Science.gov

Sample records for synchronous impulse reconstruction

  1. Ultra Wideband (UWB) Synchronous Impulse Reconstruction (SIRE) Radar Upgrade Assessment Field Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Several upgrades have been incorporated into the Ultra Wideband (UWB) Synchronous Impulse Reconstruction (SIRE) radar, which includes: (a) Augmented ... Reality , (b) antenna array mounting structure, (c) electronic switch and electro-mechanical relay, and (d) low noise amplifiers. The purpose of the experiment is to assess UWB SIRE radar upgrades.

  2. Modified impulsive synchronization of hyperchaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeri, Mohammad; Dehghani, Mahsa

    2010-03-01

    In an original impulsive synchronization only instantaneous errors are used to determine the impulsive inputs. To improve the synchronization performance, addition of an integral term of the errors is proposed here. In comparison with the original form, the proposed modification increases the impulse distances which leads to reduction in the control cost as the most important characteristic of the impulsive synchronization technique. It can also decrease the error magnitude in the presence of noise. Sufficient conditions are presented through four theorems for different situations (nominal, uncertain, noisy, and noisy uncertain cases) under which stability of the error dynamics is guaranteed. Results from computer based simulations are provided to illustrate feasibility and effectiveness of the modified impulsive synchronization method applied on Rossler hyperchaotic systems.

  3. Obstacle avoidance and concealed target detection using the Army Research Lab ultra-wideband synchronous impulse reconstruction (UWB SIRE) forward imaging radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lam; Wong, David; Ressler, Marc; Koenig, Francois; Stanton, Brian; Smith, Gregory; Sichina, Jeffrey; Kappra, Karl

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), as part of a mission and customer funded exploratory program, has developed a new low-frequency, ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for forward imaging to support the Army's vision of an autonomous navigation system for robotic ground vehicles. These unmanned vehicles, equipped with an array of imaging sensors, will be tasked to help detect man-made obstacles such as concealed targets, enemy minefields, and booby traps, as well as other natural obstacles such as ditches, and bodies of water. The ability of UWB radar technology to help detect concealed objects has been documented in the past and could provide an important obstacle avoidance capability for autonomous navigation systems, which would improve the speed and maneuverability of these vehicles and consequently increase the survivability of the U. S. forces on the battlefield. One of the primary features of the radar is the ability to collect and process data at combat pace in an affordable, compact, and lightweight package. To achieve this, the radar is based on the synchronous impulse reconstruction (SIRE) technique where several relatively slow and inexpensive analog-to-digital (A/D) converters are used to sample the wide bandwidth of the radar signals. We conducted an experiment this winter at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) to support the phenomenological studies of the backscatter from positive and negative obstacles for autonomous robotic vehicle navigation, as well as the detection of concealed targets of interest to the Army. In this paper, we briefly describe the UWB SIRE radar and the test setup in the experiment. We will also describe the signal processing and the forward imaging techniques used in the experiment. Finally, we will present imagery of man-made obstacles such as barriers, concertina wires, and mines.

  4. Adaptive impulsive cluster synchronization in community network with nonidentical nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaoli; Gan, Luyining; Wu, Zhaoyan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, cluster synchronization in community network with nonidentical nodes is investigated. Through introducing proper adaptive strategy into impulsive control scheme, adaptive impulsive controllers are designed for achieving the cluster synchronization. In this adaptive impulsive control scheme, for any given networks, the impulsive gains can adjust themselves to proper values according to the proposed adaptive strategy when the impulsive intervals are fixed. The impulsive instants can be estimated by solving a sequence of maximum value problems when the impulsive gains are fixed. Both community networks without and with coupling delay are considered. Based on the Lyapunov function method and mathematical analysis technique, two synchronization criteria are derived. Several numerical examples are performed to verify the effectiveness of the derived theoretical results.

  5. Generalized synchronization of complex dynamical networks via impulsive control.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Lu, Jun-An; Wu, Xiaoqun; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2009-12-01

    This paper investigates the generalized synchronization (GS) of two typical complex dynamical networks, small-world networks and scale-free networks, in terms of impulsive control strategy. By applying the auxiliary-system approach to networks, we demonstrate theoretically that for any given coupling strength, GS can take place in complex dynamical networks consisting of nonidentical systems. Particularly, for Barabasi-Albert scale-free networks, we look into the relations between GS error and topological parameter m, which denotes the number of edges linking to a new node at each time step, and find out that GS speeds up with increasing m. And for Newman-Watts small-world networks, the time needed to achieve GS decreases as the probability of adding random edges increases. We further reveal how node dynamics affects GS speed on both small-world and scale-free networks. Finally, we analyze how the development of GS depends on impulsive control gains. Some abnormal but interesting phenomena regarding the GS process are also found in simulations.

  6. Impulsive stabilization and synchronization of a class of chaotic delay systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuandong; Liao, Xiaofeng; Yang, Xiaofan; Huang, Tingwen

    2005-12-01

    The problems of control and synchronization of a class of chaotic systems with time delay via the impulsive control approach are investigated. Based on the Lyapunov-like stability theory for impulsive functional differential equations, several sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee chaos control and synchronization. Furthermore, we address the chaos quasisynchronization in the presence of single-parameter mismatch. Several illustrated examples are also given to show the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  7. Cluster synchronization of community network with distributed time delays via impulsive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Hui; Wu, Zhao-Yan

    2016-11-01

    Cluster synchronization is an important dynamical behavior in community networks and deserves further investigations. A community network with distributed time delays is investigated in this paper. For achieving cluster synchronization, an impulsive control scheme is introduced to design proper controllers and an adaptive strategy is adopted to make the impulsive controllers unified for different networks. Through taking advantage of the linear matrix inequality technique and constructing Lyapunov functions, some synchronization criteria with respect to the impulsive gains, instants, and system parameters without adaptive strategy are obtained and generalized to the adaptive case. Finally, numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61463022), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant No. 20161BAB201021), and the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Educational Committee, China (Grant No. GJJ14273).

  8. Impulsive control of stochastic systems with applications in chaos control, chaos synchronization, and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunguang; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    Real systems are often subject to both noise perturbations and impulsive effects. In this paper, we study the stability and stabilization of systems with both noise perturbations and impulsive effects. In other words, we generalize the impulsive control theory from the deterministic case to the stochastic case. The method is based on extending the comparison method to the stochastic case. The method presented in this paper is general and easy to apply. Theoretical results on both stability in the pth mean and stability with disturbance attenuation are derived. To show the effectiveness of the basic theory, we apply it to the impulsive control and synchronization of chaotic systems with noise perturbations, and to the stability of impulsive stochastic neural networks. Several numerical examples are also presented to verify the theoretical results.

  9. Impulsive control of stochastic systems with applications in chaos control, chaos synchronization, and neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunguang; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    Real systems are often subject to both noise perturbations and impulsive effects. In this paper, we study the stability and stabilization of systems with both noise perturbations and impulsive effects. In other words, we generalize the impulsive control theory from the deterministic case to the stochastic case. The method is based on extending the comparison method to the stochastic case. The method presented in this paper is general and easy to apply. Theoretical results on both stability in the pth mean and stability with disturbance attenuation are derived. To show the effectiveness of the basic theory, we apply it to the impulsive control and synchronization of chaotic systems with noise perturbations, and to the stability of impulsive stochastic neural networks. Several numerical examples are also presented to verify the theoretical results.

  10. Image reconstruction for synchronous data acquisition in fluorescence molecular tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanxuan; Liu, Fei; Zuo, Siming; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2015-01-01

    The present full-angle, free-space fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system uses a step-by-step strategy to acquire measurements, which consumes time for both the rotation of the object and the integration of the charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Completing the integration during the rotation is a more time-efficient strategy called synchronous data acquisition. However, the positions of sources and detectors in this strategy are not stationary, which is not taken into account in the conventional reconstruction algorithm. In this paper we propose a reconstruction algorithm based on the finite element method (FEM) to overcome this problem. Phantom experiments were carried out to validate the performance of the algorithm. The results show that, compared with the conventional reconstruction algorithm used in the step-by-step data acquisition strategy, the proposed algorithm can reconstruct images with more accurate location data and lower relative errors when used with the synchronous data acquisition strategy.

  11. A novel adaptive-impulsive synchronization of fractional-order chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Y. T. Andrew; Li, Xian-Feng; Chu, Yan-Dong; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    A novel adaptive-impulsive scheme is proposed for synchronizing fractional-order chaotic systems without the necessity of knowing the attractors’ bounds in priori. The nonlinear functions in these systems are supposed to satisfy local Lipschitz conditions but which are estimated with adaptive laws. The novelty is that the combination of adaptive control and impulsive control offers a control strategy gathering the advantages of both. In order to guarantee the convergence is no less than an expected exponential rate, a combined feedback strength design is created such that the symmetric axis can shift freely according to the updated transient feedback strength. All of the unknown Lipschitz constants are also updated exponentially in the meantime of achieving synchronization. Two different fractional-order chaotic systems are employed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the novel adaptive-impulsive control scheme. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundations of China (Grant Nos. 11161027 and 11262009), the Key Natural Science Foundation of Gansu Province, China (Grant No. 1104WCGA195), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20136204110001).

  12. pth moment exponential stochastic synchronization of coupled memristor-based neural networks with mixed delays via delayed impulsive control.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinsong; Cao, Jinde; Qiu, Jianlong

    2015-05-01

    This paper concerns the pth moment synchronization in an array of generally coupled memristor-based neural networks with time-varying discrete delays, unbounded distributed delays, as well as stochastic perturbations. Hybrid controllers are designed to cope with the uncertainties caused by the state-dependent parameters: (a) state feedback controllers combined with delayed impulsive controller; (b) adaptive controller combined with delayed impulsive controller. Based on an impulsive differential inequality, the properties of random variables, the framework of Filippov solution, and Lyapunov functional method, sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee that the considered coupled memristor-based neural networks can be pth moment globally exponentially synchronized onto an isolated node under both of the two classes of hybrid impulsive controllers. Finally, numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  13. Impulsive synchronization of Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities via multiple integral approach.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, A; Rakkiyappan, R; Cao, Jinde

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies the impulsive synchronization of Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities via multiple integral approach. The array of neural networks are coupled in a random fashion which is governed by Bernoulli random variable. The aim of this paper is to obtain the synchronization criteria, which is suitable for both exactly known and partly unknown transition probabilities such that the coupled neural network is synchronized with mixed time-delay. The considered impulsive effects can be synchronized at partly unknown transition probabilities. Besides, a multiple integral approach is also proposed to strengthen the Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities. By making use of Kronecker product and some useful integral inequalities, a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional was designed for handling the coupled neural network with mixed delay and then impulsive synchronization criteria are solvable in a set of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the theoretical results.

  14. Exponential synchronization of discontinuous neural networks with time-varying mixed delays via state feedback and impulsive control.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinsong; Cao, Jinde; Ho, Daniel W C

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates drive-response synchronization for a class of neural networks with time-varying discrete and distributed delays (mixed delays) as well as discontinuous activations. Strict mathematical proof shows the global existence of Filippov solutions to neural networks with discontinuous activation functions and the mixed delays. State feedback controller and impulsive controller are designed respectively to guarantee global exponential synchronization of the neural networks. By using Lyapunov function and new analysis techniques, several new synchronization criteria are obtained. Moreover, lower bound on the convergence rate is explicitly estimated when state feedback controller is utilized. Results of this paper are new and some existing ones are extended and improved. Finally, numerical simulations are given to verify the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  15. Tomographic reconstruction of indoor spatial temperature distributions using room impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleisteiner, M.; Barth, M.; Raabe, A.

    2016-03-01

    Temperature can be estimated by acoustic travel time measurements along known sound paths. By using a multitude of known sound paths in combination with a tomographic reconstruction technique a spatial and temporal resolution of the temperature field can be achieved. Based on it, this article focuses on an experimental method in order to determine the spatially differentiated development of room temperature with only one loudspeaker and one microphone. The theory of geometrical room acoustics is being used to identify sound paths under consideration of reflections. The travel time along a specific sound path is derived from the room impulse response. Temporal variances in room impulse response can be attributed primarily to a change in air temperature and airflow. It is shown that in the absence of airflow a 3D acoustic monitoring of the room temperature can be realized with a fairly limited use of hardware.

  16. Inter-limb differences in impulsive loading following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in females.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, J Troy; Pietrosimone, Brian; Harkey, Matt S; Luc, Brittney A; Pamukoff, Derek N

    2016-09-06

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction (ACLR) dramatically increase the risk of knee osteoarthritis, but the contributing factors, and therefore the targets for intervention, are poorly understood. Differences in loading characteristics between the ACLR and contralateral limbs during routine activities such as walking may elucidate the mechanical pathogenesis of post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis. Twenty-nine females with ACLR (age=21.7±3.1 years; time since ACL injury=48±41 months) performed walking gait at a self-selected speed from which the overall peak vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) in the first 50% of the stance phase and its linear (slope of the vGRF-time curve) and instantaneous (first time-derivative) loading rates were calculated. The magnitude of the vGRF peak immediately following heelstrike and its linear and instantaneous loading rates were also identified. Subjects were further classified as "Impulsive Loaders" or "Normal Loaders" based on whether the transient vGRF peak immediately following heelstrike was objectively classified as a heelstrike transient in the majority of trials. The vGRF magnitude immediately following heelstrike and instantaneous loading rates (both overall and immediately following heelstrike) were greater in the ACLR limb. Additionally, vGRF linear and instantaneous loading rates were greater in subjects classified as Impulsive Loaders. As higher loading rates are associated with greater cartilage degradation in animal models, these data suggest that the greater loading rates in the ACLR limb may play an important role in development of post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis. Additionally, the heelstrike transient appears to be an objective indicator of impulsive loading.

  17. Application of damage detection methods using passive reconstruction of impulse response functions.

    PubMed

    Tippmann, J D; Zhu, X; Lanza di Scalea, F

    2015-02-28

    In structural health monitoring (SHM), using only the existing noise has long been an attractive goal. The advances in understanding cross-correlations in ambient noise in the past decade, as well as new understanding in damage indication and other advanced signal processing methods, have continued to drive new research into passive SHM systems. Because passive systems take advantage of the existing noise mechanisms in a structure, offshore wind turbines are a particularly attractive application due to the noise created from the various aerodynamic and wave loading conditions. Two damage detection methods using a passively reconstructed impulse response function, or Green's function, are presented. Damage detection is first studied using the reciprocity of the impulse response functions, where damage introduces new nonlinearities that break down the similarity in the causal and anticausal wave components. Damage detection and localization are then studied using a matched-field processing technique that aims to spatially locate sources that identify a change in the structure. Results from experiments conducted on an aluminium plate and wind turbine blade with simulated damage are also presented.

  18. Are executive function and impulsivity antipodes? A conceptual reconstruction with special reference to addiction

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, Warren K.; Jarmolowicz, David P.; Mueller, E. Terry; Gatchalian, Kirstin M.; McClure, Samuel M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Although there is considerable interest in how either executive function (EF) or impulsivity relate to addiction, there is little apparent overlap between these research areas. Objectives The present paper aims to determine if components of these two constructs are conceptual antipodes—widely separated on a shared continuum. Methods EFs and impulsivities were compared and contrasted. Specifically, the definitions of the components of EF and impulsivity, the methods used to measure the various components, the populations of drug users that show deficits in these components, and the neural substrates of these components were compared and contrasted. Results Each component of impulsivity had an antipode in EF. EF, however, covered a wider range of phenomena, including compulsivity. Conclusions Impulsivity functions as an antipode of certain components of EF. Recognition of the relationship between EF and impulsivity may inform the scientific inquiry of behavioral problems such as addiction. Other theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:22441659

  19. Real-time Kinematics Base Station and Survey Unit Setup Method for the Synchronous Impulse Reconstruction (SIRE) Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    4. Novatel CDU software. ...................................................................................................4 Figure 5. Survey Unit...a laptop to the GPS receiver with a universal serial bus (USB) or RS232 cable (#3). 8. Run the Control and Display Unit ( CDU ) program on the laptop...identify the correct COM port and connect to the GPS receiver. Figure 4 shows a typical display of the CDU window. Figure 4. Novatel CDU

  20. Sensing through the wall imaging using the Army Research Lab ultra-wideband synchronous impulse reconstruction (UWB SIRE) radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lam; Ressler, Marc; Sichina, Jeffrey

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), as part of a mission and customer funded exploratory program, has developed a new low-frequency, ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The radar is capable of penetrating enclosed areas (buildings) and generating SAR imagery. This supports the U.S. Army's need for intelligence on the configuration, content, and human presence inside these enclosed areas. The radar system is mounted on a ground based vehicle traveling along the road and is configured with an array of antennas pointing toward the enclosed areas of interest. This paper will describe an experiment conducted recently at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland. In this paper we briefly describe the UWB SIRE radar and the test setup in the experiment. We will also describe the signal processing and the image techniques used to produce the SAR imagery. Finally, we will present SAR imagery of the building and its internal structure from different viewing directions.

  1. Attenuation of Spurious Impulses from an Ultra-Wideband Radar: A High-Speed Switch for the Synchronous Impulse Reconstruction (SIRE) Frontend

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    down to ground with current sufficient to latch it. When 0 V is applied to the ULN2003A input, the transistor releases its side of the coil to 5 V...V to the input of a single transistor on the ULN2003A, and the output of this transistor is connected to one side of the HF353S coil (Pin 11). A...constant 5 V is applied to the other side of the coil (Pin 1). When 5 V is applied to the ULN2003A input, the transistor pulls one side of the coil

  2. Object segmentation and reconstruction via an oscillatory neural network: interaction among learning, memory, topological organization and gamma-band synchronization.

    PubMed

    Magosso, E; Cuppini, C; Ursino, M

    2006-01-01

    Synchronization of neuronal activity in the gamma-band has been shown to play an important role in higher cognitive functions, by grouping together the necessary information in different cortical areas to achieve a coherent perception. In the present work, we used a neural network of Wilson-Cowan oscillators to analyze the problem of binding and segmentation of high-level objects. Binding is achieved by implementing in the network the similarity and prior knowledge Gestalt rules. Similarity law is realized via topological maps within the network. Prior knowledge originates by means of a Hebbian rule of synaptic change; objects are memorized in the network with different strengths. Segmentation is realized via a global inhibitor which allows desynchronisation among multiple objects avoiding interference. Simulation results performed with a 40x40 neural grid, using three simultaneous input objects, show that the network is able to recognize and segment objects in several different conditions (different degrees of incompleteness or distortion of input patterns), exhibiting the higher reconstruction performances the higher the strength of object memory. The presented model represents an integrated approach for investigating the relationships among learning, memory, topological organization and gamma-band synchronization.

  3. Reconstruction of complex networks with delays and noise perturbation based on generalized outer synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiang; Chen, Shihua; Lu, Jun-an; Ning, Di

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes an approach to identify the topological structure and unknown system parameters of a weighted complex dynamical network with delay and noise perturbation. Based on the Barbalat-type invariance principle for stochastic differential equations, an effective adaptive feedback technique with an updated law is developed to realize generalized outer synchronization. The unknown topological structure and parameters are identified simultaneously through the established technique. The weight configuration matrix was found to be unnecessarily symmetric. Numerical examples are examined to illustrate the effectiveness of the analytical results.

  4. Instantaneous Impulses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlichson, Herman

    2000-01-01

    Describes an experiment that extends Newton's instantaneous-impulse method of orbital analysis to a graphical method of orbit determination. Discusses the experiment's usefulness for teaching both horizontal projectile motion and instantaneous impulse. (WRM)

  5. Synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON): A statistical model based iterative image reconstruction method to eliminate limited-view artifacts and to mitigate the temporal-average artifacts in time-resolved CT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Li, Yinsheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In x-ray computed tomography (CT), a violation of the Tuy data sufficiency condition leads to limited-view artifacts. In some applications, it is desirable to use data corresponding to a narrow temporal window to reconstruct images with reduced temporal-average artifacts. However, the need to reduce temporal-average artifacts in practice may result in a violation of the Tuy condition and thus undesirable limited-view artifacts. In this paper, the authors present a new iterative reconstruction method, synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON), to eliminate limited-view artifacts using data acquired within an ultranarrow temporal window that severely violates the Tuy condition. Methods: In time-resolved contrast enhanced CT acquisitions, image contrast dynamically changes during data acquisition. Each image reconstructed from data acquired in a given temporal window represents one time frame and can be denoted as an image vector. Conventionally, each individual time frame is reconstructed independently. In this paper, all image frames are grouped into a spatial–temporal image matrix and are reconstructed together. Rather than the spatial and/or temporal smoothing regularizers commonly used in iterative image reconstruction, the nuclear norm of the spatial–temporal image matrix is used in SMART-RECON to regularize the reconstruction of all image time frames. This regularizer exploits the low-dimensional structure of the spatial–temporal image matrix to mitigate limited-view artifacts when an ultranarrow temporal window is desired in some applications to reduce temporal-average artifacts. Both numerical simulations in two dimensional image slices with known ground truth and in vivo human subject data acquired in a contrast enhanced cone beam CT exam have been used to validate the proposed SMART-RECON algorithm and to demonstrate the initial performance of the algorithm. Reconstruction errors and temporal fidelity

  6. Synchronization tracking in pulse position modulation receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor A.

    1987-01-01

    A clock pulse generator for decoding pulse position modulation in an optical communication receiver is synchronized by a delay tracking loop which multiplies impulses of a data pulse by the square wave clock pulses from the generator to produce positive impulses when the clock pulse is of one level, and negative impulses when the clock pulse is of another level. A delay tracking loop integrates the impulses and produces an error signal that adjusts the delay so the clock pulses will be synchronized with data pulses. A dead-time tau sub d is provided between data pulses of an interval tau sub p in the data pulse period tau. When synchronized, the average number of positive impulses integrated will equal the average number of negative impulses over the continuous stream of data pulses.

  7. Synchronicity from synchronized chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Duane, Gregory

    2015-04-01

    The synchronization of loosely-coupled chaotic oscillators, a phenomenon investigated intensively for the last two decades, may realize the philosophical concept of “synchronicity”—the commonplace notion that related events mysteriously occur at the same time. When extended to continuous media and/or large discrete arrays, and when general (non-identical) correspondences are considered between states, intermittent synchronous relationships indeed become ubiquitous. Meaningful synchronicity follows naturally if meaningful events are identified with coherent structures, defined by internal synchronization between remote degrees of freedom; a condition that has been posited as necessary for synchronizability with an external system. The important case of synchronization between mind and matter is realized if mind is analogized to a computer model, synchronizing with a sporadically observed system, as in meteorological data assimilation. Evidence for the ubiquity of synchronization is reviewed along with recent proposals that: (1) synchronization of different models of the same objective process may be an expeditious route to improved computational modeling and may also describe the functioning of conscious brains; and (2) the nonlocality in quantum phenomena implied by Bell’s theorem may be explained in a variety of deterministic (hidden variable) interpretations if the quantum world resides on a generalized synchronization “manifold”.

  8. Synchronicity from synchronized chaos

    DOE PAGES

    Duane, Gregory

    2015-04-01

    The synchronization of loosely-coupled chaotic oscillators, a phenomenon investigated intensively for the last two decades, may realize the philosophical concept of “synchronicity”—the commonplace notion that related events mysteriously occur at the same time. When extended to continuous media and/or large discrete arrays, and when general (non-identical) correspondences are considered between states, intermittent synchronous relationships indeed become ubiquitous. Meaningful synchronicity follows naturally if meaningful events are identified with coherent structures, defined by internal synchronization between remote degrees of freedom; a condition that has been posited as necessary for synchronizability with an external system. The important case of synchronization between mind andmore » matter is realized if mind is analogized to a computer model, synchronizing with a sporadically observed system, as in meteorological data assimilation. Evidence for the ubiquity of synchronization is reviewed along with recent proposals that: (1) synchronization of different models of the same objective process may be an expeditious route to improved computational modeling and may also describe the functioning of conscious brains; and (2) the nonlocality in quantum phenomena implied by Bell’s theorem may be explained in a variety of deterministic (hidden variable) interpretations if the quantum world resides on a generalized synchronization “manifold”.« less

  9. Signal and Image Processing Algorithms for the U.S. Army Research Laboratory Ultra-wideband (UWB) Synchronous Impulse Reconstruction (SIRE) Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER ARL-TR-4784 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...acquisition technique. ...................................8 Figure 10 . The SIRE transmitting pulse in the time-domain and frequency-domain... 10 Figure 11. False color plot of one complete frame of radar data: 16 receiving records using the left transmitter and 16 receiving

  10. WE-EF-207-08: Improve Cone Beam CT Using a Synchronized Moving Grid, An Inter-Projection Sensor Fusion and a Probability Total Variation Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Kong, V; Jin, J; Ren, L; Zhang, Y; Giles, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system, which uses a synchronized moving grid (SMOG) to reduce and correct scatter, an inter-projection sensor fusion (IPSF) algorithm to estimate the missing information blocked by the grid, and a probability total variation (pTV) algorithm to reconstruct the CBCT image. Methods: A prototype SMOG-equipped CBCT system was developed, and was used to acquire gridded projections with complimentary grid patterns in two neighboring projections. Scatter was reduced by the grid, and the remaining scatter was corrected by measuring it under the grid. An IPSF algorithm was used to estimate the missing information in a projection from data in its 2 neighboring projections. Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm was used to reconstruct the initial CBCT image using projections after IPSF processing for pTV. A probability map was generated depending on the confidence of estimation in IPSF for the regions of missing data and penumbra. pTV was finally used to reconstruct the CBCT image for a Catphan, and was compared to conventional CBCT image without using SMOG, images without using IPSF (SMOG + FDK and SMOG + mask-TV), and image without using pTV (SMOG + IPSF + FDK). Results: The conventional CBCT without using SMOG shows apparent scatter-induced cup artifacts. The approaches with SMOG but without IPSF show severe (SMOG + FDK) or additional (SMOG + TV) artifacts, possibly due to using projections of missing data. The 2 approaches with SMOG + IPSF removes the cup artifacts, and the pTV approach is superior than the FDK by substantially reducing the noise. Using the SMOG also reduces half of the imaging dose. Conclusion: The proposed technique is promising in improving CBCT image quality while reducing imaging dose.

  11. Funnel Beaker weather (6200-4900 cal BP) - reconstructed from the palaeolimnological record of synchronously deposited varves in northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreibrodt, Stefan; Zahrer, Jürgen; Brauer, Achim

    2013-04-01

    Depositional patterns of synchronously deposited varves of Lake Belauer See and Lake Poggensee (northern Germany) were studied on thin sections under the microscope comparatively. Events and trends that occurred synchronously in the lake systems were detected and interpret as limnologic responses to supra-regional extrinsic (climate) drivers. The different thresholds of the compared lake systems implied by different lake size were utilized to infer about weather conditions. For Lake Belauer See microfacies types of sub-recent varves were proved to reflect responses of certain meteorological conditions (e.g. severity of winters). A short weather anomaly at around 5950 cal BP was detected. Cold summers of about 40 successive years (probably with sudden frost events) lead to breaks of the thermal summer stratification and the associated carbonate precipitation. Instead renewed blooms of planctic diatoms occurred. The subsequent interval of the Funnel Beaker Culture seems to have experienced a period with favorable wea¬ther conditions, with warm summers and not extra-ordinary severe winters. Between ca. 5400 and 5340 cal BP an interval with pronounced warm winters is indicated. The favorable weather conditions termina¬ted abruptly at around 5275 cal BP when the weather (in particular summers) became colder. The comparison of the sediment sequences also provides evidence for the asynchronic onset of anthropogenic activity in the catchment areas of the lakes. A significant increase of minerogenic matter (quartz grains) indication soil erosion in the lake catchment started at ca. 3850 cal BC in Lake Poggensee, and at ca. 3500 cal BC in Lake Belau. Cycles of minerogenic input have been detected with duration of 20-25 years. Whether these cycles could represent slash and burn cycles has to be studied further.

  12. Fault degradation assessment of water hydraulic motor by impulse vibration signal with Wavelet Packet Analysis and Kolmogorov Smirnov Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. X.; Chua, Patrick S. K.; Lim, G. H.

    2008-10-01

    The machinery fault diagnosis is important for improving reliability and performance of systems. Many methods such as Time Synchronous Average (TSA), Fast Fourier Transform (FFT)-based spectrum analysis and short-time Fourier transform (STFT) have been applied in fault diagnosis and condition monitoring of mechanical system. The above methods analyze the signal in frequency domain with low resolution, which is not suitable for non-stationary vibration signal. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test is a simple and precise technique in vibration signal analysis for machinery fault diagnosis. It has limited use and advantage to analyze the vibration signal with higher noise directly. In this paper, a new method for the fault degradation assessment of the water hydraulic motor is proposed based on Wavelet Packet Analysis (WPA) and KS test to analyze the impulsive energy of the vibration signal, which is used to detect the piston condition of water hydraulic motor. WPA is used to analyze the impulsive vibration signal from the casing of the water hydraulic motor to obtain the impulsive energy. The impulsive energy of the vibration signal can be obtained by the multi-decomposition based on Wavelet Packet Transform (WPT) and used as feature values to assess the fault degradation of the pistons. The kurtosis of the impulsive energy in the reconstructed signal from the Wavelet Packet coefficients is used to extract the feature values of the impulse energy by calculating the coefficients of the WPT multi-decomposition. The KS test is used to compare the kurtosis of the impulse energy of the vibration signal statistically under the different piston conditions. The results show the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed method to assess the fault degradation of the pistons in the water hydraulic motor.

  13. Neocortical synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maksim; Seigneur, Joseé; Sejnowski, Terrence

    2011-01-01

    Summary Neuronal synchronization occurs when two or more neuronal events are coordinated across time. Local synchronization produces field potentials. Long-range synchronization between distant brain sites contributes to the electroencephalogram. Neuronal synchronization depends on synaptic (chemical/electrical), ephaptic, and extracellular interactions. For an expanded treatment of this topic see Jasper’s Basic Mechanisms of the Epilepsies, Fourth Edition (Noebels JL, Avoli M, Rogawski MA, Olsen RW, Delgado-Escueta AV, eds) published by Oxford University Press (available on the National Library of Medicine Bookshelf [NCBI] at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books). PMID:24850952

  14. Genetics of impulsive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as the tendency to act without foresight, comprises a multitude of constructs and is associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Dissecting different aspects of impulsive behaviour and relating these to specific neurobiological circuits would improve our understanding of the etiology of complex behaviours for which impulsivity is key, and advance genetic studies in this behavioural domain. In this review, we will discuss the heritability of some impulsivity constructs and their possible use as endophenotypes (heritable, disease-associated intermediate phenotypes). Several functional genetic variants associated with impulsive behaviour have been identified by the candidate gene approach and re-sequencing, and whole genome strategies can be implemented for discovery of novel rare and common alleles influencing impulsivity. Via deep sequencing an uncommon HTR2B stop codon, common in one population, was discovered, with implications for understanding impulsive behaviour in both humans and rodents and for future gene discovery.

  15. Genetics of impulsive behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as the tendency to act without foresight, comprises a multitude of constructs and is associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Dissecting different aspects of impulsive behaviour and relating these to specific neurobiological circuits would improve our understanding of the etiology of complex behaviours for which impulsivity is key, and advance genetic studies in this behavioural domain. In this review, we will discuss the heritability of some impulsivity constructs and their possible use as endophenotypes (heritable, disease-associated intermediate phenotypes). Several functional genetic variants associated with impulsive behaviour have been identified by the candidate gene approach and re-sequencing, and whole genome strategies can be implemented for discovery of novel rare and common alleles influencing impulsivity. Via deep sequencing an uncommon HTR2B stop codon, common in one population, was discovered, with implications for understanding impulsive behaviour in both humans and rodents and for future gene discovery. PMID:23440466

  16. Impulsive action: emotional impulses and their control

    PubMed Central

    Frijda, Nico H.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Rietveld, Erik

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel theoretical view on impulsive action, integrating thus far separate perspectives on non-reflective action, motivation, emotion regulation, and impulse control. We frame impulsive action in terms of directedness of the individual organism toward, away, or against other givens – toward future states and away from one’s present state. First, appraisal of a perceived or thought-of event or object on occasion, rapidly and without premonition or conscious deliberation, triggers a motive to modify one’s relation to that event or object. Situational specifics of the event as perceived and appraised motivate and guide selection of readiness for a particular kind of purposive action. Second, perception of complex situations can give rise to multiple appraisals, multiple motives, and multiple simultaneous changes in action readiness. Multiple states of action readiness may interact in generating action, by reinforcing or attenuating each other, thereby yielding impulse control. We show how emotion control can itself result from a motive state or state of action readiness. Our view links impulsive action mechanistically to states of action readiness, which is the central feature of what distinguishes one kind of emotion from another. It thus provides a novel theoretical perspective to the somewhat fragmented literature on impulsive action. PMID:24917835

  17. Entrainment and the cranial rhythmic impulse.

    PubMed

    McPartland, J M; Mein, E A

    1997-01-01

    Entrainment is the integration or harmonization of oscillators. All organisms pulsate with myriad electrical and mechanical rhythms. Many of these rhythms emanate from synchronized pulsating cells (eg, pacemaker cells, cortical neurons). The cranial rhythmic impulse is an oscillation recognized by many bodywork practitioners, but the functional origin of this impulse remains uncertain. We propose that the cranial rhythmic impulse is the palpable perception of entrainment, a harmonic frequency that incorporates the rhythms of multiple biological oscillators. It is derived primarily from signals between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Entrainment also arises between organisms. The harmonizing of coupled oscillators into a single, dominant frequency is called frequency-selective entrainment. We propose that this phenomenon is the modus operandi of practitioners who use the cranial rhythmic impulse in craniosacral treatment. Dominant entrainment is enhanced by "centering," a technique practiced by many healers, for example, practitioners of Chinese, Tibetan, and Ayurvedic medicine. We explore the connections between centering, the cranial rhythmic impulse, and craniosacral treatment.

  18. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  19. Dealing with Impulsivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neidhardt, Janet

    1987-01-01

    A mother recounts her neurologically impaired son's struggles and progress in combating impulsivity in his work and social habits. Now 23 years old, employed full-time, and off medication, the son is still impulsive, has problems with social skills, but has improved his self-image through a photography hobby. (CB)

  20. Impulsivity and Academic Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderman, Eric M.; Cupp, Pamela K.; Lane, Derek

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relations between academic cheating and impulsivity in a large sample of adolescents enrolled in high school health education classes. Results indicated that impulsivity predicts academic cheating for students who report extensive involvement in cheating. However, students who engage in extensive cheating are less likely…

  1. Rethinking Impulsivity in Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klonsky, E. David; May, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Elevated impulsivity is thought to facilitate the transition from suicidal thoughts to suicidal behavior. Therefore, impulsivity should distinguish those who have attempted suicide (attempters) from those who have only considered suicide (ideators-only). This hypothesis was examined in three large nonclinical samples: (1) 2,011 military recruits,…

  2. Impulse-induced localized control of chaos in starlike networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón, Ricardo; Palmero, Faustino; Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Locally decreasing the impulse transmitted by periodic pulses is shown to be a reliable method of taming chaos in starlike networks of dissipative nonlinear oscillators, leading to both synchronous periodic states and equilibria (oscillation death). Specifically, the paradigmatic model of damped kicked rotators is studied in which it is assumed that when the rotators are driven synchronously, i.e., all driving pulses transmit the same impulse, the networks display chaotic dynamics. It is found that the taming effect of decreasing the impulse transmitted by the pulses acting on particular nodes strongly depends on their number and degree of connectivity. A theoretical analysis is given explaining the basic physical mechanism as well as the main features of the chaos-control scenario.

  3. Impulse-induced localized control of chaos in starlike networks.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Ricardo; Palmero, Faustino; Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Locally decreasing the impulse transmitted by periodic pulses is shown to be a reliable method of taming chaos in starlike networks of dissipative nonlinear oscillators, leading to both synchronous periodic states and equilibria (oscillation death). Specifically, the paradigmatic model of damped kicked rotators is studied in which it is assumed that when the rotators are driven synchronously, i.e., all driving pulses transmit the same impulse, the networks display chaotic dynamics. It is found that the taming effect of decreasing the impulse transmitted by the pulses acting on particular nodes strongly depends on their number and degree of connectivity. A theoretical analysis is given explaining the basic physical mechanism as well as the main features of the chaos-control scenario.

  4. Synchronization waves in geometric networks.

    PubMed

    Leyva, I; Navas, A; Sendiña-Nadal, I; Buldú, J M; Almendral, J A; Boccaletti, S

    2011-12-01

    We report synchronization of networked excitable nodes embedded in a metric space, where the connectivity properties are mostly determined by the distance between units. Such a high clustered structure, combined with the lack of long-range connections, prevents full synchronization and yields instead the emergence of synchronization waves. We show that this regime is optimal for information transmission through the system, as it enhances the options of reconstructing the topology from the dynamics. Measurements of topological and functional centralities reveal that the wave-synchronization state allows detection of the most structurally relevant nodes from a single observation of the dynamics, without any a priori information on the model equations ruling the evolution of the ensemble.

  5. A Lie algebraic condition for exponential stability of discrete hybrid systems and application to hybrid synchronization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shouwei

    2011-06-01

    A Lie algebraic condition for global exponential stability of linear discrete switched impulsive systems is presented in this paper. By considering a Lie algebra generated by all subsystem matrices and impulsive matrices, when not all of these matrices are Schur stable, we derive new criteria for global exponential stability of linear discrete switched impulsive systems. Moreover, simple sufficient conditions in terms of Lie algebra are established for the synchronization of nonlinear discrete systems using a hybrid switching and impulsive control. As an application, discrete chaotic system's synchronization is investigated by the proposed method.

  6. A Lie algebraic condition for exponential stability of discrete hybrid systems and application to hybrid synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shouwei

    2011-06-01

    A Lie algebraic condition for global exponential stability of linear discrete switched impulsive systems is presented in this paper. By considering a Lie algebra generated by all subsystem matrices and impulsive matrices, when not all of these matrices are Schur stable, we derive new criteria for global exponential stability of linear discrete switched impulsive systems. Moreover, simple sufficient conditions in terms of Lie algebra are established for the synchronization of nonlinear discrete systems using a hybrid switching and impulsive control. As an application, discrete chaotic system's synchronization is investigated by the proposed method.

  7. Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wen; Lü, Jinhu; Chen, Shihua; Yu, Xinghuo

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

  8. Fractionating impulsivity: neuropsychiatric implications.

    PubMed

    Dalley, Jeffrey W; Robbins, Trevor W

    2017-02-17

    The ability to make decisions and act quickly without hesitation can be advantageous in many settings. However, when persistently expressed, impulsive decisions and actions are considered risky, maladaptive and symptomatic of such diverse brain disorders as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, drug addiction and affective disorders. Over the past decade, rapid progress has been made in the identification of discrete neural networks that underlie different forms of impulsivity - from impaired response inhibition and risky decision making to a profound intolerance of delayed rewards. Herein, we review what is currently known about the neural and psychological mechanisms of impulsivity, and discuss the relevance and application of these new insights to various neuropsychiatric disorders.

  9. Synchronizing Fireflies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Ying; Gall, Walter; Nabb, Karen Mayumi

    2006-01-01

    "Imagine a tenth of a mile of river front with an unbroken line of trees with fireflies on ever leaf flashing in synchronism. ... Then, if one's imagination is sufficiently vivid, he may form some conception of this amazing spectacle." So wrote the naturalist Hugh Smith. In this article we consider how one might model mathematically the…

  10. Channel Modeling and Time Delay Estimation for Clock Synchronization Among Seaweb Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, P; Rice, J; Clark, G A

    2012-07-08

    From simulations, tracking of the impulse response is feasible. Potential to benefit other functions such as ranging between two nodes. Potential to combine the features of different protocols to create a new and more realistic clock-synchronization protocol.

  11. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Stanley K.

    1993-01-01

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring.

  12. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, S.K.

    1993-12-21

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring. 4 figures.

