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Sample records for symptomatic peripheral artery

  1. Ticagrelor versus Clopidogrel in Symptomatic Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, William R; Fowkes, F Gerry R; Heizer, Gretchen; Berger, Jeffrey S; Baumgartner, Iris; Held, Peter; Katona, Brian G; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Norgren, Lars; Jones, W Schuyler; Blomster, Juuso; Millegård, Marcus; Reist, Craig; Patel, Manesh R

    2017-01-05

    Background Peripheral artery disease is considered to be a manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis with associated adverse cardiovascular and limb events. Data from previous trials have suggested that patients receiving clopidogrel monotherapy had a lower risk of cardiovascular events than those receiving aspirin. We wanted to compare clopidogrel with ticagrelor, a potent antiplatelet agent, in patients with peripheral artery disease. Methods In this double-blind, event-driven trial, we randomly assigned 13,885 patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease to receive monotherapy with ticagrelor (90 mg twice daily) or clopidogrel (75 mg once daily). Patients were eligible if they had an ankle-brachial index (ABI) of 0.80 or less or had undergone previous revascularization of the lower limbs. The primary efficacy end point was a composite of adjudicated cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or ischemic stroke. The primary safety end point was major bleeding. The median follow-up was 30 months. Results The median age of the patients was 66 years, and 72% were men; 43% were enrolled on the basis of the ABI and 57% on the basis of previous revascularization. The mean baseline ABI in all patients was 0.71, 76.6% of the patients had claudication, and 4.6% had critical limb ischemia. The primary efficacy end point occurred in 751 of 6930 patients (10.8%) receiving ticagrelor and in 740 of 6955 (10.6%) receiving clopidogrel (hazard ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92 to 1.13; P=0.65). In each group, acute limb ischemia occurred in 1.7% of the patients (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.79 to 1.33; P=0.85) and major bleeding in 1.6% (hazard ratio, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.43; P=0.49). Conclusions In patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease, ticagrelor was not shown to be superior to clopidogrel for the reduction of cardiovascular events. Major bleeding occurred at similar rates among the patients in the two trial groups. (Funded by Astra

  2. Aspirin Resistance Predicts Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Symptomatic Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pasala, Tilak; Hoo, Jennifer Soo; Lockhart, Mary Kate; Waheed, Rehan; Sengodan, Prasanna; Alexander, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy reduces the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and vascular death in patients who have symptomatic peripheral artery disease. However, a subset of patients who take aspirin continues to have recurrent cardiovascular events. There are few data on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with peripheral artery disease who manifest aspirin resistance. Patients with peripheral artery disease on long-term aspirin therapy (≥4 wk) were tested for aspirin responsiveness by means of the VerifyNow Aspirin Assay. The mean follow-up duration was 22.6 ± 8.3 months. The primary endpoint was a composite of death, myocardial infarction, or ischemic stroke. Secondary endpoints were the incidence of vascular interventions (surgical or percutaneous), or of amputation or gangrene caused by vascular disease. Of the 120 patients enrolled in the study, 31 (25.8%) were aspirin-resistant and 89 (74.2%) were aspirin-responsive. The primary endpoint occurred in 10 (32.3%) patients in the aspirin-resistant group and in 13 (14.6%) patients in the aspirin-responsive group (hazard ratio=2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.08–5.66; P=0.03). There was no significant difference in the secondary outcome of revascularization or tissue loss. By multivariate analysis, aspirin resistance and history of chronic kidney disease were the only independent predictors of long-term adverse cardiovascular events. Aspirin resistance is highly prevalent in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease and is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular risk. Whether intervening in these patients with additional antiplatelet therapies would improve outcomes needs to be explored. PMID:28100965

  3. Association between gait characteristics and endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew W; Montgomery, Polly S; Casanegra, Ana I; Silva-Palacios, Federico; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether gait characteristics were associated with endothelial cell inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis and with circulating biomarkers of inflammation and antioxidant capacity in older patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD). Gait measurements of 231 symptomatic men and women with PAD were assessed during a 4-m walk test. Patients were further characterized on endothelial effects of circulating factors present in the sera using a cell culture-based bioassay on primary human arterial endothelial cells and on circulating inflammatory and vascular biomarkers. In a multivariate regression model for gait speed, the significant independent variables were age (p < 0.001), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) (p < 0.001), diabetes (p = 0.003), sex (p = 0.003), and history of cerebrovascular accidents (p = 0.021). In multivariate analyses for gait cadence, the significant independent predictors included high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HsCRP) (p < 0.001), diabetes (p = 0.001), and hypertension (p = 0.001). In a multivariate regression model for gait stride length, the significant independent variables were HsCRP (p < 0.001), age (p < 0.001), ICAM-1 (p < 0.001), hypertension (p = 0.002), cellular reactive oxygen species production (p = 0.007), and sex (p = 0.008). Higher levels of circulating biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial cell oxidative stress were associated with slower gait speed, slower cadence, and shorter stride length in older symptomatic patients with PAD. Additionally, this profile of impaired gait was more evident in older patients, in women, and in those with diabetes, hypertension, and history of cerebrovascular accidents.

  4. Endothelial Cell Inflammation and Antioxidant Capacity are Associated With Exercise Performance and Microcirculation in Patients With Symptomatic Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew W; Parker, Donald E; Montgomery, Polly S; Sosnowska, Danuta; Casanegra, Ana I; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna; Sonntag, William E

    2015-10-01

    We determined whether exercise performance and lower extremity microcirculation were associated with endothelial cell inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis and with circulating biomarkers of inflammation and antioxidant capacity in 160 patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD). In a multivariate regression model for peak walking time, significant independent variables included ankle-brachial index (P < .001), age (P = .017), hydroxyl radical antioxidant capacity (P = .008), and endothelial cell nuclear factor K-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) activity (P = .015). In multivariate analyses for time to minimum exercise calf muscle hemoglobin oxygen saturation (StO2), significant independent variables included endothelial cell NF-κB activity (P = .043) and calf muscle StO2 at rest (P = .007). Endothelial cell inflammation and circulating biomarkers of inflammation and antioxidant capacity were associated with exercise performance and microcirculation of the ischemic calf musculature during exercise. The clinical implication is that interventions designed to alleviate endothelial cell inflammation and circulating inflammatory biomarkers, such as antioxidant therapy, may improve exercise performance of symptomatic patients with PAD.

  5. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  6. Peripheral artery bypass - leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007394.htm Peripheral artery bypass - leg To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Peripheral artery bypass is surgery to reroute the blood supply ...

  7. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery - discharge; PTA - peripheral artery - discharge; Angioplasty - peripheral artery - discharge; Balloon angioplasty - peripheral artery- discharge; PAD - PTA discharge; PVD - PTA discharge

  8. What Is Peripheral Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Peripheral Artery Disease? Peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.) is ... that affects blood flow to the legs. Normal Artery and Artery With Plaque Buildup The illustration shows ...

  9. Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Peripheral Artery Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 People with ... developing atherosclerosis, the most common cause of peripheral artery disease (PAD) . And individuals with PAD have a ...

  10. Peripheral artery bypass - leg - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000239.htm Peripheral artery bypass - leg - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. You had peripheral artery bypass surgery to re-route the blood supply ...

  11. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2010. Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review. We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 70 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents, bypass surgery, cilostazol, exercise, pentoxifylline, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), prostaglandins, smoking cessation, and statins. PMID:21477401

  12. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009. (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 59 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents; bypass surgery; cilostazol; exercise; pentoxifylline; percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA); prostaglandins; smoking cessation; and statins. PMID:19454099

  13. Epigenetics and Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Jonathan; Biros, Erik; Bingley, John; Iyer, Vikram; Krishna, Smriti M

    2016-04-01

    The term epigenetics is usually used to describe inheritable changes in gene function which do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. These typically include non-coding RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications. Smoking and older age are recognised risk factors for peripheral artery diseases, such as occlusive lower limb artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, and have been implicated in promoting epigenetic changes. This brief review describes studies that have associated epigenetic factors with peripheral artery diseases and investigations which have examined the effect of epigenetic modifications on the outcome of peripheral artery diseases in mouse models. Investigations have largely focused on microRNAs and have identified a number of circulating microRNAs associated with human peripheral artery diseases. Upregulating or antagonising a number of microRNAs has also been reported to limit aortic aneurysm development and hind limb ischemia in mouse models. The importance of DNA methylation and histone modifications in peripheral artery disease has been relatively little studied. Whether circulating microRNAs can be used to assist identification of patients with peripheral artery diseases and be modified in order to improve the outcome of peripheral artery disease will require further investigation.

  14. Antithrombotic Therapy in Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Bellmunt, Sergi; McGorrian, Catherine; Anand, Sonia S.; Guzman, Randolph; Criqui, Michael H.; Akl, Elie A.; Olav Vandvik, Per; Lansberg, Maarten G.; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This guideline focuses on antithrombotic drug therapies for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease as well as for the relief of lower-extremity symptoms and critical ischemia in persons with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: The most important of our 20 recommendations are as follows. In patients aged ≥ 50 years with asymptomatic PAD or asymptomatic carotid stenosis, we suggest aspirin (75-100 mg/d) over no therapy (Grade 2B) for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events. For secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with symptomatic PAD (including patients before and after peripheral arterial bypass surgery or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty), we recommend long-term aspirin (75-100 mg/d) or clopidogrel (75 mg/d) (Grade 1A). We recommend against the use of warfarin plus aspirin in patients with symptomatic PAD (Grade 1B). For patients undergoing peripheral artery percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stenting, we suggest single rather than dual antiplatelet therapy (Grade 2C). For patients with refractory claudication despite exercise therapy and smoking cessation, we suggest addition of cilostazol (100 mg bid) to aspirin (75-100 mg/d) or clopidogrel (75 mg/d) (Grade 2C). In patients with critical limb ischemia and rest pain unable to undergo revascularization, we suggest the use of prostanoids (Grade 2C). In patients with acute limb ischemia due to acute thrombosis or embolism, we recommend surgery over peripheral arterial thrombolysis (Grade 1B). Conclusions: Recommendations continue to favor single antiplatelet therapy for primary and secondary prevention of

  15. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... needed to restore blood flow: Angioplasty : In an angioplasty procedure, an interventional radiologist threads a catheter through a blood vessel to the affected artery and inflates a small balloon to reopen it. In some cases, the insertion ...

  16. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... legs; Arterial insufficiency of the legs; Recurrent leg pain and cramping; Calf pain with exercise ... The main symptoms of PAD are pain, achiness, fatigue, burning, or ... or thighs. These symptoms most often appear during walking or ...

  17. Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.)

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Peripheral Artery Disease (P.A.D.) What is P.A.D.? Arteries Clogged With Plaque Peripheral arterial disease (P. ... button on your keyboard.) Why Is P.A.D. Dangerous? Click for more information Blocked blood flow ...

  18. Could Peripheral Arterial Disease Be Your Problem?

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercise and yoga classes and has returned to teaching. Fast Facts Peripheral arterial disease (P.A.D.) occurs when a fatty material called plaque (pronounced plak) builds up on the inside walls of the arteries that carry blood from ...

  19. Mechanisms Underlying Drug Delivery to Peripheral Arteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Tzafriri, Rami; Patel, Sandeep M; Parikh, Sahil A

    2017-04-01

    Delivery of drugs onto arterial targets via endovascular devices commands several principles: dissolution, diffusion, convection, drug binding, barriers to absorption, and interaction between the drug, delivery vehicle, and accepting arterial wall. The understanding of drug delivery in the coronary vasculature is vast; there is ongoing work needed in the peripheral arteries. There are differences that account for some failures of application of coronary technology into the peripheral vascular space. Breakthroughs in peripheral vascular interventional techniques building on current technologies require investigators willing to acknowledge the similarities and differences between these different vascular territories, while developing technologies adapted for peripheral arteries.

  20. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Claudication

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fatty deposits inside them. This is called atherosclerosis. If you have PAD, your arms, and more ... also more likely in people who already have atherosclerosis in other arteries, such as the arteries in ...

  1. Management of the treatment delay in symptomatic carotid artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Stiehm, Markus; Björses, Katarina; Kremer, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Saving time to intervention is crucial in patients with symptomatic carotid artery stenosis (SCAS). We introduced a fast-track protocol (FTP). Time frames from the onset of symptoms to intervention before and after the introduction of an FTP were analyzed. SCAS patients (403 patients/405 procedures) were evaluated according to whether surgery was performed before (group 1) or after (group 2) the introduction of the FTP. Time frames to surgery, causes of delay and frequency of recurrent events are reported. The median time delay decreased from 17 to 12 days (p<0.001), but time to ultrasound examination remained unchanged. Surgery was within 2 weeks in 41% in group 1 and in 57% in group 2 (p=0.001). Of 181 (30%) patients treated according to the FTP, 54 were operated within 7 days (median), and 80% had the intervention within 2 weeks. Time to surgery decreased significantly after the introduction of the FTP.

  2. About Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAD). Both PAD and CAD are caused by atherosclerosis that narrows and blocks arteries in various critical ... can be managed with lifestyle changes and medication . Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which ...

  3. Symptomatic Peripheral Mycotic Aneurysms Due to Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    González, Isabel; Sarriá, Cristina; López, Javier; Vilacosta, Isidre; San Román, Alberto; Olmos, Carmen; Sáez, Carmen; Revilla, Ana; Hernández, Miguel; Caniego, Jose Luis; Fernández, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral mycotic aneurysms (PMAs) are a relatively rare but serious complication of infective endocarditis (IE). We conducted the current study to describe and compare the current epidemiologic, microbiologic, clinical, diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic characteristics of patients with symptomatic PMAs (SPMAs). A descriptive, comparative, retrospective observational study was performed in 3 tertiary hospitals, which are reference centers for cardiac surgery. From 922 definite IE episodes collected from 1996 to 2011, 18 patients (1.9%) had SPMAs. Because all SPMAs developed in left-sided IE, we performed a comparative study between 719 episodes of left-sided IE without SPMAs and 18 episodes with SPMAs. We found a higher frequency of intravenous drug abuse, native valve IE, intracranial bleeding, septic emboli, multiple embolisms, and IE diagnostic delay >30 days in patients with SPMAs than in patients without SPMAs. The causal microorganisms were gram-positive cocci (n =10), gram-negative bacilli (n = 2), gram-positive bacilli (n = 3), Bartonella henselae (n = 1), Candida albicans (n = 1), and negative culture (n = 1). The median IE diagnosis delay was 15 days (interquartile range [IQR], 13–33 d) in the case of high-virulence microorganisms versus 45 days (IQR, 30–240 d) in the case of low- to medium-virulence microorganisms. Twelve SPMAs were intracranial and 6 were extracranial. In 10 cases (8 intracranial and 2 extracranial), SPMAs were the initial presentation of IE; the remaining cases developed symptoms during or after finishing parenteral antibiotic treatment. The initial diagnosis of intracranial SPMAs was made by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging in 6 unruptured aneurysms and by angiography in 6 ruptured aneurysms. The initial test in extracranial SPMAs was Doppler ultrasonography in limbs, CT in liver, and coronary angiography in heart. Four (3 intracranial, 1 extracranial) of 7 (6 intracranial, 1 extracranial

  4. Angioplasty and Stenting of Symptomatic Vertebral Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadian, R.; Sharifipour, E.; Mansourizadeh, R.; Sohrabi, B.; Nayebi, A.R; Haririan, S.; Farhoudi, M.; Charsouei, S.; Najmi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) has recently become a noteworthy treatment option for significant stenosis involving the vertebral artery (VA) in selected patients. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the efficacy, safety and mid-term follow up results of 206 cases received PTA with or without stent implant to treat their symptomatic atherosclerotic VA stenosis in all segments (V1-V4). In a prospective mono-arm trial from October 2008 to July 2012 in a single center, 239 lesions affecting the intra or extracranial VA (171 in V1, 17 in V2, 14 in V3, 21 in V4 and 16 in combined segments) were treated by PTA with or without stent implant. Non-disabling stroke patients who had failed conservative medical treatment and had angiographic evidence of >50% stenosis in the dominant VA with clinical signs and symptoms of VB stenosis were included in this study. They were mean followed for 13.15±5.24 months after treatment. Overall, 206 patients underwent the procedure. A stent was implemented in 199 patients (96.6%). The periprocedural complication rate was 7.2%. The procedural (technical) success rate was 97.6%. Of the total 239 lesions, 223 were treated with stent implant. Clinical success was achieved in all 206 symptomatic patients after the procedure. Restenosis occurred in 15.9% after a mean 10.8 (6-24) months. Of those, 63.1% and 34.2% had mild and moderate stenosis that was treated medically, whereas one case (2.6%) with severe restenosis underwent balloon angioplasty. No deaths occurred during the follow-up period. The follow-up complication rate was 6.3%. TIA occurred in 4.4%, a minor stroke in 1.4% and a major stroke in one patient. The overall patient event-free survival was 92.4%. These results demonstrate the safety and feasibility of PTA with or without stent implant, with a high technical success rate, a low complication rate, a low restenosis rate and durable clinical success in patients with symptomatic VA stenosis. This

  5. Endovascular Treatment of Symptomatic Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jinsol; Ha, Sung-Kon; Choi, Jong-Il; Jin, Sung-Won; Kim, Se-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VADAs) are rare and many debates are present about treatment options. We review types and efficacy of our endovascular treatments and establish a safe endovascular therapeutic strategy regard to the angio-architecture of VADAs. Materials and Methods Between July 2008 and October 2015, we treated 22 patients with symptomatic VADAs. Fifteen patients presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage from the ruptured VADAs, digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance image confirmed the diagnosis and endovascular treatments were followed as their angio-architecture. Results Clinical results were good in 13 patients (86.7%), and there were no technical problems during endovascular procedures. The other 2 patients with poor prognosis showed severe neurological deficits at the initial evaluation. Among the three different endovascular treatments, there were no radiologic cure in one patient with stent insertion alone, but the patient had no significant clinical symptoms either. Conclusion Endovascular treatments are safe and effective treatment option for managing VADAs and can be the first treatment of choice for most patients. To select proper endovascular treatment according to the angio-architecture of VADAs can reduce the risk of the treatment. PMID:27847762

  6. Peripheral artery disease of the legs - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000577.htm Peripheral artery disease of the legs - self-care To use ... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a narrowing of the blood ...

  7. Cadmium Exposure and Incident Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tellez-Plaza, Maria; Guallar, Eliseo; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Howard, Barbara V.; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Devereux, Richard B.; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background Cadmium has been associated with peripheral arterial disease in cross-sectional studies but prospective evidence is lacking. Our goal was to evaluate the association of urine cadmium concentrations with incident peripheral arterial disease in a large population-based cohort. Methods and Results A prospective cohort study was performed with 2,864 adult American Indians 45-74 years old from Arizona, Oklahoma and North and South Dakota who participated in the Strong Heart Study in 1989-91 and were followed through two follow-up examination visits in 1993-1995 and 1997-1999. Participants were free of peripheral arterial disease, defined as an ankle brachial index <0.9 or >1.4, at baseline and had complete baseline information on urine cadmium, potential confounders and ankle brachial index determinations in the follow-up examinations. Urine cadmium was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and corrected for urinary dilution by normalization to urine creatinine.. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were computed using Cox-proportional hazards models for interval-censored data. A total of 470 cases of incident peripheral arterial disease, defined as an ankle brachial index <0.9 or >1.4, were identified. After adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors including smoking status and pack-years, the hazard ratio comparing the 80th to the 20th percentile of urine cadmium concentrations was 1.41 (1.05, 1.81). The hazard ratio comparing the highest to the lowest tertile was 1.96 (1.32, 2.81). The associations persisted after excluding participants with ankle brachial index > 1.4 only as well as in subgroups defined by sex and smoking status. Conclusions Urine cadmium, a biomarker of long-term cadmium exposure, was independently associated with incident peripheral arterial disease, providing further support for cadmium as a cardiovascular disease risk factor. PMID:24255048

  8. Clinical Characteristics of Symptomatic Vertebral Artery Dissection. A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Sharma, Priti; Robinson, Karen A.; Arnan, Martinson; Tsui, Megan; Ladha, Karim; Newman-Toker, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vertebral artery dissection (VAD) is an important cause of stroke in the young. It can present nonspecifically and may be misdiagnosed with adverse consequences. We assessed the frequency of head/neck pain, other neurological symptoms, and cerebrovascular events in symptomatic VAD. Methods We conducted a systematic review of observational studies, searching electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE) for English-language manuscripts with >5 subjects with clinical or radiological features of VAD. Two independent reviewers selected studies for inclusion; a third adjudicated differences. Studies were assessed for methodological quality and clinical data were abstracted. Pooled proportions were calculated. Results Of 3996 citations, we screened 511manuscripts and selected 75 studies describing 1,972 VAD patients. The most common symptoms were dizziness/vertigo (58%), headache (51%) and neck pain (46%). Stroke was common (63%), especially with extracranial dissections (66% vs. 32%, p<0.0001), while TIA (14%) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) (10%) were uncommon. SAH was seen only with intracranial dissections (57% vs. 0%, p=0.003). Fewer than half of the patients had obvious trauma, and only 7.9% had a known connective tissue disease. Outcome was good (modified Rankin scale (mRS) 0-1) in 67% and poor (mRS 5-6) in 10%. Conclusion VAD is associated with nonspecific symptoms such as dizziness, vertigo, headache, or neck pain. Ischemic stroke is the most common reported cerebrovascular complication. VAD should be considered in the diagnostic assessment of patients presenting with dizziness or craniocervical pain, even in the absence of other risk factors. Future studies should compare clinical findings as predictors in well-defined, undifferentiated populations of clinical VAD suspects. PMID:22931728

  9. Dual-Energy CT Angiography in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, Carolin Jochum, Susanne; Sadick, Maliha; Huck, Kurt; Ziegler, Peter; Fink, Christian; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Diehl, Steffen J.

    2009-07-15

    We sought to study the accuracy of dual-energy computed tomographic angiography (DE-CTA) for the assessment of symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremity by using the dual-energy bone removal technique compared with a commercially available conventional bone removal tool. Twenty patients underwent selective digital subtraction angiography and DE-CTA of the pelvis and lower extremities. CTA data were postprocessed with two different applications: conventional bone removal and dual-energy bone removal. All data were reconstructed and evaluated as 3D maximum-intensity projections. Time requirements for reconstruction were documented. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and concordance of DE-CTA regarding degree of stenosis and vessel wall calcification were calculated. A total of 359 vascular segments were analyzed. Compared with digital subtraction angiography, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, respectively, of CTA was 97.2%, 94.1%, and 94.7% by the dual-energy bone removal technique. The conventional bone removal tool delivered a sensitivity of 77.1%, a specificity of 70.7%, and an accuracy of 72.0%. Best results for both postprocessing methods were achieved in the vascular segments of the upper leg. In severely calcified segments, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy stayed above 90% by the dual-energy bone removal technique, whereas the conventional bone removal technique showed a substantial decrease of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. DE-CTA is a feasible and accurate diagnostic method in the assessment of symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Results obtained by DE-CTA are superior to the conventional bone removal technique and less dependent on vessel wall calcifications.

  10. Peripheral Arterial Disease Assessment Wall, Perfusion, and Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterized by lower limb arterial obstruction due to atherosclerosis and is increasingly common. Presently used methods for diagnosis and follow-up as well as for assessment of novel therapies are limited. Materials and Methods Three distinct magnetic resonance examinations were developed. The first was high-resolution black-blood atherosclerotic plaque imaging of the superficial femoral artery using a surface coil and flow saturation. Second, first-pass contrast-enhanced dual-contrast perfusion imaging of the calf muscle was performed at peak exercise using a magnetic resonance (MR)–compatible pedal ergometer. Lastly, 31P MR spectroscopy was also performed at peak exercise to measure phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery kinetics. Results Seventeen patients (age, 63 ± 10 yrs) with mild to moderate PAD were studied with black-blood atherosclerotic plaque imaging. Mean atherosclerotic plaque volume measured was 7.27 ± 3.73 cm3. Eleven patients (age, 61 ± 11 yrs) with mild to moderate symptomatic PAD and 22 normal control subjects were studied with first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging. Perfusion index was stepwise increased from patients to normal subjects with matched workload to normal subjects at maximal exercise. For PCr recovery kinetics, 20 patients with mild to moderate PAD and 14 controls were studied. The median recovery time constant of PCr was 34.7 seconds in the controls and 91.0 seconds in the PAD patients (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Three distinct MR examinations of different aspects of peripheral arterial disease have been developed and tested and shown to differentiate patients with mild to moderate PAD from normal controls. Taken together, these tests are potential quantitative end points for clinical trials of novel therapies in PAD. PMID:18025990

  11. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in three cats

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Takuma; SUNAHARA, Hiroshi; SUGIMOTO, Keisuke; ITO, Tetsuro; KANAI, Eiichi; FUJII, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Case 1 involved a 4-month-old intact male Somali cat in which peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPS) was recognized after a cardiac murmur remained following patent ductus arteriosus ligation. Case 2, which involved a 1-year-old neutered male Norwegian Forest cat, and Case 3, which involved a 6-month-old intact female American Curl cat, were referred, because of cardiac murmurs. Grades III to IV/VI systolic heart murmurs were auscultated at the left heart base in all 3 cats. All cases showed bilateral pulmonary artery stenosis, although there were no associated clinical signs. In Cases 1 and 2, the pressure gradient through the stenosis decreased after treatment with atenolol. PMID:25650057

  12. Symptomatic Type IV Dual Left Anterior Descending Coronary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Kyriacos; Georgiou, Georgios M.; Nicolaides, Evagoras

    2016-01-01

    Dual left anterior descending coronary artery is a rare congenital anomaly with 4 subtypes. Double left anterior descending coronary artery originating from the left main stem and the right coronary artery (type IV dual left anterior descending artery) has been reported to occur in 0.01% to 0.7% of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. We report a case of a 49-year-old woman who was found to have this anomaly during coronary angiography. The patient had been complaining of chest pain that mimics angina pectoris and exercise tolerance test was positive for myocardial ischemia. PMID:28203572

  13. PET evaluation of cerebral blood flow reactivity in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, H.M.; Brass, L.; Rich, D.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to use acetazolamide (AZ) enhanced O-15 water PET to evaluate cerebral perfusion reserve in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. We hypothesized that impaired vasoreactivity would be associated with symptomatic disease and a higher likelihood of future ischemic events. Twenty-two patients with significant (>75%) carotid artery occlusion underwent cerebral blood flow imaging at baseline and following AZ infusion. Paired O-15 data sets were coregistered and globally normalized. Regions of interest were drawn on baseline blood flow images and superimposed upon (AZ - baseline) difference images to derive a % change in regional blood flow after AZ administration. The results showed a significant difference in cerebral perfusion reserve between symptomatic (n=19) and asymptomatic (n=3) carotid artery disease.

  14. Stenting for a symptomatic posterior cerebral artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gelin; Zheng, Ling; Zhou, Zhiming; Liu, Xinfeng

    2009-05-01

    Evolvement of endovascular devices and increase of operator expertise have made angioplasty and stenting in intracranial vessels technically possible. Stenting has been reported in treating stenosis in middle and anterior cerebral arteries with favorable outcomes. However, the feasibility of stenting for stenosis in posterior cerebral artery (PCA) has not been established. We report a patient with progressive focal cerebral ischemic symptoms, which were arrested after reconstruction of the associated PCA stenosis with stenting.

  15. Peripheral Arterial Disease Study (PERART): Prevalence and predictive values of asymptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease related to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Alzamora, María Teresa; Baena-Díez, José Miguel; Sorribes, Marta; Forés, Rosa; Toran, Pere; Vicheto, Marisa; Pera, Guillem; Reina, María Dolores; Albaladejo, Carlos; Llussà, Judith; Bundó, Magda; Sancho, Amparo; Heras, Antonio; Rubiés, Joan; Arenillas, Juan Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Background The early diagnosis of atherosclerotic disease is essential for developing preventive strategies in populations at high risk and acting when the disease is still asymptomatic. A low ankle-arm index (AAI) is a good marker of vascular events and may be diminished without presenting symptomatology (silent peripheral arterial disease). The aim of the PERART study (PERipheral ARTerial disease) is to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (both silent and symptomatic) in a general population of both sexes and determine its predictive value related to morbimortality (cohort study). Methods/Design This cross-over, cohort study consists of 2 phases: firstly a descriptive, transversal cross-over study to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, and secondly, a cohort study to evaluate the predictive value of AAI in relation to cardiovascular morbimortality. From September 2006 to June 2007, a total of 3,010 patients over the age of 50 years will be randomly selected from a population adscribed to 24 healthcare centres in the province of Barcelona (Spain). The diagnostic criteria of peripheral arterial disease will be considered as an AAI < 0.90, determined by portable Doppler (8 Mhz probe) measured twice by trained personnel. Cardiovascular risk will be calculated with the Framingham-Wilson tables, with Framingham calibrated by the REGICOR and SCORE groups. The subjects included will be evaluted every 6 months by telephone interview and the clnical history and death registries will be reviewed. The appearance of the following cardiovascular events will be considered as variables of response: transitory ischaemic accident, ictus, angina, myocardial infartction, symptomatic abdominal aneurysm and vascular mortality. Discussion In this study we hope to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, especially the silent forms, in the general population and establish its relationship with cardiovascular morbimortality. A low

  16. Stenting for Symptomatic Vertebral Artery Stenosis Associated with Bilateral Carotid Rete Mirabile: The Long-Term Clinical and Angiographic Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jang Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic vertebral artery (VA) stenosis associated with bilateral carotid rete mirabile (CRM) has not been reported. We report the long-term clinical and angiographic outcome after stenting for symptomatic VA stenosis in the patient with bilateral CRM. This report is the first case that symptomatic VA stenosis associated with bilateral CRM was treated with stenting. PMID:25995701

  17. Endovascular treatment of a symptomatic vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Inaraja Pérez, Gabriel Cristian; Rodríguez Morata, Alejandro; Reyes Ortega, Juan Pedro; Gómez Medialdea, Rafael; Cabezudo García, Pablo

    2015-07-01

    A 35-year-old patient was brought to the emergency department referring dysarthria, left ear tinnitus for 5 min, and short-lasting blindness, with headache in the 45 min before the clinical presentation. In the magnetic resonance imaging, an acute-subacute lesion in the cerebellum right-anterior lobe (in the territory of the cerebellum anterior artery) and a dilatation near the ostium of the right vertebral artery were seen. For a better assessment, an Angio-CT was done, showing a 9-mm saccular pseudoaneurysm of the right vertebral artery close to the origin of the vessel, without being able to determine if it had been caused because of a dissection. The rest of the study (cerebral vessels and supra-aortic vessels) showed no disorders. He was operated under local anesthesia and sedation a week after the onset of the symptoms. Through a 0.014 wire, a Biotronik PK Papyrus balloon-expandable covered cobalt-chromium stent was deployed covering the hole in the artery. Antiplatelet drugs were prescribed, and the patient was discharged 24 hr after surgery. He has remained symptom free since then.

  18. Patterns of disease distribution of lower extremity peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Shi, Yang; Wang, Yutang; Li, Xiaoying

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common manifestation of atherosclerosis that is associated with an increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular (CV) events. Peripheral arterial disease involves the arteries distal to the aortic bifurcation in a nonuniform manner. Studies have shown that symptoms and prognosis of patients with PAD vary according to the location and size of the affected artery. Several modalities have been used to identify the location of PAD, including noninvasive evaluations and invasive procedures. Peripheral arterial disease has a risk factor profile similar to that associated with coronary artery disease (ie, age, gender, diabetes, smoking, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia). Many studies have shown that the distribution, extent, and progression of PAD are influenced by CV risk factors but the findings are not consistent. Management strategies for PAD are different for proximal and distal PAD. The objective of this review is to discuss the patterns of diseases distribution in patients with PAD.

  19. Factors Influencing the Prescription of Cardiovascular Preventive Therapies in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gauvin, Valerie; Turcotte, Stephane; Milot, Alain; Douville, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Background Guidelines recommend that patients with peripheral arterial disease should be medically treated to reduce the occurrence of serious cardiovascular events. Despite these recommendations, studies conducted in the early 2000s reported that medical therapies for secondary cardiovascular prevention are not given systematically to patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We identified factors associated with the prescription of preventive therapies in patients with symptomatic PAD. Methods and Findings Consecutive patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (n = 362) treated between 2008 and 2010 in one tertiary care center (CHU de Quebec, Canada) were considered. Data were collected from the medical charts. The main outcome was the combined prescription of three therapies: 1) statins, 2) antiplatelets, 3) angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. The mean age was 70 years and 43% had a pre-existing coronary artery disease. Antiplatelet therapy was the most prescribed drug (83%). A total of 52% of the patients received the three combined therapies. Less than 10% of patients had a known contraindication to one class of medication. Having at least three cardiovascular risk factors (Odds Ratio (OR) = 4.51; 95% CI: 2.76–7.37) was the factor most strongly associated with the prescription of the combined therapies. Pre-existing coronary artery disease (OR = 2.28; 95% CI: 1.43–3.65) and history of peripheral vascular surgery (OR = 2.30; 95% CI: 1.37–3.86) were two factors independently associated with the prescription of the combined therapies. However, peripheral arterial disease patients with chronic critical limb ischemia were less likely to receive the combined therapies (OR = 0.53; 95% CI: 0.32–0.87) than those with claudication. The retrospective nature of this study, not allowing for an exhaustive report of the contraindication to medication prescription, is the main limitation. Conclusion About half

  20. Symptomatic vertebral artery conflicts to the medulla oblongata and microsurgical treatment options: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hänggi, Daniel; Steiger, Hans-Jakob

    2009-04-01

    Symptomatic vascular compression of the medulla oblongata causing brainstem dysfunction is extremely rare. Only a few case reports documenting the clinical condition of patients, diagnostic features and therapeutic options are available in literature. The Medline search revealed with the present cases a total of 9 reports on patients with symptomatic vertebral artery compression to the brainstem. Out of these reports the observed symptoms comprise hypertension, hemiparesis, tetraparesis, hemihypaesthesia, pyramidal tract signs, central sleep apnea and vertigo. Moreover an overview of the various suggested and published microsurgical procedures is given. Based on the literature search basically 4 different microsurgical strategies are documented, the vessel mobilization, the vessel section with posterior fossa decompression, the autologous material inlay with posterior fossa decompression and the lateral vessel retraction assisted with Gore-Tex. Vascular compression causing brainstem deficits are particularly unusual in the young population. Two illustrative cases of young men with a symptomatic vertebral artery brainstem conflict who were treated microsurgically with vascular decompression are additionally discussed in the present article. The history, diagnostic features, microsurgical treatment and outcome of these patients are described in detail. As a conclusion these cases demonstrated that careful examination can serve to determine the diagnosis even in the young population microsurgical treated successfully. In conclusion the present review tries to provide an overview of the existent data on the variety of clinical, radiological and surgical features in patients with symptomatic vascular brainstem compression.

  1. Symptomatic obstruction of the brachiocephalic and left subclavian arteries obscured by aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Peter W; Assi, Roland; Grecu, Loreta; Dardik, Alan

    2014-04-01

    Stenosis or occlusion of the brachiocephalic artery represents an uncommon cause of cerebrovascular insufficiency. We report a patient with combined brachiocephalic and left subclavian obstruction with clinical manifestations of lightheadedness, syncope, and left-sided weakness who remained misdiagnosed essentially because of symmetrical pressures in the upper extremities. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis failed to provide symptomatic relief. Eventual stenting of the brachiocephalic trunk resolved the patient's symptoms. Our report highlights the diagnostic challenges in this case of bilateral supraaortic vessel disease and shows that equal upper extremity pressures do not rule out brachiocephalic artery obstruction.

  2. Invasive evaluation of plaque morphology of symptomatic superficial femoral artery stenoses using combined near-infrared spectroscopy and intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, Sibin K; Safian, Robert D; Madder, Ryan D; Hanson, Ivan D; Pica, Mark C; Smith, James L; Goldstein, James A; Abbas, Amr E

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the plaque morphology of severe stenoses in the superficial femoral artery (SFA) employing combined near-infrared spectroscopy and intravascular ultrasound (NIRS-IVUS). Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. Plaque composition of SFA stenoses has been characterized as primarily fibrous or fibrocalcific by non-invasive and autopsy studies. NIRS has been validated to detect lipid-core plaque (LCP) in the coronary circulation. We imaged severe SFA stenoses with NIRS-IVUS prior to revascularization in 31 patients (46 stenoses) with Rutherford claudication ⩾ class 3. Angiographic parameters included lesion location and stenosis severity. IVUS parameters included plaque burden and presence of calcium. NIRS images were analyzed for LCP and maximum lipid-core burden index in a 4-mm length of artery (maxLCBI4mm). By angiography, 38 (82.6%) lesions were calcified and 9 (19.6%) were chronic total occlusions. Baseline stenosis severity and lesion length were 86.0 ± 11.0% and 36.5 ± 46.5 mm, respectively. NIRS-IVUS identified calcium in 45 (97.8%) lesions and LCP in 17 (37.0%) lesions. MaxLCBI4mm was 433 ± 244. All lesions with LCP also contained calcium; there were no non-calcified lesions with LCP. In conclusion, this is the first study of combined NIRS-IVUS in patients with PAD. NIRS-IVUS demonstrates that nearly all patients with symptomatic severe SFA disease have fibrocalcific plaque, and one-third of such lesions contain LCP. These findings contrast with those in patients with acute coronary syndromes, and may have implications regarding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis in different vascular beds.

  3. How Is Peripheral Arterial Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & ... artery. The balloon is then inflated, which pushes plaque outward against the artery wall. This widens the ...

  4. Metals in urine and peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Navas-Acien, Ana; Silbergeld, Ellen K; Sharrett, Richey; Calderon-Aranda, Emma; Selvin, Elizabeth; Guallar, Eliseo

    2005-02-01

    Exposure to metals may promote atherosclerosis. Blood cadmium and lead were associated with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the 1999-2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In the present study we evaluated the association between urinary levels of cadmium, lead, barium, cobalt, cesium, molybdenum, antimony, thallium, and tungsten with PAD in a cross-sectional analysis of 790 participants > or =40 years of age in NHANES 1999-2000. PAD was defined as a blood pressure ankle brachial index < 0.9 in at least one leg. Metals were measured in casual (spot) urine specimens by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. After multivariable adjustment, subjects with PAD had 36% higher levels of cadmium in urine and 49% higher levels of tungsten compared with noncases. The adjusted odds ratio for PAD comparing the 75th to the 25th percentile of the cadmium distribution was 3.05 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.97 to 9.58]; that for tungsten was 2.25 (95% CI, 0.97 to 5.24). PAD risk increased sharply at low levels of antimony and remained elevated beyond 0.1 microg/L. PAD was not associated with other metals. In conclusion, urinary cadmium, tungsten, and possibly antimony were associated with PAD in a representative sample of the U.S. population. For cadmium, these results strengthen previous findings using blood cadmium as a biomarker, and they support its role in atherosclerosis. For tungsten and antimony, these results need to be interpreted cautiously in the context of an exploratory analysis but deserve further study. Other metals in urine were not associated with PAD at the levels found in the general population.

  5. Metals in Urine and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Navas-Acien, Ana; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Sharrett, A. Richey; Calderon-Aranda, Emma; Selvin, Elizabeth; Guallar, Eliseo

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to metals may promote atherosclerosis. Blood cadmium and lead were associated with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the 1999–2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In the present study we evaluated the association between urinary levels of cadmium, lead, barium, cobalt, cesium, molybdenum, antimony, thallium, and tungsten with PAD in a cross-sectional analysis of 790 participants ≥40 years of age in NHANES 1999–2000. PAD was defined as a blood pressure ankle brachial index < 0.9 in at least one leg. Metals were measured in casual (spot) urine specimens by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry. After multivariable adjustment, subjects with PAD had 36% higher levels of cadmium in urine and 49% higher levels of tungsten compared with noncases. The adjusted odds ratio for PAD comparing the 75th to the 25th percentile of the cadmium distribution was 3.05 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.97 to 9.58]; that for tungsten was 2.25 (95% CI, 0.97 to 5.24). PAD risk increased sharply at low levels of antimony and remained elevated beyond 0.1 μg/L. PAD was not associated with other metals. In conclusion, urinary cadmium, tungsten, and possibly antimony were associated with PAD in a representative sample of the U.S. population. For cadmium, these results strengthen previous findings using blood cadmium as a biomarker, and they support its role in atherosclerosis. For tungsten and antimony, these results need to be interpreted cautiously in the context of an exploratory analysis but deserve further study. Other metals in urine were not associated with PAD at the levels found in the general population. PMID:15687053

  6. Exercise training and peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Haas, Tara L; Lloyd, Pamela G; Yang, Hsiao-Tung; Terjung, Ronald L

    2012-10-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common vascular disease that reduces blood flow capacity to the legs of patients. PAD leads to exercise intolerance that can progress in severity to greatly limit mobility, and in advanced cases leads to frank ischemia with pain at rest. It is estimated that 12 to 15 million people in the United States are diagnosed with PAD, with a much larger population that is undiagnosed. The presence of PAD predicts a 50% to 1500% increase in morbidity and mortality, depending on severity. Treatment of patients with PAD is limited to modification of cardiovascular disease risk factors, pharmacological intervention, surgery, and exercise therapy. Extended exercise programs that involve walking approximately five times per week, at a significant intensity that requires frequent rest periods, are most significant. Preclinical studies and virtually all clinical trials demonstrate the benefits of exercise therapy, including improved walking tolerance, modified inflammatory/hemostatic markers, enhanced vasoresponsiveness, adaptations within the limb (angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, and mitochondrial synthesis) that enhance oxygen delivery and metabolic responses, potentially delayed progression of the disease, enhanced quality of life indices, and extended longevity. A synthesis is provided as to how these adaptations can develop in the context of our current state of knowledge and events known to be orchestrated by exercise. The benefits are so compelling that exercise prescription should be an essential option presented to patients with PAD in the absence of contraindications. Obviously, selecting for a lifestyle pattern that includes enhanced physical activity prior to the advance of PAD limitations is the most desirable and beneficial.

  7. Exercise Training and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Tara L.; Lloyd, Pamela G.; Yang, Hsiao-Tung; Terjung, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common vascular disease that reduces blood flow capacity to the legs of patients. PAD leads to exercise intolerance that can progress in severity to greatly limit mobility, and in advanced cases leads to frank ischemia with pain at rest. It is estimated that 12–15 million people in the United States are diagnosed with PAD, with a much larger population that is undiagnosed. The presence of PAD predicts a 50–1500% increase in morbidity and mortality, depending on severity. Treatment of patients with PAD is limited to modification of cardiovascular disease risk factors, pharmacological intervention, surgery, and exercise therapy. Extended exercise programs that involve walking ~5 times/wk, at a significant intensity that requires frequent rest periods, are most significant. Pre-clinical studies and virtually all clinical trials demonstrate the benefits of exercise therapy, including: improved walking tolerance, modified inflammatory/hemostatic markers, enhanced vasoresponsiveness, adaptations within the limb (angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, mitochondrial synthesis) that enhance oxygen delivery and metabolic responses, potentially delayed progression of the disease, enhanced quality of life indices, and extended longevity. A synthesis is provided as to how these adaptations can develop in the context of our current state of knowledge and events known to be orchestrated by exercise. The benefits are so compelling that exercise prescription should be an essential option presented to patients with PAD in the absence of contraindications. Obviously, selecting for a life style pattern, that includes enhanced physical activity prior to the advance of PAD limitations, is the most desirable and beneficial. PMID:23720270

  8. Leptospirosis and Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lee, Feng-You; Wang, Ying-Chuan; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Data on the association between peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) and leptospirosis are limited. We conducted a retrospective cohort study for determining whether leptospirosis is one of the possible risk factors for PAOD. Patients diagnosed with leptospirosis by using 2000 to 2010 data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with leptospirosis without a history of PAOD were selected. For each leptospirosis patient, 4 controls without a history of leptospirosis and PAOD were randomly selected and frequency-matched for sex, age, the year of the index date, and comorbidity diseases. The follow-up period was from the time of the initial diagnosis of leptospirosis to the diagnosis date of PAOD, or December 31, 2011. The Cox proportional hazard regression models were used for analyzing the risk of PAOD. During the follow-up period, the cumulative incidence of PAOD was higher among the patients from the leptospirosis cohort than among the nonleptospirosis cohort (log-rank test, P < 0.001). In total, 29 patients with PAOD from the leptospirosis cohort and 81 from the nonleptospirosis cohort were observed with the incidence rates of 2.1 and 1.3 per 1000 person-years, respectively, yielding a crude hazards ratio (HR) of 1.62 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.44–1.81) and adjusted HR (aHR) of 1.75 (95% CI = 1.58–1.95). The risk of PAOD was 1.75-fold higher in the patients with leptospirosis than in the general population. PMID:26986166

  9. Endovascular Intervention for Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thukkani, Arun K.; Kinlay, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Advances in endovascular therapies during the past decade have broadened the options for treating peripheral vascular disease percutaneously. Endovascular treatment offers a lower risk alternative to open surgery in many patients with multiple comorbidities. Noninvasive physiological tests and arterial imaging precede an endovascular intervention and help localize the disease and plan the procedure. The timing and need for revascularization are broadly related to the 3 main clinical presentations of claudication, critical limb ischemia, and acute limb ischemia. Many patients with claudication can be treated by exercise and medical therapy. Endovascular procedures are considered when these fail to improve quality of life and function. In contrast, critical limb ischemia and acute limb ischemia threaten the limb and require more urgent revascularization. In general, endovascular treatments have greater long-term durability for aortoiliac disease than femoral popliteal disease. Infrapopliteal revascularization is generally reserved for critical and acute limb ischemia. Balloon angioplasty and stenting are the mainstays of endovascular therapy. New well-tested innovations include drug-eluting stents and drug-coated balloons. Adjunctive devices for crossing chronic total occlusions or debulking plaque with atherectomy are less rigorously studied and have niche roles. Patients receiving endovascular procedures need a structured surveillance plan for follow-up care. This includes intensive treatment of cardiovascular risk factors to prevent myocardial infarction and stroke, which are the main causes of death. Limb surveillance aims to identify restenosis and new disease beyond the intervened segments, both of which may jeopardize patency and lead to recurrent symptoms, functional impairment, or a threatened limb. PMID:25908731

  10. Ovarian Artery Embolization in Patients With Collateral Supply to Symptomatic Uterine Leiomyomata

    SciTech Connect

    Scheurig-Muenkler, C. Poellinger, A. Wagner, M. Hamm, B. Kroencke, T. J.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and outcome of ovarian artery embolization (OAE) in patients with collateral supply to symptomatic uterine leiomyomata. Materials and Methods: Thirteen patients with relevant leiomyoma perfusion by way of enlarged ovarian arteries underwent additional OAE during the same (N = 10) or a second procedure (N = 3). Uterine artery embolization (UAE) was performed bilaterally in 10 and unilaterally in 2 patients with a single artery. One patient had no typical uterine arteries but bilaterally enlarged ovarian arteries, prompting bilateral OAE. OAE was accomplished with coil embolization in one and particle embolization in 12 patients. Symptoms before therapy and clinical outcome were assessed using a standardized questionnaire. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging after embolization was available in 11 of 13 patients and was used to determine the percentage of fibroid infarction. Results: UAE and OAE were technically successful in all patients. One patient experienced prolonged irritation at the puncture site. Median clinical follow-up time was 16 months (range 4-37). Ten of 13 patients showed improvement or complete resolution of clinical symptoms. One patient reported only slight improvement of her symptoms. These women presented with regular menses. Two patients (15%), 47 and 48 years, both with unilateral OAE, reported permanent amenorrhea directly after embolization. Their symptoms completely resolved. Seven patients showed complete and 4 showed >90% fibroid infarction after embolization therapy. Conclusions: OAE is technically safe and effective in patients with ovarian artery collateral supply to symptomatic uterine leiomyomata. The risk of permanent amenorrhea observed in this study is similar to the reported incidence after UAE.

  11. Peripheral arterial disease and revascularization of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, R O; Brownrigg, J; Hinchliffe, R J

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes is a complex disease with many serious potential sequelae, including large vessel arterial disease and microvascular dysfunction. Peripheral arterial disease is a common large vessel complication of diabetes, implicated in the development of tissue loss in up to half of patients with diabetic foot ulceration. In addition to peripheral arterial disease, functional changes in the microcirculation also contribute to the development of a diabetic foot ulcer, along with other factors such as infection, oedema and abnormal biomechanical loading. Peripheral arterial disease typically affects the distal vessels, resulting in multi-level occlusions and diffuse disease, which often necessitates challenging distal revascularisation surgery or angioplasty in order to improve blood flow. However, technically successful revascularisation does not always result in wound healing. The confounding effects of microvascular dysfunction must be recognised--treatment of a patient with a diabetic foot ulcer and peripheral arterial disease should address this complex interplay of pathophysiological changes. In the case of non-revascularisable peripheral arterial disease or poor response to conventional treatment, alternative approaches such as cell-based treatment, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and the use of vasodilators may appear attractive, however more robust evidence is required to justify these novel approaches.

  12. Community walking programs for treatment of peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Ryan J.; Rogers, R. Kevin; Hiatt, William R.; Regensteiner, Judith G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Supervised walking programs offered at medical facilities for patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and intermittent claudication (IC), while effective, are often not utilized due to barriers including lack of reimbursement and the need to travel to specialized locations for the training intervention. Walking programs for PAD patients that occur in community settings, such as those outside of supervised settings, may be a viable treatment option, as they are convenient and potentially bypass the need for supervised walking. This review evaluated the various methodologies and outcomes of community walking programs for PAD. Methods A literature review using appropriate search terms was conducted within PubMed/Medline and the Cochrane databases to identify studies in the English language employing community walking programs to treat PAD patients with IC. Search results were reviewed, and relevant articles were identified that form the basis of this review. The primary outcome was peak walking performance on the treadmill. Results Randomized controlled trials (n=10) examining peak walking outcomes in 558 PAD patients demonstrated that supervised exercise programs were more effective than community walking studies that consisted of general recommendations for patients with IC to walk at home. Recent community trials that incorporated more advice and feedback for PAD patients in general resulted in similar outcomes with no differences in peak walking time compared to supervised walking exercise groups. Conclusions Unstructured recommendations for patients with symptomatic PAD to exercise in the community are not efficacious. Community walking programs with more feedback and monitoring offer improvements in walking performance for patients with claudication and may bypass some obstacles associated with facility-based exercise programs. PMID:24103409

  13. Protocol for a prospective, multicentre registry study of stenting for symptomatic intracranial artery stenosis in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yilong; Miao, Zhongrong; Wang, Yongjun; Zhao, Xingquan; Gao, Peiyi; Liu, Liping; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yajie; Ma, Ning; Xu, Ziqi; Mo,, Dapeng; Gao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The SAMMPRIS trial suggested that aggressive treatment was superior to endovascular stenting in patients with severe symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS) due to high complication rates in patients in the stenting group. Given that 12.2% patients failed aggressive medical therapy in the SAMMPRIS study, it is imperative to perform a multicentre prospective registry study of stenting for patients with ICAS in China. This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endovascular stenting for patients with symptomatic intracranial artery stenosis and poor collaterals in China and to identify the characteristics of the population that would benefit the most from endovascular stenting in Chinese patients. Methods and analysis This multicentre prospective registry study will involve 20 stroke centres in China, and plans to recruit 300 patients into the registry. Patients with ≥70% stenosis and symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease caused by hypoperfusion combined with poor collaterals who met the inclusion criteria and exclusion criteria would be enrolled for this study. The primary outcome is the target vessel stroke event (including haemorrhagic or ischaemic stroke) or death within 30 days after stenting. The secondary outcomes include the successful recanalisation rate, the incidence of recurrent ischaemic stroke in the territory of the stented artery between 30 days and 1 year postoperatively, the restenosis rate and health-related quality of life. Ethics and dissemination The protocol is approved by the ethics committee at the coordinating centre and by the local institutional review board at each participating centre. Findings will be shared with participating hospitals, policymakers and the academic community to promote quality monitoring, quality improvement and the efficient allocation and use of cerebral catheterisation and intracranial artery stenting in China. Trial registration number http

  14. Drug-Coated Balloons for Infrainguinal Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjum S; Lee, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Revascularization of infrainguinal peripheral artery disease has traditionally been accomplished via percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. However, long-term results have been hampered by high rates of restenosis. Along with the advent of stents, paclitaxel-coated balloons are an emerging therapeutic option for the invasive management of infrainguinal peripheral artery disease. Paclitaxel has been successful in inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia, the main mechanism for in-stent restenosis. Technological advances have facilitated the development of paclitaxel-coated balloons, which show promise in early trials for femoropopliteal stenosis relative to uncoated balloons. For infrapopliteal stenoses, the data remain scant and conflicted. Therefore, large-scale randomized clinical trials with long-term follow-up evaluating safety and effectiveness between various strategies need to be performed to determine the optimal invasive management strategy for infrainguinal peripheral artery disease.

  15. Sternum-Sparing Hybrid Repair of a Symptomatic Innominate Artery Aneurysm in a Frail Patient with Bovine Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Pellenc, Quentin; Avramenko, Alla; Mordant, Pierre; Castier, Yves

    2016-08-01

    We present the case of a 65-year-old man with a bovine aortic arch variation, who presented a symptomatic aneurysm of the innominate artery. Standard open repair was contraindicated and an hybrid approach was performed, regarding general status (Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (OMS) Performance Status score 3 and American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status classification system score 3). Right common carotid artery and right subclavian artery were revascularized surgically from the left common carotid artery. Proximal aneurysm exclusion was performed with a vascular plug. Follow-up computed tomography angiography confirmed the exclusion of the innominate artery aneurysm. Vascular plugs can be used safely through a sternum-sparing hybrid approach to treat symptomatic innominate artery aneurysms in frail patients.

  16. Arterial cannulation can hasten the onset of symmetrical peripheral gangrene

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Nataraj M.; Chaudhuri, Souvik

    2011-01-01

    Symmetrical peripheral gangrene (SPG) is a devastating complication seen in critical care settings due to several contributory factors like low perfusion, high dose of vasopressors, disseminated intravascular coagulation, etc. Arterial cannulation is commonly done in critical patients for monitoring. We report a case of patient who developed early features of SPG which recovered in one hand, although it progressed in the hand which had the arterial cannula. PMID:25885311

  17. Prognostic significance of calcified plaque among symptomatic patients with nonobstructive coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sana; Bellam, Naveen; Leipsic, Jonathon; Berman, Daniel S.; Quyyumi, Arshed; Hausleiter, Jörg; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Budoff, Matthew J.; Cademartiri, Fillippo; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Chow, Benjamin J. W.; Cury, Ricardo C.; Delago, Augustin J.; Dunning, Allison L.; Feuchtner, Gudrun M.; Hadamitzky, Martin; Karlsberg, Ronald P.; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Lin, Fay Y.; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha M.; Maffei, Erica; Raff, Gilbert L.; Villines, Todd C.; Gomez, Millie J.; Min, James K.; Shaw, Leslee J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronary artery calcium (CAC) is a well-established predictor of clinical outcomes for population screening. Limited evidence is available as to its predictive value in symptomatic patients without obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of the current study was to assess the prognostic value of CAC scores among symptomatic patients with nonobstructive CAD. Methods From the COronary Computed Tomographic Angiography EvaluatioN For Clinical Outcomes: An InteRnational Multicenter (CONFIRM) registry, 7,200 symptomatic patients with nonobstructive CAD (<50% coronary stenosis) on coronary-computed tomographic angiography were prospectively enrolled and followed for a median of 2.1 years. Patients were categorized as without (0% stenosis) or with (>0% but <50% coronary stenosis) a luminal stenosis. CAC scores were calculated using the Agatston method. Univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were employed to estimate all-cause mortality and/or myocardial infarction (MI). Four-year death and death or MI rates were 1.9% and 3.3%. Results Of the 4,380 patients with no luminal stenosis, 86% had CAC scores of <10 while those with a luminal stenosis had more prevalent and extensive CAC with 31.9% having a CAC score of ≥100. Among patients with no luminal stenosis, CAC was not predictive of all-cause mortality (P = .44). However, among patients with a luminal stenosis, 4-year mortality rates ranged from 0.8% to 9.8% for CAC scores of 0 to ≥400 (P < .0001). The mortality hazard was 6.0 (P = .004) and 13.3 (P < .0001) for patients with a CAC score of 100–399 and ≥400. In patients with a luminal stenosis, CAC remained independently predictive in all-cause mortality (P < .0001) and death or MI (P < .0001) in multivariable models containing CAD risk factors and presenting symptoms. Conclusions CAC allows for the identification of those at an increased hazard for death or MI in symptomatic patients with nonobstructive disease. From the

  18. Subintimal Angioplasty for Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Met, Rosemarie Lienden, Krijn P. Van; Koelemay, Mark J. W.; Bipat, Shandra; Legemate, Dink A.; Reekers, Jim A.

    2008-07-15

    The objective of this study was to summarize outcomes of subintimal angioplasty (SA) for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. The Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase databases were searched to perform a systematic review of the literature from 1966 through May 2007 on outcomes of SA for peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the infrainguinal vessels. The keywords 'percutaneous intentional extraluminal revascularization,' 'subintimal angioplasty,' 'peripheral arterial disease,' 'femoral artery,' 'popliteal artery,' and 'tibial artery' were used. Assessment of study quality was done using a form based on a checklist of the Dutch Cochrane Centre. The recorded outcomes were technical and clinical success, primary (assisted) patency, limb salvage, complications, and survival, in relation to the clinical grade of disease (intermittent claudication or critical limb ischemia [CLI] or mixed) and location of lesion (femoropopliteal, crural, or mixed). Twenty-three cohort studies including a total of 1549 patients (range, 27 to 148) were included in this review. Methodological and reporting quality were moderate, e.g., there was selection bias and reporting was not done according to the reporting standards. These and significant clinical heterogeneity obstructed a meta-analysis. Reports about length of the lesion and TASC classification were too various to summarize or were not mentioned at all. The technical success rates varied between 80% and 90%, with lower rates for crural lesions compared with femoral lesions. Complication rates ranged between 8% and 17% and most complications were minor. After 1 year, clinical success was between 50% and 70%, primary patency was around 50% and limb salvage varied from 80% to 90%. In conclusion, taking into account the methodological shortcomings of the included studies, SA can play an important role in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease, especially in the case of critical limb ischemia. Despite the moderate patency

  19. The Recognition and Management of Peripheral Arterial Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, B. S.; Firor, W. B.; Key, J. A.

    1965-01-01

    Early recognition of limb ischemia may allow prompt, effective therapy for peripheral arterial injuries. A review of cases of peripheral arterial trauma at the Toronto General Hospital since 1953 revealed that 50% of the injuries were not immediately recognized. An expanding hematoma, pulsatile hemorrhage or the onset of a bruit and thrill signifies arterial damage in penetrating wounds. Ischemia may be difficult to recognize in patients with soft tissue or skeletal trauma, but the presence of distal pallor, coolness, paresis, cyanosis, anesthesia, poor capillary refill and disproportionate pain indicates significant arterial damage and necessitates surgical exploration. The diagnosis of arterial “spasm” in such instances is untenable and can only be made after direct inspection, or on the return of pulses after reduction of a fracture or release of a tight cast. Restoration of arterial continuity by end-to-end anastomosis is the recommended technique for all arterial injuries, since after ligation of even minor vessels, ischemia may ensue, and amputation may occasionally be necessary. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:14285303

  20. Correlation between Patient-Reported Symptoms and Ankle-Brachial Index after Revascularization for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Je, Hyung Gon; Kim, Bo Hyun; Cho, Kyoung Im; Jang, Jae Sik; Park, Yong Hyun; Spertus, John

    2015-01-01

    Improvement in quality of life (QoL) is a primary treatment goal for patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The current study aimed to quantify improvement in the health status of PAD patients following peripheral revascularization using the peripheral artery questionnaire (PAQ) and ankle-brachial index (ABI), and to evaluate possible correlation between the two methods. The PAQ and ABI were assessed in 149 symptomatic PAD patients before, and three months after peripheral revascularization. Mean PAQ summary scores improved significantly three months after revascularization (+49.3 ± 15 points, p < 0.001). PAQ scores relating to patient symptoms showed the largest improvement following revascularization. The smallest increases were seen in reported treatment satisfaction (all p’s < 0.001). As expected the ABI of treated limbs showed significant improvement post-revascularization (p < 0.001). ABI after revascularization correlated with patient-reported changes in the physical function and QoL domains of the PAQ. Twenty-two percent of PAD patients were identified as having a poor response to revascularization (increase in ABI < 0.15). Interestingly, poor responders reported improvement in symptoms on the PAQ, although this was less marked than in patients with an increase in ABI > 0.15 following revascularization. In conclusion, data from the current study suggest a significant correlation between improvement in patient-reported outcomes assessed by PAQ and ABI in symptomatic PAD patients undergoing peripheral revascularization. PMID:25993299

  1. [Our experience with peripheral arterial embolectomy].

    PubMed

    Caminiti, R; Arrigo, G; Broccio, G

    1975-04-30

    34 cases of acute peripheral ischaemia examined in recent years at the University of Messina General Surgery Clinic are presented. 16 were subjected to embolectomy according to Fogarty. The remaining 18 received protracted medical therapy. Some successes were obtained. In other cases, gangrene necessitated amputation of the affected limb. Satisfactory results were observed in 70% of the operated series. Success was more marked when only a short interval was left between the embolic episode, with progressively poorer results as the penalty for delay. The long-term results of embolectomy are related to the nature of the underlying disease and the treatment given after surgery.

  2. The Role of Ankle-Brachial Index for Predicting Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    RAC-ALBU, Marius; ILIUTA, Luminita; GUBERNA, Suzana Maria; SINESCU, Crina

    2014-01-01

    The presence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, regardless of gender or its clinical form of presentation (symptomatic or asymptomatic). PAD is considered an independent predictor for cardiovascular mortality, more important for survival than clinical history of coronary artery disease. The ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive and cost-effective screening tool for PAD. ABI is valuable for screening of peripheral artery disease in patients at risk and for diagnosing the disease in patients who present with lower-extremity symptoms. Compared to other diagnostic methods, ABI is superior because it is s a simple, noninvasive test, which could be routinely determined in all patients. Normal cut-off values for ABI are between 0.9 and 1.4. An abnormal ankle-brachial index- below 0.9-is a powerful independent marker of cardiovascular risk. There is an inverse correlation between ABI values, non-fatal cardiac events (myocardial infarction, stroke and heart failure exacerbation) and mortality (cardiovascular and global), the relation being nonlinear, patients with very low ABI (<0.3) having a significantly higher additional risk. Also, ABI values over 1.3-1.4 correlate with major adverse cardiovascular events. Therefore, ABI can be considered a generalized atherosclerotic predictor, identifying patients at high risk for developing cardio- or cerebrovascular events and should be incorporated into routine clinical practice. PMID:25705296

  3. Transient ischemic jejunitis due to symptomatic isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    MOCAN, MIHAELA; JEICAN, IONUŢ ISAIA; MOALE, MIHAI; CHIRA, ROMEO

    2017-01-01

    Acute abdominal pain is one of the most common conditions encountered in the emergency department. The differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain is extensive and identifying the underlying etiology can be challenging. We report a case of acute transient ischemic jejunitis due to symptomatic isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection in a patient with no cardiovascular risk factors or autoimmune diseases. Symptomatic isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain usually treated in the surgical department. The patient had criteria for conservative treatment and rapidly recovered. We highlight a rare condition which should be taken into account for the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain. PMID:28246505

  4. Peripheral arterial volume distensibility changes with applied external pressure: significant difference between arteries with different compliance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mengyan; Chen, Aiqing; Si, Xiaoshui; Ji, Mingxia; Zheng, Dingchang

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the different effect of external cuff pressure on arterial volume distensibility between peripheral arteries with different compliance. 30 healthy subjects were studied with the arm at two positions (0° and 45° from the horizontal level) to introduce different compliance of arteries. The electrocardiogram and finger and ear photoplethysmograms were recorded simultaneously under five external cuff pressures (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mmHg) on the whole arm to obtain arterial volume distensibility. With the applied external cuff pressures of 10, 20, 30 and 40 mmHg, the overall changes in arterial volume distensibility referred to those without external pressure were 0.010, 0.029, 0.054 and 0.108% per mmHg for the arm at the horizontal level, and 0.026, 0.071, 0.170 and 0.389% per mmHg for the arm at 45° from the horizontal level, confirming the non-linearity between arterial volume distensibility and external pressure. More interestingly, the significant differences in arterial volume distensibility changes were observed between the two arm positions, which were 0.016, 0.043, 0.116 and 0.281% per mmHg (all P < 0.01). Our findings demonstrated that arterial volume distensibility of peripheral arm arteries increased with external pressure, with a greater effect for more compliant arteries. PMID:28094277

  5. Gene Therapy Techniques for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, Hannu I.; Maekinen, Kimmo

    2002-03-15

    Somatic gene therapy is the introduction of new genetic material into selective somatic cells with resulting therapeutic benefits. Vascular wall and, subsequently, cardiovascular diseases have become an interesting target for gene therapy studies.Arteries are an attractive target for gene therapy since vascular interventions, both open surgical and endovascular, are well suited for minimally invasive, easily monitored gene delivery. Promising therapeutic effects have been obtained in animal models in preventing post-angioplasty restenosis and vein graft thickening, as well as increasing blood flow and collateral development in ischemic limbs.First clinical trials suggest a beneficial effect of vascular endothelial growth factor in achieving therapeutic angiogenesis in chronic limb ischemia and the efficacy of decoy oligonucleotides to prevent infrainguinal vein graft stenosis. However, further studies are mandatory to clarify the safety issues, to develop better gene delivery vectors and delivery catheters, to improve transgene expression, as well as to find the most effective and safe treatment genes.

  6. Dynamic diffuse optical tomography imaging of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Michael A; Kim, Hyun K; Kim, In-Kyong; Flexman, Molly; Dayal, Rajeev; Shrikhande, Gautam; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2012-09-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is the narrowing of arteries due to plaque accumulation in the vascular walls. This leads to insufficient blood supply to the extremities and can ultimately cause cell death. Currently available methods are ineffective in diagnosing PAD in patients with calcified arteries, such as those with diabetes. In this paper we investigate the potential of dynamic diffuse optical tomography (DDOT) as an alternative way to assess PAD in the lower extremities. DDOT is a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging modality that uses near-infrared light to create spatio-temporal maps of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin in tissue. We present three case studies in which we used DDOT to visualize vascular perfusion of a healthy volunteer, a PAD patient and a diabetic PAD patient with calcified arteries. These preliminary results show significant differences in DDOT time-traces and images between all three cases, underscoring the potential of DDOT as a new diagnostic tool.

  7. Reappraisal of primary balloon angioplasty without stenting for patients with symptomatic middle cerebral artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hideo; Terada, Tomoaki; Tanaka, Yuko; Tomura, Nagatsuki; Kono, Kenichi; Yoshimura, Ryo; Shintani, Aki

    2015-01-01

    There is a controversy regarding the safety and efficacy of intracranial stenting. We describe our experience with primary balloon angioplasty without stenting for symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis. All patients who underwent balloon angioplasty without stenting for MCA stenosis between 1996 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated technical success rates, degrees of stenosis, and stroke or death within 30 days. Among patients who were followed-up for > 1 year we evaluated latest functional outcomes, stroke recurrence at 1 year, and restenosis. In total 45/47 patients (95.7%) were successfully treated. Average pre- and postprocedure stenosis rates were 79.9% and 39.5%, respectively. Three neurological complications occurred within 30 days: one thromboembolism during the procedure; one lacunar infarction; and one fatal intraparenchymal hemorrhage after the procedure. Stroke or death rate within 30 days was 6.4%. Thirty-three patients were available for follow-up analysis with a mean period of 51.5 months. The combined rate of stroke or death within 30 days and ipsilateral ischemic stroke of the followed-up patients within 1 year beyond 30 days was 9.4%. Restenosis was observed in 26.9% of patients and all remained asymptomatic. In our retrospective series, balloon angioplasty without stenting was a safe, effective modality for symptomatic MCA stenosis. For patients refractory to medical therapy, primary balloon angioplasty may offer a better supplemental treatment option.

  8. Reappraisal of Primary Balloon Angioplasty without Stenting for Patients with Symptomatic Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    OKADA, Hideo; TERADA, Tomoaki; TANAKA, Yuko; TOMURA, Nagatsuki; KONO, Kenichi; YOSHIMURA, Ryo; SHINTANI, Aki

    2015-01-01

    There is a controversy regarding the safety and efficacy of intracranial stenting. We describe our experience with primary balloon angioplasty without stenting for symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis. All patients who underwent balloon angioplasty without stenting for MCA stenosis between 1996 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated technical success rates, degrees of stenosis, and stroke or death within 30 days. Among patients who were followed-up for > 1 year we evaluated latest functional outcomes, stroke recurrence at 1 year, and restenosis. In total 45/47 patients (95.7%) were successfully treated. Average pre- and postprocedure stenosis rates were 79.9% and 39.5%, respectively. Three neurological complications occurred within 30 days: one thromboembolism during the procedure; one lacunar infarction; and one fatal intraparenchymal hemorrhage after the procedure. Stroke or death rate within 30 days was 6.4%. Thirty-three patients were available for follow-up analysis with a mean period of 51.5 months. The combined rate of stroke or death within 30 days and ipsilateral ischemic stroke of the followed-up patients within 1 year beyond 30 days was 9.4%. Restenosis was observed in 26.9% of patients and all remained asymptomatic. In our retrospective series, balloon angioplasty without stenting was a safe, effective modality for symptomatic MCA stenosis. For patients refractory to medical therapy, primary balloon angioplasty may offer a better supplemental treatment option. PMID:25746307

  9. Symptomatic Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis Treated by Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty: Improvement of Cerebrovascular Reserves

    PubMed Central

    Abe, A.; Ueda, T.; Ueda, M.; Nogoshi, S.; Nishiyama, Y.; Katayama, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This study evaluated the recoveries of cerebrovascular reserves (CVR) after applying percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) to patients with symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis of varying severity. The patients were submitted to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to obtain their regional cerebral blood flows at resting stage (rCBFrest) and acetazolamide-challenged CBF in five regions of interest (ROIs), including the MCA, on the ipsilateral and contralateral sides of the hemisphere. rCVR values were then calculated from these CBF data to evaluate the CVR recoveries after PTA treatment. When the PTA effects were statistically analyzed of the patients dichotomized into more severe (n=9) and less severe (n=5) groups, distinctly significant ROI-specific PTA effectiveness was observed for CVR rather than CBF values in the patients of the severer group. PMID:22681739

  10. Peripheral Endothelial Function After Arterial Switch Operation for D-looped Transposition of the Great Arteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Heather Y; Stauffer, Katie Jo; Nourse, Susan E; Vu, Chau; Selamet Tierney, Elif Seda

    2017-03-27

    Coronary artery re-implantation during arterial switch operation in patients with D-looped transposition of the great arteries (D-TGA) can alter coronary arterial flow and increase shear stress, leading to local endothelial dysfunction, although prior studies have conflicting results. Endothelial pulse amplitude testing can predict coronary endothelial dysfunction by peripheral arterial testing. This study tested if, compared to healthy controls, patients with D-TGA after arterial switch operation had peripheral endothelial dysfunction. Patient inclusion criteria were (1) D-TGA after neonatal arterial switch operation; (2) age 9-29 years; (3) absence of known cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, vascular disease, recurrent vasovagal syncope, and coronary artery disease; and (4) ability to comply with overnight fasting. Exclusion criteria included (1) body mass index ≥85th percentile, (2) use of medications affecting vascular tone, or (3) acute illness. We assessed endothelial function by endothelial pulse amplitude testing and compared the results to our previously published data in healthy controls (n = 57). We tested 20 D-TGA patients (16.4 ± 4.8 years old) who have undergone arterial switch operation at a median age of 5 days (0-61 days). Endothelial pulse amplitude testing indices were similar between patients with D-TGA and controls (1.78 ± 0.61 vs. 1.73 ± 0.54, p = 0.73).In our study population of children and young adults, there was no evidence of peripheral endothelial dysfunction in patients with D-TGA who have undergone arterial switch operation. Our results support the theory that coronary arterial wall thickening and abnormal vasodilation reported in these patients is a localized phenomenon and not reflective of overall atherosclerotic burden.

