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Sample records for symptom og operation

  1. An analysis of post-traumatic stress symptoms in United States Air Force drone operators.

    PubMed

    Chappelle, Wayne; Goodman, Tanya; Reardon, Laura; Thompson, William

    2014-06-01

    Remotely piloted aircraft (RPA), commonly referred to as "drones," have emerged over the past decade as an innovative warfighting tool. Given there is a paucity of empirical research assessing drone operators, the purpose of this study was to assess for the prevalence of PTSD symptoms among this cohort. Of the 1084 United States Air Force (USAF) drone operators that participated, a total of 4.3% endorsed a pattern of symptoms of moderate to extreme level of severity meeting criteria outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-4th edition. The incidence of PTSD among USAF drone operators in this study was lower than rates of PTSD (10-18%) among military personnel returning from deployment but higher than incidence rates (less than 1%) of USAF drone operators reported in electronic medical records. Although low PTSD rates may be promising, limitations to this study are discussed.

  2. An analysis of post-traumatic stress symptoms in United States Air Force drone operators.

    PubMed

    Chappelle, Wayne; Goodman, Tanya; Reardon, Laura; Thompson, William

    2014-06-01

    Remotely piloted aircraft (RPA), commonly referred to as "drones," have emerged over the past decade as an innovative warfighting tool. Given there is a paucity of empirical research assessing drone operators, the purpose of this study was to assess for the prevalence of PTSD symptoms among this cohort. Of the 1084 United States Air Force (USAF) drone operators that participated, a total of 4.3% endorsed a pattern of symptoms of moderate to extreme level of severity meeting criteria outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-4th edition. The incidence of PTSD among USAF drone operators in this study was lower than rates of PTSD (10-18%) among military personnel returning from deployment but higher than incidence rates (less than 1%) of USAF drone operators reported in electronic medical records. Although low PTSD rates may be promising, limitations to this study are discussed. PMID:24907535

  3. Zenker’s diverticulum: aetiopathogenesis, symptoms and diagnosis. Comparison of operative methods

    PubMed Central

    Nehring, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Zenker’s diverticulum is an alimentary tract pouch localized in the area of the upper esophageal sphincter. Treatment procedure complications and coexisting diseases constitute a serious diagnostic and therapeutic problem. Characteristic symptoms and signs facilitate differential diagnosis, simultaneously being real patient maladies. There are many treatment procedures leading to pouch septum reduction and decrease of upper esophageal sphincter pressure. After years of experience in operating and endoscopic treatments we found it necessary to compare these different methods. PMID:24868270

  4. Associations of emotional arousal, dissociation and symptom severity with operant conditioning in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Paret, Christian; Hoesterey, Steffen; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Schmahl, Christian

    2016-10-30

    Those with borderline personality disorder (BPD) display altered evaluations regarding reward and punishment compared to others. The processing of rewards is basal for operant conditioning. However, studies addressing operant conditioning in BPD patients are rare. In the current study, an operant conditioning task combining learning acquisition and reversal was used. BPD patients and matched healthy controls (HCs) were exposed to aversive and neutral stimuli to assess the influence of emotion on learning. Picture content, dissociation, aversive tension and symptom severity were rated. Error rates were measured. Results showed no group interactions between aversive versus neutral scenes. The higher emotional arousal, dissociation and tension, the worse the acquisition, but not reversal, scores were for BPD patients. Scores from the Borderline Symptom List were associated with more errors in the reversal, but not the acquisition phase. The results are preliminary evidence for impaired acquisition learning due to increased emotional arousal, dissociation and tension in BPD patients. A failure to process punishment in the reversal phase was associated with symptom severity and may be related to neuropsychological dysfunctioning involving the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Conclusions are limited due to the correlational study design and the small sample size. PMID:27491014

  5. Associations of emotional arousal, dissociation and symptom severity with operant conditioning in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Paret, Christian; Hoesterey, Steffen; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Schmahl, Christian

    2016-10-30

    Those with borderline personality disorder (BPD) display altered evaluations regarding reward and punishment compared to others. The processing of rewards is basal for operant conditioning. However, studies addressing operant conditioning in BPD patients are rare. In the current study, an operant conditioning task combining learning acquisition and reversal was used. BPD patients and matched healthy controls (HCs) were exposed to aversive and neutral stimuli to assess the influence of emotion on learning. Picture content, dissociation, aversive tension and symptom severity were rated. Error rates were measured. Results showed no group interactions between aversive versus neutral scenes. The higher emotional arousal, dissociation and tension, the worse the acquisition, but not reversal, scores were for BPD patients. Scores from the Borderline Symptom List were associated with more errors in the reversal, but not the acquisition phase. The results are preliminary evidence for impaired acquisition learning due to increased emotional arousal, dissociation and tension in BPD patients. A failure to process punishment in the reversal phase was associated with symptom severity and may be related to neuropsychological dysfunctioning involving the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Conclusions are limited due to the correlational study design and the small sample size.

  6. Ear and vestibular symptoms in train operators after sudden air pressure changes in trains.

    PubMed

    Francois, Hugues M A; Vantrappen, Luc; Van Rompaey, Vincent; Godderis, Lode

    2015-01-01

    A healthy 31-year-old train operator presented to our occupational health clinic reporting ear aches, headaches, dizziness, unsteadiness and even slight tinnitus. These symptoms first appeared when the patient started operating from a new train cabin. He described a sudden pressure gradient, experienced on some parts of the trajectory, which might have caused these problems. Although the cabins were equipped with a pressure equalising device, this was usually switched off because of the device creating an uncomfortable feeling in the cabin. The literature describes sudden pressure gradients as possible factors for passenger discomfort. PMID:26678694

  7. Pre-operative function, motivation and duration of symptoms predict sporting participation after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, M; Frey, S; Parratte, S; Flecher, X; Argenson, J N

    2014-08-01

    There is little in the literature on the level of participation in sports which patients undertake after total hip replacement (THR). Our aims in this study were to determine first, the level of sporting activity, second, the predictive factors for returning to sporting activity, and third, the correlation between participation in sports and satisfaction after THR. We retrospectively identified 815 patients who had undergone THR between 1995 and 2005. All were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire regarding their sporting activity. A total of 571 patients (71%) met the inclusion criteria and completed the evaluation. At a mean follow-up of 9.8 years (sd 2.9), 366 patients (64%) returned to sporting activity as defined by a University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score of > 5. The main reasons that patients had for refraining from sports were fear of dislocation (65; 31.6%), avoiding wear (52; 25.4%), and the recommendation of the surgeon (34; 16.6%). There was a significant relationship between higher post-operative participation in sport in those patients with a higher pre-operative Harris hip score (HHS) (p = 0.0074), motivation to participate in sporting activities (p = 0.00022) and a shorter duration of symptoms (p = 0.0034). Finally, there was a correlation between age (p = 0.00013), UCLA score (p = 0.012) and pre-operative HHS (p = 0.00091) and satisfaction. In conclusion, we found that most patients participate in sporting activity after THR, regardless of the advice of their surgeon, and that there is a correlation between the level of participation and pre-operative function, motivation, duration of symptoms and post-operative satisfaction.

  8. Evaluation of respiratory symptoms and respiratory protection behavior among poultry workers in small farming operations.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Gregory D; Shaw, Robert; Prentice, Matthew; Tutor-Marcom, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural workers who work in enclosed poultry operations are at increased risk of respiratory exposure to atmospheric contaminants, including dusts, endotoxins, particulate from feathers, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide from animal excrement. Given the relatively large number of small, family-run poultry farms in North Carolina, there has been relatively little research in the area documenting human lung function and perception of using respiratory protection among poultry workers. This study assesses respiratory health, knowledge, and perception of wearing respiratory protection among a sample of poultry workers attending a regional farm show in North Carolina. Lung function (spirometry), airway inflammation (exhaled nitric oxide), self-reported respiratory symptoms, and behavior of wearing respiratory protection were evaluated. Overall, mean lung function values were slightly lower than normal predicted values. The majority of participants ranked using respiratory protection as very important (51.9%); however, actual self-reported behavior was low (16.7%). In bivariate analysis, associations between the importance of wearing respiratory protection and the number of poultry houses (P=.04), as well as using a respirator and the number of poultry houses (P=.01) were statistically significant. Improved educational opportunities, including fit-testing and proper respiratory selection, should be emphasized for workers at small, poultry farm operations.

  9. Subjective symptoms and their evolution in a small group of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operators recently engaged.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, G; Ligabue, G; Gobba, F

    2015-09-01

    Using a specific questionnaire, we examined subjective symptoms in a group of 17 physicians (9 males and 8 females, mean age 32.9 ± 3.71), attending a Postgraduate Medical School in Radiology and engaged in MRI for less than 1 year. Sixteen subjects (94%) reported the presence of at least one of the investigated symptoms during the period of MRI activity. The main symptoms were: unusual drowsiness/tiredness (88%), concentration problems (82%), headaches (76%), sleep disorders (47%), nausea (47%), illusion of movement (47%) and dizziness/vertigo (35%); the former two were subjectively related to MRI by the majority of the operators. These symptoms appeared (or worsened) in more than 15 min and, in the vast majority disappeared 30 min, or more, after the end of exposure. In 13 subjects (81%), the symptom (or some symptoms) appeared at least weekly. In this small group of health care workers recently exposed to MRI, the prevalence of subjective symptoms was higher than reported in other similar studies but, notably, the majority of subjects (77%) reported a regression within 4-8 weeks, suggesting some form of adaptation.

  10. Screening for Depressive Disorders Using the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire Anhedonic Depression Scale: A Receiver-Operating Characteristic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredemeier, Keith; Spielberg, Jeffery M.; Silton, Rebecca Levin; Berenbaum, Howard; Heller, Wendy; Miller, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the utility of the anhedonic depression scale from the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire (MASQ-AD scale) as a way to screen for depressive disorders. Using receiver-operating characteristic analysis, we examined the sensitivity and specificity of the full 22-item MASQ-AD scale, as well as the 8- and 14-item…

  11. Communication Research in Aviation and Space Operations: Symptoms and Strategies of Crew Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Hart, Sandra G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The day-to-day operators of today's aerospace systems work under increasing pressures to accomplish more with less. They work in operational systems which are complex, technology-based, and high-risk; in which incidents and accidents have far-reaching and costly consequences. For these and other reasons, there is concern that the safety net formerly built upon redundant systems and abundant resources may become overburdened. Although we know that human ingenuity can overcome incredible odds, human nature can also fail in unpredictable ways. Over the last 20 years, a large percentage of aviation accidents and incidents have been attributed to human errors rather than hardware or environmental factors alone. A class of errors have been identified which are not due to a lack of individual, technical competencies. Rather, they are due to the failure of teams to utilize readily available resources or information in a timely fashion. These insights began a training revolution in the aviation industry called Cockpit Resource Management, which later became known as Crew Resource Management (CRM) as its concepts and applications extended to teams beyond the flightdeck. Then, as now, communication has been a cornerstone in CRM training since crew coordination and resource management largely resides within information transfer processes--both within flightcrews, and between flightcrews and the ground operations teams that support them. The research I will describe takes its roots in CRM history as we began to study communication processes in order to discover symptoms of crew coordination problems, as well as strategies of effective crew management. On the one hand, communication is often the means or the tool by which team members manage their resources, solve problems, maintain situational awareness and procedural discipline. Conversely, it is the lack of planning and resource management, loss of vigilance and situational awareness, and non-standard communications that are

  12. Association of individual and work-related risk factors with musculoskeletal symptoms among Iranian sewing machine operators.

    PubMed

    Dianat, Iman; Kord, Madeh; Yahyazade, Parvin; Karimi, Mohammad Ali; Stedmon, Alex W

    2015-11-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated working conditions and the occurrence of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms among 251 Iranian sewing machine operators. A questionnaire and direct observations of working postures using the rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) method were used. A high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms, particularly in the neck/shoulders, back and hands/wrists were found. The mean RULA grand score of 5.7 highlighted a poor sewing workstation design and indicated that most operators (with posture assessed at action level 3) needed an investigation and changes in their working habits soon. Work-related factors (including number of years worked as an operator, prolonged working hours per shift, long duration of sitting work without a break, feeling pressure due to work and working postures) and individual factors (including age, gender, BMI and regular sport/physical activities) were associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in multiple logistic regression models. The findings add to the understanding of working conditions of those jobs involving sewing activities and emphasise the need for ergonomic interventions to reduce musculoskeletal symptoms in the future. PMID:26154216

  13. Combined PTSD and depressive symptoms interact with post-deployment social support to predict suicidal ideation in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom veterans.

    PubMed

    Debeer, Bryann B; Kimbrel, Nathan A; Meyer, Eric C; Gulliver, Suzy B; Morissette, Sandra B

    2014-05-30

    Rates of suicide are alarmingly high in military and veteran samples. Suicide rates are particularly elevated among those with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, which share overlapping symptoms and frequently co-occur. Identifying and confirming factors that reduce, suicide risk among veterans with PTSD and depression is imperative. The proposed study evaluated, whether post-deployment social support moderated the influence of PTSD-depression symptoms on, suicidal ideation among Veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan using state of the art clinical, diagnostic interviews and self-report measures. Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Veterans (n=145) were invited to, participate in a study evaluating returning Veterans׳ experiences. As predicted, PTSD-depression, symptoms had almost no effect on suicidal ideation (SI) when post-deployment social support was high; however, when, post-deployment social support was low, PTSD-depression symptoms were positively associated with, SI. Thus, social support may be an important factor for clinicians to assess in the context of PTSD and, depressive symptoms. Future research is needed to prospectively examine the inter-relationship, between PTSD/depression and social support on suicidal risk, as well as whether interventions to, improve social support result in decreased suicidality.

  14. Combined PTSD and Depressive Symptoms Interact with Post-Deployment Social Support to Predict Suicidal Ideation in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans

    PubMed Central

    DeBeer, Bryann B.; Kimbrel, Nathan A.; Meyer, Eric C.; Gulliver, Suzy B.; Morissette, Sandra B.

    2016-01-01

    Rates of suicide are alarmingly high in military and veteran samples. Suicide rates are particularly elevated among those with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, which share overlapping symptoms and frequently co-occur. Identifying and confirming factors that reduce suicide risk among veterans with PTSD and depression is imperative. The proposed study evaluated whether post-deployment social support moderated the influence of PTSD-depression symptoms on suicidal ideation among veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan using state of the art clinical diagnostic interviews and self-report measures. Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans (n=145) were invited to participate in a study evaluation returning veterans’ experiences. As predicted, PTSD-depression symptoms had almost no effect on suicidal ideation (SI) when post-deployment social support was high; however, when post-deployment social support was low, PTSD-depression symptoms were positively associated with SI. Thus, social support may be an important factor for clinicians to assess in the context of PTSD and depressive symptoms. Future research is needed to prospectively examine the interrelationship between PTSD/depression and social support on suicidal risk, as well as whether interventions to improve social support result in decreased suicidality. PMID:24612971

  15. Gastrointestinal symptoms, motility, and transit after the Roux-en-Y operation

    SciTech Connect

    Perino, L.E.; Adcock, K.A.; Goff, J.S.

    1988-04-01

    Roux-en-Y patients have symptoms that vary from almost none to inability to tolerate oral feedings. This study was designed to determine whether there is a relationship between a patient's symptoms and the function of the gastric remnant or the Roux-limb. Gastric remnant and Roux-limb emptying were studied in eight patients with technetium-99m-labeled oatmeal and Roux-limb motor activity was measured with a water-perfused manometry system. We found that gastric emptying was rarely significantly slowed, but emptying of the Roux-limb was delayed in several patients. We also found that there was a rough correlation between the patient's symptoms and the degree of abnormal motility found in the Roux-limb. There is no known reason for these abnormalities in Roux-limb function in some patients after a Roux-en-Y, but our finding of worse abnormalities in those who had multiple previous gastric surgeries suggests that the symptoms and dysfunction may be related to the number of surgeries, as well as to the type of surgery.

  16. Peripheral eosinophilia and respiratory symptoms in rubber injection press operators: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R J; Bascom, R; Yang, W N; Fisher, J F; Baser, M E; Greenhut, J; Baker, J H

    1986-01-01

    To evaluate a suspected association between an outbreak of acute respiratory illness and eosinophilia and employment as a rubber worker, we performed a retrospective review of medical records of rubber workers employed from September 1983 to July 1984 in a plant housing a thermoinjection process. Twenty-five workers met the case definition of a respiratory illness requiring a physician visit. The predominant respiratory illness was acute in onset with cough, chest tightness, and dyspnea. Peripheral eosinophilia, up to 40% of white blood cells in a peripheral smear, was seen in 10 of 18 (56%) cases. Twenty-one of 25 white males with respiratory symptoms were employed in the thermoinjection process (odds ratio = 22, p less than .001). Smoking and employment in this process contributed independently to an increased risk of being a case as determined by a logistic regression analysis. Return to the plant building caused recurrence of symptoms in most cases, and these workers have been transferred or left the company. We conclude that a strong previously unrecognized association exists between employment in this neoprene rubber thermoinjection process and the development of an acute respiratory illness.

  17. Symptoms of psychological distress and post-traumatic stress disorder in United States Air Force "drone" operators.

    PubMed

    Chappelle, Wayne L; McDonald, Kent D; Prince, Lillian; Goodman, Tanya; Ray-Sannerud, Bobbie N; Thompson, William

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study is to repeat a survey administered in 2010 to assess for changes in mental health among United States Air Force aircrew operating Predator/Reaper remotely piloted aircraft, also commonly referred to as "drones." Participants were assessed for self-reported sources of occupational stress, levels of clinical distress using the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) using the PTSD Checklist-Military Version. A total of 1,094 aircrew responded to the web-based survey composed of the commercially available standardized instruments mentioned above. The survey also contained nonstandardized items asking participants to report the main sources of their occupational stress, as well as questions addressing demographics and work-related characteristics. The estimated response rate to the survey was 49%. Study results reveal the most problematic self-reported stressors are operational: low manning, extra duties/administrative tasks, rotating shift work, and long hours. The results also reveal 10.72% of operators self-reported experiencing high levels of distress and 1.57% reported high levels of PTSD symptomology. The results are lower than findings from the 2010 survey and from soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Implications of the study and recommendations for United States Air Force line leadership and mental health providers are discussed.

  18. Symptoms of psychological distress and post-traumatic stress disorder in United States Air Force "drone" operators.

    PubMed

    Chappelle, Wayne L; McDonald, Kent D; Prince, Lillian; Goodman, Tanya; Ray-Sannerud, Bobbie N; Thompson, William

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study is to repeat a survey administered in 2010 to assess for changes in mental health among United States Air Force aircrew operating Predator/Reaper remotely piloted aircraft, also commonly referred to as "drones." Participants were assessed for self-reported sources of occupational stress, levels of clinical distress using the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) using the PTSD Checklist-Military Version. A total of 1,094 aircrew responded to the web-based survey composed of the commercially available standardized instruments mentioned above. The survey also contained nonstandardized items asking participants to report the main sources of their occupational stress, as well as questions addressing demographics and work-related characteristics. The estimated response rate to the survey was 49%. Study results reveal the most problematic self-reported stressors are operational: low manning, extra duties/administrative tasks, rotating shift work, and long hours. The results also reveal 10.72% of operators self-reported experiencing high levels of distress and 1.57% reported high levels of PTSD symptomology. The results are lower than findings from the 2010 survey and from soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Implications of the study and recommendations for United States Air Force line leadership and mental health providers are discussed. PMID:25102551

  19. Optimism measured pre-operatively is associated with reduced pain intensity and physical symptom reporting after coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ronaldson, Amy; Poole, Lydia; Kidd, Tara; Leigh, Elizabeth; Jahangiri, Marjan; Steptoe, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Objective Optimism is thought to be associated with long-term favourable outcomes for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Our objective was to examine the association between optimism and post-operative pain and physical symptoms in CABG patients. Methods We assessed optimism pre-operatively in 197 adults undergoing CABG surgery, and then followed them up 6–8 weeks after the procedure to measure affective pain, pain intensity, and physical symptom reporting directly pertaining to CABG surgery. Results Greater optimism measured pre-operatively was significantly associated with lower pain intensity (β = − 0.150, CI = − 0.196 to − 0.004, p = .042) and fewer physical symptoms following surgery (β = − 0.287, CI = − 0.537 to − 0.036, p = .025), but not with affective pain, after controlling for demographic, clinical and behavioural covariates, including negative affectivity. Conclusions Optimism is a modest, yet significant, predictor of pain intensity and physical symptom reporting after CABG surgery. Having positive expectations may promote better recovery. PMID:25129850

  20. Comparing the Neuropsychological Test Performance of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Veterans with and without Blast Exposure, Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Storzbach, Daniel; O'Neil, Maya Elin; Roost, Saw-Myo; Kowalski, Halina; Iverson, Grant L; Binder, Laurence M; Fann, Jesse R; Huckans, Marilyn

    2015-05-01

    To compare neuropsychological test performance of Veterans with and without mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), blast exposure, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. We compared the neuropsychological test performance of 49 Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Veterans diagnosed with MTBI resulting from combat blast-exposure to that of 20 blast-exposed OEF/OIF Veterans without history of MTBI, 23 OEF/OIF Veterans with no blast exposure or MTBI history, and 40 matched civilian controls. Comparison of neuropsychological test performance across all four participant groups showed a complex pattern of mixed significant and mostly nonsignificant results, with omnibus tests significant for measures of attention, spatial abilities, and executive function. The most consistent pattern was the absence of significant differences between blast-exposed Veterans with MTBI history and blast-exposed Veterans without MTBI history. When blast-exposed Veteran groups with and without MTBI history were aggregated and compared to non-blast-exposed Veterans, there were significant differences for some measures of learning and memory, spatial abilities, and executive function. However, covariation for severity of PTSD symptoms eliminated all significant omnibus neuropsychological differences between Veteran groups. Our results suggest that, although some mild neurocognitive effects were associated with blast exposure, these neurocognitive effects might be better explained by PTSD symptom severity rather than blast exposure or MTBI history alone.

  1. Premenstrual symptoms.

    PubMed

    1973-03-24

    Data is reviewed on premenstrual symptoms which have been related to high suicide and accident rates, employment absentee rates, poor academic performance and acute psychiatric problems. A recent study of healthy young women indicated that 39% had troublesome premenstrual symptoms, 54% passed clots in their menses, 70% had cyclical localized acneiform eruptions and only 17% failed to experience menstrual pain. Common menstrual disorders are classified as either dysmenorrhea or the premenstrual syndrome. Symptoms for the latter usually begin 2-12 days prior to menstruation and include nervous tension, irritability, anxiety, depression, bloated breasts and abdomen, swollen fingers and legs, headaches, dizziness, occasional hypersomia, excessive thirst and appetite. Some women may display an increased susceptibility to migraine, vasomotor rhinitis, asthma, urticaria and epilepsy. Symptoms are usually relieved with the onset of menses. While a definitive etiological theory remains to be substantiated, symptomatic relief has been reported with salt and water restriction and simple diuretics used 7 to 10 days premenstrually. Diazapam or chlordiazepoxide treatment is recommended before oral contraceptive therapy. The premenstrual syndrome may persist after menopause, is unaffected by parity, and sufferers score highly on neuroticism tests. Primary or spasmodic dysmenorrhea occurs in young women, tends to decline with age and parity and has no correlation with premenstrual symptoms or neuroticism. Spasmodic or colicky pain begins and is most severe on the first day of menstruation and may continue for 2-3 days. Treatment of dysmenorrhea with psychotropic drugs or narcotics is discouraged due to the risk of dependence and abuse. Temporary relief for disabling pain may be obtained with oral contraceptives containing synthetic estrogen and progestogen but the inherent risks should be acknowledged. Both disorders have been correlated to menstrual irregularity. Amenorrhea in

  2. Anthrax: Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... hands Inhalation anthrax symptoms can include: Fever and chills Chest Discomfort Shortness of breath Confusion or dizziness ... aches Gastrointestinal anthrax symptoms can include: Fever and chills Swelling of neck or neck glands Sore throat ...

  3. HIV Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Home > HIV/AIDS > What is HIV/AIDS? HIV/AIDS This information in Spanish ( en español ) HIV symptoms Photo courtesy of AIDS.gov More information ... and brain Return to top More information on HIV symptoms Explore other publications and websites Basic Information ...

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Remifemin on Peri-Menopausal Symptoms Induced by Post-Operative GnRH-a Therapy for Endometriosis: A Randomized Study versus Tibolone

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiming; Gao, Hongyan; Li, Qin; Cong, Jing; Wu, Jie; Pu, Dahua; Jiang, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate clinical efficacy and safety of Remifemin on peri-menopausal symptoms in endometriosis patients with a post-operative GnRH-a therapy. Material/Methods We treated 116 women who had endometriosis with either Remifemin (n=56) 20 mg bid po or Tibolone (n=60) 2.5 mg qd po for 12 weeks after GnRH-a injection. The efficacy was evaluated by Kupperman menopausal index (KMI), and hot flash/sweating scores. The safety parameters such as liver and renal functions, lipid profile, endometrial thickness, and serum sex hormone level, as well as the incidence of adverse events were recorded. Results (1) After GnRH-a therapy, KMI and hot flash/sweating scores in both groups increased significantly (P<0.05) but we found no significant difference for KMI (2.87±1.40 for Remifemin and 2.70±1.26 for Tibolone) and hot flash/sweating scores (0.94±1.72 for Remifemin and 1.06±1.78 for Tibolone) between the 2 groups (P>0.05). (2) No statistical change was observed in liver or renal functions and lipid profile in both groups before and after the treatment (P>0.05). The post-therapeutic serum FSH, LH, and E2 level and endometrial thickness decreased remarkably in both groups (P<0.05). E2 level in the Remifemin group was obviously lower than that in the Tibolone group (P<0.05), and FSH and LH levels were strongly higher (P<0.05). No significant difference in thickness were found in either group (P>0.05). The Remifemin group had far fewer adverse events than the Tibolone group (P<0. 05). Conclusions Compared with Tibolone, Remifemin had a similar clinical efficacy and was safer for the peri-menopausal symptoms induced by GnRH-a in endometriosis patients. PMID:25321621

  5. Plague Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Plague Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Home Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics ...

  6. Norovirus Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Español: SÃntomas Prevent Dehydration Drink plenty of liquids to replace fluids that ...

  7. Rotavirus Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... PATH's Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  8. Symptoms: Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Paskett, Electra D

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema is one of the main late effects from breast cancer treatment affecting 3-60% of breast cancer survivors. Primarily occurring in the hand, arm, and/or affected breast, symptoms of lymphedema include swelling, pain, redness, restriction of arm/hand movement, tightness and feelings of fullness. These symptoms not only may limit physical functioning but also negatively affect quality of life, body image, social functioning, and financial status of breast cancer survivors with lymphedema. Unfortunately, there are no standardized methods for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer-related lymphedema. Despite its prevalence and lack of clinical guidelines, lymphedema is one of the most poorly understood, relatively underestimated, and least researched complications of cancer treatment. This chapter reviews the current problem of breast cancer-related lymphedema by investigating prevention and risk reduction strategies, diagnosis, and treatment. In addition, this chapter identifies future research opportunities focusing on prevention and risk reduction strategies, quality of life and physical function, surveillance, patient education, cost, diagnosis, and treatment. Challenges and recommendations for future research in these areas, particularly among underserved populations, are discussed. PMID:26059932

  9. ogs6 - a new concept for porous-fractured media simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Dmitri; Bilke, Lars; Fischer, Thomas; Rink, Karsten; Wang, Wenqing; Watanabe, Norihiro; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    OpenGeoSys (OGS) is a scientific open-source initiative for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical/chemical (THMC) processes in porous and fractured media, continuously developed since the mid-eighties. The basic concept is to provide a flexible numerical framework for solving coupled multi-field problems. OGS is targeting mainly on applications in environmental geoscience, e.g. in the fields of contaminant hydrology, water resources management, waste deposits, or geothermal energy systems, but it has also been successfully applied to new topics in energy storage recently. OGS is actively participating several international benchmarking initiatives, e.g. DECOVALEX (waste management), CO2BENCH (CO2 storage and sequestration), SeSBENCH (reactive transport processes) and HM-Intercomp (coupled hydrosystems). Despite the broad applicability of OGS in geo-, hydro- and energy-sciences, several shortcomings became obvious concerning the computational efficiency as well as the code structure became too sophisticated for further efficient development. OGS-5 was designed for object-oriented FEM applications. However, in many multi-field problems a certain flexibility of tailored numerical schemes is essential. Therefore, a new concept was designed to overcome existing bottlenecks. The paradigms for ogs6 are: - Flexibility of numerical schemes (FEM#FVM#FDM), - Computational efficiency (PetaScale ready), - Developer- and user-friendly. ogs6 has a module-oriented architecture based on thematic libraries (e.g. MeshLib, NumLib) on the large scale and uses object-oriented approach for the small scale interfaces. Usage of a linear algebra library (Eigen3) for the mathematical operations together with the ISO C++11 standard increases the expressiveness of the code and makes it more developer-friendly. The new C++ standard also makes the template meta-programming technique code used for compile-time optimizations more compact. We have transitioned the main code development to

  10. Cryptorchidism --disease or symptom?

    PubMed

    Toppari, Jorma; Rodprasert, Wiwat; Virtanen, Helena E

    2014-05-01

    Testes descend to the scrotum normally before birth. When they fail to do so, the boy is cryptorchid and has an increased risk for testicular germ cell cancer and subfertility later in life. Early correction of maldescent by orchiopexy operation improves the spermatogenetic capacity of the testis but does not return the testicular cancer risk to the control level. Testicular descent is regulated by testis-derived hormones testosterone and insulin-like peptide 3. Cryptorchidism can therefore be considered a symptom of impaired testicular function that may also be linked to other testicular diseases, such as germ cell cancer and subfertility. Early orchiopexy can alleviate the effects of cryptorchidism on spermatogenesis, but alertness for testicular cancer should be maintained. In searching the genetic and environmental reasons for these diseases, it is useful to consider their connection with each other. PMID:24786701

  11. Symptoms of Aspergillosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov . Fungal Diseases Types of Fungal Diseases Aspergillosis Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment Healthcare Professionals Statistics More Resources Blastomycosis Definition Symptoms Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment & Outcomes ...

  12. Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Informed Cancer Home What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Ovarian cancer may cause one or more of these signs ...

  13. Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Signs and Symptoms Partly because there are different types ... This section presents a general picture of CMT signs and symptoms. Contractures and bone deformities Many people ...

  14. Dermatomyositis: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Signs and Symptoms What happens to someone with dermatomyositis? ... be damaged as a result. About Dermatomyositis (DM) Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Causes/Inheritance Medical Management Research ...

  15. Bell's Palsy Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bell's Palsy Sections What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's Palsy Symptoms ... Bell's Palsy? Bell's Palsy Diagnosis Bell's Palsy Treatment Bell's Palsy Symptoms Reviewed by: Philip R Rizzuto, MD FACS ...

  16. Medications for Ataxia Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ropinirole (Requip) Rigidity : Pramipexole (Mirapex), Ropinirole (Requip) Sleep Disorders/Parasomnias (vivid dreams, nightmares, acting out dreams, sleepwalking) : Clonazepam. Sleep apnea symptoms must be evaluated with ...

  17. [Academician O.G. Gazenko and aviation medicine].

    PubMed

    Ushakov, I B; Bednenko, V S; Khomenko, M N; Stepanov, V K

    2008-01-01

    The paper analyzes the contribution of O.G. Gazenko to the theory and practice of aviation medicine in the period of his service at the State Test and Research Institute of Aviation and Space Medicine under the USSR Ministry of Defense (1947-1969). O.G. Gazenko took the leadership and participated in personally in the broad investigations of the altitude effects on human organism, medical care of the staff of AF units and troops based in the Arctic, improvement of life and duty conditions for pilots and technicians in hot climate, ejection seat testing, development of methods modeling erroneous pilot's actions in order to understand their triggers. PMID:19238922

  18. International Space Station United States Orbital Segment Oxygen Generation System On-Orbit Operational Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Robert J.; Howe, John, Jr.; Kulp, Galen W.; VanKeuren, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) United States Orbital Segment (USOS) Oxygen Generation System (OGS) was originally intended to be installed in ISS Node 3. The OGS rack delivery was accelerated, and it was launched to ISS in July of 2006 and installed in the US Laboratory Module. Various modification kits were installed to provide its interfaces, and the OGS was first activated in July of 2007 for 15 hours, In October of 2007 it was again activated for 76 hours with varied production rates and day/night cycling. Operational time in each instance was limited by the quantity of feedwater in a Payload Water Reservoir (PWR) bag. Feedwater will be provided by PWR bag until the USOS Water Recovery System (WRS) is delivered to SS in fall of 2008. This paper will discuss operating experience and characteristics of the OGS, as well as operational issues and their resolution.

  19. Pinunuuchi Po'og'ani: Southern Ute Indian Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberly, Stacey Inez (Wachimamachi [Antelope Woman])

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Pinunuuchi Po'og'ani, the Southern Ute Indian Academy, providing Montessori education for Southern Ute tribal members ages 6 weeks through 10 years and reviving the use of the Southern Ute language and culture among young students and their families. Describes how the program supports families, students, and staff, and incorporates…

  20. Listeriosis: Definition and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Listeria (Listeriosis) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Listeria (Listeriosis) Definition & Symptoms Outbreaks Listeriosis Linked to Frozen ...

  1. Medically Unexplained Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    WRIISC War Related Illness and Injury Study Center Office of Public Health Department of Veterans Affairs MEDICALLY UNEXPLAINED SYMPTOMS ... showed that CFS was more common in Gulf War Veterans than non- Gulf War Veterans ( Kang et ...

  2. Symptoms of Tickborne Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease , southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI) , Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) , ehrlichiosis , and tularemia can result ... or neurologic symptoms. The rash seen with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) varies greatly from person to ...

  3. Symptoms and Warning Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... excessive exercise, self-induced vomiting, misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas Other symptoms that may develop over ... with self-induced vomiting, misuse of laxatives and diuretics, fasting, and excessive exercise binging and purging in ...

  4. Cold symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colds are caused by a virus and can occur year-round. The common cold generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and ... symptoms include sore throat, cough, and headache. A cold usually lasts about 7 days, with perhaps a ...

  5. Fibromyalgia Symptoms and Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Bielefeldt, Klaus; Wasan, Ajay D.; Szigethy, Eva; Lotrich, Francis; DiMartini, Andrea F.

    2015-01-01

    Background An association between fibromyalgia and hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been previously described. However, the relationship between nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibromyalgia symptoms has not been assessed, though they share several risk factors. Aim We aimed to assess the factors associated with fibromyalgia symptoms across etiologies of liver disease. Methods Patients with cirrhosis due to HCV, NASH, or alcohol were recruited from an outpatient hepatology clinic and administered the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the modified 2010 American College of Rheumatology Diagnostic Criteria for Fibromyalgia. Serum inflammatory markers were measured with standard luminex assays. Results Of 193 participants, 53 (27 %) met criteria for fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia symptoms were significantly associated with etiology of liver disease (HCV: 35 %, NASH: 30 %, alcohol-related liver disease: 12 %, p < 0.01). Using logistic regression, mood symptoms (OR 1.14, 95 % CI 1.06, 1.22), sleep disturbance (OR 1.32, 95 % CI 1.16, 1.52), and etiology of liver disease (NASH vs. HCV not different, alcohol vs. HCV OR 0.19, 95 % CI 0.05, 0.63) were associated with fibromyalgia symptoms. If abdominal pain was included in the model, etiology became nonsignificant, indicating that it may be central sensitization due to abdominal pain in patients with chronic liver disease that explains fibromyalgia symptoms rather than the etiology of liver disease or inflammation. Conclusions Fibromyalgia symptoms were significantly associated with HCV and NASH cirrhosis and with psychiatric symptoms. Future work should focus on the underlying pathophysiology and management of widespread pain in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:25433921

  6. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research News Make a Difference Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy Print This Page Peripheral Neuropathy symptoms usually start ... slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: A sensation of wearing an invisible “ ...

  7. Management of Menopausal Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kaunitz, Andrew M.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2015-01-01

    Most menopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms, with bothersome symptoms often lasting longer than one decade. Hormone therapy (HT) represents the most effective treatment for these symptoms, with oral and transdermal estrogen formulations having comparable efficacy. Findings from the Women’s Health Initiative and other recent randomized clinical trials have helped to clarify the benefits and risks of combination estrogen-progestin and estrogen-alone therapy. Absolute risks observed with HT tended to be small, especially in younger women. Neither regimen affected all-cause mortality rates. Given the lower rates of adverse events on HT among women close to menopause onset and at lower baseline risk of cardiovascular disease, risk stratification and personalized risk assessment appears to represent a sound strategy for optimizing the benefit: risk profile and safety of hormone therapy. Systemic HT should not be arbitrarily stopped at age 65; instead treatment duration should be individualized based on patients’ risk profiles and personal preferences. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause represents a common condition that adversely impacts the quality of life of many menopausal women. Without treatment, symptoms worsen over time. Low-dose vaginal estrogen represents highly effective treatment for this condition. Because custom-compounded hormones have not been tested for efficacy or safety, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HT is preferred. A low dose formulation of paroxetine mesylate currently represents the only nonhormonal medication FDA-approved to treat vasomotor symptoms. Gynecologists and other clinicians who remain abreast of data addressing the benefit: risk profile of hormonal and nonhormonal treatments can help menopausal women make sound choices regarding management of menopausal symptoms. PMID:26348174

  8. Symptoms of gallstone disease.

    PubMed

    Diehl, A K

    1992-11-01

    The most certain symptomatic manifestation of gallstones is episodic upper abdominal pain. Characteristically, this pain is severe and located in the epigastrium and/or the right upper quadrant. The onset is relatively abrupt and often awakens the patient from sleep. The pain is steady in intensity, may radiate to the upper back, be associated with nausea and lasts for hours to up to a day. Dyspeptic symptoms of indigestion, belching, bloating, abdominal discomfort, heartburn and specific food intolerance are common in persons with gallstones, but are probably unrelated to the stones themselves and frequently persist after surgery. Many, if not most, persons with gallstones have no history of pain attacks. Persons discovered to have gallstones in the absence of typical symptoms appear to have an annual incidence of biliary pain of 2-5% during the initial years of follow-up, with perhaps a declining rate thereafter. Gallstone-related complications occur at a rate of less than 1% annually. Those whose stones are symptomatic at discovery have a more severe course, with approximately 6-10% suffering recurrent symptoms each year and 2% biliary complications. The far higher rates of symptom development reported in a few studies raise the possibility that these incidence estimates may be too low. The best predictors of future biliary pain are a history of pain at the time of diagnosis, female gender and possibly obesity. The risk of acute cholecystitis appears to be greater in those with large solitary stones, that of biliary pancreatitis in those with multiple small stones, and that of gallbladder cancer in those with large stones of any number. Drugs that inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins may now be the treatment of choice in patients with gallstones who are suffering acute pain attacks. Persistent dyspeptic symptoms occur frequently following cholecystectomy. A prolonged history of such symptoms prior to surgery and evidence of significant psychological distress

  9. Symptom Management of Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Craig; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes a treatment approach for the symptom management of bulimia that is a synthesis of various techniques, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, response prevention, relapse training, and psychodynamic therapy. The model has been a useful teaching tool for staff and patients in both group and individual formats. Addresses the challenges of…

  10. Bullying and PTSD Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idsoe, Thormod; Dyregrov, Atle; Idsoe, Ella Cosmovici

    2012-01-01

    PTSD symptoms related to school bullying have rarely been investigated, and never in national samples. We used data from a national survey to investigate this among students from grades 8 and 9 (n = 963). The prevalence estimates of exposure to bullying were within the range of earlier research findings. Multinomial logistic regression showed that…

  11. Teacher Testing: A Symptom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaker, Paul

    Current teacher testing is a symptom of what is wrong with American public education, rooted in invalid generalizations of method from one discipline to another. America's top educational policymakers are rarely educators, instead tending to be political leaders. The Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) has produced a…

  12. Therapeutics for multiple sclerosis symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zacharia, Aliza Bitton

    2011-01-01

    Symptoms management in multiple sclerosis is an integral part of its care. Accurate assessment and addressing the different symptoms provides increased quality of life among patients with multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis symptoms may be identified as primary, secondary, or tertiary symptoms. Primary symptoms, such as weakness, sensory loss, and ataxia, are directly related to demyelination and axonal loss. Secondary symptoms, such as urinary tract infections as a result of urinary retention, are a result of the primary symptoms. Tertiary symptoms, such as reactive depression or social isolation, are a result of the social and psychological consequences of the disease. Common multiple sclerosis symptoms include fatigue and weakness; decreased balance, spasticity and gait problems; depression and cognitive issues; bladder, bowel, and sexual deficits; visual and sensory loss; and neuropathic pain. Less-common symptoms include dysarthria and dysphagia, vertigo, and tremors. Rare symptoms in multiple sclerosis include seizures, hearing loss, and paralysis. Symptom management includes nonpharmacological methods, such as rehabilitation and psychosocial support, and pharmacological methods, ie, medications and surgical procedures. The keys to symptom management are awareness, knowledge, and coordination of care. Symptoms have to be recognized and management needs to be individualized. Multiple sclerosis therapeutics include nonpharmacological strategies that consist of lifestyle modifications, rehabilitation, social support, counseling, and pharmacological agents or surgical procedures. The goal is vigilant management to improve quality of life and promote realistic expectations and hope.

  13. Hearing symptoms personal stereos

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, Tiara Santos; Borja, Ana Lúcia Vieira de Freitas

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Practical and portable the personal stereos if had become almost indispensable accessories in the day the day. Studies disclose that the portable players of music can cause auditory damages in the long run for who hear music in high volume for a drawn out time. Objective: to verify the prevalence of auditory symptoms in users of amplified players and to know its habits of use Method: Observational prospective study of transversal cut carried through in three institutions of education of the city of Salvador BA, being two of public net and one of the private net. 400 students had answered to the questionnaire, of both the sex, between 14 and 30 years that had related the habit to use personal stereos. Results: The symptoms most prevalent had been hyperacusis (43.5%), auricular fullness (30.5%) and humming (27.5), being that the humming is the symptom most present in the population youngest. How much to the daily habits: 62.3% frequent use, 57% in raised intensities, 34% in drawn out periods. An inverse relation between exposition time was verified and the band of age (p = 0,000) and direct with the prevalence of the humming. Conclusion: Although to admit to have knowledge on the damages that the exposition the sound of high intensity can cause the hearing, the daily habits of the young evidence the inadequate use of the portable stereos characterized by long periods of exposition, raised intensities, frequent use and preference for the insertion phones. The high prevalence of symptoms after the use suggests a bigger risk for the hearing of these young. PMID:25991931

  14. [Depressive symptoms and sexuality].

    PubMed

    Porto, Robert

    2014-10-01

    The mutually reinforcing dyad of depressive symptoms and erectile dysfunction is scientifically established. The cure of depression improves sexual dysfunction (SD) and the treatment of SD induces improvement of depression. Most of anti-depressants induce negative sexual side effects that lead to non-compliance of these treatments. The knowledge of interrelation between depression, anti-depressants and sexuality is of great importance in clinical practice.

  15. Neurobiology Underlying Fibromyalgia Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ceko, Marta; Bushnell, M. Catherine; Gracely, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread pain, clinical symptoms that include cognitive and sleep disturbances, and other abnormalities such as increased sensitivity to painful stimuli, increased sensitivity to multiple sensory modalities, and altered pain modulatory mechanisms. Here we relate experimental findings of fibromyalgia symptoms to anatomical and functional brain changes. Neuroimaging studies show augmented sensory processing in pain-related areas, which, together with gray matter decreases and neurochemical abnormalities in areas related to pain modulation, supports the psychophysical evidence of altered pain perception and inhibition. Gray matter decreases in areas related to emotional decision making and working memory suggest that cognitive disturbances could be related to brain alterations. Altered levels of neurotransmitters involved in sleep regulation link disordered sleep to neurochemical abnormalities. Thus, current evidence supports the view that at least some fibromyalgia symptoms are associated with brain dysfunctions or alterations, giving the long-held “it is all in your head” view of the disorder a new meaning. PMID:22135739

  16. ADHD Symptoms and Subtypes: Relationship between Childhood and Adolescent Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtig, Tuula; Ebeling, Hanna; Taanila, Anja; Miettunen, Jouko; Smalley, Susan L.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Moilanen, Irma K.

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD) symptoms and subtypes in childhood and adolescence. The results conclude the persistence of ADHD from childhood to adolescence with specific symptoms contributing to persistent ADHD.

  17. Symptoms of Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov . Fungal Diseases Types of Fungal Diseases Aspergillosis Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment Healthcare Professionals Statistics More Resources Blastomycosis Definition Symptoms Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment & Outcomes ...

  18. [Negative symptoms of schizophrenia: historical aspects].

    PubMed

    Pringuey, D; Paquin, N; Cherikh, F; Giordana, B; Belzeaux, R; Cermolacce, M; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    The history of negative symptoms of schizophrenia rises early days of medicine in clinical and pathophysiological differences between positive and negative and their complex joint. Forming a set of typical core of symptoms, and some feature of a syndrome belonging to a specific pathophysiological mechanism, negative symptoms of schizophrenia emerge from old descriptions of clinical pictures, related to the overall look of madness, the heart of alienation, a central sign of early dementia, gradually more precisely describing the strange nature of the autistic withdrawal and schizophrenic apragmatism. At therapeutic era, negative symptoms have taken over the positive symptoms to establish an operational criteria whose importance lies in the progressive severity of this clinical type and in their contribution to therapeutic resistance. Despite the efforts of modern typological classifications, this work rehabilitates the old concept of "unitary psychosis" by defining a common symptomatic core to multiple clinical forms of psychosis, combining deficit of emotional expression and avolition, meaning a native psychopathology and a pathophysiology possibly in a common final way, and calling the arrival of new treatment strategies.

  19. Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms a person feels are related to psychological factors. These symptoms can't be traced to a specific physical cause. In people who have a somatic symptom and related disorder, medical test results are either normal or don't explain ...

  20. Medically unexplained symptoms.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Margaret L; Paauw, Douglas S

    2014-05-01

    In summary, caring for patients with MUS is challenging for health care providers. Even defining somatization syndromes is complex and controversial, reflecting the medical community’s limited understanding of the pathophysiology for this group of disorders. Although risk factors for MUS have been described and are well understood, little is known about how MUS can be prevented. Uncertainty in medicine, as in any human enterprise, is a given, but the difficulties in identification and treatment of patients with MUS highlight the limitations in understanding the intersection between physical and mental health. Patients come to their physician looking for clarity, understanding, and relief of debilitating symptoms. The understanding of MUS will evolve, and perhaps an organic cause not yet understood or described may emerge to lend clarity and therapeutic opportunities to some patients with somatic disorders. In the meantime, the most powerful tools available are the ability to communicate the limits of current understanding, acknowledge the difficulties faced by patients with this disorder, and reinforce the willingness and desire of clinicians to partner with patients as the focus shifts from diagnosis to symptom management. Thus, the physician-patient relationship, still in its rightful place at the heart of the practice of medicine, lies at the center of effective treatment of patients with MUS.

  1. Medically unexplained symptoms.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Margaret L; Paauw, Douglas S

    2014-05-01

    In summary, caring for patients with MUS is challenging for health care providers. Even defining somatization syndromes is complex and controversial, reflecting the medical community’s limited understanding of the pathophysiology for this group of disorders. Although risk factors for MUS have been described and are well understood, little is known about how MUS can be prevented. Uncertainty in medicine, as in any human enterprise, is a given, but the difficulties in identification and treatment of patients with MUS highlight the limitations in understanding the intersection between physical and mental health. Patients come to their physician looking for clarity, understanding, and relief of debilitating symptoms. The understanding of MUS will evolve, and perhaps an organic cause not yet understood or described may emerge to lend clarity and therapeutic opportunities to some patients with somatic disorders. In the meantime, the most powerful tools available are the ability to communicate the limits of current understanding, acknowledge the difficulties faced by patients with this disorder, and reinforce the willingness and desire of clinicians to partner with patients as the focus shifts from diagnosis to symptom management. Thus, the physician-patient relationship, still in its rightful place at the heart of the practice of medicine, lies at the center of effective treatment of patients with MUS. PMID:24758967

  2. Gender, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, Tara M.; Gillham, Jane E.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2009-01-01

    Does anxiety lead to depression more for girls than for boys? This study prospectively examines gender differences in the relationship between anxiety and depressive symptoms in early adolescence. One hundred thirteen 11- to 14-year-old middle school students complete questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms and three dimensions of anxiety (worry and oversensitivity, social concerns and concentration, and physiological anxiety) as well as total anxiety symptoms at an initial assessment and 1 year later. Total anxiety and worry and oversensitivity symptoms are found to predict later depressive symptoms more strongly for girls than for boys. There is a similar pattern of results for social concerns and concentration symptoms, although this does not reach statistical significance. Physiological anxiety predicts later depressive symptoms for both boys and girls. These findings highlight the importance of anxiety for the development of depression in adolescence, particularly worry and oversensitivity among girls. PMID:19756209

  3. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Aarsland, D.; Marsh, L.; Schrag, A.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in Parkinson's disease, even at the earliest stages, and have important consequences for quality of life and daily functioning, are associated with increased carer burden and increased risk for nursing home admission. In addition to cognitive impairment, a wide range of neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported. In this paper, the epidemiology, clinical course, diagnosis, and management of some of the most common neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD are discussed: depression, anxiety, apathy, fatigue and psychotic symptoms. Although much is known regarding the prevalence and course of these symptoms, the empirical evidence for how to manage these symptoms is limited at best. There is thus an urgent need for systematic studies for the pharmacological and non-pharmacological management of these symptoms. PMID:19768724

  4. [Hepatic porphyrias with cutaneous symptoms].

    PubMed

    Timonen, Kaisa; Nuutinen, Pauliina; Raili, Kauppinen

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic porphyrias with cutaneous symptoms Cutaneous symptoms of porphyrias are initiated from a phototoxic reaction caused by sunlight and circulating porphyrins in the vascular walls of the skin. This leads in fragility, blistering and scarring of the skin on light-exposed areas. There are approximately 200 patients having hepatic porphyrias with cutaneous symptoms in Finland. Cutaneous symptoms of variegate porphyria and porphyria cutanea tarda are indistinguishable, but an effective treatment is available only for the latter. Differential diagnosis is important due to acute episodes occurring in variegate porphyria.

  5. Indoor environmental exposures and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Michael

    2002-08-01

    The label "sick building syndrome" is often used to imply the absence of a physiologic basis for symptoms in the built environment. Although building-related illness is widely recognized but considered rare, several well-studied mechanisms may be responsible for many symptoms in buildings. These mechanisms do not explain why some individuals perceive disability. Until researchers distinguish physiologic mechanisms from other aspects of disease and study them systematically, poorly defined symptoms will remain poorly understood. The disability associated with such symptoms and syndromes, not the physiology, is the primary interest and generates controversy.

  6. Diagnostic Tool for Assessing Overactive Bladder Symptoms: Could the International Prostate Symptom Storage Subscore Replace the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to compare the International Prostate Symptom Storage Subscore (IPSS-s) and the overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS) as tools for assessing the symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB). Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted of a sample of 1,341 patients aged 50 years and older with lower urinary tract complaints who had undergone a medical examination at one of several centers. For each patient, we reviewed the International Prostate Symptom Score and the OABSS. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to their IPSS-s result (group 1, score ≥6; group 2, score<6) and into another 2 groups according to their OABSS diagnosis (group 3, OAB patients; group 4, non-OAB patients). We determined whether the OABSS varied to a statistically significant extent between groups 1 and 2. Furthermore, we evaluated the correlation of IPSS-s severity with the OABSS results in group 3, and the OAB diagnosis rate was compared between groups 1 and 2. Results In groups 1 and 2, the OABSS results were not found to vary to a statistically significant extent (P=0.326). In group 3, no significant correlation was found between IPSS-s severity and the OABSS results (P=0.385). In the prevalence analysis, no statistically significant difference was found among the groups, and the receiver operating characteristic curve showed an area under the curve of 0.474. Conclusions The results of this cross-sectional analysis suggest that the IPSS-s and the OABSS are not significantly correlated. Although both scores are used to measure OAB symptoms, the simultaneous use of IPSS-s and OABSS is not warranted. PMID:27706011

  7. Initial symptom burden predicts duration of symptoms after concussion★

    PubMed Central

    Meehan, William P.; O’Brien, Michael J.; Geminiani, Ellen; Mannix, Rebekah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine which variables predict prolonged (>28 days) duration of symptoms after a concussion. Design We conducted a prospective cohort study of adult (>18yo) patients cared for in a specialty concussion clinic. Methods Symptoms were assessed using the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS) developed at the 3rd International Conference on Concussion in Sports. Possible predictors including age, sex, loss of consciousness, amnesia, history of prior concussion, prior treatment for headaches, history of migraines, and family history of concussions, were measured by self-report. We recorded a PCSS score at each clinical visit and defined time to symptom resolution as the number of days between the date of injury and date of last symptoms. Results Of 64 adult patients included in the study, 53.3% were male; 20.3% reported experiencing a loss of consciousness at the time of injury while 23.4% reported amnesia. Patients ranged in age from 18 to 27 years (mean 21 ± 2 years). Most concussions (92.2%) occurred during sports. The mean initial PCSS score for those suffering symptoms for longer than 28 days was significantly higher than those who symptoms resolved within 28 days (42.5 vs. 19.2, p < 0.01). Of all potential predictor variables, only the initial PCSS score was independently associated with the odds of symptoms lasting longer than 28 days (aOR 1.037; 95% CI 1.011, 1.063). Conclusions Among adult patients with concussions, those with a higher symptom burden after injury have an increased odds of suffering from prolonged symptoms. Other potential predictor variables are not associated with the risk of prolonged recovery. PMID:26718812

  8. Depressive symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Miquel; Martín, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are very common in chronic conditions. This is true so for neurodegenerative diseases. A number of patients with cognitive decline and dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease and related conditions like Parkinson’s disease, Lewy body disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal degeneration amongst other entities, experience depressive symptoms in greater or lesser grade at some point during the course of the illness. Depressive symptoms have a particular significance in neurological disorders, specially in neurodegenerative diseases, because brain, mind, behavior and mood relationship. A number of patients may develop depressive symptoms in early stages of the neurologic disease, occurring without clear presence of cognitive decline with only mild cognitive deterioration. Classically, depression constitutes a reliable diagnostic challenge in this setting. However, actually we can recognize and evaluate depressive, cognitive or motor symptoms of neurodegenerative disease in order to establish their clinical significance and to plan some therapeutic strategies. Depressive symptoms can appear also lately, when the neurodegenerative disease is fully developed. The presence of depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms have a negative impact on the quality-of-life of patients and caregivers. Besides, patients with depressive symptoms also tend to further decrease function and reduce cognitive abilities and also uses to present more affected clinical status, compared with patients without depression. Depressive symptoms are treatable. Early detection of depressive symptoms is very important in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, in order to initiate the most adequate treatment. We review in this paper the main neurodegenerative diseases, focusing in depressive symptoms of each other entities and current recommendations of management and treatment. PMID:26301229

  9. Depressive symptoms induce paranoid symptoms in narcissistic personalities (but not narcissistic symptoms in paranoid personalities).