  13. Fixed-time synchronization of multi-links complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Li, Lixiang; Peng, Haipeng; Xiao, Jinghua; Yang, Yixian; Zheng, Mingwen

    2017-01-01

    In the paper, the fixed-time and finite-time synchronizations of multi-links complex network are investigated. Compared with finite-time synchronization, the settling time of fixed-time synchronization is independent of initial conditions. For uncertain multi-links complex networks, this paper further analyzes synchronization mechanism and unknown parameters based on the drive-response concept and finite-time stability theory. Novel synchronization control criteria and the result of parameters identification are, respectively, obtained in a finite time by utilizing Lyapunov function and linear matrix inequality (LMI). Besides, we give other two versions of finite-time synchronization and parameters identification for uncertain multi-links complex network with impulsive control input. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  14. Relativistic impulse dynamics.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Classical electrodynamics has some annoying rough edges. The self-energy of charges is infinite without a cutoff. The calculation of relativistic trajectories is difficult because of retardation and an average radiation reaction term. By reconceptuallizing electrodynamics in terms of exchanges of impulses rather than describing it by forces and potentials, we eliminate these problems. A fully relativistic theory using photonlike null impulses is developed. Numerical calculations for a two-body, one-impulse-in-transit model are discussed. A simple relationship between center-of-mass scattering angle and angular momentum was found. It reproduces the Rutherford cross section at low velocities and agrees with the leading term of relativistic distinguishable-particle quantum cross sections (Møller, Mott) when the distance of closest approach is larger than the Compton wavelength of the particle. Magnetism emerges as a consequence of viewing retarded and advanced interactions from the vantage point of an instantaneous radius vector. Radiation reaction becomes the local conservation of energy-momentum between the radiating particle and the emitted impulse. A net action is defined that could be used in developing quantum dynamics without potentials. A reinterpretation of Newton's laws extends them to relativistic motion.

  15. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-10-10

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes. 9 figs.

  16. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes.

  17. Annoyance of helicopter impulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dambra, F.; Damongeot, A.

    1978-01-01

    Psychoacoustic studies of helicopter impulsive noise were conducted in order to qualify additional annoyance due to this feature and to develop physical impulsiveness descriptors to develop impulsivity correction methods. The currently proposed descriptors and methods of impulsiveness correction are compared using a multilinear regression analysis technique. It is shown that the presently recommended descriptor and correction method provides the best correlation with the subjective evaluations of real helicopter impulsive noises. The equipment necessary for data processing in order to apply the correction method is discussed.

  18. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  19. Impulse pumping modelling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, B.; Gudmundsson, J. S.

    2010-08-01

    Impulse pumping is a new pumping method based on propagation of pressure waves. Of particular interest is the application of impulse pumping to artificial lift situations, where fluid is transported from wellbore to wellhead using pressure waves generated at wellhead. The motor driven element of an impulse pumping apparatus is therefore located at wellhead and can be separated from the flowline. Thus operation and maintenance of an impulse pump are facilitated. The paper describes the different elements of an impulse pumping apparatus, reviews the physical principles and details the modelling of the novel pumping method. Results from numerical simulations of propagation of pressure waves in water-filled pipelines are then presented for illustrating impulse pumping physical principles, and validating the described modelling with experimental data.

  20. Impulsive phase transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Bely-Dubau, Francoise; Brown, John C.; Dulk, George A.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Enome, Shinzo; Gabriel, Alan H.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Melrose, Donald; Neidig, Donald F.

    1986-01-01

    The transport of nonthermal electrons is explored. The thick-target electron beam model, in which electrons are presumed to be accelerated in the corona and typically thermalized primarily in the chromosphere and photosphere, is supported by observations throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. At the highest energies, the anisotropy of gamma-ray emission above 10 MeV clearly indicates that these photons are emitted by anisotropically-directed particles. The timing of this high-energy gamma-radiation with respect to lower-energy hard X-radiation implies that the energetic particles have short life-times. For collisional energy loss, this means that they are stopped in the chromosphere or below. Stereoscopic (two-spacecraft) observations at hard X-ray energies (up to 350 keV) imply that these lower-energy (but certainly nonthermal) electrons are also stopped deep in the chromosphere. Hard X-ray images show that, in spatially resolved flares whose radiation consists of impulsive bursts, the impulsive phase starts with X-radiation that comes mostly from the foot-points of coronal loops whose coronal component is outlined by microwaves.

  1. Synchronization of Regular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caucal, Didier

    Functional graph grammars are finite devices which generate the class of regular automata. We recall the notion of synchronization by grammars, and for any given grammar we consider the class of languages recognized by automata generated by all its synchronized grammars. The synchronization is an automaton-related notion: all grammars generating the same automaton synchronize the same languages. When the synchronizing automaton is unambiguous, the class of its synchronized languages forms an effective boolean algebra lying between the classes of regular languages and unambiguous context-free languages. We additionally provide sufficient conditions for such classes to be closed under concatenation and its iteration.

  2. Advanced concepts. [specific impulse, mass drivers, electromagnetic launchers, and the rail gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    The relative strengths of those interactions which enable propulsive forces are listed as well as the specific impulse of various propellants. Graphics show the linear synchronous motor of the mass driver, the principle of the direct current electromagnetic launcher, and the characteristics of the rail gun.

  3. IMPULSIVITY PARAMETER FOR SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W. G.; Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Calvo-Mozo, B.; Martinez-Oliveros, J. C. E-mail: bcalvom@unal.edu.co E-mail: jalvarad@eso.org

    2016-02-10

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30–40 keV and 25–50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify solar flares according to their impulsivity parameter values, defining three different types of impulsivity, namely, high, medium, and low. This system of classification is independent of the manner used to calculated the impulsivity parameter. Lastly, we show the relevance of this tool as a discriminator of different HXR generation processes.

  4. Teaching about Impulse and Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Bill

    2004-01-01

    This American Association of Physics Teachers/Physics Teaching Resource Agents (APPT/PTRA) spiral-bound manual features labs and demos physics teachers can use to give students hands-on opportunities to learn about impulse and momentum. "Make-and-take activities" include AAPT Apparatus Contest winners "An Air Impulse Rocket," "A Fan Driven…

  5. Possible neural coding with interevent intervals of synchronous firing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Kazuyuki; Tokuda, Isao

    2002-08-01

    Neural networks composed of excitable neurons with noise generate rich nonlinear dynamics with spatiotemporal structures of neuronal spikes. Among various spatiotemporal patterns of spikes, synchronous firing has been studied most extensively both with physiological experimentation and with theoretical analysis. In this paper, we consider nonlinear neurodynamics in terms of synchronous firing and possibility of neural coding with such synchronous firing, which may be used in the ``noisy brain.'' In particular, reconstruction of a chaotic attractor modeling a dynamical environment is explored with interevent intervals of synchronous firing from the perspective of nonlinear time series analysis and stochastic resonance.

  6. Impulsive control for hypervelocity missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magness, R. W.

    1981-05-01

    A hypervelocity agile interceptor/quickshot is being developed for defense of ballistic missile launch sites. A guidance and control system is required to achieve the missile guidance accuracy necessary for direct target impact. Attitude control systems evaluated for the agile interceptor included aerodynamic controls, thrust vector controls and impulsive motor controls. The solid squib impulsive control motion was selected because of high response rate, low weight and low volume. A baseline motor configuration was designed and a solid propellant squib was developed for use in the control system. Ballistic pendulum and bench tests were conducted with a test impulsive control motor to measure nominal performance, establish the standard deviation of performance, and define requirements to prevent sympathetic ignition. A dynamic control wind tunnel test was also conducted to determine the impulse augmentation due to the impulsive motor jet interaction with the missile boundary layer. The degree and direction of augmentation was measured for variations in Mach number and angle of attack.

  7. Dynamics of Time Delay-Induced Multiple Synchronous Behaviors in Inhibitory Coupled Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Huaguang; Zhao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory synapse can induce synchronous behaviors different from the anti-phase synchronous behaviors, which have been reported in recent studies. In the present paper, synchronous behaviors are investigated in the motif model composed of reciprocal inhibitory coupled neurons with endogenous bursting and time delay. When coupling strength is weak, synchronous behavior appears at a single interval of time delay within a bursting period. When coupling strength is strong, multiple synchronous behaviors appear at different intervals of time delay within a bursting period. The different bursting patterns of synchronous behaviors, and time delays and coupling strengths that can induce the synchronous bursting patterns can be well interpreted by the dynamics of the endogenous bursting pattern of isolated neuron, which is acquired by the fast-slow dissection method, combined with the inhibitory coupling current. For an isolated neuron, when a negative impulsive current with suitable strength is applied at different phases of the bursting, multiple different bursting patterns can be induced. For a neuron in the motif, the inhibitory coupling current, of which the application time and strength is modulated by time delay and coupling strength, can cause single or multiple synchronous firing patterns like the negative impulsive current when time delay and coupling strength is suitable. The difference compared to the previously reported multiple synchronous behaviors that appear at time delays wider than a period of the endogenous firing is discussed. The results present novel examples of synchronous behaviors in the neuronal network with inhibitory synapses and provide a reasonable explanation. PMID:26394224

  8. Nonsputtering impulse magnetron discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Khodachenko, G. V.; Mozgrin, D. V.; Fetisov, I. K.; Stepanova, T. V.

    2012-01-15

    Experiments with quasi-steady high-current discharges in crossed E Multiplication-Sign B fields in various gases (Ar, N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and SF{sub 6}) and gas mixtures (Ar/SF{sub 6} and Ar/O{sub 2}) at pressures from 10{sup -3} to 5 Torr in discharge systems with different configurations of electric and magnetic fields revealed a specific type of stable low-voltage discharge that does not transform into an arc. This type of discharge came to be known as a high-current diffuse discharge and, later, a nonsputtering impulse magnetron discharge. This paper presents results from experimental studies of the plasma parameters (the electron temperature, the plasma density, and the temperature of ions and atoms of the plasma-forming gas) of a high-current low-pressure diffuse discharge in crossed E Multiplication-Sign B fields.

  9. Synchronization in multistatic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubrink, H. G.

    1993-08-01

    This report gives a summary of multistatic radar principles and synchronization methods. Different methods are described using direct and indirect synchronization. The report also presents a general review of synchronization methods for the future. Two LORAN C receivers have been analyzed for use as local reference oscillators in multistatic radar.

  10. The Recovery of Weak Impulsive Signals Based on Stochastic Resonance and Moving Least Squares Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kuosheng.; Xu, Guanghua.; Liang, Lin.; Tao, Tangfei.; Gu, Fengshou.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a stochastic resonance (SR)-based method for recovering weak impulsive signals is developed for quantitative diagnosis of faults in rotating machinery. It was shown in theory that weak impulsive signals follow the mechanism of SR, but the SR produces a nonlinear distortion of the shape of the impulsive signal. To eliminate the distortion a moving least squares fitting method is introduced to reconstruct the signal from the output of the SR process. This proposed method is verified by comparing its detection results with that of a morphological filter based on both simulated and experimental signals. The experimental results show that the background noise is suppressed effectively and the key features of impulsive signals are reconstructed with a good degree of accuracy, which leads to an accurate diagnosis of faults in roller bearings in a run-to failure test. PMID:25076220

  11. Impulse generated during unsteady maneuvering of swimming fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, Brenden P.; Techet, Alexandra H.

    2007-11-01

    The relationship between the maneuvering kinematics of a Giant Danio ( Danio aequipinnatus) and the resulting vortical wake is investigated for a rapid, ‘C’-start maneuver using fully time-resolved (500 Hz) particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV illuminates the two distinct vortices formed during the turn. The fish body rotation is facilitated by the initial, or “maneuvering” vortex formation, and the final fish velocity is augmented by the strength of the second, “propulsive” vortex. Results confirm that the axisymmetric vortex ring model is reasonable to use in calculating the hydrodynamic impulse acting on the fish. The total linear momentum change of the fish from its initial swimming trajectory to its final swimming trajectory is balanced by the vector sum of the impulses of both vortex rings. The timing of vortex formation is uniquely synchronized with the fish motion, and the choreography of the maneuver is addressed in the context of the resulting hydrodynamic forces.

  12. Impulse generated during unsteady maneuvering of swimming fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, Brenden P.; Techet, Alexandra H.

    The relationship between the maneuvering kinematics of a Giant Danio (Danio aequipinnatus) and the resulting vortical wake is investigated for a rapid, 'C'-start maneuver using fully time-resolved (500 Hz) particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV illuminates the two distinct vortices formed during the turn. The fish body rotation is facilitated by the initial, or "maneuvering" vortex formation, and the final fish velocity is augmented by the strength of the second, "propulsive" vortex. Results confirm that the axisymmetric vortex ring model is reasonable to use in calculating the hydrodynamic impulse acting on the fish. The total linear momentum change of the fish from its initial swimming trajectory to its final swimming trajectory is balanced by the vector sum of the impulses of both vortex rings. The timing of vortex formation is uniquely synchronized with the fish motion, and the choreography of the maneuver is addressed in the context of the resulting hydrodynamic forces.

  13. Synchronization of chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pecora, Louis M.; Carroll, Thomas L.

    2015-09-15

    We review some of the history and early work in the area of synchronization in chaotic systems. We start with our own discovery of the phenomenon, but go on to establish the historical timeline of this topic back to the earliest known paper. The topic of synchronization of chaotic systems has always been intriguing, since chaotic systems are known to resist synchronization because of their positive Lyapunov exponents. The convergence of the two systems to identical trajectories is a surprise. We show how people originally thought about this process and how the concept of synchronization changed over the years to a more geometric view using synchronization manifolds. We also show that building synchronizing systems leads naturally to engineering more complex systems whose constituents are chaotic, but which can be tuned to output various chaotic signals. We finally end up at a topic that is still in very active exploration today and that is synchronization of dynamical systems in networks of oscillators.

  14. The Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression.

    PubMed

    Blair, Robert J R

    2016-02-01

    This selective review provides a model of the neurobiology of impulsive aggression from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. It is argued that prototypical cases of impulsive aggression, those associated with anger, involve the recruitment of the acute threat response system structures; that is, the amygdala, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. It is argued that whether the recruitment of these structures results in impulsive aggression or not reflects the functional roles of ventromedial frontal cortex and dorsomedial frontal and anterior insula cortex in response selection. It is also argued that impulsive aggression may occur because of impaired decision making. The aggression may not be accompanied by anger, but it will reflect disrupted evaluation of the rewards/benefits of the action.

  15. The Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This selective review provides a model of the neurobiology of impulsive aggression from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. It is argued that prototypical cases of impulsive aggression, those associated with anger, involve the recruitment of the acute threat response system structures; that is, the amygdala, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. It is argued that whether the recruitment of these structures results in impulsive aggression or not reflects the functional roles of ventromedial frontal cortex and dorsomedial frontal and anterior insula cortex in response selection. It is also argued that impulsive aggression may occur because of impaired decision making. The aggression may not be accompanied by anger, but it will reflect disrupted evaluation of the rewards/benefits of the action. PMID:26465707

  16. Impulsive control for fast nanopositioning.

    PubMed

    Tuma, Tomas; Sebastian, Abu; Häberle, Walter; Lygeros, John; Pantazi, Angeliki

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we present a non-linear control scheme for high-speed nanopositioning based on impulsive control. Unlike in the case of a linear feedback controller, the controller states are altered in a discontinuous manner at specific instances in time. Using this technique, it is possible to simultaneously achieve good tracking performance, disturbance rejection and tolerance to measurement noise. Impulsive control is demonstrated experimentally on an atomic force microscope. A significant improvement in tracking performance is demonstrated.

  17. Impulsivity, risk taking, and timing.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Ana A; Odum, Amy L

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the relations among measures of impulsivity and timing. Impulsivity was assessed using delay and probability discounting, and self-report impulsivity (as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; BIS-11). Timing was assessed using temporal perception as measured on a temporal bisection task and time perspective (as measured by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory). One hundred and forty three college students completed these measures in a computer laboratory. The degree of delay discounting was positively correlated with the mean and range of the temporal bisection procedure. The degree of delay and probability discounting were also positively correlated. Self-reported motor impulsiveness on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with present hedonism and negatively correlated with future orientation on the ZTPI. Self-reported non-planning on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with fatalism on the ZTPI. These results show that people who overestimate the passage of time (perceive time as passing more quickly) hold less value in delayed rewards. They also confirm previous results regarding the relation between delay and probability discounting, as well as highlight similarities in self-report measures of impulsivity and time perspective.

  18. Impulsivity, Risk Taking, and Timing

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Ana A.; Odum, Amy. L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relations among measures of impulsivity and timing. Impulsivity was assessed using delay and probability discounting, and self-report impulsivity (as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; BIS-11). Timing was assessed using temporal perception as measured on a temporal bisection task and time perspective (as measured by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory). One hundred and forty three college students completed these measures in a computer laboratory. The degree of delay discounting was positively correlated with the mean and range of the temporal bisection procedure. The degree of delay and probability discounting were also positively correlated. Self-reported Motor impulsiveness on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with Present Hedonism and negatively correlated with Future orientation on the ZTPI. Self-reported Non-Planning on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with Fatalism on the ZTPI. These results show that people who overestimate the passage of time (perceive time as passing more quickly) hold less value in delayed rewards. They also confirm previous results regarding the relation between delay and probability discounting, as well as highlight similarities in self-report measures of impulsivity and time perspective. PMID:22542458

  19. Dopamine-agonists and impulsivity in Parkinson's disease: impulsive choices vs. impulsive actions.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Francesca; Ko, Ji Hyun; Miyasaki, Janis; Lang, Anthony E; Houle, Sylvain; Valzania, Franco; Ray, Nicola J; Strafella, Antonio P

    2014-06-01

    The control of impulse behavior is a multidimensional concept subdivided into separate subcomponents, which are thought to represent different underlying mechanisms due to either disinhibitory processes or poor decision-making. In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), dopamine-agonist (DA) therapy has been associated with increased impulsive behavior. However, the relationship among these different components in the disease and the role of DA is not well understood. In this imaging study, we investigated in PD patients the effects of DA medication on patterns of brain activation during tasks testing impulsive choices and actions. Following overnight withdrawal of antiparkinsonian medication, PD patients were studied with a H2 ((15)) O PET before and after administration of DA (1 mg of pramipexole), while they were performing the delay discounting task (DDT) and the GoNoGo Task (GNG). We observed that pramipexole augmented impulsivity during DDT, depending on reward magnitude and activated the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex and deactivated ventral striatum. In contrast, the effect of pramipexole during the GNG task was not significant on behavioral performance and involved different areas (i.e., lateral prefrontal cortex). A voxel-based correlation analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between the discounting value (k) and the activation of medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate suggesting that more impulsive patients had less activation in those cortical areas. Here we report how these different subcomponents of inhibition/impulsivity are differentially sensitive to DA treatment with pramipexole influencing mainly the neural network underlying impulsive choices but not impulsive action.

  20. Synchronous Energy Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The synchronous technology requirements for large space power systems are summarized. A variety of technology areas including photovoltaics, thermal management, and energy storage, and power management are addressed.

  1. Synchronization of genetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianshou; Zhang, Jiajun; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Chen, Luonan

    2008-09-01

    Synchronization of genetic or cellular oscillators is a central topic in understanding the rhythmicity of living organisms at both molecular and cellular levels. Here, we show how a collective rhythm across a population of genetic oscillators through synchronization-induced intercellular communication is achieved, and how an ensemble of independent genetic oscillators is synchronized by a common noisy signaling molecule. Our main purpose is to elucidate various synchronization mechanisms from the viewpoint of dynamics, by investigating the effects of various biologically plausible couplings, several kinds of noise, and external stimuli. To have a comprehensive understanding on the synchronization of genetic oscillators, we consider three classes of genetic oscillators: smooth oscillators (exhibiting sine-like oscillations), relaxation oscillators (displaying jump dynamics), and stochastic oscillators (noise-induced oscillation). For every class, we further study two cases: with intercellular communication (including phase-attractive and repulsive coupling) and without communication between cells. We find that an ensemble of smooth oscillators has different synchronization phenomena from those in the case of relaxation oscillators, where noise plays a different but key role in synchronization. To show differences in synchronization between them, we make comparisons in many aspects. We also show that a population of genetic stochastic oscillators have their own synchronization mechanisms. In addition, we present interesting phenomena, e.g., for relaxation-type stochastic oscillators coupled to a quorum-sensing mechanism, different noise intensities can induce different periodic motions (i.e., inhomogeneous limit cycles).

  2. Carrier synchronization techniques for unbalanced QPSK signals. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, W. R.; Lindsey, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    This paper develops a theory for assessing the tracking performance and designing carrier synchronization loops which are to be matched to an unbalanced QPSK signal design. It is assumed that the power split and the I and Q channel data rates are arbitrary. Bit synchronization is assumed to be unavailable for both carrier reconstruction techniques which have been suggested via MAP estimation theory. Numerical results are presented.

  3. EEG synchronization and migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Angelini, Leonardo; Pellicoro, Mario; Hu, Kun; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2004-03-01

    We investigate phase synchronization in EEG recordings from migraine patients. We use the analytic signal technique, based on the Hilbert transform, and find that migraine brains are characterized by enhanced alpha band phase synchronization in presence of visual stimuli. Our findings show that migraine patients have an overactive regulatory mechanism that renders them more sensitive to external stimuli.

  4. Synchronization On Hanoi Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shanshan; Boettcher, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Synchronization of coupled oscillators has been intensively studied on a variety of structures. It is believed that the dynamics is deeply associated with its structure. To explore this relation, we study the synchronization of coupled oscillators on Hanoi networks. We analyze the evolution of coupled units over time, and characterized the convergence to the global synchronized state. For this state, the results show a close connection to the spectrum of connectivity matrix. Inspired by this connection, we try to show a dynamical pattern that describes the entire synchronization process from the onset to the final state. This may unveil the unique hierarchical structure of these self-similar Hanoi networks. Our goal is to map the dynamics to the spectrum of the connectivity matrix that encodes significant information about the structure of the underlying system. This exploration may have implications on designing networks that synchronizes coupled units efficiently. Supported through NSF Grant DMR-1207431.

  5. Quantum-phase synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiderer, Lukas J.; Kuś, Marek; Braun, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    We study mechanisms that allow one to synchronize the quantum phase of two qubits relative to a fixed basis. Starting from one qubit in a fixed reference state and the other in an unknown state, we find that, contrary to the impossibility of perfect quantum cloning, the quantum phase can be synchronized perfectly through a joined unitary operation. When both qubits are initially in a pure unknown state, perfect quantum-phase synchronization through unitary operations becomes impossible. In this situation we determine the maximum average quantum-phase synchronization fidelity and the distribution of relative phases and fidelities, and we identify optimal quantum circuits that achieve this maximum fidelity. A subset of these optimal quantum circuits enable perfect quantum-phase synchronization for a class of unknown initial states restricted to the equatorial plane of the Bloch sphere.

  6. Trait Impulsivity and Newlyweds' Marital Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Lavner, Justin A; Lamkin, Joanna; Miller, Joshua D

    2017-02-01

    Despite the relationship of impulsivity with interpersonal dysfunction, including romantic relationship dysfunction, surprisingly little research has examined the degree to which impulsivity predicts how marriages unfold over time. The current study used data from 172 newlywed couples to examine spouses' impulsivity in relation to their 4-year trajectories of marital satisfaction, marital problems, relationship commitment, and verbal aggression, as well as their 10-year divorce rates. Hierarchical linear modeling indicated that husbands' and wives' impulsivity predicted their own intercepts of marital satisfaction and marital problems, reflecting lower levels of satisfaction and higher levels of problems. Wives' impulsivity also predicted their relationship commitment and their verbal aggression intercepts. No cross-spouse effects or effects on slopes were found, and impulsivity did not predict 10-year divorce rates. These findings indicate that the relationship distress associated with impulsivity begins early in marriage, and they suggest a need for further research on the processes by which impulsivity undermines marital quality.

  7. Children's Help Seeking and Impulsivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puustinen, Minna; Kokkonen, Marja; Tolvanen, Asko; Pulkkinen, Lea

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between students' (100 children aged 8 to 12) help-seeking behavior and impulsivity. Help-seeking behavior was evaluated using a naturalistic experimental paradigm in which children were placed in a problem-solving situation and had the opportunity to seek help from the experimenter, if…

  8. Demonstrating Sound Impulses in Pipes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymer, M. G.; Micklavzina, Stan

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple, direct method to demonstrate the effects of the boundary conditions on sound impulse reflections in pipes. A graphical display of the results can be made using a pipe, cork, small hammer, microphone, and fast recording electronics. Explains the principles involved. (LZ)

  9. Commentary on Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Goldstein continues the laudable practice of reprinting articles of historical significance in the history of ADHD with this selective reprinting of material from the original article by Maurice Laufer, Eric Denhoff, and Gerald Solomons on hyperkinetic impulsive disorder (HID) in children. This article on HID is among the first articles to…

  10. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-17

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2{pi} in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step {delta}t. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/{delta}t is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is ''blue shifted'' relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval {delta}t. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  11. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-01

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2π in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step Δt. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/Δt is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is "blue shifted" relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval Δt. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  12. Baseline impulsive choice predicts the effects of nicotine and nicotine withdrawal on impulsivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kayir, Hakan; Semenova, Svetlana; Markou, Athina

    2014-01-03

    Impulsive choice, a form of impulsivity, is associated with tobacco smoking in humans. Trait impulsivity may be a vulnerability factor for smoking, or smoking may lead to impulsive behaviors. We investigated the effects of 14-day nicotine exposure (6.32mg/kg/day base, subcutaneous minipumps) and spontaneous nicotine withdrawal on impulsive choice in low impulsive (LI) and high impulsive (HI) rats. Impulsive choice was measured in the delayed reward task in which rats choose between a small immediate reward and a large delayed reward. HI and LI rats were selected from the highest and lowest quartiles of the group before exposure to nicotine. In non-selected rats, nicotine or nicotine withdrawal had no effect on impulsive choice. In LI rats, chronic nicotine exposure decreased preference for the large reward with larger effects at longer delays, indicating increased impulsive choice. Impulsive choices for the smaller immediate rewards continued to increase during nicotine withdrawal in LI rats. In HI rats, nicotine exposure and nicotine withdrawal had no effect on impulsive choice, although there was a tendency for decreased preference for the large reward at short delays. These results indicate that nicotine- and nicotine withdrawal-induced increases in impulsive choice depend on trait impulsivity with more pronounced increases in impulsive choice in LI compared to HI subjects. Increased impulsivity during nicotine exposure may strengthen the addictive properties of nicotine and contribute to compulsive nicotine use.

  13. Nonlocal chaotic phase synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Meng; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Hu, Gang; Peng, Xi-Hong

    2000-09-01

    A novel synchronization behavior, nonlocal chaotic phase synchronization, is investigated. For two coupled Rossler oscillators with only one forced by an injected periodic signal, the phase of the unforced oscillator can be locked to the phase of the periodic signal while the forced one is well unlocked by the signal; in a chain of coupled chaotic oscillators with nearest coupling, the phase of an oscillator (or a cluster) can be locked to another nonneighbor one. Moreover, the mechanism underlying the transition to nonlocal synchronization is discussed in detail.

  14. Adolescent Impulsivity: Findings from a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Martial

    2005-01-01

    Impulsivity is central to several psychopathological states in adolescence. However, there is little consensus concerning the definition of impulsivity and its core dimensions. In response to this lack of consensus, Whiteside and Lynam (2001, "Pers. Individ. Differ." 30, 669-689) have developed the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale, which is able to…

  15. Characteristics of Impulsive Suicide Attempts and Attempters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Thomas R.; Swann, Alan C.; Powell, Kenneth E.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; O'Carroll, Patrick W.

    2002-01-01

    Examined impulsive suicide attempts within a population-based, case-control study of nearly lethal suicide attempts among adolescents and young adults. Impulsive attempts were more likely among those who had been in a physical fight and less likely among those who were depressed. Findings suggest inadequate control of aggressive impulses as a…

  16. Photoacoustic image reconstruction from ultrasound post-beamformed B-mode image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haichong K.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun Jae; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-03-01

    A requirement to reconstruct photoacoustic (PA) image is to have a synchronized channel data acquisition with laser firing. Unfortunately, most clinical ultrasound (US) systems don't offer an interface to obtain synchronized channel data. To broaden the impact of clinical PA imaging, we propose a PA image reconstruction algorithm utilizing US B-mode image, which is readily available from clinical scanners. US B-mode image involves a series of signal processing including beamforming, followed by envelope detection, and end with log compression. Yet, it will be defocused when PA signals are input due to incorrect delay function. Our approach is to reverse the order of image processing steps and recover the original US post-beamformed radio-frequency (RF) data, in which a synthetic aperture based PA rebeamforming algorithm can be further applied. Taking B-mode image as the input, we firstly recovered US postbeamformed RF data by applying log decompression and convoluting an acoustic impulse response to combine carrier frequency information. Then, the US post-beamformed RF data is utilized as pre-beamformed RF data for the adaptive PA beamforming algorithm, and the new delay function is applied by taking into account that the focus depth in US beamforming is at the half depth of the PA case. The feasibility of the proposed method was validated through simulation, and was experimentally demonstrated using an acoustic point source. The point source was successfully beamformed from a US B-mode image, and the full with at the half maximum of the point improved 3.97 times. Comparing this result to the ground-truth reconstruction using channel data, the FWHM was slightly degraded with 1.28 times caused by information loss during envelope detection and convolution of the RF information.

  17. Synchronization in complex networks

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, A.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Moreno, Y.; Zhou, C.; Kurths, J.

    2007-12-12

    Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are in the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understand synchronization phenomena in natural systems take now advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also overview the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying pattern of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

  18. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition.

  19. Impulse generation by detonation tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Marcia Ann

    Impulse generation with gaseous detonation requires conversion of chemical energy into mechanical energy. This conversion process is well understood in rocket engines where the high pressure combustion products expand through a nozzle generating high velocity exhaust gases. The propulsion community is now focusing on advanced concepts that utilize non-traditional forms of combustion like detonation. Such a device is called a pulse detonation engine in which laboratory tests have proven that thrust can be achieved through continuous cyclic operation. Because of poor performance of straight detonation tubes compared to conventional propulsion systems and the success of using nozzles on rocket engines, the effect of nozzles on detonation tubes is being investigated. Although previous studies of detonation tube nozzles have suggested substantial benefits, up to now there has been no systematic investigations over a range of operating conditions and nozzle configurations. As a result, no models predicting the impulse when nozzles are used exist. This lack of data has severely limited the development and evaluation of models and simulations of nozzles on pulse detonation engines. The first experimental investigation measuring impulse by gaseous detonation in plain tubes and tubes with nozzles operating in varying environment pressures is presented. Converging, diverging, and converging-diverging nozzles were tested to determine the effect of divergence angle, nozzle length, and volumetric fill fraction on impulse. The largest increases in specific impulse, 72% at an environment pressure of 100 kPa and 43% at an environment pressure of 1.4 kPa, were measured with the largest diverging nozzle tested that had a 12° half angle and was 0.6 m long. Two regimes of nozzle operation that depend on the environment pressure are responsible for these increases and were first observed from these data. To augment this experimental investigation, all data in the literature regarding

  20. Emotion Regulation and Impulsivity in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Liana R.N.; Grant, Jon E.; Odlaug, Brian L.

    2012-01-01

    Past research has linked both emotion regulation and impulsivity with the development and maintenance of addictions. However, no research has investigated the relationship between emotion regulation and impulsivity within young adults. In the present study, we analyzed 194 young adults (27.8% female; 21.3 ± 3.32 years old; 91.8% single; 85.1% Caucasian), grouping them as low, average, or high emotionally dysregulated, and compared self-reported impulsivity, impulsive behaviors (such as alcohol and substance use and gambling) and cognitive impulsivity. We hypothesized that those with high levels of emotion dysregulation would score higher on self-reported and cognitive impulsivity, and report more impulsive behaviors. Analysis indicated that compared to low, the high emotion dysregulation group scored significantly higher on two self-report measures of impulsivity, harm avoidance, and cognitive reasoning. No significant differences were found between groups in impulsive behaviors and cognitive impulsivity. Overall, this study highlights the relationship between emotion dysregulation and impulsivity, suggesting that emotion regulation may be an important factor to consider when assessing individuals at a higher risk for developing an addiction. PMID:22385661

  1. A new rolling bearing fault diagnosis method based on GFT impulse component extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Lu; Yu, Dejie; Yang, Hanjian

    2016-12-01

    Periodic impulses are vital indicators of rolling bearing faults. The extraction of impulse components from rolling bearing vibration signals is of great importance for fault diagnosis. In this paper, vibration signals are taken as the path graph signals in a manifold perspective, and the Graph Fourier Transform (GFT) of vibration signals are investigated from the graph spectrum domain, which are both introduced into the vibration signal analysis. To extract the impulse components efficiently, a new adjacency weight matrix is defined, and then the GFT of the impulse component and harmonic component in the rolling bearing vibration signals are analyzed. Furthermore, as the GFT graph spectrum of the impulse component is mainly concentrated in the high-order region, a new rolling bearing fault diagnosis method based on GFT impulse component extraction is proposed. In the proposed method, the GFT of a vibration signal is firstly performed, and its graph spectrum coefficients in the high-order region are extracted to reconstruct different impulse components. Next, the Hilbert envelope spectra of these impulse components are calculated, and the envelope spectrum values at the fault characteristic frequency are arranged in order. Furthermore, the envelope spectrum with the maximum value at the fault characteristic frequency is selected as the final result, from which the rolling bearing fault can be diagnosed. Finally, an index KR, which is the product of the kurtosis and Hilbert envelope spectrum fault feature ratio of the extracted impulse component, is put forward to measure the performance of the proposed method. Simulations and experiments are utilized to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Hydrodynamic synchronization of flagellar oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    In this review, we highlight the physics of synchronization in collections of beating cilia and flagella. We survey the nonlinear dynamics of synchronization in collections of noisy oscillators. This framework is applied to flagellar synchronization by hydrodynamic interactions. The time-reversibility of hydrodynamics at low Reynolds numbers requires swimming strokes that break time-reversal symmetry to facilitate hydrodynamic synchronization. We discuss different physical mechanisms for flagellar synchronization, which break this symmetry in different ways.

  3. A Neurogenetic Approach to Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Congdon, Eliza; Canli, Turhan

    2008-01-01

    Impulsivity is a complex and multidimensional trait that is of interest to both personality psychologists and to clinicians. For investigators seeking the biological basis of personality traits, the use of neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revolutionized personality psychology in less than a decade. Now, another revolution is under way, and it originates from molecular biology. Specifically, new findings in molecular genetics, the detailed mapping and the study of the function of genes, have shown that individual differences in personality traits can be related to individual differences within specific genes. In this article, we will review the current state of the field with respect to the neural and genetic basis of trait impulsivity. PMID:19012655

  4. Free segmentation in rendered 3D images through synthetic impulse response in integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Corral, M.; Llavador, A.; Sánchez-Ortiga, E.; Saavedra, G.; Javidi, B.

    2016-06-01

    Integral Imaging is a technique that has the capability of providing not only the spatial, but also the angular information of three-dimensional (3D) scenes. Some important applications are the 3D display and digital post-processing as for example, depth-reconstruction from integral images. In this contribution we propose a new reconstruction method that takes into account the integral image and a simplified version of the impulse response function (IRF) of the integral imaging (InI) system to perform a two-dimensional (2D) deconvolution. The IRF of an InI system has a periodic structure that depends directly on the axial position of the object. Considering different periods of the IRFs we recover by deconvolution the depth information of the 3D scene. An advantage of our method is that it is possible to obtain nonconventional reconstructions by considering alternative synthetic impulse responses. Our experiments show the feasibility of the proposed method.

  5. Optimistic barrier synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    Barrier synchronization is fundamental operation in parallel computation. In many contexts, at the point a processor enters a barrier it knows that it has already processed all the work required of it prior to synchronization. The alternative case, when a processor cannot enter a barrier with the assurance that it has already performed all the necessary pre-synchronization computation, is treated. The problem arises when the number of pre-sychronization messages to be received by a processor is unkown, for example, in a parallel discrete simulation or any other computation that is largely driven by an unpredictable exchange of messages. We describe an optimistic O(log sup 2 P) barrier algorithm for such problems, study its performance on a large-scale parallel system, and consider extensions to general associative reductions as well as associative parallel prefix computations.

  6. Facts and reflections on thalamocortical reverberation of impulses.

    PubMed

    Narikashvili, S P

    1976-01-01

    Experiments on cats, either unanesthetized or anesthetized with various doses of pentobarbital, showed that the cortical rhythmic after-discharge ("slow after-activity"), which has been regarded as a manifestation of reverberation of impulses in thalamocortical circuits [17], consists of a burst of spontaneous "spindles" evoked by stimulation. This conclusion is supported by the following facts: Spontaneous "spindles" and the rhythmic after-discharge respond absolutely identically (disappear) to activation of the EEG and deepening of pentobarbital anesthesia. The absence of thalamocortical reverberation is also indicated by the preservation of a rhythmic after-discharge (to clicks), synchronous with the cortex, in the thalamic relay nucleus (the medial geniculate body) after cooling or after removal of its projection zone.

  7. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery. PMID:27695171

  8. Impulsive behavior and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Ohmura, Yu; Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Higher impulsivity is thought to be a risk factor for drug addiction, criminal involvement, and suicide. Excessive levels of impulsivity are often observed in several psychiatric disorders including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are involved in impulsive behavior. Here, we introduce recent advances in this field and describe the role of the following nAChR-related brain mechanisms in modulating impulsive behavior: dopamine release in the ventral striatum; α4β2 nAChRs in the infralimbic cortex, which is a ventral part of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); and dopamine release in the mPFC. We also suggest several potential therapeutic drugs to address these mechanisms in impulsivity-related disorders and explore future directions to further elucidate the roles of central nAChRs in impulsive behavior.

  9. Impulsivity and sexual assault in college men.

    PubMed

    Mouilso, Emily R; Calhoun, Karen S; Rosenbloom, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Although impulsivity has been consistently linked to perpetration of sexual aggression, results lack clarity because they do not account for the substantial heterogeneity associated with the construct. The UPPS-P model (Lynam, Smith, Whiteside, & Cyders, 2006), which was proposed to clarify the multidimensional nature of impulsivity, has yet to be applied to sexual aggression. We measured UPPS-P Impulsivity in a sample of male college students who also self-reported on perpetration of sexual aggression. As predicted, impulsivity distinguished perpetrators from nonperpetrators. Perpetrators scored higher than non-perpetrators on Negative Urgency, Positive Urgency, and lack of Premeditation. Results suggest that the impulsivity traits most relevant to sexual aggression are the tendency to act impulsively when experiencing intense emotions (Positive and Negative Urgency) and lack of forethought and planning (lack of Premeditation).

  10. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  11. Modeling of impulsive propellant reorientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.; Patag, Alfredo E.; Chato, David J.

    1988-01-01

    The impulsive propellant reorientation process is modeled using the (Energy Calculations for Liquid Propellants in a Space Environment (ECLIPSE) code. A brief description of the process and the computational model is presented. Code validation is documented via comparison to experimentally derived data for small scale tanks. Predictions of reorientation performance are presented for two tanks designed for use in flight experiments and for a proposed full scale OTV tank. A new dimensionless parameter is developed to correlate reorientation performance in geometrically similar tanks. Its success is demonstrated.

  12. Effect of cervicolabyrinthine impulsation on the spinal reflex apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarotskiy, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    In view of the fact that the convergence effect of vestibular impulsation may both stimulate and inhibit intra and intersystemic coordination of physiological processes, an attempt was made to define the physiological effect on the spinal reflex apparatus of the convergence of cervicolabyrinthine impulsation on a model of the unconditioned motor reflex as a mechanism of the common final pathway conditioning the formation and realization of a focused beneficial result of human motor activities. More than 100 persons subjected to rolling effect and angular acceleration during complexly coordinated muscular loading were divided according to typical variants of the functional structure of the patella reflex in an experiment requiring 30 rapid counterclockwise head revolutions at 2/sec with synchronous recording of a 20 item series of patella reflex acts. A knee jerk coefficient was used in calculations. In 85 percent of the cases 2 patellar reflexograms show typical braking and release of knee reflex and 1 shows an extreme local variant. The diagnostic and prognostic value of these tests is suggested for determining adaptive possibilities of functional systems in respect to acceleration and proprioceptive stimuli.

