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Sample records for symbolic dynamical systems

  1. q-entropy for symbolic dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Pesin, Yakov

    2015-12-01

    For symbolic dynamical systems we use the Carathéodory construction as described in (Pesin 1997 Dimension Theory in Dynamical Systems, ConTemporary Views and Applications (Chicago: University of Chicago Press)) to introduce the notions of q-topological and q-metric entropies. We describe some basic properties of these entropies and in particular, discuss relations between q-metric entropy and local metric entropy. Both q-topological and q-metric entropies are new invariants respectively under homeomorphisms and metric isomorphisms of dynamical systems.

  2. Prediction of dynamical systems by symbolic regression.

    PubMed

    Quade, Markus; Abel, Markus; Shafi, Kamran; Niven, Robert K; Noack, Bernd R

    2016-07-01

    We study the modeling and prediction of dynamical systems based on conventional models derived from measurements. Such algorithms are highly desirable in situations where the underlying dynamics are hard to model from physical principles or simplified models need to be found. We focus on symbolic regression methods as a part of machine learning. These algorithms are capable of learning an analytically tractable model from data, a highly valuable property. Symbolic regression methods can be considered as generalized regression methods. We investigate two particular algorithms, the so-called fast function extraction which is a generalized linear regression algorithm, and genetic programming which is a very general method. Both are able to combine functions in a certain way such that a good model for the prediction of the temporal evolution of a dynamical system can be identified. We illustrate the algorithms by finding a prediction for the evolution of a harmonic oscillator based on measurements, by detecting an arriving front in an excitable system, and as a real-world application, the prediction of solar power production based on energy production observations at a given site together with the weather forecast.

  3. Prediction of dynamical systems by symbolic regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quade, Markus; Abel, Markus; Shafi, Kamran; Niven, Robert K.; Noack, Bernd R.

    2016-07-01

    We study the modeling and prediction of dynamical systems based on conventional models derived from measurements. Such algorithms are highly desirable in situations where the underlying dynamics are hard to model from physical principles or simplified models need to be found. We focus on symbolic regression methods as a part of machine learning. These algorithms are capable of learning an analytically tractable model from data, a highly valuable property. Symbolic regression methods can be considered as generalized regression methods. We investigate two particular algorithms, the so-called fast function extraction which is a generalized linear regression algorithm, and genetic programming which is a very general method. Both are able to combine functions in a certain way such that a good model for the prediction of the temporal evolution of a dynamical system can be identified. We illustrate the algorithms by finding a prediction for the evolution of a harmonic oscillator based on measurements, by detecting an arriving front in an excitable system, and as a real-world application, the prediction of solar power production based on energy production observations at a given site together with the weather forecast.

  4. Detecting Recurrence Domains of Dynamical Systems by Symbolic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graben, Peter beim; Hutt, Axel

    2013-04-01

    We propose an algorithm for the detection of recurrence domains of complex dynamical systems from time series. Our approach exploits the characteristic checkerboard texture of recurrence domains exhibited in recurrence plots. In phase space, recurrence plots yield intersecting balls around sampling points that could be merged into cells of a phase space partition. We construct this partition by a rewriting grammar applied to the symbolic dynamics of time indices. A maximum entropy principle defines the optimal size of intersecting balls. The final application to high-dimensional brain signals yields an optimal symbolic recurrence plot revealing functional components of the signal.

  5. Determination of eigenvalues of dynamical systems by symbolic computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    A symbolic computation technique for determining the eigenvalues of dynamical systems is described wherein algebraic operations, symbolic differentiation, matrix formulation and inversion, etc., can be performed on a digital computer equipped with a formula-manipulation compiler. An example is included that demonstrates the facility with which the system dynamics matrix and the control distribution matrix from the state space formulation of the equations of motion can be processed to obtain eigenvalue loci as a function of a system parameter. The example chosen to demonstrate the technique is a fourth-order system representing the longitudinal response of a DC 8 aircraft to elevator inputs. This simplified system has two dominant modes, one of which is lightly damped and the other well damped. The loci may be used to determine the value of the controlling parameter that satisfied design requirements. The results were obtained using the MACSYMA symbolic manipulation system.

  6. Causation entropy from symbolic representations of dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cafaro, Carlo; Lord, Warren M.; Sun, Jie; Bollt, Erik M.

    2015-04-15

    Identification of causal structures and quantification of direct information flows in complex systems is a challenging yet important task, with practical applications in many fields. Data generated by dynamical processes or large-scale systems are often symbolized, either because of the finite resolution of the measurement apparatus, or because of the need of statistical estimation. By algorithmic application of causation entropy, we investigated the effects of symbolization on important concepts such as Markov order and causal structure of the tent map. We uncovered that these quantities depend nonmonotonically and, most of all, sensitively on the choice of symbolization. Indeed, we show that Markov order and causal structure do not necessarily converge to their original analog counterparts as the resolution of the partitioning becomes finer.

  7. Causation entropy from symbolic representations of dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafaro, Carlo; Lord, Warren M.; Sun, Jie; Bollt, Erik M.

    2015-04-01

    Identification of causal structures and quantification of direct information flows in complex systems is a challenging yet important task, with practical applications in many fields. Data generated by dynamical processes or large-scale systems are often symbolized, either because of the finite resolution of the measurement apparatus, or because of the need of statistical estimation. By algorithmic application of causation entropy, we investigated the effects of symbolization on important concepts such as Markov order and causal structure of the tent map. We uncovered that these quantities depend nonmonotonically and, most of all, sensitively on the choice of symbolization. Indeed, we show that Markov order and causal structure do not necessarily converge to their original analog counterparts as the resolution of the partitioning becomes finer.

  8. Quantifying sudden changes in dynamical systems using symbolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoller, Cristina; Hong, Yanhua; Ayad, Sarah; Gustave, Francois; Barland, Stephane; Pons, Antonio J.; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2015-02-01

    We characterize the evolution of a dynamical system by combining two well-known complex systems’ tools, namely, symbolic ordinal analysis and networks. From the ordinal representation of a time series we construct a network in which every node weight represents the probability of an ordinal pattern (OP) to appear in the symbolic sequence and each edge's weight represents the probability of transitions between two consecutive OPs. Several network-based diagnostics are then proposed to characterize the dynamics of different systems: logistic, tent, and circle maps. We show that these diagnostics are able to capture changes produced in the dynamics as a control parameter is varied. We also apply our new measures to empirical data from semiconductor lasers and show that they are able to anticipate the polarization switchings, thus providing early warning signals of abrupt transitions.

  9. Symbolic dynamics techniques for complex systems: Application to share price dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dan; Beck, Christian

    2017-05-01

    The symbolic dynamics technique is well known for low-dimensional dynamical systems and chaotic maps, and lies at the roots of the thermodynamic formalism of dynamical systems. Here we show that this technique can also be successfully applied to time series generated by complex systems of much higher dimensionality. Our main example is the investigation of share price returns in a coarse-grained way. A nontrivial spectrum of Rényi entropies is found. We study how the spectrum depends on the time scale of returns, the sector of stocks considered, as well as the number of symbols used for the symbolic description. Overall our analysis confirms that in the symbol space transition probabilities of observed share price returns depend on the entire history of previous symbols, thus emphasizing the need for a modelling based on non-Markovian stochastic processes. Our method allows for quantitative comparisons of entirely different complex systems, for example the statistics of symbol sequences generated by share price returns using 4 symbols can be compared with that of genomic sequences.

  10. Applications of symbolic computing methods to the dynamic analysis of large systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, C. F.; Riehl, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Since the symbolic computing language is very well suited to the operations with algebraic equations, techniques use the transfer function concept as a tool for the analysis of large linear dynamic systems. Techniques were coded in the experimental symbolic computer language FORMAC. The first of these approaches, REDUCE 1, establishes the techniques and a computer program to symbolically reduce arbitrary block diagrams associated with large systems for desired transfer functions. Symbolic closed form solutions are determined in several forms including an expanded form in terms of the driving frequencies and system constants. Programs are also written to numerically evaluate the symbolic solutions. A second computer program, REDUCE 2, is also based on the use of symbolic computing methods and was written to accommodate large engineering systems.

  11. From Continuous Dynamics to Symbols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Herbert

    This article deals with mathematical models of discrete, identifiable, `symbolic' events in neural and cognitive dynamics. These dynamical symbols are the supposed correlates of identifiable motor action patterns, from phoneme utterances to restaurant visits. In the first main part of the article, models of dynamical symbols offered by dynamical systems theory are reviewed: attractors, bifurcations, spatial segregation and boundary formation, and several others. In the second main part, the concept of transient attractor (TA) is offered as yet another mathematical model of dynamical symbols. TAs share with ordinary attractors a basic property, namely, local phase space contraction. However, a TA can disappear almost as soon as it is created, which could (not very rigorously) be interpreted as a bifurcation induced by quickly changing control parameters. Such `fast bifurcation sequences' standardly occur in neural and cognitive dynamics.

  12. Symbolic Dynamics of Reanalysis Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, J. W.; Dickens, P. M.

    2003-12-01

    Symbolic dynamics1 is the study of sequences of symbols belonging to a discrete set of elements, the most commmon example being a sequence of ones and zeroes. Often the set of symbols is derived from a timeseries of a continuous variable through the introduction of a partition function--a process called symbolization. Symbolic dynamics has been used widely in the physical sciences; a geophysical example being the application of C1 and C2 complexity2 to hourly precipitation station data3. The C1 and C2 complexities are computed by examining subsequences--or words--of fixed length L in the limit of large values of L. Recent advances in information theory have led to techniques focused on the growth rate of the Shannon entropy and its asymptotic behavior in the limit of long words--levels of entropy convergence4. The result is a set of measures one can use to quantify the amount of memory stored in the sequence, whether or not an observer is able to synchronize to the sequence, and with what confidence it may be predicted. These techniques may also be used to uncover periodic behavior in the sequence. We are currently applying complexity theory and levels of entropy convergence to gridpoint timeseries from the NCAR/NCEP 50-year reanalysis5. Topics to be discussed include: a brief introduction to symbolic dynamics; a description of the partition function/symbolization strategy; a discussion of C1 and C2 complexity and entropy convergence rates and their utility; and example applications of these techniques to NCAR/NCEP 50-reanalyses gridpoint timeseries, resulting in maps of C1 and C2 complexities and entropy convergence rates. Finally, we will discuss how these results may be used to validate climate models. 1{Hao, Bai-Lin, Elementary Symbolic Dynamics and Chaos in Dissipative Systems, Wold Scientific, Singapore (1989)} 2{d'Alessandro, G. and Politi, A., Phys. Rev. Lett., 64, 1609-1612 (1990).} 3{Elsner, J. and Tsonis, A., J. Atmos. Sci., 50, 400-405 (1993).} 4

  13. Symbolic dynamics of animal interaction.

    PubMed

    Porfiri, Maurizio; Ruiz Marín, Manuel

    2017-09-13

    Since its introduction nearly two decades ago, transfer entropy has contributed to an improved understanding of cause-and-effect relationships in coupled dynamical systems from raw time series. In the context of animal behavior, transfer entropy might help explain the determinants of leadership in social groups and elucidate escape response to predator attacks. Despite its promise, the potential of transfer entropy in animal behavior is yet to be fully tested, and a number of technical challenges in information theory and statistics remain open. Here, we examine an alternative approach to the computation of transfer entropy based on symbolic dynamics. In this context, a symbol is associated with a specific locomotory bout across two or more consecutive time instants, such as reversing the swimming direction. Symbols encapsulate salient locomotory patterns and the associated permutation transfer entropy quantifies the ability to predict the patterns of an individual given those of another individual. We demonstrate this framework on an existing dataset on fish, for which we have knowledge of the underlying cause-and-effect relationship between the focal subject and the stimulus. Symbolic dynamics offers an intuitive and robust approach to study animal behavior, which could enable the inference of causal relationship from noisy experimental observations of limited duration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reconciling symbolic and dynamic aspects of language

    PubMed Central

    Rączaszek-Leonardi, Joanna; Kelso, J.A. Scott

    2009-01-01

    The present paper examines natural language as a dynamical system. The oft-expressed view of language as “a static system of symbols” is here seen as an element of a larger system that embraces the mutuality of symbols and dynamics. Following along the lines of the theoretical biologist H.H. Pattee, the relation between symbolic and dynamic aspects of language is expressed within a more general framework that deals with the role of information in biological systems. In this framework, symbols are seen as information-bearing entities that emerge under pressures of communicative needs and that serve as concrete constraints on development and communication. In an attempt to identify relevant dynamic aspects of such a system, one has to take into account events that happen on different time scales: evolutionary language change (i.e., a diachronic aspect), processes of communication (language use) and language acquisition. Acknowledging the role of dynamic processes in shaping and sustaining the structures of natural language calls for a change in methodology. In particular, a purely synchronic analysis of a system of symbols as “meaning-containing entities” is not sufficient to obtain answers to certain recurring problems in linguistics and the philosophy of language. A more encompassing research framework may be the one designed specifically for studying informationally based coupled dynamical systems (coordination dynamics) in which processes of self-organization take place over different time scales. PMID:19173014

  15. Symbolic dynamics of magnetic bumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauf, Andreas; Seri, Marcello

    2017-07-01

    For n convex magnetic bumps in the plane, whose boundary has a curvature somewhat smaller than the absolute value of the constant magnetic field inside the bump, we construct a complete symbolic dynamics of a classical particle moving with speed one.

  16. Symbolic dynamics for Lozi maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiurewicz, M.; Štimac, S.

    2016-10-01

    We study the family of Lozi maps {{L}a,b}:{{{R}}2}\\to {{{R}}2} , {{L}a,b}(x,y)=(1+y-a|x|,bx) , and their strange attractors {{ Λ }a,b} . We introduce the set of kneading sequences for the Lozi map and prove that it determines the symbolic dynamics for that map. We also introduce two other equivalent approaches.

  17. Symbols and dynamics in the brain.

    PubMed

    Cariani, P

    2001-01-01

    The work of physicist and theoretical biologist Howard Pattee has focused on the roles that symbols and dynamics play in biological systems. Symbols, as discrete functional switching-states, are seen at the heart of all biological systems in the form of genetic codes, and at the core of all neural systems in the form of informational mechanisms that switch behavior. They also appear in one form or another in all epistemic systems, from informational processes embedded in primitive organisms to individual human beings to public scientific models. Over its course, Pattee's work has explored (1) the physical basis of informational functions (dynamical vs. rule-based descriptions, switching mechanisms, memory, symbols), (2) the functional organization of the observer (measurement, computation), (3) the means by which information can be embedded in biological organisms for purposes of self-construction and representation (as codes, modeling relations, memory, symbols), and (4) the processes by which new structures and functions can emerge over time. We discuss how these concepts can be applied to a high-level understanding of the brain. Biological organisms constantly reproduce themselves as well as their relations with their environs. The brain similarly can be seen as a self-producing, self-regenerating neural signaling system and as an adaptive informational system that interacts with its surrounds in order to steer behavior.

  18. Physical Symbol Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    the theory of evolution is to all biology, the cell doctrine to cellular biology, the notion of germs to the scientific concept of disease, the notion...place for the active symbol and for the input and output symbols for the operators. This is the tip of the iceberg ; perusal of Figure 2-3 shows that...pushdown automata , linear bounded automata and Turing machines, expresses the gradation of capability with limitations in memory (Hopcroft & UlIman, 1969

  19. Symbolic Dynamics and Nonlinear Semiflows.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    G c. ADRSlCtSaeadIPCd b. ADDRESS (City. State and 7-11 Code) V Lefschetz Center for Dynamical Systems, Directorate of Mathematica& & Irnfor-matic...FRPR 3.TMECVRD1.DT FRPR (Y., V .. Dayi 1 PAGE COUNT 4Technical IFROM _ TO ____ MAY 84 45~ :0 . SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION .7. COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS...Moser [11], Palmer [13]). Silnikov [14] discussed the set of all orbits of F that remain in a small neighbor- hood of y(q). He then showed that F on

  20. Symbolic Execution Enhanced System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Misty D.; Pasareanu, Corina S.; Raman, Vishwanath

    2012-01-01

    We describe a testing technique that uses information computed by symbolic execution of a program unit to guide the generation of inputs to the system containing the unit, in such a way that the unit's, and hence the system's, coverage is increased. The symbolic execution computes unit constraints at run-time, along program paths obtained by system simulations. We use machine learning techniques treatment learning and function fitting to approximate the system input constraints that will lead to the satisfaction of the unit constraints. Execution of system input predictions either uncovers new code regions in the unit under analysis or provides information that can be used to improve the approximation. We have implemented the technique and we have demonstrated its effectiveness on several examples, including one from the aerospace domain.

  1. Symbolic representation of recurrent neural network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Thuan Q; Reggia, James A

    2012-10-01

    Simple recurrent error backpropagation networks have been widely used to learn temporal sequence data, including regular and context-free languages. However, the production of relatively large and opaque weight matrices during learning has inspired substantial research on how to extract symbolic human-readable interpretations from trained networks. Unlike feedforward networks, where research has focused mainly on rule extraction, most past work with recurrent networks has viewed them as dynamical systems that can be approximated symbolically by finite-state machine (FSMs). With this approach, the network's hidden layer activation space is typically divided into a finite number of regions. Past research has mainly focused on better techniques for dividing up this activation space. In contrast, very little work has tried to influence the network training process to produce a better representation in hidden layer activation space, and that which has been done has had only limited success. Here we propose a powerful general technique to bias the error backpropagation training process so that it learns an activation space representation from which it is easier to extract FSMs. Using four publicly available data sets that are based on regular and context-free languages, we show via computational experiments that the modified learning method helps to extract FSMs with substantially fewer states and less variance than unmodified backpropagation learning, without decreasing the neural networks' accuracy. We conclude that modifying error backpropagation so that it more effectively separates learned pattern encodings in the hidden layer is an effective way to improve contemporary FSM extraction methods.

  2. Double symbolic joint entropy in nonlinear dynamic complexity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wenpo; Wang, Jun

    2017-07-01

    Symbolizations, the base of symbolic dynamic analysis, are classified as global static and local dynamic approaches which are combined by joint entropy in our works for nonlinear dynamic complexity analysis. Two global static methods, symbolic transformations of Wessel N. symbolic entropy and base-scale entropy, and two local ones, namely symbolizations of permutation and differential entropy, constitute four double symbolic joint entropies that have accurate complexity detections in chaotic models, logistic and Henon map series. In nonlinear dynamical analysis of different kinds of heart rate variability, heartbeats of healthy young have higher complexity than those of the healthy elderly, and congestive heart failure (CHF) patients are lowest in heartbeats' joint entropy values. Each individual symbolic entropy is improved by double symbolic joint entropy among which the combination of base-scale and differential symbolizations have best complexity analysis. Test results prove that double symbolic joint entropy is feasible in nonlinear dynamic complexity analysis.

  3. Symbol Systems and Pictorial Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Joachim; Wright, Susan

    All problem-solvers are subject to the same ultimate constraints -- limitations on space, time, and materials (Minsky, 1985). He introduces two principles: (1) Economics: Every intelligence must develop symbol-systems for representing objects, causes and goals, and (2) Sparseness: Every evolving intelligence will eventually encounter certain very special ideas -- e.g., about arithmetic, causal reasoning, and economics -- because these particular ideas are very much simpler than other ideas with similar uses. An extra-terrestrial intelligence (ETI) would have developed symbol systems to express these ideas and would have the capacity of multi-modal processing. Vakoch (1998) states that ...``ETI may rely significantly on other sensory modalities (than vision). Particularly useful representations would be ones that may be intelligible through more than one sensory modality. For instance, the information used to create a three-dimensional representation of an object might be intelligible to ETI heavily reliant on either visual or tactile sensory processes.'' The cross-modal representations Vakoch (1998) describes and the symbol systems Minsky (1985) proposes are called ``metaphors'' when combined. Metaphors allow for highly efficient communication. Metaphors are compact, condensed ways of expressing an idea: words, sounds, gestures or images are used in novel ways to refer to something they do not literally denote. Due to the importance of Minsky's ``economics'' principle, it is therefore possible that a message heavily relies on metaphors.

  4. Quantitative characterisation of audio data by ordinal symbolic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschenbrenner, T.; Monetti, R.; Amigó, J. M.; Bunk, W.

    2013-06-01

    Ordinal symbolic dynamics has developed into a valuable method to describe complex systems. Recently, using the concept of transcripts, the coupling behaviour of systems was assessed, combining the properties of the symmetric group with information theoretic ideas. In this contribution, methods from the field of ordinal symbolic dynamics are applied to the characterisation of audio data. Coupling complexity between frequency bands of solo violin music, as a fingerprint of the instrument, is used for classification purposes within a support vector machine scheme. Our results suggest that coupling complexity is able to capture essential characteristics, sufficient to distinguish among different violins.

  5. Symbolic Dynamics and Grammatical Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Bai-Lin; Zheng, Wei-Mou

    The following sections are included: * Formal Languages and Their Complexity * Formal Language * Chomsky Hierarchy of Grammatical Complexity * The L-System * Regular Language and Finite Automaton * Finite Automaton * Regular Language * Stefan Matrix as Transfer Function for Automaton * Beyond Regular Languages * Feigenbaum and Generalized Feigenbaum Limiting Sets * Even and Odd Fibonacci Sequences * Odd Maximal Primitive Prefixes and Kneading Map * Even Maximal Primitive Prefixes and Distinct Excluded Blocks * Summary of Results

  6. Multiplexing symbolic dynamics-based chaos communications using synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, Jonathan N.; Corron, Ned J.

    2005-01-01

    A novel form of multiplexing information-bearing chaotic waveforms is demonstrated experimentally. This scheme dramatically increases the information carrying capacity of a chaotic communication system. In the transmitter, information is encoded in the chaotic waveforms of two electronic circuits using small perturbations to induce the symbolic dynamics to follow a prescribed symbol sequence. Waveforms from each of the drive oscillators are summed to form a single scalar signal that is transmitted to the receiver. Identical oscillators in the receiver synchronize to their counterparts in the drive system, effectively de-multiplexing the transmitted signal. The transmitted information in each channel is extracted from simple return maps of the receiver oscillators.

  7. Randomizing nonlinear maps via symbolic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Micco, L.; González, C. M.; Larrondo, H. A.; Martin, M. T.; Plastino, A.; Rosso, O. A.

    2008-06-01

    Pseudo Random Number Generators (PRNG) have attracted intense attention due to their obvious importance for many branches of science and technology. A randomizing technique is a procedure designed to improve the PRNG randomness degree according the specific requirements. It is obviously important to quantify its effectiveness. In order to classify randomizing techniques based on a symbolic dynamics’ approach, we advance a novel, physically motivated representation based on the statistical properties of chaotic systems. Recourse is made to a plane that has as coordinates (i) the Shannon entropy and (ii) a form of the statistical complexity measure. Each statistical quantifier incorporates a different probability distribution function, generating thus a representation that (i) sheds insight into just how each randomizing technique operates and also (ii) quantifies its effectiveness. Using the Logistic Map and the Three Way Bernoulli Map as typical examples of chaotic dynamics it is shown that our methodology allows for choosing the more convenient randomizing technique in each instance. Comparison with measures of complexity based on diagonal lines on the recurrence plots [N. Marwan, M.C. Romano, M. Thiel, J. Kurths, Phys. Rep. 438 (2007) 237] support the main conclusions of this paper.

  8. Chaos in the Sense of Devaney for Two-Dimensional Time-Varying Generalized Symbolic Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chuanjun

    This paper studies chaos in the sense of Devaney for a class of two-dimensional time-varying generalized symbol systems of the form xm+1,n = f(m,ym,n,xm,n,xm,n+1) ym+1,n = g(m,xm,n,ym,n,ym,n+1), where xm,n,ym,n ∈ZS = {0, 1,…,S - 1} for m,n ∈N0 = {0, 1,…}, S > 1 is an integer, f : N0 ×ZS3 →Z S and g : N0 ×ZS3 →Z S are two well-defined functions. By introducing a more restrictive concept of chaos in the sense of Devaney, some sufficient conditions for this system to be completely chaotic in the sense of Devaney are derived.

  9. Experiences in Evaluating Outcomes in Tool-Based, Competence Building Education in Dynamical Systems Using Symbolic Computer Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perram, John W.; Andersen, Morten; Ellekilde, Lars-Peter; Hjorth, Poul G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses experience with alternative assessment strategies for an introductory course in dynamical systems, where the use of computer algebra and calculus is fully integrated into the learning process, so that the standard written examination would not be appropriate. Instead, students' competence was assessed by grading three large…

  10. Evidence for distinct magnitude systems for symbolic and non-symbolic number.

    PubMed

    Sasanguie, Delphine; De Smedt, Bert; Reynvoet, Bert

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive models of magnitude representation are mostly based on the results of studies that use a magnitude comparison task. These studies show similar distance or ratio effects in symbolic (Arabic numerals) and non-symbolic (dot arrays) variants of the comparison task, suggesting a common abstract magnitude representation system for processing both symbolic and non-symbolic numerosities. Recently, however, it has been questioned whether the comparison task really indexes a magnitude representation. Alternatively, it has been hypothesized that there might be different representations of magnitude: an exact representation for symbolic magnitudes and an approximate representation for non-symbolic numerosities. To address the question whether distinct magnitude systems exist, we used an audio-visual matching paradigm in two experiments to explore the relationship between symbolic and non-symbolic magnitude processing. In Experiment 1, participants had to match visually and auditory presented numerical stimuli in different formats (digits, number words, dot arrays, tone sequences). In Experiment 2, they were instructed only to match the stimuli after processing the magnitude first. The data of our experiments show different results for non-symbolic and symbolic number and are difficult to reconcile with the existence of one abstract magnitude representation. Rather, they suggest the existence of two different systems for processing magnitude, i.e., an exact symbolic system next to an approximate non-symbolic system.

  11. Symbolic dynamics for arrhythmia identification from heart variability of rats with cardiac failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letellier, C.; Roulin, E.; Loriot, S.; Morin, J.-P.; Dionnet, F.

    2004-12-01

    Heart rate variability of rats is investigated using concepts from the nonlinear dynamical system theory. Among the important techniques offered, symbolic dynamics is very appealing by its power to investigate patterns which can be repeated in a time series. The present analysis was performed in six control rats and six chronic cardiac insufficient rats (myocardial infarction due to left descendent coronary artery ligation). Rats are left in clean atmosphere or exposed to atmosphere containing diluted engine emission pollutants. The evolution of the heart rate variability is then investigated with a three element symbolic dynamics which allows to distinguish extrasystoles from tachycardia or bradycardia using the symbol sequences.

  12. The rich detail of cultural symbol systems.

    PubMed

    Read, Dwight W

    2014-08-01

    The goal of forming a science of intentional behavior requires a more richly detailed account of symbolic systems than is assumed by the authors. Cultural systems are not simply the equivalent in the ideational domain of culture of the purported Baldwin Effect in the genetic domain.

  13. Synchronizing the information content of a chaotic map and flow via symbolic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Corron, Ned J; Pethel, Shawn D; Myneni, Krishna

    2002-09-01

    In this paper we report an extension to the concept of generalized synchronization for coupling different types of chaotic systems, including maps and flows. This broader viewpoint takes disparate systems to be synchronized if their information content is equivalent. We use symbolic dynamics to quantize the information produced by each system and compare the symbol sequences to establish synchronization. A general architecture is presented for drive-response coupling that detects symbols produced by a chaotic drive oscillator and encodes them in a response system using the methods of chaos control. We include experimental results demonstrating synchronization of information content in an electronic oscillator circuit driven by a logistic map.

  14. Studies of phase return map and symbolic dynamics in a periodically driven Hodgkin—Huxley neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jiong; Zhang, Hong; Tong, Qin-Ye; Chen, Zhuo

    2014-02-01

    How neuronal spike trains encode external information is a hot topic in neurodynamics studies. In this paper, we investigate the dynamical states of the Hodgkin—Huxley neuron under periodic forcing. Depending on the parameters of the stimulus, the neuron exhibits periodic, quasiperiodic and chaotic spike trains. In order to analyze these spike trains quantitatively, we use the phase return map to describe the dynamical behavior on a one-dimensional (1D) map. According to the monotonicity or discontinuous point of the 1D map, the spike trains are transformed into symbolic sequences by implementing a coarse-grained algorithm — symbolic dynamics. Based on the ordering rules of symbolic dynamics, the parameters of the external stimulus can be measured in high resolution with finite length symbolic sequences. A reasonable explanation for why the nervous system can discriminate or cognize the small change of the external signals in a short time is also presented.

  15. Symbolic dynamics of ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Chen, Jie

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, the symbolic dynamics analysis was used to analyze the complexity of normal heartbeat signal (NSR), Ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) signals. By calculating the information entropy value of symbolic sequences, the complexities were quantified. Based on different information entropy values, NSR, VT and VF signals were distinguished with satisfactory results. The study showed that a sudden drop of symbolic sequence’s entropy value indicated that the patients most likely entered the episode of ventricular tachycardia and this was a crucial episode for the clinical treatment of patients. It had important clinical significance for the automatic diagnosis.

  16. One-dimensional three-body problem via symbolic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tanikawa, Kiyotaka; Mikkola, Seppo

    2000-09-01

    Symbolic dynamics is applied to the one-dimensional three-body problem with equal masses. The sequence of binary collisions along an orbit is expressed as a symbol sequence of two symbols. Based on the time reversibility of the problem and numerical data, inadmissible (i.e., unrealizable) sequences of collisions are systematically found. A graph for the transitions among various regions in the Poincare section is constructed. This graph is used to find an infinite number of periodic sequences, which implies an infinity of periodic orbits other than those accompanying a simple periodic orbit called the Schubart orbit. Finally, under reasonable assumptions on inadmissible sequences, we prove that the set of admissible symbol sequences forms a Cantor set. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Media and Symbol Systems as Related to Cognition and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomon, Gavriel

    1979-01-01

    The failure of research on media to deal with media's symbol systems is discussed. Nature of symbol systems is described and related to cognition and learning. Symbolic elements used by media can facilitate the cultivation of mental skills in interaction with individual differences and depth of processing. (Author/RD)

  18. Dynamic Assessment of Graphic Symbol Combinations by Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigam, Ravi

    2001-01-01

    This article offers teaching strategies in the dynamic assessment of the potential of students with autism to acquire and use multiple graphic symbol combinations for communicative purposes. Examples are given of the matrix strategy and milieu language teaching strategies. It also describes the Individualized Communication-Care Protocol, which…

  19. Dynamic Assessment of Graphic Symbol Combinations by Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigam, Ravi

    2001-01-01

    This article offers teaching strategies in the dynamic assessment of the potential of students with autism to acquire and use multiple graphic symbol combinations for communicative purposes. Examples are given of the matrix strategy and milieu language teaching strategies. It also describes the Individualized Communication-Care Protocol, which…

  20. A Scalable Distribution Network Risk Evaluation Framework via Symbolic Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kai; Liu, Jian; Liu, Kaipei; Tan, Tianyuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Evaluations of electric power distribution network risks must address the problems of incomplete information and changing dynamics. A risk evaluation framework should be adaptable to a specific situation and an evolving understanding of risk. Methods This study investigates the use of symbolic dynamics to abstract raw data. After introducing symbolic dynamics operators, Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy and Kullback-Leibler relative entropy are used to quantitatively evaluate relationships between risk sub-factors and main factors. For layered risk indicators, where the factors are categorized into four main factors – device, structure, load and special operation – a merging algorithm using operators to calculate the risk factors is discussed. Finally, an example from the Sanya Power Company is given to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method. Conclusion Distribution networks are exposed and can be affected by many things. The topology and the operating mode of a distribution network are dynamic, so the faults and their consequences are probabilistic. PMID:25789859

  1. Application of symbolic computation to the analysis of mechanical systems, including robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, M. A.; Noble, B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper illustrates the application of symbolic computation in connection with three aspects of mechanical systems: (1) The derivation of dynamical equations by Lagrangian methods; (2) The analysis and synthesis of kinematic mechanisms; and (3) A robot manipulator arm.

  2. Degenerated ground-states in a spin chain with pair interactions: a characterization by symbolic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corona, L. A.; Salgado-García, R.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we study a class of one-dimensional spin chain having a highly degenerated set of ground-state configurations. The model consists of spin chain having infinite-range pair interactions with a given structure. We show that the set of ground-state configurations of such a model can be fully characterized by means of symbolic dynamics. Particularly we found that the set ground-state configurations define what in symbolic dynamics is called sofic shift space. Finally we prove that this system has a non-vanishing residual entropy (the topological entropy of the shift space), which can be exactly calculated.

  3. Context-tree modeling of observed symbolic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kennel, Matthew B; Mees, Alistair I

    2002-11-01

    Modern techniques invented for data compression provide efficient automated algorithms for the modeling of the observed symbolic dynamics. We demonstrate the relationship between coding and modeling, motivating the well-known minimum description length (MDL) principle, and give concrete demonstrations of the "context-tree weighting" and "context-tree maximizing" algorithms. The predictive modeling technique obviates many of the technical difficulties traditionally associated with the correct MDL analyses. These symbolic models, representing the symbol generating process as a finite-state automaton with probabilistic emission probabilities, provide excellent and reliable entropy estimations. The resimulations of estimated tree models satisfying the MDL model-selection criterion are faithful to the original in a number of measures. The modeling suggests that the automated context-tree model construction could replace fixed-order word lengths in many traditional forms of empirical symbolic analysis of the data. We provide an explicit pseudocode for implementation of the context-tree weighting and maximizing algorithms, as well as for the conversion to an equivalent Markov chain.

  4. Design and cognitive evaluation of 6 dynamic lane departure warning symbols.

    PubMed

    Maddahi, Hadi; Pouyakian, Mostafa; Tabatabai Ghomsheh, Farhad; Piri, Leila; Osqueizadeh, Reza

    2016-11-16

    Lane departure, caused by inattention, distraction, drowsiness, or any unusual driver behavior, is a typical risk threatening the driver as well as other road users. Accurate perception of such situations through effective warnings would help drivers to avoid serious consequences. With regard to critical functions of warning symbols for risk communication, the present study focused on providing effective and easily perceivable symbols, compatible with human cognitive capabilities. Thus, the main purpose of the present study was to design and cognitively appraise 6 newly designed dynamic symbols, candidates for a new type of lane departure warning system. Simplicity, familiarity, concreteness, meaningfulness, and semantic closeness were the major assessment criteria, defining cognitive features by the earlier researchers in the field. A total number of 187 driving license applicants, with a mean age of 20.58 years (SD = 3.20), participated in the present survey. The participants rated cognitive features of the 6 dynamic symbols along a 0-100 scale. Significant main effect of the element factor type of the designed symbols on rating cognitive features revealed that the existence of car element was the best predictor for illustrating lane departure. The interaction of both element factor and location of element factor significantly affected the ratings. However, the location of element factor did not solely have any strong effect on the ratings. The results also demonstrated that semantic closeness received the highest overall mean score across symbols (M = 61.80), especially within the symbols that include the car element (M = 75.67). Moreover, a significant difference was observed between the average ratings of the cognitive features, despite the fact that a significant correlation was found between cognitive features. The most considerable result of the current study was the match between the symbol with the highest ratings and the International Organization for

  5. An Acoustic OFDM System with Symbol-by-Symbol Doppler Compensation for Underwater Communication.

    PubMed

    MinhHai, Tran; Rie, Saotome; Suzuki, Taisaku; Wada, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    We propose an acoustic OFDM system for underwater communication, specifically for vertical link communications such as between a robot in the sea bottom and a mother ship in the surface. The main contributions are (1) estimation of time varying Doppler shift using continual pilots in conjunction with monitoring the drift of Power Delay Profile and (2) symbol-by-symbol Doppler compensation in frequency domain by an ICI matrix representing nonuniform Doppler. In addition, we compare our proposal against a resampling method. Simulation and experimental results confirm that our system outperforms the resampling method when the velocity changes roughly over OFDM symbols. Overall, experimental results taken in Shizuoka, Japan, show our system using 16QAM, and 64QAM achieved a data throughput of 7.5 Kbit/sec with a transmitter moving at maximum 2 m/s, in a complicated trajectory, over 30 m vertically.

  6. An Acoustic OFDM System with Symbol-by-Symbol Doppler Compensation for Underwater Communication

    PubMed Central

    MinhHai, Tran; Rie, Saotome; Suzuki, Taisaku; Wada, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    We propose an acoustic OFDM system for underwater communication, specifically for vertical link communications such as between a robot in the sea bottom and a mother ship in the surface. The main contributions are (1) estimation of time varying Doppler shift using continual pilots in conjunction with monitoring the drift of Power Delay Profile and (2) symbol-by-symbol Doppler compensation in frequency domain by an ICI matrix representing nonuniform Doppler. In addition, we compare our proposal against a resampling method. Simulation and experimental results confirm that our system outperforms the resampling method when the velocity changes roughly over OFDM symbols. Overall, experimental results taken in Shizuoka, Japan, show our system using 16QAM, and 64QAM achieved a data throughput of 7.5 Kbit/sec with a transmitter moving at maximum 2 m/s, in a complicated trajectory, over 30 m vertically. PMID:27057558

  7. Quantification of fetal heart rate regularity using symbolic dynamics.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, P; Cysarz, D; Lange, S; Geue, D; Groenemeyer, D

    2007-03-01

    Fetal heart rate complexity was examined on the basis of RR interval time series obtained in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. In each fetal RR interval time series, short term beat-to-beat heart rate changes were coded in 8 bit binary sequences. Redundancies of the 2(8) different binary patterns were reduced by two different procedures. The complexity of these sequences was quantified using the approximate entropy (ApEn), resulting in discrete ApEn values which were used for classifying the sequences into 17 pattern sets. Also, the sequences were grouped into 20 pattern classes with respect to identity after rotation or inversion of the binary value. There was a specific, nonuniform distribution of the sequences in the pattern sets and this differed from the distribution found in surrogate data. In the course of gestation, the number of sequences increased in seven pattern sets, decreased in four and remained unchanged in six. Sequences that occurred less often over time, both regular and irregular, were characterized by patterns reflecting frequent beat-to-beat reversals in heart rate. They were also predominant in the surrogate data, suggesting that these patterns are associated with stochastic heart beat trains. Sequences that occurred more frequently over time were relatively rare in the surrogate data. Some of these sequences had a high degree of regularity and corresponded to prolonged heart rate accelerations or decelerations which may be associated with directed fetal activity or movement or baroreflex activity. Application of the pattern classes revealed that those sequences with a high degree of irregularity correspond to heart rate patterns resulting from complex physiological activity such as fetal breathing movements. The results suggest that the development of the autonomic nervous system and the emergence of fetal behavioral states lead to increases in not only irregular but also regular heart rate patterns. Using symbolic dynamics to

  8. Quantification of fetal heart rate regularity using symbolic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, P.; Cysarz, D.; Lange, S.; Geue, D.; Groenemeyer, D.

    2007-03-01

    Fetal heart rate complexity was examined on the basis of RR interval time series obtained in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. In each fetal RR interval time series, short term beat-to-beat heart rate changes were coded in 8bit binary sequences. Redundancies of the 28 different binary patterns were reduced by two different procedures. The complexity of these sequences was quantified using the approximate entropy (ApEn), resulting in discrete ApEn values which were used for classifying the sequences into 17 pattern sets. Also, the sequences were grouped into 20 pattern classes with respect to identity after rotation or inversion of the binary value. There was a specific, nonuniform distribution of the sequences in the pattern sets and this differed from the distribution found in surrogate data. In the course of gestation, the number of sequences increased in seven pattern sets, decreased in four and remained unchanged in six. Sequences that occurred less often over time, both regular and irregular, were characterized by patterns reflecting frequent beat-to-beat reversals in heart rate. They were also predominant in the surrogate data, suggesting that these patterns are associated with stochastic heart beat trains. Sequences that occurred more frequently over time were relatively rare in the surrogate data. Some of these sequences had a high degree of regularity and corresponded to prolonged heart rate accelerations or decelerations which may be associated with directed fetal activity or movement or baroreflex activity. Application of the pattern classes revealed that those sequences with a high degree of irregularity correspond to heart rate patterns resulting from complex physiological activity such as fetal breathing movements. The results suggest that the development of the autonomic nervous system and the emergence of fetal behavioral states lead to increases in not only irregular but also regular heart rate patterns. Using symbolic dynamics to

  9. Symbolic, ritual and social dynamics of spiritual healing.

    PubMed

    Glik, D C

    1988-01-01

    Participant observation among white, middle class spiritual healing groups in the Baltimore area (1981-1983) revealed distinct sociocultural and interpersonal patterns of action and influence among two types of groups found. Types of groups were (1) Christian, Pentecostal, neo-Pentecostal or 'charismatic' healing groups and (2) 'New Age', or 'metaphysical' healing groups. Qualitative findings highlight similarities and differences between these two types of groups through examination of organizational characteristics, leadership patterns, ideological systems, and ritual processes. Illness and social characteristics of participants are also compared. Analysis of characteristics of groups and participants shows how the incorporation of explanatory models, social roles, myths, and symbols into the social, ideational, and ritual context of spiritual healing is essential to its therapeutic effect, and that spiritual healing exemplifies a symbolic healing system. Finally, a substantive theoretical model for healing research is suggested.

  10. Classifying cardiac biosignals using ordinal pattern statistics and symbolic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Parlitz, U; Berg, S; Luther, S; Schirdewan, A; Kurths, J; Wessel, N

    2012-03-01

    The performance of (bio-)signal classification strongly depends on the choice of suitable features (also called parameters or biomarkers). In this article we evaluate the discriminative power of ordinal pattern statistics and symbolic dynamics in comparison with established heart rate variability parameters applied to beat-to-beat intervals. As an illustrative example we distinguish patients suffering from congestive heart failure from a (healthy) control group using beat-to-beat time series. We assess the discriminative power of individual features as well as pairs of features. These comparisons show that ordinal patterns sampled with an additional time lag are promising features for efficient classification.

  11. Chaos synchronization basing on symbolic dynamics with nongenerating partition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingyuan; Wang, Mogei; Liu, Zhenzhen

    2009-06-01

    Using symbolic dynamics and information theory, we study the information transmission needed for synchronizing unidirectionally coupled oscillators. It is found that when sustaining chaos synchronization with nongenerating partition, the synchronization error will be larger than a critical value, although the required coupled channel capacity can be smaller than the case of using a generating partition. Then we show that no matter whether a generating or nongenerating partition is in use, a high-quality detector can guarantee the lead of the response oscillator, while the lag responding can make up the low precision of the detector. A practicable synchronization scheme basing on a nongenerating partition is also proposed in this paper.

  12. Carrier and symbol synchronization system performance study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    Results pertinent to predicting the performance of convolutionally encoded binary phase-shift keyed communication links were presented. The details of the development are provided in four sections. These sections are concerned with developing the bit error probability performance degradations due to PN despreading by a time-shared delay locked loop, the Costas demodulation process, symbol synchronization effects and cycle slipping phenomena in the Costas loop. In addition, Costas cycle slipping probabilities are studied as functions of Doppler count time and signal-to-noise conditions. The effect of cycle slipping in the symbol synchronizer is also studied as a function of channel Doppler and other frequency uncertainties.

  13. Neural computing for numeric-to-symbolic conversion in control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passino, Kevin M.; Sartori, Michael A.; Antsaklis, Panos J.

    1989-01-01

    A type of neural network, the multilayer perceptron, is used to classify numeric data and assign appropriate symbols to various classes. This numeric-to-symbolic conversion results in a type of information extraction, which is similar to what is called data reduction in pattern recognition. The use of the neural network as a numeric-to-symbolic converter is introduced, its application in autonomous control is discussed, and several applications are studied. The perceptron is used as a numeric-to-symbolic converter for a discrete-event system controller supervising a continuous variable dynamic system. It is also shown how the perceptron can implement fault trees, which provide useful information (alarms) in a biological system and information for failure diagnosis and control purposes in an aircraft example.

  14. Neural computing for numeric-to-symbolic conversion in control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passino, Kevin M.; Sartori, Michael A.; Antsaklis, Panos J.

    1989-01-01

    A type of neural network, the multilayer perceptron, is used to classify numeric data and assign appropriate symbols to various classes. This numeric-to-symbolic conversion results in a type of information extraction, which is similar to what is called data reduction in pattern recognition. The use of the neural network as a numeric-to-symbolic converter is introduced, its application in autonomous control is discussed, and several applications are studied. The perceptron is used as a numeric-to-symbolic converter for a discrete-event system controller supervising a continuous variable dynamic system. It is also shown how the perceptron can implement fault trees, which provide useful information (alarms) in a biological system and information for failure diagnosis and control purposes in an aircraft example.

  15. Color and symbology: symbolic systems of color ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Diana

    2002-06-01

    Color has been used symbolically in various different fields, such as Heraldry, Music, Liturgy, Alchemy, Art and Literature. In this study, we shall investigate and analyse the structures of relationships that have taken shape as symbolic systems within each specific area of analysis. We shall discuss the most significant symbolic fields and their systems of color ording, considering each one of them as a topological model based on a logic that determines the total organization, according to the scale of reciprocities applied, and the cultural context that gives it meaning.

  16. Distinguishing chaotic and stochastic dynamics from time series by using a multiscale symbolic approach.

    PubMed

    Zunino, L; Soriano, M C; Rosso, O A

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we introduce a multiscale symbolic information-theory approach for discriminating nonlinear deterministic and stochastic dynamics from time series associated with complex systems. More precisely, we show that the multiscale complexity-entropy causality plane is a useful representation space to identify the range of scales at which deterministic or noisy behaviors dominate the system's dynamics. Numerical simulations obtained from the well-known and widely used Mackey-Glass oscillator operating in a high-dimensional chaotic regime were used as test beds. The effect of an increased amount of observational white noise was carefully examined. The results obtained were contrasted with those derived from correlated stochastic processes and continuous stochastic limit cycles. Finally, several experimental and natural time series were analyzed in order to show the applicability of this scale-dependent symbolic approach in practical situations.

  17. On the physics of the symbol--matter problem in biological systems and the origin of life: affine Hilbert spaces model of the robustness of the internal quantum dynamics of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Balázs, András

    2003-06-01

    In the present paper, some physical considerations of the biological symbol-matter problem is exposed. First of all, the physical concept of quantum dynamical internal measuremental robustness is discussed. In this context, the significance of introducing affine molecular Hilbert spaces, the original (primordeal) internal quantum measurement, and the global constraining nature of time-inversion symmetry restoring, as a special restoration force, is discussed at some length. It is pointed out, as a summary, that global robustness of the internal dynamics of quantum measurements is due to two basic factors: on one hand, the global constraining nature of the chosen specific (symmetry-) restoring force, and on the other, the individual robustness of the discrete local internal measuremental interactions. The second condition is supposed to follow from a system-internalised ("objective") Bohr-type Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, corresponding, in an external context, to the Generalized Complementarity Principle of Bohr and Elsasser. It is not claimed, however, that this latter problem has been, as yet, satisfactorily settled physically. In fact, if it were, it would amount to a specifically biological quantum theory of internal measurement, which had to be rooted in the original primordeal global internal measurement, amounting to the origin of the genetic code.

  18. Symbolic dynamics of jejunal motility in the irritable bowel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wackerbauer, Renate; Schmidt, Thomas

    1999-09-01

    Different studies of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by conventional analysis of jejunal motility report conflicting results. Therefore, our aim is to quantify the jejunal contraction activity by symbolic dynamics in order to discriminate between IBS and control subjects. Contraction amplitudes during fasting motility (phase II) are analyzed for 30 IBS and 30 healthy subjects. On the basis of a particular scale-independent discretization of the contraction amplitudes with respect to the median, IBS patients are characterized by increased block entropy as well as increased mean contraction amplitude. In a further more elementary level of analysis these differences can be reduced to specific contraction patterns within the time series, namely the fact that successive large contraction amplitudes are less ordered in IBS than in controls. These significant differences in jejunal motility may point to an altered control of the gut in IBS, although further studies on a representative number of patients have to be done for a validation of these findings.

  19. Optical symbolic processor for expert system execution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Aloke

    1987-11-01

    The goal of this program is to develop a concept for an optical computer architecture for symbolic computing by defining a computation model of a high level language, examining the possible devices for the ultimate construction of a processor, and by defining required optical operations. This quarter we investigated the implementation alternatives for an optical shuffle exchange network (SEN). Work in previous quarter had led to the conclusion that the SEN was most appropriate optical interconnection network topology for the symbolic processing architecture (SPARO). A more detailed analysis was therefore conducted to examine implementation possibilities. It was determined that while the shuffle connection of the SEN was very feasible in optics using passive devices, a full-scale exchange switch which handles conflict resolution among competing messages is much more difficult. More emphasis was therefore given to the exchange switch design. The functionalities required for the exchange switch and its controls were analyzed. These functionalities were then assessed for optical implementation. It is clear that even the basic exchange switch, that is, an exchange without the controls for conflict resolution, delivery, etc..., is quite a difficult problem in optics. We have proposed a number of optical techniques that appear to be good candidates for realizing the basic exchange switch. A reasonable approach appears to be to evaluate these techniques.

  20. Symbolic dynamics of pulse transit time and heart period in children with upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Baumert, Mathias; Kohler, Mark; Pamula, Yvonne; Immanuel, Sarah A

    2015-08-01

    Upper airway obstruction (UAO) is a relatively common condition during childhood that is characterized by periods of partial or complete upper airway closure, resulting in restless sleep. It has also been suggested that UAO triggers early cardiovascular changes that may predispose to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases later in life. The aim of this study was to assess the temporal dynamics of heart period (HP) and pulse transit time (PTT) during quite, event-free periods of sleep in children with UAO (n = 40) and matched healthy controls. The dynamics of HP and PTT were symbolized based on the sextiles of their distribution and words of length three were formed and classified into four types based on their patterns. Joint symbolic dynamics represent the concomitant occurrence of words in HP and PTT. Children with UAO showed a significantly increased frequency in word types of monotonously increasing and decreasing HP and PTT as well as joint dynamics across all stages of sleep. The dynamics of HP showed a marked sleep stage dependence, while PTT dynamics appeared to be relatively unaffected. In conclusion, cardiovascular dynamics are altered in children with UAO during scored event-free sleep, indicative of frequent bursts in sympathetic nervous system activity, possibly reflecting subcortical arousal responses to brief and subtle increases in UAO.

  1. Space telescope coordinate systems, symbols, and nomenclature definitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, H. F.

    1976-01-01

    The major coordinate systems as well as the transformations and transformation angles between them, for the Space Telescope are defined. The coordinate systems were primarily developed for use in pointing and control system analysis and simulation. Additional useful information (on nomenclature, symbols, quaternion operations, etc.) is also contained.

  2. Experimental and numerical study of the symbolic dynamics of a modulated external-cavity semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Aragoneses, Andrés; Sorrentino, Taciano; Perrone, Sandro; Gauthier, Daniel J; Torrent, M C; Masoller, Cristina

    2014-02-24

    We study the symbolic dynamics of a stochastic excitable optical system with periodic forcing. Specifically, we consider a directly modulated semiconductor laser with optical feedback in the low frequency fluctuations (LFF) regime. We use a method of symbolic time-series analysis that allows us to uncover serial correlations in the sequence of intensity dropouts. By transforming the sequence of inter-dropout intervals into a sequence of symbolic patterns and analyzing the statistics of the patterns, we unveil correlations among several consecutive dropouts and we identify clear changes in the dynamics as the modulation amplitude increases. To confirm the robustness of the observations, the experiments were performed using two lasers under different feedback conditions. Simulations of the Lang-Kobayashi (LK) model, including spontaneous emission noise, are found to be in good agreement with the observations, providing an interpretation of the correlations present in the dropout sequence as due to the interplay of the underlying attractor topology, the external forcing, and the noise that sustains the dropout events.