    PubMed

    Joiner, Thomas E; Petty, Scharles; Perez, Marisol; Sachs-Ericsson, Natalie; Rudd, M David

    2008-05-30

    Based on clinical experience, anecdotal reports, and past empirical and conceptual work, we predicted that when people with narcissistic tendencies experience depressive symptoms, they are prone to develop paranoid attitudes. Moreover, we expected that this process was unidirectional, and that the combination of paranoid tendencies and depressive symptoms would not be associated with an increase in narcissistic symptoms. In both cases, results from our 6-month longitudinal study of 71 previously suicidal adults conformed to our expectations.

  10. Pneumococcal Disease: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacteremia and sepsis are blood infections. Symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Pneumococcus bacteria causes up to half of middle ear infections (otitis media). Symptoms include: Ear pain A red, swollen ear drum Fever Sleepiness  Top of Page Complications Some pneumococcal ...

  11. Menopause. How Exercise Mitigates Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargarten, Kathleen M.

    1994-01-01

    During menopause and the climacteric, women experience many changes that can affect nearly every organ system and cause psychological symptoms. This article reviews the specific changes and explains how exercise can address each symptom; outlines a practical approach physicians can use to help menopausal patients improve their quality of life. (SM)

  12. Remedies for Common Cold Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Penny F.

    1991-01-01

    Individuals suffering from intolerable symptoms of the common cold can now be advised of safe and effective products for symptomatic relief. This article describes and discusses four categories of drugs used to treat the common cold. To simplify the product selection process for family physicians, suggestions are included for possible ingredients for treatments of specific cold symptoms. PMID:21234087

  13. Neuropsychological symptoms and occupational exposure to anaesthetics.

    PubMed Central

    Saurel-Cubizolles, M J; Estryn-Behar, M; Maillard, M F; Mugnier, N; Masson, A; Monod, G

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To analyse the relation between symptoms regularly reported by hospital personnel and exposure to anaesthetics. SETTING--Personnel of 18 hospitals in Paris from 1987 to 1989. DESIGN--An exposed group that included all operating theatre members except for doctors, and which was divided into three subgroups depending on the degree of exposure--exposure was measured by the frequency of the use of the scavenging system--and a control group that included other hospital personnel matched by hospital, sex, occupation, age, and duration of service. SUBJECTS--557 exposed workers and 566 unexposed workers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--The groups were compared according to the crude rates of regular symptoms. Adjusted odds ratios were calculated to estimate the risks associated with exposure to anaesthetic gas. Liver transaminase activities (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase (s-ASAT, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase) were measured and compared between groups of exposure. RESULTS--After controlling for working conditions and matching factors, neuropsychological symptoms and tiredness were reported more by workers in less often scavenged theatres than by controls. No difference was found between workers of the well scavenged theatres and controls. Among the exposed workers, the members of paediatric surgical staffs reported a higher rate of neurological complaints (tingling, numbness, cramps) and tiredness than the members of the other surgical staffs. They had a high value of s-ASAT more frequently than the other exposed workers. CONCLUSION--These results strengthen the hypothesis of a causal relation between exposure to anaesthetics and neuropsychological symptoms, and show a dose-response effect. They suggest that the use of ventilating systems in operating rooms is an effective means of prevention. PMID:1571297

  14. Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Huseini, Mustafa; Wood, G. Craig; Seiler, Jamie; Argyropoulos, George; Irving, Brian A.; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Benotti, Peter; Still, Christopher; Rolston, David D. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several reports have shown an increased prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in obese subjects in community-based studies. To better understand the role of the GI tract in obesity, and because there are limited clinic-based studies, we documented the prevalence of upper and lower GI symptoms in morbidly obese individuals in a clinic setting. Objective: The aim of our study was to compare the prevalence of GI symptoms in morbidly obese individuals in a weight management clinic with non-obese individuals with similar comorbidities as morbidly obese individuals in an Internal Medicine clinic. Methods: Class II and III obese patients BMI >35 kg/m2 (N = 114) and 182 non-obese patients (BMI <25 kg/m2) completed the GI symptoms survey between August 2011 and April 2012 were included in this study. The survey included 24 items pertaining to upper and lower GI symptoms. The participants rated the frequency of symptoms as absent (never, rarely) or present (occasionally, frequently). The symptoms were clustered into five categories: oral symptoms, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, abdominal pain, and bowel habits. Responses to each symptom cluster were compared between obese group and normal weight groups using logistic regression. Results: Of the 24 items, 18 had a higher frequency in the obese group (p < 0.005 for each). After adjusting for age and gender, the obese patients were more likely to have upper GI symptoms: any oral symptom (OR = 2.3, p = 0.0013), dysphagia (OR 2.9, p = 0.0006), and any gastroesophageal reflux (OR 3.8, p < 0.0001). Similarly, the obese patients were more likely to have lower GI symptoms: any abdominal pain (OR = 1.7, p = 0.042) and altered bowel habits (OR = 2.8, p < 0.0001). Conclusion: These observations suggest a statistically significant increase in frequency of both upper and lower GI symptoms in morbidly obese patients when compared to non-obese subjects. PMID:25593922

  15. Turning symptoms into allies: utilization approaches with posttraumatic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M

    1993-01-01

    Adult patients with symptoms connected to the trauma of childhood sexual abuse often present in therapy with multiple symptoms and life difficulties and offer a challenge to even the most experienced clinician. In this paper, I describe my work with three such patients who were crippled in different ways by symptoms that had proved resistant to years of various therapeutic interventions. In every case, I accepted and utilized these symptoms as positive resources for successful and rapid change. Patients were then taught self-utilization approaches which allowed them to sustain and extend initial improvements. I conclude that the indirect utilization principle introduced by Milton Erickson provides an effective method to use in approaching some of the more persistent patterns of posttraumatic symptomatology related to childhood sexual abuse.

  16. Psychotic symptoms in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Hall, Devin; Finger, Elizabeth C

    2015-07-01

    Although psychotic features have long been recognized in association with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), recent genetic discoveries enabling further subtyping of FTD have revealed that psychotic symptoms are frequent in some forms of FTD. Hallucinations and delusions can even precede onset of other cognitive or behavioural symptoms in patients with FTD. In this review, we explore the frequency and types of psychotic symptoms reported in patients with FTD, as well as in other neuropsychiatric disorders, to aid practitioners' consideration of these features in the diagnosis of FTD and related disorders.

  17. Low blood sugar symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... nervousness and irritability are signs that a person's blood sugar is getting dangerously low. A person showing any of these symptoms should check their blood sugar. If the level is low (70 mg/dl), ...

  18. Measles (Rubeola): Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Signs and Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... of a patient with Koplik spots, an early sign of measles infection. Three to five days after ...

  19. Fibromyalgia: patient perspectives on symptoms, symptom management, and provider utilization.

    PubMed

    Wassem, Rebecca; McDonald, Marie; Racine, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Two surveys of individuals with fibromyalgia were conducted to assess the frequency and prevalence of symptoms (N = 99) as well as healthcare providers, medications, and self-care activities used to manage one's fibromyalgia (N = 54). The pervasiveness of symptoms was striking, with 24 various symptoms ranging from cognitive to intestinal problems occurring in at least 75% of the respondents. Significant correlations were present between health status and both physical (P = .002) and psychological (P =.008) symptoms. There was also a significant correlation between the total number of symptoms and the degree of life disruption attributed to fibromyalgia (P =.015). A variety of healthcare professionals were seen, with internists, family physicians, and rheumatologist most frequently used. Although at least 80% of the respondents reported difficulty with anxiety, confusion, irritability, depression, and cognitive difficulties, less than 10% of the respondents reported seeing a psychiatrist. Most frequently used medications were: amitriptyline, (fluoxetine HCl) Prozac, ibuprofen (Motrin), sertraline HCI (Zoloft), and zolpidem (Ambein). Self-care activities used with the most success were walking, stretching, and exercising. These studies indicate the need for more research and support for healthcare providers as well as patients with fibromyalgia. PMID:11839925

  20. What Are the Symptoms of Endometriosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Publications What are the symptoms of endometriosis? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... symptoms, may cause these endometriosis symptoms to continue. Endometriosis-Related Pain Researchers know that pain is a ...

  1. Nisin-Triggered Activity of Lys44, the Secreted Endolysin from Oenococcus oeni Phage fOg44▿

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, João Gil; Guerreiro-Pereira, Maria Carolina; Costa, Sérgio Fernandes; São-José, Carlos; Santos, Mário Almeida

    2008-01-01

    The intrinsic resistance of Oenococcus oeni cells to the secreted endolysin from oenophage fOg44 (Lys44) was investigated. Experiments with several antimicrobials support the hypothesis that the full activity of Lys44 requires sudden ion-nonspecific dissipation of the proton motive force, an event undertaken by the fOg44 holin in the phage infection context. PMID:17981964

  2. What Engages Students in MetaL-FrOG? A Triarchy Perspective on Meta-Cognitive Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fa, Ng Sen; Hussin, Firuz Hussin

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the central ideas of a grounded theory research by the name of Triarchy Perspective on Metacognitive Learning in Free Online Groups, or "TriP on MetaL-FrOG" in short. The research setting was online learning community on the platform of Free Online Group web (FrOG) intended for post-graduate students. The research…

  3. The Adoption of Systems Innovations in Educational Organizations: A Case Study of Operation Guidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kester, Ralph J.; Howard, John, Jr.

    To identify factors which affect the acceptance of innovation in school organizations, a career development product entitled Operation Guidance (OG) was the object of a case study. Five basic organizational characteristics were used to roughly quantify attributes of the organization of the six schools studied. The characteristics were:…

  4. Gallstone symptoms. Myth and reality.

    PubMed

    Egbert, A M

    1991-10-01

    Gallstones are very common, but at least two thirds of detected stones are asymptomatic and a large number undoubtedly go undetected. The presence of symptoms or complications is the indication for surgery. It is important to accurately identify which symptoms are caused by gallstones, because removing the gallbladder will relieve only these symptoms. Making this determination is a challenge, however, because the classic picture of biliary colic may be inaccurate and the connection between gallstone disease and flatulent dyspepsia is questionable at best. Descriptions of both these conditions are based on anecdotal evidence or reports of uncontrolled surgical series. A review of recent controlled trials suggests that the pain of biliary colic is constant and infrequent, comes in episodes lasting 1 to 5 hours, is located in the epigastrium or right upper quadrant of the abdomen, and characteristically occurs at night. There are few additional symptoms other than nausea or vomiting, and colic is not induced by eating fatty meals. Flatulent dyspepsia--a symptom complex of vague pain in the right upper quadrant, fatty-food intolerance, and bloating--is probably not related to the presence of gallstones in the majority of patients.

  5. [Negative symptoms and cerebral imaging].

    PubMed

    Kaladjian, A; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    A number of neuroanatomical and neurofonctional abnormalities have been evidenced by cerebral imaging studies in patients suffering from schizophrenia. Nevertheless, those specifically associated with the negative symptoms of this disease are still insufficiently known. This work is a review of selected studies that have assessed the brain correlates of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Approaches using structural imaging have highlighted reduction of gray matter density or cortical thickness associated with negative symptoms, which is rather sparsely distributed within the frontal and temporal regions, localized nevertheless more particularly in the frontal medial and orbitofrontal areas, as well as the amygdalo-hippocampic complex. These deficits are concurrent with a loss of integrity of the principal paths of white matter tracts between frontal and limbic regions. On the other hand, neurofonctional abnormalities associated with negative symptoms involve especially the frontal areas and limbic striatum. A disturbed functioning within the fronto-striatal loops, related to a striatal dopaminergic deficit, may represent a potential explanatory hypothesis of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, as suggested by studies using Positron Emission Tomography on this topic or neuroimaging studies on the effects of antipsychotics. A better identification of the cerebral abnormalities associated with the negative dimension of schizophrenia, with regard to the lateralization of these abnormalities or to their changes during the course of the disease, could offer new therapeutic modalities for the treatment of this dimension which, until now, remains few responsive to conventional pharmacological treatments. PMID:26776387

  6. [Alexithymia in negative symptom and non-negative symptom schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Nkam, I; Langlois-Thery, S; Dollfus, S; Petit, M

    1997-01-01

    Coined by Sifneos in 1972, alexithymia refers to a relative narrowing in emotional functioning, an inability to find appropriate words to describe their emotions and, a poverty of fantasy life. Although initially described in the context of psychosomatic illness, alexithymic characteristics may be observed in patients with a wide range of medical and psychiatric disorders: Parkinson disease, depression, anxiety, substance abuse and eating disorders. Flattening of affect and poverty of speech, major negative symptoms, referred to chronic schizophrenia: there is a lack of outward display of emotion. Accordingly, some disturbances of alexithymia's scores would be expected in schizophrenic patients. The purpose of this study was to estimate and compare the prevalence of alexithymia in deficit and non-deficit schizophrenia. The term "deficit symptoms" may be used as Carpenter, to refer specifically to those negative symptoms that are not considered secondary. The influence of patients' symptoms has also been studied on alexithymia scores: negative and positive symptoms of schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, anhedonia and effects of neuroleptics. Twenty-five patients, meeting DSM III-R criteria for schizophrenia have been studied. All of them treated by neuroleptics, were in a stable clinical status for at least one month. The patients have been categorized into deficit (n = 12) and non-deficit (n = 13) subgroups by one trained psychiatrist (SD), using the Schedule for the Deficit Syndrome. The subjects have been assessed by the same rater (IN), blind to deficit status, using six rating scales: Beth Israel Questionnaire (BIQ) and Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS) for alexithymia, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Montgomery and Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), revised Physical Anhedonia Scale (PAS), and finally, Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale (ESRS). Using TAS, alexithymic characteristics were more prevalent in the deficit subgroup as compared to

  7. Symptoms and Symptom Clusters Identified by Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer Using a Symptom Heuristics App.

    PubMed

    Ameringer, Suzanne; Erickson, Jeanne M; Macpherson, Catherine Fiona; Stegenga, Kristin; Linder, Lauri A

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer experience multiple distressing symptoms during treatment. Because the typical approach to symptom assessment does not easily reflect the symptom experience of individuals, alternative approaches to enhancing communication between the patient and provider are needed. We developed an iPad-based application that uses a heuristic approach to explore AYAs' cancer symptom experiences. In this mixed-methods descriptive study, 72 AYAs (13-29 years old) with cancer receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy used the Computerized Symptom Capture Tool (C-SCAT) to create images of the symptoms and symptom clusters they experienced from a list of 30 symptoms. They answered open-ended questions within the C-SCAT about the causes of their symptoms and symptom clusters. The images generated through the C-SCAT and accompanying free-text data were analyzed using descriptive, content, and visual analyses. Most participants (n = 70) reported multiple symptoms (M = 8.14). The most frequently reported symptoms were nausea (65.3%), feeling drowsy (55.6%), lack of appetite (55.6%), and lack of energy (55.6%). Forty-six grouped their symptoms into one or more clusters. The most common symptom cluster was nausea/eating problems/appetite problems. Nausea was most frequently named as the priority symptom in a cluster and as a cause of other symptoms. Although common threads were present in the symptoms experienced by AYAs, the graphic images revealed unique perspectives and a range of complexity of symptom relationships, clusters, and causes. Results highlight the need for a tailored approach to symptom management based on how the AYA with cancer perceives his or her symptom experience. PMID:26455729

  8. Depressive symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lemke, M R

    2008-04-01

    Depression occurs in approximately 45% of all patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), does not correlate with the stage of motor deficits, reduces quality of life independently of motor symptoms and appears to be underrated and undertreated. Anxiety and depression are the risk factors for the development of PD and may be present many years before the appearance of motor symptoms. Studies using functional imaging techniques indicate a primary relationship between depression and PD. Because of overlapping clinical symptoms, the diagnosis is mainly based on subjectively experienced anhedonia and feelings of emptiness. Serotonergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic mechanisms play key roles in the aetiology of depression in PD. Tricyclic and newer selective antidepressants including serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors appear to be effective in treating depression in PD. Selective reuptake inhibitors seem to be better tolerated because of their favourable side-effect profile. Experimental and clinical investigations indicate antidepressive effects for pramipexole. Placebo-controlled studies showed antidepressant effects of pramipexole in patients with different forms of depression. Various studies show that pramipexole improves depression in addition to motor symptoms in patients with PD. Because of the data available as well as clinical reasoning, pramipexole may be used as a first-line treatment in patients with PD and depression.

  9. Massage therapy for fibromyalgia symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Leonid

    2010-07-01

    Massage therapy is widely used by patients with fibromyalgia seeking symptom relief. We performed a review of all available studies with an emphasis on randomized controlled trials to determine whether massage therapy can be a viable treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms. Extensive narrative review. PubMed, PsychInfo, CINAHL, PEDro, ISI Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases (inception-December 2009) were searched for the key words "massage", "massotherapy", "self-massage", "soft tissue manipulation", "soft tissue mobilization", "complementary medicine", "fibromyalgia" "fibrositis", and "myofascial pain". No language restrictions were imposed. The reference lists of all articles retrieved in full were also searched. The effects of massage on fibromyalgia symptoms have been examined in two single-arm studies and six randomized controlled trials. All reviewed studies showed short-term benefits of massage, and only one single-arm study demonstrated long-term benefits. All reviewed studies had methodological problems. The existing literature provides modest support for use of massage therapy in treating fibromyalgia. Additional rigorous research is needed in order to establish massage therapy as a safe and effective intervention for fibromyalgia. In massage therapy of fibromyalgia, we suggest that massage will be painless, its intensity should be increased gradually from session to session, in accordance with patient's symptoms; and the sessions should be performed at least 1-2 times a week.

  10. Vestibular symptoms and history taking.

    PubMed

    Bisdorff, A

    2016-01-01

    History taking is an essential part in the diagnostic process of vestibular disorders. The approach to focus strongly on the quality of symptoms, like vertigo, dizziness, or unsteadiness, is not that useful as these symptoms often coexist and are all nonspecific, as each of them may arise from vestibular and nonvestibular diseases (like cardiovascular disease) and do not permit to distinguish potentially dangerous from benign causes. Instead, patients should be categorized if they have an acute, episodic, or chronic vestibular syndrome (AVS, EVS, or CVS) to narrow down the spectrum of differential diagnosis. Typical examples of disorders provoking an AVS would be vestibular neuritis or stroke of peripheral or central vestibular structures, of an EVS Menière's disease, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, or vestibular migraine and of a CVS long-standing uni- or bilateral vestibular failure or cerebellar degeneration. The presence of triggers should be established with a main distinction between positional (change of head orientation with respect to gravity), head motion-induced (time-locked to head motion regardless of direction) and orthostatic position change as the underlying disorders are quite different. Accompanying symptoms also help to orient to the underlying cause, like aural or neurologic symptoms, but also chest pain or dyspnea. PMID:27638064

  11. Perfectionism, Shame, and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Jeffrey S.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Martin, James L.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between depression, maladaptive perfectionism, and shame. Regression analyses were used to replicate a model in which maladaptive perfectionism was negatively associated with self-esteem and positively associated with symptoms of depression, with self-esteem mediating the effects of maladaptive perfectionism…

  12. Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epinephrine Emotional & Social Issues Find a Support Group Bullying Prevention Spread the Word True Stories Stay Informed ... Epinephrine Emotional & Social Issues Find a Support Group Bullying Prevention Spread the Word True Stories Stay Informed ...

  13. Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    > Find Us On Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Instagram Diabetes Stops Here Blog Online Community Site Menu Are You at Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to ...

  14. Correlates of urinary symptom scores in men.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, B E; Klein, R; Lee, K E; Bruskewitz, R C

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study determined the prevalence of urinary symptoms and their relationship to characteristics of a cohort of men in Beaver Dam, Wis, from 1993 to 1995. METHODS: A standardized questionnaire concerning urinary symptoms (the American Urological Association Urinary Symptom Questionnaire) was administered. RESULTS: All outcomes were associated with age and history of enlarged prostate. Urinary frequency (57%) and nocturia (65%) were the most common individual symptoms. Diuretic usage, diabetes, history of cardiovascular disease, and smoking were related to specific symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: While urinary symptoms are associated with age and history of enlarged prostate, symptoms may also be attributable to other diseases and exposures. PMID:10553401

  15. Demographic and clinical correlates of autism symptom domains and autism spectrum diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Thomas W; Youngstrom, Eric A; Embacher, Rebecca; Hardan, Antonio Y; Constantino, John N; Law, Paul; Findling, Robert L; Eng, Charis

    2014-07-01

    Demographic and clinical factors may influence assessment of autism symptoms. This study evaluated these correlates and also examined whether social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior provided unique prediction of autism spectrum disorder diagnosis. We analyzed data from 7352 siblings included in the Interactive Autism Network registry. Social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms were obtained using caregiver-reports on the Social Responsiveness Scale. Demographic and clinical correlates were covariates in regression models predicting social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses evaluated the incremental validity of social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior domains over and above global autism symptoms. Autism spectrum disorder diagnosis was the strongest correlate of caregiver-reported social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms. The presence of comorbid diagnoses also increased symptom levels. Social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms provided significant, but modest, incremental validity in predicting diagnosis beyond global autism symptoms. These findings suggest that autism spectrum disorder diagnosis is by far the largest determinant of quantitatively measured autism symptoms. Externalizing (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) and internalizing (anxiety) behavior, low cognitive ability, and demographic factors may confound caregiver-report of autism symptoms, potentially necessitating a continuous norming approach to the revision of symptom measures. Social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms may provide incremental validity in the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. PMID:24104512

  16. Poverty and adolescent depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Butler, Amy C

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal data on non-Hispanic White children from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (N = 1,056) were used to examine whether the relationship between poverty (early childhood poverty, poverty persistence, and current poverty) and adolescent depressive symptoms (measured by the Children's Depression Inventory and the Internalizing Index) can be explained by the mother's own childhood depression and family characteristics measured during the child's first year of life. Associations between poverty and depressive symptoms among adolescents were explained by mother's childhood depression and whether the adolescent had lived with both parents during the first year of life. The findings highlight the need for appropriate treatment of childhood depression so as to reduce the adverse consequences in adulthood and for the next generation.

  17. [Gender differences in cardiac symptoms].

    PubMed

    Maas, Angela H E M

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing discussion as to whether there are gender differences in symptom presentation in acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Although the burden of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the underlying mechanisms involved in ACS differ significantly between the genders during various stages of life, researchers seem to persist in comparing women against the standard for male patients. This clouds the discussion, and may be potentially harmful to women. The female pattern of CAD, with fewer obstructive coronary lesions and relatively more vascular dysfunction than in men, translates into a different combination of symptoms and relatively more type II ACS. Greater knowledge of gender-sensitive cardiology in daily practice would improve recognition and reduce poorer ACS outcomes in women. In 2015 the www.eugenmed.eu programme will present a gender-sensitive 'Roadmap' for cardiology practitioners within the EU.

  18. [Clinical symptoms of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Tariska, P; Urbanics, K; Knolmayer, J; Mészáros, A

    1995-04-23

    Data of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease and checked out in the special unit named Memory Clinic functioning from 1992 in the National Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology are summarized. Age average of the 60 patients was 63 years, the first symptoms of the disease had appeared in 57 p.c. before the age of 65, so the classical presenile form of the ailment is represented too in the material. Predominance of multifocal cortical function disturbances in the symptomatology is characteristic, association of the depression is outstandingly frequent. The atypical features, or those characteristic in diseases of cerebrovascular origin are not infrequently seen (headache, dizziness, slight symptoms of pyramidal lesions). The absence of epileptic seizures It was interesting even in considering the data of the literature too. The main points of clinical diagnostics and differential diagnostics are demonstrated with the aid of case reports. The author's material is the first Hungarian publication in the topics of clinical symptoms of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease that had been investigated with up-to-date methods. Occurrence of the disease of very great frequency could be supposed to occur at general practitioners, the importance of differential diagnostics and planning of the complex longlasting therapy is extremely great.

  19. Operational Group Sandy technical progress report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    This report documents results from the March 2013 deployment of the OGS. It includes background information on Hurricane Sandy and the federal response; the OGS methodology; scenarios for Hurricane Sandy’s impact on coastal communities and urban ecosystems; potential interventions to improve regional resilience to future major storms; a discussion of scenario results; and lessons learned about the OGS process.

  20. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Vasculitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Vasculitis? The signs and symptoms ... symptoms develop quickly, over days or weeks. Systemic Signs and Symptoms Systemic signs and symptoms are those ...

  1. Mindfulness Is Associated with Fewer PTSD Symptoms, Depressive Symptoms, Physical Symptoms, and Alcohol Problems in Urban Firefighters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bruce W.; Ortiz, J. Alexis; Steffen, Laurie E.; Tooley, Erin M.; Wiggins, Kathryn T.; Yeater, Elizabeth A.; Montoya, John D.; Bernard, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the association between mindfulness, other resilience resources, and several measures of health in 124 urban firefighters. Method: Participants completed health measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, depressive symptoms, physical symptoms, and alcohol problems and measures of resilience…

  2. Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Glaucoma Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest Research Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Symptoms and Diagnosis Glaucoma can develop in one or both eyes. Often ...

  3. What Are the Symptoms of Uterine Fibroids?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Publications What are the symptoms of uterine fibroids? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content ​Uterine fibroids can cause uncomfortable or sometimes painful symptoms, such ...

  4. Signs and Symptoms of Untreated Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs . Early Signs and Symptoms (3 to 30 days after tick bite) Fever, chills, headache, fatigue, muscle ... examples of EM rashes Later Signs and Symptoms (days to months after tick bite) Severe headaches and ...

  5. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... is considered invasive. Symptoms of pneumonia usually include: Fever and chills Cough Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing Sweating ... the blood. It can cause symptoms such as: Fever and chills Excessive tiredness Pain in the belly Nausea with ...

  6. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Print to PDF Head and Neck Cancer - Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  7. HIV / AIDS: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: Symptoms , Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment Past Issues / ... Most people who have become recently infected with HIV will not have any symptoms. They may, however, ...

  8. Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000775.htm Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease To use the ... often develops over time. You may have early signs or symptoms long before you have serious heart ...

  9. Signs and Symptoms of Mood Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of your family's history. Signs and symptoms of bipolar disorder Bipolar disorder differs significantly from clinical depression, although ... or restlessness. Symptoms of mania - the "highs" of bipolar disorder Increased physical and mental activity and energy Heightened ...

  10. [Symptoms profile of mixed anxiety and depressive disorder].

    PubMed

    Małyszczak, K; Sidorowicz, S; Łaczmański, T

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes symptoms of mixed depressive and anxiety disorder (ICD-10). The study was carried out in three medical dispensaries: two psychiatric (42 persons) and one primary care (62 persons). Patients with or without anxiety and depressive symptoms were included. Exclusion criteria was: psychoactive substance abuse, physical diseases affecting mental state, and mental disorders other than anxiety or mood disorders. A total of 104 patients (65 women and 39 men in mean age of 41.1 years) were inquired with General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30), Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) and diagnostic questionnaire based on Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry, Version 2.0. There was no pattern of symptoms specific for mixed disorder that could be a basis for operational criteria. The most frequent were symptoms of generalised anxiety disorder (GAD), depression and dysthymia. The most specific symptoms, selected using discriminant analysis were: (1) difficulty in concentrating, (2) feeling mentally tense, (3) feeling of hopelessness or despair, (4) shortening of breath, (5) lowered mood, (6) feeling dizzy, unsteady, faint, or light headed; (7) early waking up, (8) nightmares, (9) dry mouth, (10) hot flushes or cold chills, (11) frequent tearfulness. The results contribute to the concept that mixed depression and anxiety disorder is closely related to generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). PMID:11842606

  11. Gastric manometric abnormalities in patients with dyspeptic symptoms after fundoplication.

    PubMed Central

    Stanghellini, V; Malagelada, J R

    1983-01-01

    We describe six patients in whom severe dyspeptic symptoms developed after fundoplication. The symptoms began immediately after operation (three patients) or shortly thereafter (three and eight months). There were no other known predisposing factors to gastroparesis. Seven, age-matched, healthy volunteers served as controls. Pressure activity from antrum (two sites), duodenum (two sites), and jejunum (one site) was recorded by a low compliance perfusion system connected to external strain gauge transducers. Activity was recorded for three hours during fasting and for two hours after the ingestion of a solid and a liquid meal. To determine whether an inadvertent vagotomy had been performed, basal acid output and the response to insulin (Hollander's test) were measured on a separate day. Manometric studies revealed postprandial hypomotility in these patients, whereas fasting antral and intestinal activities were normal. Acid output increased in all patients during insulin induced hypoglycaemia. In three patients, an antrectomy was subsequently performed, and they were relieved of their symptoms. We conclude that, after fundoplication, symptoms associated with postprandial antral hypomotility may develop in some patients. The pathophysiologic mechanism is unknown, but a positive acid response to insulin induced hypoglycaemia does not support the occurrence of incidental vagotomy. We do not know the prevalence of this motor abnormality among asymptomatic patients with prior fundoplication. A favourable symptomatic response to antrectomy in several of our patients, however, suggests that the symptoms were related to antral motor dysfunction. PMID:6350114

  12. Does the repressor coping style predict lower posttraumatic stress symptoms?

    PubMed

    McNally, Richard J; Hatch, John P; Cedillos, Elizabeth M; Luethcke, Cynthia A; Baker, Monty T; Peterson, Alan L; Litz, Brett T

    2011-07-01

    We tested whether a continuous measure of repressor coping style predicted lower posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in 122 health care professionals serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Zero-order correlational analyses indicated that predeployment repressor coping scores negatively predicted postdeployment PTSD symptoms, r(s) = -0.29, p = 0.001, whereas predeployment Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) scores did not predict postdeployment PTSD symptoms, r(s) = -0.13, p = 0.14. However, predeployment trait anxiety was chiefly responsible for the association between repressor coping and PTSD symptom severity, r(s) = 0.38, p = 0.001. Four percent of the subjects qualified for a probable PTSD diagnosis. Although service members with relatively higher PTSD scores had lower repressor coping scores than did the other subjects, their level of predeployment anxiety was chiefly responsible for this relationship. Knowing someone's predeployment level of trait anxiety permits better prediction of PTSD symptoms among trauma-exposed service members than does knowing his or her level of repressive coping. PMID:22128715

  13. Does oseltamivir shorten flu symptom duration?

    PubMed

    Broadhurst, Richard; Mounsey, Anne

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of influenza virus infection with oral oseltamivir reduces time to alleviation of symptoms in adults and children by approximately one day compared with placebo. It reduces symptom duration even when initiated more than 2 days after symptom onset. PMID:27660842

  14. Exercise-Associated Symptoms in Triathletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Stephen N.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of 110 triathletes was made to identify symptoms experienced during triathlon activities, to determine factors affecting the symptoms, and to find out if symptoms were specific to the athlete or to the event. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  15. Simulation of traumatic brain injury symptoms on the Personality Assessment Inventory: an analogue study.

    PubMed

    Keiski, Michelle A; Shore, Douglas L; Hamilton, Joanna M; Malec, James F

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the operating characteristics of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) validity scales in distinguishing simulators feigning symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while completing the PAI (n = 84) from a clinical sample of patients with TBI who achieved adequate scores on performance validity tests (n = 112). The simulators were divided into two groups: (a) Specific Simulators feigning cognitive and somatic symptoms only or (b) Global Simulators feigning cognitive, somatic, and psychiatric symptoms. The PAI overreporting scales were indeed sensitive to the simulation of TBI symptoms in this analogue design. However, these scales were less sensitive to the feigning of somatic and cognitive TBI symptoms than the feigning of a broad range of cognitive, somatic, and emotional symptoms often associated with TBI. The relationships of TBI simulation to consistency and underreporting scales are also explored.

  16. [Conservative or operative treatment for chondropathia patellae?].

    PubMed

    Ziegler, R; Rau, R

    1980-04-01

    Results of the conservative and operative therapy in chondropathia patellae are reported. A high percentage of freedom from symptoms was achieved by physiotherapeutic measures and intra-articular Arteparon-injections.

  17. 14 CFR 23.1583 - Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... effects, a statement to this effect and information as to any symptoms, the probable behavior of the... minimum ambient air temperatures for operation. (o) Smoking. Any restrictions on smoking in the...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1583 - Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... effects, a statement to this effect and information as to any symptoms, the probable behavior of the... minimum ambient air temperatures for operation. (o) Smoking. Any restrictions on smoking in the...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1583 - Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... information as to any symptoms, the probable behavior of the airplane, and the recommended recovery procedures... minimum ambient air temperatures for operation. (o) Smoking. Any restrictions on smoking in the...

  20. Revision operations after primary gastric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W Weatherston

    1982-01-01

    A single surgeon working in a district general hospital gives his experience over 31 years of 179 reoperations after a primary gastric operation has failed to relieve symptoms of duodenal ulcer. PMID:7092089

  1. Eating disorder symptoms and parenting styles.

    PubMed

    Haycraft, Emma; Blissett, Jackie

    2010-02-01

    This study aimed to examine associations between symptoms of eating disorders and parenting style, in a non-clinical sample. One hundred and five mothers completed self-report measures of eating disorder symptoms and parenting style. Higher levels of eating disorder symptoms were associated with more authoritarian and permissive parenting styles. Authoritative parenting was not significantly related to eating disorder symptoms. The findings demonstrate that eating disorder symptoms in non-clinical individuals are related to less adaptive parenting styles. These findings have potential implications for clinicians working with mothers with eating disorders.

  2. Negative Generalization and Symptoms of Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fulford, Daniel; Rosen, Rebecca K.; Johnson, Sheri L.; Carver, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    The tendency to generalize from a single failure to one's entire self-worth is an important correlate and predictor of depression. Despite conceptual overlap between cognitive biases in anxiety and depression, little research has examined whether negative generalization relates to anxiety symptoms. We examined associations of negative generalization with symptoms of several anxiety disorders, above and beyond its association with lifetime symptoms of depression, among 248 undergraduates. After controlling for lifetime symptoms of major depression, negative generalization was significantly correlated with symptoms of each anxiety disorder tested, most notably generalized anxiety and social phobia. PMID:24340170

  3. Depressive Symptoms Among Immigrant Latino Sexual Minorities

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Scott D.; Martinez, Omar; Song, Eun-Young; Daniel, Jason; Alonzo, Jorge; Eng, Eugenia; Duck, Stacy; Downs, Mario; Bloom, Fred R.; Allen, Alex Boeving; Miller, Cindy; Reboussin, Beth

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence and identify correlates of depressive symptoms among immigrant Latino sexual minorities. Methods Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) was used to estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms, and univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to identify correlates of depressive symptoms. Results Unweighted and RDS-weighted prevalence estimates of depressive symptoms were 69.2% and 74.8%, respectively. In the multivariable analysis, low social support, sexual compulsivity, and high self-esteem were significantly associated with increased depressive symptoms. Conclusions A need exists for culturally congruent mental health services for immigrant Latino sexual minorities in the southern United States. PMID:23985187

  4. Self-Reported ADHD Symptoms among College Students: Item Positioning Affects Symptom Endorsement Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, John T.; Knouse, Laura E.; Nelson-Gray, Rosemery O.; Kwapil, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The effect of manipulating item positioning on self-reported ADHD symptoms was examined. We assessed whether listing DSM-IV ADHD symptoms serially or interspersed affected (a) the correlation between ADHD symptoms and (b) the rate of symptom endorsement. Method: In Study 1, an undergraduate sample (n = 102) completed a measure that…

  5. Premenstrual symptoms and smoking-related expectancies.

    PubMed

    Pang, Raina D; Bello, Mariel S; Stone, Matthew D; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Huh, Jimi; Monterosso, John; Haselton, Martie G; Fales, Melissa R; Leventhal, Adam M

    2016-06-01

    Given that prior research implicates smoking abstinence in increased premenstrual symptoms, tobacco withdrawal, and smoking behaviors, it is possible that women with more severe premenstrual symptoms have stronger expectancies about the effects of smoking and abstaining from smoking on mood and withdrawal. However, such relations have not been previously explored. This study examined relations between premenstrual symptoms experienced in the last month and expectancies that abstaining from smoking results in withdrawal (i.e., smoking abstinence withdrawal expectancies), that smoking is pleasurable (i.e., positive reinforcement smoking expectancies), and smoking relieves negative mood (i.e., negative reinforcement smoking expectancies). In a cross-sectional design, 97 non-treatment seeking women daily smokers completed self-report measures of smoking reinforcement expectancies, smoking abstinence withdrawal expectancies, premenstrual symptoms, mood symptoms, and nicotine dependence. Affect premenstrual symptoms were associated with increased negative reinforcement smoking expectancies, but not over and above covariates. Affect and pain premenstrual symptoms were associated with increased positive reinforcement smoking expectancies, but only affect premenstrual symptoms remained significant in adjusted models. Affect, pain, and water retention premenstrual symptoms were associated with increased smoking abstinence withdrawal expectancies, but only affect premenstrual symptoms remained significant in adjusted models. Findings from this study suggest that addressing concerns about withdrawal and alternatives to smoking may be particularly important in women who experience more severe premenstrual symptoms, especially affect-related changes. PMID:26869196

  6. Premenstrual symptoms and smoking-related expectancies.

    PubMed

    Pang, Raina D; Bello, Mariel S; Stone, Matthew D; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Huh, Jimi; Monterosso, John; Haselton, Martie G; Fales, Melissa R; Leventhal, Adam M

    2016-06-01

    Given that prior research implicates smoking abstinence in increased premenstrual symptoms, tobacco withdrawal, and smoking behaviors, it is possible that women with more severe premenstrual symptoms have stronger expectancies about the effects of smoking and abstaining from smoking on mood and withdrawal. However, such relations have not been previously explored. This study examined relations between premenstrual symptoms experienced in the last month and expectancies that abstaining from smoking results in withdrawal (i.e., smoking abstinence withdrawal expectancies), that smoking is pleasurable (i.e., positive reinforcement smoking expectancies), and smoking relieves negative mood (i.e., negative reinforcement smoking expectancies). In a cross-sectional design, 97 non-treatment seeking women daily smokers completed self-report measures of smoking reinforcement expectancies, smoking abstinence withdrawal expectancies, premenstrual symptoms, mood symptoms, and nicotine dependence. Affect premenstrual symptoms were associated with increased negative reinforcement smoking expectancies, but not over and above covariates. Affect and pain premenstrual symptoms were associated with increased positive reinforcement smoking expectancies, but only affect premenstrual symptoms remained significant in adjusted models. Affect, pain, and water retention premenstrual symptoms were associated with increased smoking abstinence withdrawal expectancies, but only affect premenstrual symptoms remained significant in adjusted models. Findings from this study suggest that addressing concerns about withdrawal and alternatives to smoking may be particularly important in women who experience more severe premenstrual symptoms, especially affect-related changes.

  7. Evolution of the Dynamic Symptoms Model.

    PubMed

    Brant, Jeannine M; Dudley, William N; Beck, Susan; Miaskowski, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Theories and conceptual models can be thought of as broad nets that attempt to rationalize, explain, and master a phenomenon within clinical nursing and interdisciplinary care. They can be used to guide a review of the literature and to formulate and organize research variables and relationships. Gaps in the literature can be identified and opportunities for additional research revealed (Fawcett, 2005). A variety of symptom models or theories exist, including the Theory of Symptom Management (Dodd et al., 2001), Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms (Lenz, Pugh, Milligan, Gift, & Suppe, 1997), Symptoms Experience Model (Armstrong, 2003), and Symptom Experiences in Time Theory (Henly, Kallas, Klatt, & Swenson, 2003). Most recently, the National Institute of Nursing Research identified a new National Institutes of Health Symptom Science Model to guide symptom science research (Cashion & Grady, 2015).
. PMID:27541557

  8. A continuum of misidentification symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sno, H N

    1994-01-01

    A case study of a schizophrenic patient with differing forms of experiences of inappropriate familiarity is described. Reduplicative paramnesia is redefined as a delusion of familiarity related to a reduplication of time, place or person. The author proposes the concept of a continuum of positive and negative misidentification symptoms. The positive pole of the continuum ranges from the minor form of déjà vu experience to reduplicative paramnesia. The negative pole ranges from depersonalisation to nihilistic delusions. Differentiation is based on the severity of the disturbance of reality testing. The argumentation is based on the fact that both déjà vu experiences and depersonalisation occurring in pathological as well as non-pathological conditions are phenomenologically uniform.

  9. Myocardial Infarction: Symptoms and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lei; Liu, Min; Sun, RongRong; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a term used for an event of heart attack which is due to formation of plaques in the interior walls of the arteries resulting in reduced blood flow to the heart and injuring heart muscles because of lack of oxygen supply. The symptoms of MI include chest pain, which travels from left arm to neck, shortness of breath, sweating, nausea, vomiting, abnormal heart beating, anxiety, fatigue, weakness, stress, depression, and other factors. The immediate treatment of MI include, taking aspirin, which prevents blood from clotting, and nitro-glycerin to treat chest pain and oxygen. The heart attack can be prevented by taking an earlier action to lower those risks by controlling diet, fat, cholesterol, salt, smoking, nicotine, alcohol, drugs, monitoring of blood pressure every week, doing exercise every day, and loosing body weight. The treatment of MI includes, aspirin tablets, and to dissolve arterial blockage injection of thrombolytic or clot dissolving drugs such as tissue plasminogen activator, streptokinase or urokinase in blood within 3 h of the onset of a heart attack. The painkillers such as morphine or meperidine can be administered to relieve pain. Nitroglycerin and antihypertensive drugs such as beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors or calcium channel blockers may also be used to lower blood pressure and to improve the oxygen demand of heart. The ECG, coronary angiography and X-ray of heart and blood vessels can be performed to observe the narrowing of coronary arteries. In this article the causes, symptoms and treatments of MI are described. PMID:25638347

  10. Myocardial Infarction: Symptoms and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lei; Liu, Min; Sun, RongRong; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a term used for an event of heart attack which is due to formation of plaques in the interior walls of the arteries resulting in reduced blood flow to the heart and injuring heart muscles because of lack of oxygen supply. The symptoms of MI include chest pain, which travels from left arm to neck, shortness of breath, sweating, nausea, vomiting, abnormal heart beating, anxiety, fatigue, weakness, stress, depression, and other factors. The immediate treatment of MI include, taking aspirin, which prevents blood from clotting, and nitro-glycerin to treat chest pain and oxygen. The heart attack can be prevented by taking an earlier action to lower those risks by controlling diet, fat, cholesterol, salt, smoking, nicotine, alcohol, drugs, monitoring of blood pressure every week, doing exercise every day, and loosing body weight. The treatment of MI includes, aspirin tablets, and to dissolve arterial blockage injection of thrombolytic or clot dissolving drugs such as tissue plasminogen activator, streptokinase or urokinase in blood within 3 h of the onset of a heart attack. The painkillers such as morphine or meperidine can be administered to relieve pain. Nitroglycerin and antihypertensive drugs such as beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors or calcium channel blockers may also be used to lower blood pressure and to improve the oxygen demand of heart. The ECG, coronary angiography and X-ray of heart and blood vessels can be performed to observe the narrowing of coronary arteries. In this article the causes, symptoms and treatments of MI are described.

  11. Activation of defense response pathways by OGs and Flg22 elicitors in Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Denoux, Carine; Galletti, Roberta; Mammarella, Nicole; Gopalan, Suresh; Werck, Danièle; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Ferrari, Simone; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Dewdney, Julia

    2010-01-01

    We carried out transcriptional profiling analysis in 10 day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with oligogalacturonides (OGs), oligosaccharides derived from the plant cell wall, or the bacterial flagellin peptide Flg22, general elicitors of the basal defense response in plants. Although detected by different receptors, both OGs and Flg22 trigger a fast and transient response that is both similar and comprehensive, and characterized by activation of early stages of multiple defense signaling pathways, particularly JA-associated processes. However, the response to Flg22 is stronger in both the number of genes differentially expressed and the amplitude of change. The magnitude of induction of individual genes is in both cases dose dependent, but even at very high concentrations, OGs do not induce a response that is as comprehensive as that seen with Flg22. While high doses of either microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) elicit a late response that includes activation of senescence processes, SA-dependent secretory pathway genes and PR1 expression are substantially induced only by Flg22. These results suggest a lower threshold for activation of early responses than for sustained or SA-mediated late defenses. Expression patterns of aminocyclopropane-carboxylate synthase genes also implicate ethylene biosynthesis in regulation of the late innate immune response. PMID:19825551

  12. Positive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rosen, W G; Mohs, R C; Johns, C A; Small, N S; Kendler, K S; Horvath, T B; Davis, K L

    1984-12-01

    Negative and positive symptoms were determined for 46 drug-free patients who met Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) and/or Feighner criteria for schizophrenia. A modified version of the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) was completed for each patient based on items from the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (SADS) and other scales. Positive symptoms were scored from the SADS as well as from the following four diagnostic systems: RDC, Schneider's first-rank symptoms, the 12-point Flexible system, and Langfeldt's criteria for poor prognosis schizophrenia. For all patients, there was no correlation of negative symptoms and positive symptoms defined by any diagnostic system. Within the paranoid and undifferentiated subtypes, there was a positive correlation of positive and negative symptoms. Patients moving from stable to exacerbated states had an increase in both positive and negative symptoms, and patients with a poor history of treatment response had both more positive and more negative symptoms than responsive patients in a stable state. These results do not support the view that subgroups of patients have predominantly either negative or positive symptoms.

  13. Associations between psychosomatic symptoms in adolescence and mental health symptoms in early adulthood.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Pirjo; Laukkanen, Eila; Kylmä, Jari

    2010-02-01

    This longitudinal study explored associations between psychosomatic symptoms in adolescence and mental health symptoms in early adulthood. The baseline data were collected in 1996 from 14-year-old pupils (n = 235; 116 girls, 119 boys) at schools using a structured questionnaire that included a 14-item scale of psychosomatic symptoms. The follow-up data were collected in 2006 from the same persons at the age of 24 using the Symptom Checklist-90. Follow-up questionnaires were returned by 149 (63.4%) young adults (88 women and 61 men). Young adults who had many psychosomatic symptoms in adolescence suffered more often than the others from somatization and anxiety symptoms in early adulthood. In addition, women had more symptoms of depression and paranoid ideation, and men had more interpersonal sensitivity and psychotic symptoms. Psychosomatic symptoms in adolescence might be important signals of mental health and this should be taken seriously in school health and in general primary care. PMID:20158547

  14. SYMPTOM DIMENSIONS OF ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER AND NICOTINE WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS

    PubMed Central

    Ameringer, Katherine J.; Leventhal, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and nicotine withdrawal symptoms are related; however, it is unknown how this relationship extends across ADHD symptom gradations, differs between inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity symptom types, and generalizes to a national sample. This study examined cross-sectional associations between childhood ADHD symptom indexes (total, inattention, and hyperactivity-impulsivity) and lifetime DSM-IV nicotine withdrawal symptoms. Results showed that each ADHD symptom index associated with almost every withdrawal symptom (Ps < .01). After controlling for hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention symptom overlap, inattention (but not hyperactivity-impulsivity) retained incremental associations with most withdrawal symptoms. These findings are relevant for understanding mechanisms of ADHD and smoking comorbidity. PMID:23244555

  15. Managing behavioural and psychological symptoms in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Stephen; O’Connor, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Most patients with dementia have some behavioural and psychological symptoms. While aggression and agitation are easily recognised, symptoms such as apathy may be overlooked. Behavioural and psychological symptoms should be managed without drugs whenever possible. Although there is little evidence to support their use, antipsychotic drugs are often prescribed to people with dementia. Before prescribing it is important to exclude other causes of altered behaviour, such as pain or infection. Some symptoms may be artefacts of memory loss rather than psychosis. Patients with dementia who are prescribed antipsychotic drugs have an increased risk of falls, hospitalisation and death. They should be regularly monitored for adverse effects. If the patient’s symptoms resolve with drug treatment, reduce the dose after two or three months. Stop the drug if the symptoms do not return. PMID:27756974

  16. Symptom Patterns Among Gulf War Registry Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Hallman, William K.; Kipen, Howard M.; Diefenbach, Michael; Boyd, Kendal; Kang, Han; Leventhal, Howard; Wartenberg, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. We identify symptom patterns among veterans who believe they suffer from Gulf War–related illnesses and characterize groups of individuals with similar patterns. Methods. A mail survey was completed by 1161 veterans drawn from the Gulf War Health Registry. Results. An exploratory factor analysis revealed 4 symptom factors. A K-means cluster analysis revealed 2 groups: (1) veterans reporting good health and few moderate/severe symptoms, and (2) veterans reporting fair/poor health and endorsing an average of 37 symptoms, 75% as moderate/severe. Those in Cluster 2 were more likely to report having 1 or more of 24 medical conditions. Conclusions. These findings are consistent with previous investigations of symptom patterns in Gulf War veterans. This multisymptom illness may be more fully characterized by the extent, breadth, and severity of symptoms reported. PMID:12660208

  17. Menopausal symptoms among Thai women in Bangkok.

    PubMed

    Sukwatana, P; Meekhangvan, J; Tamrongterakul, T; Tanapat, Y; Asavarait, S; Boonjitrpimon, P

    1991-09-01

    A random probability cluster area sampling of 614 women living in Bangkok was conducted to determine the prevalence of abnormal symptoms related to the menopause. Women interviewed were aged 40 and above currently registered as living in the Bangkok Metropolitan area. Sixty-nine percent of the women interviewed experienced abnormal symptoms. Eighty-two percent of those with abnormal symptoms reported having hot flushes. Palpitation, increased heat intolerance and emotional liability were common symptoms. Minor abnormalities included insomnia, weakness, anxiety and urinary symptoms. Changes related to sexual function were difficult to elicit due to cultural limitations. Economic and cultural factors might play important roles in the way these women perceived symptoms related to the menopause and sought medical assistance.

  18. Treatment of Non Pain-Related Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    von Gunten, Charles F.; Gafford, Ellin

    2013-01-01

    Relieving the suffering associated with cancer and its treatment in the physical, emotional, practical and spiritual domains is impossible without impeccable symptom control. This review summarizes key features essential to the management of: anorexia/cachexia, bowel obstruction, diarrhea, fatigue, mucositis, and nausea/vomiting. Taken together, these are some of the most vexing symptoms for cancer patients. Well-managed symptoms enable the course of overall cancer care to be unimpeded. PMID:24051612

  19. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Peripheral Arterial Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Peripheral Artery Disease? Many people ... flow, so the symptoms will go away. Other Signs and Symptoms Other signs and symptoms of P. ...

  20. Ectopic expression of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene from wild rice, OgUBC1, confers resistance against UV-B radiation and Botrytis infection in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, En Hee; Pak, Jung Hun; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Hye Jeong; Shin, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jai Heon; Kim, Doh Hoon; Oh, Ju Sung; Oh, Boung-Jun; Jung, Ho Won; Chung, Young Soo

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated a novel E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme from leaves of wild rice plants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 was highly expressed in leaves treated with SA and UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recombinant OgUBC1 has an enzymatic activity of E2 in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 could protect disruption of plant cells by UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OgUBC1 confers disease resistance and UV-B tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. -- Abstract: A previously unidentified gene encoding ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme was isolated from leaves of wild rice plant treated with wounding and microbe-associated molecular patterns. The OgUBC1 gene was composed of 148 amino acids and contained a typical active site and 21 ubiquitin thioester intermediate interaction residues and 4 E3 interaction residues. Both exogenous application of salicylic acid and UV-B irradiation triggered expression of OgUBC1 in leaves of wild rice. Recombinant OgUBC1 proteins bound to ubiquitins in vitro, proposing that the protein might act as E2 enzyme in planta. Heterologous expression of the OgUBC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana protected plants from cellular damage caused by an excess of UV-B radiation. A stable expression of chalcone synthase gene was detected in leaves of OgUBC1-expressing Arabidopsis, resulting in producing higher amounts of anthocyanin than those in wild-type Col-0 plants. Additionally, both pathogenesis-related gene1 and 5 were transcribed in the transgenic Arabidopsis in the absence of pathogen infection. The OgUBC1-expressing plants were resistant to the infection of Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, we suggested that the OgUBC1 is involved in ubiquitination process important for cellular response against biotic and abiotic stresses in plants.