  13. Impaired Decisional Impulsivity in Pathological Videogamers

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Michael A.; Worbe, Yulia; Bolton, Sorcha; Harrison, Neil A.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Voon, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathological gaming is an emerging and poorly understood problem. Impulsivity is commonly impaired in disorders of behavioural and substance addiction, hence we sought to systematically investigate the different subtypes of decisional and motor impulsivity in a well-defined pathological gaming cohort. Methods Fifty-two pathological gaming subjects and age-, gender- and IQ-matched healthy volunteers were tested on decisional impulsivity (Information Sampling Task testing reflection impulsivity and delay discounting questionnaire testing impulsive choice), and motor impulsivity (Stop Signal Task testing motor response inhibition, and the premature responding task). We used stringent diagnostic criteria highlighting functional impairment. Results In the Information Sampling Task, pathological gaming participants sampled less evidence prior to making a decision and scored fewer points compared with healthy volunteers. Gaming severity was also negatively correlated with evidence gathered and positively correlated with sampling error and points acquired. In the delay discounting task, pathological gamers made more impulsive choices, preferring smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards. Pathological gamers made more premature responses related to comorbid nicotine use. Greater number of hours played also correlated with a Motivational Index. Greater frequency of role playing games was associated with impaired motor response inhibition and strategy games with faster Go reaction time. Conclusions We show that pathological gaming is associated with impaired decisional impulsivity with negative consequences in task performance. Decisional impulsivity may be a potential target in therapeutic management. PMID:24146789

  14. The annoyance of impulsive helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karamcheti, K.

    1981-01-01

    A total of 96 impulsive and non-impulsive sounds were rated for annoyance by 10 subjects. The signals had the same amplitude spectrum with a maximum frequency of 4.75 kHz. By changing the phase of the spectral components different levels of impulsivity were obtained. The signals had coefficients of impulsivity of 10,8, 7,9, and -0.2 respectively. Further, signals had intensity levels 89 and 95 dBA, pulse repetition rates 10 and 20 Hz, and half the signals had pink noise added at a level 12 dBA lower than the level of the sound. The significant results were: The four females and six male subjects rated the impulsive sounds respectively 3.7 dB less annoying and 2.6 dB more annoying than the non-impulsive sounds. Overall, impulsivity had no effect. The hish pulse repetition rate increased annoyance by 2.2 dB. Addition of pink noise increased annoyance of the non-impulsive sounds 1.2 dB, but decreased the annoyance of the impulsive sounds 0.5 dB.

  15. Impulsiveness without discounting: the ecological rationality hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, David W.; Kerr, Benjamin; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2004-01-01

    Observed animal impulsiveness challenges ideas from foraging theory about the fitness value of food rewards, and may play a role in important behavioural phenomena such as cooperation and addiction. Behavioural ecologists usually invoke temporal discounting to explain the evolution of animal impulsiveness. According to the discounting hypothesis, delay reduces the fitness value of the delayed food. We develop an alternative model for the evolution of impulsiveness that does not require discounting. We show that impulsive or short-sighted rules can maximize long-term rates of food intake. The advantages of impulsive rules come from two sources. First, naturally occurring choices have a foreground-background structure that reduces the long-term cost of impulsiveness. Second, impulsive rules have a discrimination advantage because they tend to compare smaller quantities. Discounting contributes little to this result. Although we find that impulsive rules are optimal in a simple foreground-background choice situation in the absence of discounting, in contrast we do not find comparable impulsiveness in binary choice situations even when there is strong discounting. PMID:15590596

  16. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1997-02-04

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition. 14 figs.

  17. Synchronized time stamp support

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalkowski, J.

    1994-02-16

    New software has been added to IOC core to maintain time stamps. The new software has the ability to maintain time stamps over all IOCs on a network. The purpose of this paper is to explain how EPICS will synchronize the time stamps. In addition, this paper will explain how to configure and use the new EPICS time stamp support software.

  18. Implementing the Synchronous Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Jan A.

    2010-01-01

    This commentary describes an action research project conducted by selected staff at the Northern Valley Regional High School District in New Jersey. The project focused on the idea of developing a synchronous classroom to provide world language learning opportunities to students. Relevant research is provided as are ideas regarding logistics and…

  19. A multifactorial and integrative approach to impulsivity in neuropsychology: insights from the UPPS model of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Lucien; Billieux, Joël; Gagnon, Jean; Van der Linden, Martial

    2017-04-11

    Risky and excessive behaviors, such as aggressive and compulsive behaviors, are frequently described in patients with brain damage and have dramatic psychosocial consequences. Although there is strong evidence that impulsivity constitutes a key factor at play in these behaviors, the literature about impulsivity in neuropsychology is to date scarce. In addition, examining and understanding these problematic behaviors requires the assumption that impulsivity is a multidimensional construct. Consequently, this article aims at shedding light on frequent risky and excessive behaviors in patients with brain damage by focusing on a unified, comprehensive, and well-validated model, namely, the UPPS model of impulsivity. This model considers impulsivity as a multidimensional construct that includes four facets: urgency, (lack of) premeditation, (lack of) perseverance, and sensation seeking. Furthermore, we discuss the psychological mechanisms underlying the dimensions of impulsivity, as well as the laboratory tasks designed to assess each mechanism and their neural bases. We then present a scale specifically designed to assess these four dimensions of impulsivity in patients with brain damage and examine the data regarding this multidimensional approach to impulsivity in neuropsychology. This review supports the need to adopt a multifactorial and integrative approach toward impulsive behaviors, and the model presented provides a valuable rationale to disentangle the nature of brain systems and mechanisms underlying impulsive behaviors in patients with brain damage. It may also foster further relevant research in the field of impulsivity and improve assessment and rehabilitation of impulsive behaviors in clinical settings.

  20. Impulsivity and the Sexes: Measurement and Structural Invariance of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyders, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Before it is possible to test whether men and women differ in impulsivity, it is necessary to evaluate whether impulsivity measures are invariant across sex. The UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale (negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking, with added subscale of positive urgency) is one measure of five…

  1. Impulsive model for reactive collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marron, M. T.; Bernstein, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    A simple classical mechanical model of the reactive scattering of a structureless atom A and a quasi-diatomic BC is developed which takes full advantage of energy, linear and angular momentum conservation relations but introduces a minimum of further assumptions. These are as follows: (1) the vibrational degree of freedom of the reactant (BC) and product (AB) molecules is suppressed, so the change in vibrational energy is simply a parameter; (2) straight-line trajectories are assumed outside of a reaction shell; (3) within this zone, momentum transfer occurs impulsively (essentially instantaneously) following mass transfer; (4) the impulse, which may be either positive or negative, is directed along the BC axis, which may, however, assume all orientations with respect to the incident relative velocity. The model yields differential and total cross sections and product rotational energy distributions for a given collision exoergicity Q, or for any known distribution over Q. Numerical results are presented for several prototype reactions whose dynamics have been well-studied.

  2. Reliability and Validity of Measures of Impulsive Choice and Impulsive Action in Smokers Trying to Quit

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Danielle E.; Bold, Krysten W.; Minami, Haruka; Yeh, Vivian M.; Rutten, Emily; Nadkarni, Shruti G.; Chapman, Gretchen B.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional research suggests that smokers are more impulsive than are non-smokers, but few studies have examined relations between impulsiveness and later success in quitting smoking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and predictive validity of facets of impulsiveness in adult smokers trying to quit. Baseline behavioral measures of impulsive choice (assessed with a delay discounting task) and impulsive action (assessed with a measure of behavioral disinhibition) were used as predictors of smoking cessation success over 12 weeks. The sample included 116 adult (18 years old or older) daily smokers from central New Jersey. Impulsive choice, impulsive action, and self-reported impulsiveness were not significantly related to one another at baseline. Impulsive choice had high test-retest reliability from pre- to post-quit, whereas impulsive action was less stable. Test-retest reliability from pre-quit to three weeks post-quit was moderated by achievement of seven-day abstinence. Baseline impulsive action was significantly negatively related to quitting for at least one day in the first two weeks of a quit attempt and of prolonged abstinence (no relapse over the next 10 weeks). Baseline impulsive choice was robustly associated with biochemically verified seven-day point-prevalence abstinence 12 weeks post-quit, such that those with lower delay discounting were more likely to achieve abstinence. Facets of impulsiveness appear to function largely independently in adult smokers, as indicated by their lack of inter-correlation, differential stability, and differential relations with abstinence. Impulsive action may impede initial quitting, whereas impulsive choice may be an obstacle to maintaining lasting abstinence. PMID:26751623

  3. Global synchronization of memristive neural networks subject to random disturbances via distributed pinning control.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenyuan; Yang, Shaofu; Wang, Jun

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents theoretical results on global exponential synchronization of multiple memristive neural networks in the presence of external noise by means of two types of distributed pinning control. The multiple memristive neural networks are coupled in a general structure via a nonlinear function, which consists of a linear diffusive term and a discontinuous sign term. A pinning impulsive control law is introduced in the coupled system to synchronize all neural networks. Sufficient conditions are derived for ascertaining global exponential synchronization in mean square. In addition, a pinning adaptive control law is developed to achieve global exponential synchronization in mean square. Both pinning control laws utilize only partial state information received from the neighborhood of the controlled neural network. Simulation results are presented to substantiate the theoretical results.

  4. Anatomy of a SAR impulse response.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-08-01

    A principal measure of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image quality is the manifestation in the SAR image of a spatial impulse, that is, the SAR's Impulse Response (IPR). IPR requirements direct certain design decisions in a SAR. Anomalies in the IPR can point to specific anomalous behavior in the radar's hardware and/or software.

  5. Temporal Preparation, Response Inhibition and Impulsivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Angel; Trivino, Monica; Perez-Duenas, Carolina; Acosta, Alberto; Lupianez, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Temporal preparation and impulsivity involve overlapping neural structures (prefrontal cortex) and cognitive functions (response inhibition and time perception), however, their interrelations had not been investigated. We studied such interrelations by comparing the performance of groups with low vs. high non-clinical trait impulsivity during a…

  6. Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder in Children's Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laufer, Maurice W.; Denhoff, Eric; Solomons, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    A very common cause of children's behavior disorder disturbance is an entity described as the hyperkinetic impulse disorder. This is characterized by hyperactivity, short attention span and poor powers of concentration, irritability, impulsiveness, variability, and poor schoolwork. The existence of this complexity may lead to many psychological…

  7. Assessing impulsivity changes in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Lucien; Delbeuck, Xavier; Billieux, Joël; d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Anne-Claude Juillerat; Van der Linden, Martial

    2008-01-01

    Impulsive behaviors are common in brain-damaged patients including those with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD). The objective of this study was to develop and validate a short version of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale assessing changes on 4 different dimensions of impulsivity, namely urgency, (lack of) premeditation, (lack of) perseverance, and sensation seeking, arising in the course of a neurodegenerative disease. To this end, caregivers of 83 probable AD patients completed a short questionnaire adapted from the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the data were performed and revealed that a model with 4 distinct but related latent variables corresponding to 4 different dimensions of impulsivity fit the data best. Furthermore, the results showed that lack of perseverance, followed by lack of premeditation and urgency, increased after the onset of the disease, whereas sensation seeking decreased. Overall, the multifaceted nature of impulsivity was confirmed in a sample of AD patients, whose caregivers reported significant changes regarding each facet of impulsivity. Consequently, the short version of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale opens up interesting prospects for a better comprehension of behavioral symptoms of dementia.

  8. Impulsive Vaccination for an Epidemiology Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Sen, M.; Garrido, A. J.

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates sufficient conditions of almost periodic sand periodic solutions of an integral model under impulsive controls. Since the model is of generic epidemiological interest, such impulsive controls are either vaccination actions or abrupt variations of the infected population due to infected immigration or lost of infective numbers due to either vaccination or lost of infected population by out-migration.

  9. Impulsivity, School Context, and School Misconduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Matt; Barton, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity holds a central place in the explanations of adolescent delinquency. Recent research suggests that neighborhood characteristics, particularly SES (socioeconomic status), perceived supervision, and collective efficacy, moderate the association between impulsivity and delinquency. However, findings to date have been equivocal, and the…

  10. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2016-07-12

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  11. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2013-07-08

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  12. Wavelet phase synchronization and chaoticity.

    PubMed

    Postnikov, E B

    2009-11-01

    It has been shown that the so-called "wavelet phase" (or "time-scale") synchronization of chaotic signals is actually synchronization of smoothed functions with reduced chaotic fluctuations. This fact is based on the representation of the wavelet transform with the Morlet wavelet as a solution of the Cauchy problem for a simple diffusion equation with initial condition in a form of harmonic function modulated by a given signal. The topological background of the resulting effect is discussed. It is argued that the wavelet phase synchronization provides information about the synchronization of an averaged motion described by bounding tori instead of the fine-level classical chaotic phase synchronization.

  13. Multidimensionality in Impulsivity and Alcohol Use: A Meta-Analysis using the UPPS Model of Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Coskunpinar, Ayca; Dir, Allyson L.; Cyders, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although there is considerable support for the relationship between impulsivity and alcohol use, the use of multidimensional conceptualizations of impulsivity and alcohol use has lead to varying relationship sizes across studies. The aims of the current meta-analysis are to (1) examine variability in the magnitude of the bivariate relationship between impulsivity and alcohol use across studies, and (2) describe the pattern of effects between specific impulsivity traits and alcohol use variables, using the UPPS Model of Impulsivity. Methods Ninety-six studies were meta-analyzed using a random effects model to examine the relationship between general impulsivity and alcohol use, as well as the relationships among separate impulsivity traits based in the UPPS model of impulsivity and specific alcohol use outcomes. Results Results indicate that, in general, impulsivity and alcohol use are related (r = .28); however, this effect size varied significantly across studies (from −.05 to 1.02). Drinking quantity was most strongly predicted by lack of perseverance (r = .32), whereas all traits equally predicted drinking frequency. Drinking problems were most highly related to negative (r = .35) and positive (r = .34) urgency, and alcohol dependence was most highly related to negative urgency (r = .38) and lack of planning (r = .37). Conclusion Effect sizes between impulsivity and alcohol use vary significantly by UPPS trait used in each study; thus, findings suggest and further reinforce the view in the literature that specific impulsivity-related constructs differentially relate to specific alcohol use outcomes. PMID:23578176

  14. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesekin, A. N.; Nepp, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  15. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sesekin, A. N.; Nepp, A. N.

    2015-11-30

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  16. Helicopter impulsive noise: Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanism is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanism of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory-experiment are suggested.

  17. The horizontal computerized rotational impulse test.

    PubMed

    Furman, Joseph M; Shirey, Ian; Roxberg, Jillyn; Kiderman, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body impulsive rotations were used to overcome several limitations associated with manual head impulse testing. A computer-controlled rotational chair delivered brief, whole-body, earth-vertical axis yaw impulsive rotations while eye movements were measured using video-oculography. Results from an unselected group of 20 patients with dizziness and a group of 22 control subjects indicated that the horizontal computerized rotational head impulse test (crHIT) is well-tolerated and provides an estimate of unidirectional vestibulo-ocular reflex gain comparable to results from caloric testing. This study demonstrates that the horizontal crHIT is a new assessment tool that overcomes many of the limitations of manual head impulse testing and provides a reliable laboratory-based measure of unilateral horizontal semicircular canal function.

  18. Successful restrained eating and trait impulsiveness.

    PubMed

    van Koningsbruggen, Guido M; Stroebe, Wolfgang; Aarts, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Restrained eaters with high scores on the Perceived Self-Regulatory Success in Dieting Scale (PSRS) are more successful than low scorers in regulating their food intake. According to the theory of temptation-elicited goal activation (Fishbach, Friedman, & Kruglanski, 2003), they have become successful because, due to earlier repeated instances of successful self-control, they formed an associative link between temptations and thoughts of dieting. It is unclear, however, why they should have been more successful in earlier attempts at self-control than their unsuccessful counterparts. We examined whether trait impulsiveness plays a role by investigating the associations between dietary restraint, trait impulsiveness, and PSRS. Results showed that the interaction between dietary restraint and impulsiveness predicted dieting success: A lower level of impulsiveness was associated with greater dieting success among restrained eaters. These results suggest that restrained eaters who are less impulsive are more likely to become successful restrained eaters as identified with the PSRS.

  19. Conversion of Impulse Voltage Generator Into Steep Wave Impulse Test-Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed Zaid; Tanwar, Surender Singh; Dayama, Ravindra; Choudhary, Rahul Raj; Mangal, Ravindra

    This paper demonstrates the alternative measures to generate the Steep wave impulse by using Impulse Voltage Generator (IVG) for high voltage testing of porcelain insulators. The modification of IVG by incorporating compensation of resistor, inductor, and capacitor has been achieved and further performance of the modified system has been analyzed by applying the generated lightning impulse and analyzing the electrical characteristics of impulse waves under standard lightning and fast rise multiple lightning waveform to determine the effect to improve rise time. The advantageous results have been received and being reported such as increase in overshoot compensation, increase in capacitive and inductive load ranges. Such further reduces the duration of oscillations of standard impulse voltages. The reduction in oscillation duration of steep front impulse voltages may be utilized in up gradation of Impulse Voltage Generator System. Stray capacitance could further be added in order to get the minimized difference of measurement between simulation and the field establishment.

  20. Synchronization and hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Thomas; Qian, Bian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2008-03-01

    Cilia and flagella commonly beat in a coordinated manner. Examples include the flagella that Volvox colonies use to move, the cilia that sweep foreign particles up out of the human airway, and the nodal cilia that set up the flow that determines the left-right axis in developing vertebrate embryos. In this talk we present an experimental study of how hydrodynamic interactions can lead to coordination in a simple idealized system: two nearby paddles driven with fixed torques in a highly viscous fluid. The paddles attain a synchronized state in which they rotate together with a phase difference of 90 degrees. We discuss how synchronization depends on system parameters and present numerical calculations using the method of regularized stokeslets.

  1. Optimal synchronization in space.

    PubMed

    Brede, Markus

    2010-02-01

    In this Rapid Communication we investigate spatially constrained networks that realize optimal synchronization properties. After arguing that spatial constraints can be imposed by limiting the amount of "wire" available to connect nodes distributed in space, we use numerical optimization methods to construct networks that realize different trade offs between optimal synchronization and spatial constraints. Over a large range of parameters such optimal networks are found to have a link length distribution characterized by power-law tails P(l) proportional to l(-alpha), with exponents alpha increasing as the networks become more constrained in space. It is also shown that the optimal networks, which constitute a particular type of small world network, are characterized by the presence of nodes of distinctly larger than average degree around which long-distance links are centered.

  2. Synchronously deployable truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G. (Inventor); Mikulas, M., Jr. (Inventor); Wallsom, E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A collapsible-expandable truss structure, including first and second spaced surface truss layers having an attached core layer is described. The surface truss layers are composed of a plurality of linear struts arranged in multiple triangular configurations. Each linear strut is hinged at the center and hinge connected at each end to a nodular joint. A passive spring serves as the expansion force to move the folded struts from a stowed collapsed position to a deployed operative final truss configuration. A damper controls the rate of spring expansion for the synchronized deployment of the truss as the folded configuration is released for deployment by the restrain belts. The truss is synchronously extended under the control of motor driven spools.

  3. Optimal synchronization in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brede, Markus

    2010-02-01

    In this Rapid Communication we investigate spatially constrained networks that realize optimal synchronization properties. After arguing that spatial constraints can be imposed by limiting the amount of “wire” available to connect nodes distributed in space, we use numerical optimization methods to construct networks that realize different trade offs between optimal synchronization and spatial constraints. Over a large range of parameters such optimal networks are found to have a link length distribution characterized by power-law tails P(l)∝l-α , with exponents α increasing as the networks become more constrained in space. It is also shown that the optimal networks, which constitute a particular type of small world network, are characterized by the presence of nodes of distinctly larger than average degree around which long-distance links are centered.

  4. Synchronization of micromasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis-Tilley, C.; Armour, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate synchronization effects in quantum self-sustained oscillators theoretically using the micromaser as a model system. We use the probability distribution for the relative phase as a tool for quantifying the emergence of preferred phases when two micromasers are coupled together. Using perturbation theory, we show that the behavior of the phase distribution is strongly dependent on exactly how the oscillators are coupled. In the quantum regime where photon occupation numbers are low we find that, although synchronization effects are rather weak, they are nevertheless significantly stronger than expected from a semiclassical description of the phase dynamics. We also compare the behavior of the phase distribution with the mutual information of the two oscillators and show that they can behave in rather different ways.

  5. Automated synchrogram analysis applied to heartbeat and reconstructed respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Claudia; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Schumann, Aicko Y.; Penzel, Thomas; Havlin, Shlomo; Kantelhardt, Jan W.

    2009-03-01

    Phase synchronization between two weakly coupled oscillators has been studied in chaotic systems for a long time. However, it is difficult to unambiguously detect such synchronization in experimental data from complex physiological systems. In this paper we review our study of phase synchronization between heartbeat and respiration in 150 healthy subjects during sleep using an automated procedure for screening the synchrograms. We found that this synchronization is significantly enhanced during non-rapid-eye-movement (non-REM) sleep (deep sleep and light sleep) and is reduced during REM sleep. In addition, we show that the respiration signal can be reconstructed from the heartbeat recordings in many subjects. Our reconstruction procedure, which works particularly well during non-REM sleep, allows the detection of cardiorespiratory synchronization even if only heartbeat intervals were recorded.

  6. Digital Synchronizer without Metastability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simle, Robert M.; Cavazos, Jose A.

    2009-01-01

    A proposed design for a digital synchronizing circuit would eliminate metastability that plagues flip-flop circuits in digital input/output interfaces. This metastability is associated with sampling, by use of flip-flops, of an external signal that is asynchronous with a clock signal that drives the flip-flops: it is a temporary flip-flop failure that can occur when a rising or falling edge of an asynchronous signal occurs during the setup and/or hold time of a flip-flop. The proposed design calls for (1) use of a clock frequency greater than the frequency of the asynchronous signal, (2) use of flip-flop asynchronous preset or clear signals for the asynchronous input, (3) use of a clock asynchronous recovery delay with pulse width discriminator, and (4) tying the data inputs to constant logic levels to obtain (5) two half-rate synchronous partial signals - one for the falling and one for the rising edge. Inasmuch as the flip-flop data inputs would be permanently tied to constant logic levels, setup and hold times would not be violated. The half-rate partial signals would be recombined to construct a signal that would replicate the original asynchronous signal at its original rate but would be synchronous with the clock signal.

  7. Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2012-11-01

    From unicellular organisms as small as a few microns to the largest vertebrates on earth we find groups of beating flagella or cilia that exhibit striking spatio-temporal organization. This may take the form of precise frequency and phase locking as frequently found in the swimming of green algae, or beating with long-wavelength phase modulations known as metachronal waves, seen in ciliates and in our respiratory systems. The remarkable similarity in the underlying molecular structure of flagella across the whole eukaryotic world leads naturally to the hypothesis that a similarly universal mechanism might be responsible for synchronization. Although this mechanism is poorly understood, one appealing hypothesis is that it results from hydrodynamic interactions between flagella. In this talk I will describe a synthesis of recent experimental and theoretical studies of this issue that have provided the strongest evidence to date for the hydrodynamic origin of flagellar synchronization. At the unicellular level this includes studies of the beating of the two flagella of the wild type unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in their native state and under conditions of regrowth following autotomy, and of the flagellar dominance mutant ptx1, which displays unusual anti-phase synchronization. Analysis of the related multicellular organism Volvox carteri shows it to be an ideal model organism for the study of metachronal waves. Supported by BBSRC, EPSRC, ERC, and The Wellcome Trust.

  8. Socially synchronized circadian oscillators.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Guy; Herzog, Erik D; Levine, Joel D; Schwartz, William J

    2013-08-22

    Daily rhythms of physiology and behaviour are governed by an endogenous timekeeping mechanism (a circadian 'clock'). The alternation of environmental light and darkness synchronizes (entrains) these rhythms to the natural day-night cycle, and underlying mechanisms have been investigated using singly housed animals in the laboratory. But, most species ordinarily would not live out their lives in such seclusion; in their natural habitats, they interact with other individuals, and some live in colonies with highly developed social structures requiring temporal synchronization. Social cues may thus be critical to the adaptive function of the circadian system, but elucidating their role and the responsible mechanisms has proven elusive. Here, we highlight three model systems that are now being applied to understanding the biology of socially synchronized circadian oscillators: the fruitfly, with its powerful array of molecular genetic tools; the honeybee, with its complex natural society and clear division of labour; and, at a different level of biological organization, the rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus, site of the brain's circadian clock, with its network of mutually coupled single-cell oscillators. Analyses at the 'group' level of circadian organization will likely generate a more complex, but ultimately more comprehensive, view of clocks and rhythms and their contribution to fitness in nature.

  9. Phase synchronization of instrumental music signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sayan; Palit, Sanjay Kumar; Banerjee, Santo; Ariffin, M. R. K.; Bhattacharya, D. K.

    2014-06-01

    Signal analysis is one of the finest scientific techniques in communication theory. Some quantitative and qualitative measures describe the pattern of a music signal, vary from one to another. Same musical recital, when played by different instrumentalists, generates different types of music patterns. The reason behind various patterns is the psycho-acoustic measures - Dynamics, Timber, Tonality and Rhythm, varies in each time. However, the psycho-acoustic study of the music signals does not reveal any idea about the similarity between the signals. For such cases, study of synchronization of long-term nonlinear dynamics may provide effective results. In this context, phase synchronization (PS) is one of the measures to show synchronization between two non-identical signals. In fact, it is very critical to investigate any other kind of synchronization for experimental condition, because those are completely non identical signals. Also, there exists equivalence between the phases and the distances of the diagonal line in Recurrence plot (RP) of the signals, which is quantifiable by the recurrence quantification measure τ-recurrence rate. This paper considers two nonlinear music signals based on same raga played by two eminent sitar instrumentalists as two non-identical sources. The psycho-acoustic study shows how the Dynamics, Timber, Tonality and Rhythm vary for the two music signals. Then, long term analysis in the form of phase space reconstruction is performed, which reveals the chaotic phase spaces for both the signals. From the RP of both the phase spaces, τ-recurrence rate is calculated. Finally by the correlation of normalized tau-recurrence rate of their 3D phase spaces and the PS of the two music signals has been established. The numerical results well support the analysis.

  10. Penile Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Christopher J.; Chim, Harvey; Tang, Jennifer C.; Monstrey, Stan J.; Mardini, Samir

    2011-01-01

    A variety of surgical options exists for penile reconstruction. The key to success of therapy is holistic management of the patient, with attention to the psychological aspects of treatment. In this article, we review reconstructive modalities for various types of penile defects inclusive of partial and total defects as well as the buried penis, and also describe recent basic science advances, which may promise new options for penile reconstruction. PMID:22851914

  11. An underwater chaotic lidar sensor based on synchronized blue laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Luke K.; Dunn, Kaitlin J.; Bollt, Erik M.; Cochenour, Brandon; Jemison, William D.

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel chaotic lidar system designed for underwater impulse response measurements. The system uses two recently introduced, low-cost, commercially available 462 nm multimode InGaN laser diodes, which are synchronized by a bi-directional optical link. This synchronization results in a noise-like chaotic intensity modulation with over 1 GHz bandwidth and strong modulation depth. An advantage of this approach is its simple transmitter architecture, which uses no electrical signal generator, electro-optic modulator, or optical frequency doubler.

  12. Optimal impulsive manoeuvres and aerodynamic braking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezewski, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    A method developed for obtaining solutions to the aerodynamic braking problem, using impulses in the exoatmospheric phases is discussed. The solution combines primer vector theory and the results of a suboptimal atmospheric guidance program. For a specified initial and final orbit, the solution determines: (1) the minimum impulsive cost using a maximum of four impulses, (2) the optimal atmospheric entry and exit-state vectors subject to equality and inequality constraints, and (3) the optimal coast times. Numerical solutions which illustrate the characteristics of the solution are presented.

  13. [Serotonin and impulsivity (experiments on animals)].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ian, G A

    2011-01-01

    In the current paper a role of the serotinergic system in organization of impulsive behaviour in animals was considered. The results of influence of antagonists and agonists of the different types and subtypes of 5-HT receptors (1A, B; 2A, B, C; 7) and the effects of the dorsal raphe nuclei lesions on characteristics of impulsivity related with a motor control, mechanisms of attention, reinforcement and decision making were summarized. The data on knock-out animals and the experiments with microdialysis have been also considered. There was emphasized the important role of interaction of 5-HT-, dopamine- and glutamatergic systems in mediation of impulsive behaviour.

  14. Two-impulse reorientation of asymmetric spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martz, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation conducted to determine minimum maneuver costs for attitude reorientation of spacecraft of all possible inertial distribution over a wide range of maneuver angles by use of a two impulse coning method of reorientation is reported. Maneuver cost, proportional to the product of fuel consumed (total impulse) and time expended during a maneuver is discussed. Assumptions included external impulsive control torques, rigid body spacecraft rest-to-rest maneuvers, and no disturbance torques. Results are presented in terms of average cost and standard deviation for various maneuver ranges. Costs of individual reorientations are calculated with the computer program included.

  15. Identification of Experimental Unsteady Aerodynamic Impulse Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Piatak, David J.; Scott, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    The identification of experimental unsteady aerodynamic impulse responses using the Oscillating Turntable (OTT) at NASA Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is described. Results are presented for two configurations: a Rigid Semispan Model (RSM) and a rectangular wing with a supercritical airfoil section. Both models were used to acquire unsteady pressure data due to pitching oscillations on the OTT. A deconvolution scheme involving a step input in pitch and the resultant step response in pressure, for several pressure transducers, is used to identify the pressure impulse responses. The identified impulse responses are then used to predict the pressure response due to pitching oscillations at several frequencies. Comparisons with the experimental data are presented.

  16. Penile reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Garaffa, Giulio; Sansalone, Salvatore; Ralph, David J

    2013-01-01

    During the most recent years, a variety of new techniques of penile reconstruction have been described in the literature. This paper focuses on the most recent advances in male genital reconstruction after trauma, excision of benign and malignant disease, in gender reassignment surgery and aphallia with emphasis on surgical technique, cosmetic and functional outcome. PMID:22426595

  17. Synchronization of pathogenic protozoans.

    PubMed

    Svärd, Staffan; Troell, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Protozoans are single-cell eukaryotes and many of the best studied protozoans are parasitic to humans (e.g., Plasmodium falciparum causing malaria and Trypanosoma brucei causing sleeping sickness). These organisms are distantly related to humans but with retained eukaryotic type of cellular processes, making them good model systems for studies of the evolution of basic processes like the cell cycle. Giardia intestinalis causes 250 million cases of diarrhea yearly and is one of the earliest diverging protozoans. It has recently been possible to synchronize its cell cycle using compounds that inhibit different steps of the cell cycle and the detailed protocol is described here.

  18. Psychic energy and synchronicity.

    PubMed

    Zabriskie, Beverley

    2014-04-01

    Given Jung's interest in physics' formulations of psychic energy and the concept of time, overlaps and convergences in the themes addressed in analytical psychology and in quantum physics are to be expected. These are informed by the active intersections between the matter of mind and mindfulness re matter. In 1911, Jung initiated dinners with Einstein. Jung's definition of libido in the pivotal 1912 Fordham Lectures reveals the influence of these conversations. Twenty years later, a significant period in physics, Wolfgang Pauli contacted Jung. Their collaboration led to the theory of synchronicity.

  19. Generalized synchronization via nonlinear control.

    PubMed

    Juan, Meng; Xingyuan, Wang

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, the generalized synchronization problem of drive-response systems is investigated. Using the drive-response concept and the nonlinear control theory, a control law is designed to achieve the generalized synchronization of chaotic systems. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, a generalized synchronization condition is derived. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations further demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  20. Huygens synchronization of two clocks.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Henrique M; Melo, Luís V

    2015-07-23

    The synchronization of two pendulum clocks hanging from a wall was first observed by Huygens during the XVII century. This type of synchronization is observed in other areas, and is fundamentally different from the problem of two clocks hanging from a moveable base. We present a model explaining the phase opposition synchronization of two pendulum clocks in those conditions. The predicted behaviour is observed experimentally, validating the model.

  1. Planning for Victory: Joint Synchronization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-22

    Desert Storm . . . .. 13 V A JOINT SYNCHRONIZATION MATRIX .. ........ .. 16 Proposed Synchronization Matrixes Joint Sync Matrix: D-day, 1944 . . .. 16...campaigns. I will offer two such proposals. Joint Sync Matrix: D-day, 1944 . Figure 2 is offered as one proposal of how a joint synchronization matrix...CHANNEL sweep CENTRAL CHANNEL commence sweep AfW ALLIED completeI CHERBOURG-LE HAVRE FLEET sweep UTAH OMAHA GOLD JUNO SWORD ASUW SWEEPS ALLIED

  2. Surgical Excision of Multiple Penile Syringomas With Scrotal Flap Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Vaca, Elbert E.; Mundinger, Gerhard S.; Zelken, Jonathan A.; Erdag, Gulsun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Penile syringomas are rare lesions usually occurring in isolation. We report the excision and reconstruction of multiple synchronous penile shaft syringomas with local scrotal flaps. Methods: We report a rare case of excision of multiple penile syringomas and reconstruction with scrotal flaps in a 29-year-old man. Results: Penile syringomas were excised and reconstructed with scrotal flaps in a single-stage procedure. Conclusions: In addition to providing wound coverage, this reconstructive option allowed for excellent functional results with regard to shaft alignment and erectile function, and it should be considered in the reconstructive armamentarium for penile shaft lesions. PMID:24966995

  3. Synchronization tomography: a method for three-dimensional localization of phase synchronized neuronal populations in the human brain using magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Tass, P A; Fieseler, T; Dammers, J; Dolan, K; Morosan, P; Majtanik, M; Boers, F; Muren, A; Zilles, K; Fink, G R

    2003-02-28

    We present a noninvasive technique which allows the anatomical localization of phase synchronized neuronal populations in the human brain with magnetoencephalography. We study phase synchronization between the reconstructed current source density (CSD) of different brain areas as well as between the CSD and muscular activity. We asked four subjects to tap their fingers in synchrony with a rhythmic tone, and to continue tapping at the same rate after the tone was switched off. The phase synchronization behavior of brain areas relevant for movement coordination, inner voice, and time estimation changes drastically when the transition to internal pacing occurs, while their averaged amplitudes remain unchanged. Information of this kind cannot be derived with standard neuroimaging techniques like functional magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography.

  4. Impulsively generated fast coronal pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid oscillations in the corona are discussed from a theoretical standpoint, developing some previous work on ducted, fast magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium. In the theory, impulsively (e.g., flare) generated mhd (magnetohydrodynamic) waves are ducted by regions of low Alfven speed (high density) such as coronal loops. Wave propagation in such ducts is strongly dispersive and closely akin to the behavior of Love waves in seismology, Pekeris waves in oceanography and guided waves in fiber optics. Such flare-generated magnetoacoustic waves possess distinctive temporal signatures consisting of periodic, quasi-periodic and decay phases. The quasi-periodic phase possesses the strongest amplitudes and the shortest time scales. Time scales are typically of the order of a second for inhomogeneities (coronal loop width) of 1000 km and Alfven speeds of 1000/kms, and pulse duration times are of tens of seconds. Quasi-periodic signatures have been observed in radio wavelengths for over a decade and more recently by SMM. It is hoped that the theoretical ideas outlined may be successfully related to these observations and thus aid the interpretation of oscillatory signatures recorded by SMM. Such signatures may also provide a diagnostic of coronal conditions. New aspects of the ducted mhd waves, for example their behavior in smoothly varying as opposed to tube-like inhomogeneities, are currently under investigation. The theory is not restricted to loops but applied equally to open field regions.

  5. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2004-01-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  6. Impulsive behaviour in interpersonal encounters: associations with quarrelsomeness and agreeableness.

    PubMed

    aan Het Rot, Marije; Moskowitz, D S; Young, Simon N

    2015-02-01

    Associations between impulsivity and interpersonal behaviours have rarely been examined, even though impulsivity may disrupt the flow of social interactions. For example, it is unknown to what extent the commonly used Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) predicts impulsive behaviour in social situations, and how behaving impulsively during interpersonal encounters might influence levels of quarrelsomeness and agreeableness. In this study, 48 healthy working individuals completed the BIS-11 and recorded their behaviour in social situations using event-contingent recording. Record forms included items representing quarrelsome, agreeable, and impulsive behaviours. BIS-11 motor impulsiveness scores predicted impulsive behaviour in social situations. Impulsive behaviour was associated, in different interactions, with both agreeableness and quarrelsomeness. Behaving impulsively in specific interactions was negatively associated with agreeableness in participants with higher BIS-11 motor impulsiveness and positively associated with agreeableness in participants with lower BIS-11 motor impulsiveness. Impulsive quarrelsome behaviour may cause interpersonal problems. Impulsive agreeable behaviour may have positive effects in individuals with low trait impulsivity. The idea that there are between-person differences in the effects of state impulsivity on the flow of social interaction deserves further study.

  7. Digitized synchronous demodulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodhouse, Christopher E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A digitized synchronous demodulator is constructed entirely of digital components including timing logic, an accumulator, and means to digitally filter the digital output signal. Indirectly, it accepts, at its input, periodic analog signals which are converted to digital signals by traditional analog-to-digital conversion techniques. Broadly, the input digital signals are summed to one of two registers within an accumulator, based on the phase of the input signal and medicated by timing logic. At the end of a predetermined number of cycles of the inputted periodic signals, the contents of the register that accumulated samples from the negative half cycle is subtracted from the accumulated samples from the positive half cycle. The resulting difference is an accurate measurement of the narrow band amplitude of the periodic input signal during the measurement period. This measurement will not include error sources encountered in prior art synchronous demodulators using analog techniques such as offsets, charge injection errors, temperature drift, switching transients, settling time, analog to digital converter missing code, and linearity errors.

  8. Multi-impulsivity of Japanese patients with eating disorders: primary and secondary impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Nagata, T; Kawarada, Y; Kiriike, N; Iketani, T

    2000-07-17

    Several studies have noted that multi-impulsive bulimia nervosa tends to be refractory to treatment. However, it is not known whether these impulsivities are an expression of more fundamental psychopathology or simply the consequence of chaotic eating behaviors. Studies of the temporal relationship between the onset of eating disorder and the occurrence of impulsive behaviors will facilitate a better understanding of these issues. Subjects consisted of 60 patients with anorexia nervosa restricting type (AN-R), 62 patients with anorexia nervosa binge-eating/purging type (AN-BP), 114 patients with bulimia nervosa purging type (BN) and 66 control subjects. Impulsive behaviors and childhood traumatic experiences were assessed by self-report questionnaire. Multi-impulsivity (defined by at least three of the following: heavy regular alcohol drinking; suicide attempt; self-mutilation; repeated shoplifting of items other than food; sexual relationships with persons not well known to the subject) was found in 2% of AN-R, 11% of AN-BP, 18% of BN and 2% of control subjects. Eighty percent of BN patients with multi-impulsivity had a history of suicide attempts or self-mutilation history prior to the onset of bulimia nervosa. In BN patients, there tended to be a relationship between childhood parental loss or borderline personality disorder and multi-impulsivity. In conclusion, primary impulsivity (chronological prior occurrence of impulsive behaviors) does exist even in a very different culture, although the number of patients of this type is very limited.

  9. Impulsive Social Influence Increases Impulsive Choices on a Temporal Discounting Task in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Jodi M.; Curran, Max T.; Calderon, Vanessa; Stoeckel, Luke E.; Evins, A. Eden

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults who affiliate with friends who engage in impulsive behavior are more likely to engage in impulsive behaviors themselves, and those who associate with prosocial (i.e. more prudent, future oriented) peers are more likely to engage in prosocial behavior. However, it is difficult to disentangle the contribution of peer influence vs. peer selection (i.e., whether individuals choose friends with similar traits) when interpreting social behaviors. In this study, we combined a novel social manipulation with a well-validated delay discounting task assessing impulsive behavior to create a social influence delay discounting task, in which participants were exposed to both impulsive (smaller, sooner or SS payment) and non-impulsive (larger, later or LL payment) choices from their peers. Young adults in this sample, n = 51, aged 18–25 had a higher rate of SS choices after exposure to impulsive peer influence than after exposure to non-impulsive peer influence. Interestingly, in highly susceptible individuals, the rate of non-impulsive choices did not increase after exposure to non-impulsive influence. There was a positive correlation between self-reported suggestibility and degree of peer influence on SS choices. These results suggest that, in young adults, SS choices appear to be influenced by the choices of same-aged peers, especially for individuals who are highly susceptible to influence. PMID:24988440

  10. FPGA based fast synchronous serial multi-wire links synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2013-10-01

    The paper debates synchronization method of multi-wire, serial link of constant latency, by means of pseudo-random numbers generators. The solution was designed for various families of FPGA circuits. There were debated synchronization algorithm and functional structure of parameterized transmitter and receiver modules. The modules were realized in VHDL language in a behavioral form.

  11. Specific Impulse and Mass Flow Rate Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Don A.

    2005-01-01

    Specific impulse is defined in words in many ways. Very early in any text on rocket propulsion a phrase similar to .specific impulse is the thrust force per unit propellant weight flow per second. will be found.(2) It is only after seeing the mathematics written down does the definition mean something physically to scientists and engineers responsible for either measuring it or using someone.s value for it.