  3. Encoding by control of the symbolic dynamics emitted by a chaotic laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, Juan Carlos

    2015-02-01

    Application to a chaotic erbium-doped fiber laser of the digital encoding technique by control of its emitted symbolic dynamics is numerically tested. Criteria to select the better working conditions and the perturbation to be introduced in any control parameter are proposed. Once they are chosen, the procedure to prepare the system for control and the way to carry it out are described. It is shown that the general method cannot be blindly applied, but it must be adapted to the particular case under analysis for a good performance. Finally, in relation to a possible experimental implementation, influence of noise in the bit error rate of the communication system is discussed.

  4. Randomization of Symbol Repetition of Punch Cards with Superimposed Coding in Information-Search Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirovich, L. Ya

    The article shows the effect of the irregularity of using separate symbols on search noise on punch cards with superimposed symbol coding in information-search system (IPS). A binomial law of random value distribution of repetition of each symbol is established and analyzed. A method of determining the maximum value of symbol repetition is…

  5. Combining Automated Theorem Provers with Symbolic Algebraic Systems: Position Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    In contrast to pure mathematical applications where automated theorem provers (ATPs) are quite capable, proof tasks arising form real-world applications from the area of Software Engineering show quite different characteristics: they usually do not only contain much arithmetic (albeit often quite simple one), but they also often contain reasoning about specific structures (e.g. graphics, sets). Thus, an ATP must be capable of performing reasoning together with a fair amount of simplification, calculation and solving. Therefore, powerful simplifiers and other (symbolic and semi-symbolic) algorithms seem to be ideally suited to augment ATPs. In the following we shortly describe two major points of interest in combining SASs (symbolic algebraic systems) with top-down automated theorem provers (here: SETHEO [Let92, GLMS94]).

  6. Linking somatic and symbolic representation in semantic memory: the dynamic multilevel reactivation framework.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Jamie; Peelle, Jonathan E; Garcia, Amanda; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2016-08-01

    Biological plausibility is an essential constraint for any viable model of semantic memory. Yet, we have only the most rudimentary understanding of how the human brain conducts abstract symbolic transformations that underlie word and object meaning. Neuroscience has evolved a sophisticated arsenal of techniques for elucidating the architecture of conceptual representation. Nevertheless, theoretical convergence remains elusive. Here we describe several contrastive approaches to the organization of semantic knowledge, and in turn we offer our own perspective on two recurring questions in semantic memory research: (1) to what extent are conceptual representations mediated by sensorimotor knowledge (i.e., to what degree is semantic memory embodied)? (2) How might an embodied semantic system represent abstract concepts such as modularity, symbol, or proposition? To address these questions, we review the merits of sensorimotor (i.e., embodied) and amodal (i.e., disembodied) semantic theories and address the neurobiological constraints underlying each. We conclude that the shortcomings of both perspectives in their extreme forms necessitate a hybrid middle ground. We accordingly propose the Dynamic Multilevel Reactivation Framework-an integrative model predicated upon flexible interplay between sensorimotor and amodal symbolic representations mediated by multiple cortical hubs. We discuss applications of the dynamic multilevel reactivation framework to abstract and concrete concept representation and describe how a multidimensional conceptual topography based on emotion, sensation, and magnitude can successfully frame a semantic space containing meanings for both abstract and concrete words. The consideration of 'abstract conceptual features' does not diminish the role of logical and/or executive processing in activating, manipulating and using information stored in conceptual representations. Rather, it proposes that the materials upon which these processes operate

  7. Aptitudes and Symbol Systems in Adaptive Classroom Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    Education at its best is an "aptitude development program" that promotes development of learning abilities and effective personal styles needed for future learning in school and throughout life. Much of this development involves adapting and expanding the symbol systems used in teaching and learning to convey essential meanings. Adaptive…

  8. Symbolic Optimization and Analysis of Numerical Dynamics Solutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    code feature within any software with only minor cosmetic modifications. Specifically, the interpreter generates efficient simulations via...code feature within any software with only minor cosmetic modifications. Specifically, the interpreter generates efficient simulations via symbolic

  9. A Western apache writing system: the symbols of silas john.

    PubMed

    Basso, K H; Anderson, N

    1973-06-08

    At the outset of this article, it was observed that the adequacy of an etic typology of written symbols could be judged by its ability to describe all the emic distinctions in all the writing systems of the world. In conclusion, we should like to return to this point and briefly examine the extent to which currently available etic concepts can be used to describe the distinctions made by Western Apaches in relation to the writing system of Silas John. Every symbol in the Silas John script may be classified as a phonetic-semantic sign. Symbols of this type denote linguistic expressions that consist of one or more words and contrast as a class with phonetic-nonsemantic signs, which denote phonemes (or phoneme clusters), syllables (or syllable clusters), and various prosodic phenomena (2, pp. 2, 248). Phonetic semantic signs are commonly partitioned into two subclasses: alogographs (which denote single words) and phraseographs (which denote on or more words). Although every symbol in the Silas John script can be assigned to one or the other of these categories, such an exercise is without justification (21). We have no evidence to suggest that Western Apaches classify symbols according to the length or complexity of their linguistic referents, and therefore the imposition of distinctions based on these criteria would be inappropriate and misleading. A far more useful contrast, and one we have already employed, is presented in most etic typologies as an opposition between compound (composite) and noncompound (noncomposite) symbols. Used to break down the category of phonetic-semantic signs, these two concepts enable us to describe more or less exactly the distinction Apaches draw between "symbol elements put together" (ke?escin ledidilgoh) and "symbol elements standing alone" (ke?- escin doledidildaahi). The former may now be defined as consisting of compound phonetic-semantic signs, while the latter is composed of noncompound phonetic-semantic signs. Up to this point

  10. Two systems of non-symbolic numerical cognition.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    Studies of human adults, infants, and non-human animals demonstrate that non-symbolic numerical cognition is supported by at least two distinct cognitive systems: a "parallel individuation system" that encodes the numerical identity of individual items and an "approximate number system" that encodes the approximate numerical magnitude, or numerosity, of a set. The exact nature and role of these systems, however, have been debated for over a 100-years. Some argue that the non-symbolic representation of small numbers (<4) is carried out solely by the parallel individuation system and the non-symbolic representation of large numbers (>4) is carried out solely by the approximate number system. Others argue that all numbers are represented by the approximate number system. This debate has been fueled largely by some studies showing dissociations between small and large number processing and other studies showing similar processing of small and large numbers. Recent work has addressed this debate by showing that the two systems are present and distinct from early infancy, persist despite the acquisition of a symbolic number system, activate distinct cortical networks, and engage differentially based attentional constraints. Based on the recent discoveries, I provide a hypothesis that may explain the puzzling findings and makes testable predictions as to when each system will be engaged. In particular, when items are presented under conditions that allow selection of individuals, they will be represented as distinct mental items through parallel individuation and not as a numerical magnitude. In contrast, when items are presented outside attentional limits (e.g., too many, too close together, under high attentional load), they will be represented as a single mental numerical magnitude and not as distinct mental items. These predictions provide a basis on which researchers can further investigate the role of each system in the development of uniquely human numerical

  11. Dynamics of multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberson, Robert E.; Schwertassek, Richard

    The fundamental mathematical principles of multibody-system dynamics and their implementation in numerical simulations are examined in a rigorous introduction for design engineers. Chapters are devoted to the history of rotational dynamics; typical spacecraft, vehicle, and robotics applications; terminology and notation; the kinematics of a rigid body (location and orientation, velocity, and the kinematical equations of motion); the dynamics of a rigid body; multibody formalisms, kinematics, and dynamics; the linearized equations for multibody systems; and computer simulation techniques. Diagrams, drawings, and a glossary of symbols are provided.

  12. Two Systems of Non-Symbolic Numerical Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Daniel C.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of human adults, infants, and non-human animals demonstrate that non-symbolic numerical cognition is supported by at least two distinct cognitive systems: a “parallel individuation system” that encodes the numerical identity of individual items and an “approximate number system” that encodes the approximate numerical magnitude, or numerosity, of a set. The exact nature and role of these systems, however, have been debated for over a 100-years. Some argue that the non-symbolic representation of small numbers (<4) is carried out solely by the parallel individuation system and the non-symbolic representation of large numbers (>4) is carried out solely by the approximate number system. Others argue that all numbers are represented by the approximate number system. This debate has been fueled largely by some studies showing dissociations between small and large number processing and other studies showing similar processing of small and large numbers. Recent work has addressed this debate by showing that the two systems are present and distinct from early infancy, persist despite the acquisition of a symbolic number system, activate distinct cortical networks, and engage differentially based attentional constraints. Based on the recent discoveries, I provide a hypothesis that may explain the puzzling findings and makes testable predictions as to when each system will be engaged. In particular, when items are presented under conditions that allow selection of individuals, they will be represented as distinct mental items through parallel individuation and not as a numerical magnitude. In contrast, when items are presented outside attentional limits (e.g., too many, too close together, under high attentional load), they will be represented as a single mental numerical magnitude and not as distinct mental items. These predictions provide a basis on which researchers can further investigate the role of each system in the development of uniquely human

  13. [The symbol of the three reigns of nature: to look further into its significance symbolic system].

    PubMed

    Devaux, Guy

    2010-04-01

    Emblem chosen by the Parisian apothecaries, the symbol of the Palm tree, the Snake and Rocks reminds that the pharmaceutical skills concern three reigns of the nature from which arise the constituents of medicines. The hypothesis according to which Nicolas Houel was at the origin of this emblem when he was at the head of the Parisian community in 1556 is advanced, whereas an extension of its symbolic reach is looked for. The analysis of the symbolic senses associated with the snake, with the palm tree and with the rocks directs to a religious interpretation of the symbol in a Christian prospect.

  14. Symbolic Time-Series Analysis for Anomaly Detection in Mechanical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    IEEE/ASME TRANSACTIONS ON MECHATRONICS , VOL. 11, NO. 4, AUGUST 2006 439 Symbolic Time-Series Analysis for Anomaly Detection in Mechanical Systems ...fabricated as a multi- degree-of-freedom (DOF) mass-beam structure excited by oscillatory motion of two vibrators as shown in Fig. 1. Physical dimensions of...1. The dynamical system attains stationary behavior, in the fast time scale of machine vibrations , under persistent excitation in the vicinity of the

  15. Optical production systems using neural networks and symbolic substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botha, Elizabeth; Casasent, David; Barnard, Etienne

    1988-01-01

    Two optical implementations of production systems are advanced. The production systems operate on a knowledge base where facts and rules are encoded as formulas in propositional calculus. The first implementation is a binary neural network. An analog neural network is used to include reasoning with uncertainties. The second implementation uses a new optical symbolic substitution correlator. This implementation is useful when a set of similar situations has to be handled in parallel on one processor.

  16. The Dynamic Role of Symbols in Human Meaning Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Rita

    2012-01-01

    The author reviews "Symbolic Transformation: The Mind in Movement Through Culture and Society," an important first book in a new series that aimed at understanding the myriad ways "social representation processes operate in one's everyday feeling, thinking and acting." The book consists of a series of chapters brought together to develop a rich…

  17. The Dynamic Role of Symbols in Human Meaning Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Rita

    2012-01-01

    The author reviews "Symbolic Transformation: The Mind in Movement Through Culture and Society," an important first book in a new series that aimed at understanding the myriad ways "social representation processes operate in one's everyday feeling, thinking and acting." The book consists of a series of chapters brought together to develop a rich…

  18. Vector/dyad notation in computer symbolic modeling of hybrid parameter mechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barhorst, A.A.

    1996-11-01

    In this paper, computer symbolic algebra based algorithms written to take advantage of engineering vector notation, as applied to hybrid parameter mechanical systems, are demonstrated. The symbolic manipulation tools are utilized to implement a hybrid parameter system modeling algorithm previously developed by the author. The modeling algorithm produces minimal holonomic and nonholonomic equations of motion for hybrid systems of any continuum dimension and kinematic topology. Boundary conditions are rigorously supplied by the modeling method. The system model presented as an example is a hybrid parameter planar two link model of a robot manipulator. A complete analysis from model to simulation and animation in a Mathematica notebook is presented. The modeling tools presented herein are applicable for researchers, practicing engineers, and students in advanced dynamic system modeling and control courses.

  19. Symbolic dynamics applied to a numerical simulation of a perturbed Hill's spherical vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenson, Joshua; Smith, Spencer; Mitchell, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    In the classic Hill's spherical vortex flow an invariant sphere prevents material inside the vortex from mixing with material outside. Here, we apply an additional shear and rotational flow to break the symmetry of the vortex, thereby allowing mixing of the material inside and outside. The resulting system exhibits fully 3D chaotic advection. We consider the scattering of passive tracers that are drawn into and then ejected from the vortex. Here we focus on the numerical computation of fractal scattering functions-the time trapped within the vortex as a function of two impact parameters. We then compare the fractal self-similarity of these scattering functions to those predicted by 3D homotopic lobe dynamics-a new symbolic method of describing topological dynamics.

  20. EMD-Based Symbolic Dynamic Analysis for the Recognition of Human and Nonhuman Pyroelectric Infrared Signals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiaduo; Gong, Weiguo; Tang, Yuzhen; Li, Weihong

    2016-01-20

    In this paper, we propose an effective human and nonhuman pyroelectric infrared (PIR) signal recognition method to reduce PIR detector false alarms. First, using the mathematical model of the PIR detector, we analyze the physical characteristics of the human and nonhuman PIR signals; second, based on the analysis results, we propose an empirical mode decomposition (EMD)-based symbolic dynamic analysis method for the recognition of human and nonhuman PIR signals. In the proposed method, first, we extract the detailed features of a PIR signal into five symbol sequences using an EMD-based symbolization method, then, we generate five feature descriptors for each PIR signal through constructing five probabilistic finite state automata with the symbol sequences. Finally, we use a weighted voting classification strategy to classify the PIR signals with their feature descriptors. Comparative experiments show that the proposed method can effectively classify the human and nonhuman PIR signals and reduce PIR detector's false alarms.

  1. EMD-Based Symbolic Dynamic Analysis for the Recognition of Human and Nonhuman Pyroelectric Infrared Signals

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiaduo; Gong, Weiguo; Tang, Yuzhen; Li, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an effective human and nonhuman pyroelectric infrared (PIR) signal recognition method to reduce PIR detector false alarms. First, using the mathematical model of the PIR detector, we analyze the physical characteristics of the human and nonhuman PIR signals; second, based on the analysis results, we propose an empirical mode decomposition (EMD)-based symbolic dynamic analysis method for the recognition of human and nonhuman PIR signals. In the proposed method, first, we extract the detailed features of a PIR signal into five symbol sequences using an EMD-based symbolization method, then, we generate five feature descriptors for each PIR signal through constructing five probabilistic finite state automata with the symbol sequences. Finally, we use a weighted voting classification strategy to classify the PIR signals with their feature descriptors. Comparative experiments show that the proposed method can effectively classify the human and nonhuman PIR signals and reduce PIR detector’s false alarms. PMID:26805837

  2. Chaos and crises in a model for cooperative hunting: A symbolic dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Martins, Nuno; Sardanyés, Josep

    2009-12-01

    In this work we investigate the population dynamics of cooperative hunting extending the McCann and Yodzis model for a three-species food chain system with a predator, a prey, and a resource species. The new model considers that a given fraction σ of predators cooperates in prey's hunting, while the rest of the population 1-σ hunts without cooperation. We use the theory of symbolic dynamics to study the topological entropy and the parameter space ordering of the kneading sequences associated with one-dimensional maps that reproduce significant aspects of the dynamics of the species under several degrees of cooperative hunting. Our model also allows us to investigate the so-called deterministic extinction via chaotic crisis and transient chaos in the framework of cooperative hunting. The symbolic sequences allow us to identify a critical boundary in the parameter spaces (K ,C0) and (K ,σ) which separates two scenarios: (i) all-species coexistence and (ii) predator's extinction via chaotic crisis. We show that the crisis value of the carrying capacity Kc decreases at increasing σ, indicating that predator's populations with high degree of cooperative hunting are more sensitive to the chaotic crises. We also show that the control method of Dhamala and Lai [Phys. Rev. E 59, 1646 (1999)] can sustain the chaotic behavior after the crisis for systems with cooperative hunting. We finally analyze and quantify the inner structure of the target regions obtained with this control method for wider parameter values beyond the crisis, showing a power law dependence of the extinction transients on such critical parameters.

  3. Chaos and crises in a model for cooperative hunting: a symbolic dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Martins, Nuno; Sardanyés, Josep

    2009-12-01

    In this work we investigate the population dynamics of cooperative hunting extending the McCann and Yodzis model for a three-species food chain system with a predator, a prey, and a resource species. The new model considers that a given fraction sigma of predators cooperates in prey's hunting, while the rest of the population 1-sigma hunts without cooperation. We use the theory of symbolic dynamics to study the topological entropy and the parameter space ordering of the kneading sequences associated with one-dimensional maps that reproduce significant aspects of the dynamics of the species under several degrees of cooperative hunting. Our model also allows us to investigate the so-called deterministic extinction via chaotic crisis and transient chaos in the framework of cooperative hunting. The symbolic sequences allow us to identify a critical boundary in the parameter spaces (K,C(0)) and (K,sigma) which separates two scenarios: (i) all-species coexistence and (ii) predator's extinction via chaotic crisis. We show that the crisis value of the carrying capacity K(c) decreases at increasing sigma, indicating that predator's populations with high degree of cooperative hunting are more sensitive to the chaotic crises. We also show that the control method of Dhamala and Lai [Phys. Rev. E 59, 1646 (1999)] can sustain the chaotic behavior after the crisis for systems with cooperative hunting. We finally analyze and quantify the inner structure of the target regions obtained with this control method for wider parameter values beyond the crisis, showing a power law dependence of the extinction transients on such critical parameters.

  4. Identification of statistical patterns in complex systems via symbolic time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shalabh; Khatkhate, Amol; Ray, Asok; Keller, Eric

    2006-10-01

    Identification of statistical patterns from observed time series of spatially distributed sensor data is critical for performance monitoring and decision making in human-engineered complex systems, such as electric power generation, petrochemical, and networked transportation. This paper presents an information-theoretic approach to identification of statistical patterns in such systems, where the main objective is to enhance structural integrity and operation reliability. The core concept of pattern identification is built upon the principles of Symbolic Dynamics, Automata Theory, and Information Theory. To this end, a symbolic time series analysis method has been formulated and experimentally validated on a special-purpose test apparatus that is designed for data acquisition and real-time analysis of fatigue damage in polycrystalline alloys.

  5. Delayed state feedback and chaos control for time-periodic systems via a symbolic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Haitao; Deshmukh, Venkatesh; Butcher, Eric; Averina, Victoria

    2005-08-01

    This paper presents a symbolic method for a delayed state feedback controller (DSFC) design for linear time-periodic delay (LTPD) systems that are open loop unstable and its extension to incorporate regulation and tracking of nonlinear time-periodic delay (NTPD) systems exhibiting chaos. By using shifted Chebyshev polynomials, the closed loop monodromy matrix of the LTPD system (or the linearized error dynamics of the NTPD system) is obtained symbolically in terms of controller parameters. The symbolic closed loop monodromy matrix, which is a finite dimensional approximation of an infinite dimensional operator, is used in conjunction with the Routh-Hurwitz criterion to design a DSFC to asymptotically stabilize the unstable dynamic system. Two controllers designs are presented. The first design is a constant gain DSFC and the second one is a periodic gain DSFC. The periodic gain DSFC has a larger region of stability in the parameter space than the constant gain DSFC. The asymptotic stability of the LTPD system obtained by the proposed method is illustrated by asymptotically stabilizing an open loop unstable delayed Mathieu equation. Control of a chaotic nonlinear system to any desired periodic orbit is achieved by rendering asymptotic stability to the error dynamics system. To accommodate large initial conditions, an open loop controller is also designed. This open loop controller is used first to control the error trajectories close to zero states and then the DSFC is switched on to achieve asymptotic stability of error states and consequently tracking of the original system states. The methodology is illustrated by two examples.

  6. Semipredictable dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    A new class of deterministic dynamical systems, termed semipredictable dynamical systems, is presented. The spatiotemporal evolution of these systems have both predictable and unpredictable traits, as found in natural complex systems. We prove a general result: The dynamics of any deterministic nonlinear cellular automaton (CA) with p possible dynamical states can be decomposed at each instant of time in a superposition of N layers involving p0, p1, …, pN - 1 dynamical states each, where the pk ∈ N , k ∈ [ 0 , N - 1 ] are divisors of p. If the divisors coincide with the prime factors of p this decomposition is unique. Conversely, we also prove that N CA working on symbols p0, p1, …, pN - 1 can be composed to create a graded CA rule with N different layers. We then show that, even when the full spatiotemporal evolution can be unpredictable, certain traits (layers) can exactly be predicted. We present explicit examples of such systems involving compositions of Wolfram's 256 elementary CA and a more complex CA rule acting on a neighborhood of two sites and 12 symbols and whose rule table corresponds to the smallest Moufang loop M12(S3, 2).

  7. Computational complexity of symbolic dynamics at the onset of chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakdawala, Porus

    1996-05-01

    In a variety of studies of dynamical systems, the edge of order and chaos has been singled out as a region of complexity. It was suggested by Wolfram, on the basis of qualitative behavior of cellular automata, that the computational basis for modeling this region is the universal Turing machine. In this paper, following a suggestion of Crutchfield, we try to show that the Turing machine model may often be too powerful as a computational model to describe the boundary of order and chaos. In particular we study the region of the first accumulation of period doubling in unimodal and bimodal maps of the interval, from the point of view of language theory. We show that in relation to the ``extended'' Chomsky hierarchy, the relevant computational model in the unimodal case is the nested stack automaton or the related indexed languages, while the bimodal case is modeled by the linear bounded automaton or the related context-sensitive languages.

  8. Arbitrary mechanical system description by a symbolic line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrochenko, O.; Mikkola, A.; Olshevskiy, A.

    2016-04-01

    A single-line symbolic notation is proposed for description of an arbitrary multibody system. The kinematics is represented by a sequence of elementary transformations, each of those being marked by a reserved alphabetic character. Force and constraint links between the bodies are also defined by reserved characters. The parameters of the system, such as identifiers of degrees of freedom, inertia parameters and others, are assigned default names if not specified. However, user-defined names, parameters and functions can be placed instead if needed. The proposed description in its shortest form is suitable for academic purpose to identify only the essential properties of a multibody system. In an extended form, by explicit mentioning names of variables and parameters and other data like initial conditions, this description can serve as input data for a multibody analysis software. Lots of examples from the academic area and technical applications are given to show the applicability of the description.

  9. Joint Symbolic Dynamics Analysis of Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure Interactions in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Abstract- The dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) induces important changes in the autonomic control. Measures of heart rate (HR) variability and systolic...rather simple physiological interpretations and seems to be particularly suitable for risk stratification in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy ...Keywords - Symbolic dynamics, heart rate variability, blood pressure variability I. INTRODUCTION Patients suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy

  10. The approximate number system is not predictive for symbolic number processing in kindergarteners.

    PubMed

    Sasanguie, Delphine; Defever, Emmy; Maertens, Bieke; Reynvoet, Bert

    2014-02-01

    The relation between the approximate number system (ANS) and symbolic number processing skills remains unclear. Some theories assume that children acquire the numerical meaning of symbols by mapping them onto the preexisting ANS. Others suggest that in addition to the ANS, children also develop a separate, exact representational system for symbolic number processing. In the current study, we contribute to this debate by investigating whether the nonsymbolic number processing of kindergarteners is predictive for symbolic number processing. Results revealed no association between the accuracy of the kindergarteners on a nonsymbolic number comparison task and their performance on the symbolic comparison task six months later, suggesting that there are two distinct representational systems for the ANS and numerical symbols.

  11. Perception and multimeaning analysis of graphic symbols for Thai picture-based communication system.

    PubMed

    Chompoobutr, Sarinya; Potibal, Puttachart; Boriboon, Monthika; Phantachat, Wantanee

    2013-03-01

    Graphic symbols are a vital part of most augmentative and alternative communication systems. Communication fluency of graphic symbol user depends on how well the relationship between symbols and its referents are learnt. The first aim of this study is to survey the perception of the selected graphic symbols across seven age groups of participants with different educational background. Sixty-five individuals identified themselves as Thai and ranged in age from 10 to 50 years participated in the investigation used 64 graphic symbols. The last aim of this study is to demonstrate the analysis of multimeaning graphic symbols, which will be used in Thai Picture-based communication system. The twenty graphic symbols with 9-14 meanings are analyzed in both syntactic and semantic aspects. The meanings are divided into five categories: noun, verb/adjective, size, color and shape. Respect to the first aim, the results suggest that the participants under investigation with different sexes, age groups, as well as various educational levels perceive the features or inherent characteristics of such graphic symbols similarly. The results of the analysis of multimeaning of graphic symbols indicate that the foundation of Minspeak, polysemy and redundancy of the words illustrates the inherit meanings of the real-life objects, and it also conveys that the Thai graphic symbols are influenced by numerous factors in Thai circumstance such as ability, motivation, experience, worldview and culture.

  12. Complexity in Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Cristopher David

    The study of chaos has shown us that deterministic systems can have a kind of unpredictability, based on a limited knowledge of their initial conditions; after a finite time, the motion appears essentially random. This observation has inspired a general interest in the subject of unpredictability, and more generally, complexity; how can we characterize how "complex" a dynamical system is?. In this thesis, we attempt to answer this question with a paradigm of complexity that comes from computer science, we extract sets of symbol sequences, or languages, from a dynamical system using standard methods of symbolic dynamics; we then ask what kinds of grammars or automata are needed a generate these languages. This places them in the Chomsky heirarchy, which in turn tells us something about how subtle and complex the dynamical system's behavior is. This gives us insight into the question of unpredictability, since these automata can also be thought of as computers attempting to predict the system. In the culmination of the thesis, we find a class of smooth, two-dimensional maps which are equivalent to the highest class in the Chomsky heirarchy, the turning machine; they are capable of universal computation. Therefore, these systems possess a kind of unpredictability qualitatively different from the usual "chaos": even if the initial conditions are known exactly, questions about the system's long-term dynamics are undecidable. No algorithm exists to answer them. Although this kind of unpredictability has been discussed in the context of distributed, many-degree-of -freedom systems (for instance, cellular automata) we believe this is the first example of such phenomena in a smooth, finite-degree-of-freedom system.

  13. Chaos Theory: Self-Organization and Symbolic Representation in Family Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butz, Michael R.; Carlson, J. Matthew; Carlson, Jon

    1998-01-01

    Proposes an integration of the use of symbols and metaphors that illustrates nonlinear dynamics through a case example weaving together contemporary science and human development in the context of family therapy. Discusses areas of future study. (Author/MKA)

  14. Assessment of the RR versus QT relation by a new symbolic dynamics method. Gender differences in repolarization dynamics.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Rafał; Zebrowski, Jan J

    2002-04-01

    A new method based on symbolic dynamics was applied to assess RR-QT dynamics and to compare gender differences. Segments of 10,000 RR and QT from the night were selected. The values of RR and QT were coded as follows. Each RR and QT interval was compared with their means in the last 50 beats [xRR, xQT]; when the interval was larger than x + delta then it was coded as a "2", where delta is the tolerance parameter; when it was less than x - delta-the code was a "0"; when it was larger than x-delta and and the less than x+delta-then it was coded as a "1." The tolerance parameter "delta" was equal to 10 ms for RR and 4 ms for QT. We obtained pairs of symbols representing the values of RR and QT-symbolic words. The results were presented in form of the probability density of the symbolic words. Mean RR, mean QT, SDRR, SDQT, QTc (Bazett formula) were also calculated. Electrocardiogram data of healthy individuals: 20 women and 20 men (mean age 39 +/- 12) were analyzed. There were significant gender differences in RR-QT dynamics. During heart rate acceleration the probability of QT shortening (the probability of the word "00") was higher in men than in women (P =.003). During heart rate deceleration QT lengthening (the word "22") was more frequently observed in men than in women (P =.003) as well. The QT reaction to RR interval changes is less complex in women than in men. In discriminant analysis, when QTc was ignored in the model, the RR-QT dynamics separated genders with 67% accuracy (chi(2) = 9.1, P <.003). RR-QT dynamics can be analyzed with symbolic dynamics methods. The gender differences in repolarization are not only due to QTc duration alone but also result from the dependence of the duration of QT on the RR duration.

  15. Standardization of a Graphic Symbol System as an Alternative Communication Tool for Turkish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karal, Yasemin; Karal, Hasan; Silbir, Lokman; Altun, Taner

    2016-01-01

    Graphic symbols are commonly used across countries in order to support individuals with communicative deficiency. The literature review revealed the absence of such a system for Turkish socio-cultural context. In this study, the aim was to develop a symbol system appropriate for the Turkish socio-cultural context. The process began with studies…

  16. The Comparative Translucency of Initial Lexical Items Represented in Five Graphic Symbol Systems and Sets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomberg, Karen; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The comparative translucency within and across 5 aided augmentative and alternative symbol systems for symbols representing 3 parts of speech (nouns, verbs, and modifiers) was investigated with 50 college undergraduates. Results indicated that translucency varies among systems or sets and among parts of speech. (Author/DB)

  17. Standardization of a Graphic Symbol System as an Alternative Communication Tool for Turkish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karal, Yasemin; Karal, Hasan; Silbir, Lokman; Altun, Taner

    2016-01-01

    Graphic symbols are commonly used across countries in order to support individuals with communicative deficiency. The literature review revealed the absence of such a system for Turkish socio-cultural context. In this study, the aim was to develop a symbol system appropriate for the Turkish socio-cultural context. The process began with studies…

  18. Problem Solving in Calculus with Symbolic Geometry and CAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Philip; Wiechmann, James

    2008-01-01

    Computer algebra systems (CAS) have been around for a number of years, as has dynamic geometry. Symbolic geometry software is new. It bears a superficial similarity to dynamic geometry software, but differs in that problems may be set up involving symbolic variables and constants, and measurements are given as symbolic expressions. Mathematical…

  19. Poincare Plots and Symbolic Dynamics Patterns of Left Ventricular Function Parameters Extracted From Echocardiographic Acoustic Quantification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    N/A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle Poincare Plots and Symbolic Dynamics Patterns of Left Ventricular Function Parameters...IV. POINCARE ’ PLOTS ANALYSIS Poincarè plot analysis is a simple and robust graphical technique based on the analysis of the maps obtained by...Fortuin, et al. Ecocardiographic assessment of a normal adult aging population. Circulation 1977;56:273-278. [13] J.M. Gardin, W.L. Henry , D.D. Savage, J

  20. Symbolic dynamic filtering and language measure for behavior identification of mobile robots.

    PubMed

    Mallapragada, Goutham; Ray, Asok; Jin, Xin

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a procedure for behavior identification of mobile robots, which requires limited or no domain knowledge of the underlying process. While the features of robot behavior are extracted by symbolic dynamic filtering of the observed time series, the behavior patterns are classified based on language measure theory. The behavior identification procedure has been experimentally validated on a networked robotic test bed by comparison with commonly used tools, namely, principal component analysis for feature extraction and Bayesian risk analysis for pattern classification.

  1. Symbolic Representation for Introduction of Concept of Decimal System in Mexican School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solovieva, Y.; Rosas Rivera, Y.; Quintanar, L.; García, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes the usage of strategies of symbolic representation during teaching introduction of decimal system in primary school in Mexico. Our research is based on Activity Theory conception of teaching-learning process and of gradual introduction of scientific concepts in school age. The method includes symbolic external…

  2. Fixing the broken system of genetic locus symbols: Parkinson disease and dystonia as examples.

    PubMed

    Marras, Connie; Lohmann, Katja; Lang, Anthony; Klein, Christine

    2012-03-27

    Originally, locus symbols (e.g., DYT1) were introduced to specify chromosomal regions that had been linked to a familial disorder with a yet unknown gene. Symbols were systematically assigned in a numerical series to designate mapped loci for a specific phenotype or group of phenotypes. Since the system of designating and using locus symbols was originally established, both our knowledge and our techniques of gene discovery have evolved substantially. The current system has problems that are sources of confusion, perpetuate misinformation, and misrepresent the system as a useful reference tool for a list of inherited disorders of a particular phenotypic class. These include erroneously assigned loci, duplicated loci, missing symbols, missing loci, unconfirmed loci in a consecutively numbered system, combining causative genes and risk factor genes in the same list, and discordance between phenotype and list assignment. In this article, we describe these problems and their impact, and propose solutions. The system could be significantly improved by creating distinct lists for clinical and research purposes, creating more informative locus symbols, distinguishing disease-causing mutations from risk factors, raising the threshold of evidence prior to assigning a locus symbol, paying strict attention to the predominant phenotype when assigning symbols lists, and having a formal system for reviewing and continually revising the list that includes input from both clinical and genetics experts.

  3. The analysis of control trajectories using symbolic and database computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The research broadly concerned the symbolic computation, mixed numeric-symbolic computation, and data base computation of trajectories of dynamical systems, especially control systems. It was determined that trees can be used to compute symbolically series which approximate solutions to differential equations.

  4. Symbolic dynamics marker of heart rate variability combined with clinical variables enhance obstructive sleep apnea screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo-García, A. G.; Saavedra-Santana, P.; Juliá-Serdá, G.; Navarro-Mesa, J. L.; Navarro-Esteva, J.; Álvarez-López, X.; Gapelyuk, A.; Penzel, T.; Wessel, N.

    2014-06-01

    Many sleep centres try to perform a reduced portable test in order to decrease the number of overnight polysomnographies that are expensive, time-consuming, and disturbing. With some limitations, heart rate variability (HRV) has been useful in this task. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate if inclusion of symbolic dynamics variables to a logistic regression model integrating clinical and physical variables, can improve the detection of subjects for further polysomnographies. To our knowledge, this is the first contribution that innovates in that strategy. A group of 133 patients has been referred to the sleep center for suspected sleep apnea. Clinical assessment of the patients consisted of a sleep related questionnaire and a physical examination. The clinical variables related to apnea and selected in the statistical model were age (p < 10-3), neck circumference (p < 10-3), score on a questionnaire scale intended to quantify daytime sleepiness (p < 10-3), and intensity of snoring (p < 10-3). The validation of this model demonstrated an increase in classification performance when a variable based on non-linear dynamics of HRV (p < 0.01) was used additionally to the other variables. For diagnostic rule based only on clinical and physical variables, the corresponding area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.907 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.848, 0.967), (sensitivity 87.10% and specificity 80%). For the model including the average of a symbolic dynamic variable, the area under the ROC curve was increased to 0.941 (95% = 0.897, 0.985), (sensitivity 88.71% and specificity 82.86%). In conclusion, symbolic dynamics, coupled with significant clinical and physical variables can help to prioritize polysomnographies in patients with a high probability of apnea. In addition, the processing of the HRV is a well established low cost and robust technique.

  5. The Development of a Universal Tangible Symbol System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trief, Ellen; Bruce, Susan M.; Cascella, Paul W.; Ivy, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Tangible symbols are objects or partial objects with qualities, such as shape, texture, and consistency, that can be used to represent a person, place, object, activity, or concept. They can be handled and share a perceptual relationship with what they represent, known as the referent. This article presents a study on the development of a…

  6. Foundations of Representation: Where Might Graphical Symbol Systems Come from?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrod, Simon; Fay, Nicolas; Lee, John; Oberlander, Jon; MacLeod, Tracy

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that iconic graphical signs evolve into symbolic graphical signs through repeated usage. This article reports a series of interactive graphical communication experiments using a "pictionary" task to establish the conditions under which the evolution might occur. Experiment 1 rules out a simple repetition based account in…

  7. Mapping sea ice leads with a coupled numeric/symbolic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, J.; Schweiger, A. J.; Maslanik, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented which facilitates the detection and delineation of leads with single-channel Landsat data by coupling numeric and symbolic procedures. The procedure consists of three steps: (1) using the dynamic threshold method, an image is mapped to a lead/no lead binary image; (2) the likelihood of fragments to be real leads is examined with a set of numeric rules; and (3) pairs of objects are examined geometrically and merged where possible. The processing ends when all fragments are merged and statistical characteristics are determined, and a map of valid lead objects are left which summarizes useful physical in the lead complexes. Direct implementation of domain knowledge and rapid prototyping are two benefits of the rule-based system. The approach is found to be more successfully applied to mid- and high-level processing, and the system can retrieve statistics about sea-ice leads as well as detect the leads.

  8. Dorsal and ventral attention systems underlie social and symbolic cueing

    PubMed Central

    Callejas, Alicia; Shulman, Gordon L.; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Eye gaze is a powerful cue for orienting attention in space. Studies examining whether gaze and symbolic cues recruit the same neural mechanisms have found mixed results. We tested whether there is a specialized attentional mechanism for social cues. We separately measured BOLD activity during orienting and reorienting attention following predictive gaze and symbolic cues. Results showed that gaze and symbolic cues exerted their influence through the same neural networks, but also produced some differential modulations. Dorsal fronto-parietal regions in left IPS and bilateral MT+/lateral occipital cortex only showed orienting effects for symbolic cues while right pIPS showed larger validity effects following gaze cues. Both exceptions may reflect the greater automaticity of gaze cues: symbolic orienting may require more effort, while disengaging attention during reorienting may be more difficult following gaze cues. Face-selective regions, identified with a face localizer, showed selective activations for gaze cues reflecting sensory processing but no attentional modulations. Therefore, no evidence was found linking face-selective regions to a hypothetical, specialized mechanism for orienting attention to gaze cues. However, a functional connectivity analysis showed greater connectivity between face-selective regions and right pIPS, pSTS and IFG during gaze cueing, consistent with proposals that face-selective regions may send gaze signals to parts of the DAN and VAN. Finally, although the default-mode network is thought to be involved in social cognition, this role does not extend to gaze orienting as these regions were more deactivated following gaze cues and showed less functional connectivity with face-selective regions during gaze cues. PMID:23937692

  9. Combining metric episodes with semantic event concepts within the Symbolic and Sub-Symbolic Robotics Intelligence Control System (SS-RICS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Troy D.; McGhee, S.

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes the ongoing development of a robotic control architecture that inspired by computational cognitive architectures from the discipline of cognitive psychology. The Symbolic and Sub-Symbolic Robotics Intelligence Control System (SS-RICS) combines symbolic and sub-symbolic representations of knowledge into a unified control architecture. The new architecture leverages previous work in cognitive architectures, specifically the development of the Adaptive Character of Thought-Rational (ACT-R) and Soar. This paper details current work on learning from episodes or events. The use of episodic memory as a learning mechanism has, until recently, been largely ignored by computational cognitive architectures. This paper details work on metric level episodic memory streams and methods for translating episodes into abstract schemas. The presentation will include research on learning through novelty and self generated feedback mechanisms for autonomous systems.

  10. System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morecroft, John

    System dynamics is an approach for thinking about and simulating situations and organisations of all kinds and sizes by visualising how the elements fit together, interact and change over time. This chapter, written by John Morecroft, describes modern system dynamics which retains the fundamentals developed in the 1950s by Jay W. Forrester of the MIT Sloan School of Management. It looks at feedback loops and time delays that affect system behaviour in a non-linear way, and illustrates how dynamic behaviour depends upon feedback loop structures. It also recognises improvements as part of the ongoing process of managing a situation in order to achieve goals. Significantly it recognises the importance of context, and practitioner skills. Feedback systems thinking views problems and solutions as being intertwined. The main concepts and tools: feedback structure and behaviour, causal loop diagrams, dynamics, are practically illustrated in a wide variety of contexts from a hot water shower through to a symphony orchestra and the practical application of the approach is described through several real examples of its use for strategic planning and evaluation.

  11. Automated reverse engineering of nonlinear dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Bongard, Josh; Lipson, Hod

    2007-06-12

    Complex nonlinear dynamics arise in many fields of science and engineering, but uncovering the underlying differential equations directly from observations poses a challenging task. The ability to symbolically model complex networked systems is key to understanding them, an open problem in many disciplines. Here we introduce for the first time a method that can automatically generate symbolic equations for a nonlinear coupled dynamical system directly from time series data. This method is applicable to any system that can be described using sets of ordinary nonlinear differential equations, and assumes that the (possibly noisy) time series of all variables are observable. Previous automated symbolic modeling approaches of coupled physical systems produced linear models or required a nonlinear model to be provided manually. The advance presented here is made possible by allowing the method to model each (possibly coupled) variable separately, intelligently perturbing and destabilizing the system to extract its less observable characteristics, and automatically simplifying the equations during modeling. We demonstrate this method on four simulated and two real systems spanning mechanics, ecology, and systems biology. Unlike numerical models, symbolic models have explanatory value, suggesting that automated "reverse engineering" approaches for model-free symbolic nonlinear system identification may play an increasing role in our ability to understand progressively more complex systems in the future.

  12. Strategies in construction and interpretation of graphic-symbol sequences by individuals who use AAC systems.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, Natacha; Sutton, Ann; Morford, Jill P; Côté-Giroux, Patricia; Pauzé, Anne-Marie; Vallée, Véronique

    2010-12-01

    Given the frequent use of graphic symbols in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems, some individuals who use AAC may have greater familiarity with constructing graphic-symbol sequences than do speaking individuals without disabilities. Whether this increased familiarity has an impact on the interpretation of such sequences or on the relationship between construction and interpretation is fundamental to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying communication using graphic symbols. In this study, individuals who use graphic-symbol AAC systems were asked to construct and interpret graphic-symbol sequences representing the same target content (simple and complex propositions). The majority of participants used stable response patterns on both tasks; a minority were inconsistent on both tasks. Asymmetrical patterns (stable on one task but not the other) were rare, suggesting that neither channel (construction or interpretation) preceded the other, in contrast to earlier findings with participants without disabilities (i.e., novice users of graphic symbols). Furthermore, there were differences between stable and less stable responders on measures of syntactic comprehension and cognitive level but not on chronological age, receptive vocabulary, or AAC system characteristics and length of use.

  13. Symbolic generation of elastic rotor blade equations using a FORTRAN processor and numerical study on dynamic inflow effects on the stability of helicopter rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.

    1986-01-01

    The process of performing an automated stability analysis for an elastic-bladed helicopter rotor is discussed. A symbolic manipulation program, written in FORTRAN, is used to aid in the derivation of the governing equations of motion for the rotor. The blades undergo coupled bending and torsional deformations. Two-dimensional quasi-steady aerodynamics below stall are used. Although reversed flow effects are neglected, unsteady effects, modeled as dynamic inflow are included. Using a Lagrangian approach, the governing equations are derived in generalized coordinates using the symbolic program. The program generates the steady and perturbed equations and writes into subroutines to be called by numerical routines. The symbolic program can operate on both expressions and matrices. For the case of hovering flight, the blade and dynamic inflow equations are converted to equations in a multiblade coordinate system by rearranging the coefficients of the equations. For the case of forward flight, the multiblade equations are obtained through the symbolic program. The final multiblade equations are capable of accommodating any number of elastic blade modes. The computer implementation of this procedure consists of three stages: (1) the symbolic derivation of equations; (2) the coding of the equations into subroutines; and (3) the numerical study after identifying mass, damping, and stiffness coefficients. Damping results are presented in hover and in forward flight with and without dynamic inflow effects for various rotor blade models, including rigid blade lag-flap, elastic flap-lag, flap-lag-torsion, and quasi-static torsion. Results from dynamic inflow effects which are obtained from a lift deficiency function for a quasi-static inflow model in hover are also presented.

  14. Symbolic versus associative learning.

    PubMed

    Hummel, John E

    2010-08-01

    Ramscar and colleagues (2010, this volume) describe the "feature-label-order" (FLO) effect on category learning and characterize it as a constraint on symbolic learning. I argue that FLO is neither a constraint on symbolic learning in the sense of "learning elements of a symbol system" (instead, it is an effect on nonsymbolic, association learning) nor is it, more than any other constraint on category learning, a constraint on symbolic learning in the sense of "solving the symbol grounding problem."

  15. Symbolism in prehistoric man.

    PubMed

    Facchini, F

    2000-12-01

    The aptitude for symbolization, characteristic of man, is revealed not only in artistic representations and funerary practices. It is exhibited by every manifestation of human activity or representation of natural phenomena that assumes or refers to a meaning. We can recognize functional symbolism (tool-making, habitative or food technology), social symbolism, (language and social communication) and spiritual symbolism (funerary practices and artistic expressions). On the basis of these concepts, research into symbolism in prehistoric man allows us to recognize forms of symbolism already in the manifestations of the most ancient humans, starting with Homo habilis (or rudolfensis). Toolmaking, social organization and organization of the territory are oriented toward survival and the life of the family group. They attest to symbolic behaviors and constitute symbolic systems by means of which man expresses himself, lives and transmits his symbolic world. The diverse forms of symbolism are discussed with reference to the different phases of prehistoric humanity.

  16. a Hierarchy of Perturbative Models for Solving Nonlinear Problems in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics: Systematic Use of Symbolic Manipulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ray-Qing

    We apply a symbolic manipulation program (MACSYMA, 1977) and a second-order perturbation approach to develop a hierarchy of adjustable M-mode models to study nonlinear phenomena in geophysical fluid dynamics. The automated symbolic manipulation provides, for each value of M, a Fortran program of nonlinear algebraic equations for stationary solutions, and of ordinary differential equations (ODES) for time-dependent solutions. These equations are then solved numerically to determine successive bifurcations in the solution structure, and to study the stability characteristics and dynamical behavior of each solution branch. We illustrate this methodology by studying nonlinear, thermally and rotationally-driven convection in a rapidly -rotating cylindrical annulus, which is heated from the outside and cooled from the inside. This annulus model is a tool for investigating convection in the equatorial regions of major planets. The cylinder has slightly inclined end boundaries to simulate the geometry of thick atmospheres in an equatorial region. both these boundaries and the side walls are stress-free. The problem is based on the two-dimensional vorticity equation and thermodynamic equation in the Boussinesq approximation. We adopt two distinct approaches (Runge-Kutta and Fourier-decomposition) to solve the time-dependent nonlinear differential equations. We found the same solution, involving a large phase shift between waves, as Or and Busse, who used a Galerkin-type method, Additionally we found a new solution with a small phase shift between waves. The increased number of waves permitted by our hierarchic approach allows one to study wave-wave interactions, in addition to wave/mean -flow interactions. More generally, it opens the road to a study of transitions from simple solutions to chaos in systems with a moderately large number of degrees of freedom. Symbolic manipulation greatly reduces the chances of numerical and human errors in the detailed study of this

  17. Changing the precision of preschoolers’ approximate number system representations changes their symbolic math performance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinjing (Jenny); Odic, Darko; Halberda, Justin; Feigenson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    From early in life, humans have access to an Approximate Number System (ANS) that supports an intuitive sense of numerical quantity. Previous work in both children and adults suggests that individual differences in the precision of ANS representations correlate with symbolic math performance. However, this work has been almost entirely correlational in nature. Here we tested for a causal link between ANS precision and symbolic math performance by asking whether a temporary modulation of ANS precision changes symbolic math performance. First we replicated a recent finding that 5-year-old children make more precise ANS discriminations when starting with easier trials and gradually progressing to harder ones, compared to the reverse. Next, we show that this brief modulation of ANS precision influenced children’s performance on a subsequent symbolic math task, but not a vocabulary task. In a supplemental experiment we present evidence that children who performed ANS discriminations in a random trial order showed intermediate performance both on the ANS task and the symbolic math task, compared to the children who made ordered discriminations. Thus, our results point to a specific causal link from the ANS to symbolic math performance. PMID:27061668

  18. The influence of dynamic inflow and torsional flexibility on rotor damping in forward flight from symbolically generated equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Warmbrodt, W.

    1985-01-01

    The combined effects of blade torsion and dynamic inflow on the aeroelastic stability of an elastic rotor blade in forward flight are studied. The governing sets of equations of motion (fully nonlinear, linearized, and multiblade equations) used in this study are derived symbolically using a program written in FORTRAN. Stability results are presented for different structural models with and without dynamic inflow. A combination of symbolic and numerical programs at the proper stage in the derivation process makes the obtainment of final stability results an efficient and straightforward procedure.

  19. Data-derived symbol synchronization of MASK and QASK signals. [for multilevel digital communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M. K.

    1974-01-01

    Multilevel amplitude-shift-keying (MASK) and quadrature amplitude-shift-keying (QASK) as signaling techniques for multilevel digital communications systems, and the problem of providing symbol synchronization in the receivers of such systems are discussed. A technique is presented for extracting symbol sync from an MASK or QASK signal. The scheme is a generalization of the data transition tracking loop used in PSK systems. The performance of the loop was analyzed in terms of its mean-squared jitter and its effects on the data detection process in MASK and QASK systems.

  20. Symbolic coding for noninvertible systems: uniform approximation and numerical computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyn, Wolf-Jürgen; Hüls, Thorsten; Schenke, Andre

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that the homoclinic theorem, which conjugates a map near a transversal homoclinic orbit to a Bernoulli subshift, extends from invertible to specific noninvertible dynamical systems. In this paper, we provide a unifying approach that combines such a result with a fully discrete analog of the conjugacy for finite but sufficiently long orbit segments. The underlying idea is to solve appropriate discrete boundary value problems in both cases, and to use the theory of exponential dichotomies to control the errors. This leads to a numerical approach that allows us to compute the conjugacy to any prescribed accuracy. The method is demonstrated for several examples where invertibility of the map fails in different ways.

  1. An Application of the Cosmologic Concepts and Astronomical Symbols in the Ancient Medical Science and Astrology Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikichyan, H. V.

    2015-07-01

    Employing the cosmologic concepts and astronomical symbols, the features of the ancient subjective approach of the achievement or perception of the knowledge and its systematic delivery ways are presented. In particular, the ancient systems of the natural medical science and the art of astrology are discussed, whereas the relations of the five cosmological elements, three dynamical agents, nine luminaries and twelve zodiac signs are applied. It is pointed out some misunderstandings encountered in the contemporary interpretation on the evaluation of ancient systems of the knowledge.

  2. The Generalized Milnor-Thurston Conjecture and Equal Topological Entropy Class in Symbolic Dynamics of Order Topological Space of Three Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shou-Li; Zhang, Xu-Sheng

    This paper presents an answer to an open problem in the dynamical systems of three letters: the generalized Milnor-Thurston conjecture on the existence of infinitely many plateaus of topological entropy in the two-dimensional parameter plane. The concept of equal topological entropy class is introduced by the dual star product which is a generalization of the Derrida-Gervois-Pomeau star product to the symbolic dynamics of three letters for the endomorphisms on the interval. The algebraic rules established by the dual star products for the doubly superstable kneading sequences are equivalent to the normal factorization of the Milnor-Thurston characteristic polynomials. Moreover, the classification theory of symbolic primitive and compound sequences based on the topological conjugacy in the meaning of equal entropy is completed in the topological space Σ3 of three letters.

  3. A Baseband Signal Processing Scheme for Joint Data Frame Synchronization and Symbol Decoding for RFID Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yung-Yi; Chen, Jiunn-Tsair

    2010-12-01

    We proposed a novel Viterbi-based algorithm using jiggling substates for joint data sequence detection, symbol boundary self-calibration, and signal frame synchronization for the EPC-Global Gen-2 system. The proposed algorithm first represents the data-encoded scheme as a trellis diagram, and then, as a consequence; the data sequence estimation can be carried out through the Viterbi algorithm. Moreover, time duration of the symbol waveform is iteratively adjusted to generate two substates in the Viterbi algorithm so as to trace and calibrate the symbol boundary on the fly. Compared with conventional approaches, the proposed Viterbi-based algorithm can significantly improve the system performance in terms of data detection accuracy due to its full exploitation of the baseband signal structure combining with the developed substate technique.