  1. Delayed bedtimes and obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Coles, Meredith E; Schubert, Jessica R; Sharkey, Katherine M

    2012-10-01

    There is increasing recognition of an important interplay between psychiatric disorders and sleep. Clinical observations and several empirical studies have shown that later bedtimes are associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This study examined the relation of delayed bedtimes (DBs) and symptoms of OCD. Two hundred and sixty-six undergraduates completed a battery of questionnaires assessing sleep patterns, mood, and obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms. Results showed that participants with DBs reported increased rates of OC symptoms, as compared with non-DB participants. Further, this relation remained significant when controlling for negative affect. Additional work examining the interplay between sleep and OC symptoms is warranted. PMID:22946735

  2. The Brief Negative Symptom Scale: Psychometric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Brian; Strauss, Gregory P.; Nguyen, Linh; Fischer, Bernard A.; Daniel, David G.; Cienfuegos, Angel; Marder, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    The participants in the NIMH-MATRICS Consensus Development Conference on Negative Symptoms recommended that an instrument be developed that measured blunted affect, alogia, asociality, anhedonia, and avolition. The Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS) is a 13-item instrument designed for clinical trials and other studies that measures these 5 domains. The interrater, test–retest, and internal consistency of the instrument were strong, with respective intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.93 for the BNSS total score and values of 0.89–0.95 for individual subscales. Comparisons with positive symptoms and other negative symptom instruments supported the discriminant and concurrent validity of the instrument. PMID:20558531

  3. Measurement and assessment of somatic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Desai, Geetha

    2013-02-01

    Somatic symptoms are common presentations in health settings. They can manifest as symptoms of another underlying mental disorder or be termed as medically unexplained. When they are medically unexplained they are invariably subsumed under the diagnostic categories of somatoform disorders. They are associated with interference in functioning, poor quality of life and are burdensome on health resources. The measurement of these symptoms is essential for understanding the individual and planning treatment. There are various instruments that have somatic symptoms measurement in their items. The tools have included somatic symptoms measurement in measuring general psychopathology, somatic symptoms as part of anxiety and depression, somatic symptoms specifically, and as a screening instrument for somatoform disorders. The advantages and disadvantages of common measures have been discussed. It appears that no one measure fulfils the essential criteria of an ideal measure for somatic symptoms. The measures of somatic symptoms should also be culturally sensitive and serve diagnostic, prognostic and heuristic purposes. These aspects are highlighted in the review.

  4. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis: Symptoms and Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Jasona, Leonard A.; Zinn, Marcie L.; Zinn, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) continues to cause significant morbidity worldwide with an estimated one million cases in the United States. Hurdles to establishing consensus to achieve accurate evaluation of patients with ME continue, fueled by poor agreement about case definitions, slow progress in development of standardized diagnostic approaches, and issues surrounding research priorities. Because there are other medical problems, such as early MS and Parkinson’s Disease, which have some similar clinical presentations, it is critical to accurately diagnose ME to make a differential diagnosis. In this article, we explore and summarize advances in the physiological and neurological approaches to understanding, diagnosing, and treating ME. We identify key areas and approaches to elucidate the core and secondary symptom clusters in ME so as to provide some practical suggestions in evaluation of ME for clinicians and researchers. This review, therefore, represents a synthesis of key discussions in the literature, and has important implications for a better understanding of ME, its biological markers, and diagnostic criteria. There is a clear need for more longitudinal studies in this area with larger data sets, which correct for multiple testing. PMID:26411464

  5. Autism and ADHD Symptoms in Patients with OCD: Are They Associated with Specific OC Symptom Dimensions or OC Symptom Severity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anholt, Gideon E.; Cath, Danielle C.; van Oppen, Patricia; Eikelenboom, Merijn; Smit, Johannes H.; van Megen, Harold; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.

    2010-01-01

    In obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), the relationship between autism spectrum disorders (ASD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom, and obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptom dimensions and severity has scarcely been studied. Therefore, 109 adult outpatients with primary OCD were compared to 87 healthy controls on OC, ADHD and…

  6. Negative symptoms in psychometrically defined schizotypy: The role of depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Campellone, Timothy R; Elis, Ori; Mote, Jasmine; Sanchez, Amy H; Kring, Ann M

    2016-06-30

    People high in schizotypy, a risk factor for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, can have negative symptoms, including diminished experience of motivation/pleasure (MAP) and emotional expressivity (EXP). Additionally, people high in schizotypy often report elevated depressive symptoms, which are also associated with diminished MAP and EXP. In this study, we examined whether negative symptoms were related to schizotypy above and beyond the presence of depressive symptoms. Thirty-one people high in schizotypy and 24 people low in schizotypy were administered the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS), an interview-based measure of MAP and EXP negative symptoms and completed a self-report measure of cognitive and somatic-affective depressive symptoms. People high in schizotypy had more MAP negative symptoms than people low in schizotypy, but we found no group differences in EXP negative symptoms. Importantly, the relationship between MAP negative symptoms and schizotypy was fully mediated by cognitive depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that depressive symptoms, specifically cognitive depressive symptoms, may be a pathway for motivation and pleasure impairment, in people at elevated risk for developing schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.

  7. A Structural Equation Model of HIV-related Symptoms, Depressive Symptoms, and Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Yoo-Jeong, Moka; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; McCoy, Katryna; Ownby, Raymond L

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) remains critical in management of HIV infection. This study evaluated depression as a potential mechanism by which HIV-related symptoms affect medication adherence and explored if particular clusters of HIV symptoms are susceptible to this mechanism. Baseline data from a multi-visit intervention study were analyzed among 124 persons living with HIV (PLWH). A bifactor model showed two clusters of HIV-related symptom distress: general HIV-related symptoms and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Structural equation modeling showed that both general HIV-related symptoms and GI symptoms were related to higher levels of depressive symptoms, and higher levels of depressive symptoms were related to lower levels of medication adherence. Although general HIV-related symptoms and GI symptoms were not directly related to adherence, they were indirectly associated with adherence via depression. The findings highlight the importance of early recognition and evaluation of symptoms of depression, as well as the underlying physical symptoms that might cause depression, to improve medication adherence.

  8. Comparative assessment of an Og4C3 ELISA and an ICT filariasis test: a study of Myanmar migrants in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nuchprayoon, Surang; Porksakorn, Chantima; Junpee, Alisa; Sanprasert, Vivornpun; Poovorawan, Yong

    2003-12-01

    Detection of circulating filarial antigen has now emerged as an alternative method for the diagnosis of bancroftian filariasis. We compared two antigen detection assays, an Og4C3 ELISA and an ICT (immunochromatography) Filariasis test, for the diagnosis of Wuchereria bancrofti infections in migrant Myanmar workers in Tak province, Western Thailand. A total of 337 Myanmars participated in this study. The microfilarial rate was 3.3%. The Og4C3 ELISA could detect 19.1% of bancroftian filariasis while the ICT test detected 12.7%. Both antigen assays could detect all microfilaremics. The Og4C3 ELISA detected 14.8% of amicrofilaremics while the ICT test identified 8.1%. Those who were positive for the ICT test were also positive by the Og4C3 ELISA. Those Og4C3 positive cases, that were ICT negative (ICT-ve/Og4C3+ve) had statistically significant (p < 0.05, unpaired t-test) lower Og4C3 antigen levels (409.5 units, range 117-2,389) than those that were ICT positive (ICT+ve/Og4C3+ve) (5,252.0 units, range 130-28,062). Our results emphasize the problem of bancroftian filariasis in Myanmar migrants working in Thailand. Close monitoring and control of this disease in Myanmar migrants are of public health importance. Antigen detection systems are promising tools for the surveillance of bancroftian filariasis. PMID:15198343

  9. Nut allergy: symptom and severity reporting.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, H; Luyt, D

    1999-01-01

    Nut allergy, in particular peanut allergy, is becoming more common in children. Immune sensitisation to nuts appears to be occurring earlier in life. High incidence of other allergic diseases in children with nut allergy. Onset of anaphylactic symptoms is quick but symptoms last for a short time. Necessity for hospital admission due to severity of allergic reaction is low.

  10. Does cold winter weather produce depressive symptoms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Michael J.; Goodes, Mike; Furlong, Candy; Tollefson, Gary D.

    1988-06-01

    To examine whether harsh winter weather is associated with depressive symptoms, 45 healthy subjects from Minnesota were compared to 42 subjects from California near the end of the winter season. No differences in the prevalence of depressive symptoms were found between the two groups.

  11. The Emergence of Depressive Symptoms during Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne, Ed.; Petersen, Anne C., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    Twelve papers on the emergence and maintenance of severe clinical depression and depressive symptoms during adolescence are presented. Topics include parental influences, epidemiological data, depressive and negative affect, hormonal effects, preadolescent symptoms, sex differences, longitudinal studies with rhesus monkeys, suicidal ideation,…

  12. The Violent Content in Attenuated Psychotic Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Catherine; Deighton, Stephanie; Cadenhead, Kristin S; Cannon, Tyrone D; Cornblatt, Barbara A; McGlashan, Thomas H; Perkins, Diana O; Seidman, Larry J; Tsuang, Ming T; Walker, Elaine F; Woods, Scott W; Bearden, Carrie E; Mathalon, Daniel; Addington, Jean

    2016-08-30

    The relationship between psychosis and violence has typically focused on factors likely to predict who will commit violent acts. One unexplored area is violence in the content of subthreshold positive symptoms. The current aim was to conduct an exploratory analysis of violent content in the attenuated psychotic symptoms (APS) of those at clinical high risk of psychosis (CHR) who met criteria for attenuated psychotic symptom syndrome (APSS). The APS of 442 CHR individuals, determined by the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes, were described in comprehensive vignettes. The content of these symptoms were coded using the Content of Attenuated Positive Symptoms Codebook. Other measures included clinical symptoms, functioning, beliefs and trauma. Individuals with violent content had significantly higher APS, greater negative beliefs about the self and others, and increased bullying. The same findings and higher ratings on anxiety symptoms were present when participants with self-directed violence were compared to participants with no violent content. Individuals reporting violent content differ in their clinical presentation compared to those who do not experience violent content. Adverse life events, like bullying, may impact the presence of violent content in APS symptoms. Future studies should explore violent content in relation to actual behavior. PMID:27259137

  13. Depressive Symptoms in African-American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Michael K.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the prevalence of depressive symptoms in an African American female college student sample (n=78) using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI2) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). MMPI-2 was a more conservative scale than BDI in identifying depressive symptom levels. Discusses stress inoculation methods to assist…

  14. Predictors of Depressive Symptoms among Foster Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Susan A.; Eamon, Mary Keegan

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: The main purposes of this study were to determine (1) the prevalence of depressive symptoms among foster caregivers, (2) the social-demographics, risk factors, and social support predicting depressive symptoms, and (3) whether social support buffered the effects of the risk factors in the Illinois Foster Caregivers Study. Method:…

  15. Somatic Symptoms in Traumatized Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kugler, Brittany B.; Bloom, Marlene; Kaercher, Lauren B.; Truax, Tatyana V.; Storch, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood exposure to trauma has been associated with increased rates of somatic symptoms (SS), which may contribute to diminished daily functioning. One hundred and sixty-one children residing at a residential treatment home who had experienced neglect and/or abuse were administered the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC), the…

  16. Ethical dilemmas of medically unexplained symptoms.

    PubMed

    Desai, Geetha; Chaturvedi, Santosh K

    2016-01-01

    Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) are common across health settings. These are defined as "physical symptoms that prompt sufferer to seek healthcare but remain unexplained after an appropriate medical evaluation". Expectedly, MUS are often associated with significant health-seeking behaviours that add to the burden on health resources. PMID:27260826

  17. Spurious symptom reduction in fault monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shontz, William D.; Records, Roger M.; Choi, Jai J.

    1993-01-01

    Previous work accomplished on NASA's Faultfinder concept suggested that the concept was jeopardized by spurious symptoms generated in the monitoring phase. The purpose of the present research was to investigate methods of reducing the generation of spurious symptoms during in-flight engine monitoring. Two approaches for reducing spurious symptoms were investigated. A knowledge base of rules was constructed to filter known spurious symptoms and a neural net was developed to improve the expectation values used in the monitoring process. Both approaches were effective in reducing spurious symptoms individually. However, the best results were obtained using a hybrid system combining the neural net capability to improve expectation values with the rule-based logic filter.

  18. Children's peer victimization, empathy, and emotional symptoms.

    PubMed

    Malti, Tina; Perren, Sonja; Buchmann, Marlis

    2010-02-01

    This study investigated the concurrent and longitudinal relations among children's peer victimization, empathy, and emotional symptoms. The sample consisted of 175 children (85 girls, mean age = 6.1 years) recruited from kindergartens in Switzerland and followed for 1 year (Time 2). Parents and teachers reported on the children's emotional symptoms, empathy, and victimization. Children reported their empathy and victimization experiences. Peer victimization was a predictor of emotional symptoms at Time 1; this association was stronger for children with average or high levels of empathy. Increases in peer victimization predicted increases in boys' emotional symptoms, and increases in victimization were related to decreases in empathy. The results emphasize the role of negative peer relations and children's social-emotional information processing for the development of emotional symptoms.

  19. Parent Ratings of ADHD Symptoms: Differential Symptom Functioning across Malaysian Malay and Chinese Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Rapson; Vance, Alasdair

    2008-01-01

    This study examined differential symptom functioning (DSF) in ADHD symptoms across Malay and Chinese children in Malaysia. Malay (N = 571) and Chinese (N = 254) parents completed the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale, which lists the DSM-IV ADHD symptoms. DSF was examined using the multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) structural equation…

  20. Levothyroxine Poisoning - Symptoms and Clinical Outcome.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Birgitte; Saedder, Eva A; Dalhoff, Kim; Wikkelsoe, Mette; Jürgens, Gesche

    2015-10-01

    Levothyroxine (LT), T4, poisoning is rarely associated with a severe outcome. However, cases with significant complications have been reported. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with symptoms of poisoning including late-onset symptoms. All enquiries to the Danish Poison Information Centre (DPIC) concerning LT poisoning between March 2007 and September 2012 were reviewed and the following parameters were recorded: age, dose, time from ingestion, multiple drug intake and symptoms. To evaluate the frequency of late-onset symptoms, a subgroup of patients without initial symptoms were contacted. A total of 181 patients were registered (112 children). Ingested LT dose ranged from 10 to 9000 mcg (median 275 mcg). A total of 29 of 181 (16%) patients were symptomatic at the time of enquiry, and there was no difference in ingested LT dose between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients, neither in children nor in adults (age 16-92 years) (p < 0.68 and p < 0.47, respectively). In total, 153 of 181 (85%) patients did not have symptoms of poisoning at the time of enquiry; however, in 9 of 21 (43%) patients, we were able to contact, late-onset symptoms existed. In none of the cases, hospital contact was needed and there were no reports of long-term sequelae. Acute LT poisoning often follows a benign course. The occurrence of symptoms appears not to be dose dependent. Late-onset symptoms seem to be common. However, all symptoms resolved spontaneously without need of medical care.

  1. Postdeployment symptom changes and traumatic brain injury and/or posttraumatic stress disorder in men.

    PubMed

    Macera, Caroline A; Aralis, Hilary J; Macgregor, Andrew J; Rauh, Mitchell J; Galarneau, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    In Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, blast-related injuries associated with combat are frequent and can result in traumatic brain injury (TBI) symptoms that may be difficult to distinguish from psychological problems. Using data from the Post-Deployment Health Assessment and Reassessment, we identified 12,046 male U.S. Navy sailors and Marines with reported combat exposure from 2008 to 2009. Symptoms potentially associated with blast-related TBI and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that were reported immediately after deployment were compared with symptoms present several months later. Our study supports others that have found that subjects with blast-related injuries may experience the development or worsening of symptoms during the months following deployment. Additionally, our study found that those who screened positive for PTSD and TBI formed a unique group, with the presence of TBI exacerbating development of PTSD symptoms at reassessment. Providers should recognize the late development of symptoms, consider the possibility of comorbidity, and be prepared to treat multiple symptoms rather than a specific diagnostic category. PMID:23341312

  2. Rescue volunteers' posttraumatic symptoms, distress, and fear of death: attachment insecurity moderates.

    PubMed

    Berant, Ety; Pizem, Noam

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses the contribution of attachment orientations of ultra-orthodox volunteer rescuers involved in terror events to their posttraumatic symptoms, distress, and fear of death. The authors compared 53 ultra-orthodox rescuers operating in a terror-stricken area in Israel to 36 ultra-orthodox men unexposed to terror. Rescuers displayed lower distress than controls but were not significantly different in fear of death or posttraumatic symptoms. Attachment anxiety was found to be a risk factor by contributing uniquely to posttraumatic symptoms, distress, and fear of death, and as a debilitating factor among rescuers. PMID:25551333

  3. [Respiratory tract symptoms and illnesses in rescue and clearance workers after the World Trade Center catastrophe].

    PubMed

    Aro, Leena; Sauni, Riitta; Lusa, Sirpa; Lindholm, Harri; Uitti, Jukka

    2009-01-01

    The World Trade Center catastrophe and subsequent rescue and clearance operations caused unusual respiratory tract symptoms in fire fighters and rescue workers. Persistent cough was a common symptom, being extraordinarily often associated with the gastroesophageal reflux symptom. Irritant dusts caused reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). Tracheal hyperreactivity increased with the exposure, and the risk of asthma is estimated to have increased up to 12 times higher as compared with the normal population. Investigation and treatment of exposed persons have yielded generalizable information about the reactions of the respiratory system in situations of heavy exposure. PMID:19839191

  4. Fear of anxiety as a partial mediator of the relation between trauma severity and PTSD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Reuther, Erin T; Davis, Thompson E; Matthews, Russell A; Munson, Melissa S; Grills-Taquechel, Amie E

    2010-08-01

    Fear of anxiety has previously been found to be a predictor of overall symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The current exploratory study examines the relationship between fear of anxiety and symptoms of PTSD in a sample of adults exposed to Hurricane Katrina. Fear of anxiety was found to partially mediate the relationship between the severity of trauma and the severity of PTSD. Further, this mediation was found to operate differently by gender, with the mediation holding true for men but not for women. For both men and women, fear of anxiety was positively correlated with PTSD symptoms.

  5. Rescue volunteers' posttraumatic symptoms, distress, and fear of death: attachment insecurity moderates.

    PubMed

    Berant, Ety; Pizem, Noam

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses the contribution of attachment orientations of ultra-orthodox volunteer rescuers involved in terror events to their posttraumatic symptoms, distress, and fear of death. The authors compared 53 ultra-orthodox rescuers operating in a terror-stricken area in Israel to 36 ultra-orthodox men unexposed to terror. Rescuers displayed lower distress than controls but were not significantly different in fear of death or posttraumatic symptoms. Attachment anxiety was found to be a risk factor by contributing uniquely to posttraumatic symptoms, distress, and fear of death, and as a debilitating factor among rescuers.

  6. OGS#PETSc approach for robust and efficient simulations of strongly coupled hydrothermal processes in EGS reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Norihiro; Blucher, Guido; Cacace, Mauro; Kolditz, Olaf

    2016-04-01

    A robust and computationally efficient solution is important for 3D modelling of EGS reservoirs. This is particularly the case when the reservoir model includes hydraulic conduits such as induced or natural fractures, fault zones, and wellbore open-hole sections. The existence of such hydraulic conduits results in heterogeneous flow fields and in a strengthened coupling between fluid flow and heat transport processes via temperature dependent fluid properties (e.g. density and viscosity). A commonly employed partitioned solution (or operator-splitting solution) may not robustly work for such strongly coupled problems its applicability being limited by small time step sizes (e.g. 5-10 days) whereas the processes have to be simulated for 10-100 years. To overcome this limitation, an alternative approach is desired which can guarantee a robust solution of the coupled problem with minor constraints on time step sizes. In this work, we present a Newton-Raphson based monolithic coupling approach implemented in the OpenGeoSys simulator (OGS) combined with the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) library. The PETSc library is used for both linear and nonlinear solvers as well as MPI-based parallel computations. The suggested method has been tested by application to the 3D reservoir site of Groß Schönebeck, in northern Germany. Results show that the exact Newton-Raphson approach can also be limited to small time step sizes (e.g. one day) due to slight oscillations in the temperature field. The usage of a line search technique and modification of the Jacobian matrix were necessary to achieve robust convergence of the nonlinear solution. For the studied example, the proposed monolithic approach worked even with a very large time step size of 3.5 years.

  7. Emotionally biased cognitive processes: the weakest link predicts prospective changes in depressive symptom severity.

    PubMed

    Everaert, Jonas; Duyck, Wouter; Koster, Ernst H W

    2015-01-01

    Emotional biases in attention, interpretation, and memory are predictive of future depressive symptoms. It remains unknown, however, how these biased cognitive processes interact to predict depressive symptom levels in the long-term. In the present study, we tested the predictive value of two integrative approaches to model relations between multiple biased cognitive processes, namely the additive (i.e., cognitive processes have a cumulative effect) vs. the weakest link (i.e., the dominant pathogenic process is important) model. We also tested whether these integrative models interacted with perceived stress to predict prospective changes in depressive symptom severity. At Time 1, participants completed measures of depressive symptom severity and emotional biases in attention, interpretation, and memory. At Time 2, one year later, participants were reassessed to determine depressive symptom levels and perceived stress. Results revealed that the weakest link model had incremental validity over the additive model in predicting prospective changes in depressive symptoms, though both models explained a significant proportion of variance in the change in depressive symptoms from Time 1 to Time 2. None of the integrative models interacted with perceived stress to predict changes in depressive symptomatology. These findings suggest that the best cognitive marker of the evolution in depressive symptoms is the cognitive process that is dominantly biased toward negative material, which operates independent from experienced stress. This highlights the importance of considering idiographic cognitive profiles with multiple cognitive processes for understanding and modifying effects of cognitive biases in depression.

  8. Association of ventilation system type with SBS symptoms in office workers

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.

    2001-02-07

    This paper provides a review and synthesis of current knowledge about the associations of ventilation system types in office buildings with sick building syndrome symptoms and discusses potential explanations for the associations. Relative to natural ventilation, air conditioning, with or without humidification, was consistently associated with a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of one or more SBS symptoms. Prevalences were typically higher by approximately 30% to 200% in the air conditioned buildings. In two of three assessments from a single study, symptom prevalences were also significantly higher in air conditioned buildings than in buildings with simple mechanical ventilation and no humidification. In approximately half of assessments, SBS symptom prevalences were significantly higher in buildings with simple mechanical ventilation than in buildings with natural ventilation. Insufficient information was available for conclusions about the potential increased risk of SBS symptoms with humidification. The statistically significant associations of mechanical ventilation and air conditioning with SBS symptoms are much more frequent than expected from chance and also not likely to be a consequence of confounding by several potential personal, job, or building related confounders. The reasons for the increases in symptom prevalences with mechanical ventilation and particularly with air conditioning remain unclear. Multiple deficiencies in HVAC system design, construction, operation, or maintenance, including some which cause pollutant emissions from HVAC systems, may contribute to the increases in symptom prevalences.

  9. Effects of quitting cannabis on respiratory symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hancox, Robert J; Shin, Hayden H; Gray, Andrew R; Poulton, Richie; Sears, Malcolm R

    2015-07-01

    Smoking cannabis is associated with symptoms of bronchitis. Little is known about the persistence of symptoms after stopping cannabis use. We assessed associations between changes in cannabis use and respiratory symptoms in a population-based cohort of 1037 young adults. Participants were asked about cannabis and tobacco use at ages 18, 21, 26, 32 and 38 years. Symptoms of morning cough, sputum production, wheeze, dyspnoea on exertion and asthma diagnoses were ascertained at the same ages. Frequent cannabis use was defined as ≥52 occasions over the previous year. Associations between frequent cannabis use and respiratory symptoms were analysed using generalised estimating equations with adjustments for tobacco smoking, asthma, sex and age. Frequent cannabis use was associated with morning cough (OR 1.97, p<0.001), sputum production (OR 2.31, p<0.001) and wheeze (OR 1.55, p<0.001). Reducing or quitting cannabis use was associated with reductions in the prevalence of cough, sputum and wheeze to levels similar to nonusers.Frequent cannabis use is associated with symptoms of bronchitis in young adults. Reducing cannabis use often leads to a resolution of these symptoms.

  10. [Neuropsychiatric non motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Peralta, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade we have witnessed substantial progress towards the understanding of Parkinson's disease. According to pathological and neuroimaging studies, the traditional view of Parkinson's disease that begins with the development of motor symptoms such as bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor, has begun to change. It is now understood that there would be a "premotor" or "preclinical" period in which the alphasynuclein pathology begins outside of the substantia nigra in the lower brainstem and autonomic nervous system. Although the pathophysiology of this phase is still unclear, it is currently thought that its symptoms would correspond to the so-called "non-motor symptoms". Hyposmia, depression, constipation and REM sleep disorders are one of the most relevant non-motor symptoms at this "premotor" stage. The spectrum of non-motor symptoms is very broad and covers the domains of neuropsychiatric, dysautonomic, gastrointestinal and sensory symptoms as well as sleep disorders. Neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, impulse control disorder, psychosis and dementia, are a major cause of disability as they are directly related to quality of life. PMID:23979552

  11. [Neuropsychiatric non motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Peralta, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade we have witnessed substantial progress towards the understanding of Parkinson's disease. According to pathological and neuroimaging studies, the traditional view of Parkinson's disease that begins with the development of motor symptoms such as bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor, has begun to change. It is now understood that there would be a "premotor" or "preclinical" period in which the alphasynuclein pathology begins outside of the substantia nigra in the lower brainstem and autonomic nervous system. Although the pathophysiology of this phase is still unclear, it is currently thought that its symptoms would correspond to the so-called "non-motor symptoms". Hyposmia, depression, constipation and REM sleep disorders are one of the most relevant non-motor symptoms at this "premotor" stage. The spectrum of non-motor symptoms is very broad and covers the domains of neuropsychiatric, dysautonomic, gastrointestinal and sensory symptoms as well as sleep disorders. Neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, impulse control disorder, psychosis and dementia, are a major cause of disability as they are directly related to quality of life.

  12. Trajectories of depressive symptoms after hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cristancho, P.; Lenze, E. J.; Avidan, M. S.; Rawson, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hip fracture is often complicated by depressive symptoms in older adults. We sought to characterize trajectories of depressive symptoms arising after hip fracture and examine their relationship with functional outcomes and walking ability. We also investigated clinical and psychosocial predictors of these trajectories. Method We enrolled 482 inpatients, aged ≥60 years, who were admitted for hip fracture repair at eight St Louis, MO area hospitals between 2008 and 2012. Participants with current depression diagnosis and/or notable cognitive impairment were excluded. Depressive symptoms and functional recovery were assessed with the Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale and Functional Recovery Score, respectively, for 52 weeks after fracture. Health, cognitive, and psychosocial variables were gathered at baseline. We modeled depressive symptoms using group-based trajectory analysis and subsequently identified correlates of trajectory group membership. Results Three trajectories emerged according to the course of depressive symptoms, which we termed ‘resilient’, ‘distressed’, and ‘depressed’. The depressed trajectory (10% of participants) experienced a persistently high level of depressive symptoms and a slower time to recover mobility than the other trajectory groups. Stressful life events prior to the fracture, current smoking, higher anxiety, less social support, antidepressant use, past depression, and type of implant predicted membership of the depressed trajectory. Conclusions Depressive symptoms arising after hip fracture are associated with poorer functional status. Clinical and psychosocial variables predicted membership of the depression trajectory. Early identification and intervention of patients in a depressive trajectory may improve functional outcomes after hip fracture. PMID:27032698

  13. Effects of quitting cannabis on respiratory symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hancox, Robert J.; Shin, Hayden H.; Gray, Andrew R.; Poulton, Richie; Sears, Malcolm R.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking cannabis is associated with symptoms of bronchitis. Little is known about the persistence of symptoms after stopping cannabis use. We assessed associations between changes in cannabis use and respiratory symptoms in a population-based cohort of 1037 young adults. Participants were asked about cannabis and tobacco use at ages 18, 21, 26, 32 and 38 years. Symptoms of morning cough, sputum production, wheeze, dyspnoea on exertion and asthma diagnoses were ascertained at the same ages. Frequent cannabis use was defined as ≥52 occasions over the previous year. Associations between frequent cannabis use and respiratory symptoms were analysed using generalised estimating equations with adjustments for tobacco smoking, asthma, sex and age. Frequent cannabis use was associated with morning cough (OR 1.97, p<0.001), sputum production (OR 2.31, p<0.001) and wheeze (OR 1.55, p<0.001). Reducing or quitting cannabis use was associated with reductions in the prevalence of cough, sputum and wheeze to levels similar to nonusers. Frequent cannabis use is associated with symptoms of bronchitis in young adults. Reducing cannabis use often leads to a resolution of these symptoms. PMID:25837035

  14. Demographic correlates of attenuated positive psychotic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Waford, Rachel N.; MacDonald, Allison; Goines, Katrina; Novacek, Derek M.; Trotman, Hanan D.; Walker, Elaine F.; Addington, Jean; Bearden, Carrie E.; Cadenhead, Kristin S.; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Cornblatt, Barbara A.; Heinssen, Robert; Mathalon, Daniel H.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Perkins, Diana O.; Seidman, Larry J.; Woods, Scott W.; McGlashan, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    It is now well established that the utilization of standardized clinical criteria can enhance prediction of psychosis. These criteria are primarily concerned with the presence and severity of attenuated positive symptoms. Because these symptom criteria are used to derive algorithms for designating clinical high risk (CHR) status and for maximizing prediction of psychosis risk, it is important to know whether the symptom ratings vary as a function of demographic factors that have previously been linked with symptoms in diagnosed psychotic patients. Using a sample of 356 CHR individuals from the NAPLS-II multi-site study, we examined the relation of three sex, age, and educational level, with the severity of attenuated positive symptom scores from the Scale of Prodromal Symptoms (SOPS). Demographic factors accounted for little of the variance in symptom ratings (5–6%). Older CHR individuals manifested more severe suspiciousness, and female CHR participants reported more unusual perceptual experiences than male participants. Contrary to prediction, higher educational level was associated with more severe ratings of unusual thought content, but less severe perceptual abnormalities. Overall, sex, age and education were modestly related to unusual thought content and perceptual abnormalities, only, suggesting minimal implication for designating CHR status and predicting psychosis-risk. PMID:25999040

  15. Neurotology symptoms at referral to vestibular evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness-vertigo is common in adults, but clinical providers may rarely diagnose vestibular impairment and referral could be delayed. To assess neurotology symptoms (including triggers) reported by patients with peripheral vestibular disease, during the year just before their referral to vestibular evaluation. Methods 282 patients with peripheral vestibular disease and 282 control subjects accepted to participate. They had no middle ear, retinal, neurological, psychiatric, autoimmune or autonomic disorders. They reported their symptoms by a standardized questionnaire along with their anxiety/depression symptoms. Results Patients were referred after months or years from the onset of their symptoms, 24% of them reported frequent falls with a long clinical evolution; 10% of them reported no vertigo but instability related to specific triggers; 86% patients and 12% control subjects reported instability when moving the head rapidly and 79% patients and 6% control subjects reported instability when changing posture. Seven out of the 9 symptoms explored by the questionnaire allowed the correct classification of circa 95% of the participants (Discriminant function analysis, p < 0.001). High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms showed a mild correlation with the total score of symptoms (multiple R2 =0.18, p < 0.001). Conclusions Late referral to vestibular evaluation may underlie a history of frequent falls; some patients may not report vertigo, but instability related to specific triggers, which could be useful to prompt vestibular evaluation. High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms may have a mild influence on the report of symptoms of vestibular disease in both, patients and control subjects. PMID:24279682

  16. Depressive symptoms and observed eating in youth.

    PubMed

    Mooreville, Mira; Shomaker, Lauren B; Reina, Samantha A; Hannallah, Louise M; Adelyn Cohen, L; Courville, Amber B; Kozlosky, Merel; Brady, Sheila M; Condarco, Tania; Yanovski, Susan Z; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Yanovski, Jack A

    2014-04-01

    Depressive symptoms in youth may be a risk factor for obesity, with altered eating behaviors as one possible mechanism. We tested whether depressive symptoms were associated with observed eating patterns expected to promote excessive weight gain in two separate samples. In Study 1, 228 non-treatment-seeking youth, ages 12-17y (15.3±1.4y; 54.7% female), self-reported depressive symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory. Energy intake was measured as consumption from a 10,934-kcal buffet meal served at 11:00am after an overnight fast. In Study 2, 204 non-treatment-seeking youth, ages 8-17y (13.0±2.8y; 49.5% female), self-reported depressive symptoms using the Children's Depression Inventory. Energy intake was measured as consumption from a 9835-kcal buffet meal served at 2:30pm after a standard breakfast. In Study 1, controlling for body composition and other relevant covariates, depressive symptoms were positively related to total energy intake in girls and boys. In Study 2, adjusting for the same covariates, depressive symptoms among girls only were positively associated with total energy intake. Youth high in depressive symptoms and dietary restraint consumed the most energy from sweets. In both studies, the effects of depressive symptoms on intake were small. Nevertheless, depressive symptoms were associated with significantly greater consumption of total energy and energy from sweet snack foods, which, over time, could be anticipated to promote excess weight gain. PMID:24424352

  17. Beyond Intuition: Patient Fever Symptom Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Nancy J.; Peng, Claudia; Powers, John H.; Leidy, Nancy Kline; Miller-Davis, Claiborne; Rosenberg, Alice; VanRaden, Mark; Wallen, Gwenyth R.

    2013-01-01

    Context Fever is an important sign of inflammation recognized by health care practitioners and family caregivers. However, few empirical data obtained directly from patients exist to support many of the long-standing assumptions about the symptoms of fever. Many of the literature-cited symptoms, including chills, diaphoresis, and malaise, have limited scientific bases, yet they often represent a major justification for antipyretic administration. Objectives To describe the patient experience of fever symptoms for the preliminary development of a fever assessment questionnaire. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 28 inpatients, the majority (86%) with cancer diagnoses, who had a recorded temperature of ≥38°C within approximately 12 hours before the interview. A semi-structured interview guide was used to elicit patient fever experiences. Thematic analyses were conducted by three independent research team members, and the data were verified through two rounds of consensus building. Results Eleven themes emerged. The participants reported experiences of feeling cold, weakness, warmth, sweating, nonspecific bodily sensations, gastrointestinal symptoms, headaches, emotional changes, achiness, respiratory symptoms, and vivid dreams/hallucinations. Conclusion Our data not only confirm long-standing symptoms of fever but also suggest new symptoms and a level of variability and complexity not captured by the existing fever literature. Greater knowledge of patients’ fever experiences will guide more accurate assessment of symptoms associated with fever and the impact of antipyretic treatments on patient symptoms in this common condition. Results from this study are contributing to the content validity of a future instrument that will evaluate patient outcomes related to fever interventions. PMID:23742739

  18. [Psychiatric symptoms can reveal Turner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Thusgaard, Helle; Arnfred, Sidse Marie H

    2013-02-01

    Turner syndrome is usually diagnosed by physical characteristics, i.e. low height and infertility. This case report presents a woman, who was referred to a chromosome analysis at the age of 35 years, due to a specific pattern of psychiatric symptoms. She felt childish, had strong emotional bonds to her family, yet lacked friendships and intimate relationships. She had moderate symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder with a sexual content. Confronted with this constellation of symptoms, psychiatrists and psychologists should be aware of Turner syndrome.

  19. Symptom Control at the End of Life.

    PubMed

    Kreher, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    Symptom control at the end of life is an identified ongoing gap in end-of-life care. Increased demand for high-quality symptom control; limited supply of specialty trained clinicians; lack of consistent high-quality evidence-based interventions; and education deficits among clinicians, patients, and families in end-of-life processes contribute to this gap. High-value end-of-life care is centered on high-quality communication about goals of care. This article reviews primary palliative care concepts of communication and symptom control to provide a framework for primary care physicians to use in the care of patients at the end of life. PMID:27542430

  20. Envisioning the future in symptom science.

    PubMed

    Corwin, Elizabeth J; Berg, Judith A; Armstrong, Terri S; DeVito Dabbs, Annette; Lee, Kathryn A; Meek, Paula; Redeker, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Symptom assessment and management continues to be a priority issue for nursing science and practice. However, as the complexity of symptom etiology and expression becomes clear, new approaches and technologies are needed to better address biology and context, common data sources need to be built and shared, and addressing the impact of empirical findings on health policy becomes essential. In this article, we provide a forum to reflect on the future direction of symptom science, with the goal of stimulating further dialogue and improving outcomes for patients and families around the world and for years to come.

  1. Negative symptom assessment of chronic schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Raskin, A; Pelchat, R; Sood, R; Alphs, L D; Levine, J

    1993-01-01

    A new scale for assessing negative symptoms in schizophrenia, the Negative Symptom Assessment (NSA), was administered to 101 male chronic, inpatient schizophrenia patients. Factor analysis of the NSA yielded seven factors, but most of the explained variance resided in Factor 1, Restricted Affect/Emotion. The factors that emerged from this study closely resembled NSA factors derived from an earlier study of outpatient schizophrenia patients, which indicates the factor structure of the NSA is robust. A constellation of variables reflecting long-term or chronic illness were significantly related to six of the seven factors. These results suggest that "institutionalism" may play a role in the evolution of some negative symptoms.

  2. Depressive symptoms and Depo-Provera.

    PubMed

    Westhoff, C; Truman, C; Kalmuss, D; Cushman, L; Davidson, A; Rulin, M; Heartwell, S

    1998-04-01

    Women enrolled in a multicenter prospective study were evaluated to identify any possible relationship between depressive symptoms and the use of contraceptives. Women choosing Depo-Provera (n = 495) were evaluated before starting these contraceptives and were reinterviewed 1 year later. Women who continued the method had lower depressive symptom scores at baseline than did the women who discontinued the method or who were lost to follow-up. Among the continuing Depo-Provera users, the depressive symptom scores improved slightly at 1 year (7.4 vs 6.7). Those subjects with the highest (i.e., worst) scores at enrollment demonstrated improved scores at follow-up.

  3. Restless legs syndrome in subjects with a knee prosthesis: evidence that symptoms are generated in the periphery

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, José Carlos; da Silva Neto, João Luiz Pereira; Pradella-Hallinan, Márcia

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There are no data adressing the prevalence of restless legs syndrome in subjects who have knee prosthesis. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of subjects who underwent knee prosthesis surgery. METHOD: A total of 107 subjects (30 male, 77 female) were interviewed over the telephone regarding restless legs syndrome symptoms. If the patients exhibited symptoms of the syndrome, we conducted face-to-face interviews. Lastly, a therapeutic test with pramipexole was proposed for each subject. RESULTS: In our cohort, 7 males (23%) and 30 females (39%) had restless legs syndrome. Of these, 6 males and 23 females were submitted to face-to-face-interview. Of the males, 5 (83%) had restless legs after the knee surgery- exclusively in the operated leg- and reported no family restless legs history. One man had a prior case of bilateral restless legs syndrome, a positive family history and claimed exacerbation of symptoms in the operated leg. Among the females, 16 (69%) had restless legs prior to surgery. A total of 10 female patients reported bilateral symptoms, with fewer symptoms in the operated leg, while 6 displayed a worse outcome in the operated leg. The 7 females (31%) without restless legs prior to surgery and without a family history experienced symptoms only in the operated leg. All subjects responded favorably to the pramipexole therapeutic test. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that secondary unilateral restless legs syndrome may ensue from knee prosthesis surgery and that the symptoms are generated in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:22086528

  4. Depressive symptoms amongst asthmatic children's caregivers.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Alexandra; Mezei, Györgyi; Kovári, Eva; Cserháti, Endre

    2010-06-01

    We wanted to find out, whether the number of depressive symptoms is higher amongst asthmatic children's caregivers, compared to international data, to the Hungarian population average, and to parents of children with chronic renal disease. Are these depressive symptoms connected to the children's psychological status, asthma severity or current asthma symptoms? One-hundred and eight, 7- to 17-yr-old asthmatic children were enrolled, who have been treated at the Semmelweis University, First Department of Pediatrics. Children were suffering from asthma for at least 1 yr, with a median of 8 yr (1-16 yr), they started to develop asthmatic symptoms between the age of 0.5-14 yr (median: 3 yr). We also identified 27 children with chronic renal diseases and their caregivers, who functioned as a control group. Children were asked to complete the Hungarian-validated versions of the Child Depression Inventory, the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory for Children and the Juniper Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire. Asthma severity and current symptoms were also documented, 56% had no symptoms on the preceding week. Caregivers were asked to complete the Hungarian versions of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) short form, the Spielberger Anxiety Inventory and the Juniper Pediatric Asthma Caregivers' Quality of Life Questionnaire. Caregivers of asthmatic children had significantly more depressive symptoms (7.73 +/- 6.69 s.d.) than the age-specific normal population (p < 0.01). Caregivers of renal patients also experience more depressive symptoms (9.61 +/- 7.43 s.d.) than their healthy peers, but difference between the two chronic diseases' group did not prove to be significant. Asthmatic children's caregivers who scored more points on the BDI than the population average suffer from more anxiety symptoms, but their quality of life is not worse than the caregivers' with less depressive points. Depressive symptoms were neither connected to the children's psychological

  5. Hyponatraemia and mental symptoms following vesical ultrasonic lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Batra, Y K; Kapoor, R; Hemal, A K; Vaidyanathan, S

    1988-08-01

    A patient became confused and restless after vesical ultrasonic lithotripsy performed with distilled water as the irrigant. Serum sodium decreased to 120 mmol/litre from the pre-operative value of 138 mmol/litre. A cystogram revealed intraperitoneal extravasation of contrast. She recovered promptly after intravenous infusion of normal saline and emergency surgery for repair of the damaged bladder wall. This case illustrates that hyponatraemia and mental symptoms similar to those following transurethral resection syndrome also occur with ultrasonic lithotripsy when distilled water is used as the irrigant. PMID:3421461

  6. Symptoms beyond diagnosis--a case study.

    PubMed

    Skott, C

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to discuss how words for symptoms relate to experience and to find out how seriously ill patients two years after diagnosis and treatment articulated suffering. Nine patients who have had a cancer tumour of the central nervous system were interviewed in their homes and the findings were interpreted in a hermeneutic process. Bodily, obstructive, emotive and metaphorical expressions of symptoms appeared. The transformed life situation involved inability to perform everyday tasks and a feeling of frustration of needs and desires. The words for symptoms conveyed individual embodied experience connected to a discourse of shared meanings. The relationship between individuality and culture means that words for symptoms are created and understood in a process between patient and listener, between discourse, culture and history. PMID:18707620

  7. [Treatment of multiple sclerosis symptoms and exacerbations].

    PubMed

    Prieto González, José María

    2014-12-01

    In the last few years, there has been an explosion of new drugs acting on the clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS) but less attention has been paid to better knowledge of the symptoms of this disease and their pathogenesis and treatment, which is essential to improve patients' quality of life. Because many patients have numerous concurrent symptoms during their clinical course, their management is complex and consequently it is important to know which symptoms are a direct result of the degenerative lesions of MS. The present article describes all the therapeutic options available for spasticity and its associated pain, paroxystic symptoms, fatigue, genitourinary disorders and sexual dysfunction, tremor, ataxia, gait disorder and cognitive impairment, with special emphasis on novel treatments. The article also defines exacerbations, how to recognize them and the available treatments, mainly oral administration of high-dose methylprednisolone and plasmapheresis. PMID:25732949

  8. Physical Activity, Gender Difference, and Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Yen, Steven T

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the roles of physical activity (exercise) and sociodemographic factors in depressive symptoms among men and women in the United States. Data Source 2011 U.S. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Study Design Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Scale (PHQ-8) scores are aggregated and divided into five categories. An ordered switching probability model with binary endogenous physical activity is developed to accommodate ordinality of depression categories and ameliorate statistical biases due to endogeneity of physical activity. Principal Findings Average treatment effects suggest physical activity ameliorates depressive symptoms among mildly and moderately depressed individuals, most notably among mildly depressed women. Gender differences exist in the roles of sociodemographic factors, with age, income, race, education, employment status, and recent mental health condition playing differentiated roles in affecting depressive symptoms. Conclusions Regular physical activity reduces depressive symptoms among both men and women with mild to moderate depression, notably among women. PMID:25630931

  9. Exercise May Help Ease Adult ADHD Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... News) -- A burst of moderate exercise may improve motivation and energy in adults with symptoms of attention ... or movement. ADHD can also lead to low motivation and energy, poor performance at work and missed ...

  10. Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Detached or Torn Retina Sections Retinal Detachment: What Is a Torn ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment: Torn or Detached Retina Symptoms Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  11. 10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes a slow decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills. There are 10 warning signs and symptoms. ... may also increase your chances of participating in clinical drug trials that help advance research. > Learn more ...

  12. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Cancer.gov

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Osteoporosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Osteoporosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents Osteoporosis can strike at any age, although the risk ...

  14. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will test your blood. You ...

  15. Buteyko technique use to control asthma symptoms.

    PubMed

    Austin, Gillian

    The Buteyko breathing technique is recommended in national guidance for control of asthma symptoms. This article explores the evidence base for the technique, outlines its main principles and includes two cases studies.

  16. Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... early? Next Topic How is childhood leukemia diagnosed? Signs and symptoms of childhood leukemia Many of the ... blood cells do. Fever is often the main sign of infection. But some children might have a ...

  17. Signs and Symptoms of Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... early? Next Topic How are Wilms tumors diagnosed? Signs and symptoms of Wilms tumor Wilms tumors can ... the abdomen (belly): This is often the first sign of a Wilms tumor. Parents may notice this ...

  18. Teens Who Intimidate Adults: Understanding Symptom Estrangement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Moor, Gerrit

    2010-01-01

    This story gives a brief overview of the possibilities and opportunities of the Symptom Estrangement Reclaiming Intervention. It is the history of a three-year effort with a child caught in this self-defeating pattern of behaviour.

  19. Operational Amplifiers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foxcroft, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the introduction of low cost equipment into high school and college physical science classes. Examines the properties of an "ideal" operational amplifier and discusses how it might be used under saturated and non-saturated conditions. Notes the action of a "real" operational amplifier. (TW)

  20. Operating Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Brown, Robert L.

    1984-01-01

    A computer operating system spans multiple layers of complexity, from commands entered at a keyboard to the details of electronic switching. In addition, the system is organized as a hierarchy of abstractions. Various parts of such a system and system dynamics (using the Unix operating system as an example) are described. (JN)

  1. Payload Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cissom, R. D.; Melton, T. L.; Schneider, M. P.; Lapenta, C. C.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide the future ISS scientist and/or engineer a sense of what ISS payload operations are expected to be. This paper uses a real-time operations scenario to convey this message. The real-time operations scenario begins at the initiation of payload operations and runs through post run experiment analysis. In developing this scenario, it is assumed that the ISS payload operations flight and ground capabilities are fully available for use by the payload user community. Emphasis is placed on telescience operations whose main objective is to enable researchers to utilize experiment hardware onboard the International Space Station as if it were located in their terrestrial laboratory. An overview of the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) systems and user ground system options is included to provide an understanding of the systems and interfaces users will utilize to perform payload operations. Detailed information regarding POIC capabilities can be found in the POIC Capabilities Document, SSP 50304.

  2. Warehousing Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on warehousing operations is designed to provide instruction in the procedures used in warehousing operations. Introductory materials include specific information for MCI students and a study guide (guidelines to complete the course). The 22-hour…

  3. Screening Analogs of β-OG Pocket Binder as Fusion Inhibitor of Dengue Virus 2

    PubMed Central

    Tambunan, Usman SF; Zahroh, Hilyatuz; Parikesit, Arli A; Idrus, Syarifuddin; Kerami, Djati

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is an infectious disease caused by dengue virus (DENV) and transmitted between human hosts by mosquitoes. Recently, Indonesia was listed as a country with the highest cases of dengue by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. The current treatment for dengue disease is supportive therapy; there is no antiviral drug available in the market against dengue. Therefore, a research on antiviral drug against dengue is very important, especially to prevent outbreak explosion. In this research, the development of dengue antiviral is performed through the inhibition of n-octyl-β-D-glucoside (β-OG) binding pocket on envelope protein of DENV by using analogs of β-OG pocket binder. There are 828 compounds used in this study, and all of them were screened based on the analysis of molecular docking, pharmacological character prediction of the compounds, and molecular dynamics simulation. The result of these analyses revealed that the compound that can be used as an antiviral candidate against DENV is 5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-[2-(p-tolyl) benzotriazol-5-yl]furan-2-carboxamide. PMID:26617459

  4. [Three patients with the same diagnosis but very different symptoms].

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Rüst, Christoph A; Rosemann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We present three cases of patients with a thoracic disc herniation with misinterpretation of the initial symptoms. In a first case, pulmonary symptoms were prominent; in a second case, the patient complained of cardiac symptoms; and in a third case, the patient reported neurological symptoms. Ineffective investigation of thoracic symptoms should raise the suspicion of a thoracic disc herniation. PMID:25552446

  5. Conditioning of physical symptoms after neurotoxic exposure.

    PubMed

    Bolla-Wilson, K; Wilson, R J; Bleecker, M L

    1988-09-01

    Psychologic reactions to a neurotoxic exposure can produce prolonged physical symptoms which are as debilitating as the direct effects of the neurotoxic substance. A group of patients exist who experience reoccurrence of exposure-related symptoms when exposed to a variety of common environmental substances, such as perfume, gasoline, and cigarette smoke. We propose a classical conditioning model to explain the development of this phenomenon. Identification and treatment of these individuals are also discussed.

  6. Interpreting angina: symptoms along a gender continuum

    PubMed Central

    Crea-Arsenio, Mary; Shannon, Harry S; Velianou, James L; Giacomini, Mita

    2016-01-01

    Background ‘Typical’ angina is often used to describe symptoms common among men, while ‘atypical’ angina is used to describe symptoms common among women, despite a higher prevalence of angina among women. This discrepancy is a source of controversy in cardiac care among women. Objectives To redefine angina by (1) qualitatively comparing angina symptoms and experiences in women and men and (2) to propose a more meaningful construct of angina that integrates a more gender-centred approach. Methods Patients were recruited between July and December 2010 from a tertiary cardiac care centre and interviewed immediately prior to their first angiogram. Symptoms were explored through in-depth semi-structured interviews, transcribed verbatim and analysed concurrently using a modified grounded theory approach. Angiographically significant disease was assessed at ≥70% stenosis of a major epicardial vessel. Results Among 31 total patients, 13 men and 14 women had angiograpically significant CAD. Patients describe angina symptoms according to 6 symptomatic subthemes that array along a ‘gender continuum’. Gender-specific symptoms are anchored at each end of the continuum. At the centre of the continuum, are a remarkably large number of symptoms commonly expressed by both men and women. Conclusions The ‘gender continuum’ offers new insights into angina experiences of angiography candidates. Notably, there is more overlap of shared experiences between men and women than conventionally thought. The gender continuum can help researchers and clinicians contextualise patient symptom reports, avoiding the conventional ‘typical’ versus ‘atypical’ distinction that can misrepresent gendered angina experiences. PMID:27158523

  7. Menstrual Symptoms in Adolescent Girls: Association with Smoking, Depressive Symptoms and Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Lorah D.; Negriff, Sonya; Huang, Bin; Pabst, Stephanie; Hillman, Jennifer; Braverman, Paula; Susman, Elizabeth J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Dysmenorrhea affects quality of life and contributes to absenteeism from school and work diminishing opportunities for successful psychosocial and cognitive development during adolescence. In adults, depression, anxiety, and smoking have an impact on menstrual cycles and dysmenorrhea. Associations between these potential problems have not been examined in adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between depressive symptoms and anxiety with menstrual symptoms. Smoking was examined as a moderator of this relationship. Methods This study enrolled 154 post-menarcheal girls from a sample of 207 girls age 11, 13, 15, and 17 years [M = 15.4 years (± 1.9)]. Self-reported measures included the Menstrual Symptom Questionnaire (MSQ), Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and smoking behavior. Generalized linear regression modeled MSQ outcomes separately for depressive symptoms and anxiety. Results More depressive symptoms/anxiety were related to higher numbers of menstrual symptoms (r = 0.23–0.44, p < .05). Smoking status (ever) was related to higher MSQ scores. Moderating effects of smoking and depressive symptoms or anxiety on menstrual symptoms were consistent across most MSQ factors where effects were stronger in never smokers. Conclusion This is the first study in adolescents showing smoking status and depressive symptoms/anxiety are related to menstrual symptoms and that the impact of depressive symptoms/anxiety on menstrual symptoms is stronger in never smokers. The dynamic and complex nature of smoking, moods, and dysmenorrhea cannot be disentangled without longitudinal analyses. Efforts to reduce menstrual symptoms should begin at a young gynecological age and include consideration of mood and smoking status. PMID:19237109

  8. Symptom attribution after a plane crash: comparison between self-reported symptoms and GP records.

    PubMed Central

    Donker, G A; Yzermans, C J; Spreeuwenberg, P; van der Zee, J

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On 4 October 1992, an El Al Boeing 747-F cargo aeroplane crashed on two apartment buildings in Amsterdam. Thirty-nine residents on the ground and the four crew members of the plane died. In the years after, a gradually increasing number of people attributed physical signs and symptoms to their presence at the disaster scene. AIM: To investigate the consistency between patients' symptoms attributed to the crash and GPs' diagnoses and perception of the association with the crash. DESIGN OF STUDY: Comparison between self-reported symptoms to a call centre and GPs' medical records on onset and type of symptoms, diagnoses, and GPs' perception of association with the disaster, assessed by questionnaire. SETTING: Consenting patients (n = 621) contacting the call centre and their GPs. METHOD: Patients were interviewed by the call centre staff and interview data were recorded on a database. Questionnaires were sent to the consenting patients' GPs, requesting their opinions on whether or not their patients' symptoms were attributable to the effects of disaster. Baseline differences and differences in reported symptoms between interviewed patients and their GP records were tested using the chi2 test. RESULTS: The 553 responders reported on average 4.3 symptoms to the call centre. The majority of these symptoms (74%) were reported to the GP. Of the ten most commonly reported symptoms, fatigue, skin complaints, feeling anxious or nervous, dyspnoea, and backache featured in 80% of symptoms reported to the GP. One out of four symptoms was either reported to the GP before the disaster took place, or six or more years after (1998/1999, during a period of much media attention). Depression (7%), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (5%) and eczema (5%) were most frequently diagnosed by GPs. They related 6% of all reported symptoms to the disaster. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the symptoms attributed to a disaster by patients have been reported to their GP, who related only a

  9. Context processing and negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Patrizia; Zoppelt, Diana; Wiebel, Burkhard; Daum, Irene

    2007-05-01

    The objective of the study was to test the assumption that patients with a high level of negative symptoms show disproportionate impairments of inhibition and multitasking, both representing an underlying context processing mechanism. A total of 26 schizophrenia patients scoring high or low on negative symptoms (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale) and a group of 13 healthy controls were assessed on measures of response inhibition (AX- Continuous Performance Task, Stroop Test) and multitasking (Dual Task, Trail Making Test). Only the high negative symptoms group showed significantly higher inhibition costs and multitasking costs than healthy controls. In the AX-Continuous Performance Test, inhibition costs exceeded context costs in patients with more severe negative symptoms, while in controls a tendency towards the reverse pattern emerged. There were no statistically significant effects involving the patient group with lower negative symptom scores. The pattern of results suggests that primarily patients with more severe negative symptoms have difficulties benefiting from contextual information. The deficit may manifest itself via increased multitasking costs and increased inhibition costs but also via reduced context costs.