  12. Temporal preparation, response inhibition and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Correa, Angel; Triviño, Mónica; Pérez-Dueñas, Carolina; Acosta, Alberto; Lupiáñez, Juan

    2010-08-01

    Temporal preparation and impulsivity involve overlapping neural structures (prefrontal cortex) and cognitive functions (response inhibition and time perception), however, their interrelations had not been investigated. We studied such interrelations by comparing the performance of groups with low vs. high non-clinical trait impulsivity during a temporal preparation go no-go task. This task measured, in less than 10 min, how response inhibition was influenced both by temporal orienting of attention (guided by predictive temporal cues) and by sequential effects (produced by repetition/alternation of the duration of preparatory intervals in consecutive trials). The results showed that sequential effects produced dissociable patterns of temporal preparation as a function of impulsivity. Sequential effects facilitated both response speed (reaction times - RTs - to the go condition) and response inhibition (false alarms to the no-go condition) selectively in the low impulsivity group. In the high impulsivity group, in contrast, sequential effects only improved RTs but not response inhibition. We concluded that both excitatory and inhibitory processing may be enhanced concurrently by sequential effects, which enables the temporal preparation of fast and controlled responses. Impulsivity could hence be related to less efficient temporal preparation of that inhibitory processing.

  13. Ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Glickel, Steven Z; Gupta, Salil

    2006-05-01

    Volar ligament reconstruction is an effective technique for treating symptomatic laxity of the CMC joint of the thumb. The laxity may bea manifestation of generalized ligament laxity,post-traumatic, or metabolic (Ehler-Danlos). There construction reduces the shear forces on the joint that contribute to the development and persistence of inflammation. Although there have been only a few reports of the results of volar ligament reconstruction, the use of the procedure to treat Stage I and Stage II disease gives good to excellent results consistently. More advanced stages of disease are best treated by trapeziectomy, with or without ligament reconstruction.

  14. Genetic and Modeling Approaches Reveal Distinct Components of Impulsive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Nautiyal, Katherine M; Wall, Melanie M; Wang, Shuai; Magalong, Valerie M; Ahmari, Susanne E; Balsam, Peter D; Blanco, Carlos; Hen, René

    2017-01-18

    Impulsivity is an endophenotype found in many psychiatric disorders including substance use disorders, pathological gambling, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Two behavioral features often considered in impulsive behavior are behavioral inhibition (impulsive action) and delayed gratification (impulsive choice). However, the extent to which these behavioral constructs represent distinct facets of behavior with discrete biological bases is unclear. To test the hypothesis that impulsive action and impulsive choice represent statistically independent behavioral constructs in mice, we collected behavioral measures of impulsivity in a single cohort of mice using well-validated operant behavioral paradigms. Mice with manipulation of serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1BR) expression were included as a model of disordered impulsivity. A factor analysis was used to characterize correlations between the measures of impulsivity and to identify covariates. Using two approaches, we dissociated impulsive action from impulsive choice. First, the absence of 5-HT1BRs caused increased impulsive action, but not impulsive choice. Second, based on an exploratory factor analysis, a two-factor model described the data well, with measures of impulsive action and choice separating into two independent factors. A multiple-indicator multiple-causes analysis showed that 5-HT1BR expression and sex were significant covariates of impulsivity. Males displayed increased impulsivity in both dimensions, whereas 5-HT1BR expression was a predictor of increased impulsive action only. These data support the conclusion that impulsive action and impulsive choice are distinct behavioral phenotypes with dissociable biological influences that can be modeled in mice. Our work may help inform better classification, diagnosis, and treatment of psychiatric disorders, which present with disordered impulsivity.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 18 January 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2016.277.

  15. Benefits of Synchronous Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Scott; Smith, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Most online courses are offered as "asynchronous" courses and have no real-time contact with students. The Synchronous online alternative provides normal scheduled class time and allows students to login to a virtual online classroom with the instructor. We provide an overview of two different platforms for hosting synchronous classes…

  16. Chaos synchronization by nonlinear coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petereit, Johannes; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2017-03-01

    We study synchronization properties of three nonlinearly coupled chaotic maps. Coupling is introduced in such a way, that it cannot be reduced to pairwise terms, but includes combined action of all interacting units. For two models of nonlinear coupling we characterize the transition to complete synchrony, as well as partially synchronized states. Relation to hypernetworks of chaotic units is also discussed.

  17. Digital synchronization and communication techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, William C.

    1992-01-01

    Information on digital synchronization and communication techniques is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include phase shift keying, modems, characteristics of open loop digital synchronizers, an open loop phase and frequency estimator, and a digital receiver structure using an open loop estimator in a decision directed architecture.

  18. ACL reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... This increases the chance you may have a meniscus tear. ACL reconstruction may be used for these ... When other ligaments are also injured When your meniscus is torn Before surgery, talk to your health ...

  19. Further evidence of the heterogeneous nature of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Amy J; Bond, Rod; Duka, Theodora; Morgan, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    'Impulsivity' refers to a range of behaviours including preference for immediate reward (temporal-impulsivity) and the tendency to make premature decisions (reflection-impulsivity) and responses (motor-impulsivity). The current study aimed to examine how different behavioural and self-report measurements of impulsivity can be categorised into distinct subtypes. Exploratory factor analysis using full information maximum likelihood was conducted on 10 behavioural and 1 self-report measure of impulsivity. Four factors of impulsivity were indicated, with Factor 1 having a high loading of the Stop Signal Task, which measures motor-impulsivity, factor 2 representing reflection-impulsivity with loadings of the Information Sampling Task and Matching Familiar Figures Task, factor 3 representing the Immediate Memory Task, and finally factor 4 which represents the Delay Discounting Questionnaire and The Monetary Choice Questionnaire, measurements of temporal-impulsivity. These findings indicated that impulsivity is not a unitary construct, and instead represents a series of independent subtypes. There was evidence of a distinct reflection-impulsivity factor, providing the first factor analysis support for this subtype. There was also support for additional factors of motor- and temporal-impulsivity. The present findings indicated that a number of currently accepted tasks cannot be considered as indexing motor- and temporal-impulsivity suggesting that additional characterisations of impulsivity may be required.

  20. Chua's Circuit: Control and Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimiciuc, Stefan-Andrei; Vasilovici, Ovidiu; Dimitriu, Dan-Gheorghe

    Chaos-based data encryption is one of the most reliable methods used in secure communications. This implies a good control of a chaotic system and a good synchronization between the involved systems. Here, experimental results are shown on the control and synchronization of Chua's circuits. The control of the chaotic circuit was achieved by using the switching method. The influence of the control signal characteristics (amplitude, frequency and shape) on the system's states was also investigated. The synchronization of two similar chaotic circuits was studied, emphasizing the importance of the chaotic state characteristics of the Master system in respect to those of Slave system. It was shown that the synchronization does not depend on the chaotic state type, neither on the dimension (x, y or z) used for synchronization.

  1. Robust Synchronization Schemes for Dynamic Channel Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Fugin

    2003-01-01

    Professor Xiong will investigate robust synchronization schemes for dynamic channel environment. A sliding window will be investigated for symbol timing synchronizer and an open loop carrier estimator for carrier synchronization. Matlab/Simulink will be used for modeling and simulations.

  2. Twin engine synchronizer

    SciTech Connect

    Kobus, J.R.

    1988-05-03

    This patent describes an apparatus for synchronizing the speeds of two engines, each having its own throttle level connected by an associated cable to a respective hand throttle lever, comprising moving means carried by the throttle lever of one of the engines for moving the throttle lever of the one engine independently of its associated cable and its respective hand throttle lever to increase or decrease the speed of the one engine until the speed of the one engine matches the speed of the other engine. The moving means moves the throttle lever of the one engine without moving its associated cable or its respective hand throttle lever, and actuating means mounted remote from the throttle lever of the one engine for actuating the moving means.

  3. Friction and Phase Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braiman, Y.; Protopopescu, V.; Family, F.; Hentschel, H. G. E.

    2000-03-01

    Spatiotemporal fluctuations in small discrete nonlinear arrays affect the dynamics of the center of mass. We derive the equations describing the dynamics of the center of mass and the spatial fluctuations for each coherent mode of the array. Analysis of these equations indicates that depending on array stiffness, size, and the external forcing - quantized jumps occur in the minimum friction (maximum velocity) of the array. We propose an analytical formalism to determine the occurrences of these jumps. We present numerical evidence indicating that phase synchronization is related to the frictional properties of sliding objects at the atomic scale and discuss mechanisms of tuning and controlling nanoscale friction. Y. Braiman, F. Family, H. G. E. Hentschel, C. Mak, and J. Krim, Phys. Rev. E 59, R4737 (1999). H. G. E. Hentschel, F. Family, and Y. Braiman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 104 (1999).

  4. Timesharing without synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.; Rubin, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    The capacity region of a multiple-access channel has recently been identified as the convex hull (barred K) of a certain set (K) of points in the first quadrant of the (R1,R2) plane. For a pair of rates in K, a more or less standard random-coding argument can be used to show the existence of a good pair of codes. But for points in barred K-K, it is apparently necessary for the two senders to use some form of time sharing to achieve the desired rates. However, in order to share time, at least one of the senders must have knowledge of the other's phase; and in many practical situations this knowledge does not exist. This paper investigates the problems which arise in coding for multiple-access channels when the senders cannot synchronize with each other.

  5. Explained and Unexplained Momentum Impulse Transfer Events (MITEs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bantel, M.; Cunio, P.; Hendrix, D.; Therien, W.

    2016-09-01

    Precision orbit determination (OD) and characterization of resident space objects (RSOs) are fundamental components of Space Situational Awareness (SSA). Over 600 days beginning January 1, 2015, ExoAnalytic Solutions collected more than 60 million correlated astrometric measurements of active and inactive resident RSOs in geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) and in the near-GEO region using a global network of ground-based telescopes. Orbit Determination (OD) on several inactive RSOs in sub-synchronous (e.g., spent upper stages) and super-synchronous (e.g., retired satellites) orbits revealed occasional momentum impulse transfer events (MITEs) with detectable In-track velocity changes of 0.2 to 10 mm/s. These MITEs could not be explained using the accepted gravitational model and an isotropic spherical solar radiation acceleration. Two additional radiation pressure models were considered: a Yarkovsky effect and an asymmetric radiation pressure (diffuse ellipsoid), adding one and two additional free parameters to the model, respectively. Both models include a radiation pressure component perpendicular to the solar direction and in the RSO's orbital plane. The Yarkovsky and Ellipsoid radiation pressure, in combination with the RSO traversing the Earth's Umbra, can produce a measureable change in the RSO's mean motion; a delta-v of 0.5 mm/s per season is not uncommon. OD was performed using the three radiation pressure models (Sphere, Yarkovsky, and Ellipsoid) on six inactive RSOs having 9,000 to 35,000 observations over 600 days. The Ellipsoid model was in good agreement with 95% of the observations falling within a window of ± 20 microradians, or approximately ±0.8 km, over the entire 600 day duration, which included three equinox seasons. Data collection and analysis of inactive RSOs aids the SSA mission of precision tracking and characterization of debris in the space environment.

  6. Synchronically performed laparoscopic cholecystectomy and hernioplasty.

    PubMed

    Simon, E; Kelemen, O; Knausz, J; Bodnár, S; Bátorfi, J

    1999-01-01

    Cholecystectomies and hernioplasties are the two most frequently performed surgical interventions. The laparoscopic technique can be offered for the simultaneous treatment with both operating indications. The synchronical operation can give all the advantages of the minimally invasive technique. Authors had performed laparoscopic cholecystectomy with laparoscopic hernioplasty in five cases. Two inguinal and three postoperative hernias were reconstructed. The cholecystectomy was performed with a "three punction method", and the hernioplasty by using the same approach, completed by inserting a fourth assisting trocar as required. The hernial ring was covered with an intraperitoneally placed mesh, which was fixed by staplers (the so-called "IPOM-method": intraperitoneal on-lay mesh). There was no intra-, nor postoperative complication. The hernioplasty combined with laparoscopic cholecystectomy did not have effect on postoperative pain and nursing time. The return to the normal physical activity was short, similar to laparoscopic hernioplasty (in 1-2 weeks). Authors conclude that the simultaneous, synchronous laparoscopic cholecystectomy and hernioplasty is recommended and should be the method of choice because it is more advantageous for patients.

  7. Neural substrates of time perception and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Marc; Simmons, Alan N; Flagan, Taru; Lane, Scott D; Wackermann, Jiří; Paulus, Martin P

    2011-08-11

    Several studies provide empirical evidence for the association between impulsivity and time perception. However, little is known about the neural substrates underlying this function. This investigation examined the influence of impulsivity on neural activation patterns during the encoding and reproduction of intervals with durations of 3, 9 and 18s using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-seven subjects participated in this study, including 15 high impulsive subjects that were classified based on their self-rating. FMRI activation during the duration reproduction task was correlated with measures of two self-report questionnaires related to the concept of impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, BIS; Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, ZTPI). Behaviorally, those individuals who under-reproduced temporal intervals also showed lower scores on the ZTPI future perspective subscale and higher scores on the BIS. FMRI activation revealed an accumulating pattern of neural activity peaking at the end of the 9- and 18-s intervals within right posterior insula. Activations of brain regions during the reproduction phase of the timing task, such as those related to motor execution as well as to the 'core control network' - encompassing the inferior frontal and medial frontal cortices, the anterior insula as well as the inferior parietal cortex - were significantly correlated with reproduced duration, as well as with BIS and ZTPI subscales. In particular, the greater activation in these regions the shorter were the reproduced intervals, the more impulsive was an individual and the less pronounced the future perspective. Activation in the core control network, thus, may form a biological marker for cognitive time management and for impulsiveness.

  8. Neural substrates of time perception and impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Marc; Simmons, Alan N.; Flagan, Taru; Lane, Scott D.; Wackermann, Jiří; Paulus, Martin P.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies provide empirical evidence for the association between impulsivity and time perception. However, little is known about the neural substrates underlying this function. This investigation examined the influence of impulsivity on neural activation patterns during the encoding and reproduction of intervals with durations of 3, 9 and 18 seconds using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-seven subjects participated in this study, including 15 high impulsive subjects that were classified based on their self-rating. FMRI activation during the duration reproduction task was correlated with measures of two self-report questionnaires related to the concept of impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, BIS; Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, ZTPI). Behaviorally, those individuals who under-reproduced temporal intervals also showed lower scores on the ZTPI future perspective subscale and higher scores on the BIS. FMRI activation revealed an accumulating pattern of neural activity peaking at the end of the 9- and 18-s interval within right posterior insula. Activations of brain regions during the reproduction phase of the timing task, such as those related to motor execution as well as to the ‘core control network’ – encompassing the inferior frontal and medial frontal cortex, the anterior insula as well as the inferior parietal cortex – were significantly correlated with reproduced duration, as well as with BIS and ZTPI subscales. In particular, the greater activation in these regions the shorter were the reproduced intervals, the more impulsive was an individual and the less pronounced the future perspective. Activation in the core control network, thus, may form a biological marker for cognitive time management and for impulsiveness. PMID:21763642

  9. Impulsivity, frontal lobes and risk for addiction.

    PubMed

    Crews, Fulton Timm; Boettiger, Charlotte Ann

    2009-09-01

    Alcohol and substance abuse disorders involve continued use of substances despite negative consequences, i.e. loss of behavioral control of drug use. The frontal-cortical areas of the brain oversee behavioral control through executive functions. Executive functions include abstract thinking, motivation, planning, attention to tasks and inhibition of impulsive responses. Impulsiveness generally refers to premature, unduly risky, poorly conceived actions. Dysfunctional impulsivity includes deficits in attention, lack of reflection and/or insensitivity to consequences, all of which occur in addiction [Evenden JL. Varieties of impulsivity. Psychopharmacology (Berl) 1999;146:348-361.; de Wit H. Impulsivity as a determinant and consequence of drug use: a review of underlying processes. Addict Biol 2009;14:22-31]. Binge drinking models indicate chronic alcohol damages in the corticolimbic brain regions [Crews FT, Braun CJ, Hoplight B, Switzer III RC, Knapp DJ. Binge ethanol consumption causes differential brain damage in young adolescent rats compared with adult rats. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2000;24:1712-1723] causing reversal learning deficits indicative of loss of executive function [Obernier JA, White AM, Swartzwelder HS, Crews FT. Cognitive deficits and CNS damage after a 4-day binge ethanol exposure in rats. Pharmacol Biochem Behav 2002b;72:521-532]. Genetics and adolescent age are risk factors for alcoholism that coincide with sensitivity to alcohol-induced neurotoxicity. Cortical degeneration from alcohol abuse may increase impulsivity contributing to the development, persistence and severity of alcohol use disorders. Interestingly, abstinence results in bursts of neurogenesis and brain regrowth [Crews FT, Nixon K. Mechanisms of neurodegeneration and regeneration in alcoholism. Alcohol Alcohol 2009;44:115-127]. Treatments for alcoholism, including naltrexone pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy may work through improving executive functions. This review will examine the

  10. Characterization of impulse noise and hazard analysis of impulse noise induced hearing loss using AHAAH modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing

    Millions of people across the world are suffering from noise induced hearing loss (NIHL), especially under working conditions of either continuous Gaussian or non-Gaussian noise that might affect human's hearing function. Impulse noise is a typical non-Gaussian noise exposure in military and industry, and generates severe hearing loss problem. This study mainly focuses on characterization of impulse noise using digital signal analysis method and prediction of the auditory hazard of impulse noise induced hearing loss by the Auditory Hazard Assessment Algorithm for Humans (AHAAH) modeling. A digital noise exposure system has been developed to produce impulse noises with peak sound pressure level (SPL) up to 160 dB. The characterization of impulse noise generated by the system has been investigated and analyzed in both time and frequency domains. Furthermore, the effects of key parameters of impulse noise on auditory risk unit (ARU) are investigated using both simulated and experimental measured impulse noise signals in the AHAAH model. The results showed that the ARUs increased monotonically with the peak pressure (both P+ and P-) increasing. With increasing of the time duration, the ARUs increased first and then decreased, and the peak of ARUs appeared at about t = 0.2 ms (for both t+ and t-). In addition, the auditory hazard of experimental measured impulse noises signals demonstrated a monotonically increasing relationship between ARUs and system voltages.

  11. Controlling your impulses: electrical stimulation of the human supplementary motor complex prevents impulsive errors.

    PubMed

    Spieser, Laure; van den Wildenberg, Wery; Hasbroucq, Thierry; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Burle, Borís

    2015-02-18

    To err is human. However, an inappropriate urge does not always result in error. Impulsive errors thus entail both a motor system capture by an urge to act and a failed inhibition of that impulse. Here we show that neuromodulatory electrical stimulation of the supplementary motor complex in healthy humans leaves action urges unchanged but prevents them from turning into overt errors. Subjects performed a choice reaction-time task known to trigger impulsive responses, leading to fast errors that can be revealed by analyzing accuracy as a function of poststimulus time. Yet, such fast errors are only the tip of the iceberg: electromyography (EMG) revealed fast subthreshold muscle activation in the incorrect response hand in an even larger proportion of overtly correct trials, revealing covert response impulses not discernible in overt behavior. Analyzing both overt and covert response tendencies enables to gauge the ability to prevent these incorrect impulses from turning into overt action errors. Hyperpolarizing the supplementary motor complex using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) preserves action impulses but prevents their behavioral expression. This new combination of detailed behavioral, EMG, and tDCS techniques clarifies the neurophysiology of impulse control, and may point to avenues for improving impulse control deficits in various neurologic and psychiatric disorders.

  12. Impulsivity and psychopathy: associations between the barrett impulsivity scale and the psychopathy checklist revised.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Robert J; Gray, Nicola S

    2011-05-30

    Impulsivity is often cited as a core dysfunction in those who are high in psychopathic traits. However, both impulsivity and psychopathy are both multi-faceted constructs. We examined a 3-factor model of self-reported impulsivity (Barrett Impulsivity: BIS-11) against the 2-factor and 4-facet model of psychopathy as defined by the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R). Those high on 'secondary psychopathy' (Factor 2 and Facets 3 and 4 of the PCL-R) showed increased impulsivity as it related to acting with thinking (Motor Scale of BIS) and lack of future planning (Non-Planning scale of BIS), but not did not show any elevated features of poor concentration or distraction (Attention Scale of BIS). On the other hand, there was some evidence that 'primary psychopathy' (Factor 1 of PCL-R) was associated with reduced impulsivity as it relates to future planning (Non-Planning scale of BIS). Thus, our results show that only some psychopaths show increased impulsivity and that not all forms of impulsivity are raised.

  13. Impulsivity and personality variables in adolescents with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Boisseau, Christina L; Thompson-Brenner, Heather; Eddy, Kamryn T; Satir, Dana A

    2009-04-01

    Impulsivity among individuals with eating disorders (EDs) is associated with severe comorbidities and poor treatment outcome. However, research investigating the construct of impulsivity in EDs is limited. The objectives of the present study were to characterize multiple dimensions of impulsivity in adolescents with EDs; determine if differences in impulsivity were associated with ED diagnosis and/or broader personality traits; and explore the relationship between impulsivity and etiologically significant variables. Experienced clinicians from a practice-research network provided data on ED symptoms, impulsive characteristics, personality pathology, The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders comorbidity, and family and developmental history for 120 adolescent patients with EDs. Three distinct types of impulsivity were identified: general, acting out, and aggressive/destructive. The impulsivity types showed specific relationships to ED diagnosis, broader personality factors, individual histories of adverse (traumatic) events, and family histories of externalizing disorders, supporting the importance of taking, assessing, and addressing impulsivity in ED research and treatment.

  14. How Many Impulsivities? A Discounting Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel

    2014-01-01

    People discount the value of delayed and uncertain outcomes, and how steeply individuals discount is thought to reflect how impulsive they are. From this perspective, steep discounting of delayed outcomes (which fails to maximize long-term welfare) and shallow discounting of probabilistic outcomes (which fails to adequately take risk into account) reflect the same trait of impulsivity. Despite the fact that a hyperboloid function describes the discounting of both delayed and probabilistic outcomes, there is considerable evidence that the two kinds of discounting involve different processes as well as separate impulsivity traits. Several manipulations differentially affect delay and probability discounting, and correlational studies show that how steeply one discounts delayed rewards is relatively independent of how steeply one discounts probabilistic rewards. Moreover, people’s discounting of delayed money and health outcomes are uncorrelated as are discounting of real, consumable rewards and hypothetical money. These results suggest that even within delay discounting, there may be multiple ‘impulsivities,’ each of which may be important for understanding a different aspect of decision making. Taken together, the pattern of findings reviewed here argues for a more nuanced view of impulsivity than that which is usually assumed in discounting research. PMID:23344985

  15. Nutritional recommendations for synchronized swimming.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sherry; Benardot, Dan; Mountjoy, Margo

    2014-08-01

    The sport of synchronized swimming is unique, because it combines speed, power, and endurance with precise synchronized movements and high-risk acrobatic maneuvers. Athletes must train and compete while spending a great amount of time underwater, upside down, and without the luxury of easily available oxygen. This review assesses the scientific evidence with respect to the physiological demands, energy expenditure, and body composition in these athletes. The role of appropriate energy requirements and guidelines for carbohydrate, protein, fat, and micronutrients for elite synchronized swimmers are reviewed. Because of the aesthetic nature of the sport, which prioritizes leanness, the risks of energy and macronutrient deficiencies are of significant concern. Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport and disordered eating/eating disorders are also of concern for these female athletes. An approach to the healthy management of body composition in synchronized swimming is outlined. Synchronized swimmers should be encouraged to consume a well-balanced diet with sufficient energy to meet demands and to time the intake of carbohydrate, protein, and fat to optimize performance and body composition. Micronutrients of concern for this female athlete population include iron, calcium, and vitamin D. This article reviews the physiological demands of synchronized swimming and makes nutritional recommendations for recovery, training, and competition to help optimize athletic performance and to reduce risks for weight-related medical issues that are of particular concern for elite synchronized swimmers.

  16. How to synchronize biological clocks.

    PubMed

    Russo, G; Di Bernardo, M

    2009-02-01

    This paper is concerned with a novel algorithm to study networks of biological clocks. A new set of conditions is established that can be used to verify whether an existing network synchronizes or to give guidelines to construct a new synthetic network of biological oscillators that synchronize. The methodology uses the so-called contraction theory from dynamical system theory and Gershgorin disk theorem. The strategy is validated on two examples: a model of glycolisis in yeast cells and a synthetic network of Repressilators that synchronizes.

  17. Synchronization of periodical cicada emergences.

    PubMed

    Hoppensteadt, F C; Keller, J B

    1976-10-15

    Synchronized insect emergences are shown to be a possible consequence of predation in the presence of a limited environmental carrying capacity through a mathematical model for cicada populations that includes these two features. Synchronized emergences, like those observed in 13- and 17-year cicades, are predicted for insects with sufficiently long life-spans. Balanced solutions, in which comparable emergences occur each year, are found for insects having sufficiently short life-spans, such as 3-, 4-, and 7-year cicadas. For the values used here, synchronized emergences occur for insects with life-spans of 10 years or more, and balanced emergences occur for life-spans of fewer than 10 years.

  18. Optimal waveforms design for ultra-wideband impulse radio sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zhou, Zheng; Zou, Weixia; Li, Dejian; Zhao, Chong

    2010-01-01

    Ultra-wideband impulse radio (UWB-IR) sensors should comply entirely with the regulatory spectral limits for elegant coexistence. Under this premise, it is desirable for UWB pulses to improve frequency utilization to guarantee the transmission reliability. Meanwhile, orthogonal waveform division multiple-access (WDMA) is significant to mitigate mutual interferences in UWB sensor networks. Motivated by the considerations, we suggest in this paper a low complexity pulse forming technique, and its efficient implementation on DSP is investigated. The UWB pulse is derived preliminarily with the objective of minimizing the mean square error (MSE) between designed power spectrum density (PSD) and the emission mask. Subsequently, this pulse is iteratively modified until its PSD completely conforms to spectral constraints. The orthogonal restriction is then analyzed and different algorithms have been presented. Simulation demonstrates that our technique can produce UWB waveforms with frequency utilization far surpassing the other existing signals under arbitrary spectral mask conditions. Compared to other orthogonality design schemes, the designed pulses can maintain mutual orthogonality without any penalty on frequency utilization, and hence, are much superior in a WDMA network, especially with synchronization deviations.

  19. Optimal Waveforms Design for Ultra-Wideband Impulse Radio Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Zhou, Zheng; Zou, Weixia; Li, Dejian; Zhao, Chong

    2010-01-01

    Ultra-wideband impulse radio (UWB-IR) sensors should comply entirely with the regulatory spectral limits for elegant coexistence. Under this premise, it is desirable for UWB pulses to improve frequency utilization to guarantee the transmission reliability. Meanwhile, orthogonal waveform division multiple-access (WDMA) is significant to mitigate mutual interferences in UWB sensor networks. Motivated by the considerations, we suggest in this paper a low complexity pulse forming technique, and its efficient implementation on DSP is investigated. The UWB pulse is derived preliminarily with the objective of minimizing the mean square error (MSE) between designed power spectrum density (PSD) and the emission mask. Subsequently, this pulse is iteratively modified until its PSD completely conforms to spectral constraints. The orthogonal restriction is then analyzed and different algorithms have been presented. Simulation demonstrates that our technique can produce UWB waveforms with frequency utilization far surpassing the other existing signals under arbitrary spectral mask conditions. Compared to other orthogonality design schemes, the designed pulses can maintain mutual orthogonality without any penalty on frequency utilization, and hence, are much superior in a WDMA network, especially with synchronization deviations. PMID:22163511

  20. Impulsive Behavior and Associated Clinical Variables in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abosch, Aviva; Gupte, Akshay; Eberly, Lynn E.; Tuite, Paul J.; Nance, Martha; Grant, Jon E.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a degenerative brain disorder accompanied by the loss of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of motor and non-motor symptoms. We performed a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based analysis of impulsive behavior in our PD clinic population to assess prevalence and associated characteristics. We found a higher prevalence of impulsive behavior (29.7%) than previously reported, and found multiple, concurrent impulsive behaviors in 26% of subjects reporting impulsive behavior. Our findings contribute to the growing awareness of impulsive behavior in PD, and support the need for longitudinal studies to assess changes in impulsive behaviors in Parkinson's patients. PMID:21300194

  1. Does impulse noise induce vestibular disturbances?

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, I; Aalto, H; Ylikoski, J

    1989-01-01

    The effect of impulse noise on postural stability was evaluated in 54 subjects from the Finnish army, who were suffering from acute hearing loss caused by exposure to firearms noise. For referents we used 20 non-exposed army recruits and 39 civilian volunteers. The effects of vision, pressoreceptor function and proprioception were stepwise excluded or altered, leaving mainly the vestibular guidance of postural control intact. Since the postural perturbation was fairly smooth during these instances we assume that the condition evaluates mainly the function of the otolith organs in guiding stance. We found no difference in any of the test conditions used, between normal controls, army controls and impulse noise exposed subjects. Furthermore, there was no dose response with body sway and severity of hearing loss. The results indicate that impulse noise may not be the cause of significant functional changes in the vestibular system that can account for noise-induced postural instability.

  2. Auto-programmable impulse neural circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watula, D.; Meador, J.

    1990-01-01

    Impulse neural networks use pulse trains to communicate neuron activation levels. Impulse neural circuits emulate natural neurons at a more detailed level than that typically employed by contemporary neural network implementation methods. An impulse neural circuit which realizes short term memory dynamics is presented. The operation of that circuit is then characterized in terms of pulse frequency modulated signals. Both fixed and programmable synapse circuits for realizing long term memory are also described. The implementation of a simple and useful unsupervised learning law is then presented. The implementation of a differential Hebbian learning rule for a specific mean-frequency signal interpretation is shown to have a straightforward implementation using digital combinational logic with a variation of a previously developed programmable synapse circuit. This circuit is expected to be exploited for simple and straightforward implementation of future auto-adaptive neural circuits.

  3. Reflective and impulsive determinants of social behavior.

    PubMed

    Strack, Fritz; Deutsch, Roland

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a 2-systems model that explains social behavior as a joint function of reflective and impulsive processes. In particular, it is assumed that social behavior is controlled by 2 interacting systems that follow different operating principles. The reflective system generates behavioral decisions that are based on knowledge about facts and values, whereas the impulsive system elicits behavior through associative links and motivational orientations. The proposed model describes how the 2 systems interact at various stages of processing, and how their outputs may determine behavior in a synergistic or antagonistic fashion. It extends previous models by integrating motivational components that allow more precise predictions of behavior. The implications of this reflective-impulsive model are applied to various phenomena from social psychology and beyond. Extending previous dual-process accounts, this model is not limited to specific domains of mental functioning and attempts to integrate cognitive, motivational, and behavioral mechanisms.

  4. Impulsive-compulsive buying disorder: clinical overview.

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Allen, Andrea; Altamura, A Carlo; Buoli, Massimiliano; Hollander, Eric

    2008-04-01

    Impulsive-compulsive buying disorder (ICBD) is an impulse control disorder not otherwise specified (ICD-NOS) characterized by impulsive drives and compulsive behaviours (buying unneeded things), personal distress, impaired social and vocational functioning and financial problems. Despite being described in the 19th century, serious attention to ICBD began only in the last decade with the first epidemiological and pharmacological investigation. Biological, social and psychological factors contribute to the aetiology of ICBD. Cognitive-behavioural therapy and selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors are currently considered the more effective interventions in the treatment of ICBD. The present review aims to provide a broad overview of the epidemiology, aetiology, phenomenology and treatment options of ICBD.

  5. Structural health monitoring of cylindrical bodies under impulsive hydrodynamic loading by distributed FBG strain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, Pierluigi; Biscarini, Chiara; Jannelli, Elio; Ubertini, Filippo; Ubertini, Stefano

    2017-02-01

    Various mechanical, ocean, aerospace and civil engineering problems involve solid bodies impacting the water surface and often result in complex coupled dynamics, characterized by impulsive loading conditions, high amplitude vibrations and large local deformations. Monitoring in such problems for purposes such as remaining fatigue life estimation and real time damage detection is a technical and scientific challenge of primary concern in this context. Open issues include the need for developing distributed sensing systems able to operate at very high acquisition frequencies, to be utilized to study rapidly varying strain fields, with high resolution and very low noise, while scientific challenges mostly relate to the definition of appropriate signal processing and modeling tools enabling the extraction of useful information from distributed sensing signals. Building on previous work by some of the authors, we propose an enhanced method for real time deformed shape reconstruction using distributed FBG strain measurements in curved bodies subjected to impulsive loading and we establish a new framework for applying this method for structural health monitoring purposes, as the main focus of the work. Experiments are carried out on a cylinder impacting the water at various speeds, proving improved performance in displacement reconstruction of the enhanced method compared to its previous version. A numerical study is then carried out considering the same physical problem with different delamination damages affecting the body. The potential for detecting, localizing and quantifying this damage using the reconstruction algorithm is thoroughly investigated. Overall, the results presented in the paper show the potential of distributed FBG strain measurements for real time structural health monitoring of curved bodies under impulsive hydrodynamic loading, defining damage sensitive features in terms of strain or displacement reconstruction errors at selected locations along

  6. Competing Synchronization of Nonlinear Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Epaminondas

    2006-03-01

    Coupled nonlinear oscillators abound in nature and in man-made devices. Think for example of two neurons in the brain competing to get the attention of a third neuron, and eventually developing some sort of synchronization process. This is a common feature involving oscillators in general, and can be studied using numerical simulations and/or experimental setups. In this talk, results involving electronic circuits and plasma discharges will be presented showing interesting features related to the types of oscillators and to the types of couplings. In particular, for the case of two oscillators competing for synchronization with a third one, the target oscillator synchronizes alternately to one or the other of the competing oscillators. The time intervals of synchronous states vary in a random-like manner. Numerical and experimental results will be presented and the consistency between them will be discussed.

  7. Synchronous identification of friendly targets

    DOEpatents

    Telle, John M.; Roger, Stutz A.

    1998-01-01

    A synchronous communication targeting system for use in battle. The present invention includes a transceiver having a stabilizing oscillator, a synchronous amplifier and an omnidirectional receiver, all in electrical communication with each other. A remotely located beacon is attached to a blackbody radiation source and has an amplitude modulator in electrical communication with a optical source. The beacon's amplitude modulator is set so that the optical source transmits radiation frequency at approximately the same or lower amplitude than that of the blackbody radiation source to which the beacon is attached. The receiver from the transceiver is adapted to receive frequencies approximately at or below blackbody radiation signals and sends such signals to the synchronous amplifier. The synchronous amplifier then rectifies and amplifies those signals which correspond to the predetermined frequency to therefore identify whether the blackbody radiation source is friendly or not.

  8. Synchronized Swimming of Two Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros; Novati, Guido; Abbati, Gabriele; Hejazialhosseini, Babak; van Rees, Wim

    2015-11-01

    We present simulations of two, self-propelled, fish-like swimmers that perform synchronized moves in a two-dimensional, viscous fluid. The swimmers learn to coordinate by receiving a reward for their synchronized actions. We analyze the swimming patterns emerging for different rewards in terms of their hydrodynamic efficiency and artistic impression. European Research Council (ERC) Advanced Investigator Award (No. 2-73985-14).

  9. Project Reconstruct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helisek, Harriet; Pratt, Donald

    1994-01-01

    Presents a project in which students monitor their use of trash, input and analyze information via a database and computerized graphs, and "reconstruct" extinct or endangered animals from recyclable materials. The activity was done with second-grade students over a period of three to four weeks. (PR)

  10. Synchronous reactive programming in Ptolemy

    SciTech Connect

    Boulanger, F.; Vidal-Naquet, G.

    1996-12-31

    Synchronous reactive languages allow a high level deterministic description of reactive systems such as control-command systems. Their well defined mathematical semantics makes it possible to check formal properties on the control of a system. In previous work, we developed an object-oriented execution model for synchronous reactive modules. This model is implemented as a set of tools and a C++ class library, and allows us to use object-oriented methodologies and tools for the design of complex applications with both transformational and reactive parts. Among these design tools, the Ptolemy system stands as an object-oriented framework that supports various execution models, or {open_quotes}domains{close_quotes}. We are currently working on a translator from the output format of the Lustre and Esterel compilers to the Ptolemy language. Since no existing domain matches the reactive synchronous execution model, we also plan to develop a SEC (Synchronous Execution and Communication) domain. Such a domain will provide support for the execution of synchronous modules in Ptolemy. One of the most interesting features of Ptolemy is the communication between domains. Therefore we discuss the interface of the SEC domain to other domains to determine the meaning of communications between them. The main goal is to allow the use of synchronous reactive modules for the control of the behavior of data-flow or discrete event processes.

  11. Quantifying Neural Oscillatory Synchronization: A Comparison between Spectral Coherence and Phase-Locking Value Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark J.; Bonizzi, Pietro; Karel, Joël; De Weerd, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization or phase-locking between oscillating neuronal groups is considered to be important for coordination of information among cortical networks. Spectral coherence is a commonly used approach to quantify phase locking between neural signals. We systematically explored the validity of spectral coherence measures for quantifying synchronization among neural oscillators. To that aim, we simulated coupled oscillatory signals that exhibited synchronization dynamics using an abstract phase-oscillator model as well as interacting gamma-generating spiking neural networks. We found that, within a large parameter range, the spectral coherence measure deviated substantially from the expected phase-locking. Moreover, spectral coherence did not converge to the expected value with increasing signal-to-noise ratio. We found that spectral coherence particularly failed when oscillators were in the partially (intermittent) synchronized state, which we expect to be the most likely state for neural synchronization. The failure was due to the fast frequency and amplitude changes induced by synchronization forces. We then investigated whether spectral coherence reflected the information flow among networks measured by transfer entropy (TE) of spike trains. We found that spectral coherence failed to robustly reflect changes in synchrony-mediated information flow between neural networks in many instances. As an alternative approach we explored a phase-locking value (PLV) method based on the reconstruction of the instantaneous phase. As one approach for reconstructing instantaneous phase, we used the Hilbert Transform (HT) preceded by Singular Spectrum Decomposition (SSD) of the signal. PLV estimates have broad applicability as they do not rely on stationarity, and, unlike spectral coherence, they enable more accurate estimations of oscillatory synchronization across a wide range of different synchronization regimes, and better tracking of synchronization-mediated information

  12. ACL reconstruction - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction - discharge; ACL reconstruction - discharge ... had surgery to reconstruct your anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The surgeon drilled holes in the bones of ...

  13. Dimensions of impulsive behavior in adolescents: laboratory behavioral assessments.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Brady; Penfold, Robert B; Patak, Michele

    2008-04-01

    Impulsivity is a multifaceted construct that defines a range of maladaptive behavioral styles. The present research aimed to identify different dimensions of impulsive behavior in adolescents from a battery of laboratory behavioral assessments. In one analysis, correlations were examined between two self report and seven laboratory behavioral measures of impulsivity. The correlation between the two self report measures was high compared to correlations between the self report and laboratory behavioral measures. In a second analysis, a principal components analysis was performed with just the laboratory behavioral measures. Three behavioral dimensions were identified -- "impulsive decision-making", "impulsive inattention", and "impulsive disinhibition". These dimensions were further evaluated using the same sample with a confirmatory factor analysis, which did support the hypothesis that these are significant and independent dimensions of impulsivity. This research indicates there are at least three separate subtypes of impulsive behavior when using laboratory behavioral assessments with adolescent participants.

  14. Empathic deficits and alexithymia in trauma-related impulsive aggression.

    PubMed

    Teten, Andra L; Miller, Lisa A; Bailey, Sara D; Dunn, Nancy Jo; Kent, Thomas A

    2008-01-01

    Our long term interest is to develop a developmental model of impulsive aggression based on a confluence of social, psychological and biological features. This approach incorporates neurobiological research, which has identified language processing deficits as a unique characteristic of impulsive aggressors and extends it to include emotional deficits. As an initial test of this hypothesis, we examined whether empathy and alexithymia were associated with impulsive aggression. Regressions were performed to explore the associations among impaired empathy, alexithymia, impulsive aggression, verbal and physical general aggression. Among impulsive aggressive veterans (n=38) recruited from a VA trauma clinic, alexithymia predicted impulsive aggression and empathic deficits predicted verbal aggression. Neither emotional awareness deficit predicted general physical aggression in this middle-aged sample. Results suggested that empathic deficits were associated with general verbal aggression, but alexithymia was uniquely associated with impulsive aggression. Consideration of alexithymia in impulsive aggression has implications for its etiology, prevention and treatment.

  15. Impulse Plasma In Surface Engineering - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdunek, K.; Nowakowska-Langier, K.; Chodun, R.; Okrasa, S.; Rabinski, M.; Dora, J.; Domanowski, P.; Halarowicz, J.