  4. Brain potentials predict learning, transmission and modification of an artificial symbolic system

    PubMed Central

    Lumaca, Massimo; Baggio, Giosuè

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been argued that symbolic systems evolve while they are being transmitted across generations of learners, gradually adapting to the relevant brain structures and processes. In the context of this hypothesis, little is known on whether individual differences in neural processing capacity account for aspects of ‘variation’ observed in symbolic behavior and symbolic systems. We addressed this issue in the domain of auditory processing. We conducted a combined behavioral and EEG study on 2 successive days. On day 1, participants listened to standard and deviant five-tone sequences: as in previous oddball studies, an mismatch negativity (MMN) was elicited by deviant tones. On day 2, participants learned an artificial signaling system from a trained confederate of the experimenters in a coordination game in which five-tone sequences were associated to affective meanings (emotion-laden pictures of human faces). In a subsequent game with identical structure, participants transmitted and occasionally changed the signaling system learned during the first game. The MMN latency from day 1 predicted learning, transmission and structural modification of signaling systems on day 2. Our study introduces neurophysiological methods into research on cultural transmission and evolution, and relates aspects of variation in symbolic systems to individual differences in neural information processing. PMID:27510496

  5. Symbolic local information transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, K.; Haruna, T.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, the permutation-information theoretic approach has been used in a broad range of research fields. In particular, in the study of high-dimensional dynamical systems, it has been shown that this approach can be effective in characterizing global properties, including the complexity of their spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we show that this approach can also be applied to reveal local spatiotemporal profiles of distributed computations existing at each spatiotemporal point in the system. J. T. Lizier et al. have recently introduced the concept of local information dynamics, which consists of information storage, transfer, and modification. This concept has been intensively studied with regard to cellular automata, and has provided quantitative evidence of several characteristic behaviors observed in the system. In this paper, by focusing on the local information transfer, we demonstrate that the application of the permutation-information theoretic approach, which introduces natural symbolization methods, makes the concept easily extendible to systems that have continuous states. We propose measures called symbolic local transfer entropies, and apply these measures to two test models, the coupled map lattice (CML) system and the Bak-Sneppen model (BS-model), to show their relevance to spatiotemporal systems that have continuous states. In the CML, we demonstrate that it can be successfully used as a spatiotemporal filter to stress a coherent structure buried in the system. In particular, we show that the approach can clearly stress out defect turbulences or Brownian motion of defects from the background, which gives quantitative evidence suggesting that these moving patterns are the information transfer substrate in the spatiotemporal system. We then show that these measures reveal qualitatively different properties from the conventional approach using the sliding window method, and are also robust against external noise. In the BS-model, we demonstrate that

  6. A prototype symbolic model of canonical functional neuroanatomy of the motor system.

    PubMed

    Talos, Ion-Florin; Rubin, Daniel L; Halle, Michael; Musen, Mark; Kikinis, Ron

    2008-04-01

    Recent advances in bioinformatics have opened entire new avenues for organizing, integrating and retrieving neuroscientific data, in a digital, machine-processable format, which can be at the same time understood by humans, using ontological, symbolic data representations. Declarative information stored in ontological format can be perused and maintained by domain experts, interpreted by machines, and serve as basis for a multitude of decision support, computerized simulation, data mining, and teaching applications. We have developed a prototype symbolic model of canonical neuroanatomy of the motor system. Our symbolic model is intended to support symbolic look up, logical inference and mathematical modeling by integrating descriptive, qualitative and quantitative functional neuroanatomical knowledge. Furthermore, we show how our approach can be extended to modeling impaired brain connectivity in disease states, such as common movement disorders. In developing our ontology, we adopted a disciplined modeling approach, relying on a set of declared principles, a high-level schema, Aristotelian definitions, and a frame-based authoring system. These features, along with the use of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) vocabulary, enable the alignment of our functional ontology with an existing comprehensive ontology of human anatomy, and thus allow for combining the structural and functional views of neuroanatomy for clinical decision support and neuroanatomy teaching applications. Although the scope of our current prototype ontology is limited to a particular functional system in the brain, it may be possible to adapt this approach for modeling other brain functional systems as well.

  7. SYMBOD - A computer program for the automatic generation of symbolic equations of motion for systems of hinge-connected rigid bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macala, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    A computer program is described that can automatically generate symbolic equations of motion for systems of hinge-connected rigid bodies with tree topologies. The dynamical formulation underlying the program is outlined, and examples are given to show how a symbolic language is used to code the formulation. The program is applied to generate the equations of motion for a four-body model of the Galileo spacecraft. The resulting equations are shown to be a factor of three faster in execution time than conventional numerical subroutines.

  8. SYMBOD - A computer program for the automatic generation of symbolic equations of motion for systems of hinge-connected rigid bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macala, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    A computer program is described that can automatically generate symbolic equations of motion for systems of hinge-connected rigid bodies with tree topologies. The dynamical formulation underlying the program is outlined, and examples are given to show how a symbolic language is used to code the formulation. The program is applied to generate the equations of motion for a four-body model of the Galileo spacecraft. The resulting equations are shown to be a factor of three faster in execution time than conventional numerical subroutines.

  9. Knowledge through "Know How": Systemic Functional Grammatics and the Symbolic Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macken-Horarik, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This article investigates the potential of systemic functional linguistics (SFL) for exploring students' achievements in writing, thus moving beyond "deficit models" of grammar in school English. It considers the semantic features of successful interpretations of examination narratives, using what I call the "symbolic reading".…

  10. AN ON-LINE SYMBOLIC MATHEMATICS SYSTEM USING HAND-PRINTED TWO-DIMENSIONAL NOTATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A description of a system being developed for the on-line manipulation of symbolic mathematical expressions is given. The user hand-prints his...desires. Because the parser is entirely syntax-directed, the user can solve a wide variety of problems and can introduce novel operators as long as he

  11. Does the Approximate Number System Serve as a Foundation for Symbolic Mathematics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szkudlarek, Emily; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2017-01-01

    In this article we first review evidence for the approximate number system (ANS), an evolutionarily ancient and developmentally conservative cognitive mechanism for representing number without language. We then critically review five different lines of support for the proposal that symbolic representations of number build upon the ANS, and discuss…

  12. Image/video understanding systems based on network-symbolic models and active vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvich, Gary

    2004-07-01

    Vision is a part of information system that converts visual information into knowledge structures. These structures drive the vision process, resolving ambiguity and uncertainty via feedback, and provide image understanding, which is an interpretation of visual information in terms of these knowledge models. It is hard to split the entire system apart, and vision mechanisms cannot be completely understood separately from informational processes related to knowledge and intelligence. Brain reduces informational and computational complexities, using implicit symbolic coding of features, hierarchical compression, and selective processing of visual information. Vision is a component of situation awareness, motion and planning systems. Foveal vision provides semantic analysis, recognizing objects in the scene. Peripheral vision guides fovea to salient objects and provides scene context. Biologically inspired Network-Symbolic representation, in which both systematic structural/logical methods and neural/statistical methods are parts of a single mechanism, converts visual information into relational Network-Symbolic structures, avoiding precise artificial computations of 3-D models. Network-Symbolic transformations derive more abstract structures that allows for invariant recognition of an object as exemplar of a class and for a reliable identification even if the object is occluded. Systems with such smart vision will be able to navigate in real environment and understand real-world situations.

  13. Active vision and image/video understanding systems for UGV based on network-symbolic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvich, Gary

    2004-09-01

    Vision evolved as a sensory system for reaching, grasping and other motion activities. In advanced creatures, it has become a vital component of situation awareness, navigation and planning systems. Vision is part of a larger information system that converts visual information into knowledge structures. These structures drive the vision process, resolving ambiguity and uncertainty via feedback, and provide image understanding, that is an interpretation of visual information in terms of such knowledge models. It is hard to split such a system apart. Biologically inspired Network-Symbolic representation, where both systematic structural/logical methods and neural/statistical methods are parts of a single mechanism, is the most feasible for natural processing of visual information. It converts visual information into relational Network-Symbolic models, avoiding artificial precise computations of 3-dimensional models. Logic of visual scenes can be captured in such models and used for disambiguation of visual information. Network-Symbolic transformations derive abstract structures, which allows for invariant recognition of an object as exemplar of a class. Active vision helps create unambiguous network-symbolic models. This approach is consistent with NIST RCS. The UGV, equipped with such smart vision, will be able to plan path and navigate in a real environment, perceive and understand complex real-world situations and act accordingly.

  14. Student construction of differential length elements in multivariable coordinate systems: A symbolic forms analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, John; Schermerhorn, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of properties of physical quantities represented by vector fields often involves symmetries and spatial relationships best expressed in non-Cartesian coordinate systems. Many important quantities are determined by integrals that can involve multivariable vector differential quantities. Four pairs of students in junior-level Electricity and Magnetism (E&M) were interviewed to investigate their understanding of the structure of non-Cartesian coordinate systems and the associated differential elements. Pairs were asked to construct differential length elements for an unconventional spherical coordinate system. In order to explore how student conceptual understanding interacts with their understanding of the specific structures of these expressions, a symbolic forms framework was used. Analysis of student reasoning revealed both known and novel forms as well as the general progression of students--use and combination of symbol templates during the construction process. Each group invoked and combined symbolic forms in a similar sequence. Difficulties with the construction of expressions seem to be related almost exclusively to the conceptual schema (e.g., neglecting the role of projection) rather than with symbol templates. Supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-1405726.

  15. Automatic target recognition with image/video understanding systems based on network-symbolic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvich, Gary

    2004-09-01

    In past decades, the solution to ATR problem has been thought of as a solution to the Pattern Recognition problem. The reasons that Pattern Recognition problem has never been solved successfully and reliably for real-world images are more serious than lack of appropriate ideas. Vision is a part of a larger system that converts visual information into knowledge structures. These structures drive the vision process, resolving ambiguity and uncertainty via feedback, and provide image understanding, which is an interpretation of visual information in terms of these knowledge models. Vision mechanisms cannot be completely understood apart from the informational processes related to knowledge and intelligence. A reliable solution to the ATR problem is possible only within the solution of a more generic Image Understanding Problem. Biologically inspired Network-Symbolic representation, where both systematic structural/logical methods and neural/statistical methods are parts of a single mechanism, converts visual information into relational Network-Symbolic structures, avoiding precise computations of 3-D models. Logic of visual scenes can be captured in Network-Symbolic models and used for disambiguation of visual information. Network-Symbolic Transformations make possible invariant recognition of a real-world object as exemplar of a class. This allows for creating ATR systems, reliable in field conditions.

  16. The Picture Exchange Communication System: Digital Photographs versus Picture Symbols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonaitis, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is an augmentative and alternative system (AAC) used to improve and increase communication for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and other developmental disorders. Research addressing the efficacy of this system is increasing; however, there is limited information published that evaluates…

  17. Unravelling the community structure of the climate system by using lags and symbolic time-series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tirabassi, Giulio; Masoller, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Many natural systems can be represented by complex networks of dynamical units with modular structure in the form of communities of densely interconnected nodes. Unraveling this community structure from observed data requires the development of appropriate tools, particularly when the nodes are embedded in a regular space grid and the datasets are short and noisy. Here we propose two methods to identify communities, and validate them with the analysis of climate datasets recorded at a regular grid of geographical locations covering the Earth surface. By identifying mutual lags among time-series recorded at different grid points, and by applying symbolic time-series analysis, we are able to extract meaningful regional communities, which can be interpreted in terms of large-scale climate phenomena. The methods proposed here are valuable tools for the study of other systems represented by networks of dynamical units, allowing the identification of communities, through time-series analysis of the observed output signals. PMID:27406342

  18. Unravelling the community structure of the climate system by using lags and symbolic time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Tirabassi, Giulio; Masoller, Cristina

    2016-07-11

    Many natural systems can be represented by complex networks of dynamical units with modular structure in the form of communities of densely interconnected nodes. Unraveling this community structure from observed data requires the development of appropriate tools, particularly when the nodes are embedded in a regular space grid and the datasets are short and noisy. Here we propose two methods to identify communities, and validate them with the analysis of climate datasets recorded at a regular grid of geographical locations covering the Earth surface. By identifying mutual lags among time-series recorded at different grid points, and by applying symbolic time-series analysis, we are able to extract meaningful regional communities, which can be interpreted in terms of large-scale climate phenomena. The methods proposed here are valuable tools for the study of other systems represented by networks of dynamical units, allowing the identification of communities, through time-series analysis of the observed output signals.

  19. Unravelling the community structure of the climate system by using lags and symbolic time-series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirabassi, Giulio; Masoller, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Many natural systems can be represented by complex networks of dynamical units with modular structure in the form of communities of densely interconnected nodes. Unraveling this community structure from observed data requires the development of appropriate tools, particularly when the nodes are embedded in a regular space grid and the datasets are short and noisy. Here we propose two methods to identify communities, and validate them with the analysis of climate datasets recorded at a regular grid of geographical locations covering the Earth surface. By identifying mutual lags among time-series recorded at different grid points, and by applying symbolic time-series analysis, we are able to extract meaningful regional communities, which can be interpreted in terms of large-scale climate phenomena. The methods proposed here are valuable tools for the study of other systems represented by networks of dynamical units, allowing the identification of communities, through time-series analysis of the observed output signals.

  20. Remote Symbolic Computation of Loci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abanades, Miguel A.; Escribano, Jesus; Botana, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a web-based tool designed to compute certified equations and graphs of geometric loci specified using standard Dynamic Geometry Systems (DGS). Complementing the graphing abilities of the considered DGS, the equations of the loci produced by the application are remotely computed using symbolic algebraic techniques from the…

  1. Symbolic inversion of control relationships in model-based expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Stan

    1988-01-01

    Symbolic inversion is examined from several perspectives. First, a number of symbolic algebra and mathematical tool packages were studied in order to evaluate their capabilities and methods, specifically with respect to symbolic inversion. Second, the KATE system (without hardware interface) was ported to a Zenith Z-248 microcomputer running Golden Common Lisp. The interesting thing about the port is that it allows the user to have measurements vary and components fail in a non-deterministic manner based upon random value from probability distributions. Third, INVERT was studied as currently implemented in KATE, its operation documented, some of its weaknesses identified, and corrections made to it. The corrections and enhancements are primarily in the way that logical conditions involving AND's and OR's and inequalities are processed. In addition, the capability to handle equalities was also added. Suggestions were also made regarding the handling of ranges in INVERT. Last, other approaches to the inversion process were studied and recommendations were made as to how future versions of KATE should perform symbolic inversion.

  2. Understanding neuromotor strategy during functional upper extremity tasks using symbolic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Dominic E; Guastello, Stephen J; Prost, Robert W; Jeutter, Dean C

    2012-01-01

    The ability to model and quantify brain activation patterns that pertain to natural neuromotor strategy of the upper extremities during functional task performance is critical to the development of therapeutic interventions such as neuroprosthetic devices. The mechanisms of information flow, activation sequence and patterns, and the interaction between anatomical regions of the brain that are specific to movement planning, intention and execution of voluntary upper extremity motor tasks were investigated here. This paper presents a novel method using symbolic dynamics (orbital decomposition) and nonlinear dynamic tools of entropy, self-organization and chaos to describe the underlying structure of activation shifts in regions of the brain that are involved with the cognitive aspects of functional upper extremity task performance. Several questions were addressed: (a) How is it possible to distinguish deterministic or causal patterns of activity in brain fMRI from those that are really random or non-contributory to the neuromotor control process? (b) Can the complexity of activation patterns over time be quantified? (c) What are the optimal ways of organizing fMRI data to preserve patterns of activation, activation levels, and extract meaningful temporal patterns as they evolve over time? Analysis was performed using data from a custom developed time resolved fMRI paradigm involving human subjects (N=18) who performed functional upper extremity motor tasks with varying time delays between the onset of intention and onset of actual movements. The results indicate that there is structure in the data that can be quantified through entropy and dimensional complexity metrics and statistical inference, and furthermore, orbital decomposition is sensitive in capturing the transition of states that correlate with the cognitive aspects of functional task performance.

  3. Implementation of cartographic symbols for planetary mapping in geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nass, A.; van Gasselt, S.; Jaumann, R.; Asche, H.

    2011-09-01

    The steadily growing international interest in the exploration of planets in our Solar System and many advances in the development of space-sensor technology have led to the launch of a multitude of planetary missions to Mercury, Venus, the Earth's moon, Mars and various Outer-Solar System objects, such as the Jovian and Saturnian satellites. Camera instruments carried along on these missions image surfaces in different wavelength ranges and under different viewing angles, permitting additional data to be derived, such as spectral data or digital terrain models. Such data enable researchers to explore and investigate the development of planetary surfaces by analyzing and interpreting the inventory of surface units and structures. Results of such work are commonly abstracted and represented in thematic, mostly geological and geomorphological, maps. In order to facilitate efficient collaboration among different planetary research disciplines, mapping results need to be prepared, described, managed, archived, and visualized in a uniform way. These tasks have been increasingly carried out by means of computer-based geographic information systems (GIS or GI systems) which have come to be widely employed in the field of planetary research since the last two decades. In this paper we focus on the simplification of mapping processes, putting specific emphasis on a cartographically correct visualization of planetary mapping data using GIS-based environments. We present and discuss the implementation of a set of standardized cartographic symbols for planetary mapping based on the Digital Cartographic Standard for Geologic Map Symbolization as prepared by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) for the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC). Furthermore, we discuss various options to integrate this symbol catalog into generic GI systems, and more specifically into the Environmental Systems Research Institute's (ESRI) ArcGIS environment, and focus on requirements for

  4. Automatic online detection of atrial fibrillation based on symbolic dynamics and Shannon entropy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common and debilitating abnormalities of the arrhythmias worldwide, with a major impact on morbidity and mortality. The detection of AF becomes crucial in preventing both acute and chronic cardiac rhythm disorders. Objective Our objective is to devise a method for real-time, automated detection of AF episodes in electrocardiograms (ECGs). This method utilizes RR intervals, and it involves several basic operations of nonlinear/linear integer filters, symbolic dynamics and the calculation of Shannon entropy. Using novel recursive algorithms, online analytical processing of this method can be achieved. Results Four publicly-accessible sets of clinical data (Long-Term AF, MIT-BIH AF, MIT-BIH Arrhythmia, and MIT-BIH Normal Sinus Rhythm Databases) were selected for investigation. The first database is used as a training set; in accordance with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the best performance using this method was achieved at the discrimination threshold of 0.353: the sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV) and overall accuracy (ACC) were 96.72%, 95.07%, 96.61% and 96.05%, respectively. The other three databases are used as testing sets. Using the obtained threshold value (i.e., 0.353), for the second set, the obtained parameters were 96.89%, 98.25%, 97.62% and 97.67%, respectively; for the third database, these parameters were 97.33%, 90.78%, 55.29% and 91.46%, respectively; finally, for the fourth set, the Sp was 98.28%. The existing methods were also employed for comparison. Conclusions Overall, in contrast to the other available techniques, the test results indicate that the newly developed approach outperforms traditional methods using these databases under assessed various experimental situations, and suggest our technique could be of practical use for clinicians in the future. PMID:24533474

  5. Symbolic gestures and spoken language are processed by a common neural system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiang; Gannon, Patrick J; Emmorey, Karen; Smith, Jason F; Braun, Allen R

    2009-12-08

    Symbolic gestures, such as pantomimes that signify actions (e.g., threading a needle) or emblems that facilitate social transactions (e.g., finger to lips indicating "be quiet"), play an important role in human communication. They are autonomous, can fully take the place of words, and function as complete utterances in their own right. The relationship between these gestures and spoken language remains unclear. We used functional MRI to investigate whether these two forms of communication are processed by the same system in the human brain. Responses to symbolic gestures, to their spoken glosses (expressing the gestures' meaning in English), and to visually and acoustically matched control stimuli were compared in a randomized block design. General Linear Models (GLM) contrasts identified shared and unique activations and functional connectivity analyses delineated regional interactions associated with each condition. Results support a model in which bilateral modality-specific areas in superior and inferior temporal cortices extract salient features from vocal-auditory and gestural-visual stimuli respectively. However, both classes of stimuli activate a common, left-lateralized network of inferior frontal and posterior temporal regions in which symbolic gestures and spoken words may be mapped onto common, corresponding conceptual representations. We suggest that these anterior and posterior perisylvian areas, identified since the mid-19th century as the core of the brain's language system, are not in fact committed to language processing, but may function as a modality-independent semiotic system that plays a broader role in human communication, linking meaning with symbols whether these are words, gestures, images, sounds, or objects.

  6. Symbolic gestures and spoken language are processed by a common neural system

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiang; Gannon, Patrick J.; Emmorey, Karen; Smith, Jason F.; Braun, Allen R.

    2009-01-01

    Symbolic gestures, such as pantomimes that signify actions (e.g., threading a needle) or emblems that facilitate social transactions (e.g., finger to lips indicating “be quiet”), play an important role in human communication. They are autonomous, can fully take the place of words, and function as complete utterances in their own right. The relationship between these gestures and spoken language remains unclear. We used functional MRI to investigate whether these two forms of communication are processed by the same system in the human brain. Responses to symbolic gestures, to their spoken glosses (expressing the gestures' meaning in English), and to visually and acoustically matched control stimuli were compared in a randomized block design. General Linear Models (GLM) contrasts identified shared and unique activations and functional connectivity analyses delineated regional interactions associated with each condition. Results support a model in which bilateral modality-specific areas in superior and inferior temporal cortices extract salient features from vocal-auditory and gestural-visual stimuli respectively. However, both classes of stimuli activate a common, left-lateralized network of inferior frontal and posterior temporal regions in which symbolic gestures and spoken words may be mapped onto common, corresponding conceptual representations. We suggest that these anterior and posterior perisylvian areas, identified since the mid-19th century as the core of the brain's language system, are not in fact committed to language processing, but may function as a modality-independent semiotic system that plays a broader role in human communication, linking meaning with symbols whether these are words, gestures, images, sounds, or objects. PMID:19923436

  7. Neural systems supporting linguistic structure, linguistic experience, and symbolic communication in sign language and gesture.

    PubMed

    Newman, Aaron J; Supalla, Ted; Fernandez, Nina; Newport, Elissa L; Bavelier, Daphne

    2015-09-15

    Sign languages used by deaf communities around the world possess the same structural and organizational properties as spoken languages: In particular, they are richly expressive and also tightly grammatically constrained. They therefore offer the opportunity to investigate the extent to which the neural organization for language is modality independent, as well as to identify ways in which modality influences this organization. The fact that sign languages share the visual-manual modality with a nonlinguistic symbolic communicative system-gesture-further allows us to investigate where the boundaries lie between language and symbolic communication more generally. In the present study, we had three goals: to investigate the neural processing of linguistic structure in American Sign Language (using verbs of motion classifier constructions, which may lie at the boundary between language and gesture); to determine whether we could dissociate the brain systems involved in deriving meaning from symbolic communication (including both language and gesture) from those specifically engaged by linguistically structured content (sign language); and to assess whether sign language experience influences the neural systems used for understanding nonlinguistic gesture. The results demonstrated that even sign language constructions that appear on the surface to be similar to gesture are processed within the left-lateralized frontal-temporal network used for spoken languages-supporting claims that these constructions are linguistically structured. Moreover, although nonsigners engage regions involved in human action perception to process communicative, symbolic gestures, signers instead engage parts of the language-processing network-demonstrating an influence of experience on the perception of nonlinguistic stimuli.

  8. Application of symbolic processing to command and control: An Advanced Information Presentation System. Volume 1: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdybel, F.; Gibbons, J.; Greenfeld, N.; Yonke, M.

    1981-08-01

    This report describes the work performed in the second year of the three-year contract to explore the application of symbolic processing to command and control (C2); specifically, the graphics interface between the C2 user and a complex C2 decision support system. In Volume 1, the goals and approaches used in the design of the prototype system, AIPS (Advanced Information Presentation System), are discussed, as well as the year's efforts to extend the prototype. An overview of the current AIPS system is also provided.

  9. Pilot symbol assisted channel estimation for OFDM-based cognitive radio systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manasseh, Emmanuel; Ohno, Shuichi; Nakamoto, Masayoshi

    2013-12-01

    In this article, challenges regarding the provision of channel state information (CSI) in non-contiguous orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (NC-OFDM) cognitive radio (CR) systems are addressed. We propose a novel scheme that utilizes cross entropy (CE) optimization together with an analytical pilot power distribution technique to design pilot symbols that minimizes the channel estimate mean squared error (MSE) of frequency-selective channels. The optimal selection of pilot subcarriers is a combinatorial problem that requires heavy computations. To reduce the computational complexity, the CE optimization is utilized to determine the position of pilot subcarriers. Then, for a given pilot placement obtained by the CE algorithm, a closed form expression to obtain optimal pilot power distribution is employed. Simulation results indicate that, the proposed pilot symbol design provides better channel estimate MSE as well as the bit error rate (BER) performance when compared with the conventional equal powered pilot design.

  10. Pilot-symbols-aided cycle slip mitigation for DP-16QAM optical communication systems.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Haiquan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Fangzheng; Wu, Jian; Lu, Jianxin; Zhang, Guoyi; Xu, Jian; Lin, Jintong

    2013-09-23

    A pilot-symbols-aided phase unwrapping (PAPU), which utilizes the time-division multiplexed pilot symbols that are transmitted with data, is proposed to do cycle slip detection and correction with the carrier phase estimation (CPE). Numerical simulations for 10 Gbaud dual-polarization 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (DP-16QAM) systems show that the block averaging quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) partitioning with PAPU greatly eliminates the performance degradation caused by cycle slips, maintains a low CS probability with less influence of filter length, and achieves a bit-error-rate (BER) performance below soft-decision forward error correction (FEC) limit 2 × 10⁻² at 15 dB optical signal-to-noise ratio with only 1.56% overhead and 6 MHz combined laser linewidth.

  11. Neural systems supporting linguistic structure, linguistic experience, and symbolic communication in sign language and gesture

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Aaron J.; Supalla, Ted; Fernandez, Nina; Newport, Elissa L.; Bavelier, Daphne

    2015-01-01

    Sign languages used by deaf communities around the world possess the same structural and organizational properties as spoken languages: In particular, they are richly expressive and also tightly grammatically constrained. They therefore offer the opportunity to investigate the extent to which the neural organization for language is modality independent, as well as to identify ways in which modality influences this organization. The fact that sign languages share the visual–manual modality with a nonlinguistic symbolic communicative system—gesture—further allows us to investigate where the boundaries lie between language and symbolic communication more generally. In the present study, we had three goals: to investigate the neural processing of linguistic structure in American Sign Language (using verbs of motion classifier constructions, which may lie at the boundary between language and gesture); to determine whether we could dissociate the brain systems involved in deriving meaning from symbolic communication (including both language and gesture) from those specifically engaged by linguistically structured content (sign language); and to assess whether sign language experience influences the neural systems used for understanding nonlinguistic gesture. The results demonstrated that even sign language constructions that appear on the surface to be similar to gesture are processed within the left-lateralized frontal-temporal network used for spoken languages—supporting claims that these constructions are linguistically structured. Moreover, although nonsigners engage regions involved in human action perception to process communicative, symbolic gestures, signers instead engage parts of the language-processing network—demonstrating an influence of experience on the perception of nonlinguistic stimuli. PMID:26283352

  12. Symbols: historic and current uses.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Emilee

    2008-01-01

    From hieroglyphs to barcodes, symbols have been used throughout history. Symbols can be observed on traffic signs, warning signs that are affixed to building fronts, doors of public restrooms to show gender-specific usage, and caution signs on caustic or poisonous chemicals; even Braille, a system of writing and printing for the blind, is a symbol form. This article includes a brief discussion on the psychology of symbols, history of symbols, symbols used by alchemists and pharmacists, and the current use of symbols.

  13. Symbolic transfer entropy: inferring directionality in biosignals.

    PubMed

    Staniek, Matthäus; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2009-12-01

    Inferring directional interactions from biosignals is of crucial importance to improve understanding of dynamical interdependences underlying various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. We here present symbolic transfer entropy as a robust measure to infer the direction of interactions between multidimensional dynamical systems. We demonstrate its performance in quantifying driver-responder relationships in a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators and in the human epileptic brain.

  14. Fock space, symbolic algebra, and analytical solutions for small stochastic systems.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fernando A N; Gadêlha, Hermes; Gaffney, Eamonn A

    2015-12-01

    Randomness is ubiquitous in nature. From single-molecule biochemical reactions to macroscale biological systems, stochasticity permeates individual interactions and often regulates emergent properties of the system. While such systems are regularly studied from a modeling viewpoint using stochastic simulation algorithms, numerous potential analytical tools can be inherited from statistical and quantum physics, replacing randomness due to quantum fluctuations with low-copy-number stochasticity. Nevertheless, classical studies remained limited to the abstract level, demonstrating a more general applicability and equivalence between systems in physics and biology rather than exploiting the physics tools to study biological systems. Here the Fock space representation, used in quantum mechanics, is combined with the symbolic algebra of creation and annihilation operators to consider explicit solutions for the chemical master equations describing small, well-mixed, biochemical, or biological systems. This is illustrated with an exact solution for a Michaelis-Menten single enzyme interacting with limited substrate, including a consideration of very short time scales, which emphasizes when stiffness is present even for small copy numbers. Furthermore, we present a general matrix representation for Michaelis-Menten kinetics with an arbitrary number of enzymes and substrates that, following diagonalization, leads to the solution of this ubiquitous, nonlinear enzyme kinetics problem. For this, a flexible symbolic maple code is provided, demonstrating the prospective advantages of this framework compared to stochastic simulation algorithms. This further highlights the possibilities for analytically based studies of stochastic systems in biology and chemistry using tools from theoretical quantum physics.

  15. Fock space, symbolic algebra, and analytical solutions for small stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Fernando A. N.; Gadêlha, Hermes; Gaffney, Eamonn A.

    2015-12-01

    Randomness is ubiquitous in nature. From single-molecule biochemical reactions to macroscale biological systems, stochasticity permeates individual interactions and often regulates emergent properties of the system. While such systems are regularly studied from a modeling viewpoint using stochastic simulation algorithms, numerous potential analytical tools can be inherited from statistical and quantum physics, replacing randomness due to quantum fluctuations with low-copy-number stochasticity. Nevertheless, classical studies remained limited to the abstract level, demonstrating a more general applicability and equivalence between systems in physics and biology rather than exploiting the physics tools to study biological systems. Here the Fock space representation, used in quantum mechanics, is combined with the symbolic algebra of creation and annihilation operators to consider explicit solutions for the chemical master equations describing small, well-mixed, biochemical, or biological systems. This is illustrated with an exact solution for a Michaelis-Menten single enzyme interacting with limited substrate, including a consideration of very short time scales, which emphasizes when stiffness is present even for small copy numbers. Furthermore, we present a general matrix representation for Michaelis-Menten kinetics with an arbitrary number of enzymes and substrates that, following diagonalization, leads to the solution of this ubiquitous, nonlinear enzyme kinetics problem. For this, a flexible symbolic maple code is provided, demonstrating the prospective advantages of this framework compared to stochastic simulation algorithms. This further highlights the possibilities for analytically based studies of stochastic systems in biology and chemistry using tools from theoretical quantum physics.

  16. Contextualizing symbol, symbolizing context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maudy, Septiani Yugni; Suryadi, Didi; Mulyana, Endang

    2017-08-01

    When students learn algebra for the first time, inevitably they are experiencing transition from arithmetic to algebraic thinking. Once students could apprehend this essential mathematical knowledge, they are cultivating their ability in solving daily life problems by applying algebra. However, as we dig into this transitional stage, we identified possible students' learning obstacles to be dealt with seriously in order to forestall subsequent hindrance in studying more advance algebra. We come to realize this recurring problem as we undertook the processes of re-personalization and re-contextualization in which we scrutinize the very basic questions: 1) what is variable, linear equation with one variable and their relationship with the arithmetic-algebraic thinking? 2) Why student should learn such concepts? 3) How to teach those concepts to students? By positioning ourselves as a seventh grade student, we address the possibility of children to think arithmetically when confronted with the problems of linear equation with one variable. To help them thinking algebraically, Bruner's modes of representation developed contextually from concrete to abstract were delivered to enhance their interpretation toward the idea of variables. Hence, from the outset we designed the context for student to think symbolically initiated by exploring various symbols that could be contextualized in order to bridge student traversing the arithmetic-algebraic fruitfully.

  17. Sound Symbolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Leanne, Ed.; And Others

    Sound symbolism is the study of the relationship between the sound of an utterance and its meaning. In this interdisciplinary collection of new studies, 24 leading scholars discuss the role of sound symbolism in a theory of language. Contributions and authors include the following: "Sound-Symbolic Processes" (Leanne Hinton, Johanna…

  18. Sound Symbolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Leanne, Ed.; And Others

    Sound symbolism is the study of the relationship between the sound of an utterance and its meaning. In this interdisciplinary collection of new studies, 24 leading scholars discuss the role of sound symbolism in a theory of language. Contributions and authors include the following: "Sound-Symbolic Processes" (Leanne Hinton, Johanna…

  19. A fast document classification algorithm for gene symbol disambiguation in the BITOLA literature-based discovery support system.

    PubMed

    Kastrin, Andrej; Hristovski, Dimitar

    2008-11-06

    Gene symbol disambiguation is an important problem for biomedical text mining systems. When detecting gene symbols in MEDLINE citations one of the biggest challenges is the fact that many gene symbols also denote other, more general biomedical concepts (e.g. CT, MR). Our approach to this problem is first to classify the citations into genetic and non-genetic domains and then to detect gene symbols only in the genetic domain. We used ontological information provided by Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) for this classification task. The proposed algorithm is fast and is able to process the full MEDLINE distribution in a few hours. It achieves predictive accuracy of 0.91. The algorithm is currently implemented in the BITOLA literature-based discovery support system (http://www.mf.uni-lj.si/bitola/).

  20. PANSYM: a symbolic equation generator for mathematical modelling, analysis and control of metabolic and pharmacokinetic systems.

    PubMed

    Thomaseth, K

    1994-02-14

    Software is presented for automatic generation of first-order ordinary differential equations (ODE) that arise from lumped parameter representations of metabolic and pharmacokinetic systems. The definition of system structures is accomplished by fractional transfer rates between state variables, together with input/output equations and initial conditions of state variables. General non-linear mathematical expressions can be assigned to all structure definition items. The software parses and interprets the system definitions and generates symbolically the mathematical expression of the model's set of ODE. In addition, symbolic derivatives of state equations are determined with respect to model parameters, state variables and external inputs. These derivatives represent the constituents of systems of sensitivity-differential and adjoint-differential equations that arise in identification and optimal control problems. Finally, output routines generate source code that, once compiled and linked to simulation programs, allows efficient numerical integration of the system of ODE. This software has been developed in PROLOG on Macintosh computers and has been extensively used with the programming environment MATLAB. Possible applications of this software include model building, sensitivity analysis, identification, optimal experiment design and numerical solution of optimal control problems.

  1. Origin of symbol-using systems: speech, but not sign, without the semantic urge

    PubMed Central

    Sereno, Martin I.

    2014-01-01

    Natural language—spoken and signed—is a multichannel phenomenon, involving facial and body expression, and voice and visual intonation that is often used in the service of a social urge to communicate meaning. Given that iconicity seems easier and less abstract than making arbitrary connections between sound and meaning, iconicity and gesture have often been invoked in the origin of language alongside the urge to convey meaning. To get a fresh perspective, we critically distinguish the origin of a system capable of evolution from the subsequent evolution that system becomes capable of. Human language arose on a substrate of a system already capable of Darwinian evolution; the genetically supported uniquely human ability to learn a language reflects a key contact point between Darwinian evolution and language. Though implemented in brains generated by DNA symbols coding for protein meaning, the second higher-level symbol-using system of language now operates in a world mostly decoupled from Darwinian evolutionary constraints. Examination of Darwinian evolution of vocal learning in other animals suggests that the initial fixation of a key prerequisite to language into the human genome may actually have required initially side-stepping not only iconicity, but the urge to mean itself. If sign languages came later, they would not have faced this constraint. PMID:25092671

  2. Origin of symbol-using systems: speech, but not sign, without the semantic urge.

    PubMed

    Sereno, Martin I

    2014-09-19

    Natural language--spoken and signed--is a multichannel phenomenon, involving facial and body expression, and voice and visual intonation that is often used in the service of a social urge to communicate meaning. Given that iconicity seems easier and less abstract than making arbitrary connections between sound and meaning, iconicity and gesture have often been invoked in the origin of language alongside the urge to convey meaning. To get a fresh perspective, we critically distinguish the origin of a system capable of evolution from the subsequent evolution that system becomes capable of. Human language arose on a substrate of a system already capable of Darwinian evolution; the genetically supported uniquely human ability to learn a language reflects a key contact point between Darwinian evolution and language. Though implemented in brains generated by DNA symbols coding for protein meaning, the second higher-level symbol-using system of language now operates in a world mostly decoupled from Darwinian evolutionary constraints. Examination of Darwinian evolution of vocal learning in other animals suggests that the initial fixation of a key prerequisite to language into the human genome may actually have required initially side-stepping not only iconicity, but the urge to mean itself. If sign languages came later, they would not have faced this constraint.

  3. Advanced data management design for autonomous telerobotic systems in space using spaceborne symbolic processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goforth, Andre

    1987-01-01

    The use of computers in autonomous telerobots is reaching the point where advanced distributed processing concepts and techniques are needed to support the functioning of Space Station era telerobotic systems. Three major issues that have impact on the design of data management functions in a telerobot are covered. It also presents a design concept that incorporates an intelligent systems manager (ISM) running on a spaceborne symbolic processor (SSP), to address these issues. The first issue is the support of a system-wide control architecture or control philosophy. Salient features of two candidates are presented that impose constraints on data management design. The second issue is the role of data management in terms of system integration. This referes to providing shared or coordinated data processing and storage resources to a variety of telerobotic components such as vision, mechanical sensing, real-time coordinated multiple limb and end effector control, and planning and reasoning. The third issue is hardware that supports symbolic processing in conjunction with standard data I/O and numeric processing. A SSP that currently is seen to be technologically feasible and is being developed is described and used as a baseline in the design concept.

  4. A fully symbolic design and modeling of nonlinear glucose control with Control System Professional Suite (CSPS) of Mathematica.

    PubMed

    Kovács, L; Benyó, B; Paláncz, B; Benyó, Z

    2004-01-01

    In this case study a fully symbolic design and modeling method are presented for blood glucose control of diabetic patients under intensive care using Mathematica. The analysis is based on a modified two-compartment model proposed by Bergman et al. The applied feedback control law decoupling even the nonlinear model leads to a fully symbolic solution of the closed loop equations. The effectivity of the applied symbolic procedures being mostly built-in the new version of Control System Professional Suite (CSPS) Application of Mathematica have been demonstrated for controller design in case of a glucose control for treatment of diabetes mellitus and also presented for a numerical situation described in Juhász. The results are in good agreement with the earlier presented symbolic-numeric analysis by Benyó et al.

  5. Electrophysiological dynamic brain connectivity during symbolic magnitude comparison in children with different mathematics achievement levels.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Velázquez, Fabiola R; Vélez-Pérez, Hugo; Espinoza-Valdez, Aurora; Romo-Vazquez, Rebeca; Salido-Ruiz, Ricardo A; Ruiz-Stovel, Vanessa; Gallardo-Moreno, Geisa B; González-Garrido, Andrés A; Berumen, Gustavo

    2017-02-08

    Children with mathematical difficulties usually have an impaired ability to process symbolic representations. Functional MRI methods have suggested that early frontoparietal connectivity can predict mathematic achievements; however, the study of brain connectivity during numerical processing remains unexplored. With the aim of evaluating this in children with different math proficiencies, we selected a sample of 40 children divided into two groups [high achievement (HA) and low achievement (LA)] according to their arithmetic scores in the Wide Range Achievement Test, 4th ed.. Participants performed a symbolic magnitude comparison task (i.e. determining which of two numbers is numerically larger), with simultaneous electrophysiological recording. Partial directed coherence and graph theory methods were used to estimate and depict frontoparietal connectivity in both groups. The behavioral measures showed that children with LA performed significantly slower and less accurately than their peers in the HA group. Significantly higher frontocentral connectivity was found in LA compared with HA; however, when the connectivity analysis was restricted to parietal locations, no relevant group differences were observed. These findings seem to support the notion that LA children require greater memory and attentional efforts to meet task demands, probably affecting early stages of symbolic comparison.

  6. Evaluation of probabilistic and dynamical invariants from finite symbolic substrings - comparison between two approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, R.; Parisi, J.

    1992-09-01

    While evaluating scaling functions of fractal dimensions and Lyapunov exponents from time series in the traditional way, assumptions are made concerning the grammar of the underlying dynamical system: it is implicitly assumed that the length of the substrings considered is sufficient to capture the grammatical properties of the system. In this contribution, we show where this assumption becomes relevant. We give an example of a simple grammatical rule which leads to badly behaving convergence properties of the associated scaling functions. As another consequence of our investigations, we conclude that, whenever a finite grammar is encountered, the cycle expansion approach of Cvitanović using periodic orbits should preferably be used.

  7. Short-term forecasting of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias based on symbolic dynamics and finite-time growth rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Niels; Ziehmann, Christine; Kurths, Jürgen; Meyerfeldt, Udo; Schirdewan, Alexander; Voss, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    Ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT-VF) as fatal cardiac arrhythmias are the main factors triggering sudden cardiac death. The objective of this study is to find early signs of sustained VT-VF in patients with an implanted cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). These devices are able to safeguard patients by returning their hearts to a normal rhythm via strong defibrillatory shocks; additionally, they store the 1000 beat-to-beat intervals immediately before the onset of a life-threatening arrhythmia. We study these 1000 beat-to-beat intervals of 17 chronic heart failure ICD patients before the onset of a life-threatening arrhythmia and at a control time, i.e., without a VT-VF event. To characterize these rather short data sets, we calculate heart rate variability parameters from the time and frequency domain, from symbolic dynamics as well as the finite-time growth rates. We find that neither the time nor the frequency domain parameters show significant differences between the VT-VF and the control time series. However, two parameters from symbolic dynamics as well as the finite-time growth rates discriminate significantly both groups. These findings could be of importance in algorithms for next generation ICD's to improve the diagnostics and therapy of VT-VF.

  8. Symbol synchronization and sampling frequency synchronization techniques in real-time DDO-OFDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; He, Jing; Cao, Zizheng; Tang, Jin; Chen, Lin; Wu, Xian

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a symbol synchronization and sampling frequency synchronization techniques in real-time direct-detection optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (DDO-OFDM) system, over 100-km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) using a cost-effective directly modulated distributed feedback (DFB) laser. The experiment results show that the proposed symbol synchronization based on training sequence (TS) has a low complexity and high accuracy even at a sampling frequency offset (SFO) of 5000-ppm. Meanwhile, the proposed pilot-assisted sampling frequency synchronization between digital-to-analog converter (DAC) and analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is capable of estimating SFOs with an accuracy of <±5-ppm for initial SFOs as large as 1000-ppm. Moreover, the sampling frequency synchronization technique can also compensate SFO effects within a small residual SFO caused by deviation of SFO estimation and low-precision or unstable clock source. The two synchronization techniques are suitable for high-speed DDO-OFDM transmission systems.

  9. The influence of dynamic inflow and torsional flexibility on rotor damping in forward flight from symbolically generated equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Warmbrodt, W.

    1984-01-01

    The combined effects of blade torsion and dynamic inflow on the aeroelastic stability of an elastic rotor blade in forward flight are studied. The Helicopter Equations for Stability and Loads (HESL) program is extended to derive the governing equations of motion for the blade, and a Lagrangian formulation is used to obtain the equations in generalized coordinates. The program generates the steady-state and linearized perturbation equations in symbolic form and then codes them into FORTRAN subroutines. The coefficients for each equation and for each mode are identified through a numerical program; the latter can also be used to obtain the harmonic balance equations. The governing multiblade equations are derived explicitly using HESL. These equations can accommodate any number of elastic blade modes. Stability results are presented for several hingeless rotor blade structural models, and the influence of dynamic inflow in forward flight with an elastic hingeless rotor is investigated.

  10. Symbolic Constraint Maintenance Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Version 3.1 of Symbolic Constraint Maintenance Grid (SCMG) is a software system that provides a general conceptual framework for utilizing pre-existing programming techniques to perform symbolic transformations of data. SCMG also provides a language (and an associated communication method and protocol) for representing constraints on the original non-symbolic data. SCMG provides a facility for exchanging information between numeric and symbolic components without knowing the details of the components themselves. In essence, it integrates symbolic software tools (for diagnosis, prognosis, and planning) with non-artificial-intelligence software. SCMG executes a process of symbolic summarization and monitoring of continuous time series data that are being abstractly represented as symbolic templates of information exchange. This summarization process enables such symbolic- reasoning computing systems as artificial- intelligence planning systems to evaluate the significance and effects of channels of data more efficiently than would otherwise be possible. As a result of the increased efficiency in representation, reasoning software can monitor more channels and is thus able to perform monitoring and control functions more effectively.

  11. Q-S (lag or anticipated) synchronization backstepping scheme in a class of continuous-time hyperchaotic systems--a symbolic-numeric computation approach.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhenya

    2005-06-01

    First, a Q-S (lag or anticipated) synchronization of continuous-time dynamical systems is defined. Second, based on a backstepping design with one controller, a systematic, concrete, and automatic scheme is developed to investigate the Q-S (lag or anticipated) synchronization between the drive system and response system with a strict-feedback form. Two identical hyperchaotic Tamasevicius-Namajunas-Cenys(TNC) systems as well as the hyperchaotic TNC system and hyperchaotic Rossler system are chosen to illustrate the proposed scheme. Numerical simulations are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. The scheme can also be extended to study Q-S (lag or anticipated) synchronization between other dynamical systems with strict-feedback forms. With the aid of symbolic-numeric computation, the scheme can be performed to yield automatically the scalar controller in computer.

  12. Dynamical Languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huimin

    The following sections are included: * Definition of Dynamical Languages * Distinct Excluded Blocks * Definition and Properties * L and L″ in Chomsky Hierarchy * A Natural Equivalence Relation * Symbolic Flows * Symbolic Flows and Dynamical Languages * Subshifts of Finite Type * Sofic Systems * Graphs and Dynamical Languages * Graphs and Shannon-Graphs * Transitive Languages * Topological Entropy

  13. Dynamic information theory and information description of dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiusan

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we develop dynamic statistical information theory established by the author. Starting from the ideas that the state variable evolution equations of stochastic dynamic systems, classical and quantum nonequilibrium statistical physical systems and special electromagnetic field systems can be regarded as their information symbol evolution equations and the definitions of dynamic information and dynamic entropy, we derive the evolution equations of dynamic information and dynamic entropy that describe the evolution laws of dynamic information. These four kinds of evolution equations are of the same mathematical type. They show in unison when information transmits in coordinate space outside the systems that the time rate of change of dynamic information densities originates from their drift, diffusion and dissipation in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes, and that the time rate of change of dynamic entropy densities is caused by their drift, diffusion and production in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes. When space noise can be neglected, an information wave will appear. If we only consider the information change inside the systems, dynamic information evolution equations reduce to information equations corresponding to the dynamic equations which describe evolution laws of the above dynamic systems. This reveals that the evolution laws of respective dynamic systems can be described by information equations in a unified fashion. Hence, the evolution processes of these dynamic systems can be abstracted as the evolution processes of information. Furthermore, we present the formulas for information flow, information dissipation rate, and entropy production rate. We prove that the information production probably emerges in a dynamic system with internal attractive interaction between the elements, and derive a formula for this information

  14. Control and dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leondes, C.T. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This volume covers topics related to analysis and control system techniques for electric power systems. Topics include: simulation of multimachine power system dynamics, computer simulation in electric distribution systems, transient stability assessment, dynamic stability analysis, and improved power system control techniques.

  15. Receiver IQ mismatch estimation in PDM CO-OFDM system using training symbol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dandan; Ma, Xiurong; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Haoyuan

    2017-07-01

    Receiver in-phase/quadrature (IQ) mismatch is hard to mitigate at the receiver via using conventional method in polarization division multiplexed (PDM) coherent optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CO-OFDM) system. In this paper, a novel training symbol structure is proposed to estimate IQ mismatch and channel distortion. Combined this structure with Gram Schmidt orthogonalization procedure (GSOP) algorithm, we can get lower bit error rate (BER). Meanwhile, based on this structure one estimation method is deduced in frequency domain which can achieve the estimation of IQ mismatch and channel distortion independently and improve the system performance obviously. Numerical simulation shows that the proposed two methods have better performance than compared method at 100 Gb/s after 480 km fiber transmission. Besides, the calculation complexity is also analyzed.

  16. Control and dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leondes, C.T. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains papers on analysis and control system techniques for electric power systems. Topics include: modeling and control of electric power systems, dynamic state estimation techniques, optimal power flow algorithms, and neural networks in power systems.

  17. Symbolic Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podgor, Ellen S.

    1976-01-01

    The concept of symbolic speech emanates from the 1967 case of United States v. O'Brien. These discussions of flag desecration, grooming and dress codes, nude entertainment, buttons and badges, and musical expression show that the courts place symbolic speech in different strata from verbal communication. (LBH)

  18. Symbolic Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podgor, Ellen S.

    1976-01-01

    The concept of symbolic speech emanates from the 1967 case of United States v. O'Brien. These discussions of flag desecration, grooming and dress codes, nude entertainment, buttons and badges, and musical expression show that the courts place symbolic speech in different strata from verbal communication. (LBH)

  19. Characterization of activity epochs in actimetric registries for infantile colic diagnosis: Identification and feature extraction based on wavelets and symbolic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Martin-Martinez, Diego; Casaseca-de-la-Higuera, Pablo; Vegas-Sanchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo; Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Andres-de-Llano, Jesus Maria; Garmendia-Leiza, Jose Ramon; Ardura-Fernandez, Julio

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis and therapy planning of high prevalence pathologies such as infantile colic can be substantially improved by statistical signal processing of activity/rest registries. Assuming that colic episodes are associated to activity episodes, diagnosis aid systems should be based on preprocessing techniques able to separate real activity from rest epochs, and feature extraction methods to identify meaningful indices with diagnostic capabilities. In this paper, we propose a two step diagnosis aid methodology for infantile colic in children below 3 months old. Identification of activity periods is performed by means of a wavelet based activity filter which does not depend on the acquisition device (as so far proposed methods do). In addition, symbolic dynamic analysis is used for extraction of discriminative indices from the activity time series. Results on real data yielded 100% sensitivity and 80% specificity in a study group composed of 46 cases and 10 control subjects.

  20. Dynamic Interactive Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabry, Khaled; Barker, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses the notions of interactivity and dynamicity of learning systems in relation to information technologies and design principles that can contribute to interactive and dynamic learning. It explores the concept of dynamic interactive learning systems based on the emerging generation of information as part of a…

  1. Unified system of Hermann-Mauguin symbols for groups of material physics. 1. Groups with decomposable lattices.

    PubMed

    Kopský, Vojtech

    2006-03-01

    The system of Hermann-Mauguin symbols for space and subperiodic Euclidean groups in two and three dimensions is extended to groups with continuous and semicontinuous translation subgroups (lattices). An interpretation of these symbols is proposed in which each symbol defines a quite specific Euclidean group with reference to a crystallographic basis, including the location of the group in space. Symbols of subperiodic (layer and rod) groups are strongly correlated with symbols of decomposable space groups on the basis of the factorization theorem. Introduction of groups with continuous and semicontinuous lattices is connected with a proposal for several new terms that describe the properties of these groups and with a proposal to amend the meaning of space groups and of crystallographic groups. Charts of plane, layer and space groups describe variants of these groups with the same reducible point group but various types of lattices. Examples of such charts are given for plane, layer and space groups to illustrate the unification principle for groups with decomposable lattices.