  11. Comparison of BMSs with SES for Symptomatic Intracranial Disease of the Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yue Xuanye; Yin Qin; Xi Gangming; Zhu Wusheng; Xu Gelin; Zhang Renliang; Zhou Zhiming; Ma Minmin; Jin Guangfu; Liu Xinfeng

    2011-02-15

    This study was designed to compare the clinical and angiographic outcomes of patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic middle cerebral artery stenosis treated with balloon-mounted stents (BMS) and self-expandable Wingspan system (SES). We reviewed the 69 consecutive stent placement procedures for symptomatic atherosclerotic stenosis ({>=}70) in M1 segment of middle cerebral artery in 67 patients in 3 years. According to the stent types, the patients were classed as BMS and SES groups. The demographic characteristics, conventional risk factors of ischemic stroke, degree of stenosis, periprocedural complications, stent types, and clinical and angiographic outcomes were analyzed. There were 39 patients in the BMS group and 28 patients in the SES group. The demographic characteristics, conventional risk factors, and periprocedural complications were similar but different in residual stenosis after stenting in both groups (5.9% {+-} 9.9% vs. 14.4% {+-} 14.6%; P = 0.01). For the overall cohort, the rate of stroke or death and restenosis was 10.9% (7/66) and 24.5% (14/57), respectively. The frequency of restenosis was higher in the SES group than in the BMS group (log-rank, P = 0.04; crude hazard ratio = 3.03; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-9.15; P = 0.049; and adjusted hazard ratio = 3.61; 95% CI, 1.06-12.27; P = 0.04); however, there was no difference in clinical outcomes (log-rank, P = 0.51; crude hazard ratio = 1.66; 95% CI, 0.36-7.61; P = 0.51; and adjusted hazard ratio = 0.59; 95% CI, 0.04-7.89; P = 0.69). The corrected degree of restenosis was higher in the SES than the BMS group. The prevalence of restenosis was higher in the SES than the BMS group, but the perioperative complications and follow-up clinical outcomes had no significant difference.

  12. Duplex ultrasound in the assessment of peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Sayed A. A. F.

    Arteriography plays a central role in the assessment of peripheral arterial disease. Arteriography is associated with the risk of damage to the artery, peripheral embolisation, hazards of intra-arterial injection and exposure to ionising radiation. Arteriography provides an anatomical assessment of arterial stenosis but does not measure the functional results of the stenosis. Modern high resolution ultrasound imaging technology enables non-invasive assessment of vascular diseases and allows functional assessment of blood flow. This investigation is of proven value in studying carotid disease. The aim of the study was to determine the accuracy of duplex ultrasonography (DUS) in assessment of lower limb arterial disease in comparison with arteriography (IA DSA). A technical comparison has been made between the description of arterial lesion as indicated by DUS and IA DSA. In addition, the sensitivity of DUS in assessing multisegmental arterial disease has been determined. The clinical decision has been investigated in a further study in which five surgeons were asked to determine patient management based on IA DSA and DUS data in the same patient group. Concordance between management strategies was assessed. DUS was used as the primary method of investigation in further series of patients. Criteria were established to determine which patients would require angiography. The computer-assisted image analysis was used to study the ultrasound images of arterial stenosis and a method of analysing such images objectively was established. Two studies have been included in this section. These assess the technical accuracy of ultrasound image analysis compared with histological examination of plaque. The reproducibility of the image analysis has also been tested. I have developed a classification for peripheral arterial disease to be used to facilitate the communication between vascular laboratory staff who perform the duplex ultrasonography and surgeons who use this

  13. Peripheral Arterial Pseudoaneurysms-a 10-Year Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Luther, Anil; Kumar, Amit; Negi, Kamal Nabh Rai

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral arterial pseudoaneurysms are quite common in Northern India (Punjab Province) and thus a common presenting complaint of varied etiology. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of patients presenting with peripheral arterial pseudoaneurysms of varied etiology. Retrospective analysis of medical records of patients with diagnosis of peripheral arterial pseudoaneurysm from 1 May 2001 to 30 October 2009 was done. In the prospective period from 1 November 2009 to 30 April 2011, the patients were personally examined by the authors and followed up till discharge from the hospital and subsequently at 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months postdischarge from the hospital. We studied 50 patients (13 in the prospective group and 37 in the retrospective study group). Intravenous drug abuse (26 cases) followed by trauma (nine cases) was the commonest etiology. Femoral artery was the commonest artery involved (37 cases). A pulsatile mass with localized tenderness was the commonest presentation. All patients underwent surgical treatment with 36 (72 %) patients undergoing ligation and excision of the pseudoaneurysm. Six (12 %) patients underwent revascularization with reverse saphenous vein graft. Five (10 %) patients underwent primary repair, and three (6 %) patients were managed by putting a synthetic ePTFE graft. Postoperative wound infection was seen in 18 (36 %) patients, and 33 (66 %) patients had an uneventful recovery. In pseudoaneurysms, surgical repair at the early instance carries a favorable prognosis. If feasible, reverse saphenous vein grafting is the best conduit for repair. Synthetic vascular graft (ePTFE) can be used in case autologous saphenous vein is not available. Excision and ligation is safe, and we recommend it as the treatment of choice for infected arterial pseudoaneurysms.

  14. Peripheral venous catheter fracture with embolism into the pulmonary artery

    PubMed Central

    Ammari, Chady; Campisi, Alessio; D’Andrea, Rocco

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral vein catheterization is generally considered a harmless procedure. Venous catheter rupture associated with pulmonary embolism is an unlikely but potentially serious complication. We report a case of a peripheral venous catheter (PVC) fracture with pulmonary artery embolization in the left lower lobe treated successfully by a surgical approach. The positioning of a PVC is not always a harmless procedure. Every time there are difficulties in positioning or in removal of a catheter device, it should be carefully inspected to verify integrity. The advisability of removal of these small foreign bodies is debated; percutaneous retrieval is preferred, while surgery should be discussed case by case. PMID:28149586

  15. Expression of Toll-like Receptor 9 in nose, peripheral blood and bone marrow during symptomatic allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Fransson, Mattias; Benson, Mikael; Erjefält, Jonas S; Jansson, Lennart; Uddman, Rolf; Björnsson, Sven; Cardell, Lars-Olaf; Adner, Mikael

    2007-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is an inflammatory disease of the upper airway mucosa that also affects leukocytes in bone marrow and peripheral blood. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is a receptor for unmethylated CpG dinucleotides found in bacterial and viral DNA. The present study was designed to examine the expression of TLR9 in the nasal mucosa and in leukocytes derived from different cellular compartments during symptomatic allergic rhinitis. Methods The study was based on 32 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis and 18 healthy subjects, serving as controls. Nasal biopsies were obtained before and after allergen challenge. Bone marrow, peripheral blood and nasal lavage fluid were sampled outside and during pollen season. The expression of TLR9 in tissues and cells was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, respectively. Results TLR9 was found in several cell types in the nasal mucosa and in different leukocyte subpopulations derived from bone marrow, peripheral blood and nasal lavage fluid. The leukocyte expression was generally higher in bone marrow than in peripheral blood, and not affected by symptomatic allergic rhinitis. Conclusion The widespread expression of TLR9 in the nasal mucosa along with its rich representation in leukocytes in different compartments, demonstrate the possibility for cells involved in allergic airway inflammation to directly interact with bacterial and viral DNA. PMID:17328813

  16. Association Between Hematological Indices and Coronary Calcification in Symptomatic Patients without History of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chaikriangkrai, Kongkiat; Kassi, Mahwash; Alchalabi, Sama; Bala, Sayf Khaleel; Adigun, Rosalyn; Botero, Sharleen; Chang, Su Min

    2014-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) has long been shown to involve chronic low-grade subclinical inflammation. However, whether there is association between hematological indices assessed by complete blood count (CBC) and coronary atherosclerotic burden has not been well studied. Materials and Methods: Consecutive 868 patients without known CAD who presented with acute chest pain to emergency department and underwent coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring evaluation by multi-detector cardiac computed tomography were included in our study. Clinical characteristics and CBC indices were compared among different CAC groups. Results: The cohort comprised 60% male with a mean age of 61 (SD = 14) years. Median Framingham risk of CAD was 4% (range 1-16%). Median CAC score was 0 (IQR 0-43). Higher CAC groups had significantly higher Framingham risk of CAD than lower CAC groups (P < 0.001). Among different CAC categories, there was no statistically significant difference in hemoglobin level (p 0.45), mean corpuscular volume (p 0.43), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (p 0.28), mean corpuscular hemoglobin volume (p 0.36), red cell distribution width (0.42), total white blood cell counts (p 0.291), neutrophil counts (p 0.352), lymphocyte counts (p 0.92), neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (p 0.68), monocyte count (p 0.48), and platelet counts (p 0.25). Conclusion: Our study did not detect significant association between hematological indices assessed with CBC and coronary calcification in symptomatic patients without known CAD. PMID:25317386

  17. Chronic basilar artery dissection with an associated symptomatic aneurysm presenting with massive subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Moscovici, Samuel; Rajz, Gustavo; Vargas, Andres; Itshayek, Eyal

    2016-08-01

    Basilar artery dissection (BAD) is a rare condition with a worse prognosis than a dissection limited to the vertebral artery. We report a rare case of chronic BAD with an associated symptomatic aneurysm presenting with massive subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a 54-year-old woman. The diagnosis of acute BAD could only be made retrospectively, based on clinical and neuroradiological studies from a hospital admission 10months earlier. Angiography performed after her SAH showed unequivocal signs of imperfect healing; she was either post-recanalization of a complete occlusion or post-dissection. Residual multi-channel intraluminal defects led to the development of a small aneurysm, which was responsible for the massive hemorrhage. The occurrence of an associated aneurysm, and wall disease, but not an intraluminal process, reinforces the diagnosis of dissection. The patient was fully recovered at 90day follow-up. This case reinforces the need for long-term neuroradiological surveillance after non-hemorrhagic intracranial dissections to detect the development of de novo aneurysms.

  18. Numerical modeling of compensation mechanisms for peripheral arterial stenoses.

    PubMed

    Drzisga, D; Köppl, T; Pohl, U; Helmig, R; Wohlmuth, B

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this paper is to develop a numerical model for physiological mechanisms that help to compensate reduced blood flow caused by a peripheral arterial stenosis. Thereby we restrict ourselves to the following compensation mechanisms: Metabolic regulation and arteriogenesis, i.e., growth of pre-existing collateral arteries. Our model is based on dimensionally reduced differential equations to simulate large time periods with low computational cost. As a test scenario, we consider a stenosis located in the right posterior tibial artery of a human. We study its impact on blood supply for different narrowing degrees by the help of numerical simulations. Moreover, the efficiency of the above compensation mechanisms is examined. Our results reveal that even a complete occlusion of this artery exhibiting a cross-section area of 0.442cm(2) can be compensated at rest, if metabolic regulation is combined with collateral arteries whose total cross-section area accounts for 8.14% of the occluded artery.

  19. Wingspan Stent for High-Grade Symptomatic Vertebrobasilar Artery Atherosclerotic Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jian Zhao Zhenwei Gao Guodong Deng Jianping; Yu Jia; Gao Li; Yuan Yang; Qv Youzhi

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to present the treatment outcomes with Wingspan stent angioplasty of high-grade intracranial vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stenosis in symptomatic patients. Methods: Between 2007 and 2010, the records of 30 patients with 31 intracranial high-grade VBA stenoses (all{>=}70%) who underwent elective stenting due to the failure of medical therapy were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical evaluation was performed based on the modified Rankin scale and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Results: In all cases, the stent deployment was technically successful. The mean stenosis decreased significantly from 82.28 {+-} 8.02% (range, 72-99%) to 11.18 {+-} 7.28% (range, 0-25%) after stent-assisted angioplasty (P < 0.05). Periprocedure complications occurred in 3 (10%) of 30 patients; there were 2 cases of perforator strokes and 1 case of transient flow insufficiency with stent overlap. Clinical follow-up (mean, 17.81 {+-} 11.49 months; range, 5-40 months) was available for 27 patients, and angiographic follow-up (mean, 9.95 {+-} 5.74 months, range, 5-20 months) was available for 19 patients. Only one case demonstrated recurrent symptoms with restenosis ({>=}50%). There were no recurrent ischemic events and no cases of restenosis in the other patients. Conclusions: According to our data, the Wingspan stent for symptomatic intracranial VBA stenoses is a safe and efficacious treatment alternative in cases with recurrent symptoms despite medical therapy. However, the improvement of outcome requires the reduction in the rate of procedure-related complications and long-term outcomes still have to be demonstrated.

  20. Peripheral Blood Cell Gene Expression Diagnostic for Identifying Symptomatic Transthyretin Amyloidosis Patients: Male and Female Specific Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, Sunil M.; Novais, Marta; Whisenant, Thomas; Gelbart, Terri; Buxbaum, Joel N.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Coelho, Teresa; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis of familial transthyretin (TTR) amyloid diseases remains challenging because of variable disease penetrance. Currently, patients must have an amyloid positive tissue biopsy to be eligible for disease-modifying therapies. Endomyocardial biopsies are typically amyloid positive when cardiomyopathy is suspected, but this disease manifestation is generally diagnosed late. Early diagnosis is often difficult because patients exhibit apparent symptoms of polyneuropathy, but have a negative amyloid biopsy. Thus, there is a pressing need for an additional early diagnostic strategy for TTR-aggregation-associated polyneuropathy and cardiomyopathy. Methods and Findings: Global peripheral blood cell mRNA expression profiles from 263 tafamidis-treated and untreated V30M Familiar Amyloid Neuropathy patients, asymptomatic V30M carriers, and healthy, age- and sex-matched controls without TTR mutations were used to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic patients. We demonstrate that blood cell gene expression patterns reveal sex-independent, as well as male- and female-specific inflammatory signatures in symptomatic FAP patients, but not in asymptomatic carriers. These signatures differentiated symptomatic patients from asymptomatic V30M carriers with >80% accuracy. There was a global downregulation of the eIF2 pathway and its associated genes in all symptomatic FAP patients. We also demonstrated that the molecular scores based on these signatures significantly trended toward normalized values in an independent cohort of 46 FAP patients after only 3 months of tafamidis treatment. Conclusions: This study identifies novel molecular signatures that differentiate symptomatic FAP patients from asymptomatic V30M carriers as well as affected males and females. We envision using this approach, initially in parallel with amyloid biopsies, to identify individuals who are asymptomatic gene carriers that may convert to FAP patients. Upon further validation

  1. Peripheral arterial disease and chronic heart failure: a dangerous mix.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Sally C; Hermis, Adriana; Shehab, Sajad; Newton, Phillip J; Lal, Sara; Davidson, Patricia M

    2013-07-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with a high comorbidity burden, adverse impact on quality of life and high health care utilisation. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and CHF share many risk, pathophysiological and prognostic features, and each has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. PAD often goes undetected, and yet in spite of the availability of screening tools, this is not commonly considered in CHF care. A review of the electronic databases Medline, CINAHL and Cochrane CENTRAL was undertaken using the MeSH terms peripheral arterial disease, peripheral vascular disease, intermittent claudication and heart failure to identify studies examining the prevalence and clinical outcomes of coexisting PAD in patients with CHF. Five studies were identified. There are limited data describing the impact of PAD on CHF outcomes. As PAD may contribute to decreased capacity to exercise and other self-care behaviours, identifying those at risk and providing appropriate therapy are important. Based on this review, patients who are smokers and those with diagnosed coronary heart disease and diabetes should be targeted for the screening of PAD.

  2. Plasma viscosity increase with progression of peripheral arterial atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Poredos, P; Zizek, B

    1996-03-01

    Increased blood and plasma viscosity has been described in patients with coronary and peripheral arterial disease. However, the relation of viscosity to the extent of arterial wall deterioration--the most important determinant of clinical manifestation and prognosis of the disease--is not well known. Therefore, the authors studied plasma viscosity as one of the major determinants of blood viscosity in patients with different stages of arterial disease of lower limbs (according to Fontaine) and its relation to the presence of some risk factors of atherosclerosis. The study encompassed four groups of subjects: 19 healthy volunteers (group A), 18 patients with intermittent claudication up to 200 m (stage II; group B), 15 patients with critical ischemia of lower limbs (stage III and IV; group C), and 16 patients with recanalization procedures on peripheral arteries. Venous blood samples were collected from an antecubital vein without stasis for the determination of plasma viscosity (with a rotational capillary microviscometer, PAAR), fibrinogen, total cholesterol, alpha-2-macroglobulin, and glucose concentrations. In patients with recanalization procedure local plasma viscosity was also determined from blood samples taken from a vein on the dorsum of the foot. Plasma viscosity was most significantly elevated in the patients with critical ischemia (1.78 mPa.sec) and was significantly higher than in the claudicants (1.68 mPa.sec), and the claudicants also had significantly higher viscosity than the controls (1.58 mPa.sec). In patients in whom a recanalization procedure was performed, no differences in systemic and local plasma viscosity were detected, neither before nor after recanalization of the diseased artery. In all groups plasma viscosity was correlated with fibrinogen concentration (r=0.70, P < 0.01) and total cholesterol concentration (r=0.24, P < 0.05), but in group C (critical ischemia) plasma viscosity was most closely linked to the concentration of alpha-2

  3. Skin autofluorescence is increased in patients with carotid artery stenosis and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, Marjon J; Lefrandt, Joop D; Loeffen, Erik A H; Saleem, Ben R; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Lutgers, Helen L; Smit, Andries J; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2012-02-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have a pivotal role in atherosclerosis. We evaluated skin autofluorescence (SAF), a non-invasive measurement of tissue AGE accumulation, in patients with carotid artery stenosis with and without coexisting peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD). SAF was measured using the AGE Reader™ in 56 patients with carotid artery stenosis and in 56 age- and sex-matched healthy controls without diabetes, renal dysfunction or known atherosclerotic disease. SAF was higher in patients with carotid artery stenosis compared to the control group: mean 2.81 versus 2.46 (P = 0.002), but especially in the younger age group of 50-60 years old: mean 2.82 versus 1.94 (P = 0.000). Patients with carotid artery stenosis and PAOD proved to have an even higher SAF than patients with carotid artery stenosis only: mean 3.28 versus 2.66 (P = 0.003). Backward linear regression analysis showed that age, smoking, diabetes mellitus, renal function and the presence of PAOD were the determinants of SAF, but carotid artery stenosis was not. SAF is increased in patients with carotid artery stenosis and PAOD. The univariate and multivariate associations of SAF with age, smoking, diabetes, renal insufficiency and PAOD suggest that increased SAF can be seen as an indicator of widespread atherosclerosis.

  4. Stent-assisted coil embolization of a symptomatic middle cerebral artery aneurysm in an infant.

    PubMed

    Savastano, Luis E; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Gemmete, Joseph J; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O; Pandey, Aditya S

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric intracranial aneurysms are rare and challenging to treat. Achieving efficacy and durability of aneurysmal occlusion while maintaining parent vessel patency requires innovative treatment strategies, especially in cases in which aneurysmal location or morphology pose substantial morbidity associated with microsurgical treatment. In the last 3 decades, endovascular treatments have had a remarkable evolution and are currently considered safe and effective therapeutic options for cerebral aneurysms. While endovascular techniques are well described in the English literature, the endovascular management of pediatric aneurysms continues to pose a challenge. In this report, the authors describe the case of a 9-month-old infant who presented with a 1-day history of acute-onset left-sided hemiparesis and left facial droop. Imaging revealed a large symptomatic saccular middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Treatment included successful stent-assisted aneurysm coiling. At follow-up, the patient continued to fare well and MR angiography confirmed complete occlusion of the aneurysm dome. This case features the youngest patient in the English literature to harbor an intracranial aneurysm successfully treated with stent-assisted coiling. Based on this experience, endovascular intervention with vascular reconstruction can be safe and effective for the treatment of infants and could further improve prognosis; however, further studies are necessary to confirm these findings.

  5. Cutting Balloon: Review on Principles and Background of Use in Peripheral Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cejna, Manfred

    2005-05-15

    This review describes peripheral use of cutting balloon (CB) angioplasty (CBA), its characteristics, and its distinction from conventional BA and describes the experimental and clinical background of its current use in peripheral arteries.

  6. Endovascular Treatment of a Symptomatic Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Chimney and Periscope Techniques for Total Visceral and Renal Artery Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Cariati, Maurizio; Mingazzini, Pietro; Dallatana, Raffaello; Rossi, Umberto G.; Settembrini, Alberto; Santuari, Davide

    2013-05-02

    Conventional endovascular therapy of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with involving visceral and renal arteries is limited by the absence of a landing zone for the aortic endograft. Solutions have been proposed to overcome the problem of no landing zone; however, most of them are not feasible in urgent and high-risk patients. We describe a case that was successfully treated by total endovascular technique with a two-by-two chimney-and-periscope approach in a patient with acute symptomatic type IV thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with supra-anastomotic aneurysm formation involving the renal and visceral arteries and a pseduaneurismatic sac localized in the left ileopsoas muscle.

  7. Endovascular Treatment of the Internal Iliac Artery in Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Huetink, K. Steijling, J.J.F.; Mali, W.P.T.M.

    2008-03-15

    In patients with peripheral arterial disease not much is known about the relationship between the localization of the pain and the localization of arterial occlusions in the iliac arteries. Occlusions high in the iliac arteries are assumed to be able to induce pain in the buttocks and upper leg as well as pain in the calves. Several case reports show that the symptoms of arteriosclerotic lesions in the internal iliac artery are often atypical and not easy to diagnose. In this report, 3 patients with internal iliac artery occlusions who were treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) are described. One patient had isolated pain in the buttock region. In the other 2 patients the initial pain was focused on the buttock region with extension to the calves during exercise. After PTA, 2 patients were free of symptoms, while in the other patient the symptoms improved but did not disappear. Future research should clarify the relation between certain arterial occlusions and the location of the pain.

  8. Dark chocolate and vascular function in patients with peripheral artery disease: a randomized, controlled cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Alexandra; Koppensteiner, Renate; Steiner, Sabine; Niessner, Alexander; Goliasch, Georg; Gschwandtner, Michael; Hoke, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoid-rich dark chocolate has positive effects on vascular function in healthy subjects and in patients at risk of atherosclerosis. The impact of dark chocolate on endothelial and microvascular function in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) has not been investigated so far. In an investigator blinded, randomized, controlled, cross-over trial we assessed the effect of flavonoid-rich dark chocolate and cocoa-free control chocolate on flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery and on microvascular function (assessed by Laser Doppler fluxmetry) in 21 patients with symptomatic (Fontaine stage II) PAD. Measurements were done in each patient on 2 single days, with an interval of 7 days, at baseline and at 2 hours after ingestion of 50 g dark chocolate or 50 g white chocolate, respectively. FMD remained unchanged after intake of dark chocolate (baseline and 2 hours after ingestion, %: 5.1 [IQR 4.4 to 7.3] and 5.5 [IQR 3.9 to 10.4]; p = 0.57, and after intake of white chocolate (baseline and 2 hours after ingestion, %: 6.4 [IQR 4.5 to 11.4] and 4.4 [IQR 2.6 to 8.7]; p = 0.14. Similarly, microcirculatory parameters were not significantly altered after intake of any chocolate compared with the respective baseline values. In conclusion, a single consumption of 50 g dark chocolate has no effect on endothelial and microvascular function in patients with symptomatic PAD.

  9. Peripheral airways obstruction in idiopathic pulmonary artery hypertension (primary).

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Bonetti, P; Lupi-Herrera, E; Martinez-Guerra, M L; Barrios, R; Seoane, M; Sandoval, J

    1983-05-01

    The mechanical properties of the lung were studied in ten nonsmokers with idiopathic pulmonary artery hypertension (IPAH) (mean pulmonary artery pressure 65.7 +/- 30 mm Hg). In the routine lung test, residual volume was found to be abnormal (greater than 120 percent of the predicted) in seven patients, and measured airway resistance was normal in eight out of the ten patients. A decreased FEF 75-85 percent, abnormal values for the helium-air flow ratios and increased closing capacities were documented in eight of ten patients in whom lung elastic recoil was normal (six of ten) or increased (four of ten). These features suggest peripheral airways obstruction (PAO) which was also supported by histopathologic findings in three cases (one biopsy and two necropsies). The observed changes in lung compliance could be related to the behavior of the coupling of the air-space and vascular compartments. The etiology of PAO in IPAH patients is not known, but our results indicate that both the peripheral airways and the pulmonary circulation are affected. The knowledge of PAO in IPAH patients could help to better understand the observed V/Q inequality in this entity.

  10. Atherosclerotic inferior mesenteric artery stenosis resulting in large intestinal hypoperfusion: a paradigm shift in the diagnosis and management of symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lotun, Kapildeo; Shetty, Ranjith; Topaz, On

    2012-11-01

    Symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia results from intestinal hypoperfusion and is classically thought to result from involvement of two or more mesenteric arteries. The celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery are most frequently implicated in this disease process, and their involvement usually results in symptoms of small intestinal ischemia. Symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia resulting predominantly from inferior mesenteric artery involvement has largely been overlooked but does gives rise to its own, unique clinical presentation with symptoms resulting from large intestinal ischemia. We present four patients with atherosclerotic inferior mesenteric artery stenosis with symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia that have unique clinical presentations consistent with large intestinal ischemia that resolved following percutaneous endovascular treatment of the inferior mesenteric artery stenosis. These cases represent a novel approach to the diagnosis and management of this disease process and may warrant a further subclassification of chronic mesenteric ischemia into chronic small intestinal ischemia and chronic large intestinal ischemia.

  11. Increased levels of apoptosis in gastrocnemius skeletal muscle in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robert G; Duscha, Brian D; Robbins, Jennifer L; Redfern, Shelley I; Chung, Jayer; Bensimhon, Daniel R; Kraus, William E; Hiatt, William R; Regensteiner, Judith G; Annex, Brian H

    2007-11-01

    Intermittent claudication (IC) is the major clinical manifestation of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Apoptosis has been linked to skeletal muscle pathophysiology in other chronic diseases such as congestive heart failure. This study tested the hypothesis that there would be increased levels of apoptosis in the skeletal muscle of patients with PAD compared with control individuals. In total, 26 individuals with PAD and 28 age-appropriate controls underwent studies of peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) and a gastrocnemius muscle biopsy in the most symptomatic leg. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for apoptosis and caspase-3 activity. Patients with PAD had a reduced peak VO2 compared with controls. Apoptosis was increased in those with PAD compared with age-appropriate controls (3.83% +/- 2.6 vs 1.53% +/- 0.96; p < 0.001). In conclusion, PAD is associated with increased levels of apoptosis in the peripheral skeletal muscle. Further study is required to ascertain whether apoptosis plays a role in decreased functional capacity.

  12. Peripheral Artery Disease: Current Insight Into the Disease and Its Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Olin, Jeffrey W.; Sealove, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD), which comprises atherosclerosis of the abdominal aorta, iliac, and lower-extremity arteries, is underdiagnosed, undertreated, and poorly understood by the medical community. Patients with PAD may experience a multitude of problems, such as claudication, ischemic rest pain, ischemic ulcerations, repeated hospitalizations, revascularizations, and limb loss. This may lead to a poor quality of life and a high rate of depression. From the standpoint of the limb, the prognosis of patients with PAD is favorable in that the claudication remains stable in 70% to 80% of patients over a 10-year period. However, the rate of myocardial infarction, stroke, and cardiovascular death in patients with both symptomatic and asymptomatic PAD is markedly increased. The ankle brachial index is an excellent screening test for the presence of PAD. Imaging studies (duplex ultrasonography, computed tomographic angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, catheter-based angiography) may provide additional anatomic information if revascularization is planned. The goals of therapy are to improve symptoms and thus quality of life and to decrease the cardiovascular event rate (myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiovascular death). The former is accomplished by establishing a supervised exercise program and administering cilostazol or performing a revascularization procedure if medical therapy is ineffective. A comprehensive program of cardiovascular risk modification (discontinuation of tobacco use and control of lipids, blood pressure, and diabetes) will help to prevent the latter. PMID:20592174

  13. Assessment of vascular autonomic function using peripheral arterial tonometry.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Satomi; Oono, Ai; Ishihara, Yuri; Hasegawa, Yuki; Akaza, Miho; Sumi, Yuki; Inoue, Yoshinori; Izumiyama, Hajime; Hirao, Kenzo; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Sasano, Tetsuo

    2017-03-01

    Peripheral autonomic function is impaired in diabetic polyneuropathy. However, it is difficult to evaluate it due to the lack of non-invasive quantitative assessment. We aimed to establish a novel index to evaluate vascular autonomic function using reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT), a widely performed endothelial function test. Sixty-five subjects were enrolled, including healthy subjects, cases with sympathetic nerve blockers, and diabetic patients. RH-PAT was performed with 5-min blood flow occlusion in unilateral arm. We calculated the reduction ratio of the post-occlusion pulse amplitude to the baseline in the non-occluded arm (RPN), with 1-min sliding window. In healthy subjects, RPN gradually increased with time-dependent manner. However, this phenomenon was eliminated in cases with sympathetic nerve blockers. Plasma concentration of norepinephrine was measured before and after the blood flow occlusion, which showed a significant increase. We then compared RPNs with the change in heart rate variability (HRV) parameters. RPN calculated at 5 min after the reperfusion had the highest correlation with the change in sympathetic HRV parameter, and thus, we named sympathetic hypoemia index (SHI). Finally, we studied the relationship between SHI and diabetes. SHI was significantly lower in diabetic patients than matched controls. SHI, a novel index derived from RH-PAT, represented the peripheral sympathetic activity. SHI may be useful for assessing the vascular autonomic activity in diabetic patients.

  14. Relationship of Inflammatory Biomarkers with Severity of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The pentraxin family, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum amyloid P (SAP), and pentraxin 3 (PTX3), has been identified as playing a key role in inflammatory reactions such as in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we examined the relationship between peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and serum levels of pentraxins. Methods. This study was undertaken via a retrospective review of PAD patients with surgical intervention for lesions of the common femoral artery. We evaluated the preoperative patient conditions, hemodynamic status, such as ankle brachial index (ABI), and clinical ischemic conditions according to Rutherford classification. Preoperatively, we collected blood samples for determining the serum levels of hs-CRP, SAP, and PTX3. Results. Twelve PAD patients with common femoral arterial lesions were treated and examined. The hemodynamic severity of PAD was not negatively correlated with hs-CRP, SAP, or PTX3. The clinical severity evaluated by Rutherford classification was significantly positively correlated with the serum level of PTX3 (p = 0.019). Conclusion. We demonstrated that PTX3 might be a better marker of PAD than hs-CRP and SAP. Furthermore, PTX3 might be a prognostic marker to evaluate the severity of PAD. PMID:27559483

  15. Association of Peripheral Arterial and Cardiovascular Diseases in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carolina; Miname, Marcio; Makdisse, Marcia; Kalil, Roberto; Santos, Raul D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an elevation in the serum levels of total cholesterol and of low-density lipoproteins (LDL- c). Known to be closely related to the atherosclerotic process, FH can determine the development of early obstructive lesions in different arterial beds. In this context, FH has also been proposed to be a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Objective This observational cross-sectional study assessed the association of PAD with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease, in patients with heterozygous FH. Methods The diagnosis of PAD was established by ankle-brachial index (ABI) values ≤ 0.90. This study assessed 202 patients (35% of men) with heterozygous FH (90.6% with LDL receptor mutations), mean age of 51 ± 14 years and total cholesterol levels of 342 ± 86 mg /dL. Results The prevalences of PAD and previous CVD were 17% and 28.2 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an independent association between CVD and the diagnosis of PAD was observed (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.004 - 6.230; p = 0.049). Conclusion Systematic screening for PAD by use of ABI is feasible to assess patients with FH, and it might indicate an increased risk for CVD. However, further studies are required to determine the role of ABI as a tool to assess the cardiovascular risk of those patients. PMID:25029472

  16. Endovascular Repair of Acute Symptomatic Pararenal Aortic Aneurysm With Three Chimney and One Periscope Graft for Complete Visceral Artery Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Brechtel, Klaus Ketelsen, Dominik; Endisch, Andrea; Heller, Stephan; Heuschmid, Martin; Stock, Ulrich A.; Kalender, Guenay

    2012-04-15

    PurposeTo describe a modified endovascular technique for complete revascularization of visceral and renal arteries in symptomatic pararenal aortic aneurysm (PRAA).TechniqueArterial access was surgically established in both common femoral arteries (CFAs) and the left subclavian artery (LSA). Revascularization of the left renal artery, the celiac trunk, and the superior mesenteric artery was performed through one single sheath via the LSA. Suitable covered stents were put in the aortic branches but not deployed. The right renal artery was accessed over the left CFA. Due to the longitudinal extension of the presented aneurysm two stent-grafts were introduced via the right CFA. After deploying the aortic stent-grafts, all covered stents in the side branches were deployed consecutively with a minimum overlap of 5 mm over the cranial and caudal stent-graft edges. Simultaneous ballooning was performed to fully expand all stent-grafts and warranty patency. Conclusion: This is the first report in the literature of chimney grafting in PRAA for complete revascularization of visceral and renal branches by using more than two covered stents introduced from one side through one single sheath. However this technique is modified, it should be used only in bailout situations when branched stent-grafts are not available and/or surgery is not suitable.

  17. Stenting for Peripheral Artery Disease of the Lower Extremities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary Background Objective In January 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat received an application from University Health Network to provide an evidentiary platform on stenting as a treatment management for peripheral artery disease. The purpose of this health technology assessment is to examine the effectiveness of primary stenting as a treatment management for peripheral artery disease of the lower extremities. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a progressive disease occurring as a result of plaque accumulation (atherosclerosis) in the arterial system that carries blood to the extremities (arms and legs) as well as vital organs. The vessels that are most affected by PAD are the arteries of the lower extremities, the aorta, the visceral arterial branches, the carotid arteries and the arteries of the upper limbs. In the lower extremities, PAD affects three major arterial segments i) aortic-iliac, ii) femoro-popliteal (FP) and iii) infra-popliteal (primarily tibial) arteries. The disease is commonly classified clinically as asymptomatic claudication, rest pain and critical ischemia. Although the prevalence of PAD in Canada is not known, it is estimated that 800,000 Canadians have PAD. The 2007 Trans Atlantic Intersociety Consensus (TASC) II Working Group for the Management of Peripheral Disease estimated that the prevalence of PAD in Europe and North America to be 27 million, of whom 88,000 are hospitalizations involving lower extremities. A higher prevalence of PAD among elderly individuals has been reported to range from 12% to 29%. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) estimated that the prevalence of PAD is 14.5% among individuals 70 years of age and over. Modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors associated with PAD include advanced age, male gender, family history, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia. PAD is a strong predictor of myocardial infarction (MI

  18. Risk factors for neurological worsening and symptomatic watershed infarction in internal carotid artery aneurysm treated by extracranial-intracranial bypass using radial artery graft.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Hidetoshi; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Tsuboi, Toshiyuki; Noda, Kosumo; Ota, Nakao; Miyata, Shiro; Oda, Jumpei; Takeda, Rihee; Tokuda, Sadahisa; Kamada, Kyousuke

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT The revascularization technique, including bypass created using the external carotid artery (ECA), radial artery (RA), and M2 portion of middle cerebral artery (MCA), has remained indispensable for treatment of complex aneurysms. To date, it remains unknown whether diameters of the RA, superficial temporal artery (STA), and C2 portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and intraoperative MCA blood pressure have influences on the outcome and the symptomatic watershed infarction (WI). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the factors for the symptomatic WI and neurological worsening in patients treated by ECA-RA-M2 bypass for complex ICA aneurysm with therapeutic ICA occlusion. METHODS The authors measured the sizes of vessels (RA, C2, M2, and STA) and intraoperative MCA blood pressure (initial, after ICA occlusion, and after releasing the RA graft bypass) in 37 patients. Symptomatic WI was defined as presence of the following: postoperative new neurological deficits, WI on postoperative diffusion-weighted imaging, and ipsilateral cerebral blood flow reduction on SPECT. Neurological worsening was defined as the increase in 1 or more modified Rankin Scale scores. First, the authors performed receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for continuous variables and the binary end point of the symptomatic WI. The clinical, radiological, and physiological characteristics of patients with and without the symptomatic WI were compared using the log-rank test. Then, the authors compared the variables between patients with and without neurological worsening at discharge and at the 12-month follow-up examination or last hospital visit. RESULTS Symptomatic WI was observed in 2 (5.4%) patients. The mean MCA pressure after releasing the RA graft (< 55 mm Hg; p = 0.017), mean (MCA pressure after releasing the RA graft)/(initial MCA pressure) (< 0.70 mm Hg; p = 0.032), and mean cross-sectional area ratio ([RA/C2 diameter](2) < 0.40 mm [p < 0.0001] and [STA/C2

  19. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic subjects in south-west Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    OlaOlorun, Akintayo D.; Odeigah, Louis O.; Amole, Isaac O.; Adediran, Olufemi S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is rarely sought for and generally under-diagnosed even in diabetics in developing countries like Nigeria. PAD is easily detected and diagnosed by the ankle-brachial index, a simple and reliable test. Objectives To determine the prevalence of PAD in diabetic subjects aged 50–89 years and the value of ankle-brachial index measurement in the detection of PAD. Method A cross-sectional descriptive study of 219 diabetic subjects aged 50–89 years was carried out. The participants were administered a pre-tested questionnaire and measurement of ankle-brachial index (ABI) was done. The ankle-brachial index < 0.90 was considered equivalent to peripheral arterial disease. Results The overall prevalence of PAD was 52.5%. The prevalence of symptomatic PAD was 28.7% whilst that of asymptomatic PAD was 71.3%. There were a number of associations with PAD which included, age (p < 0.05), sex (p < 0.05), and marital status (p < 0.05). The use of the ankle-brachial index in the detection of PAD was clearly more reliable than the clinical methods like history of intermittent claudication and absence or presence of pedal pulses. Conclusion The prevalence of PAD is relatively high in diabetic subjects in the south-western region of Nigeria. Notable is the fact that a higher proportion was asymptomatic. Also the use of ABI is of great value in the detection of PAD as evidenced by a clearly more objective assessment of PAD compared to both intermittent claudication and absent pedal pulses.

  20. Peripheral Chemoreception and Arterial Pressure Responses to Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Peng, Ying-Jie; Kumar, Ganesh K.; Nanduri, Jayasri

    2015-01-01

    Carotid bodies are the principal peripheral chemoreceptors for detecting changes in arterial blood oxygen levels, and the resulting chemoreflex is a potent regulator of blood pressure. Recurrent apnea with intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a major clinical problem in adult humans and infants born preterm. Adult patients with recurrent apnea exhibit heightened sympathetic nerve activity and hypertension. Adults born preterm are predisposed to early onset of hypertension. Available evidence suggests that carotid body chemoreflex contributes to hypertension caused by IH in both adults and neonates. Experimental models of IH provided important insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying carotid body chemoreflex-mediated hypertension. This article provides a comprehensive appraisal of how IH affects carotid body function, underlying cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms, and the contribution of chemoreflex to the hypertension. PMID:25880505

  1. Conditions Presenting with Symptoms of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aditya M.; Norton, Patrick T.; Zhu, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is estimated to affect more than 20% of people older than 65 years. The vast majority of patients with symptoms suggestive of PAD have atherosclerosis often associated with conventional vascular risk factors such as smoking, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and inflammation. A minority of people presenting with symptoms suggesting PAD have an alternative etiology. These groups of disorders are often underdiagnosed, and if diagnosed correctly the diagnosis may be delayed. Understanding these pathologies well is important, as they can be very debilitating and optimal treatment may vary significantly. Inappropriate treatment of these disorders can lead to worsening morbidity and mortality. This article discusses the underlying causes of nonatherosclerotic PAD, including the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. PMID:25435652

  2. DIETARY INTAKE OF SUBJECTS WITH PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE AND CLAUDICATION

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andrew W.; Bright, Brianna C.; Ort, Kelly A.; Montgomery, Polly S.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the dietary intakes of subjects with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and claudication with diet recommendations of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and dietary reference intake values recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences. Forty-six subjects consumed a mean macronutrient composition of 17% protein, 51% carbohydrate, and 30% fat. Compared to the NCEP and IOM recommendations, few subjects met the recommended daily intakes for sodium (0%), vitamin E (0%), folate (13%), saturated fat (20%), fiber (26%), and cholesterol (39%). Subjects with PAD and claudication have poor nutrition, with diets particularly high in saturated fat, sodium, and cholesterol, and low in fiber, vitamin E and folate intakes. Subjects should be encouraged to reduce consumption of dietary fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium, and to increase fiber and vitamin intakes to meet recommendations of the NCEP and IOM. PMID:21406424

  3. The exercise pressor reflex and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Stone, Audrey J; Kaufman, Marc P

    2015-03-01

    The exercise pressor reflex contributes to increases in cardiovascular and ventilatory function during exercise. These reflexive increases are caused by both mechanical stimulation and metabolic stimulation of group III and IV afferents with endings in contracting skeletal muscle. Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have an augmented exercise pressor reflex. Recently, an animal model of PAD was established which allows further investigation of possible mechanisms involved in this augmented reflex. Earlier studies have identified ASIC3 channels, bradykinin receptors, P2X receptors, endoperoxide receptors, and thromboxane receptors as playing a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in healthy rats. This review focuses on recent studies using a rat model of PAD in order to determine possible mechanisms contributing to the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex seen in patients with this disease.

  4. Ozonized autohemotransfusion does not affect arterial vasodilation in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Antonino; Coppola, Ludovico; Luongo, Carlo; Arciello, Alessandro; Cacciapuoti, Federico; Lama, Diana; Luongo, Margherita; Ruggiero, Luigi; Pastore, Agostino; Gombos, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    Ozonized autohemotransfusion has been used as a complementary therapy in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). To determine whether ozone therapy could acutely modify artery vasodilatory capacity, a flow-mediated dilation test was performed at the brachial artery level before and after an ozonized autohemotransfusion in 16 patients with PAD, mean (± SD) age 55±1.8 years, and 14 healthy volunteers matched for age, sex and body mass index. Before ozonized autohemotransfusion, the mean baseline diameter of the brachial artery was higher in PAD patients than in healthy subjects (4.6±0.54 mm versus 3.6±0.54 mm, P<0.001) while mean flow-mediated brachial artery dilation and percentage of increase in flow were significantly lower in PAD patients than in controls (6.3±6.1% versus 11.8±2.4%, P<0.02; 433±61% versus 580±46%, P<0.02, respectively). No significant changes were observed after ozonized autohemotransfusion, indicating that ozonized autohemotransfusion does not modify endothelium-dependent ischemia-induced vascular reactivity. PMID:22477241

  5. Regulation of peripheral blood flow in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: clinical implication for symptomatic relief and pain management

    PubMed Central

    Groeneweg, George; Huygen, Frank JPM; Coderre, Terence J; Zijlstra, Freek J

    2009-01-01

    Background During the chronic stage of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), impaired microcirculation is related to increased vasoconstriction, tissue hypoxia, and metabolic tissue acidosis in the affected limb. Several mechanisms may be responsible for the ischemia and pain in chronic cold CPRS. Discussion The diminished blood flow may be caused by either sympathetic dysfunction, hypersensitivity to circulating catecholamines, or endothelial dysfunction. The pain may be of neuropathic, inflammatory, nociceptive, or functional nature, or of mixed origin. Summary The origin of the pain should be the basis of the symptomatic therapy. Since the difference in temperature between both hands fluctuates over time in cold CRPS, when in doubt, the clinician should prioritize the patient's report of a persistent cold extremity over clinical tests that show no difference. Future research should focus on developing easily applied methods for clinical use to differentiate between central and peripheral blood flow regulation disorders in individual patients. PMID:19775468

  6. Fusion Guidance in Endovascular Peripheral Artery Interventions: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, Anna M. Haan, Michiel W. de Graaf, Rick de Zwam, Willem H. van; Schurink, Geert Willem H.; Nelemans, Patricia J.; Wildberger, Joachim E. Das, Marco

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of endovascular guidance by means of live fluoroscopy fusion with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and computed tomography angiography (CTA).MethodsFusion guidance was evaluated in 20 endovascular peripheral artery interventions in 17 patients. Fifteen patients had received preinterventional diagnostic MRA and two patients had undergone CTA. Time for fluoroscopy with MRA/CTA coregistration was recorded. Feasibility of fusion guidance was evaluated according to the following criteria: for every procedure the executing interventional radiologists recorded whether 3D road-mapping provided added value (yes vs. no) and whether PTA and/or stenting could be performed relying on the fusion road-map without need for diagnostic contrast-enhanced angiogram series (CEAS) (yes vs. no). Precision of the fusion road-map was evaluated by recording maximum differences between the position of the vasculature on the virtual CTA/MRA images and conventional angiography.ResultsAverage time needed for image coregistration was 5 ± 2 min. Three-dimensional road-map added value was experienced in 15 procedures in 12 patients. In half of the patients (8/17), intervention was performed relying on the fusion road-map only, without diagnostic CEAS. In two patients, MRA roadmap showed a false-positive lesion. Excluding three patients with inordinate movements, mean difference in position of vasculature on angiography and MRA/CTA road-map was 1.86 ± 0.95 mm, implying that approximately 95 % of differences were between 0 and 3.72 mm (2 ± 1.96 standard deviation).ConclusionsFluoroscopy with MRA/CTA fusion guidance for peripheral artery interventions is feasible. By reducing the number of CEAS, this technology may contribute to enhance procedural safety.

  7. Clinical Assessment of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Marc A.; Griffin, Kathryn J.; Scott, D. Julian A.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) describes the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis affecting the circulation in the legs. The severity of PAD is classified according to symptom severity, time course, and anatomical distribution. The signs and symptoms of PAD reflect the degree of circulatory compromise and whether there has been a gradual reduction in the circulation or an abrupt, uncompensated decrease. Accurate clinical assessment underpins decisions on management strategy and should objectively assess the severity of the ischemia and need for revascularization. Clinical history should discriminate symptoms of PAD from other conditions presenting with leg pain, elucidate cardiovascular risk factors and the effect of symptoms on the patient's quality of life. Clinical examination includes signs of general cardiovascular disease and associated conditions before assessing the circulation and viability of the limb. Palpation of peripheral pulses must be augmented by determination of the ankle brachial pressure index using hand held Doppler. A whole patient approach to management is required and must include modification of cardiovascular risk status as well as dealing with the local circulatory manifestation of PAD. PMID:25435653

  8. Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in the Metabolic Myopathy Accompanying Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rontoyanni, Victoria G.; Nunez Lopez, Omar; Fankhauser, Grant T.; Cheema, Zulfiqar F.; Rasmussen, Blake B.; Porter, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a serious but relatively underdiagnosed and undertreated clinical condition associated with a marked reduction in functional capacity and a heightened risk of morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology of lower extremity PAD is complex, and extends beyond the atherosclerotic arterial occlusion and subsequent mismatch between oxygen demand and delivery to skeletal muscle mitochondria. In this review, we evaluate and summarize the available evidence implicating mitochondria in the metabolic myopathy that accompanies PAD. Following a short discussion of the available in vivo and in vitro methodologies to quantitate indices of muscle mitochondrial function, we review the current evidence implicating skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of PAD myopathy, while attempting to highlight questions that remain unanswered. Given the rising prevalence of PAD, the detriment in quality of life for patients, and the associated significant healthcare resource utilization, new alternate therapies that ameliorate lower limb symptoms and the functional impairment associated with PAD are needed. A clear understanding of the role of mitochondria in the pathophysiology of PAD may contribute to the development of novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:28348531

  9. Gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the setting of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a relatively common manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis that leads to progressive narrowing of the lumen of leg arteries. Circulating monocytes are in contact with the arterial wall and can serve as reporters of vascular pathology in the setting of PAD. We performed gene expression analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients with PAD and controls without PAD to identify differentially regulated genes. Methods PAD was defined as an ankle brachial index (ABI) ≤0.9 (n = 19) while age and gender matched controls had an ABI > 1.0 (n = 18). Microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix HG-U133 plus 2.0 gene chips and analyzed using GeneSpring GX 11.0. Gene expression data was normalized using Robust Multichip Analysis (RMA) normalization method, differential expression was defined as a fold change ≥1.5, followed by unpaired Mann-Whitney test (P < 0.05) and correction for multiple testing by Benjamini and Hochberg False Discovery Rate. Meta-analysis of differentially expressed genes was performed using an integrated bioinformatics pipeline with tools for enrichment analysis using Gene Ontology (GO) terms, pathway analysis using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), molecular event enrichment using Reactome annotations and network analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis suite. Extensive biocuration was also performed to understand the functional context of genes. Results We identified 87 genes differentially expressed in the setting of PAD; 40 genes were upregulated and 47 genes were downregulated. We employed an integrated bioinformatics pipeline coupled with literature curation to characterize the functional coherence of differentially regulated genes. Conclusion Notably, upregulated genes mediate immune response, inflammation, apoptosis, stress response, phosphorylation, hemostasis, platelet activation and platelet aggregation. Downregulated genes included several genes from

  10. Arterial gene transfer for therapeutic angiogenesis in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Isner, J M; Walsh, K; Symes, J; Pieczek, A; Takeshita, S; Lowry, J; Rosenfield, K; Weir, L; Brogi, E; Jurayj, D

    1996-05-20

    The age-adjusted prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the U.S. population has been estimated to approach 12%. The clinical consequences of occlusive peripheral arterial disease (PAD) include pain on walking (claudication), pain at rest, and loss of tissue integrity in the distal limbs; the latter may ultimately lead to amputation of a portion of the lower extremity. Surgical bypass techniques and percutaneous catheter-based interventions may be used to successfully revascularize the limbs of certain patients with PAD. In many patients, however, the anatomic extent and distribution of arterial occlusion is too severe to permit relief of pain and/or healing of ischemic ulcers. No effective medical therapy is available for the treatment of such patients. The purpose of this clinical protocol is to document the safety of therapeutic angiogenesis achieved in this case by percutaneous catheter-based delivery of the gene encoding vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in patients with PAD; and, as secondary objectives, investigate the bioactivity of this strategy to relieve rest pain and heal ischemic ulcers of the lower extremities. The rationale for this human protocol is based upon preclinical studies performed in a rabbit model of hindlimb ischemia. These studies are described in detail below and in the manuscripts enclosed in the Appendix to this proposal. In brief, a single intra-arterial bolus of VEGF recombinant human protein, delivered percutaneously to the ischemic limb via an intravascular catheter, resulted in angiographic, hemodynamic, physiologic, and histologic evidence of augmented collateral artery development. Subsequently, similar results were achieved using an angioplasty catheter with a hydrogel-coated balloon to deliver 400 micrograms of a plasmid containing the cDNA for VEGF to the internal iliac artery in the same animal model. Accordingly, we propose to administer arterial gene (VEGF) therapy to patients with rest pain and

  11. Evaluation and Treatment of Patients With Lower Extremity Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manesh R.; Conte, Michael S.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Dib, Nabil; Geraghty, Patrick; Gray, William; Hiatt, William R.; Ho, Mami; Ikeda, Koji; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Jaff, Michael R.; Jones, W. Schuyler; Kawahara, Masayuki; Lookstein, Robert A.; Mehran, Roxana; Misra, Sanjay; Norgren, Lars; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Povsic, Thomas J.; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Rundback, John; Shamoun, Fadi; Tcheng, James; Tsai, Thomas T.; Suzuki, Yuka; Vranckx, Pascal; Wiechmann, Bret N.; White, Christopher J.; Yokoi, Hiroyoshi; Krucoff, Mitchell W.

    2016-01-01

    The lack of consistent definitions and nomenclature across clinical trials of novel devices, drugs, or biologics poses a significant barrier to accrual of knowledge in and across peripheral artery disease therapies and technologies. Recognizing this problem, the Peripheral Academic Research Consortium, together with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, has developed a series of pragmatic consensus definitions for patients being treated for peripheral artery disease affecting the lower extremities. These consensus definitions include the clinical presentation, anatomic depiction, interventional outcomes, surrogate imaging and physiological follow-up, and clinical outcomes of patients with lower-extremity peripheral artery disease. Consistent application of these definitions in clinical trials evaluating novel revascularization technologies should result in more efficient regulatory evaluation and best practice guidelines to inform clinical decisions in patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease. PMID:25744011

  12. Mid-term Clinical Results and Patient Satisfaction After Uterine Artery Embolization in Women with Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids

    SciTech Connect

    Smeets, Albert J.; Lohle, Paul N. M. Vervest, Harry A. M.; Boekkooi, P. Focco; Lampmann, Leo E.H.

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the mid-term clinical results and patient satisfaction following uterine artery embolization (UAE) in women with symptomatic fibroids. Methods. Between August 1998 and December 2002, 135 patients had UAE for symptomatic uterine fibroids. All patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire. Questions were aimed at changes in bleeding, pain, and bulk-related symptoms. Symptoms after UAE were scored as disappeared, improved, unchanged or worsened. Adverse events were noted, such as vaginal dryness and discharge, menopausal complaints or fibroid expulsion. Patient satisfaction after UAE was assessed. Patient satisfaction of women embolized with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles was compared with satisfaction of women embolized with calibrated microspheres. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 110 of 135 women (81%) at a median time interval of 14 months following UAE. In 10 women additional embolization or hysterectomy had been performed. Of the 110 responders, 86 (78%) were satisfied with the result of UAE. The proportion of satisfied women was higher in the group embolized with calibrated microspheres than in women embolized with PVA, although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.053). Conclusion. UAE in women with symptomatic uterine fibroids leads to improvement of symptoms and patient satisfaction is good in the vast majority after a median follow-up period of 14 months.

  13. Endothelial interleukin-21 receptor up-regulation in peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Cunningham, Alexis; Houston, Kevin; Sharma, Aditya M; Chen, Lingdan; Dokun, Ayotunde O; Lye, R John; Spolski, Rosanne; Leonard, Warren J; Annex, Brian H

    2016-01-01

    In most patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD), severe stenosis in or occlusion of the major blood vessels that supply the legs make the amount of distal blood flow dependent on the capacity to induce angiogenesis and collateral vessel formation. Currently, there are no medications that improve perfusion to the ischemic limb, and thus directly treat the primary problem of PAD. A recent report from our group in a pre-clinical mouse PAD model showed that interleukin-21 receptor (IL-21R) is up-regulated in the endothelial cells from ischemic hindlimb muscle. We further showed that loss of IL-21R resulted in impaired perfusion recovery in this model. In our study, we sought to determine whether IL-21R is present in the endothelium from ischemic muscle of patients with PAD. Using human gastrocnemius muscle biopsies, we found increased levels of IL-21R in the skeletal muscle endothelial cells of patients with PAD compared to control individuals. Interestingly, PAD patients had approximately 1.7-fold higher levels of circulating IL-21. These data provide direct evidence that the IL-21R pathway is indeed up-regulated in patients with PAD. This pathway may serve as a therapeutic target for modulation. PMID:26705256

  14. Gait kinematics and kinetics are affected more by peripheral arterial disease than age

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Sara A.; Applequist, Bryon C.; Huisinga, Jessie M.; Pipinos, Iraklis I.; Johanning, Jason M.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) produces abnormal gait and disproportionately affects older individuals. The current study investigated PAD gait biomechanics in young and older subjects. Sixty-one (31 < 65 years, age: 57.4 ± 5.3 years and 30 ≥ 65 years; age: 72.2 ± 5.4 years) patients with PAD and 52 healthy age matched controls were included. Patients with PAD were tested during pain free walking and compared to matched healthy controls. Joint kinematics and kinetics (torques) were compared using a 2 × 2 ANOVA (Groups: PAD vs. Control, Age: Younger vs. Older). Patients with PAD had significantly increased ankle and decreased hip range of motion during the stance phase as well as decreased ankle dorsiflexor torque compared to controls. Gait changes in older individuals are largely constrained to time-distance parameters. Joint kinematics and kinetics are significantly altered in patients with PAD during pain free ambulation. Symptomatic PAD produces a consistent ambulatory deficit across ages definable by advanced biomechanical analysis. The most important finding of the current study is that gait, in the absence of PAD and other ambulatory comorbidities, does not decline significantly with age based on advanced biomechanical analysis. Therefore, previous studies must be examined in the context of potential PAD patients being present in the population and future ambulatory studies must include PAD as a confounding factor when assessing the gait function of elderly individuals. PMID:27149635

  15. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Two Symptomatic Giant Cavernous Hemangiomas of the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Althaus, Sandra; Ashdown, Boyd; Coldwell, Douglas; Helton, W. Scott; Freeny, Patrick C.

    1996-09-15

    Cavernous hemangiomas are usually asymptomatic; however, a small percentage may cause symptoms. This case report discusses palliation by transcatheter arterial embolization with polyvinyl alcohol particles.

  16. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase attenuates the blood pressure response to plantar flexion exercise in peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Rachel C.; Ross, Amanda J.; Blaha, Cheryl A.; Cauffman, Aimee E.; Kaufman, Marc P.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2015-01-01

    Prostanoids are produced during skeletal muscle contraction and subsequently stimulate muscle afferent nerves, thereby contributing to the exercise pressor reflex. Humans with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have an augmented exercise pressor reflex, but the metabolite(s) responsible for this augmented response is not known. We tested the hypothesis that intravenous injection of ketorolac, which blocks the activity of cyclooxygenase, would attenuate the rise in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) evoked by plantar flexion exercise. Seven PAD patients underwent 4 min of single-leg dynamic plantar flexion (30 contractions/min) in the supine posture (workload: 0.5–2.0 kg). MAP and HR were measured on a beat-by-beat basis; changes from baseline in response to exercise were determined. Ketorolac did not affect MAP or HR at rest. During the first 20 s of exercise with the most symptomatic leg, ΔMAP was significantly attenuated by ketorolac (2 ± 2 mmHg) compared with control (8 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.005), but ΔHR was similar (6 ± 2 vs. 5 ± 1 beats/min). Importantly, patients rated the exercise bout as “very light” to “fairly light,” and average pain ratings were 1 of 10. Ketorolac had no effect on perceived exertion or pain ratings. Ketorolac also had no effect on MAP or HR in seven age- and sex-matched healthy subjects who performed a similar but longer plantar flexion protocol (workload: 0.5–7.0 kg). These data suggest that prostanoids contribute to the augmented exercise pressor reflex in patients with PAD. PMID:26055794

  17. Evidence that reduced nitric oxide signal contributes to cutaneous microvascular dysfunction in peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Gary J; Nawaz, Shah; Tew, Garry A

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with cutaneous microvascular dysfunction and an increased risk of arterial ulceration in the affected lower-limb(s). The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in cutaneous microvascular dysfunction in patients with PAD. Using laser-Doppler flowmetry, we measured skin blood flow (SkBF) in 5 patients with unilateral symptomatic PAD and 10 age-matched healthy controls at baseline and during 40 min of local skin heating to 42°C at 1) untreated lower-leg sites, and 2) lower-leg sites treated with 20 mM N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to inhibit NO synthase activity. SkBF was expressed as laser-Doppler flux (LDF) and normalized to maximal LDF (%LDF(max)) achieved through localized heating to 44°C and concomitant infusion of 56 mM sodium nitroprusside. Pharmacological agents and control treatments (lactated Ringer's) were administered using intradermal microdialysis. The plateau LDF response to local skin warming at the untreated skin sites was significantly (P<0.05) lower in the diseased limb of the PAD patients (70.3±13.6 %max) compared to the non-diseased contralateral limb (85.0±10.2 %max) and the response observed for the control participants (89.0±5.2 %max). The NO contribution to the plateau SkBF response tended to be lower in the diseased limb of the PAD patients (45.1±16.4% versus 56.1±10.7% [P=0.12] and 55.4±11.5% [P=0.13], respectively). The results suggest that PAD impairs downstream cutaneous microvascular vasodilatory function and that the microvascular dysfunction is probably explained, at least in part, by a reduced NO signal.

  18. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase attenuates the blood pressure response to plantar flexion exercise in peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Muller, Matthew D; Drew, Rachel C; Ross, Amanda J; Blaha, Cheryl A; Cauffman, Aimee E; Kaufman, Marc P; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-08-01

    Prostanoids are produced during skeletal muscle contraction and subsequently stimulate muscle afferent nerves, thereby contributing to the exercise pressor reflex. Humans with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have an augmented exercise pressor reflex, but the metabolite(s) responsible for this augmented response is not known. We tested the hypothesis that intravenous injection of ketorolac, which blocks the activity of cyclooxygenase, would attenuate the rise in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) evoked by plantar flexion exercise. Seven PAD patients underwent 4 min of single-leg dynamic plantar flexion (30 contractions/min) in the supine posture (workload: 0.5-2.0 kg). MAP and HR were measured on a beat-by-beat basis; changes from baseline in response to exercise were determined. Ketorolac did not affect MAP or HR at rest. During the first 20 s of exercise with the most symptomatic leg, ΔMAP was significantly attenuated by ketorolac (2 ± 2 mmHg) compared with control (8 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.005), but ΔHR was similar (6 ± 2 vs. 5 ± 1 beats/min). Importantly, patients rated the exercise bout as "very light" to "fairly light," and average pain ratings were 1 of 10. Ketorolac had no effect on perceived exertion or pain ratings. Ketorolac also had no effect on MAP or HR in seven age- and sex-matched healthy subjects who performed a similar but longer plantar flexion protocol (workload: 0.5-7.0 kg). These data suggest that prostanoids contribute to the augmented exercise pressor reflex in patients with PAD.

  19. Treating patients with peripheral arterial disease and claudication.

    PubMed

    Treat-Jacobson, Diane; Walsh, M Eileen

    2003-03-01

    The vascular nurse plays an important role in the treatment of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), a prevalent atherosclerotic occlusive disease that affects approximately 8 to 12 million people in the United States. Approximately 4 to 5 million individuals with PAD experience claudication, the exercise-induced ischemic pain in the lower extremities that is relieved upon rest. Both PAD and claudication are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, limitations in functional capacity, and a decreased quality of life. Despite its prevalence, PAD is often undiagnosed and, therefore, increases the risk for cardiovascular ischemic events, disease progression, functional disability, amputation, and death. Risk factors for PAD and claudication are similar to those for other atherosclerotic diseases, including age, cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperhomocysteinemia. Effective treatment to normalize these risk factors can reduce disease progression and the incidence of cardiovascular ischemic events. Claudication symptoms can be improved most effectively through exercise training, which may be used in conjunction with medications specifically indicated to improve these symptoms. Vascular nurses, practicing in a multitude of inpatient and outpatient settings, can assist patients with risk-factor modifications and behavioral changes to help them stop smoking, maintain glycemic control, normalize high blood pressure and lipid levels, and ensure initiation of lifelong antiplatelet therapy and participation in exercise rehabilitation programs, thus, promoting positive outcomes for patients with claudication.

  20. ADAM12: a genetic modifier of preclinical peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lingdan; Okutsu, Mitsuharu; Farber, Charles R.; Hazarika, Surovi; Jones, W. Schuyler; Craig, Damian; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Lye, R. John; Shah, Svati H.; Annex, Brian H.

    2015-01-01

    In prior studies from multiple groups, outcomes following experimental peripheral arterial disease (PAD) differed considerably across inbred mouse strains. Similarly, in humans with PAD, disease outcomes differ, even when there are similarities in risk factors, disease anatomy, arteriosclerotic burden, and hemodynamic measures. Previously, we identified a locus on mouse chromosome 7, limb salvage-associated quantitative trait locus 1 (LSq-1), which was sufficient to modify outcomes following experimental PAD. We compared expression of genes within LSq-1 in Balb/c mice, which normally show poor outcomes following experimental PAD, with that in C57Bl/6 mice, which normally show favorable outcomes, and found that a disintegrin and metalloproteinase gene 12 (ADAM12) had the most differential expression. Augmentation of ADAM12 expression in vivo improved outcomes following experimental PAD in Balb/c mice, whereas knockdown of ADAM12 made outcomes worse in C57Bl/6 mice. In vitro, ADAM12 expression modulates endothelial cell proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis in ischemia, and this appeared to be dependent on tyrosine kinase with Ig-like and EGF-like domain 2 (Tie2) activation. ADAM12 is sufficient to modify PAD severity in mice, and this likely occurs through regulation of Tie2. PMID:26163448

  1. Hemodynamic Conditions in a Failing Peripheral Artery Bypass Graft

    PubMed Central

    McGah, Patrick M.; Leotta, Daniel F.; Beach, Kirk W.; Zierler, R. Eugene; Riley, James J.; Aliseda, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Objective The mechanisms of restenosis in autogenous vein bypass grafts placed for peripheral artery disease are not completely understood. We seek to investigate the role of hemodynamic stress in a case study of a revised bypass graft that failed due to restenosis. Methods The morphology of the lumen is reconstructed from a custom 3D ultrasound system. Scans were taken at one, six, and sixteen months after a patch angioplasty procedure. Computational hemodynamic simulations of the patient-specific model provide the blood flow features and the hemodynamic stresses on the vessel wall at the three time points studied. Results The vessel was initially free of any detectable lesions, but a 60% diameter reducing stenosis developed over the 16 month interval of study. As determined from the simulations, chaotic and recirculating flow occurred downstream of the stenosis due to the sudden widening of the lumen at the patch location. Curvature and a sudden increase in the lumen cross-sectional area induce these flow features that are hypothesized to be conducive to intimal hyperplasia. Favorable agreement was found between simulation results and in vivo Doppler ultrasound velocity measurements. Conclusions Transitional and chaotic flow occurs at the site of the revision, inducing a complex pattern of wall shear are computed with the hemodynamic simulations. This supports the hypothesis that the hemodynamic stresses in the revised segment, produced by the coupling of vessel geometry and chaotic flow, led to the intimal hyperplasia and restenosis of the graft. PMID:22551907

  2. ADAM12: a genetic modifier of preclinical peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Dokun, Ayotunde O; Chen, Lingdan; Okutsu, Mitsuharu; Farber, Charles R; Hazarika, Surovi; Jones, W Schuyler; Craig, Damian; Marchuk, Douglas A; Lye, R John; Shah, Svati H; Annex, Brian H

    2015-09-01

    In prior studies from multiple groups, outcomes following experimental peripheral arterial disease (PAD) differed considerably across inbred mouse strains. Similarly, in humans with PAD, disease outcomes differ, even when there are similarities in risk factors, disease anatomy, arteriosclerotic burden, and hemodynamic measures. Previously, we identified a locus on mouse chromosome 7, limb salvage-associated quantitative trait locus 1 (LSq-1), which was sufficient to modify outcomes following experimental PAD. We compared expression of genes within LSq-1 in Balb/c mice, which normally show poor outcomes following experimental PAD, with that in C57Bl/6 mice, which normally show favorable outcomes, and found that a disintegrin and metalloproteinase gene 12 (ADAM12) had the most differential expression. Augmentation of ADAM12 expression in vivo improved outcomes following experimental PAD in Balb/c mice, whereas knockdown of ADAM12 made outcomes worse in C57Bl/6 mice. In vitro, ADAM12 expression modulates endothelial cell proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis in ischemia, and this appeared to be dependent on tyrosine kinase with Ig-like and EGF-like domain 2 (Tie2) activation. ADAM12 is sufficient to modify PAD severity in mice, and this likely occurs through regulation of Tie2.

  3. Transcatheter Arterial Infusion of Autologous CD133+ Cells for Diabetic Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Lian, Weishuai; Lou, Wensheng; Han, Shilong; Lu, Chenhui; Zuo, Keqiang; Su, Haobo; Xu, Jichong; Cao, Chuanwu; Tang, Tao; Jia, Zhongzhi; Jin, Tao; Uzan, Georges; Gu, Jianping; Li, Maoquan

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular lesion in diabetic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) still cannot be resolved by current surgical and interventional technique. Endothelial cells have the therapeutic potential to cure microvascular lesion. To evaluate the efficacy and immune-regulatory impact of intra-arterial infusion of autologous CD133+ cells, we recruited 53 patients with diabetic PAD (27 of CD133+ group and 26 of control group). CD133+ cells enriched from patients' PB-MNCs were reinfused intra-arterially. The ulcer healing followed up till 18 months was 100% (3/3) in CD133+ group and 60% (3/5) in control group. The amputation rate was 0 (0/27) in CD133+ group and 11.54% (3/26) in control group. Compared with the control group, TcPO2 and ABI showed obvious improvement at 18 months and significant increasing VEGF and decreasing IL-6 level in the CD133+ group within 4 weeks. A reducing trend of proangiogenesis and anti-inflammatory regulation function at 4 weeks after the cells infusion was also found. These results indicated that autologous CD133+ cell treatment can effectively improve the perfusion of morbid limb and exert proangiogenesis and anti-inflammatory immune-regulatory impacts by paracrine on tissue microenvironment. The CD133+ progenitor cell therapy may be repeated at a fixed interval according to cell life span and immune-regulatory function. PMID:26981134

  4. Outcome of intracranial arterial stenting of symptomatic atherosclerotic disease: A single center experience from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Said, Youssef Al; Kurdi, Khalil; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Najjar, Ahmed; Almekhlafi, Mohammed; Hassan, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To present our local experience with intracranial angioplasty and stenting used for the treatment of symptomatic intracranial stenosis to assess its safety, efficacy, and outcome. Methods: This is a retrospective review of all the patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease who underwent endovascular treatment in King Faisal Specialist Hospital and research center, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from January 2003 to December 2014. Clinical, procedural, and outcome variables were gathered. Results: We identified 22 patients who were referred for stenting of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis. In all but 3, the stents were deployed successfully (86% procedural success rate). The procedure was carried out under conscious sedation in 32%. Excellent flow was restored immediately in all successfully-stented cases. Post procedural strokes occurred in 4 patients (17.4%). One non-neurological death was identified in a patient who suffered a major post procedural stroke (4.3%). Conclusion: Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is not uncommon in our population. Angioplasty and stenting might be a valid option for the treatment of patients with recurrent symptoms despite optimal medical treatment. PMID:27744470

  5. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a ...

  6. Peripheral arterial chemoreceptors and sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gauda, Estelle B; Cristofalo, Elizabeth; Nunez, Jeanne

    2007-07-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the major cause of death in infants between 1 month and 1 year of age. Two particular concerns are that (1) premature or low birth weight (<2500-g) infants have a 2- to 40-fold greater risk of dying of SIDS (depending on the sleep position) than infants born at term and of normal birth weight, and that (2) the proportion of premature infants dying of SIDS has increased from 12 to 34% between 1988 and 2003. Hypo- and hypersensitivity of peripheral arterial chemoreceptors (PACs) may be one biological mechanism that could help to explain the epidemiological association between the increased incidence of SIDS in formerly premature infants. Because premature infants are often exposed to the extremes of oxygen stress during early postnatal development, they are more likely to have a maladaptive response of PACs later in their lives. As the first line of defense that mediates an increase in ventilation to a hypoxic challenge during wakefulness and sleep, PACs also mediate arousal responses during sleep in response to an asphyxial event that is often associated with upper airway obstruction. In most mammalian species, PACs are not fully developed at birth and thus are vulnerable to plasticity-induced changes mediated by environmental exposures such as the extremes of oxygen tension. Hypoxic or hyperoxic exposure during early postnatal development can lead to hyposensitive or hypersensitive PAC responses later in life. Although baseline chemoreceptor activity may not be the cause of an initial hypoxic or asphyxial event, the level of peripheral chemoreceptor drive does modulate the (1) time to arousal, (2) resumption of airflow during airway obstruction, (3) escape behaviors during rebreathing, and (4) cardiorespiratory responses that result from activation of the laryngeal chemoreflex. The laryngeal chemoreflex can be stimulated by reflux of gastric contents above the upper esophageal sphincter, or an increase in nasopharyngeal

  7. Bovine Aortic Arch and Bilateral Retroesophageal Course of Common Carotid Arteries in a Symptomatic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Bissacco, Daniele; Domanin, Maurizio; Schinco, Giuseppina; Gabrielli, Livio

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations of carotid arteries may be related to their development (agenesis, aplasia, hypoplasia) or course (coiling, kinking, tortuosity). Partial or total aberrancies in carotid vessel anatomy rarely occur. We describe the case of a 95-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of confusion and disorientation together with upper limb clonus. Computed tomography (CT)-scan revealed a left frontal brain injury with a not conclusive carotid doppler ultrasound. CT angiography reported a bovine aortic arch with bilateral retroesophageal course of both common carotid arteries and left severe (>70%) internal carotid artery stenosis. The knowledge of anatomical variations of the course of carotid arteries is relevant for possible surgical or endovascular repair or in case of otolaryngology or intubation procedures. PMID:27699162

  8. Total knee arthroplasty after ipsilateral peripheral arterial bypass graft: acute arterial occlusion is a risk with or without tourniquet use.