    2014-11-01

    The article describes the view of the plasma surface engineering, assuming the role of non-thermal energy effects in the synthesis of materials and coatings deposition. In the following study it was underlined that the vapor excitation through the application of an electric field during coatings deposition gives new possibilities for coatings formation. As an example the IPD method was chosen. During the IPD (Impulse Plasma Deposition) the impulse plasma is generated in the coaxial accelerator by strong periodic electrical pulses. The impulse plasma is distributed in the form of energetic plasma pockets. Due to the almost completely ionization of gas, the nucleation of new phases takes place on ions directly in the plasma itself. As a result the coatings of metastable materials with nano-amorphous structure and excellent adhesion to the non-heated intentionally substrates could be deposited. Recently the novel way of impulse plasma generation during the coatings deposition was proposed and developed by our group. An efficient tool for plasma process control, the plasma forming gas injection to the interelectrode space was used. Periodic changing the gas pressure results in increasing both the degree of dispersion and the dynamics of the plasma pulses. The advantage of the new technique in deposition of coatings with exceptionally good properties has been demonstrated in the industrial scale not only in the case of the IPD method but also in the case of very well known magnetron sputtering method.

  16. Functional impulsivity and reinforcement sensitivity theory.

    PubMed

    Smillie, Luke D; Jackson, Chris J

    2006-02-01

    In this article, we attempt to integrate Dickman's (1990) descriptive concept of Functional Impulsivity (FI) with Gray's (1970, 1991) Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST). Specifically, we consider that FI bears great conceptual similarity to Gray's concept of reward-reactivity, which is thought to be caused by the combined effects of a Behavioral Activation System (BAS) and Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS). In our first study, we examine the construct validity and structural correlates of FI. Results indicate that FI is related positively to measures of BAS and Extraversion, negatively to measures of BIS and Neuroticism, and is separate from Psychoticism and typical trait Impulsivity, which Dickman calls Dysfunctional Impulsivity (DI). In our second study, we use a go/no-go discrimination task to examine the relationship between FI and response bias under conditions of rewarding and punishing feedback. Results indicate that FI, along with two measures of BAS, predicted the development of a response bias for the rewarded alternative. In comparison, high DI appeared to reflect indifference toward either reward or punishment. We consider how these findings might reconcile the perspectives of Gray and Dickman and help clarify the broader understanding of Impulsivity.

  17. Impulsive Behaviors in Patients With Pathological Buying

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Heike; Claes, Laurence; Voth, Eva M.; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate impulsive behaviors in pathological buying (PB). Methods The study included three groups matched for age and gender: treatment seeking outpatients with PB (PB+), treatment seeking psychiatric inpatients without PB (PB−), and a healthy control group (HC). PB was assessed by means of the Compulsive Buying Scale and by the impulse control disorder (ICD) module of the research version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-ICD). All participants answered questionnaires concerning symptoms of borderline personality disorder, self-harming behaviors, binge eating and symptoms of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In addition, comorbid ICDs were assessed using the SCID-ICD. Results The PB+ and PB− groups did not differ with regard to borderline personality disorder or ADHD symptoms, but both groups reported significantly more symptoms than the HC group. Frequencies of self-harming behaviors did not differ between the three groups. Patients with PB were more often diagnosed with any current ICD (excluding PB) compared to those without PB and the HC group (38.7% vs. 12.9% vs. 12.9%, respectively, p=.017). Discussion Our findings confirm prior research suggesting more impulsive behaviors in patients with and without PB compared to healthy controls. The results of the questionnaire-based assessment indicate that outpatients with PB perceive themselves equally impulsive and self-harm as frequently as inpatients without PB; but they seem to suffer more often from an ICD as assessed by means of an interview. PMID:27415604

  18. Specific Impulses Losses in Solid Propellant Rockets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-17

    to use the collision function form proposed by Golovin to simplify this production term: 4C><=) <P- .: Accordingly: m hence, by integration: Now, we...November 21, 1940 in Paris, Seine. VFirst Thesis. "Contribution to the Study of Specific i Impulse Loss in Solid Propellant Rockets." Second Thesis

  19. Impulse noise trauma during army weapon firing.

    PubMed

    Munjal, K R; Singh, V P

    1997-04-01

    A 100 infanty personnel firing modern weapons such as the Anti Tank Guided Missile, 106mm Recoiless Gun (RCL), 84mm Rocket Launcher (RL) and 81mm Mortar were studied for the effect of impulse noise on the ear and the evolution of the Temporary Threshold Shift (TTS), Recovery Time (RT) and Permanent Threshold Shift (PTS) was traced.

  20. How Many Impulsivities? A Discounting Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel

    2013-01-01

    People discount the value of delayed and uncertain outcomes, and how steeply individuals discount is thought to reflect how impulsive they are. From this perspective, steep discounting of delayed outcomes (which fails to maximize long-term welfare) and shallow discounting of probabilistic outcomes (which fails to adequately take risk into account)…

  1. Maternal Inattention and Impulsivity and Parenting Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Mandy; Johnston, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    This study extends previous research by examining whether maternal inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity are associated with different parenting behaviors. Ninety-six mother-son dyads participated in the study, and the boys ranged between 4 and 8 years of age. Maternal inattention was uniquely and positively associated with mothers' use of…

  2. The Relationship among Spontaneity, Impulsivity, and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipper, David A.; Green, Doreen J.; Prorak, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate two characteristics of spontaneity, its relationship to creativity and to impulsivity. We hypothesized a positive relationship between spontaneity and creativity, consistent with Moreno, 1953 "canon of spontaneity-creativity." We also predicted a negative relationship between spontaneity and…

  3. A Dual-Polarity Impulse Radiating Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, L. H.; Farr, E. G.; Lawry, D. I.

    Dual polarity Impulse Radiating Antennas (IRA's) may be useful in a variety of applications. The dual-polarity IRA described here has an impendence mismatch for each polarity at the focus of the reflector. In spite of this mismatch the antenna characteristics are quite good up to 10 GHz for applications where reflections within the system are not of great importance.

  4. Impulsivity and Strategy Transfer: Metamemory as Mediator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borkowski, John G.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Acquisition, maintenance, and generalization of organizational strategies were studied in two experiments as a function of impulsivity-reflectivity and metamemory among primary school students. Findings are in line with the hypothesis that metamemory, rather than cognitive tempo, mediates the effectiveness of an experimenter-trained strategy in…

  5. Arbitration between controlled and impulsive choices

    PubMed Central

    Economides, M.; Guitart-Masip, M.; Kurth-Nelson, Z.; Dolan, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    The impulse to act for immediate reward often conflicts with more deliberate evaluations that support long-term benefit. The neural architecture that negotiates this conflict remains unclear. One account proposes a single neural circuit that evaluates both immediate and delayed outcomes, while another outlines separate impulsive and patient systems that compete for behavioral control. Here we designed a task in which a complex payout structure divorces the immediate value of acting from the overall long-term value, within the same outcome modality. Using model-based fMRI in humans, we demonstrate separate neural representations of immediate and long-term values, with the former tracked in the anterior caudate (AC) and the latter in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Crucially, when subjects' choices were compatible with long-run consequences, value signals in AC were down-weighted and those in vmPFC were enhanced, while the opposite occurred when choice was impulsive. Thus, our data implicate a trade-off in value representation between AC and vmPFC as underlying controlled versus impulsive choice. PMID:25573670

  6. Ultrahigh Specific Impulse Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Anne Charmeau; Brandon Cunningham; Samim Anghaie

    2009-02-09

    Research on nuclear thermal propulsion systems (NTP) have been in forefront of the space nuclear power and propulsion due to their design simplicity and their promise for providing very high thrust at reasonably high specific impulse. During NERVA-ROVER program in late 1950's till early 1970's, the United States developed and ground tested about 18 NTP systems without ever deploying them into space. The NERVA-ROVER program included development and testing of NTP systems with very high thrust (~250,000 lbf) and relatively high specific impulse (~850 s). High thrust to weight ratio in NTP systems is an indicator of high acceleration that could be achieved with these systems. The specific impulse in the lowest mass propellant, hydrogen, is a function of square root of absolute temperature in the NTP thrust chamber. Therefor optimizing design performance of NTP systems would require achieving the highest possible hydrogen temperature at reasonably high thrust to weight ratio. High hydrogen exit temperature produces high specific impulse that is a diret measure of propellant usage efficiency.

  7. The Formation and Transformation of Moral Impulse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Ronald Lee

    1999-01-01

    Examines recent research that suggests the formation of moral impulse, rather than moral reasoning, is the basis for moral development and education. Discusses the insights of the medieval Jewish philosopher and physician Maimonides, comparing his ideas with current research in neuroscience. Discusses implications for educational and social…

  8. Noncoherent DTTLs for Symbol Synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin; Tkacenko, Andre

    2007-01-01

    Noncoherent data-transition tracking loops (DTTLs) have been proposed for use as symbol synchronizers in digital communication receivers. [Communication- receiver subsystems that can perform their assigned functions in the absence of synchronization with the phases of their carrier signals ( carrier synchronization ) are denoted by the term noncoherent, while receiver subsystems that cannot function without carrier synchronization are said to be coherent. ] The proposal applies, more specifically, to receivers of binary phase-shift-keying (BPSK) signals generated by directly phase-modulating binary non-return-to-zero (NRZ) data streams onto carrier signals having known frequencies but unknown phases. The proposed noncoherent DTTLs would be modified versions of traditional DTTLs, which are coherent. The symbol-synchronization problem is essentially the problem of recovering symbol timing from a received signal. In the traditional, coherent approach to symbol synchronization, it is necessary to establish carrier synchronization in order to recover symbol timing. A traditional DTTL effects an iterative process in which it first generates an estimate of the carrier phase in the absence of symbol-synchronization information, then uses the carrier-phase estimate to obtain an estimate of the symbol-synchronization information, then feeds the symbol-synchronization estimate back to the carrier-phase-estimation subprocess. In a noncoherent symbol-synchronization process, there is no need for carrier synchronization and, hence, no need for iteration between carrier-synchronization and symbol- synchronization subprocesses. The proposed noncoherent symbolsynchronization process is justified theoretically by a mathematical derivation that starts from a maximum a posteriori (MAP) method of estimation of symbol timing utilized in traditional, coherent DTTLs. In that MAP method, one chooses the value of a variable of interest (in this case, the offset in the estimated symbol

  9. Fractionating impulsivity: contrasting effects of central 5-HT depletion on different measures of impulsive behavior.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, Catharine A; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Theobald, David E H; Robbins, Trevor W

    2004-07-01

    Reducing levels of 5-HT in the central nervous system has been associated with increases in impulsive behavior. However, the impulsivity construct describes a wide range of behaviors, including the inability to withhold a response, intolerance to delay of reward and perseveration of a nonrewarded response. Although these behaviors are generally studied using instrumental paradigms, impulsivity may also be reflected in simple Pavlovian tasks such as autoshaping and conditioned activity. This experiment aimed to characterize further the effects of central 5-HT depletion and to investigate whether different behavioral measures of impulsivity are inter-related, thus validating the construct. Rats received intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusions of vehicle (n=10) or the serotonergic neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (n=12) which depleted forebrain 5-HT levels by about 90%. Lesioned animals showed significant increases in the speed and number of responses made in autoshaping, increased premature responding on a simple visual attentional task, enhanced expression of locomotor activity conditioned to food presentation, yet no change in impulsive choice was observed, as measured by a delay-discounting paradigm. Significant positive correlations were found between responses made in autoshaping and the level of conditioned activity, indicating a possible common basis for these behaviors, yet no correlations were found between other behavioral measures. These data strengthen and extend the hypothesis that 5-HT depletion increases certain types of impulsive responding. However, not all measures of impulsivity appear to be uniformly affected by 5-HT depletion, or correlate with each other, supporting the suggestion that impulsivity is not a unitary construct.

  10. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  11. Practical stability analysis of fractional-order impulsive control systems.

    PubMed

    Stamova, Ivanka; Henderson, Johnny

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we obtain sufficient conditions for practical stability of a nonlinear system of differential equations of fractional order subject to impulse effects. Our results provide a design method of impulsive control law which practically stabilizes the impulse free fractional-order system.

  12. Measuring Impulsivity in Adolescents with Serious Substance and Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laetitia L.; Whitmore, Elizabeth A.; Raymond, Kristen M.; Crowley, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Adolescents with substance use and conduct disorders have high rates of aggression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), all of which have been characterized in part by impulsivity. Developing measures that capture impulsivity behaviorally and correlate with self-reported impulsivity has been difficult. One promising behavioral…

  13. Recursive Inversion By Finite-Impulse-Response Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, Ralph E., Jr.; Baram, Yoram

    1991-01-01

    Recursive approximation gives least-squares best fit to exact response. Algorithm yields finite-impulse-response approximation of unknown single-input/single-output, causal, time-invariant, linear, real system, response of which is sequence of impulses. Applicable to such system-inversion problems as suppression of echoes and identification of target from its scatter response to incident impulse.

  14. Impulsive for life? The nature of long-term impulsivity in domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Stefanie; Mills, Daniel S; Wright, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    Individual differences in impulsivity occur at a cognitive and/or behavioural level and are associated with differing life outcomes. However, there is a lack of empirical evidence to support the long-term stability of these characteristics in non-human animals. This study reports on the stability of convergent measures of impulsivity in domestic dogs assessed more than 6 years apart. Measures were (1) owner assessment by means of a questionnaire, the validated 'Dog Impulsivity Assessment Scale' (DIAS) and (2) dogs' performance in a delayed reward choice test. Dogs had 15-min free access to two food dispensers, one dispensing a piece of food immediately, the other dispensing three pieces after a delay, which increased by 1 s every other time the dogs sampled it. Maximum delay reached in this task reflects decision-making, or cognitive impulsivity, whereas the rate of extra presses on the delayed reward device during the delay can be considered as a measure of motor or behavioural impulsivity. DIAS scores were strongly and significantly correlated across years. The maximum delay reached in the behaviour test was also highly stable, whereas paw-pressing rate was uncorrelated between the years. These results demonstrate that cognitive but not motor impulsivity is highly consistent over time in dogs.

  15. On the estimation of phase synchronization, spurious synchronization and filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Herrera, Wady A.; Escalona, Joaquín; Rivera López, Daniel; Müller, Markus F.

    2016-12-01

    Phase synchronization, viz., the adjustment of instantaneous frequencies of two interacting self-sustained nonlinear oscillators, is frequently used for the detection of a possible interrelationship between empirical data recordings. In this context, the proper estimation of the instantaneous phase from a time series is a crucial aspect. The probability that numerical estimates provide a physically relevant meaning depends sensitively on the shape of its power spectral density. For this purpose, the power spectrum should be narrow banded possessing only one prominent peak [M. Chavez et al., J. Neurosci. Methods 154, 149 (2006)]. If this condition is not fulfilled, band-pass filtering seems to be the adequate technique in order to pre-process data for a posterior synchronization analysis. However, it was reported that band-pass filtering might induce spurious synchronization [L. Xu et al., Phys. Rev. E 73, 065201(R), (2006); J. Sun et al., Phys. Rev. E 77, 046213 (2008); and J. Wang and Z. Liu, EPL 102, 10003 (2013)], a statement that without further specification causes uncertainty over all measures that aim to quantify phase synchronization of broadband field data. We show by using signals derived from different test frameworks that appropriate filtering does not induce spurious synchronization. Instead, filtering in the time domain tends to wash out existent phase interrelations between signals. Furthermore, we show that measures derived for the estimation of phase synchronization like the mean phase coherence are also useful for the detection of interrelations between time series, which are not necessarily derived from coupled self-sustained nonlinear oscillators.

  16. Bodily synchronization underlying joke telling

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, R. C.; Nie, Lin; Franco, Alison; Richardson, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in video and time series analysis have greatly enhanced our ability to study the bodily synchronization that occurs in natural interactions. Past research has demonstrated that the behavioral synchronization involved in social interactions is similar to dynamical synchronization found generically in nature. The present study investigated how the bodily synchronization in a joke telling task is spread across different nested temporal scales. Pairs of participants enacted knock–knock jokes and times series of their bodily activity were recorded. Coherence and relative phase analyses were used to evaluate the synchronization of bodily rhythms for the whole trial as well as at the subsidiary time scales of the whole joke, the setup of the punch line, the two-person exchange and the utterance. The analyses revealed greater than chance entrainment of the joke teller’s and joke responder’s movements at all time scales and that the relative phasing of the teller’s movements led those of the responder at the longer time scales. Moreover, this entrainment was greater when visual information about the partner’s movements was present but was decreased particularly at the shorter time scales when explicit gesturing in telling the joke was performed. In short, the results demonstrate that a complex interpersonal bodily “dance” occurs during structured conversation interactions and that this “dance” is constructed from a set of rhythms associated with the nested behavioral structure of the interaction. PMID:25177287

  17. How Synchronization Protects from Noise

    PubMed Central

    Tabareau, Nicolas; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Pham, Quang-Cuong

    2010-01-01

    The functional role of synchronization has attracted much interest and debate: in particular, synchronization may allow distant sites in the brain to communicate and cooperate with each other, and therefore may play a role in temporal binding, in attention or in sensory-motor integration mechanisms. In this article, we study another role for synchronization: the so-called “collective enhancement of precision”. We argue, in a full nonlinear dynamical context, that synchronization may help protect interconnected neurons from the influence of random perturbations—intrinsic neuronal noise—which affect all neurons in the nervous system. More precisely, our main contribution is a mathematical proof that, under specific, quantified conditions, the impact of noise on individual interconnected systems and on their spatial mean can essentially be cancelled through synchronization. This property then allows reliable computations to be carried out even in the presence of significant noise (as experimentally found e.g., in retinal ganglion cells in primates). This in turn is key to obtaining meaningful downstream signals, whether in terms of precisely-timed interaction (temporal coding), population coding, or frequency coding. Similar concepts may be applicable to questions of noise and variability in systems biology. PMID:20090826

  18. The Stomach-Derived Hormone Ghrelin Increases Impulsive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Hansson, Caroline; Fenander, Maya; Richard, Jennifer E; Dickson, Suzanne L; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-04-01

    Impulsivity, defined as impaired decision making, is associated with many psychiatric and behavioral disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as well as eating disorders. Recent data indicate that there is a strong positive correlation between food reward behavior and impulsivity, but the mechanisms behind this relationship remain unknown. Here we hypothesize that ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach and known to increase food reward behavior, also increases impulsivity. In order to assess the impact of ghrelin on impulsivity, rats were trained in three complementary tests of impulsive behavior and choice: differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL), go/no-go, and delay discounting. Ghrelin injection into the lateral ventricle increased impulsive behavior, as indicated by reduced efficiency of performance in the DRL test, and increased lever pressing during the no-go periods of the go/no-go test. Central ghrelin stimulation also increased impulsive choice, as evidenced by the reduced choice for large rewards when delivered with a delay in the delay discounting test. In order to determine whether signaling at the central ghrelin receptors is necessary for maintenance of normal levels of impulsive behavior, DRL performance was assessed following ghrelin receptor blockade with central infusion of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. Central ghrelin receptor blockade reduced impulsive behavior, as reflected by increased efficiency of performance in the DRL task. To further investigate the neurobiological substrate underlying the impulsivity effect of ghrelin, we microinjected ghrelin into the ventral tegmental area, an area harboring dopaminergic cell bodies. Ghrelin receptor stimulation within the VTA was sufficient to increase impulsive behavior. We further evaluated the impact of ghrelin on dopamine-related gene expression and dopamine turnover in brain areas key in impulsive behavior control. This study provides the first

  19. How to suppress undesired synchronization.

    PubMed

    Louzada, V H P; Araújo, N A M; Andrade, J S; Herrmann, H J

    2012-01-01

    Examples of synchronization can be found in a wide range of phenomena such as neurons firing, lasers cascades, chemical reactions, and opinion formation. However, in many situations the formation of a coherent state is not pleasant and should be mitigated. For example, the onset of synchronization can be the root of epileptic seizures, traffic congestion in networks, and the collapse of constructions. Here we propose the use of contrarians to suppress undesired synchronization. We perform a comparative study of different strategies, either requiring local or total knowledge, and show that the most efficient one solely requires local information. Our results also reveal that, even when the distribution of neighboring interactions is narrow, significant improvement is observed when contrarians sit at the highly connected elements. The same qualitative results are obtained for artificially generated networks and two real ones, namely, the Routers of the Internet and a neuronal network.

  20. Digital data detection and synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noack, T. L.; Morris, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The primary accomplishments have been in the analysis and simulation of receivers and bit synchronizers. It has been discovered that tracking rate effects play, a rather fundamental role in both receiver and synchronizer performance, but that data relating to recorder time-base-error, for the proper characterization of this phenomenon, is in rather short supply. It is possible to obtain operationally useful tape recorder time-base-error data from high signal-to-noise ratio tapes using synchronizers with relatively wideband tracking loops. Low signal-to-noise ratio tapes examined in the same way would not be synchronizable. Additional areas of interest covered are receiver false lock, cycle slipping, and other unusual phenomena, which have been described to some extent in this and earlier reports and simulated during the study.

  1. How to suppress undesired synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Louzada, V. H. P.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Andrade, J. S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Examples of synchronization can be found in a wide range of phenomena such as neurons firing, lasers cascades, chemical reactions, and opinion formation. However, in many situations the formation of a coherent state is not pleasant and should be mitigated. For example, the onset of synchronization can be the root of epileptic seizures, traffic congestion in networks, and the collapse of constructions. Here we propose the use of contrarians to suppress undesired synchronization. We perform a comparative study of different strategies, either requiring local or total knowledge, and show that the most efficient one solely requires local information. Our results also reveal that, even when the distribution of neighboring interactions is narrow, significant improvement is observed when contrarians sit at the highly connected elements. The same qualitative results are obtained for artificially generated networks and two real ones, namely, the Routers of the Internet and a neuronal network. PMID:22993685

  2. Remote synchronization in star networks.

    PubMed

    Bergner, A; Frasca, M; Sciuto, G; Buscarino, A; Ngamga, E J; Fortuna, L; Kurths, J

    2012-02-01

    We study phase synchronization in a network motif with a starlike structure in which the central node's (the hub's) frequency is strongly detuned against the other peripheral nodes. We find numerically and experimentally a regime of remote synchronization (RS), where the peripheral nodes form a phase synchronized cluster, while the hub remains free with its own dynamics and serves just as a transmitter for the other nodes. We explain the mechanism for this RS by the existence of a free amplitude and also show that systems with a fixed or constant amplitude, such as the classic Kuramoto phase oscillator, are not able to generate this phenomenon. Further, we derive an analytic expression which supports our explanation of the mechanism.

  3. Linear Synchronous Motor Repeatability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.R.

    2002-10-18

    A cart system using linear synchronous motors was being considered for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). One of the applications in the PIP was the movement of a stack of furnace trays, filled with the waste form (pucks) from a stacking/unstacking station to several bottom loaded furnaces. A system was ordered to perform this function in the PIP Ceramic Prototype Test Facility (CPTF). This system was installed and started up in SRTC prior to being installed in the CPTF. The PIP was suspended and then canceled after the linear synchronous motor system was started up. This system was used to determine repeatability of a linear synchronous motor cart system for the Modern Pit Facility.

  4. Different subtypes of impulsivity differentiate uncontrolled eating and dietary restraint.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Margaret A; Morgan, Michael J; Yeomans, Martin R

    2013-10-01

    The current study explored the relationship between three subtypes of impulsivity (Reflection Impulsivity, Impulsive Choice, and Impulsive Action) and measures of uncontrolled eating (TFEQ-D) and restraint (TFEQ-R). Eighty women classified as scoring higher or lower on TFEQ-D and TFEQ-R completed the Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFFT20), Delay Discounting Task (DDT), a Go No Go task, Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), and the Barrett Impulsivity Scale-11 (BIS-11). To test whether these relationships were affected by enforced controls overeating, half of the participants fasted the night before and ate breakfast in the laboratory before testing and half had no such control. Women scoring higher on the TFEQ-D were significantly more impulsive on the MFFT20 and BIS-11 overall but not on DDT, Go No Go or BART. Women scoring higher on TFEQ-R were significantly less impulsive on the Go No Go task but did not differ on other measures. The eating manipulation modulated responses on the BART and BIS-11 non-planning scale depending on TFEQ-D classification. These results confirm recent data that high scores on TFEQ-D are related to impulsivity, but imply this relates more to Reflection Impulsivity rather than Impulsive Choice or Action. In contrast restrained eating was associated with better inhibitory control. Taken together, these results suggest that subtypes of impulsivity further differentiate uncontrolled eating and restraint, and suggest that a poor ability to reflect on decisions may underlie some aspects of overeating.

  5. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L L

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship.

  6. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L. L.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship. PMID:26217251

  7. Barratt Impulsivity and Neural Regulation of Physiological Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Sien; Hu, Jianping; Wu, Po-Lun; Chao, Herta H.; Li, Chiang-shan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Theories of personality have posited an increased arousal response to external stimulation in impulsive individuals. However, there is a dearth of studies addressing the neural basis of this association. Methods We recorded skin conductance in 26 individuals who were assessed with Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and performed a stop signal task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging data were processed and modeled with Statistical Parametric Mapping. We used linear regressions to examine correlations between impulsivity and skin conductance response (SCR) to salient events, identify the neural substrates of arousal regulation, and examine the relationship between the regulatory mechanism and impulsivity. Results Across subjects, higher impulsivity is associated with greater SCR to stop trials. Activity of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) negatively correlated to and Granger caused skin conductance time course. Furthermore, higher impulsivity is associated with a lesser strength of Granger causality of vmPFC activity on skin conductance, consistent with diminished control of physiological arousal to external stimulation. When men (n = 14) and women (n = 12) were examined separately, however, there was evidence suggesting association between impulsivity and vmPFC regulation of arousal only in women. Conclusions Together, these findings confirmed the link between Barratt impulsivity and heightened arousal to salient stimuli in both genders and suggested the neural bases of altered regulation of arousal in impulsive women. More research is needed to explore the neural processes of arousal regulation in impulsive individuals and in clinical conditions that implicate poor impulse control. PMID:26079873

  8. Subjective field study of response to impulsive helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    Subjects, located outdoors and indoors, judged the noisiness and other subjective noise characteristics of flyovers of two helicopters and a propeller driven airplane as part of a study of the effects of impulsiveness on the subjective response to helicopter noise. In the first experiment, the impulsive characteristics of one helicopter was controlled by varying the main rotor speed while maintaining a constant airspeed in level flight. The second experiment which utilized only the helicopters, included descent and level flight operations. The more impulsive helicopter was consistently judged less noisy than the less impulsive helicopter at equal effective perceived noise levels (EPNL). The ability of EPNL to predict noisiness was not improved by the addition of either of two proposed impulse corrections. A subjective measure of impulsiveness, however, which was not significantly related to the proposed impulse corrections, was found to improve the predictive ability of EPNL.

  9. Multidimensional Examination of Impulsivity in Relation to Disordered Gambling

    PubMed Central

    MacKillop, James; Miller, Joshua D.; Fortune, Erica; Maples, Jessica; Lance, Charles E.; Campbell, W. Keith; Goodie, Adam S.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity has been consistently associated with pathological gambling (PG), but the diversity of definitions and measures of impulsivity has led to ambiguity with regard to which indices are independently relevant. Toward clarifying this relationship, the current study examined indices from an array of commonly-used impulsivity measures in relation to PG severity in an adult community sample of frequent gamblers (N = 353). These included both survey assessments and behavioral tasks. Using a factor analytic approach, four latent factors were identified among 19 indices and were designated reward sensitivity, punishment sensitivity, delay discounting, and cognitive impulsivity. All four latent variables were positively and independently related to PG severity, albeit at a trend level for cognitive impulsivity in a combined model. These findings reveal four generally independent domains of impulsivity that are related to PG severity, clarify which assessment measures aggregate in each domain, and illustrate the importance of measurement specificity in studying impulsivity in relation to PG and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:24708148

  10. Impulsive action and impulsive choice across substance and behavioral addictions: cause or consequence?

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2014-11-01

    Substance use disorders are prevalent and debilitating. Certain behavioral syndromes ('behavioral addictions') characterized by repetitive habits, such as gambling disorder, stealing, shopping, and compulsive internet use, may share clinical, co-morbid, and neurobiological parallels with substance addictions. This review considers overlap between substance and behavioral addictions with a particular focus on impulsive action (inability to inhibit motor responses), and impulsive choice (preference for immediate smaller rewards to the detriment of long-term outcomes). We find that acute consumption of drugs with abuse potential is capable of modulating impulsive choice and action, although magnitude and direction of effect appear contingent on baseline function. Many lines of evidence, including findings from meta-analyses, show an association between chronic drug use and elevated impulsive choice and action. In some instances, elevated impulsive choice and action have been found to predate the development of substance use disorders, perhaps signifying their candidacy as objective vulnerability markers. Research in behavioral addictions is preliminary, and has mostly focused on impulsive action, finding this to be elevated versus controls, similar to that seen in chronic substance use disorders. Only a handful of imaging studies has explored the neural correlates of impulsive action and choice across these disorders. Key areas for future research are highlighted along with potential implications in terms of neurobiological models and treatment. In particular, future work should further explore whether the cognitive deficits identified are state or trait in nature: i.e. are evident before addiction perhaps signaling risk; or are a consequence of repetitive engagement in habitual behavior; and effects of novel agents known to modulate these cognitive abilities on various addictive disorders.

  11. Synchronization in an optomechanical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlomi, Keren; Yuvaraj, D.; Baskin, Ilya; Suchoi, Oren; Winik, Roni; Buks, Eyal

    2015-03-01

    We study self-excited oscillations (SEO) in an on-fiber optomechanical cavity. Synchronization is observed when the optical power that is injected into the cavity is periodically modulated. A theoretical analysis based on the Fokker-Planck equation evaluates the expected phase space distribution (PSD) of the self-oscillating mechanical resonator. A tomography technique is employed for extracting PSD from the measured reflected optical power. Time-resolved state tomography measurements are performed to study phase diffusion and phase locking of the SEO. The detuning region inside which synchronization occurs is experimentally determined and the results are compared with the theoretical prediction.

  12. State observer for synchronous motors

    DOEpatents

    Lang, Jeffrey H.

    1994-03-22

    A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

  13. Synchronization with sound propagation delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haché, A.

    2010-04-01

    Complex systems that synchronize with acoustic signals, like chanting crowds and musical ensembles, have the intrinsic ability to maintain synchrony without external aid or visual cues, even when spread over wide areas. According to two models, the counterintuitive self-synchronization happens when the system's components have a spatial distribution that is sufficiently uniform. The roles of system size and density are examined for arrangements in 1, 2 and 3 dimensions. Asynchrony is predicted to become vanishingly small at high densities, and results suggest ways on how to minimize asynchrony in real-world situations.

  14. Optimized multiparty quantum clock synchronization

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Av, Radel; Exman, Iaakov

    2011-07-15

    A multiparty protocol for distributed quantum clock synchronization has been claimed to provide universal limits on the clock accuracy, viz., that accuracy monotonically decreases with the number n of party members. But this is only true for synchronization when one limits oneself to W states. This work shows that the usage of Z (Symmetric Dicke) states, a generalization of W states, results in improved accuracy, having a maximum when Left-Floor n/2 Right-Floor of its members have their qubits with a |1> eigenstate.

  15. Synchronization Tomography: Modeling and Exploring Complex Brain Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieseler, Thomas

    2002-03-01

    Phase synchronization (PS) plays an important role both under physiological and pathological conditions. With standard averaging techniques of MEG data, it is difficult to reliably detect cortico-cortical and cortico-muscular PS processes that are not time-locked to an external stimulus. For this reason, novel synchronization analysis techniques were developed and directly applied to MEG signals. Of course, due to the lack of an inverse modeling (i.e. source localization), the spatial resolution of this approach was limited. To detect and localize cerebral PS, we here present the synchronization tomography (ST): For this, we first estimate the cerebral current source density by means of the magnetic field tomography (MFT). We then apply the single-run PS analysis to the current source density in each voxel of the reconstruction space. In this way we study simulated PS, voxel by voxel in order to determine the spatio-temporal resolution of the ST. To this end different generators of ongoing rhythmic cerebral activity are simulated by current dipoles at different locations and directions, which are modeled by slightly detuned chaotic oscillators. MEG signals for these generators are simulated for a spherical head model and a whole-head MEG system. MFT current density solutions are calculated from these simulated signals within a hemispherical source space. We compare the spatial resolution of the ST with that of the MFT. Our results show that adjacent sources which are indistinguishable for the MFT, can nevertheless be separated with the ST, provided they are not strongly phase synchronized. This clearly demonstrates the potential of combining spatial information (i.e. source localization) with temporal information for the anatomical localization of phase synchronization in the human brain.

  16. Elegant impulser developed for flat beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M. J., LLNL

    1998-05-26

    The following report describes the design, construction, and checkout of a high-voltage (HV) impulser built for the heavy ion fusion (HIF) project [1]. The purpose of this impulser is to provide an adjustable diode voltage source of sufficient quality and level to allow the optimization of beam transport and accelerator sections of HIF [2, 3]. An elegant, low-impedance, high-energy storage capacitor circuit has been selected for this application. Circuit parameters of the retrofit to the diode region [4] have been included to provide the controlled rise time. The critical part of this circuit that is common to all candidates is the impedance matching component. The following report provides a description of the implemented circuit, the basic circuit variables for wave shaping, screening techniques revealing the weakest circuit component, and the resulting output of the injector.

  17. The hydraulic ram (or impulse) pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Allan

    2014-03-01

    The hydraulic impulse pump utilizes a fraction of the momentum of a flowing stream to lift a small portion of that water to a higher level. There it may be accumulated in an elevated cistern to provide sufficient water for several families, for the pump works 24 h a day with no additional source of energy. The operation of the pump is described, along with a working demonstration model constructed from plastic waste pipe and fittings.

  18. Cigarette Cravings, Impulsivity, and the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Potvin, Stéphane; Tikàsz, Andràs; Dinh-Williams, Laurence Lê-Anh; Bourque, Josiane; Mendrek, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    Craving is a core feature of tobacco use disorder as well as a significant predictor of smoking relapse. Studies have shown that appetitive smoking-related stimuli (e.g., someone smoking) trigger significant cravings in smokers impede their self-control capacities and promote drug seeking behavior. In this review, we begin by an overview of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies investigating the neural correlates of smokers to appetitive smoking cues. The literature reveals a complex and vastly distributed neuronal network underlying smokers’ craving response that recruits regions involved in self-referential processing, planning/regulatory processes, emotional responding, attentional biases, and automatic conducts. We then selectively review important factors contributing to the heterogeneity of results that significantly limit the implications of these findings, namely between- (abstinence, smoking expectancies, and self-regulation) and within-studies factors (severity of smoking dependence, sex-differences, motivation to quit, and genetic factors). Remarkably, we found that little to no attention has been devoted to examine the influence of personality traits on the neural correlates of cigarette cravings in fMRI studies. Impulsivity has been linked with craving and relapse in substance and tobacco use, which prompted our research team to examine the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings in an fMRI study. We found that the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings was mediated by fronto-cingulate mechanisms. Given the high prevalence of cigarette smoking in several psychiatric disorders that are characterized by significant levels of impulsivity, we conclude by identifying psychiatric patients as a target population whose tobacco-smoking habits deserve further behavioral and neuro-imaging investigation. PMID:26441686

  19. The Hydraulic Ram (Or Impulse) Pump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2014-01-01

    The hydraulic impulse pump utilizes a fraction of the momentum of a flowing stream to lift a small portion of that water to a higher level. There it may be accumulated in an elevated cistern to provide sufficient water for several families, for the pump works 24 h a day with no additional source of energy. The operation of the pump is described,…

  20. UWB Impulse Radar Characterization and Processing Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    S/B s’améliore de façon à peu près linéaire . L’intégration d’environ 80 impulsions donne lieu à un rapport S/B maximal d’environ 35 dB, avec une...défense Canada (RDDC) a un programme de recherche active sur bien des aspects des systèmes radar à bande ultra-large (UWB), y compris la simulation

  1. Winning and Losing: Effects on Impulsive Action

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of wins and losses on impulsive action in gambling (Experiments 1–3) and nongambling tasks (Experiments 4–5). In each experiment, subjects performed a simple task in which they had to win points. On each trial, they had to choose between a gamble and a nongamble. The gamble was always associated with a higher amount but a lower probability of winning than the nongamble. After subjects indicated their choice (i.e., gamble or not), feedback was presented. They had to press a key to start the next trial. Experiments 1–3 showed that, compared to the nongambling baseline, subjects were faster to initiate the next trial after a gambled loss, indicating that losses can induce impulsive actions. In Experiments 4 and 5, subjects alternated between the gambling task and a neutral decision-making task in which they could not win or lose points. Subjects were faster in the neutral decision-making task if they had just lost in the gambling task, suggesting that losses have a general effect on action. Our results challenge the dominant idea that humans become more cautious after suboptimal outcomes. Instead, they indicate that losses in the context of potential rewards are emotional events that increase impulsivity. PMID:27808548

  2. Impulsive Reconnection in the Sun's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2009-01-01

    Recent high-resolution observations from the Hinode mission show dramatically that the Sun's atmosphere is filled with explosive activity ranging from chromospheric explosions that reach heights of Mm, to coronal jets that can extend to solar radii, to giant coronal mass ejections (CME) that reach the edge of the heliosphere. The driver for all this activity is believed to be 3D magnetic reconnection. From the large variation observed in the temporal behavior of solar activity, it is clear that reconnection in the corona must take on a variety of distinct forms. The explosive nature of jets and CMEs requires that the reconnection be impulsive in that it stays off until a substantial store of free energy has been accumulated, but then turns on abruptly and stays on until much of this free energy is released. The key question, therefore, is what determines whether the reconnection is impulsive or not. We present some of the latest observations and numerical models of explosive and non-explosive solar activity. We argue that, in order for the reconnection to be impulsive, it must be driven by a quasi-ideal instability. We discuss the generality of our results for understanding 31) reconnection in other contexts.

  3. Surface-Enhanced Impulsive Coherent Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Juan; Harra, Juha; Virkki, Matti; Mäkelä, Jyrki M.; Leng, Yuxin; Kauranen, Martti; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has attracted a lot of attention in molecular sensing because of the remarkable ability of plasmonic metal nanostructures to enhance the weak Raman scattering process. On the other hand, coherent vibrational spectroscopy triggered by impulsive excitation using ultrafast laser pulses provides complete information about the temporal evolution of molecular vibrations, allowing dynamical processes in molecular systems to be followed in “real time”. Here, we combine these two concepts and demonstrate surface-enhanced impulsive vibrational spectroscopy. The vibrational modes of the ground and excited states of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)‑1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), spin-coated on a substrate covered with monodisperse silver nanoparticles, are impulsively excited with a sub-10 fs pump pulse and characterized with a delayed broad-band probe pulse. The maximum enhancement in the spectrally and temporally resolved vibrational signatures averaged over the whole sample is about 4.6, while the real-time information about the instantaneous vibrational amplitude together with the initial vibrational phase is preserved. The phase is essential to determine the vibrational contributions from the ground and excited states.

  4. Surface-Enhanced Impulsive Coherent Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Harra, Juha; Virkki, Matti; Mäkelä, Jyrki M.; Leng, Yuxin; Kauranen, Martti; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has attracted a lot of attention in molecular sensing because of the remarkable ability of plasmonic metal nanostructures to enhance the weak Raman scattering process. On the other hand, coherent vibrational spectroscopy triggered by impulsive excitation using ultrafast laser pulses provides complete information about the temporal evolution of molecular vibrations, allowing dynamical processes in molecular systems to be followed in “real time”. Here, we combine these two concepts and demonstrate surface-enhanced impulsive vibrational spectroscopy. The vibrational modes of the ground and excited states of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)−1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), spin-coated on a substrate covered with monodisperse silver nanoparticles, are impulsively excited with a sub-10 fs pump pulse and characterized with a delayed broad-band probe pulse. The maximum enhancement in the spectrally and temporally resolved vibrational signatures averaged over the whole sample is about 4.6, while the real-time information about the instantaneous vibrational amplitude together with the initial vibrational phase is preserved. The phase is essential to determine the vibrational contributions from the ground and excited states. PMID:27812020

  5. Impulsive Injection for Compressor Stator Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Bright, Michelle M.

    2005-01-01

    Flow control using impulsive injection from the suction surface of a stator vane has been applied in a low speed axial compressor. Impulsive injection is shown to significantly reduce separation relative to steady injection for vanes that were induced to separate by an increase in vane stagger angle of 4 degrees. Injected flow was applied to the airfoil suction surface using spanwise slots pitched in the streamwise direction. Injection was limited to the near-hub region, from 10 to 36 percent of span, to affect the dominant loss due to hub leakage flow. Actuation was provided externally using high-speed solenoid valves closely coupled to the vane tip. Variations in injected mass, frequency, and duty cycle are explored. The local corrected total pressure loss across the vane at the lower span region was reduced by over 20 percent. Additionally, low momentum fluid migrating from the hub region toward the tip was effectively suppressed resulting in an overall benefit which reduced corrected area averaged loss through the passage by 4 percent. The injection mass fraction used for impulsive actuation was typically less than 0.1 percent of the compressor through flow.