  2. Using symbols: developmental perspectives.

    PubMed

    Uttal, David H; Yuan, Lei

    2014-05-01

    The frequent and fluent use of symbols is a distinguishing characteristic of human thought and communication. Symbols free us from the bounds of our own direct experience and allow us to learn about the world from others. To use a symbol, children need to (1) understand the intention that led to the creation and use of the symbol, and (b) how the symbol relates to its referent. For example, to use a map, children need to know that it is intended to communicate spatial information, and how locations on the map correspond to locations in the world. In some cases, even very young children are capable of meeting both requirements. For example, infants quickly learn that people intend to communicate when they use words. Moreover, they quickly learn the meanings of many specific words and the objects or concepts that they stand for. In other cases, such as learning to use maps of large-scale space, children may struggle to understand what the symbol is intended to communicate and the specific relations between elements of the symbol and their referents in the world. Here we review the development of children's understanding of words, photographs, scale models, maps, and text. We consider when and how children gain insight into the communicative intent of each of these symbols and how they learn to establish connections between the symbol and what it represents. This review helps to integrate research on the development of children's understanding of a variety of symbol systems. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. An On-Line Electronics Graphics Symbol Set for the PLATO IV System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClintock, Peggy A.; Kimberlin, Donald A.

    An electronics graphic symbol set for on-line construction of electrical and electronics schematic diagrams is described. Specific procedures involving off-line and on-line activities are presented for the development and entry of schematic diagrams utilizing a stored set of symbols. An example of the commands and coding required for the…

  4. The Role of Symbol Systems in Problem Solving: A Literature Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shavelson, Richard J.; And Others

    This review brings diverse research to bear on the contention that current achievement tests may underestimate students' subject-matter knowledge and problem-solving ability because of the mismatch between the symbolic form that typical achievement tests use and the specificity of students' symbolic encoding that arises from instruction and…

  5. Symbolic dynamics of heart rate variability - a promising tool to investigate cardiac sympathovagal control in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)?

    PubMed

    Tonhajzerova, Ingrid; Farsky, Ivan; Mestanik, Michal; Visnovcova, Zuzana; Mestanikova, Andrea; Hrtanek, Igor; Ondrejka, Igor

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate complex cardiac sympathovagal control in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) by using heart rate variability (HRV) nonlinear analysis - symbolic dynamics. We examined 29 boys with untreated ADHD and 25 healthy boys (age 8-13 years). ADHD symptoms were evaluated by ADHD-RS-IV scale. ECG was recorded in 3 positions: baseline supine position, orthostasis, and clinostasis. Symbolic dynamics indices were used for the assessment of complex cardiac sympathovagal regulation: normalised complexity index (NCI), normalised unpredictability index (NUPI), and pattern classification measures (0V%, 1V%, 2LV%, 2UV%). The results showed that HRV complexity was significantly reduced at rest (NUPI) and during standing position (NCI, NUPI) in ADHD group compared to controls. Cardiac-linked sympathetic index 0V% was significantly higher during all posture positions and cardiovagal index 2LV% was significantly lower to standing in boys suffering from ADHD. Importantly, ADHD symptom inattention positively correlated with 0V%, and negatively correlated with NCI, NUPI. Concluding, symbolic dynamics revealed impaired complex neurocardiac control characterised by potential cardiac beta-adrenergic overactivity and vagal deficiency at rest and to posture changes in boys suffering from ADHD that is correlated with inattention. We suggest that symbolic dynamics indices could represent promising cardiac biomarkers in ADHD.

  6. Integrating Symbolic and Statistical Methods for Testing Intelligent Systems Applications to Machine Learning and Computer Vision

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Sumit Kumar; Pullum, Laura L; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Embedded intelligent systems ranging from tiny im- plantable biomedical devices to large swarms of autonomous un- manned aerial systems are becoming pervasive in our daily lives. While we depend on the flawless functioning of such intelligent systems, and often take their behavioral correctness and safety for granted, it is notoriously difficult to generate test cases that expose subtle errors in the implementations of machine learning algorithms. Hence, the validation of intelligent systems is usually achieved by studying their behavior on representative data sets, using methods such as cross-validation and bootstrapping.In this paper, we present a new testing methodology for studying the correctness of intelligent systems. Our approach uses symbolic decision procedures coupled with statistical hypothesis testing to. We also use our algorithm to analyze the robustness of a human detection algorithm built using the OpenCV open-source computer vision library. We show that the human detection implementation can fail to detect humans in perturbed video frames even when the perturbations are so small that the corresponding frames look identical to the naked eye.

  7. Symbolic Dynamics Analysis of Short Data Sets: an Application to Heart Rate Variability from Implantable Defibrillator Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebrowski, Jan J.; Baranowski, Rafal; Przybylski, Andrzej

    2003-07-01

    A method is described for the assessment of the complexity of short data sets by nonlinear dynamics. The method was devised for and tested on human heart rate recordings approximately 2000 to 9000 RR intervals long which were extracted from the memory of implantable defibrillator devices (ICD). It is, however, applicable in a more general context. The ICDs are meant to control life-threatening episodes of ventricular tachycardia and/or ventricular fibrillation by applying a electric shock to the heart through intracardiac electrodes. It is well known that conventional ICD algorithms yield approximately 20--30 % of spurious interventions. The main aim of this work is to look for nonlinear dynamics methods to enhance the appropriateness of the ICD intervention. We first showed that nonlinear dynamics methods first applied to 24-hour heart rate variability analysis were able to detect the need for the ICD intervention. To be applicable to future ICD use, the methods must also be low in computational requirements. Methods to analyse the complexity of the short and non-stationary sets were devised. We calculated the Shannon entropy of symbolic words obtained in a sliding 50 beat window and analysed the dependence of this complexity measure on the time. Precursors were found extending much earlier time than the time the standard ICD algorithms span.

  8. Programmed Approach vs. Conventional Approach Using highly Consistent Sound-Symbol System of Reading in Three Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Robert Eugene

    The effects of two primary reading programs using a programed format (with and without audio-supplement) and a conventional format (the program format deprogramed) in a highly consistent sound-symbol system of reading at three primary grade levels were compared, using a pretest, post-test control group design. The degree of suitability of…

  9. Low-complexity joint symbol synchronization and sampling frequency offset estimation scheme for optical IMDD OFDM systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Qianwu; Chen, Jian; Li, Yingchun; Song, Yingxiong

    2016-06-13

    A low-complexity joint symbol synchronization and SFO estimation scheme for asynchronous optical IMDD OFDM systems based on only one training symbol is proposed. Numerical simulations and experimental demonstrations are also under taken to evaluate the performance of the mentioned scheme. The experimental results show that robust and precise symbol synchronization and the SFO estimation can be achieved simultaneously at received optical power as low as -20dBm in asynchronous OOFDM systems. SFO estimation accuracy in MSE can be lower than 1 × 10-11 under SFO range from -60ppm to 60ppm after 25km SSMF transmission. Optimal System performance can be maintained until cumulate number of employed frames for calculation is less than 50 under above-mentioned conditions. Meanwhile, the proposed joint scheme has a low level of operation complexity comparing with existing methods, when the symbol synchronization and SFO estimation are considered together. Above-mentioned results can give an important reference in practical system designs.

  10. An Examination of the Potential for Blissymbolics to Serve as the Foundation for a Tactile Symbol System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacson, Mickey

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether Blissymbolics have the potential for being developed into a tactile symbol communication system. Tactile techniques are used by many individuals with augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) needs. Tactile processing is optimized by the use of minimalistic stimuli, i.e., stimuli…

  11. An Examination of the Potential for Blissymbolics to Serve as the Foundation for a Tactile Symbol System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacson, Mickey

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether Blissymbolics have the potential for being developed into a tactile symbol communication system. Tactile techniques are used by many individuals with augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) needs. Tactile processing is optimized by the use of minimalistic stimuli, i.e., stimuli…

  12. Symbolic modeling of flexible manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cetinkunt, Sabri; Book, Wayne J.

    1987-01-01

    An algorithm is presented to symbolically derive the full nonlinear dynamic equations of motion of multilink flexible manipulators. Lagrange's assumed modes method is the basis of new algorithm and adapted in a way suitable for symbolic manipulation by digital computers. It is applied to model a two-link flexible arm by means of a commercially available symbolic manipulation program. The advantages of the algorithm and simulation results are discussed.

  13. Coupled nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongyan

    In this dissertation, we study coupled nonlinear dynamical systems that exhibit new types of complex behavior. We numerically and analytically examine a variety of dynamical models, ranging from systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE) with novel elements of feedback to systems of partial differential equations (PDE) that model chemical pattern formation. Chaos, dynamical uncertainty, synchronization, and spatiotemporal pattern formation constitute the primary topics of the dissertation. Following the introduction in Chapter 1, we study chaos and dynamical uncertainty in Chapter 2 with coupled Lorenz systems and demonstrate the existence of extreme complexity in high-dimensional ODE systems. In Chapter 3, we demonstrate that chaos synchronization can be achieved by mutual and multiplicative coupling of dynamical systems. Chapter 4 and 5 focus on pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems, and we investigate segregation and integration behavior of populations in competitive and cooperative environments, respectively.

  14. Communication patterns in a psychotherapy following traumatic brain injury: A quantitative case study based on symbolic dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of traumatic brain injury is receiving increased attention. The evaluation of psychotherapy with these patients has been conducted largely in the absence of quantitative data concerning the therapy itself. Quantitative methods for characterizing the sequence-sensitive structure of patient-therapist communication are now being developed with the objective of improving the effectiveness of psychotherapy following traumatic brain injury. Methods The content of three therapy session transcripts (sessions were separated by four months) obtained from a patient with a history of several motor vehicle accidents who was receiving dialectical behavior therapy was scored and analyzed using methods derived from the mathematical theory of symbolic dynamics. Results The analysis of symbol frequencies was largely uninformative. When repeated triples were examined a marked pattern of change in content was observed over the three sessions. The context free grammar complexity and the Lempel-Ziv complexity were calculated for each therapy session. For both measures, the rate of complexity generation, expressed as bits per minute, increased longitudinally during the course of therapy. The between-session increases in complexity generation rates are consistent with calculations of mutual information. Taken together these results indicate that there was a quantifiable increase in the variability of patient-therapist verbal behavior during the course of therapy. Comparison of complexity values against values obtained from equiprobable random surrogates established the presence of a nonrandom structure in patient-therapist dialog (P = .002). Conclusions While recognizing that only limited conclusions can be based on a case history, it can be noted that these quantitative observations are consistent with qualitative clinical observations of increases in the flexibility of discourse during therapy. These procedures can be of particular

  15. Communication patterns in a psychotherapy following traumatic brain injury: a quantitative case study based on symbolic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Paul E; Cellucci, Christopher J; Gilpin, Adele M K; Jiménez-Montaño, Miguel A; Korslund, Kathryn E

    2011-07-27

    The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of traumatic brain injury is receiving increased attention. The evaluation of psychotherapy with these patients has been conducted largely in the absence of quantitative data concerning the therapy itself. Quantitative methods for characterizing the sequence-sensitive structure of patient-therapist communication are now being developed with the objective of improving the effectiveness of psychotherapy following traumatic brain injury. The content of three therapy session transcripts (sessions were separated by four months) obtained from a patient with a history of several motor vehicle accidents who was receiving dialectical behavior therapy was scored and analyzed using methods derived from the mathematical theory of symbolic dynamics. The analysis of symbol frequencies was largely uninformative. When repeated triples were examined a marked pattern of change in content was observed over the three sessions. The context free grammar complexity and the Lempel-Ziv complexity were calculated for each therapy session. For both measures, the rate of complexity generation, expressed as bits per minute, increased longitudinally during the course of therapy. The between-session increases in complexity generation rates are consistent with calculations of mutual information. Taken together these results indicate that there was a quantifiable increase in the variability of patient-therapist verbal behavior during the course of therapy. Comparison of complexity values against values obtained from equiprobable random surrogates established the presence of a nonrandom structure in patient-therapist dialog (P = .002). While recognizing that only limited conclusions can be based on a case history, it can be noted that these quantitative observations are consistent with qualitative clinical observations of increases in the flexibility of discourse during therapy. These procedures can be of particular value in the examination of therapies

  16. Improving accuracy of medication identification in an older population using a medication bottle color symbol label system.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli, Roberto; Mann, Christopher; Fulda, Kimberly G; Balyakina, Elizabeth; Espinoza, Anna; Lurie, Sue

    2011-12-29

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate and refine an adjuvant system of color-specific symbols that are added to medication bottles and to assess whether this system would increase the ability of patients 65 years of age or older in matching their medication to the indication for which it was prescribed. This study was conducted in two phases, consisting of three focus groups of patients from a family medicine clinic (n = 25) and a pre-post medication identification test in a second group of patient participants (n = 100). Results of focus group discussions were used to refine the medication label symbols according to themes and messages identified through qualitative triangulation mechanisms and data analysis techniques. A pre-post medication identification test was conducted in the second phase of the study to assess differences between standard labeling alone and the addition of the refined color-specific symbols. The pre-post test examined the impact of the added labels on participants' ability to accurately match their medication to the indication for which it was prescribed when placed in front of participants and then at a distance of two feet. Participants appreciated the addition of a visual aid on existing medication labels because it would not be necessary to learn a completely new system of labeling, and generally found the colors and symbols used in the proposed labeling system easy to understand and relevant. Concerns were raised about space constraints on medication bottles, having too much information on the bottle, and having to remember what the colors meant. Symbols and colors were modified if they were found unclear or inappropriate by focus group participants. Pre-post medication identification test results in a second set of participants demonstrated that the addition of the symbol label significantly improved the ability of participants to match their medication to the appropriate medical indication at a distance of two feet (p < 0

  17. Systems With Emergent Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Ian

    2002-09-01

    Evolutionary biologists often reject deterministic models of evolutionary processes because they equate `deterministic' with `goal-seeking', and have learned the hard way not to trust goal-seeking explanations of evolutionary adaptations. On the other hand, the general theory of dynamical systems potentially has much to offer for evolutionary biology— for example, as a resolution of the conflict between gradualism and punctuated equilibrium. The concept of a system with emergent dynamics retains the deterministic nature of dynamical systems, while eliminating any goal-seeking interpretation. Define an emergent property of a complex system to be a property whose computation from the entity-level rules of the system is intractable (in some reasonable sense). Say that a dynamical system has emergent dynamics if the computation of trajectories is intractable. Then systems with emergent dynamics are deterministic but not goal-seeking. As such, they offer a sensible way to use dynamical systems as models for evolutionary processes in biology, and in other areas. We discuss these issues and examine a few simple aspects of emergence in dynamical systems.

  18. Extensible Systems Dynamics Framework

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    pedigree information across communities-of-interest and across network boundaries. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ptolemy II, Systems Dynamics, PMESII, National...3 4.2 ADAPT THE PTOLEMY II FRAMEWORK TO ENSURE A WELL-SUITED MODELING...report of activities in the Extensible Systems Dynamics Framework project performed by the Ptolemy Project, University of California, Berkeley for

  19. Selforganization of Symbols and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, Werner; Feistel, Rainer

    2014-12-01

    Following the spirit of the late John Nicolis, the purpose of this paper is to develop an evolutionary approach for the basic problem of generation, storage and dissipation of information in physical and biological systems via dynamical processes. After analysing the relation of entropy and information we develop our view that information is in general a nonphysical, emergent quantity, in spite of the fact that information transfer is always connected with flows of physical energy and entropy. We argue that information can have two basic forms: free information (like that of disks, tapes, books), that is what is transferred between sender and receiver, and bound information, that is a physical non-equilibrium structure which retains potential information reflecting the history of its formation (like fossils, geological strata or galaxies). As a basic concept we consider a kinetic phase transition of the second kind, termed the ritualization transition, which leads to the self-organized emergence of symbols, the key elements of free information. Ritualization occurs only in the context of life. Hence, the simplest physical example for a ritualization process is a system that starts as a physical and ends as a biological one, in other words, the origin of life. Our interest in this transition is focussed on the self-organization of information, on the way how a physical system can be enabled to create symbols and the related symbol-processing machinery out of ordinary pre-biological roots.

  20. Nonlinear ISI cancellation in VSSB Nyquist-SCM system with symbol pre-distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Na; Ju, Cheng; Chen, Xue

    2015-03-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a 40-Gbps virtual single sideband (VSSB) Nyquist-subcarrier-modulation (Nyquist-SCM) direct detection scheme with symbol pre-distortion to mitigate the nonlinear inter-symbol interference (ISI) caused by dispersion and square-law detection. The experimental result shows that 2.6-dB receiver sensitivity improvement is obtained after 100-km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) transmission.

  1. Joint Symbol Timing and CFO Estimation for OFDM/OQAM Systems in Multipath Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusco, Tilde; Petrella, Angelo; Tanda, Mario

    2009-12-01

    The problem of data-aided synchronization for orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) systems based on offset quadrature amplitude modulation (OQAM) in multipath channels is considered. In particular, the joint maximum-likelihood (ML) estimator for carrier-frequency offset (CFO), amplitudes, phases, and delays, exploiting a short known preamble, is derived. The ML estimators for phases and amplitudes are in closed form. Moreover, under the assumption that the CFO is sufficiently small, a closed form approximate ML (AML) CFO estimator is obtained. By exploiting the obtained closed form solutions a cost function whose peaks provide an estimate of the delays is derived. In particular, the symbol timing (i.e., the delay of the first multipath component) is obtained by considering the smallest estimated delay. The performance of the proposed joint AML estimator is assessed via computer simulations and compared with that achieved by the joint AML estimator designed for AWGN channel and that achieved by a previously derived joint estimator for OFDM systems.

  2. Optimization and quantization in gradient symbol systems: a framework for integrating the continuous and the discrete in cognition.

    PubMed

    Smolensky, Paul; Goldrick, Matthew; Mathis, Donald

    2014-08-01

    Mental representations have continuous as well as discrete, combinatorial properties. For example, while predominantly discrete, phonological representations also vary continuously; this is reflected by gradient effects in instrumental studies of speech production. Can an integrated theoretical framework address both aspects of structure? The framework we introduce here, Gradient Symbol Processing, characterizes the emergence of grammatical macrostructure from the Parallel Distributed Processing microstructure (McClelland, Rumelhart, & The PDP Research Group, 1986) of language processing. The mental representations that emerge, Distributed Symbol Systems, have both combinatorial and gradient structure. They are processed through Subsymbolic Optimization-Quantization, in which an optimization process favoring representations that satisfy well-formedness constraints operates in parallel with a distributed quantization process favoring discrete symbolic structures. We apply a particular instantiation of this framework, λ-Diffusion Theory, to phonological production. Simulations of the resulting model suggest that Gradient Symbol Processing offers a way to unify accounts of grammatical competence with both discrete and continuous patterns in language performance. Copyright © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  3. Application of symbolic processing to command and control: An Advanced Information Presentation System. Volume 2: Knowledge base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdybel, F.; Gibbons, J.; Greenfeld, N.; Yonke, M.

    1981-08-01

    This report describes the work performed in the second year of the three-year contract to explore the application of symbolic processing to command and control (C2); specifically, the graphics interface between the C2 user and a complex C2 decision support system. Volume 2 contains the complete AIPS knowledge base. This document provides the fully-inherited structure that the system sees during operation.

  4. Application of symbolic processing to command and control: An Advanced Information Presentation System. Volume 3: Program source files

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdybel, F.; Gibbons, J.; Greenfeld, N.; Yonke, M.

    1981-08-01

    This report describes the work performed in the second year of the three-year contract to explore the application of symbolic processing to command and control (C2); specifically, the graphics interface between the C2 user and a complex C2 decision support system. Volume 3 contains the programs that manipulate the knowledge base and provide the active behavioral component of the system.

  5. Vulnerability of dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.

    1976-01-01

    Directed graphs are associated with dynamic systems in order to determine in any given system if each state can be reached by at least one input (input reachability), or can each state reach at least one output (output reachability). Then, the structural perturbations of a dynamic system are identified as lines or points removals from the corresponding digraph, and a system is considered vulnerable at those lines or points of the digraph whose removal destroys its input or output reachability. A suitable framework is formulated for resolving the problems of reachability and vulnerability which applies to both linear and nonlinear systems alike.

  6. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  7. Dynamics of collisionless systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    The three dimensional dynamics of rotating stellar systems were studied. A comparison of various mathematical models of flat galaxies is presented. The effects of self-gravity upon a flat galaxy undergoing a tidal encounter with another galaxy were investigated.

  8. MINING NUCLEAR TRANSIENT DATA THROUGH SYMBOLIC CONVERSION

    SciTech Connect

    Diego MAndelli; Tunc Aldemir; Alper Yilmaz; Curtis Smith

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA) methodologies generate enormous amounts of data for a very large number of simulations. The data contain temporal information of both the state variables of the simulator and the temporal status of specific systems/components. In order to measure system performances, limitations and resilience, such data need to be carefully analyzed with the objective of discovering the correlations between sequence/timing of events and system dynamics. A first approach toward discovering these correlations from data generated by DPRA methodologies has been performed by organizing scenarios into groups using classification or clustering based algorithms. The identification of the correlations between system dynamics and timing/sequencing of events is performed by observing the temporal distribution of these events in each group of scenarios. Instead of performing “a posteriori” analysis of these correlations, this paper shows how it is possible to identify the correlations implicitly by performing a symbolic conversion of both continuous (temporal profiles of simulator state variables) and discrete (status of systems and components) data. Symbolic conversion is performed for each simulation by properly quantizing both continuous and discrete data and then converting them as a series of symbols. After merging both series together, a temporal phrase is obtained. This phrase preserves duration, coincidence and sequence of both continuous and discrete data in a uniform and consistent manner. In this paper it is also shown that by using specific distance measures, it is still possible to post-process such symbolic data using clustering and classification techniques but in considerably less time since the memory needed to store the data is greatly reduced by the symbolic conversion.

  9. Discriminative Codewaves: a symbolic dynamics approach to SSVEP recognition for asynchronous BCI.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, Konstantinos Ilias; Laskaris, Nikolaos; Nikolopoulos, Spiros; Kompatsiaris, Yiannis

    2017-10-02

    Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) is a very popular approach to establishing a communication pathway in brain computer interfaces (BCIs), without any training requirements for the user. Brain activity recorded over occipital regions, in association with stimuli flickering at distinct frequencies, is used to predict the gaze direction. High performance is achieved when the analysis of multichannel signal is guided by the driving signals. It is the scope of this study to introduce an efficient way to identify the attended stimulus without the need to register the driving signals. Approach: Brain response is described as a dynamical trajectory towards one of the attractors associated with the brainwave entrainment induced by the attended stimulus. A condensed description for each single-trial response is provided by means of discriminative vector quantization (DVQ), and different trajectories are disentangled based on a simple classification scheme that uses templates and confidence intervals derived from a small training dataset. Main results: Experiments, based on two different datasets, provided evidence that the introduced approach compares favorably to well-established alternatives, regarding the Information Transfer Rate (ITR). Significance: Our approach relies on (but not restricted to) single sensor traces, incorporates a novel description of brainwaves based on semi-supervised learning, and its great advantage stems from its potential for self-paced BCI. It is the scope of this study to introduce an efficient way to identify the attended stimulus without the need to register the driving signals. To this end, brain response is described as a dynamical trajectory towards one of the attractors associated with the brainwave entrainment induced by the attended stimulus. A condensed description for each single-trial response is provided by means of discriminative vector quantization (DVQ), and different trajectories are

  10. Symbolic functions from neural computation.

    PubMed

    Smolensky, Paul

    2012-07-28

    Is thought computation over ideas? Turing, and many cognitive scientists since, have assumed so, and formulated computational systems in which meaningful concepts are encoded by symbols which are the objects of computation. Cognition has been carved into parts, each a function defined over such symbols. This paper reports on a research program aimed at computing these symbolic functions without computing over the symbols. Symbols are encoded as patterns of numerical activation over multiple abstract neurons, each neuron simultaneously contributing to the encoding of multiple symbols. Computation is carried out over the numerical activation values of such neurons, which individually have no conceptual meaning. This is massively parallel numerical computation operating within a continuous computational medium. The paper presents an axiomatic framework for such a computational account of cognition, including a number of formal results. Within the framework, a class of recursive symbolic functions can be computed. Formal languages defined by symbolic rewrite rules can also be specified, the subsymbolic computations producing symbolic outputs that simultaneously display central properties of both facets of human language: universal symbolic grammatical competence and statistical, imperfect performance.

  11. Situation awareness for UAV equipped with image/video understanding system based on network-symbolic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvich, Gary

    2004-09-01

    Situation awareness is an important factor in the effectiveness of aerial missions. One of the major problems with the UAV is that human operators lack situation awareness. Limited bandwidth does not allow telepresence to a degree, which gives the same level of situation awareness that pilots of regular airplanes have. The best solution would be to equip UAV with a "situation awareness" system that in the real time provides operators with the information necessary for effective mission control and decision making, and allows effective supervisory control of the UAV. Vision in advanced creatures is a component of situation awareness, navigation and planning systems. Fast information processing and decision making requires reduction of informational and computational complexities. The brain achieves this goal using implicit symbolic coding, hierarchical compression, and selective processing of visual information. The Network-Symbolic representation, in which both systematic structural/logical methods and neural/statistical methods are the parts of a single mechanism, converts visual information into relational Network-Symbolic knowledge models, effectively resolving ambiguity and uncertainty in the visual information, and avoiding artificial precise computations of 3-dimensional models. The UAV equipped with such smart vision, will have a situation awareness system that gives operators better control over aircraft and significantly improves surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities.

  12. Dynamic representations underlying symbolic and nonsymbolic calculation: evidence from the operational momentum effect.

    PubMed

    Knops, André; Viarouge, Arnaud; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2009-05-01

    When we add or subtract, do the corresponding quantities "move" along a mental number line? Does this internal movement lead to spatial biases? A new method was designed to investigate the psychophysics of approximate arithmetic. Addition and subtraction problems were presented either with sets of dots or with Arabic numerals, and subjects selected, from among seven choices, the most plausible result. In two experiments, the subjects selected larger numbers for addition than for subtraction problems, as if moving too far along the number line. This operational momentum effect was present in both notations and increased with the size of the outcome. Furthermore, we observed a new effect of spatial-numerical congruence, related to but distinct from the spatial numerical association of response codes effect: During nonsymbolic addition, the subjects preferentially selected numbers at the upper right location, whereas during subtraction, they were biased toward the upper left location. These findings suggest that approximate mental arithmetic involves dynamic shifts on a spatially organized mental representation of numbers. Supplemental materials for this study may be downloaded from app.psychonomic-journals.org/content/supplemental.

  13. Translation among Symbolic Representations in Problem-Solving. Report on Studies Project: Alternative Strategies for Measuring Higher Order Skills: The Role of Symbol Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shavelson, Richard J.; And Others

    Some aspects of the relationships among the symbolic representations (Rs) of problems given to students to solve, the Rs that students use to solve problems, and the accuracy of the solutions were studied. Focus was on determining: the mental Rs that students used while solving problems, the kinds of translation that takes place, the accuracy of…

  14. The motion behind the symbols: a vital role for dynamism in the conceptualization of limits and continuity in expert mathematics.

    PubMed

    Marghetis, Tyler; Núñez, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    The canonical history of mathematics suggests that the late 19th-century "arithmetization" of calculus marked a shift away from spatial-dynamic intuitions, grounding concepts in static, rigorous definitions. Instead, we argue that mathematicians, both historically and currently, rely on dynamic conceptualizations of mathematical concepts like continuity, limits, and functions. In this article, we present two studies of the role of dynamic conceptual systems in expert proof. The first is an analysis of co-speech gesture produced by mathematics graduate students while proving a theorem, which reveals a reliance on dynamic conceptual resources. The second is a cognitive-historical case study of an incident in 19th-century mathematics that suggests a functional role for such dynamism in the reasoning of the renowned mathematician Augustin Cauchy. Taken together, these two studies indicate that essential concepts in calculus that have been defined entirely in abstract, static terms are nevertheless conceptualized dynamically, in both contemporary and historical practice.

  15. How Attentional Systems Process Conflicting Cues. The Superiority of Social over Symbolic Orienting Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Hietanen, Jari K.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated orienting of attention by social and symbolic cues presented inside/outside the locus of attention. Participants responded to laterally presented targets preceded by simultaneously presented gaze and arrow cues. Participants' attention was allocated to either of the cues and the other cue served as a distractor. In Experiments 1-4…

  16. Towards Transformation: The Power of Phonetic Symbols Embedded in the Multimedia Learning Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Por, Fei Ping; Fong, Soon Fook

    2011-01-01

    The conventional way of using letter-to-sound approach to acquire English pronunciation competence is limited to simple and regular English words in elementary level. This limitation signifies the potentialities of phonetic symbols that are applicable to the pronunciation of all the words of human languages. The researchers are exploring the…

  17. Dynamic system classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumpe, Daniel; Greiner, Maksim; Müller, Ewald; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2016-07-01

    Stochastic differential equations describe well many physical, biological, and sociological systems, despite the simplification often made in their derivation. Here the usage of simple stochastic differential equations to characterize and classify complex dynamical systems is proposed within a Bayesian framework. To this end, we develop a dynamic system classifier (DSC). The DSC first abstracts training data of a system in terms of time-dependent coefficients of the descriptive stochastic differential equation. Thereby the DSC identifies unique correlation structures within the training data. For definiteness we restrict the presentation of the DSC to oscillation processes with a time-dependent frequency ω (t ) and damping factor γ (t ) . Although real systems might be more complex, this simple oscillator captures many characteristic features. The ω and γ time lines represent the abstract system characterization and permit the construction of efficient signal classifiers. Numerical experiments show that such classifiers perform well even in the low signal-to-noise regime.

  18. Dynamic system classifier.

    PubMed

    Pumpe, Daniel; Greiner, Maksim; Müller, Ewald; Enßlin, Torsten A

    2016-07-01

    Stochastic differential equations describe well many physical, biological, and sociological systems, despite the simplification often made in their derivation. Here the usage of simple stochastic differential equations to characterize and classify complex dynamical systems is proposed within a Bayesian framework. To this end, we develop a dynamic system classifier (DSC). The DSC first abstracts training data of a system in terms of time-dependent coefficients of the descriptive stochastic differential equation. Thereby the DSC identifies unique correlation structures within the training data. For definiteness we restrict the presentation of the DSC to oscillation processes with a time-dependent frequency ω(t) and damping factor γ(t). Although real systems might be more complex, this simple oscillator captures many characteristic features. The ω and γ time lines represent the abstract system characterization and permit the construction of efficient signal classifiers. Numerical experiments show that such classifiers perform well even in the low signal-to-noise regime.

  19. Q-S (complete or anticipated) synchronization backstepping scheme in a class of discrete-time chaotic (hyperchaotic) systems: a symbolic-numeric computation approach.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhenya

    2006-03-01

    First, a type of Q-S (complete or anticipated) synchronization is defined in discrete-time dynamical systems. Second, based on backstepping design with a scalar controller, a systematic, concrete and automatic scheme is presented to investigate Q-S (complete or anticipated) synchronization between the discrete-time drive system and response system with strict-feedback form. Finally, the proposed scheme is used to illustrate Q-S (complete or anticipated) synchronization between the two-dimensional discrete-time Lorenz system and Fold system, as well as the three-dimensional hyperchaotic discrete-time Rossler system and generalized discrete-time Rossler system. Moreover numerical simulations are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. Our scheme can be also extended to investigate Q-S (complete or anticipated) synchronization between other discrete-time dynamical systems with strict-feedback forms. With the aid of symbolic-numeric computation, the scheme can be performed to yield automatically the scalar controller and to verify its effectiveness in computer.

  20. How Universal Are Universal Symbols? An Estimation of Cross-Cultural Adoption of Universal Healthcare Symbols.

    PubMed

    Joy Lo, Chih-Wei; Yien, Huey-Wen; Chen, I-Ping

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of universal health symbol usage and to analyze the factors influencing the adoption of those symbols in Taiwan. Universal symbols are an important innovative tool for health facility wayfinding systems. Hablamos Juntos, a universal healthcare symbol system developed in the United States, is a thoughtful, well-designed, and thoroughly tested symbol system that facilitates communication across languages and cultures. We designed a questionnaire to test how well the selected graphic symbols were understood by Taiwanese participants and determined factors related to successful symbol decoding, including participant-related factors, stimulation factors, and the interaction between stimulation and participants. Additionally, we further established a design principle for future development of localized healthcare symbols. (1) Eleven symbols were identified as highly comprehensible and effective symbols that can be directly adopted in Taiwanese healthcare settings. Sixteen symbols were deemed incomprehensible or confusing and thus had to be redesigned. Finally, 14 were identified as relatively incomprehensible and could thus be redesigned and then have their effectiveness evaluated again. (2) Three factors were found to influence the participants' differing levels of comprehension of the Hablamos Juntos symbols. In order to prevent the three aforementioned factors from causing difficulty in interpreting symbols, we suggest that the local symbol designers should (1) use more iconic images, (2) carefully evaluate the indexical and symbolic meaning of graphic symbols, and (3) collect the consensus of Taiwanese people with different educational backgrounds. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Directed Incremental Symbolic Execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Person, Suzette; Yang, Guowei; Rungta, Neha; Khurshid, Sarfraz

    2011-01-01

    The last few years have seen a resurgence of interest in the use of symbolic execution -- a program analysis technique developed more than three decades ago to analyze program execution paths. Scaling symbolic execution and other path-sensitive analysis techniques to large systems remains challenging despite recent algorithmic and technological advances. An alternative to solving the problem of scalability is to reduce the scope of the analysis. One approach that is widely studied in the context of regression analysis is to analyze the differences between two related program versions. While such an approach is intuitive in theory, finding efficient and precise ways to identify program differences, and characterize their effects on how the program executes has proved challenging in practice. In this paper, we present Directed Incremental Symbolic Execution (DiSE), a novel technique for detecting and characterizing the effects of program changes. The novelty of DiSE is to combine the efficiencies of static analysis techniques to compute program difference information with the precision of symbolic execution to explore program execution paths and generate path conditions affected by the differences. DiSE is a complementary technique to other reduction or bounding techniques developed to improve symbolic execution. Furthermore, DiSE does not require analysis results to be carried forward as the software evolves -- only the source code for two related program versions is required. A case-study of our implementation of DiSE illustrates its effectiveness at detecting and characterizing the effects of program changes.

  2. Symbolic extensions applied to multiscale structure of genomes.

    PubMed

    Downarowicz, Tomasz; Travisany, Dante; Montecino, Martin; Maass, Alejandro

    2014-06-01

    A genome of a living organism consists of a long string of symbols over a finite alphabet carrying critical information for the organism. This includes its ability to control post natal growth, homeostasis, adaptation to changes in the surrounding environment, or to biochemically respond at the cellular level to various specific regulatory signals. In this sense, a genome represents a symbolic encoding of a highly organized system of information whose functioning may be revealed as a natural multilayer structure in terms of complexity and prominence. In this paper we use the mathematical theory of symbolic extensions as a framework to shed light onto how this multilayer organization is reflected in the symbolic coding of the genome. The distribution of data in an element of a standard symbolic extension of a dynamical system has a specific form: the symbolic sequence is divided into several subsequences (which we call layers) encoding the dynamics on various "scales". We propose that a similar structure resides within the genomes, building our analogy on some of the most recent findings in the field of regulation of genomic DNA functioning.

  3. Development of the Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory modeling package for the kinematic design and optimization of the Future Armor Rearm System robot

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, S.; Jansen, J.F.; Kress, R.L.; Babcock, S.M. ); Dubey, R.V. . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    A new program package, Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory (SML), for the automatic generation of both kinematic and static manipulator models in symbolic form is presented. Critical design parameters may be identified and optimized using symbolic models as shown in the sample application presented for the Future Armor Rearm System (FARS) arm. The computer-aided development of the symbolic models yields equations with reduced numerical complexity. Important considerations have been placed on the closed form solutions simplification and on the user friendly operation. The main emphasis of this research is the development of a methodology which is implemented in a computer program capable of generating symbolic kinematic and static forces models of manipulators. The fact that the models are obtained trigonometrically reduced is among the most significant results of this work and the most difficult to implement. Mathematica, a commercial program that allows symbolic manipulation, is used to implement the program package. SML is written such that the user can change any of the subroutines or create new ones easily. To assist the user, an on-line help has been written to make of SML a user friendly package. Some sample applications are presented. The design and optimization of the 5-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) FARS manipulator using SML is discussed. Finally, the kinematic and static models of two different 7-DOF manipulators are calculated symbolically.

  4. Development of the Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory modeling package for the kinematic design and optimization of the Future Armor Rearm System robot. Ammunition Logistics Program

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, S.; Jansen, J.F.; Kress, R.L.; Babcock, S.M.; Dubey, R.V.

    1992-08-01

    A new program package, Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory (SML), for the automatic generation of both kinematic and static manipulator models in symbolic form is presented. Critical design parameters may be identified and optimized using symbolic models as shown in the sample application presented for the Future Armor Rearm System (FARS) arm. The computer-aided development of the symbolic models yields equations with reduced numerical complexity. Important considerations have been placed on the closed form solutions simplification and on the user friendly operation. The main emphasis of this research is the development of a methodology which is implemented in a computer program capable of generating symbolic kinematic and static forces models of manipulators. The fact that the models are obtained trigonometrically reduced is among the most significant results of this work and the most difficult to implement. Mathematica, a commercial program that allows symbolic manipulation, is used to implement the program package. SML is written such that the user can change any of the subroutines or create new ones easily. To assist the user, an on-line help has been written to make of SML a user friendly package. Some sample applications are presented. The design and optimization of the 5-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) FARS manipulator using SML is discussed. Finally, the kinematic and static models of two different 7-DOF manipulators are calculated symbolically.

  5. SYMBOLS IN PHARMACOKINETICS1

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Malcolm; Tucker, Geoffrey

    1982-01-01

    To encourage uniformity in the presentation of pharmacokinetic data, a general nomenclature has been developed. The system has wide application. Flexibility is achieved through the use of general variables, constants, qualifying terms and subscripts. Yet, through the use of implied terms, the symbols describing many common variables and constants are simple.

  6. Dynamics insulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. E. W.; Hepler, W. A.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced dynamic insulation systems were analyzed from a thermodynamic point of view. A particular performance measure is proposed in order to characterize various insulations in a unique manner. This measure is related to a base quantity, the refrigeration power ratio. The latter is the minimum refrigeration power, for a particular dynamic insulation limit, to the actual reliquefaction power associated with cryoliquid boiloff. This ratio serves as reference quantity which is approximately constant for a specific ductless insulation at a chosen normal boiling point. Each real container with support structure, vent tube, and other transverse components requires a larger refrigeration power. The ratio of the actual experimental power to the theoretical value of the support-less system is a suitable measure of the entire insulation performance as far as parasitic heat leakage is concerned. The present characterization is illustrated using simple thermodynamic system examples including experiments with liquid nitrogen. Numerical values are presented and a comparison with liquid helium is given.

  7. Dynamics insulation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. E. W.; Hepler, W. A.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1985-10-01

    Advanced dynamic insulation systems were analyzed from a thermodynamic point of view. A particular performance measure is proposed in order to characterize various insulations in a unique manner. This measure is related to a base quantity, the refrigeration power ratio. The latter is the minimum refrigeration power, for a particular dynamic insulation limit, to the actual reliquefaction power associated with cryoliquid boiloff. This ratio serves as reference quantity which is approximately constant for a specific ductless insulation at a chosen normal boiling point. Each real container with support structure, vent tube, and other transverse components requires a larger refrigeration power. The ratio of the actual experimental power to the theoretical value of the support-less system is a suitable measure of the entire insulation performance as far as parasitic heat leakage is concerned. The present characterization is illustrated using simple thermodynamic system examples including experiments with liquid nitrogen. Numerical values are presented and a comparison with liquid helium is given.

  8. Elisabeth Kubler-Ross and the Tradition of the Private Sphere: An Analysis of Symbols.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klass, Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Shows how Kubler-Ross' schema functions as a symbol system. Analyzes the symbol "acceptance." Shows how that symbol is part of a strong American tradition of symbols of the private sphere. (Author/JAC)

  9. Elisabeth Kubler-Ross and the Tradition of the Private Sphere: An Analysis of Symbols.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klass, Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Shows how Kubler-Ross' schema functions as a symbol system. Analyzes the symbol "acceptance." Shows how that symbol is part of a strong American tradition of symbols of the private sphere. (Author/JAC)

  10. Dynamics for flexible systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraco, A.; Cuny, B.; Ishiomin, G.

    Analytical techniques for dynamic modeling of mechanical systems with deformable members are developed and demonstrated. Formulations for the rigid member and the flexible member are derived; the position of an arbitrary point is defined; and the construction of the complete model from these components is explained. Numerical results for the case of a planar four-bar parallelogram rotating about a fixed axis located in the same plane are presented in graphs and discussed.

  11. Control of Dynamical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-30

    I, Academic Press, pp. 211-222, 1976. [24] LASALLE , J.P. (with E.N. Onwuchekwa) An Invariance Principle for Vector Liapunov Functions. Dynamical...Press, Inc. pp. XVii-XXi, 1976. V-7 [59] LASALLE , J.P. Stability Theory and Invariance Principles . Chapter 5: Topological Dynamtical Systems...to extend the earlier work of Hurt in [50] in applying the invariance principle to extend Liapunov’s direct method. An exposition of some of these

  12. Solar System Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    2002-01-01

    In these 18 years, the research has touched every major dynamical problem in the solar system, including: the effect of chaotic zones on the distribution of asteroids, the delivery of meteorites along chaotic pathways, the chaotic motion of Pluto, the chaotic motion of the outer planets and that of the whole solar system, the delivery of short period comets from the Kuiper belt, the tidal evolution of the Uranian arid Galilean satellites, the chaotic tumbling of Hyperion and other irregular satellites, the large chaotic variations of the obliquity of Mars, the evolution of the Earth-Moon system, and the resonant core- mantle dynamics of Earth and Venus. It has introduced new analytical and numerical tools that are in widespread use. Today, nearly every long-term integration of our solar system, its subsystems, and other solar systems uses algorithms that was invented. This research has all been primarily Supported by this sequence of PGG NASA grants. During this period published major investigations of tidal evolution of the Earth-Moon system and of the passage of the Earth and Venus through non-linear core-mantle resonances were completed. It has published a major innovation in symplectic algorithms: the symplectic corrector. A paper was completed on non-perturbative hydrostatic equilibrium.

  13. The analysis of control trajectories using symbolic and database computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Robert

    1995-01-01

    This final report comprises the formal semi-annual status reports for this grant for the periods June 30-December 31, 1993, January 1-June 30, 1994, and June 1-December 31, 1994. The research supported by this grant is broadly concerned with the symbolic computation, mixed numeric-symbolic computation, and database computation of trajectories of dynamical systems, especially control systems. A review of work during the report period covers: trajectories and approximating series, the Cayley algebra of trees, actions of differential operators, geometrically stable integration algorithms, hybrid systems, trajectory stores, PTool, and other activities. A list of publications written during the report period is attached.

  14. Using chaos to model random symbols for improved unsupervised information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumona; Leung, Henry

    We present theoretical analyses that may allow strengthening the connection between chaotic dynamical system and information processing. The analytical and empirical studies prove that computing with chaos and nonlinear characterization of information improves unsupervised information processing. Traditional supervised techniques for information retrieval from noisy environment achieve optimal performance. However, the need for training symbols is an inefficient strategy. We prove that with a chaotic generator as an information source, unsupervised performance is close to that of supervised with a white Gaussian stochastic process. Analytical results show that unsupervised technique using chaotic symbolic dynamics is equivalent to that of supervised when using random symbolic information. We conclude from the concepts of measure theory and ergodic theory, that random symbolic information can be modeled by a chaotic dynamical system via symbolic dynamics. We observe that the performance of unsupervised information retrieval is equivalent to that of supervised, when random symbolic information and a dynamical representation of it are used in conjunction. This fact enables to apply nonlinear dynamics to design improved communication systems. This research is supported by Alberta Innovates Technology Futures doctoral scholarship.

  15. A fault diagnosis scheme for planetary gearboxes using modified multi-scale symbolic dynamic entropy and mRMR feature selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongbo; Yang, Yuantao; Li, Guoyan; Xu, Minqiang; Huang, Wenhu

    2017-07-01

    Health condition identification of planetary gearboxes is crucial to reduce the downtime and maximize productivity. This paper aims to develop a novel fault diagnosis method based on modified multi-scale symbolic dynamic entropy (MMSDE) and minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) to identify the different health conditions of planetary gearbox. MMSDE is proposed to quantify the regularity of time series, which can assess the dynamical characteristics over a range of scales. MMSDE has obvious advantages in the detection of dynamical changes and computation efficiency. Then, the mRMR approach is introduced to refine the fault features. Lastly, the obtained new features are fed into the least square support vector machine (LSSVM) to complete the fault pattern identification. The proposed method is numerically and experimentally demonstrated to be able to recognize the different fault types of planetary gearboxes.

  16. Coarsening in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuca, Radu

    1997-11-01

    The way in which the description of a physical system changes when viewed on different length or time scales is an important characteristic of that system. The present work studies the effects of coarsening the description (i.e. changing the spatial or temporal observation scale) of dynamical systems at various levels. First, the effects of spatial coarsening on the equations of motion are analyzed for the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. The linearized equation is used to evaluate the stability of arbitrary solutions under perturbations and extract the Lyapunov exponents and some properties of the power spectrum. Second, the effects of time or spatial coarsening on the integral solutions are analyzed for some high Reynolds number Couette-Taylor turbulence experiments and for numerical simulations of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. Quantities related to metric entropies are shown to scale with the observation scale for these systems. Third, a new method of time coarsening in nonstationary systems is presented. Nonstationary effects are examined on a ball-bearing experiment and on epileptic EEG recordings. Finally, the coarsening of a very complex state space describing the configuration of a factory floor is presented. By introducing global degrees of freedom, the complexity of the representation of the system is highly reduced, without significant information loss. The methods presented here are nonstandard, but they share with the classical methods the goal of replacing the complex description of a system with a much simpler, but relevant one.

  17. On the periodicity of symbolic observations of piecewise smooth discrete-time systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramadge, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    A study is made of the behavior of discrete-time systems composed of a set of smooth transition maps coupled by a quantized feedback function. The feedback function partitions the state space into disjoint regions and assigns a smooth transition function to each region. The main result is that under a constraint on the norm of the derivative of the transition maps, a bounded state trajectory with limit points in the interior of the switching regions leads to a region index sequence that is eventually periodic. Under these assumptions, it is shown that eventually the feedback function is determined by a finite state automaton. A similar result is proved in the case of finite state dynamic feedback.

  18. Dynamics of elastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankovich, Vladimir

    1998-12-01

    The goal of this paper is to build a consistent physical theory of the dynamics of the bat-ball interaction. This requires creating realistic models for both the softball bat and the softball. Some of the features of these models are known phenomenologically, from experiments conducted in our laboratory, others will be introduced and computed from first principles here for the first time. Both interacting objects are treated from the viewpoint of the theory of elasticity, and it is shown how a computer can be used to accurately calculate all the relevant characteristics of batball collisions. It is shown also how the major elastic parameters of the material constituting the interior of a softball can be determined using the existing experimental data. These parameters, such as the Young's modulus, the Poisson ratio and the damping coefficient are vital for the accurate description of the ball's dynamics. We are demonstrating how the existing theories of the elastic behavior of solid bars and hollow shells can be augmented to simplify the resulting equations and make the subsequent computer analysis feasible. The standard system of fourth-order PDE's is reduced to a system of the second order, because of the inclusion of the usually ignored effects of the shear forces in the bat.

  19. Data Systems Dynamic Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouff, Christopher; Clark, Melana; Davenport, Bill; Message, Philip

    1993-01-01

    The Data System Dynamic Simulator (DSDS) is a discrete event simulation tool. It was developed for NASA for the specific purpose of evaluating candidate architectures for data systems of the Space Station era. DSDS provides three methods for meeting this requirement. First, the user has access to a library of standard pre-programmed elements. These elements represent tailorable components of NASA data systems and can be connected in any logical manner. Secondly, DSDS supports the development of additional elements. This allows the more sophisticated DSDS user the option of extending the standard element set. Thirdly, DSDS supports the use of data streams simulation. Data streams is the name given to a technique that ignores packet boundaries, but is sensitive to rate changes. Because rate changes are rare compared to packet arrivals in a typical NASA data system, data stream simulations require a fraction of the CPU run time. Additionally, the data stream technique is considerably more accurate than another commonly-used optimization technique.

  20. A new symbol-and-GIS based detailed geomorphological mapping system: Renewal of a scientific discipline for understanding landscape development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Marcus; Kolstrup, Else; Seijmonsbergen, Arie C.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive and flexible new geomorphological combination legend that expands the possibilities of current geomorphological mapping concepts. The new legend is presented here at scale of 1:10,000 and it combines symbols for hydrography, morphometry/morphography, lithology and structure with colour variations for process/genesis and geologic age. The piece-by-piece legend forms a "geomorphological alphabet" that offers a high diversity of geomorphological information and a possibility for numerous combinations of information. This results in a scientific map that is rich in data and which is more informative than most previous maps but is based on a simple legend. The system is developed to also be used as a basis for applications in GIS. The symbol-based information in the geomorphological maps can be digitally stored as a powerful database with thematic layers and attribute tables. By combining and further developing aspects of different classical mapping systems and techniques into expanded data combinations, new possibilities of presentation and storage are developed and thus a strong scientific tool is provided for landscape configuration and the reconstruction of its development; in turn the combination paves the way for specific thematic applications. The new system is illustrated for two contrasting landscape types: the first is located on the border of Vorarlberg, western Austria, and Liechtenstein in a glacially influenced, high altitude alpine setting that is strongly modified by various degradation processes; the second area represents a formerly glaciated region in Dalarna, central Sweden near Mora, an area that is characterized by a variety of aeolian, fluvial, glaciofluvial and lacustrine depositional and erosional landforms and also reflects isostatic uplift. The new method functions well for both areas and results in detailed scientific outlines of both landscape types.

  1. Comparing dynamical systems by a graph matching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jiongxuan; Skufca, Joseph D.; Bollt, Erik M.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we consider comparing dynamical systems by using a method of graph matching, either between the graphs representing the underlying symbolic dynamics, or between the graphs approximating the action of the systems on a fine but otherwise non-generating partition. For conjugate systems, the graphs are isomorphic and we show that the permutation matrices that relate the adjacency matrices coincide with the solution of Monge’s mass transport problem. We use the underlying earth mover’s distance (EMD) to generate the “approximate” matching matrix to illustrate the association of graphs which are derived from equal-distance partitioning of the phase spaces of systems. In addition, for one system which embeds into the other, we show that the comparison of these two systems by our method is an issue of subgraph matching.

  2. Dynamic Color Scanner System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-05-01

    wm^^mrmm JlilJJLUJJ.l, UM *•* ". «^^~mw^-r mmmmmmmem DYNAMIC COLOR SCANNER SYSTEM L. T. Hunkler ITT Aerospaco/Gpticai Division S Fort Wayne ...Division, a division of International Telephone and Tele- graph Corporation, Fort Wayne , Indiana, under contract F33615-72- C-2071 for research and...iliKriiBiröfiiii-1, ■ ^ii ■"»*-—™""tWi "!—i^^^P«^ ^3 <o lil r^ ■ i u o o 0) (0 n •H Q (U ri 0) l-i 3 tP •H 20 SO-Z^H •— ■■■■I

  3. Influence of third-generation oral contraceptives on the complexity analysis and symbolic dynamics of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Ana Cristina; Tamburús, Nayara; Salviati, Mariana; Celante, Vanessa; Takahashi, Anielle; de Sá, Marcos Felipe; Catai, Aparecida; Silva, Ester

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the influence of oral contraceptives (OCs) containing 20 μg ethinylestradiol (EE) and 150 μg gestodene (GEST) on the autonomic modulation of heart rate (HR) in women. One-hundred and fifty-five women aged 24 ± 2 years were divided into four groups according to their physical activity and the use or not of an OC: active-OC, active-non-OC (NOC), sedentary-OC, and sedentary-NOC. The heart rate was registered in real time based on the electrocardiogram signal for 15 minutes, in the supine-position. The heart rate variability (HRV) was analysed using Shannon's entropy (SE), conditional entropy (complexity index [CInd] and normalised CInd [NCI]), and symbolic analysis (0V%, 1V%, 2LV%, and 2ULV%). For statistical analysis the Kruskal-Wallis test with Dunn post hoc and the Wilcoxon test (p < 0.05 was considered significant) were applied. Treatment with this COC caused no significant changes in SE, CInd, NCI, or symbolic analysis in either active or sedentary groups. Active groups presented higher values for SE and 2ULV%, and lower values for 0V% when compared to sedentary groups (p < 0.05). HRV patterns differed depending on life style; the non-linear method applied was highly reliable for identifying these changes. The use of OCs containing 20 μg EE and 150 μg GEST does not influence HR autonomic modulation.