  10. Illness episodes, physician visits, and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Berkanovic, E; Hurwicz, M L

    1992-08-01

    Although there is a large literature examining the effects of distress on the demand for medical care, the data on which this literature is based are equivocal. Nonetheless, this literature is cited frequently by those who advocate a national mental health policy designed to produce a cost-effective "medical offset effect." In this study, longitudinal data on illness episodes, physician visits, and depressive symptoms were collected from 940 Medicare recipients enrolled in a health maintenance organization (HMO) under a Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act (TEFRA) contract. Seven waves of interviews were conducted over a period of 1 year. This article presents two sets of analyses. In the first, controlling for chronic conditions and demographics reported at baseline, the relationships between depressive symptoms reported at baseline, and all illness episodes and physician visits that occurred over the subsequent year are examined. In the second, controlling for depressive symptoms and demographics reported at baseline, the relationships between illness episodes and physician visits over the study year, and depressive symptoms recorded at the final interview are examined. The data indicate that, whereas depressive symptoms at baseline are virtually unrelated to subsequent illness episodes and physician visits, illness episodes and physician visits are related to subsequent depressive symptoms. These data indicate, therefore, that policies aimed at diverting the distressed from seeking medical care may result in further inequities in the receipt of needed care. PMID:10120227

  11. Symptom management in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2011-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex disease associated with a wide variety of different symptoms that can affect the ability of multiple sclerosis patients to carry out normal activities of daily living. Although a myriad of symptoms can afflict these patients, the most commonly reported include fatigue, mood disorders, changes in cognitive function or memory, sensory changes (numbness, pain, vibrations), motor changes (loss of balance, poor coordination, muscle weakness or stiffness), vision changes (double vision, blurred vision, loss of vision) and bladder or bowel dysfunction. Treatments are available that can help minimise some of these symptoms and relieve patient distress. After the diagnosis has been established and a decision taken regarding initiation of immunomodulatory treatments, the majority of management decisions with which the physician will be confronted will concern symptom management. Whereas some symptoms are relatively easily treated, others are more difficult to manage. Management involves rehabilitation, pharmacological treatments and surgical procedures. Successful symptom management is a key determinant of quality of life for the patient and is the basis for improving physical and psychological function.

  12. Therapeutic Yoga: Symptom Management for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kim A; MacDonald, Megan

    2015-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, affecting over 2.3 million people worldwide. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the age of disease onset is typically between 20 and 40 years, with a higher incidence in women. Individuals with MS experience a wide range of symptoms, including declining physical, emotional, and psychological symptoms (e.g., fatigue, imbalance, spasticity, chronic pain, cognitive impairment, bladder and bowel dysfunction, visual and speech impairments, depression, sensory disturbance, and mobility impairment). To date, both the cause of and cure for MS remain unknown. In recent years, more individuals with MS have been pursuing alternative methods of treatment to manage symptoms of the disease, including mind-body therapies such as yoga, meditation, breathing, and relaxation techniques. It has been suggested that the practice of yoga may be a safe and effective way of managing symptoms of MS. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to summarize the most relevant literature on exercise and mind-body modalities to treat MS symptoms and, more specifically, the benefits and potential role of yoga as an alternative treatment of symptom management for individuals with MS. The article also discusses future directions for research. PMID:26270955

  13. Regulation of nif expression in Methanococcus maripaludis: roles of the euryarchaeal repressor NrpR, 2-oxoglutarate, and two operators.

    PubMed

    Lie, Thomas J; Wood, Gwendolyn E; Leigh, John A

    2005-02-18

    The methanogenic archaean Methanococcus maripaludis can use ammonia, alanine, or dinitrogen as a nitrogen source for growth. The euryarchaeal nitrogen repressor NrpR controls the expression of the nif (nitrogen fixation) operon, resulting in full repression with ammonia, intermediate repression with alanine, and derepression with dinitrogen. NrpR binds to two tandem operators in the nif promoter region, nifOR(1) and nifOR(2). Here we have undertaken both in vivo and in vitro approaches to study the way in which NrpR, nifOR(1), nifOR(2), and the effector 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) combine to regulate nif expression, leading to a comprehensive understanding of this archaeal regulatory system. We show that NrpR binds as a dimer to nifOR(1) and cooperatively as two dimers to both operators. Cooperative binding occurs only with both operators present. nifOR(1) has stronger binding and by itself can mediate the repression of nif transcription during growth on ammonia, unlike the weakly binding nifOR(2). However, nifOR(2) in combination with nifOR(1) is critical for intermediate repression during growth on alanine. Accordingly, NrpR binds to both operators together with higher affinity than to nifOR(1) alone. NrpR responds directly to 2OG, which weakens its binding to the operators. Hence, 2OG is an intracellular indicator of nitrogen deficiency and acts as an inducer of nif transcription via NrpR. This model is upheld by the recent finding (J. A. Dodsworth and J. A. Leigh, submitted for publication) in our laboratory that 2OG levels in M. maripaludis vary with growth on different nitrogen sources.

  14. Students' Decision Steps in Meta-Cognitive Learning in Free Online Groups (MetaL-FrOG): A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen Fa, Kinsley Ng; Hussin, Firuz Hussin

    2011-01-01

    What prompts the students to respond in online dialogic discussion? Why some students chose to fall out? This case study through the lens of phenomenography observation attempts to explain the five decision steps of students to respond in Meta-cognitive Learning in Free Online Groups (MetaL-FrOG) discussion. It presents a part of a research…

  15. Development of a symptom assessment instrument for chronic hemodialysis patients: the Dialysis Symptom Index.

    PubMed

    Weisbord, Steven D; Fried, Linda F; Arnold, Robert M; Rotondi, Armando J; Fine, Michael J; Levenson, David J; Switzer, Galen E

    2004-03-01

    Little is known about the prevalence, severity, or impact of symptoms in hemodialysis patients because of the lack of a validated symptom assessment instrument. We systematically developed an index to assess physical and emotional symptom burden in this patient population. We employed four steps in the generation of this index: a review of dialysis quality-of-life instruments, three focus groups, experts' content validity assessment, and test-retest reliability measurement. Seventy-five symptoms were identified. Of these, 46 appeared in > or = 4 of the instruments/focus groups and were considered for inclusion. Twelve were grouped into other symptom constructs and experts judged four of the remaining items not to be pertinent, leaving 30 items in the new index. Overall kappa statistic was 0.48+/-0.22. These steps allowed the systematic development of a 30-item symptom assessment index for hemodialysis patients. Additional reliability and validity testing is needed prior to its widespread use.

  16. Psychological Symptom Amplification: Are Psychological Symptoms Subject to "Somatization"-Like Processes?

    PubMed

    Kontos, Nicholas; Querques, John; Freudenreich, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Many patients demonstrate amplified somatic symptom experiences that are felt by providers to cause excessive distress and functional impairment, and that can be diagnostically misleading. Terms attached to these presentations include somatization, medically unexplained symptoms, and, most recently, somatic symptom disorder. The analogous amplification of psychological symptoms has not been considered. Accordingly, this column makes a case for discussion and investigation of psychological symptom amplification (PSA), a process made possible by the medical legitimization of certain types of human suffering. As various forms of psychological suffering gain greater medical legitimacy, PSA becomes increasingly relevant. Circumstantial evidence suggests that unrecognized PSA may distort research findings and clinical efficacy in psychiatry. The largely symptom-based nature of psychiatric diagnosis makes PSA a challenging, but necessary, object of further scientific and clinical scrutiny.

  17. Hypothyroidism:Symptoms,Diagnosis and Treatment | NIH Medlineplus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Hypothyroidism Hypothyroidism: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2012 Table ... of its symptoms are seen in other diseases, hypothyroidism usually cannot be diagnosed based on symptoms alone. ...

  18. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Fanconi Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Fanconi Anemia? Major Signs and Symptoms Your doctor may suspect ... sisters also should be tested for the disorder. Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  19. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia? Lower than normal numbers of red blood cells, ... most of the signs and symptoms of aplastic anemia. Signs and Symptoms of Low Blood Cell Counts ...

  20. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia? The most common symptom of anemia is fatigue ( ... mild symptoms or none at all. Complications of Anemia Some people who have anemia may have arrhythmias ( ...

  1. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Sarcoidosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Sarcoidosis? Many people who have sarcoidosis have no signs ... symptom is more common in women than men. Sarcoidosis Signs and Symptoms The illustration shows the major ...

  2. Headaches and Migraines: Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Headaches and Migraines Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Past Issues / Spring ... of headache. Each has distinct symptoms and treatments. Migraine and Other Vascular Headaches—Symptoms and Diagnosis Migraine: ...

  3. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hemochromatosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hemochromatosis? Hemochromatosis can affect many parts of the body and cause various signs and symptoms. Many of the signs and symptoms ...

  4. Operant Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Staddon, J. E. R.; Cerutti, D. T.

    2005-01-01

    Operant behavior is behavior “controlled” by its consequences. In practice, operant conditioning is the study of reversible behavior maintained by reinforcement schedules. We review empirical studies and theoretical approaches to two large classes of operant behavior: interval timing and choice. We discuss cognitive versus behavioral approaches to timing, the “gap” experiment and its implications, proportional timing and Weber's law, temporal dynamics and linear waiting, and the problem of simple chain-interval schedules. We review the long history of research on operant choice: the matching law, its extensions and problems, concurrent chain schedules, and self-control. We point out how linear waiting may be involved in timing, choice, and reinforcement schedules generally. There are prospects for a unified approach to all these areas. PMID:12415075

  5. Pharmacological treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Czobor, Pal

    2015-10-01

    Effective treatment of negative symptoms is one of the most important unmet needs in schizophrenic disorders. Because the evidence on current psychopharmacological treatments is unclear, the authors reviewed the findings published to date by searching PubMed with the keywords negative symptoms, antipsychotics, antidepressants, glutamatergic compounds, monotherapy and add-on therapy and identifying additional articles in the reference lists of the resulting publications. The findings presented here predominantly focus on results of meta-analyses. Evidence for efficacy of current psychopharmacological medications is difficult to assess because of methodological problems and inconsistent results. In general, the second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) do not appear to have good efficacy in negative symptoms, although some show better efficacy than first-generation antipsychotics, some of which also demonstrated efficacy in negative symptoms. Specific trials on predominant persistent negative symptoms are rare and have been performed with only a few SGAs. More often, trials on somewhat persistent negative symptoms evaluate add-on strategies to ongoing antipsychotic treatment. Such trials, mostly on modern antidepressants, have demonstrated some efficacy. Several trials with small samples have evaluated add-on treatment with glutamatergic compounds, such as the naturally occurring amino acids glycine and D-serine and new pharmacological compounds. The results are highly inconsistent, although overall efficacy results appear to be positive. The unsatisfactory and inconsistent results can be partially explained by methodological problems. These problems need to be solved in the future, and the authors propose some possible solutions. Further research is required to identify effective treatment for the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:25895634

  6. Pharmacological treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Czobor, Pal

    2015-10-01

    Effective treatment of negative symptoms is one of the most important unmet needs in schizophrenic disorders. Because the evidence on current psychopharmacological treatments is unclear, the authors reviewed the findings published to date by searching PubMed with the keywords negative symptoms, antipsychotics, antidepressants, glutamatergic compounds, monotherapy and add-on therapy and identifying additional articles in the reference lists of the resulting publications. The findings presented here predominantly focus on results of meta-analyses. Evidence for efficacy of current psychopharmacological medications is difficult to assess because of methodological problems and inconsistent results. In general, the second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) do not appear to have good efficacy in negative symptoms, although some show better efficacy than first-generation antipsychotics, some of which also demonstrated efficacy in negative symptoms. Specific trials on predominant persistent negative symptoms are rare and have been performed with only a few SGAs. More often, trials on somewhat persistent negative symptoms evaluate add-on strategies to ongoing antipsychotic treatment. Such trials, mostly on modern antidepressants, have demonstrated some efficacy. Several trials with small samples have evaluated add-on treatment with glutamatergic compounds, such as the naturally occurring amino acids glycine and D-serine and new pharmacological compounds. The results are highly inconsistent, although overall efficacy results appear to be positive. The unsatisfactory and inconsistent results can be partially explained by methodological problems. These problems need to be solved in the future, and the authors propose some possible solutions. Further research is required to identify effective treatment for the negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

  7. Tobacco Withdrawal Symptoms Mediate Motivation to Reinstate Smoking During Abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Claudia; Madrid, Jillian; Leventhal, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    Withdrawal-based theories of addiction hypothesize that motivation to reinstate drug use following acute abstinence is mediated by withdrawal symptoms. Experimental tests of this hypothesis in the tobacco literature are scant and may be subject to methodological limitations. This study utilized a robust within-subject laboratory experimental design to investigate the extent to which composite tobacco withdrawal symptomatology level and three unique withdrawal components (i.e., low positive affect, negative affect, and urge to smoke) mediated the effect of smoking abstinence on motivation to reinstate smoking. Smokers (10≥cig/day; N=286) attended two counterbalanced sessions at which abstinence duration was differentially manipulated (1-hour vs. 17-hours). At both sessions, participants reported current withdrawal symptoms and subsequently completed a task in which they were monetarily rewarded proportional to the length of time they delayed initiating smoking, with shorter latency reflecting stronger motivation to reinstate smoking. Abstinence reduced latency to smoking initiation and positive affect and increased composite withdrawal symptom level, urge, and negative affect. Abstinence-induced reductions in latency to initiating smoking were mediated by each withdrawal component, with stronger effects operating through urge. Combined analyses suggested that urge, negative affect, and low positive affect operate through empirically-unique mediational pathways. Secondary analyses suggested similar effects on smoking quantity, few differences among specific urge and affect subtypes, and that dependence amplifies some abstinence effects. This study provides the first experimental evidence that within-person variation in abstinence impacts motivation to reinstate drug use through withdrawal. Urge, negative affect, and low positive affect may reflect unique withdrawal-mediated mechanisms underlying tobacco addiction. PMID:25961814

  8. Tobacco withdrawal symptoms mediate motivation to reinstate smoking during abstinence.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Claudia G; Madrid, Jillian; Leventhal, Adam M

    2015-08-01

    Withdrawal-based theories of addiction hypothesize that motivation to reinstate drug use following acute abstinence is mediated by withdrawal symptoms. Experimental tests of this hypothesis in the tobacco literature are scant and may be subject to methodological limitations. This study utilized a robust within-subject laboratory experimental design to investigate the extent to which composite tobacco withdrawal symptomatology level and 3 unique withdrawal components (i.e., low positive affect, negative affect, and urge to smoke) mediated the effect of smoking abstinence on motivation to reinstate smoking. Smokers (≥10 cigarettes per day; N = 286) attended 2 counterbalanced sessions at which abstinence duration was differentially manipulated (1 hr vs. 17 hr). At both sessions, participants reported current withdrawal symptoms and subsequently completed a task in which they were monetarily rewarded proportional to the length of time they delayed initiating smoking, with shorter latency reflecting stronger motivation to reinstate smoking. Abstinence reduced latency to smoking initiation and positive affect and increased composite withdrawal symptom level, urge, and negative affect. Abstinence-induced reductions in latency to initiating smoking were mediated by each withdrawal component, with stronger effects operating through urge. Combined analyses suggested that urge, negative affect, and low positive affect operate through empirically unique mediational pathways. Secondary analyses suggested similar effects on smoking quantity, few differences among specific urge and affect subtypes, and that dependence amplifies some abstinence effects. This study provides the first experimental evidence that within-person variation in abstinence impacts motivation to reinstate drug use through withdrawal. Urge, negative affect, and low positive affect may reflect unique withdrawal-mediated mechanisms underlying tobacco addiction.

  9. Cholecystectomy and gallstone dyspepsia. Clinical and physiological study of a symptom complex.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    The symptom complex of gallstone dyspepsia is defined and then analysed before and after cholecystectomy in 108 patients. Only 46% of patients were symptom-free after operation and 30% were no better. When pyloric function was studied patients with these symptoms before or after cholecystectomy and those with normal radiographs showed duodenogastric reflux, often precipitated by intraduodenal fat. Symptomless matched control subjects showed no reflux. Synchronous radiology and pressure recordings demonstrated that the pylorus in these patients failed to contract in response to a duodenal contraction, whereas the normal pylorus could prevent the reflux produced by an isolated duodenal contraction. The effect of metoclopramide on gastroduodenal contractions and in treating the symptoms was assessed. Gallstone dyspepsia is essentially a functional disease--a disorder of gastroduodenal motility. Images Fig. 1 PMID:235236

  10. Managing systemic symptoms in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Newton, Julia L; Jones, David E J

    2012-01-01

    Improved medical management and the changing disease demographic mean that the majority of patients with chronic liver disease are living with the disease rather than dying from it. Historically, the perception has been that the impact of chronic liver disease is related entirely to the consequences of endstage liver disease; however, more recently a number of systemic symptoms have been recognised that can occur at any point in the natural history of chronic liver disease and which can be associated with functional impairment and reduced quality of life. The most characteristic of these systemic symptoms is fatigue, which frequently associates with sleep disturbance and autonomic dysfunction, particularly manifest as abnormality of blood pressure regulation. Cognitive symptoms can occur even in non-cirrhotic patients. Falls can present in patients with autonomic dysfunction, complicated by the presence of peripheral muscle strength problems. Importantly for clinicians managing chronic liver disease, the severity of these systemic symptoms is typically not related to liver disease severity, and therefore despite optimal liver disease management, patients can often continue to experience debilitating symptoms. The similarity in systemic symptoms between different chronic liver diseases (and indeed chronic inflammatory conditions affecting other organs) suggests the possibility of shared pathogenetic processes and raises the possibility of common management strategies, although further research is urgently needed to confirm this. In primary biliary cirrhosis, where our understanding of systemic symptoms is arguably most developed, structured management strategies have been shown to improve the quality of life of patients. It is highly likely that similar approaches will have comparable benefits for other chronic liver disease groups. Here, we review the current understanding of systemic symptoms in chronic liver disease and offer recommendations regarding the

  11. An Examination of Family Adjustment among Operation Desert Storm Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Casey T.; Schumm, Jeremiah A.; Panuzio, Jillian; Proctor, Susan P.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined interrelationships among combat exposure, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and family adjustment in a sample of male and female Operation Desert Storm veterans (N = 1,512). In structural equation models for both male and female veterans, higher combat exposure was associated with higher PTSD symptoms, which in…

  12. Symptom control in the pregnant cancer patient.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, M K; LeGrand, S B; Walsh, D

    2000-12-01

    While much attention has been devoted to cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy in the pregnant cancer patient, the drugs used for management of symptoms and complications related to cancer during pregnancy have been overlooked. There is substantial overlap between the symptoms of cancer and cancer management and the symptoms related to pregnancy. The mainstay of symptom management is drug therapy and the potential for a drug to be embryotoxic or teratogenic depends on when it is given. In general, drugs not proven safe in pregnancy should be withheld, especially during the first trimester. The few drugs that have been proven to be teratogenic are alcohol, thalidomide, the folic acid antagonists (which includes methotrexate), diethylstilbestrol, and the vitamin A isomers, but there is a good deal of uncertainty about many other therapeutic agents. Placental transport of drugs from mother to fetus must be taken into consideration from the fifth week of gestation to parturition. Although the first trimester is the time of most organ development in the fetus, the brain continues to develop throughout pregnancy and may be damaged later in pregnancy, resulting in diminished intelligence or behavioral problems. This review will focus on the treatment of the most common symptoms of cancer in a pregnant patient and the potential for fetal damage. PMID:11130478

  13. Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Current Considerations in Symptom Management.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), one of the most common rheumatic disorders, is estimated to affect up to 15 million people in the United States, 80% to 90% of whom are women. The syndrome is characterized by the presence of chronic widespread pain and various concurrent symptoms, which may include fatigue, cognitive disturbances (memory problems, difficulty concentrating, confusion), distressed mood (anxiety, depression), nonrestorative sleep, and muscular stiffness. Symptom management appears to be best addressed using a multimodal approach, with treatment strategies tailored to the individual. While medication may provide adequate symptom relief for some patients, experts generally recommend integrating both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches. Some patients may benefit from the adjunctive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities. Because symptom remission is rare and medication adverse effects can complicate symptom management, well-informed nursing care practices and patient education are essential. This article describes the existing treatment guidelines, discusses pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches (including CAM-based modalities), and outlines nursing approaches aimed at enhancing patient self-management.

  14. Depressive symptoms in institutionalized older adults

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Lívia Maria; Mattos, Inês Echenique

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms among institutionalized elderly individuals and to analyze factors associated with this condition. METHODS This was a cross-sectional study involving 462 individuals aged 60 or older, residents in long stay institutions in four Brazilian municipalities. The dependent variable was assessed using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. Poisson’s regression was used to evaluate associations with co-variables. We investigated which variables were most relevant in terms of presence of depressive symptoms within the studied context through factor analysis. RESULTS Prevalence of depressive symptoms was 48.7%. The variables associated with depressive symptoms were: regular/bad/very bad self-rated health; comorbidities; hospitalizations; and lack of friends in the institution. Five components accounted for 49.2% of total variance of the sample: functioning, social support, sensory deficiency, institutionalization and health conditions. In the factor analysis, functionality and social support were the components which explained a large part of observed variance. CONCLUSIONS A high prevalence of depressive symptoms, with significant variation in distribution, was observed. Such results emphasize the importance of health conditions and functioning for institutionalized older individuals developing depression. They also point to the importance of providing opportunities for interaction among institutionalized individuals. PMID:24897042

  15. Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Current Considerations in Symptom Management.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), one of the most common rheumatic disorders, is estimated to affect up to 15 million people in the United States, 80% to 90% of whom are women. The syndrome is characterized by the presence of chronic widespread pain and various concurrent symptoms, which may include fatigue, cognitive disturbances (memory problems, difficulty concentrating, confusion), distressed mood (anxiety, depression), nonrestorative sleep, and muscular stiffness. Symptom management appears to be best addressed using a multimodal approach, with treatment strategies tailored to the individual. While medication may provide adequate symptom relief for some patients, experts generally recommend integrating both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches. Some patients may benefit from the adjunctive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities. Because symptom remission is rare and medication adverse effects can complicate symptom management, well-informed nursing care practices and patient education are essential. This article describes the existing treatment guidelines, discusses pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches (including CAM-based modalities), and outlines nursing approaches aimed at enhancing patient self-management. PMID:26669843

  16. Time series models of symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tschacher, Wolfgang; Kupper, Zeno

    2002-12-15

    The symptom courses of 84 schizophrenia patients (mean age: 24.4 years; mean previous admissions: 1.3; 64% males) of a community-based acute ward were examined to identify dynamic patterns of symptoms and to investigate the relation between these patterns and treatment outcome. The symptoms were monitored by systematic daily staff ratings using a scale composed of three factors: psychoticity, excitement, and withdrawal. Patients showed moderate to high symptomatic improvement documented by effect size measures. Each of the 84 symptom trajectories was analyzed by time series methods using vector autoregression (VAR) that models the day-to-day interrelations between symptom factors. Multiple and stepwise regression analyses were then performed on the basis of the VAR models. Two VAR parameters were found to be associated significantly with favorable outcome in this exploratory study: 'withdrawal preceding a reduction of psychoticity' as well as 'excitement preceding an increase of withdrawal'. The findings were interpreted as generating hypotheses about how patients cope with psychotic episodes.

  17. Symptoms and microenvironmental measures in nonproblem buildings.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, M J; Frohliger, J; Permar, E; Tidwell, C; Traven, N D; Olenchock, S A; Karpf, M

    1991-04-01

    Symptoms commonly defined as the sick building syndrome were studied in a cross-sectional investigation of 147 office workers in five building areas using a linear-analog self-assessment scale questionnaire to define symptoms at a specific point in time. At the same time, the environment in the breathing zone was characterized by measuring thermal parameters (dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, air speed, and radiant temperature), volatile organic compounds, respirable suspended particulates, noise and light intensity, and carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide levels. Demographic characteristics of the occupants and building characteristics were recorded. Up to 25% of the variance in regression models could be explained for mucous membrane irritation and central nervous system symptoms. These two symptom groups were related to the concentrations of volatile organic compounds, to crowding, to layers of clothing, and to measured levels of lighting intensity. Chest tightness was also related to lighting intensity. Skin complaints were related only to gender. Gender, age, and education failed to demonstrate a consistent relationship with symptom categories. This study suggests that the sick building syndrome may have specific environmental causes, including lighting and volatile organic compounds.

  18. 'Brain fag' symptoms in apprentices in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Morakinyo, O; Peltzer, K

    2002-01-01

    The 'brain fag' syndrome, which was first reported from West Africa in 1960 among students, has been shown to occur very widely in African students in western educational systems south of the Sahara. This study investigated the distribution of its symptoms in a group of apprentices chosen by convenient sampling from Ile-Ife, a university town about 240 km northeast of Lagos in Nigeria. The subjects who (in contrast) were training under an indigenous form of education - the African apprenticeship system - consisted of 183 (69.8%) males, and 79 (30.2%) females, in the age range of 13-26 years (mean +/- SD 18.2 +/- 3.0 years). Questionnaires were interview-administered to collect data on the sociodemographic, economic, and family background, English language proficiency, and the degree of the presence of brain fag symptoms. Results indicated a generally low rate of brain fag symptoms among these different types of apprentices. A relationship between proficiency in English, but not socioeconomic status, with brain fag symptoms was found. In the case of the Nigerian apprentices investigated here, brain fag symptoms were not significantly associated with the method of training learning (which is dependent mainly on verbal instructions in the vernacular from their bosses, and vicarious learning by observing the boss at work). The implications of these findings for two of the theories advanced for the pathogenesis of the brain fag syndrome were discussed.

  19. Reactive transport modeling in variably saturated porous media with OGS-IPhreeqc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, W.; Beyer, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Jang, E.; Kalbacher, T.; Shao, H.; Wang, W.; Kolditz, O.

    2014-12-01

    Worldwide, sustainable water resource management becomes an increasingly challenging task due to the growth of population and extensive applications of fertilizer in agriculture. Moreover, climate change causes further stresses to both water quantity and quality. Reactive transport modeling in the coupled soil-aquifer system is a viable approach to assess the impacts of different land use and groundwater exploitation scenarios on the water resources. However, the application of this approach is usually limited in spatial scale and to simplified geochemical systems due to the huge computational expense involved. Such computational expense is not only caused by solving the high non-linearity of the initial boundary value problems of water flow in the unsaturated zone numerically with rather fine spatial and temporal discretization for the correct mass balance and numerical stability, but also by the intensive computational task of quantifying geochemical reactions. In the present study, a flexible and efficient tool for large scale reactive transport modeling in variably saturated porous media and its applications are presented. The open source scientific software OpenGeoSys (OGS) is coupled with the IPhreeqc module of the geochemical solver PHREEQC. The new coupling approach makes full use of advantages from both codes: OGS provides a flexible choice of different numerical approaches for simulation of water flow in the vadose zone such as the pressure-based or mixed forms of Richards equation; whereas the IPhreeqc module leads to a simplification of data storage and its communication with OGS, which greatly facilitates the coupling and code updating. Moreover, a parallelization scheme with MPI (Message Passing Interface) is applied, in which the computational task of water flow and mass transport is partitioned through domain decomposition, whereas the efficient parallelization of geochemical reactions is achieved by smart allocation of computational workload over

  20. Reactive transport modeling in the subsurface environment with OGS-IPhreeqc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenkui; Beyer, Christof; Fleckenstein, Jan; Jang, Eunseon; Kalbacher, Thomas; Naumov, Dimitri; Shao, Haibing; Wang, Wenqing; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    Worldwide, sustainable water resource management becomes an increasingly challenging task due to the growth of population and extensive applications of fertilizer in agriculture. Moreover, climate change causes further stresses to both water quantity and quality. Reactive transport modeling in the coupled soil-aquifer system is a viable approach to assess the impacts of different land use and groundwater exploitation scenarios on the water resources. However, the application of this approach is usually limited in spatial scale and to simplified geochemical systems due to the huge computational expense involved. Such computational expense is not only caused by solving the high non-linearity of the initial boundary value problems of water flow in the unsaturated zone numerically with rather fine spatial and temporal discretization for the correct mass balance and numerical stability, but also by the intensive computational task of quantifying geochemical reactions. In the present study, a flexible and efficient tool for large scale reactive transport modeling in variably saturated porous media and its applications are presented. The open source scientific software OpenGeoSys (OGS) is coupled with the IPhreeqc module of the geochemical solver PHREEQC. The new coupling approach makes full use of advantages from both codes: OGS provides a flexible choice of different numerical approaches for simulation of water flow in the vadose zone such as the pressure-based or mixed forms of Richards equation; whereas the IPhreeqc module leads to a simplification of data storage and its communication with OGS, which greatly facilitates the coupling and code updating. Moreover, a parallelization scheme with MPI (Message Passing Interface) is applied, in which the computational task of water flow and mass transport is partitioned through domain decomposition, whereas the efficient parallelization of geochemical reactions is achieved by smart allocation of computational workload over

  1. Applied Operations Research: Operator's Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    NASA operates high value critical equipment (HVCE) that requires trouble shooting, periodic maintenance and continued monitoring by Operations staff. The complexity HVCE and information required to maintain and trouble shoot HVCE to assure continued mission success as paper is voluminous. Training on new HVCE is commensurate with the need for equipment maintenance. LaRC Research Directorate has undertaken a proactive research to support Operations staff by initiation of the development and prototyping an electronic computer based portable maintenance aid (Operator's Assistant). This research established a goal with multiple objectives and a working prototype was developed. The research identified affordable solutions; constraints; demonstrated use of commercial off the shelf software; use of the US Coast Guard maintenance solution; NASA Procedure Representation Language; and the identification of computer system strategies; where these demonstrations and capabilities support the Operator, and maintenance. The results revealed validation against measures of effectiveness and overall proved a substantial training and capability sustainment tool. The research indicated that the OA could be deployed operationally at the LaRC Compressor Station with an expectation of satisfactorily results and to obtain additional lessons learned prior to deployment at other LaRC Research Directorate Facilities. The research revealed projected cost and time savings.

  2. Recognition of error symptoms in large systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Ravishankar K.; Sridhar, V.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology for automatically detecting symptoms of frequently occurring errors in large computer systems is developed. The proposed symptom recognition methodology and its validation are based on probabilistic techniques. The technique is shown to work on real failure data from two CYBER systems at the University of Illinois. The methodology allows for the resolution between independent and dependent causes and, also quantifies a measure of the strength of relationship among errors. Comparison made with failure/repair information obtained from field maintenance engineers shows that in 85% of the cases, the error symptoms recognized by our approach correspond to real system problems. Further, the remaining 15% although not directly supported by field data, were confirmed as valid problems. Some of these were shown to be persistent problems which otherwise would have been considered as minor transients and hence ignored.

  3. Gastrointestinal Symptoms among African Americans Undergoing Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Glenda; Robinson, Janie R; Walker, Charles; Pennings, Jacquelyn S; Anderson, Staci T

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of end stage renal disease is more than three times higher in African Americans. Treatment regimens contribute to gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. This study's purpose was to examine the incidence of GI symptoms in African-American patients undergoing hemodialysis. Younger participants were more likely to report mild indigestion, while older participants reported severe indigestion or none at all. Females were more likely to report gastrointestinal symptoms. Commonly reported co-morbidities included hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease. Time on hemodialysis ranged from 1 to 279 months. Those who had been on hemodialysis the longest were more likely to report acid reflux, stomach rumbling and mild diarrhea. This study provides a foundation for early identification of GI symptoms in African-Americans patients undergoing hemodialysis.

  4. Marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms in China.

    PubMed

    Miller, Richard B; Mason, Tiffany M; Canlas, Jerevie M; Wang, Dahua; Nelson, David A; Hart, Craig H

    2013-08-01

    Although there is substantial evidence that low marital satisfaction is a significant risk factor for depression, little research has examined this relationship in cultures outside of the U.S. and Europe. The validity of the marital discord model of depression in Chinese culture was tested by studying 391 couples living in Beijing and Hangzhou, China. Results of structural equation modeling using an actor-partner interdependence model strategy indicated that husbands' and wives' marital satisfaction was significantly predictive of their own depressive symptoms. In addition, wives' marital satisfaction significantly predicted husbands' depressive symptoms. These results provide evidence that the marital discord model of depression is useful in understanding the role of marital dissatisfaction as a risk factor for depressive symptoms in collectivistic societies, such as China. PMID:23834363

  5. [Negative symptoms in schizophrenia: new pharmacological approaches].

    PubMed

    Lodovighi, M-A; Palomba, A; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    The management of negative symptoms appears to be a major challenge because of functional disability induced by these symptoms and their relative resistance to treatments currently on the market. The aim of this article is to review new approaches that may enable optimal management of these symptoms. First, we describe the methodological difficulties that hindered the development and evaluation of specific treatment, and objectives currently defined to enable the development of new pharmacological approaches. Then we present the monotherapy and adjuvant therapies that have been assessed, including first and second generation antipsychotics, psychostimulants, antidepressants, cholinergic and glutamatergic agents, the oxytocin, hormones and more invasive therapies such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Other molecules are under development and evaluation such alpha-7 nicotinic receptor agonists.

  6. Central Diabetes Insipidus presenting with manic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Jasmine Kaur; Chalana, Harsh

    2011-09-01

    Central Diabetes Insipidus mostly presents with polydipsia and polyuria but may also present with confusion, psychosis, seizure or coma. We present a case of Central Diabetes Insipidus presenting with manic symptoms. A 21 year old Indian male had Central Diabetes Insipidus, which was confirmed by water deprivation test. He presented to our hospital with full blown manic symptoms meeting the ICD 10 criteria. He was managed with intranasal Desmopressin, water restriction and Olanzapine. In contrary to routine psychiatric patients which may present with psychogenic polydipsia or Central Diabetes Insipidus patients presenting in delirium or psychosis, our case presents a unique example of Central Diabetes Insipidus presenting with manic symptoms. It hints about a relationship between a common pathway for Central Diabetes Insipidus and mood disorders which needs further research. Diencephalon has already been the focus of attention for several researchers but no concrete evidence is available yet. PMID:23051126

  7. Influence of aeroionotherapy on some psychiatric symptoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleanu, M.; Stamatiu, C.

    1985-03-01

    Negative aeroionotherapy (daily 15 50 min sittings, for 10 30 days) was applied in 112 patients with various psychiatric disorders, especially neuroses, with the aim of ameliorating certain symptoms (target symptoms). Corona and water air ion generators, as well as electro-aerosol generators, were used. The aeroionization (small air ion concentration), at the patient's respiration level, was moderate: n-=10,000 15,000/ml air; n+s≅1,000/ml air; q=n+/n-≅0.1. In most treated patients a diminution or even the disappearance of the target symptoms was obtained. Those obviously ameliorated under the influence of aeroionotherapy were: asthenia, depressive reactions, anxiety, irascibility, cephalea, insomnia, and general indisposition.

  8. [Negative symptoms in schizophrenia: new pharmacological approaches].

    PubMed

    Lodovighi, M-A; Palomba, A; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    The management of negative symptoms appears to be a major challenge because of functional disability induced by these symptoms and their relative resistance to treatments currently on the market. The aim of this article is to review new approaches that may enable optimal management of these symptoms. First, we describe the methodological difficulties that hindered the development and evaluation of specific treatment, and objectives currently defined to enable the development of new pharmacological approaches. Then we present the monotherapy and adjuvant therapies that have been assessed, including first and second generation antipsychotics, psychostimulants, antidepressants, cholinergic and glutamatergic agents, the oxytocin, hormones and more invasive therapies such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Other molecules are under development and evaluation such alpha-7 nicotinic receptor agonists. PMID:26776392

  9. Identifying Symptom Patterns in People Living With HIV Disease.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Natalie L; Azuero, Andres; Vance, David E; Richman, Joshua S; Moneyham, Linda D; Raper, James L; Heath, Sonya L; Kempf, Mirjam-Colette

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms guide disease management, and patients frequently report HIV-related symptoms, but HIV symptom patterns reported by patients have not been described in the era of improved antiretroviral treatment. The objectives of our study were to investigate the prevalence and burden of symptoms in people living with HIV and attending an outpatient clinic. The prevalence, burden, and bothersomeness of symptoms reported by patients in routine clinic visits during 2011 were assessed using the 20-item HIV Symptom Index. Principal component analysis was used to identify symptom clusters and relationships between groups using appropriate statistic techniques. Two main clusters were identified. The most prevalent and bothersome symptoms were muscle aches/joint pain, fatigue, and poor sleep. A third of patients had seven or more symptoms, including the most burdensome symptoms. Even with improved antiretroviral drug side-effect profiles, symptom prevalence and burden, independent of HIV viral load and CD4+ T cell count, are high.

  10. Identifying Symptom Patterns in People Living With HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Natalie L.; Azuero, Andres; Vance, David E.; Richman, Joshua S.; Moneyham, Linda D.; Raper, James L.; Heath, Sonya L.; Kempf, Mirjam-Colette

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms guide disease management, and patients frequently report HIV-related symptoms, but HIV symptom patterns reported by patients have not been described in the era of improved antiretroviral treatment. The objectives of our study were to investigate the prevalence and burden of symptoms in people living with HIV and attending an outpatient clinic. The prevalence, burden, and bothersomeness of symptoms reported by patients in routine clinic visits during 2011 were assessed using the 20-item HIV Symptom Index. Principal component analysis was used to identify symptom clusters and relationships between groups using appropriate statistic techniques. Two main clusters were identified. The most prevalent and bothersome symptoms were muscle aches/joint pain, fatigue, and poor sleep. A third of patients had seven or more symptoms, including the most burdensome symptoms. Even with improved antiretroviral drug side-effect profiles, symptom prevalence and burden, independent of HIV viral load and CD4+ T cell count, are high. PMID:26790340

  11. National Institutes of Health Symptom Science Model sheds light on patient symptoms.

    PubMed

    Cashion, Ann K; Gill, Jessica; Hawes, Rebecca; Henderson, Wendy A; Saligan, Leorey

    2016-01-01

    Since the establishment of the nursing profession, identifying and alleviating the subjective symptoms experienced by patients has been at the core of nursing practice. In supporting the scientific foundation for clinical practice, nursing science has maintained a consistent commitment to prevent, manage, and eliminate symptoms. Scientists from the intramural research program at the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), a component of the National Institutes of Health, developed a National Institutes of Health Symptom Science Model (NIH-SSM) to guide symptom science research programs engaged in the use of emerging "omic" methods such as the genotyping of symptom phenotypes. The NIH-SSM was developed based on the NINR intramural research program's success in designing and implementing methods for examining identified symptoms or symptom clusters. The NIH-SSM identifies the research process of characterizing symptom phenotypes, identifying and testing biomarkers, and ultimately developing clinical interventions in cancer-related fatigue, gastrointestinal disorders, and traumatic brain injuries. The purpose of this article was to demonstrate how scientists can apply the NIH-SSM, leading the broader scientific community in advancing personalized and precise clinical interventions. PMID:27349632

  12. Do Symptoms of Sluggish Cognitive Tempo in Children with ADHD Symptoms Represent Comorbid Internalizing Difficulties?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Annie A.; Mrug, Sylvie; Hodgens, Bart; Patterson, Cryshelle

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Symptoms of sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) are correlated with inattention and internalizing difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether symptoms of SCT reflect comorbid internalizing disorder with ADHD or a separate syndrome. Method: Using a clinical sample of youth evaluated for behavioral and learning…

  13. Associations between Sleep Characteristics, Seasonal Depressive Symptoms, Lifestyle, and ADHD Symptoms in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bijlenga, Denise; van der Heijden, Kristiaan B.; Breuk, Minda; van Someren, Eus J. W.; Lie, Maria E. H.; Boonstra, A. Marije; Swaab, Hanna J. T.; Kooij, J. J. Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors explored associations between ADHD symptoms, seasonal depressive symptoms, lifestyle, and health. Method: Adult ADHD patients ("n" = 202) and controls ("n" = 189) completed the ASESA questionnaire involving lifestyle, eating pattern, and physical and psychological health, and validated measures on ADHD…

  14. Predicting Difficulties in Youth's Friendships: Are Anxiety Symptoms as Damaging as Depressive Symptoms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Amanda J.; Carlson, Wendy; Luebbe, Aaron M.; Schwartz-Mette, Rebecca A.; Smith, Rhiannon R.; Swenson, Lance P.

    2011-01-01

    Youth's friendships serve important functions in development; however, internalizing symptoms may undermine these relationships. Two studies are presented that examine the association of depressive and anxiety symptoms with friendship adjustment. Study 1 tested concurrent effects and Study 2 tested prospective effects over 6 months. Like past…

  15. Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Cerejeira, J.; Lagarto, L.; Mukaetova-Ladinska, E. B.

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), also known as neuropsychiatric symptoms, represent a heterogeneous group of non-cognitive symptoms and behaviors occurring in subjects with dementia. BPSD constitute a major component of the dementia syndrome irrespective of its subtype. They are as clinically relevant as cognitive symptoms as they strongly correlate with the degree of functional and cognitive impairment. BPSD include agitation, aberrant motor behavior, anxiety, elation, irritability, depression, apathy, disinhibition, delusions, hallucinations, and sleep or appetite changes. It is estimated that BPSD affect up to 90% of all dementia subjects over the course of their illness, and is independently associated with poor outcomes, including distress among patients and caregivers, long-term hospitalization, misuse of medication, and increased health care costs. Although these symptoms can be present individually it is more common that various psychopathological features co-occur simultaneously in the same patient. Thus, categorization of BPSD in clusters taking into account their natural course, prognosis, and treatment response may be useful in the clinical practice. The pathogenesis of BPSD has not been clearly delineated but it is probably the result of a complex interplay of psychological, social, and biological factors. Recent studies have emphasized the role of neurochemical, neuropathological, and genetic factors underlying the clinical manifestations of BPSD. A high degree of clinical expertise is crucial to appropriately recognize and manage the neuropsychiatric symptoms in a patient with dementia. Combination of non-pharmacological and careful use of pharmacological interventions is the recommended therapeutic for managing BPSD. Given the modest efficacy of current strategies, there is an urgent need to identify novel pharmacological targets and develop new non-pharmacological approaches to improve the adverse outcomes associated with

  16. Depressive Symptoms in Adults with Spina Bifida

    PubMed Central

    Dicianno, Brad E.; Kinback, Nicholas; Bellin, Melissa; Chaikind, Laurie; Buhari, Alhaji; Holmbeck, Grayson N.; Zabel, Andy; Donlan, Robert M.; Collins, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective To examine the prevalence of depressive symptoms in adults with spina bifida and identify contributing factors for depressive symptomatology. Research Method/Design Retrospective Cohort Study. Data collection was conducted at a regional adult spina bifida clinic. A total of 190 charts from adult patients with spina bifida were included. The main outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and the mobility domain of the Craig Handicap Assessment Reporting Technique Short Form (CHART-SF). Results Of the 190 participants, 49 (25.8%) had BDI-II scores (14+) indicative of depressive symptomatology. Sixty-nine (36.3%) of all participants were on antidepressants for the purpose of treating depressive symptoms, and 31 (63.3%) of those with clinical symptoms of depression were on antidepressants. The total number of participants with a history of depressive symptoms may be as high as 45.7% if both participants with BDI-II scores 14+ and those with antidepressant use specifically for the purposes of depression treatment are combined. In this population, lower CHART-SF mobility score, expressing “emotional concerns” as a reason for the visit on an intake sheet, and use of antidepressant medications were significantly associated with depressive symptoms. Conclusions/Implications Depressive symptomatology appears to be common and undertreated in this cohort of adults with spina bifida, which may warrant screening for emotional concerns in routine clinic appointments. Significant depressive symptoms are associated with fewer hours out of bed and fewer days leaving the house. Additional research is needed to assess the impact of interventions directed towards mobility on depression and in the treatment of depression in this patient population. PMID:26147238

  17. Operation Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Operation Galileo education program took off with the first of four flights on board a U.S. Air Force C-130 transport aircraft from Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Teachers from Mississippi and Louisiana participated in the program which aims to enhance math and science education of high-risk students by allowing junior high and middle school teachers, students and parents to fly in cargo and tanker aircraft during routine training missions. The Air Force Reserve created Operation Galileo, which was implemented by NASA's Educator Resource Center at Stennis.

  18. Mental health symptoms and patient-reported diabetes symptom burden: implications for medication regimen changes

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, Dara H.; Billimek, John; August, Kristin J.; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Kaplan, Sherrie H.; Reikes, Andrew R.; Greenfield, Sheldon

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To examine the relative contribution of glycaemic control (HbA1C) and depressive symptoms on diabetes-related symptom burden (hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia) in order to guide medication modification. Methods. Secondary analysis of medical records data and questionnaires collected from a racially/ethnically diverse sample of adult patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 710) from seven outpatient clinics affiliated with an academic medical centre over a 1-year period as part of the Reducing Racial Disparities in Diabetes: Coached Care (R2D2C2) study. Results. Results from linear regression analysis revealed that patients with high levels of depressive symptoms had more diabetes-related symptom burden (both hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia) than patients with low levels of depressive symptoms (βs = 0.09–0.17, Ps < 0.02). Furthermore, results from two logistic regression analyses suggested that the odds of regimen intensification at 1-year follow-up was marginally associated with patient-reported symptoms of hypoglycaemia [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.24, 95% CI: 0.98–1.58; P = 0.08] and hyperglycaemia (aOR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.00–1.46; P = 0.05), after controlling for patients’ HbA1C, comorbidity, insulin use and demographics. These associations, however, were diminished for patients with high self-reported hypoglycaemia and high levels of depressive symptoms, but not low depressive symptoms (interaction terms for hypoglycaemia by depressive symptoms, aOR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.97–0.99; P = 0.03). Conclusions. Mental health symptoms are associated with higher levels of patient-reported of diabetes-related symptoms, but the association between diabetes-related symptoms and subsequent regimen modifications is diminished in patients with greater depressive symptoms. Clinicians should focus attention on identifying and treating patients’ mental health concerns in order to address the role of diabetes-related symptom burden in guiding physician medication

  19. Hysterical symptoms masking brain stem glioma.

    PubMed

    Burch, E A; Hutchison, C F; Still, C N

    1978-01-01

    To function effectively as primary care specialists, psychiatrists must remain ever alert to the possibility of organic disorders in patients who at first show only psychiatric symptoms. A case is presented in which hysterical overlay led to misdiagnosis in a 31 year woman, who dies of a diffuse medullary glioma 3 1/2 years after onset of "conversion" symptoms. The authors point out how the label "hysterical" clouds longitudinal objective diagnostic observations especially when initial clinical and laboratory data fail to support a definitive organic diagnosis.

  20. Alopecia as the Presenting Symptom of Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Ornelas, Jennifer; Agbai, Oma N; Kiuru, Maija; Sivamani, Raja K

    2015-07-15

    Alopecia can be one of the many symptoms of secondary syphilis and the clinical presentations include essential syphilitic alopecia or symptomatic syphilitic alopecia. In this report, we present a case of a patient with essential syphilitic alopecia whose sole presenting symptom of syphilis was alopecia. Despite an initial negative rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, he was ultimately found to have syphilis on scalp biopsy. His alopecia improved following treatment with benzathine penicillin. This presentation serves as a reminder to clinicians to be cognizant of alopecia as a presenting sign of syphilis. A review of the specificity and sensitivity of the typical tests used for the diagnosis is presented.

  1. Symptoms and signs of acute alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Basra, Gurjot; Basra, Sarpreet; Parupudi, Sreeram

    2011-01-01

    Although there is not one specific sign or symptom related to alcoholic hepatitis (AH), a constellation of symptoms and signs can help make the diagnosis of AH with reasonable accuracy. Documentation of chronic and active alcohol abuse is paramount in making a diagnosis of AH. Clinical presentation after abstinence for more than 3 m should raise doubts about the diagnosis of AH and dictate the need for considering other causes of liver disease, decompensation of alcoholic cirrhosis, sepsis and malignancy as the cause of patient’s clinical profile. PMID:21731904

  2. [Neurological symptoms following infusion of infliximab].

    PubMed

    Bebe, Anna C K M; Harboe, Kirstine Moll; Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2012-10-01

    Infliximab is indicated for treatment of plaque psoriasis when traditional systemic therapy is inadequate or inappropriate. The treatment is efficient but also carries a risk of serious adverse drug events. We describe a case of neurological symptoms following the first infusion of infliximab in a patient treated for plaque psoriasis. The patient fully recovered after sensation of the therapy. We believe the symptoms could be related to infliximab and stress the importance of thorough information of patients treated with tumour necrosis factor-α-inhibitors, also about the risk of serious adverse events.

  3. [Nickel in the environment and morbid symptoms].

    PubMed

    Karaś, Zbigniew; Bładek, Jan

    2004-01-01

    In the paper, results of researches on the influence of nickel on allergies and their symptoms are presented. Using "flake" test with nickel sulfate(VI) it was shown that 12.5% of women's population is allergic to this metal. Dermal changes, catarrh and conjunctiva changes were recorded in these women; they periodically suffer from headache, stomach ache and shortness of breath. A hypothesis was made that the intensification of morbid symptoms is caused by an increase in the exposure to the metal owing to variable in time environmental pollution. A need for monitoring of nickel content in air, water, soil and food was proved.

  4. Longitudinal modelling of respiratory symptoms in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlink, Uwe; Fritz, Gisela; Herbarth, Olf; Richter, Matthias

    2002-08-01

    A panel of 277 children, aged 3-7 years, was used to study the association between air pollution (O3, SO2, NO2, and total suspended particles), meteorological factors (global radiation, maximum daytime temperature, daily averages of vapour pressure and air humidity) and respiratory symptoms. For 759 days the symptoms were recorded in a diary and modelling was based on a modification of the method proposed by Korn and Whittemore (Biometrics 35: 795-798, 1979). This approach (1) comprises an extension using environmental parameters at different time scales, (2) addresses the suitability of using the daily fraction of symptomatic individuals to account for inter-individual interactions and (3) enables the most significant weather effects to be identified. The resulting model consisted of (1) an individual specific intercept that takes account of the population's heterogeneity, (2) the individual's health status the day before, (3) a long-term meteorological effect, which may be either the squared temperature or global radiation in interaction with temperature, (4) the short-term effect of sulfur dioxide, and (5) the short-term effect of an 8-h ozone concentration above 60 µg/m3. Using the estimated parameters as input to a simulation study, we checked the quality of the model and demonstrate that the annual cycle of the prevalence of respiratory symptoms is associated to atmospheric covariates. Individuals suffering from allergy have been identified as a group of a particular susceptibility to ozone. The duration of respiratory symptoms appears to be free of scale and follows an exponential distribution function, which confirms that the symptom record of each individual follows a Poisson point-process. This supports the assumption that not only respiratory diseases, but also respiratory symptoms can be considered an independent measure for the health status of a population sample. Since a point process is described by only one parameter (namely the intensity of the

  5. Visual and spatial symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Davidsdottir, Sigurros; Cronin-Golomb, Alice; Lee, Alison

    2005-05-01

    The interaction of visual/visuospatial and motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) was investigated by means of a 31-item self-report questionnaire. The majority of 81 non-demented patients reported problems on non-motor tasks that depended on visual or visuospatial abilities. Over a third reported visual hallucinations, double vision and difficulty estimating spatial relations. Freezing of gait was associated with visual hallucinations, double vision and contrast sensitivity deficits. Visual strategies frequently were employed to overcome freezing. The results underscore the importance of investigating visual and visuospatial impairments in PD and their relation to motor symptoms, in order to help patients develop successful compensatory strategies.

  6. [Pain and unexpressed symptoms: the other dementia].

    PubMed

    Marín Carmona, José Manuel

    2009-11-01

    Patients with advanced dementia are biologically, socially and personally highly vulnerable. The care of these patients is a challenge in terms of both the quantity of care required and qualitative aspects (the need for specific and adapted approaches). The advanced phases of dementia are characterized by severe speech impairment, loss of mobility, and feeding and nutritional alterations (in patients with severe cognitive and functional impairment). Problems of recognition and verbal expression of sensations hampers the diagnostic and therapeutic approach. This article briefly reviews the clinical characteristics of the symptoms and syndromes prevalent in these patients (pain, neuropsychiatric symptoms, delirium, epilepsy) and emphasizes the general principles for prevention and therapeutic approaches.

  7. A Cluster of Genes Involved in Polysaccharide Biosynthesis from Enterococcus faecalis OG1RF

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Murray, Barbara E.; Weinstock, George M.