    PubMed

    Turner, N S; Pagnano, M W; Sim, F H

    2001-04-01

    A retrospective review was done of the total joint registry at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, which contains the computerized records of 19,808 consecutive total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) including primary and revision that were performed from 1970 to 1997. From that database, 9 patients were found to have had a TKA after an ipsilateral peripheral arterial reconstruction. One patient had had bilateral peripheral arterial reconstruction followed by bilateral TKA, and 10 TKAs were reviewed. The medical records were reviewed retrospectively with particular attention given to the type of peripheral bypass surgery performed, the bypass graft source, the timing of the bypass surgery relative to TKA, the use of a tourniquet at the time of TKA, and the occurrence of complications after TKA. Of the 10 TKAs, 2 patients had acute arterial occlusion. One patient had a tourniquet, and the other patient did not. There was not a statistical correlation between graft type, tourniquet use, timing of surgery, postoperative anticoagulation, and occurrence of arterial occlusion. There is a marked risk of acute thrombosis of an ipsilateral arterial bypass graft after TKA that cannot be eliminated by performing the TKA without a tourniquet. Careful monitoring of the vascular status of the limb is required in the early postoperative period to detect arterial compromise. Should limb ischemia be suspected, an emergent vascular surgery consultation is required, and arterial flow to the lower extremity must be re-established.

  9. Peripheral arterial disease diagnosed with high-count-rate radionuclide arteriography

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, M.; Ijima, H.; Kohda, Y.; Kuramoto, K.; Kikuchi, Y.; Wada, M.; Akisada, M.

    1984-07-01

    Thirty-seven patients with peripheral vascular disease involving the legs were studied with first-pass peripheral radio-nuclide arteriography (RNA) and contrast arteriography to determine whether RNA could be used to evaluate perfusion of the toes. Peripheral time-activity curves were examined and the time required for activity to decline to 75% of peak activity (T75) was recorded. These data suggest that peripheral RNA of the toes is a reliable, noninvasive procedure for evaluation of peripheral arterial disease; it can be valuable as a screening test prior to contrast arteriography as well as for follow-up.

  10. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis: an unusual case and discussion of genetic associations.

    PubMed

    Ngo, My-Linh D; Aggarwal, Avichal; Knudson, Jarrod D

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is a common congenital heart lesion associated with several genetic syndromes. We have reviewed the genetics of the lesion and present an unusual case of peripheral pulmonary stenosis involving a newly reported genetic deletion on chromosome 16. Further studies will be needed to confirm association of this genotype and phenotype.

  11. Prostatic Artery Embolization (PAE) for Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): Part 2, Insights into the Technical Rationale.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Crisóstomo, Verónica; Báez-Díaz, Claudia; Sánchez, Francisco M

    2016-02-01

    Rationale of prostatic artery embolization (PAE) in the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia is conventionally believed to include two parts: shrinkage of the enlarged prostate gland as a result of PAE-induced ischemic infarction and potential effects to relax the increased prostatic smooth muscle tone by reducing the number and density of α1-adrenergic receptor in the prostate stroma. This review describes new insights into the likely mechanisms behind PAE, such as ischemia-induced apoptosis, apoptosis enhanced by blockage of androgens circulation to the embolized prostate, secondary denervation following PAE, and potential effect of nitric oxide pathway immediately after embolization. Studies on therapeutic mechanisms in PAE may shed light on potentially new treatment strategies and development of novel techniques.

  12. Prostatic Artery Embolization (PAE) for Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): Part 2, Insights into the Technical Rationale

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Fei Crisóstomo, Verónica Báez-Díaz, Claudia Sánchez, Francisco M.

    2016-02-15

    Rationale of prostatic artery embolization (PAE) in the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia is conventionally believed to include two parts: shrinkage of the enlarged prostate gland as a result of PAE-induced ischemic infarction and potential effects to relax the increased prostatic smooth muscle tone by reducing the number and density of α{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor in the prostate stroma. This review describes new insights into the likely mechanisms behind PAE, such as ischemia-induced apoptosis, apoptosis enhanced by blockage of androgens circulation to the embolized prostate, secondary denervation following PAE, and potential effect of nitric oxide pathway immediately after embolization. Studies on therapeutic mechanisms in PAE may shed light on potentially new treatment strategies and development of novel techniques.

  13. Endovascular revascularization of symptomatic chronic middle cerebral artery occlusions: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yue; Lo, Wai-Ting; Liu, Yang-Xia

    2016-01-01

    For patients with chronic middle cerebral artery occlusions who have recurrent ischemic symptoms despite antiplatelet therapy and vascular risk factor control, treatment options are limited. Because of concerns about the safety of endovascular revascularization of these occlusions and the technical skills required, these procedures have not been widely performed. We report on two patients with successful endovascular revascularization of the chronic middle cerebral artery occlusion with impaired cerebral hemodynamics, with vessel patency maintained on follow-up imaging and no recurrence of stroke. A literature review of treatment options for such patients was performed. Revascularization is technically feasible and can be considered an option for carefully selected chronic middle cerebral artery occlusion patients with recurrent ischemic symptoms despite medical therapy. PMID:26647227

  14. Drug-eluting stents in the management of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Bosiers, Marc; Cagiannos, Catherine; Deloose, Koen; Verbist, Jürgen; Peeters, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Since major meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials in interventional cardiology showed the potential of drug-eluting stents in decreasing restenosis and reintervention rates after coronary artery stenting, one of the next steps in the treatment of arterial occlusive disease is the transfer of the active coating technology towards peripheral arterial interventions. In this manuscript, we aim to provide a literature overview on available peripheral (lower limb, renal, and supra-aortic) drug-eluting stent applications, debate the cost implications, and give recommendations for future treatment strategies.

  15. Drug-eluting stents in the management of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Bosiers, Marc; Cagiannos, Catherine; Deloose, Koen; Verbist, Jürgen; Peeters, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Since major meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials in interventional cardiology showed the potential of drug-eluting stents in decreasing restenosis and reintervention rates after coronary artery stenting, one of the next steps in the treatment of arterial occlusive disease is the transfer of the active coating technology towards peripheral arterial interventions. In this manuscript, we aim to provide a literature overview on available peripheral (lower limb, renal, and supra-aortic) drug-eluting stent applications, debate the cost implications, and give recommendations for future treatment strategies. PMID:18827906

  16. Clinical Comparison of Outcomes of Early versus Delayed Carotid Artery Stenting for Symptomatic Cerebral Watershed Infarction due to Stenosis of the Proximal Internal Carotid Artery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huakun; Chu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Chaolai; Yan, Zhongrui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of early versus delayed carotid artery stenting (CAS) for symptomatic cerebral watershed infarction (sCWI) patients due to stenosis of the proximal internal carotid artery. We retrospectively collected clinical data of those who underwent early or delayed CAS from March 2011 to April 2014. The time of early CAS and delayed CAS was within a week of symptom onset and after four weeks from symptom onset. Clinical data such as second stroke, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NHISS) score, and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score and periprocedural complications were collected. The rate of second stroke in early CAS group is lower when compared to that of delayed CAS group. There was no significant difference regarding periprocedural complications in both groups. There was a significant difference regarding mean NHISS score 90 days after CAS in two groups. Early CAS group had a significant better good outcome (mRS score ≤ 2) than delayed CAS group. We suggest early CAS for sCWI due to severe proximal internal carotid artery stenosis as it provides lower rate of second stroke, comparable periprocedural complications, and better functional outcomes compared to that of delayed CAS. PMID:28004005

  17. Peripheral arterial obliterative disease. Cost of illness in France.

    PubMed

    Montron, A; Guignard, E; Pelc, A; Comte, S

    1998-01-01

    The main purpose of this study, carried out in 1995, was to determine, using available sources, the cost of peripheral arterial obliterative disease (PAOD) in France over a 1-year period. This cost-of-illness study was based on a retrospective analysis of the available literature and databases. It involved a description of epidemiological data and a cost estimate of the different medical resources consumed over 1 year. For this latter purpose, a payer perspective was chosen. Data were extracted from national representative surveys and databases with respect to morbidity and mortality [from the National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale; INSERM) and the National Sickness Insurance Fund for Salaried People (Caisse Nationale d'Assurance Maladie des Travailleurs Salariés; CNAMTS)], consultations, examination tests and drug prescriptions [from the French Medical Audit conducted by Intercontinental Medical Statistics (IMS)], hospitalisations [from the Statistical Unit of the Department of Health-Service des Statistiques, des Etudes et des Systemes d'Information (SESI) and the National Public Research Centre in Health Economics (Centre de Recherche d'Etude et de Documentation en Economie de la Santé; CREDES)] and related health expenditure from CNAMTS. In France, the prevalence of stage II PAOD (Leriche and Fontaine classification) in 1992 was estimated to be 675,000; 53% of these patients had undergone vascular or bypass surgery. The total annual cost of healthcare (including consultations, drugs, laboratory tests, hospitalisation and hydrotherapy) for the management of patients with PAOD ranged from 3.9 billion French francs (F) to F4.6 billion (1995 values), depending on the type of hospital considered. 50% of this cost was related to hospitalisations and 75% was covered by the CNAMTS. Although this study was only a partial evaluation and did not take into account indirect costs or nonmedical direct

  18. Use of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry and circulating biological markers to predict outcomes in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Nobre, Vandack; Ataíde, Thiago Bragança; Brant, Luisa Caldeira; Oliveira, Clara Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Lucas Vieira; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz Pinho; Lopes, Fernanda Barbosa; Saraiva, Ivan Euclides; Andrade, Marcus Vinícius

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the usefulness and prognostic value of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry in patients with sepsis. Moreover, we investigated the association of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry results with serum levels of certain inflammatory molecules. Methods Prospective study, conducted in an 18-bed mixed intensive care unit for adults. The exclusion criteria included severe immunosuppression or antibiotic therapy initiated more than 48 hours before assessment. We measured the reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry on inclusion (day 1) and on day 3. Interleukin-6, interleukin-10, high-mobility group box 1 protein and soluble ST2 levels were measured in the blood obtained upon inclusion. Results Seventeen of the 79 patients (21.6%) enrolled were determined to have reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry signals considered technically unreliable and were excluded from the study. Thus, 62 patients were included in the final analysis, and they underwent a total of 95 reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry exams within the first 48 hours after inclusion. The mean age was 51.5 (SD: 18.9), and 49 (62%) of the patients were male. Reactive hyperemia indexes from days 1 and 3 were not associated with vasopressor need, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, or 28-day mortality. Among the patients who died, compared with survivors, there was a significant increase in the day 3 reactive hyperemia index compared with day 1 (p = 0.045). There was a weak negative correlation between the day 1 reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry index and the levels of high-mobility group box 1 protein (r = -0.287). Conclusion Technical difficulties and the lack of clear associations between the exam results and clinical severity or outcomes strongly limits the utility of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry in septic patients

  19. Reduced intraepidermal nerve fiber density in patients with chronic ischemic pain in peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Gröne, Eva; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Abahji, Thomas; Fleckenstein, Johannes; Irnich, Dominik; Mussack, Thomas; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Sommer, Claudia; Lang, Philip M

    2014-09-01

    Chronic ischemic pain in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a leading cause of pain in the lower extremities. A neuropathic component of chronic ischemic pain has been shown independent of coexisting diabetes. We aimed to identify a morphological correlate potentially associated with pain and sensory deficits in PAD. Forty patients with symptomatic PAD (Fontaine stages II-IV), 20 with intermittent claudication (CI), and 20 with critical limb ischemia (CLI) were enrolled; 12 volunteers served as healthy controls. All patients were examined using pain scales and questionnaires. All study participants underwent quantitative sensory testing (QST) at the distal calf and skin punch biopsy at the distal leg for determination of intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD). Additionally, S100 beta serum levels were measured as a potential marker for ischemic nerve damage. Neuropathic pain questionnaires revealed slightly higher scores and more pronounced pain-induced disability in CLI patients compared to CI patients. QST showed elevated thermal and mechanical detection pain thresholds as well as dynamic mechanical allodynia, particularly in patients with advanced disease. IENFD was reduced in PAD compared to controls (P<0.05), more pronounced in the CLI subgroup (CLI: 1.3 ± 0.5 fibers/mm, CI: 2.9 ± 0.5 fibers/mm, controls: 5.3 ± 0.6 fibers/mm). In particular, increased mechanical and heat pain thresholds negatively correlated with lower IENFD. Mean S100 beta levels were in the normal range but were higher in advanced disease. Patients with chronic ischemic pain had a reduced IENFD associated with impaired sensory functions. These findings support the concept of a neuropathic component in ischemic pain.

  20. Symptomatic Growth of a Thrombosed Persistent Sciatic Artery Aneurysm after Bypass and Distal Exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Cho, Sungsin; Cho, Min-Ji; Min, Sang-il; Ahn, Sanghyun; Ha, Jongwon; Min, Seung-Kee

    2017-01-01

    A 71-year-old woman presented with an enlarging mass in the right buttock, with pain and tingling sensation in sitting position. Five years ago, she was diagnosed with acute limb ischemia due to acute thrombosis of right persistent sciatic artery (PSA), and she underwent successful thromboembolectomy and femoro-tibioperoneal trunk bypass. Computed tomography angiography revealed a huge PSA aneurysm (PSAA). During the previous bypass, the distal popliteal artery was ligated just above the distal anastomosis to exclude the PSAA, whose proximal end was already thrombosed. However, PSAA has grown to cause compression symptoms, and the mechanism of aneurysm growth can be ascribed to type 1a or type 2 endoleak. In order to relieve the compression symptoms, aneurysm excision was performed without any injury to the sciatic nerve. A postoperative tingling sensation due to sciatic-nerve stimulation in the supine position resolved spontaneously one month after surgery. PMID:28377910

  1. [Doppler ultrasound assisted hemorrhoid artery ligation. A new therapy in symptomatic hemorrhoids].

    PubMed

    Arnold, S; Antonietti, E; Rollinger, G; Scheyer, M

    2002-03-01

    In 1995, Morinaga et al. (Japan) reported on a new technique in the treatment of hemorrhoids. We report the results of our first 105 patients thus treated. By a specially designed proctoscope coupled with a Doppler transducer, the hemorrhoidal arteries are looked for and ligated. All stages of hemorrhoid were treated. This method is painless, successful, and has a low rate of complications. It is for outpatients and is an alternative to all other methods in the treatment of hemorrhoids.

  2. Endovascular management of symptomatic vertebral artery origin stenosis in the presence of an acute thrombus.

    PubMed

    Amole, Adewumi O; Akdol, Mehmet S; Wood, Clint E; Keyrouz, Salah G; Erdem, Eren

    2012-07-01

    A woman in her early 60s with hypertension and hyperlipidemia was undergoing investigations for anemia of unknown etiology. She developed a sudden reduction in visual acuity and bilateral visual field impairment. MRI and angiography revealed acute infarcts in the posterior circulation and severe narrowing of the left vertebral artery origin. Digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a high-grade stenosis of the left vertebral artery origin with a thrombus just distal to the stenosis. The patient developed recurrent infarcts while on antithrombotic therapy. The lesion was successfully treated by vertebral artery origin angioplasty and stenting (VOAS) using a flow reversal technique and distal embolic protection. She was discharged to a rehabilitation facility 4 days later without worsening or new neurological deficits. A search of the literature yielded a similar report managed with anticoagulation and subsequent VOAS after complete lysis of the thrombus. Our report highlights the technique, safety and feasibility of VOAS in the presence of a thrombus using a flow reversal technique and distal protection.

  3. Evaluation of Endarterectomy Recanalization under Ultrasound Guidance in Symptomatic Patients with Carotid Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yumei; Jia, Lingyun; Liu, Beibei; Meng, Xiufeng; Yang, Jie; Li, Jingzhi; Zhou, Yinghua; Jiao, Liqun; Hua, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Rigorous screening and good imaging would help perform surgery on carotid artery occlusion CAO safely and effectively. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate carotid endarterectomy (CEA) recanalization in patients with common carotid artery occlusion (CCAO) or internal carotid artery occlusion (ICAO) with color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI). A total of 59 patients undergoing CEA were enrolled. According to the results of CEA, the patients were divided into successful recanalization (group A) and unsuccessful recanalization (group B) groups. The original diameter, lesion length, proximal-to-distal diameter ratio and echo characteristics of the lesion within the lumen of the carotid artery were recorded before CEA and compared between the two groups. In regards to the achievement of repatency by CEA, the overall success rate was 74.6% (44/59), the success rate in CCAO patients was 75.9% (22/29) and the success rate in ICAO patients was 73.3% (22/30). There was no significant difference in the success rates between the CCAO and ICAO patients (χ2 = 0.050, P = 0.824). The overall rate of stroke and death within 30 postoperative days was 5.1% (3/59). For the CCAO patients, the lesion length in group A was shorter than that in group B (t = 3.221, P = 0.004). For the ICAO patients, the original diameter of the distal ICA was broader (t = 6.254, P = 0.000) and the proximal-to-distal ICA diameter ratio was smaller (t = 8.036, P = 0.000) in group A than in group B. The rate of recanalization for lumens with a homogeneous echo pattern (hypoecho or isoecho) was significantly higher than that for lumens with echo heterogeneity for both the CCAO and ICAO patients (χ2 = 14.477, P = 0.001; χ2 = 10.519, P = 0.003). However, for both the CCAO and ICAO patients, there was no difference in the rate of recanalization between patients with hypoecho and isoecho lesions (χ2 = 0.109, P = 0.742; χ2 = 0.836, P = 0.429). The original diameter, proximal-to-distal ICA

  4. Evaluation of Endarterectomy Recanalization under Ultrasound Guidance in Symptomatic Patients with Carotid Artery Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yumei; Jia, Lingyun; Liu, Beibei; Meng, Xiufeng; Yang, Jie; Li, Jingzhi; Zhou, Yinghua; Jiao, Liqun; Hua, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Rigorous screening and good imaging would help perform surgery on carotid artery occlusion CAO safely and effectively. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate carotid endarterectomy (CEA) recanalization in patients with common carotid artery occlusion (CCAO) or internal carotid artery occlusion (ICAO) with color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI). A total of 59 patients undergoing CEA were enrolled. According to the results of CEA, the patients were divided into successful recanalization (group A) and unsuccessful recanalization (group B) groups. The original diameter, lesion length, proximal-to-distal diameter ratio and echo characteristics of the lesion within the lumen of the carotid artery were recorded before CEA and compared between the two groups. In regards to the achievement of repatency by CEA, the overall success rate was 74.6% (44/59), the success rate in CCAO patients was 75.9% (22/29) and the success rate in ICAO patients was 73.3% (22/30). There was no significant difference in the success rates between the CCAO and ICAO patients (χ2 = 0.050, P = 0.824). The overall rate of stroke and death within 30 postoperative days was 5.1% (3/59). For the CCAO patients, the lesion length in group A was shorter than that in group B (t = 3.221, P = 0.004). For the ICAO patients, the original diameter of the distal ICA was broader (t = 6.254, P = 0.000) and the proximal-to-distal ICA diameter ratio was smaller (t = 8.036, P = 0.000) in group A than in group B. The rate of recanalization for lumens with a homogeneous echo pattern (hypoecho or isoecho) was significantly higher than that for lumens with echo heterogeneity for both the CCAO and ICAO patients (χ2 = 14.477, P = 0.001; χ2 = 10.519, P = 0.003). However, for both the CCAO and ICAO patients, there was no difference in the rate of recanalization between patients with hypoecho and isoecho lesions (χ2 = 0.109, P = 0.742; χ2 = 0.836, P = 0.429). The original diameter, proximal-to-distal ICA

  5. Midterm Results after Uterine Artery Embolization Versus MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids

    SciTech Connect

    Froeling, V. Meckelburg, K. Scheurig-Muenkler, C. Schreiter, N. F. Kamp, J. Maurer, M. H. Beck, A. Hamm, B. Kroencke, T. J.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To compare the rate of reintervention and midterm changes in symptom severity (SS) and Total health-related quality of life (HRQoL) scores after uterine artery embolization (UAE) and magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-g HIFU) for symptomatic uterine fibroids. Methods: Eighty women (median age 38.3 years), equally eligible for MR-g HIFU and UAE who underwent one of both treatments between 2002 and 2009 at our institution, were included. The primary end point of the study was defined as the rate of reintervention after both therapies. The secondary outcome was defined as changes in SS and Total HRQoL scores after treatment. SS and Total HRQoL scores before treatment and at midterm follow-up (median 13.3 months) were assessed by the uterine fibroid symptom and quality-of-life questionnaire (UFS-QoL) and compared. Results: The rate of reintervention was significantly lower after UAE than after MR-g HIFU (p = 0.002). After both treatments, SS and Total HRQoL scores improved significantly from baseline to follow-up (UAE: p < 0.001, p < 0.001; MR-g HIFU: p = 0.002, p < 0.001). Total HRQoL scores were significantly higher after UAE than after MR-g HIFU (p = 0.032). Changes in the SS scores did not differ significantly for both treatments (p = 0.061). Conclusion: UAE and MR-g HIFU significantly improved the health-related quality of life of women with symptomatic uterine fibroids. After UAE, the change in Total HRQoL score improvement was significantly better, and a significantly lower rate of reintervention was observed.

  6. Hypereosinophilic syndrome accompanying gangrene of the toes with peripheral arterial occlusion--a case report.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Satoru; Masaki, Ichiro; Furuyama, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    The authors herein report the case of a teenage boy who presented with peripheral arterial occlusion of both upper and lower extremities associated with hypereosinophilia. During a 10-year follow-up, corticosteroid therapy was continued for the treatment of hypereosinophilia. The patient underwent bilateral lumbar sympathectomies because of severe ischemia of the bilateral lower extremities with gangrene of the toes. Based on the progress of his disease over the past 10 years, he was suspected to have idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) accompanied by peripheral arterial obstruction. Idiopathic HES is a disease characterized by unexpected hypereosinophilia, which may lead to organ damage. This is a very rare case of peripheral arterial occlusion associated with idiopathic HIS.

  7. Peripheral pulmonary arteries: identification at multi-slice spiral CT with 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel; Pawlak, Sebastien; Dechambre, Stéphane; Maldague, Baudouin

    2003-04-01

    Our objective was to analyze the peripheral pulmonary arteries using thin-collimation multi-slice spiral CT. Twenty consecutive patients underwent enhanced-spiral multi-slice CT using 1-mm collimation. Two observers analyzed the pulmonary arteries by consensus on a workstation. Each artery was identified on axial and 3D shaded-surface display reconstruction images. Each subsegmental artery was measured at a mediastinal window setting and compared with anatomical classifications. The location and branching of every subsegmental artery was recorded. The number of well-visualized sub-subsegmental arteries at a mediastinal window setting was compared with those visualized at a lung window setting. Of 800 subsegmental arteries, 769 (96%) were correctly visualized and 123 accessory subsegmental arteries were identified using the mediastinal window setting. One thousand ninety-two of 2019 sub-subsegmental arteries (54%) identified using the lung window setting were correctly visualized using the mediastinal window setting. Enhanced multi-slice spiral CT with thin collimation can be used to analyze precisely the subsegmental pulmonary arteries and may identify even more distal pulmonary arteries.

  8. Civil and war peripheral arterial trauma: review of risk factors associated with limb loss.

    PubMed

    Davidovic, Lazar B; Cinara, Ilijas S; Ille, Tanja; Kostic, Dusan M; Dragas, Marko V; Markovic, Dragan M

    2005-01-01

    We sought to analyze the early results of civil and war peripheral arterial injury treatment and to identify risk factors associated with limb loss. Between 1992 and 2001, data collected retrospectively and prospectively on 413 patients with 448 peripheral arterial injuries were analyzed. Of these, there were 140 patients with war injuries and 273 patients with civil injuries. The mechanism of injury was gunshot in 40%, blunt injury in 24%, explosive trauma in 20.3%, and stabbing in 15.7% of the cases. The most frequently injured vessels were the femoral arteries (37.3%), followed by the popliteal (27.8%), axillary and brachial (23.5%), and crural arteries (6.5%). Associated injuries, which included bone, nerve, and remote injuries affecting the head, chest, or abdomen, were present in 60.8% of the cases. Surgery was carried out on all patients, with a limb salvage rate of 89.1% and a survival rate of 97.3%. In spite of a rising trend in peripheral arterial injuries, our total and delayed amputation rates remained stable. On statistical analysis, significant risk factors for amputation were found to be failed revascularization, associated injuries, secondary operation, explosive injury, war injury (p < .01) and arterial contusion with consecutive thrombosis, popliteal artery injury, and late surgery (p < .05). Peripheral arterial injuries, if inadequately treated, carry a high amputation rate. Explosive injuries are the most likely to lead to amputations, whereas stab injuries are the least likely to do so. The most significant independent risk factor for limb loss was failed revascularization.

  9. The Current National Criteria for Carotid Artery Stenting Overestimates Its Efficacy in Patients Who Are Symptomatic and High Risk

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shunsuke; Bensley, Rodney P.; Glaser, Julia D.; Nabzdyk, Christoph S.; Hamdan, Allen D.; Wyers, Mark C.; Chaikof, Elliot L.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.; Boston

    2013-01-01

    , both P≤.05) Conclusions Physiologic high risk status was associated with increased stroke/death, while anatomic high risk status showed a trend towards increased stroke/death, in symptomatic patients undergoing CAS compared to non-high risk patients undergoing CAS or physiologically high risk patients undergoing CEA. Our results suggest that the current national criteria for carotid artery stenting overestimates its efficacy in patients who are symptomatic and high risk. PMID:23566490

  10. Mechanical Recanalization of Subacute Vessel Occlusion in Peripheral Arterial Disease with a Directional Atherectomy Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Massmann, Alexander Katoh, Marcus; Shayesteh-Kheslat, Roushanak; Buecker, Arno

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively examine the technical feasibility and safety of directional atherectomy for treatment of subacute infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions. Methods: Five patients (one woman, four men, age range 51-81 years) with peripheral arterial disease who experienced sudden worsening of their peripheral arterial disease-related symptoms during the last 2-6 weeks underwent digital subtraction angiography, which revealed vessel occlusion in native popliteal artery (n = 4) and in-stent occlusion of the superficial femoral artery (n = 1). Subsequently, all patients were treated by atherectomy with the SilverHawk (ev3 Endovascular, USA) device. Results: The mean diameter of treated vessels was 5.1 {+-} 1.0 mm. The length of the occlusion ranged 2-14 cm. The primary technical success rate was 100%. One patient experienced a reocclusion during hospitalization due to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. There were no further periprocedural complications, in particular no peripheral embolizations, until hospital discharge or during the follow-up period of 1 year. Conclusion: The recanalization of infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions by atherectomy with the SilverHawk device is technically feasible and safe. In our limited retrospective study, it was associated with a high technical success rate and a low procedure-related complication rate.

  11. Non-invasive quantification of peripheral arterial volume distensibility and its non-linear relationship with arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dingchang; Murray, Alan

    2009-05-29

    arm positioning procedure, with the greatest effect at low pressures. This work is an important step in developing a simple non-invasive technique for assessing peripheral arterial volume distensibility.

  12. Intra-Arterial Angiolymphoid Hyperplasia with Eosinophilia: A Rare Case Report of Peripheral Medium Sized Muscular Artery Involvement.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ashima; Umashankar, T; Dsouza, Chryselle Olive

    2015-08-01

    Angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE) is an uncommon benign vasoproliferative disease with distinct clinical and histopathological features. The most common clinical presentation is dermal and subcutaneous painless nodules in the head and neck region. The involvement of medium sized peripheral muscular artery is uncommon. It predominantly affects Caucasian adults during the third and fourth decades, but is also known to occur in Asians and it very rarely occurs in children. We here by present a case of intravascular ALHE in a 46-year-old female presenting with subcutaneous forearm nodule clinically diagnosed as ulnar artery thrombosis.

  13. Long-Term Follow-up of Uterine Artery Embolization for Symptomatic Adenomyosis

    SciTech Connect

    Smeets, A. J. Nijenhuis, R. J.; Boekkooi, P. F.; Vervest, H. A. M.; Rooij, W. J. van; Lohle, P. N. M.

    2012-08-15

    Introduction: Long-term results of uterine artery embolization (UAE) for adenomyosis are largely unknown. We assess long-term outcome of UAE in 40 women with adenomyosis. Materials and methods: Between March 1999 and October 2006, 40 consecutive women with adenomyosis (22 in combination with fibroids) were treated with UAE. Changes in junction zone thickness were assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline and again at 3 months. After a mean clinical follow-up of 65 months (median 58 [range 38-129]), women filled out the uterine fibroid symptom and quality of life (UFS-QoL) questionnaire, which had additional questions on the long-term evolution of baseline symptoms and adverse events. Results: During follow-up, 7 of 40 women (18%) underwent hysterectomy. Among these 7 women, the junction zones were significantly thicker, both at baseline (mean 23 vs. 16 mm, P = 0.028) and at 3-month follow-up (mean 15 vs. 9 mm, P = 0.034). Of 33 women with preserved uterus, 29 were asymptomatic. Four patients had symptom severity scores of 50 to 85 and overall QoL scores of 60 to 66, indicating substantial clinical symptoms. There was no relation between clinical outcome and the initial presence of fibroids in addition to adenomyosis. Conclusion: In women with therapy-resistant adenomyosis, UAE resulted in long-term preservation of the uterus in the majority. Most patients with preserved uterus were asymptomatic. The only predictor for hysterectomy during follow-up was initial thickness of the junction zone. The presence or absence of fibroids in addition to adenomyosis had no relation with the need for hysterectomy or clinical outcome.

  14. Endothelial Dysfunction and Brachial Intima-Media Thickness: Long Term Cardiovascular Risk with Claudication Related to Peripheral Arterial Disease: A Prospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hafner, Franz; Kieninger, Andrea; Meinitzer, Andreas; Gary, Thomas; Froehlich, Harald; Haas, Elke; Hackl, Gerald; Eller, Philipp; Brodmann, Marianne; Seinost, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endothelial dysfunction plays a key role in the development, progression, and clinical manifestation of atherosclerosis, and in symptomatic peripheral arterial disease, endothelial dysfunction and enlarged intima-media thickness might be associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Flow-mediated dilatation and serologic parameters are used to evaluate individual endothelial function. Brachial intima-media thickness, a less recognized parameter of cardiovascular risk, is independently associated with coronary artery disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of ultrasound and serologic parameters of endothelial function in relation to cardiovascular mortality in peripheral arterial disease. Design monocentric, prospective cohort study. Methods Flow mediated dilatation and brachial intima-media thickness were assessed in 184 (124 male) patients with peripheral arterial disease (Rutherford stages 2–3). Serologic parameters of endothelial function included asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), and L-homoarginine. Cardiovascular events were recorded during a follow-up of 99.1±11.1 months. Subjects who died of noncardiovascular causes were excluded from further analysis. Results Eighty-two patients (44.6%) died during follow-up after a mean duration of 49.7±28.3 months. There were 49 cardiovascular deaths (59.8%) and 33 other deaths (40.2%). Flow mediated dilatation was associated with cardiovascular death [1.17% (0.0, 4.3) vs. 4.1% (1.2, 6.4), p<0.001]. Intima-media thickness was greater in patients who succumbed to cardiovascular disease [0.37 mm (0.30, 0.41)] than in survivors [0.21 mm (0.15, 0.38), p<0.001]. Brachial intima-media thickness above 0.345 mm was most predictive of cardiovascular death, with sensitivity and specificity values of 0.714 and 0.657, respectively (p<0.001). Furthermore, ADMA levels above 0.745 µmol/l and SDMA levels above 0.825 µmol/l were significantly associated with

  15. Selective arterial embolization of symptomatic and asymptomatic renal angiomyolipomas: a retrospective study of safety, outcomes and tumor size reduction

    PubMed Central

    Bardin, Florian; Chevallier, Olivier; Bertaut, Aurélie; Delorme, Emmanuel; Moulin, Morgan; Pottecher, Pierre; Di Marco, Lucy; Gehin, Sophie; Mourey, Eric; Cormier, Luc; Mousson, Christiane; Midulla, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background Angiomyolipoma (AML) is the most common renal benign tumor. Treatment should be considered for symptomatic patients or for those at risk for complications, especially retroperitoneal bleeding which is correlated to tumor size, grade of the angiogenic component and to the presence of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). This study reports our single-center experience with the use of selective arterial embolization (SAE) in the management of symptomatic and asymptomatic renal AMLs. Methods In this retrospective mono-centric study, all demographic and imaging data, medical records, angiographic features, outpatient charts and follow-up visits of patients who underwent prophylactic or emergency SAE for AMLs between January 2005 and July 2016 were reviewed. Tumor size and treatment outcomes were assessed at baseline and after the procedure during follow-up. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasonography was used to evaluate AML shrinkage. Renal function was measured pre- and post-procedure. Results Twenty-three patients (18 females, 5 males; median age, 45 years; range, 19–85 years) who underwent SAE either to treat bleeding AML (n=6) or as a prophylactic treatment (n=17) were included. Overall, 34 AMLs were embolized. TSC status was confirmed for 6 patients. Immediate technical success rate was 96% and 4 patients benefitted from an additional procedure. Major complications occurred in 3 patients and minor post-embolization syndrome (PES) in 14 patients. The mean AML size reduction rate was 26.2% after a mean follow-up was 20.5 months (range, 0.5–56 months), and only non-TSC status was significantly associated with better shrinkage of tumor (P=0.022). Intralesional aneurysms were significantly more frequent in patients with hemorrhagic presentation (P=0.008). There was no change in mean creatinine level after SAE. Conclusions SAE is a safe and effective technique to manage renal AMLs as a preventive treatment as well as in

  16. Peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes and postprandial lipidaemia: Is there a link?

    PubMed Central

    Valdivielso, Pedro; Ramírez-Bollero, José; Pérez-López, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease, manifested as intermittent claudication or critical ischaemia, or identified by an ankle/brachial index < 0.9, is present in at least one in every four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Several reasons exist for peripheral arterial disease in diabetes. In addition to hyperglycaemia, smoking and hypertension, the dyslipidaemia that accompanies type 2 diabetes and is characterised by increased triglyceride levels and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations also seems to contribute to this association. Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in postprandial lipidaemia, as a result of various prospective studies showing that non-fasting triglycerides predict the onset of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease better than fasting measurements do. Additionally, the use of certain specific postprandial particle markers, such as apolipoprotein B-48, makes it easier and more simple to approach the postprandial phenomenon. Despite this, only a few studies have evaluated the role of postprandial triglycerides in the development of peripheral arterial disease and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to examine the epidemiology and risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in type 2 diabetes, focusing on the role of postprandial triglycerides and particles. PMID:25317236

  17. Effects of Beraprost Sodium on Subjective Symptoms in Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hang Seob; Choi, Woo Jin; Sung, Il Hoon; Lee, Ho Seong; Chung, Hyung Jin

    2013-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the effects of Beraprost sodium (Berasil) on subjective leg symptoms in patients with peripheral arterial disease caused by diabetes mellitus. Methods Ninety-four diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease were treated with Beraprost in a fixed-dose, prospective, multicenter, cohort study. Beraprost (40 µg) was administered orally 3 times daily (120 µg/day) for 12 weeks. We developed a new disease-specific symptom questionnaire, which evaluated the effect of peripheral arterial disease on leg discomfort in daily life and assessed therapeutic responses to treatment. Patients were asked for their subjective assessment of symptoms on a written questionnaire before treatment and after 12 weeks of therapy. Results There was significant improvement in all estimated subjective symptoms (burning, coldness, edema, exertional pain, stabbing, and paresthesias) in the lower extremities at 12 weeks (p < 0.001). There were 18 patients with neuropathy in whom significant improvement was noted for 6 subjective symptoms at 12 weeks (p < 0.05). Adverse events considered to be drug-related were observed in 4 patients (4.3%), all of which were mild and resolved with discontinuation of the medication. Conclusions Beraprost is effective as a treatment for improving various subjective symptoms in the lower extremities, such as burning, coldness, edema, exertional pain, stabbing, and paresthesias, in diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease. PMID:23730480

  18. [Sulodexide in conservative treatment of peripheral arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Kosykh, I V; Yu, Tolstikhin V; Kuznetsova, V F; Magnitsky, I A

    2015-01-01

    Presented in the article is a review of the literature, analysing principles of conservative therapy of patients with obliterating diseases of lower limb arteries and most commonly used drugs to treat them, followed by discussing the mechanisms of action and efficacy of such pharmacological agents as pentoxyphyllin, cilostazol, naphthidrofuryl, aktovegin, sulodexide. Described in details are subtle mechanisms of action of sulodexide as an endothelioprotector, its clinical efficacy in intermittent claudication.

  19. Lipoprotein (a) concentrations, apolipoprotein (a) phenotypes, and peripheral arterial disease in three independent cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Laschkolnig, Anja; Kollerits, Barbara; Lamina, Claudia; Meisinger, Christa; Rantner, Barbara; Stadler, Marietta; Peters, Annette; Koenig, Wolfgang; Stöckl, Andrea; Dähnhardt, Doreen; Böger, Carsten A.; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Fraedrich, Gustav; Strauch, Konstantin; Kronenberg, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Aims The relevance of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] concentrations and low-molecular-weight (LMW) apo(a) phenotypes in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) has only been investigated by few studies. Therefore, we analysed this association in three independent cohorts and performed a Mendelian Randomization approach using instrumental variable regression. Methods and results Lp(a) concentrations, apo(a) phenotypes, and one SNP in the LPA gene (rs10455872) were measured in the CAVASIC study, including 241 male patients with intermittent claudication and 246 age- and diabetes-matched controls as well as in the two population-based studies KORA F3 (n = 3184) and KORA F4 (n = 3080). In KORA F3/F4, 109/80 persons suffered from intermittent claudication, 200/144 from PAD, and 128/103 showed an ankle–brachial index (ABI) <0.9. In CAVASIC, adjusted logistic regression analyses revealed significant associations between an increase of log-Lp(a) per one standard deviation (SD) (OR = 1.28, P = 0.02) as well as LMW apo(a) phenotypes and symptomatic PAD (OR = 1.65, P = 0.03). Linear regression models with continuous ABI showed a significant association in the combined analyses of KORA F3/F4: an increase in log-Lp(a) per one SD (β = −0.006, P = 0.005) and the presence of LMW apo(a) phenotypes (β = −0.011, P = 0.02) or the minor allele of rs10455872 (ß = −0.016, P = 0.03) were associated with a decrease in ABI in the fully adjusted linear and instrumental variable regression models. Conclusion Analyses in three independent populations showed significant associations of Lp(a) concentrations, LMW apo(a) phenotypes, and rs10455872 with PAD. This points to a causal relationship between Lp(a) and PAD since the genetically determined apo(a) phenotypes and SNP alleles are indeed associated with PAD. PMID:24760552

  20. Evaluation of the Effects of Mesoglycan on Some Markers of Endothelial Damage and Walking Distance in Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Angela; Romano, Davide; Maffioli, Pamela

    2017-03-06

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the variation of some parameters involved in peripheral artery disease progression in diabetic patients with peripheral artery disease after six months of mesoglycan [...].

  1. Arterial erectile dysfunction and peripheral arterial disease: reliability of a new phenotype of endothelial progenitor cells and endothelial microparticles.

    PubMed

    Condorelli, Rosita A; Calogero, Aldo E; Vicari, Enzo; di Pino, Luigi; Giacone, Filippo; Mongioì, Laura; la Vignera, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the blood concentrations of a new immunophenotype of circulating late endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and endothelial microparticles (EMP) varies in patients with arterial erectile dysfunction (aED) and abnormalities in other arterial districts. To accomplish this, cavernous artery peak systolic velocity (PSV), acceleration time (AT), and intima-media thickness (IMT) were determined after intracavernous administration of alprostadil by echo-color Doppler in 80 consecutive patients (age range, 50-75 years). Fifteen patients had aED alone (group A) and served as controls; 22 had aED plus atheroma plaques and/or increased IMT of the common carotid artery (group B); 20 had aED plus lower limb artery abnormalities (group C); and 23 had aED plus carotid and lower limb artery abnormalities (group D). EPC and EMP blood concentrations were evaluated by flow cytometry. Blood mononuclear cells with the immunophenotype CD45(neg)/CD34(pos)/CD144(pos) were defined as EPCs, whereas CD45(neg)/CD144(pos)/annexin V(pos) cells were defined as EMPs. Group B and C patients had a similar PSV, AT, and IMT at the level of the cavernous arteries. Their PSV values were significantly lower and mean values of AT and IMT significantly higher compared with group A patients. Patients of group D had a significantly lower PSV and significantly higher AT and IMT compared with all other groups. As far as serum concentrations of EPCs and EMPs, group D patients had significantly higher EPC and EMP mean values compared with all other groups. Group B and C patients had similar EPC and EMP values. This study showed that a more generalized peripheral atherosclerotic process is associated with a more severe penile artery insufficiency and endothelial dysfunction. Moreover, this study confirms the diagnostic reliability of the immunophenotype of EPCs and EMPs chosen in the clinical practice.

  2. Severe symptomatic intracranial internal carotid artery stenosis treated with intracranial stenting: a single center study with 58 patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-Liang; Gao, Bu-Lang; Li, Tian-Xiao; Cai, Dong-Yang; Zhu, Liang-Fu; Xue, Jiang-Yu; Bai, Wei-Xing; Li, Zhao-Shuo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of intracranial stenting in a population with severe (≥70%) symptomatic intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) atherosclerotic stenosis. METHODS Fifty-eight patients with severe intracranial ICA atherosclerotic stenosis were prospectively enrolled. The baseline data, cerebral angiography, success rate, perioperative complications, clinical and imaging follow-up were prospectively analyzed. RESULTS All patients had successful intracranial stenting (100%), and the mean degree of stenosis was improved from 84.3%±7.5% to 23.5%±5.1% after the stent procedure. During the 30-day perioperative period, only one patient (1.7%) had ischemic stroke. Seven patients (12.1%) had headache and dysphoria. Thirty-six patients (62.1%) had clinical follow-up for 6–68 months after stenting. Five female patients (13.9%) had ipsilateral stroke including one death, but no disabling stroke, while three other patients (8.3%) had ipsilateral temporary ischemic attack (TIA). The recurrent stroke rate was higher in patients presenting with stroke (4/17, 23.5%) than in patients presenting with TIA (1/19, 5.3%), with no statistical significance (P = 0.33). Thirteen patients (22.4%) had imaging follow-up of 5–12 months following stenting, five of whom (38.5%) had in-stent restenosis. CONCLUSION Intracranial stenting for patients with intracranial ICA atherosclerotic stenosis has a low perioperative stroke rate and decent outcome on long-term follow-up, despite a relatively high in-stent restenosis rate. PMID:26809831

  3. Marvels, Mysteries, and Misconceptions of Vascular Compensation to Peripheral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    ZIEGLER, MATTHEW A.; DISTASI, MATTHEW R.; BILLS, RANDALL G.; MILLER, STEVEN J.; ALLOOSH, MOUHAMAD; MURPHY, MICHAEL P.; AKINGBA, A. GEORGE; STUREK, MICHAEL; DALSING, MICHAEL C.; UNTHANK, JOSEPH L.

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a major health problem and there is a significant need to develop therapies to prevent its progression to claudication and critical limb ischemia. Promising results in rodent models of arterial occlusion have generally failed to predict clinical success and led to questions of their relevance. While sub-optimal models may have contributed to the lack of progress, we suggest that advancement has also been hindered by misconceptions of the human capacity for compensation and the specific vessels which are of primary importance. We present and summarize new and existing data from humans, Ossabaw miniature pigs, and rodents which provide compelling evidence that natural compensation to occlusion of a major artery (i) may completely restore perfusion, (ii) occurs in specific pre-existing small arteries, rather than the distal vasculature, via mechanisms involving flow-mediated dilation and remodeling (iii) is impaired by cardiovascular risk factors which suppress the flow-mediated mechanisms and (iv) can be restored by reversal of endothelial dysfunction. We propose that restoration of the capacity for flow-mediated dilation and remodeling in small arteries represents a largely unexplored potential therapeutic opportunity to enhance compensation for major arterial occlusion and prevent the progression to critical limb ischemia in the peripheral circulation. PMID:20141596

  4. Late Stent Expansion and Neointimal Proliferation of Oversized Nitinol Stents in Peripheral Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hugh Q. Nikanorov, Alexander; Virmani, Renu; Jones, Russell; Pacheco, Erica; Schwartz, Lewis B.

    2009-07-15

    For peripheral endovascular intervention, self-expanding (SE) stents are commonly oversized in relation to target arteries to assure optimal wall apposition and prevent migration. However, the consequences of oversizing have not been well studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of SE stent oversizing (OS) with respect to the kinetics of late stent expansion and the long-term histological effects of OS. Pairs of overlapped 8 x 28-mm Nitinol SE stents were implanted into the iliofemoral arteries of 14 Yucatan swine. Due to variations in target artery size, the stent-to-artery ratio ranged from 1.2:1 to 1.9:1. Lumen and stent diameters were assessed by quantitative angiography at the time of implantation. Following angiographic assessment at 6 months, stented arteries were perfusion-fixed, sectioned, and stained for histological analysis. Immediately following implantation, the stents were found to be expanded to a range of 4.7-7.1 mm, largely conforming to the diameter of the recipient target artery. The stents continued to expand over time, however, and all stents had enlarged to nearly their 8-mm nominal diameter by 6 months. The histological effects of OS were profound, with marked increases in injury and luminal area stenosis, including a statistically significant linear correlation between stent-to-artery ratio and area stenosis. In this experimental model of peripheral endovascular intervention, oversized Nitinol SE stents are constrained by their target artery diameter upon implantation but expand to their nominal diameter within 6 months. Severe OS (stent-to-artery ratio >1.4:1) results in a profound long-term histological response including exuberant neointimal proliferation and luminal stenosis.

  5. Arterial Stiffness and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Ahmet; Demir, Kenan; Kaya, Zeynettin; Marakoglu, Kamile; Ceylan, Esra; Ekmekci, Ahmet Hakan; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Demir, Aysegul; Altunkeser, Bulent Behlul

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated the relationship between peripheral neuropathy and parameters of arterial stiffness and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Material/Methods The study included 161 patients (80 females and 81 males), 69 of whom had peripheral neuropathy. All patients underwent 24-h blood pressure monitoring, and arterial stiffness parameters were measured. The CIMT was measured using B-mode ultrasonography and patients also underwent transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Results Patients with peripheral neuropathy, compared with those without it, were older (54.68±8.35 years vs. 51.04±7.89 years; p=0.005) and had T2DM for longer periods (60 vs. 36 months; p=0.004). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values (8.55±1.85 mg/dL vs. 7.30±1.51 mg/dL; p<0.001), pulse wave velocity (PWV) (7.74±1.14 m/s vs. 7.15±1.10 m/s; p=0.001), CIMT (anterior 0.74±0.15 mm vs. 0.67±0.13 mm; p=0.01), and left ventricular mass (LVM) index (98.68±26.28 g/m2 vs. 89.71±19.70 g/m2; p=0.02) were all significantly increased in the group with peripheral neuropathy compared to the group without peripheral neuropathy. We determined that duration of diabetes, HbA1c, and LVM index were predictors of peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions A significant relationship was found between diabetic neuropathy and increased PWV, a parameter of arterial stiffness, as well as CIMT, a marker of systemic atherosclerosis. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy may be a determinant of subclinical atherosclerosis in T2DM. PMID:25351260

  6. Endovascular surgery for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. A critical review.

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, S S; Eton, D; Moore, W S

    1992-01-01

    Endovascular surgery is a new multidisciplinary field that applies the recently innovated techniques of angioscopy, intraluminal ultrasound, balloon angioplasty, laser, mechanical atherectomy, and stents. This field can be defined as a diagnostic and therapeutic discipline that uses catheter-based systems to treat vascular disease. As such, it integrates the subspecialties of vascular surgery, interventional radiology, interventional cardiology, and biomedical engineering for the common purpose of improving arterial hemodynamics. Endovascular surgery offers many potential benefits: long incisions are replaced with a puncture wound, the need for postoperative intensive care is significantly reduced, major cardiac and pulmonary complications from general anesthesia are side stepped, and the dollar savings could be dramatic as the need for intensive care unit and in-hospital stay diminishes. Despite these technological advancements, endovascular surgery is still in its infancy and currently has limited applications. This review provides an updated summary of endovascular surgery today and addresses some of the obstacles still preventing its widespread use. PMID:1385944

  7. The treadmill test in the assessment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Ucchino, S; Nardi, M; Santarelli, M; Legnini, M; Costantini, A; Ucchino, G; Napolitano, A M

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study using the treadmill test on 32 patients with peripheral Fontaine's stage II arterial disease are described. The aim of the study was to evaluate the utility of the test in assessing useful information concerning the site of the lesion. Patients were divided in three classes depending on the arterial segment involved (iliac-femoral, femoro-popliteal, associated lesions) as resulted from the velocimetric and angiographic evaluation. Ankle pressure and WI, at rest and after stress test, PFWD and RT were evaluated. The authors conclude that data achieved with the dynamic test are related to the arterial involvement, allowing to differentiate obstructive and stenotic lesions, but do not give information concerning the site of the lesion. Nevertheless it is a valuable means of highlighting arterial lesions well compensated at rest and with normal pressure values.

  8. Predictors of Improved Walking after a Supervised Walking Exercise Program in Men and Women with Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Polly S.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the changes in ambulatory outcomes between men and women with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) following completion of a supervised, on-site, treadmill exercise program, and we determined whether exercise training variables and baseline clinical characteristics were predictive of changes in ambulatory outcomes in men and women. Twenty-three men and 25 women completed the supervised exercise program, consisting of intermittent walking to mild-to-moderate claudication pain for three months. Men and women significantly increased claudication onset time (COT) (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, resp.) and peak walking time (PWT) (p < 0.001 for each group). However, change in PWT was less in women (54%) than in men (77%) (p < 0.05). Neither group significantly changed 6-minute walk distance (6MWD). In women, baseline COT was the only predictor for the change in COT (p = 0.007) and the change in PWT (p = 0.094). In men, baseline COT (p < 0.01) and obesity (p < 0.10) were predictors for the change in COT, and obesity was the only predictor for the change in PWT (p = 0.002). Following a supervised, on-site, treadmill exercise program, women had less improvement in PWT than men, and neither men nor women improved submaximal, overground 6MWD. Furthermore, obese men and patients with lower baseline COT were least responsive to supervised exercise. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrial.gov, unique identifier: NCT00618670. PMID:28116164

  9. The Peripheral Arterial disease study (PERART/ARTPER): prevalence and risk factors in the general population

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The early diagnosis of atherosclerotic disease is essential for developing preventive strategies in populations at high risk and acting when the disease is still asymptomatic. A low ankle-arm index is a good marker of vascular events and may be diminished without presenting symptomatology (silent peripheral arterial disease). The aim of the study is to know the prevalence and associated risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in the general population. Methods We performed a cross-sectional, multicentre, population-based study in 3786 individuals >49 years, randomly selected in 28 primary care centres in Barcelona (Spain). Peripheral arterial disease was evaluated using the ankle-arm index. Values < 0.9 were considered as peripheral arterial disease. Results The prevalence (95% confidence interval) of peripheral arterial disease was 7.6% (6.7-8.4), (males 10.2% (9.2-11.2), females 5.3% (4.6-6.0); p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed the following risk factors: male sex [odds ratio (OR) 1.62; 95% confidence interval 1.01-2.59]; age OR 2.00 per 10 years (1.64-2.44); inability to perform physical activity [OR 1.77 (1.17-2.68) for mild limitation to OR 7.08 (2.61-19.16) for breathless performing any activity]; smoking [OR 2.19 (1.34-3.58) for former smokers and OR 3.83 (2.23-6.58) for current smokers]; hypertension OR 1.85 (1.29-2.65); diabetes OR 2.01 (1.42-2.83); previous cardiovascular disease OR 2.19 (1.52-3.15); hypercholesterolemia OR 1.55 (1.11-2.18); hypertriglyceridemia OR 1.55 (1.10-2.19). Body mass index ≥25 Kg/m2 OR 0.57 (0.38-0.87) and walking >7 hours/week OR 0.67 (0.49-0.94) were found as protector factors. Conclusions The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease is low, higher in males and increases with age in both sexes. In addition to previously described risk factors we found a protector effect in physical exercise and overweight. PMID:20529387

  10. The impact of peripheral arterial disease on patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Keswani, Amit N; White, Christopher J

    2014-04-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a prevalent disease with many comorbidities and is associated with high health care expenditures. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a known comorbidity of CHF and is associated with worse morbidity and mortality. CHF and PAD share risk factors, pathophysiology, treatment strategies, and prognostic features. We review the impact of PAD on patients with CHF using several studies to support PAD's influence on outcomes in CHF. Based on the evidence and current guidelines, patients with heart failure who are smokers, and those who have known coronary artery disease and/or diabetes should be screened for PAD.

  11. A Primary Care Approach to the Diagnosis and Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, David L.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this work are: (1) Be able to recognize characteristic symptoms of intermittent claudication (2) Diagnose PAD on the basis of history, physical exam, and simple limb blood pressure measurements (3) Recognize the significance of peripheral artery disease as a marker for coronary or cerebrovascular atherosclerosis (4) Provide appropriate medical management of atherosclerosis risk factors-- including use of antiplatelet therapy to reduce risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and death (5) Manage symptoms of intermittent claudication with program of smoking cessation, exercise, and medication The diagnosis of intermittent claudication secondary to peripheral artery disease (PAD) can often be made on the basis of history and physical examination. Additional evaluation of PAD is multi-modal and the techniques used will vary depending on the nature and severity of the patient's presenting problem. Most patients can be appropriately managed without referral for specialized diagnostic services or interventions.

  12. Pharmacology in Peripheral Arterial Disease: What the Interventional Radiologist Needs to Know

    PubMed Central

    Atturu, Gnaneswar; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Russell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a progressive disease with significant morbidity and mortality. Risk factor control, using diet and lifestyle modification, exercise, and pharmacological methods, improves symptoms and reduces associated cardiovascular events in these patients. Antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants may be used to reduce the incidence of acute events related to thrombosis. The armamentarium available for symptom relief and disease modification is discussed. Novel treatments such as therapeutic angiogenesis are in their evolutionary phase with promising preclinical data. PMID:25435658

  13. Optimal Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease for the Non-Specialist

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, ME; Reid, JA; Lau, LL; Hannon, RJ; Lee, B

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) now affects approximately 20% of adults older than 55 years to an estimated total of 27 million people in the Western World. The aim of this paper is to describe the medical management of PAD for the non-vascular specialist, particularly general practitioners, where PAD has now been included in the Northern Ireland Department of Health's Primary Care Service Framework (Directed Enhanced Service). PMID:22347739

  14. [Diagnostics and treatment of lower extremity peripheral arterial disease; guideline and registry].

    PubMed

    Vahl, A; Elsman, B; van Enst, A

    2016-01-01

    - Revision of the 2005 guideline 'Diagnostics and treatment of lower extremity peripheral arterial disease' and the development of an audit have instigated a degree of efficiency and transparency for the treatment of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). - The key recommendations are that first-line treatment of patients, who - preferably by means of a consultation in a vascular laboratory - are diagnosed with intermittent claudication, is supervised exercise therapy and secondary prevention. Referral for second-line treatment only needs to occur when invasive therapy is considered, for example when there is insufficient improvement in symptoms or in patients who have or are developing critical ischemia. - In case of endovascular treatments it is not necessary to insert stents routinely; this can be reserved for cases where the angiographic result of the angioplasty is insufficient. - All patients with PAD are registered on the DAPA register ('Dutch audit for peripheral arterial disease'), which has two unique characteristics: patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are recorded and a case mix correction is incorporated for the PROMs and amputation-free survival through linkage with the health insurance database.

  15. Imaging of Small Animal Peripheral Artery Disease Models: Recent Advancements and Translational Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jenny B.; Phillips, Evan H.; Riggins, Ti’Air E.; Sangha, Gurneet S.; Chakraborty, Sreyashi; Lee, Janice Y.; Lycke, Roy J.; Hernandez, Clarissa L.; Soepriatna, Arvin H.; Thorne, Bradford R. H.; Yrineo, Alexa A.; Goergen, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a broad disorder encompassing multiple forms of arterial disease outside of the heart. As such, PAD development is a multifactorial process with a variety of manifestations. For example, aneurysms are pathological expansions of an artery that can lead to rupture, while ischemic atherosclerosis reduces blood flow, increasing the risk of claudication, poor wound healing, limb amputation, and stroke. Current PAD treatment is often ineffective or associated with serious risks, largely because these disorders are commonly undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Active areas of research are focused on detecting and characterizing deleterious arterial changes at early stages using non-invasive imaging strategies, such as ultrasound, as well as emerging technologies like photoacoustic imaging. Earlier disease detection and characterization could improve interventional strategies, leading to better prognosis in PAD patients. While rodents are being used to investigate PAD pathophysiology, imaging of these animal models has been underutilized. This review focuses on structural and molecular information and disease progression revealed by recent imaging efforts of aortic, cerebral, and peripheral vascular disease models in mice, rats, and rabbits. Effective translation to humans involves better understanding of underlying PAD pathophysiology to develop novel therapeutics and apply non-invasive imaging techniques in the clinic. PMID:25993289

  16. Clinical review: Complications and risk factors of peripheral arterial catheters used for haemodynamic monitoring in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Bernd Volker; Perel, Azriel; Pfeiffer, Ulrich J

    2002-01-01

    In order to evaluate the complications and risk factors associated with peripheral arterial catheters used for haemodynamic monitoring, we reviewed the literature published from 1978 to 2001. We closely examined the three most commonly used arterial cannulation sites. The reviewed papers included a total of 19,617 radial, 3899 femoral and 1989 axillary artery catheterizations. Factors that contribute to higher complication rates were investigated. Major complications occurred in fewer than 1% of the cases, and rates were similar for the radial, femoral and axillary arteries. We conclude that arterial cannulation is a safe procedure. PMID:12133178

  17. Association of Hypertension With Erectile Function in Chronic Peripheral Arterial Insufficiency Patients

    PubMed Central

    Spessoto, Luis Cesar Fava; Facio, Fernando Nestor; de Arruda, Jose Germano Ferraz; Arruda, Pedro Francisco F.; Gatti, Marcio; Antoniassi, Thiago Silveira; Facio, Maria Fernanda Warick; de Godoy, Jose Maria Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk factors may influence the improvement or worsening of erectile dysfunction (ED). The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of systemic hypertension on ED in patients with peripheral arterial disease. Methods The effect of hypertension on ED was assessed in 125 consecutive patients in a cross-sectional quantitative study. The ages of the patients ranged from 19 to 88 years old (mean: 59.82 ± 10.48 years). The only exclusion criterion was the amputation of one or both legs. The ankle-arm index was assessed and the international index of ED questionnaire was applied to all participants in the study. Results Of the 125 patients, 22 (17.6%) had mild (grade 1), 50 (40.0%) had moderate (grade 2) and 53 (42.4%) had severe (grade 3) ED. Hypertensive patients have more ED, with ED in hypertensive patients being associated to chronic arterial disease. However, in comparison with normotensive patients, hypertension exerts an immediate protective effect on erectile function. Conclusions In conclusion, although erectile function is initially protected by systemic arterial hypertension in patients with chronic arterial disease, both chronic arterial disease and ED deteriorate over the long term in hypertensive patients. PMID:27429678

  18. Connective Tissue Reflex Massage for Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A.; Feriche-Fernández-Castanys, Belen; Granados-Gámez, Genoveva; Quesada-Rubio, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of connective tissue massage to improve blood circulation and intermittent claudication symptoms in type 2 diabetic patients. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken. Ninety-eight type 2 diabetes patients with stage I or II-a peripheral arterial disease (PAD) (Leriche-Fontaine classification) were randomly assigned to a massage group or to a placebo group treated using disconnected magnetotherapy equipment. Peripheral arterial circulation was determined by measuring differential segmental arterial pressure, heart rate, skin temperature, oxygen saturation and skin blood flow. Measurements were taken before and at 30 min, 6 months and 1 year after the 15-week treatment. After the 15-week program, the groups differed (P < .05) in differential segmental arterial pressure in right lower limb (lower one-third of thigh, upper and lower one-third of leg) and left lower limb (lower one-third of thigh and upper and lower one-third of leg). A significant difference (P < .05) was also observed in skin blood flow in digits 1 and 4 of right foot and digits 2, 4 and 5 of left foot. ANOVA results were significant (P < .05) for right and left foot oxygen saturation but not for heart rate and temperature. At 6 months and 1 year, the groups differed in differential segmental arterial pressure in upper third of left and right legs. Connective tissue massage improves blood circulation in the lower limbs of type 2 diabetic patients at stage I or II-a and may be useful to slow the progression of PAD. PMID:19933770

  19. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis as a cause of pulmonary hypertension in adults

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mostafa; Hamed, Fadi; Prieto, Lourdes R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPAS) is an underrecognized condition in the adult population. PPAS can lead to pulmonary hypertension but is likely misdiagnosed as either idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. We retrospectively identified adult patients with PPAS either in its isolated form or related to other congenital defects from January 1998 to September 2012. We reviewed the patients’ clinical data by using our hospital electronic medical records and/or their paper charts. We identified 6 adult patients with PPAS with an age range of 16–56 years (1 woman and the rest men). Presenting signs and symptoms were thoracic murmurs, progressive dyspnea, and syncope. Three patients had Williams-Beuren syndrome. Pulmonary angiography showed that PPAS was predominantly located in main branches or lobar pulmonary arteries in 5 patients, while in 1 patient the arterial narrowing was at the level of the segmental pulmonary arteries. Right heart catheterization showed a mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) ranging from 35 to 60 mmHg. Balloon dilation was performed in all patients, predominantly in the lobar arteries, and it caused a decrease in mean PAP that ranged from 16% to 46% in 5 patients. In 1 patient the mean PAP did not decrease. All but 1 patient had follow-up echocardiograms at 1 year that showed stable echocardiographic findings. Pulmonary hypertension due to PPAS continues to presents a diagnostic challenge. Therefore, a high index of suspicion during the initial evaluation of pulmonary hypertension is essential for its prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment. PMID:25992283

  20. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses for more profitable strategies in peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Di Minno, Giovanni; Spadarella, Gaia; Cafaro, Giovanni; Petitto, Maurizio; Lupoli, Roberta; Di Minno, Alessandro; de Gaetano, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    In the peripheral arteries, a thrombus superimposed on atherosclerosis contributes to the progression of peripheral artery disease (PAD), producing intermittent claudication (IC), ischemic necrosis, and, potentially, loss of the limb. PAD with IC is often undiagnosed and, in turn, undertreated. The low percentage of diagnosis (∼30%) in this setting of PAD is of particular concern because of the potential worsening of PAD (amputation) and the high risk of adverse vascular outcomes (vascular death, coronary artery disease, stroke). A Medline literature search of the highest-quality systematic reviews and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials documents that, due to risk of bias, imprecision, and indirectness, the overall quality of the evidence concerning diagnostic tools and antithrombotic interventions in PAD is generally low. Areas of research emerge from the information collected. Appropriate treatments for PAD patients will only derive from ad-hoc studies. Innovative imaging techniques are needed to identify PAD subjects at the highest vascular risk. Whether IC unresponsive to physical exercise and smoking cessation identifies those with a heritable predisposition to more severe vascular events deserves to be addressed. Devising ways to improve prevention of vascular events in patients with PAD implies a co-ordinated approach in vascular medicine. PMID:25045928

  1. Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Coronary Heart Disease in Symptomatic Subjects With Advanced Vascular Atherosclerosis of the Carotid Artery (Type III and IV b Findings Using Ultrasound)

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Ansgar; Bojara, Waldemar; Schunk, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Background A study was conducted as to whether the early diagnosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) in symptomatic patients with advanced atherosclerosis of the carotid artery was more successful using ultrasound technology than exercise electrocardiography (ECG). Methods Within the scope of an occupational screening program using subjects from diverse employment sectors, people were given the opportunity to determine their risk of heart attack. During the study, the total plaque area (TPA), the maximum plaque thickness in the carotid artery and the PROCAM scores of 3,513 healthy men and 2,088 healthy women between the ages of 20 and 65 were determined. During the subsequent follow-up study, 36 subjects developed symptoms such as exertional dyspnea, atypical angina pectoris (AP) or typical AP. Four patients displayed no symptoms. The initial cardiac diagnostic testing was conducted on 31 patients using an exercise ECG, four patients were assessed using a coronary angiogram, and five further patients were assessed using a computed tomography (CT) coronary angiogram. An ultrasound examination of the carotid artery of 39 patients revealed a type IV b finding and in one patient, the examination revealed a type III finding. Results In 17 patients, the PROCAM score was < 10%, 13 patients had a score of 10-20% and 10 patients had a score of > 20%. In the final analysis, only two patients had entirely smooth coronary arteries, seven had coronary sclerosis, seven had a 30% stenosis, one had a 30-40% stenosis, one had a 40% stenosis, and 22 patients had a stenosis ≥ 50%, and in extreme cases, a left main coronary artery stenosis with three-vessel disease was shown. The exercise ECG only achieved a true positive result in four patients, and in 21 patients, the result was false negative. Conclusions Symptomatic patients with advanced atherosclerosis of the carotid artery (type III and type IV b findings) had a high risk for CHD. The diagnosis of CHD is better achieved by

  2. Infrared thermography as option for evaluating the treatment effect of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty by patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Staffa, Erik; Bernard, Vladan; Kubicek, Lubos; Vlachovsky, Robert; Vlk, Daniel; Mornstein, Vojtech; Bourek, Ales; Staffa, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the possible use of infrared thermography as a supplementary method to the ankle-brachial index used in assessing the treatment effect of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. The study included 21 patients, mean age was 60.22 years. Healthy control group included 20 persons, mean age was 55.60 years. Patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (Fontaine stages I-III) were admitted for endovascular treatment by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Thermal images and ankle-brachial index values were obtained before and after treatment by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Median temperature change in the treated limb was 0.4℃, for non-treated limb was -0.5℃. The median value of ankle-brachial index in the treated limb increased by 0.17 from 0.81 after the procedure. The median value of ankle-brachial index in the non-treated limb decreased by 0.03 from the value of 1.01. Significant difference between treated limb and non-treated limb in change of ankle-brachial index was found with p value = .0035. The surface temperature obtained by the infrared thermography correlates with ankle-brachial index. We present data showing that the increase of ankle-brachial index is associated with increase of skin temperature in the case of limbs treated by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Our results also suggest potential of the use of infrared thermography for monitoring foot temperature as a means of early detection of onset of foot ischemic disorders.

  3. Sex-specific predictors of improved walking with step-monitored, home-based exercise in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew W; Parker, Donald E; Montgomery, Polly S

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether baseline clinical characteristics and the duration and intensity of ambulation during our step-monitored home-based exercise program were predictive of changes in ambulatory outcomes at completion of the program in symptomatic patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Twenty-two men (ankle-brachial index (ABI) = 0.71 ± 0.19) and 24 women (ABI = 0.66 ± 0.23) completed the home exercise program, consisting of intermittent walking to mild-to-moderate claudication pain for 3 months. Ambulatory outcome measures were peak walking time (PWT) and claudication onset time (COT) during a treadmill test, and the distance recorded during a 6-minute walk distance test (6MWD). Men experienced significant increases (p<0.01) in COT, PWT, and 6MWD following the home exercise program, and women had significant increases in 6MWD (p<0.01) and PWT (p<0.05). In women, average exercise cadence during the home exercise sessions was the only predictor that entered the model for change in COT (p=0.082), and was the first predictor in the model for change in PWT (p=0.029) and 6MWD (p=0.006). In men, the ABI was the only predictor that entered the model for change in 6MWD (p=0.002), and ABI was a predictor along with metabolic syndrome in the model for change in COT (p=0.003). No variables entered the model for change in PWT. Faster ambulatory cadence during the step-monitored home-based exercise program may predict greater improvements in ambulatory function in women, whereas having less severe PAD and comorbid burden at baseline may predict greater improvements in ambulatory function in men. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00618670.

  4. Gait and balance assessments as early indicators of frailty in patients with known peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Thiede, Rebecca; Toosizadeh, Nima; Mills, Joseph L.; Zaky, Mahmoud; Mohler, Jane; Najafi, Bijan

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral artery disease is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, and frailty syndrome may mediate the risk of these adverse health outcomes to predict intervention results. The aim of this study was to determine the association between motor performance impairments based on in-clinic gait and balance measurements with frailty at intermediate stages (pre-frailty) in peripheral artery disease patients. Methods Seventeen participants with peripheral artery disease (≥ 55 years) were recruited and frailty assessed using Fried criteria. Gait and balance were quantified using wearable sensor technologies in the clinical setting. Between-group differences in frailty were assessed using analysis of variance, and independent associations between gait and balance parameters with frailty were determined using logistic regression models. Findings Based on Fried index nine (53%) participants were pre-frail and eight (47%) were non-frail. Although no between group differences in demographics or clinical parameters was observed, gait parameters were worse among pre-frail compared to non-frail participants. The highest effect sizes for between group differences were observed in double support during habitual normal walking (effect size=1.86, p<0.01), speed variability during dual-task (effect size=1.26, p=0.03), and trunk sway during fast walking (effect size=1.43, p=0.02). No significant difference was observed in balance parameters (p > 0.07). The regression model using gait parameters demonstrated a high sensitivity and specificity in predicting pre-frailty. Interpretation A short 25-step sensor-based in-clinic overground gait test objectively identified pre-frailty independent of age. Double support was the most sensitive parameter in identifying pre-frail aging adults. PMID:26775227

  5. Percutaneous transluminal excimer laser angioplasty in total peripheral artery occlusion in man

    SciTech Connect

    Wollenek, G.; Laufer, G.; Grabenwoeger, F.

    1988-01-01

    Laser angioplasty and laser-assisted angioplasty have become a clinical reality. Producing sharply defined borders of the ablated area with minimal adjacent thermal damage, excimer lasers offer several proven and some potential advantages over conventional systems. To evaluate the feasibility of excimer laser angioplasty, we have treated one patient using 308-nm radiation via a bare fiber in direct contact with the total occlusion of a right femoral artery. The lesion was successfully recanalized, thus allowing easy passage of the balloon catheter and subsequent dilatation. This percutaneous laser recanalization of an occluded peripheral artery is one of the first to be done in man using excimer laser radiation, thus demonstrating that the technique is feasible and the system is potentially useful.

  6. Detecting lower extremity vascular dynamics in patients with peripheral artery disease using diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Michael A.; Kim, Hyun-Keol K.; Kim, In-Kyong; Dayal, Rajeev; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2011-02-01

    Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) affects over 10 million Americans and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. While in many cases the ankle-brachial index (ABI) can be used for diagnosing the disease, this parameter is not dependable in the diabetic and elderly population. These populations tend to have calcified arteries, which leads to elevated ABI values. Dynamic optical tomography (DDOT) promises to overcome the limitations of the current diagnostic techniques and has the potential to initiate a paradigm shift in the diagnosis of vascular disease. We have performed initial pilot studies involving 5 PAD patients and 3 healthy volunteers. The time traces and tomographic reconstruction obtained from measurements on the feet show significant differences between healthy and affected vasculatures. In addition, we found that DOT is capable of identifying PAD in diabetic patients, who are misdiagnosed by the traditional ABI screening.

  7. Peripheral arterial disease in a female using high-dose combined oral contraceptive pills.

    PubMed

    Pallavee, P; Samal, Sunita; Samal, Rupal

    2013-01-01

    The association between oral contraceptive (OC) pills and vascular diseases is well-known, although, the present generation of pills is considered to be relatively safer in this regard. Hormonal treatment for severe abnormal uterine bleeding is usually considered after ruling out malignancy, when such bleeding is resistant to all other forms of treatment. We report a case of severe peripheral arterial disease in a female, who had been on high-dose OC pills for an extended period of time for severe uterine bleeding.