  4. Dynamic Modeling of ALS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of dynamic modeling and simulation of Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems is to help design them. Static steady state systems analysis provides basic information and is necessary to guide dynamic modeling, but static analysis is not sufficient to design and compare systems. ALS systems must respond to external input variations and internal off-nominal behavior. Buffer sizing, resupply scheduling, failure response, and control system design are aspects of dynamic system design. We develop two dynamic mass flow models and use them in simulations to evaluate systems issues, optimize designs, and make system design trades. One model is of nitrogen leakage in the space station, the other is of a waste processor failure in a regenerative life support system. Most systems analyses are concerned with optimizing the cost/benefit of a system at its nominal steady-state operating point. ALS analysis must go beyond the static steady state to include dynamic system design. All life support systems exhibit behavior that varies over time. ALS systems must respond to equipment operating cycles, repair schedules, and occasional off-nominal behavior or malfunctions. Biological components, such as bioreactors, composters, and food plant growth chambers, usually have operating cycles or other complex time behavior. Buffer sizes, material stocks, and resupply rates determine dynamic system behavior and directly affect system mass and cost. Dynamic simulation is needed to avoid the extremes of costly over-design of buffers and material reserves or system failure due to insufficient buffers and lack of stored material.

  5. Symbol grounding: a bridge from artificial life, to artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Thompson, E

    1997-06-01

    This paper develops a bridge from AL issues about the symbol-matter relation to AI issues about symbol-grounding by focusing on the concepts of formality and syntactic interpretability. Using the DNA triplet-amino acid specification relation as a paradigm, it is argued that syntactic properties can be grounded as high-level features of the non-syntactic interactions in a physical dynamical system. This argument provides the basis for a rebuttal of John Searle's recent assertion that syntax is observer-relative (1990, 1992). But the argument as developed also challenges the classic symbol-processing theory of mind against which Searle is arguing, as well as the strong AL thesis that life is realizable in a purely computational medium. Finally, it provides a new line of support for the autonomous systems approach in AL and AI (Varela & Bourgine 1992a, 1992b).

  6. Image segmentation for enhancing symbol recognition in prosthetic vision.

    PubMed

    Horne, Lachlan; Barnes, Nick; McCarthy, Chris; He, Xuming

    2012-01-01

    Current and near-term implantable prosthetic vision systems offer the potential to restore some visual function, but suffer from poor resolution and dynamic range of induced phosphenes. This can make it difficult for users of prosthetic vision systems to identify symbolic information (such as signs) except in controlled conditions. Using image segmentation techniques from computer vision, we show it is possible to improve the clarity of such symbolic information for users of prosthetic vision implants in uncontrolled conditions. We use image segmentation to automatically divide a natural image into regions, and using a fixation point controlled by the user, select a region to phosphenize. This technique improves the apparent contrast and clarity of symbolic information over traditional phosphenization approaches.

  7. Simulations of Stagewise Development with a Symbolic Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobet, Fernand

    This chapter compares Piaget's theory of development with Feigenbaum & Simon's (1962; 1984) EPAM theory. An attempt is made to map the concepts of assimilation and accommodation in Piaget's theory onto the concepts of familiarisation and accommodation in EPAM. An EPAM-like model of the balance scale task is then presented, with a discussion of preliminary results showing how it accounts for children's discontinuous, stage-like development. The analysis focuses on the transition between rules, using catastrophe flags (Gilmore, 1981) as criteria. It is argued that some symbolic models may be described as dynamical systems, in the same way as some non-symbolic models.

  8. A Field Study of a Standardized Tangible Symbol System for Learners Who Are Visually Impaired and Have Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trief, Ellen; Cascella, Paul W.; Bruce, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The study reported in this article tracked the learning rate of 43 children with multiple disabilities and visual impairments who had limited to no verbal language across seven months of classroom-based intervention using a standardized set of tangible symbols. Methods: The participants were introduced to tangible symbols on a daily…

  9. A Field Study of a Standardized Tangible Symbol System for Learners Who Are Visually Impaired and Have Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trief, Ellen; Cascella, Paul W.; Bruce, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The study reported in this article tracked the learning rate of 43 children with multiple disabilities and visual impairments who had limited to no verbal language across seven months of classroom-based intervention using a standardized set of tangible symbols. Methods: The participants were introduced to tangible symbols on a daily…

  10. Abstract Expression Grammar Symbolic Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korns, Michael F.

    This chapter examines the use of Abstract Expression Grammars to perform the entire Symbolic Regression process without the use of Genetic Programming per se. The techniques explored produce a symbolic regression engine which has absolutely no bloat, which allows total user control of the search space and output formulas, which is faster, and more accurate than the engines produced in our previous papers using Genetic Programming. The genome is an all vector structure with four chromosomes plus additional epigenetic and constraint vectors, allowing total user control of the search space and the final output formulas. A combination of specialized compiler techniques, genetic algorithms, particle swarm, aged layered populations, plus discrete and continuous differential evolution are used to produce an improved symbolic regression sytem. Nine base test cases, from the literature, are used to test the improvement in speed and accuracy. The improved results indicate that these techniques move us a big step closer toward future industrial strength symbolic regression systems.

  11. Landscape Construction in Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ying; Yuan, Ruoshi; Wang, Gaowei; Ao, Ping

    The idea of landscape has been recently applied to study various of biological problems. We demonstrate that a dynamical structure built into nonlinear dynamical systems allows us to construct such a global optimization landscape, which serves as the Lyapunov function for the ordinary differential equation. We find exact constructions on the landscape for a class of dynamical systems, including a van der Pol type oscillator, competitive Lotka-Volterra systems, and a chaotic system. The landscape constructed provides a new angle for understanding and modelling biological network dynamics.

  12. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Pulse Amplification in Dispersion-Decreasing Fibers with Symbolic Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Tian, Bo; Xu, Tao; Cai, Ke-Jie; Zhang, Huan

    2009-12-01

    The pulse amplification in the dispersion-decreasing fiber (DDF) is investigated via symbolic computation to solve the variable-coefficient higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation with the effects of third-order dispersion, self-steepening, and stimulated Raman scattering. The analytic one-soliton solution of this model is obtained with a set of parametric conditions. Based on this solution, the fundamental soliton is shown to be amplified in the DDF. The comparison of the amplitude of pulses for different dispersion profiles of the DDF is also performed through the graphical analysis. The results of this paper would be of certain value to the study of signal amplification and pulse compression.

  13. Detection of time-delayed interactions in biosignals using symbolic coupling traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, N.; Suhrbier, A.; Riedl, M.; Marwan, N.; Malberg, H.; Bretthauer, G.; Penzel, T.; Kurths, J.

    2009-07-01

    Directional coupling analysis of bivariate time series is an important subject of current research. In this letter, a method based on symbolic dynamics for the detection of time-delayed coupling is presented. The symbolic coupling traces, defined as the symmetric and diametric traces of the bivariate word distribution, allow for the quantification of coupling and are compared with established methods like mutual information and cross recurrence analysis. The symbolic coupling traces method is applied to model systems and cardiological data which demonstrate its advantages especially for nonstationary data.

  14. The Nexus of Knowledge and Behavior for School-Aged Children: Implementation of Health Education Programs and a Nutritional Symbol System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Judith; Graham, Lorraine; Pennington, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Health-related knowledge has been assumed to inform lifestyle choices for school-aged students. A "health-promoting school" provides the conceptual framework for this intervention. A large boarding school developed, implemented and refined a Nutritional Symbol System for their dining hall. The effectiveness of this social marketing…

  15. Effectiveness of Combining Tangible Symbols with the Picture Exchange Communication System to Teach Requesting Skills to Children with Multiple Disabilities Including Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Emad; MacFarland, Stephanie Z.; Umbreit, John

    2011-01-01

    The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is an augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) program used to teach functional requesting and commenting skills to people with disabilities (Bondy & Frost, 1993; Frost & Bondy, 2002). In this study, tangible symbols were added to PECS in teaching requesting to four students (ages 7-14) with…

  16. The Nexus of Knowledge and Behavior for School-Aged Children: Implementation of Health Education Programs and a Nutritional Symbol System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Judith; Graham, Lorraine; Pennington, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Health-related knowledge has been assumed to inform lifestyle choices for school-aged students. A "health-promoting school" provides the conceptual framework for this intervention. A large boarding school developed, implemented and refined a Nutritional Symbol System for their dining hall. The effectiveness of this social marketing…

  17. Teaching Young People Who Are Blind and Have Autism to Make Requests Using a Variation on the Picture Exchange Communication System with Tactile Symbols: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Shelley K.; Troha, Jeanette M.

    2008-01-01

    This study used a single-subject multiple baseline across participants design to evaluate the effectiveness of a modified picture exchange communication system (PECS) teaching protocol with tactile symbols. Three students (two male, one female) aged 12-17 years who had autism and were blind participated in the study. The instructional program…

  18. High-resolution joint symbolic analysis to enhance classification of the cardiorespiratory system in patients with schizophrenia and their relatives

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Steffen; Haueisen, Jens; Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Andreas, Voss

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia as a mental illness is one of the most serious in the world. Patients with schizophrenia have an increased cardiac mortality rate, but the reasons for this remain unclear. In addition to other factors, the role of impaired autonomic regulation during acute psychosis has become more evident in different studies applying heart rate (HR) variability analyses. But, until now, respiration and cardiorespiratory regulation, which are important for homeostatic control, have not been considered. In this study, short-term cardiorespiratory couplings (CRCs) of 23 unmedicated patients with paranoid schizophrenia (SZO), 20 of their healthy first-degree relatives (REL) and 20 healthy subjects (CON) matched according to age and sex of SZO and REL were investigated by applying high-resolution joint symbolic dynamics (HRJSD) analysis. We found a significantly (p<0.0061) altered HR pattern, respiratory pattern and CRCs in SZO and only marginal alterations for the REL group in comparison with the CON group when we applied HRJSD. These results might be an indication of decreased vagal activity within the brainstem, an altered or suppressed interaction of the brainstem and higher regulatory centres, or panic- and anxiety-related changes in the brainstem associated with the acute psychosis of these patients. PMID:25548266

  19. Online medical symbol recognition using a Tablet PC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Amlan; Hu, Qian; Boykin, Stanley; Clark, Cheryl; Fish, Randy; Jones, Stephen; Moore, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a scheme to enhance the usability of a Tablet PC's handwriting recognition system by including medical symbols that are not a part of the Tablet PC's symbol library. The goal of this work is to make handwriting recognition more useful for medical professionals accustomed to using medical symbols in medical records. To demonstrate that this new symbol recognition module is robust and expandable, we report results on both a medical symbol set and an expanded symbol test set which includes selected mathematical symbols.

  20. Control and dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leondes, C.T. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This volume covers topics pertaining to analysis and control system techniques for electric power systems. Topics include: computer relaying in power systems, power system generation expansion, expert systems for power systems, and power flow algorithms.

  1. Adaptive modulation and intra-symbol frequency-domain averaging scheme for multiband OFDM UWB over fiber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jing; Li, Teng; Wen, Xuejie; Deng, Rui; Chen, Ming; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the unbalanced error bit distribution among subcarriers caused by inter-subcarriers mixing interference (ISMI) and frequency selective fading (FSF), an adaptive modulation scheme based on 64/16/4QAM modulation is proposed and experimentally investigated in the intensity-modulation direct-detection (IM/DD) multiband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MB-OFDM) ultra-wideband (UWB) over fiber system. After 50 km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) transmission, at the bit error ratio (BER) of 1×10-3, the experimental results show that the power penalty of the IM/DD MB-OFDM UWBoF system with 64/16/4QAM adaptive modulation scheme is about 3.6 dB, compared to that with the 64QAM modulation scheme. Moreover, the receiver sensitivity has been improved about 0.52 dB when the intra-symbol frequency-domain averaging (ISFA) algorithm is employed in the IM/DD MB-OFDM UWBoF system based on the 64/16/4QAM adaptive modulation scheme. Meanwhile, after 50 km SSMF transmission, there is a negligible power penalty in the adaptively modulated IM/DD MB-OFDM UWBoF system, compared to the optical back-to-back case.

  2. SD-CAS: Spin Dynamics by Computer Algebra System.

    PubMed

    Filip, Xenia; Filip, Claudiu

    2010-11-01

    A computer algebra tool for describing the Liouville-space quantum evolution of nuclear 1/2-spins is introduced and implemented within a computational framework named Spin Dynamics by Computer Algebra System (SD-CAS). A distinctive feature compared with numerical and previous computer algebra approaches to solving spin dynamics problems results from the fact that no matrix representation for spin operators is used in SD-CAS, which determines a full symbolic character to the performed computations. Spin correlations are stored in SD-CAS as four-entry nested lists of which size increases linearly with the number of spins into the system and are easily mapped into analytical expressions in terms of spin operator products. For the so defined SD-CAS spin correlations a set of specialized functions and procedures is introduced that are essential for implementing basic spin algebra operations, such as the spin operator products, commutators, and scalar products. They provide results in an abstract algebraic form: specific procedures to quantitatively evaluate such symbolic expressions with respect to the involved spin interaction parameters and experimental conditions are also discussed. Although the main focus in the present work is on laying the foundation for spin dynamics symbolic computation in NMR based on a non-matrix formalism, practical aspects are also considered throughout the theoretical development process. In particular, specific SD-CAS routines have been implemented using the YACAS computer algebra package (http://yacas.sourceforge.net), and their functionality was demonstrated on a few illustrative examples. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamical Systems in Psychology: Linguistic Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulis, William

    Major goals for psychoanalysis and psychology are the description, analysis, prediction, and control of behaviour. Natural language has long provided the medium for the formulation of our theoretical understanding of behavior. But with the advent of nonlinear dynamics, a new language has appeared which offers promise to provide a quantitative theory of behaviour. In this paper, some of the limitations of natural and formal languages are discussed. Several approaches to understanding the links between natural and formal languages, as applied to the study of behavior, are discussed. These include symbolic dynamics, Moore's generalized shifts, Crutchfield's ɛ machines, and dynamical automata.

  4. Symbolic Shadowing and the Computation of Entropy for Observed Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Diana A.; Mendes, Vivaldo M.; Ferreira, Nuno; Menezes, Rui

    Order, disorder and recurrence are common features observed in complex time series that can be encountered in many fields, like finance, economics, biology and physiology. These phenomena can be modelled by chaotic dynamical systems and one way to undertake a rigorous analysis is via symbolic dynamics, a mathematical-statistical technique that allows the detection of the underlying topological and metrical structures in the time series. Symbolic dynamics is a powerful tool initially developed for the investigation of discrete dynamical systems. The main idea consists in constructing a partition, that is, a finite collection of disjoint subsets whose union is the state space. By identifying each subset with a distinct symbol, we obtain sequences of symbols that correspond to each trajectory of the original system. One of the major problems in defining a "good" symbolic description of the corresponding time series is to obtain a generating partition, that is, the assignment of symbolic sequences to trajectories that is unique, up to a set of measure zero. Unfortunately, this is not a trivial task, and, moreover, for observed time series the notion of a generating partition is no longer well defined in the presence of noise. In this paper we apply symbolic shadowing, a deterministic algorithm using tessellations, in order to estimate a generating partition for a financial time series (PSI20) and consequently to compute its entropy. This algorithm allows producing partitions such that the symbolic sequences uniquely encode all periodic points up to some order. We compare these results with those obtained by considering the Pesin's identity, that is, the metric entropy is equal to the sum of positive Lyapunov exponents. To obtain the Lyapunov exponents, we reconstruct the state space of the PSI20 data by applying an embedding process and estimate them by using the Wolf et al. algorithm.

  5. Dynamical systems theory for music dynamics.

    PubMed

    Boon, Jean Pierre; Decroly, Olivier

    1995-09-01

    We show that, when music pieces are cast in the form of time series of pitch variations, the concepts and tools of dynamical systems theory can be applied to the analysis of temporal dynamics in music. (i) Phase space portraits are constructed from the time series wherefrom the dimensionality is evaluated as a measure of the global dynamics of each piece. (ii) Spectral analysis of the time series yields power spectra ( approximately f(-nu)) close to red noise (nu approximately 2) in the low frequency range. (iii) We define an information entropy which provides a measure of the local dynamics in the musical piece; the entropy can be interpreted as an evaluation of the degree of complexity in the music, but there is no evidence of an analytical relation between local and global dynamics. These findings are based on computations performed on eighty sequences sampled in the music literature from the 18th to the 20th century. (c) 1995 American Institute of Physics.

  6. The development of automated access to symbolic and non-symbolic number knowledge in children: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Gebuis, Titia; Herfs, Inkeri K; Kenemans, J Leon; de Haan, Edward H F; van der Smagt, Maarten J

    2009-11-01

    Infants can visually detect changes in numerosity, which suggests that a (non-symbolic) numerosity system is already present early in life. This non-symbolic system is hypothesized to serve as the basis for the later acquired symbolic system. Little is known about the processes underlying the transition from the non-symbolic to symbolic code. In the current study we investigated the development of automatization of symbolic number processing in children from second (6.0 years) and fourth grade (8.0 years) and adults using a symbolic and non-symbolic size congruency task and event-related potentials (ERPs) as a measure. The comparison between symbolic and non-symbolic size congruency effects (SCEs) allowed us to disentangle processes necessary to perform the task from processes specific to numerosity notation. In contrast to previous studies, second graders already revealed a behavioral symbolic SCE similar to that of adults. In addition, the behavioral SCE increased for symbolic and decreased for non-symbolic notation with increasing age. For all age groups, the ERP data showed that the two magnitudes interfered at a level before selective activation of the response system, for both notations. However, only for the second graders distinct processes were recruited to perform the symbolic size comparison task. This shift in recruited processes for the symbolic task only might reflect the functional specialization of the parietal cortex.

  7. Indian Graphic Symbols.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stump, Sarain

    1979-01-01

    Noting Indian tribes had invented ways to record facts and ideas, with graphic symbols that sometimes reached the complexity of hieroglyphs, this article illustrates and describes Indian symbols. (Author/RTS)

  8. Generating Dynamic System Matrices for Dynamic SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of the computer program is to generate system matrices that model data acquisition process in dynamic single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The application is for the reconstruction of dynamic data from projection measurements that provide the time evolution of activity uptake and wash out in an organ of interest. The measurement of the time activity in the blood and organ tissue provide time-activity curves (TACs) that are used to estimate kinetic parameters. The program provides a correct model of the in vivo spatial and temporal distribution of radioactive in organs. The model accounts for the attenuation of the internal emitting radioactivity, it accounts for the vary point response of the collimators, and correctly models the time variation of the activity in the organs. One important application where the software is being used in a measuring the arterial input function (AIF) in a dynamic SPECT study where the data are acquired from a slow camera rotation. Measurement of the arterial input function (AIF) is essential to deriving quantitative estimates of regional myocardial blood flow using kinetic models. A study was performed to evaluate whether a slowly rotating SPECT system could provide accurate AIF's for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Methods: Dynamic cardiac SPECT was first performed in human subjects at rest using a Phillips Precedence SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of Tc-99m-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 minutes. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K1. Results: The spatiotemporal 4D ML-EM reconstructions gave more accurate reconstructions that did standard frame-by-frame 3D ML-EM reconstructions. From additional computer simulations and phantom studies, it was determined that a 1 minute infusion with a SPECT system rotation speed

  9. Control and dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leondes, C.T. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This book covers analysis and control system techniques for electric power systems. Topics include: concurrent processing in power system analysis, power system protection, voltage collapse, reliability techniques in large electric power systems, optimization in hydroelectric systems, and linear programming methods for optimal energy plant operation.

  10. Identifying delayed directional couplings with symbolic transfer entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickten, Henning; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2014-12-01

    We propose a straightforward extension of symbolic transfer entropy to enable the investigation of delayed directional relationships between coupled dynamical systems from time series. Analyzing time series from chaotic model systems, we demonstrate the applicability and limitations of our approach. Our findings obtained from applying our method to infer delayed directed interactions in the human epileptic brain underline the importance of our approach for improving the construction of functional network structures from data.

  11. Symbols for welding, brazing and nondestructive examination

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a method of conveying instructions to the welder or brazer by means of symbols which may have several parts. Detailed instructions and examples are provided so that the welding or brazing symbol may be constructed and interpreted to cover most welded or brazed designs. Also included is a system of symbols for informing the nondestructive examination technician as to the method, frequency and extent of examination required.

  12. Symbolicity Among Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, L. Brooks; Lujan, Philip

    Within the framework of "symbolicity" and "nativistic movement" the paper presents a "reasonably balanced and illustrative" examination of selected negative and positive trends in Native American symbolicity. Symbolicity is defined as the state, condition, and tendency of people to organize their perceptions and…

  13. Towards Symbolic Model Checking for Multi-Agent Systems via OBDDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raimondi, Franco; Lomunscio, Alessio

    2004-01-01

    We present an algorithm for model checking temporal-epistemic properties of multi-agent systems, expressed in the formalism of interpreted systems. We first introduce a technique for the translation of interpreted systems into boolean formulae, and then present a model-checking algorithm based on this translation. The algorithm is based on OBDD's, as they offer a compact and efficient representation for boolean formulae.

  14. An algebraic criterion for the onset of chaos in nonlinear dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, A.; Tobak, M.

    1987-01-01

    The correspondence between iterated integrals and a noncommutative algebra is used to recast the given dynamical system from the time domain to the Laplace-Borel transform domain. It is then shown that the following algebraic criterion has to be satisfied for the outset of chaos: the limit (as tau approaches infinity and x sub 0 approaches infinity) of ((sigma(k=0) (tau sup k) / (k* x sub 0 sup k)) G II G = 0, where G is the generating power series of the trajectories, the symbol II is the shuffle product (le melange) of the noncommutative algebra, x sub 0 is a noncommutative variable, and tau is the correlation parameter. In the given equation, symbolic forms for both G and II can be obtained by use of one of the currently available symbolic languages such as PLI, REDUCE, and MACSYMA. Hence, the criterion is a computer-algebraic one.

  15. SymGF: a symbolic tool for quantum transport analysis and its application to a double quantum dot system.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zimin; Sun, Qing-feng; Wan, Langhui; Guo, Hong

    2011-10-19

    We report the development and an application of a symbolic tool, called SymGF, for analytical derivations of quantum transport properties using the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The inputs to SymGF are the device Hamiltonian in the second quantized form, the commutation relation of the operators and the truncation rules of the correlators. The outputs of SymGF are the desired NEGF that appear in the transport formula, in terms of the unperturbed Green's function of the device scattering region and its coupling to the device electrodes. For complicated transport analysis involving strong interactions and correlations, SymGF provides significant assistance in analytical derivations. Using this tool, we investigate coherent quantum transport in a double quantum dot system where strong on-site interaction exists in the side-coupled quantum dot. Results obtained by the higher-order approximation and Hartree-Fock approximation are compared. The higher-order approximation reveals Kondo resonance features in the density of states and conductances. Results are compared both qualitatively and quantitatively to the experimental data reported in the literature.

  16. Ergatic dynamic control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, V. V. (Editor); Drozdova, T. I. (Editor); Antomonov, Y. G. (Editor); Golego, V. N. (Editor); Ivakhnenko, A. G. (Editor); Meleshev, A. M. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Synthesis and analysis of systems containing a man in their control circuits are considered. The concepts of ergonomics and ergatic systems are defined, and tasks and problems of ergonomics are outlined. The synthesis of the structure of an astronautic ergatic organism is presented, as well as the synthesis of nonstationary ergatic systems. Problems of selecting the criteria for complex systems are considered, and the results are presented from a study of ergatic control systems with any degree of human participation.

  17. Symbols of a cosmic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madjid, F. Hadi; Myers, John M.

    2016-10-01

    The world runs on networks over which signals communicate sequences of symbols, e.g. numerals. Examining both engineered and natural communications networks reveals an unsuspected order that depends on contact with an unpredictable entity. This order has three roots. The first is a proof within quantum theory that no evidence can ever determine its explanation, so that an agent choosing an explanation must do so unpredictably. The second root is the showing that clocks that step computers do not "tell time" but serve as self-adjusting symbol-handling agents that regulate "logically synchronized" motion in response to unpredictable disturbances. Such a clock-agent has a certain independence as well as the capacity to communicate via unpredictable symbols with other clock-agents and to adjust its own tick rate in response to that communication. The third root is the noticing of unpredictable symbol exchange in natural systems, including the transmission of symbols found in molecular biology. We introduce a symbol-handling agent as a role played in some cases by a person, for example a physicist who chooses an explanation of given experimental outcomes, and in other cases by some other biological entity, and in still other cases by an inanimate device, such as a computer-based detector used in physical measurements. While we forbear to try to explain the propensity of agents at all levels from cells to civilizations to form and operate networks of logically synchronized symbol-handling agents, we point to this propensity as an overlooked cosmic order, an order structured by the unpredictability ensuing from the proof. Appreciating the cosmic order leads to a conception of agency that replaces volition by unpredictability and reconceives the notion of objectivity in a way that makes a place for agency in the world as described by physics. Some specific implications for physics are outlined.

  18. A perceptual account of symbolic reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Landy, David; Allen, Colin; Zednik, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    People can be taught to manipulate symbols according to formal mathematical and logical rules. Cognitive scientists have traditionally viewed this capacity—the capacity for symbolic reasoning—as grounded in the ability to internally represent numbers, logical relationships, and mathematical rules in an abstract, amodal fashion. We present an alternative view, portraying symbolic reasoning as a special kind of embodied reasoning in which arithmetic and logical formulae, externally represented as notations, serve as targets for powerful perceptual and sensorimotor systems. Although symbolic reasoning often conforms to abstract mathematical principles, it is typically implemented by perceptual and sensorimotor engagement with concrete environmental structures. PMID:24795662

  19. A perceptual account of symbolic reasoning.

    PubMed

    Landy, David; Allen, Colin; Zednik, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    People can be taught to manipulate symbols according to formal mathematical and logical rules. Cognitive scientists have traditionally viewed this capacity-the capacity for symbolic reasoning-as grounded in the ability to internally represent numbers, logical relationships, and mathematical rules in an abstract, amodal fashion. We present an alternative view, portraying symbolic reasoning as a special kind of embodied reasoning in which arithmetic and logical formulae, externally represented as notations, serve as targets for powerful perceptual and sensorimotor systems. Although symbolic reasoning often conforms to abstract mathematical principles, it is typically implemented by perceptual and sensorimotor engagement with concrete environmental structures.

  20. Symbolic estrangement: evidence against a strong association between numerical symbols and the quantities they represent.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Ian M; Ansari, Daniel; Beilock, Sian L

    2012-11-01

    Are numerals estranged from a sense of the actual quantities they represent? We demonstrate that, irrespective of numerical size or distance, direct comparison of the relative quantities represented by symbolic and nonsymbolic formats leads to performance markedly worse than when comparing 2 nonsymbolic quantities (Experiment 1). Experiment 2 shows that this effect cannot be attributed to differences in perceptual processing streams. Experiment 3 shows that there is no additional cost of mixing 2 formats that are both symbolic; that is, the decrement in mixing formats is specific to mixing symbolic and nonsymbolic representations. In sum, we show that accessing a sense of how much a numerical symbol actually represents is a surprisingly difficult and nontrivial process. Our data are consistent with the view that numerical symbols operate primarily as an associative system in which relations between symbols come to overshadow those between symbols and their quantity referents. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Child and Symbol Factors in Learning to Read a Visually Complex Writing System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nag, Sonali; Snowling, Margaret; Quinlan, Philip; Hulme, Charles

    2014-01-01

    In Kannada, visual features are arranged in blocks called "akshara," making this a visually more complex writing system than typical alphabetic orthographies. Akshara knowledge was assessed concurrently and 8 months later in 113 children in the first years of reading instruction (aged 4-7 years). Mixed effects logistic regression models…

  2. A Symbolic Approach Using Feature Construction Capable of Acquiring Information/Knowledge for Building Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Major, Raymond L.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a technique for developing a knowledge-base of information to use in an expert system. Proposed approach employs a popular machine-learning algorithm along with a method for forming a finite number of features or conjuncts of at most n primitive attributes. Illustrates this procedure by examining qualitative information represented in a…

  3. Child and Symbol Factors in Learning to Read a Visually Complex Writing System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nag, Sonali; Snowling, Margaret; Quinlan, Philip; Hulme, Charles

    2014-01-01

    In Kannada, visual features are arranged in blocks called "akshara," making this a visually more complex writing system than typical alphabetic orthographies. Akshara knowledge was assessed concurrently and 8 months later in 113 children in the first years of reading instruction (aged 4-7 years). Mixed effects logistic regression models…

  4. Dynamics robustness of cascading systems.

    PubMed

    Young, Jonathan T; Hatakeyama, Tetsuhiro S; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2017-03-01

    A most important property of biochemical systems is robustness. Static robustness, e.g., homeostasis, is the insensitivity of a state against perturbations, whereas dynamics robustness, e.g., homeorhesis, is the insensitivity of a dynamic process. In contrast to the extensively studied static robustness, dynamics robustness, i.e., how a system creates an invariant temporal profile against perturbations, is little explored despite transient dynamics being crucial for cellular fates and are reported to be robust experimentally. For example, the duration of a stimulus elicits different phenotypic responses, and signaling networks process and encode temporal information. Hence, robustness in time courses will be necessary for functional biochemical networks. Based on dynamical systems theory, we uncovered a general mechanism to achieve dynamics robustness. Using a three-stage linear signaling cascade as an example, we found that the temporal profiles and response duration post-stimulus is robust to perturbations against certain parameters. Then analyzing the linearized model, we elucidated the criteria of when signaling cascades will display dynamics robustness. We found that changes in the upstream modules are masked in the cascade, and that the response duration is mainly controlled by the rate-limiting module and organization of the cascade's kinetics. Specifically, we found two necessary conditions for dynamics robustness in signaling cascades: 1) Constraint on the rate-limiting process: The phosphatase activity in the perturbed module is not the slowest. 2) Constraints on the initial conditions: The kinase activity needs to be fast enough such that each module is saturated even with fast phosphatase activity and upstream changes are attenuated. We discussed the relevance of such robustness to several biological examples and the validity of the above conditions therein. Given the applicability of dynamics robustness to a variety of systems, it will provide a

  5. Dynamics robustness of cascading systems

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2017-01-01

    A most important property of biochemical systems is robustness. Static robustness, e.g., homeostasis, is the insensitivity of a state against perturbations, whereas dynamics robustness, e.g., homeorhesis, is the insensitivity of a dynamic process. In contrast to the extensively studied static robustness, dynamics robustness, i.e., how a system creates an invariant temporal profile against perturbations, is little explored despite transient dynamics being crucial for cellular fates and are reported to be robust experimentally. For example, the duration of a stimulus elicits different phenotypic responses, and signaling networks process and encode temporal information. Hence, robustness in time courses will be necessary for functional biochemical networks. Based on dynamical systems theory, we uncovered a general mechanism to achieve dynamics robustness. Using a three-stage linear signaling cascade as an example, we found that the temporal profiles and response duration post-stimulus is robust to perturbations against certain parameters. Then analyzing the linearized model, we elucidated the criteria of when signaling cascades will display dynamics robustness. We found that changes in the upstream modules are masked in the cascade, and that the response duration is mainly controlled by the rate-limiting module and organization of the cascade’s kinetics. Specifically, we found two necessary conditions for dynamics robustness in signaling cascades: 1) Constraint on the rate-limiting process: The phosphatase activity in the perturbed module is not the slowest. 2) Constraints on the initial conditions: The kinase activity needs to be fast enough such that each module is saturated even with fast phosphatase activity and upstream changes are attenuated. We discussed the relevance of such robustness to several biological examples and the validity of the above conditions therein. Given the applicability of dynamics robustness to a variety of systems, it will provide a

  6. Improving Preschoolers’ Arithmetic through Number Magnitude Training: The Impact of Non-Symbolic and Symbolic Training

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The numerical cognition literature offers two views to explain numerical and arithmetical development. The unique-representation view considers the approximate number system (ANS) to represent the magnitude of both symbolic and non-symbolic numbers and to be the basis of numerical learning. In contrast, the dual-representation view suggests that symbolic and non-symbolic skills rely on different magnitude representations and that it is the ability to build an exact representation of symbolic numbers that underlies math learning. Support for these hypotheses has come mainly from correlative studies with inconsistent results. In this study, we developed two training programs aiming at enhancing the magnitude processing of either non-symbolic numbers or symbolic numbers and compared their effects on arithmetic skills. Fifty-six preschoolers were randomly assigned to one of three 10-session-training conditions: (1) non-symbolic training (2) symbolic training and (3) control training working on story understanding. Both numerical training conditions were significantly more efficient than the control condition in improving magnitude processing. Moreover, symbolic training led to a significantly larger improvement in arithmetic than did non-symbolic training and the control condition. These results support the dual-representation view. PMID:27875540

  7. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rather than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.

  8. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    DOE PAGES

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; ...

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rathermore » than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.« less

  9. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Since the occurrence of dynamic instabilities is not acceptable for any commercial maglev systems, it is important to consider the dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study is to consider the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on the guideway which consists of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev system.

  10. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-09-01

    Since the occurrence of dynamic instabilities is not acceptable for any commercial maglev systems, it is important to consider the dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study is to consider the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on the guideway which consists of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev system.

  11. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1994-05-01

    Because dynamic instabilities are not acceptable in any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study considers the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  12. Systoles in discrete dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Sara; Grácio, Clara; Ramos, Carlos Correia

    2013-01-01

    The fruitful relationship between Geometry and Graph Theory has been explored by several authors benefiting also the Theory of discrete dynamical systems seen as Markov chains in graphs. In this work we will further explore the relation between these areas, giving a geometrical interpretation of notions from dynamical systems. In particular, we relate the topological entropy with the systole, here defined in the context of discrete dynamical systems. We show that for continuous interval maps the systole is trivial; however, for the class of interval maps with one discontinuity point the systole acquires relevance from the point of view of the dynamical behavior. Moreover, we define the geodesic length spectrum associated to a Markov interval map and we compute the referred spectrum in several examples.

  13. Solar System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Carl D.; Dermott, Stanley F.

    2000-02-01

    Preface; 1. Structure of the solar system; 2. The two-body problem; 3. The restricted three-body problem; 4. Tides, rotation and shape; 5. Spin-orbit coupling; 6. The disturbing function; 7. Secular perturbations; 8. Resonant perturbations; 9. Chaos and long-term evolution; 10. Planetary rings; Appendix A. Solar system data; Appendix B. Expansion of the disturbing function; Index.

  14. Realization of dynamical electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammari, Elena; Catthoor, Francky; Iasemidis, Leonidas; Kjeldsberg, Per Gunnar; Huisken, Jos; Tsakalis, Konstantinos

    2014-04-01

    This article gives an overview of a methodology for building dynamical electronic systems. As an example a part of a system for epileptic seizure prediction is used, which monitors EEG signals and continuously calculates the largest short-term Lyapunov exponents. In dynamical electronic systems, the cost of exploitation, for instance energy consumption, may vary substantially with the values of input signals. In addition, the functions describing the variations are not known at the time the system is designed. As a result, the architecture of the system must accommodate for the worst case exploitation costs, which rapidly exceed the available resources (for instance battery life) when accumulated over time. The presented system scenario methodology solves these challenges by identifying at design time groups of possible exploitation costs, called system scenarios, and implementing a mechanism to detect system scenarios at run time and re-configure the system to cost-efficiently accommodate them. During reconfiguration, the optimized system architecture settings for the active system scenario are selected and the total exploitation cost is reduced. When the dynamic behavior is due to input data variables with a large number of possible values, current techniques for bottom-up scenario identification and detection becomes too complex. A new top-down technique, based on polygonal regions, is presented in this paper. The results for the example system indicate that with 10 system scenarios the average energy consumption of the system can be reduced by 28% and brought within 5% of the theoretically best solution.

  15. Solar system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    1987-01-01

    The rotational dynamics of irregularly shaped satellites and the origin of Kirkwood Gaps are discussed. The chaotic tumbling of Hyperion and the anomalously low eccentricity of Deimos are examined. The Digital Orrery is used to explore the phase space of the ellipic restricted three body problem near the principal commensurabilities (2/1, 5/2, 3/1, and 3/2). The results for the 3/1 commensurability are in close agreement with those found earlier with the algebraic mapping method. Large chaotic zones are associated with the 3/1, 2/1 and 5/2 resonances, where there are gaps in the distribution of asteroids. The region near the 3/2 resonance, where the Hilda group of asteroids is located, is largely devoid of chaotic behavior. Thus, there is a qualitative agreement between the character of the motion and the distribution of asteroids.

  16. Dynamical Aspects of Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliman, J.; Itkis, M. G.; Gmuca, Š.

    2008-11-01

    Fission dynamics. Dependence of scission-neutron yield on light-fragment mass for [symbol]=1/2 [et al.]. Dynamics of capture quasifission and fusion-fission competition / L. Stuttgé ... [et al.] -- Fission-fission. The processes of fusion-fission and quasi-fission of superheavy nuclei / M. G. Itkis ... [et al.]. Fission and quasifission in the reactions [symbol]Ca+[symbol]Pb and [symbol]Ni+[symbol]W / G. N. Knyazheva ... [et al.]. Mass-energy characteristics of reactions [symbol]Fe+[symbol][symbol][symbol]266Hs and [symbol]Mg+[symbol]Cm[symbol][symbol]Hs at Coulomb barrier / L. Krupa ... [et al.]. Fusion of heavy ions at extreme sub-barrier energies / Ş. Mişicu and H. Esbensen. Fusion and fission dynamics of heavy nuclear system / V. Zagrebaev and W. Greiner. Time-dependent potential energy for fusion and fission processes / A. V. Karpov ... [et al.] -- Superheavy elements. Advances in the understanding of structure and production mechanisms for superheavy elements / W. Greiner and V. Zagrebaev. Fission barriers of heaviest nuclei / A. Sobiczewski ... [et al.]. Possibility of synthesizing doubly magic superheavy nuclei / Y Aritomo ... [et al.]. Synthesis of superheavy nuclei in [symbol]Ca-induced reactions / V. K. Utyonkov ... [et al.] -- Fragmentation. Production of neutron-rich nuclei in the nucleus-nucleus collisions around the Fermi energy / M. Veselský. Signals of enlarged core in [symbol]Al / Y. G. Ma ... [et al.] -- Exotic modes. New insight into the fission process from experiments with relativistic heavy-ion beams / K.-H. Schmidt ... [et al.]. New results for the intensity of bimodal fission in binary and ternary spontaneous fission of [symbol]Cf / C. Goodin ... [et al.]. Rare fission modes: study of multi-cluster decays of actinide nuclei / D. V. Kamanin ... [et al.]. Energy distribution of ternary [symbol]-particles in [symbol]Cf(sf) / M. Mutterer ... [et al.]. Preliminary results of experiment aimed at searching for collinear cluster tripartition of

  17. Effects of a hydrotherapy programme on symbolic and complexity dynamics of heart rate variability and aerobic capacity in fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Zamunér, Antonio Roberto; Andrade, Carolina P; Forti, Meire; Marchi, Andrea; Milan, Juliana; Avila, Mariana Arias; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Porta, Alberto; Silva, Ester

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of a hydrotherapy programme on aerobic capacity and linear and non-linear dynamics of heart rate variability (HRV) in women with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). 20 women with FMS and 20 healthy controls (HC) took part in the study. The FMS group was evaluated at baseline and after a 16-week hydrotherapy programme. All participants underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing on a cycle ergometer and RR intervals recording in supine and standing positions. The HRV was analysed by linear and non-linear methods. The current level of pain, the tender points, the pressure pain threshold and the impact of FMS on quality of life were assessed. The FMS patients presented higher cardiac sympathetic modulation, lower vagal modulation and lower complexity of HRV in supine position than the HC. Only the HC decreased the complexity indices of HRV during orthostatic stimulus. After a 16-week hydrotherapy programme, the FMS patients increased aerobic capacity, decreased cardiac sympathetic modulation and increased vagal modulation and complexity dynamics of HRV in supine. The FMS patients also improved their cardiac autonomic adjustments to the orthostatic stimulus. Associations between improvements in non-linear dynamics of HRV and improvements in pain and in the impact of FMS on quality of life were found. A 16-week hydrotherapy programme proved to be effective in ameliorating symptoms, aerobic functional capacity and cardiac autonomic control in FMS patients. Improvements in the non-linear dynamics of HRV were related to improvements in pain and in the impact of FMS on quality of life.

  18. Biologically inspired dynamic material systems.

    PubMed

    Studart, André R

    2015-03-09

    Numerous examples of material systems that dynamically interact with and adapt to the surrounding environment are found in nature, from hair-based mechanoreceptors in animals to self-shaping seed dispersal units in plants to remodeling bone in vertebrates. Inspired by such fascinating biological structures, a wide range of synthetic material systems have been created to replicate the design concepts of dynamic natural architectures. Examples of biological structures and their man-made counterparts are herein revisited to illustrate how dynamic and adaptive responses emerge from the intimate microscale combination of building blocks with intrinsic nanoscale properties. By using top-down photolithographic methods and bottom-up assembly approaches, biologically inspired dynamic material systems have been created 1) to sense liquid flow with hair-inspired microelectromechanical systems, 2) to autonomously change shape by utilizing plantlike heterogeneous architectures, 3) to homeostatically influence the surrounding environment through self-regulating adaptive surfaces, and 4) to spatially concentrate chemical species by using synthetic microcompartments. The ever-increasing complexity and remarkable functionalities of such synthetic systems offer an encouraging perspective to the rich set of dynamic and adaptive properties that can potentially be implemented in future man-made material systems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Self-Supervised Dynamical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2003-01-01

    Some progress has been made in a continuing effort to develop mathematical models of the behaviors of multi-agent systems known in biology, economics, and sociology (e.g., systems ranging from single or a few biomolecules to many interacting higher organisms). Living systems can be characterized by nonlinear evolution of probability distributions over different possible choices of the next steps in their motions. One of the main challenges in mathematical modeling of living systems is to distinguish between random walks of purely physical origin (for instance, Brownian motions) and those of biological origin. Following a line of reasoning from prior research, it has been assumed, in the present development, that a biological random walk can be represented by a nonlinear mathematical model that represents coupled mental and motor dynamics incorporating the psychological concept of reflection or self-image. The nonlinear dynamics impart the lifelike ability to behave in ways and to exhibit patterns that depart from thermodynamic equilibrium. Reflection or self-image has traditionally been recognized as a basic element of intelligence. The nonlinear mathematical models of the present development are denoted self-supervised dynamical systems. They include (1) equations of classical dynamics, including random components caused by uncertainties in initial conditions and by Langevin forces, coupled with (2) the corresponding Liouville or Fokker-Planck equations that describe the evolutions of probability densities that represent the uncertainties. The coupling is effected by fictitious information-based forces, denoted supervising forces, composed of probability densities and functionals thereof. The equations of classical mechanics represent motor dynamics that is, dynamics in the traditional sense, signifying Newton s equations of motion. The evolution of the probability densities represents mental dynamics or self-image. Then the interaction between the physical and

  20. The symbol detachment problem.

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Giovanni; Castelfranchi, Cristiano

    2007-06-01

    In situated and embodied approaches it is commonly assumed that the dynamics of sensorimotor engagement between an adaptive agent and its environment are crucial in understanding natural cognition. This perspective permits to address the symbol grounding problem, since the aboutness of any mental state arising during agent-environment engagement is guaranteed by their continuous coupling. However, cognitive agents are also able to formulate representations that are detached from the current state of affairs, such as expectations and goals. Moreover, they can act on their representations before--or instead of--acting directly on the environment, for example building the plan of a bridge and not directly the bridge. On the basis of representations, actions such as planning, remembering or imagining are possible that are disengaged from the current sensorimotor cycle, and often functional to future-oriented conducts. A new problem thus has to be acknowledged, the symbol detachment problem: how and why do situated agents develop representations that are detached from their current sensorimotor interaction, but nevertheless preserve grounding and aboutness? How do cognitive agents progressively acquire a range of capabilities permitting them to deal not only with the current situation but also with alternative, in particular future states of affairs? How do they develop the capability of acting on their representations instead of acting directly on the world? In a theoretical and developmental perspective, we propose that anticipation plays a crucial role in the detachment process: anticipatory representations, originally detached from the sensorimotor cycle for the sake of action control, are successively exapted for bootstrapping increasingly complex cognitive capabilities.

  1. Communication as a Symbolic Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, L. David; Good, Leslie T.

    1989-01-01

    Critiques an article by Ian Angus and John Lannamann on the fragmentation of the communication field ("Questioning the Institutional Boundaries of U. S. Communication Research: An Epistemological Inquiry," v38 n3). Argues that any medium, including the body, can be conceptualized as a system of symbol creation, recognition, and…

  2. Chaotic transport in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Stephen

    The subject of chaotic transport in dynamical systems is examined from the viewpoint of problems of phase space transport. The examples considered include uniform elliptical vortices in external linear time-dependent velocity fields; capture and passage through resonance in celestial mechanics; bubble dynamics in straining flows; and photodissociation of molecules. The discussion covers transport in two-dimensional maps; convective mixing and transport problems in fluid mechanics; transport in quasi-periodically forced systems; Markov models; and transport in k-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian systems.

  3. Dynamically reconfigurable photovoltaic system

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2016-12-27

    A PV system composed of sub-arrays, each having a group of PV cells that are electrically connected to each other. A power management circuit for each sub-array has a communications interface and serves to connect or disconnect the sub-array to a programmable power grid. The power grid has bus rows and bus columns. A bus management circuit is positioned at a respective junction of a bus column and a bus row and is programmable through its communication interface to connect or disconnect a power path in the grid. As a result, selected sub-arrays are connected by selected power paths to be in parallel so as to produce a low system voltage, and, alternately in series so as to produce a high system voltage that is greater than the low voltage by at least a factor of ten.

  4. Dynamically reconfigurable photovoltaic system

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2016-05-31

    A PV system composed of sub-arrays, each having a group of PV cells that are electrically connected to each other. A power management circuit for each sub-array has a communications interface and serves to connect or disconnect the sub-array to a programmable power grid. The power grid has bus rows and bus columns. A bus management circuit is positioned at a respective junction of a bus column and a bus row and is programmable through its communication interface to connect or disconnect a power path in the grid. As a result, selected sub-arrays are connected by selected power paths to be in parallel so as to produce a low system voltage, and, alternately in series so as to produce a high system voltage that is greater than the low voltage by at least a factor of ten.

  5. Constraint elimination in dynamical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, R. P.; Likins, P. W.

    1989-01-01

    Large space structures (LSSs) and other dynamical systems of current interest are often extremely complex assemblies of rigid and flexible bodies subjected to kinematical constraints. A formulation is presented for the governing equations of constrained multibody systems via the application of singular value decomposition (SVD). The resulting equations of motion are shown to be of minimum dimension.

  6. Managing Complex Dynamical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, John C.; Webster, Robert L.; Curry, Jeanie A.; Hammond, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    Management commonly engages in a variety of research designed to provide insight into the motivation and relationships of individuals, departments, organizations, etc. This paper demonstrates how the application of concepts associated with the analysis of complex systems applied to such data sets can yield enhanced insights for managerial action.

  7. Comparison of nonlinear methods symbolic dynamics, detrended fluctuation, and Poincaré plot analysis in risk stratification in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Andreas; Schroeder, Rico; Truebner, Sandra; Goernig, Matthias; Figulla, Hans Reiner; Schirdewan, Alexander

    2007-03-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) has an incidence of about 20/100 000 new cases per annum and accounts for nearly 10 000 deaths per year in the United States. Approximately 36% of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) suffer from cardiac death within five years after diagnosis. Currently applied methods for an early risk prediction in DCM patients are rather insufficient. The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of short-term nonlinear methods symbolic dynamics (STSD), detrended fluctuation (DFA), and Poincaré plot analysis (PPA) for risk stratification in these patients. From 91 DCM patients and 30 healthy subjects (REF), heart rate and blood pressure variability (HRV, BPV), STSD, DFA, and PPA were analyzed. Measures from BPV analysis, DFA, and PPA revealed highly significant differences (p<0.0011) discriminating REF and DCM. For risk stratification in DCM patients, four parameters from BPV analysis, STSD, and PPA revealed significant differences between low and high risk (maximum sensitivity: 90%, specificity: 90%). These results suggest that STSD and PPA are useful nonlinear methods for enhanced risk stratification in DCM patients.

  8. The Effects of the Davis Symbol Mastery System to Assist a Fourth Grader with Dyslexia in Spelling: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amsberry, Gianna; McLaughlin, T. F.; Derby, K. Mark; Waco, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of using the Davis Symbol Mastery Procedure for Words (Davis, 1994) for improving spelling skills. The participant was a fourth-grade male diagnosed with a significant learning disability. The intervention consisted of having the participant write each word, its definition, the word in a…

  9. The importance of symbolic and engaged participation in evidence-based quality improvement in a complex integrated healthcare system: response to "The science of stakeholder engagement in research".

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Alison B; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2017-09-19

    In this commentary, we respond to the commentary provided by Goodman and Sanders Thompson regarding our paper on multilevel stakeholder engagement in a VA implementation trial of evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI) in women's health primary care. We clarify our overall approach to engagement (comprised of both symbolic and engaged participation, according to the authors' classification rubric), highlighting that symbolic participation is of more import and value than the authors suggest, especially in the context of a hierarchical healthcare system. We contend that the issue of power-and how power matters in stakeholder engagement-needs to be considered in this context rather than in global "community" terms. In response to the authors' call for greater detail, we clarify our planning processes as well as our approach to veteran engagement. We concur with Goodman and Sanders Thompson that the science of stakeholder engagement necessitates a broader understanding of best practices as well as the impact of engagement on implementation outcomes.

  10. Chromatic dispersion monitoring and adaptive compensation using pilot symbols in an 8 x 12.5 Gbit/s all-optical OFDM system.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Satoshi; Cincotti, Gabriella; Wada, Naoya

    2014-04-07

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel technique for chromatic dispersion (CD) monitoring and adaptive compensation in an 8 x 12.5 Gbit/s all-optical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (AO-OFDM) system by using two pilot symbols and a virtually imaged phased array (VIPA) for a tunable CD compensator. The two pilot symbols are added to the first and the last sub-channels of the OFDM signal, and their relative time delay is detected and used for CD estimation at the CD monitoring circuit. The monitored CD value is fed to VIPA for CD compensation. In the experiments, the relative time delay between the two pilot symbols was successfully observed, and the adaptive CD compensation drastically improved the bit-error-rate (BER) from over 10(-5) to under 10(-9). The estimated CD values showed less than 10 ps/nm difference from the values measured by a photonic dispersion analyzer, which is accurate enough since the AO-OFDM system can keep BER<10(-9) upto 20 ps/nm residual CD.

  11. Culture as a Moving Symbolic Border.

    PubMed

    Simão, Lívia Mathias

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose the notion of culture as a symbolic moving border. Departing from both, Boesch's (1991) concept of culture as a symbolic field of action, and Herbst's (1995) co-genetic logic, I will discuss the dynamics of self-other relationships in terms of their potentiality as sources of movement in culture. A brief analysis of an empirical material is given in illustrative character of the ideas here exposed.