    1998-01-01

    Our previous work identified a cosmid clone containing a 43-kb insert from Enterococcus faecalis OG1RF that produced a nonprotein antigen in Escherichia coli. In the present work, we studied this clone in detail. Periodate treatment of lysates of the clone confirmed that the antigen was carbohydrate in nature. Analysis of DNA sequences and transposon insertion mutants suggested that the insert contained a multicistronic gene cluster. Database comparison showed that the cluster contained genes similar to genes involved in the biosynthesis of dTDP-rhamnose, glycosyltransferases, and ABC transporters involved in the export of sugar polymers from both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. Insertions in several genes within the cluster abolished the immunoreactivity of the clone. This is the first report on a gene cluster of E. faecalis involved in the biosynthesis of an antigenic polysaccharide. PMID:9712783

  8. Prevalence of Hypoglycemic Symptoms after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass and Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy and Associated Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Clare J.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Schweitzer, Michael; Magnuson, Thomas; Steele, Kimberley; Koerner, Olivia; Brown, Todd T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for postprandial hypoglycemic symptoms among bariatric surgery patients. Design and Methods A questionnaire including the Edinburgh hypoglycemia scale was mailed to patients who underwent either Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) at a single center. Based on the questionnaire, we categorized the patients as having high or low suspicion for post-surgical, postprandial hypoglycemic symptoms. Results Of the 1119 patients with valid addresses, 40.2% (N=450) responded. Among the respondents, 34.2% had a high suspicion for symptoms of post-bariatric surgery hypoglycemia. In multivariate analyses, in addition to female sex (p=0.001), RYGB (p=0.004), longer time since surgery (p=0.013), lack of diabetes (p=0.040), the high suspicion group was more likely to report preoperative symptoms of hypoglycemia (p<0.001), compared to the low suspicion group. Similar results were observed when the high suspicion group was restricted to those requiring assistance from others, syncope, seizure with severe symptoms or medically confirmed hypoglycemia (N=52). Conclusion One third of RYGB or VSG reported postprandial symptoms concerning for post-surgical hypoglycemia, which was related to the presence of pre-operative hypoglycemic symptoms. Pre-operative screening for hypoglycemic symptoms may identify a group of patients at increased risk of post-bariatric surgery hypoglycemia. PMID:25866150

  9. The range of symptoms in refugees of war: the New Mexico Refugee Symptom Checklist-121.

    PubMed

    Hollifield, Michael; Warner, Teddy D; Krakow, Barry; Jenkins, Janis; Westermeyer, Joseph

    2009-02-01

    The range of symptoms experienced by refugees of war has not been empirically assessed. The New Mexico Refugee Symptom Checklist-121 (NMRSCL-121) was developed utilizing established guidelines and evaluated for its psychometric properties. Community-dwelling Kurdish and Vietnamese refugees reported 48 (SD = 31) persistent and bothersome somatic and psychological symptoms on the NMRSCL-121. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability for the total scale and for most subscales were acceptable, and construct and concurrent validity for the NMRSCL-121 data was shown. There were modest ethnic group differences on symptom severity and psychometric properties of NMRSCL-121 subscales. The NMRSCL-121 produces reliable and valid assessments of a wide range of symptoms in 2 broad community samples of displaced adult refugees.

  10. The Autonomic Symptom Profile: a new instrument to assess autonomic symptoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, G. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Offord, K. P.; Atkinson, E. J.; O'Brien, P. C.; Low, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a new specific instrument called the Autonomic Symptom Profile to measure autonomic symptoms and test its validity. BACKGROUND: Measuring symptoms is important in the evaluation of quality of life outcomes. There is no validated, self-completed questionnaire on the symptoms of patients with autonomic disorders. METHODS: The questionnaire is 169 items concerning different aspects of autonomic symptoms. The Composite Autonomic Symptom Scale (COMPASS) with item-weighting was established; higher scores indicate more or worse symptoms. Autonomic function tests were performed to generate the Composite Autonomic Scoring Scale (CASS) and to quantify autonomic deficits. We compared the results of the COMPASS with the CASS derived from the Autonomic Reflex Screen to evaluate validity. RESULTS: The instrument was tested in 41 healthy controls (mean age 46.6 years), 33 patients with nonautonomic peripheral neuropathies (mean age 59.5 years), and 39 patients with autonomic failure (mean age 61.1 years). COMPASS scores correlated well with the CASS, demonstrating an acceptable level of content and criterion validity. The mean (+/-SD) overall COMPASS score was 9.8 (+/-9) in controls, 25.9 (+/-17.9) in the patients with nonautonomic peripheral neuropathies, and 52.3 (+/-24.2) in the autonomic failure group. Scores of symptoms of orthostatic intolerance and secretomotor dysfunction best predicted the CASS on multiple stepwise regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: We describe a questionnaire that measures autonomic symptoms and present evidence for its validity. The instrument shows promise in assessing autonomic symptoms in clinical trials and epidemiologic studies.

  11. Psychological symptoms, smoking lapse behavior, and the mediating effects of nicotine withdrawal symptoms: A laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Ameringer, Katherine J; Leventhal, Adam M

    2015-03-01

    The influence of psychological symptoms on smoking-lapse behavior is critical to understand. However, this relationship is obscured by comorbidity across multiple forms of psychological symptoms and their overlap with nicotine withdrawal. To address these challenges, we constructed a structural model of latent factors underlying 9 manifest scales of affective and behavioral symptoms and tested relations between latent factors and manifest scale residuals with nicotine withdrawal and smoking lapse in a laboratory analog task. Adult daily smokers (N = 286) completed a baseline session at which several forms of affective and behavioral symptoms were assessed and 2 experimental sessions (i.e., following 16 hr of smoking abstinence and following regular smoking), during which withdrawal symptoms and delay of smoking in exchange for monetary reinforcement, as an analogue for lapse propensity, were measured. A single second-order factor of general psychological maladjustment associated with more severe withdrawal-like symptoms, which in turn associated with shorter delay of smoking. The first-order factors, which tapped qualitatively unique domains of psychological symptoms (low positive affect, negative affect, disinhibition), and the manifest scale residuals provided little predictive power beyond the second-order factor with regard to lapse behavior. Relations among general psychological maladjustment, withdrawal-like symptoms, and lapse were significant in both abstinent and nonabstinent conditions, suggesting that psychological maladjustment, and not nicotine withdrawal per se, accounted for the relation with lapse. These results highlight the potential for smoking-cessation strategies that target general psychological maladjustment processes and have implications for addressing withdrawal-like symptoms among individuals with psychological symptoms.

  12. Operation Uplift...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NJEA Review, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Article described a model policy on student care and counseling for prevention of drug and alcohol dependency. It was adopted by the Department of School Nurses through funding by the National Education Association for Operation Uplift--Better Health for Better Learning. (Author/RK)

  13. Operations Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Edward T.

    1984-01-01

    Describes operations research as an important management tool that can aid library managers in effectively using available resources and as a set of analytical tools that can enable researchers to better understand library and information services. Early history, definition, models, applications to libraries, and impact are noted. Twenty-five…

  14. Operating Efficiently

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The ailing economy has spared few schools and universities. Faced with funding cutbacks, most education administrators have had to make difficult choices about where to allocate dwindling resources. Even in the best of financial times, educating students is the first priority. When money is tight, school maintenance and operations (M&O) programs…

  15. Cognitive Function in Heart Failure is Associated with Nonsomatic Symptoms of Depression but Not Somatic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Misty A. W.; Dolansky, Mary A.; Schaefer, Julie T.; Fulcher, Michael J.; Gunstad, John; Redle, Joseph D.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with heart failure (HF) have high rates of cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms have been associated with greater cognitive impairments in HF; however, it is not known whether particular clusters of depressive symptoms are more detrimental to cognition than others. Objective To identify whether somatic and/or nonsomatic depressive symptom clusters were associated with cognitive function in persons with HF. Methods Participants were 326 HF patients (40.5% female, 26.7% race-ethnicity, aged 68.6±9.7 years). Depressive symptoms were measured using a depression questionnaire commonly used in medical populations: the Patient Health Questionnatire-9 (PHQ-9). Somatic and Nonsomatic subscales scores were created using previous factor analytic results. A neuropsychological battery tested attention, executive function, and memory. Composites were created using averages of age-adjusted scaled scores. Regressions adjusting for demographic and clinical factors were conducted. Results Regressions revealed that PHQ-9 Total was associated with Attention (β=−.14, p=.008) and Executive Function (β=−.17, p=.001). When analyzed separately, the Nonsomatic subscale – but not the Somatic symptoms subscale (ps ≥.092) – was associated with Attention scores (β=−.15, p=.004) and Memory (β=−.11, p=.044). Both Nonsomatic (β=−.18, p<.001) and Somatic symptoms (β=−.11, p=.048) were related to Executive Function. When included together, only the Nonsomatic symptom cluster was associated with Attention (β=−.15, p=.020) and Executive Function (β=−.19, p=.003). Conclusions Greater overall depressive symptom severity was associated with poorer performance on multiple cognitive domains, an effect driven primarily by the nonsomatic symptoms of depression. Clinical Implications These findings suggest that screening explicitly for nonsomatic depressive symptoms may be warranted and that the mechanisms underlying the

  16. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Evaluation of symptoms, including pain. 220... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.114 Evaluation of symptoms, including pain...'s symptoms, including pain, and the extent to which the claimant's symptoms can reasonably...

  17. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Evaluation of symptoms, including pain. 220... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.114 Evaluation of symptoms, including pain...'s symptoms, including pain, and the extent to which the claimant's symptoms can reasonably...

  18. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Evaluation of symptoms, including pain. 220... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.114 Evaluation of symptoms, including pain...'s symptoms, including pain, and the extent to which the claimant's symptoms can reasonably...

  19. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Evaluation of symptoms, including pain. 220... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.114 Evaluation of symptoms, including pain...'s symptoms, including pain, and the extent to which the claimant's symptoms can reasonably...

  20. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evaluation of symptoms, including pain. 220... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.114 Evaluation of symptoms, including pain...'s symptoms, including pain, and the extent to which the claimant's symptoms can reasonably...

  1. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Kawasaki Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Kawasaki Disease? Major Signs and Symptoms One of the main symptoms during ... of the feet Redness of the eyes Other Signs and Symptoms During the acute phase, your child ...

  2. The Longitudinal Association between Oppositional and Depressive Symptoms across Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Khrista; Georgiades, Katholiki; Szatmari, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and depression show high rates of co-occurrence, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. This study examines the extent to which variation in oppositional symptoms predict, variation in depressive symptoms over time, accounting for co-occurring depressive symptoms and measurement error.…

  3. Prodromal Signs and Symptoms of Schizophrenic Relapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subotnik, Kenneth L.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.

    Increasing evidence that decompensation into acute psychosis by schizophrenics can often be avoided with active pharmacological and psychosocial intervention at the early signs of relapse has stimulated research into the signs and symptoms prodromal to acute psychosis. In this study, 6-week periods prior to 17 psychotic relapses and to 11 relapses…

  4. Dyadic Parenting and Children's Externalizing Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meteyer, Karen B.; Perry-Jenkins, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    We explore dyadic parenting styles and their association with first-grade children's externalizing behavior symptoms in a sample of 85 working-class, dual-earner families. Cluster analysis is used to create a typology of parenting types, reflecting the parental warmth, overreactivity, and laxness of both mothers and fathers in two-parent families.…

  5. Depression, Life Events and Somatic Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozzini, Renzo; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between somatic symptoms, depression, and life events (health status, function, social satisfaction, income) in a population of 1,201 elderly persons living at home. Found depression was the most important factor in the appearance of somatic complaints; however, life events were important cofactors in defining…

  6. Psychiatric Symptoms in Alpha-Mannosidosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malm, D.; Pantel, J.; Linaker, O. M.

    2005-01-01

    Alpha-mannosidosis is characterized by mild to moderate intellectual disability (ID), moderate to severe neurosensory hearing loss, frequent infections, psychomotor disturbances and skeletal dysmorphism. For the first time, a panel of nine alpha-mannosidosis patients with psychiatric symptoms is presented. The clinical picture has several…

  7. Psychiatric Symptoms in Children with Primary Headache

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anttila, Pirjo; Sourander, Andre; Metsahonkala, Liisa; Aromaa, Minna; Helenius, Hans; Sillanpaa, Matti

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association of psychiatric symptoms with migraine and tension-type headache in children. Method: A questionnaire completed by 1,135 Finnish children in the sixth grade identified 154 children with migraine, 138 with tension-type headache, and 407 children who were headache-free. Seventy children were randomly selected…

  8. Autism and ADHD: Overlapping and Discriminating Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Mayes, Rebecca D.; Molitoris, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Children with ADHD and autism have some similar features, complicating a differential diagnosis. The purpose of our study was to determine the degree to which core ADHD and autistic symptoms overlap in and discriminate between children 2-16 years of age with autism and ADHD. Our study demonstrated that 847 children with autism were easily…

  9. Therapy-resistant symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vorovenci, Ruxandra Julia; Biundo, Roberta; Antonini, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the management of Parkinson's disease (PD) has come a long way, leading to an increase in therapeutic options that now include oral and transdermal drug delivery, infusion as well as surgical treatments. Nonetheless, in the evolution of this complex neurodegenerative disorder, several symptoms remain refractory to dopaminergic therapy. It is our aim to review the literature to date and to bring them into focus, as well as emphasizing on pathophysiological mechanisms, profile of risk factors in their development, and therapeutic options. We will focus on freezing of gait, camptocormia, dysphagia and dysphonia, as well as cognitive impairment and dementia because they represent the far end of therapy-resistant symptoms, encompassing poor health-related quality of life and often a more reserved prognosis with either a rapid evolution of the disease, and/or merely a more severe clinical picture. Pathophysiological mechanisms and brain neurotransmitter abnormalities behind these symptoms seem to overlap to some extent, and a better understanding of these correlations is desirable. We believe that further research is paramount to expand our knowledge of the dopamine-resistant symptoms and, consequently, to develop specific therapeutic strategies. PMID:26410626

  10. [Psychopathological aspects of negative symptoms in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Cermolacce, M; Belzeaux, R; Pringuey, D; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    During the past ten years, research on schizophrenia has witnessed a clear emphasis on studies based on negative symptoms. This interest can be explained in terms of diagnosis, specific treatment, functional prognosis and outcome issues. However, main current approaches consider negative symptoms from an operationalist view, which implies objective and atheoretical descriptions of clinical criteria, observed from a third person perspective. And the understanding of negative symptoms in schizophrenia, still a crucial issue of mental health, remains only partial. From a different perspective, psychopathology - and notably psychiatric phenomenology -, can provide a conceptual and clinical framework, taking into account subjective experience (first person perspective), based on a global understanding of the clinical situation lived by patients with schizophrenia. In the present review, we give a brief survey on the historical aspects of the description of negative symptoms. Then, we introduce the clinical contributions raised by clinical phenomenology. We principally develop Minkowski's notion of loss of vital contact, and Blankenburg's notion of loss of natural evidence. Then we highlight the current debates which are discussed and explored in contemporary psychopathology. In conclusion, we discuss the possible articulation between objective and subjective approaches, in order to better understand pauci-symptomatic forms of schizophrenia.

  11. Anchoring ADHD Symptoms to Mental Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Callie; Dunham, Mardis; Patel, Samir H.; Contreras-Bloomdahl, Susana

    2016-01-01

    "The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5)," requires that symptoms of ADHD must be "developmentally inappropriate" in order for an ADHD diagnosis to be considered. Because the DSM-5 does not specifically outline procedure for determining developmental inappropriateness of behaviors,…

  12. Neuropsychological Correlates of Early Symptoms of Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Geraldine; Meltzoff, Andrew N.; Osterling, Julie; Rinaldi, Julie

    1998-01-01

    Examined performance on neuropsychological tests (tapping the medial temporal lobe and related limbic structures, and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, respectively) in relation to performance on tasks assessing autistic symptoms in young children with autism, and developmentally matched children with Down syndrome or typical development.…

  13. An integrated network model of psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Looijestijn, Jasper; Blom, Jan Dirk; Aleman, André; Hoek, Hans W; Goekoop, Rutger

    2015-12-01

    The full body of research on the nature of psychosis and its determinants indicates that a considerable number of factors are relevant to the development of hallucinations, delusions, and other positive symptoms, ranging from neurodevelopmental parameters and altered connectivity of brain regions to impaired cognitive functioning and social factors. We aimed to integrate these factors in a single mathematical model based on network theory. At the microscopic level this model explains positive symptoms of psychosis in terms of experiential equivalents of robust, high-frequency attractor states of neural networks. At the mesoscopic level it explains them in relation to global brain states, and at the macroscopic level in relation to social-network structures and dynamics. Due to the scale-free nature of biological networks, all three levels are governed by the same general laws, thereby allowing for an integrated model of biological, psychological, and social phenomena involved in the mediation of positive symptoms of psychosis. This integrated network model of psychotic symptoms (INMOPS) is described together with various possibilities for application in clinical practice.

  14. Does Early Adolescent Sex Cause Depressive Symptoms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabia, Joseph J.

    2006-01-01

    A recent study by the Heritage Foundation (Rector, Johnson, & Noyes, 2003) found evidence of a positive relationship between early sexual intercourse and depressive symptoms. This finding has been used to bolster support for funding abstinence only sex education. However, promoting abstinence will only yield mental health benefits if there is a…

  15. Political Ideology and Psychological Symptoms Following Terror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laufer, Avital; Solomon, Zahava

    2010-01-01

    The article examines the associations between political ideology and level of psychological symptoms in youth exposed to terror attacks. The study included 2,999 7th to 10th graders from various parts of Israel. Political ideology was examined in two ways: (a) as a content dimension: "political stand"--holding right, centrist, or left wing views…

  16. Emotion Regulation and Depressive Symptoms in Preadolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siener, Shannon; Kerns, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined associations among several measures of emotion regulation, and their links to depressive symptoms, in a sample of children ages 10-12 years old (N = 87). Both temporal features of emotion regulation and regulation processes involved in the evaluation, monitoring, and modification of emotion were assessed through parent and…

  17. Anorexia Nervosa: Its Symptoms and Possible Cures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingaman, David E.

    This document presents a definition and description of anorexia nervosa as a disorder that occurs predominantly in girls and that can affect 1 out of every 250 girls between the ages of 12 and 18 years. The existence of a distorted mental body image among anorexics is discussed and symptoms of the disorder are described, including amenorrhea…

  18. An integrated network model of psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Looijestijn, Jasper; Blom, Jan Dirk; Aleman, André; Hoek, Hans W; Goekoop, Rutger

    2015-12-01

    The full body of research on the nature of psychosis and its determinants indicates that a considerable number of factors are relevant to the development of hallucinations, delusions, and other positive symptoms, ranging from neurodevelopmental parameters and altered connectivity of brain regions to impaired cognitive functioning and social factors. We aimed to integrate these factors in a single mathematical model based on network theory. At the microscopic level this model explains positive symptoms of psychosis in terms of experiential equivalents of robust, high-frequency attractor states of neural networks. At the mesoscopic level it explains them in relation to global brain states, and at the macroscopic level in relation to social-network structures and dynamics. Due to the scale-free nature of biological networks, all three levels are governed by the same general laws, thereby allowing for an integrated model of biological, psychological, and social phenomena involved in the mediation of positive symptoms of psychosis. This integrated network model of psychotic symptoms (INMOPS) is described together with various possibilities for application in clinical practice. PMID:26432501

  19. Programmed Symptoms: Disparate Effects United by Purpose

    PubMed Central

    Gracely, Richard H.; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes (CSS) share features of similar multiple symptoms, virtually unknown mechanisms and lack of effective treatments. The CSS nomenclature was chosen over alternatives because it focused on a putative physiological mechanism of central sensitization common to disorders such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, vulvodynia and temporomandibular disorder. Increasing evidence from multiple biological systems suggests a further development. In this new model central sensitization is part of a ensemble that includes also the symptoms of widespread pain, fatigue, unrefreshing sleep and dyscognition. The main feature is an intrinsic program that produces this ensemble to guide behavior to restore normal function in conditions that threaten survival. The well known “illness response” is a classic example that is triggered in response to the specific threat of viral infection. The major leap for this model in the context of CSS is that the symptom complex is not a reactive result of pathology, but a purposeful feeling state enlisted to combat pathology. Once triggered, this state is produced by potential mechanisms that likely include contributions of the peripheral and central immune systems, as well as stress response systems such as the autonomic system and the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis. These act in concert to alter behavior in a beneficial direction. This concept explains similar symptoms for many triggering conditions, the poorly understood pathology, and the resistance to treatment. PMID:26088212

  20. Body Image Change and Adolescent Depressive Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Judith M.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the temporal association between body image and depressive symptoms in African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, and white adolescents. Found that girls were more influenced by body image change than boys. Compared to other ethnic groups, African American girls experienced a greater increase in psychological distress as body…

  1. Management of refractory typical GERD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Scarpellini, Emidio; Ang, Daphne; Pauwels, Ans; De Santis, Adriano; Vanuytsel, Tim; Tack, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The management of patients with refractory GERD (rGERD) is a major clinical challenge for gastroenterologists. In up to 30% of patients with typical GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or regurgitation), acid-suppressive therapy does not provide clinical benefit. In this Review, we discuss the current management algorithm for GERD and the features and management of patients who do not respond to treatment (such as those individuals with an incorrect diagnosis of GERD, inadequate PPI intake, persisting acid reflux and persisting weakly acidic reflux). Symptom response to existing surgical techniques, novel antireflux procedures, and the value of add-on medical therapies (including prokinetics and reflux inhibitors) for rGERD symptoms are discussed. Pharmaceutical agents targeting oesophageal sensitivity, a condition that can contribute to symptom generation in rGERD, are also discussed. Finally, on the basis of available published data and our expert opinion, we present an outline of a current, usable algorithm for management of patients with rGERD that considers the timing and diagnostic use of pH-impedance monitoring on or off PPI, additional diagnostic tests, the clinical use of baclofen and the use of add-on neuromodulators (tricyclic agents and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). PMID:27075264

  2. Behavioral symptoms related to cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Carol; Serrano, Cecilia M; Castro, Diego; Leguizamón, Patricio Perez; Heisecke, Silvina L; Taragano, Fernando E

    2013-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) are core features of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. On one hand, behavioral symptoms in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can indicate an increased risk of progressing to dementia. On the other hand, mild behavioral impairment (MBI) in patients who usually have normal cognition indicates an increased risk of developing dementia. Whatever the cause, all dementias carry a high rate of NPI. These symptoms can be observed at any stage of the disease, may fluctuate over its course, are a leading cause of stress and overload for caregivers, and increase rates of hospitalization and early institutionalization for patients with dementia. The clinician should be able to promptly recognize NPI through the use of instruments capable of measuring their frequency and severity to support diagnosis, and to help monitor the treatment of behavioral symptoms. The aims of this review are to describe and update the construct ‘MBI’ and to revise the reported NPS related to prodromal stages of dementia (MCI and MBI) and dementia stages of Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. PMID:24092982

  3. West Nile Virus: Symptoms and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nile virus infection are available. Over-the-counter pain relievers can be used to reduce fever and relieve some symptoms In severe cases, patients often need to be hospitalized to receive supportive treatment, such as intravenous fluids, pain medication, and nursing ...

  4. Establishing operations

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Jack

    1993-01-01

    The first two books on behavior analysis (Skinner, 1938; Keller & Schoenfeld, 1950) had chapter-length coverage of motivation. The next generation of texts also had chapters on the topic, but by the late 1960s it was no longer being given much treatment in the behavior-analytic literature. The present failure to deal with the topic leaves a gap in our understanding of operant functional relations. A partial solution is to reintroduce the concept of the establishing operation, defined as an environmental event, operation, or stimulus condition that affects an organism by momentarily altering (a) the reinforcing effectiveness of other events and (b) the frequency of occurrence of that part of the organism's repertoire relevant to those events as consequences. Discriminative and motivative variables can be distinguished as follows: The former are related to the differential availability of an effective form of reinforcement given a particular type of behavior; the latter are related to the differential reinforcing effectiveness of environmental events. An important distinction can also be made between unconditioned establishing operations (UEOs), such as food deprivation and painful stimulation, and conditioned establishing operations (CEOs) that depend on the learning history of the organism. One type of CEO is a stimulus that has simply been paired with a UEO and as a result may take on some of the motivative properties of that UEO. The warning stimulus in avoidance procedures is another important type of CEO referred to as reflexive because it establishes its own termination as a form of reinforcement and evokes the behavior that has accomplished such termination. Another CEO is closely related to the concept of conditional conditioned reinforcement and is referred to as a transitive CEO, because it establishes some other stimulus as a form of effective reinforcement and evokes the behavior that has produced that other stimulus. The multiple control of human

  5. Opportunities for targeting the fatigue-anorexia-cachexia symptom cluster.

    PubMed

    Alesi, Erin R; del Fabbro, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    Cancer patients experience multiple symptoms throughout their illness trajectory. Symptoms consistently occurring together, known as symptom clusters, share common pathophysiologic mechanisms. Understanding and targeting such symptom clusters may allow for more effective and efficient use of treatments for a variety of symptoms. Fatigue-anorexia-cachexia is one of the most prevalent symptom clusters and significantly impairs quality of life. In this review, we explore the fatigue-anorexia-cachexia symptom cluster and focus on current and emerging therapies with an emphasis on pharmacologic management.

  6. Experimental investigation of the effects of naturalistic dieting on bulimic symptoms: moderating effects of depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Presnell, Katherine; Stice, Eric; Tristan, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Prospective studies suggest that dieting increases risk for bulimic symptoms, but experimental trials indicate dieting reduces bulimic symptoms. However, these experiments may be unrepresentative of real-world weight loss dieting. In addition, the fact that most dieters do not develop eating disorders suggests moderating factors may be important. Accordingly, we randomly assigned 157 female intermittent dieters to either diet as they usually do for weight loss or eat as they normally do when not dieting for 4 weeks. Naturalistic dieting halted the weight gain shown by controls, but did not result in significant weight loss. Although there was no main effect of the dieting manipulation on bulimic symptoms, moderation analyses indicated that naturalistic dieting decreased bulimic symptoms among participants with initially low depressive symptoms. Results suggest that self-initiated weight loss dieting is not particularly effective, which appears to explain several discrepancies in the literature. Additionally, depressive symptoms may be an important determinant of bulimic symptoms that eclipses the effects of naturalistic dieting on this outcome. PMID:17662503

  7. Operation Poorman

    SciTech Connect

    Pruvost, N.; Tsitouras, J.

    1981-03-18

    The objectives of Operation Poorman were to design and build a portable seismic system and to set up and use this system in a cold-weather environment. The equipment design uses current technology to achieve a low-power, lightweight system that is configured into three modules. The system was deployed in Alaska during wintertime, and the results provide a basis for specifying a mission-ready seismic verification system.

  8. The Relation between Insomnia Symptoms, Mood, and Rumination about Insomnia Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Colleen E.; Harris, Andrea L.; Falco, Ashley; Edinger, Jack D.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Research suggests that rumination may play an important role in insomnia. Whereas some have suggested that rumination mainly relates to depression, the evidence suggests that there may be insomnia-specific rumination. This paper explores insomnia symptom rumination across two distinct samples of varying levels of depressed mood and insomnia symptom severity. Methods: The first sample consisted of nonclinical participants (N = 327) with a range of insomnia and depressed mood symptoms, and the second sample consisted of those who met both Major Depressive Disorder and Insomnia diagnoses (N = 66). Rather than relying on a measure developed for those with depression, we developed and tested an insomnia-specific measurement scale based on items from previous rumination studies and the addition of items derived from common daytime insomnia symptoms. Results: Internal consistency was highly acceptable across the two samples for the new insomnia-specific rumination measure (Cronbach α was 0.93 and 0.94). In the first study, poor sleepers reported significantly higher levels of daytime symptom rumination than did good sleepers. Across both studies, rumination about daytime insomnia symptoms and depression were signifi-cantly correlated; however, insomnia rumination scores predicted insomnia even after controlling for depression. Moreover, in Study 2, insomnia-specific rumination was related to insomnia, but general depressive rumination was not predictive of insomnia. Conclusions: The findings provide support for the use of this insomnia-specific rumination scale; moreover the findings support previous observances regarding rumination about daytime insomnia symptoms that are not exclusive to depression. Citation: Carney CE; Harris AL; Falco A; Edinger JD. The relation between insomnia symptoms, mood, and rumination about insomnia symptoms. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(6):567-575. PMID:23772190

  9. Base Rates of Depressive Symptoms in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease: An Individual Symptom Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kohlmann, Sebastian; Gierk, Benjamin; Murray, Alexandra M.; Scholl, Arne; Lehmann, Marco; Löwe, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Background Major depression is common in coronary heart disease (CHD) but challenging to diagnose. Instead of focusing on the overall diagnosis of depression, base rates of depressive symptoms could facilitate screening and management of psychopathology in CHD. The present study investigates the frequency of individual depressive symptoms in CHD and their impact on cardiac and subjective health. Methods In total, 1337 in- and outpatients with CHD were screened for depressive symptoms with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) at three different cardiac treatment sites. Tables stratified by age and gender were designed to illustrate base rates of depressive symptoms. Multiple regression analyses adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical data were conducted to test associations between individual depressive symptoms and quality of life as well impairment caused angina pectoris and dyspnea. Results During the last 14 days, more than half of patients reported a loss of energy (74.9%, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 70.6–79.2), sleeping problems (69.4%, 95% CI: 64.9–74.0), loss of interest (55.7%, 95% CI: 50.8–60.7). In contrast, psychomotor change (25.6%, 95%CI: 21.3–30.0), feelings of failure (21.9%, 95%CI: 17.7–26.0), suicidal ideations (14.1%, 95%CI: 10.7–17.6) were less frequently reported. Depending on the outcome, only particular depressive symptoms were highly associated with low quality of life and impairment caused by angina pectoris and dyspnea. Loss of energy was the only depressive symptom that reliably predicted all three outcomes. Conclusions Depressive symptoms in CHD are frequent but vary widely in terms of frequency. Findings underline the differential effects of individual depressive symptoms on cardiac health. Presented base rates of depressive symptoms offer clinicians a new way to judge the severity of individual depressive symptoms and to communicate individual PHQ-9 profiles with patients with respect to gender, age, cardiac

  10. Neurobiological correlates of distinct PTSD symptom profiles during threat anticipation in combat veterans

    PubMed Central

    Grupe, Daniel W.; Wielgosz, Joseph; Davidson, Richard J.; Nitschke, Jack B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous research in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has identified disrupted ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) function in those with versus without PTSD. It is unclear whether this brain region is uniformly affected in all individuals with PTSD, or whether vmPFC dysfunction is related to individual differences in discrete features of this heterogeneous disorder. Methods In a sample of 51 male veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom, we collected functional magnetic resonance imaging data during a novel threat anticipation task with crossed factors of threat condition and temporal unpredictability. Voxelwise regression analyses related anticipatory brain activation to individual differences in overall PTSD symptom severity, as well as individual differences in discrete symptom subscales (re-experiencing, emotional numbing/avoidance, and hyperarousal). Results The vmPFC showed greater anticipatory responses for safety relative to threat, driven primarily by deactivation during threat anticipation. During unpredictable threat anticipation, increased PTSD symptoms were associated with relatively greater activation for threat vs. safety. However, simultaneous regression on individual symptom subscales demonstrated that this effect was driven specifically by individual differences in hyperarousal symptoms. Furthermore, this analysis revealed an additional, anatomically distinct region of the vmPFC in which re-experiencing symptoms were associated with greater activation during threat anticipation. Conclusions Increased anticipatory responses to unpredictable threat in distinct vmPFC subregions were uniquely associated with elevated hyperarousal and re-experiencing symptoms in combat veterans. These results underscore the disruptive impact of uncertainty for veterans, and suggest that investigating individual differences in discrete aspects of PTSD may advance our understanding of underlying neurobiological mechanisms. PMID

  11. 14 CFR 23.1583 - Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... effects, a statement to this effect and information as to any symptoms, the probable behavior of the... temperatures. Where appropriate, maximum and minimum ambient air temperatures for operation. (o) Smoking. Any restrictions on smoking in the airplane. (p) Types of surface. A statement of the types of surface on...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1583 - Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... effects, a statement to this effect and information as to any symptoms, the probable behavior of the... temperatures. Where appropriate, maximum and minimum ambient air temperatures for operation. (o) Smoking. Any restrictions on smoking in the airplane. (p) Types of surface. A statement of the types of surface on...

  13. PET2OGS: Algorithms to link the static model of Petrel with the dynamic model of OpenGeoSys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.-H.; Shinn, Y. J.; Park, Y.-C.; Huh, D.-G.; Lee, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    A set of three algorithms named PET2OGS is developed to integrate the static model (Petrel) with the dynamic model (OpenGeoSys). PET2OGS consists of three sub-algorithms that convert finite difference methods (FDMs) grids to finite element methods (FEMs) grids. The algorithms and the workflow of the integration procedures are described in detail. After the proposed algorithms are tested on a variety of grids both in homogeneous and heterogeneous media, the integrated platform of the static and dynamic models is applied to model CO2 storage in a saline aquifer. A successful demonstration of the proposed algorithms proved a robust integration of the platform. With some minor modifications of the algorithms in the part of input and output, the proposed algorithms can be extended to integrate different combinations of FDM-based static models and FEM-based dynamic models beyond the example combination in the paper.

  14. Elevated Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone in Human Pregnancy Increases the Risk of Postpartum Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Ilona S.; Glynn, Laura M.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; Hobel, Calvin J.; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra; Sandman, Curt A.

    2009-01-01

    Context Postpartum depression (PPD) is common and has serious implications for the mother and her newborn. A possible link between placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (pCRH) and PPD incidence has been discussed, but there is a lack of empirical evidence. Objective To determine whether accelerated pCRH increases throughout pregnancy are associated with PPD symptoms. Design Pregnant women were recruited into this longitudinal cohort study. Blood samples were obtained at 15, 19, 25, 31 and 37 weeks gestational age (GA) for assessment of pCRH, cortisol and ACTH. Depressive symptoms were assessed with a standardized questionnaire at the last four pregnancy visits and postpartum. Setting Subjects were recruited from two Southern California Medical Centers, and visits were conducted in university research laboratories. Participants 100 adult women with a singleton pregnancy. Main Outcome Measure PPD symptoms were assessed 8.7 weeks (SD = 2.94 wks) after delivery with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Results Sixteen women developed PPD symptoms. At 25 weeks GA, pCRH was a strong predictor of PPD symptoms (R2 = .21, β = .46, p < .001), an effect that remained significant after controlling for prenatal depressive symptoms. No significant associations were found for cortisol and ACTH. Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analyses revealed that pCRH at 25 weeks GA is a useful diagnostic test (area under the curve = .78, p = .001). Sensitivity (.75) and specificity (.74) at the ideal cut-off point (56.86 pg/ml pCRH) were high. Growth curve analyses indicated that pCRH trajectories in women with PPD symptoms are significantly accelerated between 23 and 26 weeks GA. Conclusion There is a critical period in mid-pregnancy during which pCRH is a sensitive and specific early diagnostic test for PPD symptoms. If replicated, these results have implications for identification and treatment of pregnant women at risk of PPD. PMID:19188538

  15. Dichotomous factor analysis of symptoms reported by UK and US veterans of the 1991 Gulf War.

    PubMed

    Nisenbaum, Rosane; Ismail, Khalida; Wessely, Simon; Unwin, Catherine; Hull, Lisa; Reeves, William C

    2004-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Factor analysis is one of the most used statistical techniques to analyze the inter-relationships among symptoms reported by Gulf War veterans. The objective of this study was to apply factor analyses to binary symptom data from the UK study of Gulf War illness and the US Air Force study of Gulf War veterans, and to compare the symptom domains derived from the distinct samples. METHODS: UK veterans of the 1991 Gulf War (n = 3,454), individuals deployed to Bosnia on U.N. peacekeeping operations (n = 1,979) and Gulf War-era servicemen (n = 2,577) who were not deployed to the Gulf were surveyed in 1997-1998, and US 1991 Gulf War veterans from four Air Force units (n = 1,163) were surveyed in 1995 to collect health characteristics including symptoms. Each sample was randomly split in half for exploratory and confirmatory dichotomous factor analyses with promax oblique rotation. RESULTS: Four correlated factors were identified in each of the samples. Three factors (Respiratory, Mood-Cognition, Peripheral Nervous) overlapped considerably across the UK cohorts. The Gastrointestinal/Urogenital factor in the UK Gulf cohort was noticeably different from the Gastrointestinal factor identified from the Bosnia and Era cohorts. Symptoms from Gulf War UK and U.S cohorts yielded similar Gastrointestinal, Respiratory and Mood-Cognition factors, despite differences in symptom inventories between the two surveys. A Musculoskeletal factor was only elicited from the US Gulf sample. CONCLUSION: Findings of this report are consistent with those from other factor analysis studies that identified similar symptom dimensions between Gulf and non-Gulf War veterans, except that the Gastrointestinal factor in Gulf veterans included other symptom types. Correlations among factors raise the question as to whether there is a general illness, even if not unique to Gulf veterans, representing the common pathway underlying the identified factors. Hierarchical factor analysis models may be

  16. Operations automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, Charles Thomas

    1994-01-01

    This is truly the era of 'faster-better-cheaper' at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA/JPL). To continue JPL's primary mission of building and operating interplanetary spacecraft, all possible avenues are being explored in the search for better value for each dollar spent. A significant cost factor in any mission is the amount of manpower required to receive, decode, decommutate, and distribute spacecraft engineering and experiment data. The replacement of the many mission-unique data systems with the single Advanced Multimission Operations System (AMMOS) has already allowed for some manpower reduction. Now, we find that further economies are made possible by drastically reducing the number of human interventions required to perform the setup, data saving, station handover, processed data loading, and tear down activities that are associated with each spacecraft tracking pass. We have recently adapted three public domain tools to the AMMOS system which allow common elements to be scheduled and initialized without the normal human intervention. This is accomplished with a stored weekly event schedule. The manual entries and specialized scripts which had to be provided just prior to and during a pass are now triggered by the schedule to perform the functions unique to the upcoming pass. This combination of public domain software and the AMMOS system has been run in parallel with the flight operation in an online testing phase for six months. With this methodology, a savings of 11 man-years per year is projected with no increase in data loss or project risk. There are even greater savings to be gained as we learn other uses for this configuration.

  17. Symptom appraisal and healthcare-seeking for symptoms suggestive of colorectal cancer: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hall, N; Birt, L; Banks, J; Emery, J; Mills, K; Johnson, M; Rubin, G P; Hamilton, W; Walter, F M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Timely diagnosis of colorectal cancer is important to improve survival. This study explored symptom appraisal and help-seeking among patients referred to specialist services with symptoms of colorectal cancer. Design Qualitative in-depth interview study. Setting and participants Participants were recruited on referral to gastroenterology clinics (North East and East of England); interviews were conducted soon after referral. We purposively sampled participants to ensure a range of accounts in terms of age, sex, diagnosis and geographical location. Methods Data collection and analysis were underpinned by the Model of Pathways to Treatment. Framework analysis was used to explore the data within and across cases, focusing on patient beliefs and experiences, disease factors and healthcare influences. Results 40 participants were interviewed (aged 43–87 years, 17 women, 18 diagnosed with colorectal cancer). Patients diagnosed with and without colorectal cancer had similar symptom pathways. We found a range of interacting and often competing biopsychosocial, contextual and cultural influences on the way in which people recognised, interpreted and acted on their symptoms. People attempted to ‘maintain normality’ through finding benign explanations for their symptoms. Bodily changes were appraised within the context of usual bowel patterns, comorbidities and life events, and decisions to seek help were made in relation to expectations about the course of symptoms. The ‘private nature’ of colorectal cancer symptoms could affect both their identification and discussions with others including healthcare professionals. Within the context of the National Health Service, people needed to legitimise appropriate use of healthcare services and avoid being thought of as wasting doctors’ time. Conclusions Findings provide guidance for awareness campaigns on reducing stigma around appraising and discussing bowel movements, and the importance of intermittent

  18. Development of cereal-based functional food using cereal-mix substrate fermented with probiotic strain - Pichia kudriavzevii OG32.

    PubMed

    Ogunremi, Omotade R; Agrawal, Renu; Sanni, Abiodun I

    2015-11-01

    Probiotic strains contribute to the functionality of foods during fermentation. In this present work, cereal-mix was fermented with probiotic Pichia kudriavzevii OG32. Selected fermentation parameters and functional properties of the product were determined. The growth of Pichia kudriavzevii OG32 was supported by the cereal-mix containing 1% salt and 0.2% red chili powder to counts of between 7.46 and 8.22 Log10 cfu/mL within 24 h. Pichia kudriavzevii OG32 increased the viscosity of cereal-mix with the highest inoculum size (1.84x105cfu/ml) giving the highest viscosity of 1793.6 mPa.S. An inoculum size of 1.98 × 10(4) cfu/mL gave the most acceptable product based on the sensory evaluation by the panelist. Forty volatile compounds were identified in the fermented product, while acids (32.21%) and esters (32.37%) accounted for the largest proportions. The cereal-based fermented product scavenged DPPH from 200 μmol/L methanolic solution by 55.71%. Probiotic yeast improved the sensory and some functional properties of cereal-based substrate during fermentation. This is one of the first reports on the volatile composition of cereal-based functional food produced with probiotic yeast. PMID:26788290

  19. Extraesophageal gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms are not more frequently associated with proximal esophageal reflux than typical GERD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J R; Aravapalli, A; Pohl, D; Freeman, J; Castell, D O

    2012-01-01

    Extraesophageal (EE) symptoms such as cough and throat clearing are common in patients referred for reflux testing, but are less commonly associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Patients with reflux associated EE symptoms often lack typical GERD symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation. Our aim was to compare the frequency of proximal esophageal reflux between esophageal (typical) symptoms and EE (atypical) symptoms. Combined multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (MII-pH) tracings were blinded by an investigator so that symptom markers were relabeled with a number without disclosure of symptom type. We selected 40 patients with at least five reflux-related symptom events for one of four symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation, cough, or throat clearing). A blinded investigator analyzed all 200 reflux episodes, reporting the proximal esophageal extent of the reflux for all symptoms. The percentage of symptom-related reflux extending proximally to 17 cm above the LES was similar among all four symptom types. At least 50% of all symptoms were associated with proximal esophageal reflux to 17 cm, with regurgitation having the highest frequency at 60%. Our data indicate that EE symptoms are not more frequently associated with proximal esophageal reflux than typical esophageal symptoms.

  20. Gender differences in posttraumatic stress symptoms among OEF/OIF veterans: an item response theory analysis.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew W; Street, Amy E; Gradus, Jaimie L; Vogt, Dawne S; Resick, Patricia A

    2013-04-01

    Establishing whether men and women tend to express different symptoms of posttraumatic stress in reaction to trauma is important for both etiological research and the design of assessment instruments. Use of item response theory (IRT) can reveal how symptom reporting varies by gender and help determine if estimates of symptom severity for men and women are equally reliable. We analyzed responses to the PTSD Checklist (PCL) from 2,341 U.S. military veterans (51% female) who completed deployments in support of operations in Afghanistan and Iraq (Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom [OEF/OIF]), and tested for differential item functioning by gender with an IRT-based approach. Among men and women with the same overall posttraumatic stress severity, women tended to report more frequent concentration difficulties and distress from reminders whereas men tended to report more frequent nightmares, emotional numbing, and hypervigilance. These item-level gender differences were small (on average d = 0.05), however, and had little impact on PCL measurement precision or expected total scores. For practical purposes, men's and women's severity estimates had similar reliability. This provides evidence that men and women veterans demonstrate largely similar profiles of posttraumatic stress symptoms following exposure to military-related stressors, and some theoretical perspectives suggest this may hold in other traumatized populations.

  1. Operating internationally

    SciTech Connect

    Seeley, R.S.

    1994-02-01

    When Enron Power Corp. took over a 28 MW power facility at the former US Naval base in Subic Bay, the Philippines, the company was required to employ 139 people to run the plant. This large labor force was necessary not because of the plant's operational needs, but because of local labor practices and unemployment pressures. Independent power companies have become all too familiar with the high cost and complexity of developing projects in emerging international markets. Some of the most significant issues involve taxation, unfamiliar legal systems, changing regulations, and foreign investment restrictions. In addition, questions about currency exchange, national credit worthiness, and political stability add to the difficulty of international development. However, one of the most daunting challenges centers not on development, but on long-term operations and maintenance (O M). A key concern is finding qualified labor. Most developers and O M companies agree that local people should run the plant, with the top person, or persons, thoroughly trained in the developer's company philosophy.

  2. Safinamide for symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, T

    2015-11-01

    Chronic and slow progression of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is responsible for an altered neurotransmission of various biogenic amines, such as dopamine. Therefore, an individually different pronounced heterogeneity of motor and nonmotor symptoms characterizes each Parkinson's disease patient. Ideal candidates for the balance of these neurotransmitter deficits are compounds like safinamide with broad mechanisms of action such as reversible monoamine oxidase type B inhibition, blockage of voltage-dependent sodium channels, modulation of calcium channels and of glutamate release. Safinamide is administered one time daily with oral doses ranging from 50 to 100 mg. Safinamide was well tolerated and safe, ameliorated motor symptoms when combined with dopamine agonist only or additional levodopa in clinical trials. Safinamide is a novel instrument for the drug therapy of Parkinson's disease with better safety and tolerability particularly concerning diarrhea than inhibitors of catechol-O-methyltransferase, like entacapone, according to an indirect comparison within a meta-analysis with entacapone. PMID:26744740

  3. An unusual cause of cerebellovestibular symptoms.

    PubMed

    Alzuabi, Muayad A; Saad, Anas M; Al-Husseini, Muneer J; Nada, Maha A

    2016-01-13

    Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE) is a controversial autoimmune disorder, probably underdiagnosed, that causes a wide variety of neurological manifestations. Symptoms differ among patients and may be very severe in some cases. However, it can be treated, with a very good prognosis. In our case, a teenaged girl with a family history of migraine, vitiligo and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo presented with severe ataxia, vomiting and hypotension. She had a history of similar, but milder, symptoms and was misdiagnosed several times. She had subclinical hypothyroidism, and high levels of antithyroid antibodies. There were abnormal MRI and visual evoked potential findings. After excluding other more common causes, we diagnosed her as having 'Hashimoto Encephalopathy', and started treatment with corticosteroids, on which she showed dramatic improvement. After about 2 years of presentation, the patient is able to continue her life independently.

  4. Somatic symptoms in traumatized children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Brittany B; Bloom, Marlene; Kaercher, Lauren B; Truax, Tatyana V; Storch, Eric A

    2012-10-01

    Childhood exposure to trauma has been associated with increased rates of somatic symptoms (SS), which may contribute to diminished daily functioning. One hundred and sixty-one children residing at a residential treatment home who had experienced neglect and/or abuse were administered the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC), the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). Primary caregivers completed the Child Behavior Checklist. Two composite measures of SS were formed to represent both child- and caregiver-rated SS. Over 95% of children endorsed at least one SS on the child-rated measure. Children who had experienced sexual abuse had higher rates of SS relative to children who had not. Child-rated SS were highly correlated with the CDI total score and the TSCC subscales of anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress, dissociation, and anger. The TSCC anxiety subscale mediated the relationship between sexual abuse and child-rated SS.

  5. PTSD symptom courseduring the first year of college

    PubMed Central

    Read, Jennifer P.; Bachrach, Rachel L.; Wright, Aidan G.C.; Colder, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examined patterns of transition in posttraumatic stress symptoms over the first year of college. We also examined two factors that might predict these transitions, trauma exposure and alcohol involvement. Matriculating students (N=944; 65% female) completed assessments of PTSD, trauma exposure, and alcohol use and consequences multiple times in their freshman year. Three symptom classes (No Symptoms, Moderate Symptoms, and Severe Symptoms) were identified. Examination of transitions from one status to another was conducted with latent transition analysis (LTA). These models revealed considerable variability in the course of PTSD symptoms. The most common pattern was resolution, yet a significant portion of students showed other patterns. Symptom worsening was more commonly observed in the second semester. Trauma exposure had a deleterious effect on PTSD symptom change trajectories, as did alcohol involvement, though less consistently so. Interventions that focus on the timing and correlates of symptom progression may benefit college students with posttraumatic distress. PMID:26828977

  6. [GASTROENTEROLOGICAL SYMPTOM IN DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2].

    PubMed

    Osipenko, M F; Vorontsova, E S; Zhuk, E A

    2015-01-01

    The data of the literature and own data on the frequency and mechanisms of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 are discussed. Changes in the gastrointestinal tract with diabetes mellitus type 2 are detected over its entire length and occur more frequently than in the general population. Among the reasons of it the presence of autonomic neuropathy, factor of hyperglycemia, increased anxiety and depression in patients are discussed.

  7. Signs, symptoms and treatment of penile fracture.

    PubMed

    Bhoil, Rohit; Sood, Dinesh

    2015-10-01

    Penile fracture is an uncommon injury and requires urgent treatment, therefore emergency nurses should be aware of the signs and symptoms and understand the importance of immediate surgical referral. This article describes the anatomy and physiology of penile erection and the ways in which penile fracture can occur. It also outlines the management of patients and includes a case study of a fracture caused by vigorous masturbation. PMID:26451939

  8. Narcissistic Symptoms in German School Shooters.

    PubMed

    Bondü, Rebecca; Scheithauer, Herbert

    2015-12-01

    School shooters are often described as narcissistic, but empirical evidence is scant. To provide more reliable and detailed information, we conducted an exploratory study, analyzing police investigation files on seven school shootings in Germany, looking for symptoms of narcissistic personality disorder as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV) in witnesses' and offenders' reports and expert psychological evaluations. Three out of four offenders who had been treated for mental disorders prior to the offenses displayed detached symptoms of narcissism, but none was diagnosed with narcissistic personality disorder. Of the other three, two displayed narcissistic traits. In one case, the number of symptoms would have justified a diagnosis of narcissistic personality disorder. Offenders showed low and high self-esteem and a range of other mental disorders. Thus, narcissism is not a common characteristic of school shooters, but possibly more frequent than in the general population. This should be considered in developing adequate preventive and intervention measures. PMID:25063684

  9. Non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Poewe, W

    2008-04-01

    Although still considered a paradigmatic movement disorder, Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with a broad spectrum of non-motor symptoms. These include disorders of mood and affect with apathy, anhedonia and depression, cognitive dysfunction and hallucinosis, as well as complex behavioural disorders. Sensory dysfunction with hyposmia or pain is almost universal, as are disturbances of sleep-wake cycle regulation. Autonomic dysfunction including orthostatic hypotension, urogenital dysfunction and constipation is also present to some degree in a majority of patients. Whilst overall non-motor symptoms become increasingly prevalent with advancing disease, many of them can also antedate the first occurrence of motor signs - most notably depression, hyposmia or rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD). Although exact clinicopathological correlations for most of these non-motor features are still poorly understood, the occurrence of constipation, RBD or hyposmia prior to the onset of clinically overt motor dysfunction would appear consistent with the ascending hypothesis of PD pathology proposed by Braak and colleagues. Screening these early non-motor features might, therefore, be one approach towards early 'preclinical' diagnosis of PD. This review article provides an overview of the clinical spectrum of non-motor symptoms in PD together with a brief review of treatment options.

  10. Impact of Trauma on Attenuated Psychotic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Falukozi, Erin; Addington, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Evidence that trauma may play a role in the development of a psychotic illness has lead researchers to investigate the relationship between trauma and the content of attenuated psychotic symptoms. Participants in this study were considered to be at clinical high risk for developing psychosis by meeting criteria for attenuated positive symptom syndrome based on the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes. Trained raters used a specifically designed codebook to identify content in the vignettes of 45 participants. Various types of trauma that had occurred before age 16 were assessed, where participants who endorsed more types of trauma were considered to have experienced a greater amount of trauma. Spearman rank correlations revealed significant positive relationships between increased trauma and feeling watched or followed (rho=0.38, p<0.05) and false beliefs of status or power (rho=0.31, p<0.04). Significant negative relationships were observed between increased trauma and hearing nonnegative voices (rho=−0.39, p<0.01) as well as having unusual negative thoughts surrounding the self (rho=−0.31, p<0.05). Although this was a small sample, these findings support the possibility of a meaningful relationship between experiences of trauma and the content of attenuated positive symptoms. PMID:23155365

  11. Conversational conduct and the symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Frith, R C

    1996-11-01

    In an attempt to refine further the argument that certain patients with schizophrenia have problems understanding the mental states of other people, appreciation of the Gricean maxims of quantity, quality, and relation, and the more contextually specific need to be polite was examined amongst patients differing in their current symptom profiles. Five sets of five stories were given to the subjects who had to choose the likely final piece of speech of one of the characters. Subjects chose from two alternatives, one adhered to the rule under question whereas the other flouted that rule. Patients with negative symptoms were inclined to flout all maxims with the exception of the maxim of relation which was adhered to by all groups. It is argued that these patients have a severe ''theory of mind'' deficit that encompasses knowledge of conversational rules. The performance of patients with paranoid delusions was more selective in that they often failed to respond in a polite fashion when this was indicated by the context but performed at a level with controls on the stories involving the original Gricean maxims. These effects were largely independent of current intellectual level. The results suggest that although patients with negative behavioural signs suffer a ''theory of mind'' deficit similar to that seen in autism, those with paranoid symptoms have a more specific ''online'' mentalising deficit which becomes evident only when the skill is challenged by situations where context-dependent behaviour is determined by an appreciation of another's mental state.

  12. Symptoms: Menopause, Infertility, and Sexual Health.

    PubMed

    Barton, Debra L; Ganz, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    By 2022, the number of survivors is expected to grow to nearly 18 million. Therefore, addressing acute and chronic negative sequelae of a cancer diagnosis and its treatments becomes a health imperative. For women with a history of breast cancer, one of the common goals of treatment and prevention of recurrence is to reduce circulating concentrations of estradiol, especially in women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Hormone deprivation after a diagnosis of breast cancer impacts physiological targets other than in the breast tissue and can result in unwanted side effects, all of which can negatively impact quality of life and function and cause distress. Symptoms that are most strongly linked by evidence to hormone changes after cancer diagnosis and treatment include hot flashes, night sweats, sleep changes, fatigue, mood changes, and diminishing sexual function, including vaginal atrophy (decreased arousal, dryness and dyspareunia), infertility, decreased desire and negative self-image. Weight gain and resulting body image changes are often concomitants of the abrupt onset of treatment-induced menopause. The purpose of this chapter is to briefly review what is known about the advent of premature menopause in women treated for breast cancer, menopausal symptoms that are exacerbated by endocrine treatments for breast cancer, and the associated concerns of hot flashes and related menopausal symptoms, sexual health and fertility issues. We will discuss limitations in the current research and propose strategies that address current limitations in order to move the science forward. PMID:26059933

  13. Autism, will vitamin D treat core symptoms?

    PubMed

    Cannell, John Jacob

    2013-08-01

    No medication exists to treat the core symptoms of autism. However, some children spontaneously improve and have optimal outcomes. Parents of autistic children who have access to swimming pool have reported summertime improvement in symptoms to me. A Japanese case report found the same summer times improvements. If the cause of that summertime improvement could be identified, it may lead to effective treatment. Vitamin D is highly seasonal with a summertime surfeit and a wintertime deficit. The hypotheses that the increased prevalence in the diagnosis of autism is due to better detection imply that parents, teachers and physicians of the 1950s, 60s, and 70s missed this non subtle diagnosis, an unlikely scenario. Recent research indicates that autism often first present itself during the second and third year of life. This is a time when most toddlers have no known sources of vitamin D. Vitamin D has remarkable antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-autoimmune properties. In vitro, in vivo, and animal experiments provide compelling data for vitamin D's role brain proliferation, differentiation, neurotrophism, neuroprotection, neurotransmission, and neuroplasticity. It also upregulates glutathione, upregulates a suit of genes involved in DNA repair and raises the seizure threshold. Adequate, perhaps pharmacological, doses of vitamin D may have a treatment effect in the core symptoms of autism.