  8. Angioplasty with drug coated balloons for the treatment of infrainguinal peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Werner, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Restenosis or re-occlusion after femoropopliteal angioplasty or stent implantation is the main limitation of endovascular treatment strategies for peripheral artery disease. Within the last years, balloon catheters with anti-proliferative drug coating on the balloon surface have shown to be associated with higher patency rates compared to plain balloon angioplasty. Thus, drug-coated balloons were gradually adopted in many interventional centres for the treatment of femoropopliteal obstructions. The current review summarises the existing evidence for drug-coated balloons in the infrainguinal vessels and their indication in special lesion cohorts.

  9. Drug-coated balloons and their place in treating peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Schnorr, Beatrix; Albrecht, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Drug-coated balloons (DCB) have emerged as an additional treatment option for managing restenosis in lesions of the superficial femoral artery and of the infrapopliteal arterial bed. Relatively limited data are available on the use of DCB in these lesions, but scientific evidence is mounting. In five randomized controlled trials, late lumen loss 6 months after the intervention was found to be markedly lower in patients treated with paclitaxel-coated balloons (PCB) compared with uncoated balloons. Different types of PCB are currently on the market. It remains to be seen how different coatings affect the performance of PCB and clinical outcome. Long-term results are also awaited. In this review, the authors describe the components of DCB and how they affect performance. Then, the authors provide an overview of clinical results obtained with PCB in the superficial femoral artery and below the knee, and finally the article gives an outlook on the future of DCB in peripheral arterial disease.

  10. Comparison of Cardiovascular Risk Factors for Peripheral Artery Disease and Coronary Artery Disease in the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Shin Yi; Ju, Eun Young; Cho, Sung-Il; Lee, Seung Wook

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives The objective of this study was to analyze and compare risk factors for peripheral artery disease (PAD) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Subjects and Methods The sample included 7936 Korean patients aged ≥20 years who were hospitalized from 1994 to 2004. Of the 7936 subjects, PAD (n=415), CAD (n=3686), and normal controls (Control) (n=3835) were examined at the Health Promotion Center, Samsung Medical Center. Results The mean age (years) of PAD subjects was 64.4 (±9.3), while CAD subjects was 61.2 (±9.9), and Control subjects was 59.9 (±9.1) (p<0.01). The proportion of males was 90.6% for PAD, 71.4% for CAD, and 75.5% for Control subjects (p<0.01). The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease were significantly higher in subjects with PAD or CAD compared to those in Control. However, the ORs for high density lipoprotein, being overweight, and being obese were significantly lower in PAD subjects compared to those in Control. Conclusion We found that cardiovascular risk factors were in fact risk factors for both PAD and CAD. PMID:23755078

  11. Diabetes and Hypertension Consistently Predict the Presence and Extent of Coronary Artery Calcification in Symptomatic Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nicoll, Rachel; Zhao, Ying; Ibrahimi, Pranvera; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Henein, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship of conventional cardiovascular risk factors (age, gender, ethnicity, diabetes, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, obesity, exercise, and the number of risk factors) to coronary artery calcification (CAC) presence and extent has never before been assessed in a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: We included only English language studies that assessed at least three conventional risk factors apart from age, gender, and ethnicity, but excluded studies in which all patients had another confirmed condition such as renal disease. Results: In total, 10 studies, comprising 15,769 patients, were investigated in the systematic review and seven studies, comprising 12,682 patients, were included in the meta-analysis, which demonstrated the importance of diabetes and hypertension as predictors of CAC presence and extent, with age also predicting CAC presence. Male gender, dyslipidaemia, family history of coronary artery disease, obesity, and smoking were overall not predictive of either CAC presence or extent, despite dyslipidaemia being a key risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). Conclusion: Diabetes and hypertension consistently predict the presence and extent of CAC in symptomatic patients. PMID:27608015

  12. 2D Rotational Angiography for Fast and Standardized Evaluation of Peripheral and Visceral Artery Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Marcus Opitz, Armin; Minko, Peter; Massmann, Alexander; Berlich, Joachim; Buecker, Arno

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the value of rotational digital subtraction angiography (rDSA) for evaluation of peripheral and visceral artery stenoses compared to conventional digital subtraction angiography (cDSA). Methods: A phantom study was performed comparing the radiation dose of cDSA with two projections and rDSA by means of the 2D Dynavision technique (Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany). Subsequently, 33 consecutive patients (18 women, 15 men; mean {+-} SD age 67 {+-} 15 years) were examined by both techniques. In total, 63 vessel segments were analyzed by two observers with respect to stenoses, image contrast, and vessel sharpness. Results: Radiation dose was significantly lower with rDSA. cDSA and rDSA revealed 21 and 24 flow-relevant stenotic lesions and vessel occlusions (70-100%), respectively. The same stenosis grade was assessed in 45 segments. By means of rDSA, 10 lesions were judged to have a higher and 8 lesions a lower stenosis grade compared to cDSA. rDSA yielded additive information regarding the vessel anatomy and pathology in 29 segments. However, a tendency toward better image quality and sharper vessel visualization was seen with cDSA. Conclusion: rDSA allows for multiprojection assessment of peripheral and visceral arteries and provides additional clinically relevant information after a single bolus of contrast medium. At the same time, radiation dose can be significantly reduced compared to cDSA.

  13. Multiple Instances of Peripheral Artery Emboli from Occult Primary Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Roberto; Rosati, Maria Sofia; Chiappa, Roberto; Vitale, Silvio; Millarelli, Massimiliano; Caselli, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Most peripheral artery emboli originate in the heart, and systemic neoplastic emboli are infrequently associated with bronchogenic carcinoma. To our knowledge, there have been no reports of pulmonary vein infiltration by small cell lung cancer. We describe a highly unusual case of multiple instances of peripheral embolism as the first overt sign of occult primary small cell lung cancer. Tumor emboli infiltrated the pulmonary veins of a 62-year-old man who presented first with a transient ischemic attack and then with other ischemic symptoms. The uncommonly wide distribution of tumor emboli over a short time resulted in death. Improvements in diagnostic imaging have led to the early identification of relatively isolated small cell lung cancers. This patient's case underscores the importance of transesophageal echocardiography in detecting cardiac emboli when the cause of cerebral ischemic attack is unknown or if there might be multiple instances of arterial embolism. Computed tomography also has a role in the investigation of possible sources of emboli and unrecognized, asymptomatic embolization. PMID:22719159

  14. Drug delivering technology for endovascular management of infrainguinal peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Karan; Spelber, David A; Bhatt, Deepak L; Mohammad, Atif; Prasad, Anand; Brilakis, Emmanouil S; Banerjee, Subhash

    2014-08-01

    Endovascular intervention has become a well-recognized treatment modality for peripheral artery disease; however, mid- and long-term outcomes have been plagued by limited durability. Plain balloon angioplasty and bare-metal stents have historically suffered from high restenosis rates leading to the need for frequent repeat revascularization procedures. The innovation of locally administered, drug-delivering balloons and stents has been a direct result of technological innovations directed toward prevention and treatment of this limitation. Over the last 5 years, numerous clinical trials investigating the use of drug-coated stents and drug-coated balloons indicate a significant improvement in endovascular treatment durability and outcomes. This review provides an up-to-date assessment of the current evidence for the use of drug-coated stents and drug-coated balloons in the treatment of femoropopliteal and infrapopliteal peripheral artery disease. Additionally, it provides an overview of the development of this technology, highlights landmark ongoing and completed clinical trials, examines evidence to support the use of drug-coated technologies in combination with other modalities, and examines promising new technological developments. Last, it summarizes the challenges and safety concerns that have delayed U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of these devices.

  15. Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease Does Not Affect Circulating Monocyte Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Krzanowski, Marek; Malinowski, Krzysztof P.; Nizankowski, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes are mononuclear cells characterized by distinct morphology and expression of CD14 and CD16 surface receptors. Classical, quiescent monocytes are positive for CD14 (lipopolysaccharide receptor) but do not express Fc gamma receptor III (CD16). Intermediate monocytes coexpress CD16 and CD14. Nonclassical monocytes with low expression of CD14 represent mature macrophage-like monocytes. Monocyte behavior in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and during vessel wall directed treatment is not well defined. This observation study aimed at monitoring of acute changes in monocyte subpopulations during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in PAD patients. Patients with Rutherford 3 and 4 PAD with no signs of inflammatory process underwent PTA of iliac, femoral, or popliteal segments. Flow cytometry for CD14, CD16, HLA-DR, CD11b, CD11c, and CD45RA antigens allowed characterization of monocyte subpopulations in blood sampled before and after PTA (direct angioplasty catheter sampling). Patients were clinically followed up for 12 months. All 61 enrolled patients completed 12-month follow-up. Target vessel failure occurred in 12 patients. While absolute counts of monocyte were significantly lower after PTA, only subtle monocyte activation after PTA (CD45RA and β-integrins) occurred. None of the monocyte parameters correlated with long-term adverse clinical outcome. Changes in absolute monocyte counts and subtle changes towards an activation phenotype after PTA may reflect local cell adhesion phenomenon in patients with Rutherford 3 or 4 peripheral arterial disease. PMID:27818999

  16. Unilateral symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis and myopathy in an adolescent with Graves disease: a case report of an high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Zhu, Jiajia; Huang, Dongling; Shi, Changzheng; Guan, Yuqing; Zhou, Liang; Pan, Suyue

    2015-01-01

    Vascular and muscular involvements in Graves disease (GD) are rare. Here, we report a case of a 17-year-old patient with unilateral symptomatic middle cerebral artery stenosis concurrent with GD and myopathy. He presented with a 1-day history of acute severe right-sided hemiparesis and aphasia and a 3-week history of high metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of the stenosis is most likely vasculitis rather than atherosclerosis, based on contrast-enhanced high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging showing concentric wall enhancement. We suggest that lipid storage myopathy is secondary to GD, and it is likely mitochondrial dysfunction or immune dysfunction induced by GD responsible for the myopathy and that magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is capable of establishing the diagnosis of myopathy. Thus, MRS can be used for follow-up evaluations of the myopathy along with the pathology biopsy.

  17. The Role of Coagulation and Inflammation After Angioplasty in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlgren, C.M. Sten-Linder, M.; Egberg, N.; Kalin, B.; Blohme, L.; Swedenborg, J.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. Restenosis remains a frequent complication after angioplasty in peripheral arterial disease. Inflammation plays a critical role in the vascular response to injury. Effective medical treatment to improve patency after angioplasty is still elusive. The aims of this prospective clinical study were to investigate changes in blood coagulation and inflammatory markers after angioplasty and their significance for restenosis. Methods. Thirty-four patients with peripheral arterial disease underwent angioplasty of the iliac and superficial femoral arteries. Ten patients undergoing diagnostic angiography were included in the study as controls. Plasma levels of tissue factor, prothrombin fragment 1 + 2, D-dimer, P-selectin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and fibrinogen were analyzed before and after angioplasty. Patients were followed up with angiography after 6 months to assess restenosis. Results. CRP was elevated the day after angioplasty (6.6 mg/l, p = 0.0001) and tended to peak after 1 week (11 mg/l, p = 0.09). There was a significant increase of D-dimer and P-selectin 1-4 hr after angioplasty (0.4 mg/l, p = 0.001 and 68 ng/ml, p = 0.05, respectively). None of the biochemical markers was a statistically significant predictor of restenosis. Conclusion. We have observed a much more prolonged inflammatory response than previously noted, but only minor changes in coagulation activity after angioplasty. The biochemical markers, before and after angioplasty, were not related to restenosis. Further studies are needed to delineate the molecular mechanisms behind these observations and their involvement in thrombosis and restenosis. If these pathways are further defined, improved treatment strategies, including antithrombotic treatments and statins, could be tailored to modulate postprocedural inflammation.

  18. Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging of Peripheral Arteries as an Adjunct to Balloon Angioplasty and Atherectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Korogi, Yukunori; Hirai, Toshinori; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    1996-11-15

    This article reviews many of the applications of intravascular ultrasound (US) imaging for peripheral arterial diseases. In vitro studies demonstrate an excellent correlation between ultrasound measurements of lumen and plaque crossectional area compared with histologic sections. In vivo clinical studies reveal the enhanced diagnostic capabilities of this technology compared with angiography. Intravascular US imaging can provide valuable information on the degree, eccentricity, and histologic type of stenosis before intervention, and on the morphological changes in the arterial wall and the extent of excision after intervention. Intravascular US may also serve as a superior index for gauging the diameter of balloon, stent, laser probe, and/or atherectomy catheter appropriate for a proposed intervention. Significant new insights into the mechanisms of balloon angioplasty and atherectomy have been established by intravascular US findings. Intravascular US imaging has been shown to be a more accurate method than angiography for determining the cross-sectional area of the arterial lumen, and for assessing severity of stenosis. Quantitative assessment of the luminal cross-sectional area after the balloon dilatation should be more accurate than angiography as intimal tears or dissections produced by the dilatation may not be accurately evaluated with angiography. At the present time, intravascular US is still a controversial imaging technique. Outcome studies are currently being organized to assess the clinical value and cost effectiveness of intravascular ultrasound in the context of these interventional procedures.

  19. Mechanisms of decompensation and organ failure in cirrhosis: From peripheral arterial vasodilation to systemic inflammation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Mauro; Moreau, Richard; Angeli, Paolo; Schnabl, Bernd; Arroyo, Vicente

    2015-11-01

    The peripheral arterial vasodilation hypothesis has been most influential in the field of cirrhosis and its complications. It has given rise to hundreds of pathophysiological studies in experimental and human cirrhosis and is the theoretical basis of life-saving treatments. It is undisputed that splanchnic arterial vasodilation contributes to portal hypertension and is the basis for manifestations such as ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, but the body of research generated by the hypothesis has revealed gaps in the original pathophysiological interpretation of these complications. The expansion of our knowledge on the mechanisms regulating vascular tone, inflammation and the host-microbiota interaction require a broader approach to advanced cirrhosis encompassing the whole spectrum of its manifestations. Indeed, multiorgan dysfunction and failure likely result from a complex interplay where the systemic spread of bacterial products represents the primary event. The consequent activation of the host innate immune response triggers endothelial molecular mechanisms responsible for arterial vasodilation, and also jeopardizes organ integrity with a storm of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Thus, the picture of advanced cirrhosis could be seen as the result of an inflammatory syndrome in contradiction with a simple hemodynamic disturbance.

  20. Arterial baroreceptors and brain histamine contribute to bradycardia to peripheral hyperosmolality.

    PubMed

    Kenney, M J; Bealer, S L

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the bradycardic response to peripheral hyperosmolality in conscious rats is dependent on afferent baroreceptor mechanisms and whether central histamine H2 receptors play a role in baroreflex-mediated changes in heart rate (HR). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and HR were recorded continuously during a 30-min infusion of 2.5 M NaCl (10 microliters.100 g-1.min-1) hypertonic saline (HTS). HTS infusion significantly increased MAP (21 +/- 4 mmHg) and reduced HR (-62 +/- 10 beats/min) in rats with intact arterial baroreceptors. In sinoaortic-denervated rats, HR remained unchanged from control despite a significant increase in MAP. After intracerebroventricular (lateral ventricle) administration of cimetidine or ranitidine (H2-receptor antagonists) in intact rats, HTS infusion significantly increased MAP (19 +/- 2 and 17 +/- 2 mmHg, respectively) but the bradycardia was abolished (-12 +/- 10 and -10 +/- 10 beats/min, respectively). In contrast, central H2-receptor blockade did not alter reflex HR responses to the intravenous administration of phenylephrine and nitroprusside or to the central administration of histamine or angiotensin II. These results indicate that the bradycardic response to HTS infusion is mediated through the arterial baroreceptor reflex and involves in part a selective histaminergic pathway.

  1. Atherosclerosis in vascular grafts for peripheral vascular disease. Part 2. Synthetic arterial prostheses.

    PubMed

    Walton, K W; Slaney, G; Ashton, F

    1986-08-01

    Thirty-nine synthetic (32 Dacron and 7 Teflon) arterial prostheses (from 38 patients with peripheral arterial disease) removed after periods between 2 months and 18 years, were examined by histology and immuno-histology. The grafts were initially permeated by thrombus containing platelet antigens and this became organised and converted to granulation, and then to fibrous, tissue. The newly-formed tissue contained 'foreign-body' giant-cells in contact with the plastic prosthesis and showed evidence of permeation by plasma proteins. In grafts of over 2 years duration, this reactive tissue no longer contained platelet antigens but invariably revealed bound lipid, identifiable as apolipoprotein-B-containing lipoproteins (LpB), and fibrinogen-related antigens (FRA), in a distribution resembling that seen in atherosclerotic arteries. LpB and FRA were also seen in organised, or partially organised, mural thrombi in older grafts. The oldest grafts additionally showed stenosis, calcification or aneurysm formation. Lipid deposition increases with the age of grafts; is independent of the nature of the plastic fibre used or its mode of fabrication; and sometimes contributes to graft failure. Immuno-histology indicates that this is an insudative process indistinguishable from 'true' atherosclerosis which occurs in graft-linings of prostheses of long duration and in old mural thrombi in grafts and that the lipid in these lesions derives from plasma LpB rather than from platelets. This source for the lipid suggests that the insudative and thrombogenic theories of atherogenesis can be reconciled.

  2. Underrecognized Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus in Thailand: We Must Consider Neuroischemic Foot Ulcers From This Fallout.

    PubMed

    Rerkasem, Kittipan; Kosachunhanun, Natapong; Sony, Kiran; Inpankaew, Nimit; Mani, Raj

    2015-06-01

    A range of prevalence of peripheral artery disease in diabetic patients has been estimated using the measurement of ankle brachial pressure index and clinical features in Asian countries. These data may be underestimates and hence underrecognized, raising questions about the numbers of patients with neuroischemic feet who are also at risk of diabetic foot ulcers. Underrecognition of these lesions may well increase the high levels of chronic wound burden resulting from peripheral artery disease as well as neuroischemic foot lesions. Improved education and training of clinical staff (nurses and family physicians) is required to combat these serious issues.

  3. External carotid artery angioplasty and stenting to augment cerebral perfusion in the setting of subacute symptomatic ipsilateral internal carotid artery occlusion. Case report.

    PubMed

    Adel, Joseph G; Bendok, Bernard R; Hage, Ziad A; Naidech, Andrew M; Miller, Jeffery W; Batjer, H Hunt

    2007-12-01

    The authors performed external carotid artery (ECA) angioplasty and stenting in a 45-year-old man who had presented with right hemispheric crescendo ischemic symptoms stemming from acute right internal carotid artery occlusion (ICAO). This unique application of ECA angioplasty and stenting augmented cerebral perfusion and improved clinical symptoms. In certain situations, ECA stenting can increase cerebral perfusion in the setting of ICAO and ECA stenosis. The authors are the first to describe this approach in this context.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Nitinol Stent Oversizing in Arteries with Clinically Relevant Levels of Peripheral Arterial Disease: The Influence of Plaque Type on the Outcomes of Endovascular Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gökgöl, Can; Diehm, Nicolas; Büchler, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Oversizing of the Nitinol stents in the femoro-popliteal arterial tract is commonly performed by clinicians and further encouraged by stent manufacturers. However, in spite of the procedure's supposed benefits of strong wall apposition and increased luminal gain, its effects on the mechanical behavior of arteries with peripheral arterial disease are not fully clear. In this study, finite element (FE) analyses of endovascular revascularization of an idealized artery with 70% stenosis and three different plaque types have been performed to examine the influence of Nitinol stent oversizing on the arterial stresses and acute lumen gain. The analyses included the simulation of balloon angioplasty to model plaque failure, followed by stent implantation, in which four different oversizing ratios were investigated. Results showed that balloon angioplasty was crucial in determining the stress levels of the artery prior to stent implantation and heavily affected the outcome of endovascular therapy. For all plaque types, Nitinol stent oversizing was found to produce a marginal lumen gain in contrast to a significant increase in arterial stresses. For the arteries with lightly and moderately calcified plaques, oversizing was found to be non-critical; whereas for the arteries with heavily calcified plaques, the procedure should be avoided due to a risk of tissue failure.

  5. Utility of Indocyanine Green Angiography in Arterial Selection during Free Flap Harvest in Patients with Severe Peripheral Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Anne K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Indocyanine green angiography (SPY) was used to guide arterial selection for an anterolateral thigh free flap in the setting of severe peripheral vascular disease. SPY technology serves as a novel and sensitive intraoperative tool to predict decreased tissue perfusion from vessel sacrifice for flap harvest. Change in SPY time parameters measuring superficial blood flow distal to the donor site while temporarily intraoperatively clamping different possible arterial pedicles can optimize free flap design to avoid iatrogenic critical limb ischemia. PMID:27826489

  6. Use of the Corus® CAD Gene Expression Test for Assessment of Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease Likelihood in Symptomatic Non-Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Jose; Lima, Joao A C; Kraus, William E; Douglas, Pamela S; Rosenberg, Steven

    2013-08-26

    The determination of the underlying etiology of symptoms suggestive of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD, ≥50% stenosis in a major coronary artery) is a common clinical challenge in both primary care and cardiology clinics. Usual care in low to medium risk patients often involves a family history, risk factor assessment, and then stress testing with or without non-invasive imaging. If positive, this is often followed by invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Despite extensive adoption of this usual care paradigm, more than 60% of patients referred for angiography do not have obstructive CAD. In order to robustly identify those symptomatic patients without obstructive CAD, who can avoid subsequent cardiac testing and look elsewhere for the cause of their symptoms, a recently described whole blood gene expression score (GES: Corus® CAD, CardioDx, Inc., Palo Alto, CA) has been developed and validated in two multi-center trials. This paper reviews the published literature and assessments by independent parties regarding the analytical and clinical validity as well as the clinical utility of the Corus® CAD test.

  7. Patients with resistant hypertension have more peripheral arterial disease than other uncontrolled hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, P E; Kautiainen, H; Kantola, I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether resistant hypertension differs from uncontrolled and controlled hypertension in terms of target organ damage. Hypertensive subjects with antihypertensive medication (n=385) were identified in a population survey conducted in southwestern Finland. None of the study subjects had previously diagnosed cardiovascular or renal disease or diabetes. Ankle-brachial index, estimated glomerular filtration rate, electrocardiogram-determined left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiometabolic risk factors were assessed. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease among subjects with resistant, uncontrolled and controlled hypertension was 6/37 (16%), 22/275 (8%) and 0/73 (0%), respectively (P=0.006). There were no differences in the prevalence of renal insufficiency, left ventricular hypertrophy or metabolic parameters between the groups. Resistant hypertension affects vasculature more than uncontrolled hypertension, and thus it can be regarded as a marker of more severe disease.

  8. Percutaneous laser thermal angioplasty: initial clinical results with a laser probe in total peripheral artery occlusions.

    PubMed

    Cumberland, D C; Sanborn, T A; Tayler, D I; Moore, D J; Welsh, C L; Greenfield, A J; Guben, J K; Ryan, T J

    1986-06-28

    A metal-tipped laser fibre was used during percutaneous angioplasty of femoral/popliteal or iliac artery occlusions in 56 patients. Primary success was achieved in 50 (89%) of these total occlusions, providing a channel for subsequent balloon dilatation. Before the procedure, 18 lesions had been judged untreatable by conventional angioplasty and four of the six failures were in these. Complications directly attributable to the laser probe were one case of vessel perforation and two cases of entry into vessel walls; these had no sequelae. Other acute complications were a distal thrombosis in a non-heparinised patient, requiring local streptokinase treatment, and two reocclusions and one transient peripheral embolic episode in the first 24 hours. The laser probe technique has potential for increasing the proportion of patients suitable for angioplasty.

  9. Study on mental stress using near-infrared spectroscopy, electroencephalography, and peripheral arterial tonometry.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yoshikazu; Ogata, Hajime; Takano, Hidenori; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Mukai, Toshiharu; Yagi, Tohru

    2008-01-01

    In this research, we used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as an alternative technique for mental state analysis, and compared its performance with other conventional techniques such as electroencephalography (EEG) and peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT) during stress and healing tasks. We measured biological signals simultaneously in our experiments using these techniques for comparison. NIRS results showed that the level of total hemoglobin in the frontal cortex increased during a stress task and decreased during a healing task for all subjects whose blood volume change was properly recorded. EEG, however, showed inconsistent results due to task variation. Only PAT gave consistent results in many of the subjects. Taken together, the results suggest that NIRS might be suitable for mental state evaluation, with PAT as an alternative.

  10. Predictors of peripheral arterial disease in SLE change with patient’s age

    PubMed Central

    Erdozain, Jose-Gabriel; Villar, Irama; Nieto, Javier; Ruiz-Arruza, Ioana

    2017-01-01

    Objective To analyse the differential influence of risk factors of peripheral artery disease (PAD) according to age in patients with SLE. Methods 216 patients from the Lupus-Cruces cohort were divided in three age groups: ≤34 years, 35–49 years and ≥50 years. A low ankle–brachial index defined PAD. Significant variables were identified by univariant and multivariant analysis in each age group. Results Different factors were identified in different age groups: antiphospholipid antibodies/antiphospholipid syndrome and glucocorticoids in patients ≤34 years; in patients 35–49 years old, hypertension was the only statistically significant predictor, although a trend was observed for fibrinogen levels; a trend was observed for hypercholesterolaemia in those ≥50 years. Conclusions Age may modulate the influence of risk factors for PAD in patients with SLE. PMID:28123770

  11. New developments in the clinical use of drug-coated balloon catheters in peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Naghi, Jesse; Yalvac, Ethan A; Pourdjabbar, Ali; Ang, Lawrence; Bahadorani, John; Reeves, Ryan R; Mahmud, Ehtisham; Patel, Mitul

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) involving the lower extremity is a major source of morbidity and mortality. Clinical manifestations of PAD span the spectrum from lifestyle limiting claudication to ulceration and gangrene leading to amputation. Advancements including balloon angioplasty, self-expanding stents, drug-eluting stents, and atherectomy have resulted in high technical success rates for endovascular therapy in patients with PAD. However, these advances have been limited by somewhat high rates of clinical restenosis and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. The recent introduction of drug-coated balloon technology shows promise in limiting neointimal hyperplasia induced by vascular injury after endovascular therapies. This review summarizes the contemporary clinical data in the emerging area of drug-coated balloons. PMID:27418859

  12. The Use of Heparin during Endovascular Peripheral Arterial Interventions: A Synopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wiersema, Arno M.; Watts, Christopher; Durran, Alexandra C.; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; van Delden, Otto M.; Moll, Frans L.; Vos, Jan Albert

    2016-01-01

    A large variety exists for many aspects of the use of heparin as periprocedural prophylactic antithrombotics (PPAT) during peripheral arterial interventions (PAI). This variation is present, not only within countries, but also between them. Due to a lack of (robust) data, no systematic review on the use of heparin during PAI could be justified. A synopsis of all available literature on heparin during PAI describes that heparin is used on technical equipment to reduce the thrombogenicity and in the flushing solution with saline. Heparin could have a cumulative anticoagulant effect when used in combination with ionic contrast medium. No level-1 evidence exists on the use of heparin. A measurement of actual anticoagulation status by means of an activated clotting time should be mandatory. PMID:27190678

  13. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Digital Gangrene: A Rare Presentation of Diabetic Hand Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Santokh; Chand, Gian; Charan, Shiv; Arora, Sahil; Singh, Parampreet

    2013-01-01

    Digital gangrene in upper limbs may be due to systemic sclerosis, trauma, connective tissue disorders, vasculitic disorders and various myeloproliferative disorders or as a part of tropical diabetes hand syndrome which follows trauma. Peripheral arterial disease in diabetics commonly involves lower limbs. The present case, 45-year-old diabetic, presented with dry gangrene in fingertips of both hands for last two weeks without any history of trauma or lower limb gangrene. On examination and workup of the patient was found to have bilateral upper limb arterio-occlusive disease involving ulnar vessels as a macrovascular complication of diabetes mellitus. This presentation of diabetic hand syndrome is very, very rare, hence being reported. PMID:24298503

  14. Primary care screening for peripheral arterial disease: a cross-sectional observational study

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Jane H; Richards, Jonathan; Conway, Kevin; Kenkre, Joyce E; Lewis, Jane EA; Mark Williams, E

    2017-01-01

    Background Early identification of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and subsequent instigation of risk modification strategies could minimise disease progression and reduce overall risk of cardiovascular (CV) mortality. However, the feasibility and value of primary care PAD screening is uncertain. Aim This study (the PIPETTE study — Peripheral arterial disease In Primary carE: Targeted screening and subsequenT managEment) aimed to determine the value of a proposed primary care PAD screening strategy. Outcomes assessed were: prevalence of PAD and agreement of ankle– brachial index (ABI)-defined PAD (ABI ≤0.9) with QRISK®2-defined high CV risk (≥20). Design and setting A cross-sectional observational study was undertaken in a large general practice in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales. Method In total, 1101 individuals with ≥2 pre-identified CV risk factors but no known CV disease or diabetes were invited to participate. Participants underwent ABI measurement and QRISK2 assessment, and completed Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaires. Results A total of 368 people participated in the study (participation rate: 33%). Prevalence of PAD was 3% (n = 12). The number needed to screen (NNS) to detect one new case of PAD was 31. Refining the study population to those aged ≥50 years with a smoking history reduced the NNS to 14, while still identifying 100% of PAD cases. Of participants with PAD, 33% reported severe lifestyle-limiting symptoms of intermittent claudication that warranted subsequent endovascular intervention, yet had not previously presented to their GP. The QRISK2 score predicted high CV risk in 92% of participants with PAD. Conclusion The low PAD yield and the fact that QRISK2 was largely comparable to the ABI in predicting high CV risk suggests that routine PAD screening may be unwarranted. Instead, strategies to improve public awareness of PAD are needed. PMID:28126882

  15. Coronary exercise hyperemia is impaired in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Amanda J.; Gao, Zhaohui; Luck, J. Carter; Blaha, Cheryl A.; Cauffman, Aimee E.; Aziz, Faisal; Radtka, John F.; Proctor, David N.; Leuenberger, Urs A.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.; Muller, Matthew D.

    2017-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic vascular disease that affects over 200 million worldwide. The hallmark of PAD is ischemic leg pain and this condition is also associated with an augmented blood pressure response to exercise, impaired vascular function, and high risk of myocardial infarction and cardiovascular mortality. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that coronary exercise hyperemia is impaired in PAD. Methods Twelve patients with PAD and no overt coronary disease (65 ± 2 yr, 7 men) and 15 healthy control subjects (64 ± 2 yr, 9 men) performed supine plantar flexion exercise (30 contractions/min, increasing workload). A subset of subjects (N = 7 PAD, N = 8 healthy) also performed isometric handgrip exercise (40% maximum voluntary contraction to fatigue). Coronary blood velocity in the left anterior descending artery was measured by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography; blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously. Results Coronary blood velocity responses to 4 minutes of plantar flexion exercise (PAD: Δ 2.4 ± 1.2, healthy: Δ 6.0 ± 1.6 cm/s, P = 0.039) and to isometric handgrip exercise (PAD: Δ 8.3 ± 4.2, healthy: Δ 16.9 ± 3.6, P = 0.033) were attenuated in PAD patients. Conclusions These data indicate that coronary exercise hyperemia is impaired in PAD, which may predispose these patients to myocardial ischemia. PMID:27575303

  16. A Review of the Pathophysiology and Potential Biomarkers for Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Smriti Murali; Moxon, Joseph V.; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is due to the blockage of the arteries supplying blood to the lower limbs usually secondary to atherosclerosis. The most severe clinical manifestation of PAD is critical limb ischemia (CLI), which is associated with a risk of limb loss and mortality due to cardiovascular events. Currently CLI is mainly treated by surgical or endovascular revascularization, with few other treatments in routine clinical practice. There are a number of problems with current PAD management strategies, such as the difficulty in selecting the appropriate treatments for individual patients. Many patients undergo repeated attempts at revascularization surgery, but ultimately require an amputation. There is great interest in developing new methods to identify patients who are unlikely to benefit from revascularization and to improve management of patients unsuitable for surgery. Circulating biomarkers that predict the progression of PAD and the response to therapies could assist in the management of patients. This review provides an overview of the pathophysiology of PAD and examines the association between circulating biomarkers and PAD presence, severity and prognosis. While some currently identified circulating markers show promise, further larger studies focused on the clinical value of the biomarkers over existing risk predictors are needed. PMID:25993296

  17. Peripheral Augmentation Index is Associated With the Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index in Patients With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Kevin S.; Patvardhan, Eshan A.; Karas, Richard H.; Kuvin, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Vascular dysfunction is highly prevalent if not ubiquitous in patients with hypertension. We compared two different measures of vascular function obtained from digital volume waveforms with measures of ventricular-vascular load derived from 24-hour blood pressure (BP) recordings in patients with hypertension. Methods Digital pulsatile volume waveforms were captured via plethysmography (peripheral arterial tone, PAT) and used to derive augmentation index (a measure of ventricular-vascular coupling) and the pulse wave amplitude-reactive hyperemia index (a measure of microvascular reactivity). Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) and the BP variability ratio (BPVR) were derived from 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings. Results There was a positive association between PAT-AIx and AASI (r = 0.52, P < 0.05). There was also a positive association between PAT-AIx and BPVR (r = 0.37, P < 0.05). PAT-AIx was not associated with PWA-RHI (r = -0.14, P > 0.05). PWA-RHI was not associated with AASI or BPVR (P > 0.05). Conclusions PAT-AIx is associated with ambulatory measures of vascular function and may offer clinical insight into vascular burden and cardiovascular disease risk in patients with hypertension independent of information obtained from PWA-RHI.

  18. Molecular Imaging of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Survival and Homing in Murine Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    van der Bogt, Koen E.A.; Hellingman, Alwine A.; Lijkwan, Maarten A.; Bos, Ernst-Jan; de Vries, Margreet R.; Fischbein, Michael P.; Quax, Paul H.; Robbins, Robert C.; Hamming, Jaap F.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow mononuclear cell (MNC) therapy is a promising treatment for peripheral artery disease (PAD). This study aims to provide insight into cellular kinetics using molecular imaging following different transplantation methods. Methods and Results MNCs were isolated from F6 transgenic mice (FVB background) that express firefly luciferase (Fluc) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Male FVB and C57Bl6 mice (n=50) underwent femoral artery ligation and were randomized into 4 groups receiving: (1) single intramuscular (i.m.) injection of 2×106 MNC; (2) four weekly i.m. injections of 5×105 MNC; (3) 2×106 MNCs intravenously (i.v.); and (4) PBS. Cellular kinetics, measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI), revealed near-complete donor cell death 4 weeks after i.m. transplantation. Following i.v. transplantation, BLI monitored cells homed in on the injured area in the limb, as well as to the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Ex vivo BLI showed presence of MNCs in the scar tissue and adductor muscle. However, no significant effects on neovascularisation were observed as monitored by Laser-Doppler-Perfusion-Imaging and histology. Conclusion This is one of the first studies to assess kinetics of transplanted MNCs in PAD using in vivo molecular imaging. MNC survival is short lived and MNCs do not significantly stimulate perfusion in this model. PMID:22239892

  19. Peripheral Veno-Arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Bridge to Decision for Pediatric Fulminant Myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Noritaka; Murayama, Hiroomi; Hasegawa, Hiroki; Kawai, Satoru; Mori, Hiromitsu; Yasuda, Kazushi

    2016-08-01

    It is essential to establish an appropriate initial treatment strategy for pediatric fulminant myocarditis. We reviewed eight cases of pediatric fulminant myocarditis that required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) from 2012 to 2015. The median age was 8 years (range 3 months-13 years), and the median body surface area was 0.89 m(2) (range 0.35-1.34 m(2) ). Peripheral veno-arterial ECMO was initially applied, and we evaluated whether heart decompression was sufficient. If the pump flow was insufficient, central cannulation was performed via median sternotomy (central ECMO). The need for subsequent ventricular assist device (VAD) support was determined 72 h after ECMO initiation. Six patients were bridged to recovery using peripheral ECMO support only (for 3-11 days), whereas two required VAD support. One patient was switched to central ECMO before VAD implantation. Three patients died of multiorgan failure, even though cardiac function recovered in two of those patients. The duration from hospital arrival to ECMO initiation was shorter in the survival (3.3 ± 1.3 h; range 1.6-4.7 h) than in the nonsurvival group (32 ± 28 h; range 0.7-55 h). Peripheral ECMO can be useful as a bridge to decision for pediatric fulminant myocarditis, which is frequently followed by a successful bridge to recovery. It is important to determine whether ECMO support should be initiated before organ dysfunction advances to preserve organ function, which provides a better bridge to subsequent VAD therapy and heart transplant or recovery.

  20. PADPIN: protein-protein interaction networks of angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, and inflammation in peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Chaitanya G.; Annex, Brian H.; Bader, Joel S.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) results from an obstruction of blood flow in the arteries other than the heart, most commonly the arteries that supply the legs. The complexity of the known signaling pathways involved in PAD, including various growth factor pathways and their cross talks, suggests that analyses of high-throughput experimental data could lead to a new level of understanding of the disease as well as novel and heretofore unanticipated potential targets. Such bioinformatic analyses have not been systematically performed for PAD. We constructed global protein-protein interaction networks of angiogenesis (Angiome), immune response (Immunome), and arteriogenesis (Arteriome) using our previously developed algorithm GeneHits. The term “PADPIN” refers to the angiome, immunome, and arteriome in PAD. Here we analyze four microarray gene expression datasets from ischemic and nonischemic gastrocnemius muscles at day 3 posthindlimb ischemia (HLI) in two genetically different C57BL/6 and BALB/c mouse strains that display differential susceptibility to HLI to identify potential targets and signaling pathways in angiogenesis, immune, and arteriogenesis networks. We hypothesize that identification of the differentially expressed genes in ischemic and nonischemic muscles between the strains that recovers better (C57BL/6) vs. the strain that recovers more poorly (BALB/c) will help for the prediction of target genes in PAD. Our bioinformatics analysis identified several genes that are differentially expressed between the two mouse strains with known functions in PAD including TLR4, THBS1, and PRKAA2 and several genes with unknown functions in PAD including EphA4, TSPAN7, SLC22A4, and EIF2a. PMID:26058837

  1. [Recent Knowledge of Smoking and Peripheral Arterial Disease in Lower Extremities].

    PubMed

    Sotoda, Yoko; Hirooka, Shigeki; Orita, Hiroyuki; Wakabayashi, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic obstructive disease of the arteries in lower extremities. Patients with PAD show high rates of mortality from coronary artery disease (CAD) and stroke. Smoking as well as diabetes is an important risk factor for PAD. A lesion of PAD in the lower extremities tends to be more proximal in smokers than in nonsmokers and to be more distal in patients with diabetes than in nondiabetics. By a systematic review, the odds ratio for PAD of smokers vs nonsmokers has been reported to be in the range of 1.7-7.4. Previous epidemiological studies suggest a stronger association of smoking with PAD than that with CAD. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecule suppressing the progression of atherosclerosis, but this function is compromised by smoking. Smoking decreases the bioactivity of NO and the expression level of NO synthase. In addition, smoking results in deteriorations of risk factors for atherosclerosis such as decreases in blood HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol and tissue plasminogen activator levels and increases in the levels of blood triglycerides, LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, fibrinogen and the von Willebrand factor. Thus, smoking increases blood coagulability and deteriorates the blood lipid profile, resulting in thrombogenetic proneness and dyslipidemia. Smoking also increases the generation of atherogenic oxidized LDL in blood and decreases antiatherogenic prostacyclin production in the vascular endothelium. Smoking cessation is important for the prevention and therapy of PAD, and to this end, counseling by physicians and nicotine replacement therapy are useful and strongly recommended for patients with PAD.

  2. Adaptation of the Main Peripheral Artery and Vein to Long Term Confinement (MARS 500)

    PubMed Central

    Arbeille, Philippe; Provost, Romain; Vincent, Nicole; Aubert, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objective was to check if 520 days in confinement (MARS 500), may affect the main peripheral arterial diameter and wall thickness and the main vein size. Method Common carotid (CC) femoral artery (FA) portal vein (PV), jugular (JG), femoral vein (FV) and tibial vein were assessed during MARS 500 by echography, performed by the subjects. A hand free volumic echographic capture method and a delayed 3D reconstruction software developed by our lab were used for collecting and measuring the vascular parameters. Results During the MARS 500 experiment the subjects performed 6 sessions among which 80% of the echographic data were of sufficient quality to be processed. No significant change was found for the Common carotid, Jugular vein, femoral artery, femoral vein, portal vein, and tibial vein diameter. CC and FA IMT (intima media thickness) were found significantly increased (14% to 28% P<0.05) in all the 6 subjects, during the confinement period and also at +2 days after the confinement period, but there was no significant difference 6 month later compare to pre MARS 500. Conclusion The experiment confirmed that even untrained to performing echography the subjects were able to capture enough echographic data to reconstruct the vessel image from which the parameters were measured. The increase in both CC and FA IMT should be in relation with the stress generated by the confined environment or absence of solar radiation, as there was no change in gravity, temperature and air in the MARS 500 module, and minor changes in physical exercise and nutrition. PMID:24475025

  3. Blood pressure and calf muscle oxygen extraction during plantar flexion exercise in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Luck, J Carter; Miller, Amanda J; Aziz, Faisal; Radtka, John F; Proctor, David N; Leuenberger, Urs A; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Muller, Matthew D

    2017-04-06

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic vascular disease that affects 200 million worldwide. While PAD primarily affects large arteries, it is also associated with microvascular dysfunction, an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise, and high cardiovascular mortality. We hypothesized that fatiguing plantar flexion exercise that evokes claudication elicits a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation (SmO2) and a higher rise in BP in PAD compared to age-matched healthy subjects, but low-intensity steady state plantar flexion elicits similar responses between groups. In the first experiment, eight PAD patients and eight healthy controls performed fatiguing plantar flexion exercise (from 0.5 to 7 kg for up to 14 min). In the second experiment, seven PAD patients and seven healthy controls performed low-intensity plantar flexion exercise (2.0 kg for 14 min). BP, heart rate (HR), and SmO2 from near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) were measured continuously. SmO2 is the ratio of oxygenated hemoglobin to total hemoglobin, expressed as a percent. At fatigue, PAD patients had a greater increase in mean arterial BP (18 ± 2 versus vs. 10 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.029) and HR (14 ± 2 versus 6 ± 2 beats/min, P = 0.033) and a greater reduction in SmO2 (-54 ± 10 versus -12 ± 4 %, P = 0.001). However, both groups had similar physiological responses to low-intensity, non-painful plantar flexion exercise. These data suggest that PAD patients have altered oxygen uptake and/or utilization during fatiguing exercise coincident with an augmented BP response.

  4. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. Methods The International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) is a multicentre, international, randomised controlled trial with blinded adjudication of outcomes. Patients with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive carotid artery stenting or carotid endarterectomy. Randomisation was by telephone call or fax to a central computerised service and was stratified by centre with minimisation for sex, age, contralateral occlusion, and side of the randomised artery. Patients and investigators were not masked to treatment assignment. Patients were followed up by independent clinicians not directly involved in delivering the randomised treatment. The primary outcome measure of the trial is the 3-year rate of fatal or disabling stroke in any territory, which has not been analysed yet. The main outcome measure for the interim safety analysis was the 120-day rate of stroke, death, or procedural myocardial infarction. Analysis was by intention to treat (ITT). This study is registered, number ISRCTN25337470. Findings The trial enrolled 1713 patients (stenting group, n=855; endarterectomy group, n=858). Two patients in the stenting group and one in the endarterectomy group withdrew immediately after randomisation, and were not included in the ITT analysis. Between randomisation and 120 days, there were 34 (Kaplan-Meier estimate 4·0%) events of disabling stroke or death in the stenting group compared with 27 (3·2%) events in the endarterectomy group (hazard ratio [HR] 1·28, 95% CI 0·77–2·11). The incidence of stroke, death, or procedural myocardial infarction was 8·5% in the stenting group compared with 5·2% in the endarterectomy group (72 vs 44 events

  5. Risk Stratification of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Using Aortic Augmentation Index

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Marianne; Husmann, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Central augmentation index (cAIx) is an indicator for vascular stiffness. Obstructive and aneurysmatic vascular disease can affect pulse wave propagation and reflection, causing changes in central aortic pressures. Aim To assess and compare cAIx in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and / or abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods cAIx was assessed by radial applanation tonometry (Sphygmocor) in a total of 184 patients at a tertiary referral centre. Patients were grouped as having PAD only, AAA only, or both AAA and PAD. Differences in cAIx measurements between the three patient groups were tested by non-parametric tests and stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis to investigate associations with obstructive or aneurysmatic patterns of vascular disease. Results In the study sample of 184 patients, 130 had PAD only, 20 had AAA only, and 34 patients had both AAA and PAD. Mean cAIx (%) was 30.5 ± 8.2 across all patients. It was significantly higher in females (35.2 ± 6.1, n = 55) than males (28.4 ± 8.2, n = 129), and significantly higher in patients over 80 years of age (34.4 ± 6.9, n = 22) than in those under 80 years (30.0 ± 8.2, n = 162). Intergroup comparison revealed a significant difference in cAIx between the three patient groups (AAA: 27.3 ± 9.5; PAD: 31.4 ± 7.8; AAA & PAD: 28.8 ± 8.5). cAIx was significantly lower in patients with AAA, higher in patients with both AAA and PAD, and highest in patients with PAD only (beta = 0.21, p = 0.006). Conclusion Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness in high-risk patients indicates that cAIx differs according to the pattern of vascular disease. Measurements revealed significantly higher cAIx values for patients with obstructive peripheral arterial disease than for patients with aneurysmatic disease. PMID:26452151

  6. Long-Term Comparative Outcomes of Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease With and Without Concomitant Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Debbie C; Singh, Gagan D; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Waldo, Stephen W; Laird, John R; Amsterdam, Ezra A

    2017-04-15

    There are limited contemporary data on guideline-directed medical therapy (GDMT) utilization and long-term clinical outcomes in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) with and without concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD). From 2006 to 2013, 879 patients with claudication or critical limb ischemia (CLI) underwent diagnostic angiography or therapeutic endovascular intervention at our multidisciplinary vascular center. GDMT use was assessed at the time of angiography, and major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) and all-cause mortality were determined during 5 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to adjust for baseline differences between patients with and without concomitant CAD. Despite a higher adherence to GDMT (all p ≤0.002) for the use of aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker, and statins, patients with PAD and concomitant CAD had higher unadjusted 5-year rates of MACCE (hazard ratio [HR] 1.7, 95% CI 1.3 to 2.1, p = 0.0001) and all-cause mortality (HR 1.86, 95% CI 1.4 to 2.4, p = 0.0001). After adjustment for baseline co-morbidities, the presence of CAD remained an independent risk factor for mortality (adjusted HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.80, p = 0.04) but not for MACCE (adjusted HR 1.24, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.60, p = 0.10) in patients with PAD. A sensitivity analysis limited to patients with CLI demonstrated that concomitant CAD was associated with significantly higher adjusted rates of both MACCE (adjusted HR 1.52, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.03, p = 0.01) and mortality (adjusted HR 1.64, 95% CI 1.12 to 2.20, p = 0.006). In conclusion, despite higher rates of GDMT use, PAD patients with concomitant CAD had significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality during a 5-year postprocedural follow-up. The subgroup of CLI patients with concomitant CAD was at particularly high risk for both MACCE and all-cause mortality.

  7. Quantification of lower leg arterial calcifications by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Patsch, Janina M; Zulliger, Martin A; Vilayphou, Nicolas; Samelson, Elizabeth J; Cejka, Daniel; Diarra, Danielle; Berzaczy, Gundula; Burghardt, Andrew J; Link, Thomas M; Weber, Michael; Loewe, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcifications and bone health seem to be etiologically linked via common risk factors such as aging and subclinical chronic inflammation. Epidemiologic studies have shown significant associations between low bone mineral density (BMD), fragility fractures and calcifications of the coronary arteries and the abdominal aorta. In the last decade, high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) has emerged as in-vivo research tool for the assessment of peripheral bone geometry, density, and microarchitecture. Although vascular calcifications are frequently observed as incidental findings in HR-pQCT scans, they have not yet been incorporated into quantitative HR-pQCT analyses. We developed a semi-automated algorithm to quantify lower leg arterial calcifications (LLACs), captured by HR-pQCT. The objective of our study was to determine validity and reliability of the LLAC measure. HR-pQCT scans were downscaled to a voxel size of 250μm. After subtraction of bone volumes from the scans, LLACs were detected and contoured by a semi-automated, dual-threshold seed-point segmentation. LLAC mass (in mg hydroxyapatite; HA) was calculated as the product of voxel-based calcification volume (mm(3)) and mean calcification density (mgHA/cm(3))/1000. To determine validity, we compared LLACs to coronary artery calcifications (CACs), as quantified by multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) and Agatston scoring in forty-six patients on chronic hemodialysis. Moreover, we investigated associations of LLACs with age, time on dialysis, type-2 diabetes mellitus, history of stroke, and myocardial infarction. In a second step, we determined intra- and inter-reader reliability of the LLAC measure. In the validity study, LLACs were present (>0mgHA) in 76% of patients, 78% of patients had CACs (>0mgHA). Median LLAC was 6.65 (0.08-24.40)mgHA and median CAC as expressed by Agatston score was 266.3 (15.88-1877.28). We found a significant positive correlation between

  8. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Ankle-Brachial Index Abnormalites in Young and Middle-Aged HIV-Positive Patients in Lower Silesia, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Wiesława; Knysz, Brygida; Arczyńska, Katarzyna; Drelichowska, Justyna; Czarnecki, Marcin; Gąsiorowski, Jacek; Karczewski, Maciej; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a clinical manifestation of atherosclerosis and mainly refers to elderly patients, having a negative impact on their functionality and quality of life. The findings of previous studies in HIV-infected patients have shown that cardiovascular risk is higher and PAD occurs more frequently than in the general population. There are also contradictory observations. Much less is known about the ankle-brachial index (ABI) value in asymptomatic HIV-infected patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PAD and ankle-brachial index abnormalities as well as to determine risk factors related to the disease in a group of Polish HIV–positive patients. Methods and Findings One hundred and eleven young to middle aged HIV–positive subjects and 40 noninfected subjects were enrolled into the study. Resting ABI measurements were performed and cardiovascular risk was analysed as well. Subgroups were created according to the ABI values: low (PAD), borderline, normal, high and altered ABI. Symptomatic PAD was observed in 2 HIV–positive patients, asymptomatic PAD was not diagnosed. The ABI value is lower and more varied, in 22.5% of the study group altered ABI values were found. Six subjects demonstrated borderline ABI, and 15 high ABI, including >1.4. In the control group no low or very high values were reported. A relation between low ABI and cardiovascular family history and between altered ABI and high–density–lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL–C) level was demonstrated. Conclusions In young and middle–aged HIV–positive patients, symptomatic PAD prevalence is comparable to that observed in the overall population. Among asymptomatic patients PAD is not reported. The ABI value in HIV–positive patients is more varied compared to the HIV–negative subjects; the altered ABI shows a strong relation with low HDL–C levels and metabolic syndrome. PMID:25503743

  9. Prostatic Artery Embolization (PAE) for Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): Part 1, Pathological Background and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Crisóstomo, Verónica; Báez-Díaz, Claudia; Sánchez, Francisco M

    2016-01-01

    Pathological features of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) dictate various responses to prostatic artery embolization (PAE). Typically, BPH originates in the transition zone and periurethral region, where should be considered the primary target area in PAE procedures. Given that histological heterogeneity of components in hyperplasia nodules, epithelial or stromal, identifying the more responsive nodules to PAE will have clinical implications. Since some lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with BPH are usually related to bladder outlet obstruction-induced changes in bladder function rather than to outflow obstruction directly, proper selection of candidate patients prior to PAE is of great clinical importance. BPH is a typical chronic progressive condition, suggesting PAE could aim not only to relieve LUTS but also to delay or prevent the clinical progression. Awareness of the pathological background of BPH is essential for interventional radiologists to improve clinical outcomes and develop new treatment strategies in clinical practice of PAE.

  10. Prostatic Artery Embolization (PAE) for Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): Part 1, Pathological Background and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Fei Crisóstomo, Verónica Báez-Díaz, Claudia Sánchez, Francisco M.

    2016-01-15

    Pathological features of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) dictate various responses to prostatic artery embolization (PAE). Typically, BPH originates in the transition zone and periurethral region, where should be considered the primary target area in PAE procedures. Given that histological heterogeneity of components in hyperplasia nodules, epithelial or stromal, identifying the more responsive nodules to PAE will have clinical implications. Since some lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with BPH are usually related to bladder outlet obstruction-induced changes in bladder function rather than to outflow obstruction directly, proper selection of candidate patients prior to PAE is of great clinical importance. BPH is a typical chronic progressive condition, suggesting PAE could aim not only to relieve LUTS but also to delay or prevent the clinical progression. Awareness of the pathological background of BPH is essential for interventional radiologists to improve clinical outcomes and develop new treatment strategies in clinical practice of PAE.

  11. The carotid intima-media thickness as a marker of the presence of severe symptomatic coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Geroulakos, G; O'Gorman, D J; Kalodiki, E; Sheridan, D J; Nicolaides, A N

    1994-06-01

    High resolution ultrasound can be used for the accurate measurement of intima-media thickness (IMT). The within-observer coefficient of variation of the IMT of two carotids measured seven times each on different days by two different observers was between 4% and 8%, and the mean absolute difference of the IMT of 68 carotids measured independently by two observers was 0.11 +/- 0.11 mm (mean value +/- SD). Seventy-five consecutive male patients who underwent coronary angiography for assessment of chest pain and 40 normal controls matched for age and sex, were examined with high resolution B-mode ultrasound. The IMT of the common carotid artery for the controls was 0.71 +/- 0.16 mm and for the patients 0.91 +/- 0.18 mm (P < 0.005). In patients with normal coronary angiogram the IMT was 0.73 +/- 0.1 mm, and this increased in each of the subgroups with coronary stenosis compared to patients who had a normal coronary angiogram. In the group with one-vessel disease it was 0.91 +/- 0.17 mm (P < 0.05, ANOVA), in the group with two-vessel disease it was 0.96 +/- 0.17 mm (P < 0.01), and in the group with three-vessel disease it was 0.99 +/- 0.21 mm (P < 0.01). There was a significant linear trend between IMT and the number of involved vessels (P < 0.0001, r = 0.44). An IMT > or = 0.85 mm was derived from the studied population of 75 patients as a criterion for the prediction of coronary artery disease (CAD).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reduces total peripheral resistance during chronic infusion: direct arterial mesenteric relaxation is not involved

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) delivered over 1 week results in a sustained fall in blood pressure in the sham and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt rat. We hypothesized 5-HT lowers blood pressure through direct receptor-mediated vascular relaxation. In vivo, 5-HT reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP), increased heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac index, and reduced total peripheral resistance during a 1 week infusion of 5-HT (25 µg/kg/min) in the normotensive Sprague Dawley rat. The mesenteric vasculature was chosen as an ideal candidate for the site of 5-HT receptor mediated vascular relaxation given the high percentage of cardiac output the site receives. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA transcripts for the 5-HT2B, 5-HT1B, and 5-HT7 receptors are present in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric arteries. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot validated the presence of the 5-HT2B, 5- HT1B and 5-HT7 receptor protein in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric artery. Isometric contractile force was measured in endothelium-intact superior mesenteric artery and mesenteric resistance arteries in which the contractile 5- HT2A receptor was antagonized. Maximum concentrations of BW-723C86 (5- HT2B agonist), CP 93129 (5-HT1B agonist) or LP-44 (5-HT7 agonist) did not relax the superior mesenteric artery from DOCA-salt rats vs. vehicle. Additionally, 5-HT (10–9 M to 10–5 M) did not cause relaxation in either contracted mesenteric resistance arteries or superior mesenteric arteries from normotensive Sprague- Dawley rats. Thus, although 5-HT receptors known to mediate vascular relaxation are present in the superior mesenteric artery, they are not functional, and are therefore not likely involved in a 5-HT-induced fall in total peripheral resistance and MAP. PMID:22559843

  13. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reduces total peripheral resistance during chronic infusion: direct arterial mesenteric relaxation is not involved.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert Patrick; Pattison, Jill; Thompson, Janice M; Tiniakov, Ruslan; Scrogin, Karie E; Watts, Stephanie W

    2012-05-06

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) delivered over 1 week results in a sustained fall in blood pressure in the sham and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt rat. We hypothesized 5-HT lowers blood pressure through direct receptor-mediated vascular relaxation. In vivo, 5-HT reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP), increased heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac index, and reduced total peripheral resistance during a 1 week infusion of 5-HT (25 µg/kg/min) in the normotensive Sprague Dawley rat. The mesenteric vasculature was chosen as an ideal candidate for the site of 5-HT receptor mediated vascular relaxation given the high percentage of cardiac output the site receives. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA transcripts for the 5-HT2B, 5-HT1B, and 5-HT7 receptors are present in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric arteries. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot validated the presence of the 5-HT2B, 5- HT1B and 5-HT7 receptor protein in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric artery. Isometric contractile force was measured in endothelium-intact superior mesenteric artery and mesenteric resistance arteries in which the contractile 5- HT2A receptor was antagonized. Maximum concentrations of BW-723C86 (5- HT2B agonist), CP 93129 (5-HT1B agonist) or LP-44 (5-HT7 agonist) did not relax the superior mesenteric artery from DOCA-salt rats vs. vehicle. Additionally, 5-HT (10-9 M to 10-5 M) did not cause relaxation in either contracted mesenteric resistance arteries or superior mesenteric arteries from normotensive Sprague- Dawley rats. Thus, although 5-HT receptors known to mediate vascular relaxation are present in the superior mesenteric artery, they are not functional, and are therefore not likely involved in a 5-HT-induced fall in total peripheral resistance and MAP.

  14. Effects of the endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan on hemodynamics and exercise capacity in Japanese patients with mildly symptomatic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Masaru; Yamada, Hidehiro; Fukuda, Keiichi; Yoshioka, Koichiro; Funauchi, Masanori; Kuwana, Masataka; Sata, Masataka; Taniguchi, Mitsugu; Nakanishi, Norifumi; Saito, Takefumi; Saji, Tsutomu; Sasayama, Shigetake

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) trial has mostly enrolled patients with World Health Organization functional class (WHO FC) III or IV. However, PAH is rapidly progressive in nature even in patients with less severe forms at diagnosis. Following the recent studies in Western population, here we assessed the efficacy of bosentan in Japanese patients with WHO FCII PAH. In this open-label trial, bosentan 125 mg twice daily was administered for 12 weeks in 16 patients, and a hemodynamic evaluation was performed. Treatment was continued for a further 12 weeks, where the effect on exercise capacity was assessed in 13 patients. In 16 patients, mean pulmonary arterial pressure decreased from 40.4 ± 10.4 to 35.6 ± 12.6 mmHg (p = 0.018) and cardiac index increased from 2.54 ± 0.73 to 2.96 ± 0.82 L/min/m(2) (p = 0.023). Thus, pulmonary vascular resistance decreased from 792 ± 565 to 598 ± 558 dyn·sec/cm(5) (p = 0.006). In 13 patients followed up for 24 weeks, 6-min walking distance increased from baseline at Week 12 (p = 0.003) and Week 24 (p = 0.011). All patients were mildly symptomatic at baseline with dyspnea index (Borg scale) of 2.50 ± 1.58 and the specific activity scale (SAS) of 5.0 ± 1.4 METs. These values remained unchanged throughout the study. These results suggest that bosentan treatment was beneficial for Japanese patients with WHO FC II PAH and treatment should be started in the early stage of the disease.

  15. [Peripheral artery disease as supplemental diagnosis in coronary heart disease--influence on diagnostics, treatment and prognosis].

    PubMed

    Espinola-Klein, C; Savvidis, S; Kopp, H

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) increases cardiovascular event rate in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Therefore PAD should be considered in patients with CAD with regard to diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PAD may difficult diagnostic tests in CAD patients. Patients with PAD and CAD may be limited in stress testing by decreased leg perfusion. In addition, arterial puncture can be more difficult in sclerotic femoral arteries. Cardiovascular risk factors should be treated carefully in all manifestations of atherosclerosis. Target values from current guidelines are similar for PAD and CAD. Inhibitors of platelet aggregation are indication in both CAD and PAD. Exercise not only improves walking distance in patients with intermittent claudication but also improves cardiovascular prognosis in patients with atherosclerosis.

  16. Monitoring of peripheral vascular condition using a log-linearized arterial viscoelastic index during endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Hiroki; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Hirano, Harutoyo; Kurita, Yuichi; Ukawa, Teiji; Nakamura, Ryuji; Saeki, Noboru; Yoshizumi, Masao; Kawamoto, Masashi; Tsuji, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel technique to support the monitoring of peripheral vascular conditions using biological signals such as electrocardiograms, arterial pressure values and pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveforms. In this approach, a second-order log-linearized model (referred to here as a log-linearized peripheral arterial viscoelastic model) is used to describe the non-linear viscoelastic relationship between blood pressure waveforms and photo-plethysmographic waveforms. The proposed index enables estimation of peripheral arterial wall stiffness changes induced by sympathetic nerve activity. The validity of the method is discussed here based on the results of peripheral vascular condition monitoring conducted during endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS). The results of ETS monitoring showed significant changes in stiffness variations between the periods before and during the procedures observed (p < 0.01) as well as during and after them (p < 0.01), so that it was confirmed that sympathetic nerve activity is drastically decreased in the area around the monitoring site after the thoracic sympathetic nerve trunk on the monitoring side is successfully blocked. In addition, no change was observed in the values of the proposed index during the ETS procedure on the side opposite that of the monitoring site. The experimental results obtained clearly show the proposed method can be used to assess changes in sympathetic nerve activity during ETS.

  17. Stent revascularization versus bypass surgery for peripheral artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients – an instrumental variable analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Hsuin; Lin, Jou-Wei; Hsu, Jiun; Wu, Li-Chiu; Lai, Mei-Shu

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use instrumental variable (IV) analyses to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of percutaneous stent revascularization versus bypass surgery in the treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD) among type 2 diabetic patients. Type 2 diabetic patients who received peripheral artery bypass surgery (n = 5,652) or stent revascularization (n = 659) for lower extremity arterial stenosis between 2000 and 2007 were identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance claims database. Patients were followed from the date of index hospitalization for 2 years for lower-extremity amputation, revascularization, and hospitalization for medical treatment. Analysis using treatment year, patients’ monthly income level, and regional difference as IVs were conducted to reduce unobserved treatment selection bias. The crude analysis showed a statistically significant risk reduction in favor of stent placement in lower extremity amputation and in the composite endpoint of amputation, revascularization, or hospitalization for medical treatment. However, peripheral artery stent revascularization and bypass surgery had similar risk of lower limb amputation and composite endpoints in the analyses using calendar year or patients’ monthly income level as IVs. These two treatment modalities had similar risk of lower limb amputation among DM patients with PAD. PMID:27857178

  18. Pain and Return to Daily Activities after Uterine Artery Embolization and Hysterectomy in the Treatment of Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids: Results from the Randomized EMMY Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hehenkamp, Wouter J.K. Volkers, Nicole A.; Birnie, Erwin; Reekers, Jim A.; Ankum, Willem M.

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of uterine artery embolization (UAE) and hysterectomy for symptomatic uterine fibroids by means of a randomized controlled trial. The present paper analyses short-term outcomes, i.e., pain and return to daily activities. Methods. Patients were randomized (1:1) to UAE or hysterectomy. Pain was assessed during admission and after discharge, both quantitatively and qualitatively, using a numerical rating scale and questionnaires. Time to return to daily activities was assessed by questionnaire. Results. Seventy-five patients underwent hysterectomy and 81 patients underwent UAE. UAE patients experienced significantly less pain during the first 24 hr after treatment (p = 0.012). Non-white patients had significantly higher pain scores. UAE patients returned significantly sooner to daily activities than hysterectomy patients (for paid work: 28.1 versus 63.4 days; p < 0.001). In conclusion, pain appears to be less after UAE during hospital stay. Return to several daily activities was in favor of UAE in comparison with hysterectomy.

  19. Population-Based Study of Incidence, Risk Factors, Outcome, and Prognosis of Ischemic Peripheral Arterial Events

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Dominic P.J.; Banerjee, Amitava; Fairhead, Jack F.; Hands, Linda; Silver, Louise E.; Rothwell, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background— There are few published data on the incidence and long-term outcomes of critical limb ischemia, acute limb ischemia, or acute visceral ischemia with which to inform health service planning, to monitor prevention, and to enable risk prediction. Methods and Results— In a prospective population-based study (Oxfordshire, UK; 2002–2012), we determined the incidence and outcome of all acute peripheral arterial events in a population of 92 728. Risk factors were assessed by comparison with the underlying population. A total of 510 acute events occurred in 386 patients requiring 803 interventions. Two hundred twenty-one patients (59.3%) were ≥75 years of age, and 98 (26.3%) were ≥85 years old. Two hundred thirty patients (62.3%) were independent before the event, but 270 (73.4%) were dead or dependent at the 6-month follow-up, and 328 (88.9%) were dead or dependent at 5 years. The 30-day survival was lowest for patients with acute visceral ischemia (28.2%) compared with acute limb ischemia (75.3%) and critical limb ischemia (92.6%; P<0.001). Risk factors (all P<0.001) were hypertension (age- and sex-adjusted risk ratio, 2.75; 95% confidence interval, 1.95–3.90), smoking (adjusted risk ratio, 2.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.37–3.34), and diabetes mellitus (adjusted risk ratio, 3.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.69–5.35), particularly for critical limb ischemia (adjusted risk ratio, 5.96; 95% confidence interval, 3.15–11.26). Two hundred eighty-eight patients (77.2%) had known previous cardiovascular disease, and 361 (96.8%) had vascular risk factors, but only 203 (54.4%) were on an antiplatelet and only 166 (44.5%) were on a statin. Although 260 patients (69.7%) were taking antihypertensives, 42.9% of all blood pressures recorded during the 5 years before the event were >140/90 mm Hg. Of 88 patients (23.6%) with incident cardioembolic events, 62 had known atrial fibrillation (diagnosed before the event), of whom only 14.5% were

  20. Community-based walking exercise for peripheral artery disease: An exploratory pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Ryan J; Hiatt, William R; Casserly, Ivan P; Rogers, R Kevin; Main, Deborah S; Kohrt, Wendy M; Ho, P Michael; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2016-01-01

    Supervised walking exercise is an effective treatment to improve walking ability of patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD), but few exercise programs in community settings have been effective. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of a community-based walking exercise program with training, monitoring, and coaching (TMC) components to improve exercise performance and patient-reported outcomes in PAD patients. This was a randomized, controlled trial including PAD patients who previously received peripheral endovascular therapy or presented with stable claudication. Patients randomized (n=25) to the intervention group received a comprehensive community-based walking exercise program with elements of TMC over 14 weeks. Patients in the control group did not receive treatment beyond standard advice to walk. The primary outcome in the intent-to-treat (ITT) analyses was peak walking time (PWT) on a graded treadmill. Secondary outcomes included claudication onset time (COT) and patient-reported outcomes assessed via the Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ). Intervention group patients (n=10) did not significantly improve PWT when compared with the control group patients (n=10) (mean±standard error: +2.1±0.7 vs. 0.0±0.7 min, p=0.052). Changes in COT and WIQ scores were greater for intervention patients compared with control patients (COT: +1.6±0.8 vs. −0.6±0.7 min, p=0.045; WIQ: +18.3±4.2 vs. −4.6±4.2%, p=0.001). This pilot using a walking program with TMC and an ITT analyses did not improve the primary outcome in PAD patients. Other walking performance and patient self-reported outcomes were improved following exercise in community settings. Further study is needed to determine whether this intervention improves outcomes in a trial employing a larger sample size. PMID:25755148

  1. Advancing Beyond the ‘Heart-Healthy Diet’ for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nosova, Emily V.; Conte, Michael S.; Grenon, S. Marlene

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a burdensome cardiovascular condition that results from chronic inflammatory insults to the arterial vasculature. Key risk factors include age, gender, Type II diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, smoking, lack of physical fitness and poor diet, the latter three being modifiable in the development and progression of PAD. A growing body of evidence indicates that imbalanced nutrient intake may contribute to the development and progression of PAD. The purpose of this review is to summarize current knowledge about nutritional patterns among patients with PAD, and to ascertain whether certain health- promoting foods and nutrients could benefit patients with this condition. Methods We conducted a comprehensive literature review to examine primary source evidence for or against the nutrients that are commonly associated with PAD, and their potential utility as therapies. Results We summarized nine categories of nutrients, as well as four diets endorsed by the American Heart Association that may be prescribed to patients with or at risk for PAD. The nutrients reviewed included omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), folate and B-series vitamins, and anti-oxidants. The diet plans described include the DASH diet, Mediterranean diet, low-fat diet, low carbohydrate diet, Dr. Dean Ornish’s Spectrum® Diet and Dr. Andrew Weil’s Anti-Inflammatory Diet. Conclusion PAD is a chronic inflammatory condition that is associated with longstanding poor nutrition habits. We advocate for an intensified use of diet in PAD therapy, and we specifically recommend following eating patterns that are rich in nutrients with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. PMID:25534981

  2. Collateral vessel number, plaque burden, and functional decline in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Mary M; Carr, James; Liu, Kiang; Kramer, Christopher M; Yuan, Chun; Tian, Lu; Criqui, Michael H; Guralnik, Jack M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zhao, Lihui; Xu, Dongxiang; Kibbe, Melina; Berry, Jarett; Carroll, Timothy J

    2014-08-01

    Associations of collateral vessels and lower extremity plaque with functional decline are unknown. Among people with peripheral artery disease (PAD), we determined whether greater superficial femoral artery (SFA) plaque burden combined with fewer lower extremity collateral vessels was associated with faster functional decline, compared to less plaque and/or more numerous collateral vessels. A total of 226 participants with ankle-brachial index (ABI) <1.00 underwent magnetic resonance imaging of lower extremity collateral vessels and cross-sectional imaging of the proximal SFA. Participants were categorized as follows: Group 1 (best), maximum plaque area < median and collateral vessel number ≥6 (median); Group 2, maximum plaque area < median and collateral vessel number <6; Group 3, maximum plaque area > median and collateral vessel number ≥6; Group 4 (worst), maximum plaque area > median and collateral vessel number <6. Functional measures were performed at baseline and annually for 2 years. Analyses adjust for age, sex, race, comorbidities, and other confounders. Annual changes in usual-paced walking velocity were: Group 1, +0.01 m/s; Group 2, -0.02 m/s; Group 3, -0.01 m/s; Group 4, -0.05 m/s (p-trend=0.008). Group 4 had greater decline than Group 1 (p<0.001), Group 2 (p=0.029), and Group 3 (p=0.010). Similar trends were observed for fastest-paced 4-meter walking velocity (p-trend=0.018). Results were not substantially changed when analyses were repeated with additional adjustment for ABI. However, there were no associations of SFA plaque burden and collateral vessel number with decline in 6-minute walk. In summary, a larger SFA plaque burden combined with fewer collateral vessels is associated with a faster decline in usual and fastest-paced walking velocity in PAD.

