine Fever Virus: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, Inmaculada; Alonso, Covadonga

    2017-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a highly contagious viral disease of swine which causes high mortality, approaching 100%, in domestic pigs. ASF is caused by a large, double stranded DNA virus, ASF virus (ASFV), which replicates predominantly in the cytoplasm of macrophages and is the only member of the Asfarviridae family, genus Asfivirus. The natural hosts of this virus include wild suids and arthropod vectors of the Ornithodoros genus. The infection of ASFV in its reservoir hosts is usually asymptomatic and develops a persistent infection. In contrast, infection of domestic pigs leads to a lethal hemorrhagic fever for which there is no effective vaccine. Identification of ASFV genes involved in virulence and the characterization of mechanisms used by the virus to evade the immune response of the host are recognized as critical steps in the development of a vaccine. Moreover, the interplay of the viral products with host pathways, which are relevant for virus replication, provides the basic information needed for the identification of potential targets for the development of intervention strategies against this disease. PMID:28489063

  17. African Swine Fever Virus: A Review.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Inmaculada; Alonso, Covadonga

    2017-05-10

    African swine fever (ASF) is a highly contagious viral disease of swine which causes high mortality, approaching 100%, in domestic pigs. ASF is caused by a large, double stranded DNA virus, ASF virus (ASFV), which replicates predominantly in the cytoplasm of macrophages and is the only member of the Asfarviridae family, genus Asfivirus. The natural hosts of this virus include wild suids and arthropod vectors of the Ornithodoros genus. The infection of ASFV in its reservoir hosts is usually asymptomatic and develops a persistent infection. In contrast, infection of domestic pigs leads to a lethal hemorrhagic fever for which there is no effective vaccine. Identification of ASFV genes involved in virulence and the characterization of mechanisms used by the virus to evade the immune response of the host are recognized as critical steps in the development of a vaccine. Moreover, the interplay of the viral products with host pathways, which are relevant for virus replication, provides the basic information needed for the identification of potential targets for the development of intervention strategies against this disease.

  18. Metabolic disposition of ivermectin in swine

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Shuething Lee; Sestokas, E.; Taub, R.; Green, M.L.; Baylis, F.P.; Jacob, T.A.; Lu, A.Y.H. )

    1990-11-01

    Tissue residue distribution and metabolism of tritium-labeled ivermectin have been studied in swine dosed subcutaneously at 0.4 mg/kg of body weight. The residue distribution pattern among edible tissues (liver, kidney, muscle, and fat) was similar to those found in cattle, sheep, and rats, with highest levels in fat and liver tissues ranging between 78 and 654 ppb within ppb within 7 days after dosing. The parent drug was the major radioactive residue in liver and fat, accounting for >50% of total radioactivity up to 7 days and {approximately}30% after 14 days. The major liver metabolites were identified as 3{double prime}-O-desmethyl-H{sub 2}B{sub 1a} and 3{double prime}-O-desmethyl-H{sub 2}B{sub 1b} by chemical derivatization and mixed-sample HPLC cochromatography with in vitro metabolites from swine liver microsomal incubations. As in other species studied, good correlation has been observed between in vitro and in vivo metabolism. The drug was essentially eliminated by fecal and biliary excretion.

  19. Classical Swine Fever-An Updated Review.

    PubMed

    Blome, Sandra; Staubach, Christoph; Henke, Julia; Carlson, Jolene; Beer, Martin

    2017-04-21

    Classical swine fever (CSF) remains one of the most important transboundary viral diseases of swine worldwide. The causative agent is CSF virus, a small, enveloped RNA virus of the genus Pestivirus. Based on partial sequences, three genotypes can be distinguished that do not, however, directly correlate with virulence. Depending on both virus and host factors, a wide range of clinical syndromes can be observed and thus, laboratory confirmation is mandatory. To this means, both direct and indirect methods are utilized with an increasing degree of commercialization. Both infections in domestic pigs and wild boar are of great relevance; and wild boars are a reservoir host transmitting the virus sporadically also to pig farms. Control strategies for epidemic outbreaks in free countries are mainly based on classical intervention measures; i.e., quarantine and strict culling of affected herds. In these countries, vaccination is only an emergency option. However, live vaccines are used for controlling the disease in endemically infected regions in Asia, Eastern Europe, the Americas, and some African countries. Here, we will provide a concise, updated review on virus properties, clinical signs and pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and immune responses, diagnosis and vaccination possibilities.

  20. Novel marker vaccines against classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Beer, Martin; Reimann, Ilona; Hoffmann, Bernd; Depner, Klaus

    2007-07-26

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is one of the most devastating epizootic diseases of pigs worldwide. For eradication and control purposes, CSF vaccination is an important tool, and efficacious and safe attenuated vaccines have been available for many decades (for example, the C-strain vaccines). In addition to administering them parenterally, live attenuated vaccines are also administered orally for the control and eradication of CSF in wild boar populations. However, antibodies against live attenuated vaccines do not allow to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA principle) and the mechanism responsible for attenuation is not known. Only a few years ago the first DIVA vaccines based on baculovirus-expressed E2 glycoprotein have been put on the market [Hulst MM, Westra DF, Wensvoort G, Moormann RJ. Glycoprotein E1 of hog cholera virus expressed in insect cells protects swine from hog cholera. J Virol 1993;67(9):5435-42]. However, these subunit E2 marker vaccines are less efficient and more than one parenteral application is necessary. Furthermore, oral vaccination is not possible. Taking these disadvantages into account, the development of novel CSF vaccines has been focussed on five different strategies, mainly based on genetically engineered constructs: (1) immunogenic CSFV peptides, (2) DNA vaccines, (3) viral vectors expressing CSFV proteins, (4) chimeric pestiviruses, and (5) trans-complemented deleted CSFV genomes (replicons).