  12. Generalized Symbolic Execution for Model Checking and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurshid, Sarfraz; Pasareanu, Corina; Visser, Willem; Kofmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Modern software systems, which often are concurrent and manipulate complex data structures must be extremely reliable. We present a novel framework based on symbolic execution, for automated checking of such systems. We provide a two-fold generalization of traditional symbolic execution based approaches: one, we define a program instrumentation, which enables standard model checkers to perform symbolic execution; two, we give a novel symbolic execution algorithm that handles dynamically allocated structures (e.g., lists and trees), method preconditions (e.g., acyclicity of lists), data (e.g., integers and strings) and concurrency. The program instrumentation enables a model checker to automatically explore program heap configurations (using a systematic treatment of aliasing) and manipulate logical formulae on program data values (using a decision procedure). We illustrate two applications of our framework: checking correctness of multi-threaded programs that take inputs from unbounded domains with complex structure and generation of non-isomorphic test inputs that satisfy a testing criterion. Our implementation for Java uses the Java PathFinder model checker.

  13. Symbolic and non symbolic numerical representation in adults with and without developmental dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    Furman, Tamar; Rubinsten, Orly

    2012-11-28

    The question whether Developmental Dyscalculia (DD; a deficit in the ability to process numerical information) is the result of deficiencies in the non symbolic numerical representation system (e.g., a group of dots) or in the symbolic numerical representation system (e.g., Arabic numerals) has been debated in scientific literature. It is accepted that the non symbolic system is divided into two different ranges, the subitizing range (i.e., quantities from 1-4) which is processed automatically and quickly, and the counting range (i.e., quantities larger than 4) which is an attention demanding procedure and is therefore processed serially and slowly. However, so far no study has tested the automaticity of symbolic and non symbolic representation in DD participants separately for the subitizing and the counting ranges. DD and control participants undergo a novel version of the Stroop task, i.e., the Enumeration Stroop. They were presented with a random series of between one and nine written digits, and were asked to name either the relevant written digit (in the symbolic task) or the relevant quantity of digits (in the non symbolic task) while ignoring the irrelevant aspect. DD participants, unlike the control group, didn't show any congruency effect in the subitizing range of the non symbolic task. These findings suggest that DD may be impaired in the ability to process symbolic numerical information or in the ability to automatically associate the two systems (i.e., the symbolic vs. the non symbolic). Additionally DD have deficiencies in the non symbolic counting range.

  14. Symbolic and non symbolic numerical representation in adults with and without developmental dyscalculia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The question whether Developmental Dyscalculia (DD; a deficit in the ability to process numerical information) is the result of deficiencies in the non symbolic numerical representation system (e.g., a group of dots) or in the symbolic numerical representation system (e.g., Arabic numerals) has been debated in scientific literature. It is accepted that the non symbolic system is divided into two different ranges, the subitizing range (i.e., quantities from 1-4) which is processed automatically and quickly, and the counting range (i.e., quantities larger than 4) which is an attention demanding procedure and is therefore processed serially and slowly. However, so far no study has tested the automaticity of symbolic and non symbolic representation in DD participants separately for the subitizing and the counting ranges. Methods DD and control participants undergo a novel version of the Stroop task, i.e., the Enumeration Stroop. They were presented with a random series of between one and nine written digits, and were asked to name either the relevant written digit (in the symbolic task) or the relevant quantity of digits (in the non symbolic task) while ignoring the irrelevant aspect. Result DD participants, unlike the control group, didn't show any congruency effect in the subitizing range of the non symbolic task. Conclusion These findings suggest that DD may be impaired in the ability to process symbolic numerical information or in the ability to automatically associate the two systems (i.e., the symbolic vs. the non symbolic). Additionally DD have deficiencies in the non symbolic counting range. PMID:23190433

  15. Analog-symbolic memory that tracks via reconsolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegelmann, Hava T.

    2008-07-01

    A fundamental part of a computational system is its memory, which is used to store and retrieve data. Classical computer memories rely on the static approach and are very different from human memories. Neural network memories are based on auto-associative attractor dynamics and thus provide a high level of pattern completion. However, they are not used in general computation since there are practically no algorithms to load an arbitrary landscape of attractors into them. In this sense neural network memory models cannot communicate well with symbolic and prior knowledge. We propose the design of a new memory based on localist attractor dynamics with reconsolidation called Reconsolidation Attractor Network (RAN). RAN combines symbolic and subsymbolic features in a very attractive way: it is based on attractors; enables pattern classification under missing data; and demonstrates dynamic reconsolidation, which is very useful for tracking changing concepts. The perception RAN enables is somewhat reminiscent of human perception due to its context sensitivity. Furthermore, it enables an immediate and clear interface with symbolic memories, including loading of attractors by means of trivial wiring, updating attractors, and retrieving them faster without waiting for full convergence. It also scales to any number of concepts. This provides a useful counterpoint to more conventional memory systems, such as random access memory and auto-associative neural networks.

  16. Democratisation of AAC Symbol Choices Using Technology.

    PubMed

    Draffan, E A; Wald, Mike; Zeinoun, Nadine; Banes, David

    2017-01-01

    The use of an online voting system has been developed to enable democratic choices of newly designed symbols to support speech, language and literacy skills in a localisation situation. The system works for those using and supporting Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) symbols on electronic systems by the provision of simplified scales of acceptance and adapted grids. The methodology and results highlighted the importance of user participation at the outset and concrete examples of symbol adaptations that were found necessary to ensure higher levels of user satisfaction. Design changes included appropriate local dress codes, linguistic nuances, social settings, the built environment and religious sensitivities.

  17. Can dynamical systems approach turbulence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Philip

    I review some ideas and methods from dynamical systems theory and discuss applications, actual and potential, to the study of fully developed turbulent flows in an open system: the wall region of a boundary layer. After a brief account of applications to a closed flow system, the approach I concentrate on attempts a marriage between statistical methods and deterministic dynamical systems, both orderly and chaotic. Specifically, coherent structures are identified with combinations of certain basis functions using the proper orthogonal decomposition. A relatively low dimensional ordinary differential equation describing the dynamical interactions of a set of these spatially organized structures is then derived by Galerkin projection of the Navier-Stokes equations. The resulting system is optimal in the sense that it retains the greatest turbulent kinetic energy, in a time averaged sense, among all projections of the same dimension. The model is analyzed using the methods of dynamical systems and symmetries are found to play a crucial rôle. In particular, structurally and asymptotically stable heteroclinic cycles emerge as a common feature in models of various dimensions and orbits attracted to these cycles lead to solutions exhibiting intermittent, violent "events," which appear to reproduce key features of the bursting process. I speculate on the validity of this approach, the "understanding" of turbulent processes it offers and on how some of the gaps in the procedure might be bridged. I do not suggest that this is the only way in which dynamical systems methods can be used, but it is one which seems worth pursuing.

  18. Symbolic Interaction Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Vernon W.; Wright, H. Curtis

    Symbolic interactionism is a theoretical framework that derives from critical humanism through social psychology and is presented as an alternative to sociological and psychological views of social reality. This paper analyzes the general arguments of symbolic interactionism, its portrayal of people as responsible agents, and its interpretive…

  19. The Symbolic Identity Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goud, Nelson H.

    2001-01-01

    Explains the role of symbols in attaining total psychic growth by applying concepts of C. Jung, R. Assagiolo, and L. Kubie. Describes a new strategy, the symbolic identity technique, which involves environmental exploration in a relaxed, receptive manner in order to discover something in the outer environment that reflects one's inner nature.…

  20. Quantities, Units, and Symbols.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal Society, London (England).

    This booklet provides a reference to the quantities, units, and their symbols which are used in physical science. It is a revision of a 1969 report and takes account of the progress which has been made in obtaining international agreement on the definitions, names, and symbols for units and on the rules for the expression of relations involving…

  1. Self-organisation of symbolic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistel, R.

    2016-12-01

    Information is encountered in two different appearances, in native form by arbitrary physical structures, or in symbolic form by coded sequences of letters or the like. The self-organised emergence of symbolic information from structural information is referred to as a ritualisation transition. Occurring at some stage in evolutionary history, ritualisation transitions have in common that after the crossover, arbitrary symbols are issued and recognised by information-processing devices, by transmitters and receivers in the sense of Shannon's communication theory. Symbolic information-processing systems exhibit the fundamental code symmetry whose key features, such as largely lossless copying or persistence under hostile conditions, may elucidate the reasons for the repeated successful occurrence of ritualisation phenomena in evolution history. Ritualisation examples are briefly reviewed such as the origin of life, the appearance of human languages, the establishment of emergent social categories such as money, or the development of digital computers. In addition to their role as carriers of symbolic information, symbols are physical structures which also represent structural information. For a thermodynamic description of symbols and their arrangements, it appears reasonable to distinguish between Boltzmann entropy, Clausius entropy and Pauling entropy. Thermodynamic properties of symbols imply that their lifetimes are limited by the 2nd law.

  2. Self-organisation of symbolic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistel, R.

    2017-01-01

    Information is encountered in two different appearances, in native form by arbitrary physical structures, or in symbolic form by coded sequences of letters or the like. The self-organised emergence of symbolic information from structural information is referred to as a ritualisation transition. Occurring at some stage in evolutionary history, ritualisation transitions have in common that after the crossover, arbitrary symbols are issued and recognised by information-processing devices, by transmitters and receivers in the sense of Shannon's communication theory. Symbolic information-processing systems exhibit the fundamental code symmetry whose key features, such as largely lossless copying or persistence under hostile conditions, may elucidate the reasons for the repeated successful occurrence of ritualisation phenomena in evolution history. Ritualisation examples are briefly reviewed such as the origin of life, the appearance of human languages, the establishment of emergent social categories such as money, or the development of digital computers. In addition to their role as carriers of symbolic information, symbols are physical structures which also represent structural information. For a thermodynamic description of symbols and their arrangements, it appears reasonable to distinguish between Boltzmann entropy, Clausius entropy and Pauling entropy. Thermodynamic properties of symbols imply that their lifetimes are limited by the 2nd law.

  3. Waddington, Dynamic Systems, and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Tronick, Ed; Hunter, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Waddington coined the term “epigenetic” to attempt to explain the complex, dynamic interactions between the developmental environment and the genome that led to the production of phenotype. Waddington's thoughts on the importance of both adaptability and canalization of phenotypic development are worth recalling as well, as they emphasize the available range for epigenetic action and the importance of environmental feedback (or lack thereof) in the development of complex traits. We suggest that a dynamic systems view fits well with Waddington's conception of epigenetics in the developmental context, as well as shedding light on the study of the molecular epigenetic effects of the environment on brain and behavior. Further, the dynamic systems view emphasizes the importance of the multi-directional interchange between the organism, the genome and various aspects of the environment to the ultimate phenotype. PMID:27375447

  4. Dynamics of Variable Mass Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eke, Fidelis O.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of the effects of mass loss on the attitude behavior of spinning bodies in flight. The principal goal is to determine whether there are circumstances under which the motion of variable mass systems can become unstable in the sense that their transverse angular velocities become unbounded. Obviously, results from a study of this kind would find immediate application in the aerospace field. The first part of this study features a complete and mathematically rigorous derivation of a set of equations that govern both the translational and rotational motions of general variable mass systems. The remainder of the study is then devoted to the application of the equations obtained to a systematic investigation of the effect of various mass loss scenarios on the dynamics of increasingly complex models of variable mass systems. It is found that mass loss can have a major impact on the dynamics of mechanical systems, including a possible change in the systems stability picture. Factors such as nozzle geometry, combustion chamber geometry, propellant's initial shape, size and relative mass, and propellant location can all have important influences on the system's dynamic behavior. The relative importance of these parameters on-system motion are quantified in a way that is useful for design purposes.

  5. Algebraic Structure of Dynamical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-22

    cryptography , computer science, and even biology. Viewed as a purely mathematical object, one can ask questions about the behavior of the dynamical system...6 Cryptography and Substitution Ciphers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3...associated with them. However, we will discuss how one of our main results can be applied to cryptography . In Section 3, we formulate three of our main

  6. Elastica as a dynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Larry; Chhabra, Robin; Śniatycki, Jędrzej

    2016-12-01

    The elastica is a curve in R3 that is stationary under variations of the integral of the square of the curvature. Elastica is viewed as a dynamical system that arises from the second order calculus of variations, and its quantization is discussed.

  7. Mass properties measurement system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    The MPMS mechanism possess two revolute degrees-of-freedom and allows the user to measure the mass, center of gravity, and the inertia tensor of an unknown mass. The dynamics of the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS) from the Lagrangian approach to illustrate the dependency of the motion on the unknown parameters.

  8. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    Because dynamic instability is not acceptable for any commercial maglev systems, it is important to consider this phenomenon in the development of all maglev systems. This study considers the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The theory and analysis developed in this study identifies basic stability characteristics and future research needs of maglev systems.

  9. Symbolic Substitution Using Shadow-Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Wei; Chen, Li-Xue; Li, Chun-Fei; Hu, Qiang-Sheng

    1989-02-01

    A new optical system for symbolic substitution is proposed. The system is composed of the lensless shadow-casting system combined with optical logical array and optical image storage elements. The LED's (light-emitting diode) are used as both a light source and a control element in the operation, so that symbolic substitution is implemented by all-photoelectric manipulation. Experimental principle, procedure and result are given.

  10. Dynamics of immune system vulnerabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, Sean P.

    The adaptive immune system can be viewed as a complex system, which adapts, over time, to reflect the history of infections experienced by the organism. Understanding its operation requires viewing it in terms of tradeoffs under constraints and evolutionary history. It typically displays "robust, yet fragile" behavior, meaning common tasks are robust to small changes but novel threats or changes in environment can have dire consequences. In this dissertation we use mechanistic models to study several biological processes: the immune response, the homeostasis of cells in the lymphatic system, and the process that normally prevents autoreactive cells from entering the lymphatic system. Using these models we then study the effects of these processes interacting. We show that the mechanisms that regulate the numbers of cells in the immune system, in conjunction with the immune response, can act to suppress autoreactive cells from proliferating, thus showing quantitatively how pathogenic infections can suppress autoimmune disease. We also show that over long periods of time this same effect can thin the repertoire of cells that defend against novel threats, leading to an age correlated vulnerability. This vulnerability is shown to be a consequence of system dynamics, not due to degradation of immune system components with age. Finally, modeling a specific tolerance mechanism that normally prevents autoimmune disease, in conjunction with models of the immune response and homeostasis we look at the consequences of the immune system mistakenly incorporating pathogenic molecules into its tolerizing mechanisms. The signature of this dynamic matches closely that of the dengue virus system.

  11. Research on Nonlinear Dynamical Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-19

    LaSalle , J .P ., “Stability theory and invariance principles ” , Dynamical Systems, An International Symposium, Vol.1, pp. 2 11—222 , Academic Press...1974 — 31 November 1975 Principal Investigator: Professor J. P. LaSalle Grant DAA G 29/76/G/0052 1 December 1975 - 31 August 1976 Principal...Investigator: Professor 3. P. LaSalle L.fsch.ts Cente r for. Dynamical Syst.m. Division of Appli.d Mathematics Brown Univ.r sity Providena., Rhod. ~~~~~ 02912 D

  12. The physics of symbols: bridging the epistemic cut.

    PubMed

    Pattee, H H

    2001-01-01

    Evolution requires the genotype-phenotype distinction, a primeval epistemic cut that separates energy-degenerate, rate-independent genetic symbols from the rate-dependent dynamics of construction that they control. This symbol-matter or subject-object distinction occurs at all higher levels where symbols are related to a referent by an arbitrary code. The converse of control is measurement in which a rate-dependent dynamical state is coded into quiescent symbols. Non-integrable constraints are one necessary condition for bridging the epistemic cut by measurement, control, and coding. Additional properties of heteropolymer constraints are necessary for biological evolution.

  13. Dynamical systems probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2014-03-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is the primary tool used to risk-inform nuclear power regulatory and licensing activities. Risk-informed regulations are intended to reduce inherent conservatism in regulatory metrics (e.g., allowable operating conditions and technical specifications) which are built into the regulatory framework by quantifying both the total risk profile as well as the change in the risk profile caused by an event or action (e.g., in-service inspection procedures or power uprates). Dynamical Systems (DS) analysis has been used to understand unintended time-dependent feedbacks in both industrial and organizational settings. In dynamical systems analysis, feedback loops can be characterized and studied as a function of time to describe the changes to the reliability of plant Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs). While DS has been used in many subject areas, some even within the PRA community, it has not been applied toward creating long-time horizon, dynamic PRAs (with time scales ranging between days and decades depending upon the analysis). Understanding slowly developing dynamic effects, such as wear-out, on SSC reliabilities may be instrumental in ensuring a safely and reliably operating nuclear fleet. Improving the estimation of a plant's continuously changing risk profile will allow for more meaningful risk insights, greater stakeholder confidence in risk insights, and increased operational flexibility.

  14. Vehicle systems: coupled and interactive dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantsevich, Vladimir V.

    2014-11-01

    This article formulates a new direction in vehicle dynamics, described as coupled and interactive vehicle system dynamics. Formalised procedures and analysis of case studies are presented. An analytical consideration, which explains the physics of coupled system dynamics and its consequences for dynamics of a vehicle, is given for several sets of systems including: (i) driveline and suspension of a 6×6 truck, (ii) a brake mechanism and a limited slip differential of a drive axle and (iii) a 4×4 vehicle steering system and driveline system. The article introduces a formal procedure to turn coupled system dynamics into interactive dynamics of systems. A new research direction in interactive dynamics of an active steering and a hybrid-electric power transmitting unit is presented and analysed to control power distribution between the drive axles of a 4×4 vehicle. A control strategy integrates energy efficiency and lateral dynamics by decoupling dynamics of the two systems thus forming their interactive dynamics.

  15. Unveiling the complex organization of recurrent patterns in spiking dynamical systems

    PubMed Central

    Aragoneses, Andrés; Perrone, Sandro; Sorrentino, Taciano; Torrent, M. C.; Masoller, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Complex systems displaying recurrent spike patterns are ubiquitous in nature. Understanding the organization of these patterns is a challenging task. Here we study experimentally the spiking output of a semiconductor laser with feedback. By using symbolic analysis we unveil a nontrivial organization of patterns, revealing serial spike correlations. The probabilities of the patterns display a well-defined, hierarchical and clustered structure that can be understood in terms of a delayed model. Most importantly, we identify a minimal model, a modified circle map, which displays the same symbolic organization. The validity of this minimal model is confirmed by analyzing the output of the forced laser. Since the circle map describes many dynamical systems, including neurons and cardiac cells, our results suggest that similar correlations and hierarchies of patterns can be found in other systems. Our findings also pave the way for optical neurons that could provide a controllable set up to mimic neuronal activity. PMID:24732050

  16. Noncoherent Symbol Synchronization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin

    2005-01-01

    Traditional methods for establishing symbol synchronization (sync) in digital communication receivers assume that carrier sync has already been established, i.e., the problem is addressed at the baseband level assuming that a 'perfect' estimate of carrier phase is available. We refer to this approach as coherent symbol sync. Since, for NRZ signaling, a suppressed carrier sync loop such as an I-Q Costas loop includes integrate-and-dump (I and D) filters in its in-phase (1) and quadrature (Q) arms, the traditional approach is to first track the carrier in the absence of symbol sync information, then feed back the symbol sync estimate to these filters, and then iterate between the two to a desirable operating level In this paper, we revisit the symbol sync problem by examining methods for obtaining such sync in the absence of carrier phase information, i.e., so-called noncoherent symbol sync loops. We compare the performance of these loops with that of a well-known coherent symbol sync loop and examine the conditions under which one is preferable over the other.

  17. Hidden attractors in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Jafari, Sajad; Kapitaniak, Tomasz; Kuznetsov, Nikolay V.; Leonov, Gennady A.; Prasad, Awadhesh

    2016-06-01

    Complex dynamical systems, ranging from the climate, ecosystems to financial markets and engineering applications typically have many coexisting attractors. This property of the system is called multistability. The final state, i.e., the attractor on which the multistable system evolves strongly depends on the initial conditions. Additionally, such systems are very sensitive towards noise and system parameters so a sudden shift to a contrasting regime may occur. To understand the dynamics of these systems one has to identify all possible attractors and their basins of attraction. Recently, it has been shown that multistability is connected with the occurrence of unpredictable attractors which have been called hidden attractors. The basins of attraction of the hidden attractors do not touch unstable fixed points (if exists) and are located far away from such points. Numerical localization of the hidden attractors is not straightforward since there are no transient processes leading to them from the neighborhoods of unstable fixed points and one has to use the special analytical-numerical procedures. From the viewpoint of applications, the identification of hidden attractors is the major issue. The knowledge about the emergence and properties of hidden attractors can increase the likelihood that the system will remain on the most desirable attractor and reduce the risk of the sudden jump to undesired behavior. We review the most representative examples of hidden attractors, discuss their theoretical properties and experimental observations. We also describe numerical methods which allow identification of the hidden attractors.

  18. Uniform attractors for non-autonomous random dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hongyong; Langa, José A.

    2017-07-01

    This paper is devoted to establishing a (random) uniform attractor theory for non-autonomous random dynamical systems (NRDS). The uniform attractor is defined as the minimal compact uniformly pullback attracting random set. Nevertheless, the uniform pullback attraction in fact implies a uniform forward attraction in probability, and implies also an almost uniform pullback attraction for discrete time-sequences. Though no invariance is required by definition, the uniform attractor can have a negative semi-invariance under certain conditions. Several existence criteria for uniform attractors are given, and the relationship between uniform and cocycle attractors is carefully studied. To overcome the measurability difficulty, the symbol space is required to be Polish which is shown fulfilled by the hulls of Llocp (R ;Lr) functions, p , r > 1. Moreover, uniform attractors for continuous NRDS are shown determined by uniformly attracting deterministic compact sets. Finally, the uniform attractor for a stochastic reaction-diffusion equation with translation-bounded external forcing are studied as applications.

  19. Functional dynamics of living systems and genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Buiatti, Marcello

    2004-01-01

    The discussion on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO's) has been centred mainly on the nature and effects on economy, human health, environment, of the few transgenic plant lines present in the market in the last eight years. On the contrary, the present paper starts with a discussion of some of the relevant changes in our basic knowledge of the structure and dynamics of living systems in the last twenty years. Contemporary Biology is then compared with what may be called the "modern paradigm" of life sciences on which present day GMO's are conceptually based. Technical, environmental, social and economic problems deriving from the unexpected, persistent prevalence of the old fashioned modern vision of life in the "spirit of time" will be thoroughly discussed with a particular attention to the virtualisation process of GMO's and the effects of the prevalence over economic, social, environmental reality of their symbolic values.

  20. Matter and symbols of the artificial

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, L.M.

    1998-08-01

    The study of complex systems should be based on a systems-theoretic framework which requires both self-organizing and symbolic dimensions. An inclusive framework based on the notion of semiotics is advanced to build models capable of representing, as well as evolving in their environments, with implications for Artificial Life. Such undertaking is pursued by discussing the ways in which symbol and matter are irreducibly intertwined in evolutionary systems. The problem is thus phrased in terms of the semiotic categories of syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. With this semiotic view of matter and symbols the requirements of semiotic closure are expressed in models with both self-organizing and symbolic characteristics. Situated action and recent developments in the evolution of cellular automata rules to solve non-trivial tasks are discussed in this context. Finally, indirect encoding schemes for genetic algorithms are developed which follow the semiotic framework here proposed.

  1. Dynamical Systems and Motion Vision.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    TASK Artificial Inteligence Laboratory AREA I WORK UNIT NUMBERS 545 Technology Square . Cambridge, MA 02139 C\\ II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME ANO0 ADDRESS...INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I.Memo No. 1037 April, 1988 Dynamical Systems and Motion Vision Joachim Heel Abstract: In this... Artificial Intelligence L3 Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Support for the Laboratory’s [1 Artificial Intelligence Research is

  2. Structural identifiability for a class of non-linear compartmental systems using linear/non-linear splitting and symbolic computation.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Michael J; Godfrey, Keith R; Chappell, Michael J; Evans, Neil D

    2003-05-01

    Under certain controllability and observability restrictions, two different parameterisations for a non-linear compartmental model can only have the same input-output behaviour if they differ by a locally diffeomorphic change of basis for the state space. With further restrictions, it is possible to gain valuable information with respect to identifiability via a linear analysis. Examples are presented where non-linear identifiability analyses are substantially simplified by means of an initial linear analysis. For complex models, with four or more compartments, this linear analysis can prove lengthy to perform by hand and so symbolic computation has been employed to aid this procedure.

  3. A modified non-binary LDPC scheme based on watermark symbols in high speed optical transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liming; Qiao, Yaojun; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Wenbo

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a watermark non-binary low-density parity check code (NB-LDPC) scheme, which can estimate the time-varying noise variance by using prior information of watermark symbols, to improve the performance of NB-LDPC codes. And compared with the prior-art counterpart, the watermark scheme can bring about 0.25 dB improvement in net coding gain (NCG) at bit error rate (BER) of 1e-6 and 36.8-81% reduction of the iteration numbers. Obviously, the proposed scheme shows great potential in terms of error correction performance and decoding efficiency.

  4. From dynamical systems to renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menous, Frédéric

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we study logarithmic derivatives associated to derivations on completed graded Lie algebra, as well as the existence of inverses. These logarithmic derivatives, when invertible, generalize the exp-log correspondence between a Lie algebra and its Lie group. Such correspondences occur naturally in the study of dynamical systems when dealing with the linearization of vector fields and the non linearizability of a resonant vector fields corresponds to the non invertibility of a logarithmic derivative and to the existence of normal forms. These concepts, stemming from the theory of dynamical systems, can be rephrased in the abstract setting of Lie algebra and the same difficulties as in perturbative quantum field theory (pQFT) arise here. Surprisingly, one can adopt the same ideas as in pQFT with fruitful results such as new constructions of normal forms with the help of the Birkhoff decomposition. The analogy goes even further (locality of counter terms, choice of a renormalization scheme) and shall lead to more interactions between dynamical systems and quantum field theory.

  5. From dynamical systems to renormalization

    SciTech Connect

    Menous, Frédéric

    2013-09-15

    In this paper we study logarithmic derivatives associated to derivations on completed graded Lie algebra, as well as the existence of inverses. These logarithmic derivatives, when invertible, generalize the exp-log correspondence between a Lie algebra and its Lie group. Such correspondences occur naturally in the study of dynamical systems when dealing with the linearization of vector fields and the non linearizability of a resonant vector fields corresponds to the non invertibility of a logarithmic derivative and to the existence of normal forms. These concepts, stemming from the theory of dynamical systems, can be rephrased in the abstract setting of Lie algebra and the same difficulties as in perturbative quantum field theory (pQFT) arise here. Surprisingly, one can adopt the same ideas as in pQFT with fruitful results such as new constructions of normal forms with the help of the Birkhoff decomposition. The analogy goes even further (locality of counter terms, choice of a renormalization scheme) and shall lead to more interactions between dynamical systems and quantum field theory.

  6. Homecoming for Library Symbol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Bessie

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the significance and development of the library symbol and the history of its acceptance by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Canadian Library Association (CLA). Suggestions are made for its use. (CLB)

  7. Structural dynamics system model reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. C.; Rose, T. L.; Wada, B. K.

    1987-01-01

    Loads analysis for structural dynamic systems is usually performed by finite element models. Because of the complexity of the structural system, the model contains large number of degree-of-freedom. The large model is necessary since details of the stress, loads and responses due to mission environments are computed. However, a simplified model is needed for other tasks such as pre-test analysis for modal testing, and control-structural interaction studies. A systematic method of model reduction for modal test analysis is presented. Perhaps it will be of some help in developing a simplified model for the control studies.

  8. Research on Nonlinear Dynamical Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-10

    Professor J. P. LaSalle Grant DAAG29-79 C 0161 September 1, 1979 - September 24, 1982 Principal Investigators: H. T. Banks C. M. Dafermos J. K. Hale E...F. Infante J. P. LaSalle . J. Mallet-Paret Lefschetz Center for Dynamical Systems Division of Applied Mathematics D T I Brown University L emtc...publications LaSALLE , J.P. [94] Stability of nonautonomous systems, Journal of Nonlinear Analysis: Theory, Methods, and Applications, Vol.1, No.1

  9. Sensitivity analysis of dynamic biological systems with time-delays

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mathematical modeling has been applied to the study and analysis of complex biological systems for a long time. Some processes in biological systems, such as the gene expression and feedback control in signal transduction networks, involve a time delay. These systems are represented as delay differential equation (DDE) models. Numerical sensitivity analysis of a DDE model by the direct method requires the solutions of model and sensitivity equations with time-delays. The major effort is the computation of Jacobian matrix when computing the solution of sensitivity equations. The computation of partial derivatives of complex equations either by the analytic method or by symbolic manipulation is time consuming, inconvenient, and prone to introduce human errors. To address this problem, an automatic approach to obtain the derivatives of complex functions efficiently and accurately is necessary. Results We have proposed an efficient algorithm with an adaptive step size control to compute the solution and dynamic sensitivities of biological systems described by ordinal differential equations (ODEs). The adaptive direct-decoupled algorithm is extended to solve the solution and dynamic sensitivities of time-delay systems describing by DDEs. To save the human effort and avoid the human errors in the computation of partial derivatives, an automatic differentiation technique is embedded in the extended algorithm to evaluate the Jacobian matrix. The extended algorithm is implemented and applied to two realistic models with time-delays: the cardiovascular control system and the TNF-α signal transduction network. The results show that the extended algorithm is a good tool for dynamic sensitivity analysis on DDE models with less user intervention. Conclusions By comparing with direct-coupled methods in theory, the extended algorithm is efficient, accurate, and easy to use for end users without programming background to do dynamic sensitivity analysis on complex

  10. Dynamic security assessment processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei

    The architecture of dynamic security assessment processing system (DSAPS) is proposed to address online dynamic security assessment (DSA) with focus of the dissertation on low-probability, high-consequence events. DSAPS upgrades current online DSA functions and adds new functions to fit into the modern power grid. Trajectory sensitivity analysis is introduced and its applications in power system are reviewed. An index is presented to assess transient voltage dips quantitatively using trajectory sensitivities. Then the framework of anticipatory computing system (ACS) for cascading defense is presented as an important function of DSAPS. ACS addresses various security problems and the uncertainties in cascading outages. Corrective control design is automated to mitigate the system stress in cascading progressions. The corrective controls introduced in the dissertation include corrective security constrained optimal power flow, a two-stage load control for severe under-frequency conditions, and transient stability constrained optimal power flow for cascading outages. With state-of-the-art computing facilities to perform high-speed extended-term time-domain simulation and optimization for large-scale systems, DSAPS/ACS efficiently addresses online DSA for low-probability, high-consequence events, which are not addressed by today's industrial practice. Human interference is reduced in the computationally burdensome analysis.

  11. Dynamically controlled crystal growth system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Terry L. (Inventor); Kim, Larry J. (Inventor); Harrington, Michael (Inventor); DeLucas, Lawrence J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Crystal growth can be initiated and controlled by dynamically controlled vapor diffusion or temperature change. In one aspect, the present invention uses a precisely controlled vapor diffusion approach to monitor and control protein crystal growth. The system utilizes a humidity sensor and various interfaces under computer control to effect virtually any evaporation rate from a number of different growth solutions simultaneously by means of an evaporative gas flow. A static laser light scattering sensor can be used to detect aggregation events and trigger a change in the evaporation rate for a growth solution. A control/follower configuration can be used to actively monitor one chamber and accurately control replicate chambers relative to the control chamber. In a second aspect, the invention exploits the varying solubility of proteins versus temperature to control the growth of protein crystals. This system contains miniature thermoelectric devices under microcomputer control that change temperature as needed to grow crystals of a given protein. Complex temperature ramps are possible using this approach. A static laser light scattering probe also can be used in this system as a non-invasive probe for detection of aggregation events. The automated dynamic control system provides systematic and predictable responses with regard to crystal size. These systems can be used for microgravity crystallization projects, for example in a space shuttle, and for crystallization work under terrestial conditions. The present invention is particularly useful for macromolecular crystallization, e.g. for proteins, polypeptides, nucleic acids, viruses and virus particles.

  12. Network dynamics and systems biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrell, Johannes A.

    The physics of complex systems has grown considerably as a field in recent decades, largely due to improved computational technology and increased availability of systems level data. One area in which physics is of growing relevance is molecular biology. A new field, systems biology, investigates features of biological systems as a whole, a strategy of particular importance for understanding emergent properties that result from a complex network of interactions. Due to the complicated nature of the systems under study, the physics of complex systems has a significant role to play in elucidating the collective behavior. In this dissertation, we explore three problems in the physics of complex systems, motivated in part by systems biology. The first of these concerns the applicability of Boolean models as an approximation of continuous systems. Studies of gene regulatory networks have employed both continuous and Boolean models to analyze the system dynamics, and the two have been found produce similar results in the cases analyzed. We ask whether or not Boolean models can generically reproduce the qualitative attractor dynamics of networks of continuously valued elements. Using a combination of analytical techniques and numerical simulations, we find that continuous networks exhibit two effects---an asymmetry between on and off states, and a decaying memory of events in each element's inputs---that are absent from synchronously updated Boolean models. We show that in simple loops these effects produce exactly the attractors that one would predict with an analysis of the stability of Boolean attractors, but in slightly more complicated topologies, they can destabilize solutions that are stable in the Boolean approximation, and can stabilize new attractors. Second, we investigate ensembles of large, random networks. Of particular interest is the transition between ordered and disordered dynamics, which is well characterized in Boolean systems. Networks at the

  13. Memoized Symbolic Execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Guowei; Pasareanu, Corina S.; Khurshid, Sarfraz

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces memoized symbolic execution (Memoise), a novel approach for more efficient application of forward symbolic execution, which is a well-studied technique for systematic exploration of program behaviors based on bounded execution paths. Our key insight is that application of symbolic execution often requires several successive runs of the technique on largely similar underlying problems, e.g., running it once to check a program to find a bug, fixing the bug, and running it again to check the modified program. Memoise introduces a trie-based data structure that stores the key elements of a run of symbolic execution. Maintenance of the trie during successive runs allows re-use of previously computed results of symbolic execution without the need for re-computing them as is traditionally done. Experiments using our prototype embodiment of Memoise show the benefits it holds in various standard scenarios of using symbolic execution, e.g., with iterative deepening of exploration depth, to perform regression analysis, or to enhance coverage.

  14. Statistical Mechanics of Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, H.; Hata, H.; Horita, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    A statistical-mechanical formalism of chaos based on the geometry of invariant sets in phase space is discussed to show that chaotic dynamical systems can be treated by a formalism analogous to that of thermodynamic systems if one takes a relevant coarse-grained quantity, but their statistical laws are quite different from those of thermodynamic systems. This is a generalization of statistical mechanics for dealing with dissipative and hamiltonian (i.e., conservative) dynamical systems of a few degrees of freedom. Thus the sum of the local expansion rate of nearby orbits along relevant orbit over a long but finite time has been introduced in order to describe and characterize (1) a drastic change of the structure of a chaotic attractor at a bifurcation and anomalous phenomena associated, (2) a critical scaling of chaos in the neighborhood of a critical point for the bifurcation to a nonexotic state, and a self-similar temporal structure of a critical orbit on the critical 2^∞ attractor an the critical golden tori without mixing, (3) the critical KAM torus, diffusion and repeated sticking of a chaotic orbit to a critical torus in hamiltonian systems. Here a q-phase transition, analogous to the ferromagnetic phase transition, plays an important role. They are illustrated numerically and theoretically by treating the driven damped pendulum, the driven Duffing equation, the Henon map, and the dissipative and conservative standard maps. This description of chaos breaks the time-reversal symmetry of hamiltonian dynamical laws analogously to statistical mechanics of irreversible processes. The broken time-reversal symmetry is brought about by orbital instability of chaos.

  15. The mathematics of xenology: di-cographs, symbolic ultrametrics, 2-structures and tree-representable systems of binary relations.

    PubMed

    Hellmuth, Marc; Stadler, Peter F; Wieseke, Nicolas

    2017-07-01

    The concepts of orthology, paralogy, and xenology play a key role in molecular evolution. Orthology and paralogy distinguish whether a pair of genes originated by speciation or duplication. The corresponding binary relations on a set of genes form complementary cographs. Allowing more than two types of ancestral event types leads to symmetric symbolic ultrametrics. Horizontal gene transfer, which leads to xenologous gene pairs, however, is inherent asymmetric since one offspring copy "jumps" into another genome, while the other continues to be inherited vertically. We therefore explore here the mathematical structure of the non-symmetric generalization of symbolic ultrametrics. Our main results tie non-symmetric ultrametrics together with di-cographs (the directed generalization of cographs), so-called uniformly non-prime ([Formula: see text]) 2-structures, and hierarchical structures on the set of strong modules. This yields a characterization of relation structures that can be explained in terms of trees and types of ancestral events. This framework accommodates a horizontal-transfer relation in terms of an ancestral event and thus, is slightly different from the the most commonly used definition of xenology. As a first step towards a practical use, we present a simple polynomial-time recognition algorithm of [Formula: see text] 2-structures and investigate the computational complexity of several types of editing problems for [Formula: see text] 2-structures. We show, finally that these NP-complete problems can be solved exactly as Integer Linear Programs.

  16. Survivability of Deterministic Dynamical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hellmann, Frank; Schultz, Paul; Grabow, Carsten; Heitzig, Jobst; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The notion of a part of phase space containing desired (or allowed) states of a dynamical system is important in a wide range of complex systems research. It has been called the safe operating space, the viability kernel or the sunny region. In this paper we define the notion of survivability: Given a random initial condition, what is the likelihood that the transient behaviour of a deterministic system does not leave a region of desirable states. We demonstrate the utility of this novel stability measure by considering models from climate science, neuronal networks and power grids. We also show that a semi-analytic lower bound for the survivability of linear systems allows a numerically very efficient survivability analysis in realistic models of power grids. Our numerical and semi-analytic work underlines that the type of stability measured by survivability is not captured by common asymptotic stability measures. PMID:27405955

  17. Symbolism in the Feature Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakony, Edward

    A study of symbolism in feature films reveals how the symbolism employed by film makers can serve as a bridge between feeling and thought, and between aesthetics and cognition. What individuals read from and learn through a symbol varies with what they bring to it. The filmmaker's symbolims must be universal and not private. However, symbolism in…

  18. Structural Dynamics of Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, E.

    2013-03-01

    The published work on analytical ("mathematical") and computer-aided, primarily finite-element-analysis (FEA) based, predictive modeling of the dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations is reviewed. While understanding the physics of and the ability to predict the response of an electronic structure to dynamic loading has been always of significant importance in military, avionic, aeronautic, automotive and maritime electronics, during the last decade this problem has become especially important also in commercial, and, particularly, in portable electronics in connection with accelerated testing of various surface mount technology (SMT) systems on the board level. The emphasis of the review is on the nonlinear shock-excited vibrations of flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) experiencing shock loading applied to their support contours during drop tests. At the end of the review we provide, as a suitable and useful illustration, the exact solution to a highly nonlinear problem of the dynamic response of a "flexible-and-heavy" PCB to an impact load applied to its support contour during drop testing.

  19. Exact and Approximate Probabilistic Symbolic Execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckow, Kasper; Pasareanu, Corina S.; Dwyer, Matthew B.; Filieri, Antonio; Visser, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Probabilistic software analysis seeks to quantify the likelihood of reaching a target event under uncertain environments. Recent approaches compute probabilities of execution paths using symbolic execution, but do not support nondeterminism. Nondeterminism arises naturally when no suitable probabilistic model can capture a program behavior, e.g., for multithreading or distributed systems. In this work, we propose a technique, based on symbolic execution, to synthesize schedulers that resolve nondeterminism to maximize the probability of reaching a target event. To scale to large systems, we also introduce approximate algorithms to search for good schedulers, speeding up established random sampling and reinforcement learning results through the quantification of path probabilities based on symbolic execution. We implemented the techniques in Symbolic PathFinder and evaluated them on nondeterministic Java programs. We show that our algorithms significantly improve upon a state-of- the-art statistical model checking algorithm, originally developed for Markov Decision Processes.

  20. Safety symbol comprehension: effects of symbol type, familiarity, and age.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Holly E; Rogers, Wendy A; Schroeder, Derek; Fisk, Arthur D

    2004-01-01

    A new procedure for evaluating symbol comprehension, the phrase generation procedure, was assessed with 52 younger and 52 older adults. Participants generated as many phrases as came to mind when viewing 40 different safety symbols (hazard alerting, mandatory action, prohibition, and information symbols). Symbol familiarity was also assessed. Comprehension rates for both groups were lower than the 85% level recommended by the American National Standards Institute. Moreover, older participants' comprehension was significantly worse than younger participants', and the older adults also generated significantly fewer phrases. Generally, prohibition symbols were comprehended best and hazard alerting symbols worst. In addition, symbol familiarity was positively correlated with symbol comprehension. These findings indicate that important safety information depicted on signs and household products may be misunderstood if presented in symbolic form. Furthermore, certain types of symbols may be better understood (e.g., prohibition symbols) than other types (e.g., hazard alerting symbols) by both younger and older individuals. These findings signify the utility of the phrase generation procedure as a method for evaluating symbol comprehension, particularly when it is not possible or desirable to provide contextual information. Actual or potential applications of this research include using the phrase generation approach to identify poorly comprehended symbols, including identification of critical confusions that may arise when processing symbolic information.

  1. Noise in Nonlinear Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Frank; McClintock, P. V. E.

    2009-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Introduction to volume three; 1. The effects of coloured quadratic noise on a turbulent transition in liquid He II J. T. Tough; 2. Electrohydrodynamic instability of nematic liquid crystals: growth process and influence of noise S. Kai; 3. Suppression of electrohydrodynamic instabilities by external noise Helmut R. Brand; 4. Coloured noise in dye laser fluctuations R. Roy, A. W. Yu and S. Zhu; 5. Noisy dynamics in optically bistable systems E. Arimondo, D. Hennequin and P. Glorieux; 6. Use of an electronic model as a guideline in experiments on transient optical bistability W. Lange; 7. Computer experiments in nonlinear stochastic physics Riccardo Mannella; 8. Analogue simulations of stochastic processes by means of minimum component electronic devices Leone Fronzoni; 9. Analogue techniques for the study of problems in stochastic nonlinear dynamics P. V. E. McClintock and Frank Moss; Index.

  2. Sub-symbol-rate sampling for PDM-QPSK signals in super-Nyquist WDM systems using quadrature poly-binary shaping.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng; Gao, Guanjun; Chen, Sai; Zhang, Jie; Luo, Ming; Hu, Rong; Yang, Qi

    2016-11-14

    We compare the performance of sub-symbol-rate sampling for polarization-division-multiplexed quadrature-phase-shift-keying (PDM-QPSK) signals in super-Nyquist wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) system by using quadrature duo-binary (QDB) and quadrature four-level poly-binary (4PB) shaping together with maximum likelihood sequence estimation (MLSE). PDM-16QAM is adopted in the simulation to be compared with PDM-QPSK. The numerical simulations show that, for a software defined communication system, the level number of quadrature poly-binary modulation should be adjusted to achieve the optimal performance according to channel spacing, required OSNR and sampling rate restrictions of optics. In the experiment, we demonstrate 3-channel 12-Gbaud PDM-QPSK transmission with 10-GHz channel spacing and only 8.4-GSa/s ADC sampling rate at lowest. By using QDB or 4PB shaping with 3tap-MLSE, the sampling rate can be reduced to the signal baud rate (1 samples per symbol) without penalty.

  3. Symbolically Modeling Concurrent MCAPI Executions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Topher; Mercer, Eric; Rungta, Neha

    2011-01-01

    Improper use of Inter-Process Communication (IPC) within concurrent systems often creates data races which can lead to bugs that are challenging to discover. Techniques that use Satisfiability Modulo Theories (SMT) problems to symbolically model possible executions of concurrent software have recently been proposed for use in the formal verification of software. In this work we describe a new technique for modeling executions of concurrent software that use a message passing API called MCAPI. Our technique uses an execution trace to create an SMT problem that symbolically models all possible concurrent executions and follows the same sequence of conditional branch outcomes as the provided execution trace. We check if there exists a satisfying assignment to the SMT problem with respect to specific safety properties. If such an assignment exists, it provides the conditions that lead to the violation of the property. We show how our method models behaviors of MCAPI applications that are ignored in previously published techniques.

  4. Detailed balance, nonequilibrium states, and dissipation in symbolic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolis, G.; Nicolis, C.

    2016-05-01

    Symbolic sequences arising from the coarse graining of deterministic dynamical systems continuous in phase space are considered. The extent to which signatures of the time irreversibility and of the nonequilibrium constraints at the level of the original system, such as fluxes or dissipation, can be identified at the coarse-grained level is analyzed. The roles of the partition, of the time window, and of time averaging in distinguishing in a clear-cut way the equilibrium versus nonequilibrium character of the sequence are brought out.

  5. Ordinal symbolic analysis and its application to biomedical recordings

    PubMed Central

    Amigó, José M.; Keller, Karsten; Unakafova, Valentina A.

    2015-01-01

    Ordinal symbolic analysis opens an interesting and powerful perspective on time-series analysis. Here, we review this relatively new approach and highlight its relation to symbolic dynamics and representations. Our exposition reaches from the general ideas up to recent developments, with special emphasis on its applications to biomedical recordings. The latter will be illustrated with epilepsy data. PMID:25548264

  6. Getting symbols out of a neural architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, John E.

    2011-06-01

    Traditional connectionist networks are sharply limited as general accounts of human perception and cognition because they are unable to represent relational ideas such as loves (John, Mary) or bigger-than (Volkswagen, breadbox) in a way that allows them to be manipulated as explicitly relational structures. This paper reviews and critiques the four major responses to this problem in the modelling community: (1) reject connectionism (in any form) in favour of traditional symbolic approaches to modelling the mind; (2) reject the idea that mental representations are symbolic (i.e. reject the idea that we can represent relations); and (3) attempt to represent symbolic structures in a connectionist/neural architecture by finding a way to represent role-filler bindings. Approach (3) is further subdivided into (3a) approaches based on varieties of conjunctive coding and (3b) approaches based on dynamic role-filler binding. I will argue that (3b) is necessary to get symbolic processing out of a neural computing architecture. Specifically, I will argue that vector addition is both the best way to accomplish dynamic binding and an essential part of the proper treatment of symbols in a neural architecture.

  7. Dynamical Systems++ for a Theory of Biological System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-12-01

    Biological dynamical systems can autonomously change their rule governing the dynamics. To deal with the change in their rule, possible approaches to extend dynamical-systems theory are discussed: They include chaotic itinerancy in high-dimensional dynamical systems, discreteness-induced switches of states, and interference between slow and fast modes. Applications of these concepts to cell differentiation, adaptation, and memory are briefly reviewed, while biological evolution is discussed as selection of dynamical systems by dynamical systems. Finally, necessity of mathematical framework to deal with self-referential dynamics for the rule formation is stressed.

  8. Dynamical habitability of planetary systems.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Rudolf; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Bois, Eric; Schwarz, Richard; Funk, Barbara; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Eiroa, Carlos; Fridlund, Malcolm; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Lammer, Helmut; Léger, Alain; Liseau, René; Lunine, Jonathan; Paresce, Francesco; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Röttgering, Huub; Selsis, Frank; Schneider, Jean; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna; White, Glenn J

    2010-01-01

    The problem of the stability of planetary systems, a question that concerns only multiplanetary systems that host at least two planets, is discussed. The problem of mean motion resonances is addressed prior to discussion of the dynamical structure of the more than 350 known planets. The difference with regard to our own Solar System with eight planets on low eccentricity is evident in that 60% of the known extrasolar planets have orbits with eccentricity e > 0.2. We theoretically highlight the studies concerning possible terrestrial planets in systems with a Jupiter-like planet. We emphasize that an orbit of a particular nature only will keep a planet within the habitable zone around a host star with respect to the semimajor axis and its eccentricity. In addition, some results are given for individual systems (e.g., Gl777A) with regard to the stability of orbits within habitable zones. We also review what is known about the orbits of planets in double-star systems around only one component (e.g., gamma Cephei) and around both stars (e.g., eclipsing binaries).

  9. Crowding affects letters and symbols differently.

    PubMed

    Grainger, Jonathan; Tydgat, Ilse; Isselé, Joanna

    2010-06-01

    Five experiments examined crowding effects with letter and symbol stimuli. Experiments 1 through 3 compared 2-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) identification accuracy for isolated targets presented left and right of fixation with targets flanked either by 2 other items of the same category or a single item situated to the right or left of targets. Interference from flankers (crowding) was significantly stronger for symbols than letters. Single flankers generated performance similar to the isolated targets when the stimuli were letters but closer to the 2-flanker condition when the stimuli were symbols. Experiment 4 confirmed this pattern using a partial-report bar probe procedure. Experiment 5 showed that another measure of crowding, critical spacing, was greater for symbols than for letters. The results support the hypothesis that letter-string processing involves a specialized system developed to limit the spatial extent of crowding for letters in words.

  10. Quadratic Dynamical Systems and Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinyon, M. K.; Sagle, A. A.

    1995-03-01

    Quadratic dynamical systems come from differential or discrete systems of the form Ẋ = Q(X) or X(k+1)=Q(X(k)), where Q:Rn→Rn is homogeneous of degree 2; i.e., Q(αX) = α2Q(X) for all α∈R, X∈Rn. Defining a bilinear mapping β:Rn × Rn→Rn by β(X, Y) ≔ {1}/{2}[Q(X+Y)-Q(X)-Q(Y)], we view XY≡β(X, Y) as a multiplication, and thus consider A=(Rn, β) to be a commutative, nonassociative algebra. The quadratic systems are then studied with the general theme that the structure of the algebras helps determine the behavior of the solutions. For example, semisimple algebras give a decoupling of the original system into systems occurring in simple algebras, and solvable algebras give solutions to differential systems via linear differential equations; the general three-dimensional example of the latter phenomenon is described. There are many classical examples and the scope of quadratic systems is large; every polynomial system can be embedded into a higher dimensional quadratic system such that solutions of the original system are obtained from the quadratic system. For differential systems, nilpotents of index 2 (N2=0) are equilibria and idempotents (E2=E) give ray solutions. The origin is never asymptotically stable, and the existence of nonzero idempotents implies that the origin is actually unstable. Nonzero equilibria are not hyperbolic, but can be studied by standard algebra techniques using nondegenerate bilinear forms as Lyapunov functions. Periodic orbits lie on "cones." They cannot occur in dimension 2 or in power-associative algebras. No periodic orbit can be an attractor but "limit cycles" (invariant cones) can exist. Automorphisms of the algebra A leave equilibria, periodic orbits, and domains of attraction invariant. Also, explicit solutions can be given by the action of automorphisms on an initial point; the general three-dimensional example of this is described. Thus if there are sufficient automorphisms, Hilbert‧s sixteenth problem in R3 has

  11. Effects of Non-Symbolic Approximate Number Practice on Symbolic Numerical Abilities in Pakistani Children.

    PubMed

    Khanum, Saeeda; Hanif, Rubina; Spelke, Elizabeth S; Berteletti, Ilaria; Hyde, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Current theories of numerical cognition posit that uniquely human symbolic number abilities connect to an early developing cognitive system for representing approximate numerical magnitudes, the approximate number system (ANS). In support of this proposal, recent laboratory-based training experiments with U.S. children show enhanced performance on symbolic addition after brief practice comparing or adding arrays of dots without counting: tasks that engage the ANS. Here we explore the nature and generality of this effect through two brief training experiments. In Experiment 1, elementary school children in Pakistan practiced either a non-symbolic numerical addition task or a line-length addition task with no numerical content, and then were tested on symbolic addition. After training, children in the numerical training group completed the symbolic addition test faster than children in the line length training group, suggesting a causal role of brief, non-symbolic numerical training on exact, symbolic addition. These findings replicate and extend the core findings of a recent U.S. laboratory-based study to non-Western children tested in a school setting, attesting to the robustness and generalizability of the observed training effects. Experiment 2 tested whether ANS training would also enhance the consistency of performance on a symbolic number line task. Over several analyses of the data there was some evidence that approximate number training enhanced symbolic number line placements relative to control conditions. Together, the findings suggest that engagement of the ANS through brief training procedures enhances children's immediate attention to number and engagement with symbolic number tasks.