  3. Risk of Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ya-Wen; Yu, Mei-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Li; Yu, Tung-Min; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with atherosclerosis, but the relationship between SLE and peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) remains unclear. We sought to investigate this relationship by comparing cardiovascular complications in patients with and without SLE. Data on patients from 2000 to 2011 were collected from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. The SLE cohort was frequency-matched according to age, sex, and history of diabetes mellitus (DM) with patients without SLE (control cohort). We evaluated the risk of cardiovascular complications, including hypertension, DM, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, coronary artery disease, and hyperlipidemia. The study included 10,144 patients with SLE and 10,144 control patients. The incidence of PAOD was 9.39-fold higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = 7.70–11.15) in the SLE cohort than in the non-SLE cohort. Moreover, SLE was an independent risk factor for PAOD. The adjusted risk of PAOD was highest in patients with SLE who were aged ≤34 years (hazard ratio = 47.6, 95% CI = 26.8–84.4). The risk of PAOD was highest during the first year of follow-up and decreased over time. Patients with SLE exhibit a higher incidence and an independently higher risk of PAOD compared with the general population. The PAOD risk is markedly elevated in patients with SLE who are young and in whom the disease is at an early stage. PMID:26579830

  4. CUBAN AMERICANS HAVE THE HIGHEST RATES OF PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASE IN DIVERSE HISPANIC/LATINO COMMUNITIES

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Matthew A.; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Raij, Leopoldo; Kaplan, Robert; Ostfeld, Robert J.; Pattany, Maria S.; Heiss, Gerardo; Criqui, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since Hispanic ethnicity in the United States is heterogeneous, the purpose of this study was to determine the epidemiology of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) within US Hispanic/Latino groups defined by national background. Methods 9,648 men and women over the age of 45 years enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study – Study of Latinos (HCHS-SOL) included in this analysis. The ankle brachial index (ABI) was computed as the higher of the posterior tibial and dorsalis pedis systolic blood pressures (SBP) for each leg divided by the higher brachial artery SBP. The index ABI was the higher of the two. An ABI ≤ 0.90 was criterion for the presence of PAD. Results The mean age was 56 years and 55% were female. Overall, the prevalence of an ABI ≤ 0.90 (PAD), 0.90 to 0.99 (borderline), 1.0 to 1.39 (normal) and ≥ 1.40 (high) was 5.7, 19.3, 72.5 and 2.6%, respectively. After multivariable adjustment for PAD risk factors, and compared to Mexicans, Cubans had nearly a 3-fold higher odds for PAD (OR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.9 – 4.4). The odds of PAD for the other Hispanic/Latino groups ranged from 1.2 to 1.8. Although males had over a 3-fold higher odds of an ABI ≥ 1.40 (3.6, 2.0 – 6.5), the odds did not differ significantly by Hispanic/Latino background. Conclusions Compared to Mexican Americans, all other Hispanic/Latino background groups have a significantly higher odds of having PAD, with the odds being nearly 3-fold higher among Cubans. PMID:26141696

  5. German guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral artery disease - a comprehensive update 2016.

    PubMed

    Lawall, Holger; Huppert, Peter; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Zemmrich, Claudia Silke; Ruemenapf, Gerhard

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) is increasing worldwide and is strongly age-related, affecting about 20 % of Germans over 70 years of age. Recent advances in endovascular and surgical techniques as well as clinical study results on comparative treatment methods strengthened the need for a comprehensive review of the published evidence for diagnosis, management, and prevention of PAD. The interdisciplinary guideline exclusively covers distal aorta and atherosclerotic lower extremity artery disease. A systematic literature review and formal consensus finding process, including delegated members of 22 medical societies and two patient self-support organisations were conducted and supervised by the Association of Scientific Medical Societies in Germany, AWMF. Three levels of recommendation were defined, A = "is recommended/indicated", B = "should be considered", C = "may be considered", means agreement of expert opinions due to lack of evidence. Altogether 294 articles, including 34 systematic reviews and 98 RCTs have been analysed. The key diagnostic tools and treatment basics have been defined. In patients with intermittent claudication endovascular and/or surgical techniques are treatment options depending on appropriate individual morphology and patient preference. In critical limb ischaemia, revascularisation without delay by means of the most appropriate technique is key. If possible and reasonable, endovascular procedures should be applied first. The TASC classification is no longer recommended as the base of therapeutic decision process due to advances in endovascular techniques and new crural therapeutic options. Limited new data on rehabilitation and follow-up therapies have been integrated. The article summarises major new aspects of PAD treatment from the updated German Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment of PAD. Limited scientific evidence still calls for randomised clinical trials to close the present gap of evidence.

  6. Peripheral Artery Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease: Clinical Synergy to Improve Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Pranav S.; Hirsch, Alan T.

    2014-01-01

    Persons with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at a higher risk of developing peripheral artery disease (PAD) and its adverse health outcomes than individuals in the general population who have normal renal function. Classic atherosclerosis risk factors care (e.g., age, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia) are common in CKD patients, but CKD also imposes additional unique risk factors that promote arterial disease (e.g., chronic inflammation, hypoalbuminemia and a pro-calcific state). Current nephrology clinical practice is adversely impacted by PAD diagnostic challenges, the complexities of managing two serious comorbid diseases, delayed vascular specialist referral, and slow PAD treatment initiation in CKD patients. Persons with CKD are less likely to be provided recommended ‘optimal’ PAD care. The knowledge that both limb and mortality outcomes are significantly worse in CKD patients, especially those on dialysis, is not a biologic fact, but can serve as a care delivery call to action. Nephrologists can facilitate positive change. This manuscript proposes that patients with PAD and CKD be strategically co-managed by care teams that encompass the skills to create and use evidence-based care pathways. This proposed collaborative multidisciplinary approach will include vascular medicine specialists, nephrologists, wound specialists and mid-level providers. Just as clinical care quality metrics have served as the base for ESRD and acute MI quality improvement, it is time that such quality outcomes metrics be initiated for the large PAD-CKD population. This new system will identify and resolve key gaps in the current care model so that clinical outcomes improve within a cost-effective care frame for this vulnerable population. PMID:25443571

  7. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Allopurinol in Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Alan J.; Struthers, Allan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are limited by intermittent claudication in the distance they can walk. Allopurinol has been shown in coronary arterial disease to prolong exercise before angina occurs, likely by prevention of oxygen wastage in tissues and reduction of harmful oxidative stress. Methods In this study we evaluated whether allopurinol could prolong the time to development of leg pain in participants with PAD. In a double-blind, randomized controlled clinical trial participants were randomized to receive either allopurinol 300 mg twice daily or placebo for 6 months. The primary outcome was change in exercise capacity on treadmill testing at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were 6-minute walking distance, Walking Impairment Questionnaire, SF-36 questionnaire, flow-mediated dilatation, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Outcome measures were repeated midstudy and at the end of study. The mean age of the 50 participants was 68.4 ± 1.2 years with 39 of 50 (78%) male. Results Five participants withdrew during the study (2 active, 3 placebo). There was a significant reduction in uric acid levels in those who received active treatment of 52.1% (P < 0.001), but no significant change in either the pain-free or the maximum walking distance. Other measures of exercise capacity, blood vessel function, and the participants' own assessment of their health and walking ability also did not change during the course of the study. Conclusions Although allopurinol has been shown to be of benefit in a number of other diseases, in this study there was no evidence of any improvement after treatment in patients with PAD. PMID:26277090

  8. Complications and Reinterventions in Uterine Artery Embolization for Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids: A Literature Review and Meta Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jason Bhanot, Kunal; Athreya, Sriharsha

    2013-04-15

    To perform a literature review of the spectrum of complications associated with UAE relative to surgery and compare the risk of reintervention as well as minor, major, and overall complications. Literature review was conducted in PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane, and CINAHL databases, and meta-analysis was performed. In randomized clinical trials, common complications were discharge and fever (4.00 %), bilateral uterine artery embolization (UAE) failure (4.00 %), and postembolization syndrome (2.86 %). Two trials showed a significantly decreased risk in major complications with UAE, with odds ratios (ORs) of 0.07143 (0.009426-0.5413) and 0.5196 (0.279-0.9678). None of the trials showed a significant difference in OR for minor complications of UAE. None of the trials showed a significant difference in risk for overall complications of UAE. Three trials showed a significantly increased risk for reintervention with UAE with ORs of 10.45 (2.654-41.14), 2.679 (1.289-5.564), and 9.096 (1.269-65.18). In 76 nonrandomized studies, common complications were amenorrhea (4.26 %), pain (3.59 %), and discharge and fever (3.37 %). In 41 case studies, common complications were discharge and fever (n = 22 cases), repeat UAE (n = 6 cases), and fibroid expulsion (n = 5 cases). Overall, UAE has a significantly lower rate of major complications relative to surgery, but it comes at the cost of increased risk of reintervention in the future. Educating patients about the rate and types of complications of UAE versus surgery, as well as the potential for reintervention, should help the patient and clinician come to a reasoned decision.

  9. Doppler sensors and harnesses for cardiac and peripheral arterial flow monitoring.

    PubMed

    Arbeille, P

    1997-01-01

    orientation of the Doppler beam. The whole Doppler monitoring system was successfully tested during orthostatic tests, such as lower body negative pressure or tilt table tests performed in pre and post head-down tilt experiments and space flights, with the objective of assessing and quantifying the cardiac and peripheral arterial hemodynamic changes associated with orthostatic intolerance.

  10. β-Blockers and Vascular Hemodynamics in Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Schlager, Oliver; Gajdosova Kovacicova, Ludmila; Senn, Oliver; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice; Wilkinson, Ian B; Jacomella, Vincenzo; Husmann, Marc

    2016-12-01

    Aortic augmentation index (AIx) is a marker of central aortic pressure burden and is modulated by antihypertensive drugs. In patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) undergoing antihypertensive treatment, aortic pressures parameters, heart rate-adjusted augmentation index (AIx75), and unadjusted AIx were determined. The (aortic) systolic and diastolic blood pressure did not differ between PAD patients who were taking β-blockers (n=61) and those who were not taking β-blockers (n=80). In patients taking β-blockers, augmentation pressure and pulse pressure were higher than in patients who did not take β-blockers (augmentation pressure, P=.02; pulse pressure, P=.005). AIx75 was lower in PAD patients taking β-blockers than in patients not taking β-blockers (P=.04), while the AIx did not differ between PAD patients taking and not taking β-blockers. The present study demonstrates that β-blockers potentially affect markers of vascular hemodynamics in patients with PAD. Because these markers are surrogates of cardiovascular risk, further studies are warranted to clarify the impact of selective β-blocker treatment on clinical outcome in patients with PAD.

  11. Chronic venous ulceration of leg associated with peripheral arterial disease: an underappreciated entity in developing country.

    PubMed

    Nag, Falguni; De, Abhishek; Hazra, Avijit; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Ghosh, Arghyaprasun; Surana, Trupti V

    2014-10-01

    Chronic venous ulcer can often be associated with asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which usually remains undiagnosed adding significantly to the morbidity of these patients. The Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI) is suggested for PAD evaluation. Many PAD studies were conducted in western countries, but there is a scarcity of data on the prevalence of PAD in clinical venous ulcer patient in developing countries. We conducted a study in a tertiary care hospital of eastern part of India to find out the prevalence of PAD in venous ulcer patients, and also to find the sensitivity of ABPI as a diagnostic tool in these patients. We evaluated clinically diagnosed patients with venous ulcer using ABPI and Colour Doppler study for the presence of PAD. Possible associations such as age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking, hypertension and atherosclerosis were studied. All results were analysed using the software Statistica version 6. PAD was present in 23 (27·71%) patients. Older age, longer duration, smoking, high BMI and hypertension were found to be significantly associated with PAD. A very strong level of agreement was found between venous Doppler and ABPI. Assessment for the presence of PAD is important in all clinically diagnosed venous ulcer patients. ABPI being a simple, non-invasive outpatient department (OPD)-based procedure, can be routinely used in cases of venous ulcer to find out the hidden cases of PAD even in developing countries.

  12. Fasting apolipoprotein B48 is a marker for peripheral arterial disease in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mancera-Romero, J; Sánchez-Chaparro, M A; Rioja, J; Ariza, M J; Olivecrona, G; González-Santos, P; Valdivielso, P

    2013-06-01

    An earlier study showed that fasting and postprandial concentrations of apolipoprotein B48 were raised in patients with type 2 diabetes (DM2) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) as compared with persons without DM2 or persons with DM2 but not PAD. The aim of this study was to confirm the association of PAD and B48 in a larger group of patients with DM2 and the relation of B48 with the preheparin lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mass. We studied 456 patients with DM2. PAD was defined as an ankle-brachial index (ABI) <0.9. Apolipoprotein B48 was quantified by ELISA. Apo B48 was significantly higher in the group with an ABI <0.9 than the groups with ABI of 0.9-1.3 and >1.3 (10.7 ± 6.28 vs. 9.24 ± 5.5 vs. 9.17 ± 8.8 mg/L, ANOVA test, p < 0.05). B48 was independently associated with an ABI <0.9 (OR 1.053; 95 % CI, 1.013-1.094; p < 0.05), together with smoking and duration of diabetes. The preheparin LPL mass was similar in the patients with and without PAD. In conclusion, we confirmed that fasting B48 is an independent marker of PAD in patients with DM2, unrelated to the preheparin LPL mass, statin therapy or glucose lowering treatment.

  13. Impaired vascular endothelial growth factor A and inflammation in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew W; Parker, Donald E; Montgomery, Polly S; Sosnowska, Danuta; Casanegra, Ana I; Esponda, Omar L; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna; Sonntag, William E

    2014-09-01

    We compared apoptosis, cellular oxidative stress, and inflammation of cultured endothelial cells treated with sera from 130 patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and a control group of 36 patients with high burden of comorbid conditions and cardiovascular risk factors. Second, we compared circulating inflammatory, antioxidant capacity, and vascular biomarkers between the groups. The groups were not significantly different (P > .05) on apoptosis, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical antioxidant capacity, and nuclear factor κ-light-chain enhancer of activated B cells. Circulating tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α; P = .016) and interleukin 8 (IL-8; P = .006) were higher in the PAD group, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A; P = .023) was lower. The PAD does not impair the endothelium beyond that which already occurs from comorbid conditions and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with claudication. However, patients with PAD have lower circulating VEGF-A than the control group and higher circulating inflammatory parameters of TNF-α and IL-8.

  14. The role of nutrition and body composition in peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Brostow, Diana P.; Hirsch, Alan T.; Collins, Tracie C.; Kurzer, Mindy S.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) has not been as extensively investigated as other cardiovascular diseases. However, the available data suggest that nutrition-based treatment strategies have the potential to reduce the cost-economic burden of PAD substantially. Abdominal obesity is associated with PAD and prospective and cross-sectional studies have shown that a low dietary intake of folate and reduced synthesis of vitamin D are associated with an increased risk of PAD and severe walking impairment in patients who have the disease. However, dietary patterns that are associated with decreased cardiovascular risk might protect against PAD. A small number of clinical trials have provided evidence that increased intakes of niacin and insoluble fiber might be associated with decreased levels of LDL cholesterol and thrombogenic biomarkers, as well as increased serum levels of HDL cholesterol in patients with PAD. However, little evidence that antioxidants, vitamins B6 and B12, or essential fatty acid supplements improve clinical outcomes in these patients exists. Overall, data on the effects of nutrition, body composition, and nutritional supplementation on the risk, progression, and prognosis of PAD are scarce. Further research into these areas is required to allow the development of evidence-based nutritional guidelines for the prevention and treatment of the disease. PMID:22922595

  15. National trends for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease in Korea between 2004 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youn Young; Han, Sang-Ah; Kim, Sang Hyun; Cho, Sungsin; Park, Ho-Chul; Ahn, Hyung Joon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) has been a major public health issue in the elderly. Advances in endovascular surgery have led to a substantial shift in the management of PAD. Although the nationwide trend of PAD treatment in the Western countries was reported, limited data have been available on this in Korea. This study examined the national trend in the treatment of PAD in Korea over the past decade. Methods Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service data were used. We sought to analyze trends in the open and endovascular surgery for the treatment of PAD in Medicare beneficiaries between 2004 and 2013. We also analyzed trends in each types of surgery in the lower extremity. A linear-by-linear association was performed to determine the changes of PAD treatment for this period. Results The rate of open surgery per 100,000 Medicare beneficiaries decreased significantly from 8 procedures in 2004 to 6 in 2013. At the same time, endovascular surgery increased from 23 procedures in 2004 to 59 in 2013. Endovascular surgery in the lower extremity increased more than twofold, while the open surgery decreased by 39%. The rate of balloon angioplasty among endovascular surgery was increased by almost threefold, while the bypass surgery using artificial graft decreased by half. Conclusion Endovascular surgery is now performed more commonly than open surgery for PAD treatment. Balloon angioplasty increased by almost threefold, while the bypass surgery using artificial graft decreased by about 50%. PMID:26665127

  16. Use of prostheses in lower limb amputee patients due to peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Chamlian, Therezinha Rosane

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the indication of prosthesis during rehabilitation and the maintenance of their use or abandonment rate after discharge, as well as mortality of lower limb amputees due to peripheral arterial disease. Methods A retrospective and cross-sectional study carried out with lower limb amputee patients, at transfemoral and transtibial levels, due to vascular conditions. The sample was composed of 310 patients (205 men, 105 women, mean age 61.8 years), transfemoral (142) and transtibial (150) levels, unilateral or bilateral (18). A total of 217 were fitted with prosthesis and 93 did not. Nonparametric statistical tests with equality of two proportions, 95% confidence interval and p value <0,05 were used. Results Out of 195 patients we contacted, 151 were fitted with prosthesis and 44 not. Of those that were fitted with prosthesis, 54 still use it, 80 abandoned and 17 died. In the group without prosthesis, 27 were on wheelchair and 17 died. Mortality is statistically higher among patients who were not fitted with prosthesis and 34 death occur, on average, 3.91 years after amputation. Survival time of patients who were not fitted with prosthesis was smaller than those were fitted. Conclusion The use of prosthesis in lower limb amputees, due to vascular conditions, during rehabilitation is high. However, maintenance of prosthesis is not frequent after discharge. Early and high mortality is observed mainly among diabetic patients. PMID:25628194

  17. In vitro hemorheological effects of parenteral agents used in peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biro, Katalin; Sandor, Barbara; Toth, Andras; Koltai, Katalin; Papp, Judit; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Kalman; Kesmarky, Gabor

    2014-05-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a frequent manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis. In PAD hemorheological parameters were defined as risk factors in a number of studies and several therapeutic agents were tried in these conditions. Our study aims to investigate and compare the in vitro hemorheological effects of various drugs generally used in the parenteral treatment of intermittent claudication and critical limb ischemia. Blood samples of healthy male volunteers were incubated with iloprost, alprostadil, pentoxifylline, sulodexide or pentosan polysulfate at calculated therapeutic serum concentration. Hematocrit (Hct) was determined by microhematocrit centrifuge. Plasma and apparent whole blood viscosities (WBV) were evaluated by capillary viscometer. Red blood cell aggregation was measured by LORCA (laserassisted optical rotational cell analyzer) aggregometer, and LORCA ektacytometer was used for measuring erythrocyte deformability at 37°C. Iloprost, alprostadil, and pentoxifylline incubation did not have any significant effect on plasma and apparent WBV. Elongation index increased in samples incubated with alprostadil at low shear stresses 0.95 and 0.53 Pa (p < 0.05). Sulodexide significantly improved WBV and Hct/WBV ratio (p < 0.05). Incubation with pentosan polysulfate resulted in higher WBV, lower Hct/WBV ratio and deterioration in the aggregation parameters (p < 0.05). Sulodexide may have beneficial effect on a macrorheological parameter; alprostadil may improve a microrheological parameter. Hemorheological alterations could be important in PAD patients with hampered vasodilator capacity.

  18. Optical coherence tomography and hyperspectral imaging of vascular recovery in a model of peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Kristin M.; Sit, Wesley W.; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Duvall, Craig L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) leads to an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke, increased mortality, and reduced quality of life. The mouse hind limb ischemia (HLI) model is the most commonly used system for studying the mechanisms of collateral vessel formation and for testing new PAD therapies, but there is a lack of techniques for acquiring physiologically-relevant, quantitative data intravitally in this model. In this work, non-invasive, quantitative optical imaging techniques were applied to the mouse HLI model over a time course. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaged changes in blood flow (Doppler OCT) and microvessel morphology (speckle variance OCT) through the skin of haired mice with high resolution. Hyperspectral imaging was also used to quantify blood oxygenation. In ischemic limbs, blood oxygenation in the footpad was substantially reduced after induction of ischemia followed by complete recovery by three weeks, consistent with standard measures. Three dimensional images of the vasculature distal to vessel occlusion acquired with speckle variance OCT revealed changes in OCT flow signal and vessel morphology. Taken together, OCT and hyperspectral imaging enable intravital acquisition of both functional and morphological data which fill critical gaps in understanding structure-function relationships that contribute to recovery in the mouse HLI model. Therefore, these optical imaging methods hold promise as tools for studying the mechanisms of vascular recovery and evaluating novel therapeutic treatments in preclinical studies.

  19. Exercise interventions for patients with peripheral arterial disease: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Ingrid; Parry, Monica; Brown, C Ann

    2012-05-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common chronic cardiovascular condition that affects the lower extremities and can substantially limit daily activities and quality of life. Lifestyle interventions, including smoking cessation, diet modification, regular physical activity, and pharmacotherapy, are often prescribed to treat patients with PAD. Exercise interventions can be effective in increasing claudication onset time and maximal walking distance. Of the various types of exercise interventions available for patients with PAD, little is known about the differences that may exist between men and women in patient response to such interventions. The purpose of this literature review is to examine the current knowledge of exercise interventions for individuals with mild (Fontaine stages I-II) PAD and to consider any differences that may exist between men and women. Women with PAD present with a different clinical profile compared with men, but respond similarly to an acute bout of exercise and a training program. Patients with PAD should be encouraged to walk regularly; however, more research is needed to determine differences between men and women in their response to various exercise interventions.

  20. Wound Closure in Smoking Peripheral Arterial Disease Patients With Treatment-Refractory Ulcerations

    PubMed Central

    Smedley, Jonathan; Michael, Georgina M.; Tamire, Yeabsera G.

    2016-01-01

    Despite ongoing smoking cessation efforts and optimized perfusion, failed wound closure in the presence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and diabetes are common. A clinical effectiveness review was conducted in actively smoking diabetic patients diagnosed with PAD, treated with serial applications of a viable intact cryopreserved human placental membrane (vCPM) (Grafix, Osiris Therapeutics Inc, Columbia, MD) for recalcitrant lower extremity ulcerations (n = 6). More than half of the patients were not candidates for revascularization. Baseline vascular status in 5 of 6 lower-extremity wounds remained unchanged throughout the entire course of vCPM treatment. Daily cigarette consumption averaged 18 cigarettes per patient. Mean wound duration and mean surface area was 53 weeks and 4.6 cm2, respectively. Mean number of vCPM applications and time to closure was 7.0 grafts in 7.8 weeks. There were no wound-related infections or amputations and no vCPM-related adverse events. All 6 wounds remained closed at the 12-month follow-up visit. In conclusion, vCPM demonstrated clinically effective outcomes in 6 previously nonhealing ulcerations despite ongoing smoking habits in the presence of PAD and diabetes. PMID:27852883

  1. Association between peripheral arterial occlusive disease and cardiothoracic ratio in patients on chronic hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Kang-Yi; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Fang, Yu-Wei; Leu, Jyh-Gang; Tsai, Ming-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    The cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) and peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) are related to mortality in hemodialysis patients. However, data on the association between PAOD and CTR are limited. In this study, we aim to elucidate this relationship in patients on chronic hemodialysis. Using a retrospective cross-sectional study of 622 Taiwanese patients, we investigated the association of PAOD and CTR. PAOD was significantly associated with CTR in the crude analysis. The odds ratio (OR) for CTR >0.5 was 1.77 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.32–2.37], and the odds ratio for CTR >0.6 was 2.18 [95% CI, 1.44–3.30]. After adjusting for confounding variables, this difference continued to exhibit significant predictive power for CTR >0.6 (OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.14–3.11), but the predictive power for CTR >0.5 was attenuated (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 0.98–2.03). In the subgroup analysis, PAOD was an independent factor for CTR >0.6, particularly in elderly and female patients or patients with hemoglobin >10 mg/dl and with no history of cardiovascular disease. In this research, we showed that the detection of PAOD was independently associated with CTR >0.6 in patients on chronic hemodialysis. PMID:27918569

  2. Occult peripheral artery disease is common and limits the benefit achieved in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Tam, Marty C; Longenecker, Chris T; Chow, Chen; Vest, Marianne; Sukeena, Richard; Madan Mohan, Sri K; Carman, Teresa; Parikh, Sahil A; Josephson, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has proven morbidity and mortality benefits in cardiovascular disease, which directly correlates with exercise performance achieved. Many patients in CR exercise at sub-optimal levels, without obvious limitations. Occult lower-extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) may be a determinant of diminished exercise capacity and reduced benefit obtained from traditional CR. In this prospective study of 150 consecutive patients enrolled in Phase II CR, we describe the prevalence of PAD, the utility of externally validated screening questionnaires, and the observed impact on CR outcomes. Abnormal ankle-brachial indices (ABI) (< 0.9 and >1.4) were observed in 19% of those studied. The Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire was insensitive for detecting PAD by low ABI in this population, and the Walking Impairment Questionnaire and a modified Gardner protocol demonstrated a lack of typical symptoms with low levels of activity. Importantly, at completion of traditional CR, exercise improvement measured in metabolic equivalents (METs) was worse in those with a low ABI compared to those with a normal ABI (+1.39 vs +2.41 METs, p = 0.002). In conclusion, PAD is common in patients in Phase II CR and often clinically occult. Screening based on standard questionnaires appears insensitive in this population, suggesting a need for a broad-based screening strategy with ABI measurements. In this study, undiagnosed PAD significantly attenuated improvements in exercise performance, which potentially has bearings on future clinical events.

  3. Exercise testing and exercise rehabilitation for patients with peripheral arterial disease: status in 1997.

    PubMed

    Regensteiner, J G; Gardner, A; Hiatt, W R

    1997-01-01

    Intermittent claudication is a common manifestation of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). Patients with claudication are limited in terms of work, housework and leisure activities so that functional status is very impaired. Therefore, the goals for treatment should focus on improving the functional impairment as well as on modifying risk factors. Evaluation of the functional status is of critical importance before beginning any therapy so that any resultant changes can be assessed. A validated graded treadmill protocol and validated questionnaires are used for this purpose. Three questionnaires that are currently used include the Walking Impairment Questionnaire, the PAOD Physical Activity Recall and the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36. Exercise rehabilitation is a method that has been particularly efficacious for treating the functional impairment associated with intermittent claudication. Exercise rehabilitation has been shown to improve pain-free treadmill walking distance by 44% to 300% and absolute walking distance by 25% to 442%. In addition, improvements have also been reported (using questionnaire data) in the ability to walk distances and speeds, in amount of habitual physical activity and in physical functioning. Thus, exercise rehabilitation has caused improvements not only in exercise capacity but also in community-based functional status. Because of the benefits of this treatment, in addition to the low associated morbidity, exercise therapy is recommended as an important treatment option for people with intermittent claudication due to PAOD.

  4. Uncoupling Angiogenesis and Inflammation in Peripheral Artery Disease with Therapeutic Peptide-loaded Microgels

    PubMed Central

    Zachman, Angela L.; Wang, Xintong; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Fitzpatrick, Sean T.; Lee, Sue H.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Skala, Melissa C.; Sung, Hak-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is characterized by vessel occlusion and ischemia in the limbs. Treatment for PAD with surgical interventions has been showing limited success. Moreover, recent clinical trials with treatment of angiogenic growth factors proved ineffective as increased angiogenesis triggered severe inflammation in a proportionally coupled fashion. Hence, the overarching goal of this research was to address this issue by developing a biomaterial system that enables controlled, dual delivery of pro-angiogenic C16 and anti-inflammatory Ac-SDKP peptides in a minimally-invasive way. To achieve the goal, a peptide-loaded injectable microgel system was developed and tested in a mouse model of PAD. When delivered through multiple, low volume injections, the combination of C16 and Ac-SDKP peptides promoted angiogenesis, muscle regeneration, and perfusion recovery, while minimizing detrimental inflammation. Additionally, this peptide combination regulated inflammatory TNF-α pathways independently of MMP-9 mediated pathways of angiogenesis in vitro, suggesting a potential mechanism by which angiogenic and inflammatory responses can be uncoupled in the context of PAD. This study demonstrates a translatable potential of the dual peptide-loaded injectable microgel system for PAD treatment. PMID:25154665

  5. Association Between Albuminuria and Duration of Diabetes and Myocardial Dysfunction and Peripheral Arterial Disease Among Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease in the BARI 2D Study

    PubMed Central

    Escobedo, Jorge; Rana, Jamal S.; Lombardero, Manuel S.; Albert, Stewart G.; Davis, Andrew M.; Kennedy, Frank P.; Mooradian, Arshag D.; Robertson, David G.; Srinivas, V. S.; Gebhart, Suzanne S. P.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of prior duration of diabetes, glycated hemoglobin level at study entry, and microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria on the extent and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) and peripheral arterial disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied baseline characteristics of the 2368 participants of the BARI 2D (Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes) study, a randomized clinical trial that evaluates treatment efficacy for patients with type 2 diabetes and angiographically documented stable CAD. Patients were enrolled from January 1, 2001, through March 31, 2005. Peripheral arterial disease was ascertained by an ankle-brachial index (ABI) of 0.9 or less, and extent of CAD was measured by presence of multivessel disease, a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of less than 50%, and myocardial jeopardy index. RESULTS: Duration of diabetes of 20 or more years was associated with increased risk of ABI of 0.9 or less (odds ratio [OR], 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-2.26), intermittent claudication (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.10-2.35), and LVEF of less than 50% (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.37-3.02). Microalbuminuria was associated with intermittent claudication (OR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.16-2.02) and ABI of 0.9 or less (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.98-1.75), whereas macroalbuminuria was associated with abnormal ABI, claudication, and LVEF of less than 50%. There was a significant association between diabetes duration and extent of CAD as manifested by number of coronary lesions, but no other significant associations were observed between duration of disease, glycated hemoglobin levels, or albumin-to-creatinine ratio and other manifestations of CAD. CONCLUSION: Duration of diabetes and microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria are important predictors of severity of peripheral arterial disease and left ventricular dysfunction in a cohort of patients selected for the presence of CAD. PMID:20042560

  6. Suspension model for blood flow through a catheterized arterial stenosis with peripheral layer of plasma free from cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponalagusamy, R.

    2016-06-01

    The present article describes the blood flow in a catheterized artery with radially symmetric and axially asymmetric stenosis. To understand the effects of red cell concentration, plasma layer thickness and catheter size simultaneously, blood is considered by a two-layered model comprising a core region of suspension of all the erythrocytes (particles) supposed to be a particle-fluid mixture and a peripheral zone of cell-free plasma. The analytical expressions for flow features, such as fluid phase and particle phase velocities, flow rate, wall shear stress and resistive force are obtained. It is witnessed that the presence of the catheter causes a substantial increase in the frictional forces on the walls of arterial stenosis and catheter, shear stress and flow resistance, in addition to that, have occurred due to the presence of red cells concentration (volume fraction density of the particles) and the absence of peripheral plasma layer near the wall of the stenosed artery. The introduction of an axially asymmetric nature of stenosis and plasma layer thickness causes significant reduction in flow resistance. One can notice that the two-phase fluid (suspension model) is more profound to the thickness of peripheral plasma layer and catheter than the single-phase fluid.

  7. Preoperative Angiographic Criteria for Predicting Free-Flap Transfer Outcomes in Patients With Lower-Extremity Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Woo; Kim, Junhyung; Choi, Jaehoon; Kim, Jun Sik; Lee, Jeong Hwan; Park, Young Sook

    2016-09-29

    Patients scheduled for microsurgical reconstruction of the lower leg often receive preoperative assessment of recipient vessels using angiography. However, no clear standard is available for evaluating angiographic results to predict free-flap survival outcomes. We developed angiographic criteria for predicting surgical outcome in patients with lower-extremity peripheral arterial disease based on abnormality of the anterior tibial and posterior tibial arteries. We applied the criteria to a small number of patients scheduled for microsurgical reconstruction of the lower leg. Angiographies with arterial abnormalities were classified into 3 groups: favorable free-flap survival, compromised free-flap survival, and postsurgical pedal ischemia. The study enrolled 50 patients between 2005 and 2013. In 42% of patients, arterial abnormalities were observed by angiography. Age >65 years was the strongest risk factor for development of lower-leg arterial abnormality (P < .001). The anterior tibial and peroneal arteries were significantly more stenotic than other vessels. In the favorable free-flap survival and compromised free-flap survival groups, free-flap transfers were attempted in 7 patients but intraoperatively abandoned in 2 patients, with postoperative failure in 1 patient. In the postsurgical pedal ischemia group, free-flap transfers were attempted in 10 patients but intraoperatively abandoned in 6 patients, with postoperative failure in 3.

  8. System identification of dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance by arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolai Aljuri, A.; Bursac, Nenad; Marini, Robert; Cohen, Richard J.

    2001-08-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity in space flight missions (days) impairs the mechanisms responsible for defense of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cardiac output (CO) against orthostatic stress in the post-flight period. The mechanisms responsible for the observed orthostatic intolerance are not yet completely understood. Additionally, effective counter measures to attenuate this pathophysiological response are not available. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of our proposed system identification method to predict closed-loop dynamic changes in TPR induced by changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and right atrial pressure (RAP). For this purpose we designed and employed a novel experimental animal model for the examination of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in the dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance (TPR), and applied system identification to the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in the measured signals.

  9. System identification of dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance by arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aljuri, A. N.; Bursac, N.; Marini, R.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity in space flight missions (days) impairs the mechanisms responsible for defense of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cardiac output (CO) against orthostatic stress in the post-flight period. The mechanisms responsible for the observed orthostatic intolerance are not yet completely understood. Additionally, effective counter measures to attenuate this pathophysiological response are not available. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of our proposed system identification method to predict closed-loop dynamic changes in TPR induced by changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and right atrial pressure (RAP). For this purpose we designed and employed a novel experimental animal model for the examination of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in the dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance (TPR), and applied system identification to the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in the measured signals. Grant numbers: NAG5-4989. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of Gender on the Prognostic Value of Coronary Artery Calcium in Symptomatic Patients With Normal Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography Myocardial Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Engbers, Elsemiek M; Timmer, Jorik R; Ottervanger, Jan Paul; Mouden, Mohamed; Knollema, Siert; Jager, Pieter L

    2016-12-01

    The coronary artery calcium (CAC) score provides independent prognostic value on top of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). We sought to determine whether the prognostic value of the CAC score in patients with normal SPECT MPI is gender specific. We studied 3,705 consecutive symptomatic patients without a history of coronary artery disease with normal SPECT MPI. All patients underwent concomitant CAC scoring, which was categorized as CAC score 0, 1 to 99, 100 to 399, 400 to 999, or ≥1,000. Major adverse cardiac events were defined as revascularization, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or all-cause mortality. The median CAC score was 9 in women (interquartile range 0 to 113) and 47 in men (interquartile range 1 to 307, p <0.001). The annual event rate was lower in women than in men (1.6% and 2.7%, respectively, p <0.001). When stratified by CAC score, annual event rates were similar (for women and men, respectively: CAC score 0, 0.6% and 0.5%, p = 0.95; CAC score 1 to 99, 0.9% and 1.2%, p = 0.45; CAC score 100 to 399, 2.7% and 3.8%, p = 0.23; CAC score 400 to 999, 3.8% and 5.3%, p = 0.34; CAC score ≥1,000, 8.4% and 8.7%, p = 0.99). The CAC score was an independent predictor of major adverse cardiac events in both genders (CAC score ≥1,000: hazard ratio for women 8.5, 95% confidence interval 4.0 to 18.1; hazard ratio for men 14.8, 95% confidence interval 5.3 to 41.1). In conclusion, risk for events is similar for both genders when stratified by CAC score, wherein a high CAC score carries a high risk for events despite normal SPECT MPI. Our findings do not reveal a gender-specific prognostic value of the CAC score.

  11. Dark Chocolate Acutely Improves Walking Autonomy in Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Loffredo, Lorenzo; Perri, Ludovica; Catasca, Elisa; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Brancorsini, Monica; Nocella, Cristina; De Falco, Elena; Bartimoccia, Simona; Frati, Giacomo; Carnevale, Roberto; Violi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Background NOX‐2, the catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase, has a key role in the formation of reactive oxidant species and is implicated in impairing flow‐mediated dilation (FMD). Dark chocolate exerts artery dilatation via down‐regulating NOX2‐mediated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dark chocolate improves walking autonomy in peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients via an oxidative stress‐mediated mechanism. Methods and Results FMD, serum levels of isoprostanes, nitrite/nitrate (NOx) and sNOX2‐dp, a marker of blood NOX2 activity, maximal walking distance (MWD) and maximal walking time (MWT) were studied in 20 PAD patients (14 males and 6 females, mean age: 69±9 years) randomly allocated to 40 g of dark chocolate (>85% cocoa) or 40 g of milk chocolate (≤35% cocoa) in a single blind, cross‐over design. The above variables were assessed at baseline and 2 hours after chocolate ingestion. Dark chocolate intake significantly increased MWD (+11%; P<0.001), MWT (+15%; P<0.001), serum NOx (+57%; P<0.001) and decreased serum isoprostanes (−23%; P=0.01) and sNOX2‐dp (−37%; P<0.001); no changes of the above variables were observed after milk chocolate intake. Serum epicatechin and its methylated metabolite significantly increased only after dark chocolate ingestion. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that Δ of MWD was independently associated with Δ of MWT (P<0.001) and Δ of NOx (P=0.018). In vitro study demonstrated that HUVEC incubated with a mixture of polyphenols significantly increased nitric oxide (P<0.001) and decreased E‐selectin (P<0.001) and VCAM1 (P<0.001). Conclusion In PAD patients dark but not milk chocolate acutely improves walking autonomy with a mechanism possibly related to an oxidative stress‐mediated mechanism involving NOX2 regulation. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01947712. PMID:24990275

  12. Human Enterovirus in the Gastrocnemius of Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Julian K. S.; Zhu, Zhen; Casale, George; Koutakis, Panagiotis; McComb, Rodney D.; Swanson, Stanley; Thompson, Jonathan; Miserlis, Dimitrios; Johanning, Jason M.; Haynatzki, Gleb; Pipinos, Iraklis I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterized by myofiber degeneration and loss of function in muscles of the lower limbs. Human enterovirus (HEV) infection has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of muscle diseases. However, its association with PAD has not been studied. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that infectious HEV is present in skeletal muscle of patients with PAD and is associated with severity of disease. Methods and Results Gastrocnemius biopsies from 37 patients with PAD and 14 controls were examined for the presence of HEV RNA, viral capsid protein, viral RNA copy number, and viral infectivity. HEV RNA was detected in 54% of the biopsies from patients with PAD but was not detected in muscle biopsies from control patients. This difference in prevalence among PAD and control patients was significant at P<0.001. Viral RNA copy numbers were increased significantly at the later stages of disease; Fontaine Stage IV (105.50 copies/mg muscle wet weight, at P<0.005) and Stage III (104.87 copies/mg, at P<0.010) compared to Stage II (102.50 copies/mg). Viral replication was confirmed by the presence of the negative‐strand of viral RNA in all specimens positive for HEV RNA. Cultures of HeLa and human skeletal muscle cells treated with muscle homogenates showed HEV replication and the presence of HEV capsid protein. Conclusion Our data identified infectious HEV in the gastrocnemius of PAD patients but not in controls. Viral copy number and prevalence of infection were higher in the later stages of disease. Our data point to the need for further studies to determine the contribution of HEV infection to the pathophysiology of PAD. PMID:23920231

  13. Differences in nutrition status by body mass index in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Oka, Roberta K; Alley, Hugh F

    2012-09-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is most prevalent in the elderly and associated with increased cardio vascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. Treatment focuses on improving functional capacity and reducing CVD risk factors. To date, little is understood about dietary habits and weight in this patient population. Nutritional and weight recommendations are based on heart health, and little is known about the unique needs of elderly PAD patients with multiple comorbidities. This prospective study compared 1) the dietary intake of nonobese PAD patients in comparison with those who were obese and; 2) dietary intake of those patients with the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) based on age, gender and BMI. Nutritional intake was assessed with the Block 98 Food Frequency Questionnaire. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated in accordance with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) guidelines.The study population was divided into obese (BMI ≥ 30) and nonobese (NO) groups. Comparisons between groups were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test for continuous variables and the Chi-square test for ordinal variables. All tests were two-tailed and P < 0.05 was considered significant. The Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) cut-point method was used to compare nutritional variables with Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI). The study population included 189 NO (BMI < 30) and 111 obese (BMI > 30) individuals. Obese participants reported greater intake of foods containing cholesterol and trans-fatty acids and more frequent intake of B vitamins in comparison with the NO BMI group. Additionally, the nutrient intake of all participants by age, gender and BMI was lower than the EAR for magnesium, folate, and Vitamin E. These results suggest that the nutritional intake of PAD patients differs based on gender and BMI. Additionally, EAR was lower for specific nutrients than recommended. Further investigation is needed to examine the association between nutritional

  14. Influence of Peripheral Artery Disease and Statin Therapy on Apolipoprotein Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andrew W.; Parker, Donald E.; Montgomery, Polly S.; Esponda, Omar L.; Casanegra, Ana I.

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B is a stronger predictor of myocardial infarction than LDL cholesterol, and it is inversely related to physical activity and modifiable with exercise training. As such, apolipoprotein measures may be of particular relevance for subjects with PAD and claudication. We compared plasma apolipoprotein profiles in 29 subjects with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and intermittent claudication and in 39 control subjects. Furthermore, we compared the plasma apolipoprotein profiles of subjects with PAD either treated (n = 17) or untreated (n = 12) with statin medications. For the apolipoprotein subparticle analyses, subjects with PAD had higher age-adjusted Lp-B:C (P < 0.05) and lower values of Lp-A-I:A-II (P < 0.05) than controls. The PAD group taking statins had lower age-adjusted values for apoB (P < 0.05), Lp-A-II:B:C:D:E (P < 0.05), Lp-B:E + Lp-B:C:E (P < 0.05), Lp-B:C (P < 0.05), and Lp-A-I (P < 0.05) than the untreated PAD group. Subjects with PAD have impaired apolipoprotein profiles than controls, characterized by Lp-B:C and Lp-A-I:A-II. Furthermore, subjects with PAD on statin medications have a more favorable risk profile, particularly noted in multiple apolipoprotein subparticles. The efficacy of statin therapy to improve cardiovascular risk appears more evident in the apolipoprotein sub-particle profile than in the more traditional lipid profile of subjects with PAD and claudication. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00618670. PMID:24102029

  15. Angiogenic response to passive movement and active exercise in individuals with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Hoier, B; Walker, M; Passos, M; Walker, P J; Green, A; Bangsbo, J; Askew, C D; Hellsten, Y

    2013-12-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is caused by atherosclerosis and is associated with microcirculatory impairments in skeletal muscle. The present study evaluated the angiogenic response to exercise and passive movement in skeletal muscle of PAD patients compared with healthy control subjects. Twenty-one PAD patients and 17 aged control subjects were randomly assigned to either a passive movement or an active exercise study. Interstitial fluid microdialysate and tissue samples were obtained from the thigh skeletal muscle. Muscle dialysate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were modestly increased in response to either passive movement or active exercise in both subject groups. The basal muscle dialysate level of the angiostatic factor thrombospondin-1 protein was markedly higher (P < 0.05) in PAD patients compared with the control subjects, whereas soluble VEGF receptor-1 dialysate levels were similar in the two groups. The basal VEGF protein content in the muscle tissue samples was ∼27% lower (P < 0.05) in the PAD patients compared with the control subjects. Analysis of mRNA expression for a range of angiogenic and angiostatic factors revealed a modest change with active exercise and passive movement in both groups, except for an increase (P < 0.05) in the ratio of angiopoietin-2 to angiopoietin-1 mRNA in the PAD group with both interventions. PAD patients and aged individuals showed a similar limited angiogenic response to active exercise and passive movement. The limited increase in muscle extracellular VEGF combined with an elevated basal level of thrombospondin-1 in muscle extracellular fluid of PAD patients may restrict capillary growth in these patients.

  16. Gender differences in cholesterol-lowering medication prescribing in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Mary M; Greenland, Philip; Reed, George; Mazor, Kathleen M; Merriam, Philip A; Graff, Rex; Tao, Huimin; Pagoto, Sherry; Manheim, Larry; Kibbe, Melina R; Ockene, Ira S

    2011-12-01

    Among 320 patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels > 70 mg/dl, we determined whether male sex, higher education, and greater self-efficacy for willingness to request therapy from one's physician were associated with increases in LDL-C-lowering medication and achievement of an LDL-C level < 70 mg/dl at 1-year follow-up. Participants were enrolled in a randomized controlled clinical trial to determine whether a telephone counseling intervention can help PAD patients achieve an LDL-C level < 70 mg/dl, compared to usual care and attention control conditions, respectively. Adjusting for age, race, comorbidities, PAD severity, and other covariates, male sex (odds ratio = 3.33, 95% confidence interval = 1.64 to 6.77, p = 0.001) was associated with a higher likelihood of adding cholesterol-lowering medication during follow-up, but was not associated with achieving an LDL-C < 70 mg/dl (odds ratio = 1.09, 95% confidence interval = 0.55 to 2.18). No associations of education level or self-efficacy with study outcomes were identified. In conclusion, male PAD patients with baseline LDL-C levels ≥ 70 mg/dl were more likely to intensify LDL-C-lowering medication during 1-year follow-up than female PAD patients. Despite greater increases in LDL-C-lowering medication among female PAD patients, there was no difference in the degree of LDL-C lowering during the study between men and women with PAD.

  17. Angiogenic response to passive movement and active exercise in individuals with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoier, B.; Walker, M.; Passos, M.; Walker, P. J.; Green, A.; Bangsbo, J.; Askew, C. D.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is caused by atherosclerosis and is associated with microcirculatory impairments in skeletal muscle. The present study evaluated the angiogenic response to exercise and passive movement in skeletal muscle of PAD patients compared with healthy control subjects. Twenty-one PAD patients and 17 aged control subjects were randomly assigned to either a passive movement or an active exercise study. Interstitial fluid microdialysate and tissue samples were obtained from the thigh skeletal muscle. Muscle dialysate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were modestly increased in response to either passive movement or active exercise in both subject groups. The basal muscle dialysate level of the angiostatic factor thrombospondin-1 protein was markedly higher (P < 0.05) in PAD patients compared with the control subjects, whereas soluble VEGF receptor-1 dialysate levels were similar in the two groups. The basal VEGF protein content in the muscle tissue samples was ∼27% lower (P < 0.05) in the PAD patients compared with the control subjects. Analysis of mRNA expression for a range of angiogenic and angiostatic factors revealed a modest change with active exercise and passive movement in both groups, except for an increase (P < 0.05) in the ratio of angiopoietin-2 to angiopoietin-1 mRNA in the PAD group with both interventions. PAD patients and aged individuals showed a similar limited angiogenic response to active exercise and passive movement. The limited increase in muscle extracellular VEGF combined with an elevated basal level of thrombospondin-1 in muscle extracellular fluid of PAD patients may restrict capillary growth in these patients. PMID:24157526

  18. Association of lower urinary tract syndrome with peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung; Wu, Hsi-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To describe atherosclerosis may lead to chronic bladder ischemia, eventually resulting in lower urinary tract syndrome (LUTS), and peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). We investigated the association of LUTS with PAOD. Methods This nationwide population-based cohort study was based on data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database from 2000 to 2010; follow-up lasted until the end of 2011. We identified patients with newly diagnosed LUTS by using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Results In total, 36,042 and 36,042 patients were enrolled in LUTS and non-LUTS cohorts, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities, the risk of subsequent PAOD was 1.36-fold higher [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.26–1.46] in the LUTS cohort than in the non-LUTS cohort. The adjusted risk of PAOD was the highest in patients with LUTS without any comorbidity [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.54–2.41]. The age-specific relative risk of PAOD was significantly higher in all age groups, particularly in those aged <49 years (aHR = 1.80, 95% CI = 1.39–2.34], in the LUTS cohort than in the non-LUTS cohort. Conclusion LUTS is a risk factor for PAOD. Physicians should consider the possibility of underlying PAOD in patients with LUTS aged <49 years and without cardiovascular comorbidities. Additional studies developing strategies for decreasing the risk of PAOD are warranted. PMID:28301517

  19. Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Depletion After Hepatic Arterial {sup 90}Yttrium Microsphere Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Brian I.; Metes, Diana M.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The short- and long-term effects of {sup 90}Yttrium microspheres therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on peripheral blood lymphocytes are unknown and were therefore examined. Methods and Materials: Ninety-two HCC patients were enrolled in a {sup 90}Yttrium therapy study and routine blood counts were examined as part of standard clinical monitoring. Results: We found an early, profound, and prolonged lymphopenia. In a subsequent cohort of 25 additional HCC patients, prospective flow cytometric immune-monitoring analysis was performed to identify specific changes on distinct lymphocyte subsets (i.e., CD3, CD4, CD8 T, and CD19 B lymphocytes) and NK cells absolute numbers, in addition to the granulocytes and platelets subsets. We found that the pretreatment lymphocyte subset absolute numbers (with the exception of NK cells) had a tendency to be lower compared with healthy control values, but no significant differences were detected between groups. Posttherapy follow-up revealed that overall, all lymphocyte subsets, except for NK cells, were significantly (>50% from pretherapy values), promptly (as early as 24 h) and persistently (up to 30 months) depleted post-{sup 90}Yttrium microspheres therapy. In contrast, granulocytes increased rapidly (24 h) to compensate for lymphocyte depletion, and remained increased at 1-year after therapy. We further stratified patients into two groups, according to survival at 1 year. We found that lack of recovery of CD19, CD3, CD8, and especially CD4 T cells was linked to poor patient survival. No fungal or bacterial infections were noted during the 30-month follow-up period. Conclusions: The results show that lymphocytes (and not granulocytes, platelets, or NK cells) are sensitive to hepatic arterial {sup 90}Yttrium without associated clinical toxicity, and lack of lymphocyte recovery (possibly leading to dysregulation of adaptive cellular immunity) posttherapy indicates poor survival.

  20. Role of Cilostazol Therapy in Hemodialysis Patients with Asymptomatic Peripheral Arterial Disease: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming Ying; Pai, Mei-Ann; Wu, Tsai-Kun; Chen, Chang Hsu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and its relevant complications are more common in hemodialysis (HD) patients, while the evidence regarding antiplatelet therapy in CKD patients is scarce. We retrospectively analyzed the efficacy of cilostazol on outcomes in HD patients with asymptomatic PAD (aPAD). Methods. This cohort study enrolled 217 HD patients (median follow-up time: 5.75 years). Associations between cilostazol use and the outcomes were evaluated by time-dependent Cox regression analysis. Results. During follow-up, 39.5% (47/119) patients used cilostazol for aPAD and 31.8% (69/217) patients died. Cilostazol users had significantly lower CVD and all-cause mortalities (adjusted HR [95% CI]: 0.11 [0.03, 0.51] and 0.2 [0.08, 0.52]) than nonusers. Both death risks were nonsignificantly higher in cilostazol users than in HD patients without aPAD. The unadjusted and adjusted HR [95% CI] of CVD death risk were 0.4 [0.07, 2.12] and 0.14 [0.02, 0.8] for patients with aPAD during follow-up and were 0.74 [0.16, 3.36] and 0.19 [0.04, 0.93] for those with aPAD at initial. Conclusions. In HD patients with aPAD, lower CVD and all-cause mortality rates were observed in low-dose cilostazol user. Further evidences from large-scale prospective study and randomization trial are desired to confirm the effect of cilostazol. PMID:27747241

  1. Biochemical markers in patients with open reconstructions with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Stone, Patrick A; Thompson, Stephanie N; Williams, David; AbuRahma, Zachary; Grome, Luke; Schlarb, Haley; AbuRahma, Ali F

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine outcome differences as a function of baseline high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels in patients receiving lower extremity open reconstructions for the treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease. We retrospectively examined patients who underwent surgical reconstructions performed by a single operator during a seven-year time span who received preoperative hsCRP and BNP testing and post-procedure imaging. Outcomes of interest included major adverse limb events, a composite end point of target vessel revascularization, limb amputation, and disease progression, and major adverse cardiovascular events comprised of stroke, myocardial infarction, and death. A total of 89 limbs in 82 patients were included in analysis. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that higher hsCRP levels (>3.0 mg/L) trended toward, but failed to significantly associate with major adverse limb events at 24 months (hazard ratio: 2.2 [1.0-5.2], p = 0.06), however the use of a vein bypass conduit (vs. prosthetic reconstruction) significantly predicted major adverse limb events (hazard ratio: 3.2 [1.5-6.9], p < 0.01). Elevated BNP levels (>100 pg/ml), but not hsCRP, associated with major adverse cardiovascular events (hazard ratio: 3.5 [1.2-10.3], p = 0.03). Preoperative biochemical markers may assist in clinical decision making and stratifying patients regarding adverse events following open reconstructions.

  2. Mapping of Autogenous Saphenous Veins as an Imaging Adjunct to Peripheral MR Angiography in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease and Peripheral Bypass Grafting: Prospective Comparison with Ultrasound and Intraoperative Findings

    PubMed Central

    Jah-Kabba, Ann-Marie Bintu Munda; Kukuk, Guido Matthias; Hadizadeh, Dariusch Reza; Träber, Frank; Koscielny, Arne; Kabba, Mustapha Sundifu; Verrel, Frauke; Schild, Hans Heinz; Willinek, Winfried Albert

    2014-01-01

    Background Mapping of the great saphenous vein is very important for planning of peripheral and coronary bypass surgery. This study investigated mapping of the great saphenous vein as an adjunct to peripheral MR angiography using a blood pool contrast agent in patients who were referred for evaluation of peripheral arterial occlusive disease and bypass surgery. Methods 38 patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (21 men; mean age: 71 years, range, 44–88 years) underwent peripheral MR angiography using the blood pool contrast agent Gadofosveset trisodium. Apart from primary arterial assessment images were evaluated in order to determine great saphenous vein diameters at three levels: below the saphenofemoral junction, mid thigh and 10 cm above the knee joint (usability: diameter range: >3 and <10 mm at one level and >3.5 and <10 mm at a neighboring level). Duplex ultrasound was performed by an independent examiner providing diameter measurements at the same levels. Additionally, vessel usability was determined intraoperatively by the vascular surgeon during subsequent bypass surgery. Results Mean venous diameters for MR angiography/duplex ultrasound were 5.4±2.6/5.5±2.8 mm (level 1), 4.7±2.7/4.6±2.9 mm (level 2) and 4.4±2.2/4.5±2.3 mm (level 3), respectively, without significant differences between the modalities (P = 0.207/0.806/0.518). Subsequent surgery was performed in 27/38 patients. A suitable saphenous vein was diagnosed in 25 and non-usability was diagnosed in 2 of the 27 patients based on MR angiography/duplex ultrasound, respectively. Usability was confirmed by intraoperative assessment in all of the 24 patients that received a venous bypass graft in subsequent bypass surgery. In 1 case, in which the great saphenous vein was assessed as useable by both MR angiography and duplex ultrasound, it was not used during subsequent bypass surgery due to the patients clinical condition and comorbidities. Conclusion Simultaneous mapping of the

  3. Imaging of vascular dynamics within the foot using dynamic diffuse optical tomography to diagnose peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Hoi, J. W.; Kim, I.; Dayal, R.; Shrikande, G.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is the narrowing of the functional area of the artery generally due to atherosclerosis. It affects between 8-12 million people in the United States and if untreated this can lead to ulceration, gangrene and ultimately amputation. The current diagnostic method for PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The ABI is a ratio of the patient's systolic blood pressure in the foot to that of the brachial artery in the arm, a ratio below 0.9 is indicative of affected vasculature. However, this method is ineffective in patients with calcified arteries (diabetic and end-stage renal failure patients), which falsely elevates the ABI recording resulting in a false negative reading. In this paper we present our results in a pilot study to deduce optical tomography's ability to detect poor blood perfusion in the foot. We performed an IRB approved 30 patient study, where we imaged the feet of the enrolled patients during a five stage dynamic imaging sequence. The patients were split up into three groups: 10 healthy subjects, 10 PAD patients and 10 PAD patients with diabetes and they were imaged while applying a pressure cuff to their thigh. Differences in the magnitude of blood pooling in the foot and rate at which the blood pools in the foot are all indicative of arterial disease.

  4. Severity of arterial hypoxaemia affects the relative contributions of peripheral muscle fatigue to exercise performance in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Amann, Markus; Romer, Lee M; Subudhi, Andrew W; Pegelow, David F; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2007-05-15

    We examined the effects of hypoxia severity on peripheral versus central determinants of exercise performance. Eight cyclists performed constant-load exercise to exhaustion at various fractions of inspired O2 fraction (FIO2 0.21/0.15/0.10). At task failure (pedal frequency < 70% target) arterial hypoxaemia was surreptitiously reversed via acute O2 supplementation (FIO2 = 0.30) and subjects were encouraged to continue exercising. Peripheral fatigue was assessed via changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force (DeltaQ(tw,pot)) as measured pre- versus post-exercise in response to supramaximal femoral nerve stimulation. At task failure in normoxia (haemoglobin saturation (SpO2) approximately 94%, 656 +/- 82 s) and moderate hypoxia (SpO2) approximately 82%, 278 +/- 16 s), hyperoxygenation had no significant effect on prolonging endurance time. However, following task failure in severe hypoxia (SpO2) approximately 67%; 125 +/- 6 s), hyperoxygenation elicited a significant prolongation of time to exhaustion (171 +/- 61%). The magnitude of DeltaQ(tw,pot) at exhaustion was not different among the three trials (-35% to -36%, P = 0.8). Furthermore, quadriceps integrated EMG, blood lactate, heart rate, and effort perceptions all rose significantly throughout exercise, and to a similar extent at exhaustion following hyperoxygenation at all levels of arterial oxygenation. Since hyperoxygenation prolonged exercise time only in severe hypoxia, we repeated this trial and assessed peripheral fatigue following task failure prior to hyperoxygenation (125 +/- 6 s). Although Q(tw,pot) was reduced from pre-exercise baseline (-23%; P < 0.01), peripheral fatigue was substantially less (P < 0.01) than that observed at task failure in normoxia and moderate hypoxia. We conclude that across the range of normoxia to severe hypoxia, the major determinants of central motor output and exercise performance switches from a predominantly peripheral origin of fatigue to a hypoxia-sensitive central

  5. Prevalence, Correlates, and Prognosis of Peripheral Artery Disease in Rural Ecuador—Rationale, Protocol, and Phase I Results of a Population-Based Survey: An Atahualpa Project-Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Del Brutto, Oscar H.; Sedler, Mark J.; Mera, Robertino M.; Castillo, Pablo R.; Cusick, Elizabeth H.; Gruen, Jadry A.; Phelan, Kelsie J.; Del Brutto, Victor J.; Zambrano, Mauricio; Brown, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Little is known on the prevalence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in developing countries. Study design. Population-based study in Atahualpa. In Phase I, the Edinburgh claudication questionnaire (ECQ) was used for detection of suspected symptomatic PAD; persons with a negative ECQ but a pulse pressure ≥65 mmHg were suspected of asymptomatic PAD. In Phase II, the ankle-brachial index will be used to test reliability of screening instruments and to determine PAD prevalence. In Phase III, participants will be followed up to estimate the relevance of PAD as a predictor of vascular outcomes. Results. During Phase I, 665 Atahualpa residents aged ≥40 years were enrolled (mean age: 59.5 ± 12.6 years, 58% women). A poor cardiovascular health status was noticed in 464 (70%) persons of which 27 (4%) had a stroke and 14 (2%) had ischemic heart disease. Forty-four subjects (7%) had suspected symptomatic PAD and 170 (26%) had suspected asymptomatic PAD. Individuals with suspected PAD were older, more often women, and had a worse cardiovascular profile than those with nonsuspected PAD. Conclusions. Prevalence of suspected PAD in this underserved population is high. Subsequent phases of this study will determine whether prompt detection of PAD is useful to reduce the incidence of catastrophic vascular diseases in the region. PMID:25389500

  6. Process of Care and Outcomes in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beyth, Rebecca J.; Nelson, David B.; Petersen, Nancy J.; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.; Bush, Ruth L.; Hirsch, Alan T.; Ashton, Carol M.

    2007-01-01

    Background We investigated the association of process of care measures with adverse limb and systemic events in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with PAD, as defined by an ankle-brachial index (ABI) <0.9. The index date was defined as the date, during 1995 to 1998, when the patient was seen in the Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center noninvasive vascular laboratory and found to have PAD. We conducted a chart review for process of care variables starting 3 years before the index date and ending at the time of the first event or the final visit (December 31, 2001), whichever occurred first. We examined the association between PAD process of care measures, including risk factor control, and prescribing of medication, with time of the patient’s first major limb event or death. Results Of the 796 patients (mean age, 65 ± 9.9 years), 230 (28.9% experienced an adverse limb event (136 lower-extremity bypass, 94 lower-extremity amputation), and 354 (44.5%) died. Of the patients who died, 247 died without a preceding limb event. Glucose control was protective against death or a limb event with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.74 (95% confidence limits [CL] 0.60, 0.91, P = 0.004). African Americans were at 2.8 (95% CL 1.7, 4.5) times the risk of Whites or Hispanics for an adverse limb event. However, this risk was no longer significant if their glucose was controlled. For process measures, the dispensing of PAD specific medication (HR 1.4, 95% CL 1.1, 1.7) was associated an increased risk for an adverse outcome. Conclusions Our data suggest that glucose control is key to reducing the risk for adverse outcomes, particularly limb events in African Americans. Certain process of care measures, as markers of disease severity and disease management, are associated with poor outcomes in patients with PAD. Further work is needed to determine the role of early disease intervention to reduce poor

  7. Correlation between plasma lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai-Bing; Yang, Fan; Jing, Li; Ma, Juan; Jia, Ya-Dan; Dong, Shao-Ying; Zheng, Wei-Feng; Zhao, Luo-Sha

    2013-05-01

    Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is a recently identified and potentially useful plasma biomarker for cardiovascular diseases. However, its role in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remains unclear. The objective of this study was to assess the independent association of Lp-PLA2 and other inflammatory markers with the reduced ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABI), a marker of PAD. We performed a cross-sectional study in 982 individuals aged ≥40 years who were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University. PAD was defined as an ABI <0.9 in at least one leg. The individuals were further divided into two groups, 145 with PAD and 837 without PAD. Following adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, the odds ratios of PAD when comparing the highest to the lowest quartiles were 3.24 (95% CI, 1.68-3.94) for Lp-PLA2, 2.14 (95% CI, 1.07-3.11) for homocysteine, 1.93 (95% CI, 1.02-4.01) for fibrinogen, 2.26 (95% CI, 1.32-5.74) for apolipoprotein B and 1.3 (95% CI, 0.75-2.49) for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). When Lp-PLA2 and inflammatory markers were simultaneously included in the full model, the corresponding odds ratios were 1.81 (95% CI, 1.14-3.68) for Lp-PLA2, 1.15 (95% CI, 0.49-2.69) for homocysteine, 1.21 (95% CI, 0.88-5.57) for fibrinogen, 0.98 (95% CI, 0.51-3.85) for apolipoprotein B and 1.23 (95% CI, 1.12-3.51) for hsCRP. Lp-PLA2 levels were significantly and independently associated with PAD following adjustment for other inflammatory markers. These findings reflect the potential role of circulating Lp-PLA2 as a marker of atherosclerosis.

  8. Usefulness of the platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in predicting long-term cardiovascular mortality in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    PubMed Central

    Erturk, Mehmet; Cakmak, Huseyin Altug; Kalkan, Ali Kemal; Akturk, Ibrahim Faruk; Yalcin, Ahmet Arif; Uygur, Begum; Bulut, Umit; Oz, Kursat

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Inflammation and increased platelet activation play a crucial role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) has recently been reported as a new independent predictor for major adverse cardiovascular events in cardiovascular diseases. Aim To investigate the relation between PLR and cardiovascular mortality in patients with intermittent claudication or critical limb ischemia (CLI) or both. Material and methods In our retrospective study, 602 consecutive patients who were admitted to a large tertiary hospital with the diagnosis of symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) were included. Patients were divided into two groups according to their PLR as follows: high PLR (PLR > 142) and low PLR (PLR ≤ 142) groups. Results During the follow-up period (median: 33.8 months (interquartile range: 21–45)), 131 deaths occurred out of 602 (21.8%) patients. Cardiovascular mortality was found to be significantly higher in the high PLR group compared to the low PLR group (31.6% vs. 17.2 %; p < 0.001). Even after adjustment for various risk factors, PLR > 142 and age were found to be independent predictors of long-term cardiovascular mortality in Cox regression analysis (hazard ratios (95% confidence interval): 1.03 (1.01–1.04) and 1.04 (1.02–1.06), p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio, which is one of the parameters of routine complete blood count, reflects increased inflammatory status, platelet activation and aggregation. PLR is a cheap and readily available marker that has the ability to improve risk stratification provided by conventional risk scores in predicting long-term cardiovascular mortality in PAOD. PMID:28344615

  9. Mass transport disturbances in the distal graft/artery junction of a peripheral bypass graft.

    PubMed

    Devereux, P D; O'Callaghan, S M; Walsh, M T; McGloughlin, T

    2005-11-01

    Intimal hyperplasia (IH) development is a primary cause of failure of reconstructive bypass surgery. While the exact mechanism by which IH initiates and proliferates has yet to be fully elucidated, it is clear that the abnormal haemodynamics present in the downstream graft/artery junction are intrinsic in its development. Mass transport disturbances owing to abnormal haemodynamics have been associated with atherogenesis and it is for this reason that an investigation into transport of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a known promoter of the intimal hyperplastic response, at the downstream graft/artery junction was carried out. A steady flow analysis in a three-dimensional, idealized, downstream graft/artery junction was carried out using commercial computational fluid dynamics software. It was found that there is a two-and-half fold increase in the transport of PDGF to the artery wall at the bed of the junction when compared with an idealized, healthy artery. The presence of secondary flows in the downstream arterial section also leads to large disturbances in mass transport. It was concluded that PDGF transport in the downstream graft/artery junction tends to be highly disturbed and that there may be a role of this disturbance in the initiation and subsequent development of distal anastomotic intimal hyperplasia.

  10. The “Intermediate” CD14++CD16+ monocyte subset increases in severe peripheral artery disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Aschenbrenner, Teresa; Wendorff, Heiko; Czubba, Maria; Glinzer, Almut; Haller, Bernhard; Schiemann, Matthias; Zimmermann, Alexander; Berger, Hermann; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Meier, Reinhard; Wohlgemuth, Walter A.; Libby, Peter; Zernecke, Alma

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes are key players in atherosclerotic. Human monocytes display a considerable heterogeneity and at least three subsets can be distinguished. While the role of monocyte subset heterogeneity has already been well investigated in coronary artery disease (CAD), the knowledge about monocytes and their heterogeneity in peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) still is limited. Therefore, we aimed to investigate monocyte subset heterogeneity in patients with PAOD. Peripheral blood was obtained from 143 patients suffering from PAOD (Rutherford stage I to VI) and three monocyte subsets were identified by flow cytometry: CD14++CD16− classical monocytes, CD14+CD16++ non-classical monocytes and CD14++CD16+ intermediate monocytes. Additionally the expression of distinct surface markers (CD106, CD162 and myeloperoxidase MPO) was analyzed. Proportions of CD14++CD16+ intermediate monocyte levels were significantly increased in advanced stages of PAOD, while classical and non-classical monocytes displayed no such trend. Moreover, CD162 and MPO expression increased significantly in intermediate monocyte subsets in advanced disease stages. Likewise, increased CD162 and MPO expression was noted in CD14++CD16− classical monocytes. These data suggest substantial dynamics in monocyte subset distributions and phenotypes in different stages of PAOD, which can either serve as biomarkers or as potential therapeutic targets to decrease the inflammatory burden in advanced stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:27991581

  11. The association between ischemic and jeopardized myocardia and all-cause mortality in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Tarek A; Yousefzai, Rayan; Venkatachalam, Sridhar; Lowry, Ashley; Gornik, Heather L; Jaber, Wael; Bartholomew, John R; Kim, Soo Hyun; Cerqueira, Manuel; Gray, Bruce H; Blackstone, Eugene H; Shishehbor, Mehdi H

    2016-04-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is associated with increased mortality and concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether uncovering the presence of functional coronary ischemia by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) would further help stratifying that excess risk. From January 2000 to 2009, 4294 individuals underwent cardiac stress testing within 180 days of ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurements. Of these, 645 had PAD and SPECT MPI stress testing. Abnormal ABI was defined as ⩽ 0.9 or prior lower extremity arterial revascularization. Myocardial ischemic burden and total jeopardized myocardium were represented by the summed difference score (SDS) and summed stress score (SSS), respectively. Univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazard analyses were used to study the impact of SDS and SSS on all-cause mortality. Additionally, using a hierarchical approach, we examined the step-wise addition of post-stress test coronary and lower extremity arterial revascularizations as time-varying covariates on outcomes. We found no significant difference in all-cause mortality between patients with ischemic myocardium (SDS > 0) and those without (SDS = 0) (adjusted HR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.53-1.69; p = 0.84). Similarly, the presence of jeopardized myocardium (SSS > 0) did not have a significant impact on mortality (adjusted HR: 1.16, 95% CI: 0.67-2.00; p = 0.59). Moreover, adjustment for post-testing coronary and lower extremity arterial revascularizations did not affect our results. In conclusion, ischemic and jeopardized myocardia are not predictors of all-cause mortality in PAD; thus, SPECT MPI does not appear to be a useful risk stratification tool in these patients.

  12. Severity of arterial hypoxaemia affects the relative contributions of peripheral muscle fatigue to exercise performance in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Markus; Romer, Lee M; Subudhi, Andrew W; Pegelow, David F; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2007-01-01

    We examined the effects of hypoxia severity on peripheral versus central determinants of exercise performance. Eight cyclists performed constant-load exercise to exhaustion at various fractions of inspired O2 fraction (FIO2 0.21/0.15/0.10). At task failure (pedal frequency < 70% target) arterial hypoxaemia was surreptitiously reversed via acute O2 supplementation (FIO2 = 0.30) and subjects were encouraged to continue exercising. Peripheral fatigue was assessed via changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force (ΔQtw,pot) as measured pre- versus post-exercise in response to supramaximal femoral nerve stimulation. At task failure in normoxia (haemoglobin saturation (SpO2) ∼94%, 656 ± 82 s) and moderate hypoxia (SpO2 ∼82%, 278 ± 16 s), hyperoxygenation had no significant effect on prolonging endurance time. However, following task failure in severe hypoxia (SpO2 ∼67%; 125 ± 6 s), hyperoxygenation elicited a significant prolongation of time to exhaustion (171 ± 61%). The magnitude of ΔQtw,pot at exhaustion was not different among the three trials (−35% to −36%, P = 0.8). Furthermore, quadriceps integrated EMG, blood lactate, heart rate, and effort perceptions all rose significantly throughout exercise, and to a similar extent at exhaustion following hyperoxygenation at all levels of arterial oxygenation. Since hyperoxygenation prolonged exercise time only in severe hypoxia, we repeated this trial and assessed peripheral fatigue following task failure prior to hyperoxygenation (125 ± 6 s). Although Qtw,pot was reduced from pre-exercise baseline (−23%; P < 0.01), peripheral fatigue was substantially less (P < 0.01) than that observed at task failure in normoxia and moderate hypoxia. We conclude that across the range of normoxia to severe hypoxia, the major determinants of central motor output and exercise performance switches from a predominantly peripheral origin of fatigue to a hypoxia-sensitive central component of fatigue, probably involving brain

  13. Computational drug repositioning for peripheral arterial disease: prediction of anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Liang-Hui; Annex, Brian H.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) results from atherosclerosis that leads to blocked arteries and reduced blood flow, most commonly in the arteries of the legs. PAD clinical trials to induce angiogenesis to improve blood flow conducted in the last decade have not succeeded. We have recently constructed PADPIN, protein-protein interaction network (PIN) of PAD, and here we combine it with the drug-target relations to identify potential drug targets for PAD. Specifically, the proteins in the PADPIN were classified as belonging to the angiome, immunome, and arteriome, characterizing the processes of angiogenesis, immune response/inflammation, and arteriogenesis, respectively. Using the network-based approach we predict the candidate drugs for repositioning that have potential applications to PAD. By compiling the drug information in two drug databases DrugBank and PharmGKB, we predict FDA-approved drugs whose targets are the proteins annotated as anti-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory, respectively. Examples of pro-angiogenic drugs are carvedilol and urokinase. Examples of anti-inflammatory drugs are ACE inhibitors and maraviroc. This is the first computational drug repositioning study for PAD. PMID:26379552

  14. Computational drug repositioning for peripheral arterial disease: prediction of anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chu, Liang-Hui; Annex, Brian H; Popel, Aleksander S

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) results from atherosclerosis that leads to blocked arteries and reduced blood flow, most commonly in the arteries of the legs. PAD clinical trials to induce angiogenesis to improve blood flow conducted in the last decade have not succeeded. We have recently constructed PADPIN, protein-protein interaction network (PIN) of PAD, and here we combine it with the drug-target relations to identify potential drug targets for PAD. Specifically, the proteins in the PADPIN were classified as belonging to the angiome, immunome, and arteriome, characterizing the processes of angiogenesis, immune response/inflammation, and arteriogenesis, respectively. Using the network-based approach we predict the candidate drugs for repositioning that have potential applications to PAD. By compiling the drug information in two drug databases DrugBank and PharmGKB, we predict FDA-approved drugs whose targets are the proteins annotated as anti-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory, respectively. Examples of pro-angiogenic drugs are carvedilol and urokinase. Examples of anti-inflammatory drugs are ACE inhibitors and maraviroc. This is the first computational drug repositioning study for PAD.