  1. The efficacy of a novel saline/bipolar radiofrequency energy instrument for arresting ongoing solid and non-solid organ hemorrhage in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Ball, Chad G; Campbell, Andre; Grondin, Sean C; Dixon, Elijah

    2016-12-01

    Ongoing hemorrhage is often life threatening and can be challenging to stop in critically injured patients. Traditional techniques for addressing this issue include high voltage cautery (Bovie), topical hemostatic application, and the delivery of ignited argon gas. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a novel energy device for arresting ongoing bleeding from both solid and non-solid organs within a swine model. A novel instrument utilizing bipolar radiofrequency (RF) energy which acts to ignite/boil dripping saline from a small hand piece was employed to arrest ongoing hemorrhage from an escalating series of injuries in large male swine. Liver, spleen, kidney, lung, heart, inferior vena cava and abdominal wall targets were evaluated and digitally recorded. Methodology was descriptive. Four large male swine received escalating injuries to their liver, spleen, kidney, lung, heart, inferior vena cava and abdominal wall. Injury patterns included a variety of surface decapsulation, superficial lacerations, deep lacerations, "through and through" missiles and complete transections. Application of the bipolar/RF instrument to sites of ongoing hemorrhage was successful in 97% of all scenarios. Depth of tissue penetration via microscopic evaluation ranged from 1.1mm to 3.0mm depending on the target organ composition. No air leaks were observed following application to the bleeding lung. Surgeon reported 'ease of use' score was high (4.8/5). This energy technology is successful in arresting ongoing hemorrhage from varying intensities of traumatic injuries to the liver, spleen, kidney, abdominal wall, lung and heart in the swine model. Additional testing is required before advocating its use on any thoracic organs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in the U.S. swine herd using sera collected during the National Animal Health Monitoring Survey (Swine 2006)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sera and data on swine management practices was collected during the voluntary survey of 185 grower/finisher swine production sites located in 16 states accounting for >90% of U.S. swine production . A total of 6,238 sera were tested for T. gondii antibodies using a commercial ELISA assay; all posit...

  3. Vitamin D Deficiency Accelerates Coronary Artery Disease Progression in Swine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcang; Swier, Vicki J; Boosani, Chandra S; Radwan, Mohamed M; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-08-01

    The role of vitamin D deficiency in coronary artery disease (CAD) progression is uncertain. Chronic inflammation in epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. However, the molecular mechanism underlying vitamin D deficiency-enhanced inflammation in the EAT of diseased coronary arteries remains unknown. We examined a mechanistic link between 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-mediated suppression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transporter, karyopherin α4 (KPNA4) expression and NF-κB activation in preadipocytes. Furthermore, we determined whether vitamin D deficiency accelerates CAD progression by increasing KPNA4 and nuclear NF-κB levels in EAT. Nuclear protein levels were detected by immunofluorescence and Western blot. Exogenous KPNA4 was transported into cells by a transfection approach and constituted lentiviral vector. Swine were administered vitamin D-deficient or vitamin D-sufficient hypercholesterolemic diet. After 1 year, the histopathology of coronary arteries and nuclear protein expression of EAT were assessed. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D inhibited NF-κB activation and reduced KPNA4 levels through increased vitamin D receptor expression. Exogenous KPNA4 rescued 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-dependent suppression of NF-κB nuclear translocation and activation. Vitamin D deficiency caused extensive CAD progression and advanced atherosclerotic plaques, which are linked to increased KPNA4 and nuclear NF-κB levels in the EAT. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D attenuates NF-κB activation by targeting KPNA4. Vitamin D deficiency accelerates CAD progression at least, in part, through enhanced chronic inflammation of EAT by upregulation of KPNA4, which enhances NF-κB activation. These novel findings provide mechanistic evidence that vitamin D supplementation could be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of CAD. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Alanine, glutamate, and ammonia exchanges in acutely ischemic swine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Hacker, T A; Hall, J L; Stone, C K; Stanley, W C

    1992-01-01

    Coronary artery disease causes an increase in glutamate uptake and alanine output by the heart. We assessed the effects of acute myocardial ischemia on alanine and glutamate exchange and ammonia production in 10 anesthetized open-chest domestic swine (46.9 +/- 0.7 kg). Coronary blood flow was controlled through an extracorporal perfusion circuit. After a nonischemic control period (aerobic) the blood flow in the left anterior descending coronary artery was reduced by 60%. Arterial and anterior interventricular venous samples where drawn before and during 35 min of ischemia. Subendocardial blood flow, measured using radiolabeled microspheres, decreased from 1.27 +/- 0.16 to 0.25 +/- 0.09 (ml/g)/min, and left-ventricular wall-thickening fell to 47% of aerobic values. Ischemia resulted in a significant increase in the rate of glucose uptake (p less than 0.05) and a switch to net lactate production (p less than 0.01). Ischemia did not affect the rates of alanine output (-0.9 +/- 1.0 vs. -0.3 +/- 0.3 mumol/min) or glutamate uptake (-0.4 +/- 1.1 vs. 0.3 +/- 0.6 mumol/min), but did increase the venous-arterial difference for ammonia (-4.1 +/- 4.1 to 52.7 +/- 5.5 microM, p less than 0.0001) and the ammonia output (-0.33 +/- 0.24 to 1.34 +/- 0.14 mumol/min, p less than 0.0001). In conclusion, acute ischemia did not stimulate greater alanine output or glutamate uptake. However, acute ischemia did cause an increase in anaerobic glycolysis rate and ammonia output, which reflects a profound disruption in myocardial energy metabolism.

  5. 9 CFR 94.8 - Pork and pork products from regions where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to exist. 94.8 Section 94.8 Animals and... NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE... where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to exist. African swine fever exists or the...

  6. 9 CFR 94.8 - Pork and pork products from regions where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to exist. 94.8 Section 94.8 Animals and... NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE... where African swine fever exists or is reasonably believed to exist. African swine fever exists or the...