  6. The thermal impulse response of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Paster, Eli; Ryu, William S.

    2008-01-01

    Swimming Escherichia coli responds to changes in temperature by modifying its motor behavior. Previous studies using populations of cells have shown that E. coli accumulate in spatial thermal gradients, but these experiments did not cleanly separate thermal responses from chemotactic responses. Here we have isolated the thermal response by studying the behavior of single, tethered cells. The motor output of cells grown at 33°C was measured at constant temperature, from 10° to 40°C, and in response to small, impulsive increases in temperature, from 23° to 43°C. The thermal impulse response at temperatures < 31°C is similar to the chemotactic impulse response: Both follow a similar time course, share the same directionality, and show biphasic characteristics. At temperatures > 31°C, some cells show an inverted response, switching from warm- to cold-seeking behavior. The fraction of inverted responses increases nonlinearly with temperature, switching steeply at the preferred temperature of 37°C. PMID:18385380

  7. Impulse noise generated by starter pistols

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, Deanna K.; Finan, Donald S.; Soendergaard, Jacob; Flamme, Gregory A.; Murphy, William J.; Lankford, James E.; Stewart, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study describes signals generated by .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols in the context of noise-induced hearing loss risk for sports officials and athletes. Design Acoustic comparison of impulses generated from typical .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols firing blanks were made to impulses generated from comparable firearms firing both blanks and live rounds. Acoustic characteristics are described in terms of directionality and distance from the shooter in a simulated outdoor running track. Metrics include peak sound pressure levels (SPL), A-weighted equivalent 8-hour level (LeqA8), and maximum permissible number of individual shots, or maximum permissible exposures (MPE) for the unprotected ear. Results Starter pistols produce peak SPLs above 140 dB. The numbers of MPEs are as few as five for the .22-caliber starter pistol, and somewhat higher (≤25) for the .32-caliber pistol. Conclusion The impulsive sounds produced by starter pistols correspond to MPE numbers that are unacceptably small for unprotected officials and others in the immediate vicinity of the shooter. At the distances included in this study, the risk to athletes appears to be low (when referencing exposure criteria for adults), but the sound associated with the starter pistol will contribute to the athlete’s overall noise exposure. PMID:23373743

  8. Synchronization by elastic neuronal latencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi, Roni; Timor, Reut; Marom, Shimon; Abeles, Moshe; Kanter, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Psychological and physiological considerations entail that formation and functionality of neuronal cell assemblies depend upon synchronized repeated activation such as zero-lag synchronization. Several mechanisms for the emergence of this phenomenon have been suggested, including the global network quantity, the greatest common divisor of neuronal circuit delay loops. However, they require strict biological prerequisites such as precisely matched delays and connectivity, and synchronization is represented as a stationary mode of activity instead of a transient phenomenon. Here we show that the unavoidable increase in neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulation serves as a nonuniform gradual stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops. This apparent nuisance is revealed to be an essential mechanism in various types of neuronal time controllers, where synchronization emerges as a transient phenomenon and without predefined precisely matched synaptic delays. These findings are described in an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on a circuit of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro, and are corroborated and extended by simulations of circuits composed of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with time-dependent latencies. These findings announce a cortical time scale for time controllers based on tens of microseconds stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops per spike. They call for a reexamination of the role of the temporal periodic mode in brain functionality using advanced in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  9. Speed control for synchronous motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, H.; Schott, J.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback circuit controls fluctuations in speed of synchronous ac motor. Voltage proportional to phase angle is developed by phase detector, rectified, amplified, compared to threshold, and reapplied positively or negatively to motor excitation circuit. Speed control reduces wow and flutter of audio turntables and tape recorders, and enhances hunting in gyroscope motors.

  10. Sports Medicine Meets Synchronized Swimming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenz, Betty J.; And Others

    This collection of articles contains information about synchronized swimming. Topics covered include general physiology and cardiovascular conditioning, flexibility exercises, body composition, strength training, nutrition, coach-athlete relationships, coping with competition stress and performance anxiety, and eye care. Chapters are included on…

  11. Fermi Timing and Synchronization System

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.; Staples, J.; Doolittle, L.; Byrd, J.; Ratti, A.; Kaertner, F.X.; Kim, J.; Chen, J.; Ilday, F.O.; Ludwig, F.; Winter, A.; Ferianis, M.; Danailov, M.; D'Auria, G.

    2006-07-19

    The Fermi FEL will depend critically on precise timing of its RF, laser and diagnostic subsystems. The timing subsystem to coordinate these functions will need to reliably maintain sub-100fs synchronicity between distant points up to 300m apart in the Fermi facility. The technology to do this is not commercially available, and has not been experimentally demonstrated in a working facility. Therefore, new technology must be developed to meet these needs. Two approaches have been researched by different groups working with the Fermi staff. At MIT, a pulse transmission scheme has been developed for synchronization of RF and laser devices. And at LBL, a CW transmission scheme has been developed for RF and laser synchronization. These respective schemes have advantages and disadvantages that will become better understood in coming years. This document presents the work done by both teams, and suggests a possible system design which integrates them both. The integrated system design provides an example of how choices can be made between the different approaches without significantly changing the basic infrastructure of the system. Overall system issues common to any synchronization scheme are also discussed.

  12. Tweaking synchronization by connectivity modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Paul; Peron, Thomas; Eroglu, Deniz; Stemler, Thomas; Ramírez Ávila, Gonzalo Marcelo; Rodrigues, Francisco A.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Natural and man-made networks often possess locally treelike substructures. Taking such tree networks as our starting point, we show how the addition of links changes the synchronization properties of the network. We focus on two different methods of link addition. The first method adds single links that create cycles of a well-defined length. Following a topological approach, we introduce cycles of varying length and analyze how this feature, as well as the position in the network, alters the synchronous behavior. We show that in particular short cycles can lead to a maximum change of the Laplacian's eigenvalue spectrum, dictating the synchronization properties of such networks. The second method connects a certain proportion of the initially unconnected nodes. We simulate dynamical systems on these network topologies, with the nodes' local dynamics being either discrete or continuous. Here our main result is that a certain number of additional links, with the relative position in the network being crucial, can be beneficial to ensure stable synchronization.

  13. Tweaking synchronization by connectivity modifications.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Paul; Peron, Thomas; Eroglu, Deniz; Stemler, Thomas; Ramírez Ávila, Gonzalo Marcelo; Rodrigues, Francisco A; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Natural and man-made networks often possess locally treelike substructures. Taking such tree networks as our starting point, we show how the addition of links changes the synchronization properties of the network. We focus on two different methods of link addition. The first method adds single links that create cycles of a well-defined length. Following a topological approach, we introduce cycles of varying length and analyze how this feature, as well as the position in the network, alters the synchronous behavior. We show that in particular short cycles can lead to a maximum change of the Laplacian's eigenvalue spectrum, dictating the synchronization properties of such networks. The second method connects a certain proportion of the initially unconnected nodes. We simulate dynamical systems on these network topologies, with the nodes' local dynamics being either discrete or continuous. Here our main result is that a certain number of additional links, with the relative position in the network being crucial, can be beneficial to ensure stable synchronization.

  14. Adaptive two-pass rank order filter to remove impulse noise in highly corrupted images.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyin; Miller, Eric L; Chen, Dongbin; Sarhadi, Mansoor

    2004-02-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive two-pass rank order filter to remove impulse noise in highly corrupted images. When the noise ratio is high, rank order filters, such as the median filter for example, can produce unsatisfactory results. Better results can be obtained by applying the filter twice, which we call two-pass filtering. To further improve the performance, we develop an adaptive two-pass rank order filter. Between the passes of filtering, an adaptive process is used to detect irregularities in the spatial distribution of the estimated impulse noise. The adaptive process then selectively replaces some pixels changed by the first pass of filtering with their original observed pixel values. These pixels are then kept unchanged during the second filtering. In combination, the adaptive process and the second filter eliminate more impulse noise and restore some pixels that are mistakenly altered by the first filtering. As a final result, the reconstructed image maintains a higher degree of fidelity and has a smaller amount of noise. The idea of adaptive two-pass processing can be applied to many rank order filters, such as a center-weighted median filter (CWMF), adaptive CWMF, lower-upper-middle filter, and soft-decision rank-order-mean filter. Results from computer simulations are used to demonstrate the performance of this type of adaptation using a number of basic rank order filters.

  15. Synchronization between two coupled complex networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Changpin; Sun, Weigang; Kurths, Jürgen

    2007-10-01

    We study synchronization for two unidirectionally coupled networks. This is a substantial generalization of several recent papers investigating synchronization inside a network. We derive analytically a criterion for the synchronization of two networks which have the same (inside) topological connectivity. Then numerical examples are given which fit the theoretical analysis. In addition, numerical calculations for two networks with different topological connections are presented and interesting synchronization and desynchronization alternately appear with increasing value of the coupling strength.

  16. Synchronization effect for uncertain quantum networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlin; Gebremariam, Tesfay; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel technique for investigating the synchronization effect for uncertain networks with quantum chaotic behaviors in this paper. Through designing a special function to construct Lyapunov function of network and the adaptive laws of uncertain parameters, the synchronization between the uncertain network and the synchronization target can be realized, and the uncertain parameters in state equations of the network nodes are perfectly identified. All the theoretical results are verified by numerical simulations to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed synchronization technique.

  17. Dimensions of impulsive behavior in adolescent smokers and nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Fields, Sherecce; Collins, Christine; Leraas, Kristen; Reynolds, Brady

    2009-10-01

    Robust associations have been identified between impulsive personality characteristics and cigarette smoking during adolescents, indicating that impulsive behavior may play an important role in the initiation of cigarette smoking. The present study extended this research by using laboratory behavioral assessments to explore relationships between three specific dimensions of impulsive behavior (impulsive decision-making, inattention, and disinhibition) and adolescent cigarette smoking. Participants were male and female adolescent smokers (n = 50) and nonsmokers (n = 50). Adolescent smokers were more impulsive on a measure of decision-making; however, there were significant smoking status by gender interaction effects for impulsive inattention and disinhibition. Male smokers were most impulsive on the measure of inattention, but male smokers were least impulsive on the measure of disinhibition. Correlations between biomarkers of smoking and impulsive inattention and disinhibition were found for females but not males. The current findings, coupled with previous findings (Reynolds et al., 2007), indicate there may be robust gender difference in associations between certain types of impulsive behavior and cigarette smoking during adolescence.

  18. Evaluating Eve: visceral states influence the evaluation of impulsive behavior.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Loran F; van der Pligt, Joop; van Harreveld, Frenk

    2007-07-01

    Impulsive behavior is a common source of stigma. The authors argue that people often stigmatize impulsive behavior because they fail to appreciate the influence visceral impulses have on behavior. Because people tend to underestimate the motivational force of cravings for sex, drugs, food, and so forth, they are prone to stigmatize those who act on these impulses. In line with this reasoning, in 4 studies, the authors found that participants who were in a cold state (e.g., not hungry) made less favorable evaluations of a related impulsive behavior (impulsive eating) than did participants who were in a hot state (e.g., hungry). This empathy gap effect was tested with 3 different visceral states--fatigue, hunger, and sexual arousal--and was found both when participants evaluated others' impulsive behavior (Studies 1 & 2) and when participants evaluated their own impulsive behavior (Study 3). Study 3 also demonstrated that the empathy gap effect is due to different perceptions of the strength of the visceral state itself. Finally, Study 4 revealed that this effect is state specific: Hungry people, for example, evaluated only hunger-driven impulses, and not other forms of impulse, more favorably.

  19. Quality of life and impulsivity in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Sarah E; Johnson, Sheri L; Gotlib, Ian H

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric illness that impairs quality of life (QoL) in numerous life domains even when mood symptoms are not present and is characterized by elevated impulsivity. Many of the comorbid conditions that are associated with diminished QoL in BD also involve impulsivity. The objective of this project was to investigate whether impulsivity might mediate the effects of these comorbid conditions on poor QoL. Methods A total of 76 participants diagnosed with bipolar I disorder by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders completed the Quality of Life in Bipolar Disorder (QoL-BD) scale, the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11), and the Positive Urgency Measure (PUM). Participants were also assessed for comorbid DSM-IV diagnoses of anxiety, substance use, and impulse control disorders. Results Several subscales of the BIS-11 as well as the PUM total score were significantly negatively correlated with overall QoL. PUM total score remained a significant predictor of QoL after controlling for comorbid anxiety, substance use, and impulse control disorders. After controlling for impulsivity, comorbid disorders were no longer significantly related to overall QoL. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that impulsivity, specifically positive urgency, is highly correlated with QoL in BD. Impulsivity was found to mediate the relation between QoL and several comorbidities in BD. Interventions targeting impulsivity might help to improve QoL in BD. PMID:21676133

  20. Impulsivity and Cigarette Craving among Adolescent Daily and Occasional Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Amanda R.; Burris, Jessica L.; Froeliger, Brett; Saladin, Michael E.; Carpenter, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Impulsivity is a multi-dimensional construct that is robustly related to cigarette smoking. While underlying factors that account for this relation are not well understood, craving has been proposed as a central mechanism linking impulsivity to smoking. In order to further refine our understanding of associations between impulsivity and cigarette craving, the current study examined the association between impulsivity and tonic and cue-elicited craving among a sample of adolescent smokers. We expected trait impulsivity would be positively associated with both tonic and cue-elicited craving, and that this relationship would be stronger among daily vs. occasional smokers. Methods 106 smokers (ages 16–20) completed questionnaires and reported their cigarette craving prior to and immediately following presentation of each of three counterbalanced cue types: (a) in vivo smoking, (b) alcohol, and (c) neutral cue. Results Impulsivity was positively associated with tonic craving for daily smokers (β=.38; p=.005), but not occasional smokers (β=.01; p=.95), with a significant impulsivity x smoker group interaction (β=1.31; p=.03). Impulsivity was unrelated to craving following smoking or alcohol cue, regardless of smoker group (all p’s>.16). Conclusions Results suggest a moderated effect in which impulsivity is positively associated with tonic craving for daily smokers, but not occasional smokers. Tonic craving may serve as a mechanism linking impulsivity, smoking persistence, and nicotine dependence among daily smokers. PMID:25665916

  1. Synchronization control of memristor-based recurrent neural networks with perturbations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiping; Li, Lixiang; Peng, Haipeng; Xiao, Jinghua; Yang, Yixian

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, the synchronization control of memristor-based recurrent neural networks with impulsive perturbations or boundary perturbations is studied. We find that the memristive connection weights have a certain relationship with the stability of the system. Some criteria are obtained to guarantee that memristive neural networks have strong noise tolerance capability. Two kinds of controllers are designed so that the memristive neural networks with perturbations can converge to the equilibrium points, which evoke human's memory patterns. The analysis in this paper employs the differential inclusions theory and the Lyapunov functional method. Numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of our results.

  2. Don't homogenize, synchronize.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, M

    2001-01-01

    To be more responsive to customers, companies often break down organizational walls between their units--setting up all manner of cross-business and cross-functional task forces and working groups and promoting a "one-company" culture. But such attempts can backfire terribly by distracting business and functional units and by contaminating their strategies and processes. Fortunately, there's a better way, says the author. Rather than tear down organizational walls, a company can make them permeable to information. It can synchronize all its data on products, filtering the information through linked databases and applications and delivering it in a coordinated, meaningful form to customers. As a result, the organization can present a single, unified face to the customer--one that can change as market conditions warrant--without imposing homogeneity on its people. Such synchronization can lead not just to stronger customer relationships and more sales but also to greater operational efficiency. It allows a company, for example, to avoid the high costs of maintaining many different information systems with redundant data. The decoupling of product control from customer control in a synchronized company reflects a fundamental fact about business: While companies have to focus on creating great products, customers think in terms of the activities they perform and the benefits they seek. For companies, products are ends, but for customers, products are means. The disconnect between how customers think and how companies organize themselves is what leads to inefficiencies and missed opportunities, and that's exactly the problem that synchronization solves. Synchronized companies can get closer to customers, sustain product innovation, and improve operational efficiency--goals that have traditionally been very difficult to achieve simultaneously.

  3. The utility of rat models of impulsivity in developing pharmacotherapies for impulse control disorders

    PubMed Central

    Winstanley, Catharine A

    2011-01-01

    High levels of impulsive behaviours are a clinically significant symptom in a range of psychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, personality disorders, pathological gambling and substance abuse. Although often measured using questionnaire assessments, levels of different types of impulsivity can also be determined using behavioural tests. Rodent analogues of these paradigms have been developed, and similar neural circuitry has been implicated in their performance in both humans and rats. In the current review, the methodology underlying the measurement of different aspects of impulsive action and choice are considered from the viewpoint of drug development, with a focus on the continuous performance task (CPT), stop-signal task (SST), go/no-go and delay-discounting paradigms. Current issues impeding translation between animal and human studies are identified, and comparisons drawn between the acute effects of dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic compounds across species. Although the field could benefit from a more systematic determination of different pharmacological agents across paradigms, there are signs of strong concordance between the animal and human data. However, the type of impulsivity measured appears to play a significant role, with the SST and delay discounting providing more consistent effects for dopaminergic drugs, while the CPT and SST show better predictive validity so far for serotonergic and noradrenergic compounds. Based on the available data, it would appear that these impulsivity models could be used more widely to identify potential pharmacotherapies for impulse control disorders. Novel targets within the glutamatergic and serotonergic system are also suggested. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-4 PMID:21410459

  4. Delay synchronization of temporal Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qiang; Xie, Cheng-jun; Liang, Yi; Niu, Yu-jun; Lin, Da

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the delay synchronization between two temporal Boolean networks base on semi-tensor product method, which improve complete synchronization. Necessary and sufficient conditions for delay synchronization are drawn base on algebraic expression of temporal Boolean networks. A example is presented to show the effectiveness of theoretical analysis.

  5. Efficient localization of synchronous EEG source activities using a modified RAP-MUSIC algorithm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hesheng; Schimpf, Paul H

    2006-04-01

    Synchronization across different brain regions is suggested to be a possible mechanism for functional integration. Noninvasive analysis of the synchronization among cortical areas is possible if the electrical sources can be estimated by solving the electroencephalography inverse problem. Among various inverse algorithms, spatio-temporal dipole fitting methods such as RAP-MUSIC and R-MUSIC have demonstrated superior ability in the localization of a restricted number of independent sources, and also have the ability to reliably reproduce temporal waveforms. However, these algorithms experience difficulty in reconstructing multiple correlated sources. Accurate reconstruction of correlated brain activities is critical in synchronization analysis. In this study, we modified the well-known inverse algorithm RAP-MUSIC to a multistage process which analyzes the correlation of candidate sources and searches for independent topographies (ITs) among precorrelated groups. Comparative studies were carried out on both simulated data and clinical seizure data. The results demonstrated superior performance with the modified algorithm compared to the original RAP-MUSIC in recovering synchronous sources and localizing the epileptiform activity. The modified RAP-MUSIC algorithm, thus, has potential in neurological applications involving significant synchronous brain activities.

  6. Criterion of quantum synchronization and controllable quantum synchronization based on an optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlin; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2015-02-01

    We propose a quantitative criterion to determine whether the coupled quantum systems can achieve complete synchronization or phase synchronization in the process of analyzing quantum synchronization. Adopting the criterion, we discuss the quantum synchronization effects between optomechanical systems and find that the error between the systems and the fluctuation of error is sensitive to coupling intensity by calculating the largest Lyapunov exponent of the model and quantum fluctuation, respectively. By taking the appropriate coupling intensity, we can control quantum synchronization even under different logical relationships between switches. Finally, we simulate the dynamical evolution of the system to verify the quantum synchronization criterion and to show the ability of synchronization control.

  7. Self-organized synchronization of digital phase-locked loops with delayed coupling in theory and experiment

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, Lucas; Jörg, David J.; Pollakis, Alexandros; Rave, Wolfgang; Fettweis, Gerhard; Jülicher, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Self-organized synchronization occurs in a variety of natural and technical systems but has so far only attracted limited attention as an engineering principle. In distributed electronic systems, such as antenna arrays and multi-core processors, a common time reference is key to coordinate signal transmission and processing. Here we show how the self-organized synchronization of mutually coupled digital phase-locked loops (DPLLs) can provide robust clocking in large-scale systems. We develop a nonlinear phase description of individual and coupled DPLLs that takes into account filter impulse responses and delayed signal transmission. Our phase model permits analytical expressions for the collective frequencies of synchronized states, the analysis of stability properties and the time scale of synchronization. In particular, we find that signal filtering introduces stability transitions that are not found in systems without filtering. To test our theoretical predictions, we designed and carried out experiments using networks of off-the-shelf DPLL integrated circuitry. We show that the phase model can quantitatively predict the existence, frequency, and stability of synchronized states. Our results demonstrate that mutually delay-coupled DPLLs can provide robust and self-organized synchronous clocking in electronic systems. PMID:28207779

  8. Analysis of impulse signals with Hylaty ELF station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulak, A.; Mlynarczyk, J.; Ostrowski, M.; Kubisz, J.; Michalec, A.

    2012-04-01

    Lighting discharges generate electromagnetic field pulses that propagate in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. The attenuation in the ELF range is so small that the pulses originating from strong atmospheric discharges can be observed even several thousand kilometers away from the individual discharge. The recorded waveform depends on the discharge process, the Earth-ionosphere waveguide properties on the source-receiver path, and the transfer function of the receiver. If the distance from the source is known, an inverse method can be used for reconstructing the current moment waveform and the charge moment of the discharge. In order to reconstruct the source parameters from the recorded signal a reliable model of the radio wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide as well as practical signal processing techniques are necessary. We present two methods, both based on analytical formulas. The first method allows for fast calculation of the charge moment of relatively short atmospheric discharges. It is based on peak amplitude measurement of the recorded magnetic component of the ELF EM field and it takes into account the receiver characteristics. The second method, called "inverse channel method" allows reconstructing the complete current moment waveform of strong atmospheric discharges that exhibit the continuing current phase, such as Gigantic Jets and Sprites. The method makes it possible to fully remove from the observed waveform the distortions related to the receiver's impulse response as well as the influence of the Earth-ionosphere propagation channel. Our ELF station is equipped with two magnetic antennas for Bx and By components measurement in the 0.03 to 55 Hz frequency range. ELF Data recording is carried out since 1993, with continuous data acquisition since 2005. The station features low noise level and precise timing. It is battery powered and located in the sparsely populated area, far from major electric power lines, which results in high

  9. Self-reported impulsivity, but not behavioral choice or response impulsivity, partially mediates the effect of stress on drinking behavior.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Ansell, Emily B; Reynolds, Brady; Potenza, Marc N; Sinha, Rajita

    2013-01-01

    Stress and impulsivity contribute to alcohol use, and stress may also act via impulsivity to increase drinking behavior. Impulsivity represents a multi-faceted construct and self-report and behavioral assessments may effectively capture distinct clinically relevant factors. The present research investigated whether aspects of impulsivity mediate the effect of stress on alcohol use. A community-based sample of 192 men and women was assessed on measures of cumulative stress, alcohol use, self-reported impulsivity, and behavioral choice and response impulsivity. Data were analyzed using regression and bootstrapping techniques to estimate indirect effects of stress on drinking via impulsivity. Cumulative adversity exhibited both direct effects and indirect effects (via self-reported impulsivity) on drinking behavior. Additional models examining specific types of stress indicated direct and indirect effects of trauma and recent life events, and indirect effects of major life events and chronic stressors on drinking behavior. Overall, cumulative stress was associated with increased drinking behavior, and this effect was partially mediated by self-reported impulsivity. Self-reported impulsivity also mediated the effects of different types of stress on drinking behavior. These findings highlight the value of mediation models to examine the pathways through which different types of stress increase drinking behavior. Treatment and prevention strategies should focus on enhancing stress management and self-control.

  10. Differences between Impulsive and Non-Impulsive Suicide Attempts among Individuals Treated in Emergency Rooms of South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Meerae; Lee, Soojung

    2016-01-01

    Objective A considerable proportion of suicide attempts are the result of sudden desires. Understanding such impulsive suicide attempts is necessary for effective interventions. We evaluated the impulsivity of suicide attempters treated in emergency rooms. The aim of the study was to identify the characteristics of impulsive suicide attempts by comparing these individuals to those who attempted to commit suicide in a non-impulsive manner. Methods This study analyzed suicide attempters who visited the emergency departments of seven selected university hospitals. A total of 269 medical records in which impulsivity of suicide attempt were confirmed were subject to be analyzed. The impulsivity of the suicide attempt was examined using a summative score of items 6 and 15 on the Suicide Intent Scale. Results A total of 48.0% of the participants were impelled by sudden inclinations to attempt suicide. Impulsive attempters were younger, unmarried and less physical illness than non-impulsive attempters, whereas no significant differences were found on psychiatric history and previous suicide history. Impulsive suicide attempters had suicide ideations that were not as severe (χ2=55.33, p<0.001) or intense (t=-8.38, p<0.001) as their counterparts'. Furthermore, medical results of impulsive suicide attempts were better than non-impulsive suicide attempts (t=-3.77, p<0.001). Conclusion The results suggested that a considerable proportion of suicide attempts were the result of sudden inclinations. Impulsive attempts were made in relatively earlier stages of suicide ideation; consequently, they have less intent than non-impulsive attempts. PMID:27482239

  11. Spatial organization and Synchronization in collective swimming of Hemigrammus bleheri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Intesaaf; Ha, Thanh-Tung; Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Thiria, Benjamin; Halloy, Jose; Collignon, Bertrand; Laboratoire de Physique et Mécanique des Milieux Hétérogènes (PMMH) Team; Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire des Energies de Demain (LIED) Team

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we study the collective swimming of Hemigrammus bleheri fish using experiments in a shallow swimming channel. We use high-speed video recordings to track the midline kinematics and the spatial organization of fish pairs and triads. Synchronizations are characterized by observance of "out of phase" and "in phase" configurations. We show that the synchronization state is highly correlated to swimming speed. The increase in synchronization led to efficient swimming based on Strouhal number. In case of fish pairs, the collective swimming is 2D and the spatial organization is characterized by two characteristic lengths: the lateral and longitudinal separation distances between fish pairs.For fish triads, different swimming patterns or configurations are observed having three dimensional structures. We performed 3D kinematic analysis by employing 3D reconstruction using the Direct Linear Transformation (DLT). We show that fish still keep their nearest neighbor distance (NND) constant irrespective of swimming speeds and configuration. We also point out characteristic angles between neighbors, hence imposing preferred patterns. At last we will give some perspectives on spatial organization for larger population. Sorbonne Paris City College of Doctoral Schools. European Union Information and Communication Technologies project ASSISIbf, FP7-ICT-FET-601074.

  12. X-ray observations of the impulsive phase of solar flares with the Yohkoh satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Andrew

    This thesis starts with an overview of the physics of the solar corona, concentrating on X-ray emission and the plasma dynamics associated with the impulsive or rise phase of solar flares. The Yohkoh satellite is described, with a section on each major instrument on board. Analysis techniques used in the thesis are then introduced, with a section of soft X-ray spectroscopy and on the application of the Maximum Entropy Method image reconstruction technique to data from the Hard X-ray Telescope on Yohkoh. The instrumental effect known as fixed pattern noise is described, leading to a numerical model of the BCS digitisation process, which is used both to understand the limits of the detector, and to correct the data in a limited way. Alternative methods for the avoidance of fixed pattern noise are evaluated. The analysis of a solar flare with unusually large soft X-ray blue shifts is then performed. Physical parameters of the plasma during the initial stages of the flare are derived, which are used in an energy balance calculation. Agreement is found between the energy in nonthermal electrons and that contained in the coronal plasma, supporting the nonthermal beam driven chromospheric evaporation theory of impulsive flares. The location of superhot plasma in two impulsive flares and one hot thermal flare is then investigated. Superhot plasma is found to be located close to the chromosphere, and related to the nonthermal burst in the two impulsive flares. Superhot plasma in the hot thermal flare is distributed uniformly throughout the loop. The differences are explained as being due to the different energy transport processes active in each type of flare.

  13. Reconsidering the link between impulsivity and suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Anestis, Michael D; Soberay, Kelly A; Gutierrez, Peter M; Hernández, Theresa D; Joiner, Thomas E

    2014-11-01

    It is widely accepted that suicidal behavior often occurs with little planning. We propose, however, that suicidal behavior is rarely if ever impulsive-that it is too frightening and physically distressing to engage in without forethought-and that suicidal behavior in impulsive individuals is accounted for by painful and fearsome behaviors capable of enhancing their capacity for suicide. We conducted a meta-analysis of the association between trait impulsivity and suicidal behavior and a critical review of research considering the impulsiveness of specific suicide attempts. Meta-analytic results suggest the relationship between trait impulsivity and suicidal behavior is small. Furthermore, studies examining a mediating role of painful and provocative behaviors have uniformly supported our model. Results from our review suggest that researchers have been unable to adequately measure impulsivity of attempts and that measures sensitive to episodic planning must be developed to further our understanding of this phenomenon.

  14. Impaired goal-directed behavioural control in human impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Hogarth, Lee; Chase, Henry W.; Baess, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Two dissociable learning processes underlie instrumental behaviour. Whereas goal-directed behaviour is controlled by knowledge of the consequences, habitual behaviour is elicited directly by antecedent Pavlovian stimuli without knowledge of the consequences. Predominance of habitual control is thought to underlie psychopathological conditions associated with corticostriatal abnormalities, such as impulsivity and drug dependence. To explore this claim, smokers were assessed for nicotine dependence, impulsivity, and capacity for goal-directed control over instrumental performance in an outcome devaluation procedure. Reduced goal-directed control was selectively associated with the Motor Impulsivity factor of Barrett's Impulsivity Scale (BIS), which reflects propensity for action without thought. These data support the claim that human impulsivity is marked by impaired use of causal knowledge to make adaptive decisions. The predominance of habit learning may play a role in psychopathological conditions that are associated with trait impulsivity. PMID:21077008

  15. Three Centuries of Synchronous Forest Defoliator Outbreaks in Western North America.

    PubMed

    Flower, Aquila

    2016-01-01

    Insect outbreaks often occur synchronously across large spatial scales, but the long-term temporal stability of the phenomenon and the mechanisms behind it are not well understood. In this study, I use a widespread lepidopteran defoliator native to western North America-the western spruce budworm-as a case study to explore patterns of and potential causes for synchronous population fluctuations. Analyses of synchrony are typically severely limited by the short historical records available for many species. To overcome this limitation, I compiled multi-century dendrochronological reconstructions of western spruce budworm outbreaks from across much of the species' range. This allowed me to analyze synchrony at a sub-continental spatial scale over the last three centuries. I found statistically significant synchrony among regional outbreak records up to 2,000 km apart and identified numerous outbreak periods that occurred synchronously across much of the species' range. I quantified spatial and temporal associations between climate and synchronous outbreak periods using paleoclimate reconstructions. The spatial patterns of outbreak histories and climate records were remarkably similar, with higher similarity in outbreak histories apparent between regions with more similar climate conditions. Synchronous outbreaks typically occurred during periods of average or above average moisture availability preceded by periods of low moisture availability. My results suggest that climatic variability has played a key role in synchronizing western spruce budworm population fluctuations in disjunct forests across western North America for at least the last three centuries. Widespread synchrony appears to be a natural part of this species' population dynamics, though synchronous outbreaks have occurred more frequently during the 20th century than during prior centuries. This study uses a novel combination of statistical methods and dendrochronological data to provide analyses of

  16. Three Centuries of Synchronous Forest Defoliator Outbreaks in Western North America

    PubMed Central

    Flower, Aquila

    2016-01-01

    Insect outbreaks often occur synchronously across large spatial scales, but the long-term temporal stability of the phenomenon and the mechanisms behind it are not well understood. In this study, I use a widespread lepidopteran defoliator native to western North America—the western spruce budworm—as a case study to explore patterns of and potential causes for synchronous population fluctuations. Analyses of synchrony are typically severely limited by the short historical records available for many species. To overcome this limitation, I compiled multi-century dendrochronological reconstructions of western spruce budworm outbreaks from across much of the species’ range. This allowed me to analyze synchrony at a sub-continental spatial scale over the last three centuries. I found statistically significant synchrony among regional outbreak records up to 2,000 km apart and identified numerous outbreak periods that occurred synchronously across much of the species’ range. I quantified spatial and temporal associations between climate and synchronous outbreak periods using paleoclimate reconstructions. The spatial patterns of outbreak histories and climate records were remarkably similar, with higher similarity in outbreak histories apparent between regions with more similar climate conditions. Synchronous outbreaks typically occurred during periods of average or above average moisture availability preceded by periods of low moisture availability. My results suggest that climatic variability has played a key role in synchronizing western spruce budworm population fluctuations in disjunct forests across western North America for at least the last three centuries. Widespread synchrony appears to be a natural part of this species’ population dynamics, though synchronous outbreaks have occurred more frequently during the 20th century than during prior centuries. This study uses a novel combination of statistical methods and dendrochronological data to provide

  17. Partial Synchronization of Interconnected Boolean Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongwei; Liang, Jinling; Lu, Jianquan

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the partial synchronization problem for the interconnected Boolean networks (BNs) via the semi-tensor product (STP) of matrices. First, based on an algebraic state space representation of BNs, a necessary and sufficient criterion is presented to ensure the partial synchronization of the interconnected BNs. Second, by defining an induced digraph of the partial synchronized states set, an equivalent graphical description for the partial synchronization of the interconnected BNs is established. Consequently, the second partial synchronization criterion is derived in terms of adjacency matrix of the induced digraph. Finally, two examples (including an epigenetic model) are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results.

  18. Different Synchronization Schemes for Chaotic Rikitake Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. Ali

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the chaos synchronization by designing a different type of controllers. Firstly, we propose the synchronization of bi-directional coupled chaotic Rikitake systems via hybrid feedback control. Secondly, we study the synchronization of unidirectionally coupled Rikitake systems using hybrid feedback control. Lastly, we investigate the synchronization of unidirectionally coupled Rikitake chaotic systems using tracking control. Comparing all the results, finally, we conclude that tracking control is more effective than feedback control. Simulation results are presented to show the efficiency of synchronization schemes.

  19. Multistatic radar: Synchronization and time reference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubrink, H. G.

    1994-08-01

    A synchronization and time reference system for multistatic radar (MSR) is presented. The report also gives a summary of the most important parameter values of the synchronization process in MSR. Some reference oscillator systems using Loran C and global positioning system (GPS) receivers have been briefly analyzed. The synchronization method is based on a multioscillator system from the HP time and frequency standard system, the HP 55000 system. The multioscillator concept gives a more robust and redundant solution of the synchronization problem. The synchronization system can also be given external support by other time precision systems, for instance the GPS system.

  20. Inhomogeneity induces relay synchronization in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Frasca, Mattia; Fortuna, Luigi; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Relay synchronization is a collective state, originally found in chains of interacting oscillators, in which uncoupled dynamical units synchronize through the action of mismatched inner nodes that relay the information but do not synchronize with them. It is demonstrated herein that relay synchronization is not limited to such simple motifs, rather it can emerge in larger and arbitrary network topologies. In particular, we show how this phenomenon can be observed in networks of chaotic systems in the presence of some mismatched units, the relay nodes, and how it is actually responsible for an enhancement of synchronization in the network.

  1. Inhomogeneity induces relay synchronization in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Frasca, Mattia; Fortuna, Luigi; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Relay synchronization is a collective state, originally found in chains of interacting oscillators, in which uncoupled dynamical units synchronize through the action of mismatched inner nodes that relay the information but do not synchronize with them. It is demonstrated herein that relay synchronization is not limited to such simple motifs, rather it can emerge in larger and arbitrary network topologies. In particular, we show how this phenomenon can be observed in networks of chaotic systems in the presence of some mismatched units, the relay nodes, and how it is actually responsible for an enhancement of synchronization in the network.

  2. Photonic cavity synchronization of nanomechanical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Mahmood; Poot, Menno; Fan, Linran; Marquardt, Florian; Tang, Hong X

    2013-11-22

    Synchronization in oscillatory systems is a frequent natural phenomenon and is becoming an important concept in modern physics. Nanomechanical resonators are ideal systems for studying synchronization due to their controllable oscillation properties and engineerable nonlinearities. Here we demonstrate synchronization of two nanomechanical oscillators via a photonic resonator, enabling optomechanical synchronization between mechanically isolated nanomechanical resonators. Optical backaction gives rise to both reactive and dissipative coupling of the mechanical resonators, leading to coherent oscillation and mutual locking of resonators with dynamics beyond the widely accepted phase oscillator (Kuramoto) model. In addition to the phase difference between the oscillators, also their amplitudes are coupled, resulting in the emergence of sidebands around the synchronized carrier signal.

  3. Lyapunov Control of Quantum Systems with Impulsive Control Fields

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Sun, Jitao

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the Lyapunov control of finite-dimensional quantum systems with impulsive control fields, where the studied quantum systems are governed by the Schrödinger equation. By three different Lyapunov functions and the invariant principle of impulsive systems, we study the convergence of quantum systems with impulsive control fields and propose new results for the mentioned quantum systems in the form of sufficient conditions. Two numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method. PMID:23766712

  4. Effects of Acoustic Impulses on the Middle Ear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    impulsive noises (impacts and impulses). Keywords: Noise exposure; hearing loss, noise-induced; impulsive noise; reflex ; conditioned response...stated in the approved SOW are: 1. Determine the prevalence of acoustic reflexes to among young people with H-1 hearing status as per Army...Regulation 40-501, Table 7-1. 2. Determine whether reflexive MEMC are pervasive for multiple acoustic and non-acoustic stimuli. 3. Determine whether

  5. Energetic electrons in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A new analysis was made of a thermal flare model proposed by Brown, Melrose, and Spicer (1979) and Smith and Lilliequist (1979). They assumed the source of impulsive hard X-rays to be a plasma at a temperature of order 10 to the 8th power K, initially located at the apex of a coronal arch, and confined by ion-acoustic turbulence in a collisionless conduction front. Such a source would expand at approximately the ion-sound speed, C sub S = square root of (k T sub e/m sub i), until it filled the arch. Brown, Melrose, and Spicer and Smith and Brown (1980) argued that the source assumed in this model would not explain the simultaneous impulsive microwave emission. In contrast, the new results presented herein suggest that this model leads to the development of a quasi-Maxwellian distribution of electrons that explains both the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. This implies that the source sizes can be determined from observations of the optically-thick portions of microwave spectra and the temperatures obtained from associated hard X-ray observations. In this model, the burst emission would rise to a maximum in a time, t sub r, approximately equal to L/c sub s, where L is the half-length of the arch. New observations of these impulsive flare emissions were analyzed herein to test this prediction of the model. Observations made with the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft and the Bern Radio Observatory are in good agreement with the model.

  6. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic X-ray spectra of two simple, impulsive solar flares are examined together with H alpha, microwave and meter wave radio observations. X-ray spectra of both events were characteristic of thermal bremsstrahlung from single temperature plasmas. The symmetry between rise and fall was found to hold for the temperature and emission measure. The relationship between temperature and emission measure was that of an adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion; the adiabatic index of 5/3 indicated that the electron distribution remained isotropic. Observations in H alpha provided further evidence for compressive energy transfer.

  7. Antiepileptics for aggression and associated impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Huband, Nick; Ferriter, Michael; Nathan, Rajan; Jones, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Background Aggression is a major public health issue and is integral to several mental health disorders. Antiepileptic drugs may reduce aggression by acting on the central nervous system to reduce neuronal hyper-excitability associated with aggression. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in reducing aggression and associated impulsivity. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) and ClinicalTrials.gov to April 2009. We also searched Cochrane Schizophrenia Group’s register of trials on aggression, National Research Record and handsearched for studies. Selection criteria Prospective, placebo-controlled trials of antiepileptic drugs taken regularly by individuals with recurrent aggression to reduce the frequency or intensity of aggressive outbursts. Data collection and analysis Three authors independently selected studies and two authors independently extracted data. We calculated standardised mean differences (SMDs), with odds ratios (ORs) for dichotomous data. Main results Fourteen studies with data from 672 participants met the inclusion criteria. Five different antiepileptic drugs were examined. Sodium valproate/divalproex was superior to placebo for outpatient men with recurrent impulsive aggression, for impulsively aggressive adults with cluster B personality disorders, and for youths with conduct disorder, but not for children and adolescents with pervasive developmental disorder. Carbamazepine was superior to placebo in reducing acts of self-directed aggression in women with borderline personality disorder, but not in children with conduct disorder. Oxcarbazepine was superior to placebo for verbal aggression and aggression against objects in adult outpatients. Phenytoin was superior to placebo on the frequency of aggressive acts in male prisoners and in outpatient men including those with personality disorder, but not on the frequency of ‘behavioral incidents’ in

  8. Controller reduction by preserving impulse response energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Su, Tzu-Jeng

    1989-01-01

    A model order reduction algorithm based on a Krylov recurrence formulation is developed to reduce order of controllers. The reduced-order controller is obtained by projecting the full-order LQG controller onto a Krylov subspace in which either the controllability or the observability grammian is equal to the identity matrix. The reduced-order controller preserves the impulse response energy of the full-order controller and has a parameter-matching property. Two numerical examples drawn from other controller reduction literature are used to illustrate the efficacy of the proposed reduction algorithm.