  15. Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Additional Steady-State Acquisition of the Infragenicular Arteries in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Yousef W.; Eiberg, Jonas P.; Logager, Vibeke B.; Just, Sven; Schroeder, Torben V.; Thomsen, Henrik S.

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if addition of infragenicular steady-state (SS) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to first-pass imaging improves diagnostic performance compared with first-pass imaging alone in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) undergoing whole-body (WB) MRA. Twenty consecutive patients with PAD referred to digital-subtraction angiography (DSA) underwent WB-MRA. Using a bolus-chase technique, first-pass WB-MRA was performed from the supra-aortic vessels to the ankles. The blood-pool contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium was used at a dose of 0.03 mmol/kg body weight. Ten minutes after injection of the contrast agent, high-resolution (0.7-mm isotropic voxels) SS-MRA of the infragenicular arteries was performed. Using DSA as the 'gold standard,' sensitivities and specificities for detecting significant arterial stenoses ({>=}50% luminal narrowing) with first-pass WB-MRA, SS-MRA, and combined first-pass and SS-MRA were calculated. Kappa statistics were used to determine intermodality agreement between MRA and DSA. Overall sensitivity and specificity for detecting significant arterial stenoses with first-pass WB-MRA was 0.70 (95% confidence interval 0.61 to 0.78) and 0.97 (0.94 to 0.99), respectively. In first-pass WB-MRA, the lowest sensitivity was in the infragenicular region, with a value of 0.42 (0.23 to 0.63). Combined analysis of first-pass WB-MRA and SS-MRA increased sensitivity to 0.81 (0.60 to 0.93) in the infragenicular region, with specificity of 0.94 (0.88 to 0.97). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting significant arterial stenoses with isolated infragenicular SS-MRA was 0.47 (0.27 to 0.69) and 0.86 (0.78 to 0.91), respectively. Intermodality agreement between MRA and DSA in the infragenicular region was moderate for first-pass WB-MRA ({kappa} = 0.49), fair for SS-MRA ({kappa} = 0.31), and good for combined first-pass/SS-MRA ({kappa} = 0.71). Addition of infragenicular SS-MRA to first-pass WB MRA

  16. An Update on Methods for Revascularization and Expansion of the TASC Lesion Classification to Include Below-the-Knee Arteries: A Supplement to the Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC II)

    PubMed Central

    Jaff, *Michael R.; White, Christopher J.; Hiatt, William R.; Fowkes, Gerry R.; Dormandy, John; Razavi, Mahmood; Reekers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC) guidelines were last updated in 2007 (TASC II) and represented the collaboration of international vascular specialties involved in the management of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Since the publication of TASC II, there have been innovations in endovascular revascularization strategies for patients with PAD. The intent of this publication is to provide a complete anatomic lower limb TASC lesion classification, including the infrapopliteal segment, and an updated literature review of new endovascular techniques and practice patterns employed by vascular specialists today. PMID:26730266

  17. Peripheral venous blood gas analysis: An alternative to arterial blood gas analysis for initial assessment and resuscitation in emergency and intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Shilpi; Rani, Raka; Malviya, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis is the gold standard method for assessment of oxygenation and acid base analysis, yielding valuable information about a variety of disease process. This study is aimed to determine the extent of correlation between arterial and peripheral venous samples for blood gases and acid base status in critically ill and emergency department patients and to evaluate if venous sample may be a better alternative for initial assessment and resuscitation. The prospective study was conducted on 45 patients of either sex in the age group of 15-80 years of intensive care unit and emergency ward. Relevant history, presenting complaints, vital signs, and indication for testing were recorded. Arterial and peripheral venous samples were drawn simultaneously in a pre-heparinized syringe and analyzed immediately for blood gases and acid base status. Mean difference and Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient was used to compare the result. After statistical evaluation, the present study shows minimal mean difference and good correlation (r > 0.9) between arterial and peripheral venous sample for blood gases and acid base status. Correlation in PO2 measurement was poor (r < 0.3). Thus, venous blood may be a useful alternative to arterial blood during blood gas analysis obviating the need for arterial puncture in difficult clinical situation especially trauma patients, for initial emergency department assessment and early stages of resuscitation.

  18. A Near Infrared Spectroscopy-Based Test of Calf Muscle Function in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Brian Lindegaard; Bækgaard, Niels; Quistorff, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    Background The study aims to test a new, simple, and reliable apparatus and procedure for the diagnostics and treatment evaluation of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The test apparatus involves near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) of a main part of the lower leg muscles during isometric flexion and extension of the ankle joint performed with the foot strapped in a specially designed pedal ergometer. Design To evaluate the reproducibility of the new test compared with an existing testing method of treadmill walking. Methods Eleven patients participated in the study: nine patients with claudication and two age-matched patients without claudication. Each patient was tested with an isometric ergometer pedal test and a treadmill test applying NIRS measurements of the anterior tibial and the gastrocnemius muscles (GAS). Tests were repeated three times with randomly selected intervals between individual test runs. Intraclass correlation constant (ICC) was used to describe reproducibility. The ICC was calculated using the area under the NIRS oxygenated hemoglobin (Hbox) curve, the initial velocity of the Hbox recovery curve, force measurements, and walking time. Results The ICC of the GAS was between 0.92–0.95 (foot-pedal) and 0.70–0.98 (tread mill) and of the anterior tibial muscle was between 0.87–0.96 (foot-pedal) and 0.67–0.79 (tread mill). Conclusion In this study, we contribute a new apparatus and test protocol for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) applying NIRS technique and controlled physical activity to evaluate the degree of muscle oxygenation under specific functionally relevant conditions. Thus, we have developed a clinically applicable “easy-to-do” exercise test of patients with chronic PAD which show high reproducibility. PMID:25780325

  19. Covered Stents in the Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Aneurysms: Procedural Results and Midterm Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Beregi, Jean-Paul; Prat, Alain; Willoteaux, Serge; Vasseur, Marc-Antoine; Boularand, Valerie; Desmoucelle, Frederic

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate initial and midterm results of percutaneous treatment of peripheral aneurysms using covered stents. Methods: Between June 1994 and December 1997 we used covered stents (EndoPro System or Passager) on 19 patients with peripheral aneurysms (7 iliac, 5 subclavian, 3 femoral, 3 popliteal, 1 carotid). Results: Successful aneurysm exclusion was achieved in 18 of 19 patients (95%). In the short term (<30 days), one patient died of puncture site hemorrhage complicated by myocardial infarction; two femoral stents were surgically removed because of leakage. At subsequent follow-up (mean 20 months) two further unrelated deaths occurred. At 1 year (intention-to-treat) the stent was patent in 13 of 19 patients (68%) and the aneurysm was excluded in 17 of 19 (89%). Conclusion: Treatment of peripheral aneurysms with covered stents has a high rate of immediate procedural success. Continued exclusion of the aneurysms is achieved in a large proportion of patients but there is a relatively high rate of stent thrombosis.

  20. Peripheral Arterial Disease in Older People with Intellectual Disability in The Netherlands Using the Ankle-Brachial Index: Results of the HA-ID Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, C. F.; Bastiaanse, L. P.; Kranendonk, S. E.; Hilgenkamp, T. I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Older people with an intellectual disability (ID) have been shown to have similar to increased cardiovascular risks as compared to the general population. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD), atherosclerosis distal from the aortic bifurcation, is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of PAD has not been…

  1. Ketoprofen combined with artery graft entubulization improves functional recovery of transected peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Mehrtash, Moein; Nikonam, Nima; Mehrtash, Moied; Amini, Keyvan

    2014-12-01

    The objective was to assess the local effect of ketoprofen on sciatic nerve regeneration and functional recovery. Eighty healthy male white Wistar rats were randomized into four experimental groups of 20 animals each: In the transected group (TC), the left sciatic nerve was transected and nerve cut ends were fixed in the adjacent muscle. In the treatment group the defect was bridged using an artery graft (AG/Keto) filled with 10 microliter ketoprofen (0.1 mg/kg). In the artery graft group (AG), the graft was filled with phosphated-buffer saline alone. In the sham-operated group (SHAM), the sciatic nerve was exposed and manipulated. Each group was subdivided into four subgroups of five animals each and regenerated nerve fibres were studied at 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks post operation. Behavioural testing, sciatic nerve functional study, gastrocnemius muscle mass and morphometric indices showed earlier regeneration of axons in AG/Keto than in AG group (p < 0.05). Immunohistochemical study clearly showed more positive location of reactions to S-100 in AG/Keto than in AG group. When loaded in an artery graft, ketoprofen improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of the sciatic nerve. Local usage of this easily accessible therapeutic medicine is cost saving and avoids the problems associated with systemic administration.

  2. Peripheral blood circular RNA hsa_circ_0124644 can be used as a diagnostic biomarker of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhenzhou; Li, Xuejie; Gao, Chuanyu; Jian, Dongdong; Hao, Peiyuan; Rao, Lixin; Li, Muwei

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of circular RNAs (circRNAs) in the peripheral blood of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and the potential use of circRNAs as diagnostic biomarkers of CAD. We first analysed peripheral blood circRNAs of 12 CAD patients and 12 control individuals by RNA microarray and found that 22 circRNAs were differentially expressed between these two groups: 12 were upregulated, and 10 were downregulated. Then, we selected 5 circRNAs as candidate biomarkers under stricter screening criteria and verified them in another group of subjects consisting of 30 control individuals and 30 CAD patients with different SYNTAX scores. These 5 circRNAs were all remarkably increased in the CAD group. Hsa_circ_0124644 had the largest area under the curve (AUC). We tested hsa_circ_0124644 in an independent cohort consisting of 115 control individuals and 137 CAD patients. After we included the risk factors for CAD, the AUC slightly increased from 0.769 (95% confidence interval = [0.710–0.827], P < 0.001) to 0.804 ([0.751–0.857], P < 0.001), and when combined with hsa_circ_0098964, the diagnostic value slightly increased. Taken together, our results suggest that hsa_circ_0124644 can be used as a diagnostic biomarker of CAD. PMID:28045102

  3. [Identification of endogenous control genes for gene expression studies in peripheral blood of patients with coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Fong, S W; Suhairi, I; Mohamed, M S; Few, L L; Too, W C S; Khoo, B Y; Yussof, Z; Rahman, A R A; Yvonne-Tee, G B

    2013-01-01

    The selection of stable endogenous control genes is critical for normalization of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) data. In this study, we aimed to identify a suitable set of control genes to be used as endogenous references for gene expression evaluation in human peripheral blood samples among coronary artery disease patients. The expression levels of 12 endogenous control genes procured from TATAA Biocenter (Goteborg, Sweden) were measured in five acute coronary syndrome patients and five chronic stable angina patients. Gene expression stability was analyzed using two different software applications i.e geNorm and NormFinder. Results suggested that beta-glucuronidase is the most stable endogenous control, followed by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. The NormFinder analysis further confirmed that beta-glucuronidase and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase were on the first rank order with the most stable expression among endogenous control genes analyzed and 60S acidic ribosomal protein P0. Besides this, the expression levels of 18S rRNA were revealed to be highly variable between coronary heart disease patients. We thus recommend the use of beta-glucuronidase and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase as reference genes for accurate normalization of relative quantities of gene expression levels in coronary artery disease patients using qPCR. Also the use of 18S rRNA as a control gene should be avoided.

  4. Effect of peripheral arterial disease on the onset of lactate threshold during cardiopulmonary exercise test: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Key, Angela; Ali, Tamara; Walker, Paul; Duffy, Nick; Barkat, Mo; Snellgrove, Jayne; Torella, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) is widely used in preoperative assessment and cardiopulmonary rehabilitation. The effect of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) on oxygen delivery (VO2) measured by CPET is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PAD on VO2 measurements during CPET. Methods and analysis We designed a prospective cohort study, which will recruit 30 patients with PAD, who will undergo CPET before and after treatment of iliofemoral occlusive arterial disease. The main outcome measure is the difference in VO2 at the lactate threshold (LT) between the 2 CPETs. The secondary outcome measure is the relationship between change in VO2 at the LT and peak exercise pretreatment and post-treatment and haemodynamic measures of PAD improvement (ankle–brachial index differential). For VO2 changes, only simple paired bivariate comparisons, not multivariate analyses, are planned, due to the small sample size. The correlation between ABI and VO2 rise will be tested by linear regression. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the North West-Lancaster Research and Ethics committee (reference 15/NW/0801). Results will be disseminated through scientific journal and scientific conference presentation. Completion of recruitment is expected by the end of 2016, and submission for publication by March 2017. Trial registration number NCT02657278. PMID:27993904

  5. Mutations in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and in cysthationine beta synthase: is there a link to homocysteine levels in peripheral arterial disease?

    PubMed

    Santos, Maria E R C; das C L E Silva, Francisco; Gomes, Karina B; Fernandes, Ana Paula M; Freitas, Fernanda R; Faria, Mayara C; Mota, Ana Paula L; Carvalho, Maria G

    2011-06-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic disturbance characterized by a progressive obstruction of lower limb arteries. Many risk factors associated with PAD development have being reported in the literature. The present study aimed to investigate whether mutations in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) or in the cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) genes are associated with higher levels of homocysteine and the risk of PAD in patients from Brazil. This study analyzed 39 patients with PAD and 32 without PAD in whom risk factors and C677T mutations in the MTHFR gene and both 844ins68 and T833C mutations in the CBS gene were investigated. Although higher levels of homocysteine could be observed in patients with PAD compared to controls, no association between the increase of homocysteine and the frequency of C677T, 844ins68, and T833C mutations could be observed. The results suggest that these mutations do not appear to be related to either homocysteine levels or the development of the disease. However, hyperhomocysteinemia and smoking are important factors in PAD development.

  6. Effect of Bosentan on Claudication Distance and Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilation in Hispanic Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    De Haro, Joaquin; Bleda, Silvia; Varela, Cesar; Esparza, Leticia; Acin, Francisco

    2016-01-15

    Endothelin (ET) is involved in the etiopathogenesis of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We hypothesized that ET antagonism might improve the endothelial function, inflammatory status, and symptoms in PAD. This pilot randomized clinical trial was designed to determine the clinical efficacy, pleiotropic effects, and safety of dual ET-receptor antagonist bosentan in Hispanic patients with PAD presenting intermittent claudication. The Bosentan Population-Based Randomized Trial for Clinical and Endothelial Function Assessment on Endothelin Antagonism Therapy was a 12-month, randomized, controlled, parallel-group, double-blind, proof-of-concept pilot study evaluating the effect of bosentan on absolute claudication distance (primary efficacy end point), flow-mediated arterial dilation, and C-reactive protein levels (primary pleiotropic end points) in patients with PAD with Rutherford category 1 to 2 of recent diagnosis. Secondary end points included ankle-brachial index, subjective claudication distance, and safety. Of the 629 screened subjects, 56 patients were randomized 1:1 to receive bosentan for 12 weeks (n = 27) or placebo (n = 29). Six months after the initiation, a significant treatment effect in flow-mediated arterial dilation of 2.43 ± 0.3% (95% CI 1.75 to 3.12; p = 0.001), absolute claudication distance of 283 ± 23 m (95% CI 202 to 366; p = 0.01), ankle-brachial index of 0.16 ± 0.03 (95% CI 0.09 to 0.23; p = 0.001), and a decrease in C-reactive protein levels of -2.0 ± 0.5 mg/L (95% CI -2.8 to -1.1; p = 0.02) were observed in the bosentan-treated group compared to the control group. No severe adverse effects were found in the bosentan group. In conclusion, in Hispanic patients with intermittent claudication, bosentan was well tolerated and improved endothelial function and claudication distance as well as inflammatory and hemodynamic states.

  7. Modeling of the blood flow in the lower extremities for dynamic diffuse optical tomography of peripheral artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marone, A.; Hoi, J. W.; Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Shrikhande, G.; Dayal, R.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2015-07-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is caused by a reduction of the internal diameters of the arteries in the upper or lower extremities mainly due to atherosclerosis. If not treated, its worsening may led to a complete occlusion, causing the death of the cells lacking proper blood supply, followed by gangrene that may require chirurgical amputation. We have recently performed a clinical study in which good sensitivities and specificities were achieved with dynamic diffuse optical tomography. To gain a better understanding of the physiological foundations of many of the observed effects, we started to develop a mathematical model for PAD. The model presented in this work is based on a multi-compartment Windkessel model, where the vasculature in the leg and foot is represented by resistors and capacitors, the blood pressure with a voltage drop, and the blood flow with a current. Unlike existing models, the dynamics induced by a thigh-pressure-cuff inflation and deflation during the measurements are taken into consideration. This is achieved by dynamically varying the resistances of the large veins and arteries. By including the effects of the thigh-pressure cuff, we were able to explain many of the effects observed during our dynamic DOT measurements, including the hemodynamics of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration changes. The model was implemented in MATLAB and the simulations were normalized and compared with the blood perfusion obtained from healthy, PAD and diabetic patients. Our preliminary results show that in unhealthy patients the total system resistance is sensibly higher than in healthy patients.

  8. Andreas Grüntzig's balloon catheter for angioplasty of peripheral arteries (PTA) is 25 years old.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, A; Schlumpf, M

    1999-02-01

    History of Andreas Grüntzig's time spent in Angiology and Radiology of the Zürich University Hospital (1969-1975). First, the pioneer of catheter therapy discovered that the Achilles tendon reflex is significantly prolonged during claudication pain. Furthermore, he participated actively in the clinical evaluation of Doppler ultrasound. After a stay in the Aggertalklinik (Engelskirchen near Köln, Germany), where he learnt Charles Dotter's original procedure with Eberhard Zeitler, he introduced catheter therapy of peripheral arteries in Zürich. In the same period he developed a new, rigid, sausage-shaped balloon catheter (polyvinylchloride), manufactured the device on his kitchen table together with his wife Michaela, Maria and Walter Schlumpf, and used it first on February 12, 1974 in a patient with intermittent claudication due to subtotal stenosis of the superficial femoral artery. The first successful dilatation of an iliac artery stenosis by his double-lumen catheter, which was modified later on into the famous coronary catheter, followed on January 23, 1975. Soon, the innovative catheter became commercially available (Cook and Schneider Companies). Andreas Grüntzig not only excelled in pioneering novel techniques, but also in patient care, in a prospective follow-up study of his own 242 patients lasting 15 years (results summarized in this article), in the teaching of Swiss scholars like Felix Mahler, Ernst Schneider and Bernhard Meier and many more in the world, and in organizing life demonstrations for large numbers of participants. His career in Cardiology, his work in Atlanta Georgia, USA, and his early tragic death in an airplane accident are briefly mentioned.

  9. Concentrations of C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, and haptoglobin in uterine arterial and peripheral blood in bitches with pyometra.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Roman; Kostro, Krzysztof; Szczubiał, Marek

    2013-09-15

    Pyometra is a life-threatening reproductive disorder that affects the uterus of female dogs. This study was designed to identify the possible indicators of uterine inflammation by comparing C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), and haptoglobin (Hp) concentrations in uterine arterial and peripheral venous blood in bitches with open- and closed-cervix pyometra. CRP, SAA, and Hp concentrations were higher in bitches with closed-cervix pyometra irrespective of the site of blood collection. Higher acute-phase protein concentrations were observed in peripheral compared with uterine arterial blood in bitches with closed-cervix pyometra, whereas the levels were comparable in dogs with open-cervix pyometra. Our results indicate that mean acute-phase protein concentrations differ according to pyometra type/severity and blood source and suggest the possible use of peripheral blood levels of CRP, SAA, and Hp to monitor inflammation during the course of pyometra.

  10. Single injection protocol for coronary and lower extremity CT angiographies in patients suspected for peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Ashish; Kondo, Takeshi; Amanuma, Makoto; Oida, Akitsugu; Sano, Tomonari; Sachin, Saboo S.; Takase, Shinichi; Rybicki, Frank J.; Kumamaru, Kanako K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the feasibility of a single injection protocol for coronary CT angiography (CTA) and lower extremity CTA in patients suspected for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). This prospective observational study included a total of 103 patients who showed an ankle brachial index ≤0.9 and underwent the single injection protocol for coronary and lower extremity CTA. All CTAs used iodinated contrast (weight × 0.06 mL/s × 20 seconds). A prospective Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated coronary CTA was performed, followed by helical lower extremity CTA beginning 9 seconds after coronary CTA. Using catheter angiography as reference standard, diagnostic ability of CTA was evaluated. The mean total volume of iodinated contrast used was 70 ± 14 mL. Contrast opacification in the superficial femoral artery was adequate (408 ± 97  Hounsfield Units [HU]) and PAD was detected in 72.8% (75/103). The estimated radiation doses for lower extremity and coronary CTA were 3.6 ± 1.2 and 5.5 ± 4.5 mSv. A significant coronary stenosis was detected in 47 patients (45.6%). Coronary CT image quality was recorded as excellent in 86.4%, acceptable in 11.7%, and unacceptable for 1.9%. Contrast opacification within the superficial femoral artery was adequate in all cases while 27.2% needed an additional scan below the calf to capture the contrast bolus arrival in the smaller lower extremity vessels. Segment based sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values were 57.9%, 97.9%, 73.8%, and 95.9% for the coronary CTA, and 63.4%, 91.5%, 76.3%, and 85.3% for peripheral CTA. A single injection protocol for coronary CTA and lower extremity CTA is feasible with a relatively small volume of iodinated contrast. PMID:27861382

  11. Transcatheter stenting of the right ventricular outflow tract augments pulmonary arterial growth in symptomatic infants with right ventricular outflow tract obstruction and hypercyanotic spells.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Eimear; Morgan, Conall T; Oslizlok, Paul; Kenny, Damien; Walsh, Kevin P; McMahon, Colin J

    2016-10-01

    We retrospectively reviewed all the children with right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, hypoplastic pulmonary annulus, and pulmonary arteries who underwent stenting of the right ventricular outflow tract for hypercyanotic spells at our institution between January, 2008 and December, 2013; nine patients who underwent cardiac catheterisation at a median age of 39 days (range 12-60 days) and weight of 3.6 kg (range 2.6-4.3 kg) were identified. The median number of stents placed was one stent (range 1-4). The median oxygen saturation increased from 60% to 96%. The median right pulmonary artery size increased from 3.3 to 5.5 mm (-2.68 to -0.92 Z-score), and the median left pulmonary artery size increased from 3.4 to 5.5 mm (-1.93 to 0 Z-scores). Among all, one patient developed transient pulmonary haemorrhage, and one patient had pericardial tamponade requiring drainage. Complete repair of tetralogy of Fallot +/- atrioventricular septal defect or double-outlet right ventricle was achieved in all nine patients. Transcatheter stent alleviation of the right ventricular outflow tract obstruction resolves hypercyanotic spells and allows reasonable growth of the pulmonary arteries to facilitate successful surgical repair. This represents a viable alternative to placement of a systemic-to-pulmonary artery shunt, particularly in small neonates.

  12. A single serving of blueberry (V. corymbosum) modulates peripheral arterial dysfunction induced by acute cigarette smoking in young volunteers: a randomized-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Del Bo', Cristian; Porrini, Marisa; Fracassetti, Daniela; Campolo, Jonica; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy; Riso, Patrizia

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette smoking causes oxidative stress, hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. Polyphenol-rich foods may prevent these conditions. We investigated the effect of a single serving of fresh-frozen blueberry intake on peripheral arterial function and arterial stiffness in young smokers. Sixteen male smokers were recruited for a 3-armed randomized-controlled study with the following experimental conditions: smoking treatment (one cigarette); blueberry treatment (300 g of blueberry) + smoking; control treatment (300 mL of water with sugar) + smoking. Each treatment was separated by one week of wash-out period. The blood pressure, heart rate, peripheral arterial function (reactive hyperemia and Framingham reactive hyperemia), and arterial stiffness (digital augmentation index, digital augmentation index normalized for a heart rate of 75 bpm) were measured before and 20 min after smoking with Endo-PAT2000. Smoking impaired the blood pressure, heart rate and peripheral arterial function, but did not affect the arterial stiffness. Blueberry consumption counteracted the impairment of the reactive hyperemia index induced by smoking (-4.4 ± 0.8% blueberry treatment vs. -22.0 ± 1.1% smoking treatment, p < 0.01) and Framingham reactive hyperemia (+28.3 ± 19.2% blueberry treatment vs. -42.8 ± 20.0% smoking treatment, p < 0.0001), and the increase of systolic blood pressure (+8.4 ± 0.02% blueberry treatment vs. +13.1 ± 0.02% smoking treatment, mmHg, p < 0.05) after cigarette smoking. No effect was observed for arterial stiffness and other vital signs. In conclusion, data obtained suggest a protective role of blueberry on reactive hyperemia, Framingham reactive hyperemia, and systolic blood pressure in subjects exposed to smoke of one cigarette. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms involved.

  13. Effectiveness of a New Exercise Program after Lower Limb Arterial Blood Flow Surgery in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jakubsevičienė, Edita; Vasiliauskas, Donatas; Velička, Linas; Kubilius, Raimondas; Milinavičienė, Eglė; Venclovienė, Jonė

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a supervised exercise program (SEP) plus at home nonsupervised exercise therapy (non-SET) on functional status, quality of life (QoL) and hemodynamic response in post-lower-limb bypass surgery patients. Results: One hundred and seventeen patients were randomized to an intervention (n = 57) or a control group (n = 60). A new individual SEP was designed for patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and applied to the studied subjects of the intervention group who also continued non-SET at home, whereas those assigned to the control group received just usual SEP according to a common cardiovascular program. The participants of the study were assessed by a 6-min walking test (6 MWT), an ankle-brachial index (ABI), and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36) of QoL at baseline, at 1 and 6 months after surgery. A significant improvement was observed in the walked distance in the intervention group after 6 months compared with the control group (p < 0.001). The intervention group had significantly higher QoL score in the physical and mental component of SF-36 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: A 6-month application of the new SEP and non-SET at home has yielded significantly better results in walking distance and QoL in the intervention group than in the controls. PMID:25105547

  14. Comparison of two progressive treadmill tests in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Riebe, D; Patterson, R B; Braun, C M

    2001-11-01

    In a vascular rehabilitation program, 28% of our frail elderly patients are unable to be tested with traditional progressive exercise protocols at program entry due to the high (2.0 miles/h or 3.2 km/h) initial treadmill speeds. The purpose of this investigation was to compare a new progressive treadmill protocol which has a reduced initial speed (1.0 mile/h or 1.6 km/h) to an established protocol performed at 2.0 miles/h (3.2 km/h) to determine the comparability and reproducibility of the new protocol. Eleven patients with arterial claudication performed three symptom-limited exercise tests in random order. Two tests used the new protocol while the remaining trial used the established protocol. Claudication pain was measured using a 5-point scale. Oxygen consumption, heart rate, minute ventilation, respiratory exchange ratio and blood pressure at peak exercise were similar among the three trials. There were strong intraclass correlations for peak oxygen consumption (r = 0.97), onset of claudication (r = 0.96) and maximum walking time (r = 0.98) between the two trials using the new protocol. There was also a significant correlation between the new protocol and the established protocol for peak oxygen consumption (r = 0.90) and maximum walking time (r = 0.89). The new progressive treadmill protocol represents a valid, reliable protocol for patients with arterial claudication. This protocol may be useful for testing patients with a low functional capacity so that clinically appropriate exercise prescriptions can be established and the efficacy of treatments can be determined.

  15. [Recanalization of the peripheral arteries by laser thermal balloon angioplasty. 2 years of clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Riambau Alonso, V; Masotti Centol, M; Latorre Vilallonga, J; Viver Manresa, E; Crexells Figueres, C; Oriol Palou, A

    1991-01-01

    Laser angioplasty represents an attractive alternative to overcome the limitations of balloon angioplasty. We describe our results with laser thermal balloon angioplasty (LTBA) in the treatment of atherosclerosis obliterans in the lower limbs after two years clinical follow up. We also analyse the influence of lesion characteristics on immediate results. Thirty seven patients (34 men), whose mean age was 58 +/- 9 years, were included in this study. Occlusive arterial disease (Fontaine stage II-IV), with 39 significant haemodynamic arterial lesions were present in all of them. Ankle/brachial Doppler index was O,51 +/- 0,17. Eighteen lesions were located in the iliac area (13 stenoses 2,3 +/- 1 cm of length and 5 occlusions 4,2 +/- 3 cm) and 21 lesions in femoro-popliteal area (5 stenoses 2,6 +/- 2 cm and 16 occlusions 5,7 +/- 3 cm). A percutaneous procedure was used in 38 cases and only in one case a femoral dissection was necessary. The laser source was argon in 26 cases and Nd-YAG in 13. The overall immediate angiographic and clinical success was 85% (89% in iliac lesions and 81% in femoropopliteal lesions; 100% in stenoses and 70% in occlusions). The presence of occlusion (p less than 0,01) and/or calcium (p less than O,05) influenced negatively the immediate results. No major complications were observed. Seven (17%) minor complications occurred, but no emergency surgery was necessary. The ankle/brachial Doppler index after treatment was 0,82 +/- 0,21. Cumulative clinical patency was 91% for successfully treated patients after two years follow up. We conclude that LTBA represents an effective and less aggressive way to treat atherosclerosis obliterans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Racial disparities in outcomes of endovascular procedures for peripheral arterial disease: An evaluation of California hospitals, 2005–2009

    PubMed Central

    Loja, Melissa N.; Brunson, Ann; Li, Chin-Shang; Carson, John G.; White, Richard H.; Romano, Patrick S.; Hedayati, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Background Racial/ethnic disparities in treatment outcomes of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are well documented. Compared to non-Hispanic (NH) whites, blacks and Hispanics are more likely to undergo amputation and less likely to undergo bypass surgery for limb salvage. Endovascular procedures are being increasingly performed as first line of therapy for PAD. In this study, we examined the outcomes of endovascular PAD treatments based on race/ethnicity in a contemporary large population-based study. Methods We used Patient Discharge Data (PDD) from California’s Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD) to identify all patients over the age of 35 who underwent a lower extremity arterial intervention from 2005 to 2009. A look-back period of five years was used to exclude all patients with prior lower extremity arterial revascularization procedures or major amputation. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compare amputation-free survival and time to death within 365 days. Logistic regression was used for comparison of 1-month myocardial infarction (MI), 1-month major amputation, 1-month all-cause mortality, 12-month major amputation, 12-month reintervention, and 12-month all-cause mortality rates among NH white, black, and Hispanic patients. These analyses were adjusted for age, gender, insurance status, severity of PAD, comorbidities, history of coronary artery angioplasty or bypass surgery, or history of carotid endarterectomy. Results Between 2005 and 2009, a total of 41,507 individuals underwent PAD interventions, 25,635 (61.7%) of whom underwent endovascular procedures. There were 17,433 (68%) NH whites, 4,417 (17.2%) Hispanics, 1,979 (7.7%) blacks, 1,163 (4.5%) Asian/Native Hawaiians, and 643 (2.5%) others in this group. There was a statistically significant difference in the amputation-free survival within 365 days among the NH white, Hispanic and black groups (P < 0.0001); the hazard ratio for amputation within 365 days was 1

  17. Impact of betablockers on general and local outcome in patients hospitalized for lower extremity peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Mirault, Tristan; Galloula, Alexandre; Cambou, Jean-Pierre; Lacroix, Philippe; Aboyans, Victor; Boulon, Carine; Constans, Joel; Bura-Riviere, Alessandra; Messas, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) is one manifestation of atherosclerosis. Patients with PAD have an increased rate of mortality due to concurrent coronary artery disease and hypertension. Betablockers (BB) may, therefore, be prescribed, especially in case of heart failure. However, BB safety in PAD is controversial, because of presumed peripheral hemodynamic consequences of BB that could lead to worsening of symptoms in patients with PAD. In this context, we aimed to determine the impact of BB on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and amputation rate at 1 year after hospitalization for PAD from the COPART Registry population. This is a prospective multicenter observational study collecting data from consecutive patients hospitalized for PAD in vascular medicine departments of 4 academic hospitals in France. Patients with, either claudication, critical limb ischemia or acute lower limb ischemia related to a documented PAD were included. We compared the outcomes of patients with BB versus those without BB in their prescription list at hospital discharge. The mean age of the study population was 70.9 years, predominantly composed of males (71%). Among the 1267 patients at admission, 28% were treated by BB for hypertension, prior myocardial infarction or heart failure. During their hospital stay, 40% underwent revascularization (including bypass surgery 29% and angioplasty 74%), 17% required an amputation, and 5% died. In a multivariate analysis, only prior myocardial infarction was found associated with BB prescription with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.11, P < 0.001. Conversely, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or PAD with ulcer impeded BB prescription (OR: 0.57 and 0.64, P = 0.007; P = 0.001, respectively). One-year overall mortality of patients with BB did not differ from those without (23% vs. 23%, P = 0.95). The 1-year amputation rate did not differ either (4% vs. 6%, P = 0.14). Patients hospitalized for PAD with a

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging-based computational modelling of blood flow and nanomedicine deposition in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Shaolie S; Zhang, Yongjie; Fu, Xiaoyi; Brunner, Gerd; Singh, Jaykrishna; Hughes, Thomas J R; Shah, Dipan; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2015-05-06

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is generally attributed to the progressive vascular accumulation of lipoproteins and circulating monocytes in the vessel walls leading to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. This is known to be regulated by the local vascular geometry, haemodynamics and biophysical conditions. Here, an isogeometric analysis framework is proposed to analyse the blood flow and vascular deposition of circulating nanoparticles (NPs) into the superficial femoral artery (SFA) of a PAD patient. The local geometry of the blood vessel and the haemodynamic conditions are derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), performed at baseline and at 24 months post intervention. A dramatic improvement in blood flow dynamics is observed post intervention. A 500% increase in peak flow rate is measured in vivo as a consequence of luminal enlargement. Furthermore, blood flow simulations reveal a 32% drop in the mean oscillatory shear index, indicating reduced disturbed flow post intervention. The same patient information (vascular geometry and blood flow) is used to predict in silico in a simulation of the vascular deposition of systemically injected nanomedicines. NPs, targeted to inflammatory vascular molecules including VCAM-1, E-selectin and ICAM-1, are predicted to preferentially accumulate near the stenosis in the baseline configuration, with VCAM-1 providing the highest accumulation (approx. 1.33 and 1.50 times higher concentration than that of ICAM-1 and E-selectin, respectively). Such selective deposition of NPs within the stenosis could be effectively used for the detection and treatment of plaques forming in the SFA. The presented MRI-based computational protocol can be used to analyse data from clinical trials to explore possible correlations between haemodynamics and disease progression in PAD patients, and potentially predict disease occurrence as well as the outcome of an intervention.

  19. Development of a New Hybrid Biodegradable Drug-Eluting Stent for the Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hee; Kim, Soon-Joong; Park, Se-Il; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Hong, Myeong-Ki; Jang, Yangsoo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a new biodegradable stent for peripheral artery disease (PAD) that could provide sufficient radial force to maintain long-term patency and flexibility. All self-expandable hybrid biodegradable stents were designed by using a knitting structure composed of poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) and nitinol. Four different types of stents were implanted in 20 iliac arteries in 10 mini pigs as follows: a bare-metal stent (BMS) (group 1, n = 5), a drug-free hybrid stent (group 2, n = 5), a 50% (50 : 100, w/w) paclitaxel (PTX)/poly-lactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA; fast PTX-releasing form) hybrid stent (group 3, n = 5), and a 30% (30 : 100, w/w) PTX/PLGA (slow PTX-releasing form) hybrid stent (group 4, n = 5). We performed follow-up angiography and intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS) at 4 and 8 weeks. In a comparison of groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, less diameter stenosis was observed in the angiographic analysis for group 4 at the 4-week follow-up (19.0%  ±  12.7% versus 39.3%  ±  18.1% versus 46.8%  ±  38.0% versus 4.8%  ±  4.2%, resp.; p = 0.032). IVUS findings further suggested that the neointima of the patients in group 4 tended to be lesser than those of the others. Our new biodegradable 30% PTX/PLGA (slow-releasing form) stent showed more favorable results for patency than the other stent types.

  20. Development of a New Hybrid Biodegradable Drug-Eluting Stent for the Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon-Joong; Park, Se-Il; Jang, Yangsoo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a new biodegradable stent for peripheral artery disease (PAD) that could provide sufficient radial force to maintain long-term patency and flexibility. All self-expandable hybrid biodegradable stents were designed by using a knitting structure composed of poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) and nitinol. Four different types of stents were implanted in 20 iliac arteries in 10 mini pigs as follows: a bare-metal stent (BMS) (group 1, n = 5), a drug-free hybrid stent (group 2, n = 5), a 50% (50 : 100, w/w) paclitaxel (PTX)/poly-lactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA; fast PTX-releasing form) hybrid stent (group 3, n = 5), and a 30% (30 : 100, w/w) PTX/PLGA (slow PTX-releasing form) hybrid stent (group 4, n = 5). We performed follow-up angiography and intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS) at 4 and 8 weeks. In a comparison of groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, less diameter stenosis was observed in the angiographic analysis for group 4 at the 4-week follow-up (19.0%  ±  12.7% versus 39.3%  ±  18.1% versus 46.8%  ±  38.0% versus 4.8%  ±  4.2%, resp.; p = 0.032). IVUS findings further suggested that the neointima of the patients in group 4 tended to be lesser than those of the others. Our new biodegradable 30% PTX/PLGA (slow-releasing form) stent showed more favorable results for patency than the other stent types. PMID:27999810

  1. Lipoprotein (a) and risk of coronary, cerebrovascular and peripheral artery disease; the EPIC-Norfolk prospective population study

    PubMed Central

    Gurdasani, Deepti; Sjouke, Barbara; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Hovingh, G. Kees; Luben, Robert N.; Wainwright, Nicholas W. J.; Pomilla, Cristina; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Sandhu, Manjinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective While the association between circulating levels of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and stroke is well established, its role in risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD) remains unclear. Here, we examine the association between Lp(a) levels and PAD in a large prospective cohort. To contextualise these findings, we also examined the association between Lp(a) levels and risk of stroke and CAD and studied the role of LDL as an effect modifier of Lp(a) associated cardiovascular risk. Methods and Results Lp(a) levels were measured in apparently healthy participants in the EPIC-Norfolk cohort. Cox regression was used to quantify the association between Lp(a) levels and risk of PAD, stroke and CAD outcomes. During 212,981 person-years at risk, a total of 2365 CAD, 284 ischemic stroke and 596 PAD events occurred in 18,720 participants. Lp(a) was associated with PAD and CAD outcomes but not with ischemic stroke (HR per 2.7 fold increase in Lp(a) of 1.37, 95% CI 1.25-1.50, 1.13, 95% CI 1.04-1.22 and 0.91, 95%CI 0.79-1.03 respectively). LDL-C levels did not modify these associations. Conclusion Lp(a) levels were associated with future PAD and CAD events. The association between Lp(a) and cardiovascular disease was not modified by LDL-C levels. PMID:23065826

  2. Effects of bosentan on peripheral endothelial function in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hirashiki, Akihiro; Adachi, Shiro; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Kamimura, Yoshihiro; Shimokata, Shigetake; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Murohara, Toyoaki; Kondo, Takahisa

    2016-06-01

    Endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) have been shown to improve the prognosis of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the effect of the oral dual ERA bosentan on peripheral endothelial dysfunction (PED), as assessed by flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), in patients with pulmonary hypertension is not well characterized. We investigated the effect of bosentan on PED in patients with PAH or inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). A total of 18 patients with PAH and 8 with CTEPH were treated with bosentan. All patients underwent FMD assessment before and after 3 months of bosentan treatment. Whereas FMD increased from 6.01% ± 2.42% at baseline to 8.07% ± 3.18% after 3 months (P < 0.0001) in patients with PAH, those with CTEPH showed no change in FMD after bosentan therapy. In addition, FMD at baseline showed no correlation with pulmonary vascular resistance (r = 0.09) or plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels (r = -0.23) in patients with PAH. Bosentan treatment ameliorated PED in patients with PAH but not in those with inoperable CTEPH. In addition, FMD did not correlate with PAH severity.

  3. Dynamic analysis with a fractional-order chaotic system for estimation of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chien-Ming; Du, Yi-Chun; Wu, Jian-Xing; Lin, Chia-Hung; Ho, Yueh-Ren; Chen, Tainsong

    2013-08-01

    Lower-extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is caused by narrowing or occlusion of vessels in patients like type 2 diabetes mellitus, the elderly and smokers. Patients with PAD are mostly asymptomatic; typical early symptoms of this limb-threatening disorder are intermittent claudication and leg pain, suggesting the necessity for accurate diagnosis by invasive angiography and ankle-brachial pressure index. This index acts as a gold standard reference for PAD diagnosis and categorizes its severity into normal, low-grade and high-grade, with respective cut-off points of ≥0.9, 0.9-0.5 and <0.5. PAD can be assessed using photoplethysmography as a diagnostic screening tool, displaying changes in pulse transit time and shape, and dissimilarities of these changes between lower limbs. The present report proposed photoplethysmogram with fractional-order chaotic system to assess PAD in 14 diabetics and 11 healthy adults, with analysis of dynamic errors based on various butterfly motion patterns, and color relational analysis as classifier for pattern recognition. The results show that the classification of PAD severity among these testees was achieved with high accuracy and efficiency. This noninvasive methodology potentially provides timing and accessible feedback to patients with asymptomatic PAD and their physicians for further invasive diagnosis or strict management of risk factors to intervene in the disease progression.

  4. A Longitudinal Study of Remodeling in a Revised Peripheral Artery Bypass Graft Using 3D Ultrasound Imaging and Computational Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Leotta, Daniel F.; Beach, Kirk W.; Riley, James J.; Aliseda, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    We report a study of the role of hemodynamic shear stress in the remodeling and failure of a peripheral artery bypass graft. Three separate scans of a femoral to popliteal above-knee bypass graft were taken over the course of a 16 month period following a revision of the graft. The morphology of the lumen is reconstructed from data obtained by a custom 3D ultrasound system. Numerical simulations are performed with the patient-specific geometries and physiologically realistic flow rates. The ultrasound reconstructions reveal two significant areas of remodeling: a stenosis with over 85% reduction in area, which ultimately caused graft failure, and a poststenotic dilatation or widening of the lumen. Likewise, the simulations reveal a complicated hemodynamic environment within the graft. Preliminary comparisons with in vivo velocimetry also showed qualitative agreement with the flow dynamics observed in the simulations. Two distinct flow features are discerned and are hypothesized to directly initiate the observed in vivo remodeling. First, a flow separation occurs at the stenosis. A low shear recirculation region subsequently develops distal to the stenosis. The low shear region is thought to be conducive to smooth muscle cell proliferation and intimal growth. A poststenotic jet issues from the stenosis and subsequently impinges onto the lumen wall. The lumen dilation is thought to be a direct result of the high shear stress and high frequency pressure fluctuations associated with the jet impingement. PMID:21428682

  5. Imaging techniques to evaluate cell therapy in peripheral artery disease: state of the art and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Schiano, Concetta; Casamassimi, Amelia; Zullo, Alberto; Soricelli, Andrea; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Napoli, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    Cell-based therapies, as potential approach to cure peripheral artery disease (PAD), have been clinically investigated after promising results in preclinical models. The so far published studies are very heterogeneous, as different cell sources, cell types, amounts of administered cells and delivering strategies have been used. Overall, cell therapies for PAD bring about a general improvement of patient's clinical condition, even though conclusions cannot be established due to the small size and non-randomized design of these trials. In this context, non-invasive imaging techniques, aimed to monitor angiogenesis and neovascularization after cell therapy, will help the follow-up of clinical studies. However, still much work is needed to establish advanced imaging procedure to overcome the limitation of the current techniques and to accumulate more data in large populations of patients. Here, we report the main imaging techniques employed to evaluate the outcome of the different cell-based therapies in PAD. Moreover, we focus on both published and ongoing clinical trials utilizing cell therapy in PAD.

  6. Gender differences in the prevalence and management of metabolic syndrome and its components in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Nael, Raha; Montgomery, Polly S; Scott, Kristy J; Blevins, Steve M; Gardner, Andrew W

    2011-11-01

    We compared the prevalence and management of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in men and women with peripheral artery disease (PAD). A total of 70 men and 70 women with PAD were evaluated for presence of MetS. There was no significant gender difference in presence of MetS (P = .399) and the number of MetS components (P = .411). Among PAD patients with each MetS component, there was no significant gender difference in the use (P = .617) and number (P = .716) of blood pressure medications, the use (P = .593) and number (P = .591) of lipid-lowering medications, and the number (P = .155) of diabetic medications. Significantly more women were treated with diabetic medications compared with men (85 vs 57%, P = .026). The prevalence and management of MetS and its components was similar between men and women with PAD, except that more women were treated for diabetes. Patients with PAD having MetS did not receive optimal medical management.

  7. Immunological status in patients with lower limb amputation due to peripheral arterial disease before and after comprehensive rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Štefančič, Martin; Prešern-Štrukelj, Metka; Vidmar, Gaj; Kotnik, Vladimir; Kopitarl, Andreja Nataša; Ihan, Alojz

    2015-03-01

    The immunological status before and after a comprehensive rehabilitation program was studied. Seven persons (4 males, 3 females, mean age 71.4 years) after lower limb amputation due to peripheral arterial disease (PAD) were subject to standard comprehensive rehabilitation program for amputees of four-week duration, which included training in activities of daily living, daily exercise of various types, training of crutch-assisted gait and use of leg prosthesis, and mild transcutaneous electrical stimulation. Before and after rehabilitation, peripherial blood was collected and the number and ratio of white blood cells were determined and analysed for the expression of cell surface antigens (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD25, CD69), cytokines (IFN-gamma, IL-4) and phagocytosis/oxidative killing functional tests. Due to strict patient selection criteria excluding serious accompanying disease, immunological parameters were within normal limits already before rehabilitation. After rehabilitation, an increase in oxidative burst was observed in monocytes and neutrophil granulocytes, but statistically significant only in monocytes. The expression of CD69 molecules by T cells and monocytes was significantly increased, as well as the expression of IL-4 by T cells. A significant decrease in the ratio of CD4 to CD8 cells was also found, but not a clinically critical one. It can therefore be concluded that the comprehensive rehabilitation treatment in patients with lower limb amputation due to PAD led to some--prevailingly positive--immunological changes, which were consistent with the patients' improved physical condition and clinical status.

  8. Attitudes and behavior of peripheral arterial disease patients toward influencing their physician's prescription of cholesterol-lowering medication.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Mary M; Mazor, Kathleen M; Reed, George; Pagoto, Sherry; Graff, Rex; Merriam, Philip; Kibbe, Melina; Greenland, Philip; Ockene, Judy; Olendzki, Barbara; Huimin Tao; Ockene, Ira

    2010-04-01

    Among 355 peripheral arterial disease (PAD) patients with low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels > or = 70 mg/dl, we assessed knowledge regarding optimal LDL levels and the importance of LDL-C-lowering therapy. We also assessed PAD participants' behaviors and attitudes regarding their engagement with their physician in treatment decisions for LDL-C lowering. The average baseline LDL-C level of participants was 103.4 mg/dl +/- 30.7 mg/dl. Seventy-six percent of participants were taking at least one cholesterol-lowering medication. Sixty-six percent were unable to define their optimal LDL-C. Only 47% strongly agreed that their own actions and decisions could reduce their LDL-C. Just 29.8% were aware that patients who request specific medications from their physician were more likely to receive them, and 16% had asked their physician whether they should be taking more cholesterol-lowering medication. These findings suggest that further study is needed to identify effective interventions to educate PAD patients and their physicians about the importance of cholesterol-lowering therapy and to encourage PAD patients to participate with their physician in decisions regarding cholesterol-lowering treatment. Clinical Trial Registration - URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00217919.

  9. Novel screening metric for the identification of at-risk peripheral artery disease patients using administrative claims data.

    PubMed

    Bali, Vishal; Yermilov, Irina; Coutts, Kayla; Legorreta, Antonio P

    2016-02-01

    Despite high morbidity and mortality associated with peripheral artery disease (PAD), it remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. The objective of this study was to develop a screening metric to identify undiagnosed patients at high risk of developing PAD using administrative data. Commercial claims data from 2010 to 2012 were utilized to develop and internally validate a PAD screening metric. Medicare data were used for external validation. The study population included adults, aged 30 years or older, with new cases of PAD identified using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnosis/procedure codes or the Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) codes. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted to determine PAD risk factors used in the development of the screening metric for the identification of at-risk PAD patients. The cumulative incidence of PAD was 6.6%. Sex, age, congestive heart failure, hypertension, chronic renal insufficiency, stroke, diabetes, acute myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack, hyperlipidemia, and angina were significant risk factors for PAD. A cut-off score of ⩾20 yielded sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and c-statistics of 83.5%, 60.0%, 12.8%, 98.1%, and 0.78, respectively. By identifying patients at high risk for developing PAD using only administrative data, the use of the current pre-screening metric could reduce the number of diagnostic tests, while still capturing those patients with undiagnosed PAD.

  10. ROS-responsive microspheres for on demand antioxidant therapy in a model of diabetic peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Poole, Kristin M; Nelson, Christopher E; Joshi, Rucha V; Martin, John R; Gupta, Mukesh K; Haws, Skylar C; Kavanaugh, Taylor E; Skala, Melissa C; Duvall, Craig L

    2015-02-01

    A new microparticle-based delivery system was synthesized from reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive poly(propylene sulfide) (PPS) and tested for "on demand" antioxidant therapy. PPS is hydrophobic but undergoes a phase change to become hydrophilic upon oxidation and thus provides a useful platform for ROS-demanded drug release. This platform was tested for delivery of the promising anti-inflammatory and antioxidant therapeutic molecule curcumin, which is currently limited in use in its free form due to poor pharmacokinetic properties. PPS microspheres efficiently encapsulated curcumin through oil-in-water emulsion and provided sustained, on demand release that was modulated in vitro by hydrogen peroxide concentration. The cytocompatible, curcumin-loaded microspheres preferentially targeted and scavenged intracellular ROS in activated macrophages, reduced in vitro cell death in the presence of cytotoxic levels of ROS, and decreased tissue-level ROS in vivo in the diabetic mouse hind limb ischemia model of peripheral arterial disease. Interestingly, due to the ROS scavenging behavior of PPS, the blank microparticles also showed inherent therapeutic properties that were synergistic with the effects of curcumin in these assays. Functionally, local delivery of curcumin-PPS microspheres accelerated recovery from hind limb ischemia in diabetic mice, as demonstrated using non-invasive imaging techniques. This work demonstrates the potential for PPS microspheres as a generalizable vehicle for ROS-demanded drug release and establishes the utility of this platform for improving local curcumin bioavailability for treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases.

  11. A longitudinal study of remodeling in a revised peripheral artery bypass graft using 3D ultrasound imaging and computational hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    McGah, Patrick M; Leotta, Daniel F; Beach, Kirk W; Riley, James J; Aliseda, Alberto

    2011-04-01

    We report a study of the role of hemodynamic shear stress in the remodeling and failure of a peripheral artery bypass graft. Three separate scans of a femoral to popliteal above-knee bypass graft were taken over the course of a 16 month period following a revision of the graft. The morphology of the lumen is reconstructed from data obtained by a custom 3D ultrasound system. Numerical simulations are performed with the patient-specific geometries and physiologically realistic flow rates. The ultrasound reconstructions reveal two significant areas of remodeling: a stenosis with over 85% reduction in area, which ultimately caused graft failure, and a poststenotic dilatation or widening of the lumen. Likewise, the simulations reveal a complicated hemodynamic environment within the graft. Preliminary comparisons with in vivo velocimetry also showed qualitative agreement with the flow dynamics observed in the simulations. Two distinct flow features are discerned and are hypothesized to directly initiate the observed in vivo remodeling. First, a flow separation occurs at the stenosis. A low shear recirculation region subsequently develops distal to the stenosis. The low shear region is thought to be conducive to smooth muscle cell proliferation and intimal growth. A poststenotic jet issues from the stenosis and subsequently impinges onto the lumen wall. The lumen dilation is thought to be a direct result of the high shear stress and high frequency pressure fluctuations associated with the jet impingement.

  12. The ARIC carotid MRI study of blood cellular markers: an inverse association of monocyte myeloperoxidase content with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Matijevic, Nena; Wu, Kenneth K; Nidkarni, Nivedita; Heiss, Gerardo; Folsom, Aaron R

    2011-04-01

    We evaluated the association of blood monocyte and platelet activation markers with the risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in a multicenter study of atherosclerosis among African American and Caucasian patients. Flow cytometric analysis of blood cells was performed in 1791 participants (209 cases with PAD and 1582 noncases) from the cross-sectional Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Carotid Magnetic Resonance Imaging ([MRI] ARIC Carotid MRI) Study to assess platelet glycoproteins IIb and IIIa, P-selectin, CD40 ligand, platelet-leukocyte aggregates, monocyte lipopolysaccharide receptor, toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1, cyclooxygenase 2, and myeloperoxidase. Multivariate regression analyses evaluated the association of cellular markers with the risk of PAD. After adjusting for age, race, and gender, platelet CD40L, and monocyte myeloperoxidase (mMPO) levels were significantly lower (P < .001), and monocyte TLR-4 levels were higher (P = .03) in patients with PAD. With additional adjustments for conventional risk factors, mMPO remained inversely and independently associated with the risk of PAD (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P = .01).

  13. The ARIC Carotid MRI Study of Blood Cellular Markers: An Inverse Association of Monocyte Myeloperoxidase Content With Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matijevic (Aleksic), Nena; Wu, Kenneth K.; Nidkarni, Nivedita; Heiss, Gerardo; Folsom, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the association of blood monocyte and platelet activation markers with the risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in a multicenter study of atherosclerosis among African American and Caucasian patients. Flow cytometric analysis of blood cells was performed in 1791 participants (209 cases with PAD and 1582 noncases) from the cross-sectional Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Carotid Magnetic Resonance Imaging ([MRI] ARIC Carotid MRI) Study to assess platelet glycoproteins IIb and IIIa, P-selectin, CD40 ligand, platelet–leukocyte aggregates, monocyte lipopolysaccharide receptor, toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1, cyclooxygenase 2, and myeloperoxidase. Multivariate regression analyses evaluated the association of cellular markers with the risk of PAD. After adjusting for age, race, and gender, platelet CD40L, and monocyte myeloperoxidase (mMPO) levels were significantly lower (P < .001), and monocyte TLR-4 levels were higher (P = .03) in patients with PAD. With additional adjustments for conventional risk factors, mMPO remained inversely and independently associated with the risk of PAD (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P = .01). PMID:21406422

  14. The myopathy of peripheral arterial occlusive disease: part 1. Functional and histomorphological changes and evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pipinos, Iraklis I; Judge, Andrew R; Selsby, Joshua T; Zhu, Zhen; Swanson, Stanley A; Nella, Aikaterini A; Dodd, Stephen L

    In recent years, an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that a myopathy is present, contributes, and, to a certain extent, determines the pathogenesis of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAD). These works provide evidence that a state of repetitive cycles of exercise-induced ischemia followed by reperfusion at rest operates in PAD patients and mediates a large number of structural and metabolic changes in the muscle, resulting in reduced strength and function. The key players in this process appear to be defective mitochondria that, through multilevel failure in their roles as energy, oxygen radical species, and apoptosis regulators, produce and sustain a progressive decline in muscle performance. In this 2-part review, we highlight the currently available evidence that characterizes the nature and mechanisms responsible for this myopathy. In part 1, the authors review the functional and histomorphological characteristics of the myopathy and focus on the biochemistry and bioenergetics of its mitochondriopathy. In part 2, they then review accumulating evidence that oxidative stress related to ischemia reperfusion is probably the major operating mechanism of PAD myopathy. Important new findings of a possible neuropathy and a shift in muscle fiber type are also reviewed. Learning more about these mechanisms will enhance our understanding of the degree to which they are preventable and treatable.

  15. Iloprost infusion in diabetic patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease and foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mirenda, Francesco; La Spada, Michele; Baccellieri, Domenico; Stilo, Francesco; Benedetto, Filippo; Spinelli, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate iloprost infusion as an alternative to open surgical revascularisation in diabetic patients with foot ulcers, also as a support measure in conjunction with endovascular procedures. We studied 244 patients with critical ischaemia of the lower limbs, 146 of whom (59.8%) affected by diabetes. A femoro-distal bypass was performed in 175 patients. In the 69 nonsurgical diabetic patients (47.3% of the diabetics) an iloprost infusion was started. These diabetics presented foot ulcers, a palpable or slightly hypo-sphygmic popliteal pulse and high distal arterial flow at the ankle. In 55 of these patients (79.7% of those not operated on and 37.6% of the diabetics) who were non-responders to medical therapy, an endovascular procedure was also performed. The results of the iloprost infusion (69 pts.) were evaluated after one week. In 14 responders treated only with iloprost infusion, complete healing of the lesions occurred during the 3 weeks following the end of the 4-week course of therapy. No severe ischaemia recurrences were reported in the follow-up of these 69 patients. In the 47.3% of subjects with diabetic arteriopathy presenting foot ulcers and high distal flow, it proved possible to avoid an open surgical revascularisation procedure and to resort to medical therapy with iloprost, completed in 79.7% of cases with endovascular procedures. Iloprost infusion improves limb perfusion and, in selected cases may be an important therapeutic tool for the care of ulcerative lesions of the diabetic foot, also as a support measure in conjunction with endovascular procedures.

  16. Transradial approach for vertebral artery stenting

    PubMed Central

    Tekieli, Łukasz; Kabłak-Ziembicka, Anna; Paluszek, Piotr; Trystuła, Mariusz; Wójcik-Pędziwiatr, Magdalena; Machnik, Roman; Pieniążek, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Introductuion Symptomatic severe vertebral artery (VA) stenosis may be treated safely with stent supported angioplasty via femoral access. There is limited clinical data on transradial approach for VA angioplasty in case of peripheral artery disease. Aim To evaluate the safety and efficacy of transradial angioplasty of symptomatic VA stenosis. Material and methods Fifteen patients (age 66 ±7.4 years, 73% men, with VA > 80% stenosis, 11 right-side, all symptomatic from posterior circulation (history of stroke, TIA, or chronic ischaemia symptoms)) with peripheral artery disease (PAD) or unsuccessful attempt via femoral approach were scheduled for VA angioplasty by radial access. Clinical and duplex ultrasound (DUS) follow-up were performed before discharge and 1, 12, and 24 months after VA angioplasty. Results The technical success rate was 100%. In all cases VA angioplasty was performed with the use of single balloon-mounted stent (9 bare metal stents, 6 drug-eluting stents). The mean NASCET VA stenosis was reduced from 85.3% to 5.3% (p < 0.001). No periprocedural death, stroke, myocardial infarction, or transient ischaemic attack occurred. During 24-months follow-up, in 12 of 15 patients chronic ischaemia symptoms release was observed, and no new acute ischaemic neurological symptoms were diagnosed in all patients. One patient died 20 months after intervention from unknown causes. There was one symptomatic borderline VA in-stent stenosis 12 months after angioplasty. Conclusions Transradial VA stenting may be a very effective and safe procedure, and it may constitute an alternative to the femoral approach in patients with symptomatic VA stenosis. PMID:25848368

  17. Evaluation of the Effects of Mesoglycan on Some Markers of Endothelial Damage and Walking Distance in Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Giuseppe, Derosa; Angela, D’Angelo; Romano, Davide; Pamela, Maffioli

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the variation of some parameters involved in peripheral artery disease progression in diabetic patients with peripheral artery disease after six months of mesoglycan. We enrolled 64 Caucasian, type 2 diabetic patients, with stage IIa peripheral artery disease. They were randomized to mesoglycan (Prisma®), 50 mg twice a day, or placebo, for six months. We evaluated: glycemic control, metalloproteinase-2, and -9 (MMP-2, and -9), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (sVCAM-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). We recorded a decrease of MMP-2, MMP-9, sE-selectin, TNF-α, sVCAM-1, and IL-6 compared to baseline, and to placebo in the group treated with mesoglycan. Regarding sICAM-1, and hs-CRP, instead, we recorded a decrease with mesoglycan only compared to baseline. Preliminary results seem to suggest an improvement of pain free walking distance with mesoglycan in 18 patients both compared to baseline and to placebo, even if data should be taken cautiously. Our study showed that supplementation with mesoglycan improved endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral artery disease. Regarding the preliminary data suggesting also a slight improvement of clinical parameters such as pain free walking distance, more data and a bigger sample of patients are necessary to better verify this aspect. PMID:28272312

  18. Low-fat diet and regular, supervised physical exercise in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease: reduction of stress-induced myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Schuler, G.; Schlierf, G.; Wirth, A.; Mautner, H.P.; Scheurlen, H.; Thumm, M.; Roth, H.; Schwarz, F.; Kohlmeier, M.; Mehmel, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of physical exercise and normalization of serum lipoproteins on stress-induced myocardial ischemia were studied in 18 patients with coronary artery disease, stable angina pectoris, and mild hypercholesterolemia (total serum cholesterol 242 +/- 32 mg/dl). These patients underwent a combined regimen of low-fat/low-cholesterol diet and regular, supervised physical exercise at high intensity for 12 months. At 1 year serum lipoproteins has been lowered to ideal levels (serum cholesterol 202 +/- 31 mg/dl, low-density lipoproteins 130 +/- 30 mg/dl, very low-density lipoproteins 22 +/- 15 mg/dl, serum triglycerides 105 (69 to 304) mg/dl) and physical work capacity was improved by 21% (p less than .01). No significant effect was noted on high-density lipoproteins, probably as a result of the low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet. Stress-induced myocardial ischemia, as assessed by thallium-201 scintigraphy, was decreased by 54% (p less than .05) despite higher myocardial oxygen consumption. Eighteen patients matched for age and severity of coronary artery disease served as a control group and ''usual medical care'' was rendered by their private physicians. No significant changes with respect to serum lipoproteins, physical work capacity, maximal rate-pressure product, or stress-induced myocardial ischemia were observed in this group. These data indicate that regular physical exercise at high intensity, lowered body weight, and normalization of serum lipoproteins may alleviate compromised myocardial perfusion during stress.

  19. Variability and Persistence of Poor Response to Aspirin by Aggregometry and PFA-100 over Twelve-Months in Peripheral Arterial Disease from the Effect of Lipid Modification on Peripheral Arterial Disease after Endovascular Intervention Trial (ELIMIT)

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Justin; Nambi, Vijay; Kimball, Kay T.; Virani, Salim S.; Morrisett, Joel D.; Lumsden, Alan B.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Dong, Jing-Fei

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of poor response to aspirin (ASA) therapy over 12-month follow-up in patients with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD), and to compare the classification agreement among different ASA response assays. Subjects Patients with PAD on ASA therapy at baseline were included from the ongoing Effect of Lipid Modification on Peripheral Arterial Disease after Endovascular Intervention Trial (ELIMIT), which is a randomized trial testing whether combination treatment with ezetimibe, niacin, and a statin will halt/regress atherosclerosis compared to statin monotherapy. Main Outcome Measures Patients who had baseline platelet testing and repeat testing at 6-month or 12-month follow-up were included. ASA responsiveness was tested using three different assays: Optical aggregation with 0.5-mg/mL of arachidonic acid (AA), optical aggregation with 10-μM of adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and platelet function analyzer-100 (PFA-100) testing with collagen/Epinephrine (Epi) loaded cartridges. ASA response was defined as AA aggregation <30%, ADP aggregation <70%, or PFA-100 Epi> 164 sec. Patients who showed response to ASA at baseline were classified as Responders. Poor response to ASA was defined as AA aggregation ≥30%, ADP aggregation ≥70%, or PFA-100 Epi ≤164 sec. Patients who showed poor response (PR) to an assay at baseline, but then were responsive at follow-up visits were classified as Initial PRs. Patients who showed poor response at baseline and all follow-up visits were classified as Persistent PRs. The classification agreement between assays was tested using the kappa statistic. Results Of 102 patients randomized in ELIMIT, 80 patients satisfied inclusion criteria. There were no significant baseline demographic differences between Responders, Initial PRs, and Persistent PRs. The prevalence of persistent poor response varied by the assay used; 5% of subjects (4/80) were Persistent PRs by AA aggregation, compared to 27

  20. Lumbar Sympathicolysis in Patients with Severe Peripheral Artery Disease: Hemodynamics of the Lower Limbs Determined by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, Color Coded Duplex Sonography, and Temperature Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Bombor, Ingmar; Wissgott, Christian; Andresen, Reimer

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the effects of CT-guided lumbar sympathicolysis on somatic regional oxygen saturation, arterial flow velocity, and skin temperature of the lower limbs in patients with advanced peripheral artery disease (PAD). CT-guided lumbar sympathicolysis was additionally performed after successful revascularization therapy in 61 patients with PAD in categories 5 and 6 according to Rutherford. Somatic regional oxygen saturation in the distal lower limbs was determined semiquantitatively with a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system. Before and after intervention, peak flow and end-diastolic flow velocity in the dorsalis pedis artery were determined by means of color-coded duplex sonography, and the skin temperature of the feet was measured with an infrared thermometer. After CT-guided lumbar sympathicolysis, somatic regional oxygen saturation, peak flow, end-diastolic flow velocity, and skin temperature in the lower limbs increased significantly. PMID:25788836

  1. Intra-aortic balloon pump insertion through the right subclavian artery in a patient of anterior wall myocardial infarction with ventricular septal rupture and severe peripheral artery obstruction disease.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kamal H; Shah, Bhavik S; Jadhav, Nikhil D

    2016-09-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) is used in cardiogenic shock of different etiologies. Routinely, it is inserted through the transfemoral access, but in the patients with severe peripheral artery obstruction disease (PAOD), use of alternative approach is needed. In this case report, IABP insertion through the right subclavian artery with the help of cardiothoracic surgeon in a patient of anterior wall myocardial infarction (AWMI) with severe PAOD has been described. A 60-years-old male patient, with the history of chronic smoking, presented with progressing chest pain for last 3 days. On the basis of clinical examination and radiological findings, he was diagnosed with AWMI along with the ventricular septal rupture and PAOD. The patient was advised to undergo coronary artery bypass graft with VSR repair, but to stabilize the patient, it was necessary to put him on IABP. Because of the severe PAOD, femoral access was not suitable to insert the IABP, and hence, the right subclavian route was accessed. Then, the patient was operated and no other complications were encountered. Subclavian arterial IABP insertion under local anesthesia is easier and safer to perform and allows increased patient mobility. Other routes, such as, ascending aorta and axillary artery have also been discussed in other literatures, but subclavian arterial IABP insertion was found to be the best in the patients with severe PAOD. Trans-subclavian route is an effective approach in extended IABP utilization even in patients with severe PAOD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Lowered LDL-C Levels Reduce Later Local Vascular Events after Surgical or Endovascular Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kouji; Takahashi, Junichiro; Kanaoka, Tsuyoshi; Wakamatsu, Yutaka; Gohda, Toshihiro; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between incidence of later, local vascular events (restenosis and occlusion) and clinical factors including lipid levels after surgical or endovascular treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD). Methods: Consecutive 418 PAD lesions (in 308 patients under the age of 70) treated with surgical (n = 188) or endovascular (n = 230) repair for iliac (n = 228) and infrainguinal (n = 190) lesions were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical features and lipid levels were compared between patients who developed vascular events (n = 51; VE group) and those who did not (n = 257; NoVE group). Results: Among assessed factors, post-therapeutic low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels (mg/dL) were significantly higher in the VE group (120.4 ± 31.2) than in the NoVE group (108.2 ± 25.1) (P = 0.01). Infrainguinal lesions were more common in the VE than in the NoVE group (P <0.001). Cox hazard analysis indicated that infrainguinal lesions relative to iliac lesions significantly increased the risk of vascular events (hazard ratio (HR) 3.35; 95% CI 1.63–6.90; P = 0.001) and post-therapeutic LDL-C levels <130 (mg/dL) decreased the risk (HR 0.34; 95%CI 0.17–0.67; P = 0.002). Conclusion: Lowered post-therapeutic LDL-C levels can decrease the risk of later, local vascular events after PAD treatment. These results may support the rationale for aggressive lipid-modifying therapy for PAD. PMID:23555508

  3. Sex Differences in the Incidence of Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Grace J.; Shaw, Pamela A.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Anderson, Amanda H.; Xie, Dawei; Wang, Xue; Nessel, Lisa C.; Mohler, Emile R.; Sozio, Stephen M.; Jaar, Bernard G.; Chen, Jing; Wright, Jackson; Taliercio, Jonathan J.; Ojo, Akinlolu; C.Ricardo, Ana; Lustigova, Eva; Fairman, Ronald M.; Feldman, Harold I.; Ky, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Background To define how the incidence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) differs according to sex and age. Methods and Results The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) is a multi-center, prospective cohort study of CKD participants. Fine and Gray methods were used to determine the cumulative incidence of PAD, defined by an ankle brachial index (ABI) < 0.90 or a confirmed PAD event, with death as a competing event. Adjusted subdistribution hazard ratios from the Fine and Gray model determined the risk of PAD according to sex. A priori, we hypothesized that the relationship between sex and cumulative incidence of PAD differed according to age. The mean age of the 3,174 participants in this study was 56.6 years and consisted of 55% males. Over a median follow-up of 5.9 years, 17.8% developed PAD, 13.0% were lost to followup and 11.1% died. Females had a 1.53-fold greater adjusted PAD risk compared to men (95% CI 1.27-1.84, p<0.001). These sex-related differences in PAD risk also differed by age (p=0.013). Women, compared to men, were at a markedly increased risk for PAD at younger ages; however, at ages greater than 70 years, the risk was similar across both sexes. Older men had a substantially greater PAD risk compared to younger men. In women, PAD risk did not vary with age. Conclusions Females with CKD have a higher PAD risk compared to males at younger ages. There is an important need to improve our understanding of the biological and clinical basis for these differences. PMID:26908866

  4. Multidisciplinary treatment for peripheral arterial occlusive disease and the role of eHealth and mHealth

    PubMed Central

    Fokkenrood, Hugo JP; Lauret, Gert-Jan; Scheltinga, Marc RM; Spreeuwenberg, Cor; de Bie, Rob A; Teijink, Joep AW

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly unaffordable health care costs are forcing care providers to develop economically viable and efficient health care plans. Currently, only a minority of all newly diagnosed peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) patients receive efficient and structured conservative treatment for their disease. The aim of this article is to introduce an innovative effective treatment model termed ClaudicatioNet. This concept was launched in The Netherlands as a means to combat treatment shortcomings and stimulate cohesion and collaboration between stakeholders. The overall goal of ClaudicatioNet is to stimulate quality and transparency of PAOD treatment by optimizing multidisciplinary health care chains on a national level. Improved quality is based on stimulating both a theoretical and practical knowledge base, while eHealth and mHealth technologies are used to create clear insights of provided care to enhance quality control management, in addition these technologies can be used to increase patient empowerment, thereby increasing efficacy of PAOD treatment. This online community consists of a web portal with public and personal information supplemented with a mobile application. By connecting to these tools, a social community is created where patients can meet and keep in touch with fellow patients, while useful information for supervising health care professionals is provided. The ClaudicatioNet concept will likely create more efficient and cost-effective PAOD treatment by improving the quality of supervised training programs, extending possibilities and stimulating patient empowerment by using eHealth and mHealth solutions. A free market principle is introduced by introducing transparency to provided care by using objective and subjective outcome parameters. Cost-effectiveness can be achieved using supervised training programs, which may substitute for or postpone expensive invasive vascular interventions. PMID:23093906

  5. Comparison of quality of life in patients with peripheral arterial disease caused by atherosclerosis obliterans or Buerger’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Karakoyun, Rojbin; Köksoy, Cüneyt; Şener, Zeynep; Gündüz, Umut; Karakaş, Barış; Karakoyun, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective Buerger’s disease and atherosclerosis obliterans (ASO) are two peripheral arterial diseases (PAD) that are frequently encountered. The aim of this study was to compare quality of life (QOL) in patients with Buerger’s disease and ASO. Methods We prospectively followed 86 patients who were admitted to our hospital due to ASO or Buerger’s disease. Their ischaemia was evaluated according to the clinical category chronic limb ischaemia at the time of hospital admission and at six and 12 months. The QOL was measured at the time of hospital admission and at six and 12 months with the Short Form Health Status Survey (SF-36) and Vascular Quality of Life Questionnaire (VASCUQOL). Results A total of 86 patients with ASO or Buerger’s disease (47 and 39, respectively) were included in the study. Pain parameters from both SF-36 and VASCUQOL scores were lower in patients with Buerger’s disease at the time of hospital admission and at six months. The impairment in QOL was found to be proportional to the extent of chronic limb ischaemia. Conversely, when patients with critical limb ischaemia were evaluated, no difference was observed between those with ASO or Buerger’s disease in terms of QOL. Amputations were found to have a negative effect on quality of life. Conclusion Buerger’s disease had a more pronounced negative effect on QOL than ASO, particularly in terms of pain score. When critical limb ischaemia was considered, ASO and Buerger’s disease impaired quality of life at the same rate. PMID:25000442

  6. [Assessment of generic and disease-specific health-related quality of life instruments in peripheral arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Knipfer, E; Reeps, C; Dolezal, C; Zimmermann, A; Pelisek, J; Behrens, J; Eckstein, H-H

    2008-05-01

    As chronic diseases are continuously increasing in our aging society, the description and improvement of quality of medical care needs critical examination of the multidimensional subject of "quality of life". Health-related quality of life is currently used as an outcome-criterion in modern medicine. As there is no generally accepted definition of quality of life, various components of the state of health and the patient's behaviour are recorded by questionnaires. The level of subjective well- being is determined by several dimensions such as physical constitution of the patient, state of mind, functional competency in everyday life and the form of interpersonal relationships. Based on these principles various instruments for measuring quality of life are developed. The assessment of the subjective quality of life reflects the increased acceptance of the patient's view. In addition to the common generic instruments such as SF-36, FLZ(M), MLDL, EQ-5D, WHOQOL-100, NHP, SIP, also disease-specific instruments e.g. for peripheral arterial disease are currently used (PAVK-86, CLAU-S, VASCUQOL, SIP(IC), and WIQ). At the moment SF-36 is the best established questionnaire as generic QOL instrument. FLZ(M) takes the individual weighting of items into account, by correlating the importance and the contentment for life. For evaluating the effectivity of medical outcome and the success of therapeutic treatment for patients with vascular disease, the VASCUQOL instrument seems to be the best choice. Simultaneous application of a generic instrument and disease-specific questionnaires displays as well the subjective quality of health as the individual impairment of the patient in a good way. As a consequence using both instruments is superior to the exclusive use of a generic questionnaire.