  7. Meralgia paresthetica affecting parturient women who underwent cesarean section -A case report-

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kum Hee; Ko, Tong Kyun; Park, Chung Hyun; Chun, Duk Hee; Yang, Hyeon Jeong; Gill, Hyun Jue; Kim, Min Ku

    2010-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica is commonly caused by a focal entrapment of lateral femoral cuteneous nerve while it passes the inguinal ligament. Common symptoms are paresthesias and numbness of the upper lateral thigh area. Pregnancy, tight cloths, obesity, position of surgery and the tumor in the retroperitoneal space could be causes of meralgia paresthetica. A 29-year-old female patient underwent an emergency cesarean section under spinal anesthesia without any problems. But two days after surgery, the patient complained numbness and paresthesia in anterolateral thigh area. Various neurological examinations and L-spine MRI images were all normal, but the symptoms persisted for a few days. Then, electromyogram and nerve conduction velocity test of the trunk and both legs were performed. Test results showed left lateral cutaneous nerve injury and meralgia paresthetica was diagnosed. Conservative treatment was implemented and the patient was free of symptoms after 1 month follow-up. PMID:21286469

  8. Meralgia paresthetica affecting parturient women who underwent cesarean section -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kum Hee; Lee, Jong Yeon; Ko, Tong Kyun; Park, Chung Hyun; Chun, Duk Hee; Yang, Hyeon Jeong; Gill, Hyun Jue; Kim, Min Ku

    2010-12-01

    Meralgia paresthetica is commonly caused by a focal entrapment of lateral femoral cuteneous nerve while it passes the inguinal ligament. Common symptoms are paresthesias and numbness of the upper lateral thigh area. Pregnancy, tight cloths, obesity, position of surgery and the tumor in the retroperitoneal space could be causes of meralgia paresthetica. A 29-year-old female patient underwent an emergency cesarean section under spinal anesthesia without any problems. But two days after surgery, the patient complained numbness and paresthesia in anterolateral thigh area. Various neurological examinations and L-spine MRI images were all normal, but the symptoms persisted for a few days. Then, electromyogram and nerve conduction velocity test of the trunk and both legs were performed. Test results showed left lateral cutaneous nerve injury and meralgia paresthetica was diagnosed. Conservative treatment was implemented and the patient was free of symptoms after 1 month follow-up.

  9. Warming infusion improves perioperative outcomes of elderly patients who underwent bilateral hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ma, He; Lai, Bingjie; Dong, Shanshan; Li, Xinyu; Cui, Yunfeng; Sun, Qianchuang; Liu, Wenhua; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Feng; Lv, Hui; Han, Hongyu; Pan, Zhenxiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This prospective, randomized, and controlled study was performed to determine the benefits of prewarmed infusion in elderly patients who underwent bilateral hip replacement. Methods: Between September 2015 and April 2016, elderly patients who underwent bilateral hips replacement that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in this study. After inclusion, patients were randomized into one of the study groups: in the control group, patients received an infusion of fluid kept at room temperature (22–23°C); in the warming infusion group, patients received an infusion of fluid warmed using an infusion fluid heating apparatus (35°C). Postoperative outcomes, including recovery time, length of hospital stay, visual analogue scale (VAS) score, and postoperative complications rate of patients from both groups, were compared. Results: A total of 64 patients were included in our study (71.2 ± 7.6 years, 53.1% males), with 32 patients in the control group and 32 patients in warming infusion group. No significant difference was found in terms of demographic data and intraoperative blood transfusion rate between 2 groups (P > 0.05). Patients receiving a prewarmed infusion had a significantly shorter time to spontaneous breath, eye opening, consciousness recovery, and extubation than the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, significant differences were found in Steward score and VAS score between 2 groups (P < 0.05). Moreover, warming infusion group also showed an obviously decreased incidence of shivering and postoperative cognitive dysfunction (P < 0.05). Conclusion: A prewarmed infusion could reduce the incidence of perioperative hypothermia and improve outcomes in the elderly during bilateral hip replacement. PMID:28353593

  10. [Clinical anatomy: anthropometry for nutritional assessment of 367 adults who underwent endoscopic gastrostomy].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Jorge; Santos, Carla Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Patients suffering from long standing dysphagia need tube feeding through gastrostomy. Nutritional assessment of these patients is challenging and must be supported on objective data, including anthropometric evaluation. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the usefulness of anthropometry for identifying and grading malnutrition, as part of the initial assessment of patients that underwent endoscopic gastrostomy. From the files of consecutive adults underwent gastrostomy we selected patients with anthropometric data obtained before the procedure: Body Mass Index, Mid Upper Arm Circumference, Triceps Skinfold Thickness and Mid Arm Muscle Circumference. Nutritional status was classified according with World Health Organization criteria for Body Mass Index, and for Mid Upper Arm Circumference, Triceps Skinfold Thickness and Mid Arm Muscle Circumference using comparison with Frisancho reference-tables. Were selected 367 patients (median of ages: 74.1 years): neurological disease: 172; head and neck cancer: 176; other diseases: 19. Body Mass Index identified 136 underweight and 231 eutrophic or overweight patients. Mid Upper Arm Circumference identified 310 malnourished and 57 eutrophic or overweight patients. Triceps Skinfold Thickness identified 301 malnourished and 66 eutrophic or overweight patients. Mid Arm Muscle Circumference identified 269 malnourished, 97 eutrophic and one with MAMC above normal. Anthropometry identified the malnourished endoscopic gastrostomy-patients, contributed for malnutrition grading and demonstrated the impact on muscle and fat reserves. Mid Upper Arm Circumference, Triceps Skinfold Thickness and Mid Arm Muscle Circumference identified malnutrition in nearly 80% of the patients, most clearly with fat tissue wasting than muscle. Easily accessible e inexpensive, anthropometry allowed personalized nutritional therapy. Anthropometry must be recognized as a fundamental tool for enteral feeding teams.