  9. The genetic correlation between procrastination and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Loehlin, John C; Martin, Nicholas G

    2014-12-01

    The reported genetic correlation of 1.0 between the traits of procrastination and impulsivity (Gustavson, D. E., Miyake, A., Hewitt, J. K., & Friedman, N. P. (2014). Psychological Science), which was held to support an evolutionary origin of the relationship between the two traits, was tested in data from two large samples of twins from Australia. A genetic correlation of 0.299 was obtained. It was concluded that, although the presence of a genetic correlation between the two traits was supported, the modest magnitude of the correlation was such as to be consistent with many possible hypotheses, evolutionary and otherwise, about causal relationships between the traits in question.

  10. Association between Impulsivity and Weight Status in a General Population

    PubMed Central

    Bénard, Marc; Camilleri, Géraldine M.; Etilé, Fabrice; Méjean, Caroline; Bellisle, France; Reach, Gérard; Hercberg, Serge; Péneau, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the association between impulsivity and weight status in a large sample of the adult general population in France, and the influence of gender on this relationship. A total of 11,929 men and 39,114 women participating in the NutriNet-Santé cohort were selected in this cross-sectional analysis. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) was used to assess impulsivity. Weight and height were self-reported. The association between impulsivity and BMI was estimated using logistic regressions adjusted for socio-demographic and lifestyle factors. Individuals with high impulsivity levels (BIS-11 total score >71) were more likely to be obese (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.80, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.39, 2.33 in men; OR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.48 in women) compared to individuals in the average range of impulsivity. The strongest associations between impulsivity and obesity were observed in men, where highly impulsive participants were more likely to be class III obese (BMI > 40 kg/m2) (OR = 3.57, 95% CI: 1.86, 6.85). This large sample analysis supports the existence of a relationship between impulsivity and weight status and the importance of psychological factors in the prevention of obesity. PMID:28257032

  11. Dissecting impulsivity and its relationships to drug addictions.

    PubMed

    Jentsch, J David; Ashenhurst, James R; Cervantes, M Catalina; Groman, Stephanie M; James, Alexander S; Pennington, Zachary T

    2014-10-01

    Addictions are often characterized as forms of impulsive behavior. That said, it is often noted that impulsivity is a multidimensional construct, spanning several psychological domains. This review describes the relationship between varieties of impulsivity and addiction-related behaviors, the nature of the causal relationship between the two, and the underlying neurobiological mechanisms that promote impulsive behaviors. We conclude that the available data strongly support the notion that impulsivity is both a risk factor for, and a consequence of, drug and alcohol consumption. While the evidence indicating that subtypes of impulsive behavior are uniquely informative--either biologically or with respect to their relationships to addictions--is convincing, multiple lines of study link distinct subtypes of impulsivity to low dopamine D2 receptor function and perturbed serotonergic transmission, revealing shared mechanisms between the subtypes. Therefore, a common biological framework involving monoaminergic transmitters in key frontostriatal circuits may link multiple forms of impulsivity to drug self-administration and addiction-related behaviors. Further dissection of these relationships is needed before the next phase of genetic and genomic discovery will be able to reveal the biological sources of the vulnerability for addiction indexed by impulsivity.

  12. Eyes wide shopped: shopping situations trigger arousal in impulsive buyers.

    PubMed

    Serfas, Benjamin G; Büttner, Oliver B; Florack, Arnd

    2014-01-01

    The present study proposes arousal as an important mechanism driving buying impulsiveness. We examined the effect of buying impulsiveness on arousal in non-shopping and shopping contexts. In an eye-tracking experiment, we measured pupil dilation while participants viewed and rated pictures of shopping scenes and non-shopping scenes. The results demonstrated that buying impulsiveness is closely associated with arousal as response to viewing pictures of shopping scenes. This pertained for hedonic shopping situations as well as for utilitarian shopping situations. Importantly, the effect did not emerge for non-shopping scenes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that arousal of impulsive buyers is independent from cognitive evaluation of scenes in the pictures.

  13. Genetic association of impulsivity in young adults: a multivariate study

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, S; Narayanan, B; Meda, S A; Gelernter, J; Han, S; Sawyer, B; Aslanzadeh, F; Stevens, M C; Hawkins, K A; Anticevic, A; Potenza, M N; Pearlson, G D

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is a heritable, multifaceted construct with clinically relevant links to multiple psychopathologies. We assessed impulsivity in young adult (N~2100) participants in a longitudinal study, using self-report questionnaires and computer-based behavioral tasks. Analysis was restricted to the subset (N=426) who underwent genotyping. Multivariate association between impulsivity measures and single-nucleotide polymorphism data was implemented using parallel independent component analysis (Para-ICA). Pathways associated with multiple genes in components that correlated significantly with impulsivity phenotypes were then identified using a pathway enrichment analysis. Para-ICA revealed two significantly correlated genotype–phenotype component pairs. One impulsivity component included the reward responsiveness subscale and behavioral inhibition scale of the Behavioral-Inhibition System/Behavioral-Activation System scale, and the second impulsivity component included the non-planning subscale of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and the Experiential Discounting Task. Pathway analysis identified processes related to neurogenesis, nervous system signal generation/amplification, neurotransmission and immune response. We identified various genes and gene regulatory pathways associated with empirically derived impulsivity components. Our study suggests that gene networks implicated previously in brain development, neurotransmission and immune response are related to impulsive tendencies and behaviors. PMID:25268255

  14. Impulsive control of a financial model [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jitao; Qiao, Fei; Wu, Qidi

    2005-02-01

    In this Letter, several new theorems on the stability of impulsive control systems are presented. These theorem are then used to find the conditions under which an advertising strategy can be asymptotically control to the equilibrium point by using impulsive control. Given the parameters of the financial model and the impulsive control law, an estimation of the upper bound of the impulse interval is given, i.e., number of advert can been decreased (i.e., can decrease cost) for to obtain the equivalent advertising effect.The result is illustrated to be efficient through a numerical example.

  15. The Relationship between Impulsivity and Problem Gambling in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Secades-Villa, Roberto; Martínez-Loredo, Victor; Grande-Gosende, Aris; Fernández-Hermida, José R.

    2016-01-01

    Gambling has become one of the most frequently reported addictive behaviors among young people. Understanding risk factors associated with the onset or maintenance of gambling problems in adolescence has implications for its prevention and treatment. The main aim of the present study was to examine the potential relationships between impulsivity and problem gambling in adolescence. Participants were 874 high school students (average age: 15 years old) who were surveyed to provide data on gambling and impulsivity. Self-reported gambling behavior was assessed using the South Oaks Gambling Screen – Revised for Adolescents (SOGS-RA) and impulsivity was measured using the Impulsive Sensation Seeking Questionnaire (ZKPQ), the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11-A), and a delay discounting task. The data were analyzed using both a prospective-longitudinal and a cross-sectional design. In the longitudinal analyses, results showed that the impulsivity subscale of the ZKPQ increased the risk of problem gambling (p = 0.003). In the cross-sectional analyses, all the impulsivity measures were higher in at-risk/problem gamblers than in non-problem gamblers (p = 0.04; 0.03; and 0.01, respectively). These findings further support the relationship between impulsivity and gambling in adolescence. Moreover, our findings suggest a bidirectional relationship between impulsivity and problem gambling in adolescence. These results have consequences for the development of prevention and treatment programs for adolescents with gambling problems. PMID:28008322

  16. Producing Newborn Synchronous Mammalian Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Thornton, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    A method and bioreactor for the continuous production of synchronous (same age) population of mammalian cells have been invented. The invention involves the attachment and growth of cells on an adhesive-coated porous membrane immersed in a perfused liquid culture medium in a microgravity analog bioreactor. When cells attach to the surface divide, newborn cells are released into the flowing culture medium. The released cells, consisting of a uniform population of synchronous cells are then collected from the effluent culture medium. This invention could be of interest to researchers investigating the effects of the geneotoxic effects of the space environment (microgravity, radiation, chemicals, gases) and to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies involved in research on aging and cancer, and in new drug development and testing.

  17. Parallel integrated frame synchronizer chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghuman, Parminder Singh (Inventor); Solomon, Jeffrey Michael (Inventor); Bennett, Toby Dennis (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A parallel integrated frame synchronizer which implements a sequential pipeline process wherein serial data in the form of telemetry data or weather satellite data enters the synchronizer by means of a front-end subsystem and passes to a parallel correlator subsystem or a weather satellite data processing subsystem. When in a CCSDS mode, data from the parallel correlator subsystem passes through a window subsystem, then to a data alignment subsystem and then to a bit transition density (BTD)/cyclical redundancy check (CRC) decoding subsystem. Data from the BTD/CRC decoding subsystem or data from the weather satellite data processing subsystem is then fed to an output subsystem where it is output from a data output port.

  18. [Synchronous diverticulitis: a case report.].

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Argáiz, R; Rodríguez-Zentner, H A; Tapia, H; González-Contreras, Q H

    2010-01-01

    Diverticular colonic disease is not as common in developing nations as in western and industrialized societies, accounting for approximately 130 000 hospitalizations per year in the United States, being diverticulitis the most frequent complication. Synchronous presentation of this complication is very rare, with only one case reported in literature. We present a patient who presented with diffuse abdominal pain. Colonoscopy was performed identifying a mass in the sigmoid colon and a perforation in the cecum. Patient underwent total abdominal colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis and protective loop ileostomy. Histopathologic examination revealed synchronous complicated diverticular disease of the sigmoid and cecum. In this report we disclose this type of atypical presentation of diverticular disease and establish that the approach taken is safe and feasible.

  19. Synchronous clock stopper for microprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchin, David A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A synchronous clock stopper circuit for inhibiting clock pulses to a microprocessor in response to a stop request signal, and for reinstating the clock pulses in response to a start request signal thereby to conserve power consumption of the microprocessor when used in an environment of limited power. The stopping and starting of the microprocessor is synchronized, by a phase tracker, with the occurrences of a predetermined phase in the instruction cycle of the microprocessor in which the I/O data and address lines of the microprocessor are of high impedance so that a shared memory connected to the I/O lines may be accessed by other peripheral devices. The starting and stopping occur when the microprocessor initiates and completes, respectively, an instruction, as well as before and after transferring data with a memory. Also, the phase tracker transmits phase information signals over a bus to other peripheral devices which signals identify the current operational phase of the microprocessor.

  20. Synchronization of electronic genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Wagemakers, Alexandre; Buldú, Javier M; García-Ojalvo, Jordi; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2006-03-01

    We describe a simple analog electronic circuit that mimics the behavior of a well-known synthetic gene oscillator, the repressilator, which represents a set of three genes repressing one another. Synchronization of a population of such units is thoroughly studied, with the aim to compare the role of global coupling with that of global forcing on the population. Our results show that coupling is much more efficient than forcing in leading the gene population to synchronized oscillations. Furthermore, a modification of the proposed analog circuit leads to a simple electronic version of a genetic toggle switch, which is a simple network of two mutual repressor genes, where control by external forcing is also analyzed.

  1. Impulse source versus dodecahedral loudspeaker for measuring parameters derived from the impulse response in room acoustics.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Ricardo; Arana, Miguel; Machín, Jorge; Arregui, Abel

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the performance of dodecahedral and impulse sources when measuring acoustic parameters in enclosures according to ISO 3382-1 [Acoustics-Measurement of room acoustic parameters. Part 1: Performance spaces (International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2009)]. In general, methods using speakers as a sound source are limited by their frequency response and directivity. On the other hand, getting impulse responses from impulse sources typically involves a lack of repeatability, and it is usually necessary to average several measurements for each position. Through experiments in different auditoriums that recreate typical situations in which the measurement standard is applied, it is found that using impulse sources leads to greater variation in the results, especially at low frequencies. However, this prevents subsequent dispersions due to variables that this technique does not require, such as the orientation of the emitting source. These dispersions may be relevant at high frequencies exceeding the established tolerance criteria for certain parameters. Finally, a new descriptor for dodecahedral sources reflecting the influence their lack of omnidirectionality produces on measuring acoustic parameters is proposed.

  2. Impulsivity and the sexes: measurement and structural invariance of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale.

    PubMed

    Cyders, Melissa A

    2013-02-01

    Before it is possible to test whether men and women differ in impulsivity, it is necessary to evaluate whether impulsivity measures are invariant across sex. The UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale (negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking, with added subscale of positive urgency) is one measure of five dispositions toward rash action that has shown to have robust and clinically useful relationships among risk-taking outcomes. In the current research, the author examined (a) the psychometric measurement invariance of the UPPS-P across sex, (b) the scale's structural invariance across sex, and (c) whether the five impulsivity traits differentially relate to risk outcomes as a function of sex. In a sample of 1,372 undergraduates, the author found evidence for measurement and invariance across sex: Thus, comparisons of men and women on the UPPS-P can be considered valid. Additionally, although males tend to report higher levels of sensation seeking and positive urgency (and possibly lack of perseverance), the relationships between the UPPS-P traits and risk outcomes were generally invariant across sex. The UPPS-P appears to function comparably across males and females, and mean differences on this scale between the sexes can be thought to reflect trait-level differences.

  3. High Accuracy Time Transfer Synchronization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    HIGH ACCURACY TIME TRANSFER SYNCHRONIZATION Paul Wheeler, Paul Koppang, David Chalmers, Angela Davis, Anthony Kubik and William Powell U.S. Naval...Observatory Washington, DC 20392 Abstract In July 1994, the US Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a...field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchro- nization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance

  4. Conveyor-belt clock synchronization

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Maccone, Lorenzo; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Wong, Franco N.C.; Lloyd, Seth

    2004-10-01

    A protocol for synchronizing distant clocks is proposed that does not rely on the arrival times of the signals which are exchanged, and an optical implementation based on coherent-state pulses is described. This protocol is not limited by any dispersion that may be present in the propagation medium through which the light signals are exchanged. Possible improvements deriving from the use of quantum-mechanical effects are also addressed.

  5. Digital-data receiver synchronization

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F.; Turner, Gary W.

    2005-08-02

    Digital-data receiver synchronization is provided with composite phase-frequency detectors, mutually cross-connected comparison feedback or both to provide robust reception of digital data signals. A single master clock can be used to provide frequency signals. Advantages can include fast lock-up time in moderately to severely noisy conditions, greater tolerance to noise and jitter when locked, and improved tolerance to clock asymmetries.

  6. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-03-22

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron's tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network's activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits.

  7. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron’s tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network’s activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits. PMID:26961000

  8. Trait Impulsivity and Anhedonia: Two Gateways for the Development of Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed

    Houeto, Jean-Luc; Magnard, Robin; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Belin, David; Carnicella, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Apathy and impulsivity are two major comorbid syndromes of Parkinson's disease (PD) that may represent two extremes of a behavioral spectrum modulated by dopamine-dependent processes. PD is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta to which are attributed the cardinal motor symptoms of the disorder. Dopamine replacement therapy (DRT), used widely to treat these motor symptoms, is often associated with deficits in hedonic processing and motivation, including apathy and depression, as well as impulse control disorders (ICDs). ICDs comprise pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping, binge eating, compulsive overuse of dopaminergic medication, and punding. More frequently observed in males with early onset PD, ICDs are associated not only with comorbid affective symptoms, such as depression and anxiety, but also with behavioral traits, such as novelty seeking and impulsivity, as well as with personal or familial history of alcohol use. This constellation of associated risk factors highlights the importance of inter-individual differences in the vulnerability to develop comorbid psychiatric disorders in PD patients. Additionally, withdrawal from DRT in patients with ICDs frequently unmasks a severe apathetic state, suggesting that apathy and ICDs may be caused by overlapping neurobiological mechanisms within the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical networks. We suggest that altered hedonic and impulse control processes represent distinct prodromal substrates for the development of these psychiatric symptoms, the etiopathogenic mechanisms of which remain unknown. Specifically, we argue that deficits in hedonic and motivational states and impulse control are mediated by overlapping, yet dissociable, neural mechanisms that differentially interact with DRT to promote the emergence of ICDs in vulnerable individuals. Thus, we provide a novel heuristic framework for basic and clinical research to better

  9. Serotonergic modulation of ‘waiting impulsivity' is mediated by the impulsivity phenotype in humans

    PubMed Central

    Neufang, S; Akhrif, A; Herrmann, C G; Drepper, C; Homola, G A; Nowak, J; Waider, J; Schmitt, A G; Lesch, K-P; Romanos, M

    2016-01-01

    In rodents, the five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) has been established as a reliable measure of waiting impulsivity being defined as the ability to regulate a response in anticipation of reinforcement. Key brain structures are the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and prefrontal regions (for example, pre- and infralimbic cortex), which are, together with other transmitters, modulated by serotonin. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we examined 103 healthy males while performing the 5-CSRTT measuring brain activation in humans by means of a paradigm that has been widely applied in rodents. Subjects were genotyped for the tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2; G-703T; rs4570625) variant, an enzyme specific for brain serotonin synthesis. We addressed neural activation patterns of waiting impulsivity and the interaction between the NAcc and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) using dynamic causal modeling. Genetic influence was examined via interaction analyses between the TPH2 genotype (GG homozygotes vs T allele carriers) and the degree of impulsivity as measured by the 5-CSRTT. We found that the driving input of the vmPFC was reduced in highly impulsive T allele carriers (reflecting a reduced top-down control) in combination with an enhanced response in the NAcc after correct target processing (reflecting an augmented response to monetary reward). Taken together, we found a high overlap of our findings with reports from animal studies in regard to the underlying cognitive processes, the brain regions associated with waiting impulsivity and the neural interplay between the NAcc and vmPFC. Therefore, we conclude that the 5-CSRTT is a promising tool for translational studies. PMID:27824354

  10. Super-resolution in respiratory synchronized positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Daphné; Lamare, Frédéric; Kontaxakis, Giorgos; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2012-02-01

    Respiratory motion is a major source of reduced quality in positron emission tomography (PET). In order to minimize its effects, the use of respiratory synchronized acquisitions, leading to gated frames, has been suggested. Such frames, however, are of low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as they contain reduced statistics. Super-resolution (SR) techniques make use of the motion in a sequence of images in order to improve their quality. They aim at enhancing a low-resolution image belonging to a sequence of images representing different views of the same scene. In this work, a maximum a posteriori (MAP) super-resolution algorithm has been implemented and applied to respiratory gated PET images for motion compensation. An edge preserving Huber regularization term was used to ensure convergence. Motion fields were recovered using a B-spline based elastic registration algorithm. The performance of the SR algorithm was evaluated through the use of both simulated and clinical datasets by assessing image SNR, as well as the contrast, position and extent of the different lesions. Results were compared to summing the registered synchronized frames on both simulated and clinical datasets. The super-resolution image had higher SNR (by a factor of over 4 on average) and lesion contrast (by a factor of 2) than the single respiratory synchronized frame using the same reconstruction matrix size. In comparison to the motion corrected or the motion free images a similar SNR was obtained, while improvements of up to 20% in the recovered lesion size and contrast were measured. Finally, the recovered lesion locations on the SR images were systematically closer to the true simulated lesion positions. These observations concerning the SNR, lesion contrast and size were confirmed on two clinical datasets included in the study. In conclusion, the use of SR techniques applied to respiratory motion synchronized images lead to motion compensation combined with improved image SNR and contrast

  11. Multivariate singular spectrum analysis and the road to phase synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, Andreas; Ghil, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Singular spectrum analysis (SSA) and multivariate SSA (M-SSA) are based on the classical work of Kosambi (1943), Loeve (1945) and Karhunen (1946) and are closely related to principal component analysis. They have been introduced into information theory by Bertero, Pike and co-workers (1982, 1984) and into dynamical systems analysis by Broomhead and King (1986a,b). Ghil, Vautard and associates have applied SSA and M-SSA to the temporal and spatio-temporal analysis of short and noisy time series in climate dynamics and other fields in the geosciences since the late 1980s. M-SSA provides insight into the unknown or partially known dynamics of the underlying system by decomposing the delay-coordinate phase space of a given multivariate time series into a set of data-adaptive orthonormal components. These components can be classified essentially into trends, oscillatory patterns and noise, and allow one to reconstruct a robust "skeleton" of the dynamical system's structure. For an overview we refer to Ghil et al. (Rev. Geophys., 2002). In this talk, we present M-SSA in the context of synchronization analysis and illustrate its ability to unveil information about the mechanisms behind the adjustment of rhythms in coupled dynamical systems. The focus of the talk is on the special case of phase synchronization between coupled chaotic oscillators (Rosenblum et al., PRL, 1996). Several ways of measuring phase synchronization are in use, and the robust definition of a reasonable phase for each oscillator is critical in each of them. We illustrate here the advantages of M-SSA in the automatic identification of oscillatory modes and in drawing conclusions about the transition to phase synchronization. Without using any a priori definition of a suitable phase, we show that M-SSA is able to detect phase synchronization in a chain of coupled chaotic oscillators (Osipov et al., PRE, 1996). Recently, Muller et al. (PRE, 2005) and Allefeld et al. (Intl. J. Bif. Chaos, 2007) have

  12. Synchronization transition in networked chaotic oscillators: the viewpoint from partial synchronization.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chenbo; Lin, Weijie; Huang, Liang; Wang, Xingang

    2014-05-01

    Synchronization transition in networks of nonlocally coupled chaotic oscillators is investigated. It is found that in reaching the state of global synchronization the networks can stay in various states of partial synchronization. The stability of the partial synchronization states is analyzed by the method of eigenvalue analysis, in which the important roles of the network topological symmetry on synchronization transition are identified. Moreover, for networks possessing multiple topological symmetries, it is found that the synchronization transition can be divided into different stages, with each stage characterized by a unique synchronous pattern of the oscillators. Synchronization transitions in networks of nonsymmetric topology and nonidentical oscillators are also investigated, where the partial synchronization states, although unstable, are found to be still playing important roles in the transitions.

  13. Impulse Propagation in Disordered Hertzian Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Marian; Sen, Surajit; Hurd, Alan J.

    2000-03-01

    It was shown by Nesterenko [1] that an impulse initiated at an end of a chain of elastic grains in mutual contact, i.e., interacting via the nonlinear Hertz potential, travels as a soliton-like object. Recent theoretical [2], experimental [3] and numerical studies [4] have validated his findings. In the presentation we shall examine the propagation of an impulse in an imperfect system that is characterized by grains composed of different elastic materials, different sizes, shapes and velocity-dependent friction. Our study shows that even in the presence of considerable disorder, most of the energy still travels as a weakly dispersive bundle of energy. According to our calculations, the amplitude, position and geometry of the leading pulse are related to chain disorder via simple scaling laws. We shall comment upon the inverse problem of determining the material properties by studying the pulse propagation, with many potential applications. [1] V.F. Nesterenko, J Appl Mech Tech Phys 5, 733 (1983) [2] S. Sen and M. Manciu, Physica A 268, 644 (1999); A. Chatterjee, Phys Rev E 59, 5912 (1999) [3] C. Coste, E. Falcon and S. Fauve, Phys Rev E 56, 6104 (1997); E.J. Hinch and S. Saint-Jean, Proc R Soc A 455, 3201 (1999) [4] M. Manciu, V. Tehan and S. Sen, Chaos (in press)

  14. Design and construction of an impulse turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, E.

    2013-11-01

    Impulse turbine has been constructed to be used in the program of Hydraulic Machines, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering at the Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, sede Bucaramanga. For construction of the impulse turbine (Pelton) detailed plans were drawn up taking into account the design and implementation of the fundamental equations of hydraulic turbomachinery. From the experimental data found maximum mechanical efficiency of 0.6 ± 0.03 for a water flow of 2.1 l/s. The maximum overall efficiency was 0.23 ± 0.02 for a water flow of 0.83 l/s. The design parameter used was a power of 1 kW, as flow regulator built a needle type regulator, which performed well, the model of the bucket or vane is built on a machine type CNC (Computer Numerical Control). For the construction of the impeller and blades was used aluminium because of chemical and physical characteristics and the casing was manufactured in acrylic.

  15. Rock Directed Breaking Under the Impulse Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomeriki, Sergo; Mataradze, Edgar; Chikhradze, Nikoloz; Losaberidze, Marine; Khomeriki, Davit; Shatberashvili, Grigol

    2016-10-01

    In the work the problem of directed chipping of facing stone material by means of managing of explosion process is considered. The technology of the mining of decorative stone by the use of explosion energy means the very rapid transfer of potential energy of elastic deformations to kinetic energy. As a result, the explosion impulse, in the expanse of the inertia of rock massive, does not cause the increase of existing cracks. In the course of explosion, the shock wave is propagated by ultrasonic velocity and in this case the medium parameters (pressure, density, temperature, velocity) increase in spurts. In spite of this fact the all three conservation laws of mechanics remain valid on basis of three laws the equations are derived by which the parameters of shock wave may be defined by means of the rock physical-mechanical properties. The load on the body volume at breaking under explosion acts over very small period of the time. Therefore, stressed-deformed state of the rock was studied when the impulse load acts on the boundary. It was considered that the mining of the blocks of facing stone is performed from the hard rocks. This means that the breaking proceeds in the zone of elastic deformation. In the conditions of mentioned assumptions, the expression of the stress tensor and displacement of vector components initiated by stressed-deformed state in the rock are written.

  16. Low cost impulse compatible wideband antenna

    DOEpatents

    Rosenbury, Erwin T.; Burke, Gerald J.; Nelson, Scott D.; Stever, Robert D.; Governo, George K.; Mullenhoff, Donald J.

    2002-01-01

    An antenna apparatus and method for building the antenna is disclosed. Impulse signals travel through a feed point of the antenna with respect to a ground plane. A geometric fin structure is connected to the feed point, and through a termination resistance to the ground plane. A geometric ridge structure connected to the ground is positioned with respect to the fin in order to receive and radiate electromagnetic energy from the impulse signal at a predetermined impedance and over a predetermined set of frequencies. The fin and ridge can be either a wire or a planar surface. The fin and ridge may be disposed within a radiation cavity such as a horn. The radiation cavity is constructed of stamped and etched metal sheets bent and then soldered together. The fin and ridge are also formed from metal sheets or wires. The fin is attached to the feed point and then to the cavity through a termination resistance. The ridge is attached to the cavity and disposed with respect to the fin in order to achieve a particular set of antenna characteristics.

  17. X-ray Diffraction and Multi-Frame Phase Contrast Imaging Diagnostics for IMPULSE at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Adam; Carlson, Carl; Young, Jason; Curtis, Alden; Jensen, Brian; Ramos, Kyle; Yeager, John; Montgomery, David; Fezza, Kamel

    2013-07-08

    The diagnostic needs of any dynamic loading platform present unique technical challenges that must be addressed in order to accurately measure in situ material properties in an extreme environment. The IMPULSE platform (IMPact system for Ultrafast Synchrotron Experiments) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is no exception and, in fact, may be more challenging, as the imaging diagnostics must be synchronized to both the experiment and the 60 ps wide x-ray bunches produced at APS. The technical challenges of time-resolved x-ray diffraction imaging and high-resolution multi-frame phase contrast imaging (PCI) are described in this paper. Example data from recent IMPULSE experiments are shown to illustrate the advances and evolution of these diagnostics with a focus on comparing the performance of two intensified CCD cameras and their suitability for multi-frame PCI. The continued development of these diagnostics is fundamentally important to IMPULSE and many other loading platforms and will benefit future facilities such as the Dynamic Compression Sector at APS and MaRIE at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  18. Sex Differences in Impulsivity: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Catharine P.; Copping, Lee T.; Campbell, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Men are overrepresented in socially problematic behaviors, such as aggression and criminal behavior, which have been linked to impulsivity. Our review of impulsivity is organized around the tripartite theoretical distinction between reward hypersensitivity, punishment hyposensitivity, and inadequate effortful control. Drawing on evolutionary,…

  19. Impulse Magnetic Fields Generated by Electrostatic Discharges in Protoplanetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tunyi, I.; Guba, P.; Roth, L. E.; Timko, M.

    2002-01-01

    We examine quantitative aspects associated with the hypothesis of nebular lightnings as a source of impulse magnetic fields. Our findings support our previous accretion model in which a presence of impulse magnetic fields was of a key necessity. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Impulsivity in internet addiction: a comparison with pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae Woo; Choi, Jung-Seok; Shin, Young-Chul; Lee, Jun-Young; Jung, Hee Yeon; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2012-07-01

    Internet addiction has been considered to be associated with poor impulse control. The aim of this study is to compare the trait impulsivity of those suffering from Internet addiction with that of individuals suffering from pathological gambling. Twenty-seven patients diagnosed with Internet addiction (age: 24.78±4.37 years), 27 patients diagnosed with pathological gambling (age: 25.67±3.97 years), and 27 healthy controls (age: 25.33±2.79 years) were enrolled in this study. All patients were men seeking treatment. Trait impulsivity and the severity of the Internet addiction and pathological gambling were measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, the Young's Internet Addiction Test, and the South Oaks Gambling Screen, respectively. The Beck Depression Inventory and the Beck Anxiety Inventory were also administered to all subjects. Our results show that those suffering from Internet addiction showed increased levels of trait impulsivity which were comparable to those of patients diagnosed with pathological gambling. Additionally, the severity of Internet addiction was positively correlated with the level of trait impulsivity in patients with Internet addiction. These results state that Internet addiction can be conceptualized as an impulse control disorder and that trait impulsivity is a marker for vulnerability to Internet addiction.

  1. Domain-Specific Impulsivity in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsukayama, Eli; Duckworth, Angela Lee; Kim, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is a salient individual difference in children with well-established predictive validity for life outcomes. The current investigation proposes that impulsive behaviors vary systematically by domain. In a series of studies with ethnically and socioeconomically diverse samples of middle school students, we find that schoolwork-related…

  2. Impulsivity in College Students with and without ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jessica A.

    2010-01-01

    Impulsivity is the cardinal symptom of ADHD. It is estimated that ADHD is present in eighteen percent of children and in four percent of adults. The present study repeats and extends a previous study (Gray, Breier, Foorman, & Fletcher, 2002) that measured impulsivity in adolescents with and without ADHD, which found higher false alarm rates…

  3. Periodic solutions for ordinary differential equations with sublinear impulsive effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Dingbian; Li, Xinyu

    2005-03-01

    The continuation method of topological degree is used to investigate the existence of periodic solutions for ordinary differential equations with sublinear impulsive effects. The applications of the abstract approach include the generalizations of some classical nonresonance theorem for impulsive equations, for instance, the existence theorem for asymptotically positively homogeneous differential systems and the existence theorem for second order equations with Landesman-Lazer conditions.

  4. Individual differences in impulsivity predict anticipatory eye movements.

    PubMed

    Cirilli, Laetitia; de Timary, Philippe; Lefèvre, Phillipe; Missal, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Impulsivity is the tendency to act without forethought. It is a personality trait commonly used in the diagnosis of many psychiatric diseases. In clinical practice, impulsivity is estimated using written questionnaires. However, answers to questions might be subject to personal biases and misinterpretations. In order to alleviate this problem, eye movements could be used to study differences in decision processes related to impulsivity. Therefore, we investigated correlations between impulsivity scores obtained with a questionnaire in healthy subjects and characteristics of their anticipatory eye movements in a simple smooth pursuit task. Healthy subjects were asked to answer the UPPS questionnaire (Urgency Premeditation Perseverance and Sensation seeking Impulsive Behavior scale), which distinguishes four independent dimensions of impulsivity: Urgency, lack of Premeditation, lack of Perseverance, and Sensation seeking. The same subjects took part in an oculomotor task that consisted of pursuing a target that moved in a predictable direction. This task reliably evoked anticipatory saccades and smooth eye movements. We found that eye movement characteristics such as latency and velocity were significantly correlated with UPPS scores. The specific correlations between distinct UPPS factors and oculomotor anticipation parameters support the validity of the UPPS construct and corroborate neurobiological explanations for impulsivity. We suggest that the oculomotor approach of impulsivity put forth in the present study could help bridge the gap between psychiatry and physiology.

  5. Spectral analysis of impulse noise for hearing conservation purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Stevin, G.O.

    1982-12-01

    Damage-risk criteria for impulse noise does not presently take the spectrum of the impulse into account; however, it is known that the human auditory system is spectrally tuned. The present paper advocates the extension to impulse noise of the noise dose concept which is widely used for continuous noise. This approach is based upon sound exposure instead of sound pressure. An A-weighting filter or an octave band analysis can then be used to take the spectral content of the impulses into account. The equipment needed for applying these procedures for impulse noise is an integrating sound level meter or a digital Fourier processor. Generalized spectral methods have been evaluated by means of an impulse simulation applied to a mathematical model of the human hearing mechanism. The results of this simulation agree with the most recent experiments on impulse noise and fully support the proposed rating methods. This conclusion must be emphasized as it leads the derivation of a uniform procedure for predicting loudness and damage risk for hearing which is applicable for continuous noise as well as for impulse noise.

  6. 33 CFR 183.586 - Pressure impulse test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pressure impulse test. 183.586...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Tests § 183.586 Pressure impulse test. A fuel... pressure test under § 183.580. (b) If the tank is non-metallic, fill it to capacity with a gasoline...

  7. Optimum Three Impulse Trajectory Generator with Patched Conic Trajectory Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, M. H.; Pines, S.; Horsewood, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Optimal multi-impulse trajectories were investigated as a nominal about which asymptotic expansion was used to obtain approximations of optimal low thrust trajectories. The work consisted of the analysis and description of an optimal 3-impulse trajectory program. A patched-conic trajectory model was specifically designed for compatibility with the subsequent addition of the low thrust expansion approximation.

  8. Causal impulse response for circular sources in viscous media

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, James F.; McGough, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    The causal impulse response of the velocity potential for the Stokes wave equation is derived for calculations of transient velocity potential fields generated by circular pistons in viscous media. The causal Green’s function is numerically verified using the material impulse response function approach. The causal, lossy impulse response for a baffled circular piston is then calculated within the near field and the far field regions using expressions previously derived for the fast near field method. Transient velocity potential fields in viscous media are computed with the causal, lossy impulse response and compared to results obtained with the lossless impulse response. The numerical error in the computed velocity potential field is quantitatively analyzed for a range of viscous relaxation times and piston radii. Results show that the largest errors are generated in locations near the piston face and for large relaxation times, and errors are relatively small otherwise. Unlike previous frequency-domain methods that require numerical inverse Fourier transforms for the evaluation of the lossy impulse response, the present approach calculates the lossy impulse response directly in the time domain. The results indicate that this causal impulse response is ideal for time-domain calculations that simultaneously account for diffraction and quadratic frequency-dependent attenuation in viscous media. PMID:18397018

  9. Individual Differences in Impulsive Choice and Timing in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galtress, Tiffany; Garcia, Ana; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Individual differences in impulsive choice behavior have been linked to a variety of behavioral problems including substance abuse, smoking, gambling, and poor financial decision-making. Given the potential importance of individual differences in impulsive choice as a predictor of behavioral problems, the present study sought to measure the extent…

  10. Choice impulsivity: Definitions, measurement issues, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Mitchell, Marci R; Wing, Victoria C; Balodis, Iris M; Bickel, Warren K; Fillmore, Mark; Lane, Scott D; Lejuez, C W; Littlefield, Andrew K; Luijten, Maartje; Mathias, Charles W; Mitchell, Suzanne H; Napier, T Celeste; Reynolds, Brady; Schütz, Christian G; Setlow, Barry; Sher, Kenneth J; Swann, Alan C; Tedford, Stephanie E; White, Melanie J; Winstanley, Catharine A; Yi, Richard; Potenza, Marc N; Moeller, F Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Impulsivity critically relates to many psychiatric disorders. Given the multifaceted construct that impulsivity represents, defining core aspects of impulsivity is vital for the assessment and understanding of clinical conditions. Choice impulsivity (CI), involving the preferential selection of smaller sooner rewards over larger later rewards, represents one important type of impulsivity. The International Society for Research on Impulsivity (InSRI) convened to discuss the definition and assessment of CI and provide recommendations regarding measurement across species. Commonly used preclinical and clinical CI behavioral tasks are described, and considerations for each task are provided to guide CI task selection. Differences in assessment of CI (self-report, behavioral) and calculating CI indices (e.g., area-under-the-curve, indifference point, and steepness of discounting curve) are discussed along with properties of specific behavioral tasks used in preclinical and clinical settings. The InSRI group recommends inclusion of measures of CI in human studies examining impulsivity. Animal studies examining impulsivity should also include assessments of CI and these measures should be harmonized in accordance with human studies of the disorders being modeled in the preclinical investigations. The choice of specific CI measures to be included should be based on the goals of the study and existing preclinical and clinical literature using established CI measures.

  11. Designing an electro-impulse de-icing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumwalt, G. W.; Friedberg, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Basic principles and parameters for a system to deice aircraft with electromagnetic impulses are described. The physical basis for deicing by such impulses is explained, and the requirements involved in the electrodynamic design, structural dynamic design, and system design are discussed. Some manufacturing and testing problems and techniques are described.

  12. Temperament and Character Dimensions: Correlates of Impulsivity in Morphine Addicts

    PubMed Central

    Abassi, Moslem; Abolghasemi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Given the role of temperament and character dimensions on impulsivity in addicts, the purpose of this study was to temperament and character dimensions: correlates of impulsivity in morphine addicts. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine and verify the association of temperament and character dimensions with impulsivity in morphine addicts. Patients and Methods: The research method was descriptive and correlational. The study sample consisted of 120 morphine addicts referred to drug addiction treatment centers in Ardabil city in 2013. The participants were selected through convenience sampling method from 5 centers. We used impulsivity scale as well as temperament and character inventory to collect data. Results: The results showed that significant relationship existed between impulsivity and characteristics such as novelty seeking, harm avoidance, reward dependence, persistence, self-directedness, and cooperativeness, while no significant relationship between impulsivity and self-transcendence was observed. The results of the multiple regression analysis showed that 47% of the impulsivity variance was explained by temperament and character dimensions. Conclusions: These findings suggest that temperament and character dimensions are associated with impulsivity. The findings also have important implications for prevention, pathology, and treatment in the morphine addicts. PMID:26870706

  13. [Impulsivity and decision making in alcohol-addicted individuals].

    PubMed

    Kałwa, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    Decision making processes are the research problem, that has been increasingly undertaken. Alcohol addiction is a disease associated with unfavorable decision making, in spite of its negative consequences. Impulsivity plays an important role in alcoholics' decision making. It can be understood in terms of behavioral and/or cognitive flexibility disorders, that manifest in cognitive function disorders, making it difficult or even impossible to quickly and adequately assess the situation and to adjust behavior according to its requirements.. Neurobiological and genetic research indicate the existing relationship between impulsivity and certain genetic predisposition. In alcohol addicts, impulsivity can be understood also in terms of specific personality traits, e.g. novelty seeking according to the theory of Cloninger. Although the concept of impulsivity itself has been the main topic of many studies, not many of them concern also decision making processes. In studies concerning alcoholics' decision making, the relationship between this processes and behavioral impulsivity defined in many different ways, has been noticed. Some of these works define unfavorable decision making processes itself as a feature of impulsivity. Based on the results of theoretical works and research studies, it seems that it would be worth to define more precisely the concept of impulsivity, in order to determine its effect on decision making. The assessment of whether - and to what extent - the two variables (impulsivity and decision making) can be considered as separate should also be taken into account.

  14. The effects of heroin administration and drug cues on impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jermaine D; Vadhan, Nehal P; Luba, Rachel R; Comer, Sandra D

    2016-08-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and continued use despite negative consequences. Behavioral impulsivity is a strong predictor of the initiation and maintenance of drug addiction. Preclinical data suggest that heroin may exacerbate impulsive characteristics in an individual but this has yet to be assessed in clinical samples. The current secondary data analysis sought to investigate the effects of heroin on impulsivity along with the effects of exposure to drug cues. Using the current data set, we also tentatively assessed the etiological relationship between impulsivity and heroin abuse. Sixteen heroin-dependent participants were recruited to complete Immediate Memory Task/Delayed Memory Task (IMT/DMT) and GoStop tasks following repeated heroin administration, following acute heroin administration, and following a drug cue exposure session. Four preceding days of active heroin availability, compared to four preceding days of placebo drug availability, increased impulsivity assessed using the IMT and DMT. Presentation of drug cues similarly acted to increase impulsivity assessments on all three tasks. It also appears that heavier users were more susceptible to the influence of drug cues on impulsivity. The present study represents a step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between opioid abuse and impulsivity. A better understanding of these factors could provide critical insight into the maintenance of heroin use and relapse.