  14. Lower urinary tract symptoms in men

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, John M

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a highly prevalent and costly condition that affects older men worldwide. Many affected men develop lower urinary tract symptoms, which can have a negative impact on their quality of life. In the past, transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was the mainstay of treatment. However, several efficacious drug treatments have been developed, which have transformed BPH from an acute surgical entity to a chronic medical condition. Specifically, multiple clinical trials have shown that α adrenoceptor antagonists can significantly ameliorate lower urinary tract symptoms. Moreover, 5α reductase inhibitors, alone or combined with an α adrenoceptor antagonist, can reverse the natural course of BPH, reducing the risk of urinary retention and the need for surgical intervention. Newer medical regimens including the use of antimuscarinic agents or phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, have shown promise in men with predominantly storage symptoms and concomitant erectile dysfunction, respectively. For men who do not adequately respond to conservative measures or pharmacotherapy, minimally invasive surgical techniques (such as transurethral needle ablation, microwave thermotherapy, and prostatic urethral lift) may be of benefit, although they lack the durability of TURP. A variety of laser procedures have also been introduced, whose improved hemostatic properties abrogate many of the complications associated with traditional surgery. PMID:25125424

  15. [Clinical significance of psychotic-like symptoms in youth].

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Maija; Therman, Sebastian; Granö, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms of the psychotic type are relatively common in young persons, but seldom result in the development of an actual psychotic disorder. Psychotic-like symptoms in the young are, however, associated with more severe psychiatric symptoms and a less favorable prognosis, whereby their identification is important in psychiatric treatment. A symptom-oriented approach is important in the treatment: instead of the possible risk of psychosis, focus will be on the actual situation, taking the total symptom picture and the person's life situation into consideration. Cognitive psychotherapy is the recommended first-line treatment for psychotic-like symptoms. PMID:27132292

  16. Interpersonal cognitive biases as genetic markers for pediatric depressive symptoms: twin data from the emotions, cognitions, heredity and outcome (ECHO) study.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jennifer Y F; Belli, Stefano R; Gregory, Alice M; Eley, Thalia C

    2014-11-01

    Childhood depressive symptoms may arise from genetic and environmental risks, which act to bias the ways in which children process emotional information. Previous studies show that several "cognitive biases" are heritable and share genetic and environmental risks with depressive symptoms. Past research suggests that many cognitive biases only reflect genetic risks for depressive symptoms from adolescence. The present study sought to identify (a) when interpersonal cognitions mature as risk factors for depressive symptoms by examining whether these factors are stable and predict symptoms across time in childhood, and (b) the extent to which interpersonal cognitions reflect inherited/environmental risks on children's depressive symptoms. Results showed that there was some stability for interpersonal cognitive biases from age 8 to 10 years (rs = .32-.43). Only the absence of positive self/other perceptions, and negative peer and mother expectations at age 8 predicted depressive symptoms at age 10 (after controlling for depressive symptoms at age 8). The absence of positive self/other perceptions shared genetic influences with depressive symptoms within and across time. Across middle to late childhood, interpersonal cognitions begin to operate as vulnerability-trait factors for depressive symptoms, gradually reflecting distal genetic risks on symptoms.

  17. [Relationship between clinical symptoms and Hiragana reading ability in children with difficulties in reading and writing:usefulness of a clinical-symptoms-checklist].

    PubMed

    Kita, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Tomoka; Koike, Toshihide; Koeda, Tatsuya; Wakamiya, Eiji; Hosokawa, Torn; Kaga, Makiko; Inagaki, Masumi

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the clinical symptoms of children with developmental dyslexia (DD) and evaluated the relationship between these symptoms and their Hiragana reading abilities. In order to detect the clinical symptoms of DD, we newly developed a clinical-symptoms-checklist (CL), which consisted of a total of 30 yes/no questions regarding symptoms linked to reading (15 questions) and writing (15 questions). Subjects were 98 Japanese school grade (1 to 9) children, aged 6 to 15 years old, with normal intelligence confirmed by the Wechsler Intelligence Test for Children (WISC-Ill) and they were divided into 2 groups according to their diagnosis. Twenty four children diagnosed as developmental dyslexia consisted the DD group, and the remaining 74 children were grouped in the non-DD group. CL showed significant construct validity (p<0.05) and inner consistency (reading: a =0.82, writing: a =0.72) after deleting two questions from the originals. The number of questions checked in the CL reading subcategory significantly correlated with the Hiragana reading ability of articulation time in all Hiragana reading tasks (p<0.001). More severe clinical symptoms and lower reading ability were observed in the DD group compared to the non-DD group. Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) analysis indicated that these two groups could be discriminated by the CL and the results of the reading task, and both sensitivity and specificity rate were approximately 80%. It was suggested that 7 or more positive checks in the CL and 2 or more abnormal scores in the reading tasks might discriminate DD from other conditions which cause difficulties in reading and writing in Japanese children.

  18. Concordance of self- and proxy-rated worry and anxiety symptoms in older adults with dementia.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Andrea; Brenes, Gretchen A; Robinson, Roberta A; Wilson, Nancy; Snow, A Lynn; Kunik, Mark E; Calleo, Jessica; Petersen, Nancy J; Stanley, Melinda A; Amspoker, Amber B

    2013-01-01

    We compared the psychometric performance of two validated self-report anxiety symptom measures when rated by people with dementia versus collaterals (as proxies). Forty-one participants with mild-to-moderate dementia and their respective collaterals completed the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory, the Penn State Worry Questionnaire-Abbreviated, and a structured diagnostic interview. We used descriptive and nonparametric statistics to compare scores according to respondent characteristics. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated to establish the predictive validity of each instrument by rater type against a clinical diagnosis of an anxiety disorder. Participant and collateral ratings performed comparably for both instruments. However, collaterals tended to give more severe symptom ratings, and the best-performing cut-off scores were higher for collaterals. Our findings suggest that people with mild-to-moderate dementia can give reliable self-reports of anxiety symptoms, with validity comparable to reports obtained from collaterals. Scores obtained from multiple informants should be interpreted in context.

  19. Physical Characteristics of Asteroid-like Comet Nucleus C/2001 OG108 (LONEOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, P. A.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Pravec, P.; French, L. M.; Farnham, T. L.; Gaffey, M. J.; Hardersen, P. S.; Kusnirak, P.; Sarounova, L.; Sheppard, S. S.

    2003-01-01

    For many years several investigators have suggested that some portion of the near-Earth asteroid population may actually be extinct cometary nuclei. Evidence used to support these hypotheses was based on: observations of asteroid orbits and associated meteor showers (e.g. 3200 Phaethon and the Geminid meteor shower); low activity of short period comet nuclei, which implied nonvolatile surface crusts (e.g. Neujmin 1, Arend-Rigaux); and detections of transient cometary activity in some near-Earth asteroids (e.g. 4015 Wilson-Harrington). Recent investigations have suggested that approximately 5-10% of the near- Earth asteroid population may be extinct comets. However if members of the near-Earth asteroid population are extinct cometary nuclei, then there should be some objects within this population that are near their final stages of evolution and so should demonstrate only low levels of activity. The recent detections of coma from near-Earth object 2001 OG108 have renewed interest in this possible comet-asteroid connection. This paper presents the first high quality ground-based near-infrared reflectance spectrum of a comet nucleus combined with detailed lightcurve and albedo measurements.

  20. An exploration of comorbid symptoms and clinical correlates of clinically significant hoarding symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Brian J.; Tolin, David F.; Frost, Randy O.; Steketee, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Background Hoarding Disorder is currently being considered for inclusion in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, yet remains poorly understood. Consensus is building that hoarding may constitute a separate disorder, although comorbidity remains high and complicates the diagnostic picture. The purpose of this investigation was to explore patterns of comorbidity among people who engage in hoarding behavior in order to better understand its clinical presentation and phenomenology. Methods Data were collected from a large internet sample (N = 363) of people who self-identified as having hoarding problems, met criteria for clinically significant hoarding, and completed all measures for this study. Participants self-reported their symptoms of disorders commonly co-occurring with hoarding (obsessive compulsive disorder [OCD], depression, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD]), along with other clinical problems. Results: Latent class analysis results indicated that the participants were grouped into three classes: “non-comorbid” hoarding (42%), hoarding with depression (42%), and hoarding with depression and inattention (16%). Conclusions Depression symptoms were the most commonly co-occurring symptom in this sample. Contrary to previous theory relating to hoarding etiology, OCD symptoms were not significantly co-occurring and a large percentage of the study participants were free from comorbid symptoms of OCD, depression, and ADHD. This suggests that hoarding disorder is not primarily the consequence of other psychiatric conditions. Implications for DSM-5, clinical treatment, and future research directions are discussed. PMID:23213052

  1. Testing specificity among parents' depressive symptoms, parenting, and child internalizing and externalizing symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gruhn, Meredith A; Dunbar, Jennifer P; Watson, Kelly H; Reising, Michelle M; McKee, Laura; Forehand, Rex; Cole, David A; Compas, Bruce E

    2016-04-01

    The present study examined the specificity in relations between observed withdrawn and intrusive parenting behaviors and children's internalizing and externalizing symptoms in an at-risk sample of children (ages 9 to 15 years old) of parents with a history of depression (N = 180). Given past findings that parental depression and parenting behaviors may differentially impact boys and girls, gender was examined as a moderator of the relations between these factors and child adjustment. Correlation and linear regression analyses showed that parental depressive symptoms were significantly related to withdrawn parenting for parents of boys and girls and to intrusive parenting for parents of boys only. When controlling for intrusive parenting, preliminary analyses demonstrated that parental depressive symptoms were significantly related to withdrawn parenting for parents of boys, and this association approached significance for parents of girls. Specificity analyses yielded that, when controlling for the other type of problem (i.e., internalizing or externalizing), withdrawn parenting specifically predicted externalizing problems but not internalizing problems in girls. No evidence of specificity was found for boys in this sample, suggesting that impaired parenting behaviors are diffusely related to both internalizing and externalizing symptoms for boys. Overall, results highlight the importance of accounting for child gender and suggest that targeting improvement in parenting behaviors and the reduction of depressive symptoms in interventions with parents with a history of depression may have potential to reduce internalizing and externalizing problems in this high-risk population.

  2. A prospective study of the onset of symptoms of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sayle, Amy E; Wilcox, Allen J; Weinberg, Clarice R; Baird, Donna D

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this study was to provide prospectively collected data on the onset of pregnancy symptoms. Two hundred twenty-one women attempting pregnancy kept daily records of the occurrence of symptoms of pregnancy. Among 136 women delivering live infants, half began experiencing symptoms by day 36 after their last menstrual period (LMP), and 89% by the end of the eighth week. Onset of symptoms occurred later in pregnancies that went on to miscarry. Among 48 women with biochemically detected pregnancy loss before 6 weeks LMP, symptoms were substantially reduced but not entirely absent. Women who smoked tobacco or marijuana tended to have delayed onset of symptoms. Nearly 90% of women with successful pregnancies experience symptoms within 8 weeks LMP. Even pregnancies lost very early (before 6 weeks) are sometimes symptomatic. The earliest symptoms do not begin until after key stages of embryogenesis, reinforcing the need for women to initiate sound health behaviors before pregnancy is apparent. Published by Elsevier Science Inc.

  3. When Indoor Temps Rise, So Do COPD Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Temps Rise, So Do COPD Symptoms And inside air pollution makes symptoms even worse, study says To use ... COPD), particularly in homes with high levels of air pollution, researchers report. The research included 69 people with ...

  4. Brief Return of Concussion Symptoms Normal Part of Recovery

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160281.html Brief Return of Concussion Symptoms Normal Part of Recovery: Study It's not ... common for children who've suffered a mild concussion to experience a return of symptoms when they ...

  5. Pediatric functional constipation gastrointestinal symptom profile compared with healthy controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patient-reported outcomes are necessary to evaluate the gastrointestinal symptom profile of patients with functional constipation. Study objectives were to compare the gastrointestinal symptom profile of pediatric patients with functional constipation with matched healthy controls with the Pediatric...

  6. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atherosclerosis? Atherosclerosis usually doesn't cause signs and symptoms ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  7. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Long QT Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Long QT Syndrome? Major Signs and Symptoms If you ... This may cause noisy gasping while sleeping. Silent Long QT Syndrome Sometimes long QT syndrome doesn't ...

  8. Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Symptoms and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Is it ADHD? Symptoms Checklist Fill out the symptoms checklist and ... more about other concerns and conditions . How is ADHD diagnosed? Healthcare professionals use the guidelines in the ...

  9. The association between self-reported anxiety symptoms and suicidality.

    PubMed

    Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Woolley, Stephen B; Goethe, John W

    2009-02-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed the association between self-reported anxiety symptoms and self-reported suicidality among a mixed diagnostic sample of psychiatric outpatients. Data were obtained from chart review of 2,778 outpatients who completed a routine diagnostic clinical interview and a standardized self-report of psychiatric symptoms on admission. Bivariate analyses indicated that those with >or= moderate anxiety symptoms were over three times as likely to report >or= moderate difficulty with suicidality. Self-reported anxiety symptoms were associated with a 2-fold increased likelihood of reporting suicidality after controlling for confounding (demographics, depressive symptoms, and diagnoses). These data are consistent with a growing literature demonstrating an association between anxiety symptoms and suicidality, and suggest that this association is not accounted for by coexisting mood symptoms or diagnoses. A single item, self-report may be a useful screening tool for symptoms that are pertinent to assessment of suicide risk.

  10. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease? Some people ... have diabetic heart disease (DHD) may have no signs or symptoms of heart disease. This is called “ ...

  11. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Bronchitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Bronchitis? Acute Bronchitis Acute bronchitis ... breath, especially with physical activity. Chronic Bronchitis The signs and symptoms of chronic bronchitis include coughing, wheezing, ...

  12. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Thrombocythemia and Thrombocytosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Thrombocythemia and Thrombocytosis? People who have thrombocythemia or thrombocytosis may not have signs or symptoms. These conditions might be discovered only ...

  13. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure? The most common ... lungs. The condition requires emergency treatment. Heart Failure Signs and Symptoms The image shows the major signs ...

  14. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation? Atrial fibrillation (AF) ... the lungs and body. This can lead to signs and symptoms, such as: Palpitations (feelings that your ...

  15. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hypotension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hypotension? Orthostatic Hypotension and Neurally Mediated Hypotension The signs and symptoms of orthostatic hypotension and neurally mediated ...

  16. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Angina?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Angina? Pain and discomfort are ... tell exactly where the pain is coming from. Signs and symptoms such as nausea (feeling sick to ...

  17. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis? The signs and ... mucus that contains blood and bacteria. Respiratory System Signs and Symptoms People who have CF have thick, ...

  18. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Mitral Valve Prolapse?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Mitral Valve Prolapse? Most people ... major mitral valve backflow. When MVP does cause signs and symptoms, they may include: Palpitations (feelings that ...

  19. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of LAM?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of LAM? The uncontrolled growth of ... their effect on nearby body tissues causes the signs and symptoms of LAM. The most common signs ...

  20. Signs and Symptoms of a Bleeding Disorder in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Blood Disorders Signs and Symptoms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Bleeding Disorders Download and print this fact sheet » Signs and symptoms of a bleeding disorder: I have ...

  1. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pneumonia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pneumonia? The signs and symptoms of pneumonia vary from ... have sudden changes in mental awareness. Complications of Pneumonia Often, people who have pneumonia can be successfully ...

  2. North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS 2): The Prodromal Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Addington, Jean; Liu, Lu; Buchy, Lisa; Cadenhead, Kristin S.; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Cornblatt, Barbara A.; Perkins, Diana O.; Seidman, Larry J.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Walker, Elaine F.; Woods, Scott W.; Bearden, Carrie E.; Mathalon, Daniel H.; McGlashan, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    In studies describing the long-term follow-up up of youth at clinical high risk (CHR) of psychosis, little attention has been given to details of specific prodromal symptoms. In this paper we describe the prodromal symptoms of 764 CHR participants recruited in the multi-site North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS). Symptoms were rated on the Scale of Prodromal Symptoms (SOPS) at baseline and 6, 12, 18 and 24 month follow-ups. Clinical outcome at the 2-year assessment was categorized as psychotic, prodromal progression, symptomatic or in remission. The majority of the CHR sample (93%) met criteria for the attenuated positive symptoms syndrome (APSS). Significant improvements in SOPS symptoms were observed overtime. Unusual thought content, disorganized communication and overall ratings on disorganized symptoms differentiated those who transitioned to psychosis from the other clinical outcome groups. Suspiciousness and total positive symptoms differentiated those in remission from the other clinical outcome groups. PMID:25919383

  3. Risk factors for work-related symptoms in northern California office workers

    SciTech Connect

    Mendell, M.J.

    1991-10-01

    In most episodes of health complaints reported in office buildings in the last-twenty years, causal factors have not been identified. In order to assess risk factors for work-related symptoms in office workers, a reanalysis was performed of previous studies, and an epidemiologic study was conducted. The reanalysis of data, showed remarkable agreement among studies. Air-conditioned buildings were consistently associated with higher prevalence of headache, lethargy, and eye, nose, or throat problems. Humidification was not a necessary factor for this higher prevalence. Mechanical ventilation without air-conditioning was not associated with higher symptom prevalence. A study was conducted among 880 office workers, within 12 office buildings selected without regard to worker complaints, in northern California. A number of factors were found associated with prevalence of work-related symptoms, after adjustment in a logistic regression model for personal, psychosocial, job, workspace, and building factors. Two different ventilation types were associated with increases Ln symptom prevalence, relative to workers in naturally ventilated buildings: mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation, without air conditioning and with operable windows; and air-conditioning with sealed windows. No study buildings were humidified. In both these ventilation types, the highest odds ratios (ORs) found were for skin symptoms (ORs-5.0, 5.6) and for tight chest or difficulty breathing (ORs-3.6, 4.3). Use of carbonless copies or photocopiers, sharing a workspace, carpets, new carpets, new walls, and distance from a window were associated with symptom increases. Cloth partitions and new paint were associated with symptom decreases.

  4. The measurement of symptoms in children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Collins, J J; Byrnes, M E; Dunkel, I J; Lapin, J; Nadel, T; Thaler, H T; Polyak, T; Rapkin, B; Portenoy, R K

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine symptom prevalence, characteristics, and distress in children with cancer. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS) 10-18, a 30-item patient-rated instrument adapted from a previously validated adult version, provided multidimensional information about the symptoms experienced by children with cancer. This instrument was administered to 160 children with cancer aged 10-18 (45 inpatients, 115 outpatients). To confirm the instrument's reliability and validity, additional data about symptoms were collected from both the parents and the medical charts, and retesting was performed on a subgroup of inpatients. Patients could easily complete the scale in a mean of 11 minutes. The analyses supported the reliability and validity of the MSAS 10-18 subscale scores as measures of physical, psychological, and global symptom distress, respectively. Symptom prevalence ranged from 49.7% for lack of energy to 6.3% for problems with urination. The mean (+/- SD) number of symptoms per inpatient was 12.7 +/- 4.9 (range, 4-26), significantly more than the mean 6.5 +/- 5.7 (range, 0-28) symptoms per outpatient. Patients who had recently received chemotherapy had significantly more symptoms than patients who had not received chemotherapy for more than 4 months (11.6 +/- 6.0 vs. 5. 2 +/- 5.1), and those patients with solid tumors had significantly more symptoms than patients with either leukemia, lymphoma, or central nervous system malignancies (9.9 +/- 7.0 vs. 6.8 +/- 5.5 vs. 6.8 +/- 5.0 vs. 8.0 +/- 6.1). The most common symptoms (prevalence > 35%) were lack of energy, pain, drowsiness, nausea, cough, lack of appetite, and psychological symptoms (feeling sad, feeling nervous, worrying, feeling irritable). Of the symptoms with prevalence rates > 35%, those that caused high distress in more than one-third of patients were feeling sad, pain, nausea, lack of appetite, and feeling irritable. Subscale scores demonstrated large variability in

  5. The relationship between negative expressivity, anger, and PTSD symptom clusters.

    PubMed

    Claycomb, Meredith; Roley, Michelle E; Contractor, Ateka A; Armour, Cherie; Dranger, Paula; Wang, Li; Elhai, Jon D

    2016-09-30

    More investigation is needed to understand how specific posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom clusters relate to the internal experience of anger and overt negative behaviors in response to anger (negative expressivity). We investigated whether anger mediated relations between PTSD symptom clusters and negative expressivity. Multiple regression revealed lower PTSD intrusion symptoms associated with higher levels of negative expressivity. Anger mediated this relationship. Higher avoidance symptoms related to higher negative expressivity. Clinical implications, limitations, and strengths are discussed. PMID:27343408

  6. [A scale for evaluating withdrawal symptoms induced by anxiolytic agents].

    PubMed

    Bourin, M

    1988-01-01

    A scale to evaluate the withdrawal syndrome induced by tranquilizers (TWS) is proposed to distinguish between anxiety induced symptoms and withdrawal induced symptoms. This scale was established and validated by Lader, the french translation was performed by the author. The most frequently observed symptoms during a withdrawal syndrome are physical tiredness, headache, vertigo and tremor but other symptoms are evaluated by this tranquilizers withdrawal scale.

  7. Vulnerability factors in OCD symptoms: cross-cultural comparisons between Turkish and Canadian samples.

    PubMed

    Yorulmaz, Orçun; Gençöz, Tülin; Woody, Sheila

    2010-01-01

    Recent findings have suggested some potential psychological vulnerability factors for development of obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms, including cognitive factors of appraisal and thought control, religiosity, self-esteem and personality characteristics such as neuroticism. Studies demonstrating these associations usually come from Western cultures, but there may be cultural differences relevant to these vulnerability factors and OC symptoms. The present study examined the relationship between putative vulnerability factors and OC symptoms by comparing non-clinical samples from Turkey and Canada, two countries with quite different cultural characteristics. The findings revealed some common correlates such as neuroticism and certain types of metacognition, including appraisals of responsibility/threat estimation and perfectionism/need for certainty, as well as thought-action fusion. However, culture-specific factors were also indicated in the type of thought control participants used. For OC disorder symptoms, Turkish participants were more likely to utilize worry and thought suppression, while Canadian participants tended to use self-punishment more frequently. The association with common factors supports the cross-cultural validity of some factors, whereas unique factors suggest cultural features that may be operative in cognitive processes relevant to OC symptoms.

  8. Complementary therapies for cancer-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie R; Yeung, K Simon

    2004-01-01

    Relief of cancer-related symptoms is essential in the supportive and palliative care of cancer patients. Complementary therapies such as acupuncture, mind-body techniques, and massage therapy can help when conventional treatment does not bring satisfactory relief or causes undesirable side effects. Controlled clinical trials show that acupuncture and hypnotherapy can reduce pain and nausea. Meditation, relaxation therapy, music therapy, and massage mitigate anxiety and distress. Pilot studies suggest that complementary therapies may treat xerostomia, hot flashes, and fatigue. Botanicals or dietary supplements are popular but often problematic. Concurrent use of herbal products with mainstream medical treatment should be discouraged.

  9. [Skin symptoms of psoriasis associated with spondylarthropathies].

    PubMed

    Menzinger, Sébastien; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning

    2016-03-01

    The term spondylarthropathy summarizes a heterogenous group of diseases with spinal involvement as the common denominator. In this paper, we will primarily focus on cutaneous manifestations of psoriasis, as this dermatosis is associated with psoriatic artrhritis, one of the major diseases classified as spondylarthropathy. We will describe the clinical manifestations of psoriasis as well as the underlying pathophysiology, the latter allowing to understand the differences in efficacy of numerous Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (DMARDs) on joint versus skin symptoms. Additionally, we address the exacerbation of pre-existing psoriasis under DMARD therapy.

  10. Perceived discrimination and children's mental health symptoms.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Cheryl L; Bowie, Bonnie H; Carrère, Sybil

    2014-01-01

    Perceived discrimination has been shown to be strongly associated with mental health outcomes, such as depression, anxiety, chronic stress, post traumatic stress disorder, and low self-esteem. This study (N = 88) examined the effects of perceived discrimination and its association with child mental health symptoms. African American children had a significantly stronger association between social stress and a sense of exclusion/rejection than Multiracial or European American children. Nurses need to assess and counsel families of color about their experiences with perceived discriminatory acts.

  11. Cardiac Arrhythmias: Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Fu, Du-Guan

    2015-11-01

    The cardiac arrhythmia is characterized by irregular rhythm of heartbeat which could be either too slow (<60 beats/min) or too fast (>100 beats/min) and can happen at any age. The use of pacemaker and defibrillators devices has been suggested for heart arrhythmias patients. The antiarrhythmic medications have been reported for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias or irregular heartbeats. The diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of cardiac arrhythmias as well as the radiofrequency ablation, tachycardia, Brugada syndrome, arterial fibrillation, and recent research on the genetics of cardiac arrhythmias have been described here.

  12. Transvestism as a Symptom: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Anupama, M.; Gangadhar, K. H.; Shetty, Vandana B.; Dip, P. Bhadja

    2016-01-01

    Transvestism, commonly termed as cross-dressing, means to dress in the clothing of opposite sex. We describe a series of three cases with transvestism as one of their primary complaints. The discussion sheds light on the various ways in which transvestism as a symptom can present in Psychiatry. In the first two cases, there was lower intelligence. In first and third case, there were other paraphilia along with transvestism. Second case had co-morbid obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and had good response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). PMID:27011411

  13. Fear conditioned responses and PTSD symptoms in children: Sex differences in fear-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gamwell, Kaitlyn; Nylocks, Maria; Cross, Dorthie; Bradley, Bekh; Norrholm, Seth D; Jovanovic, Tanja

    2015-11-01

    Fear conditioning studies in adults have found that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with heightened fear responses and impaired discrimination. The objective of the current study was to examine the association between PTSD symptoms and fear conditioned responses in children from a highly traumatized urban population. Children between 8 and 13 years old participated in a fear conditioning study in addition to providing information about their trauma history and PTSD symptoms. Results showed that females showed less discrimination between danger and safety signals during conditioning compared to age-matched males. In boys, intrusive symptoms were predictive of fear responses, even after controlling for trauma exposure. However, in girls, conditioned fear to the danger cue was predictive of self-blame and fear of repeated trauma. This study suggests there are early sex differences in the patterns of fear conditioning and that these sex differences may translate to differential risk for trauma-related psychopathology.

  14. Simple Identification of Complex ADHD Subtypes Using Current Symptom Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volk, Heather E.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Hay, David A.; Todd, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    The results of the assessment of the accuracy of simple rules based on symptom count for assigning youths to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder subtypes show that having six or more total symptoms and fewer than three hyperactive-impulsive symptoms is an accurate predictor for the latent class sever inattentive subtype.

  15. Fibromyalgia Syndrome Symptoms and Effects: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Alice; Bernard, Amy L.; Edsall, Patricia A.

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed fibromyalgia syndrome support group members about characteristics of the disease and how it affected their lives. Respondents had symptoms for many years before being diagnosed. Symptoms varied tremendously on a daily and yearly basis, so disease management was in a constant state of flux. Most symptoms significantly impacted quality of…

  16. Posttraumatic stress symptoms following near-death experiences.

    PubMed

    Greyson, B

    2001-07-01

    Persons who report "near-death experiences" (NDEs) acknowledge more intrusive symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than those who came close to death without NDEs, but not more avoidance symptoms, suggesting a nonspecific stress response. Although dissociation generally increases vulnerability to PTSD, the positive affect that distinguishes NDEs from other dissociative experiences may mitigate subsequent PTSD symptoms.

  17. Trajectories of Postpartum Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Children's Social Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yelena P.; Selig, James P.; Roberts, Michael C.; Steele, Ric G.

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of new mothers experience at least some depressive symptoms. Postpartum maternal depressive symptoms can greatly influence children's outcomes (e.g., emotional, cognitive, language, and social development). However, there have been relatively few longitudinal studies of how maternal depressive symptoms may influence children's…

  18. Depressive symptoms and cognitive performance in older adults.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Park, Hyuntae; Makizako, Hyuma; Doi, Takehiko; Lee, Sangyoon; Suzuki, Takao

    2014-10-01

    Many longitudinal studies have found that older adults with depressive symptoms or depression have increased risk of cognitive impairment. We investigated the relationships between depressive symptoms or depression, cognitive function, serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and volumetric MRI measurements in older adults. A total of 4352 individuals aged 65 years or older (mean age 72 years) participated in the study. We investigated medical history and geriatric depression scale-15 (GDS-15) items to determine depression and depressive symptoms. Cognitive tests included the mini-mental state examination (MMSE), story memory, word list memory, trail-making tests, and the symbol digit substitution task. Of the 4352 participants, 570 (13%) fulfilled the criteria for depressive symptoms (GDS-15: 6 + points) and 87 (2%) were diagnosed with depression. All cognitive tests showed significant differences between the 'no depressive symptoms', 'depressive symptoms', and 'depression' groups. The 'depressive symptoms' and 'depression' groups showed lower serum BDNF (p < 0.001) concentrations than the 'no depressive symptoms' group. The 'depressive symptoms' group exhibited greater atrophy of the right medial temporal lobe than did the 'no depressive symptoms' group (p = 0.023). These results suggest that memory, executive function, and processing speed examinations are useful to identify cognitive decline in older adults who have depressive symptoms and depression. Serum BDNF concentration and atrophy of the right medial temporal lobe may in part mediate the relationships between depressive symptoms and cognitive decline.

  19. Pathways from Depressive Symptoms to Low Social Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agoston, Anna M.; Rudolph, Karen D.

    2013-01-01

    This research examined two pathways through which depressive symptoms contribute to low social status (i.e., neglect and rejection) within the peer group over time: (a) depressive symptoms promote socially helpless behavior and consequent neglect by peers; and (b) depressive symptoms promote aggressive behavior and consequent rejection by peers.…

  20. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Valve Disease? Major Signs and Symptoms The main sign of heart valve ... legs, abdomen, and veins in the neck Other Signs and Symptoms Heart valve disease can cause chest ...

  1. Prevalence of Self-Reported Depressive Symptoms in Young Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenbach, Victor J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    To investigate significance and measurement of depressive symptoms in young adolescents, 624 students were asked to complete the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) during home interviews. The presence of persistent symptoms varied by both race and sex. Results support the feasibility of using a self-report symptom scale to…

  2. Prevalence of self-reported depressive symptoms in young adolescents.

    PubMed Central

    Schoenbach, V J; Kaplan, B H; Wagner, E H; Grimson, R C; Miller, F T

    1983-01-01

    To investigate the significance and measurement of depressive symptoms in young adolescents, 624 junior high school students were asked to complete the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) during home interviews. In 384 usable symptom scales, item-scale correlations (most were above .50), inter-item correlations, coefficient alpha (.85), and patterns of reported symptoms were reasonable. Persistent symptoms were reported more often by Blacks, especially Black males. Prevalence of persistent symptoms in Whites was quite close to reported figures for adults, ranging from 1 per cent to 15 per cent in adolescent males and 2 per cent to 13 per cent in adolescent females. Adolescents reported persistent vegetative symptoms less often and psychosocial symptoms more often. Reports of symptoms without regard to duration were much more frequent in the adolescents, ranging from 18 per cent to 76 per cent in White males, 34 per cent to 76 per cent in White and Black females, and 41 per cent to 85 per cent in Black males. The results support the feasibility of using a self-report symptom scale to measure depressive symptoms in young adolescents. Transient symptoms reported by adolescents probably reflect their stage of development, but persistent symptoms are likely to have social psychiatric importance. PMID:6625033

  3. Risperidone Nonadherence and Return of Positive Symptoms in the Early Course of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Subotnik, Kenneth L.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.; Ventura, Joseph; Gitlin, Michael J.; Marder, Stephen; Mintz, Jim; Hellemann, Gerhard S.; Thornton, Leslie A.; Singh, Indira R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined the effect of medication nonadherence on the return of positive symptoms among recent-onset schizophrenia patients. Method Three sets of operational criteria for medication nonadherence with differing levels of severity were compared for their ability to predict relapse. Explicit operational criteria are provided with the hope that they will be adopted by others. Psychotic symptoms were prospectively rated on a frequent basis, and systematic criteria were applied using a computer scoring program to identify periods of psychotic symptom return. In addition, a specialized statistical survival analysis method, optimal for examining risk periods and outcomes that can recur during the follow-up assessment, was used. Results As hypothesized, medication nonadherence robustly predicted a return of psychotic symptoms during the early phase of schizophrenia (hazard ratios=3.7–28.5, depending on the severity of nonadherence). Conclusions Even brief periods of partial nonadherence lead to greater risk of relapse than what is commonly assumed. Patients in the early phase of schizophrenia should be cautioned about the possible consequences of partial or relatively brief periods of antipsychotic medication nonadherence. PMID:21205805

  4. Consensus Paper: Revisiting the Symptoms and Signs of Cerebellar Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bodranghien, Florian; Bastian, Amy; Casali, Carlo; Hallett, Mark; Louis, Elan D; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter; Nowak, Dennis A; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Serrao, Mariano; Steiner, Katharina Marie; Strupp, Michael; Tilikete, Caroline; Timmann, Dagmar; van Dun, Kim

    2016-06-01

    The cerebellum is involved in sensorimotor operations, cognitive tasks and affective processes. Here, we revisit the concept of the cerebellar syndrome in the light of recent advances in our understanding of cerebellar operations. The key symptoms and signs of cerebellar dysfunction, often grouped under the generic term of ataxia, are discussed. Vertigo, dizziness, and imbalance are associated with lesions of the vestibulo-cerebellar, vestibulo-spinal, or cerebellar ocular motor systems. The cerebellum plays a major role in the online to long-term control of eye movements (control of calibration, reduction of eye instability, maintenance of ocular alignment). Ocular instability, nystagmus, saccadic intrusions, impaired smooth pursuit, impaired vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and ocular misalignment are at the core of oculomotor cerebellar deficits. As a motor speech disorder, ataxic dysarthria is highly suggestive of cerebellar pathology. Regarding motor control of limbs, hypotonia, a- or dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetria, grasping deficits and various tremor phenomenologies are observed in cerebellar disorders to varying degrees. There is clear evidence that the cerebellum participates in force perception and proprioceptive sense during active movements. Gait is staggering with a wide base, and tandem gait is very often impaired in cerebellar disorders. In terms of cognitive and affective operations, impairments are found in executive functions, visual-spatial processing, linguistic function, and affective regulation (Schmahmann's syndrome). Nonmotor linguistic deficits including disruption of articulatory and graphomotor planning, language dynamics, verbal fluency, phonological, and semantic word retrieval, expressive and receptive syntax, and various aspects of reading and writing may be impaired after cerebellar damage. The cerebellum is organized into (a) a primary sensorimotor region in the anterior lobe and adjacent part of lobule VI, (b) a second sensorimotor

  5. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants, Manual of Practice No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertson, Orrie E.; And Others

    This book is intended to be a reference or textbook on the operation of wastewater treatment plants. The book contains thirty-one chapters and three appendices and includes the description, requirements, and latest techniques of conventional unit process operation, as well as the symptoms and corrective measures regarding process problems. Process…

  6. Interoception and Positive Symptoms in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ardizzi, Martina; Ambrosecchia, Marianna; Buratta, Livia; Ferri, Francesca; Peciccia, Maurizio; Donnari, Simone; Mazzeschi, Claudia; Gallese, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    The present study focuses on the multifaceted concept of self-disturbance in schizophrenia, adding knowledge about a not yet investigated aspect, which is the interoceptive accuracy. Starting from the assumption that interoceptive accuracy requires an intact sense of self, which otherwise was proved to be altered in schizophrenia, the aim of the present study was to explore interoceptive accuracy in a group of schizophrenia patients, compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, the possible association between interoceptive accuracy and patients' positive and negative symptomatology was assessed. To pursue these goals, a group of 23 schizophrenia patients and a group of 23 healthy controls performed a heartbeat perception task. Patients' symptomatology was assessed by means of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Results demonstrated significantly lower interoceptive accuracy in schizophrenia patients compared to healthy controls. This difference was not accounted for participants' age, BMI, anxiety levels, and heart rate. Furthermore, patients' illness severity, attention and pharmacological treatment did not influence their interoceptive accuracy levels. Interestingly, a strong positive relation between interoceptive accuracy and positive symptoms severity, especially Grandiosity, was found. The present results demonstrate for the first time that interoceptive accuracy is altered in schizophrenia. Furthermore, they prove a specific association between interoceptive accuracy and positive symptomatology, suggesting that the symptom Grandiosity might be protective against an altered basic sense of self in patients characterized by higher sensibility to their inner bodily sensations. PMID:27512369

  7. Interoception and Positive Symptoms in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ardizzi, Martina; Ambrosecchia, Marianna; Buratta, Livia; Ferri, Francesca; Peciccia, Maurizio; Donnari, Simone; Mazzeschi, Claudia; Gallese, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    The present study focuses on the multifaceted concept of self-disturbance in schizophrenia, adding knowledge about a not yet investigated aspect, which is the interoceptive accuracy. Starting from the assumption that interoceptive accuracy requires an intact sense of self, which otherwise was proved to be altered in schizophrenia, the aim of the present study was to explore interoceptive accuracy in a group of schizophrenia patients, compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, the possible association between interoceptive accuracy and patients’ positive and negative symptomatology was assessed. To pursue these goals, a group of 23 schizophrenia patients and a group of 23 healthy controls performed a heartbeat perception task. Patients’ symptomatology was assessed by means of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Results demonstrated significantly lower interoceptive accuracy in schizophrenia patients compared to healthy controls. This difference was not accounted for participants’ age, BMI, anxiety levels, and heart rate. Furthermore, patients’ illness severity, attention and pharmacological treatment did not influence their interoceptive accuracy levels. Interestingly, a strong positive relation between interoceptive accuracy and positive symptoms severity, especially Grandiosity, was found. The present results demonstrate for the first time that interoceptive accuracy is altered in schizophrenia. Furthermore, they prove a specific association between interoceptive accuracy and positive symptomatology, suggesting that the symptom Grandiosity might be protective against an altered basic sense of self in patients characterized by higher sensibility to their inner bodily sensations. PMID:27512369

  8. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Structure in Injured Children: Functional Impairment and Depression Symptoms in a Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Marsac, Meghan L.; Cirilli, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in children and adolescents who have experienced an acute single-incident trauma, associations between PTSD symptom clusters and functional impairment, and the specificity of PTSD symptoms in relation to depression and general distress. Method: Examined…

  9. Prognostic Significance of Depressive Symptoms on Weight Loss and Psychosocial Outcomes Following Gastric Bypass Surgery: A Prospective 24-month Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    White, Marney A.; Kalarchian, Melissa A.; Levine, Michele D.; Masheb, Robin M.; Marcus, Marsha D.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examined the prognostic significance of depressive symptoms in bariatric surgery patients over 24 months of follow-ups. Method Three hundred fifty-seven patients completed a battery of assessments before and at 6, 12, and 24 months following gastric bypass surgery. In addition to weight loss and depressive symptoms, the assessments targeted eating disorder psychopathology and quality of life. Results Clinically significant depressive symptoms, defined as a score of 15 or greater on the Beck Depression Inventory, characterized 45% of patients prior to surgery, and 12% at 6-month follow-up, 13% at 12-month follow-up, and 18% at 24-month follow-up. Preoperative depressive symptoms did not predict postoperative weight outcomes. In contrast, post-surgery depressive symptoms were predictive of weight loss outcomes. Higher post-surgery depressive symptoms at each time point predicted a greater degree of concurrent and subsequent eating disorder psychopathology and lower quality of life. Conclusions The frequency of elevated depressive symptoms decreases substantially following gastric bypass surgery but increases gradually over 24-months. Postoperative depressive symptoms are significantly associated with poorer weight outcomes at 6-months and 12-months following surgery but does not predict longer-term weight outcomes at 24-months. Post-operative depressive symptoms prospectively predict greater eating disorder psychopathology and poorer quality of life through 24-months. Elevated depressive symptoms, readily assessed by self-report, may signal a need for clinical attention after surgery. PMID:25720515

  10. Pathophysiology of Clinical Symptoms in Acute Viral Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Kuchar, E; Miśkiewicz, K; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Szenborn, L

    2015-01-01

    In this article we discuss the pathophysiology of common symptoms of acute viral respiratory infections (e.g., sneezing, nasal discharge, sore throat, cough, muscle pains, malaise, and mood changes). Since clinical symptoms are not sufficient to determine the etiology of viral respiratory tract infections, we believe that the host defense mechanisms are critical for the symptomatology. Consequently, this review of literature is focused on the pathophysiology of respiratory symptoms regardless of their etiology. We assume that despite a high prevalence of symptoms of respiratory infection, their pathogenesis is not widely known. A better understanding of the symptoms' pathogenesis could improve the quality of care for patients with respiratory tract infections.

  11. Neglected children, shame-proneness, and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bennett, David S; Sullivan, Margaret Wolan; Lewis, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Neglected children may be at increased risk for depressive symptoms. This study examines shame-proneness as an outcome of child neglect and as a potential explanatory variable in the relation between neglect and depressive symptoms. Participants were 111 children (52 with a Child Protective Services [CPS] allegation of neglect) seen at age 7. Neglected children reported more shame-proneness and more depressive symptoms than comparison children. Guilt-proneness, in contrast, was unrelated to neglect and depressive symptoms, indicating specificity for shame-proneness. The potential role of shame as a process variable that can help explain how some neglected children exhibit depressive symptoms is discussed.

  12. Using Smartphones to Monitor Bipolar Disorder Symptoms: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kindermann, Sally; Maier, Andreas; Kerl, Christopher; Moock, Jörn; Barbian, Guido; Rössler, Wulf

    2016-01-01

    Background Relapse prevention in bipolar disorder can be improved by monitoring symptoms in patients' daily life. Smartphone apps are easy-to-use, low-cost tools that can be used to assess this information. To date, few studies have examined the usefulness of smartphone data for monitoring symptoms in bipolar disorder. Objective We present results from a pilot test of a smartphone-based monitoring system, Social Information Monitoring for Patients with Bipolar Affective Disorder (SIMBA), that tracked daily mood, physical activity, and social communication in 13 patients. The objective of this study was to investigate whether smartphone measurements predicted clinical symptoms levels and clinical symptom change. The hypotheses that smartphone measurements are (1) negatively related to clinical depressive symptoms and (2) positively related to clinical manic symptoms were tested. Methods Clinical rating scales were administered to assess clinical depressive and manic symptoms. Patients used a smartphone with the monitoring app for up to 12 months. Random-coefficient multilevel models were computed to analyze the relationship between smartphone data and externally rated manic and depressive symptoms. Overall clinical symptom levels and clinical symptom changes were predicted by separating between-patient and within-patient effects. Using established clinical thresholds from the literature, marginal effect plots displayed clinical relevance of smartphone data. Results Overall symptom levels and change in clinical symptoms were related to smartphone measures. Higher overall levels of clinical depressive symptoms were predicted by lower self-reported mood measured by the smartphone (beta=-.56, P<.001). An increase in clinical depressive symptoms was predicted by a decline in social communication (ie, outgoing text messages: beta=-.28, P<.001) and a decline in physical activity as measured by the smartphone (ie, cell tower movements: beta=-.11, P=.03). Higher overall

  13. Gastrointestinal Symptoms Before and After Total Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotransplantation: The Role of Pancreatic Enzyme Dosing and Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Jill; Bellin, Melena D.; Radosevich, David M.; Chinnakotla, Srinath; Dunn, Ty B.; Pruett, Timothy L.; Freeman, Martin L.; Beilman, Greg J.; Schwarzenberg, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In a large cohort of subjects undergoing total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation (TPIAT), we assessed the prevalence and duration of gastrointestinal symptoms before and after the procedure and to determine the impact of enzyme adherence on gastrointestinal symptoms. Methods 356 pre- and post-operative questionnaires were collected from 184 subjects between ages of 5 and 66 years who underwent TPIAT between 2008 and 2011 at University of Minnesota. Questionnaires were analyzed for self-reported frequency and severity of gastrointestinal symptoms, pancreatic enzyme usage, and glycemic variability index (GVI). Results After surgery, patient-reported steatorrhea increased; constipation decreased. Gastrointestinal symptoms interfered with daily activity in 44–69% of subjects, before and after surgery, despite high reported enzyme adherence. Post-operatively, ≥79% of subjects reported consistent use of enzymes at all meals. Presence of gastrointestinal symptoms did not vary with adherence. GVI of 2 had a 2.8 fold increased odds of steatorrhea (95% confidence interval 1.1– 7.0) compared to GVI of 0. Conclusions Gastrointestinal symptoms were common after TPIAT; ongoing management is needed. Enzyme non-adherence was not a major contributor to diarrhea/steatorrhea in this cohort. Glycemic variability was closely associated with steatorrhea; poor response to enzyme replacement may complicate diabetes management. PMID:25486528

  14. [Urea formation in the after operational liver].

    PubMed

    Savilov, P N

    2016-01-01

    The effect of resection of the left lobe of the liver (LR, 15-20% og the organ weight) on hepatic urea formation was investigated in 84 albino rats. The objects of study were the surgery left (LLP), inoperable middle (MLP) lobe of the liver, blood (aorta, v. hepatica, v. porta) and choledochal bile. They studied the urea content. Arginase activity was examined in liver homogenate. On the day 3 and day 7 after resection reduced arginase activity was detected. LR caused a decrease of urea in v. hepatica, but increased urea content in the arterial blood and v. porta. Increase in bile urea on day 7 it was replaced by a decrease observed on day 14 of the postsurgery period. The concentration of urea in the liver on the 3rd day after LR was below the norm, and on the 7th and 14th day was within it. The results indicate a violation of urea operated by hepatocytes of the liver and extrahepatic activation mechanisms of the formation of urea.

  15. Generating physical symptoms from visual cues: An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Jane; Zoukas, Serafim

    2009-12-01

    This experimental study explored whether the physical symptoms of cold, pain and itchiness could be generated by visual cues, whether they varied in the ease with which they could be generated and whether they were related to negative affect. Participants were randomly allocated by group to watch one of three videos relating to cold (e.g. ice, snow, wind), pain (e.g. sporting injuries, tattoos) or itchiness (e.g. head lice, scratching). They then rated their self-reported symptoms of cold, pain and itchiness as well as their negative affect (depression and anxiety). The researcher recorded their observed behaviour relating to these symptoms. The results showed that the interventions were successful and that all three symptoms could be generated by the visual cues in terms of both self-report and observed behaviour. In addition, the pain video generated higher levels of anxiety and depression than the other two videos. Further, the degree of itchiness was related to the degree of anxiety. This symptom onset process also showed variability between symptoms with self-reported cold symptoms being greater than either pain or itchy symptoms. The results show that physical symptoms can be generated by visual cues indicating that psychological factors are not only involved in symptom perception but also in symptom onset. PMID:20183542

  16. Symptoms following mild head injury: expectation as aetiology.

    PubMed Central

    Mittenberg, W; DiGiulio, D V; Perrin, S; Bass, A E

    1992-01-01

    An affective, somatic, and memory check-list of symptoms was administered to subjects who had no personal experience or knowledge of head injury. Subjects indicated their current experiences of symptoms, then imagined having sustained a mild head injury in a motor vehicle accident, and endorsed symptoms they expected to experience six months after the injury. The checklist of symptoms was also administered to a group of patients with head injuries for comparison. Imaginary concussion reliably showed expectations in controls of a coherent cluster of symptoms virtually identical to the postconcussion syndrome reported by patients with head trauma. Patients consistently underestimated the premorbid prevalence of these symptoms compared with the base rate in controls. Symptom expectations appear to share as much variance with postconcussion syndrome as head injury itself. An aetiological role is suggested. PMID:1564481

  17. Trajectories of BMI and internalizing symptoms: Associations across adolescence.

    PubMed

    Ames, Megan E; Wintre, Maxine G; Flora, David B

    2015-12-01

    The present study examined the longitudinal relations between body mass index (BMI) and internalizing symptoms among youth ages 10-17. Adolescents were selected from Statistics Canada's National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). Latent growth curve modeling was used to investigate: 1) whether initial level (at age 10) or change in BMI were associated with changes in internalizing symptoms; and, 2) whether initial level or change in internalizing symptoms were associated with changes in BMI across adolescence. Associations between trajectories differed for boys and girls. Boys who started out with higher BMI experienced more internalizing symptoms across early- to mid-adolescence, but not more depressive symptoms at ages 16 and 17. For girls, there was a bidirectional relation between BMI and internalizing symptoms which persisted into later adolescence. Results suggest the bidirectional relation between BMI and internalizing symptoms is more salient for girls than for boys.

  18. Motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease: A unified framework.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed A; Chakravarthy, Srinivasa; Phillips, Joseph R; Gupta, Ankur; Keri, Szabolcs; Polner, Bertalan; Frank, Michael J; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2016-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a range of motor symptoms. Besides the cardinal symptoms (akinesia and bradykinesia, tremor and rigidity), PD patients show additional motor deficits, including: gait disturbance, impaired handwriting, grip force and speech deficits, among others. Some of these motor symptoms (e.g., deficits of gait, speech, and handwriting) have similar clinical profiles, neural substrates, and respond similarly to dopaminergic medication and deep brain stimulation (DBS). Here, we provide an extensive review of the clinical characteristics and neural substrates of each of these motor symptoms, to highlight precisely how PD and its medical and surgical treatments impact motor symptoms. In conclusion, we offer a unified framework for understanding the range of motor symptoms in PD. We argue that various motor symptoms in PD reflect dysfunction of neural structures responsible for action selection, motor sequencing, and coordination and execution of movement. PMID:27422450

  19. Symptoms of hypoglycemia, thresholds for their occurrence, and hypoglycemia unawareness.

    PubMed

    Cryer, P E

    1999-09-01

    Ultimately traceable to neural glucose deprivation, symptoms of hypoglycemia include neurogenic (autonomic) and neuroglycopenic symptoms. Neurogenic symptoms (tremulousness, palpitations, anxiety, sweating, hunger, paresthesias) are the results of the perception of physiologic changes caused by the autonomic nervous system's response to hypoglycemia. Neuroglycopenic symptoms (confusion, sensation of warmth, weakness or fatigue, severe cognitive failure, seizure, coma) are the results of brain glucose deprivation itself. Glycemic thresholds for symptoms of hypoglycemia shift to lower plasma glucose concentrations following recent episodes of hypoglycemia, leading to the syndrome of hypoglycemia unawareness--loss of the warning symptoms of developing hypoglycemia. Thus, patients with recurrent hypoglycemia (e.g., those with tightly controlled diabetes or with an insulinoma) often tolerate abnormally low plasma glucose concentrations without symptoms. PMID:10500927

  20. Developmental Pathways Linking Externalizing Symptoms, Internalizing Symptoms, and Academic Competence to Adolescent Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englund, Michelle M.; Siebenbruner, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    This study extends previous research investigating the developmental pathways predicting adolescent alcohol and marijuana use by examining the cascading effects of externalizing and internalizing symptoms and academic competence in the prediction of use and level of use of these substances in adolescence. Participants (N = 191) were drawn from a…

  1. Cortisol Awakening Response and Internalizing Symptoms across Childhood: Exploring the Role of Age and Externalizing Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, Ellen W.; Lopez-Duran, Nestor; Martinez-Torteya, Cecilia; Abelson, James L.; Muzik, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to identify biological correlates of internalizing symptoms in childhood have involved examinations of HPA-axis functioning, namely Cortisol Awakening Response (CAR). However, research has not assessed the relationship between CAR and internalizing problems among children younger than 8 years. Findings with older samples have been somewhat…

  2. Characteristics and treatability of oil-bearing wastes from aluminum alloy machining operations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luke; Hsieh, Chueh-Chen; Wetherbee, John; Yang, Chen-Lu

    2008-04-15

    Enomoto Industry Co., exclusively uses water-based cutting fluids in its aluminum alloy machining operations. Since the cost of disposal can be much greater than the cost of purchase, the treatability of spent cutting fluids is becoming a major criterion for cutting fluid selection. Samples were collected from the machining lines at Enomoto's facility to determine their characteristics and evaluate their treatability with centrifugation, chemical coagulation and electrochemical coagulation. As expected, oil and grease (O&G) and total suspended solids (TSS) are the main reasons that spent cutting fluids are prohibited from being discharged into local swage systems. The average O&G found in the spent cutting fluids is 87,354 mg/L with TSS of more than 70,000 mg/L. Both O&G and TSS are the major contributors to the high turbidity of these waste effluents. A centrifuge with a relative centrifugal force of 1318 x g, was able to reduce 60% of the turbidity. By adding the coagulant aluminum chloride, the oil-water emulsion was destabilized, and the turbidity was reduced from 3249 Formazin Attenuation Units (FAU) to around 314 FAU. With freshly generated aluminum ions in the spent cutting fluid, the electrochemical process destabilized the oil-water emulsion system. The coalesced oil droplets were adsorbed onto the highly dispersed aluminum coagulant. The oil-rich sludge that was generated in the operation was then floated to the surface, forming a blanket that was removed by skimming. The electrochemical treatment was able to reduce the turbidity to less than 14 FAU, which is the detection limit of the Hach DR/4000 UV-vis spectrophotometer. PMID:17850956

  3. Pathological pregnancy and psychological symptoms in women.

    PubMed

    Bjelanović, Vedran; Babić, Dragan; Oresković, Slavko; Tomić, Vajdana; Martinac, Marko; Juras, Josip

    2012-09-01

    Pregnancy is followed by many physiologic, organic and psychological changes and disorders, which can become more serious in pregnancy followed by complications, especially in women with pathological conditions during pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to find out and analyze the prevalence and intensity of psychological disorders in women with pathological conditions during pregnancy and compare it with conditions in pregnant women who had normal development of pregnancy. The research is approved by the Ethical committee of the Mostar University Hospital Center, and it was made in accordance with Helsinki declaration and good clinical practices. The research conducted section for pathology of pregnancy of Department for gynecology and obstetrics of the Mostar University Hospital Center. It included 82 pregnant women with disorders in pregnancy developement and control group consisted of pregnant women who had normal development of pregnancy. The research work was conducted from September 2007 to August 2008 in Mostar University Hospital Center. Pregnant women had Standard and laboratory tests, Ultrasound. CTG examinations were done for all pregnant women and additional tests for those women with complications during pregnancy. Pregnant women completed sociobiographical, obstetrical-clinical and psychological SCL 90-R questionnaire. Pregnant women with pathological pregnancy exibited significantly more psychological symptoms in comparison to pregnant women with normal pregnancy (p < 0.001 to p = 0.004). Frequency and intensity of psychical symptoms and disorders statisticly are more characteristic in pathological pregnancy (61%/40.6%). The statistical data indicate a significantly higher score of psychological disorders in those pregnant women with primary school education (p = 0.050), those who take more than 60% carbohydrates (p = 0.001), those with pathological CTG records (p < 0.001), those with pathological ultrasound results (p < 0.001 to 0.216) and

  4. Sources, symptoms, and signs of arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Hutton, J T; Christians, B L

    1983-09-01

    Arsenic poisoning continues to be a serious medical problem that may easily be overlooked or misdiagnosed. The broad constellation of symptoms and signs in arsenic poisoning, along with changing sources of this toxin, contributes to misdiagnosis. A re-examination of current potential sources was carried out. Sources were determined in 17 of 20 documented cases of arsenic poisoning. Fourteen cases resulted from ingestion of a single, commonly available, arsenic-containing ant killer. In contrast to earlier reports, this survey found that agricultural and industrial sources were relatively uncommon. A peculiar posturing of the hand is commonly seen in the early stages of arsenic poisoning prior to the development of Mee's lines or palmar hyperkeratosis. An illustrative case is reported that resulted from intermittent self-administration of an arsenic-containing ant killer in order to maintain a state of chronic invalidism.