  11. Prognostic nomogram for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma underwent adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization following curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Chu-Yu; Fu, Yi-Peng; Zheng, Su-Su; Yi, Yong; Shen, Hu-Jia; Huang, Jin-Long; Xu, Xin; Lin, Jia-Jia; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Ren, Zheng-Gang; Qiu, Shuang-Jian; Zhang, Bo-Heng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is a major option for postoperative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with recurrence risk factors. However, individualized predictive models for subgroup of these patients are limited. This study aimed to develop a prognostic nomogram for patients with HCC underwent adjuvant TACE following curative resection. A cohort comprising 144 HCC patients who received adjuvant TACE following curative resection in the Zhongshan Hospital were analyzed. The nomogram was formulated based on independent prognostic indicators for overall survival (OS). The performance of the nomogram was evaluated by the concordance index (C-index), calibration curve, and decision curve analysis (DCA) and compared with the conventional staging systems. The results were validated in an independent cohort of 86 patients with the same inclusion criteria. Serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), hyper-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), incomplete tumor encapsulation, and double positive staining of Cytokeratin 7 and Cytokeratin 19 on tumor cells were identified as independent predictors for OS. The C-indices of the nomogram for OS prediction in the training cohort and validation cohort were 0.787 (95%CI 0.775–0.799) and 0.714 (95%CI 0.695–0.733), respectively. In both the training and validation cohorts, the calibration plot showed good consistency between the nomogram-predicted and the observed survival. Furthermore, the established nomogram was superior to the conventional staging systems in terms of C-index and clinical net benefit on DCA. The proposed nomogram provided an accurate prediction on risk stratification for HCC patients underwent adjuvant TACE following curative resection. PMID:28296727

  12. Prognostic nomogram for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma underwent adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization following curative resection.

    PubMed

    Jing, Chu-Yu; Fu, Yi-Peng; Zheng, Su-Su; Yi, Yong; Shen, Hu-Jia; Huang, Jin-Long; Xu, Xin; Lin, Jia-Jia; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Ren, Zheng-Gang; Qiu, Shuang-Jian; Zhang, Bo-Heng

    2017-03-01

    Adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is a major option for postoperative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with recurrence risk factors. However, individualized predictive models for subgroup of these patients are limited. This study aimed to develop a prognostic nomogram for patients with HCC underwent adjuvant TACE following curative resection.A cohort comprising 144 HCC patients who received adjuvant TACE following curative resection in the Zhongshan Hospital were analyzed. The nomogram was formulated based on independent prognostic indicators for overall survival (OS). The performance of the nomogram was evaluated by the concordance index (C-index), calibration curve, and decision curve analysis (DCA) and compared with the conventional staging systems. The results were validated in an independent cohort of 86 patients with the same inclusion criteria.Serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), hyper-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), incomplete tumor encapsulation, and double positive staining of Cytokeratin 7 and Cytokeratin 19 on tumor cells were identified as independent predictors for OS. The C-indices of the nomogram for OS prediction in the training cohort and validation cohort were 0.787 (95%CI 0.775-0.799) and 0.714 (95%CI 0.695-0.733), respectively. In both the training and validation cohorts, the calibration plot showed good consistency between the nomogram-predicted and the observed survival. Furthermore, the established nomogram was superior to the conventional staging systems in terms of C-index and clinical net benefit on DCA.The proposed nomogram provided an accurate prediction on risk stratification for HCC patients underwent adjuvant TACE following curative resection.

  13. Clinicopathological Features of Cervical Esophageal Cancer: Retrospective Analysis of 63 Consecutive Patients Who Underwent Surgical Resection.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Yukaya, Takafumi; Tajiri, Hirotada; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Sho; Nakaji, Yu; Kudou, Kensuke; Akiyama, Shingo; Kasagi, Yuta; Nakashima, Yuichiro; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Sonoda, Hideto; Ohgaki, Kippei; Oki, Eiji; Yasumatsu, Ryuji; Nakashima, Torahiko; Morita, Masaru; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this retrospective study were to elucidate the clinicopathological features and recent surgical results of cervical esophageal cancer. Cervical esophageal cancer has been reported to have a dismal prognosis. Accurate knowledge of the clinical characteristics of cervical esophageal cancer is warranted to establish appropriate therapeutic strategies. The clinicopathological features and treatment results of 63 consecutive patients with cervical esophageal cancer (Ce group) who underwent surgical resection from 1980 to 2013 were analyzed and compared with 977 patients with thoracic or abdominal esophageal cancer (T/A group) who underwent surgical resection during that time. Among the patients who received curative resection, the 5-year overall and disease-specific survival rates of the Ce patients were significantly better than those of the T/A patients (overall: 77.3% vs 46.5%, respectively, P = 0.0067; disease-specific: 81.9% vs 55.8%, respectively, P = 0.0135). Although total pharyngo-laryngo-esophagectomy procedures were less frequently performed in the recent period, the rate of curative surgical procedures was markedly higher in the recent period (2000-1013) than that in the early period (1980-1999) (44.4% vs 88.9%, P = 0.0001). The 5-year overall survival rate in the recent period (71.5%) was significantly better than that in the early period (40.7%, P = 0.0342). Curative resection for cervical esophageal cancer contributes to favorable outcomes compared with other esophageal cancers. Recent surgical results for cervical esophageal cancer have improved, and include an increased rate of curative resection and decreased rate of extensive surgery.

  14. Stored swine manure and swine faeces as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, T R; Cotta, M A

    2013-04-01

    Inclusion of low levels of antibiotics in the feed of domestic food animals promotes improved growth, animal performance and overall health benefits. However, this practice has come under scrutiny due to concerns over such feeding on bacterial antibiotic resistance (AR) and potential impact on human health. There is a paucity of data on the types and levels of AR genes that may be present in agricultural practices. Using PCR detection of AR genes, this study demonstrates that both stored swine manure and swine faeces harbour a variety of AR genes, and bacterial members of these communities contain genes that may move between micro-organisms. Thus, both ecosystems may serve as reservoirs of AR genes.