  12. Effects of Non-Symbolic Approximate Number Practice on Symbolic Numerical Abilities in Pakistani Children

    PubMed Central

    Khanum, Saeeda; Hanif, Rubina; Spelke, Elizabeth S.; Berteletti, Ilaria; Hyde, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Current theories of numerical cognition posit that uniquely human symbolic number abilities connect to an early developing cognitive system for representing approximate numerical magnitudes, the approximate number system (ANS). In support of this proposal, recent laboratory-based training experiments with U.S. children show enhanced performance on symbolic addition after brief practice comparing or adding arrays of dots without counting: tasks that engage the ANS. Here we explore the nature and generality of this effect through two brief training experiments. In Experiment 1, elementary school children in Pakistan practiced either a non-symbolic numerical addition task or a line-length addition task with no numerical content, and then were tested on symbolic addition. After training, children in the numerical training group completed the symbolic addition test faster than children in the line length training group, suggesting a causal role of brief, non-symbolic numerical training on exact, symbolic addition. These findings replicate and extend the core findings of a recent U.S. laboratory-based study to non-Western children tested in a school setting, attesting to the robustness and generalizability of the observed training effects. Experiment 2 tested whether ANS training would also enhance the consistency of performance on a symbolic number line task. Over several analyses of the data there was some evidence that approximate number training enhanced symbolic number line placements relative to control conditions. Together, the findings suggest that engagement of the ANS through brief training procedures enhances children's immediate attention to number and engagement with symbolic number tasks. PMID:27764117

  13. Multiple symbol differential detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Simon, Marvin K. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A differential detection technique for multiple phase shift keying (MPSK) signals is provided which uses a multiple symbol observation interval on the basis of which a joint decision is made regarding the phase of the received symbols. In accordance with the invention, a first difference phase is created between first and second received symbols. Next, the first difference phase is correlated with the possible values thereof to provide a first plurality of intermediate output signals. A second difference phase is next created between second and third received symbols. The second difference phase is correlated with plural possible values thereof to provide a second plurality of intermediate output signals. Next, a third difference phase is created between the first and third symbols. The third difference phase is correlated with plural possible values thereof to provide a third plurality of intermediate output signals. Each of the first plurality of intermediate outputs are combined with each of the second plurality of intermediate outputs and each of the third plurality of intermediate outputs to provide a plurality of possible output values. Finally, a joint decision is made by choosing from the plurality of possible output values the value which represents the best combined correlation of the first, second and third difference values with the possible values thereof.

  14. Commentary: Are there good reasons to adopt dynamic systems approaches for explaining deductive reasoning?

    PubMed

    Leitão, Selma

    2008-06-01

    The focus of this commentary is twofold. First, I examine Faiciuc's attempts to counter symbolic computationalism as a major theoretical framework for the study of deductive reasoning. Second, I wish to see how far the author goes in her defense of Dynamic Systems Approaches (DSAs) as a more promising framework for explaining logical reasoning. When reading her work, I posed two versions of the same for/against question to myself: How strong is the case against symbolic computationalism? And, on the basis of the author's argumentation, would one feel justified in adopting DSAs instead? I examine each question in turn, and come to similar conclusions. The article by Faiciuc tackles issues of relevance to any serious effort toward reflecting on the two perspectives being compared. Unfortunately, however, references to studies supporting her claims are rather thin. A better-informed answer to the question raised in the title of the article is still to be given.

  15. A Simulation System for Validating the Analytical Prediction of Performance of the Convolutional Encoded and Symbol Interleaved TDRSS S-band Return Link Service in a Pulsed RFI Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A hardware integrated convolutional coding/symbol interleaving and integrated symbol deinterleaving/Viterbi decoding simulation system is described. Validation on the system of the performance of the TDRSS S-band return link with BPSK modulation, operating in a pulsed RFI environment is included. The system consists of three components, the Fast Linkabit Error Rate Tester (FLERT), the Transition Probability Generator (TPG), and a modified LV7017B which includes rate 1/3 capability as well as a periodic interleaver/deinterleaver. Operating and maintenance manuals for each of these units are included.

  16. Symbolic Analysis of Concurrent Programs with Polymorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rungta, Neha Shyam

    2010-01-01

    The current trend of multi-core and multi-processor computing is causing a paradigm shift from inherently sequential to highly concurrent and parallel applications. Certain thread interleavings, data input values, or combinations of both often cause errors in the system. Systematic verification techniques such as explicit state model checking and symbolic execution are extensively used to detect errors in such systems [7, 9]. Explicit state model checking enumerates possible thread schedules and input data values of a program in order to check for errors [3, 9]. To partially mitigate the state space explosion from data input values, symbolic execution techniques substitute data input values with symbolic values [5, 7, 6]. Explicit state model checking and symbolic execution techniques used in conjunction with exhaustive search techniques such as depth-first search are unable to detect errors in medium to large-sized concurrent programs because the number of behaviors caused by data and thread non-determinism is extremely large. We present an overview of abstraction-guided symbolic execution for concurrent programs that detects errors manifested by a combination of thread schedules and data values [8]. The technique generates a set of key program locations relevant in testing the reachability of the target locations. The symbolic execution is then guided along these locations in an attempt to generate a feasible execution path to the error state. This allows the execution to focus in parts of the behavior space more likely to contain an error.

  17. There Is More to Mathematics than Symbols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, Ferdinand

    2010-01-01

    When teachers provide students with every opportunity to visually understand a mathematical concept, process, definition, or notation, they allow them to construct and manipulate relevant and useful images in their minds. Visual understanding has a dynamic character that they do not easily develop with alphanumeric symbols alone despite the…

  18. Two Pieces of Wood: Symbols of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sharon Shockley; McKerrow, K. Kelly

    For 2 years, at least 2 days a week were spent by a researcher in observing, through the actions of the principal, the dynamics of cultural and ideologic conflict and the process of social control in an elementary school. This personal account analyzes the principal's use of corporal punishment, symbolized by the paddle, and positive…

  19. Singularity perturbed zero dynamics of nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isidori, A.; Sastry, S. S.; Kokotovic, P. V.; Byrnes, C. I.

    1992-01-01

    Stability properties of zero dynamics are among the crucial input-output properties of both linear and nonlinear systems. Unstable, or 'nonminimum phase', zero dynamics are a major obstacle to input-output linearization and high-gain designs. An analysis of the effects of regular perturbations in system equations on zero dynamics shows that whenever a perturbation decreases the system's relative degree, it manifests itself as a singular perturbation of zero dynamics. Conditions are given under which the zero dynamics evolve in two timescales characteristic of a standard singular perturbation form that allows a separate analysis of slow and fast parts of the zero dynamics.

  20. Spatial Operator Algebra for multibody system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Jain, A.; Kreutz-Delgado, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Spatial Operator Algebra framework for the dynamics of general multibody systems is described. The use of a spatial operator-based methodology permits the formulation of the dynamical equations of motion of multibody systems in a concise and systematic way. The dynamical equations of progressively more complex grid multibody systems are developed in an evolutionary manner beginning with a serial chain system, followed by a tree topology system and finally, systems with arbitrary closed loops. Operator factorizations and identities are used to develop novel recursive algorithms for the forward dynamics of systems with closed loops. Extensions required to deal with flexible elements are also discussed.

  1. Symbol interval optimization for molecular communication with drift.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na-Rae; Eckford, Andrew W; Chae, Chan-Byoung

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a symbol interval optimization algorithm in molecular communication with drift. Proper symbol intervals are important in practical communication systems since information needs to be sent as fast as possible with low error rates. There is a trade-off, however, between symbol intervals and inter-symbol interference (ISI) from Brownian motion. Thus, we find proper symbol interval values considering the ISI inside two kinds of blood vessels, and also suggest no ISI system for strong drift models. Finally, an isomer-based molecule shift keying (IMoSK) is applied to calculate achievable data transmission rates (achievable rates, hereafter). Normalized achievable rates are also obtained and compared in one-symbol ISI and no ISI systems.

  2. Dynamical Localization in Molecular Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xidi

    In the first four chapters of this thesis we concentrate on the Davydov model which describes the vibrational energy quanta of Amide I bonds (C=O bonds on the alpha -helix) coupled to the acoustic phonon modes of the alpha-helix backbone in the form of a Frohlich Hamiltonian. Following a brief introduction in chapter one, in chapter two we formulate the dynamics of vibrational quanta at finite temperature by using coherent state products. The fluctuation-dissipation relation is derived. At zero temperature, in the continuum limit, we recover the original results of Davydov. We also achieve good agreement with numerical simulations. In chapter three, the net contraction of the lattice is calculated exactly at any temperature, and its relation to the so -call "topological stability" of the Davydov soliton is discussed. In the second section of the chapter three we calculate the overtone spectra of crystalline acetanilide (according to some opinions ACN provides experimental evidence for the existence of Davydov solitons). Good agreement with experimental data has been obtained. In chapter four we study the self-trapped vibrational excitations by the Quantum Monte Carlo technique. For a single excitation, the temperature dependence of different physical observables is calculated. The quasi-particle which resembles the Davydov soliton has been found to be fairly narrow using the most commonly used data for the alpha -helix; at temperatures above a few Kelvin, the quasi-particle reaches its smallest limit (extends over three sites), which implies diffusive motion of the small polaron-like quasi-particle at high temperatures. For the multi-excitation case, bound pairs and clusters of excitations are found at low temperatures; they gradually dissociate when the temperature of the system is increased as calculated from the density-density correlation function. In the last chapter of this thesis, we study a more general model of dynamical local modes in molecular systems

  3. The GBT Dynamic Scheduling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, M. T.; Balser, D. S.; Braatz, J.; Clark, M. H.; Condon, J.; Creager, R. E.; Maddalena, R. J.; Marganian, P.; O'Neil, K.; Sessoms, E.; Shelton, A. L.

    2012-09-01

    The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) Dynamic Scheduling System (DSS), in use since September, 2009, was designed to maximize observing efficiency while preserving telescope flexibility and data quality without creating undue adversity for the observers. Using observing criteria; observer availability and qualifications for remote observing; three-dimensional weather forecasts; and telescope state, the DSS software optimally schedules observers 24 to 48 hours in advance for a telescope that has a wide-range of capabilities and a geographical location with variable weather patterns. The DSS project was closed October 28, 2011 and will now enter a continuing maintenance and enhancement phase. Recent improvements include a new resource calendar for incorporating telescope maintenance activities, a sensitivity calculator that leverages the scheduling algorithms to facilitate consistent tools for proposal preparation, improved support for monitoring observations, scheduling of high frequency continuum and spectral line observations for both sparse and fully sampled array receivers, and additional session parameters for observations having special requirements.

  4. Use of symbolic computation in robotics education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vira, Naren; Tunstel, Edward

    1992-01-01

    An application of symbolic computation in robotics education is described. A software package is presented which combines generality, user interaction, and user-friendliness with the systematic usage of symbolic computation and artificial intelligence techniques. The software utilizes MACSYMA, a LISP-based symbolic algebra language, to automatically generate closed-form expressions representing forward and inverse kinematics solutions, the Jacobian transformation matrices, robot pose error-compensation models equations, and Lagrange dynamics formulation for N degree-of-freedom, open chain robotic manipulators. The goal of such a package is to aid faculty and students in the robotics course by removing burdensome tasks of mathematical manipulations. The software package has been successfully tested for its accuracy using commercially available robots.

  5. Use of symbolic computation in robotics education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vira, Naren; Tunstel, Edward

    1992-01-01

    An application of symbolic computation in robotics education is described. A software package is presented which combines generality, user interaction, and user-friendliness with the systematic usage of symbolic computation and artificial intelligence techniques. The software utilizes MACSYMA, a LISP-based symbolic algebra language, to automatically generate closed-form expressions representing forward and inverse kinematics solutions, the Jacobian transformation matrices, robot pose error-compensation models equations, and Lagrange dynamics formulation for N degree-of-freedom, open chain robotic manipulators. The goal of such a package is to aid faculty and students in the robotics course by removing burdensome tasks of mathematical manipulations. The software package has been successfully tested for its accuracy using commercially available robots.

  6. Dynamical Signatures of Living Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the main challenges in modeling living systems is to distinguish a random walk of physical origin (for instance, Brownian motions) from those of biological origin and that will constitute the starting point of the proposed approach. As conjectured, the biological random walk must be nonlinear. Indeed, any stochastic Markov process can be described by linear Fokker-Planck equation (or its discretized version), only that type of process has been observed in the inanimate world. However, all such processes always converge to a stable (ergodic or periodic) state, i.e., to the states of a lower complexity and high entropy. At the same time, the evolution of living systems directed toward a higher level of complexity if complexity is associated with a number of structural variations. The simplest way to mimic such a tendency is to incorporate a nonlinearity into the random walk; then the probability evolution will attain the features of diffusion equation: the formation and dissipation of shock waves initiated by small shallow wave disturbances. As a result, the evolution never "dies:" it produces new different configurations which are accompanied by an increase or decrease of entropy (the decrease takes place during formation of shock waves, the increase-during their dissipation). In other words, the evolution can be directed "against the second law of thermodynamics" by forming patterns outside of equilibrium in the probability space. Due to that, a specie is not locked up in a certain pattern of behavior: it still can perform a variety of motions, and only the statistics of these motions is constrained by this pattern. It should be emphasized that such a "twist" is based upon the concept of reflection, i.e., the existence of the self-image (adopted from psychology). The model consists of a generator of stochastic processes which represents the motor dynamics in the form of nonlinear random walks, and a simulator of the nonlinear version of the diffusion

  7. Dynamical Signatures of Living Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the main challenges in modeling living systems is to distinguish a random walk of physical origin (for instance, Brownian motions) from those of biological origin and that will constitute the starting point of the proposed approach. As conjectured, the biological random walk must be nonlinear. Indeed, any stochastic Markov process can be described by linear Fokker-Planck equation (or its discretized version), only that type of process has been observed in the inanimate world. However, all such processes always converge to a stable (ergodic or periodic) state, i.e., to the states of a lower complexity and high entropy. At the same time, the evolution of living systems directed toward a higher level of complexity if complexity is associated with a number of structural variations. The simplest way to mimic such a tendency is to incorporate a nonlinearity into the random walk; then the probability evolution will attain the features of diffusion equation: the formation and dissipation of shock waves initiated by small shallow wave disturbances. As a result, the evolution never "dies:" it produces new different configurations which are accompanied by an increase or decrease of entropy (the decrease takes place during formation of shock waves, the increase-during their dissipation). In other words, the evolution can be directed "against the second law of thermodynamics" by forming patterns outside of equilibrium in the probability space. Due to that, a specie is not locked up in a certain pattern of behavior: it still can perform a variety of motions, and only the statistics of these motions is constrained by this pattern. It should be emphasized that such a "twist" is based upon the concept of reflection, i.e., the existence of the self-image (adopted from psychology). The model consists of a generator of stochastic processes which represents the motor dynamics in the form of nonlinear random walks, and a simulator of the nonlinear version of the diffusion

  8. Simbolos Nacionales. National Symbols.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Leonor

    Written in Spanish and English, this booklet contains information on Puerto Rico's national symbols, including its anthem, emblem, and flag. Verses to "La Borinquena," the national anthem, are given , as well as the song's historical background and musical evolution, covering contributions of Felix Astol Artes, Paco Ramirez Ortiz, Lola Rodriques…

  9. Optical Symbolic Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, John A.

    1989-12-01

    Experiments originating from Gestalt psychology have shown that representing information in a symbolic form provides a more effective means to understanding. Computer scientists have been struggling for the last two decades to determine how best to create, manipulate, and store collections of symbolic structures. In the past, much of this struggling led to software innovations because that was the path of least resistance. For example, the development of heuristics for organizing the searching through knowledge bases was much less expensive than building massively parallel machines that could search in parallel. That is now beginning to change with the emergence of parallel architectures which are showing the potential for handling symbolic structures. This paper will review the relationships between symbolic computing and parallel computing architectures, and will identify opportunities for optics to significantly impact the performance of such computing machines. Although neural networks are an exciting subset of massively parallel computing structures, this paper will not touch on this area since it is receiving a great deal of attention in the literature. That is, the concepts presented herein do not consider the distributed representation of knowledge.

  10. Simbolos Nacionales. National Symbols.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Leonor

    Written in Spanish and English, this booklet contains information on Puerto Rico's national symbols, including its anthem, emblem, and flag. Verses to "La Borinquena," the national anthem, are given , as well as the song's historical background and musical evolution, covering contributions of Felix Astol Artes, Paco Ramirez Ortiz, Lola Rodriques…

  11. Exploring Native American Symbolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufrene, Phoebe

    This paper described the events and results of a workshop on Native American symbolism presented to educators and held in Kansas City, Missouri. The presenter maintained that some of the most crucial problems facing U.S. educators and students are caused by racial misunderstandings, and that the universality of artistic expression can be a vehicle…

  12. Exploring Native American Symbolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufrene, Phoebe

    This paper described the events and results of a workshop on Native American symbolism presented to educators and held in Kansas City, Missouri. The presenter maintained that some of the most crucial problems facing U.S. educators and students are caused by racial misunderstandings, and that the universality of artistic expression can be a vehicle…

  13. An Interactive Programming Environment For Integrated Signal-Symbol Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upton, Richard A.; Lynch, Denis

    1987-06-01

    This paper describes an interactive programming environment and tools designed to facilitate the rapid implementation, testing and evaluation of algorithms and systems for image processing, image understanding, and 2- and 3-D graphics processing. The environment, termed Scope, is Lisp-based, resides on a Symbolics 36xx Lisp machine, and provides a tightly-coupled interface between the Symbolics Lisp machine and a Pixar 2D Image Computer. In particular, the environment provides an integrated set of utilities for program development and program maintenance based on the Symbolics Genera operating system. In addition, a wide range of near-real-time image and symbolic operations are provided, and a variety of image and symbolic representations are supported. The environment is specifically designed to facilitate crosstalk between numeric and symbolic data representations and processes. This paper discusses the major features of the environment and their use in developing and investigating selected image understanding capabilities.

  14. The hippocampus facilitates integration within a symbolic field.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, John Thor

    2017-01-13

    This paper attempts to elaborate a fundamental brain mechanism involved in the creation and maintenance of symbolic fields of thought. It will integrate theories of psychic spaces as explored by Donald Winnicott and Wilfred Bion with the neuroscientific examinations of those with bilateral hippocampal injury to show how evidence from both disciplines sheds important light on this aspect of mind. Possibly originating as a way of maintaining an oriented, first person psychic map, this capacity allows individuals a dynamic narrative access to a realm of layered elements and their connections. If the proposed hypothesis is correct, the hippocampus facilitates the integration of this symbolic field of mind, where narrative forms of thinking, creativity, memory, and dreaming are intertwined. Without the hippocampus, there is an inability to engage many typical forms of thought itself. Also, noting the ways these individuals are not impaired supports theories about other faculties of mind, providing insight into their possible roles within human thought. The evidence of different systems working in conjunction with the symbolic field provides tantalizing clues about these fundamental mechanisms of brain and mind that are normally seamlessly integrated, and hints at future areas of clinical and laboratory research, both within neuroscience and psychoanalysis.

  15. Stability of Dynamical Systems with Discontinuous Motions:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Anthony N.; Hou, Ling

    In this paper we present a stability theory for discontinuous dynamical systems (DDS): continuous-time systems whose motions are not necessarily continuous with respect to time. We show that this theory is not only applicable in the analysis of DDS, but also in the analysis of continuous dynamical systems (continuous-time systems whose motions are continuous with respect to time), discrete-time dynamical systems (systems whose motions are defined at discrete points in time) and hybrid dynamical systems (HDS) (systems whose descriptions involve simultaneously continuous-time and discrete-time). We show that the stability results for DDS are in general less conservative than the corresponding well-known classical Lyapunov results for continuous dynamical systems and discrete-time dynamical systems. Although the DDS stability results are applicable to general dynamical systems defined on metric spaces (divorced from any kind of description by differential equations, or any other kinds of equations), we confine ourselves to finite-dimensional dynamical systems defined by ordinary differential equations and difference equations, to make this paper as widely accessible as possible. We present only sample results, namely, results for uniform asymptotic stability in the large.

  16. Attractors for discrete periodic dynamical systems

    Treesearch

    John E. Franke; James F. Selgrade

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical framework is introduced to study attractors of discrete, nonautonomous dynamical systems which depend periodically on time. A structure theorem for such attractors is established which says that the attractor of a time-periodic dynamical system is the unin of attractors of appropriate autonomous maps. If the nonautonomous system is a perturbation of an...

  17. The Meaning Constructed beyond Symbols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delice, Ali; Aydin, Emin

    2006-01-01

    Algebra and calculus students have difficulties to express themselves in a statement of mathematical symbols and to comment on written mathematical statements to end with equivalent mathematical symbols statement. In this study, the reasons behind the meaning students load to the mathematical symbols and written mathematical statements was…

  18. Brief non-symbolic, approximate number practice enhances subsequent exact symbolic arithmetic in children

    PubMed Central

    Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research reveals a link between individual differences in mathematics achievement and performance on tasks that activate the approximate number system (ANS): a primitive cognitive system shared by diverse animal species and by humans of all ages. Here we used a brief experimental paradigm to test one causal hypothesis suggested by this relationship: activation of the ANS may enhance children's performance of symbolic arithmetic. Over 2 experiments, children who briefly practiced tasks that engaged primitive approximate numerical quantities performed better on subsequent exact, symbolic arithmetic problems than did children given other tasks involving comparison and manipulation of non-numerical magnitudes (brightness and length). The practice effect appeared specific to mathematics, as no differences between groups were observed on a comparable sentence completion task. These results move beyond correlational research and provide evidence that the exercise of non-symbolic numerical processes can enhance children's performance of symbolic mathematics. PMID:24462713

  19. Lisbon Symbol Database (LSD): Subjective norms for 600 symbols.

    PubMed

    Prada, Marília; Rodrigues, David; Silva, Rita R; Garrido, Margarida V

    2016-12-01

    This article presents subjective rating norms for a new set of 600 symbols, depicting various contents (e.g., transportation, technology, and leisure activities) that can be used by researchers in different fields. Symbols were evaluated for aesthetic appeal, familiarity, visual complexity, concreteness, valence, arousal, and meaningfulness. The normative data were obtained from 388 participants, and no gender differences were found. Descriptive results (means, standard deviations, and confidence intervals) for each symbol in each dimension are presented. Overall, the dimensions were highly correlated. Additionally, participants were asked to briefly describe the meaning of each symbol. The results indicate that the present symbol set is varied, allowing for the selection of exemplars with different levels on the seven examined dimensions. This set of symbols constitutes a tool with potential for research in different areas. The database with all of the symbols is available as supplemental materials.

  20. An optimization framework of biological dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Horie, Ryota

    2008-07-07

    Different biological dynamics are often described by different mathematical equations. On the other hand, some mathematical models describe many biological dynamics universally. Here, we focus on three biological dynamics: the Lotka-Volterra equation, the Hopfield neural networks, and the replicator equation. We describe these three dynamical models using a single optimization framework, which is constructed with employing the Riemannian geometry. Then, we show that the optimization structures of these dynamics are identical, and the differences among the three dynamics are only in the constraints of the optimization. From this perspective, we discuss the unified view for biological dynamics. We also discuss the plausible categorizations, the fundamental nature, and the efficient modeling of the biological dynamics, which arise from the optimization perspective of the dynamical systems.

  1. Dynamical systems theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awrejcewicz, Jan

    2006-08-01

    The 7th International Conference devoted to "Dynamical Systems-Theory and Applications" hold in 8-11 December, 2003 in Łódź, Poland, and it was organized by the staff of Department of Automatics and Biomechanics of the Technical University of Łódź. It was financially supported by the Rector of the Technical University of Łódź and the Department of Education and Physical Culture of the Łódź City Hall. The members of the International Scientific Committee included: Igor V. Andrianov (Dniepropetrovsk), Jan Awrejcewicz (Łódź), Iliya Blekhman (Sankt Petersburg), Roman Bogacz (Warszawa), Dick van Campen (Eindhoven), Zbigniew Engel (Kraków), Lothar Gaul (Stuttgart), Józef Giergiel (Kraków), Michał Kleiber (Warszawa), Vadim A. Krysko (Saratov), Włodzimierz Kurnik (Warszawa), Claude-Henri Lamarque (Lyon), Leonid I. Manevitch (Moscow), Jan Osiecki (Warszawa), Wiesaw Ostachowicz (Gdańsk), Ladislav Pust (Prague), Giuseppe Rega (Rome), Tsuneo Someya (Tokyo), Zbigniew Starczewski (Warszawa), Eugeniusz Świtoński (Gliwice), Andrzej Tylikowski (Warszawa), Tadeusz Uhl (Kraków), Aleksander F. Vakakis (Illinois), Józef Wojnarowski (Gliwice).

  2. Integrated health management and control of complex dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolani, Devendra K.

    2005-11-01

    A comprehensive control and health management strategy for human-engineered complex dynamical systems is formulated for achieving high performance and reliability over a wide range of operation. Results from diverse research areas such as Probabilistic Robust Control (PRC), Damage Mitigating/Life Extending Control (DMC), Discrete Event Supervisory (DES) Control, Symbolic Time Series Analysis (STSA) and Health and Usage Monitoring System (HUMS) have been employed to achieve this goal. Continuous-domain control modules at the lower level are synthesized by PRC and DMC theories, whereas the upper-level supervision is based on DES control theory. In the PRC approach, by allowing different levels of risk under different flight conditions, the control system can achieve the desired trade off between stability robustness and nominal performance. In the DMC approach, component damage is incorporated in the control law to reduce the damage rate for enhanced structural durability. The DES controller monitors the system performance and, based on the mission requirements (e.g., performance metrics and level of damage mitigation), switches among various lower-level controllers. The core idea is to design a framework where the DES controller at the upper-level, mimics human intelligence and makes appropriate decisions to satisfy mission requirements, enhance system performance and structural durability. Recently developed tools in STSA have been used for anomaly detection and failure prognosis. The DMC deals with the usage monitoring or operational control part of health management, where as the issue of health monitoring is addressed by the anomaly detection tools. The proposed decision and control architecture has been validated on two test-beds, simulating the operations of rotorcraft dynamics and aircraft propulsion.

  3. Single timepoint models of dynamic systems

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, K.; Itani, S.; Fitzgerald, J.; Schoeberl, B.; Nolan, G. P.; Tomlin, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Many interesting studies aimed at elucidating the connectivity structure of biomolecular pathways make use of abundance measurements, and employ statistical and information theoretic approaches to assess connectivities. These studies often do not address the effects of the dynamics of the underlying biological system, yet dynamics give rise to impactful issues such as timepoint selection and its effect on structure recovery. In this work, we study conditions for reliable retrieval of the connectivity structure of a dynamic system, and the impact of dynamics on structure-learning efforts. We encounter an unexpected problem not previously described in elucidating connectivity structure from dynamic systems, show how this confounds structure learning of the system and discuss possible approaches to overcome the confounding effect. Finally, we test our hypotheses on an accurate dynamic model of the IGF signalling pathway. We use two structure-learning methods at four time points to contrast the performance and robustness of those methods in terms of recovering correct connectivity. PMID:24511382

  4. Generalized Abstract Symbolic Summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Person, Suzette; Dwyer, Matthew B.

    2009-01-01

    Current techniques for validating and verifying program changes often consider the entire program, even for small changes, leading to enormous V&V costs over a program s lifetime. This is due, in large part, to the use of syntactic program techniques which are necessarily imprecise. Building on recent advances in symbolic execution of heap manipulating programs, in this paper, we develop techniques for performing abstract semantic differencing of program behaviors that offer the potential for improved precision.

  5. Therapeutic Processes and Perceived Helpfulness of Dang-Ki (Chinese Shamanism) from the Symbolic Healing Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Boon-Ooi; Kirmayer, Laurence J.; Groleau, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    meaning system and symbolic transformation are complex and dynamic, and may be carried over several healing sessions. PMID:20012176

  6. Symbolic play and language development.

    PubMed

    Orr, Edna; Geva, Ronny

    2015-02-01

    Symbolic play and language are known to be highly interrelated, but the developmental process involved in this relationship is not clear. Three hypothetical paths were postulated to explore how play and language drive each other: (1) direct paths, whereby initiation of basic forms in symbolic action or babbling, will be directly related to all later emerging language and motor outputs; (2) an indirect interactive path, whereby basic forms in symbolic action will be associated with more complex forms in symbolic play, as well as with babbling, and babbling mediates the relationship between symbolic play and speech; and (3) a dual path, whereby basic forms in symbolic play will be associated with basic forms of language, and complex forms of symbolic play will be associated with complex forms of language. We micro-coded 288 symbolic vignettes gathered during a yearlong prospective bi-weekly examination (N=14; from 6 to 18 months of age). Results showed that the age of initiation of single-object symbolic play correlates strongly with the age of initiation of later-emerging symbolic and vocal outputs; its frequency at initiation is correlated with frequency at initiation of babbling, later-emerging speech, and multi-object play in initiation. Results support the notion that a single-object play relates to the development of other symbolic forms via a direct relationship and an indirect relationship, rather than a dual-path hypothesis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Handwriting generates variable visual input to facilitate symbol learning

    PubMed Central

    Li, Julia X.; James, Karin H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that handwriting practice facilitates letter categorization in young children. The present experiments investigated why handwriting practice facilitates visual categorization by comparing two hypotheses: That handwriting exerts its facilitative effect because of the visual-motor production of forms, resulting in a direct link between motor and perceptual systems, or because handwriting produces variable visual instances of a named category in the environment that then changes neural systems. We addressed these issues by measuring performance of 5 year-old children on a categorization task involving novel, Greek symbols across 6 different types of learning conditions: three involving visual-motor practice (copying typed symbols independently, tracing typed symbols, tracing handwritten symbols) and three involving visual-auditory practice (seeing and saying typed symbols of a single typed font, of variable typed fonts, and of handwritten examples). We could therefore compare visual-motor production with visual perception both of variable and similar forms. Comparisons across the six conditions (N=72) demonstrated that all conditions that involved studying highly variable instances of a symbol facilitated symbol categorization relative to conditions where similar instances of a symbol were learned, regardless of visual-motor production. Therefore, learning perceptually variable instances of a category enhanced performance, suggesting that handwriting facilitates symbol understanding by virtue of its environmental output: supporting the notion of developmental change though brain-body-environment interactions. PMID:26726913

  8. Handwriting generates variable visual output to facilitate symbol learning.

    PubMed

    Li, Julia X; James, Karin H

    2016-03-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that handwriting practice facilitates letter categorization in young children. The present experiments investigated why handwriting practice facilitates visual categorization by comparing 2 hypotheses: that handwriting exerts its facilitative effect because of the visual-motor production of forms, resulting in a direct link between motor and perceptual systems, or because handwriting produces variable visual instances of a named category in the environment that then changes neural systems. We addressed these issues by measuring performance of 5-year-old children on a categorization task involving novel, Greek symbols across 6 different types of learning conditions: 3 involving visual-motor practice (copying typed symbols independently, tracing typed symbols, tracing handwritten symbols) and 3 involving visual-auditory practice (seeing and saying typed symbols of a single typed font, of variable typed fonts, and of handwritten examples). We could therefore compare visual-motor production with visual perception both of variable and similar forms. Comparisons across the 6 conditions (N = 72) demonstrated that all conditions that involved studying highly variable instances of a symbol facilitated symbol categorization relative to conditions where similar instances of a symbol were learned, regardless of visual-motor production. Therefore, learning perceptually variable instances of a category enhanced performance, suggesting that handwriting facilitates symbol understanding by virtue of its environmental output: supporting the notion of developmental change though brain-body-environment interactions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Dynamic systems of regional economy management optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, S.; Kudzh, S.

    -called "topographical" approach, which is used by intellectual information technology "Dynamics of systems". According to it the realistic plan of regional economic system is created in the virtual space -directly on a computer desktop. And economic objects are displayed on evident schemes according to their real "geographical" structure. Each enterprise, bank, business-unit or the detached division of the company receives its own "Module" (area in working space of a spreadsheet). In result the general plan of regional economic system appears at planners. A whole real picture of all economic system functioning is recreated by such way. The idea of a method is obvious: the operator sees actual functioning of regional economy. This is promoted by "the friendly interface", allowing to display real objects as a clear symbols. The regional economy can be considered as a set of the separate enterprises connected by various economic communications. Constant monitoring of an infrastructure development, tracking of a cargoes transportation condition, supervision over following the ecological specifications by the regional enterprises, growth of housing and industrial building level, condition of communications, etc. is necessary for carrying out with the help of modern technologies of space shooting and satellite navigating systems. It will allow to obtain the data in an operative mode and will also help to the quickly modeling of a situation development variants, and to accept anticipatory administrative decisions. Other sources of the information are statistical directories and reports on a social condition in region: about a migration level and the population incomes, consumer's basket structure, demographic parameters - age of the capable population, a sexual and national attributes, etc. It is possible to attribute financial parameters to the third group: the regional budget condition data, a gain of investments into the regional economy, a growth of incomes in the regional budget from the

  10. Symbol addition by monkeys provides evidence for normalized quantity coding

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, Margaret S.; Pettine, Warren W.; Srihasam, Krishna; Moore, Brandon; Morocz, Istvan A.; Lee, Daeyeol

    2014-01-01

    Weber’s law can be explained either by a compressive scaling of sensory response with stimulus magnitude or by a proportional scaling of response variability. These two mechanisms can be distinguished by asking how quantities are added or subtracted. We trained Rhesus monkeys to associate 26 distinct symbols with 0–25 drops of reward, and then tested how they combine, or add, symbolically represented reward magnitude. We found that they could combine symbolically represented magnitudes, and they transferred this ability to a novel symbol set, indicating that they were performing a calculation, not just memorizing the value of each combination. The way they combined pairs of symbols indicated neither a linear nor a compressed scale, but rather a dynamically shifting, relative scaling. PMID:24753600

  11. Reconceptualizing Learning as a Dynamical System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Catherine D.

    1992-01-01

    Dynamical systems theory can increase our understanding of the constantly evolving learning process. Current research using experimental and interpretive paradigms focuses on describing the attractors and constraints stabilizing the educational process. Dynamical systems theory focuses attention on critical junctures in the learning process as…

  12. Incorporating Dynamical Systems into the Traditional Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natov, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a brief overview of dynamical systems. Gives examples from dynamical systems and where they fit into the current curriculum. Points out that these examples are accessible to undergraduate freshmen and sophomore students, add continuity to the standard curriculum, and are worth including in classes. (MM)

  13. Semicontinuity of attractors for impulsive dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonotto, E. M.; Bortolan, M. C.; Collegari, R.; Czaja, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of collective tube conditions which assures a suitable behaviour for a family of dynamical systems close to impulsive sets. Using the collective tube conditions, we develop the theory of upper and lower semicontinuity of global attractors for a family of impulsive dynamical systems.

  14. Systems-Dynamic Analysis for Neighborhood Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systems-dynamic analysis (or system dynamics (SD)) helps planners identify interrelated impacts of transportation and land-use policies on neighborhood-scale economic outcomes for households and businesses, among other applications. This form of analysis can show benefits and tr...

  15. Systems-Dynamic Analysis for Neighborhood Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systems-dynamic analysis (or system dynamics (SD)) helps planners identify interrelated impacts of transportation and land-use policies on neighborhood-scale economic outcomes for households and businesses, among other applications. This form of analysis can show benefits and tr...

  16. Nonlinear Dynamics of Parametrically Excited Gyroscopic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Namachchivaya. N.S.

    2001-06-01

    The primary objective of this project is to determine how some of the powerful geometric methods of dynamical systems can be applied to study nonlinear gyroscopic systems. We proposed to develop techniques to predict local and global behavior and instability mechanisms and to analyze the interactions between noise, stability, and nonlinearities inherent in gyroscopic systems. In order to obtain these results we use the method of normal forms, global bifurcation techniques, and various other dynamical systems tools.

  17. Identification of dynamic systems, theory and formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, R. E.; Iliff, K. W.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of estimating parameters of dynamic systems is addressed in order to present the theoretical basis of system identification and parameter estimation in a manner that is complete and rigorous, yet understandable with minimal prerequisites. Maximum likelihood and related estimators are highlighted. The approach used requires familiarity with calculus, linear algebra, and probability, but does not require knowledge of stochastic processes or functional analysis. The treatment emphasizes unification of the various areas in estimation in dynamic systems is treated as a direct outgrowth of the static system theory. Topics covered include basic concepts and definitions; numerical optimization methods; probability; statistical estimators; estimation in static systems; stochastic processes; state estimation in dynamic systems; output error, filter error, and equation error methods of parameter estimation in dynamic systems, and the accuracy of the estimates.

  18. Anomalous diffusion in a symbolic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, H. V.; Lenzi, E. K.; Mendes, R. S.; Santoro, P. A.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we investigate some statistical properties of symbolic sequences generated by a numerical procedure in which the symbols are repeated following the power-law probability density. In this analysis, we consider that the sum of n symbols represents the position of a particle in erratic movement. This approach reveals a rich diffusive scenario characterized by non-Gaussian distribution and, depending on the power-law exponent or the procedure used to build the walker, we may have superdiffusion, subdiffusion or usual diffusion. Additionally, we use the continuous-time random walk framework to compare the analytic results with the numerical data, thereby finding good agreement. Because of its simplicity and flexibility, this model can be a candidate for describing real systems governed by power-law probability densities.

  19. Dynamical systems, attractors, and neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Biology is the study of dynamical systems. Yet most of us working in biology have limited pedagogical training in the theory of dynamical systems, an unfortunate historical fact that can be remedied for future generations of life scientists. In my particular field of systems neuroscience, neural circuits are rife with nonlinearities at all levels of description, rendering simple methodologies and our own intuition unreliable. Therefore, our ideas are likely to be wrong unless informed by good models. These models should be based on the mathematical theories of dynamical systems since functioning neurons are dynamic-they change their membrane potential and firing rates with time. Thus, selecting the appropriate type of dynamical system upon which to base a model is an important first step in the modeling process. This step all too easily goes awry, in part because there are many frameworks to choose from, in part because the sparsely sampled data can be consistent with a variety of dynamical processes, and in part because each modeler has a preferred modeling approach that is difficult to move away from. This brief review summarizes some of the main dynamical paradigms that can arise in neural circuits, with comments on what they can achieve computationally and what signatures might reveal their presence within empirical data. I provide examples of different dynamical systems using simple circuits of two or three cells, emphasizing that any one connectivity pattern is compatible with multiple, diverse functions.

  20. Symbolic inference of xenobiotic metabolism.

    PubMed

    McShan, D C; Updadhayaya, M; Shah, I

    2004-01-01

    We present a new symbolic computational approach to elucidate the biochemical networks of living systems de novo and we apply it to an important biomedical problem: xenobiotic metabolism. A crucial issue in analyzing and modeling a living organism is understanding its biochemical network beyond what is already known. Our objective is to use the available metabolic information in a representational framework that enables the inference of novel biochemical knowledge and whose results can be validated experimentally. We describe a symbolic computational approach consisting of two parts. First, biotransformation rules are inferred from the molecular graphs of compounds in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Second, these rules are recursively applied to different compounds to generate novel metabolic networks, containing new biotransformations and new metabolites. Using data for 456 generic reactions and 825 generic compounds from KEGG we were able to extract 110 biotransformation rules, which generalize a subset of known biocatalytic functions. We tested our approach by applying these rules to ethanol, a common substance of abuse and to furfuryl alcohol, a xenobiotic organic solvent, which is absent in metabolic databases. In both cases our predictions on the fate of ethanol and furfuryl alcohol are consistent with the literature on the metabolism of these compounds.

  1. SYMBOLIC INFERENCE OF XENOBIOTIC METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    MCSHAN, D.C.; UPDADHAYAYA, M.; SHAH, I.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new symbolic computational approach to elucidate the biochemical networks of living systems de novo and we apply it to an important biomedical problem: xenobiotic metabolism. A crucial issue in analyzing and modeling a living organism is understanding its biochemical network beyond what is already known. Our objective is to use the available metabolic information in a representational framework that enables the inference of novel biochemical knowledge and whose results can be validated experimentally. We describe a symbolic computational approach consisting of two parts. First, biotransformation rules are inferred from the molecular graphs of compounds in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Second, these rules are recursively applied to different compounds to generate novel metabolic networks, containing new biotransformations and new metabolites. Using data for 456 generic reactions and 825 generic compounds from KEGG we were able to extract 110 biotransformation rules, which generalize a subset of known biocatalytic functions. We tested our approach by applying these rules to ethanol, a common substance of abuse and to furfuryl alcohol, a xenobiotic organic solvent, which is absent in metabolic databases. In both cases our predictions on the fate of ethanol and furfuryl alcohol are consistent with the literature on the metabolism of these compounds. PMID:14992532

  2. "They Mean Something More!" Teaching about Symbols Using Balanced Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vesperman, Dean P.; Bernens-Kinkead, Donna J.; Loudermilk, Liesl S.; Newsom, Gladys I. M.

    2012-01-01

    Since the election of 1796, buttons, slogans, and, most importantly, symbols have become a mainstay of the American election system. The log cabin symbolized the childhoods of Andrew Jackson and Abraham Lincoln; the sun represented hope on Barack Obama's 2008 presidential election posters. Many people without formal instruction in what symbols…

  3. Symbolic Calculators in Mathematics Lessons--The Case of Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weigand, Hans-Georg; Bichler, Ewald

    2010-01-01

    Many empirical investigations concerning the use of computer algebra systems (CAS) and symbolic calculators (SC) are restricted to a period of only a few weeks. They do not show long-term effects on students understanding. Therefore, a long term project (2003-2012) was started to test the use of symbolic calculators in Bavarian…

  4. The Interpretation of Symbol Schemes in a Computational Medium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Michael; Frederickson, Ann; Martin, Lori

    This study investigated the variation of meaning that may be assigned by students to instructional symbol systems. Toward this end, student interpretations of symbols employed to represent free fall in Boxer, a computational environment designed for innovative instructional activities in math and science, were analyzed. Four classes of…

  5. "They Mean Something More!" Teaching about Symbols Using Balanced Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vesperman, Dean P.; Bernens-Kinkead, Donna J.; Loudermilk, Liesl S.; Newsom, Gladys I. M.

    2012-01-01

    Since the election of 1796, buttons, slogans, and, most importantly, symbols have become a mainstay of the American election system. The log cabin symbolized the childhoods of Andrew Jackson and Abraham Lincoln; the sun represented hope on Barack Obama's 2008 presidential election posters. Many people without formal instruction in what symbols…

  6. The Symbol Grounding Problem Revisited: A Thorough Evaluation of the ANS Mapping Account and the Proposal of an Alternative Account Based on Symbol–Symbol Associations

    PubMed Central

    Reynvoet, Bert; Sasanguie, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a lot of studies in the domain of numerical cognition have been published demonstrating a robust association between numerical symbol processing and individual differences in mathematics achievement. Because numerical symbols are so important for mathematics achievement, many researchers want to provide an answer on the ‘symbol grounding problem,’ i.e., how does a symbol acquires its numerical meaning? The most popular account, the approximate number system (ANS) mapping account, assumes that a symbol acquires its numerical meaning by being mapped on a non-verbal and ANS. Here, we critically evaluate four arguments that are supposed to support this account, i.e., (1) there is an evolutionary system for approximate number processing, (2) non-symbolic and symbolic number processing show the same behavioral effects, (3) non-symbolic and symbolic numbers activate the same brain regions which are also involved in more advanced calculation and (4) non-symbolic comparison is related to the performance on symbolic mathematics achievement tasks. Based on this evaluation, we conclude that all of these arguments and consequently also the mapping account are questionable. Next we explored less popular alternative, where small numerical symbols are initially mapped on a precise representation and then, in combination with increasing knowledge of the counting list result in an independent and exact symbolic system based on order relations between symbols. We evaluate this account by reviewing evidence on order judgment tasks following the same four arguments. Although further research is necessary, the available evidence so far suggests that this symbol–symbol association account should be considered as a worthy alternative of how symbols acquire their meaning. PMID:27790179

  7. Information processing capacity of dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Dambre, Joni; Verstraeten, David; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Massar, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Many dynamical systems, both natural and artificial, are stimulated by time dependent external signals, somehow processing the information contained therein. We demonstrate how to quantify the different modes in which information can be processed by such systems and combine them to define the computational capacity of a dynamical system. This is bounded by the number of linearly independent state variables of the dynamical system, equaling it if the system obeys the fading memory condition. It can be interpreted as the total number of linearly independent functions of its stimuli the system can compute. Our theory combines concepts from machine learning (reservoir computing), system modeling, stochastic processes, and functional analysis. We illustrate our theory by numerical simulations for the logistic map, a recurrent neural network, and a two-dimensional reaction diffusion system, uncovering universal trade-offs between the non-linearity of the computation and the system's short-term memory.

  8. Information Processing Capacity of Dynamical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dambre, Joni; Verstraeten, David; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Massar, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Many dynamical systems, both natural and artificial, are stimulated by time dependent external signals, somehow processing the information contained therein. We demonstrate how to quantify the different modes in which information can be processed by such systems and combine them to define the computational capacity of a dynamical system. This is bounded by the number of linearly independent state variables of the dynamical system, equaling it if the system obeys the fading memory condition. It can be interpreted as the total number of linearly independent functions of its stimuli the system can compute. Our theory combines concepts from machine learning (reservoir computing), system modeling, stochastic processes, and functional analysis. We illustrate our theory by numerical simulations for the logistic map, a recurrent neural network, and a two-dimensional reaction diffusion system, uncovering universal trade-offs between the non-linearity of the computation and the system's short-term memory. PMID:22816038

  9. Concealed identification symbols and nondestructive determination of the identification symbols

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; Gibbs, Kenneth M.

    2014-09-16

    The concealing of one or more identification symbols into a target object and the subsequent determination or reading of such symbols through non-destructive testing is described. The symbols can be concealed in a manner so that they are not visible to the human eye and/or cannot be readily revealed to the human eye without damage or destruction of the target object. The identification symbols can be determined after concealment by e.g., the compilation of multiple X-ray images. As such, the present invention can also provide e.g., a deterrent to theft and the recovery of lost or stolen objects.

  10. A Golay complementary TS-based symbol synchronization scheme in variable rate LDPC-coded MB-OFDM UWBoF system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jing; Wen, Xuejie; Chen, Ming; Chen, Lin

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a Golay complementary training sequence (TS)-based symbol synchronization scheme is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in multiband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MB-OFDM) ultra-wideband over fiber (UWBoF) system with a variable rate low-density parity-check (LDPC) code. Meanwhile, the coding gain and spectral efficiency in the variable rate LDPC-coded MB-OFDM UWBoF system are investigated. By utilizing the non-periodic auto-correlation property of the Golay complementary pair, the start point of LDPC-coded MB-OFDM UWB signal can be estimated accurately. After 100 km standard single-mode fiber (SSMF) transmission, at the bit error rate of 1×10-3, the experimental results show that the short block length 64QAM-LDPC coding provides a coding gain of 4.5 dB, 3.8 dB and 2.9 dB for a code rate of 62.5%, 75% and 87.5%, respectively.

  11. Joint timing/frequency offset estimation and correction based on FrFT encoded training symbols for PDM CO-OFDM systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huibin; Li, Xiang; Tang, Ming; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Xi; Luo, Ming; Fu, Songnian; Liu, Deming

    2016-12-12

    A joint timing offset (TO) and frequency offset (FO) estimation algorithm is proposed for polarization division multiplexing (PDM) coherent optical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (CO-OFDM) systems. It is realized by taking the advantage of the time-frequency property of the fractional Fourier transformation (FrFT) encoded training symbols. Compared with the classical Schmidl & Cox method, the proposed algorithm exhibits robust estimation result of timing offset with poor optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) and nonlinear interference. For the frequency offset estimation, a quite large FO estimation ranges of [-5GHz + 5GHz] can be achieved. The mean normalized estimation error can be kept under 0.002 and the max normalized estimation error is no more than 0.008. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed joint estimation algorithm has been verified by experiments. The transmission performances with [-5GHz + 5GHz] FO are compared under the OSNR range from 14 to 27dB in a 106.8Gbit/s 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) PDM CO-OFDM transmission system. The proposed TO/FO estimation algorithm performs robustly and accurately without any induced BER degradations.

  12. Compressive Information Extraction: A Dynamical Systems Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-24

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0097 Compressive Information Extraction A Dynamical Systems Approach Mario Sznaier NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY Final Report 02/09...Final Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01-06-2012 to 31-05-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Compressive Information Extraction A Dynamical Systems ... information extraction, hybrid system identification 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a.  NAME OF

  13. Session 6: Dynamic Modeling and Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey; Chapman, Jeffryes; May, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    These presentations cover some of the ongoing work in dynamic modeling and dynamic systems analysis. The first presentation discusses dynamic systems analysis and how to integrate dynamic performance information into the systems analysis. The ability to evaluate the dynamic performance of an engine design may allow tradeoffs between the dynamic performance and operability of a design resulting in a more efficient engine design. The second presentation discusses the Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS). T-MATS is a Simulation system with a library containing the basic building blocks that can be used to create dynamic Thermodynamic Systems. Some of the key features include Turbo machinery components, such as turbines, compressors, etc., and basic control system blocks. T-MAT is written in the Matlab-Simulink environment and is open source software. The third presentation focuses on getting additional performance from the engine by allowing the limit regulators only to be active when a limit is danger of being violated. Typical aircraft engine control architecture is based on MINMAX scheme, which is designed to keep engine operating within prescribed mechanical/operational safety limits. Using a conditionally active min-max limit regulator scheme, additional performance can be gained by disabling non-relevant limit regulators

  14. Dynamical Evolution of Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgardt, H.

    2016-11-01

    Dynamical simulations have become a powerful tool to study the evolution of star clusters due to hardware and software progresses in recent years. Here, I review the state of the art of N-body and other simulation techniques and show what we have learned from these simulations about the dynamical evolution of star clusters. Special attention is given to the results on the lifetimes of star clusters as a function of their environment, the internal changes of the mass functions, the influence of primordial gas expulsion on the ratio of first to second generation stars in globular clusters, and the possible presence of intermediate-mass black holes in star clusters.

  15. Scene understanding based on network-symbolic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvich, Gary

    2005-05-01

    New generations of smart weapons and unmanned vehicles must have reliable perceptual systems that are similar to human vision. Instead of precise computations of 3-dimensional models, a network-symbolic system converts image information into an "understandable" Network-Symbolic format, which is similar to relational knowledge models. Logic of visual scenes can be captured in the Network-Symbolic models and used for the disambiguation of visual information. It is hard to use geometric operations for processing of natural images. Instead, the brain builds a relational network-symbolic structure of visual scene, using different clues to set up the relational order of surfaces and objects. Feature, symbol, and predicate are equivalent in the biologically inspired Network-Symbolic systems. A linking mechanism binds these features/symbols into coherent structures, and image converts from a "raster" into a "vector" representation that can be better interpreted by higher-level knowledge structures. View-based object recognition is a hard problem for traditional algorithms that directly match a primary view of an object to a model. In Network-Symbolic Models, the derived structure, not the primary view, is a subject for recognition. Such recognition is not affected by local changes and appearances of the object as seen from a set of similar views.