  7. Supervised Exercise, Stent Revascularization, or Medical Therapy for Claudication Due to Aortoiliac Peripheral Artery Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy P.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Mohler, Emile R.; Cohen, David J.; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Massaro, Joseph M.; Lewis, Beth A.; Cerezo, Joselyn; Oldenburg, Niki C.; Thum, Claudia C.; Jaff, Michael R.; Comerota, Anthony J.; Steffes, Michael W.; Abrahamsen, Ingrid H.; Goldberg, Suzanne; Hirsch, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment for claudication due to aortoiliac peripheral artery disease (PAD) often relies on stent revascularization. However, supervised exercise is known to provide comparable short-term (6-month) improvements in functional status and quality of life. Longer-term outcomes are not known. Objectives The goal of this study was to report the longer-term (18-month) efficacy of supervised exercise compared with stenting and optimal medical care. Methods Of 111 patients with aortoiliac PAD randomly assigned to receive optimal medical care (OMC), OMC plus supervised exercise (SE), or OMC plus stent revascularization (ST), 79 completed the 18-month clinical and treadmill follow-up assessment. SE consisted of 6 months of supervised exercise and an additional year of telephone-based exercise counseling. Primary clinical outcomes included objective treadmill-based walking performance and subjective quality of life. Results Peak walking time improved from baseline to 18 months for both SE (5.0 ± 5.4 min) and ST (3.2 ± 4.7 min; p < 0.001) compared with OMC (0.2 ± 2.1 min, p = 0.04). The difference between SE and ST was not significant (p = 0.16). Improvement in claudication onset time (COT) was greater for SE compared with OMC, but not for ST compared with OMC. Many disease-specific quality-of-life scales demonstrated durable improvements that were greater for ST compared with SE or OMC. Conclusions Both SE and ST had better 18-month outcomes than OMC. SE and ST provided comparable durable improvement in functional status and in quality of life up to 18 months. The durability of claudication exercise interventions merits its consideration as a primary PAD claudication treatment. Claudication: Exercise Versus Endoluminal Revascularization [CLEVER]: NCT00132743 PMID:25766947

  8. Identification of candidate target genes for human peripheral arterial disease using weighted gene co‑expression network analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, De-Xin; Zhao, Hao-Min; Sun, Da-Jun; Yao, Jian; Ding, Da-Yong

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the potential treatment targets of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and provide further insights into the underlying mechanism of PAD, based on a weighted gene co‑expression network analysis (WGCNA) method. The mRNA expression profiles (accession. no. GSE27034), which included 19 samples from patients with PAD and 18 samples from normal control individuals were extracted from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Subsequently, the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were obtained using the Limma package and the co‑expression network modules were screened using the WGCNA approach. In addition, the protein‑protein interaction network for the DEGs in the most significant module was constructed using Cytoscape software. Functional enrichment analyses of the DEGs in the most significant module were also performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Orthology‑Based Annotation System, respectively. A total of 148 DEGs were identified in PAD, which were used to construct the WGCN, in which two modules (gray module and turquoise module) were identified, with the gray module exhibiting a higher gene significance (GS) value than the turquoise module. In addition, a co‑expression network was constructed for 60 DEGs in the gray module. The functional enrichment results showed that the DEGs in the gray module were enriched in five Gene Ontology terms and four KEGG pathways. For example, cyclin‑dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS) and prostaglandin‑endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) were enriched in response to glucocorticoid stimulus. The results of the present study suggested that DEGs in the gray module, including CDKN1A, FOS and PTGS2, may be associated with the pathogenesis of PAD, by modulating the cell cycle, and may offer potential for use as candidate treatment

  9. Thromboelastographic Changes Following Nonionic Contrast Medium Injection During Transfemoral Angiography in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, V.K. Handa, A.; Philips-Hughes, J.; Boardman, P.; Uberoi, R.; Hands, L.J.

    2006-12-15

    Background/Purpose. Patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) are known to be systemically hypercoagulable and there is concern that exposing them to contrast media during angiography may exacerbate that thrombotic tendency. Many in vitro studies in which blood is exposed to contrast media suggest that nonionic contrast medium (NICM) has a weaker anticoagulant effect than ionic contrast medium (ICM) and some studies suggest that NICM can lead to activation of coagulation thus increasing the risk of thrombotic events where it is employed. We have looked at the changes in coagulation adjacent to the site of contrast injection/potential angioplasty to determine the magnitude of change locally. Methods. We measured changes in the coagulability of aortic blood samples immediately before and within 2 min after injection of the last bolus of iohexol (NICM) prior to any intervention procedure in 30 patients with PAOD. Samples were analyzed using thromboelastography (TEG) to identify changes in the coagulability of the aortic blood samples. Results. TEG tracings of samples taken from the aorta after injection of NICM showed a significant increase in R time (time to fibrin formation) (p = 0.036) and in k time (dynamics of clot formation) (p = 0.028) and a reduction in Angle (decreased acceleration of fibrin build-up) (p = 0.013), Maximal amplitude (MA) (reduced ultimate clot strength) (p = 0.018) and Coagulation Index (CI) (p = 0.032). Conclusion. These changes in TEG parameters show that the local effect of NICM is a reduction in coagulation activity rather than the activation suggested by some previous studies.

  10. Effectiveness of revascularization of the ulcerated foot in patients with diabetes and peripheral artery disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hinchliffe, R J; Brownrigg, J R W; Andros, G; Apelqvist, J; Boyko, E J; Fitridge, R; Mills, J L; Reekers, J; Shearman, C P; Zierler, R E; Schaper, N C

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms or signs of peripheral artery disease (PAD) can be observed in up to 50% of the patients with a diabetic foot ulcer and is a risk factor for poor healing and amputation. In 2012, a multidisciplinary working group of the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot published a systematic review on the effectiveness of revascularization of the ulcerated foot in patients with diabetes and PAD. This publication is an update of this review and now includes the results of a systematic search for therapies to revascularize the ulcerated foot in patients with diabetes and PAD from 1980 to June 2014. Only clinically relevant outcomes were assessed. The research conformed to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines, and Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network methodological scores were assigned. A total of 56 articles were eligible for full-text review. There were no randomized controlled trials, but there were four nonrandomized studies with a control group. The major outcomes following endovascular or open bypass surgery were broadly similar among the studies. Following open surgery, the 1-year limb salvage rates were a median of 85% (interquartile range of 80-90%), and following endovascular revascularization, these rates were 78% (70-89%). At 1-year follow-up, 60% or more of ulcers had healed following revascularization with either open bypass surgery or endovascular techniques. Studies appeared to demonstrate improved rates of limb salvage associated with revascularization compared with the results of conservatively treated patients in the literature. There were insufficient data to recommend one method of revascularization over another. There is a real need for standardized reporting of baseline demographic data, severity of disease and outcome reporting in this group of patients.

  11. Comparison of intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography using carbon dioxide by 'home made' delivery system and conventional iodinated contrast media in the evaluation of peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhan, K S; Sharma, S; Srivastava, D N; Thulkar, S; Mehta, S N; Prasad, G; Seenu, V; Agarwal, S

    2009-02-01

    To prospectively compare the feasibility, safety and diagnostic role of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) using a 'home made' delivery system with iodinated contrast medium (ICM) DSA in the evaluation of peripheral arterial occlusive diseases (PAOD) of lower limbs. Twenty-one patients (27 limbs; all men; mean age, 47.6 years) who presented with PAOD of lower limbs underwent DSA using both intra-arterial CO(2) and ICM. Conventional ICM DSA was performed first and used as gold standard. Carbon dioxide was then injected by hand using a locally improvised home made plastic bag delivery system. Patient tolerance was assessed subjectively. Arteries from aortic bifurcation to the ankle were independently evaluated by two radiologists and graded for stenosis using a five-point scale. For each patient, the quality of CO(2) DSA images were compared with the corresponding images of ICM DSA and an overall grade of 'good', 'acceptable' or 'poor' was assigned. Cohen's kappa coefficient was used to determine inter-observer agreement. Carbon dioxide opacified 86.2% (188/195) of major arteries and depicted stenosis adequately in 84.5% (191/226) of arterial segments. A good or acceptable image quality of CO(2) DSA was obtained in over 95% of patients. Infrapopliteal arteries were inadequately visualized. Mild pain was seen in six (28.6%) patients with both contrast agents; one patient developed severe pain during CO(2) DSA. Inter-observer agreement was good (k > 0.75) at 70% of the segments. Administration of CO(2) into lower limb arteries is well tolerated. Carbon dioxide DSA using the locally improvised home made delivery system is a feasible and safe alternative to ICM DSA in the evaluation of PAOD. It provides adequate imaging of arteries of lower extremities except infrapopliteal segments.

  12. Randomized Comparison of Uterine Artery Embolization (UAE) with Surgical Treatment in Patients with Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids (REST Trial): Subanalysis of 5-Year MRI Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Ananthakrishnan, Ganapathy; Murray, Lilian; Ritchie, Moira; Murray, Gordon; Bryden, Fiona; Lassman, Sue; Lumsden, Mary Ann; Moss, Jon G.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To report 5-year contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging findings of the REST trial recruits who underwent either uterine artery embolization (UAE) or myomectomy. Methods. A total of 157 patients were randomized to UAE or surgery (hysterectomy or myomectomy). Ninety-nine patients who had UAE and eight patients who had myomectomy were analyzed. MRI scans at baseline, 6 months, and 5 years were independently interpreted by two radiologists. Dominant fibroid diameter, uterine volume, total fibroid infarction (complete 100 %, almost complete 90-99 %, partial <90 %), and new fibroid formation were the main parameters assessed and related to the need for reintervention. Results. In the UAE group, mean {+-} standard deviation uterine volume was 670 {+-} 503, 422 {+-} 353, and 292 {+-} 287 mL at baseline, 6 months, and 5 years, respectively. Mean dominant fibroid diameter was 7.6 {+-} 3.0, 5.8 {+-} 2.9, and 5 {+-} 2.9 cm at baseline, 6 months, and 5 years. Fibroid infarction at 6 months was complete in 35 % of women, almost complete in 29 %, and partial in 36 %. Need for reintervention was 19, 10, and 33 % in these groups, respectively (p = 0.123). No myomectomy cases had further intervention. At 5 years, the prevalence of new fibroid was 60 % in the myomectomy group and 7 % in the UAE group (p = 0.008). Conclusion. There is a further significant reduction in both uterine volume and dominant fibroid diameter between 6 months and 5 years after UAE. Complete fibroid infarction does not translate into total freedom from a subsequent reintervention. New fibroid formation is significantly higher after myomectomy.

  13. Uterine Artery Embolisation for Symptomatic Adenomyosis with Polyzene F-Coated Hydrogel Microspheres: Three-Year Clinical Follow-Up Using UFS–QoL Questionnaire

    SciTech Connect

    Nijenhuis, R. J. Smeets, A. J. Morpurgo, M.; Boekkooi, P. F. Reuwer, P. J. H. M. Smink, M.; Rooij, W. J. van Lohle, P. N. M. E-mail: paullohle@gmail.com

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess midterm outcome of uterine artery embolisation (UAE) for women with therapy-resistant adenomyosis using polyzene F-coated hydrogel microspheres.MethodsBetween September 2006 and January 2010, 29 consecutive women with adenomyosis (15 in combination with fibroids) were treated with UAE using polyzene F-coated hydrogel microspheres. Junction zone thickness was assessed with MRI at baseline and 3 months. Women filled out the uterine fibroid symptom and quality of life questionnaire at baseline, 3 months and after a mean clinical follow-up of 37 months (median 35, range 29–64 months).ResultsAt baseline, symptom severity score of 29 women was mean 67 (median 72, range 23–100). At 3 months, this score decreased to mean 22 (median 15, range 0–66) and mean 15 (median 17, range 0–34) at final follow-up. At final follow-up of mean 37 months (median 35, range 29–64 months), 22 of 29 (76 %) patients were asymptomatic. Of these 22 women, 3 underwent a second UAE at 6, 7, and 14 months. The remaining seven patients clinically improved but still had symptoms; one underwent a hysterectomy. There was no difference in outcome between women with pure adenomyosis and women with additional fibroids. The junction zone of 4 women with additional therapy was significantly thicker compared with the remaining 25 patients.ConclusionsIn women with therapy resistant adenomyosis, UAE using polyzene F-coated hydrogel microspheres resulted in 3 years preservation of the uterus in 28 of 29 (97 %) with good clinical outcome in the vast majority of patients. Initial thickness of the junction zone is related to additional therapy.

  14. Lower-limb hot-water immersion acutely induces beneficial hemodynamic and cardiovascular responses in peripheral arterial disease and healthy, elderly controls.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kate N; van Rij, André M; Lucas, Samuel J E; Cotter, James D

    2017-03-01

    Passive heat induces beneficial perfusion profiles, provides substantive cardiovascular strain, and reduces blood pressure, thereby holding potential for healthy and cardiovascular disease populations. The aim of this study was to assess acute responses to passive heat via lower-limb, hot-water immersion in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and healthy, elderly controls. Eleven patients with PAD (age 71 ± 6 yr, 7 male, 4 female) and 10 controls (age 72 ± 7 yr, 8 male, 2 female) underwent hot-water immersion (30-min waist-level immersion in 42.1 ± 0.6°C water). Before, during, and following immersion, brachial and popliteal artery diameter, blood flow, and shear stress were assessed using duplex ultrasound. Lower-limb perfusion was measured also using venous occlusion plethysmography and near-infrared spectroscopy. During immersion, shear rate increased (P < 0.0001) comparably between groups in the popliteal artery (controls: +183 ± 26%; PAD: +258 ± 54%) and brachial artery (controls: +117 ± 24%; PAD: +107 ± 32%). Lower-limb blood flow increased significantly in both groups, as measured from duplex ultrasound (>200%), plethysmography (>100%), and spectroscopy, while central and peripheral pulse-wave velocity decreased in both groups. Mean arterial blood pressure was reduced by 22 ± 9 mmHg (main effect P < 0.0001, interaction P = 0.60) during immersion, and remained 7 ± 7 mmHg lower 3 h afterward. In PAD, popliteal shear profiles and claudication both compared favorably with those measured immediately following symptom-limited walking. A 30-min hot-water immersion is a practical means of delivering heat therapy to PAD patients and healthy, elderly individuals to induce appreciable systemic (chronotropic and blood pressure lowering) and hemodynamic (upper and lower-limb perfusion and shear rate increases) responses.

  15. [A Case of Ruptured Peripheral Cerebral Aneurysm at Abnormal Vessels Associated with Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis:Similarity to Moyamoya Disease].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hajime; Kohno, Kanehisa; Tanaka, Hideo; Fukumoto, Shinya; Ichikawa, Haruhisa; Onoue, Shinji; Fumoto, Noriyuki; Ozaki, Saya; Maeda, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of ruptured peripheral cerebral aneurysm at abnormal vessels associated with severe stenosis at the middle cerebral artery (MCA). A 66-year-old woman was admitted at our hospital with headache on foot. Computed tomography (CT) showed intracerebral hemorrhage in the left fronto-basal area. Three-dimensional-CT and conventional angiogram revealed abnormal vessels, which were similar to those seen in moyamoya disease, with a small enhancement close to the hematoma. On day 11, subsequent cerebral angiogram demonstrated an aneurysm at the peripheral portion of an abnormal vessel arising from the left A2. On day 17, soon after the diagnosis of the ruptured aneurysm was made (while still at the subacute stage), we operated on the aneurysm. Superficial temporal artery (STA)-MCA anastomosis was also performed to preserve cerebral blood flow and reduce hemodynamic stress. Several days after the operation, she had transient aphasia due to hyperperfusion of the MCA territory, but eventually recovered with no neurological deficit at discharge. Follow-up study revealed revascularization from the branches of the external carotid artery as well as the STA. On admission, we initially thought that this patient had abnormal vessels associated with arteriosclerotic MCA stenosis. However, the postoperative clinical course as well as the histopathological specimens of both the abnormal artery with the aneurysm and the STA revealed similar findings to those of moyamoya disease. Although this case did not satisfy the criteria for moyamoya disease, it is conceivable that a single arterial occlusive lesion associated with moyamoya-like vessels might develop in the same mechanism with that of moyamoya disease.

  16. miRNA-197 and miRNA-223 Predict Cardiovascular Death in a Cohort of Patients with Symptomatic Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Appelbaum, Sebastian; Karakas, Mahir; Ojeda, Francisco; Lau, Denise M.; Hartmann, Tim; Lackner, Karl J.; Westermann, Dirk; Schnabel, Renate B.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeller, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Background Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have been described as potential diagnostic biomarkers in cardiovascular disease and in particular, coronary artery disease (CAD). Few studies were undertaken to perform analyses with regard to risk stratification of future cardiovascular events. miR-126, miR-197 and miR-223 are involved in endovascular inflammation and platelet activation and have been described as biomarkers in the diagnosis of CAD. They were identified in a prospective study in relation to future myocardial infarction. Objectives The aim of our study was to further evaluate the prognostic value of these miRNAs in a large prospective cohort of patients with documented CAD. Methods Levels of miR-126, miR-197 and miR-223 were evaluated in serum samples of 873 CAD patients with respect to the endpoint cardiovascular death. miRNA quantification was performed using real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Results The median follow-up period was 4 years (IQR 2.78–5.04). The median age of all patients was 64 years (IQR 57–69) with 80.2% males. 38.9% of the patients presented with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), 61.1% were diagnosed with stable angina pectoris (SAP). Elevated levels of miRNA-197 and miRNA-223 reliably predicted future cardiovascular death in the overall group (miRNA-197: hazard ratio (HR) 1.77 per one standard deviation (SD) increase (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20; 2.60), p = 0.004, C-index 0.78; miRNA-223: HR 2.23 per one SD increase (1.20; 4.14), p = 0.011, C-index 0.80). In ACS patients the prognostic power of both miRNAs was even higher (miRNA-197: HR 2.24 per one SD increase (1.25; 4.01), p = 0.006, C-index 0.89); miRA-223: HR 4.94 per one SD increase (1.42; 17.20), p = 0.012, C-index 0.89). Conclusion Serum-derived circulating miRNA-197 and miRNA-223 were identified as predictors for cardiovascular death in a large patient cohort with CAD. These results reinforce the assumption that circulating miRNAs are promising biomarkers

  17. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe enough, blocked blood flow can cause tissue death and can sometimes lead to amputation of the foot or leg. The main risk factor for PAD is smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases ...

  18. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... legs (or rarely the arms), usually due to atherosclerosis and resulting in decreased blood flow. Symptoms depend ... among older people because it often results from atherosclerosis (plaque or disease buildup in the wall of ...

  19. COMBINED REDUCED FORCED EXPIRATORY VOLUME IN 1-SECOND (FEV1) AND PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE IN SEDENTARY ELDERS WITH FUNCTIONAL LIMITATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Brinkley, Tina; Church, Timothy; Liu, Christine K.; Manini, Todd; Newman, Anne B.; Stafford, Randall S.; McDermott, Mary M.; Gill, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Because they are potentially modifiable and may coexist, we evaluated the combined occurrence of a reduced forced expiratory volume in 1-second (FEV1) and peripheral artery disease (PAD), including its association with exertional symptoms, physical inactivity, and impaired mobility, in sedentary elders with functional limitations. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Lifestyle Interventions and Independence in Elder (LIFE) Study. Participants 1307 sedentary community-dwelling persons, mean age 78.9, with functional limitations (Short Physical Performance Battery [SPPB] <10). Measurements A reduced FEV1 was defined by a Z-score <-1.64 (< lower limit of normal), while PAD was defined by an ankle-brachial index <1.00. Exertional dyspnea was defined as moderate-to-severe (modified Borg index), immediately after a 400-meter walk test (400MWT). Exertional leg symptoms were established by the San Diego Claudication Questionnaire. Physical inactivity was evaluated by percent of accelerometry wear-time with activity <100 counts/min (top quartile established high sedentary-time). Mobility was evaluated by the 400MWT (gait-speed <0.8 m/s defined as slow) and SPPB (≤7 defined moderate-to-severe mobility impairment). Results A combined reduced FEV1 and PAD was established in 6.0% (78/1307) of participants. However, among those who had a reduced FEV1, 34.2% (78/228) also had PAD, while 20.8% (78/375) of those who had PAD also had a reduced FEV1. The two combined conditions were associated with exertional dyspnea (adjusted odds ratio [adjOR] 2.59 [1.20, 5.60]) and slow gait-speed (adjOR 3.15 [1.72, 5.75]) but not with exertional leg symptoms, high sedentary-time, and moderate-to-severe mobility impairment. Conclusions In sedentary community-dwelling elders with functional limitations, a reduced FEV1 and PAD frequently coexisted and, in combination, were strongly associated with exertional dyspnea and slow gait-speed (a frailty indicator that increases the risk of

  20. Dietary intake and peripheral arterial disease incidence in middle-aged adults: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, Rachel P; Lutsey, Pamela L; Heiss, Gerardo; Folsom, Aaron R; Steffen, Lyn M

    2017-03-01

    Background: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a costly source of morbidity and mortality among older persons in the United States. Dietary intake plays a role in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease; however, few studies have examined the relation of food intake or dietary patterns with PAD.Objective: We examined the relation between habitual dietary intake at midlife and incident PAD over ∼20 y of follow-up.Design: Among 14,082 participants enrolled in the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) Study initially free of PAD, dietary intake was assessed at baseline in 1987-1989 by using a modified Harvard food-frequency questionnaire. Food groups were created, and principal components analysis was used to develop "healthy" and "Western" dietary patterns; both were categorized into quintiles or quartiles. Incident PAD was determined by an ankle-brachial index <0.9 assessed at 2 subsequent examinations and hospital discharge codes through 2012. Multivariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression was used.Results: During a mean follow-up of 19.9 y, 1569 participants developed incident PAD. In models adjusted for demographic characteristics, behaviors, and food groups, the HRs (95% CIs) for incident PAD increased across quintiles of meat consumption [quintile 1: reference, quintile 2: 1.38 (1.16, 1.65), quintile 3: 1.38 (1.16, 1.65), quintile 4: 1.45 (1.20, 1.74), quintile 5: 1.66 (1.36, 2.03); P-trend <0.001]. Compared with those who drank no alcohol, those who had 1-6 drinks/wk had a lower risk of incident PAD [0.78 (0.68, 0.89)]. For coffee, ≥4 cups/d compared with none was inversely associated with incident PAD [quintile 5 compared with quintile 1: 0.84 (0.75, 1.00); P-trend = 0.014]. There was no association between other food groups or patterns and incident PAD.Conclusions: In this prospective cohort study, greater meat consumption was associated with a higher risk, and moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a lower

  1. [Hemodynamic bases for the automated quantification of the degree of obstruction in the peripheral arteries of diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Vega Gómez, M E; Ley Pozo, J; Aldama Figueroa, A; Fernández Montequín, J I; Montalvo Diago, J; Fernández Boloña, A; Gutiérrez Jiménez, O

    1992-01-01

    In order to improve in the early diagnosis of an arterial occlusion, we proposed the bases of an automatized system that allows to recognize the hemodynamic features of diabetic patients in different stadiums of their disease. Fifty-four patients with type-II diabetes were studied. We recorded the arterial flow curves in the bilateral femoral, popliteal, pedia and tibial-posterior arteries from all of our patients. In the distal arteries from patients with hemodynamics disturbances, we found normal values of the variants measured: maximal systolic speed flow (Max A), maximal diastolic speed flow (Max D), Peurcelot's resistance (RP), pulsatility index (PI) and spectral band (SB).

  2. [Hemodynamic bases for the automatized quantification of the degree of obstruction in peripheral arteries in diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Vega Gómez, M E; Ley Pozo, J; Aldama Figueroa, A; Fernández Montequín, J I; Montalvo Diago, J; Fernández Boloña, A; Gutiérrez Jiménez, O

    1993-01-01

    In order to improve the early diagnosis of arterial occlusions, we tried to establish the basis of an automatized system that allowed the study of the hemodynamic features of diabetic patients in the different stadii of their disease. Fifty-four patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type II were included in the study. In all of them, arterial flow curves were carried out at different levels: femoral, popliteal, pedia and tibial posterior arteries of both lower limbs. In the distal arteries of patients with hemodynamic injury, normal values of Maximal Systolic Velocity (Max A), Maximal Diastolic Velocity (Max D), Peurcelot's resistance (PR), pulsatility index (PI) and spectral band (SB), were found.

  3. Motor phenotype is not associated with vascular dysfunction in symptomatic Huntington’s disease transgenic R6/2 (160 CAG) mice

    PubMed Central

    Di Pardo, A.; Carrizzo, A.; Damato, A.; Castaldo, S.; Amico, E.; Capocci, L.; Ambrosio, M.; Pompeo, F.; De Sanctis, C.; Spinelli, C. C.; Puca, A. A.; Remondelli, P.; Maglione, V.; Vecchione, C.

    2017-01-01

    Whereas Huntington’s disease (HD) is unequivocally a neurological disorder, a critical mass of emerging studies highlights the occurrence of peripheral pathology like cardiovascular defects in both animal models and humans. The overt impairment in cardiac function is normally expected to be associated with peripheral vascular dysfunction, however whether this assumption is reasonable or not in HD is still unknown. In this study we functionally characterized the vascular system in R6/2 mouse model (line 160 CAG), which recapitulates several features of human pathology including cardiac disease. Vascular reactivity in different arterial districts was determined by wire myography in symptomatic R6/2 mice and age-matched wild type (WT) littermates. Disease stage was assessed by using well-validated behavioural tests like rotarod and horizontal ladder task. Surprisingly, no signs of vascular dysfunction were detectable in symptomatic mice and no link with motor phenotype was found. PMID:28211486

  4. Diagnostic Accuracy Study of an Oscillometric Ankle-Brachial Index in Peripheral Arterial Disease: The Influence of Oscillometric Errors and Calcified Legs

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Cavero-Redondo, Iván; Álvarez-Bueno, Celia; Garrido-Miguel, Miriam; Notario-Pacheco, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an indicator of widespread atherosclerosis. However, most individuals with PAD, in spite of being at high cardiovascular risk, are asymptomatic. This fact, together with the limitations of the Doppler ankle-brachial index (ABI), contributes to PAD underdiagnose. The aim of this study was to compare oscillometric ABI and Doppler ABI to diagnose peripheral arterial disease, and also to examine the influence of oscillometric errors and calcified legs on the PAD diagnoses. Methods and Findings We measured the ankle-brachial indexes of 90 volunteers (n = 180 legs, age 70 ± 14 years, 43% diabetics) using both oscillometer OMRON-M3 and Doppler. For concordance analyses we used the Bland and Altman method, and also estimated the intraclass correlation coefficient. Receiver Operating Characteristic Curves were used to examine the diagnostic performance of both methods. The ABI means were 1.06 ± 0.14 and 1.04 ± 0.16 (p = 0.034) measured by oscillometer and Doppler ABIs respectively, with limits of agreement of ± 0.20 and intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.769. Oscillometer yielded 23 “error” measurements, and also overestimated the measurements in low ankle pressures. Using Doppler as gold standard, oscillometer performance for diagnosis of PAD showed an Area Under Curve = 0.944 (sensitivity: 66.7%, specificity: 96.8%). Moreover, when considered calcified legs and oscillometric “error” readings as arteriopathy equivalents, sensitivity rose to 78.2%, maintaining specificity in 96%. The best oscillometer cut-off point was 0.96 (sensitivity: 87%, specificity: 91%, positive likelihood ratio: 9.66 and negative likelihood ratio: 0.14). Conclusion Despite its limitations, oscillometric ABI could be a useful tool for the diagnosis of PAD, particularly when considering calcified legs and oscillometric “errors” readings as peripheral arterial disease equivalents. PMID:27898734

  5. Automatic Pulmonary Artery-Vein Separation and Classification in Computed Tomography Using Tree Partitioning and Peripheral Vessel Matching.

    PubMed

    Charbonnier, Jean-Paul; Brink, Monique; Ciompi, Francesco; Scholten, Ernst T; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M; van Rikxoort, Eva M

    2016-03-01

    We present a method for automatic separation and classification of pulmonary arteries and veins in computed tomography. Our method takes advantage of local information to separate segmented vessels, and global information to perform the artery-vein classification. Given a vessel segmentation, a geometric graph is constructed that represents both the topology and the spatial distribution of the vessels. All nodes in the geometric graph where arteries and veins are potentially merged are identified based on graph pruning and individual branching patterns. At the identified nodes, the graph is split into subgraphs that each contain only arteries or veins. Based on the anatomical information that arteries and veins approach a common alveolar sag, an arterial subgraph is expected to be intertwined with a venous subgraph in the periphery of the lung. This relationship is quantified using periphery matching and is used to group subgraphs of the same artery-vein class. Artery-vein classification is performed on these grouped subgraphs based on the volumetric difference between arteries and veins. A quantitative evaluation was performed on 55 publicly available non-contrast CT scans. In all scans, two observers manually annotated randomly selected vessels as artery or vein. Our method was able to separate and classify arteries and veins with a median accuracy of 89%, closely approximating the inter-observer agreement. All CT scans used in this study, including all results of our system and all manual annotations, are publicly available at "http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink">http://arteryvein.grand-challenge.org".

  6. PERIPHERAL NERVE-DERIVED CXCL12 AND VEGF-A REGULATE THE PATTERNING OF ARTERIAL VESSEL BRANCHING IN DEVELOPING LIMB SKIN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenling; Kohara, Hiroshi; Uchida, Yutaka; James, Jennifer M.; Soneji, Kosha; Cronshaw, Darran G.; Zou, Yong-Rui; Nagasawa, Takashi; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In developing limb skin, peripheral nerves provide a spatial template that controls the branching pattern and differentiation of arteries. Our previous studies indicate that nerve-derived VEGF-A is required for arterial differentiation but not for nerve-vessel alignment. In this study, we demonstrate that nerve-vessel alignment depends on the activity of Cxcl12-Cxcr4 chemokine signaling. Genetic inactivation of Cxcl12-Cxcr4 signaling perturbs nerve-vessel alignment, and abolishes arteriogenesis. Further in vitro assays allow us to uncouple nerve-vessel alignment and arteriogenesis, revealing that nerve-derived Cxcl12 stimulates endothelial cell migration, while nerve-derived VEGF-A is responsible for arterial differentiation. These findings suggest a coordinated sequential action in which nerve-Cxcl12 functions over a distance to recruit vessels to align with nerves and subsequent arterial differentiation presumably requires a local-action of nerve-VEGF-A in the nerve-associated vessels. PMID:23395391

  7. Left Anterior Descending Coronary Artery and Multiple Peripheral Mycotic Aneurysms Due to Mycobacterium Bovis Following Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Therapy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Duvnjak, Petar; Laguna, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The use of live attenuated intravesicular Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) therapy is a generally accepted safe and effective method for the treatment of superficial transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder. Although rare, < 5% of patient’s treated with intravesicular BCG therapy may develop potentially serious complications, including localized infections to the genitourinary tract, mycotic aneurysms and osteomyelitis. We present here a case of a 63-year-old male who developed left coronary and multiple peripheral M. Bovis mycotic aneurysms as a late complication of intravesicular BCG therapy for superficial bladder cancer. The patient initially presented with acute onset pain and swelling in the left knee > 2 years following initial therapy, and initial workup revealed a ruptured saccular aneurysm of the left popliteal artery as well as incidental bilateral common femoral artery aneurysms. Following endovascular treatment and additional workup, the patient was discovered to have additional aneurysms in the right popliteal artery and left anterior descending artery (LAD). Surgical pathology and bacterial cultures obtained from the excised femoral aneurysms and surgical groin wounds were positive for Mycobacterium Bovis, and the patient was initiated on a nine-month antimycobacterial course of isoniazid, rifampin and ethambutol. Including the present case, there has been a total of 32 reported cases of mycotic aneurysms as a complication from intravesicular BCG therapy, which we will review here. The majority of reported cases involve the abdominal aorta; however, this represents the first known reported case of a coronary aneurysm. PMID:27761190

  8. Usefulness of the maximum rate of pressure rise in the central and peripheral arteries after weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass in pediatric congenital heart surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Won; Bang, Ji-Yeon; Park, Chun Soo; Gwak, Mijeung; Shin, Won-Jung; Hwang, Gyu-Sam

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The maximum rate of pressure rise (dP/dtmax) in radial artery has been proposed as a noninvasive surrogate of aortic dp/dtmax, reflecting left ventricular (LV) contractility in children. The aim of this study was to investigate relationship between aortic and radial dp/dtmax at weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and usefulness of these indices for estimating postoperative outcomes in pediatric congenital heart surgery. Aortic and radial arterial pressure waveforms were analyzed simultaneously during weaning from CPB in 29 congenital heart surgery. The maximum first derivatives of aortic and radial arterial waveforms were calculated and averaged from 3 consecutive respiratory cycles. We obtained the maximum vasoactive inotropic score during the first 36 postoperative hours, LV ejection fraction, and fractional shortening on transthoracic echocardiography performed within postoperative day 7. A significant difference between aortic and radial dP/dtmax was observed (mean difference 356 mm Hg/s, 44% of averages), and radial dP/dtmax was weakly correlated with aortic dP/dtmax (r =0.373, P = 0.047). Aortic dP/dtmax was significantly associated with the maximum vasoactive inotropic score (P < 0.001), postoperative LV ejection fraction (P = 0.018), and fractional shortening (P = 0.015); however, radial dP/dtmax was not. On Receiver operating characteristic analysis, aortic dP/dtmax had a greater area under the curve than radial dP/dtmax in predicting higher vasoactive inotropic score (0.827 vs 0.673). Immediately after CPB in pediatric congenital heart surgery, radial dP/dtmax may not replace aortic dP/dtmax because of a discrepancy between central and peripheral arterial waveforms. In this critical period, aortic dP/dtmax can be useful to estimate postoperative ventricular function rather than peripherally derived dP/dtmax. PMID:27930515

  9. Not only the Sugar, Early infarct sign, hyperDense middle cerebral artery, Age, Neurologic deficit score but also atrial fibrillation is predictive for symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator

    PubMed Central

    Muengtaweepongsa, Sombat; Prapa-Anantachai, Pornpoj; Dharmasaroja, Pornpat A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) is the most unwanted adverse event in patients with acute ischemic stroke who received intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (i.v. rt-PA). Many tool scores are available to predict the probability of sICH. Among those scores, the Sugar, Early infarct sign, hyperDense middle cerebral artery, Age, Neurologic deficit (SEDAN) gives the highest area under the curve-receiver operating characteristic value. Objective: We aimed to examine any factors other than the SEDAN score to predict the probability of sICH. Methods: Patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with i.v. rt-PA within 4.5 h time window from January 2010 to July 2012 were evaluated. Compiling demographic data, risk factors, and comorbidity (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, atrial fibrillation (AF), ischemic heart disease, valvular heart disease, previous stroke, gout, smoking cigarette, drinking alcoholic beverage, family history of stroke, and family history of ischemic heart disease), computed tomography scan of patients prior to treatment with rt-PA, and assessing the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score for the purpose of calculating SEDAN score were analyzed. Results: Of 314 patients treated with i.v. rt-PA, there were 46 ICH cases (14.6%) with 14 sICH (4.4%) and 32 asymptomatic intracranial hemorrhage cases (10.2%). The rate of sICH occurrence was increased in accordance with the increase in the SEDAN score and AF. Age over 75 years, early infarction, hyperdense cerebral artery, baseline blood sugar more than 12 mmol/l, NIHSS as 10 or more, and AF were the risk factors to develop sICH after treated with rt-PA at 1.535, 2.501, 1.093, 1.276, 1.253, and 2.492 times, respectively. Conclusions: Rather than the SEDAN score, AF should be a predictor of sICH in patients with acute ischemic stroke after i.v. rt-PA treatment in Thai population. PMID:28149081

  10. The AMC Linear Disability Score (ALDS): a cross-sectional study with a new generic instrument to measure disability applied to patients with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Met, Rosemarie; Reekers, Jim A; Koelemay, Mark JW; Legemate, Dink A; de Haan, Rob J

    2009-01-01

    Background The AMC Linear Disability Score (ALDS) is a calibrated generic itembank to measure the level of physical disability in patients with chronic diseases. The ALDS has already been validated in different patient populations suffering from chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the clinimetric properties of the ALDS in patients with peripheral arterial disease. Methods Patients with intermittent claudication (IC) and critical limb ischemia (CLI) presenting from January 2007 through November 2007 were included. Risk factors for atherosclerosis, ankle/brachial index and toe pressure, the Vascular Quality of Life Questionnaire (VascuQol), and the ALDS were recorded. To compare ALDS and VascuQol scores between the two patient groups, an unpaired t-test was used. Correlations were determined between VascuQol, ALDS and pressure measurements. Results Sixty-two patients were included (44 male, mean ± sd age was 68 ± 11 years) with IC (n = 26) and CLI (n = 36). The average ALDS was significantly higher in patients with IC (80, ± 10) compared to patients with CLI (64, ± 18). Internal reliability consistency of the ALDS expressed as Cronbach's α coefficient was excellent (α > 0.90). There was a strong convergent correlation between the ALDS and the disability related Activity domain of the VascuQol (r = 0.64). Conclusion The ALDS is a promising clinimetric instrument to measure disability in patients with various stages of peripheral arterial disease. PMID:19822016

  11. Treatment of peripheral arterial disease in diabetes: a consensus of the Italian Societies of Diabetes (SID, AMD), Radiology (SIRM) and Vascular Endovascular Surgery (SICVE).

    PubMed

    Aiello, A; Anichini, R; Brocco, E; Caravaggi, C; Chiavetta, A; Cioni, R; Da Ros, R; De Feo, M E; Ferraresi, R; Florio, F; Gargiulo, M; Galzerano, G; Gandini, R; Giurato, L; Graziani, L; Mancini, L; Manzi, M; Modugno, P; Setacci, C; Uccioli, L

    2014-04-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is a chronic and highly disabling complication of diabetes. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is high in diabetic patients and, associated or not with peripheral neuropathy (PN), can be found in 50% of cases of DF. It is worth pointing out that the number of major amputations in diabetic patients is still very high. Many PAD diabetic patients are not revascularised due to lack of technical expertise or, even worse, negative beliefs because of poor experience. This despite the progress obtained in the techniques of distal revascularisation that nowadays allow to reopen distal arteries of the leg and foot. Italy has one of the lowest prevalence rates of major amputations in Europe, and has a long tradition in the field of limb salvage by means of an aggressive approach in debridement, antibiotic therapy and distal revascularisation. Therefore, we believe it is appropriate to produce a consensus document concerning the treatment of PAD and limb salvage in diabetic patients, based on the Italian experience in this field, to share with the scientific community.

  12. Generalised wavelet analysis of cutaneous flowmotion during post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia in patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Bertuglia, S; Varanini, M; Giusti, A; Santoro, G; Carpi, A

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess whether the generalised wavelet analysis (GWA) of the leg cutaneous laser Doppler (LD) flowmotion waves recorded during baseline (Bsl) and after skin post-occlusive hyperaemia (POH) can provide information on the leg cutaneous microcirculatory adaptation to stage II peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAOD). With this aim the flowmotion was characterised in 20 healthy subjects (HS) and 20 stage II PAOD patients by GWA of LDF tracings during Bsl and POH test. The vascular endothelial and smooth muscle function was also evaluated exploring the arm skin vasodilatory response to iontophoretically delivered acetylcholine (Ach) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) using LD. During Bsl there was no significant difference in leg skin perfusion between HS and PAOD patients (7.3+/-5.6 vs. 5.8+/-2.9 AU, respectively). PAOD patients revealed higher peak powers in the frequency interval of 0.007-0.02 Hz (120+/-82 vs. 85+/-62 AU(2)/Hz; P < 0.05), 0.02-0.06 Hz (116+/-128 vs. 63+/-48 AU(2)/Hz, respectively; P < 0.05) and 0.06-0.2 Hz (39+/-49 vs. 14+/-10 AU(2)/Hz; P < 0.05). These flowmotion frequencies are related to vascular endothelium activity, sympathetic activity and vessel wall myogenic activity, respectively. During POH the mean peak power of the flowmotion waves increased significantly (P < 0.05) in HS respect to Bsl with the only exception of the 0.02-0.06 Hz band. In the PAOD patients, compared to Bsl the amplitude of the flowmotion waves did not significantly change during POH. In addition, the PAOD patients presented an increased time from release to peak-flux (18.25+/-15.5 vs. 2.16+/-1.28 s, respectively; P < 0.05), an increased time from release to recovery of the basal perfusion (90.26+/-39.14 vs. 26.55+/-14.05 s, respectively; P < 0.05) and a lower slope of the POH curve (10+/-15 vs. 54+/-17 degrees , respectively; P < 0.05), compared with HS. The cutaneous arm vasodilatory response to Ach and to SNP was reduced in PAOD

  13. Macitentan for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kholdani, Cyrus A; Fares, Wassim H; Trow, Terence K

    2014-01-01

    Macitentan is the most recently approved dual endothelin-receptor antagonist (ERA) for the treatment of symptomatic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Compared to other available ERAs, it demonstrates superior receptor-binding properties, with consequently improved tissue penetration, and a longer duration of action allowing for once-daily dosing. It has a favorable adverse-effect profile, with notably no demonstrable increase in the risk of hepatotoxicity or peripheral edema, but like other ERAs, it is potentially limited by significant anemia. Phase I data have demonstrated a favorable drug–drug interaction profile and no need for dose adjustment with hepatic and renal impairment. In the pivotal SERAPHIN study, treatment of symptomatic pulmonary arterial hypertension patients with macitentan led to statistically significant improvements in functional class, exercise tolerance, and hemodynamic parameters, in addition to a reduction in morbidity in an event-driven long-term trial. PMID:25473292

  14. Efficacy and Safety of a Novel Vascular Closure Device (Glubran 2 Seal) After Diagnostic and Interventional Angiography in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Del Corso, Andrea; Bargellini, Irene Cicorelli, Antonio; Perrone, Orsola; Leo, Michele; Lunardi, Alessandro; Alberti, Aldo; Tomei, Francesca; Cioni, Roberto; Ferrari, Mauro; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2013-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate safety and efficacy of a novel vascular closure device (Glubran 2 Seal) after peripheral angiography in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). From December 2010 to June 2011, all consecutive patients with PAOD undergoing peripheral angiography were prospectively enrolled onto the study after percutaneous antegrade or retrograde puncture of the common femoral artery. After angiography, the Glubran 2 Seal device was used to achieve hemostasis. The following data were registered: technical success and manual compression duration, patients' discomfort (scale 0-5), operators' technical difficulty (scale 0-5), and vascular complications. The site of hemostasis was evaluated by clinical inspection and color-coded Duplex ultrasound performed 1 day and 1 month after the procedure. One hundred seventy-eight patients were enrolled (112 male, mean age 70.8 years) with a total of 206 puncture sites, including 104 (50.5 %) antegrade accesses. The device was successful in 198(96.1 %) of 206 procedures, with 8 cases of manual compression lasting longer than 5 min (maximum 20 min). No major vascular complications were observed, resulting in 100 % procedural success. Minor complications occurred in seven procedures (3.4 %), including two cases of pseudoaneurysms, successfully treated by ultrasound-guided glue injection. The mean {+-} standard deviation score for patients' discomfort was 0.9 {+-} 0.7, whereas the mean score for operators' difficulty was 1.2 {+-} 0.9. In patients with PAOD, the Glubran 2 Seal represents a simple, painless, and efficient vascular closure device, able to achieve hemostasis both in antegrade and retrograde accesses.

  15. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Is Associated With Increased Arterial Stiffness Without Changes in Carotid Intima–Media Thickness in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Sook; Moon, Sung-dae; Kim, Hun-Sung; Lim, Dong Jun; Cho, Jae Hyoung; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Ahn, Chul Woo; Yoon, Kun Ho; Kang, Moo Il; Cha, Bong Yun; Son, Ho Young

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study was conducted to investigate the association of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) with both arterial stiffness and intima–media thickness (IMT). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 731 subjects with type 2 diabetes. DPN was diagnosed on the basis of neuropathic symptoms, insensitivity to a 10-g monofilament, abnormal pin-prick sensation, and abnormal current perception threshold. Arterial stiffness was assessed by cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), and IMT was assessed by B-mode ultrasonography. RESULTS Patients with DPN had higher CAVI than those without DPN in multivariate-adjusted models, whereas no differences in IMT were observed between patients with and without DPN after adjustment for age and sex. In the multivariate analysis, CAVI was a significant determinant of DPN (odds ratio 1.36 [95% CI 1.13–1.65], P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS DPN is significantly associated with arterial stiffness without carotid intimal changes in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:21515840

  16. An Extreme Case of CoreValve Bioprosthesis Embolization into the Abdominal Aorta and of the Delivery Catheter Cone into the Right Internal Iliac Artery.

    PubMed

    Alsancak, Yakup; Bilge, Mehmet; Ali, Sina; Duran, Mustafa; Saatci Yasar, Ayse

    2015-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new and hopefully therapeutic option in patients with symptomatic severe calcific aortic valve stenosis and multiple comorbidities who are not eligible for open-heart surgery due to unacceptable conventional surgical risks. Herein is reported the case of a patient who underwent TAVI in whom an unusual CoreValve bioprosthesis embolization occurred into the abdominal aorta. While attempting to retrieve the whole system, the conical tip of the catheter delivery system also became embolized into the right iliac artery. Importantly, this case demonstrated a rare complication of CoreValve bioprosthesis embolization which was managed without surgical intervention. Video 1: Peripheral angiography demonstrating the embolized CoreValve bioprosthesis. Video 2: Fluoroscopy demonstrating completely opened CoreValve bioprosthesis at a level above the iliac artery bifurcation and the mobile conical tip in the valve system. Video 3: Peripheral angiography demonstrating prosthetic valve without any flow limitation and embolized conical tip into the right internal iliac artery. Video 4: Peripheral angiography demonstrating prosthetic valve without any flow limitation and embolized conical tip into the right internal iliac artery. Video 5: Aortography demonstrating the successfully implanted second CoreValve bioprosthesis in an optimal aortic position, with no paravalvular leak. Video 6: Peripheral angiography demonstrating the embolized conical tip into the right iliac artery with a normal external iliac artery flow. Video 7: Peripheral angiography demonstrating the embolized conical tip into the right iliac artery with a normal external iliac artery flow.

  17. Acute coronary syndromes are associated with a reduction of VLA-1+ peripheral blood T cells and their enrichment in coronary artery plaque aspirates.

    PubMed

    Asman, Arik; Chouraqui, Pierre; Marcu-Malina, Victoria; Matetzky, Shlomo; Segev, Amit; Fefer, Paul; Agranat, Oren; Koltakov, Alexander; Hod, Hanoch; Livneh, Avi; Bank, Ilan

    2014-04-01

    Memory T cells producing interferon (IFN)γ and expressing very late antigen-1 (VLA-1) integrin collagen receptors are found in carotid atherosclerotic plaques, suggesting their involvement in coronary artery disease (CAD) as well. To determine the role of VLA-1+ T cells in CAD percent of CD3+ T cells binding monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to VLA-1 in peripheral blood (PB), and in coronary plaque material aspirated during coronary arterography and arterial blood, were analyzed in a cohort of 117 patients with CAD and 34 controls without CAD. % VLA-1+ T cells in PB was 0.63 ± 0.09% in controls compared to 0.96 ± 0.95% in patients with CAD (p<0.009). The increase was due to a marked elevation of % VLA-1+ T cells in stable CAD (1.6 ± 0.27%) whereas % VLA-1+ T cells during acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and in patients with ischemia by thalium SPECT scan had significantly lower levels. % VLA-1+ T cells in coronary artery plaque material aspirated during therapeutic angiography in patients with ACS was significantly higher than in arterial blood (1.39 ± 0.96% vs 0.75 ± 0.84%, p<0.035, n=3). Thus, % VLA-1+ T cells increases in the PB during stable CAD but decreases in ACS. The finding of their enrichment in coronary blood containing atherosclerotic plaque aspirates suggests that a shift of VLA-1+ T cells from blood to atherosclerotic plaques may play a role in plaque instability in patients with ACS.

  18. A Novel Two-Step Technique for Retrieving Fractured Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Segments Migrating into the Heart or the Pulmonary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Hao; Miao, Nan-Dong; Ren, Yong-Jun; Liu, Kang; Min, Xu-Li; Yang, Ke; Yang, Shi; Yang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To report the experience of a percutaneous technique for retrieving fractured peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) segments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery. Method. From April 2013 to July 2015, we performed percutaneous retrieval of fractured PICC segments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery in five cancer patients who had undergone chemotherapy via PICC. The fractures were diagnosed with chest plain radiography. The patients included three cases of breast cancer, one case of rectal cancer, and one case of lower limb Ewing's tumor. The fractures were retained in the vessels of the patients for 1 to 3 days. All the fractures were retrieved by using a novel two-step technique in the digital subtraction angiography (DSA) suite. This two-step technique involves inserting a pigtail catheter to the heart or the pulmonary artery to grasp the fractured catheter fragment and bring it to the lower segment of the inferior vena cava, followed by grasping and removing the catheter fragment with a retrieval loop system of the vena cava filter retrieval set. Result. The fractured PICC segments were removed successfully in all five patients via unilateral (four patients) or bilateral (one patient) femoral vein access. No complications occurred during the interventional procedure. Conclusion. Percutaneous retrieval can be a safe, convenient, and minimally invasive method for the removal of fractured PICC segments. The technique reported in this paper will be applicable for the retrieval of fractured PICC segments and other catheter fragments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery. PMID:27642604

  19. Assessing the end-organ in peripheral arterial occlusive disease—from contrast—enhanced ultrasound to blood-oxygen-level-dependent MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Partovi, Sasan; Jacobi, Bjoern; Fergus, Nathan; Schulte, Anja-Carina; Robbin, Mark R.; Bilecen, Deniz; Staub, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is a result of atherosclerotic disease which is currently the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Patients with PAOD may present with intermittent claudication or symptoms related to critical limb ischemia. PAOD is associated with increased mortality rates. Stenoses and occlusions are usually detected by macrovascular imaging, including ultrasound and cross-sectional methods. From a pathophysiological view these stenoses and occlusions are affecting the microperfusion in the functional end-organs, such as the skin and skeletal muscle. In the clinical arena new imaging technologies enable the evaluation of the microvasculature. Two technologies currently under investigation for this purpose on the end-organ level in PAOD patients are contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MR imaging (MRI). The following article is providing an overview about these evolving techniques with a specific focus on skeletal muscle microvasculature imaging in PAOD patients. PMID:24834413

  20. Nutritional status and body composition in patients with peripheral arterial disease: A cross-sectional examination of disease severity and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Brostow, Diana P; Hirsch, Alan T; Pereira, Mark A; Bliss, Robin L; Kurzer, Mindy S

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional and body weight recommendations for cardiovascular diseases are well established, yet there are no equivalent guidelines for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). This cross-sectional study measured the prevalence of cardiovascular-related nutritional and body composition risk factors in sixty PAD patients and their association with PAD severity. A diet that exceeds daily recommended intake of fat and that falls short of recommended intakes of fiber, folate, and vitamin D was associated with increased leg pain and walking difficulty. Increased body fat and waist circumference were associated with diminished walking ability and poorer psychosocial quality of life. Future prospective investigations are merited to inform both PAD clinical care and disease management guidelines.

  1. Exercise rehabilitation for peripheral artery disease: An exercise physiology perspective with special emphasis on the emerging trend of home-based exercise.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew W

    2015-11-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a significant medical concern that is highly prevalent, costly, and deadly. Additionally, patients with PAD have significant impairments in functional independence and health-related quality of life due to leg symptoms and ambulatory dysfunction. Exercise therapy is a primary treatment for patients with PAD, as ambulatory outcome measures improve following a program of exercise rehabilitation. This review describes the outcomes that improve with exercise, the potential mechanisms for improved leg symptoms, key exercise program considerations for training patients with PAD with walking-based exercise, other exercise modalities that have been utilised, the use of on-site supervised exercise programs, and a major focus on historical and contemporary trials on conducting home-based, minimally supervised exercise program to treat PAD. The review concludes with recommendations for future exercise trials, with particular emphasis on reported greater details of the exercise prescription to more accurately quantify the total exercise dose of the program.

  2. [Peripheral arterial disease and diabetes related lower limb amputations. Presentation of the epidemiological data and the analysis of potentialities in preventive strategy].

    PubMed

    Kolossváry, Endre; Járai, Zoltán; Farkas, Katalin

    2016-08-01

    Lower limb amputation as one of the most devastating consequences of peripheral arterial disease and diabetes mellitus needs peculiar attention. This review aims at comparing Hungarian and international amputation data. Realizing the great variability of the global amputation incidence and trends data, the main determinants of this variety are assessed. These factors involve methodological differences in reporting, demographic, epidemiological, economic, societal and cultural variation of the affected populations and differences in the health care service. The amputation hazard can be considered as an example of lifetime risk that can be characterized by complex interaction of contionuously changing risk factor pattern. In that sense an effective preventive strategy planning needs complex measure implementations that associate with multidisciplinary approach, timely complex preventive interventions and centralized vascular care. Research and development on amputation field shows clear priority that can contribute to the better understanding of this extremely complex scenario with significant public health consequences. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(32), 1266-1274.

  3. Starclose SE® hemostasis after 6F direct antegrade superficial femoral artery access distal to the femoral head for peripheral endovascular procedures in obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Kitrou, Panagiotis; Christeas, Nikolaos; Karnabatidis, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Direct superficial femoral artery (SFA) antegrade puncture is a valid alternative to common femoral artery (CFA) access for peripheral vascular interventions. Data investigating vascular closure device (VCD) hemostasis of distant SFA 6F access are limited. We aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of the Starclose SE® VCD for hemostasis, following direct 6F antegrade SFA access distal to the femoral head. METHODS This prospective, single-center study included patients who were not suitable for CFA puncture and were scheduled to undergo peripheral endovascular interventions using direct antegrade SFA 6F access, at least 2 cm below the inferior edge of femoral head. Hemostasis was obtained with the Starclose SE® VCD (Abbott Laboratories). Primary endpoints were successful hemostasis rate and periprocedural (30-day) major complication rate. Secondary endpoint was the rate of minor complications. Clinical and Doppler ultrasound follow-up was performed at discharge and at one month. RESULTS Between September 2014 and August 2015, a total of 30 patients (21 male; 70.0%) with a mean body mass index of 41.2 kg/m2 were enrolled. Mean age was 72±9 years (range, 67–88 years). Most patients suffered from critical limb ischemia (87.1%) and diabetes (61.3%). Calcifications were present in eight cases (26.6%). Reason for direct SFA puncture was obesity (100%). Successful hemostasis was achieved in 100% of the cases. No major complications were noted after one-month follow-up. Minor complications included two <5 cm hematomas (6.6%) not necessitating treatment. CONCLUSION In this prospective study, Starclose SE® VCD was safe and effective for hemostasis of antegrade direct SFA puncture. Uncomplicated hemostasis was achieved even in cases of puncturing 2 to 7 cm below the inferior edge of the femoral head. PMID:27641942

  4. Impact of Indoxyl Sulfate on Progenitor Cell-Related Neovascularization of Peripheral Arterial Disease and Post-Angioplasty Thrombosis of Dialysis Vascular Access

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chih-Cheng; Hung, Szu-Chun; Kuo, Ko-Lin; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2017-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of vascular disease, which is associated with considerable health care costs. Vascular disease in CKD differs clinically and pathobiologically from that in patients with normal renal function. Besides the traditional risk factors, retention of uremic toxins contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in patients with CKD. Indoxyl sulfate is a protein-bound uremic toxin and is inefficiently removed by conventional dialysis. Accumulating evidence suggests that indoxyl sulfate is a vascular toxin involved in atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, vascular calcification and vascular repair. Clinically, indoxyl sulfate is associated with total and cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD. Recent studies have indicated that in addition to coronary and cerebral arteries, indoxyl sulfate plays a role in peripheral artery disease (PAD) and dialysis graft thrombosis. Emerging evidence suggests that indoxyl sulfate is implicated via novel mechanisms, including progenitor cell-related neovascularization and tissue factor-related hypercoagulability. These findings raise the possibility that strategies targeting serum indoxyl sulfate may have the potential to improve the outcomes of PAD and dialysis vascular access in patients with CKD. PMID:28067862

  5. [A ruptured aneurysm at the peripheral collateral circulation of the anterior choroidal artery in a patient with moyamoya disease: a case report].

    PubMed

    Nakai, H; Yamamoto, K; Sako, K; Tanikawa, R; Kunimoto, M; Hashimoto, M; Tomabechi, M; Ohgami, S; Yonemasu, Y; Muraoka, S

    1992-09-01

    This 42-year-old man experienced a sudden onset of occipital headache. Neurological examination revealed a moderately disturbed consciousness and a moderate left hemiparesis. CT scan disclosed a hugh hematoma in the right temporo parietal lobe without intraventricular hemorrhage. A cerebral angiography demonstrated typical findings of moyamoya disease and a small saccular aneurysm at the peripheral portion of the right anterior choroidal artery, which was dilated at the collateral circulation to the parietal lobe. The hematoma was removed at once by a craniotomy. He became alert but mild hemiparesis persisted. MRI disclosed a small signal-void lesion lateral to the trigone of the right lateral ventricle. The angiography repeated three weeks after the removal of the hematoma showed the unchanged size of the aneurysm. Direct surgery for the aneurysm was performed via the right parietal transcortical approach. The aneurysm was reached under the guidance of the intraoperative angiography. Trapping of the parent artery and the excision of the aneurysm were performed. On the basis of the presence of an internal elastic lamina at the neck of the aneurysm, the surgical specimen was histologically verified to be a true aneurysm. Since the collateral circulation was well preserved during surgery, no worsening of the neurological manifestation was observed. In view of the unfavorable prognosis for a moyamoya patient with this type of the aneurysm, which often results in a massive ventricular or intracerebral hemorrhage, surgery directed to the aneurysm itself should be considered.

  6. Tissue-Muscle Perfusion Scintigraphy of the Lower Limbs in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Manevska, Nevena; Gjorceva, Daniela Pop; Ahmeti, Irfan; Todorovska, Lidija; Stojanoski, Sinisa; Kocovska, Marina Zdraveska

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of tissue perfusion as a hemodynamic consequence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in diabetic patients is of great importance in the management of these patients.We present a noninvasive, functional method of 99mTc-MIBI (methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile) tissue-muscle perfusion scintigraphy (TMPS) of the lower limbs, which assesses tissue perfusion in basal conditions (“rest” study) and exercise conditions (“stress” study). Emphasis is given on perfusion reserve (PR) as an important indicator of preservation of microcirculation and its local autoregulatory mechanisms in PAD. We present a case of a 71-year-old male diabetic patient with skin ulcers of the right foot and an ankle-brachial index >1.2 (0.9-1.1). Dynamic phase TMPS of the lower limbs showed decreased and late arterial vascularization of the right calf (RC) with lower percentage of radioactivity in the 1st minute: RC 66%, left calf (LC) 84%. PR was borderline with a value of 57% for LC and decreased for RC (42%). Functional assessment of hemodynamic consequences of PAD is important in evaluating both advanced and early PAD, especially the asymptomatic form. The method used to determine the TMPS of the lower limbs, can differentiate subtle changes in microcirculation and tissue perfusion. PMID:27299288

  7. Treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Tandon, D; Berardelli, A

    1985-01-01

    There are three general approaches to treatment of peripheral neuropathy. First, an attempt should be made to reverse the pathophysiological process if its nature can be elucidated. Second, nerve metabolism can be stimulated and regeneration encouraged. Third, even if the neuropathy itself cannot be improved, symptomatic therapy can be employed. This review outlines the options available for each approach. PMID:3003254

  8. Autonomic nervous activation triggered during induction of reactive hyperemia exerts a greater influence on the measured reactive hyperemia index by peripheral arterial tonometry than on flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery in patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Yoshida, Masanobu; Higashi, Yukihito; Takase, Bonpei; Furumoto, Tomoo; Kario, Kazuomi; Ohya, Yusuke; Yamashina, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery (FMD) and reactive hyperemia index (RHI) measured by peripheral arterial tonometry are known to be weakly associated with one another, but the mechanisms underlying this weak association remain to be clarified. We examined whether the autonomic nervous activation induced by the 5 min forearm clamping used to induce reactive hyperemia might exert any influence on the FMD and RHI in subjects with hypertension. In 115 subjects with hypertension (age 61±1 years), the FMD and RHI were measured simultaneously, and the heart rate variability (HRV) parameters (low-frequency component (LF), high-frequency component (HF), and the ratio (LF/HF) between the two) were calculated from the electrocardiographic recordings obtained before and after the start of forearm clamping. A multivariate linear regression analysis with adjustments for confounding variables demonstrated that the RHI, but not the FMD, was significantly associated with the percent change of the LF/HF associated with forearm clamping (beta=-0.204, P=0.043). In conclusion, autonomic nervous system activation, especially sympathetic activation, induced by 5-min forearm clamping utilized to provoke reactive hyperemia may significantly affect the RHI rather than FMD in subjects with hypertension.

  9. Symptomatic pharmacotherapy of migraine.

    PubMed

    Lobo, B L; Cooke, S C; Landy, S H

    1999-07-01

    This review summarizes data on the effectiveness of various symptomatic migraine pharmacotherapies and makes recommendations for treatment. A wide variety of agents are available for the symptomatic treatment of migraine headache, including over-the-counter analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), combination products, opiates, ergot alkaloids, corticosteroids, dopamine antagonists, and triptans. In the stepped-care approach, simple analgesics and NSAIDs are the recommended first step for the treatment of mild-to-moderate migraine headaches. Patients who do not respond to first-step treatments may be given ergots, combination products, dopamine antagonists, or triptans as the second step. Corticosteroids or opiates may be used as rescue treatment in patients who do not respond to second-step treatment. A stratified approach to care individualizes treatment based on the severity of the headache and other patient-specific factors. In a stratified approach, dihydroergotamine or triptans may be the first-step treatment for patients who present with a history of severe migraines that have responded poorly to previous treatments. Sumatriptan was the first triptan approved for the symptomatic treatment of migraine headache; newer triptans include zolmitriptan, naratriptan, and rizatriptan. Since sumatriptan is rapidly absorbed by the subcutaneous route, its time to onset of effect is shortest. Among triptan drugs that are administered orally, the relative time to onset may be shorter with rizatriptan than sumatriptan. Naratriptan has a longer time to onset but is associated with a lower rate of migraine recurrence than other triptans. graine headache, ergot alkaloids, triptans,

  10. Peripheral Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... PVD can result from a condition known as atherosclerosis, where a waxy substance forms inside of the ... cramping in the legs. The risk factors for atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries are the same as ...

  11. High-resolution ultrasound speckle tracking may detect vascular mechanical wall changes in peripheral artery bypass vein grafts.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, William F; Kim, Kang; Henke, Peter K; Rubin, Jonathan M

    2009-03-01

    We report the use of high-resolution, phase-sensitive ultrasound speckle tracking to measure the local vessel-wall strain in two subjects with artery-vein bypass grafts. In addition, we combined this technique with a free-hand pressure equalization procedure to elucidate the nonlinear effects of blood pressure on vessel wall compliance. While conventional ultrasound imaging can be used to elucidate the mechanical properties of tissues within the body, it is constrained by comparatively lower resolution and inferential, rather than direct, measurements of strain and by the small strain normally produced under physiological pressure in highly nonlinear structures such as arteries. One of our subjects was examined both before and after developing stenosis 3 months postsurgery. The strain values for this individual were found to be significantly lower, indicating a stiffer vessel wall at the stenotic region than at a nonstenotic region under both physiological and equalized pressure. These results suggest the possibility of noninvasive detection of neointimal hyperplasia preceding anastomotic stenosis.

  12. The atherosclerosis burden score (ABS): a convenient ultrasound-based score of peripheral atherosclerosis for coronary artery disease prediction.

    PubMed

    Yerly, Patrick; Marquès-Vidal, Pedro; Owlya, Reza; Eeckhout, Eric; Kappenberger, Lukas; Darioli, Roger; Depairon, Michèle

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasonographic detection of subclinical atherosclerosis improves cardiovascular risk stratification, but uncertainty persists about the most discriminative method to apply. In this study, we found that the "atherosclerosis burden score (ABS)", a novel straightforward ultrasonographic score that sums the number of carotid and femoral arterial bifurcations with plaques, significantly outperformed common carotid intima-media thickness, carotid mean/maximal thickness, and carotid/femoral plaque scores for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) (receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve area under the curve (AUC) = 0.79; P = 0.027 to <0.001 with the other five US endpoints) in 203 patients undergoing coronary angiography. ABS was also more correlated with CAD extension (R = 0.55; P < 0.001). Furthermore, in a second group of 1128 patients without cardiovascular disease, ABS was weakly correlated with the European Society of Cardiology chart risk categories (R(2) = 0.21), indicating that ABS provided information beyond usual cardiovascular risk factor-based risk stratification. Pending prospective studies on hard cardiovascular endpoints, ABS appears as a promising tool in primary prevention.

  13. Angiotensin Receptor Blockades Effect on Peripheral Muscular and Central Aortic Arterial Stiffness: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chih-Hsuan; Lai, Yau-Huei; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Lee, Ping-Ying; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Yeh, Hung-I; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous clinical trials have demonstrated the impact of blocking upstream renin-angiotensin-axis with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) on arterial stiffness as evaluated by pulse-wave velocity (PWV). We ran a meta-analysis to evaluate the anti-stiffness effect of powerful downstream angiotensin receptor blockades (ARBs) on peripheral and central arterial stiffness (brachial to ankle, ba-PWV; carotid to femoral, cf-PWV, respectively), using a systematic review to assess the clinical arterial stiffness issues. Methods For our study, we searched the PubMed and Cochrane Library databases from inception to June 2013, targeting randomized controlled trials. ARBs along with other antihypertensive agents, ACEIs, calcium channel blockers (CCBs), beta-blockers and diuretics were evaluated to ascertain their comparable effect on ba-PWV and cf-PWV, respectively. A meta-analysis was conducted utilizing the fixed or random effect of the weighted mean change difference between the ARB and comparator groups, depending on the I2 statistic heterogeneity measurement. Results In 2 trials treating patients with ARBs (n = 30), the ARBs insignificantly reduced levels of ba-PWV (pooled mean change difference -188, 95% CI -687, 311, p = 0.24 with significant heterogeneity) as compared to other hypertensive agents (ACEIs and CCBs, n = 77). Interestingly, ARBs (n = 20) had a superior capacity to reduce levels of ba-PWV than CCBs (n = 20) in single study results (mean change difference -400, 95% CI -477, -322, p < 0.05). In 7 trials which included a total of 653 patients, treatment with ARBs (n = 308) also insignificantly reduced cf-PWV (pool mean change difference -0.197, 95% CI -0.54, 0.14, p = 0.218) as compared to other anti-hypertensive agents. Conclusions Our data suggested that ARBs had a similar effect as other anti-hypertensive agents in reducing ba-PWV and cf-PWV. Upon systematic review, the renin-angiotensin-axis system mechanism seems more significant

  14. Symptomatic posterior mediastinal angioleiomyoma.

    PubMed

    I, Hoseok; Jeong, Yeon Joo; Choi, Kyung Un; Kim, Yeong-Dae

    2008-08-30

    We report a case of a symptomatic angioleiomyoma in the left posterior mediastinum. A 66-year-old woman presented with left back and flank pain for 6 months. Chest computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a well-circumscribed 4.3 cm round mass. The mass was initially diagnosed as nerve sheath tumor, because of her symptoms and its close location to the sympathetic trunk and intercostal nerve. It was uneventfully removed through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. The pathology revealed an angioleiomyoma.

  15. Development and characterization of targeted poly(NIPAm) nanoparticles for delivery of anti-inflammatory peptides in peripheral artery disease and osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMasters, James F.