  15. Wine and heart health

    MedlinePlus

    Health and wine; Wine and heart disease; Preventing heart disease - wine; Preventing heart disease - alcohol ... more often just to lower your risk of heart disease. Heavier drinking can harm the heart and ...

  16. What Is Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  17. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... yourself MedlinePlus for More Information National Institute on Aging Related Topics Heart Failure High Blood Cholesterol High ... us | Customer Support | site map National Institute on Aging | U.S. National Library of Medicine | National Institutes of ...

  18. Hearts Wish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lethonee A.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates characteristics and themes in 102 drawings by sexually abused children. Themes of the drawings included genitalia, the absence of specific body parts, phallic symbols, inappropriate smiles, distorted body images, kinetic activity, prominent hands and fingers, and hearts. (RJC)

  19. Heart Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this information Order our Heart Transplant brochure Video: Preparing For Your Surgery Find helpful tips from ... how to plan and prepare for your surgery. Video: Recovering From Your Surgery Find helpful tips from ...

  20. The effects of proximal and distal routes of intraosseous epinephrine administration on short-term resuscitative outcome measures in an adult swine model of ventricular fibrillation: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Burgert, James M; Johnson, Arthur D; Garcia-Blanco, Jose; Froehle, Jacob; Morris, Todd; Althuisius, Ben; Richards, Jennifer; Castano, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown if the anatomical distance of intraosseous (i.o.) epinephrine injection from the heart affects resuscitative outcome. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between the anatomical distance of i.o. epinephrine injection and measures of resuscitative outcome in an adult swine model of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Thirty-two Yorkshire-cross swine (60-80 kg) were randomly assigned to four groups: humeral i.o. (HIO), tibial i.o. (TIO), i.v. with defibrillation and epinephrine, and i.v. control: with defibrillation but no epinephrine. Ventricular fibrillation was induced. Swine remained in VF for 4 minutes prior to mechanical chest compressions. After 6 minutes in VF, swine were defibrillated and epinephrine (0.01 mg/kg) administered by group assignment. Defibrillation was repeated every 2 minutes. Epinephrine was repeated every 4 minutes. Interventions continued until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or 26 post-arrest minutes elapsed. Swine achieving ROSC were observed for 30 minutes post-ROSC. There were no significant differences between the HIO, TIO, and i.v. groups relative to the occurrence of ROSC (P > .05 in all cases), 30-minute post-ROSC survival (P > .05 in all cases), and time to ROSC (P = .43). There were significant differences between the HIO, TIO, and i.v. groups compared to the control group relative to the occurrence of ROSC (P = .02, .01, and .007 respectively), and 30 minute post-ROSC survival (P = .05, .03, and .007, respectively). The anatomical distance of i.o. epinephrine injection from the heart did not affect short-term measures of resuscitative outcome in an adult swine model of VF including the occurrence of ROSC, 30 minute post-ROSC survival, and time to ROSC. Rapidly administered epinephrine, irrespective of route of administration, increased the chance ROSC and survival to 30 minutes post-ROSC would occur in this study. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Resuscitation with lactated ringer's does not increase inflammatory response in a Swine model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Watters, Jennifer M; Brundage, Susan I; Todd, S Rob; Zautke, Nathan A; Stefater, J A; Lam, J C; Muller, Patrick J; Malinoski, Darren; Schreiber, Martin A

    2004-09-01

    Lactated Ringer's (LR) and normal saline (NS) are widely and interchangeably used for resuscitation of trauma victims. Studies show LR to be superior to NS in the physiologic response to resuscitation. Recent in vitro studies demonstrate equivalent effects of LR and NS on leukocytes. We aimed to determine whether LR resuscitation would produce an equivalent inflammatory response compared with normal saline (NS) resuscitation in a clinically relevant swine model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. Thirty-two swine were randomized. Control animals (n = 6) were sacrificed following induction of anesthesia for baseline data. Sham animals (n = 6) underwent laparotomy and 2 h of anesthesia. Uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock animals (n = 10/group) underwent laparotomy, grade V liver injury, and blinded resuscitation with LR or NS to maintain baseline blood pressure for 1.5 h before sacrifice. Lung was harvested, and tissue mRNA levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were determined using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (Q-RT-PCR). Sections of lung were processed and examined for neutrophils sequestered within the alveolar walls. Cytokine analysis showed no difference in IL-6 gene transcription in any group (P = 0.99). Resuscitated swine had elevated G-CSF and TNF-alpha gene transcription, but LR and NS groups were not different from each other (P= 0.96 and 0.10, respectively). Both resuscitation groups had significantly more alveolar neutrophils present than controls (P < 0.01) and shams (P < 0.05) but were not different from one another (P= 0.83). LR and NS resuscitation have equivalent effects on indices of inflammation in the lungs in our model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock.

  2. Investigation of noninvasive muscle pH and oxygen saturation during uncontrolled hemorrhage and resuscitation in swine.