  16. A novel symbolization scheme for multichannel recordings with emphasis on phase information and its application to differentiate EEG activity from different mental tasks.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, Stavros I; Laskaris, Nikolaos A; Tsirka, Vasso; Erimaki, Sofia; Vourkas, Michael; Micheloyannis, Sifis; Fotopoulos, Spiros

    2012-02-01

    Symbolic dynamics is a powerful tool for studying complex dynamical systems. So far many techniques of this kind have been proposed as a means to analyze brain dynamics, but most of them are restricted to single-sensor measurements. Analyzing the dynamics in a channel-wise fashion is an invalid approach for multisite encephalographic recordings, since it ignores any pattern of coordinated activity that might emerge from the coherent activation of distinct brain areas. We suggest, here, the use of neural-gas algorithm (Martinez et al. in IEEE Trans Neural Netw 4:558-569, 1993) for encoding brain activity spatiotemporal dynamics in the form of a symbolic timeseries. A codebook of k prototypes, best representing the instantaneous multichannel data, is first designed. Each pattern of activity is then assigned to the most similar code vector. The symbolic timeseries derived in this way is mapped to a network, the topology of which encapsulates the most important phase transitions of the underlying dynamical system. Finally, global efficiency is used to characterize the obtained topology. We demonstrate the approach by applying it to EEG-data recorded from subjects while performing mental calculations. By working in a contrastive-fashion, and focusing in the phase aspects of the signals, we show that the underlying dynamics differ significantly in their symbolic representations. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11571-011-9186-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  17. SIAM conference on applications of dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    A conference (Oct.15--19, 1992, Snowbird, Utah; sponsored by SIAM (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) Activity Group on Dynamical Systems) was held that highlighted recent developments in applied dynamical systems. The main lectures and minisymposia covered theory about chaotic motion, applications in high energy physics and heart fibrillations, turbulent motion, Henon map and attractor, integrable problems in classical physics, pattern formation in chemical reactions, etc. The conference fostered an exchange between mathematicians working on theoretical issues of modern dynamical systems and applied scientists. This two-part document contains abstracts, conference program, and an author index.

  18. Dynamical systems, attractors, and neural circuits

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Biology is the study of dynamical systems. Yet most of us working in biology have limited pedagogical training in the theory of dynamical systems, an unfortunate historical fact that can be remedied for future generations of life scientists. In my particular field of systems neuroscience, neural circuits are rife with nonlinearities at all levels of description, rendering simple methodologies and our own intuition unreliable. Therefore, our ideas are likely to be wrong unless informed by good models. These models should be based on the mathematical theories of dynamical systems since functioning neurons are dynamic—they change their membrane potential and firing rates with time. Thus, selecting the appropriate type of dynamical system upon which to base a model is an important first step in the modeling process. This step all too easily goes awry, in part because there are many frameworks to choose from, in part because the sparsely sampled data can be consistent with a variety of dynamical processes, and in part because each modeler has a preferred modeling approach that is difficult to move away from. This brief review summarizes some of the main dynamical paradigms that can arise in neural circuits, with comments on what they can achieve computationally and what signatures might reveal their presence within empirical data. I provide examples of different dynamical systems using simple circuits of two or three cells, emphasizing that any one connectivity pattern is compatible with multiple, diverse functions. PMID:27408709

  19. Modeling the dynamical systems on experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, Natalie B.; Anishchenko, Vadim S.

    1996-06-01

    An attempt is made in the work to create qualitative models of some real biological systems, i.e., isolated frog's heart, a human's heart and a blood circulation system of a white rat. Sampled one-dimensional realizations of these systems were taken as the initial data. Correlation dimensions were calculated to evaluate the embedding dimensions of the systems' attractors. The result of the work are the systems of ordinary differential equations which approximately describe the dynamics of the systems under investigation.

  20. Parallelized implementation of dynamical particle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mašek, Jan; Frantík, Petr; Vořechovský, Miroslav

    2017-07-01

    The paper presents approaches to implementation of solution of discrete dynamical system of mutually repelling particles. Two platforms: a single-thread JAVA process and parallelized CUDA C solution, are employed for the dynamical simulation. Qualities of both platforms are discussed and explained as their performance when solving two proposed interaction laws is compared.

  1. The controlled system fundamentals of system dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Everdeen, J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper is an introduction to the control of turbines for engineers. The paper examines the turbine parameters and control characteristics which determine the dynamic performance of the turbine and speed control combination. A hydromechanical governor is used as an example of the speed control. No mathematics are used; the class uses common engineering concepts.

  2. Ordinal symbolic analysis and its application to biomedical recordings.

    PubMed

    Amigó, José M; Keller, Karsten; Unakafova, Valentina A

    2015-02-13

    Ordinal symbolic analysis opens an interesting and powerful perspective on time-series analysis. Here, we review this relatively new approach and highlight its relation to symbolic dynamics and representations. Our exposition reaches from the general ideas up to recent developments, with special emphasis on its applications to biomedical recordings. The latter will be illustrated with epilepsy data. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Cooperative Autonomic Management in Dynamic Distributed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Zhao, Ming; Fortes, José A. B.

    The centralized management of large distributed systems is often impractical, particularly when the both the topology and status of the system change dynamically. This paper proposes an approach to application-centric self-management in large distributed systems consisting of a collection of autonomic components that join and leave the system dynamically. Cooperative autonomic components self-organize into a dynamically created overlay network. Through local information sharing with neighbors, each component gains access to global information as needed for optimizing performance of applications. The approach has been validated and evaluated by developing a decentralized autonomic system consisting of multiple autonomic application managers previously developed for the In-VIGO grid-computing system. Using analytical results from complex random network and measurements done in a prototype system, we demonstrate the robustness, self-organization and adaptability of our approach, both theoretically and experimentally.

  4. Detecting event-related recurrences by symbolic analysis: applications to human language processing

    PubMed Central

    beim Graben, Peter; Hutt, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Quasi-stationarity is ubiquitous in complex dynamical systems. In brain dynamics, there is ample evidence that event-related potentials (ERPs) reflect such quasi-stationary states. In order to detect them from time series, several segmentation techniques have been proposed. In this study, we elaborate a recent approach for detecting quasi-stationary states as recurrence domains by means of recurrence analysis and subsequent symbolization methods. We address two pertinent problems of contemporary recurrence analysis: optimizing the size of recurrence neighbourhoods and identifying symbols from different realizations for sequence alignment. As possible solutions for these problems, we suggest a maximum entropy criterion and a Hausdorff clustering algorithm. The resulting recurrence domains for single-subject ERPs are obtained as partition cells reflecting quasi-stationary brain states. PMID:25548270

  5. Dynamics of baroclinic wave systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcilon, Albert; Weng, Hengyi

    1989-01-01

    The research carried out in the past year dealt with nonlinear baroclinic wave dynamics. The model consisted of an Eady baroclinic basic state and uneven Elkman dissipation at the top and bottom boundaries with/without slopes. The method of solution used a truncated spectral expansion with three zonal waves and one or two meridional modes. Numerical experiments were performed on synoptic scale waves or planetary scale waves with/without wave-wave interaction.

  6. Dynamics of Solar System Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, Stanley F.

    2002-01-01

    The ongoing aim of the research is to investigate the dynamical and physical evolution of interplanetary dust particles in order to produce a detailed global model of the zodiacal cloud and its constituent components that is capable of predicting thermal fluxes in mid-infrared wave bands to an accuracy of 1% or better; with the additional aim of exploiting this research as a basis for predicting structure in exozodiacal clouds that may be signatures of unseen planets.

  7. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1984-01-01

    Tethered satellite system (TSS) dynamics were studied. The dynamic response of the TSS during the entire stationkeeping phase for the first electrodynamic mission was investigated. An out of plane swing amplitude and the tether's bowing were observed. The dynamics of the slack tether was studied and computer code, SLACK2, was improved both in capabilities and computational speed. Speed hazard related to tether breakage or plasma contactor failure was examined. Preliminary values of the potential difference after the failure and of the drop of the electric field along the tether axis have been computed. The update of the satellite rotational dynamics model is initiated.

  8. Understanding and Modeling Teams As Dynamical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Jamie C.; Dunbar, Terri A.; Grimm, David; Gipson, Christina L.

    2017-01-01

    By its very nature, much of teamwork is distributed across, and not stored within, interdependent people working toward a common goal. In this light, we advocate a systems perspective on teamwork that is based on general coordination principles that are not limited to cognitive, motor, and physiological levels of explanation within the individual. In this article, we present a framework for understanding and modeling teams as dynamical systems and review our empirical findings on teams as dynamical systems. We proceed by (a) considering the question of why study teams as dynamical systems, (b) considering the meaning of dynamical systems concepts (attractors; perturbation; synchronization; fractals) in the context of teams, (c) describe empirical studies of team coordination dynamics at the perceptual-motor, cognitive-behavioral, and cognitive-neurophysiological levels of analysis, and (d) consider the theoretical and practical implications of this approach, including new kinds of explanations of human performance and real-time analysis and performance modeling. Throughout our discussion of the topics we consider how to describe teamwork using equations and/or modeling techniques that describe the dynamics. Finally, we consider what dynamical equations and models do and do not tell us about human performance in teams and suggest future research directions in this area. PMID:28744231

  9. Constructing minimal models for complex system dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzel, Baruch; Liu, Yang-Yu; Barabási, Albert-László

    2015-05-01

    One of the strengths of statistical physics is the ability to reduce macroscopic observations into microscopic models, offering a mechanistic description of a system's dynamics. This paradigm, rooted in Boltzmann's gas theory, has found applications from magnetic phenomena to subcellular processes and epidemic spreading. Yet, each of these advances were the result of decades of meticulous model building and validation, which are impossible to replicate in most complex biological, social or technological systems that lack accurate microscopic models. Here we develop a method to infer the microscopic dynamics of a complex system from observations of its response to external perturbations, allowing us to construct the most general class of nonlinear pairwise dynamics that are guaranteed to recover the observed behaviour. The result, which we test against both numerical and empirical data, is an effective dynamic model that can predict the system's behaviour and provide crucial insights into its inner workings.

  10. Model Verification of Mixed Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evensen, D. A.; Chrostowski, J. D.; Hasselman, T. K.

    1982-01-01

    MOVER uses experimental data to verify mathematical models of "mixed" dynamic systems. The term "mixed" refers to interactive mechanical, hydraulic, electrical, and other components. Program compares analytical transfer functions with experiment.

  11. How Symbolic Experience Shapes Children's Symbolic Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thom, Emily E.; Sandhofer, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    The current experiments asked whether children with dual-symbolic experience (e.g., unimodal bilingual and bimodal) develop a preference for words like monolingual children (Namy & Waxman, 1998). In Experiment 1, ninety-five 18- and 24-month-olds, with monolingual, unimodal bilingual, or bimodal symbolic experience, were tested in their…

  12. Symbolic Interaction and Applied Social Research

    PubMed Central

    Kotarba, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    In symbolic interaction, a traditional yet unfortunate and unnecessary distinction has been made between basic and applied research. The argument has been made that basic research is intended to generate new knowledge, whereas applied research is intended to apply knowledge to the solution of practical (social and organizational) problems. I will argue that the distinction between basic and applied research in symbolic interaction is outdated and dysfunctional. The masters of symbolic interactionist thought have left us a proud legacy of shaping their scholarly thinking and inquiry in response to and in light of practical issues of the day (e.g., Znaniecki, and Blumer). Current interactionist work continues this tradition in topical areas such as social justice studies. Applied research, especially in term of evaluation and needs assessment studies, can be designed to serve both basic and applied goals. Symbolic interaction provides three great resources to do this. The first is its orientation to dynamic sensitizing concepts that direct research and ask questions instead of supplying a priori and often impractical answers. The second is its orientation to qualitative methods, and appreciation for the logic of grounded theory. The third is interactionism’s overall holistic approach to interfacing with the everyday life world. The primary illustrative case here is the qualitative component of the evaluation of an NIH-funded, translational medical research program. The qualitative component has provided interactionist-inspired insights into translational research, such as examining cultural change in medical research in terms of changes in the form and content of formal and informal discourse among scientists; delineating the impact of significant symbols such as "my lab" on the social organization of science; and appreciating the essence of the self-concept "scientist" on the increasingly bureaucratic and administrative identities of medical researchers. This

  13. Dynamic Impregnator Reactor System (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    IBRF poster developed for the IBRF showcase. Describes the multifarious system designed for complex feedstock impregnation and processing. IBRF feedstock system has several unit operations combined into one robust system that provides for flexible and staged process configurations, such as spraying, soaking, low-severity pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, concentration/evaporation, and distillation.

  14. Dynamical Systems Approach to Endothelial Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Erzsébet Ravasz; Aird, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Objective Here we reexamine our current understanding of the molecular basis of endothelial heterogeneity. We introduce multistability as a new explanatory framework in vascular biology. Methods We draw on the field of non-linear dynamics to propose a dynamical systems framework for modeling multistability and its derivative properties, including robustness, memory, and plasticity. Conclusions Our perspective allows for both a conceptual and quantitative description of system-level features of endothelial regulation. PMID:22723222

  15. Digital simulation of stiff linear dynamic systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. D.; Walsh, J. R., Jr.; Kerr, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    A method is derived for digital computer simulation of linear time-invariant systems when the insignificant eigenvalues involved in such systems are eliminated by an ALSAP root removal technique. The method is applied to a thirteenth-order dynamic system representing a passive RLC network.

  16. Structural Identifiability of Dynamic Systems Biology Models

    PubMed Central

    Villaverde, Alejandro F.

    2016-01-01

    A powerful way of gaining insight into biological systems is by creating a nonlinear differential equation model, which usually contains many unknown parameters. Such a model is called structurally identifiable if it is possible to determine the values of its parameters from measurements of the model outputs. Structural identifiability is a prerequisite for parameter estimation, and should be assessed before exploiting a model. However, this analysis is seldom performed due to the high computational cost involved in the necessary symbolic calculations, which quickly becomes prohibitive as the problem size increases. In this paper we show how to analyse the structural identifiability of a very general class of nonlinear models by extending methods originally developed for studying observability. We present results about models whose identifiability had not been previously determined, report unidentifiabilities that had not been found before, and show how to modify those unidentifiable models to make them identifiable. This method helps prevent problems caused by lack of identifiability analysis, which can compromise the success of tasks such as experiment design, parameter estimation, and model-based optimization. The procedure is called STRIKE-GOLDD (STRuctural Identifiability taKen as Extended-Generalized Observability with Lie Derivatives and Decomposition), and it is implemented in a MATLAB toolbox which is available as open source software. The broad applicability of this approach facilitates the analysis of the increasingly complex models used in systems biology and other areas. PMID:27792726

  17. Structural Identifiability of Dynamic Systems Biology Models.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Alejandro F; Barreiro, Antonio; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2016-10-01

    A powerful way of gaining insight into biological systems is by creating a nonlinear differential equation model, which usually contains many unknown parameters. Such a model is called structurally identifiable if it is possible to determine the values of its parameters from measurements of the model outputs. Structural identifiability is a prerequisite for parameter estimation, and should be assessed before exploiting a model. However, this analysis is seldom performed due to the high computational cost involved in the necessary symbolic calculations, which quickly becomes prohibitive as the problem size increases. In this paper we show how to analyse the structural identifiability of a very general class of nonlinear models by extending methods originally developed for studying observability. We present results about models whose identifiability had not been previously determined, report unidentifiabilities that had not been found before, and show how to modify those unidentifiable models to make them identifiable. This method helps prevent problems caused by lack of identifiability analysis, which can compromise the success of tasks such as experiment design, parameter estimation, and model-based optimization. The procedure is called STRIKE-GOLDD (STRuctural Identifiability taKen as Extended-Generalized Observability with Lie Derivatives and Decomposition), and it is implemented in a MATLAB toolbox which is available as open source software. The broad applicability of this approach facilitates the analysis of the increasingly complex models used in systems biology and other areas.

  18. Dynamics and kinematics of simple neural systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovich, M. |; Selverston, A.; Rubchinsky, L.; Huerta, R.

    1996-09-01

    The dynamics of simple neural systems is of interest to both biologists and physicists. One of the possible roles of such systems is the production of rhythmic patterns, and their alterations (modification of behavior, processing of sensory information, adaptation, control). In this paper, the neural systems are considered as a subject of modeling by the dynamical systems approach. In particular, we analyze how a stable, ordinary behavior of a small neural system can be described by simple finite automata models, and how more complicated dynamical systems modeling can be used. The approach is illustrated by biological and numerical examples: experiments with and numerical simulations of the stomatogastric central pattern generators network of the California spiny lobster. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Irreversible thermodynamics in multiscale stochastic dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Santillán, Moisés; Qian, Hong

    2011-04-01

    This work extends the results of a recently developed theory of a rather complete thermodynamic formalism for discrete-state, continuous-time Markov processes with and without detailed balance. We investigate whether and in what way the thermodynamic structure is invariant in a multiscale stochastic system, that is, whether the relations between thermodynamic functions of state and process variables remain unchanged when the system is viewed at different time scales and resolutions. Our results show that the dynamics on a fast time scale contribute an entropic term to the internal energy function u(S)(x) for the slow dynamics. Based on the conditional free energy u(S)(x), we can then treat the slow dynamics as if the fast dynamics is nonexistent. Furthermore, we show that the free energy, which characterizes the spontaneous organization in a system without detailed balance, is invariant with or without the fast dynamics: The fast dynamics is assumed to reach stationarity instantaneously on the slow time scale; it has no effect on the system's free energy. The same cannot be said for the entropy and the internal energy, both of which contain the same contribution from the fast dynamics. We also investigate the consequences of time-scale separation in connection to the concepts of quasi-stationarity and steady adiabaticity introduced in the phenomenological steady-state thermodynamics. ©2011 American Physical Society

  20. Model systems for single molecule polymer dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Latinwo, Folarin

    2012-01-01

    Double stranded DNA (dsDNA) has long served as a model system for single molecule polymer dynamics. However, dsDNA is a semiflexible polymer, and the structural rigidity of the DNA double helix gives rise to local molecular properties and chain dynamics that differ from flexible chains, including synthetic organic polymers. Recently, we developed single stranded DNA (ssDNA) as a new model system for single molecule studies of flexible polymer chains. In this work, we discuss model polymer systems in the context of “ideal” and “real” chain behavior considering thermal blobs, tension blobs, hydrodynamic drag and force–extension relations. In addition, we present monomer aspect ratio as a key parameter describing chain conformation and dynamics, and we derive dynamical scaling relations in terms of this molecular-level parameter. We show that asymmetric Kuhn segments can suppress monomer–monomer interactions, thereby altering global chain dynamics. Finally, we discuss ssDNA in the context of a new model system for single molecule polymer dynamics. Overall, we anticipate that future single polymer studies of flexible chains will reveal new insight into the dynamic behavior of “real” polymers, which will highlight the importance of molecular individualism and the prevalence of non-linear phenomena. PMID:22956980

  1. Model systems for single molecule polymer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Latinwo, Folarin; Schroeder, Charles M

    2011-01-01

    Double stranded DNA (dsDNA) has long served as a model system for single molecule polymer dynamics. However, dsDNA is a semiflexible polymer, and the structural rigidity of the DNA double helix gives rise to local molecular properties and chain dynamics that differ from flexible chains, including synthetic organic polymers. Recently, we developed single stranded DNA (ssDNA) as a new model system for single molecule studies of flexible polymer chains. In this work, we discuss model polymer systems in the context of "ideal" and "real" chain behavior considering thermal blobs, tension blobs, hydrodynamic drag and force-extension relations. In addition, we present monomer aspect ratio as a key parameter describing chain conformation and dynamics, and we derive dynamical scaling relations in terms of this molecular-level parameter. We show that asymmetric Kuhn segments can suppress monomer-monomer interactions, thereby altering global chain dynamics. Finally, we discuss ssDNA in the context of a new model system for single molecule polymer dynamics. Overall, we anticipate that future single polymer studies of flexible chains will reveal new insight into the dynamic behavior of "real" polymers, which will highlight the importance of molecular individualism and the prevalence of non-linear phenomena.

  2. Application of dynamical systems theory to nonlinear aircraft dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culick, Fred E. C.; Jahnke, Craig C.

    1988-01-01

    Dynamical systems theory has been used to study nonlinear aircraft dynamics. A six degree of freedom model that neglects gravity has been analyzed. The aerodynamic model, supplied by NASA, is for a generic swept wing fighter and includes nonlinearities as functions of the angle of attack. A continuation method was used to calculate the steady states of the aircraft, and bifurcations of these steady states, as functions of the control deflections. Bifurcations were used to predict jump phenomena and the onset of periodic motion for roll coupling instabilities and high angle of attack maneuvers. The predictions were verified with numerical simulations.

  3. Clustering of symbolic objects using gravitational approach.

    PubMed

    Ravi, T V; Gowda, K C

    1999-01-01

    Most of the techniques used in the literature in clustering symbolic data are based on the hierarchical methodology, which uses the concept of agglomeration or division as the core of the algorithm. The main contribution of this paper is to formulate a clustering algorithm for symbolic objects based on the gravitational approach. The proposed procedure is based on the physical phenomenon in which a system of particles in space converge to the centroid of the system due to gravitational attraction between the particles. Some pairs of samples called mutual pairs, which have a tendency to gravitate toward each other, are discerned at each stage of this multistage scheme. The notions of cluster coglomerate strength and global coglomerate strength are used for accomplishing or abandoning the process of merging a mutual pair. The methodology forms composite symbolic objects whenever two symbolic objects are merged. The process of merging at each stage, reduces the number of samples that are available for consideration. The procedure terminates at some stage where there are no more mutual pairs available for merging. The efficacy of the proposed methodology is examined by applying it on numeric data and also on data sets drawn from the domain of fat oil, microcomputers, microprocessors, and botany. A detailed comparative study is carried out with other methods and the results are presented.

  4. Visco-elastic Dynamics of an Active Polar Dynamic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleiner, Harald; Svensek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    2015-03-01

    We study the dynamics of systems with a polar dynamic preferred direction that are embedded in visco-elastic media. Examples include the pattern-forming growth of bacteria and molecular motors. Because the ordered state only exists dynamically, but not statically, the macroscopic variable of choice is the velocity of the active units. The passive visco-elastic medium is described by a relaxing strain tensor. We derive the macroscopic equations for such a system and discuss novel static, reversible and irreversible cross-couplings connected to this two-fluid (two-velocity) system. The dynamics is rather different compared to the case of passive, static polar order. In particular, we find a complicated normal mode structure that reflects the broken time-reversal symmetry due to the non-equilibrium situation, anisotropy of first sound and a possible second sound excitation due to the active velocity, and various manifestations of the visco-elastic relaxation. We discuss critically the role of the so-called active term in the stress tensor as well as the thermodynamically correct description of the hydrodynamic transport velocities.

  5. Dynamics and controls in maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-09-01

    The dynamic response of magnetically levitated (maglev) ground transportation systems has important consequences for safety and ride quality, guideway design, and system costs. Ride quality is determined by vehicle response and by environmental factors such as humidity and noise. The dynamic response of the vehicles is the key element in determining ride quality, and vehicle stability is an important safety-related element. To design a proper guideway that provides acceptable ride quality in the stable region, vehicle dynamics must be understood. Furthermore the trade-off between guideway smoothness and the levitation and control systems must be considered if maglev systems are to be economically feasible. The link between the guideway and the other maglev components is vehicle dynamics. For a commercial maglev system, vehicle dynamics must be analyzed and tested in detail. In this study, the role of dynamics and controls in maglev vehicle/guideway interactions is discussed, and the literature on modeling the dynamic interactions of vehicle/guideway and suspension controls for ground vehicles is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on modeling vehicle/guideway interactions and response characteristics of maglev systems for a multicar, multiload vehicle traveling on a single- or doublespan flexible guideway, including coupling effects of vehicle/guideway, comparison of concentrated and distributed loads, and ride comfort. Different control-law designs are introduced into vehicle suspensions when a simple two-degree-of-freedom vehicle model is applied. Active and semiactive control designs for primary and secondary suspensions do improve the response of vehicle and provide acceptable ride comfort. Finally, future research associated with dynamics and controls of vehicle/guideway systems is identified.

  6. Topological Causality in Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnack, Daniel; Laminski, Erik; Schünemann, Maik; Pawelzik, Klaus Richard

    2017-09-01

    Determination of causal relations among observables is of fundamental interest in many fields dealing with complex systems. Since nonlinear systems generically behave as wholes, classical notions of causality assuming separability of subsystems often turn out inadequate. Still lacking is a mathematically transparent measure of the magnitude of effective causal influences in cyclic systems. For deterministic systems we found that the expansions of mappings among time-delay state space reconstructions from different observables not only reflect the directed coupling strengths, but also the dependency of effective influences on the system's temporally varying state. Estimation of the expansions from pairs of time series is straightforward and used to define novel causality indices. Mathematical and numerical analysis demonstrate that they reveal the asymmetry of causal influences including their time dependence, as well as provide measures for the effective strengths of causal links in complex systems.

  7. Dynamic modeling of solar dynamic components and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochstein, John I.; Korakianitis, T.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this grant was to support NASA in modeling efforts to predict the transient dynamic and thermodynamic response of the space station solar dynamic power generation system. In order to meet the initial schedule requirement of providing results in time to support installation of the system as part of the initial phase of space station, early efforts were executed with alacrity and often in parallel. Initially, methods to predict the transient response of a Rankine as well as a Brayton cycle were developed. Review of preliminary design concepts led NASA to select a regenerative gas-turbine cycle using a helium-xenon mixture as the working fluid and, from that point forward, the modeling effort focused exclusively on that system. Although initial project planning called for a three year period of performance, revised NASA schedules moved system installation to later and later phases of station deployment. Eventually, NASA selected to halt development of the solar dynamic power generation system for space station and to reduce support for this project to two-thirds of the original level.

  8. Dynamic Modeling of Solar Dynamic Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.; Korakianitis, T.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to support NASA in modeling efforts to predict the transient dynamic and thermodynamic response of the space station solar dynamic power generation system. In order to meet the initial schedule requirement of providing results in time to support installation of the system as part of the initial phase of space station, early efforts were executed with alacrity and often in parallel. Initially, methods to predict the transient response of a Rankine as well as a Brayton cycle were developed. Review of preliminary design concepts led NASA to select a regenerative gas-turbine cycle using a helium-xenon mixture as the working fluid and, from that point forward, the modeling effort focused exclusively on that system. Although initial project planning called for a three year period of performance, revised NASA schedules moved system installation to later and later phases of station deployment. Eventually, NASA selected to halt development of the solar dynamic power generation system for space station and to reduce support for this project to two-thirds of the original level.

  9. System crash as dynamics of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi; Xiao, Gaoxi; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Yubo; Wang, Zhen; Kurths, Jürgen; Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim

    2016-10-18

    Complex systems, from animal herds to human nations, sometimes crash drastically. Although the growth and evolution of systems have been extensively studied, our understanding of how systems crash is still limited. It remains rather puzzling why some systems, appearing to be doomed to fail, manage to survive for a long time whereas some other systems, which seem to be too big or too strong to fail, crash rapidly. In this contribution, we propose a network-based system dynamics model, where individual actions based on the local information accessible in their respective system structures may lead to the "peculiar" dynamics of system crash mentioned above. Extensive simulations are carried out on synthetic and real-life networks, which further reveal the interesting system evolution leading to the final crash. Applications and possible extensions of the proposed model are discussed.

  10. Dynamic stability of electrodynamic maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    Because dynamic instabilities are not acceptable in any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study considers the stability of maglev systems based on mathematical models and experimental data. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis for motion-dependent magnetic-force-induced instability developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  11. Dynamic control of the space tethered system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malashin, A. A.; Smirnov, N. N.; Bryukvina, O. Yu.; Dyakov, P. A.

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the problem of simultaneous dynamical stabilization and suppression of transverse and longitudinal vibrations of the space tethered system deployed along a certain trajectory. The dynamics of the system is described by a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for the longitudinal and transverse waves and we consider a non-classical version of the problem with one moving boundary. We formulate a mathematical model and perform the analytic and numerical analysis of the boundary control problem based on the Lyapunov method. A scheme of the deployment mechanism is suggested. It includes a control torque and transverse displacement of the boundary and ensures stable deployment of the whole system.

  12. Coupled dynamics analysis of wind energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A qualitative description of all key elements of a complete wind energy system computer analysis code is presented. The analysis system addresses the coupled dynamics characteristics of wind energy systems, including the interactions of the rotor, tower, nacelle, power train, control system, and electrical network. The coupled dynamics are analyzed in both the frequency and time domain to provide the basic motions and loads data required for design, performance verification and operations analysis activities. Elements of the coupled analysis code were used to design and analyze candidate rotor articulation concepts. Fundamental results and conclusions derived from these studies are presented.

  13. A Participatory Research Approach to develop an Arabic Symbol Dictionary.

    PubMed

    Draffan, E A; Kadous, Amatullah; Idris, Amal; Banes, David; Zeinoun, Nadine; Wald, Mike; Halabi, Nawar

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the Arabic Symbol Dictionary research discussed in this paper, is to provide a resource of culturally, environmentally and linguistically suitable symbols to aid communication and literacy skills. A participatory approach with the use of online social media and a bespoke symbol management system has been established to enhance the process of matching a user based Arabic and English core vocabulary with appropriate imagery. Participants including AAC users, their families, carers, teachers and therapists who have been involved in the research from the outset, collating the vocabularies, debating cultural nuances for symbols and critiquing the design of technologies for selection procedures. The positive reaction of those who have voted on the symbols with requests for early use have justified the iterative nature of the methodologies used for this part of the project. However, constant re-evaluation will be necessary and in depth analysis of all the data received has yet to be completed.

  14. Research on new dynamic torque calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Zhong Yu; Yin, Xiao

    2016-06-01

    Dynamic torque calibration method based on rotating table and interferometric system is studied in this paper. A load mass with certain moment of inertia are screwed on the top of torque transducer, the dynamic torque is realized by load object are traceable to angular acceleration and moment of inertia of the object by M (t)=I θ ¨(t) , where I is the total moment of inertia acting on the sensing element of the torque transducer and θ ¨ is the time and spatial-dependent angular acceleration of the load object which is directly measured by a laser interferometer. This paper will introduce a dynamic torque calibration system developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses servomotor to generate dynamic torque in the range from 0.1Nm to 200Nm, and heterodyne laser interferometers cooperated with column grating are used for angular acceleration measurement. An airbearing system is developed to increase the performance of the dynamic turque calibration system. This paper introduce the setup of the dynamic torque calibration system.

  15. SYMBOLS USED IN MUSIC ANALYSIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JONES, GEORGE T.

    A RECOMMENDED STANDARDIZED SYMBOLIZATION RESULTED FROM A DETAILED COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ANALYTICAL SYMBOLIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY FOUND IN MUSIC THEORY AND HARMONY TEXTBOOKS WHICH WERE IN GENERAL USE IN THE UNITED STATES. OVER 200 MEMBER SCHOOLS OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS OF MUSIC PROVIDED DATA ON MATERIALS. ABSTRACTS SHOWING…

  16. Symbolic Mediation in Cognitive Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veraksa, Alexander N.

    2011-01-01

    This article used two studies to investigate sign and symbol mediation in children aged 8-11 years. In role play, children exist at one at the same time in objective reality and their representation of reality. We cannot observe their mental representation directly, but the issue of whether signs or symbols mediate early role play is an important…

  17. Symbolic Mediation in Cognitive Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veraksa, Alexander N.

    2011-01-01

    This article used two studies to investigate sign and symbol mediation in children aged 8-11 years. In role play, children exist at one at the same time in objective reality and their representation of reality. We cannot observe their mental representation directly, but the issue of whether signs or symbols mediate early role play is an important…

  18. The Symbolism Of Chemical Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2005-01-01

    A question about the historical origin of equal sign and double arrow symbolism in balanced chemical equation is raised. The study shows that Marshall proposed the symbolism in 1902, which includes the use of currently favored double barb for equilibrium reactions.

  19. The Symbolism Of Chemical Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2005-01-01

    A question about the historical origin of equal sign and double arrow symbolism in balanced chemical equation is raised. The study shows that Marshall proposed the symbolism in 1902, which includes the use of currently favored double barb for equilibrium reactions.

  20. Dynamical genetic programming in XCSF.

    PubMed

    Preen, Richard J; Bull, Larry

    2013-01-01

    A number of representation schemes have been presented for use within learning classifier systems, ranging from binary encodings to artificial neural networks. This paper presents results from an investigation into using a temporally dynamic symbolic representation within the XCSF learning classifier system. In particular, dynamical arithmetic networks are used to represent the traditional condition-action production system rules to solve continuous-valued reinforcement learning problems and to perform symbolic regression, finding competitive performance with traditional genetic programming on a number of composite polynomial tasks. In addition, the network outputs are later repeatedly sampled at varying temporal intervals to perform multistep-ahead predictions of a financial time series.

  1. Automated non-alphanumeric symbol resolution in clinical texts.

    PubMed

    Moon, SungRim; Pakhomov, Serguei; Ryan, James; Melton, Genevieve B

    2011-01-01

    Although clinical texts contain many symbols, relatively little attention has been given to symbol resolution by medical natural language processing (NLP) researchers. Interpreting the meaning of symbols may be viewed as a special case of Word Sense Disambiguation (WSD). One thousand instances of four common non-alphanumeric symbols ('+', '-', '/', and '#') were randomly extracted from a clinical document repository and annotated by experts. The symbols and their surrounding context, in addition to bag-of-Words (BoW), and heuristic rules were evaluated as features for the following classifiers: Naïve Bayes, Support Vector Machine, and Decision Tree, using 10-fold cross-validation. Accuracies for '+', '-', '/', and '#' were 80.11%, 80.22%, 90.44%, and 95.00% respectively, with Naïve Bayes. While symbol context contributed the most, BoW was also helpful for disambiguation of some symbols. Symbol disambiguation with supervised techniques can be implemented with reasonable accuracy as a module for medical NLP systems.

  2. Symbolic representation on geographic concepts and their mutual relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Li; Chen, Yijin; Zhou, Danhui

    2006-10-01

    Cartographic language has the characteristics of natural language. As the vocabulary in cartographic language, cartographic symbols are composed of exterior form and idealistic content. Geographic concepts are the essential attribute of geographic objects and cell of geographic thinking. Geographic concepts are thinking form of human brain and are invisible, which only needed to be represented by a certain form. Aiming at the problem of symbolic representation in geographic concepts and their mutual relationships, the geometrical composition of symbols of large scale topographic maps and the semantic and geometrical relationships among symbols were analyzed, the symbols system of topographic maps was regarded as a two-dimensional graphic language, and the relationship between symbols and geographic concepts was discussed. According to concept of logic and geometrical shape of symbols the represented categories of geographic concepts and their mutual relationships on the basis of symbols of topographic maps were defined and the actual examples were given, which provides the use for reference for studying cartographic language by logic method.

  3. Aircraft Hydraulic Systems Dynamic Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    PUMP TESTING AND SYSTEM VERIFICATION ............ ... 297 a. Computer Simulation ....... ................. ... 300 h. Conclusions...236 299 Pressure 20.0 Inches along Line 3 ... ............ 236 300 Pressure 0.0 Inches along Line 3 .... ............ 237 301 Flow 0.0 Inches...297 394 Hytran Schemat ic of Two Pump Test System ........... 300 195 69-07-111 Turn-On Transient .......... ............... 301 xxiii ,j

  4. Shanahan on symbolization.

    PubMed

    Lassègue, Jean

    2008-03-01

    In his article 'A New View of Language, Emotion and the Brain,' Dan Shanahan claims that the post-war Cognitive Turn focused mainly on information processing and that little attention was paid to the dramatic role played by emotion in human cognition. One key argument in his defence of a more comprehensive view of human cognition rests upon the idea that the process of symbolization--a unique capacity only developed by humans--combines, right from the start, information processing and feelings. The author argues that any theory ignoring this fact would miss the whole point, just as mainstream cognitive science has done since Noam Chomsky published Syntactic Structures, exactly 50 years ago.

  5. Smart dynamic system design: an integrated approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Mike J.; Skelton, Robert T.

    1994-05-01

    A dynamic system with satisfactory performance generally consists of a mechanical system (the plant) and a controller that drives the mechanical system to meet certain performance requirements. Traditionally the control engineer designs the controller only after the plant design is completed. This two-step approach to plant and controller design does not provide the best system design because the dynamics of the plant and the dynamics of the controller often oppose each other. This paper presents an application of the iterative system equivalent optimal mix algorithm to perform a smart design of a nine-member truss substructure and its accompanying controller. The objective of the design algorithm is to reduce the amount of energy used by the controller to maintain control performance, subject to the structure design constraints. Two unique features of the algorithm are that each iteration of the design problem is stated as a convex quadratic programming problem, and the control effort monotonically converges to its final value.

  6. The Pixar 2D - Symbolics Connection: An Interactive Workstation For Integrated Signal-Symbol Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Barbara K.; Upton, Richard A.

    1986-12-01

    This paper describes a workstation and a software development environment designed to facilitate the investigation of integrated signal/symbol processing in image understanding and graphics processing. The workstation is comprised of two complementary, high-performance processors connected via a high-speed interface: the Pixar 2D Image computer and the Symbolics 36xx Lisp machine. Some of the current and potential applications of the system include developing and evaluating new image analysis and feature extraction algorithms, investigating the role of the extracted features in perceptual aggregation, object detection/identification and scene analysis, and assisting in the creation of prototypical image understanding systems.

  7. Dynamics of Multibody Systems Near Lagrangian Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Brian

    This thesis examines the dynamics of a physically connected multi-spacecraft system in the vicinity of the Lagrangian points of a Circular Restricted Three-Body System. The spacecraft system is arranged in a wheel-spoke configuration with smaller and less massive satellites connected to a central hub using truss/beams or tether connectors. The kinematics of the system is first defined, and the kinetic, gravitational potential energy and elastic potential energy of the system are derived. The Assumed Modes Method is used to discretize the continuous variables of the system, and a general set of ordinary differential equations describing the dynamics of the connectors and the central hub are obtained using the Lagrangian method. The flexible body dynamics of the tethered and truss connected systems are examined using numerical simulations. The results show that these systems experienced only small elastic deflections when they are naturally librating or rotating at moderate angular velocities, and these deflections have relatively small effect on the attitude dynamics of the systems. Based on these results, it is determined that the connectors can be modeled as rigid when only the attitude dynamics of the system is of interest. The equations of motion of rigid satellites stationed at the Lagrangian points are linearized, and the stability conditions of the satellite are obtained from the linear equations. The required conditions are shown to be similar to those of geocentric satellites. Study of the linear equations also revealed the resonant conditions of rigid Lagrangian point satellites, when a librational natural frequency of the satellite matches the frequency of its station-keeping orbit leading to large attitude motions. For tethered satellites, the linear analysis shows that the tethers are in stable equilibrium when they lie along a line joining the two primary celestial bodies of the Three-Body System. Numerical simulations are used to study the long term

  8. Numerical Modeling of Compliant-Moored System Dynamics with Applications to Marine Energy Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, Tyler

    The development of a numerical model simulating the dynamic response of compliant-moored submerged systems to non-uniform fluid flow is presented. The model is meant to serve as a computational tool with applications to compliant-moored marine energy converters by time-domain representation of the mooring dynamics. The scope of the initial code is restricted to full-submerged moored tidal turbines, though the model can be readily expanded to analyze wave energy converters as well. The system is modeled in a Lagrangian frame treating tidal turbines and structural elements as rigid bodies. Mooring lines are modeled as a series of discrete elastic segments, with parameters and force contributions lumped to point-mass nodes joining each segment. Full-range of motion is achieved using the alpha-beta-gamma Euler Angle method. The governing equations of motion of the system are derived computationally through implementation of Lagrange's Equation of Motion. The techniques employed to develop the symbolic expressions for the total kinetic, potential, and damping energies of the system and the forces acting on each element of the system are discussed. The system of differential equations obtained from evaluation of Lagrange's Equation with the developed symbolic expressions is solved numerically using a built-in MATLAB ordinary differential equation solver called ODE15i.m with the user defined initial condition of the system. Several validation tests are presented and their results discussed. Finally, an explanation of future plans for development of the model and application to existing tidal energy systems are presented.

  9. Symbolic Computation Using Cellular Automata-Based Hyperdimensional Computing.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozgur

    2015-12-01

    This letter introduces a novel framework of reservoir computing that is capable of both connectionist machine intelligence and symbolic computation. A cellular automaton is used as the reservoir of dynamical systems. Input is randomly projected onto the initial conditions of automaton cells, and nonlinear computation is performed on the input via application of a rule in the automaton for a period of time. The evolution of the automaton creates a space-time volume of the automaton state space, and it is used as the reservoir. The proposed framework is shown to be capable of long-term memory, and it requires orders of magnitude less computation compared to echo state networks. As the focus of the letter, we suggest that binary reservoir feature vectors can be combined using Boolean operations as in hyperdimensional computing, paving a direct way for concept building and symbolic processing. To demonstrate the capability of the proposed system, we make analogies directly on image data by asking, What is the automobile of air?

  10. Ontology of Earth's nonlinear dynamic complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaie, Hassan; Davarpanah, Armita

    2017-04-01

    As a complex system, Earth and its major integrated and dynamically interacting subsystems (e.g., hydrosphere, atmosphere) display nonlinear behavior in response to internal and external influences. The Earth Nonlinear Dynamic Complex Systems (ENDCS) ontology formally represents the semantics of the knowledge about the nonlinear system element (agent) behavior, function, and structure, inter-agent and agent-environment feedback loops, and the emergent collective properties of the whole complex system as the result of interaction of the agents with other agents and their environment. It also models nonlinear concepts such as aperiodic, random chaotic behavior, sensitivity to initial conditions, bifurcation of dynamic processes, levels of organization, self-organization, aggregated and isolated functionality, and emergence of collective complex behavior at the system level. By incorporating several existing ontologies, the ENDCS ontology represents the dynamic system variables and the rules of transformation of their state, emergent state, and other features of complex systems such as the trajectories in state (phase) space (attractor and strange attractor), basins of attractions, basin divide (separatrix), fractal dimension, and system's interface to its environment. The ontology also defines different object properties that change the system behavior, function, and structure and trigger instability. ENDCS will help to integrate the data and knowledge related to the five complex subsystems of Earth by annotating common data types, unifying the semantics of shared terminology, and facilitating interoperability among different fields of Earth science.

  11. The dilemma of the symbols: analogies between philosophy, biology and artificial life.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes some analogies going from Artificial Life questions about the symbol-matter connection to Artificial Intelligence questions about symbol-grounding. It focuses on the notion of the interpretability of syntax and how the symbols are integrated in a unity ("binding problem"). Utilizing the DNA code as a model, this paper discusses how syntactic features could be defined as high-grade characteristics of the non syntactic relations in a material-dynamic structure, by using an emergentist approach. This topic furnishes the ground for a confutation of J. Searle's statement that syntax is observer-relative, as he wrote in his book "Mind: A Brief Introduction". Moreover the evolving discussion also modifies the classic symbol-processing doctrine in the mind which Searle attacks as a strong AL argument, that life could be implemented in a computational mode. Lastly, this paper furnishes a new way of support for the autonomous systems thesis in Artificial Life and Artificial Intelligence, using, inter alia, the "adaptive resonance theory" (ART).

  12. Symbols are not uniquely human.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sidarta; Loula, Angelo; de Araújo, Ivan; Gudwin, Ricardo; Queiroz, João

    2007-01-01

    Modern semiotics is a branch of logics that formally defines symbol-based communication. In recent years, the semiotic classification of signs has been invoked to support the notion that symbols are uniquely human. Here we show that alarm-calls such as those used by African vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops), logically satisfy the semiotic definition of symbol. We also show that the acquisition of vocal symbols in vervet monkeys can be successfully simulated by a computer program based on minimal semiotic and neurobiological constraints. The simulations indicate that learning depends on the tutor-predator ratio, and that apprentice-generated auditory mistakes in vocal symbol interpretation have little effect on the learning rates of apprentices (up to 80% of mistakes are tolerated). In contrast, just 10% of apprentice-generated visual mistakes in predator identification will prevent any vocal symbol to be correctly associated with a predator call in a stable manner. Tutor unreliability was also deleterious to vocal symbol learning: a mere 5% of "lying" tutors were able to completely disrupt symbol learning, invariably leading to the acquisition of incorrect associations by apprentices. Our investigation corroborates the existence of vocal symbols in a non-human species, and indicates that symbolic competence emerges spontaneously from classical associative learning mechanisms when the conditioned stimuli are self-generated, arbitrary and socially efficacious. We propose that more exclusive properties of human language, such as syntax, may derive from the evolution of higher-order domains for neural association, more removed from both the sensory input and the motor output, able to support the gradual complexification of grammatical categories into syntax.

  13. Is processing of symbols and words influenced by writing system? Evidence from Chinese, Korean, English, and Greek.

    PubMed

    Altani, Angeliki; Georgiou, George K; Deng, Ciping; Cho, Jeung-Ryeul; Katopodi, Katerina; Wei, Wei; Protopapas, Athanassios

    2017-12-01

    We examined cross-linguistic effects in the relationship between serial and discrete versions of digit naming and word reading. In total, 113 Mandarin-speaking Chinese children, 100 Korean children, 112 English-speaking Canadian children, and 108 Greek children in Grade 3 were administered tasks of serial and discrete naming of words and digits. Interrelations among tasks indicated that the link between rapid naming and reading is largely determined by the format of the tasks across orthographies. Multigroup path analyses with discrete and serial word reading as dependent variables revealed commonalities as well as significant differences between writing systems. The path coefficient from discrete digits to discrete words was greater for the more transparent orthographies, consistent with more efficient sight-word processing. The effect of discrete word reading on serial word reading was stronger in alphabetic languages, where there was also a suppressive effect of discrete digit naming. However, the effect of serial digit naming on serial word reading did not differ among the four language groups. This pattern of relationships challenges a universal account of reading fluency acquisition while upholding a universal role of rapid serial naming, further distinguishing between multi-element interword and intraword processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nonequilibrium quantum dynamics in optomechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Cheung, Hil F. H.; Shaffer, Airlia; Wang, Ke; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The thermalization dynamics of isolated quantum systems has so far been explored in the context of cold atomic systems containing a large number of particles and modes. Quantum optomechanical systems offer prospects of studying such dynamics in a qualitatively different regime - with few individually addressable modes amenable to continuous quantum measurement and thermalization times that vastly exceed those observed in cold atomic systems. We have experimentally realized a dynamical continuous phase transition in a quantum compatible nondegenerate mechanical parametric oscillator. This system is formally equivalent to the optical parametric amplifiers whose dynamics have been a subject of intense theoretical study. We experimentally verify its phase diagram and observe nonequilibrium behavior that was only theorized, but never directly observed, in the context of optical parametric amplifiers. We discuss prospects of using nonequilibrium protocols such as quenches in optomechanical systems to amplify weak nonclassical correlations and to realize macroscopic nonclassical states. This work was supported by the DARPA QuASAR program through a Grant from the ARO and the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium manybody dynamics.

  15. Effects of environmental sounds on the guessability of animated graphic symbols.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Ashley C; Schlosser, Ralf W; Gygi, Brian; Shane, Howard C; Kong, Ying-Yee; Book, Lorraine; Macduff, Kelly; Hearn, Emilia

    2014-12-01

    Graphic symbols are a necessity for pre-literate children who use aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems (including non-electronic communication boards and speech generating devices), as well as for mobile technologies using AAC applications. Recently, developers of the Autism Language Program (ALP) Animated Graphics Set have added environmental sounds to animated symbols representing verbs in an attempt to enhance their iconicity. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of environmental sounds (added to animated graphic symbols representing verbs) in terms of naming. Participants included 46 children with typical development between the ages of 3;0 to 3;11 (years;months). The participants were randomly allocated to a condition of symbols with environmental sounds or a condition without environmental sounds. Results indicated that environmental sounds significantly enhanced the naming accuracy of animated symbols for verbs. Implications in terms of symbol selection, symbol refinement, and future symbol development will be discussed.

  16. Distinctive Role of Symbolic Number Sense in Mediating the Mathematical Abilities of Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Hiniker, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Despite reports of mathematical talent in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), little is known about basic number processing abilities in affected children. We investigated number sense, the ability to rapidly assess quantity information, in 36 children with ASD and 61 typically developing controls. Numerical acuity was assessed using symbolic (Arabic numerals) as well as non-symbolic (dot array) formats. We found significant impairments in non-symbolic acuity in children with ASD, but symbolic acuity was intact. Symbolic acuity mediated the relationship between non-symbolic acuity and mathematical abilities only in children with ASD, indicating a distinctive role for symbolic number sense in the acquisition of mathematical proficiency in this group. Our findings suggest that symbolic systems may help children with ASD organize imprecise information. PMID:26659551

  17. The data system dynamic simulation /DSDS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooper, J. W.; Piner, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the development by NASA of the data system dynamic simulation (DSDS) which provides a data system simulation capability for a broad range of programs, with the capability to model and simulate all or any portion of an end-to-end data system to multiple levels of fidelity. Versatility is achieved by specifying parameters which define the performance characteristics of data system components, and by specifying control and data paths in a data system. DSDS helps reduce overall simulation cost and the time required for obtaining a data systems analysis, and helps provide both early realistic representations of data systems and the flexibility to study design changes and operating strategies.

  18. Similarity Metrics for Closed Loop Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark S.; Yang, Lee C.; Bedrossian, Naz; Hall, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent and in what ways can two closed-loop dynamic systems be said to be "similar?" This question arises in a wide range of dynamic systems modeling and control system design applications. For example, bounds on error models are fundamental to the controller optimization with modern control design methods. Metrics such as the structured singular value are direct measures of the degree to which properties such as stability or performance are maintained in the presence of specified uncertainties or variations in the plant model. Similarly, controls-related areas such as system identification, model reduction, and experimental model validation employ measures of similarity between multiple realizations of a dynamic system. Each area has its tools and approaches, with each tool more or less suited for one application or the other. Similarity in the context of closed-loop model validation via flight test is subtly different from error measures in the typical controls oriented application. Whereas similarity in a robust control context relates to plant variation and the attendant affect on stability and performance, in this context similarity metrics are sought that assess the relevance of a dynamic system test for the purpose of validating the stability and performance of a "similar" dynamic system. Similarity in the context of system identification is much more relevant than are robust control analogies in that errors between one dynamic system (the test article) and another (the nominal "design" model) are sought for the purpose of bounding the validity of a model for control design and analysis. Yet system identification typically involves open-loop plant models which are independent of the control system (with the exception of limited developments in closed-loop system identification which is nonetheless focused on obtaining open-loop plant models from closed-loop data). Moreover the objectives of system identification are not the same as a flight test and

  19. Automated symbolic calculations in nonequilibrium thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Martin; Hütter, Markus

    2010-12-01

    We cast the Jacobi identity for continuous fields into a local form which eliminates the need to perform any partial integration to the expense of performing variational derivatives. This allows us to test the Jacobi identity definitely and efficiently and to provide equations between different components defining a potential Poisson bracket. We provide a simple Mathematica TM notebook which allows to perform this task conveniently, and which offers some additional functionalities of use within the framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics: reversible equations of change for fields, and the conservation of entropy during the reversible dynamics. Program summaryProgram title: Poissonbracket.nb Catalogue identifier: AEGW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 227 952 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 268 918 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica TM 7.0 Computer: Any computer running Mathematica TM 6.0 and later versions Operating system: Linux, MacOS, Windows RAM: 100 Mb Classification: 4.2, 5, 23 Nature of problem: Testing the Jacobi identity can be a very complex task depending on the structure of the Poisson bracket. The Mathematica TM notebook provided here solves this problem using a novel symbolic approach based on inherent properties of the variational derivative, highly suitable for the present tasks. As a by product, calculations performed with the Poisson bracket assume a compact form. Solution method: The problem is first cast into a form which eliminates the need to perform partial integration for arbitrary functionals at the expense of performing variational derivatives. The corresponding equations are conveniently obtained using

  20. Phase control of intermittency in dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Samuel; Mariño, Inés P; Salvadori, Francesco; Meucci, Riccardo; Sanjuán, Miguel A F; Arecchi, F T

    2006-07-01

    We present a nonfeedback method to tame or enhance crisis-induced intermittency in dynamical systems. By adding a small harmonic perturbation to a parameter of the system, the intermittent behavior can be suppressed or enhanced depending on the value of the phase difference between the main driving and the perturbation. The validity of the method is shown both in the model and in an experiment with a CO2 laser. An analysis of this scheme applied to the quadratic map near crisis illustrates the role of phase control in nonlinear dynamical systems.