    Inflammation is the underlying cause of several severe diseases including cardiovascular disease and osteoarthritis. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is characterized by atherosclerotic occlusions within the peripheral vasculature. Current treatment for severe PAD involves mechanical widening of the artery via percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Unfortunately, deployment of the balloon damages the endothelial layer, exposing the underlying collagenous matrix. Circulating platelets can bind to this collagen and become activated, releasing proinflammatory cytokines that promote proliferation of local smooth muscle cells. These proliferating cells eventually reocclude the vessel, resulting in restenosis and necessitating the need for a second procedure to reopen the vessel. Current treatments for moderate osteoarthritis include local injection of anti-inflammatory compounds such as glucocorticoids. Unfortunately, prolonged treatment carries with it significant side effects including osteoporosis, and cardiovascular complications. Our lab has developed an anti-inflammatory cell-penetrating peptide that inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase activated protein kinase 2 (MK2). MK2 is implicated in the inflammatory cascade of atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis, making it a potentially effective strategy for reducing inflammation in both disease states. Unfortunately, these peptides are untargeted and quickly degraded in the presence of serum proteases, making the development of an effective delivery system of paramount importance. The overall goal of the research presented here is to detail the development of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticle that is able to effectively load and release anti-inflammatory peptides for the treatment of these inflammatory diseases. In this dissertation, I will discuss the development of a collagen-binding nanoparticle that is able to inhibit platelet binding following angioplasty, thereby halting the initial inflammatory cascade

  16. Multi-Parametric Assessment of Vascular Function in Peripheral Artery Disease: Dynamic Measurement of Skeletal Muscle Perfusion, BOLD Signal, and Venous Oxygen Saturation

    PubMed Central

    Englund, Erin K.; Langham, Michael C.; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Fanning, Molly; Wehrli, Felix W.; Mohler, Emile R.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction present in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) may be better understood by measuring the temporal dynamics of blood flow and oxygen saturation during reactive hyperemia than by conventional static measurements. Methods and Results Perfusion, Intravascular Venous Oxygen saturation, and T2* (PIVOT), a recently developed MRI technique, was used to measure the response to an ischemia-reperfusion paradigm in ninety-six patients with PAD of varying severity, and ten healthy controls. Perfusion, venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), and T2* were each quantified in the calf at two second temporal resolution, yielding a dynamic time course for each variable. Compared to healthy controls, patients had a blunted and delayed hyperemic response. Moreover, patients with lower ankle-brachial index had: 1) a more delayed reactive hyperemia response time, manifesting as an increase in time to peak perfusion in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and peroneus muscles, and in the anterior compartment; 2) an increase in the time to peak T2* measured in the soleus muscle; and 3) a prolongation of the posterior tibial vein SvO2 washout time. Intra- and inter-session repeatability was also assessed. Results indicated that time to peak perfusion and time to peak T2* were the most reliable extracted time course metrics. Conclusions Perfusion, dynamic SvO2, and T2* response times following induced ischemia are highly correlated with PAD disease severity. Combined imaging of peripheral microvascular blood flow and dynamics of oxygen saturation with PIVOT may be a useful tool to investigate the pathophysiology of PAD. PMID:25873722

  17. Association between n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid content of red blood cells and inflammatory biomarkers in patients with peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Grenon, S. Marlene; Conte, Michael S.; Nosova, Emily; Alley, Hugh; Chong, Karen; Harris, William S.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Owens, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are dietary components derived from fish oil with beneficial cardiovascular effects that may relate in part to anti-inflammatory properties. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is characterized by a marked pro-inflammatory state. We hypothesized that the n-3 PUFA content of red blood cells (omega-3 index) would be correlated with biomarkers of inflammation and vascular function in a PAD cohort. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of subjects who presented to an outpatient vascular surgery clinic for evaluation of PAD. We used linear regression to evaluate the independent association between the omega-3 index, inflammatory biomarkers [C-reactive protein (CRP), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor-necrosis-factor-α (TNF-α)] and endothelial function (brachial artery flow mediated dilation [FMD]). Results 64 subjects (61 claudicants and 3 with critical limb ischemia) were recruited for the study. The mean CRP level was 5.0 ± 5.0 mg/L and the mean omega-3 index was 5.0% ± 1.8%. In an unadjusted model, the omega-3 index was negatively associated with CRP (38% increase in CRP for one standard deviation decrease in the omega-3 index; P=.007) which remained significant after adjustment for age, body-mass index, smoking, the ABI and HDL (33%; P=.04). There was also evidence for independent associations between the omega-3 index and IL-6 (P=.001). There were no significant associations between the omega-3 index and vascular function tests. Conclusions In a cohort of patients with PAD, the omega-3 index was inversely associated with biomarkers of inflammation even after adjustment for covariates including the ABI. Because patients with PAD have a high inflammatory burden, further studies should be conducted to determine if manipulation of omega-3 index via dietary changes or fish oil supplementation could improve inflammation and symptoms in these patients. PMID:23830313

  18. Peripheral Endothelial (Dys)Function, Arterial Stiffness and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Patients after Kawasaki Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Sanne M.; Tacke, Carline E. A.; Hutten, Barbara A.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic pediatric vasculitis. Its main complication is the development of coronary arterial aneurysms (CAA), causing an increased risk for ischemia and myocardial infarction. It is unclear whether KD patients, apart from the presence of CAA, have an increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk due to the previous systemic vasculitis. The aim of this study was to systematically review and meta-analyse the literature regarding surrogate markers for CVD risk in KD patients. Methods Medline and Embase were searched for articles comparing endothelial dysfunction (flow-mediated dilation, nitroglycerin-mediated dilation and peripheral arterial tonometry), vascular stiffness (stiffness index, pulse wave velocity) and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) between patients and controls. Two investigators assessed the articles for eligibility and evaluated quality. Results Thirty studies were included. For all outcomes, moderate to high heterogeneity between studies was found. Most studies reported a decreased flow-mediated dilation in the whole KD- and CAA-positive group compared to controls, while data on CAA-negative patients were conflicting. The stiffness index was increased in the majority of studies evaluating the whole KD- and CAA-positive group, but not in most studies on CAA-negative patients. Mean cIMT was neither significantly increased in the whole KD-group nor in the CAA-positive group nor in most studies studying CAA-negative patients. Studies measuring maximum cIMT were conflicting. Conclusion Literature suggests that surrogate markers for CVD risk in KD patients are increased in CAA-positive but not in CAA-negative patients. This may indicate that CAA-positive patients should be monitored for CVD in later life. The results of this review have to be interpreted with care due to substantial heterogeneity between studies and methodological limitations, as well as the lack of long-term follow-up studies. PMID:26161871

  19. Flow Cytometric Quantification of Peripheral Blood Cell β-Adrenergic Receptor Density and Urinary Endothelial Cell-Derived Microparticles in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jonathan A.; Wanner, Nicholas; Cheong, Hoi I.; Queisser, Kimberly; Barrett, Patrick; Park, Margaret; Hite, Corrine; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V.; Erzurum, Serpil; Asosingh, Kewal

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by severe angiogenic remodeling of the pulmonary artery wall and right ventricular hypertrophy. Thus, there is an increasing need for novel biomarkers to dissect disease heterogeneity, and predict treatment response. Although β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) dysfunction is well documented in left heart disease while endothelial cell-derived microparticles (Ec-MPs) are established biomarkers of angiogenic remodeling, methods for easy large clinical cohort analysis of these biomarkers are currently absent. Here we describe flow cytometric methods for quantification of βAR density on circulating white blood cells (WBC) and Ec-MPs in urine samples that can be used as potential biomarkers of right heart failure in PAH. Biotinylated β-blocker alprenolol was synthesized and validated as a βAR specific probe that was combined with immunophenotyping to quantify βAR density in circulating WBC subsets. Ec-MPs obtained from urine samples were stained for annexin-V and CD144, and analyzed by a micro flow cytometer. Flow cytometric detection of alprenolol showed that βAR density was decreased in most WBC subsets in PAH samples compared to healthy controls. Ec-MPs in urine was increased in PAH compared to controls. Furthermore, there was a direct correlation between Ec-MPs and Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) in PAH patients. Therefore, flow cytometric quantification of peripheral blood cell βAR density and urinary Ec-MPs may be useful as potential biomarkers of right ventricular function in PAH. PMID:27270458

  20. Genetic Variants in the Bone Morphogenic Protein Gene Family Modify the Association between Residential Exposure to Traffic and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ward-Caviness, Cavin K.; Neas, Lucas M.; Blach, Colette; Haynes, Carol S.; LaRocque-Abramson, Karen; Grass, Elizabeth; Dowdy, Elaine; Devlin, Robert B.; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Cascio, Wayne E.; Lynn Miranda, Marie; Gregory, Simon G.; Shah, Svati H.; Kraus, William E.; Hauser, Elizabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing literature indicating that genetic variants modify many of the associations between environmental exposures and clinical outcomes, potentially by increasing susceptibility to these exposures. However, genome-scale investigations of these interactions have been rarely performed particularly in the case of air pollution exposures. We performed race-stratified genome-wide gene-environment interaction association studies on European-American (EA, N = 1623) and African-American (AA, N = 554) cohorts to investigate the joint influence of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and residential exposure to traffic (“traffic exposure”)—a recognized vascular disease risk factor—on peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Traffic exposure was estimated via the distance from the primary residence to the nearest major roadway, defined as the nearest limited access highways or major arterial. The rs755249-traffic exposure interaction was associated with PAD at a genome-wide significant level (P = 2.29x10-8) in European-Americans. Rs755249 is located in the 3’ untranslated region of BMP8A, a member of the bone morphogenic protein (BMP) gene family. Further investigation revealed several variants in BMP genes associated with PAD via an interaction with traffic exposure in both the EA and AA cohorts; this included interactions with non-synonymous variants in BMP2, which is regulated by air pollution exposure. The BMP family of genes is linked to vascular growth and calcification and is a novel gene family for the study of PAD pathophysiology. Further investigation of BMP8A using the Genotype Tissue Expression Database revealed multiple variants with nominally significant (P < 0.05) interaction P-values in our EA cohort were significant BMP8A eQTLs in tissue types highlight relevant for PAD such as rs755249 (tibial nerve, eQTL P = 3.6x10-6) and rs1180341 (tibial artery, eQTL P = 5.3x10-6). Together these results reveal a novel gene, and possibly gene

  1. Detection of peripheral arterial disease with an improved automated device: comparison of a new oscillometric device and the standard Doppler method

    PubMed Central

    Špan, Matjaž; Geršak, Gregor; Millasseau, Sandrine C; Meža, Marko; Košir, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    In occidental countries, peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an important health issue; however, most subjects are asymptomatic (~50%) and therefore undiagnosed and untreated. Current guidelines recommend screening for PAD in primary care setting using ankle brachial index (ABI) in all patients with cardiovascular risks. This is, however, not performed strictly because the standard Doppler method is cumbersome and time-consuming. Here, we evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of ABI measurements obtained by an improved automated oscillometric device, the MESI ABPI MD® device, and the standard Doppler method. ABI was measured in random order in a general practice with Doppler probes by two operators separately (ABI_dop) and twice with the MESI ABPI MD device (ABI_mesi). ABI_dop was calculated dividing the highest systolic blood pressure from both tibial and dorsalis pedis arteries by the highest systolic blood pressure of both brachial arteries. ABI_mesi was obtained automatically with simultaneous measurements on three extremities. According to ABI_dop, PAD was present in 10% of the 136 screened subjects (68.2±7.4 years). Interoperator coefficient of variation was 5.5% for ABI_dop, while the intrasubject coefficient of variation for ABI_mesi was 3.0%. ABI_mesi was correlated with ABI_dop (R=0.61, P<0.0001). The difference between the two techniques was 0.06±0.14 with ABI_mesi providing slightly higher values (P<0.0001) and negligible bias across the range (R=0.19, P<0.0001). Therefore, ABI_mesi ≤1 had a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 96% to detect ABI_dop ≤0.9 and hence PAD. Doppler measurements took seven times longer than MESI ABPI MD measurements to be performed. In conclusion, MESI improved automated oscillometric method and offered a faster and repeatable measurement of ABI with only a small, clinically irrelevant overestimation of ABI value. The tested MESI ABPI MD-improved oscillometric system can be used as a screening tool for patients

  2. Genetic Variants in the Bone Morphogenic Protein Gene Family Modify the Association between Residential Exposure to Traffic and Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Ward-Caviness, Cavin K; Neas, Lucas M; Blach, Colette; Haynes, Carol S; LaRocque-Abramson, Karen; Grass, Elizabeth; Dowdy, Elaine; Devlin, Robert B; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Cascio, Wayne E; Lynn Miranda, Marie; Gregory, Simon G; Shah, Svati H; Kraus, William E; Hauser, Elizabeth R

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing literature indicating that genetic variants modify many of the associations between environmental exposures and clinical outcomes, potentially by increasing susceptibility to these exposures. However, genome-scale investigations of these interactions have been rarely performed particularly in the case of air pollution exposures. We performed race-stratified genome-wide gene-environment interaction association studies on European-American (EA, N = 1623) and African-American (AA, N = 554) cohorts to investigate the joint influence of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and residential exposure to traffic ("traffic exposure")-a recognized vascular disease risk factor-on peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Traffic exposure was estimated via the distance from the primary residence to the nearest major roadway, defined as the nearest limited access highways or major arterial. The rs755249-traffic exposure interaction was associated with PAD at a genome-wide significant level (P = 2.29x10-8) in European-Americans. Rs755249 is located in the 3' untranslated region of BMP8A, a member of the bone morphogenic protein (BMP) gene family. Further investigation revealed several variants in BMP genes associated with PAD via an interaction with traffic exposure in both the EA and AA cohorts; this included interactions with non-synonymous variants in BMP2, which is regulated by air pollution exposure. The BMP family of genes is linked to vascular growth and calcification and is a novel gene family for the study of PAD pathophysiology. Further investigation of BMP8A using the Genotype Tissue Expression Database revealed multiple variants with nominally significant (P < 0.05) interaction P-values in our EA cohort were significant BMP8A eQTLs in tissue types highlight relevant for PAD such as rs755249 (tibial nerve, eQTL P = 3.6x10-6) and rs1180341 (tibial artery, eQTL P = 5.3x10-6). Together these results reveal a novel gene, and possibly gene family

  3. A multiscale computational model predicts distribution of anti-angiogenic isoform VEGF165b in peripheral arterial disease in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Liang-Hui; Ganta, Vijay Chaitanya; Choi, Min H.; Chen, George; Finley, Stacey D.; Annex, Brian H.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing microvessels. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is caused by atherosclerosis that results in ischemia mostly in the lower extremities. Clinical trials including VEGF-A administration for therapeutic angiogenesis have not been successful. The existence of anti-angiogenic isoform (VEGF165b) in PAD muscle tissues is a potential cause for the failure of therapeutic angiogenesis. Experimental measurements show that in PAD human muscle biopsies the VEGF165b isoform is at least as abundant if not greater than the VEGF165a isoform. We constructed three-compartment models describing VEGF isoforms and receptors, in human and mouse, to make predictions on the secretion rate of VEGF165b and the distribution of various isoforms throughout the body based on the experimental data. The computational results are consistent with the data showing that in PAD calf muscles secrete mostly VEGF165b over total VEGF. In the PAD calf compartment of human and mouse models, most VEGF165a and VEGF165b are bound to the extracellular matrix. VEGF receptors VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) are mostly in ‘Free State’. This study provides a computational model of VEGF165b in PAD supported by experimental measurements of VEGF165b in human and mouse, which gives insight of VEGF165b in therapeutic angiogenesis and VEGF distribution in human and mouse PAD model. PMID:27853189

  4. DVC1-0101 to Treat Peripheral Arterial Disease: A Phase I/IIa Open-label Dose-escalation Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Matsumoto, Takuya; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Jin; Uchiyama, Makiko; Yoshida, Kumi; Onimaru, Mitsuho; Onohara, Toshihiro; Inoguchi, Hiroyuki; Kyuragi, Ryoichi; Shimokawa, Mototsugu; Ban, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Michiko; Inoue, Makoto; Shu, Tsugumine; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    We here report the results of a Phase I/IIa open-label four dose-escalation clinical study assessing the safety, tolerability, and possible therapeutic efficacy of a single intramuscular administration of DVC1-0101, a new gene transfer vector based on a nontransmissible recombinant Sendai virus (rSeV) expressing the human fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) gene (rSeV/dF-hFGF2), in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Gene transfer was done in 12 limbs of 12 patients with rest pain, and three of them had ischemic ulcer(s). No cardiovascular or other serious adverse events (SAEs) caused by gene transfer were detected in the patients over a 6-month follow-up. No infectious viral particles, as assessed by hemagglutination activity, were detected in any patient during the study. No representative elevation of proinflammatory cytokines or plasma FGF-2 was seen. Significant and continuous improvements in Rutherford category, absolute claudication distance (ACD), and rest pain were observed (P < 0.05 to 0.01). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clinical trial of the use of a gene transfer vector based on rSeV. The single intramuscular administration of DVC1-0101 to PAD patients was safe and well tolerated, and resulted in significant improvements of limb function. Larger pivotal studies are warranted as a next step. PMID:23319060

  5. Spontaneous and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy of human gastrocnemius muscle biopsies in CH-stretching region for discrimination of peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, X; Irmak, S; Lu, Y F; Pipinos, I; Casale, G; Subbiah, J

    2015-08-01

    Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) is a common manifestation of atherosclerosis, characterized by lower leg ischemia and myopathy in association with leg dysfunction. In the present study, Spontaneous and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopic techniques in CH-stretching spectral region were evaluated for discriminating healthy and diseased tissues of human gastrocnemius biopsies of control and PAD patients. Since Raman signatures of the tissues in the fingerprint region are highly complex and CH containing moieties are dense, CH-stretching limited spectral range was used to classify the diseased tissues. A total of 181 Raman spectra from 9 patients and 122 CARS spectra from 12 patients were acquired. Due to the high dimensionality of the data in Raman and CARS measurements, principal component analysis (PCA) was first performed to reduce the dimensionality of the data (6 and 9 principal scores for Raman and CARS, respectively) in the CH-stretching region, followed by a discriminant function analysis (DFA) to classify the samples into different categories based on disease severity. The CH2 and CH3 vibrational signatures were observed in the Raman and CARS spectroscopy. Raman and CARS data in conjunction with PCA-DFA analysis were capable of differentiating healthy and PAD gastrocnemius with an accuracy of 85.6% and 78.7%, respectively.

  6. Serum carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (I-CTP) is predictive of clinical outcome in peripheral artery disease patients following endovascular therapy.

    PubMed

    Otaki, Yoichiro; Watanabe, Tetsu; Takahashi, Hiroki; Yamaura, Gensai; Nishiyama, Satoshi; Arimoto, Takanori; Shishido, Tetsuro; Miyamoto, Takuya; Kubota, Isao

    2017-02-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a risk factor for the development of heart failure and mortality. The serum levels of carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (I-CTP), a marker for collagen degradation derived from the extracellular matrix of vascular and myocardial tissue, is reportedly a useful marker for cardiac events in patients with heart disease. However, it remains unclear whether I-CTP can predict poor clinical outcome in patients with PAD. Serum I-CTP was measured in 246 consecutive PAD patients who underwent endovascular therapy. Patients were prospectively followed during a median follow-up period of 887 days with the end points of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). I-CTP was significantly higher in patients with critical limb ischemia than those without. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that I-CTP was an independent predictor of MACE after adjusting for confounding factors. Patients were stratified into three groups based on I-CTP level tertile, and those with third tertile had higher levels of brain natriuretic peptide levels and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein compared to the other two groups. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that patients in the highest tertile of I-CTP also had the greatest risk of MACE. The net reclassification index significantly improved with the addition of I-CTP to basic predictors. I-CTP is a reliable marker and indicator for MACE in patients with PAD.

  7. Temporal Trends and Geographic Variation of Lower Extremity Amputation in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease: Results from U.S. Medicare 2000–2008

    PubMed Central

    Jones, W. Schuyler; Patel, Manesh R.; Dai, David; Subherwal, Sumeet; Stafford, Judith; Calhoun, Sarah; Peterson, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We sought to characterize temporal trends, patient-specific factors and geographic variation associated with amputation in patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (LE PAD) during the study period. Background Amputation represents the end stage failure for those with LE PAD and little is known about the rates and geographic variation in use of LE amputation. Methods Using data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2008, we examined national patterns of LE amputation among patients 65 years or older with PAD. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust regional results for other patient demographic and clinical factors. Results Among 2,730,742 older patients with identified PAD, the overall rate of LE amputation declined from 7,258 per 100,000 PAD patients to 5,790 per 100,000 (p < 0.001 for trend). Male sex, black race, diabetes mellitus and renal disease were all independent predictors of LE amputation. The adjusted odds ratio of LE amputation per year between 2000 and 2008 was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.95-0.95, p<0.001). Conclusions From 2000 to 2008, LE amputation rates decreased significantly among PAD patients. There however remains significant patient and geographic variation in amputation rates across the United States. PMID:23103040

  8. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and risk of incident peripheral arterial disease in a multi-ethnic cohort: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Parveen K; Jorgensen, Neal W; McClelland, Robyn L; Jenny, Nancy S; Criqui, Michael H; Allison, Matthew A; Greenland, Philip; Rosenson, Robert S; Siscovick, David S; Cushman, Mary

    2017-02-01

    Prospective studies supporting a relationship between elevated lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) and incident peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are limited. We evaluated the association of Lp-PLA2 with incident PAD in a multi-ethnic cohort without clinical cardiovascular disease. A total of 4622 participants with measurement of Lp-PLA2 mass and Lp-PLA2 activity and an ankle-brachial index (ABI) between 0.9 and 1.4 were followed for the development of PAD (median follow-up = 9.3 years), defined as an ABI ⩽0.9 and decline from baseline ⩾0.15. There were 158 incident PAD events during follow-up. In adjusted logistic regression models, each higher standard deviation of both Lp-PLA2 activity and mass did not confer an increased risk of developing PAD [odds ratios, (95% confidence intervals)]: 0.92 (0.66-1.27) for Lp-PLA2 activity and 1.06 (0.85-1.34) for mass. Additionally, no significant interaction was found according to ethnicity: p=0.43 for Lp-PLA2 activity and p=0.55 for Lp-PLA2 mass. We found no evidence of an association between Lp-PLA2 and incident PAD.

  9. The role of inflammation in cardiovascular diseases: the predictive value of neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio as a marker in peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Paquissi, Feliciano Chanana

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an important manifestation of atherosclerosis, with increasing prevalence worldwide. A growing body of evidence shows that the systemic inflammatory response is closely related to the development, progression, and prognosis of atherosclerosis. In the last decade, several studies have suggested the role of measured inflammatory biomarkers as predictors of severity and prognosis in PAD in an effort to stratify the risk of these patients, to improve treatment selection, and to predict the results after interventions. A simple inflammatory marker, more available than any other, is the neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio (NLR), which can be easily obtained in clinical practice, based on the absolute count of neutrophils and lymphocytes from the differential leukocytes count. Many researchers evaluated vigorously the NLR as a potential prognostic biomarker predicting pathological and survival outcomes in patients with atherosclerosis. In this work, we aim to present the role of NLR as a prognostic marker in patients with PAD through a thorough review of the literature. PMID:27313459

  10. [Obesity as pathology of adipocytes: number of cells, volume of arterial bloodstream,local pools of circulation in vivo, natriuretic peptides and arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Dmitriev, V A

    2015-03-01

    The non-specific systemic biological reaction of arterial pressure from the level of organism. vasomotor center and proximal section of arterial bloodstream is appealed to compensate disorders of metabolism and microcirculation in distal section of arteries. This phenomenon occurs in several cases. The primarily local disorders of metabolism at autocrine level, physiological (aphysiological) death of cells, "littering" of intercellular medium become the cause of disorder of microcirculation in paracrin cenosises and deteriorate realization of biological functions of homeostasis, trophology, endoecology and adaptation. The local compensation of affected perfusion in paracrin cenosises at the expense of function of peripheral peristaltic pumps, redistribution of local bloodflow in biological reaction of endothelium-depended vaso-dilation has no possibility to eliminate disorders in realization of biological functions. The systemic increase of arterial pressure under absence of specific symptoms of symptomatic arterial hypertension is a test to detect disorder of biological functions of homeostasis, trophology, biological function of endoecology and adaptation. Allforms of arterial hypertension develop by common algorithm independently from causes of disorders of blood flow, microcirculation in distal section of arteries. The non-specific systemic compensation ofdisorders of metabolism from level of organism, in proximal section of arterial bloodstream always is the same one and results in aphysiological alterations in organs-targets. To comprehend etiological characteristics of common pathogenesis of arterial hypertension is possible in case of application of such technically complicated and still unclear in differential diagnostic of deranged functions modes of metabolomics.

  11. Femoropopliteal bypass vs percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting in treatment of peripheral artery diseases of infrainquinal segment - short-term results.

    PubMed

    Cvetanovski, M V; Jovev, S; Cvetanovska, M; Blazevski, B; Colanceski, R; Andreevska, T; Gramatnikovski, N; Kartalov, A

    2009-07-01

    failure in 1 patient or 5%. After 6 months the patency rate was 75% (15), of which 11 patients (73.2%) had short-segment occlusions (< 4 cm) whereas 4 patients (26,8%) had lesions > 4 cm. The baseline value of the lower limb index (ABI - ankle-brachial index) was significantly increased in both groups, from 0.41 to 0.91 in the group with surgical revascularization and from 0.47 to 0.88 in the second group treated with stenting. The same trend was observed after six months. This study demonstrated a small but significant difference (85% vs 75%, p < 0.05) in favour of the autologous saphenous vein, which should be a preferred graft material in all cases for reconstruction of the femoropopliteal segment. When compared to the overall patency rate of PTFE grafts after 6 months there was no significant difference in patency in the group treated with stent grafting (76.5% vs 75%). However, stenting is a method of choice in the treatment of short-segment occlusions - smaller than 4 cm with good early run off (73.2% vs 64.6%, p > 0.05 p = ns). It is obvious that the results are identical to those in treatment with an autologous great saphenous vein, but in comparison with PTFE the results imply stent usage (73.2% vs 56.5%, p < 0.005). Prosthesis (PTFE) is a graft material of choice when the great saphenous vein is used, damaged or calcified and when the occlusion is longer than 4 cm and is not suitable for stent grafting (43.5% vs 26.6%, p < 0.001). Key words: peripheral artery disease, femoropopliteal bypass, percutaneous translu notminal stent angioplasty.

  12. Frequency of abdominal aortic aneurysm in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Annabelle; Elkalioubie, Ahmed; Juthier, Francis; Tagzirt, Madjid; Vincentelli, André; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Haulon, Stéphan; Deklunder, Ghislaine; Breyne, Joke; Susen, Sophie; Marechaux, Sylvestre; Pinet, Florence; Jude, Brigitte

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to clarify the prevalence and the risk factors for unsuspected abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting for severe coronary artery disease and to identify the most at risk patients for AAA. Among 217 patients (189 men, mean age 64 +/- 11 years), asymptomatic AAAs, as prospectively identified by echocardiography, were found in 15 patients (6.9%). All patients with AAAs were men and smokers or past smokers. Factors significantly associated by univariate analysis with asymptomatic AAA presence were smoking (p = 0.003), symptomatic peripheral artery disease (p = 0.006), significant carotid artery stenosis (p = 0.007), and larger femoral and popliteal diameters (p = 0.008 and p = 0.0012, respectively). The other classic demographic, clinical, and biologic features were equally distributed among patients. In conclusion, in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting who were men and aged <75 years with smoking histories, the prevalence of AAA was as high as 24% when they had concomitant peripheral arterial disease and/or carotid artery stenosis (vs 4.4% in the absence of either condition, p = 0.007), justifying consideration of AAA screening in this subgroup of in-hospital patients.

  13. Influence of left ventricular dysfunction (diastolic versus systolic) on long-term prognosis in patients with versus without diabetes mellitus having elective peripheral arterial surgery.

    PubMed

    van Kuijk, Jan-Peter; Flu, Willem-Jan; Valentijn, Tabita M; Chonchol, Michel; Kuiper, Ruud J; Verhagen, Hence J M; Bax, Jeroen J; Poldermans, Don

    2010-09-15

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) are often coexistent and invariably associated with increased mortality. Data on long-term prognosis of "isolated" diastolic LVD in diabetics are lacking; therefore, we evaluated these prognostic implications in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and DM. Using echocardiography, 1321 patients were screened for diastolic, systolic (ejection fraction <50%) or combined LVD. Diastolic LVD was diagnosed based on the ratio of early rapid filling to late filling due to atrial contraction, pulmonary vein flow, and deceleration time. Patients using glucose-lowering drugs or insulin or with a fasting glucose level >6.1 mmol/L were diagnosed with DM. The primary end point was occurrence of cardiovascular death during a mean follow-up of 2.5 +/- 1.9 years. In the total population, DM was diagnosed in 518 patients (39%), and diastolic, systolic, or combined LVD was present in 356 patients (27%), 102 patients (8%), or 156 patients (12%), respectively. In diabetic patients, diastolic and systolic LVDs were associated with increased cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 3.03; hazard ratio 3.1, 95% confidence interval 1.46 to 6.38). In nondiabetic patients, the same association between diastolic or systolic LVD and outcome was observed (hazard ratio 2.2, 95% confidence interval 1.30 to 3.74; hazard ratio 3.9, 95% confidence interval 2.00 to 7.52). Combined systolic and diastolic LVD had the worst prognosis. In conclusion, diabetic patients with PAD have an increased prevalence of isolated systolic and combined LVD. In patients with PAD the presence of isolated diastolic, systolic, or combined LVD was independently and equally associated with increased cardiovascular mortality, irrespective of the concomitant presence of DM.

  14. The effect of inhibition of acyl coenzyme A-cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) on exercise performance in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, William R; Klepack, Ellen; Nehler, Mark; Regensteiner, Judith G; Blue, John; Imus, James; Criqui, Michael H

    2004-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that avasimibe, an inhibitor of acyl coenzyme A-cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), would improve treadmill exercise performance in patients with claudication secondary to peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Four hundred and forty-two patients with PAD (ankle-brachial index in the index leg of < or =0.90 with a > or =20% reduction post-exercise) were enrolled from 39 centers in the USA. Patients were randomized to receive oral avasimibe 50 mg, 250 mg, 750 mg or placebo for a treatment period of 12 months. Changes from baseline in peak walking time (PWT) using a graded treadmill protocol were compared among groups after 6 and 12 months of treatment. Individual group comparisons were considered statistically significant if p < 0.0245 for the 50 mg and 250 mg groups and p < 0.001 for the 750 mg group. Patients randomized to the 50 mg group experienced a 0.76 min net increase over placebo in PWT, but this did not reach the pre-specified level of statistical significance (Hochberg procedure p = 0.027) using ANCOVA after 12 months of treatment after adjusting for multiple comparisons. This trend in PWT was supported by the changes in treadmill initial claudication time (ICT) (p = 0.026) and Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ) walking distance score (p = 0.058). The 250 mg and 750 mg avasimibe dose groups failed to demonstrate an improvement in PWT over placebo after 6 months of treatment. In conclusion, while the ACAT inhibitor avasimibe did not show clear evidence of benefit on treadmill exercise performance in patients with PAD, the results add to our knowledge of the impact of treatments directed at atherosclerosis on functional endpoints.

  15. Independent Factors of Changes of Ankle-Brachial Index in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease in Elderly Patients with or without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bąk, Ewelina; Marcisz, Czesław; Kadłubowska, Monika; Michalik, Anna; Krawczyk, Bożena; Dobrzyń-Matusiak, Dorota; Krzemińska, Sylwia; Fiałkowski, Tomasz; Glądys, Elżbieta; Drosdzol-Cop, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) belongs to the commonly-occurring pathologies associated with elderly age. A simple tool for defining the severity of PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The purpose of this research was to determine independent factors of changes of ABI in elderly patients with occlusive PAD disease (PAOD) with and without diabetes. The research was carried out on 49 elderly patients with PAOD, including 29 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 20 patients without diabetes. The concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6), E-selectin, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood serum was marked. In all patients, the independent factors of changes of ABI were determined with the use of the multiple logistic regression analysis. Our results show that in the group of patients with PAOD suffering from diabetes, it was demonstrated that the ABI was related to age, the duration of the symptoms of PAD, body mass index (BMI), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fibrinogen, and sex (determination coefficient R2 = 0.699). In patients with PAOD without diabetes, the ABI was related to age, the duration of the symptoms of PAD, the levels of CRP, E-selectin, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the glomerular filtration rate(determination coefficient R2 = 0.844). We conclude that in elderly patients with PAOD with and without diabetes, the participation of independent factors related to the ABI is diversified; in patients with diabetes, the concentration of IL-6 and fibrinogen is lower, and the concentration of E-selectin is higher than in patients without diabetes. PMID:27834825

  16. Circulating YKL-40 Level, but not CHI3L1 Gene Variants, Is Associated with Atherosclerosis-Related Quantitative Traits and the Risk of Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Semon; Hsu, Lung-An; Cheng, Shih-Tsung; Teng, Ming-Sheng; Yeh, Ching-Hua; Sun, Yu-Chen; Huang, Hsuan-Li; Ko, Yu-Lin

    2014-01-01

    YKL-40, a pleotropic cytokine, is emerging as a risk factor and a prognostic predictor of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We attempted to elucidate the genetic, clinical and biochemical correlates of circulating YKL-40 level and, by combining it with CHI3L1 gene variants, with the risk and long-term mortality of peripheral artery disease (PAD). Plasma YKL-40 concentrations were measured in 612 Taiwanese individuals who had no clinically overt systemic disease. Clinical parameters, CHI3L1 gene promoter variants and 18 biomarker levels were analyzed. Eighty-six PAD patients were further enrolled for analysis. Significant associations were found between CHI3L1 genotypes/haplotypes and YKL-40 levels for the health examination subjects (smallest p = 8.36 × 10−7 for rs4950928 and smallest p = 1.72 × 10−10 for haplotype TGG) and also for PAD patients. For the health examination subjects, circulating YKL-40 level, but not CHI3L1 gene variants, were positively associated with age, smoking, and circulating levels of triglyceride, lipocalin 2 and multiple inflammatory biomarkers and negatively associated with low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Circulating YKL-40 level is also significantly associated with the risk of PAD (p = 3.3 × 10−23). Circulating YKL40 level, but not CHI3L1 gene promoter variants, is associated with the risk of PAD in Taiwanese. The association of YKL-40 levels with multiple quantitative traits relating to the risk of PAD may provide a molecular basis linking YKL-40 to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:25486056

  17. Association of Far-Infrared Radiation Therapy and Ankle-Brachial Index of Patients on Hemodialysis with Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Kuo, I-Ching; Mai, Hsiu-Chin; Kuo, Po-Lin; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is recognized to be a good marker for atherosclerosis, and is useful in the diagnosis of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) which is prevalent among patients on hemodialysis (HD). Methods: This randomized trial aimed to evaluate the effect of far-infrared radiation (FIR) therapy on ABI in HD patients with PAOD. PAOD was defined as patients with ABI < 0.95. One hundred and eight HD patients were enrolled, including 50 in the control group and 58 in the FIR group. A WS TY101 FIR emitter was applied for 40 minutes during each HD session, three times per week for six months. The ABI was measured before and after the FIR therapy. Results: Regardless of FIR therapy, the bilateral ABI decreased (in the FIR group, left: 0.88±0.22 to 0.85±0.24, p = 0.188; right: 0.92±0.20 to 0.90±0.23, p = 0.372; in control group, left: 0.91±0.23 to 0.88±0.21, p = 0144; right: 0.93±0.17 to 0.89±0.21, p = 0.082). Multivariate logistic analysis of the FIR group revealed that high uric acid (odds ratio [OR]: 2.335; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.117-4.882; p=0.024) and aspirin use (OR: 16.463; 95% CI: 1.787-151.638; p=0.013) were independently associated with increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that ABI is not increased after FIR therapy in HD patients with PAOD. However, in the FIR group, patients with higher uric acid level or those who used aspirin have increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy. PMID:27994503

  18. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (CEBPA) polymorphisms and mutations in healthy individuals and in patients with peripheral artery disease, ischaemic heart disease and hyperlipidaemia.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, O; Kostecka, A; Provazníková, D; Krásná, B; Kotlín, R; Stanková, M; Kobylka, P; Dostálová, G; Zeman, M; Chochola, M

    2010-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, encoded by the intronless CEBPA gene, is a transcription factor that induces expression of genes involved in differentiation of granulocytes, monocytes, adipocytes and hepatocytes. Both mono- and bi-allelic CEBPA mutations were detected in acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. In this study we also identified CEBPA mutations in healthy individuals and in patients with peripheral artery disease, ischaemic heart disease and hyperlipidaemia. We found 16 various deletions with the presence of two direct repeats in CEBPA by analysis of 431 individuals. Three most frequent repeats included in these deletions in CEBPA gene are CGCGAG (493- 498_865-870), GG (486-487_885-886), and GCCAAGCAGC (508-517_907-916), all according to GenBank Accession No. NM_004364.2. In one case we identified that a father with ischaemic heart disease and his healthy son had two identical deletions (493_864del and 508_906del, both according to GenBank Accession No. NM_004364.2) in CEBPA. The occurrence of deletions between two repetitive sequences may be caused by recombination events in the repair process. A double-stranded cut in DNA may initiate these recombination events in adjacent DNA sequences. Four types of polymorphisms in the CEBPA gene were also detected in the screened individuals. Polymorphism in CEBPA gene 690 G>T according to GenBank Accession No. NM_004364.2 is the most frequent type in our analysis. Statistical analysis did not find significant differences in the frequency of polymorphisms in CEBPA in patients and in healthy individuals with the exception of P4 polymorphism (580_585dup according to GenBank Accesion No. NM_004364.2). P4 polymorphism was significantly increased in ischaemic heart disease patients.

  19. MAGnesium-oral supplementation to reduce PAin in patients with severe PERipheral arterial occlusive disease: the MAG-PAPER randomised clinical trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Venturini, Monica Aida; Zappa, Sergio; Minelli, Cosetta; Bonardelli, Stefano; Lamberti, Laura; Bisighini, Luca; Zangrandi, Marta; Turin, Maddalena; Rizzo, Francesco; Rizzolo, Andrea; Latronico, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Magnesium exerts analgaesic effects in several animal pain models, as well as in patients affected by acute postoperative pain and neuropathic chronic pain. There is no evidence that magnesium can modulate pain in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). We describe the protocol of a single-centre randomised double-blind clinical trial aimed at assessing the efficacy of oral magnesium supplementation in controlling severe pain in patients with advanced PAOD. Methods and analysis Adult patients affected by PAOD at stages III and IV of Lèriche-Fontaine classification, who are opioid-naïve, and who have been admitted to our Acute Pain Service for intractable pain, will be eligible. Patients will be randomised to the control group, treated with standard therapy (oxycodone and pregabalin) plus placebo for 2 weeks, or to the experimental group (standard therapy plus magnesium oxide). Patients will be evaluated on days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 14; the following information will being collected: daily oxycodone dose; average and maximum pain (Numerical Rating Scale); pain relief (Pain Relief Scale); characteristics of the pain (Neuropathic Pain Scale); impact of pain on the patient's daily activities (Brief Pain Inventory). The primary outcome will be oxycodone dosage needed to achieve satisfactory analgaesia on day 14. Secondary outcomes will be pain relief on day 2, time needed to achieve satisfactory analgaesia and time needed to achieve a pain reduction of 50%. A sample size calculation was performed for the primary outcome, which estimated a required sample size of 150 patients (75 per group). Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval of the study protocol has been obtained from Comitato Etico Provinciale di Brescia, Brescia, Italy. Trial results will be disseminated through scientific journal manuscripts and scientific conference presentations. Trial registration number NCT02455726. PMID:26674497

  20. The FReedom from Ischemic Events - New Dimensions for Survival (FRIENDS) registry: design of a prospective cohort study of patients with advanced peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Advanced lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD), whether presenting as acute limb ischemia (ALI) or chronic critical limb ischemia (CLI), is associated with high rates of cardiovascular ischemic events, amputation, and death. Past research has focused on strategies of revascularization, but few data are available that prospectively evaluate the impact of key process of care factors (spanning pre-admission, acute hospitalization, and post-discharge) that might contribute to improving short and long-term health outcomes. Methods/Design The FRIENDS registry is designed to prospectively evaluate a range of patient and health system care delivery factors that might serve as future targets for efforts to improve limb and systemic outcomes for patients with ALI or CLI. This hypothesis-driven registry was designed to evaluate the contributions of: (i) pre-hospital limb ischemia symptom duration, (ii) use of leg revascularization strategies, and (iii) use of risk-reduction pharmacotherapies, as pre-specified factors that may affect amputation-free survival. Sequential patients would be included at an index “vascular specialist-defined” ALI or CLI episode, and patients excluded only for non-vascular etiologies of limb threat. Data including baseline demographics, functional status, co-morbidities, pre-hospital time segments, and use of medical therapies; hospital-based use of revascularization strategies, time segments, and pharmacotherapies; and rates of systemic ischemic events (e.g., myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization, and death) and limb ischemic events (e.g., hospitalization for revascularization or amputation) will be recorded during a minimum of one year follow-up. Discussion The FRIENDS registry is designed to evaluate the potential impact of key factors that may contribute to adverse outcomes for patients with ALI or CLI. Definition of new “health system-based” therapeutic targets could then become the focus of future

  1. Acute myelogenous leukemia associated with extreme symptomatic thrombocytosis and chromosome 3q translocation: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor T; Aviv, Hana; Howard, Leslie M; Padberg, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Acute leukemias with thrombocytosis have been recently linked with structural abnormalities of the short arm of chromosome 3. A 46-year-old man with a 2-month history of recurrent transient ischemic attacks and abdominal pain developed an ischemic left foot and a gangrenous toe as his initial symptoms. Platelet count was 3.5 x 10(6)/microL, and despite plateletpheresis, the patient required left-leg amputation. Pathologic examination was remarkable for arterial thrombosis in the absence of atherosclerotic lesions. A diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia with a novel translocation between chromosomes 3q21, 16, and 7 was made. Induction therapy was unsuccessful, and the patient died of overwhelming sepsis within 5 weeks of diagnosis. The striking features of this case were extreme symptomatic thrombocytosis, peripheral gangrene without atherosclerosis, and a novel three-way chromosomal translocation involving chromosome 3q21.

  2. [Renal artery stenosis : atheromatous disease and fibromuscular dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Halimi, Jean-Michel

    2009-04-01

    Renal artery stenosis may be due to atheromatous disease or renal fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD). Management of both diseases requires treatment of hypertension usually observed in such patients; however, clinical presentation, mechanism and treatment of these 2 diseases are usually different. Renal FMD is now considered as a systemic disease, the cause of which may be genetic (although the exact cause is still elusive). Renal arteries are the most frequent localizations of FMD, but extra renal arteries may also be involved (usually carotid arteries). Risk factors of hypertension-induced renal FMD include estrogen treatment and smoking. Renal FMD are mostly found in young women and in children who present with recent severe and/or refractory symptomatic hypertension. Diagnosis is usually easy (Doppler, CT-scan), and treatment of renal FMD is angioplasty in most cases. Atheromatous renal artery stenosis is usually found in patients with other atheromatous disease (peripheral artery disease, carotid, coronary artery disease...). Clinical presentation include severe or refractory hypertension, recurrent flash pulmonary edema in a patient with hypertension, progressive renal dysfunction spontaneously or after medical treatment with converting-enzyme inhibition or angiotensin II blockade, hypertension in a patient (usually smoker or ex-smoker) with diffuse atheromatous vascular disease. Management of atheromatous renal artery disease is medical treatment in all patients (aggressive treatment of cardiovascular risk factors, control of arterial pressure); revascularization is required in some patients only since it rarely cures hypertension: the goal of revascularization is mostly renal function protection, which may be observed in selected patients. Revascularization must be decided by physicians or teams involved in the care of such patients. Patients with atheromatous renal artery disease are at very high renal and cardiovascular risk : aggressive management of

  3. Urgent treatment of severe symptomatic direct carotid cavernous fistula caused by ruptured cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm using high-flow bypass, proximal ligation, and direct distal clipping: Technical case report

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Hirotaka; Inoue, Tomohiro; Tamura, Akira; Saito, Isamu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Direct carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) secondary to ruptured carotid cavernous aneurysms (CCAs) is rare, but patients with this condition who develop acutely worsening and severe neuro-ophthalmic symptoms require urgent treatment. Endovascular methods are the first-line option, but this modality may not be available on an urgent basis. Case Description: In this article, we report a 45-year-old female with severe direct CCF due to rupture of the CCA. She presented with intractable headache and acute worsening of double vision and visual acuity. Emergent radiographic study revealed high-flow fistula tracked from the CCA toward the contralateral cavernous sinus and drained into the engorged left superior orbital vein. To prevent permanent devastating neuro-ophthalmic damages, urgent high-flow bypass with placement of a radial artery graft was performed followed by right cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) ligation and the clipping of the ICA at the C3 portion, proximal to the ophthalmic artery. In the immediate postoperative period, her symptoms resolved and angiography confirmed patency of the high-flow bypass and complete occlusion of the CCF. Conclusion: With due consideration of strategy and techniques to secure safety, open surgical intervention with trapping and bypass is a good treatment option for direct severe CCF when the endovascular method is not available, not possible, or is unsuccessful. PMID:24818056

  4. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Manuscripts Revised Manuscripts → Article Types → General Preparation Instructions → Research Guidelines → How to Submit a Manuscript Journal Policies Permissions and Rights Q&A Submission Sites Circulation CME AHA Journals RSS Feeds International Users AHA Newsroom AHA Journals AHA Journals Home ...

  5. Living with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Smoking and Your Heart Stroke Send ... D.), you’re more likely to also have coronary heart disease , heart attack , stroke , and transient ischemic attack ("mini- ...

  6. Acute oxygenation changes on ischemic foot of a novel intermittent pneumatic compression device and of an existing sequential device in severe peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) improves haemodynamics in peripheral arterial disease (PAD), but its effects on foot perfusion were scarcely studied. In severe PAD patients we measured the foot oxygenation changes evoked by a novel intermittent IPC device (GP), haemodynamics and compliance to the treatment. Reference values were obtained by a sequential foot-calf device (SFC). Methods Twenty ischemic limbs (Ankle-Brachial Index = 0.5 ± 0.2) of 12 PAD patients (7 male, age: 74.5 ± 10.8 y) with an interval of 48 ± 2 hours received a 35 minute treatment in supine position with two IPC devices: i) a Gradient Pump (GP), which slowly inflates a single thigh special sleeve and ii) an SFC (ArtAssist®, ACI Medical, San Marcos, CA, USA), which rapidly inflates two foot-calf sleeves. Main outcome measure: changes of oxygenated haemoglobin at foot (HbO2foot) by continuous near-infrared spectroscopy recording and quantified as area-under-curve (AUC) for periods of 5 minutes. Other measures: haemodynamics by echo-colour Doppler (time average velocity (TAV) and blood flow (BF) in the popliteal artery and in the femoral vein), patient compliance by a properly developed form. Results All patients completed the treatment with GP, 9 with SFC. HbO2foot during the working phase, considered as average value of the 5 minutes periods, increased with GP (AUC 458 ± 600 to 1216 ± 280) and decreased with SFC (AUC 231 ± 946 to −1088 ± 346), significantly for most periods (P < 0.05). The GP treatment was associated to significant haemodynamic changes from baseline to end of the treatment (TAV = 10.2 ± 3.3 to 13.5 ± 5.5 cm/sec, P = 0.004; BF = 452.0 ± 187.2 to 607.9 ± 237.8 ml/sec, P = 0.0001), not observed with SFC (TAV = 11.2 ± 3.4 to 11.8 ± 4.3 cm/sec; BF = 513.8 ± 203.7 to 505.9 ± 166.5 ml/min, P = n.s.). GP obtained a higher score of patient

  7. Comparison of effects of statin use on mortality in patients with peripheral arterial disease with versus without elevated C-reactive protein and d-dimer levels.

    PubMed

    Vidula, Himabindu; Tian, Lu; Liu, Kiang; Criqui, Michael H; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M; Green, David; Ridker, Paul; McDermott, Mary M

    2010-05-01

    We determined whether statin use was associated with lower all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in 579 participants with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) according to the presence and absence of elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and D-dimer levels. Statin use was determined at baseline and at each annual visit. The CRP and D-dimer levels were measured at baseline. The mean follow-up was 3.7 years. The analyses were adjusted for age, gender, race, co-morbidities, ankle brachial index, cholesterol, and other confounders. Of the 579 participants, 242 (42%) were taking a statin at baseline and 129 (22%) died during follow-up. Statin use was associated with lower all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.30 to 0.86, p = 0.012) and CVD mortality (hazard ratio 0.36, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.89, p = 0.027) compared to statin nonuse. No statistically significant interaction was found for the baseline CRP or D-dimer level with the association of statin use and mortality. However, statin therapy was associated with significantly lower all-cause and total mortality only among participants with baseline CRP values greater than the median and not among those with CRP values less than the median (hazard ratio 0.44, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.88 vs hazard ratio 0.73, 95% CI 0.31 to 1.75 for all-cause mortality and hazard ratio 0.20, 95% CI 0.063 to 0.65 vs hazard ratio 0.59, 95% CI 0.093 to 3.79 for CVD mortality). In conclusion, among those with PAD, statin use was associated with lower all-cause and CVD mortality compared to no statin use. The favorable association of statin use with mortality was not influenced significantly by the baseline CRP or D-dimer level.

  8. Impact and duration of brief surgeon-delivered smoking cessation advice on attitudes regarding nicotine dependence and tobacco harms for patients with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Newhall, Karina; Suckow, Bjoern; Spangler, Emily; Brooke, Benjamin S.; Schanzer, Andres; Tan, TzeWoei; Burnette, Mary; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Farber, Alik; Goodney, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the recognized benefits of smoking cessation, many clinicians question if a brief smoking cessation intervention can help dedicated smokers with peripheral arterial disease understand nicotine dependence and harms related to smoking. We investigated the impact and durability of a multi-modal smoking cessation intervention on patient attitudes regarding nicotine dependence and the health effects of smoking. Methods We conducted a pilot cluster randomized trial of a brief smoking cessation intervention at eight vascular surgery practices between September 1, 2014 and August 31, 2015. Compared with control sites, patients at intervention sites received protocolized brief cessation counseling, medications and referrals to a quitline. After their clinic visit and again at 3 months, participants completed a brief survey about patient attitudes regarding nicotine dependence and the health effects of smoking. Responses to questions were analyzed using Chi2 and student’s t-tests. Results All trial participants (n=156) complete the initial survey, and 75 (45%) participants completed the follow-up survey. Intervention and control patients both reported a greater than 30-pack-year history (80% vs 90%, p=0.07) and previous failed quit attempts (77% vs 78%, p=0.8). Compared to usual care, patients in the intervention group were more likely to describe hearing advice to quit from their surgeon (98% vs. 77%, p<0.001), and expressed “a lot” or “some” interest in quitting (95.4% vs 85.7%, p=0.05). Patients in the intervention group were also more likely to acknowledge their addictive behaviors, consistently scoring higher on question bank items regarding nicotine addiction (52.9 vs 48.0, p=0.006) and the negative health effects of smoking (scaled score 56.6 vs 50.6, p=0.001). When re-surveyed three months after intervention, patients in the intervention group had larger declines in nicotine dependence and health effects domains, suggesting durable impact

  9. Home‐Based Walking Exercise in Peripheral Artery Disease: 12‐Month Follow‐up of the Goals Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Criqui, Michael H.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zhao, Lihui; Liu, Kiang; Domanchuk, Kathryn; Spring, Bonnie; Tian, Lu; Kibbe, Melina; Liao, Yihua; Lloyd Jones, Donald; Rejeski, W. Jack

    2014-01-01

    Background We studied whether a 6‐month group‐mediated cognitive behavioral (GMCB) intervention for peripheral artery disease (PAD) participants, which promoted home‐based walking exercise, improved 6‐minute walk and other outcomes at 12‐month follow‐up, 6 months after completing the intervention, compared to a control group. Methods and Results We randomized PAD participants to a GMCB intervention or a control group. During phase I (months 1 to 6), the intervention used group support and self‐regulatory skills during weekly on‐site meetings to help participants adhere to home‐based exercise. The control group received weekly on‐site lectures on topics unrelated to exercise. Primary outcomes were measured at the end of phase I. During phase II (months 7 to 12), each group received telephone contact. Compared to controls, participants randomized to the intervention increased their 6‐minute walk distance from baseline to 12‐month follow‐up, (from 355.4 to 381.9 m in the intervention versus 353.1 to 345.6 m in the control group; mean difference=+34.1 m; 95% confidence interval [CI]=+14.6, +53.5; P<0.001) and their Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ) speed score (from 36.1 to 46.5 in the intervention group versus 34.9 to 36.5 in the control group; mean difference =+8.8; 95% CI=+1.6, +16.1; P=0.018). Change in the WIQ distance score was not different between the 2 groups at 12‐month follow‐up (P=0.139). Conclusions A weekly on‐site GMCB intervention that promoted home‐based walking exercise intervention for people with PAD demonstrated continued benefit at 12‐month follow‐up, 6 months after the GMCB intervention was completed. Clinical Trial Registration URL: ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00693940. PMID:24850615

  10. Advanced Age and Disease Predict Lack of Symptomatic Improvement after Endovascular Iliac Treatment in Male Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Roland; Brownson, Kirstyn E.; Hall, Michael R.; Kuwahara, Go; Vasilas, Penny; Dardik, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endovascular angioplasty and stent placement is currently the most frequent treatment for iliac artery occlusive disease. However, despite a successful endovascular procedure, some patients do not experience symptomatic improvement and satisfaction with their care. This study seeks to identify patient-related factors associated with lack of symptomatic improvement after endovascular iliac artery treatment in male veterans. Methods: Retrospective review of patients treated with endovascular methods for iliac artery occlusive disease between January 2008 and July 2012 at VA Connecticut Healthcare System. Symptomatic improvement on the first post-operative visit was evaluated, with bilateral treatments counted separately. Results: Sixty-two patients had 91 iliac arteries treated with angioplasty and stent placement. Forty-seven (52 percent) legs had critical limb ischemia, and 77 (85 percent) had at least two-vessel distal runoff. Angiographic success was 100 percent. Patient-reported symptomatic improvement at the first post-operative visit was 55 percent (50/91). Lack of symptomatic improvement correlated with older age (OR 1.09 [1.03-1.17], p = 0.008), presence of critical limb ischemia (OR 3.03 [1.09-8.65], p = 0.034), and need for additional surgical intervention (OR 5.61 [1.65-17.36], p = 0.006). Survival, primary and secondary patency, and freedom from restenosis were comparable between patients who reported symptomatic improvement and those who did not. Conclusions: Despite angiographically successful revascularization, patients who are older or have critical limb ischemia who are treated with isolated endovascular iliac artery intervention are more likely to require additional interventions and less likely to experience symptomatic improvement. These patients may need more extensive infra-inguinal revascularization than isolated iliac angioplasty and stent placement, despite a preserved ankle-brachial index. Quality of life needs to be measured

  11. Successful Recanalization of a Longstanding Right Common Iliac Artery Occlusion with a Radiofrequency Guidewire

    SciTech Connect

    Tapping, C. R.; Uri, I. F.; Dixon, S.; Bratby, M. J.; Anthony, S.; Uberoi, R.

    2012-10-15

    We describe a case of successful recanalization of a longstanding right common iliac occlusion with a radiofrequency (RF) guidewire. The patient had been symptomatic with claudication for 3 years, and a preliminary attempt to cross the lesion using conventional techniques proved unsuccessful. Using low and medium intensity RF pulses and a PowerWire, a tract through the occlusion was established, which allowed subsequent stenting with an excellent angiographic result and a good immediate clinical response. We propose this as a useful technique in the peripheral arterial system for occlusive lesions not amenable to traditional recanalization techniques.

  12. Emergency EC-IC bypass for symptomatic atherosclerotic ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Nitta, Junpei; Ishizaka, Shigetoshi; Kanaya, Kohei; Yanagawa, Takao; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass surgery has no preventive effect on subsequent ipsilateral ischemic stroke in patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic internal carotid occlusion and hemodynamic cerebral ischemia. A few studies have assessed whether an urgent EC-IC bypass surgery is an effective treatment for main trunk stenosis or occlusion in acute stage. The authors retrospectively reviewed 58 consecutive patients who underwent urgent EC-IC bypass for symptomatic internal carotid artery or the middle cerebral artery stenosis or occlusion between January 2003 and December 2011. Clinical characteristics and neuroimagings were evaluated and analyzed. Based on preoperative angiogram, responsible lesions were the internal carotid artery in 19 (32.8%) patients and the middle cerebral artery in 39 (67.2%). No hemorrhagic complication occurred. Sixty-nine percent of patients showed improvement of neurological function after surgery, and 74.1% of patients had favorable outcome. Unfavorable outcome was associated with insufficient collateral flow and new infarction after bypass surgery.

  13. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral neuropathy Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Peripheral neuropathy, a result of damage to your peripheral nerves, often causes weakness, numbness and pain, usually in your hands and feet. It can also ...

  14. Clinical aspects of symptomatic hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Andreas; Höybye, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia (HN) is a common condition, with a large number of etiologies and a complicated treatment. Although chronic HN has been shown to be a predictor of poor outcome, sodium-increasing treatments in chronic stable and asymptomatic HN have not proven to increase life expectancy. For symptomatic HN, in contrast, the necessity for urgent treatment has broadly been accepted to avoid the development of fatal cerebral edema. On the other hand, a too rapid increase of serum sodium in chronic HN may result in cerebral damage due to osmotic demyelinisation. Recently, administration of hypertonic saline bolus has been recommended as first-line treatment in patients with moderate-to-severe symptomatic HN. This approach is easy to memorize and holds the potential to greatly facilitate the initial treatment of symptomatic HN. First-line treatment of chronic HN is fluid restriction and if ineffective treatment with tolvaptan or in some patients other agents should be considered. A number of recommendations and guidelines have been published on HN. In the present review, the management of patients with HN in relation to everyday clinical practice is summarized with focus on the acute management. PMID:27609587

  15. The HubBLe Trial: haemorrhoidal artery ligation (HAL) versus rubber band ligation (RBL) for symptomatic second- and third-degree haemorrhoids: a multicentre randomised controlled trial and health-economic evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Steven; Tiernan, Jim; Biggs, Katie; Hind, Daniel; Shephard, Neil; Bradburn, Mike; Wailoo, Allan; Alshreef, Abualbishr; Swaby, Lizzie; Watson, Angus; Radley, Simon; Jones, Oliver; Skaife, Paul; Agarwal, Anil; Giordano, Pasquale; Lamah, Marc; Cartmell, Mark; Davies, Justin; Faiz, Omar; Nugent, Karen; Clarke, Andrew; MacDonald, Angus; Conaghan, Phillip; Ziprin, Paul; Makhija, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Optimal surgical intervention for low-grade haemorrhoids is unknown. Rubber band ligation (RBL) is probably the most common intervention. Haemorrhoidal artery ligation (HAL) is a novel alternative that may be more efficacious. OBJECTIVE The comparison of HAL with RBL for the treatment of grade II/III haemorrhoids. DESIGN A multicentre, parallel-group randomised controlled trial. PERSPECTIVE UK NHS and Personal Social Services. SETTING 17 NHS Trusts. PARTICIPANTS Patients aged ≥ 18 years presenting with grade II/III (second- and third-degree) haemorrhoids, including those who have undergone previous RBL. INTERVENTIONS HAL with Doppler probe compared with RBL. OUTCOMES Primary outcome - recurrence at 1 year post procedure; secondary outcomes - recurrence at 6 weeks; haemorrhoid severity score; European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions, 5-level version (EQ-5D-5L); Vaizey incontinence score; pain assessment; complications; and cost-effectiveness. RESULTS A total of 370 participants entered the trial. At 1 year post procedure, 30% of the HAL group had evidence of recurrence compared with 49% after RBL [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.42 to 3.51; p = 0.0005]. The main reason for the difference was the number of extra procedures required to achieve improvement/cure. If a single HAL is compared with multiple RBLs then only 37.5% recurred in the RBL arm (adjusted OR 1.35, 95% CI 0.85 to 2.15; p = 0.20). Persistence of significant symptoms at 6 weeks was lower in both arms than at 1 year (9% HAL and 29% RBL), suggesting significant deterioration in both groups over the year. Symptom score, EQ-5D-5L and Vaizey score improved in both groups compared with baseline, but there was no difference between interventions. Pain was less severe and of shorter duration in the RBL group; most of the HAL group who had pain had mild to moderate pain, resolving by 3 weeks. Complications were low frequency and not significantly different

  16. Efficacy of optimal long-term management of multiple cardiovascular risk factors (CVD) on walking and quality of life in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD): protocol for randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Oka, Roberta K; Conte, Michael S; Owens, Christopher D; Rapp, Joseph; Fung, Gordon; Alley, Hugh F; Giacomini, John C; Myers, Jonathan; Mohler, Emile R

    2012-02-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an understudied chronic illness most prevalent in elderly individuals. PAD patients experience substantial walking impairment due to symptoms of limb ischemia that significantly diminishes quality of life (QOL). Cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality is increased in this population because of aggressive atherosclerosis resulting from untreated CVD risk factors. Despite current national guidelines recommending intensive CVD risk factor management for PAD patients, untreated CVD risk factors are common. Interventions that bridge this gap are imperative. The Vascular Insufficiency - Goals for Optimal Risk Reduction (VIGOR(2)) study is a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that examines the effectiveness of a long-term multifactor CVD risk reduction program on walking and quality of life in patients with PAD. The purpose of this article is to provide a detailed description of the design and methods of VIGOR(2). Clinical Trial Registration - URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00537225.

  17. Symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Moles, Alexis; Hamel, Olivier; Perret, Christophe; Bord, Eric; Robert, Roger; Buffenoir, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    Symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas during pregnancy are rare, as only 27 cases have been reported in the literature since 1948. However, symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas can be responsible for spinal cord compression, in which case they constitute a medical emergency, which raises management difficulties in the context of pregnancy. Pregnancy is a known factor responsible for deterioration of these vascular tumors. In this paper, the authors report 2 clinical cases of symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas during pregnancy, including 1 case of spontaneous fracture that has never been previously reported in the literature. The authors then present a brief review of the literature to discuss emergency management of this condition. The first case was a 28-year-old woman at 35 weeks of gestation, who presented with paraparesis. Spinal cord MRI demonstrated a vertebral hemangioma invading the body and posterior arch of T-3 with posterior epidural extension. Laminectomy and vertebroplasty were performed after cesarean section, allowing neurological recovery. The second case involved a 35-year-old woman who presented with spontaneous fracture of T-7 at 36 weeks of gestation, revealing a vertebral hemangioma with no neurological deficit, but it was responsible for pain and local instability. Treatment consisted of postpartum posterior interbody fusion. With a clinical and radiological follow-up of 2 years, no complications and no modification of the hemangiomas were observed. A review of the literature reveals discordant management of these rare cases, which is why the treatment course must be decided by a multidisciplinary team as a function of fetal gestational age and maternal neurological features.

  18. In vivo quantitation of platelet deposition on human peripheral arterial bypass grafts using indium-111-labeled platelets. Effect of dipyridamole and aspirin

    SciTech Connect

    Pumphrey, C.W.; Chesebro, J.H.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Wahner, H.W.; Hollier, L.H.; Pairolero, P.C.; Fuster, V.

    1983-03-01

    Indium-111-labeled autologous platelets, injected 48 hours after operation, were used to evaluate the thrombogenicity of prosthetic material and the effect of platelet inhibitor therapy in vivo. Dacron double-velour (Microvel) aortofemoral artery bifurcation grafts were placed in 16 patients and unilateral polytetrafluoroethylene femoropopliteal grafts were placed in 10 patients. Half the patients in each group received platelet inhibitors before operation (dipyridamole, 100 mg 4 times a day) and after operation (dipyridamole, 75 mg, and acetylsalicylic acid, 325 mg 3 times a day); the rest of the patients served as control subjects. Five-minute scintigrams of the graft region were taken with a gamma camera interfaced with a computer 48, 72, and 96 hours after injection of the labeled platelets. Platelet deposition was estimated from the radioactivities of the grafts and expressed as counts per 100 pixels per microcurie injected. Dipyridamole and aspirin therapy significantly reduced the number of platelets deposited on Dacron grafts and prevented platelet accumulation over 3 days. With the small amount of platelet deposition on polytetrafluoroethylene femoropopliteal artery grafts even in control patients, platelet inhibitor therapy had no demonstrable effect on platelet deposition on these grafts. It is concluded that (1) platelet deposition on vascular grafts in vivo can be quantitated by noninvasive methods, and (2) dipyridamole and aspirin therapy reduced platelet deposition on Dacron aortofemoral artery grafts.

  19. Symptomatic management in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pushkar

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the commonest cause of disability in young adults. While there is increasing choice and better treatments available for delaying disease progression, there are still, very few, effective symptomatic treatments. For many patients such as those with primary progressive MS (PPMS) and those that inevitably become secondary progressive, symptom management is the only treatment available. MS related symptoms are complex, interrelated, and can be interdependent. It requires good understanding of the condition, a holistic multidisciplinary approach, and above all, patient education and empowerment. PMID:26538847

  20. Effect of Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization Combined with Argon-Helium Cryosurgery System on the Changes of NK Cells and T Cell Subsets in Peripheral Blood of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Manping; Wang, Xiaoyi; Bin, Huang

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most aggressive tumors in humans. T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells are the body's first line of defense to prevent tumor cell growth. Previous studies have demonstrated that transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) combined with argon-helium cryosurgery system (AHCS) can effectively treat liver cancer. However, the mechanism of the treatment is unclear yet. In the current study, we investigated the effects of TACE combined with AHCS on the changes of T cell subsets and NK cells in peripheral blood of HCC. Our data show that alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels in peripheral blood were significantly up-regulated in HCC patients before treatment when compared with healthy people and reduced after TACE combined with AHCS treatment (P < 0.01). In addition, we found that CD4+ cells and NK cells decreased (P < 0.05) and CD8+ cells increased (P < 0.05) in HCC patients when compared with healthy people. After treatment, the CD4+ cells, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, and NK cells were dramatically increased in HCC patients (P < 0.05). In contrast, CD8+ cells were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). TACE combined with AHCS treatment significantly prolonged 1-year survival rate of HCC patients and did not show significant side effects. Taken together, our data indicate that TACE combined with AHCS treatment improves patients' immune system. It is a feasible and effective therapeutic method for HCC patients.

  1. Resection of Celiac Artery Aneurysm with Bypass Grafting to the Splenic and Common Hepatic Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Pattakos, Gregory; Tolpin, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Celiac artery aneurysms are rare and typically warrant surgical treatment. Atherosclerosis is their chief cause. Symptomatic patients usually present with abdominal pain. Surgical resection of celiac artery aneurysms is associated with low morbidity and mortality rates. We report the case of a patient whose 2.2-cm celiac artery aneurysm we resected, with subsequent saphenous vein bypass grafting from the celiac trunk to the splenic and common hepatic arteries. In addition, we briefly discuss other treatment options. PMID:28265220

  2. Stable angina pectoris: the medical management of symptomatic myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Parker, John D; Parker, John O

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality and is a serious public health problem. Over the last 4 decades there have been dramatic advances in the both the prevention and treatment of CAD. The management of CAD was revolutionized by the development of effective surgical and percutaneous revascularization techniques. In this review we discuss the importance of the medical management of symptomatic, stable angina. Medical management approaches to both the treatment and prevention of symptomatic myocardial ischemia are summarized. In Canada, organic nitrates, β-adrenergic blocking agents, and calcium channel antagonists have been available for the therapy of angina for more than 25 years. All 3 classes are of proven benefit in the improvement of symptoms and exercise capacity in patients with stable angina. Although there is no clear first choice within these classes of anti-anginal agents, the presence of prior or concurrent conditions (for example, prior myocardial infarction and/or hypertension) plays an important role in the choice of anti-anginal class in individual patients. For some patients, combinations of different anti-anginal agents can be effective; however it is recommended that this approach be individualized. Although not currently available in Canada, other classes of anti-anginal agents have been developed; their mechanism of action and clinical efficacy is discussed. Patients with stable angina have an excellent prognosis. Patients in this category who obtain relief from symptomatic myocardial ischemia may do well without invasive intervention.

  3. Combination treatment of biomechanical support and targeted intra-arterial infusion of peripheral blood stem cells mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for the osteonecrosis of the femoral head: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qiang; Wang, Weidong; Xu, Taotao; Zhang, Shanxing; Xiao, Luwei; Chen, Di; Jin, Hongting; Tong, Peijian

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the benefits of combination treatment with mechanical support and targeted intra-arterial infusion of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) via the medial circumflex femoral artery on the progression of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Fifty-five patients (89 hips) with early and intermediate stage ONFH were recruited and randomly assigned to combination treatment or mechanical support treatment (control group). All hips received mechanical support treatment (porous tantalum rod implantation). Then, hips in the combination treatment group were performed targeted intra-arterial infusion of PBSCs. At each follow-up, Harris hip score (HHS) and Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) classification were used to evaluate the symptoms and progression of osteonecrosis. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) was assessed as an endpoint at each follow-up. At 36 months, 9 of the 41 hips (21.95%) in the control group progressed to clinical failure and underwent THA whereas only 3 of the 48 hips (6.25%) in the combination treatment group required THA (p = 0.031). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a significant difference in the survival time between the two groups (log-rank test; p = 0.025). Compared to the control group, combination treatment significantly improved the HHS at 36 months (p = 0.003). At the final follow-up examination, radiological progression was noted in 13 of 41 hips (31.71%) for the control group, but in only 4 of 48 hips (8.33%) for the combination treatment group (p = 0.005). The overall collapse rates were 15.15% (5/33 hips) and 8.11% (3/37 hips) in the control and combination treatment groups, respectively. Targeted intra-arterial infusion of PBSCs is capable of enhancing the efficacy of biomechanical support in the treatment of ONFH. This clinical trial confirmed that the combination treatment might be a safe and feasible

  4. Symptomatic sacral perineurial (Tarlov) cysts.

    PubMed

    Sajko, Tomislav; Kovać, Damir; Kudelić, Nenad; Kovac, Lana

    2009-12-01

    Sacral perineurial (Tarlov) cysts are rare lesions. Over a seven year period 4000 patients underwent surgery for lumbar disk herniation. In three patients neurological symptoms were caused by large sacral perineurial cysts. Methods of choice for diagnosis of Tarlov cysts are lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography myelography. The majority of Tarlov cysts are asymptomatic. In case of large (> or = 1.5 cm) and symptomatic perineurial cyst, as in three patients reported in this article, microsurgical treatment was successful. Although rare, perineurial (Tarlov) cysts must be taken into consideration when approaching to patient with low back and radicular pain. Authors review the medical literature, pathological and pathophysiological features and treatment options of sacral perineurial cysts.

  5. Differences in autonomic nerve function in patients with silent and symptomatic myocardial ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Shakespeare, C. F.; Katritsis, D.; Crowther, A.; Cooper, I. C.; Coltart, J. D.; Webb-Peploe, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Autonomic neuropathy provides a mechanism for the absence of symptoms in silent myocardial ischaemia, but characterisation of the type of neuropathy is lacking. AIM--To characterise and compare autonomic nerve function in patients with silent and symptomatic myocardial ischaemia. METHODS AND RESULTS--The Valsalva manoeuvre, heart rate variation (HRV) in response to deep breathing and standing, lower body negative pressure, isometric handgrip, and the cold pressor test were performed by patients with silent (n = 25) and symptomatic (n = 25) ambulatory ischaemia and by controls (n = 21). No difference in parasympathetic efferent function between patients with silent and symptomatic ischaemia was recorded, but both had significantly less HRV in response to standing than the controls (p < 0.005 for silent and p < 0.01 for symptomatic). Patients with silent ischaemia showed an increased propensity for peripheral vasodilatation compared with symptomatic patients (p < 0.02) and controls (p < 0.04). Impaired sympathetic function was found in patients with pure silent ischaemia (n = 4) compared with the remaining patients with silent ischaemia whose pain pathways were presumed to be intact. CONCLUSIONS--Patients with silent ischaemia and pain pathways presumed to be intact have an enhanced peripheral vasodilator response, and if this applied to the coronary vasculature it could provide a mechanism for limiting ischaemia to below the pain threshold. Patients with pure silent ischaemia have evidence of sympathetic autonomic dysfunction. Images PMID:8297687

  6. Aberrant Ovarian Collateral Originating from External Iliac Artery During Uterine Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Joon Ho; Kim, Man Deuk Lee, Kwang-hun; Lee, Myungsu; Lee, Mu Sook; Won, Jong Yun; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun

    2013-02-15

    We report a case of a 35-year-old woman who underwent uterine artery embolization (UAE) for symptomatic multiple uterine fibroids with collateral aberrant right ovarian artery that originated from the right external iliac artery. We believe that this is the first reported case in the literature of this collateral uterine flow by the right ovarian artery originated from the right external iliac artery. We briefly present the details of the case and review the literature on variations of ovarian artery origin that might be encountered during UAE.

  7. Effect of low dose intra-arterial reserpine on vascular wall norepinephrine content.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, J M; Reiney, C G

    1975-01-01

    A number of reports in recent years have indicated that the administration of low dose intra-arterial reserpine has resulted in significant clinical improvement in patients with symptomatic vasospasm, with the benefits presumably resulting from regional vascular wall norepinephrine depletion with resultant vasodilatation. However, to date, there has been no evidence that such low dose reserpine actually alters vascular wall norepinephrine content. This study was performed to determine both regional and systemic effects of low