    PubMed

    Soller, Babs; Smith, Charles; Zou, Fengmei; Ellerby, Gwenn E C; Prince, M Dale; Sondeen, Jill L

    2014-07-01

    This study evaluated noninvasively determined muscle pH (pHm) and muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) in a swine shock model that used uncontrolled hemorrhage and restricted volume resuscitation. Anesthetized 40-kg female swine underwent hemorrhage until 24 mL/kg of blood was removed (n = 26), followed by transection of the spleen, causing uncontrolled hemorrhage throughout the remainder of the protocol. After 15 min, 15 mL/kg of resuscitation fluid (Hextend, fresh-frozen plasma or platelets) was given for 30 min. Arterial and venous blood gases were measured at baseline, shock, end of resuscitation, and end of the study (death or 5 h), along with lactate and base excess. In addition, seven animals underwent a sham procedure. Spectra were collected continuously from the posterior thigh using a prototype CareGuide 1100 Oximeter, and pHm and SmO2 were calculated from the spectra. A two-factor analysis of variance with repeated measures followed by Tukey post hoc comparisons was used to compare experimental factors. It was shown that, for both pH and SO2, venous and muscle values were similar to each other at the end of the resuscitation period and at the end of the study for both surviving and nonsurviving animals. pH and SO2, venous and muscle, significantly declined as a result of bleeding, but lactate and base excess did not show significant changes during this period. Noninvasive pHm and SmO2 tracked the adequacy of resuscitation in real time, indicating at the time all of the fluid was delivered, which animals would live and which would die. The results of this swine study indicate that further evaluation on trauma patients is warranted.

  3. African swine fever and classical swine fever: a review of the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Carrasco, L; Bautista, M J; Sierra, M A; Quezada, M; Hervas, J; Chacón, M de Lara F; Ruiz-Villamor, E; Salguero, F J; Sónchez-Cordón, P J; Romanini, S; Núñez, A; Mekonen, T; Méndez, A; Jover, A

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes major pathogenetic mechanisms of African and Classical Swine Fever virus infections. The interactions between both viruses and the monocyte-macrophage-system result in the release of mediator molecules, which are important for the further progression of the diseases. The causes of the thrombocytopenia and the mechanisms of the haemorrhages, which are characteristic in both infections, are described. Apoptotic cell death is regarded as the predominant cause of lymphopenia in both virus infections.

  4. What Is a Heart Murmur?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Murmur Related Topics Anemia Congenital Heart Defects Heart Valve Disease Holes in the Heart How the Heart Works ... heart defect that is present since birth or heart valve disease. Depending on the heart problem causing the abnormal ...

  5. Circulation of classical swine influenza virus in Europe between the wars?

    PubMed

    Lange, Jeannette; Groth, Marco; Kanrai, Pumaree; Pleschka, Stephan; Scholtissek, Christoph; Dürrwald, Ralf; Platzer, Matthias; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Zell, Roland

    2014-06-01

    The complete genomes of two swine influenza viruses from England were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed classical swine H1N1 viruses, one of which, A/swine/London, is closely related to virus strains of the early 1930s. Both strains are also antigenically related to A/swine/Iowa/15/1930, the strain originally isolated by Richard Shope. The source of A/swine/London is unknown, but its relationship to early classical swine influenza viruses suggests that the emergence of these viruses in Europe has to be antedated by 15-20 years.

  6. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethynylestradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl der...

  7. Nutrient removal from swine lagoon effluent by duckweed

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, B.A.; Cheng, J.; Classen, J.; Stomp, A.M.

    2000-04-01

    Three duckweed geographic isolates were grown on varying concentrations of swine lagoon effluent in a greenhouse to determine their ability to remove nutrients from the effluent. Duckweed biomass was harvested every other day over a 12-day period. Duckweed biomass production, nutrient loss from the swine lagoon effluent, and nutrient content of duckweed biomass were used to identify effluent concentrations/geographic isolate combinations that are effective in terms of nutrient utilization from swine lagoon effluent and production of healthy duckweed biomass. When Lemna minor geographic isolate 8627 was grown on 50% swine lagoon effluent, respective losses of TKN, NH{sub 3}-N, TP, OPO{sub 4}-P, TOC, K, Cu, and Zn were 83, 100, 49, 31, 68, 21, 28 and 67%.

  8. Translational Relevance of Swine Models of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Schomberg, Dominic T; Miranpuri, Gurwattan S; Chopra, Abhishek; Patel, Kush; Meudt, Jennifer J; Tellez, Armando; Resnick, Daniel K; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan

    2017-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a physically and psychologically devastating clinical condition. The typical treatment regimens of decompressive surgery and rehabilitation therapy still leave many patients with permanent disability. The development of new therapies and devices can be accelerated if relevant translational animal models are more effectively used in pre-clinical stages. Swine is a highly relevant model for SCI research, especially with respect to spine and spinal cord anatomy, spine vasculature, immune responses to injury, and functional assessments. Several spine injury models have recently been developed for swine and are beginning to be used to evaluate new therapies. Swine models of SCI offer tremendous advantages for efficient translation of pre-clinical discoveries and the development of new therapies and devices. Future swine models will also be enhanced by advances in gene-editing technology to further elucidate the complex pathophysiology associated with SCI and provide a means to engineer specific spinal pathologies.

  9. Vaccination influences the evolution of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Niu, Dan-Dan; Si, Hong-Li; Ding, Nai-Zheng; He, Cheng-Qiang

    2014-07-01

    Classical swine fever is a serious, economically damaging disease caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). The CSFV is composed of two clades, according to phylogenetic estimates. Attenuated live vaccine such as HCLV, has been widely used to protect pigs from CSFV, but the influence of vaccination on the evolution of CSFV has not been studied. We conducted a systemic analysis of the impact of vaccination on the evolution of CSFV by comparing vaccine-related and non-vaccine-related CSFV groups. We found that vaccination may affect strain diversity and immune escape through recombination and point mutation. We also found that vaccination may influence the population dynamics, evolutionary rate and adaptive evolution of classical swine fever virus. Our evidence suggests that the vaccination might also change host adaptation through influencing codon usage of the virus in swine. These findings suggest that it is necessary to avoid excessive use of CSFV attenuated vaccines.

  10. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethynylestradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl der...

  11. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethinyl estradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl de...

  12. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethinyl estradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl de...