  5. [Headache as initial symptom of schizophrenic disease].

    PubMed

    Hinterhuber, H

    1976-06-23

    Initial schizophrenia was observed in 15 out of 93 out-patients being treated for cephalea in a Regional Neuropsychiatrical Department. Certain abnormal phenomena in the field of consciousness and body sensations are typical of coenasthetic schizophrenia, with vital asthenia and vegetative symptoms. Cephaleas and head dysaesthesias are reported. There is no doubt that coenaesthetic schizophrenia has many points in common with latent schizophrenia; on the other hand it is also closely linked to hypochondriac depression, the syndrome of endogenous juvenile failure, certain latent depressions, hypochondriac euphoria, vegetative and endoreactive dysthmia and pseudoneurotic schizophrenia. Personal studies of stress responses in schizophrenia, and pneumoencephalographic examinations and EEG data in the active stage suggest diencephalic alteration. For diagnostic and initially therapeutic purposes, every patient with cephalea should be examined thoroughly by the psychiatrist; in this way the number of schizophrenias identified and treated will be considerably increased. PMID:934551

  6. Symptom validity testing, effort, and neuropsychological assessment.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D

    2012-07-01

    Symptom validity testing (SVT) has become a major theme of contemporary neuropsychological research. However, many issues about the meaning and interpretation of SVT findings will require the best in research design and methods to more precisely characterize what SVT tasks measure and how SVT test findings are to be used in neuropsychological assessment. Major clinical and research issues are overviewed including the use of the “effort” term to connote validity of SVT performance, the use of cut-scores, the absence of lesion-localization studies in SVT research, neuropsychiatric status and SVT performance and the rigor of SVT research designs. Case studies that demonstrate critical issues involving SVT interpretation are presented.

  7. [Jerusalem syndrome. Symptoms, course and cultural context].

    PubMed

    Prochwicz, Katarzyna; Sobczyk, Artur

    2011-01-01

    The Jerusalem syndrome is an acute psychotic state observed in tourists and pilgrims who visit Jerusalem. The main symptom of this disorder is identification with a character from the Bible and exhibiting behaviours which seems to be typical for this character. The article presents an overview of cultural and demographic factors associated with the appearance of the Jerusalem syndrome. Three main categories of the syndrome were identified with special focus on the category unconjoined to previous psychopathology which can be described as the 'pure' form of the Jerusalem syndrome. The main diagnostic criteria for the 'pure' type and the sequence of seven clinical stages of the Jerusalem syndrome were described. The article contains a review of the hypothesis about the causes of Jerusalem syndrome with special attention given to the role of places of particular meaning for religious tradition. PMID:21714216

  8. [Pneumatosis intestinalis; no disease, but a symptom].

    PubMed

    Smit, A L; Lamme, B; Gratama, J W C; Bouma, W H; Spronk, P E; Rommes, J H

    2008-08-01

    In three patients, men aged 77, 83 and 69 years, pneumatosis intestinalis was detected during CT for abdominal pain occurring in the first patient after an aortic stent had been placed, and during laparotomy because of ileus in the latter two patients. The first patient underwent removal of an ischaemic intestinal segment but died later due to infection around the prosthesis. The other two patients recovered after conservative therapy. Pneumatosis intestinalis is defined as the presence of gas in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Often it is detected by accident during abdominal radiographic examination or laparotomy. Pneumatosis intestinalis is a symptom and has been found in a wide variety of diseases. The clinical condition of the patient and the underlying disease determine the clinical significance of pneumatosis intestinalis and the therapy. The main issue is whether surgical intervention is necessary because of intestinal ischaemia or perforation. PMID:18727598

  9. Prevent the cause, not just the symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lands, Bill

    2011-11-01

    If people stay healthy, less health care treatments need to be paid. Alternatively, health care treatments are uneconomical and unethical when they only remove signs and symptoms and leave the primary cause neglected and unchanged to cause future harm. Neglected preventable causes continue to cause massive health-related financial loss in the US. Monitoring imbalances of omega-3 and omega-6 hormone precursors in individuals can increase awareness and motivation for making efforts to prevent this pervasive diet-related cause of dysfunction, disease and financial loss. We now have low-cost tools for individuals to monitor their balance of omega-3 and omega-6 hormone precursors and to identify and choose foods that will maintain a desired balance and a desired quality of life. PMID:21827870

  10. Green light induces shade avoidance symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingting; Maruhnich, Stefanie A; Folta, Kevin M

    2011-11-01

    Light quality and quantity affect plant adaptation to changing light conditions. Certain wavelengths in the visible and near-visible spectrum are known to have discrete effects on plant growth and development, and the effects of red, far-red, blue, and ultraviolet light have been well described. In this report, an effect of green light on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rosette architecture is demonstrated using a narrow-bandwidth light-emitting diode-based lighting system. When green light was added to a background of constant red and blue light, plants exhibited elongation of petioles and upward leaf reorientation, symptoms consistent with those observed in a shaded light environment. The same green light-induced phenotypes were also observed in phytochrome (phy) and cryptochrome (cry) mutant backgrounds. To explore the molecular mechanism underlying the green light-induced response, the accumulation of shade-induced transcripts was measured in response to enriched green light environments. Transcripts that have been demonstrated to increase in abundance under far-red-induced shade avoidance conditions either decrease or exhibit no change when green light is added. However, normal far-red light-associated transcript accumulation patterns are observed in cryptochrome mutants grown with supplemental green light, indicating that the green-absorbing form of cryptochrome is the photoreceptor active in limiting the green light induction of shade-associated transcripts. These results indicate that shade symptoms can be induced by the addition of green light and that cryptochrome receptors and an unknown light sensor participate in acclimation to the enriched green environment.

  11. Deficits in Agency in Schizophrenia, and Additional Deficits in Body Image, Body Schema, and Internal Timing, in Passivity Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Kyran T.; Martin-Iverson, Mathew T.; Holmes, Nicholas P.; Jablensky, Assen; Waters, Flavie

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia, particularly those with passivity symptoms, may not feel in control of their actions, believing them to be controlled by external agents. Cognitive operations that contribute to these symptoms may include abnormal processing in agency as well as body representations that deal with body schema and body image. However, these operations in schizophrenia are not fully understood, and the questions of general versus specific deficits in individuals with different symptom profiles remain unanswered. Using the projected-hand illusion (a digital video version of the rubber-hand illusion) with synchronous and asynchronous stroking (500 ms delay), and a hand laterality judgment task, we assessed sense of agency, body image, and body schema in 53 people with clinically stable schizophrenia (with a current, past, and no history of passivity symptoms) and 48 healthy controls. The results revealed a stable trait in schizophrenia with no difference between clinical subgroups (sense of agency) and some quantitative (specific) differences depending on the passivity symptom profile (body image and body schema). Specifically, a reduced sense of self-agency was a common feature of all clinical subgroups. However, subgroup comparisons showed that individuals with passivity symptoms (both current and past) had significantly greater deficits on tasks assessing body image and body schema, relative to the other groups. In addition, patients with current passivity symptoms failed to demonstrate the normal reduction in body illusion typically seen with a 500 ms delay in visual feedback (asynchronous condition), suggesting internal timing problems. Altogether, the results underscore self-abnormalities in schizophrenia, provide evidence for both trait abnormalities and state changes specific to passivity symptoms, and point to a role for internal timing deficits as a mechanistic explanation for external cues becoming a possible source of self-body input

  12. Factors influencing postconcussion and posttraumatic stress symptom reporting following military-related concurrent polytrauma and traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Brickell, Tracey A; Kennedy, Jan E; Bailie, Jason M; Sills, Cheryl; Asmussen, Sarah; Amador, Ricardo; Dilay, Angelica; Ivins, Brian; French, Louis M

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that are predictive of, or associated with, high endorsement of postconcussion and posttraumatic stress symptoms following military-related traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants were 1,600 U.S. service members (age: M = 27.1, SD = 7.1; 95.4% male) who had sustained a mild-to-moderate TBI and who had been evaluated by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center at one of six military medical centers. Twenty-two factors were examined that included demographic, injury circumstances/severity, treatment/evaluation, and psychological/physical variables. Four factors were statistically and meaningfully associated with clinically elevated postconcussion symptoms: (i) low bodily injury severity, (ii) posttraumatic stress, (iii) depression, and (iv) military operation where wounded (p < .001, 43.2% variance). The combination of depression and posttraumatic stress symptoms accounted for the vast majority of unique variance (41.5%) and were strongly associated with, and predictive of, clinically elevated postconcussion symptoms [range: odds ratios (OR) = 4.24-7.75; relative risk (RR) = 2.28-2.51]. Five factors were statistically and meaningfully associated with clinically elevated posttraumatic stress symptoms: (i) low bodily injury severity, (ii) depression, (iii) a longer time from injury to evaluation, (iv) military operation where wounded, and (v) current auditory deficits (p < .001; 65.6% variance accounted for). Depression alone accounted for the vast majority of unique variance (60.0%) and was strongly associated with, and predictive of, clinically elevated posttraumatic stress symptoms (OR = 38.78; RR = 4.63). There was a very clear, strong, and clinically meaningful association between depression, posttraumatic stress, and postconcussion symptoms in this sample. Brain injury severity, however, was not associated with symptom reporting following TBI. PMID:24723461

  13. Heritability estimates for psychotic symptom dimensions in twins with psychotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Rijsdijk, Frühling V; Gottesman, Irving I; McGuffin, Peter; Cardno, Alastair G

    2011-01-01

    Factor analysis of psychotic symptoms frequently results in positive, negative, and disorganized dimensions, but heritability estimates have not yet been reported. Symptom dimensions are usually only measured in individuals with psychotic disorders. Here, it is valuable to assess influences acting via liability to psychosis and independent modifying effects. We estimated heritability for psychotic symptom dimensions, taking account of these issues. Two-hundred-and-twenty-four probandwise twin pairs (106 monozygotic, 118 same-sex dizygotic), where probands had psychoses, were ascertained from the Maudsley Twin Register in London (1948-1993). Lifetime history of DSM-III-R psychotic disorder and psychotic symptom dimensions was assessed from clinical records and research interviews and rated using the Operational Criteria Checklist. Estimates of heritability and environmental components of variance in liability were made with structural equation modeling using a causal-contingent common pathway model adapted for ascertainment from a clinical register. Significant heritability was found for DSM-III-R psychotic disorder (h² = 90%, 95%CI 68-94%) and the disorganized symptom dimension (h² = 84%, 95%CI 18-93%). The heritability for the disorganized dimension remained significant when influences acting through liability to psychosis were set to zero, suggesting that some influences on disorganization are modifying factors independent of psychosis liability. However, the relative extent of modifying factors versus influences acting through psychosis liability could not be clearly determined. To our knowledge, this study provides the first formal evidence of substantive heritability for the disorganized symptom dimension, and suggests that genetic loci influencing disorganization in individuals with psychoses are in some cases different from loci that influence risk of psychotic disorders themselves. PMID:21184588

  14. Maternal Depressive Symptoms During Childhood and Risky Adolescent Health Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Wickham, Maeve E.; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; Wild, T. Cameron; Hoglund, Wendy L.G.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Maternal depression is a risk factor for adolescent depression; however, the effect of childhood exposure to maternal depression on adolescent engagement in health risk behaviors (eg, substance use, delinquency) is unclear. METHODS: We examined the relationship between maternal depressive symptoms (child’s age 4–15) and engagement in health risk behaviors at age 16 to 17 by using data from 2910 mother–youth pairs in a nationally representative prospective Canadian cohort. Maternal depressive trajectories were estimated through finite mixture modeling, and multiple regression analyses examined the relationship between maternal depressive symptoms and engagement in various health risk behaviors (linear regression) and age of debut of various behaviors (Cox regression). RESULTS: Five trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms were found: recurrent maternal symptoms, midchildhood exposure to maternal symptoms, adolescent exposure to maternal symptoms, mild maternal symptoms, and low symptoms. Adolescents exposed to maternal depressive symptoms during middle childhood were more likely to use common substances (alcohol, cigarettes, marijuana), engage in violent and nonviolent delinquent behavior, and have an earlier debut ages of cigarette, alcohol, marijuana, and hallucinogen use. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that exposure to maternal depressive symptoms, particularly in middle childhood, is associated with greater and earlier engagement in health risk behaviors. PMID:25535266

  15. Evaluation of Physical Symptoms in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Ana Elizabeth; Goodlad, Cate; Clemenger, Michelle; Haddoub, San San; McGrory, Jacqueline; Pryde, Kim; Tonkins, Emma; Hisole, Nora; Brown, Edwina Anne

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Little is known about physical symptoms in peritoneal dialysis (PD) Patients. This study aims to determine the prevalence of symptoms (general and abdominal) in PD patients. Methods. A cross-sectional study, with subsequent followup, using an author-designed 21 symptoms questionnaire (15 nonabdominal and 6 abdominal). Each symptom was assessed on a scale 0–3 for severity (none–severe) and frequency (never–every day). Results. We studied 41 patients, mean age 60 ± 15 years, 56% male, 19.5% diabetics, and 51.5% on APD. Mean number of symptoms was 9.5 ± 3.9 and total symptoms score was 28.5 ± 12 with abdominal scores of 6.4 ± 4.8. Most frequent symptoms were lack of energy, itching, cramps, poor sleep, and loss of appetite. A second evaluation in 20 patients disclosed no statistical difference between the first and second assessments, or between subgroups. Cramps were the only symptoms which decreased over time (P = 0.120). Lack of energy did not correlate with haemoglobin, neither did itching with phosphate level. Conclusions. Physical symptoms are frequent and troublesome; they relate to advanced kidney disease and not specifically to PD. Symptoms remain stable over time and do not appear to relate to dialysis parameter markers. PMID:23050149

  16. Symptom Perception in Children with Asthma: Cognitive and Psychological Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Daphne Koinis; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Seifer, Ronald; Kopel, Sheryl J.; Nassau, Jack H.; Klein, Robert; Feldman, Jonathan; Wamboldt, Marianne Z.; Fritz, Gregory K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study tested the differential effects of several cognitive and psychological variables on children's perception of asthma symptoms by use of an Asthma Risk Grid. Children's subjective and objective assessments of PEFR (peak expiratory flow rate) were characterized as representing perceptual accuracy, symptom magnification, and/or underestimation of asthma symptoms. Design: Two hundred and seventy children with asthma (ages 7-17) and their primary caregivers completed measures assessing cognitive and psychological factors and a 5-6 week symptom perception assessment. Main Outcome Measures: Children's symptom perception scores by use of the Asthma Risk Grid. Results: Children's attentional abilities had more of a bearing on their symptom monitoring abilities than their IQ estimates and psychological symptoms. The more time children took on Trails and Cancellation Tasks and the fewer errors they made on these tasks, the more likely they were to perceive their asthma symptoms accurately. More time on these tasks were associated with more symptom magnification scores, and fewer errors were related with fewer symptom magnification scores. More errors and higher total scores on the Continuous Performance Task were associated with a greater proportion of scores in the danger zone. Conclusion: Statistical support was provided for the utility of attentional-based instruments for identifying children who may have problems with perceptual accuracy, and who are at risk for asthma morbidity. PMID:19290715

  17. Rate and predictors of psychotic symptoms after Kashmir earthquake.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Muhammad; Saeed, Khalid; Kingdon, David; Naeem, Farooq

    2015-09-01

    Psychotic symptoms are more common in general population than validated diagnosis of psychosis. There is evidence to suggest that these symptoms, hallucinations, paranoia, elated mood, thought insertion, are part of a spectrum of psychosis and may have association with the same risk factors that determine development of psychosis. These symptoms have an association with exposure to psychological trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of psychotic symptoms in the population affected by a natural disaster, earthquake in this case and possible correlates of these symptoms. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of a population sample affected by the disaster, comprising of 1,291 individuals, 18 months after 2005 earthquake in Northern Pakistan and Kashmir to look at the prevalence of these symptoms and their correlates. Screening Instrument for Traumatic Stress in Earthquake Survivors and Self-Reporting Questionnaire and Psychosis Screening Questionnaire were used as tools. We examined association between the symptoms of anxiety, depression, PTSD and psychotic symptoms. We performed logistic regression analysis where hallucinations and delusions were dependent variables and demographic and trauma exposure variables were independent variables. The prevalence of psychotic symptoms ranged between 16.8 and 30.4 %. They were directly correlated with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder as well as concurrent symptoms of anxiety and depression. Lower level of education had a strong association in all the regression models. For hallucinations, living in a joint family had a negative association and participation in rescue, history of exposure to previous trauma and past psychiatric history had positive association. Paranoia was associated with female gender. Any psychiatric symptom was associated death of a family member, history of past psychiatric illness and living in a tent at the time of

  18. Rate and predictors of psychotic symptoms after Kashmir earthquake.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Muhammad; Saeed, Khalid; Kingdon, David; Naeem, Farooq

    2015-09-01

    Psychotic symptoms are more common in general population than validated diagnosis of psychosis. There is evidence to suggest that these symptoms, hallucinations, paranoia, elated mood, thought insertion, are part of a spectrum of psychosis and may have association with the same risk factors that determine development of psychosis. These symptoms have an association with exposure to psychological trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of psychotic symptoms in the population affected by a natural disaster, earthquake in this case and possible correlates of these symptoms. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of a population sample affected by the disaster, comprising of 1,291 individuals, 18 months after 2005 earthquake in Northern Pakistan and Kashmir to look at the prevalence of these symptoms and their correlates. Screening Instrument for Traumatic Stress in Earthquake Survivors and Self-Reporting Questionnaire and Psychosis Screening Questionnaire were used as tools. We examined association between the symptoms of anxiety, depression, PTSD and psychotic symptoms. We performed logistic regression analysis where hallucinations and delusions were dependent variables and demographic and trauma exposure variables were independent variables. The prevalence of psychotic symptoms ranged between 16.8 and 30.4 %. They were directly correlated with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder as well as concurrent symptoms of anxiety and depression. Lower level of education had a strong association in all the regression models. For hallucinations, living in a joint family had a negative association and participation in rescue, history of exposure to previous trauma and past psychiatric history had positive association. Paranoia was associated with female gender. Any psychiatric symptom was associated death of a family member, history of past psychiatric illness and living in a tent at the time of

  19. Understanding medical symptoms: a conceptual review and analysis.

    PubMed

    Malterud, Kirsti; Guassora, Ann Dorrit; Graungaard, Anette Hauskov; Reventlow, Susanne

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this article is to present a conceptual review and analysis of symptom understanding. Subjective bodily sensations occur abundantly in the normal population and dialogues about symptoms take place in a broad range of contexts, not only in the doctor's office. Our review of symptom understanding proceeds from an initial subliminal awareness by way of attribution of meaning and subsequent management, with and without professional involvement. We introduce theoretical perspectives from phenomenology, semiotics, social interactionism, and discourse analysis. Drew Leder's phenomenological perspectives deal with how symptom perception occurs when any kind of altered balance brings forward a bodily attention. Corporeality is brought to explicit awareness and perceived as sensations. Jesper Hoffmeyer's biosemiotic perspectives provide access to how signs are interpreted to attribute meaning to the bodily messages. Symptom management is then determined by the meaning of a symptom. Dorte E. Gannik's concept "situational disease" explains how situations can be reviewed not just in terms of their potential to produce signs or symptoms, but also in terms of their capacity to contain symptoms. Disease is a social and relational phenomenon of containment, and regulating the situation where the symptoms originate implies adjusting containment. Discourse analysis, as presented by Jonathan Potter and Margaret Wetherell, provides a tool to notice the subtle ways in which language orders perceptions and how language constructs social interaction. Symptoms are situated in culture and context, and trends in modern everyday life modify symptom understanding continuously. Our analysis suggests that a symptom can only be understood by attention to the social context in which the symptom emerges and the dialogue through which it is negotiated.

  20. Understanding medical symptoms: a conceptual review and analysis.

    PubMed

    Malterud, Kirsti; Guassora, Ann Dorrit; Graungaard, Anette Hauskov; Reventlow, Susanne

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this article is to present a conceptual review and analysis of symptom understanding. Subjective bodily sensations occur abundantly in the normal population and dialogues about symptoms take place in a broad range of contexts, not only in the doctor's office. Our review of symptom understanding proceeds from an initial subliminal awareness by way of attribution of meaning and subsequent management, with and without professional involvement. We introduce theoretical perspectives from phenomenology, semiotics, social interactionism, and discourse analysis. Drew Leder's phenomenological perspectives deal with how symptom perception occurs when any kind of altered balance brings forward a bodily attention. Corporeality is brought to explicit awareness and perceived as sensations. Jesper Hoffmeyer's biosemiotic perspectives provide access to how signs are interpreted to attribute meaning to the bodily messages. Symptom management is then determined by the meaning of a symptom. Dorte E. Gannik's concept "situational disease" explains how situations can be reviewed not just in terms of their potential to produce signs or symptoms, but also in terms of their capacity to contain symptoms. Disease is a social and relational phenomenon of containment, and regulating the situation where the symptoms originate implies adjusting containment. Discourse analysis, as presented by Jonathan Potter and Margaret Wetherell, provides a tool to notice the subtle ways in which language orders perceptions and how language constructs social interaction. Symptoms are situated in culture and context, and trends in modern everyday life modify symptom understanding continuously. Our analysis suggests that a symptom can only be understood by attention to the social context in which the symptom emerges and the dialogue through which it is negotiated. PMID:26597868

  1. Distinct symptom experiences in subgroups of patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Vivi L; Rustøen, Tone; Cooper, Bruce A; Miaskowski, Christine; Henriksen, Anne H; Bentsen, Signe B; Holm, Are M

    2016-01-01

    Background In addition to their respiratory symptoms, patients with COPD experience multiple, co-occurring symptoms. Objectives The aims of this study were to identify subgroups of COPD patients based on their distinct experiences with 14 symptoms and to determine how these subgroups differed in demographic and clinical characteristics and disease-specific quality of life. Patients and methods Patients with moderate, severe, and very severe COPD (n=267) completed a number of self-report questionnaires. Latent class analysis was used to identify subgroups of patients with distinct symptom experiences based on the occurrence of self-reported symptoms using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. Results Based on the probability of occurrence of a number of physical and psychological symptoms, three subgroups of patients (ie, latent classes) were identified and named “high”, “intermediate”, and “low”. Across the three latent classes, the pairwise comparisons for the classification of airflow limitation in COPD were not significantly different, which suggests that measurements of respiratory function are not associated with COPD patients’ symptom burden and their specific needs for symptom management. While patients in both the “high” and “intermediate” classes had high occurrence rates for respiratory symptoms, patients in the “high” class had the highest occurrence rates for psychological symptoms. Compared with the “intermediate” class, patients in the “high” class were younger, more likely to be women, had significantly more acute exacerbations in the past year, and reported significantly worse disease-specific quality of life scores. Conclusion These findings suggest that subgroups of COPD patients with distinct symptom experiences can be identified. Patients with a higher symptom burden warrant more detailed assessments and may have therapeutic needs that would not be identified using current classifications based only on

  2. [Operative treatment of lateral hyperpressure syndrome of the patella].

    PubMed

    Franke, J; Riede, D; Rudolph, F

    1980-04-01

    The lateral hyperpressure syndrome of the patella according to Ficat is characterized as a main cause of chondropathia patellae. Symptoms and course as well as roentgenology of this syndrome are illustrated. The logical method of treatment of this syndrome is the lateral release-operation according to Viernstein and Weigert. With this operation we gained good and very good results in 77 per cent of the 30 operated knee-joints.

  3. Multiple perspectives on symptom interpretation in primary care research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Assessment and management of symptoms is a main task in primary care. Symptoms may be defined as 'any subjective evidence of a health problem as perceived by the patient’. In other words, symptoms do not appear as such; symptoms are rather the result of an interpretation process. We aim to discuss different perspectives on symptom interpretation as presented in the disciplines of biomedicine, psychology and anthropology and the possible implications for our understanding of research on symptoms in relation to prevalence and diagnosis in the general population and in primary care. Discussion Symptom experiences are embedded in a complex interplay between biological, psychological and cultural factors. From a biomedical perspective, symptoms are seen as possible indicators of disease and are characterized by parameters related to seriousness (e.g. appearance, severity, impact and temporal aspects). However, such symptom characteristics are rarely unambiguous, but merely indicate disease probability. In addition, the GP’s interpretation of presenting symptoms will also be influenced by other factors. From a psychological perspective, factors affecting interpretation are in focus (e.g. internal frame of reference, attention to sensations, illness perception and susceptibility to suggestion). These individual factors cannot stand alone either, but are influenced by the surroundings. Anthropological research suggests that personal experiences and culture form a continuous feedback relationship which influence when and how sensations are understood as symptoms of disease and acted upon. Summary The different approaches to symptom interpretation imply that we need to be cautious and conscious when interpreting survey findings that are based on symptom prevalence in the general population or in primary care. These findings will reflect a variety of interpretations of sensations, which are not equivalent to expressions of underlying disease. Furthermore, if

  4. Symptoms in Children with Convergence Insufficiency: Before and After Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Barnhardt, Carmen; Cotter, Susan A.; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Scheiman, Mitchell; Kulp, Marjean T.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate symptom patterns and evaluate the relationship between patient characteristics and symptom severity before and after treatment for symptomatic children with convergence insufficiency (CI). Methods In a randomized clinical trial, the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey (CISS) was administered pre- and post-treatment to 221 children 9 to <18 years with symptomatic CI. Frequency of symptom type was determined at baseline, mean change in performance-related versus eye-related symptoms for treatment responders was compared, and the relationship between patient characteristics and symptom severity at baseline for the entire cohort and after treatment for those who responded to treatment, was determined. Results At baseline, the score for performance-related symptoms was greater than that for eye-related symptoms (mean response of 2.3 vs. 1.8, p<0.001) regardless age, sex, race/ethnicity, or presence of parent-reported ADHD. Symptom severity increased with age for both the overall and eye-related subscale scores (p=0.048, p=0.022, respectively). Children with parent-reported ADHD were more symptomatic (p=0.005) than those without parent-reported ADHD because of a higher performance-related score (p<0.001). A significant and equal improvement (p<0.01) for the performance-related and eye-related symptoms was found in treatment responders. Girls had significantly lower performance-related symptoms than boys (p=0.014) and African-American children reported less eye-related symptoms than White children (p=0.022). Children without parent-reported ADHD had significantly less symptoms overall and less eye-related symptoms than children with parent-reported ADHD (p=0.019, p=0.011, respectively). Conclusions Because of a high frequency of both performance- and eye-related symptoms, clinicians should perform a targeted history that addresses both types of symptoms to help identify children with symptomatic CI. Future study regarding the relationship of CI

  5. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms and Expenditure on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Maulik P.; Zafonte, Ross D.; Sherman, Laura M.; Davis, Roger B.; Giwerc, Michelle Y.; Shenton, Martha E.; Yeh, Gloria Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuropsychiatric symptoms affect 37% of US adults. These symptoms are often refractory to standard therapies, and patients may consequently opt for complementary and alternative medicine therapies (CAM). We sought to determine the demand for CAM by those with neuropsychiatric symptoms compared to those without neuropsychiatric symptoms as measured by out-of-pocket expenditure. Method We compared CAM expenditure between US adults with and without neuropsychiatric symptoms (n = 23,393) using the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Symptoms included depression, anxiety, insomnia, attention deficits, headaches, excessive sleepiness, and memory loss. CAM was defined per guidelines from the National Institutes of Health as mind-body therapies, biological therapies, manipulation therapies, or alternative medical systems. Expenditure on CAM by those without neuropsychiatric symptoms was compared to those with neuropsychiatric symptoms. Results Of the adults surveyed, 37% had ≥ 1 neuropsychiatric symptom and spent $ 14.8 billion out-of-pocket on CAM. Those with ≥ 1 neuropsychiatric symptom were more likely than those without neuropsychiatric symptoms to spend on CAM (27.4% vs 20.3%, P < .001). Likelihood to spend on CAM increased with number of symptoms (27.2% with ≥ 3 symptoms, P < .001). After adjustment was made for confounders using logistic regression, those with ≥ 1 neuropsychiatric symptom remained more likely to spend on CAM (odds ratio [OR] = 1.34; 95% Cl, 1.22–1.48), and the likelihood increased to 1.55 (95% Cl, 1.34–1.79) for ≥ 3 symptoms. Anxiety (OR = 1.40 [95% Cl, 1.22–1.60]) and excessive sleepiness (OR=1.36 [95% Cl, 1.21–1.54]) were the most closely associated with CAM expenditure. Conclusions Those with ≥ 1 neuropsychiatric symptom had disproportionately higher demand for CAM than those without symptoms. Research regarding safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of CAM is limited; therefore, future research should evaluate

  6. Magnesium, Potassium and Phosphorus in Available Forms in Luvisols in the Vicinity of Głogów Copper Smelter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworska, H.; Dąbkowska-Naskręt, H.; Różański, S.

    2016-02-01

    Region near Głogów is characterized as industrial—agricultural area, intensively used. Presented study was undertaken to estimate the impact of agricultural land use and the vicinity of Głogów copper smelter on the contents of available forms of magnesium, phosphorus and potassium in selected profiles of Luvisols. The following analysis were performed: soil particle-size distribution, pH, organic carbon contents, CaCO3 contents. The contents of available forms of phosphorus and potassium were determined by Egner- Riehm method and that of magnesium using Schachtschabel's method. The results of the study showed that the contents of available P is medium (III class of abundance), very low in K (V class) and for available Mg very low (V class) to medium for surface horizons and very high (I class of abundance) in other soil horizons. The soils, in spite of the elevated copper content in humus horizons, according to IUNG, were classified as uncontaminated soils, therefore, can be used in plant production for all types of crops.

  7. Applying symptom appraisal models to understand sociodemographic differences in responses to possible cancer symptoms: a research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, K L; Scott, S E; Wardle, J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sociodemographic inequalities in the stage of diagnosis and cancer survival may be partly due to differences in the appraisal interval (time from noticing a bodily change to perceiving a reason to discuss symptoms with a health-care professional). A number of symptom appraisal models have been developed describing the psychological factors that underlie how people make sense of symptoms, although none explicitly focus on sociodemographic characteristics. Methods: We therefore conducted a conceptual review synthesising all symptom appraisal models, and focus on potential links with sociodemographics that could be the focus of future research. Results: Common psychological elements across nine symptom appraisal models included knowledge, attention, expectation and identity, all of which could be sensitive to sociodemographic factors. For example, lower socioeconomic status (SES), male sex and older age are associated with lower health literacy generally and lower cancer symptom knowledge. Limited attentional resources, lower expectations about health and lack of social support also hamper symptom interpretation, and would be likely to be more prevalent in those from lower SES backgrounds. Symptom heuristics (‘rules of thumb') may lead to symptoms being normalised because they are common within the social network, potentially disadvantaging older populations. Conclusions: A better understanding of the processes through which people interpret their symptoms, and the way these processes differ by sociodemographic factors, could help guide the development of interventions with the aim of reducing inequalities in cancer outcomes. PMID:25734385

  8. The Association of Daily Physical Symptoms with Future Health

    PubMed Central

    Leger, Kate A.; Charles, Susan T.; Ayanian, John Z.; Almeida, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Daily physical symptoms play a critical role in health and illness experiences. Despite their daily prevalence, the ability of these symptoms to predict future health status is debated. Objective The current study examined whether physical symptom reports predict future health outcomes independent of trait measures of emotion. Methods Participants (N = 1189) who completed both Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) Surveys I and II as well as the National Study of Daily Experiences (NSDE) reported their daily physical symptoms at baseline and number of reported chronic conditions and functional disability nearly 10 years later. Results Physical symptoms at baseline significantly predicted the occurrence of chronic conditions and functional impairment at long-term follow-up, even after adjusting for self-reported affect, self-reported health, and previous health status. Conclusion Findings suggest that daily physical symptoms are unique indicators of future health status. PMID:26364011

  9. Interpretation of Ambiguity in Individuals with Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuckertz, Jennie M.; Amir, Nader; Tobin, Anastacia C.; Najmi, Sadia

    2013-01-01

    In two experiments we examined the psychometric properties of a new measure of interpretation bias in individuals with obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCs). In Experiment 1, 38 individuals high in OC symptoms, 34 individuals high in anxiety and dysphoric symptoms, and 31 asymptomatic individuals completed the measure. Results revealed that the Word Sentence Association Test for OCD (WSAO) can differentiate those with OC symptoms from both a matched anxious/dysphoric group and a non-anxious/non-dysphoric group. In a second experiment, we tested the predictive validity of the WSAO using a performance-based behavioral approach test of contamination fears, and found that the WSAO was a better predictor of avoidance than an established measure of OC washing symptoms (Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Revised, washing subscale). Our results provide preliminary evidence for the reliability and validity of the WSAO as well as its usefulness in predicting response to behavioral challenge above and beyond OC symptoms, depression, and anxiety. PMID:24179287

  10. A twin study of perfume-related respiratory symptoms.

    PubMed

    Elberling, J; Lerbaek, A; Kyvik, K O; Hjelmborg, J

    2009-11-01

    Respiratory symptoms from environmental perfume exposure are main complaints in patients with multiple chemical sensitivities and often coincide with asthma and or eczema. In this population-based twin study we estimate the heritability of respiratory symptoms related to perfume and if co-occurrences of the symptoms in asthma, atopic dermatitis, hand eczema or contact allergy are influenced by environmental or genetic factors common with these diseases. In total 4,128 twin individuals (82%) responded to a questionnaire. The heritability of respiratory symptoms related to perfume is 0.35, 95%CI 0.14-0.54. Significant associations (p<0.05) between perfume-related respiratory symptoms and asthma, atopic dermatitis, hand eczema or contact allergy are not attributable to shared genetic or shared environmental/familial factors, except possibly for atopic dermatitis where genetic pleiotropy with respiratory symptoms to perfume is suggested by an estimated genetic correlation of 0.39, 95%CI 0.09-0.72.

  11. Dissociative Symptoms and Mother's Marital Status in Young Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Bob, Petr; Selesova, Petra; Raboch, Jiri; Kukla, Lubomir

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Current findings suggest that mother's marital status indicating father's absence or conflicting relationship to father may be specifically related to dissociation and other stress-related symptoms. We have assessed relationships of mother's marital status, dissociative symptoms, and other psychopathological manifestations in a sample of 19 years’ old young adults (N = 364) participating in European longitudinal study (European Longitudinal Study of Parenthood and Childhood). The results show clinically significant manifestations of dissociative symptoms in young adult men whose mothers were fatherless and in women whose mothers were re-married. Other psychopathological symptoms did not reach clinically significant manifestations. The results suggest that significant factor related to high level of dissociative symptoms in men growing in fatherless families might be linked with disturbed and conflicting attachment to a father's figure and pathological dependent attachment to mother. In women dissociative symptoms likely are linked to conflicting relationship between mother and daughter associated with stepfather’ presence in the family. PMID:25590849

  12. Menstruation: symptoms, management and attitudes in university students.

    PubMed

    Cronjé, H S; Kritzinger, I E

    1991-06-01

    The aim of the study was documentation of the attitude towards and management of menstruation in Afrikaans speaking university students. Of 130 questionnaires issued, 102 (78.5%) were analysed. Severe symptoms occurred in 23% of the women. Premenstrually, the major symptoms were irritability, moodiness, breast tenderness, skin changes and increased appetite. During menstruation, dysmenorrhea was the most important symptom. Although only 17.6% of the women consulted a physician during the 2 years preceding the study, 47.1% used medication for symptoms. Seventy-six (74.5%) of the women accepted menstruation as an integral part of a woman's life whereas 19.6% preferred not to menstruate. In this latter group, the majority reported severe symptoms. Fear of consulting a physician for menstrual symptoms was documented.

  13. Cannabis use in HIV for pain and other medical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Woolridge, Emily; Barton, Simon; Samuel, Jonathon; Osorio, Jess; Dougherty, Andrew; Holdcroft, Anita

    2005-04-01

    Despite the major benefits of antiretroviral therapy on survival during HIV infection, there is an increasing need to manage symptoms and side effects during long-term drug therapy. Cannabis has been reported anecdotally as being beneficial for a number of common symptoms and complications in HIV infections, for example, poor appetite and neuropathy. This study aimed to investigate symptom management with cannabis. Following Ethics Committee approval, HIV-positive individuals attending a large clinic were recruited into an anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire study. Up to one-third (27%, 143/523) reported using cannabis for treating symptoms. Patients reported improved appetite (97%), muscle pain (94%), nausea (93%), anxiety (93%), nerve pain (90%), depression (86%), and paresthesia (85%). Many cannabis users (47%) reported associated memory deterioration. Symptom control using cannabis is widespread in HIV outpatients. A large number of patients reported that cannabis improved symptom control.

  14. Motivational enhancement of cognitive control depends on depressive symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ravizza, Susan M.; Delgado, Mauricio R.

    2014-01-01

    Performance feedback can motivate improvements in executive function (Ravizza et al., 2012). The present study examines whether the enhancement of task switching with performance feedback is modulated by the level of depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms have been linked to deficits in processing affective information inherent to such feedback (Henriques, 1994; Pizzagalli, et al., 2005). Task switching speed was assessed when performance feedback about accuracy was present or absent in a group of participants with minimal to moderate levels of depression. A significant positive correlation was observed between depressive symptoms and feedback effects on executive function indicating that those with lower depressive symptoms were more likely to show improvements in switching speed when performance feedback was present. These results suggest a novel link between executive function deficits and depression symptoms; namely, that greater levels of depressive symptoms are linked to diminished executive functioning via deficits in processing the affective component of performance feedback. PMID:24866522

  15. Should Unexplained Painful Physical Symptoms be Considered within the Spectrum of Depressive Symptoms?

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jihyung; Novick, Diego; Montgomery, William; Aguado, Jaume; Dueñas, Héctor; Peng, Xiaomei; Haro, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether painful physical symptoms (PPS) can be considered within the spectrum of depressive symptoms. Methods: Data for this post-hoc analysis were taken from a 6-month observational study mostly conducted in East Asia, Mexico, and the Middle East of 1,549 depressed patients without sexual dysfunction at baseline. Both explanatory and confirmatory factor analyses (EFA and CFA) were performed on the combined items of the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report and the Somatic Symptom Inventory (seven pain-related items only). An additional second-order CFA was also conducted to examine an association between retained factors and the overall “depressive symptoms” factor. In addition, Spearman’s correlation was used to assess levels of correlation between retained factors and depression severity as well as quality of life. Results: Both EFA and CFA suggested and validated a four-factor solution, which included a pain factor. The other three factors identified were a mood/cognitive factor, a sleep disturbance factor, and an appetite/weight disturbance factor. All four factors were significantly associated with the overall factor of depression. They were also highly correlated to depression severity and quality of life (p<0.001 for all). The levels of correlations with the pain factor were generally greater than those with the appetite/weight factor and similar to those with the sleep factor. Conclusion: It may be reasonable to consider PPS within a broad spectrum of depressive symptoms. At least, they should be routinely assessed in patients with depression. Further research is warranted to validate these preliminary findings. PMID:25870649

  16. Pediatric obesity: Causes, symptoms, prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    XU, SHUMEI; XUE, YING

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric or childhood obesity is the most prevalent nutritional disorder among children and adolescents worldwide. Approximately 43 million individuals are obese, 21–24% children and adolescents are overweight, and 16–18% of individuals have abdominal obesity. The prevalence of obesity is highest among specific ethnic groups. Obesity increases the risk of heart diseases in children and adults. Childhood obesity predisposes the individual to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, liver and kidney diseases and causes reproductive dysfunction in adults. Obesity in children is a major health concern of the developed world. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey has reported that the prevalence of obesity is on the increase in all the pediatric age groups, in males and females, and in various ethnic and racial groups. Factors, such as eating habits, genetics, environment, metabolism, and lifestyle play an important role in the development of obesity. Over 90% of obesity cases are idiopathic and less than 10% are associated with genetic and hormonal causes. Obesity occurs when the body consumes more calories than it burns, through overeating and underexercising. The symptoms of obesity include breathing disorders, sleep apnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, certain types of cancer such as prostate, bowel, breast and uterine, coronary heart disease, diabetes (type 2 in children), depression, liver and gallbladder problems, gastro-esophageal reflux disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, stroke, and joint diseases such as osteoarthritis, pain in knees and lower back. Environmental, behavioral such as consumption of convenience foods, genetic, and family factors contribute to pediatric obesity. Obesity can be countered through lower calorie consumption, weight loss and diet programs, as well as increased physical activity. A number of endogenous molecules including leptin, hypothalamic melanocortin 4 receptor

  17. A new look at methane and nonmethane hydrocarbon emissions from oil and natural gas operations in the Colorado Denver-Julesburg Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétron, Gabrielle; Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; Miller, Benjamin R.; Montzka, Stephen A.; Frost, Gregory J.; Trainer, Michael; Tans, Pieter; Andrews, Arlyn; Kofler, Jonathan; Helmig, Detlev; Guenther, Douglas; Dlugokencky, Ed; Lang, Patricia; Newberger, Tim; Wolter, Sonja; Hall, Bradley; Novelli, Paul; Brewer, Alan; Conley, Stephen; Hardesty, Mike; Banta, Robert; White, Allen; Noone, David; Wolfe, Dan; Schnell, Russ

    2014-06-01

    Emissions of methane (CH4) from oil and natural gas (O&G) operations in the most densely drilled area of the Denver-Julesburg Basin in Weld County located in northeastern Colorado are estimated for 2 days in May 2012 using aircraft-based CH4 observations and planetary boundary layer height and ground-based wind profile measurements. Total top-down CH4 emission estimates are 25.8 ± 8.4 and 26.2 ± 10.7 t CH4/h for the 29 and 31 May flights, respectively. Using inventory data, we estimate the total emissions of CH4 from non-O&G gas-related sources at 7.1 ± 1.7 and 6.3 ± 1.0 t CH4/h for these 2 days. The difference in emissions is attributed to O&G sources in the study region, and their total emission is on average 19.3 ± 6.9 t/h, close to 3 times higher than an hourly emission estimate based on Environmental Protection Agency's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program data for 2012. We derive top-down emissions estimates for propane, n-butane, i-pentane, n-pentane, and benzene from our total top-down CH4 emission estimate and the relative hydrocarbon abundances in aircraft-based discrete air samples. Emissions for these five nonmethane hydrocarbons alone total 25.4 ± 8.2 t/h. Assuming that these emissions are solely originating from O&G-related activities in the study region, our results show that the state inventory for total volatile organic compounds emitted by O&G activities is at least a factor of 2 too low for May 2012. Our top-down emission estimate of benzene emissions from O&G operations is 173 ± 64 kg/h, or 7 times larger than in the state inventory.

  18. Advancing Symptom Science Through Use of Common Data Elements

    PubMed Central

    Redeker, Nancy S.; Anderson, Ruth; Bakken, Suzanne; Corwin, Elizabeth; Docherty, Sharron; Dorsey, Susan G.; Heitkemper, Margaret; McCloskey, Donna Jo; Moore, Shirley; Pullen, Carol; Rapkin, Bruce; Schiffman, Rachel; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Grady, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background Use of common data elements (CDEs), conceptually defined as variables that are operationalized and measured in identical ways across studies, enables comparison of data across studies in ways that would otherwise be impossible. Although healthcare researchers are increasingly using CDEs, there has been little systematic use of CDEs for symptom science. CDEs are especially important in symptom science because people experience common symptoms across a broad range of health and developmental states, and symptom management interventions may have common outcomes across populations. Purposes The purposes of this article are to (a) recommend best practices for the use of CDEs for symptom science within and across centers; (b) evaluate the benefits and challenges associated with the use of CDEs for symptom science; (c) propose CDEs to be used in symptom science to serve as the basis for this emerging science; and (d) suggest implications and recommendations for future research and dissemination of CDEs for symptom science. Design The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)-supported P20 and P30 Center directors applied published best practices, expert advice, and the literature to identify CDEs to be used across the centers to measure pain, sleep, fatigue, and affective and cognitive symptoms. Findings We generated a minimum set of CDEs to measure symptoms. Conclusions The CDEs identified through this process will be used across the NINR Centers and will facilitate comparison of symptoms across studies. We expect that additional symptom CDEs will be added and the list will be refined in future work. Clinical Relevance Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 47:5, ©2015 Sigma Theta Tau International. PMID:26250061

  19. Hormone therapy for the management of menopause symptoms.

    PubMed

    Collins Fantasia, Heidi; Sutherland, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Many women will undergo menopause without incident, but others will experience bothersome effects resulting from declining estrogen levels. Vasomotor symptoms, which manifest as intense feelings of warmth, flushing, and perspiration, are the most common symptoms for which women seek treatment. Hormone therapy is indicated for the relief of vasomotor symptoms related to menopause. We review current Food Drug Administration-approved options for hormone therapy and discuss implications for practice and patient education.

  20. Risk factors for DSM 5 PTSD symptoms in Israeli civilians during the Gaza war

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Sharon; Weinberg, Michael; Or-Chen, Keren; Harel, Hila

    2015-01-01

    Background In light of the current modifications presented in the diagnostic criteria of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the DSM 5, this study aimed at revalidating well-known PTSD risk factors, including gender, peritraumatic dissociation, social support, level of threat, and trait tendency for forgiveness. Method Five hundred and one Israeli civilians were assessed during real-time exposure to missile and rocket fire at the eruption of the Gaza war. Assessments took place approximately one to 2 weeks after the beginning of this military operation, relying on web administration of the study, which allowed simultaneous data collection from respondents in the three regions in Israel that were under attack. Results A structural equation model design revealed that higher levels of forgiveness toward situations were associated with fewer PTSD symptoms, whereas peritraumatic dissociation and high levels of objective and subjective threat were positively associated with PTSD symptoms. Additionally, females were at higher risk for PTSD symptoms than males. Conclusions The findings of this study provide further evidence for the importance of directing preventive attention to those vulnerable to the development of elevated levels of PTSD symptoms. Theoretical and clinical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:25905028

  1. Correlates of pain symptoms among Iraq and Afghanistan military personnel following combat-related blast exposure.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Kelcey J; Hawn, Sage E; Amstadter, Ananda B; Cifu, David X; Walker, William C

    2014-01-01

    Pain complaints are highly prevalent among military servicemembers and Veterans of the recent combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. The high comorbidity of pain with conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) underscores the importance of a greater understanding of factors associated with complex polytraumatic injuries among military personnel. The present study aimed to identify correlates of current pain among 201 U.S. military personnel who reported at least one blast experience during combat deployment (age [mean +/– standard deviation]: 27.20 +/– 7.58 yr). Theoretically derived subsets of variables were analyzed in successive hierarchical regression models to determine correlates of self-reported pain symptoms. Preliminary models evaluated demographic features, medical and injury characteristics (e.g., TBI classification), psychosocial history (e.g., trauma exposure), and psychiatric variables. A final model was then derived, in which older age, possible or probable mild TBI, depression symptoms, and PTSD re-experiencing symptoms emerged as significant correlates of pain. The findings further the understanding of polytrauma symptoms among military personnel by identifying specific patient characteristics and comorbidity patterns related to pain complaints. Increased awareness of demographic, psychiatric, or medical factors implicated in pain will enhance comprehensive clinical assessment and intervention efforts. PMID:25789376

  2. Italian neurologists' perception on cognitive symptoms in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Neri, G; Serrati, C; Zolo, P; Cataldo, N; Ripellino, C

    2016-09-01

    The assessment of cognition is an important part of major depressive disorder (MDD) evaluation and a crucial issue is the physicians' perception of cognitive dysfunction in MDD that remains nowadays a little known matter. The present study aims at investigating the understanding of neurologists' perception about cognitive dysfunction in MDD. An on-line survey addressed to 85 Italian neurologists in the period between May and June 2015 was performed. The questionnaire comprised three sections: the first section collecting information on neurologists' socio-demographic profile, the second investigating cognitive symptoms relevance in relation with different aspects and the third one explicitly focusing on cognitive symptoms in MDD. Cognitive symptoms are considered most significant among DSM-5 symptoms to define the presence of a Major Depressive Episode in a MDD, to improve antidepressant therapy adherence, patients' functionality and concurrent neurological condition, once resolved. Furthermore, an incongruity came to light from this survey: the neurologists considered cognitive symptoms a not relevant aspect to choose the antidepressant treatment in comparison with the other DSM-5 symptoms on one side, but they declared the opposite in the third part of the questionnaire focused on cognitive symptoms. Cognitive symptoms appeared to be a relevant aspect in MDD and neurologists have a clear understanding of this issue. Nevertheless, the discrepancy between neurologists' perception on cognitive symptoms and the antidepressant treatment highlights the feeling of an unmet need that could be filled increasing the awareness of existing drugs with pro-cognitive effects.

  3. Symptoms of autism among children with congenital deafblindness.

    PubMed

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2014-05-01

    Associations between congenital deafness or blindness and autism have been found. The main consequences of congenital sensory impairment, being barriers for communication, language and social interaction development, may lead to symptoms of autism. To date only few studies have been reported concerning individuals with congenital deafblindness. This study examines symptoms of autism among 71 children with congenital deafblindness using the Autism Behavior Checklist. The cohort of children with congenital deafblindness was found to have symptoms of autism on a level similar to children with another developmental disorder than autism for example intellectual disability. No association was found between severity of congenital sensory impairment and severity or type of symptoms of autism. PMID:24127166

  4. Determinants of depressive symptoms in Jordanian working women.

    PubMed

    Al-Modallal, H; Abuidhail, J; Sowan, A; Al-Rawashdeh, A

    2010-09-01

    Depressive symptoms are an epidemic problem affecting different subgroups of women in clinical and non-clinical settings. However, depressive symptoms experienced by working women have rarely been studied. This study aimed at identifying depressive symptoms and their determinants in a sample of 101 Jordanian working women recruited from a higher educational institution. Data about women's depressive symptoms, their educational level, presence of children, sharing a job with an intimate partner, health status, diagnosis with chronic illnesses, and complaints of spousal abuse were collected. Logistic regression analysis was used to test for the significance of the selected factors on women's experiences of depressive symptoms. Findings indicated that 51.2% (n = 42) women complained of moderate and severe levels of depressive symptoms. Factors identified as significant in predicting depressive symptoms were women's experiences of spousal abuse (odds ratio adjusted = 3.5, 95% confidence interval = 1.05-11.7) and being diagnosed with chronic illnesses (odds ratio adjusted = 7.09, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-42.2). It was concluded that causes of women's depressive symptoms were imbedded in their familial and social environment, rather than their job per se. Mental health nurses can change the practice of nursing to better standards. Being familiarized with causes of depressive symptoms can empower nurses to be active advocates for depressed women. PMID:20712679

  5. [Sleep difficulties and psychological symptoms in medicine students in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Tafoya, Silvia A; Jurado, María M; Yépez, Norma J; Fouilloux, Mariana; Lara, María C

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe sleep difficulties in first year medical students associated with psychopathological symptoms. A cross-sectional study in 572 Medicine students, who were assessed by the Symptom Check List-90 (SCL-90), was performed. A 3.5% of students reported having a hard time sleeping, 6.3% had difficulty staying asleep and 11.4% waking up very early. Sleep difficulties were significantly associated with all psychopathological symptoms. The best predictors of sleep difficulties were anxiety, hostility and interpersonal sensitivity. In conclusion, the symptoms associated with stress, anger, worry, cognitive hyperarousal and hypervigilance are the best predictors for sleep difficulties in this population.

  6. Limited knowledge of concussion symptoms in college athletes.

    PubMed

    Fedor, Andrew; Gunstad, John

    2015-01-01

    Concussions are common in athletes and often go unreported. A likely contributor to underreporting of concussions in athletes is lack of knowledge of concussion-related symptoms. The current study assessed concussion symptom knowledge in 382 Division I athletes and 230 nonathletes. Participants were asked to identify potential symptoms following a concussion from a list of both real symptoms and distractors. Student-athletes expected significantly more total symptoms following a concussion than did nonathletes, and they correctly identified symptoms such as nausea and/or vomiting and being easily upset by loud noises more frequently than controls. However, many student-athletes failed to identify possible emotional symptoms resulting from a concussion, and approximately 70% of student-athletes endorsed the distracter item "forgetting names or faces of people you know well" as being a symptom of concussion. These current findings suggest that student-athletes may have an incomplete understanding of concussion-related symptoms, and future studies are needed to determine whether formal education sessions can improve knowledge for this high-risk population.

  7. [Lactose intolerance: pathophysiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Hutyra, Tomasz; Iwańczak, Barbara

    2009-02-01

    Lactose malabsorption and milk products intolerance symptoms are the most common alimentary tract disorders. Lactose intolerance is a result of lactase deficiency or lack of lactase and lactose malabsorption. Three types of lactase deficiency were distinguished: congenital, late-onset lactase deficiency and secondary lactase deficiency. Lactose intolerance means the appearance of clinical gastrointestinal symptoms after ingestion of lactose. To the clinical symptoms of lactose intolerance belongs: nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, cramps, flatulence, flatus, diarrhea and abdominal pain. The diagnosis of lactose intolerance is based on the breath hydrogen test and analysis of lactase activity in the small intestine mucosa. Dietary treatment eliminates clinical symptoms.

  8. Reflux Laryngitis: Correlation between the Symptoms Findings and Indirect Laryngoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carlos Eduardo Dilen da; Niedermeier, Bruno Taccola; Portinho, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The indirect laryngoscopy has an important role in the characterization of reflux laryngitis. Although many findings are nonspecific, some strongly suggest that the inflammation is the cause of reflux. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between reflux symptoms and the findings of indirect laryngoscopy. Methods We evaluated 27 patients with symptoms of pharyngolaryngeal reflux disease. Results Laryngoscopy demonstrated in all patients the presence of hypertrophy of the posterior commissure and laryngeal edema. The most frequent symptoms were the presence of dry cough and foreign body sensation. Conclusion There was a correlation between the findings at laryngoscopy and symptoms of reflux. PMID:26157498

  9. Airborne chemicals cause respiratory symptoms in individuals with contact allergy.

    PubMed

    Elberling, J; Linneberg, A; Mosbech, H; Dirksen, A; Menné, T; Nielsen, N H; Madsen, F; Frølund, L; Johansen, J Duus

    2005-02-01

    Exposure to fragrance chemicals causes various eye and airway symptoms. Individuals with perfume contact allergy report these symptoms more frequently than individuals with nickel allergy or no contact allergies. However, the associations between contact allergy and respiratory symptoms elicited by airborne chemicals other than perfumes are unclear. The study aimed to investigate the association between eye and airway symptoms elicited by airborne chemicals (other than perfumes) and contact allergy in a population-based sample. A questionnaire on respiratory symptoms was posted, in 2002, to 1189 individuals who participated in 1997/1998 in a Danish population-based study of allergic diseases. Questions about eye and airway symptoms elicited by different airborne chemicals and airborne proteins were included in the questionnaire. Data from the questionnaire were compared with data on patch testing and prick testing. Having at least 1 positive patch test (adjusted odds ratio 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.5) was associated with the symptoms, and the odds ratio increased with the number of positive patch tests (P-value for test for trend <0.05). Bronchial hyperreactivity, female sex and psychological vulnerability were independently associated with symptoms, but no association was found between prick test reactivity to proteins and the symptoms elicited by airborne chemicals.

  10. Stress, sense of coherence and emotional symptoms in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Moksnes, Unni K; Espnes, Geir A; Haugan, Gørill

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the association between the domains of stress, sense of coherence (SOC) and emotional symptoms (depression and anxiety) in adolescents, as well as the potential moderating role of SOC on the relationship between stress and emotional symptoms. The study is based on a cross-sectional sample of 1183 adolescents aged 13-18 who attend public elementary and secondary schools in Mid-Norway. The results showed that girls scored higher than boys on stress related to peer pressure, home life, school performance, school/leisure conflict and emotional symptoms. Conversely, boys reported higher SOC than girls. Results from multiple hierarchical regression analyses showed that for boys, stress related to school performance was positively associated with symptoms of both depression and anxiety, whereas stress from peer pressure was associated with depressive symptoms. For girls, stress from peer pressure, romantic relationships and school was associated with more depressive symptoms. SOC was strongly and inversely associated with emotional symptoms, especially anxiety in girls. SOC also moderated the association between stress related to peer pressure and depressive symptoms in both genders. The study provides evidence of the association of SOC with stress and emotional symptoms during adolescence.

  11. Hypopyon uveitis (without scleritis) a manifestation symptom of relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Genevois, Olivier; Calenda, E; Nasser, Z; Benzerroug, M; Gardea, E; Muraine, M

    2009-01-01

    We report an atypical ocular symptom, hypopyon uveitis without scleritis encountered in relapsing polychondritis. Relapsing polychondritis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sterile hypopyon uveitis.

  12. Aripiprazole Improved Obsessive Compulsive Symptoms in Asperger's Disorder.

    PubMed

    Celik, Gonca; Tahiroglu, Aysegul Yolga; Firat, Sunay; Avci, Ayşe

    2011-12-01

    There are many comorbid disorders associated with autism spectrum disorders in child and adolescent population. Although obsessive compulsive disorder and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) comorbidity has common in clinical practice, there are few reports about psychopharmacological treatment for obsessive compulsive symptoms in children with ASD in the literacy. We report a successful treatment case with aripiprazole in Asperger's Disorder with obsessive compulsive symptoms. The Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale was performed to assess symptom variety. This case report supports the effectiveness of aripiprazole in treatment of obsessive compulsive symptoms in Asperger's Disorder or ASDs. Aripiprazole may be beneficial to obsessive compulsive disorder comorbid autism spectrum disorders in child and adolescent age group.

  13. Reflux Laryngitis: Correlation between the Symptoms Findings and Indirect Laryngoscopy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carlos Eduardo Dilen da; Niedermeier, Bruno Taccola; Portinho, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Introduction The indirect laryngoscopy has an important role in the characterization of reflux laryngitis. Although many findings are nonspecific, some strongly suggest that the inflammation is the cause of reflux. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between reflux symptoms and the findings of indirect laryngoscopy. Methods We evaluated 27 patients with symptoms of pharyngolaryngeal reflux disease. Results Laryngoscopy demonstrated in all patients the presence of hypertrophy of the posterior commissure and laryngeal edema. The most frequent symptoms were the presence of dry cough and foreign body sensation. Conclusion There was a correlation between the findings at laryngoscopy and symptoms of reflux.

  14. Longitudinal associations between smoking and depressive symptoms among adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Beal, Sarah J; Negriff, Sonya; Dorn, Lorah D; Pabst, Stephanie; Schulenberg, John

    2014-08-01

    Adolescence is an important period for initiation of smoking and manifestation of depression, which are often comorbid. Researchers have examined associations between depressive symptoms and smoking to elucidate whether those with increased depressive symptoms smoke more to self-medicate, whether those who smoke experience increased subsequent depressive symptoms, or both. Collectively, there have been mixed findings; however, studies have been limited by (1) cross-sectional or short-term longitudinal data or (2) the use of methods that test associations, or only one direction in the associations, rather than a fully-reciprocal model to examine directionality. This study examined the associations between smoking and depressive symptoms in a sample of adolescent girls using latent dual change scores to model (1) the effect of smoking on change in depressive symptoms, and simultaneously (2) the effect of depressive symptoms on change in smoking across ages 11-20. Data were from a cohort-sequential prospective longitudinal study (N = 262). Girls were enrolled by age cohort (11, 13, 15, and 17 years) and were primarily White (61 %) or African American (31 %). Data were restructured by age. Every 6 months, girls reported depressive symptoms and cigarette use. Results indicated that controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, higher levels of smoking predicted a greater increase in depressive symptoms across adolescence. These findings suggest that a higher level of cigarette smoking does contribute to more depressive symptoms, which has implications for prevention of depression and for intervention and future research.

  15. Acute and subacute symptoms among workers in the printing industry.

    PubMed

    Baelum, J; Andersen, I; Mølhave, L

    1982-02-01

    The study population comprised 52 male printers and 52 controls. Each person was interviewed about job history, general health, and work-related symptoms. Symptoms from eyes and airways, neurological symptoms, and general symptoms were recorded. A lung function test and a measurement of the sense of smell were also carried out. The printers had significantly more eye, airway, and neurological symptoms than the controls; the main complaints being irritation of eyes, nose, throat, and a reduced sense of taste. The neurological symptoms were disorders of vision, vertigo, feeling of intoxication, and headache. Furthermore, abdominal pain and flatulence occurred more often among the printers. The symptoms showed no relation to age or job seniority, but neurological and general symptoms were related to shift work. No difference in lung function was found between the two groups. The printers had a slightly lower threshold of smell than the controls. Although the total load due to organic solvents and dust in the air was far below legal limits, the number of magnitude of symptoms experienced by the printers exceeded what is supposed when norms for workroom exposure are set. It is suggested that either the irritative effects of solvents are underestimated or the assumption of additive effects when great numbers of solvents are found does not hold true. A reduction of the number of solvents by eliminating the most toxic solvents or by using dyes without solvents is suggested. PMID:7066223

  16. Breast cancer survivorship symptom management: current perspective and future development

    PubMed Central

    van Londen, G; Beckjord, EB; Dew, MA; Cuijpers, P; Tadic, S; Brufsky, A

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Increasing numbers and longevity of cancer survivors has furthered our insight into the factors affecting their health outcomes, suggesting that multiple factors play a role (e.g., effects of cancer treatments and health behaviors). Emotional and physical symptoms may not always receive sufficient attention. In this short narrative review highlighting recent literature, we describe the most common physical and emotional symptoms of breast cancer survivors aged 50 years and older and outline a multidisciplinary symptom management approach, regardless of symptom etiology. PMID:23814614

  17. Emotion regulation predicts symptoms of depression over five years.

    PubMed

    Berking, Matthias; Wirtz, Carolin M; Svaldi, Jennifer; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2014-06-01

    Deficits in emotion regulation have been identified as an important risk and maintaining factor for depression. The aim of this study was to examine the long-term effects of emotion regulation on symptoms of depression. Moreover, we investigated which specific emotion regulation skills were associated with subsequent symptoms of depression. Participants were 116 individuals (78% women, average age 35.2 years) who registered for an online-based assessment of depression and its risk-factors and reported at least some symptoms of depression. Successful application of emotion regulation skills and depressive symptom severity were assessed twice over a 5-year period. We utilized cross-lagged panel analyses to assess whether successful skills application would be negatively associated with subsequent depressive symptom severity. Cross-lagged panel analyses identified successful skills application as a significant predictor for depressive symptom severity even when controlling for the effects of initial symptoms of depression. A comparison of the effect sizes for different emotion regulation skills on subsequent depressive symptoms suggests that most of the skills included have similar predictive value. These findings provide preliminary evidence for the hypotheses that deficits in emotion regulation may contribute to the development of depression and that interventions systematically enhancing adaptive emotion regulation skills may help prevent and treat depressive symptoms.

  18. Unexplained symptoms after terrorism and war: an expert consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Clauw, Daniel J; Engel, Charles C; Aronowitz, Robert; Jones, Edgar; Kipen, Howard M; Kroenke, Kurt; Ratzan, Scott; Sharpe, Michael; Wessely, Simon

    2003-10-01

    Twelve years of concern regarding a possible "Gulf War syndrome" has now given way to societal concerns of a "World Trade Center syndrome" and efforts to prevent unexplained symptoms following the most recent war in Iraq. These events serve to remind us that unexplained symptoms frequently occur after war and are likely after terrorist attacks. An important social priority is to recognize, define, prevent, and care for individuals with unexplained symptoms after war and related events (eg, terrorism, natural or industrial disasters). An international, multidisciplinary, and multiinstitutional consensus project was completed to summarize current knowledge on unexplained symptoms after terrorism and war.

  19. Birth order effects on autism symptom domains.

    PubMed

    Reichenberg, Abraham; Smith, Christopher; Schmeidler, James; Silverman, Jeremy M

    2007-03-30

    Autism is predominantly genetically determined. Evidence supports familiality of the main sets of behavioral characteristics that define the syndrome of autism; however, possible non-genetic effects have also been suggested. The present study compared levels of autism symptom domains, as measured by the Autism Diagnostic Interview, and useful phrase speech scores between 106 pairs of first- and second-born siblings from multiply affected families. In addition, the intercorrelations between the measures were compared between siblings. The overall mean repetitive behavior total score was significantly higher (worse) in first-born than in second-born siblings. In contrast, first-born siblings had significantly lower (better) useful phrase speech than their younger siblings. Autism social and non-verbal communication scores were significantly correlated in first- and in second-born siblings. However, there was a significant difference in the coefficients between first- and second-born siblings. Performance on the non-verbal communication domain was also significantly and positively correlated with useful phrase speech score in both first- and second-born siblings. It is unclear at this time whether these results are of biologic origin. Nevertheless, the findings suggest that genetic studies in autism using specific levels of familial autism traits as phenotypes should take into account their intercorrelations and birth order effects embedded in the instrument.

  20. Medically unexplained symptoms and neuropsychological assessment.

    PubMed

    Binder, Laurence M; Campbell, Keith A

    2004-05-01

    Several illnesses expressed somatically that do not have clearly demonstrated pathophysiological origin and that are associated with neuropsychological complaints are reviewed. Among them are nonepileptic seizures, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, Persian Gulf War unexplained illnesses, toxic mold and sick building syndrome, and silicone breast implant disease. Some of these illnesses may be associated with objective cognitive abnormalities, but it is not likely that these abnormalities are caused by traditionally defined neurological disease. Instead, the cognitive abnormalities may be caused by a complex interaction between biological and psychological factors. Nonepileptic seizures serve as an excellent model of medically unexplained symptoms. Although nonepileptic seizures clearly are associated with objective cognitive abnormalities, they are not of neurological origin. There is evidence that severe stressors and PTSD are associated with immune system problems, neurochemical changes, and various diseases; these data blur the distinctions between psychological and organic etiologies. Diagnostic problems are intensified by the fact that many patients are poor historians. Patients are prone to omit history of severe stressors and psychiatric problems, and the inability to talk about stressors increases the likelihood of suffering from physiological forms of stress. PMID:15512927

  1. Eating disorder symptoms pre- and postpartum.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Cecilia Brundin; Zandian, Modjtaba; Clinton, David

    2016-08-01

    The study aimed to investigate symptoms of disordered eating pre- and postpartum using a standardised and widely used measure of eating disorder (ED) psychopathology. A consecutive series of women attending either prenatal (N = 426) or postnatal (N = 345) clinics in metropolitan Stockholm were assessed using the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). Assessments were conducted at either the first visit to prenatal clinics (10-12 weeks of pregnancy) or 6 to 8 months postpartum. An optimised shortened version of the EDE-Q was best suited for studying eating disorders pre- and postpartum. Using the optimised version of the instrument with 14 items and a cut-off score of ≥2.8, it was estimated that 5.3 % of prepartum and 12.8 % of postpartum mothers were suffering from clinical eating disorders. Seriously disordered eating behaviour during, and especially after, pregnancy may be more common than previously thought. It is imperative that health services focus increased attention on these problems by raising awareness, developing and extending specialist services, as well as through implementing educational programmes and training directed toward frontline healthcare services.

  2. Eating disorder symptoms pre- and postpartum.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Cecilia Brundin; Zandian, Modjtaba; Clinton, David

    2016-08-01

    The study aimed to investigate symptoms of disordered eating pre- and postpartum using a standardised and widely used measure of eating disorder (ED) psychopathology. A consecutive series of women attending either prenatal (N = 426) or postnatal (N = 345) clinics in metropolitan Stockholm were assessed using the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). Assessments were conducted at either the first visit to prenatal clinics (10-12 weeks of pregnancy) or 6 to 8 months postpartum. An optimised shortened version of the EDE-Q was best suited for studying eating disorders pre- and postpartum. Using the optimised version of the instrument with 14 items and a cut-off score of ≥2.8, it was estimated that 5.3 % of prepartum and 12.8 % of postpartum mothers were suffering from clinical eating disorders. Seriously disordered eating behaviour during, and especially after, pregnancy may be more common than previously thought. It is imperative that health services focus increased attention on these problems by raising awareness, developing and extending specialist services, as well as through implementing educational programmes and training directed toward frontline healthcare services. PMID:26961005

  3. DC-8-based observations of aircraft CO, CH4, N2O, and H2O(g) emission indices during SUCCESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, S. A.; Anderson, B. E.; Sachse, G. W.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Podolske, J. R.; Twohy, C. H.; Gandrud, B.; Chan, K. R.; Baughcum, S. L.; Wallio, H. A.

    We report the first measurements of CO, CH4, N2O, CO2, and H2O(g) in the exhaust trails of T-39, B-757, and DC-8 aircraft at cruise conditions. Emission indices (EI) derived from these in-situ measurements are presented. Results are in agreement with ground-based tests indicating aircraft act as a net sink for CH4 and recent airborne in-situ measurements that N2O is not an important exhaust constituent. Condensation of H2O(g) on exhaust particles resulted in EI(H2O(g)) values less than those expected from the combustion of fuel alone. Observed apparent negative EI(H2O(g)) values suggest that aircraft aerosol emissions, under unique atmospheric conditions, seed cloud formation and lead to dehydration of the exhaust-influenced air parcel. Such conditions may induce the formation of cirrus clouds from persistent contrails. Comparisons with the Boeing EMIT Code show measurement-derived CO emission index values consistent with model evaluations.

  4. Toward the next generation of negative symptom assessments: the collaboration to advance negative symptom assessment in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Jack J; Kring, Ann M; Horan, William P; Gur, Raquel

    2011-03-01

    Negative symptoms in schizophrenia are related to poor functional outcome, persistent over time, a source of burden for caregivers, and only minimally responsive to currently available medications. A major challenge to developing efficacious interventions concerns the valid and reliable assessment of negative symptoms. In a recent consensus statement on negative symptoms, a central recommendation was the need to develop new assessment approaches that address the limitations of existing instruments. In the current report, we summarize the background and rationale for the Collaboration to Advance Negative Symptom Assessment in Schizophrenia (CANSAS). The CANSAS project is an National Institute of Mental Health-funded multisite study that is constructing a next-generation negative symptom scale, the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS). The CAINS is being developed within a data-driven iterative process that seeks to ensure the measure's reliability, validity, and utility for both basic psychopathology and treatment development research. PMID:20861151

  5. Prevalence of Depressive Symptoms and Related Factors in Korean Employees: The Third Korean Working Conditions Survey (2011)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Nam; Han, Mi Ah; Park, Jong; Ryu, So Yeon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association between general working conditions and depressive symptoms among Korean employees. The target population of the study was native employees nationwide who were at least 15 years old, and 50,032 such individuals were enrolled in the study. Depressive symptoms was assessed using the WHO-5 wellbeing index. Associations between general characteristics, job-related characteristics, work environment, and depressive symptoms were tested using chi-square tests, t-tests, and multiple logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 39% (40.7% in males and 36.5% in females). Multiple regression analysis revealed that male subjects, older subjects, subjects with higher education status, subjects with lower monthly income, current smokers, and frequent drinkers were more likely to have depressive symptoms. In addition, longer weekly work hours, occupation type (skilled, unskilled, operative, or economic sector), shift work, working to tight deadlines, exposure to stress at work, and hazard exposure were associated with depressive symptoms. This representative study will be a guide to help manage depression among Korean employees. We expect that further research will identify additional causal relationships between general or specific working conditions and depression. PMID:27089355

  6. The Relative Impact of Socioeconomic Status and Childhood Trauma on Black-White Differences in Paranoid Personality Disorder Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Iacovino, Juliette M.; Jackson, Joshua J.; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examines mechanisms of racial differences in symptoms of paranoid personality disorder (PPD) in a sample of adults ages 55–64 from the St. Louis, MO area. Socioeconomic status (SES) and childhood trauma were tested as intervening variables in the association between race and PPD symptoms using structural equation modeling. PPD symptoms were modeled as a latent variable composed of items from the PPD scales of the Multi-Source Assessment of Personality Pathology self and informant reports and the Structured Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM–IV) Personality. Childhood trauma was measured using the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire, and SES was a composite of parent education, participant education, and annual household income. Blacks exhibited higher levels of PPD symptoms across the 3 personality measures, reported significantly lower SES, and reported greater childhood trauma. The proposed model was a good fit to the data, and the effect of race on PPD symptoms operated mainly through SES. The indirect effect through SES was stronger for males. Findings suggest that racial differences in PPD symptoms are partly explained by problems more commonly experienced by Black individuals. PMID:24661172

  7. The relative impact of socioeconomic status and childhood trauma on Black-White differences in paranoid personality disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Iacovino, Juliette M; Jackson, Joshua J; Oltmanns, Thomas F

    2014-02-01

    The current study examines mechanisms of racial differences in symptoms of paranoid personality disorder (PPD) in a sample of adults ages 55-64 from the St. Louis, MO area. Socioeconomic status (SES) and childhood trauma were tested as intervening variables in the association between race and PPD symptoms using structural equation modeling. PPD symptoms were modeled as a latent variable composed of items from the PPD scales of the Multi-Source Assessment of Personality Pathology self and informant reports and the Structured Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) Personality. Childhood trauma was measured using the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire, and SES was a composite of parent education, participant education, and annual household income. Blacks exhibited higher levels of PPD symptoms across the 3 personality measures, reported significantly lower SES, and reported greater childhood trauma. The proposed model was a good fit to the data, and the effect of race on PPD symptoms operated mainly through SES. The indirect effect through SES was stronger for males. Findings suggest that racial differences in PPD symptoms are partly explained by problems more commonly experienced by Black individuals.

  8. Combined Cubital and Carpal Tunnel Release Results in Symptom Resolution Outside of the Median or Ulnar Nerve Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Chimenti, Peter C.; McIntyre, Allison W.; Childs, Sean M.; Hammert, Warren C.; Elfar, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resolution of symptoms including pain, numbness, and tingling outside of the median nerve distribution has been shown to occur following carpal tunnel release. We hypothesized that a similar effect would be found after combined release of the ulnar nerve at the elbow with simultaneous release of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel. Methods: 20 patients with combined cubital and carpal tunnel syndrome were prospectively enrolled. The upper extremity was divided into six zones and the location of pain, numbness, tingling, or strange sensations was recorded pre-operatively. Two-point discrimination, Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing, and validated questionnaires were collected pre-operatively and at six-week follow-up. Results: Probability of resolution was greater in the median nerve distribution than the ulnar nerve for numbness (71% vs. 43%), tingling (86% vs. 75%). Seventy percent of the cohort reported at least one extra-anatomic symptom pre-operatively, and greater than 80% of these resolved at early follow-up. There was a decrease in pain as measured by validated questionnaires. Conclusion: This study documents resolution of symptoms in both extra-ulnar and extra-median distributions after combined cubital and carpal tunnel release. Pre-operative patient counseling may therefore include the likelihood of symptomatic improvement in a non-expected nerve distribution after this procedure, assuming no other concomitant pathology which may cause persistent symptoms. Future studies could be directed at correlating pre-operative disease severity with probability of symptom resolution using a larger population. PMID:27347239

  9. [The transition of deep brain stimulation from disease specific to symptom specific indications].

    PubMed

    Okun, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    The success of chronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) and electrical neuro-network modulation (ENM) to address neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders has led the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and also other worldwide regulatory agencies to grant approval for the use of DBS in specific disorders. In the United States, DBS is FDA approved for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), essential tremor (ET), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and for dystonia. OCD and dystonia have been approved under a mechanism referred to as a humanitarian device exemption (HDE). However, as the field of DBS and ENM evolve there has been a shift in practice patterns from targeting diseases to targeting specific and disabling symptoms. This shift has been driving interdisciplinary DBS boards to collect, and to address symptom profiles in all potential DBS candidates. Based on a specific symptom profile, a strategic and personalized medicine approach can be undertaken. The personalized approach will take into consideration the brain target, a unilateral versus a bilateral procedure, and the potential for use of more than one DBS lead per brain hemisphere. Additionally, a personalized approach to DBS will also facilitate improved pre-operative medication adjustments, as well as optimal post-operative medication, behavioral, and device management. PMID:23196455

  10. Relief of nonhemispheric symptoms in low flow states by anterior circulation revascularization: a physiologic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yonas, H.; Steed, D.L.; Latchaw, R.E.; Gur, D.; Peitzman, A.B.; Webster, M.W.

    1987-02-01

    Operative intervention remains controversial for patients with transient nonhemispheric symptoms with occlusive disease of both the anterior and posterior cerebral circulations. In addition to the standard evaluation of these patients, we have used stable xenon-enhanced computed tomographic mapping of cerebral blood flow (Xe/CT CBF). This relatively new and potentially widely available CBF methodology, by measuring approximately 30,000 CBF values within each of three CT levels, provides a readily interpretable means of evaluating extremes of hemodynamic compromise within any or all vascular territories. In the past 30 months, Xe/CT CBF studies in 300 patients with occlusive vascular disease have identified nine patients with global low flow and nonhemispheric symptoms (vertigo, lightheadedness, and/or blurred vision). Blood pressures determined by ocular pneumoplethysmography of Gee were markedly abnormal with reduced ocular/brachial ratios. Each patient had a combination of both segmental carotid and vertebrobasilar occlusive disease. Each patient had a flow-augmenting procedure performed on the anterior circulation in an attempt to improve global flow: carotid endarterectomy (two patients), subclavian-external carotid bypass (one patient), and superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery bypass (six patients). In each case disabling transient symptoms were relieved. There were no operative deaths, but one stroke occurred, probably as a result of a brief period of postoperative hypotension. Postoperative Xe/CT CBF studies show a long-term improved global CBF in all patients.

  11. Symptom Burden in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Kuehn, Carrie M.; Amtmann, Dagmar; Cardenas, Diane D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine (1) the frequency, severity, and reported course of 7 symptoms in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) and (2) the association between these symptoms and patient functioning. Design Postal survey. Setting Community. Intervention A survey that included measures of the frequency, severity, and recalled course of pain, fatigue, numbness, weakness, shortness of breath, vision loss, and memory loss, as well as a measure of community integration and psychologic functioning was mailed to a sample of persons with SCI. One hundred forty-seven usable surveys were returned (response rate, 43% of surveys mailed). Main Outcome Measures The frequency and average severity of each symptom was computed, and the frequencies of each type of reported course were noted. Analyses estimated the associations among the symptoms, and between symptom severity and measures of patient functioning. Results The most common symptoms were pain, weakness, fatigue, and numbness. All symptoms were reported to remain the same or to get worse more often than they were reported to improve once they began. Pain, weakness, fatigue, and memory loss were the symptoms most closely associated with patient functioning. Conclusions Patients with SCI must deal with a number of secondary complications in addition to any disability caused by the injury itself. Of 7 symptoms studied, pain, weakness, and fatigue appeared to be most common and most closely linked to patient social and mental health functioning. Research is needed to identify the causal relationships between perceived symptoms and quality of life in patients with SCI and to identify effective treatments for those symptoms shown to impact patient functioning. PMID:17466734

  12. Neuromuscular Strain Increases Symptom Intensity in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Peter C.; Fontaine, Kevin R.; Lauver, Megan; Jasion, Samantha E.; Marden, Colleen L.; Moni, Malini; Thompson, Carol B.; Violand, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complex, multisystem disorder that can be disabling. CFS symptoms can be provoked by increased physical or cognitive activity, and by orthostatic stress. In preliminary work, we noted that CFS symptoms also could be provoked by application of longitudinal neural and soft tissue strain to the limbs and spine of affected individuals. In this study we measured the responses to a straight leg raise neuromuscular strain maneuver in individuals with CFS and healthy controls. We randomly assigned 60 individuals with CFS and 20 healthy controls to either a 15 minute period of passive supine straight leg raise (true neuromuscular strain) or a sham straight leg raise. The primary outcome measure was the symptom intensity difference between the scores during and 24 hours after the study maneuver compared to baseline. Fatigue, body pain, lightheadedness, concentration difficulties, and headache scores were measured individually on a 0–10 scale, and summed to create a composite symptom score. Compared to individuals with CFS in the sham strain group, those with CFS in the true strain group reported significantly increased body pain (P = 0.04) and concentration difficulties (P = 0.02) as well as increased composite symptom scores (all P = 0.03) during the maneuver. After 24 hours, the symptom intensity differences were significantly greater for the CFS true strain group for the individual symptom of lightheadedness (P = 0.001) and for the composite symptom score (P = 0.005). During and 24 hours after the exposure to the true strain maneuver, those with CFS had significantly higher individual and composite symptom intensity changes compared to the healthy controls. We conclude that a longitudinal strain applied to the nerves and soft tissues of the lower limb is capable of increasing symptom intensity in individuals with CFS for up to 24 hours. These findings support our preliminary observations that increased mechanical sensitivity may be a

  13. Late-life Depressive Symptoms: Prediction Models of Change

    PubMed Central

    García-Peña, Carmen; Wagner, Fernando A.; Sánchez-García, Sergio; Espinel-Bermúdez, Claudia; Juárez-Cedillo, Teresa; Pérez-Zepeda, Mario; Arango-Lopera, Victoria; Franco-Marina, Francisco; Ramírez-Aldana, Ricardo; Gallo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is a well-recognised problem in the elderly. The aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with predictors of change in depressive symptoms, both in subjects with and without baseline significant depressive symptoms. Methods Longitudinal study of community-dwelling elderly people (>60 years or older), baseline evaluations, and two additional evaluations were reported. Depressive symptoms were measured using a 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale, and a score of 11 was used as cutoff point for significant depressive symptoms in order to stratify the analyses in two groups: with significant depressive symptoms and without significant depressive symptoms. Sociodemographic data, social support, anxiety, cognition, positive affect, control locus, activities of daily living, recent traumatic life events, physical activity, comorbidities, and quality of life were evaluated. Multi-level generalised estimating equation model was used to assess the impact on the trajectory of depressive symptoms. Results 7,882 subjects were assessed, with 29.42% attrition. At baseline assessment, mean age was 70.96 years, 61.15% were women. Trajectories of depressive symptoms had a decreasing trend. Stronger associations in those with significant depressive symptoms, were social support (OR .971, p<.001), chronic pain (OR 2.277, p<.001) and higher locus of control (OR .581, p<.001). In contrast for those without baseline significant depressive symptoms anxiety and a higher locus of control were the strongest associations. Conclusions New insights into late-life depression are provided, with special emphasis in differentiated factors influencing the trajectory when stratifying regarding basal status of significant depressive symptoms. Limitations The study has not included clinical evaluations and nutritional assessments PMID:23731940

  14. Neuromuscular Strain Increases Symptom Intensity in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Peter C; Fontaine, Kevin R; Lauver, Megan; Jasion, Samantha E; Marden, Colleen L; Moni, Malini; Thompson, Carol B; Violand, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complex, multisystem disorder that can be disabling. CFS symptoms can be provoked by increased physical or cognitive activity, and by orthostatic stress. In preliminary work, we noted that CFS symptoms also could be provoked by application of longitudinal neural and soft tissue strain to the limbs and spine of affected individuals. In this study we measured the responses to a straight leg raise neuromuscular strain maneuver in individuals with CFS and healthy controls. We randomly assigned 60 individuals with CFS and 20 healthy controls to either a 15 minute period of passive supine straight leg raise (true neuromuscular strain) or a sham straight leg raise. The primary outcome measure was the symptom intensity difference between the scores during and 24 hours after the study maneuver compared to baseline. Fatigue, body pain, lightheadedness, concentration difficulties, and headache scores were measured individually on a 0-10 scale, and summed to create a composite symptom score. Compared to individuals with CFS in the sham strain group, those with CFS in the true strain group reported significantly increased body pain (P = 0.04) and concentration difficulties (P = 0.02) as well as increased composite symptom scores (all P = 0.03) during the maneuver. After 24 hours, the symptom intensity differences were significantly greater for the CFS true strain group for the individual symptom of lightheadedness (P = 0.001) and for the composite symptom score (P = 0.005). During and 24 hours after the exposure to the true strain maneuver, those with CFS had significantly higher individual and composite symptom intensity changes compared to the healthy controls. We conclude that a longitudinal strain applied to the nerves and soft tissues of the lower limb is capable of increasing symptom intensity in individuals with CFS for up to 24 hours. These findings support our preliminary observations that increased mechanical sensitivity may be a

  15. A rating scale for psychotic symptoms (RSPS) part I: theoretical principles and subscale 1: perception symptoms (illusions and hallucinations).

    PubMed

    Chouinard, G; Miller, R

    1999-08-17

    The authors present a new rating scale for the psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia and related psychoses. The scale links specific symptoms of psychopathology to dysfunction and overactivity of dopaminergic mechanisms underlying the processes of reward and selective attention. The Rating Scale for Psychotic Symptoms (RSPS) is a 44-item rating instrument with a seven-point severity scale for each item. Psychotic symptoms are classified into three groups: Pathological amplification of mental images (perception symptoms) (subscale 1), Distraction symptoms (including catatonia and passivity experiences) (subscale 2), and Delusions (subscale 3). A dimensional, rather than a categorical, conceptualization of psychosis is assumed. Rating is accomplished through a manual and a semi-structured interview (SSCI-RSPS). In this first of two papers, general issues about the construction of the scale and the derivation of symptom groups are discussed. Dopamine-mediated modification of cortico-striatal synapses is seen as being of critical importance in all three groups of symptoms. In this first paper, we present subscale I (perception symptoms), which includes both amplified perceptual images (illusions) and hallucinations. A total of seven illusions and 11 hallucinations are rated as individual items.

  16. Recalled peritraumatic distress in survivors of violent crime: exploring its impact on the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and posttraumatic growth.

    PubMed

    Kunst, Maarten Jacob Johannes

    2012-11-01

    Several authors have speculated that the lack of consistency regarding the relationship between symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and posttraumatic growth (PTG) is caused by third variables. Recalled peritraumatic distress (PD) may operate as a third variable because previous research suggests that both PTSD and PTG correlate with recalled PD. Therefore, the present study explored how recalled PD impacts the relationship between PTSD and PTG. An Internet questionnaire on PTSD symptom severity, recalled PD, and PTG was administered to 678 survivors of violent crime. The results suggested that recalled PD suppresses the association between PTSD symptom severity and PTG. In addition, a significant association between the interaction term of PTSD symptom severity and recalled PD and PTG was observed. Simple slopes tests indicated that self-reported PTSD symptoms were negatively associated with PTG but only among survivors with high levels of PD.

  17. Managing lower urinary tract symptoms in men.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Kenneth R; Aning, Jonathan J

    2016-04-01

    Male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common and increase in prevalence with age. Up to 90% of men aged 50 to 80 may suffer from troublesome LUTS. Men may attend expressing direct concern about micturition, describing one or more LUTS and the related impact on their quality of life. Frequently men may present for other medical or urological reasons such as concern regarding their risk of having prostate cancer or erectile dysfunction but on taking a history bothersome LUTS are identified. Men may present late in the community with urinary retention: the inability to pass urine. A thorough urological history is essential to inform management. It is important to determine whether men have storage or voiding LUTS or both. All patients must have a systematic comprehensive examination including genitalia and a digital rectal examination. Investigations performed in primary care should be guided by the history and examination findings, taking into account the impact of the LUTS on the individual's quality of life. Current NICE guidelines recommend the following to be performed at initial assessment: frequency volume chart (FVC); urine dipstick to detect blood, glucose, protein, leucocytes and nitrites; and prostate specific antigen. Men should be referred for urological review if they have: bothersome LUTS which have not responded to conservative management or medical therapy; LUTS in association with recurrent or persistent UTIs; urinary retention; renal impairment suspected to be secondary to lower urinary tract dysfunction; or suspected urological malignancy. All patients not meeting criteria for immediate referral to urology can be managed initially in primary care. Based on history, examination and investigation findings an individualised management plan should be formulated. Basic lifestyle advice should be given regarding reduction or avoidance of caffeinated products and alcohol. The FVC should guide advice regarding fluid intake management and all

  18. Tetrahydrocannabinol for neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Amir I.A.; Verkes, Robbert-Jan; Kramers, Cees; Feuth, Ton; Rosenberg, Paul B.; van der Marck, Marjolein A.; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the efficacy and safety of low-dose oral tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in the treatment of dementia-related neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS). Methods: This is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients with dementia and clinically relevant NPS were randomly assigned to receive THC 1.5 mg or matched placebo (1:1) 3 times daily for 3 weeks. Primary outcome was change in Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), assessed at baseline and after 14 and 21 days. Analyses were based on intention-to-treat. Results: Twenty-four patients received THC and 26 received placebo. NPS were reduced during both treatment conditions. The difference in reduction from baseline between THC and placebo was not significant (mean difference NPItotal: 3.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] −3.6 to 10.0), nor were changes in scores for agitation (Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory 4.6, 95% CI −3.0 to 12.2), quality of life (Quality of Life–Alzheimer's Disease −0.5, 95% CI −2.6 to 1.6), or activities of daily living (Barthel Index 0.6, 95% CI −0.8 to 1.9). The number of patients experiencing mild or moderate adverse events was similar (THC, n = 16; placebo, n = 14, p = 0.36). No effects on vital signs, weight, or episodic memory were observed. Conclusions: Oral THC of 4.5 mg daily showed no benefit in NPS, but was well-tolerated, which adds valuable knowledge to the scarce evidence on THC in dementia. The benign adverse event profile of this dosage allows study of whether higher doses are efficacious and equally well-tolerated. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that for patients with dementia-related NPS, low-dose THC does not significantly reduce NPS at 21 days, though it is well-tolerated. PMID:25972490

  19. Management of Influenza Symptoms in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Rothberg, Michael B; He, Shunian; Rose, David N

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the cost-effectiveness of rapid diagnostic testing and empiric antiviral therapy for healthy adults with symptoms of influenza. DESIGN Cost-effectiveness analysis using a decision model based on previously published data. Outcome measures included costs and quality-adjusted life expectancy. SETTING Physician's office. PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS Hypothetically healthy, working adults < 65 years of age presenting with cough and fever during the influenza season. INTERVENTIONS Rapid testing or clinical diagnosis followed by treatment with amantadine, rimantadine, oseltamivir, or zanamivir compared with no antiviral therapy. RESULTS Base-case analysis: not giving antiviral therapy is the most expensive and least effective strategy, costing $471 per patient, mostly owing to time lost from work. Amantadine treatment increases life expectancy by 0.0014 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) while saving $108 per patient relative to no antiviral therapy. Zanamivir is slightly more effective than amantadine, adding 0.0002 QALYs at an incremental cost of $31, or $133,000 per QALY saved. All other strategies, including testing strategies, are both less effective and more expensive. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS The model is sensitive to the probability of influenza infection, proportion of influenza caused by type B, the relative efficacy of the various drugs, and the value of a workday. At a clinical probability of influenza infection > 20%, antiviral therapy is favored. As the proportion of influenza B increases, zanamivir is favored over amantadine. Testing is rarely indicated. Ignoring the costs of lost workdays, amantadine treatment costs $1,200/QALY saved. CONCLUSIONS Antiviral therapy with either amantadine or zanamivir is cost-effective for healthy, young patients with influenza-like illness during the influenza season, depending on the prevalence of influenza B. PMID:14521643

  20. Risk factors for DSM-5 posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) among Israeli civilians during the 2014 Israel-Hamas war.

    PubMed

    Gil, Sharon; Weinberg, Michael; Shamai, Michal; Ron, Pnina; Harel, Hila; Or-Chen, Keren

    2016-01-01

    In light of current modifications in the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this study aimed to revalidate well-known PTSD risk factors related to terrorism and war in Israel, namely, proximity to the Gaza Strip, dissociative symptoms, acute stress disorder (ASD) symptoms, and social support. One hundred and sixty Israeli civilians were assessed during the 2014 Israel-Hamas war at 2 time points: 1 week after the beginning of the operation (t1) and 1 month after initial evaluation (t2), using the DSM-5 PTSD Symptom Levels Scale (PSLS; Gil, Weinberg, Or-Chen, & Harel, 2015). A paired t test analysis showed significant reduction in the respondents' posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) 1 month after the initial assessment point. A structural equation model (SEM) showed that higher ASD symptoms at t1 and higher dissociative symptoms at t2 increased the risk for PTSS at t2. Conversely, higher peritraumatic dissociation at t1 decreased the risk for PTSS at t2. Proximity to the Gaza Strip, and social support, failed to demonstrate significant association with PTSS at t2. DSM-5 PTSS 1 month after prolonged traumatic exposure are strongly associated with high ASD symptoms at 1 week as a risk factor; high levels of peritraumatic dissociation at 1 week as a protective factor; and high levels of dissociative symptoms at 1 month as a risk factor. Theoretically and clinically the findings of the study further suggest that ongoing massive terrorism and war cannot be viewed or treated as identical to other traumas. PMID:26214069

  1. Neurocognition and neuroimaging of persistent negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hovington, Cindy L; Lepage, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Negative symptoms have been a conundrum to researchers and clinicians alike since having first been identified by Bleuler and Kraepelin. The term 'negative symptoms' has been scrutinized with regards to what it encompasses. Negative symptomatology has been categorized into distinct subdomains, including primary symptoms, secondary symptoms, deficit syndrome and, more recently, persistent negative symptoms (PNS). Although there have been some theories put forward with regards to negative symptoms, there are still discordant findings regarding PNS. Thus, this article aimed to review the structural, functional and cognitive correlates of PNS in an attempt to better understand these specific negative symptoms in schizophrenia. According to the reviewed literature, deficit syndrome appears to have similar neurocognitive and structural deficits as PNS; however, some minor distinctions may suggest that PNS are a separate subtype of negative symptoms. White matter decrements in the frontal lobe and gray matter reductions in the temporal lobe may be related more specifically to PNS. Furthermore, unlike deficit syndrome, structural abnormalities in the frontal and temporal lobe also appear to be related to PNS in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. Cognitive domains, such as memory, are impaired and appear to be predominantly related to PNS. Hence, PNS do appear to have neuroimaging and neurocognitive correlates and warrant further research. PMID:22243045

  2. Depressive Symptoms, Coping Strategies, and Disordered Eating among College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanBoven, Amy M.; Espelage, Dorothy L.

    2006-01-01

    In a 2-phase study with a total of 392 participants, depressive symptoms mediated the association between disordered eating and lower problem-solving confidence and an avoidance problem-solving style. Depressive symptoms did not mediate the association between the ability to generate competent solutions to hypothetical stressful situations and…

  3. Breathing Problems? Learn to Recognize the Symptoms of COPD

    MedlinePlus

    ... often attribute the first symptoms to things like aging, gaining weight or being out of shape. And because of this, they don’t even recognize the symptoms.” Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of COPD in the United States, but long-term exposure ...

  4. Childhood Sexual Abuse and Psychosomatic Symptoms in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Colin A.

    2005-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by chronic gastrointestinal symptoms without a demonstrable physical cause. In a subgroup of patients, irritable bowel syndrome may be part of a cluster of psychosomatic symptoms related to childhood sexual abuse. To investigate this possibility, the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS), the…

  5. School Mobility during Childhood Predicts Psychotic Symptoms in Late Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winsper, Catherine; Wolke, Dieter; Bryson, Alex; Thompson, Andrew; Singh, Swaran P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recently, school mobility was identified as a risk factor for psychotic symptoms in early adolescence. The extent to which this risk continues into late adolescence and the trajectories via which this risk manifests remain unexplored. Methods: Psychotic symptoms in 4,720 adolescents aged 18 were ascertained by trained psychologists…

  6. Sleep Deprivation, Allergy Symptoms, and Negatively Reinforced Problem Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Craig H.; Meyer, Kim A.

    1996-01-01

    A study of the relationship between presence or absence of sleep deprivation, allergy symptoms, and the rate and function of problem behavior in three adolescents with moderate to profound mental retardation found that problem behavior was negatively reinforced by escape from instruction, and both allergy symptoms and sleep deprivation influenced…

  7. Ethnic and Sex Differences in Children's Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kistner, Janet A.; David-Ferdon, Corinne F.; Lopez, Cristina M.; Dunkel, Stephanie B.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined ethnic and sex differences in children's depressive symptoms, along with hypothesized mediators of those differences (academic achievement, peer acceptance), in a follow-up of African American (n = 179) and Euro-American (n= 462) children in Grades 3 to 5. African American boys reported more depressive symptoms than African…

  8. Depressive Symptoms and Cigarette Smoking in a College Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Brent A.; Holahan, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: The authors examined (1) the relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking in a college sample and (2) the role of smoking self-efficacy (one's perceived ability to abstain from smoking) in explaining the relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking. Methods: Predominantly first-year…

  9. Assessing Secondary Control and Its Association with Youth Depression Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisz, John R.; Francis, Sarah E.; Bearman, Sarah Kate

    2010-01-01

    Extensive research has linked youth depression symptoms to low levels of perceived control, using measures that reflect "primary control" (i.e., influencing objective conditions to make them fit one's wishes). We hypothesized that depressive symptoms are also linked to low levels of "secondary control" (i.e., influencing the psychological impact…

  10. Monthly Instability in Early Adolescent Friendship Networks and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Alessandra; Poulin, Francois

    2009-01-01

    This study examined (1) the relation between perceived friendship instability and depressive symptoms, (2) the directionality of this link, and (3) whether the relation between friendship instability and depressive symptoms would differ according to specific friendship status (best and secondary friendships) and contexts (school, non-school, and…

  11. Nonmotor Symptoms and Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Joon; Jeon, Beom S; Paek, Sun Ha

    2015-05-01

    Subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) is an established treatment for the motor symptoms in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition to improvements in motor symptoms, many studies have reported changes in various nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) after STN DBS in patients with PD. Psychiatric symptoms, including depression, apathy, anxiety, and impulsivity, can worsen or improve depending on the electrical stimulation parameters, the locations of the stimulating contacts within the STN, and changes in medications after surgery. Global cognitive function is not affected by STN DBS, and there is no increase in the incidence of dementia after STN DBS compared to that after medical treatment, although clinically insignificant declines in verbal fluency have been consistently reported. Pain, especially PD-related pain, improves with STN DBS. Evidence regarding the effects of STN DBS on autonomic symptoms and sleep-related problems is limited and remains conflicting. Many symptoms of nonmotor fluctuations, which are occasionally more troublesome than motor fluctuations, improve with STN DBS. Although it is clear that NMSs are not target symptoms for STN DBS, NMSs have a strong influence on the quality of life of patients with PD, and clinicians should thus be aware of these NMSs when deciding whether to perform surgery and should pay attention to changes in these symptoms after STN DBS to ensure the optimal care for patients. PMID:26090080

  12. Etiological and Clinical Features of Childhood Psychotic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Polanczyk, Guilherme; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Arseneault, Louise; Cannon, Mary; Ambler, Antony; Keefe, Richard S. E.; Houts, Renate; Odgers, Candice L.; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-01-01

    Context It has been reported that childhood psychotic symptoms are common in the general population and may signal neurodevelopmental processes that lead to schizophrenia. However, it is not clear whether these symptoms are associated with the same extensive risk factors established for adult schizophrenia. Objective To examine the construct validity of children’s self-reported psychotic symptoms by testing whether these symptoms share the risk factors and clinical features of adult schizophrenia. Design Prospective, longitudinal cohort study of a nationally representative birth cohort in Great Britain. Participants A total of 2232 twelve-year-old children followed up since age 5 years (retention, 96%). Main Outcome Measure Children’s self-reported hallucinations and delusions. Results Children’s psychotic symptoms are familial and heritable and are associated with social risk factors (eg, urbanicity); cognitive impairments at age 5; home-rearing risk factors (eg, maternal expressed emotion); behavioral, emotional, and educational problems at age 5; and comorbid conditions, including self-harm. Conclusions The results provide a comprehensive picture of the construct validity of children’s self-reported psychotic symptoms. For researchers, the findings indicate that children who have psychotic symptoms can be recruited for neuroscience research to determine the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. For clinicians, the findings indicate that psychotic symptoms in childhood are often a marker of an impaired developmental process and should be actively assessed. PMID:20368509

  13. Heterogeneity in ADHD: Neuropsychological Pathways, Comorbidity and Symptom Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlstedt, Cecilia; Thorell, Lisa B.; Bohlin, Gunilla

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate different neuropsychological impairments and comorbid behavioral problems in relation to symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), studying the independent effects of different functions as well as specific relations to symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattention. A…

  14. Depression Symptoms among Homeless Smokers: Effect of Motivational Interviewing

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Cendrine; Rogers, Charles R.; Okuyemi, Kola

    2016-01-01

    Background Tobacco use is higher among homeless individuals than the general population. Homeless individuals are also more likely to have symptoms of depression. Depression symptoms may add to the burden of homelessness by increasing psychological distress and serve as a barrier to quitting smoking. Objectives The primary goal of this study was to assess the impact of depression symptoms on psychological distress in homeless smokers. The effect of depression symptoms on abstinence and the effect of Motivational Interviewing (MI) on cessation among smokers was also explored. Methods Homeless smokers (N=430) enrolled in a smoking cessation study were randomized to Motivational Interviewing (MI) or standard care (SC). Participants received nicotine replacement therapy and were followed for 26 weeks. Participants were categorized into a depression symptoms (DS) group or control group using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Between group differences of perceived stress, hopelessness, confidence, craving and abstinence were assessed at weeks 8 and 26. The interaction between depression symptoms (levels: DS and control) and the intervention (levels: MI and SC) was also assessed. Results Homeless smokers in the DS group reported higher levels of hopelessness, perceived stress, and craving. There was no effect of DS status on abstinence at week 8 or week 26. There was no significant interaction between depression symptoms (DS vs. Control) and the intervention (MI vs. SC). Conclusion Despite reporting greater psychological distress, homeless smokers with depression symptoms in this sample had abstinence levels similar to the control group. Future research should explore protective factors among depressed smokers. PMID:27267588

  15. Internet Use for Prediagnosis Symptom Appraisal by Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Maria D.; Siminoff, Laura A.; Longo, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study explored the characteristics of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who accessed Internet-based health information as part of their symptom appraisal process prior to consulting a health care provider. Method: Newly diagnosed CRC patients who experienced symptoms prior to diagnosis were interviewed. Brief COPE was used to…

  16. Conceptualization and treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sonali; Hillner, Kiley; Velligan, Dawn I

    2015-12-22

    Negative symptoms of schizophrenia including social withdrawal, diminished affective response, lack of interest, poor social drive, and decreased sense of purpose or goal directed activity predict poor functional outcomes for patients with schizophrenia. They may develop and be maintained as a result of structural and functional brain abnormalities, particularly associated with dopamine reward pathways and by environmental and psychosocial factors such as self-defeating cognitions and the relief from overstimulation that accompanies withdrawal from social and role functioning. Negative symptoms are more difficult to treat than the positive symptoms of schizophrenia and represent an unmet therapeutic need for large numbers of patients with schizophrenia. While antipsychotic medications to treat the symptoms of schizophrenia have been around for decades, they have done little to address the significant functional impairments in the disorder that are associated with negative symptoms. Negative symptoms and the resulting loss in productivity are responsible for much of the world-wide personal and economic burden of schizophrenia. Pharmacologic treatments may be somewhat successful in treating secondary causes of negative symptoms, such as antipsychotic side effects and depression. However, in the United States there are no currently approved treatments for severe and persistent negative symptoms (PNS) that are not responsive to treatments for secondary causes. Pharmacotherapy and psychosocial treatments are currently being developed and tested with severe and PNS as their primary targets. Academia, clinicians, the pharmaceutical industry, research funders, payers and regulators will need to work together to pursue novel treatments to address this major public health issue. PMID:26740926

  17. Physical Symptoms and Psychological Distress among Inhalant Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joe, George W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Among 110 Mexican-American adolescents with varying drug use histories, self-reported physical health problems were not related to inhalant use history, but blood analyses indicated a relationship between extensive inhalant use and liver problems. Psychological distress symptoms were related to inhalant use and physical symptoms. Contains 23…

  18. Changes in Parental Depression Symptoms during Family Preservation Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffin, Mark; Bard, David

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Parental depression symptoms often change over the course of child welfare family preservation and parenting services. This raises the question of whether certain processes in family preservation services might be associated with depression symptom change. This study tests three correlational models of change among family preservation…

  19. Structure of Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in Pediatric OCD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mataix-Cols, David; Nakatani, Eriko; Micali, Nadia; Heyman, Isobel

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of the structure of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms observed in adults is similar to those observed in children is presented. This investigation indicates the structure of OCD symptoms is the same across the entire lifespan as compared to pediatric OCD and adulthood OCD.

  20. Emotional inertia contributes to depressive symptoms beyond perseverative thinking.

    PubMed

    Brose, Annette; Schmiedek, Florian; Koval, Peter; Kuppens, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The autocorrelation or inertia of negative affect reflects how much negative emotions carry over from moment to moment and has been associated with increased depressive symptoms. In this study, we posed three challenges to this association by examining: (1) whether emotional inertia is relevant for depressive symptoms when assessed on a longer timescale than usual; (2) whether inertia is uniquely related to depressive symptoms after controlling for perseverative thoughts; and (3) whether inertia is related to depressive symptoms over and above the within-person association between affect and perseverative thoughts. Participants (N = 101) provided ratings of affect and perseverative thoughts for 100 days; depressive symptoms were reported before and after the study, and again after 2.5 years. Day-to-day emotional inertia was related to depressive symptoms over and above trait and state perseverative thoughts. Moreover, inertia predicted depressive symptoms when adjusting for its association with perseverative thoughts. These findings establish the relevance of emotional inertia in depressive symptoms independent of perseverative thoughts.