  13. The pathogenesis of vesicular exanthema of swine virus and San Miguel sea lion virus in swine.

    PubMed

    Gelberg, H B; Lewis, R M

    1982-07-01

    Vesicular exanthema of swine virus type A48 or San Miguel sea lion virus type 2, when inoculated intradermally into swine, resulted in fluid-filled vesicles at the sites of inoculation in the snout, coronary band, and tongue. Pigs that developed vesicles also had fevers. Secondary vesicle formation varied, depending on virus serotype. Viremia was found in one pig infected with San Miguel sea lion virus five days after infection. Virus was recovered from nasal-oral passages for up to five days after infection in both groups of pigs and from the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts of pigs infected with San Miguel sea lion virus. Neutralizing antibodies began to increase three days after inoculation and reached peak titers in seven to ten days. In the absence of secondary bacterial infection, healing was well advanced by ten days after inoculation. Lesions usually were limited to nonhaired portions of the integument and tongue. Individual epithelial cells became infected when a break in the skin allowed virus access to susceptible epithelial cells from either exogenous or endogenous sources. Individual infected cells ruptured and adjacent cells were infected, resulting in the formation of multiple microvesicles. Centrifugal coalescence of microvesicles led to formation of grossly visible macrovesicles. Lesions rarely developed from viral contamination of intact hair follicles. A mild virus-induced encephalitis was seen in pigs infected with vesicular exanthema of swine virus, and virus was recovered from brain tissue of pigs infected with San Miguel sea lion virus.

  14. Estimation of the transmission dynamics of African swine fever virus within a swine house.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, J P; Larsen, T S; Halasa, T; Christiansen, L E

    2017-10-01

    The spread of African swine fever virus (ASFV) threatens to reach further parts of Europe. In countries with a large swine production, an outbreak of ASF may result in devastating economic consequences for the swine industry. Simulation models can assist decision makers setting up contingency plans. This creates a need for estimation of parameters. This study presents a new analysis of a previously published study. A full likelihood framework is presented including the impact of model assumptions on the estimated transmission parameters. As animals were only tested every other day, an interpretation was introduced to cover the weighted infectiousness on unobserved days for the individual animals (WIU). Based on our model and the set of assumptions, the within- and between-pen transmission parameters were estimated to β w = 1·05 (95% CI 0·62-1·72), β b = 0·46 (95% CI 0·17-1·00), respectively, and the WIU = 1·00 (95% CI 0-1). Furthermore, we simulated the spread of ASFV within a pig house using a modified SEIR-model to establish the time from infection of one animal until ASFV is detected in the herd. Based on a chosen detection limit of 2·55% equivalent to 10 dead pigs out of 360, the disease would be detected 13-19 days after introduction.

  15. [African swine fever in Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Zaberezhnyĭ, A D; Aliper, T I; Grebennikova, T A; Verkhovskiĭ, O A; Sanchez-Vizcaino, J M; Mur, Lina; Nepoklonov, E A; L'vov, D K

    2012-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is an infectious viral disease that causes high economic losses due to the necessity of depopulation of pigs in affected areas, sanitary measures, trade restrictions, etc. The virus (ASFV) is relatively stable in the unprocessed meat products and environment. Thus, large areas are at risk due to free movement of people and products. The ASFV does not affect people and animals, except the wild and domestic pigs. Some ticks can become infected and carry the virus for years. Adaptation of the virus by changing into the less virulent form would mean the threat of an endemic situation to the area. The disease is endemic in domestic and wild pigs in most of sub-Saharan Africa and Sardinia, Italy. There is no treatment for ASF, and no vaccine has been developed. In case of infection with less virulent ASFV strains, the recovered pigs could spread the virus as long as their live. In terms of clinical symptoms, ASF is very similar to Classical Swine Fever. The methods of laboratory diagnostics are well developed and efficient for identification of ASFV and virus-specific antibodies. Experience of eradication of ASF in Spain suggests the importance of serological monitoring of pigs. In the spring of 2007, the ASF was detected in the Caucasus region. Same virus was detected in Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Russia. The ASFV circulating in the Caucasus and the Russian Federation is a highly virulent virus. No reduction of the virulence was observed since the first outbreak in Georgia. In the last years, the ASF remained in the Caucasus, southern parts of Russia and appeared occasionally as far as St. Petersburg and St. Petersburg region, and in the area of Nizhny Novgorod. Domestic pigs play an important role in the ASFV spread; they transfer the virus to the wild boars. The virus circulates in the population of wild boars depending on their density in the area. Occasionally, the disease is spread from wild to domestic pigs. There is no evidence of

  16. Heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of multidisciplinary interventions for heart failure? What are the effects of exercise in people with heart failure? What are the effects of drug treatments for heart failure? What are the effects of devices for treatment of heart failure? What are the effects of coronary revascularisation for treatment of heart failure? What are the effects of drug treatments in people at high risk of heart failure? What are the effects of treatments for diastolic heart failure? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aldosterone receptor antagonists, amiodarone, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, anticoagulation, antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, calcium

  17. Effect of rapid delayed rectifier current on hysteresis in restitution of action potential duration in swine.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anuj; Jing, Linyuan; Patwardhan, Abhijit

    2012-01-01

    Electrical stability in the heart depends on two important factors; restitution of action potential duration (APD) and memory. Repolarization currents play an important role in determining APD and also affect memory. We determined the effects of blocking the rapid component of the delayed rectifier (I(Kr)) on a quantifiable measure of memory, i.e. hysteresis in restitution of APD, in swine. Transmembrane potentials were recorded from right ventricular endocardial tissues. Two pacing protocols with explicit control of diastolic interval (DI) were used to change DIs in a sequential and sinusoidal pattern to quantify hysteresis in restitution of APD. E-4031 (5 µM/L) was used to block I(Kr). Measures of memory and restitution were quantified by calculating hysteresis loop thickness, area, overall tilt, and maximum and minimum delays between DIs and APDs. Blocking I(Kr) with E-4031 increased the baseline APD, loop thickness, area, and tilt (p<0.05). However, loop thickness did not increase beyond what could be predicted by the increase in baseline APD after block of I(Kr). The substantial change in APD after blocking I(Kr) suggests that this current plays a major role in repolarization in the swine. Loop thickness is a measure of memory, an increase in which is predicted by theory to reduce instability in activation. In our study, the substantial increase in loop thickness could be accounted for by an equally substantial increase in APD and therefore does not necessarily indicate increased memory after blocking I(Kr). Our results also suggest that factors based on restitution and memory need to be considered in the context of operating point, i.e. baseline APD, when they are used to explore mechanisms that affect electrical stability in the heart.

  18. 3D coronary motion tracking in swine models with MR tracking catheters.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ehud J; Yoneyama, Ryuichi; Dumoulin, Charles L; Darrow, Robert D; Klein, Eric; Kiruluta, Andrew J M; Hayase, Motoya

    2009-01-01

    To develop MR-tracked catheters to delineate the three-dimensional motion of coronary arteries at high spatial and temporal resolution. Catheters with three tracking microcoils were placed into nine swine. During breath-holds, electrocardiographic (ECG)-synchronized 3D motion was measured at varying vessel depths. 3D motion was measured in American Heart Association left anterior descending (LAD) segments 6-7, left circumflex (LCX) segments 11-15, and right coronary artery (RCA) segments 2-3, at 60-115 beats/min heart rates. Similar-length cardiac cycles were averaged. Intercoil cross-correlation identified early systolic phase (ES) and determined segment motion delay. Translational and rotational motion, as a function of cardiac phase, is shown, with directionality and amplitude varying along the vessel length. Rotation (peak-to-peak solid-angle RCA approximately 0.10, LAD approximately 0.06, LCX approximately 0.18 radian) occurs primarily during fast translational motion and increases distally. LCX displacement increases with heart rate by 18%. Phantom simulations of motion effects on high-resolution images, using RCA results, show artifacts due to translation and rotation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tracking catheters quantify motion at 20 fps and 1 mm(3) resolution at multiple vessel depths, exceeding that available with other techniques. Imaging artifacts due to rotation are demonstrated. Motion-tracking catheters may provide physiological information during interventions and improve imaging spatial resolution.

  19. Pathological Characterization of Ovarian Cancer Patients Who Underwent Debulking Surgery in Combination With Diaphragmatic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Takeshi; Oshiro, Hisashi; Sagawa, Yasukazu; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Terauchi, Fumitoshi; Nagao, Toshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite exhaustive efforts to detect early-stage ovarian cancers, greater than two-thirds of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Although diaphragmatic metastasis is not rare in advanced ovarian cancer patients and often precludes optimal cytoreductive surgery, little is known about the mechanisms and predictive factors of metastasis to the diaphragm. Thus, as an initial step toward investigating such factors, the present study was conducted to characterize the pathological status of ovarian cancer patients who underwent debulking surgery in combination with diaphragmatic surgery. This is a retrospective and cross-sectional study of patients who underwent debulking surgery in combination with diaphragmatic surgery at our institution between January 2005 and July 2015. Clinicopathological data were reviewed by board-certified gynecologists, pathologists, and cytopathologists. The rates of various pathological findings were investigated and compared by Fisher exact test between 2 groups: 1 group that was pathologically positive for diaphragmatic metastasis (group A) and another group that was pathologically negative for diaphragmatic metastasis (group B). Forty-six patients were included: 41 patients pathologically positive and 5 pathologically negative for diaphragmatic metastasis. The rates of metastasis to the lymph node (95.8% vs 20%, P = 0.001) and metastasis to the peritoneum except for the diaphragm (97.6% vs 60.0%, P = 0.028) were significantly increased in group A compared with group B. However, no significant differences between the 2 groups were found for rates of histological subtypes (high-grade serous or non-high-grade serous), the presence of ascites, the presence of malignant ascites, exposure of cancer cells on the ovarian surface, blood vascular invasion in the primary lesion, and lymphovascular invasion in the primary lesion. Our study demonstrated that metastasis to the lymph node and nondiaphragmatic metastasis to the

  20. Sexual functioning and sex hormones in men who underwent bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Sarwer, David B; Spitzer, Jacqueline C; Wadden, Thomas A; Rosen, Raymond C; Mitchell, James E; Lancaster, Kathy; Courcoulas, Anita; Gourash, William; Christian, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between obesity and impairments in male sexual functioning is well documented. Relatively few studies have investigated changes in sexual functioning and sex hormones in men who achieve significant weight loss with bariatric surgery. The objective of this study was to assess changes in sexual functioning, sex hormones, and relevant psychosocial constructs in men who underwent bariatric surgery. A prospective cohort study of 32 men from the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 (LABS) investigation who underwent a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (median body mass index [25th percentile, 75th percentile] 45.1 [42.0, 52.2]) and completed assessments between 2006 and 2012. Bariatric surgery was performed by a LABS-certified surgeon. Sexual functioning was assessed by the International Index of Erectile Functioning (IIEF). Hormones were assessed by blood assay. Quality of life (QoL), body image, depressive symptoms and marital adjustment were assessed by questionnaire. Men lost, on average, (95% confidence interval) 33.3% (36.1%, 30.5%) of initial weight at postoperative year 1, 33.6% (36.8%, 30.5%) at year 2, 31.0% (34.1%, 27.9%) at year 3, and 29.4% (32.7%, 26.2%) at year 4. Participants experienced significant increases in total testosterone (P<.001) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) (P<.001) through postoperative year 4. Although men reported improvements in sexual functioning after surgery, these changes did not significantly differ from baseline, with the exception of overall satisfaction at postoperative year 3 (P = .008). Participants reported significant improvements in physical domains of health-related quality of life (HRQoL), all domains of weight-related QOL, and body image, but not in the mental health domains of HRQoL or relationship satisfaction. Men who lost approximately one third of their weight after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass experienced significant increases in total testosterone and SHBG. They did not, however, report