  15. Validity of proposed DSM-5 ADHD impulsivity symptoms in children.

    PubMed

    Ünsel Bolat, Gül; Ercan, Eyüp Sabri; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Bilaç, Öznur; Massuti, Rafael; Uysal Özaslan, Taciser; Bolat, Hilmi; Rohde, Luis Augusto

    2016-10-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) working group on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) proposed the inclusion of four new impulsivity symptoms. However, they were not included in DSM-5 due to the lack of sufficient evidence. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance of the proposed four ADHD impulsivity symptoms with respect to: (a) ADHD factor structure; (b) performance in predicting clinical impairment; (c) specificity for ADHD diagnosis and (d) best symptomatic threshold to predict clinical impairment. The sample comprised 416 children (31 ADHD subjects according to both DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5, 20 ADHD subjects according to just one diagnostic system and 365 controls) from 12 schools. Diagnoses were derived using semi-structured interviews and ADHD rating scales. Results from confirmatory factor analysis indicate that addition of the four new impulsivity items provided a slightly better factor structure if compared to models including only 18 items. Regression analyses showed that only one of the new impulsivity symptoms (impatient) was part of the list of best predictors of impairment. None of the four new impulsivity items was specifically associated with ADHD diagnosis. The best cutoff point in the hyperactivity/impulsivity dimension for predicting impairment did not change significantly. Overall, our findings suggest that the determination on how to best capture impulsivity dimension as part of the ADHD construct needs more investigation and that there is not enough evidence to include these four assessed impulsivity symptoms as part of the ADHD criteria.

  16. Choice Impulsivity: Definitions, Measurement Issues, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Kristen R.; Mitchell, Marci R.; Wing, Victoria C.; Balodis, Iris M.; Bickel, Warren K.; Fillmore, Mark; Lane, Scott D.; Lejuez, C. W.; Littlefield, Andrew K.; Luijten, Maartje; Mathias, Charles W.; Mitchell, Suzanne H.; Napier, T. Celeste; Reynolds, Brady; Schütz, Christian G.; Setlow, Barry; Sher, Kenneth J.; Swann, Alan C.; Tedford, Stephanie E.; White, Melanie J.; Winstanley, Catharine A.; Yi, Richard; Potenza, Marc N.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Background Impulsivity critically relates to many psychiatric disorders. Given the multi-faceted construct that impulsivity represents, defining core aspects of impulsivity is vital for the assessment and understanding of clinical conditions. Choice impulsivity (CI), involving the preferential selection of smaller sooner rewards over larger later rewards, represents one important type of impulsivity. Method The International Society for Research on Impulsivity (InSRI) convened to discuss the definition and assessment of CI and provide recommendations regarding measurement across species. Results Commonly used preclinical and clinical CI behavioral tasks are described, and considerations for each task are provided to guide CI task selection. Differences in assessment of CI (self-report, behavioral) and calculating CI indices (e.g., area-under-the-curve, indifference point, steepness of discounting curve) are discussed along with properties of specific behavioral tasks used in preclinical and clinical settings. Conclusions The InSRI group recommends inclusion of measures of CI in human studies examining impulsivity. Animal studies examining impulsivity should also include assessments of CI and these measures should be harmonized in accordance with human studies of the disorders being modeled in the preclinical investigations. The choice of specific CI measures to be included should be based on the goals of the study and existing preclinical and clinical literature using established CI measures. PMID:25867841

  17. The action of antidromic impulses on the cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, J. C.; Llinás, R.; Sasaki, K.

    1966-01-01

    1. Antidromic impulses have been set up in the axons of Purkinje cells of the cerebellar vermis by stimulation in the juxta-fastigial (J.F.) region. Most experiments were performed on the normal cat cerebellum, but in nine the cerebellum was chronically deafferented by bilateral pedunculotomy 9-23 days previously. 2. Intra- and extracellular recording from Purkinje cells both showed a characteristic inflexion on the rising phase of the spike potential (the characteristic IS—SD inflexion) that presumably signals a delay in invasion between the axon and the large soma-dendritic expansion. 3. Laminar field analysis of the antidromic spike potentials showed that the antidromic impulses invaded at least 200 μ of the main dendrites as well as the soma, there being then a steep decrement to the surface. At superficial levels there was even an inverse antidromic spike potential. There appeared to be a synchronous invasion of the soma-dendritic complex, perhaps due to trigger zones of low threshold on the dendrites. 4. Antidromic soma-dendritic invasion was modified in the expected manner by a volley in the parallel fibres; there was inhibition of transmission into the soma and up the main dendrites (maximum effect at 200-300 μ depth) due to the inhibitory action of the basket and superficial stellate cells that are excited by the parallel fibres; there was facilitation of transmission in the dendrites at levels superficial to 200 μ due to the direct excitatory action of parallel fibres. Both the inhibitory and excitatory actions had a duration in excess of 100 msec. 5. In the chronically deafferented cerebellum a second J.F. stimulation evoked a full size antidromic spike potential at an interval of 3 msec. There was a gradual decline in size down to intervals of about 2 msec, and at briefer intervals, to 1 msec, there was a small residual spike potential that possibly is due to transmission into the Purkinje cell axon collaterals at intervals too brief for soma

  18. Fast synchronization recovery for lossy image transmission with a suffix-rich Huffman code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Te-Chung; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    1998-10-01

    A new entropy codec, which can recover quickly from the loss of synchronization due to the occurrence of transmission errors, is proposed and applied to wireless image transmission in this research. This entropy codec is designed based on the Huffman code with a careful choice of the assignment of 1's and 0's to each branch of the Huffman tree. The design satisfies the suffix-rich property, i.e. the number of a codeword to be the suffix of other codewords is maximized. After the Huffman coding tree is constructed, the source can be coded by using the traditional Huffman code. Thus, this coder does not introduce any overhead to sacrifice its coding efficiency. Statistically, the decoder can automatically recover the lost synchronization with the shortest error propagation length. Experimental results show that fast synchronization recovery reduces quality degradation on the reconstructed image while maintaining the same coding efficiency.

  19. Robust H∞ observer-based control for synchronization of a class of complex dynamical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hai-Qing; Jing, Yuan-Wei

    2011-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the robust H∞ synchronization problem for a class of complex dynamical networks by applying the observer-based control. The proposed feedback control scheme is developed to ensure the asymptotic stability of the augmented system, to reconstruct the non-measurable state variables of each node and to improve the H∞ performance related to the synchronization error and observation error despite the external disturbance. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, a synchronization criterion is obtained under which the controlled network can be robustly stabilized onto a desired state with a guaranteed H∞ performance. The controller and the observer gains can be given by the feasible solutions of a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is demonstrated by a numerical example through simulation.

  20. Impulse Testing of Corporate-Fed Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel method for detecting faults in antenna arrays. The method, termed Impulse Testing, was developed for corporate-fed patch arrays where the element is fed by a probe and is shorted at its center. Impulse Testing was devised to supplement conventional microwave measurements in order to quickly verify antenna integrity. The technique relies on exciting each antenna element in turn with a fast pulse (or impulse) that propagates through the feed network to the output port of the antenna. The resulting impulse response is characteristic of the path through the feed network. Using an oscilloscope, a simple amplitude measurement can be made to detect faults. A circuit model of the antenna elements and feed network was constructed to assess various fault scenarios and determine fault-detection thresholds. The experimental setup and impulse measurements for two patch array antennas are presented. Advantages and limitations of the technique are discussed along with applications to other antenna array topologies

  1. Impulsive pressurization of neuronal cells for traumatic brain injury study.

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Matthew; Lee, Jeong Soon; Feng, Ruqiang; Lim, Jung Yul

    2011-10-12

    A novel impulsive cell pressurization experiment has been developed using a Kolsky bar device to investigate blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). We demonstrate in this video article how blast TBI-relevant impulsive pressurization is applied to the neuronal cells in vitro. This is achieved by using well-controlled pressure pulse created by a specialized Kolsky bar device, with complete pressure history within the cell pressurization chamber recorded. Pressurized neuronal cells are inspected immediately after pressurization, or further incubated to examine the long-term effects of impulsive pressurization on neurite/axonal outgrowth, neuronal gene expression, apoptosis, etc. We observed that impulsive pressurization at about 2 MPa induces distinct neurite loss relative to unpressurized cells. Our technique provides a novel method to investigate the molecular/cellular mechanisms of blast TBI, via impulsive pressurization of brain cells at well-controlled pressure magnitude and duration.

  2. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an "all or none" phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera).

  3. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization

    SciTech Connect

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L.

    2015-01-15

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an “all or none” phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera)

  4. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization.

    PubMed

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an "all or none" phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera).

  5. Explosive synchronization coexists with classical synchronization in the Kuramoto model.

    PubMed

    Danziger, Michael M; Moskalenko, Olga I; Kurkin, Semen A; Zhang, Xiyun; Havlin, Shlomo; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Explosive synchronization has recently been reported in a system of adaptively coupled Kuramoto oscillators, without any conditions on the frequency or degree of the nodes. Here, we find that, in fact, the explosive phase coexists with the standard phase of the Kuramoto oscillators. We determine this by extending the mean-field theory of adaptively coupled oscillators with full coupling to the case with partial coupling of a fraction f. This analysis shows that a metastable region exists for all finite values of f > 0, and therefore explosive synchronization is expected for any perturbation of adaptively coupling added to the standard Kuramoto model. We verify this theory with GPU-accelerated simulations on very large networks (N ∼ 10(6)) and find that, in fact, an explosive transition with hysteresis is observed for all finite couplings. By demonstrating that explosive transitions coexist with standard transitions in the limit of f → 0, we show that this behavior is far more likely to occur naturally than was previously believed.

  6. Nondestructive synchronous beam current monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, Michel Kireeff

    2014-12-15

    A fast current transformer is mounted after the deflectors of the Berkeley 88-Inch Cyclotron. The measured signal is amplified and connected to the input of a lock-in amplifier. The lock-in amplifier performs a synchronous detection of the signal at the cyclotron second harmonic frequency. The magnitude of the signal detected is calibrated against a Faraday cup and corresponds to the beam intensity. It has exceptional resolution, long term stability, and can measure the beam current leaving the cyclotron as low as 1 nA.

  7. Synchronization in random balanced networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García del Molino, Luis Carlos; Pakdaman, Khashayar; Touboul, Jonathan; Wainrib, Gilles

    2013-10-01

    Characterizing the influence of network properties on the global emerging behavior of interacting elements constitutes a central question in many areas, from physical to social sciences. In this article we study a primary model of disordered neuronal networks with excitatory-inhibitory structure and balance constraints. We show how the interplay between structure and disorder in the connectivity leads to a universal transition from trivial to synchronized stationary or periodic states. This transition cannot be explained only through the analysis of the spectral density of the connectivity matrix. We provide a low-dimensional approximation that shows the role of both the structure and disorder in the dynamics.

  8. [Respiratory synchronization and breast radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mège, A; Ziouèche-Mottet, A; Bodez, V; Garcia, R; Arnaud, A; de Rauglaudre, G; Pourel, N; Chauvet, B

    2016-10-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy following breast cancer surgery continues to improve locoregional control and overall survival. But the success of highly targeted-conformal radiotherapy such as intensity-modulated techniques, can be compromised by respiratory motion. The intrafraction motion can potentially result in significant under- or overdose, and also expose organs at risk. This article summarizes the respiratory motion and its effects on imaging, dose calculation and dose delivery by radiotherapy for breast cancer. We will review the methods of respiratory synchronization available for breast radiotherapy to minimize the respiratory impact and to spare organs such as heart and lung.

  9. Synchronous Sampling for Distributed Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittkamp, M.; Ettl, J.

    2015-09-01

    Sounding Rocket payloads, especially for atmospheric research, often consists of several independent sensors or experiments with different objectives. The data of these sensors can be combined in the post processing to improve the scientific results of the flight. One major requirement for this data-correlation is a common timeline for the measurements of the distributed experiments. Within this paper we present two ways to achieve absolute timing for asynchronously working experiments. The synchronization process is using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and a standard serial communication protocol for transport of timestamps and flight-states.

  10. Mutual synchronization of weakly coupled gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rozental, R. M.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Ginzburg, N. S.

    2015-09-15

    The processes of synchronization of two weakly coupled gyrotrons are studied within the framework of non-stationary equations with non-fixed longitudinal field structure. With the allowance for a small difference of the free oscillation frequencies of the gyrotrons, we found a certain range of parameters where mutual synchronization is possible while a high electronic efficiency is remained. It is also shown that synchronization regimes can be realized even under random fluctuations of the parameters of the electron beams.

  11. Synchronization analysis of cultured epileptic human astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balazsi, Gabor; Cornell-Bell, Ann; Neiman, Alexander; Moss, Frank

    2001-03-01

    Astrocyte cultures from severely epileptic patients were cultured, and the fluctuations of the intracellular calcium ion concentration were visualized using the fluorescent dye Fluo-3. The resulting image sequences were analyzed by methods of stochastic synchronization. Increased synchronization was observed in the epileptic tissues, when compared to normal tissues from rats. The more pathological the tissue, the more synchronized the calcium oscillations. The results might lead to a better understanding of intracellular calcium dynamics and could help drug development.

  12. Complexity and synchronization in stochastic chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Thai Son; Palit, Sanjay Kumar; Mukherjee, Sayan; Hoang, Thang Manh; Banerjee, Santo

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the complexity of a hyperchaotic dynamical system perturbed by noise and various nonlinear speech and music signals. The complexity is measured by the weighted recurrence entropy of the hyperchaotic and stochastic systems. The synchronization phenomenon between two stochastic systems with complex coupling is also investigated. These criteria are tested on chaotic and perturbed systems by mean conditional recurrence and normalized synchronization error. Numerical results including surface plots, normalized synchronization errors, complexity variations etc show the effectiveness of the proposed analysis.

  13. Desynchronization of stochastically synchronized chemical oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Snari, Razan; Tinsley, Mark R. E-mail: kshowalt@wvu.edu; Faramarzi, Sadegh; Showalter, Kenneth E-mail: kshowalt@wvu.edu; Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff; Netoff, Theoden Ivan

    2015-12-15

    Experimental and theoretical studies are presented on the design of perturbations that enhance desynchronization in populations of oscillators that are synchronized by periodic entrainment. A phase reduction approach is used to determine optimal perturbation timing based upon experimentally measured phase response curves. The effectiveness of the perturbation waveforms is tested experimentally in populations of periodically and stochastically synchronized chemical oscillators. The relevance of the approach to therapeutic methods for disrupting phase coherence in groups of stochastically synchronized neuronal oscillators is discussed.

  14. Synchronization reveals topological scales in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Alex; Díaz-Guilera, Albert; Pérez-Vicente, Conrad J

    2006-03-24

    We study the relationship between topological scales and dynamic time scales in complex networks. The analysis is based on the full dynamics towards synchronization of a system of coupled oscillators. In the synchronization process, modular structures corresponding to well-defined communities of nodes emerge in different time scales, ordered in a hierarchical way. The analysis also provides a useful connection between synchronization dynamics, complex networks topology, and spectral graph analysis.

  15. Topological speed limits to network synchronization.

    PubMed

    Timme, Marc; Wolf, Fred; Geisel, Theo

    2004-02-20

    We study collective synchronization of pulse-coupled oscillators interacting on asymmetric random networks. We demonstrate that random matrix theory can be used to accurately predict the speed of synchronization in such networks in dependence on the dynamical and network parameters. Furthermore, we show that the speed of synchronization is limited by the network connectivity and remains finite, even if the coupling strength becomes infinite. In addition, our results indicate that synchrony is robust under structural perturbations of the network dynamics.

  16. Impulsivity and self-harm in adolescence: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Joanna; Daley, David; Townsend, Ellen; Sayal, Kapil

    2017-04-01

    Research supports an association between impulsivity and self-harm, yet inconsistencies in methodology across studies have complicated understanding of this relationship. This systematic review examines the association between impulsivity and self-harm in community-based adolescents aged 11-25 years and aims to integrate findings according to differing concepts and methods. Electronic searches of EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, CINAHL, PubMed and The Cochrane Library, and manual searches of reference lists of relevant reviews identified 4496 articles published up to July 2015, of which 28 met inclusion criteria. Twenty-four of the studies reported an association between broadly specified impulsivity and self-harm. However, findings varied according to the conception and measurement of impulsivity and the precision with which self-harm behaviours were specified. Specifically, lifetime non-suicidal self-injury was most consistently associated with mood-based impulsivity-related traits. However, cognitive facets of impulsivity (relating to difficulties maintaining focus or acting without forethought) differentiated current self-harm from past self-harm. These facets also distinguished those with thoughts of self-harm (ideation) from those who acted on thoughts (enaction). The findings suggested that mood-based impulsivity is related to the initiation of self-harm, while cognitive facets of impulsivity are associated with the maintenance of self-harm. In addition, behavioural impulsivity is most relevant to self-harm under conditions of negative affect. Collectively, the findings indicate that distinct impulsivity facets confer unique risks across the life-course of self-harm. From a clinical perspective, the review suggests that interventions focusing on reducing rash reactivity to emotions or improving self-regulation and decision making may offer most benefit in supporting those who self-harm.

  17. Associations between trait impulsivity and prepotent response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Aichert, Désirée S; Wöstmann, Nicola M; Costa, Anna; Macare, Christine; Wenig, Johanna R; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Rubia, Katya; Ettinger, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the relationship between trait impulsivity and inhibitory control, two features known to be impaired in a number of psychiatric conditions. While impulsivity is often measured using psychometric self-report questionnaires, the inhibition of inappropriate, impulsive motor responses is typically measured using experimental laboratory tasks. It remains unclear, however, whether psychometrically assessed impulsivity and experimentally operationalized inhibitory performance are related to each other. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between these two traits in a large sample using correlative and latent variable analysis. A total of 504 healthy individuals completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and a battery of four prepotent response inhibition paradigms: the antisaccade, Stroop, stop-signal, and go/no-go tasks. We found significant associations of BIS impulsivity with commission errors on the go/no-go task and directional errors on the antisaccade task, over and above effects of age, gender, and intelligence. Latent variable analysis (a) supported the idea that all four inhibitory measures load on the same underlying construct termed "prepotent response inhibition" and (b) revealed that 12% of variance of the prepotent response inhibition construct could be explained by BIS impulsivity. Overall, the magnitude of associations observed was small, indicating that while a portion of variance in prepotent response inhibition can be explained by psychometric trait impulsivity, the majority of variance remains unexplained. Thus, these findings suggest that prepotent response inhibition paradigms can account for psychometric trait impulsivity only to a limited extent. Implications for studies of patient populations with symptoms of impulsivity are discussed.

  18. Impulsivity and Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder: Subtype Classification Using the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale.

    PubMed

    Miller, Drew J; Derefinko, Karen J; Lynam, Donald R; Milich, Richard; Fillmore, Mark T

    2010-09-01

    This study examined the classification accuracy of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale (UPPS) in discriminating several attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) subtypes, including predominantly inattentive type (ADHD/I), combined type (ADHD/C), and combined type with behavioral problems (ADHD/ODD), between each other and a non-ADHD control group using logistic regression analyses. The sample consisted of 88 children ranging in age from 9.0 years to 12.8 years, with a mean of 10.9 years. Children were predominantly male (74%) and Caucasian (86%) and in grades 3-7. Results indicated that the UPPS performed well in classifying ADHD subtypes relative to traditional diagnostic measures. In addition, analyses indicated that differences in symptoms between subtypes can be explained by specific pathways to impulsivity. Implications for the assessment of ADHD and conceptual issues are discussed.

  19. Impulsivity and Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder: Subtype Classification Using the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale

    PubMed Central

    Derefinko, Karen J.; Lynam, Donald R.; Milich, Richard; Fillmore, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the classification accuracy of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale (UPPS) in discriminating several attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) subtypes, including predominantly inattentive type (ADHD/I), combined type (ADHD/C), and combined type with behavioral problems (ADHD/ODD), between each other and a non-ADHD control group using logistic regression analyses. The sample consisted of 88 children ranging in age from 9.0 years to 12.8 years, with a mean of 10.9 years. Children were predominantly male (74%) and Caucasian (86%) and in grades 3–7. Results indicated that the UPPS performed well in classifying ADHD subtypes relative to traditional diagnostic measures. In addition, analyses indicated that differences in symptoms between subtypes can be explained by specific pathways to impulsivity. Implications for the assessment of ADHD and conceptual issues are discussed. PMID:21765593

  20. Detecting Structural Failures Via Acoustic Impulse Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Joshi, Sanjay S.

    1995-01-01

    Advanced method of acoustic pulse reflectivity testing developed for use in determining sizes and locations of failures within structures. Used to detect breaks in electrical transmission lines, detect faults in optical fibers, and determine mechanical properties of materials. In method, structure vibrationally excited with acoustic pulse (a "ping") at one location and acoustic response measured at same or different location. Measured acoustic response digitized, then processed by finite-impulse-response (FIR) filtering algorithm unique to method and based on acoustic-wave-propagation and -reflection properties of structure. Offers several advantages: does not require training, does not require prior knowledge of mathematical model of acoustic response of structure, enables detection and localization of multiple failures, and yields data on extent of damage at each location.

  1. On coating adhesion during impulse plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowska-Langier, Katarzyna; Zdunek, Krzysztof; Chodun, Rafal; Okrasa, Sebastian; Kwiatkowski, Roch; Malinowski, Karol; Składnik-Sadowska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Marek J.

    2014-05-01

    The impulse plasma deposition (IPD) technique is the only method of plasma surface engineering (among plasma-based technologies) that allows a synthesis of layers upon a cold unheated substrate and which ensures a good adhesion. This paper presents a study of plasma impacts upon a copper substrate surface during the IPD process. The substrate was exposed to pulsed N2/Al plasma streams during the synthesis of AlN layers. For plasma-material interaction diagnostics, the optical emission spectroscopy method was used. Our results show that interactions of plasma lead to sputtering of the substrate material. It seems that the obtained adhesion of the layers is the result of a complex surface mechanism combined with the effects of pulsed plasma energy impacts upon the unheated substrate. An example of such a result is the value of the critical load for the Al2O3 layer, which was measured by the scratch-test method to be above 40 N.

  2. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.; Maetzler, C.; Ohki, K.; Saba, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    A set of 22 simple, impulsive solar flares, identified in the OSO-5 hard X-ray data, were analyzed together with coincident microwave and meterwave radio observations. The rise times and fall times of the X-ray bursts are found to be highly correlated and effectively equal, strongly suggesting a flare energizing mechanism that is reversible. The good time resolution available for these observations reveals that the microwave emission is influenced by an additional process, evident in the tendency of the microwave emission to peak later and decay more slowly than the symmetric X-ray bursts. Meterwave emission is observed in coincidence with the 5 events which show the strongest time correlation between the X-ray and microwave burst structure. This meterwave emission is characterized by U-burst radiation, indicating confinement of the flare source.

  3. The functional anatomy of impulse control disorders.

    PubMed

    Probst, Catharina C; van Eimeren, Thilo

    2013-10-01

    Impulsive-compulsive disorders such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive eating, and shopping are side effects of the dopaminergic therapy for Parkinson's disease. With a lower prevalence, these disorders also appear in the general population. Research in the last few years has discovered that these pathological behaviors share features similar to those of substance use disorders (SUD), which has led to the term "behavioral addictions". As in SUDs, the behaviors are marked by a compulsive drive toward and impaired control over the behavior. Furthermore, animal and medication studies, research in the Parkinson's disease population, and neuroimaging findings indicate a common neurobiology of addictive behaviors. Changes associated with addictions are mainly seen in the dopaminergic system of a mesocorticolimbic circuit, the so-called reward system. Here we outline neurobiological findings regarding behavioral addictions with a focus on dopaminergic systems, relate them to SUD theories, and try to build a tentative concept integrating genetics, neuroimaging, and behavioral results.

  4. SAR impulse response with residual chirps.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-06-01

    A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

  5. Walking Through the Impulse-Momentum Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugland, Ole Anton

    2013-02-01

    Modern force platforms are handy tools for investigating forces during human motion. Earlier they were very expensive and were mostly used in research laboratories. But now even platforms that can measure in two directions are quite affordable. In this work we used the PASCO 2-Axis Force Platform. The analysis of the data can serve as a nice illustration of qualitative or quantitative use of the impulse-momentum theorem p - p0 = ∫t0t Fdt = I. The most common use of force platforms is to study the force from the base during the push-off period of a vertical jump. I think this is an activity of great value, and I would recommend it. The use of force platforms in teaching is well documented in research literature.1-4

  6. Reflection of the State of Hunger in Impulse Activity of Nose Wing Muscles and Upper Esophageal Sphincter during Search behavior in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kromin, A A; Dvoenko, E E; Zenina, O Yu

    2016-07-01

    Reflection of the state of hunger in impulse activity of nose wing muscles and upper esophageal sphincter muscles was studied in chronic experiments on rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation in the absence of locomotion and during search behavior. In the absence of apparent behavioral activity, including sniffing, alai nasi muscles of hungry rabbits constantly generated bursts of action potentials synchronous with breathing, while upper esophageal sphincter muscles exhibited regular aperiodic low-amplitude impulse activity of tonic type. Latent form of food motivation was reflected in the structure of temporal organization of impulse activity of alai nasi muscles in the form of bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and in temporal structure of impulse activity of upper esophageal sphincter muscles in the form of monomodal distribution. The latent form of food motivation was manifested in the structure of temporal organization of periods of the action potentials burst-like rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, in the form of monomodal distribution, characterized by a high degree of dispersion of respiratory cycle periods. In the absence of physical activity hungry animals sporadically exhibited sniffing activity, manifested in the change from the burst-like impulse activity of alai nasi muscles to the single-burst activity type with bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and monomodal distribution of the burst-like action potentials rhythm periods, the maximum of which was shifted towards lower values, which was the cause of increased respiratory rate. At the same time, the monomodal temporal structure of impulse activity of the upper esophageal sphincter muscles was not changed. With increasing food motivation in the process of search behavior temporal structure of periods of the burst-like action potentials rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, became similar to that observed during sniffing, not accompanied by animal's locomotion, which is

  7. Tape-recorded Lectures With Slide Synchronization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhue, D.

    1969-01-01

    Describes "Taped Explanation Slide Synchronization" programs used for individual study or group showing in college zoology. Discusses preparation of programs, class organization, equipment, and costs. (EB)

  8. Variety of synchronous regimes in neuronal ensembles.

    PubMed

    Komarov, M A; Osipov, G V; Suykens, J A K

    2008-09-01

    We consider a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of oscillatory activity in neurons of the snail Helix pomatia. This model has a distinctive feature: It demonstrates multistability in oscillatory and silent modes that is typical for the thalamocortical neurons. A single neuron cell can demonstrate a variety of oscillatory activity: Regular and chaotic spiking and bursting behavior. We study collective phenomena in small and large arrays of nonidentical cells coupled by models of electrical and chemical synapses. Two single elements coupled by electrical coupling show different types of synchronous behavior, in particular in-phase and antiphase synchronous regimes. In an ensemble of three inhibitory synaptically coupled elements, the phenomenon of sequential synchronous dynamics is observed. We study the synchronization phenomena in the chain of nonidentical neurons at different oscillatory behavior coupled with electrical and chemical synapses. Various regimes of phase synchronization are observed: (i) Synchronous regular and chaotic spiking; (ii) synchronous regular and chaotic bursting; and (iii) synchronous regular and chaotic bursting with different numbers of spikes inside the bursts. We detect and study the effect of collective synchronous burst generation due to the cluster formation and the oscillatory death.

  9. Pilotless Frame Synchronization Using LDPC Code Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Christopher; Vissasenor, John

    2009-01-01

    A method of pilotless frame synchronization has been devised for low- density parity-check (LDPC) codes. In pilotless frame synchronization , there are no pilot symbols; instead, the offset is estimated by ex ploiting selected aspects of the structure of the code. The advantag e of pilotless frame synchronization is that the bandwidth of the sig nal is reduced by an amount associated with elimination of the pilot symbols. The disadvantage is an increase in the amount of receiver data processing needed for frame synchronization.

  10. Coupled lasers: phase versus chaos synchronization.

    PubMed

    Reidler, I; Nixon, M; Aviad, Y; Guberman, S; Friesem, A A; Rosenbluh, M; Davidson, N; Kanter, I

    2013-10-15

    The synchronization of chaotic lasers and the optical phase synchronization of light originating in multiple coupled lasers have both been extensively studied. However, the interplay between these two phenomena, especially at the network level, is unexplored. Here, we experimentally compare these phenomena by controlling the heterogeneity of the coupling delay times of two lasers. While chaotic lasers exhibit deterioration in synchronization as the time delay heterogeneity increases, phase synchronization is found to be independent of heterogeneity. The experimental results are found to be in agreement with numerical simulations for semiconductor lasers.

  11. Map synchronization in optical communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliardi, R. M.; Mohanty, N.

    1973-01-01

    The time synchronization problem in an optical communication system is approached as a problem of estimating the arrival time (delay variable) of a known transmitted field. Maximum aposteriori (MAP) estimation procedures are used to generate optimal estimators, with emphasis placed on their interpretation as a practical system device, Estimation variances are used to aid in the design of the transmitter signals for best synchronization. Extension is made to systems that perform separate acquisition and tracking operations during synchronization. The closely allied problem of maintaining timing during pulse position modulation is also considered. The results have obvious application to optical radar and ranging systems, as well as the time synchronization problem.

  12. Dopaminergic influences on executive function and impulsive behaviour in impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Leroi, Iracema; Barraclough, Michelle; McKie, Shane; Hinvest, Neal; Evans, Jonathan; Elliott, Rebecca; McDonald, Kathryn

    2013-09-01

    The development of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD) may arise from an interaction among cognitive impairment, impulsive responding and dopaminergic state. Dopaminergic state may be influenced by pharmacologic or genotypic (catechol-O-methyltransferase; COMT) factors. We sought to investigate this interaction further by comparing those with (n = 35) and without (n = 55) ICDs on delay-discounting in different pharmacologic conditions (ON or OFF dopaminergic medication) and on response inhibition as well as aspects of executive functioning in the ON state. We then undertook an exploratory sub-group analysis of these same tasks when the overall PD group was divided into different allelic variants of COMT (val/val vs. met/met). A healthy control group (HC; n = 20) was also included. We found that in those with PD and ICDs, 'cognitive flexibility' (set shifting, verbal fluency, and attention) in the ON medication state was not impaired compared with those without ICDs. In contrast, our working memory, or 'cognitive focus', task was impaired in both PD groups compared with the HC group when ON. During the delay-discounting task, the PD with ICDs group expressed greater impulsive choice compared with the PD group without ICDs, when in the ON, but not the OFF, medication state. However, no group difference on the response inhibition task was seen when ON. Finally, the met homozygous group performed differently on tests of executive function compared with the val homozygous group. We concluded that the disparity in levels of impairment among different domains of executive function and impulsive decision-making distinguishes those with ICD in PD from those without ICD, and may in part be affected by dopaminergic status. Both pharmacologic and genotypic influences on dopaminergic state may be important in ICD.

  13. Relations between trait impulsivity, behavioral impulsivity, physiological arousal, and risky sexual behavior among young men.

    PubMed

    Derefinko, Karen J; Peters, Jessica R; Eisenlohr-Moul, Tory A; Walsh, Erin C; Adams, Zachary W; Lynam, Donald R

    2014-08-01

    The current study examined how impulsivity-related traits (negative urgency, sensation seeking, and positive urgency), behavioral measures of risk taking and reward seeking, and physiological reactivity related to three different risky sexual behaviors in sexually active undergraduate men (N = 135). Regression analyses indicated that sensation seeking and behavioral risk-taking predicted unique variance in number of sexual partners. These findings suggest that, for young men, acquisition of new partners is associated with need for excitement and reward and willingness to take risks to meet those needs. Sensation seeking, behavioral risk-taking, and skin conductance reactivity to arousing stimuli was related to ever having engaged in sex with a stranger, indicating that, for men, willingness to have sex with a stranger is related not only to the need for excitement and risk-taking but also with innate responsiveness to arousing environmental triggers. In contrast, regression analyses indicated that young men who were impulsive in the context of negative emotions were less likely to use condoms, suggesting that emotion-based impulsivity may be an important factor in negligent prophylactic use. This study adds to the current understanding of the divergence between the correlates of risky sexual behaviors and may lend utility to the development of individualized HIV prevention programming.

  14. Relations Between Trait Impulsivity, Behavioral Impulsivity, Physiological Arousal, and Risky Sexual Behavior among Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Derefinko, Karen J.; Peters, Jessica R.; Eisenlohr-Moul, Tory A.; Walsh, Erin C.; Adams, Zachary W.; Lynam, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined how impulsivity-related traits (negative urgency, sensation seeking, and positive urgency), behavioral measures of risk taking and reward seeking, and physiological reactivity related to three different risky sexual behaviors in sexually active undergraduate men (N = 135). Regression analyses indicated that sensation seeking and behavioral risk-taking predicted unique variance in number of sexual partners. These findings suggest that, for young men, acquisition of new partners is associated with need for excitement and reward and willingness to take risks to meet those needs. Sensation seeking, behavioral risk-taking, and skin conductance reactivity to arousing stimuli was related to ever having engaged in sex with a stranger, indicating that, for men, willingness to have sex with a stranger is related not only to the need for excitement and risk-taking but also with innate responsiveness to arousing environmental triggers. In contrast, regression analyses indicated that young men who were impulsive in the context of negative emotions were less likely to use condoms, suggesting that emotion-based impulsivity may be an important factor in negligent prophylactic use. This study adds to the current understanding of the divergence between the correlates of risky sexual behaviors and may lend utility to the development of individualized HIV prevention programming. PMID:24958252

  15. High accuracy time transfer synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Paul J.; Koppang, Paul A.; Chalmers, David; Davis, Angela; Kubik, Anthony; Powell, William M.

    1995-01-01

    In July 1994, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchronization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance cesium frequency standards were transported from the USNO in Washington, DC to Los Angeles, California in the USNO's mobile earth station. Two-Way Satellite Time Transfer links between the mobile earth station and the USNO were conducted each day of the trip, using the Naval Research Laboratory(NRL) designed spread spectrum modem, built by Allen Osborne Associates(AOA). A Motorola six channel GPS receiver was used to track the location and altitude of the mobile earth station and to provide coordinates for calculating Sagnac corrections for the two-way measurements, and relativistic corrections for the cesium clocks. This paper will discuss the trip, the measurement systems used and the results from the data collected. We will show the accuracy of using two-way satellite time transfer for synchronization and the performance of the three HP 5071 cesium clocks in an operational environment.

  16. Gait synchronization in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Raizen, David M.; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Collective motion is observed in swarms of swimmers of various sizes, ranging from self-propelled nanoparticles to fish. The mechanisms that govern interactions among individuals are debated, and vary from one species to another. Although the interactions among relatively large animals, such as fish, are controlled by their nervous systems, the interactions among microorganisms, which lack nervous systems, are controlled through physical and chemical pathways. Little is known, however, regarding the mechanism of collective movements in microscopic organisms with nervous systems. To attempt to remedy this, we studied collective swimming behavior in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a microorganism with a compact nervous system. We evaluated the contributions of hydrodynamic forces, contact forces, and mechanosensory input to the interactions among individuals. We devised an experiment to examine pair interactions as a function of the distance between the animals and observed that gait synchronization occurred only when the animals were in close proximity, independent of genes required for mechanosensation. Our measurements and simulations indicate that steric hindrance is the dominant factor responsible for motion synchronization in C. elegans, and that hydrodynamic interactions and genotype do not play a significant role. We infer that a similar mechanism may apply to other microscopic swimming organisms and self-propelled particles. PMID:24778261

  17. Coronal Modeling and Synchronic Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, Jon A.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Downs, C.; Henney, C. J.; Arge, C.

    2013-07-01

    MHD simulations of the solar corona rely on maps of the solar magnetic field (typically measured at the photosphere) for input as boundary conditions. These "synoptic" maps (available from a number of ground-based and space-based solar observatories), which are perhaps better described as "diachronic," are built up over a solar rotation. A well-known problem with this approach is that the maps contain data that is as much as 27 days old. The Sun's magnetic flux is always evolving, and these changes in the flux affect coronal and heliospheric structure. Flux evolution models can in principle provide a more accurate specification, by estimating the likely state of the photospheric magnetic field on unobserved portions of the Sun. The Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport (ADAPT) model (Arge et al. 2010), which incorporates data assimilation techniques into the Worden and Harvey (2000) flux evolution model, is especially well-suited for this purpose. In this presentation we describe the use of such "synchronic" maps with coronal models. We compare results using synchronic maps versus the traditional synoptic maps. Research supported by AFOSR, NASA, and NSF.

  18. Synchronizing with music: intercultural differences.

    PubMed

    Drake, Carolyn; Ben El Heni, Jamel

    2003-11-01

    The way in which listeners perceive music changes throughout childhood, but little is known about the factors responsible for these changes. One factor, explicit music training, has received considerable attention, with studies indicating that musicians demonstrate a more complex hierarchical mental representation for music and superior temporal organizational skills. But does acculturation-the passive exposure to a particular type of music since birth-also influence the acquisition of these skills? We compared the music synchronization performance of Tunisian and French subjects with music from these two contrasting musical cultures. Twelve musical excerpts were selected from the two popular music cultures, matched for perceived tempo, complexity, and familiarity, and subjects were asked to tap in time with the music. Tapping mode (rate and hierarchical level) varied with subjects' familiarity with the musical idiom, as evidenced by an interaction between musical culture and type of music: participants synchronized at higher hierarchical levels (and over a wider range) with music from their own culture than with an unfamiliar type of music. Thus, passive acculturation as well as explicit music tuition influence our perception and cognition of music.

  19. Neuromagnetic source reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, P.S.; Mosher, J.C.; Leahy, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    In neuromagnetic source reconstruction, a functional map of neural activity is constructed from noninvasive magnetoencephalographic (MEG) measurements. The overall reconstruction problem is under-determined, so some form of source modeling must be applied. We review the two main classes of reconstruction techniques-parametric current dipole models and nonparametric distributed source reconstructions. Current dipole reconstructions use a physically plausible source model, but are limited to cases in which the neural currents are expected to be highly sparse and localized. Distributed source reconstructions can be applied to a wider variety of cases, but must incorporate an implicit source, model in order to arrive at a single reconstruction. We examine distributed source reconstruction in a Bayesian framework to highlight the implicit nonphysical Gaussian assumptions of minimum norm based reconstruction algorithms. We conclude with a brief discussion of alternative non-Gaussian approachs.

  20. An Exploration of Apathy and Impulsivity in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahearn, David J.; McDonald, Kathryn; Barraclough, Michelle; Leroi, Iracema

    2012-01-01

    Background. Apathy and impulsivity in Parkinson disease (PD) are associated with clinically significant behavioral disorders. Aim. To explore the phenomenology, distribution, and clinical correlates of these two behaviors. Methods. In PD participants (n = 99) without dementia we explored the distribution of measures of motivation and impulsivity using univariate methods. We then undertook factor analysis to define specific underlying dimensions of apathy and impulsivity. Regression models were developed to determine the associated demographic and clinical features of the derived dimensions. Results. The factor analysis of apathy (AES-C) revealed a two-factor solution: “cognitive-behavior” and “social indifference”. The factor analysis of impulsivity (BIS-11) revealed a five-factor solution: “inattention”; “impetuosity”; “personal security”; “planning”; and “future orientation”. Apathy was significantly associated with: age, age of motor symptom onset (positive correlation), disease stage, motor symptom severity, and depression. Impulsivity was significantly associated with: age of motor symptom onset (negative correlation), gambling and anxiety scores, and motor complications. We observed an overlap of apathy and impulsivity in some participants. Conclusion. In PD, apathy and impulsivity have specific phenomenological profiles and are associated with particular clinical phenotypes. In spite of this, there is some overlap of behaviors which may suggests common aspects in the pathology underlying motivation and reward processes. PMID:22829814

  1. Response of end tidal CO2 pressure to impulse exercise.

    PubMed

    Yano, T; Afroundeh, R; Yamanak, R; Arimitsu, T; Lian, C-S; Shirkawa, K; Yunoki, T

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how end tidal CO(2) pressure (PETCO(2)) is controlled in impulse exercise. After pre-exercise at 25 watts for 5 min, impulse exercise for 10 sec with 200 watts followed by post exercise at 25 watts was performed. Ventilation (VE) significantly increased until the end of impulse exercise and significantly re-increased after a sudden decrease. Heart rate (HR) significantly increased until the end of impulse exercise and then decreased to the pre-exercise level. PETCO(2) remained constant during impulse exercise. PETCO(2) significantly increased momentarily after impulse exercise and then significantly decreased to the pre-exercise level. PETCO(2) showed oscillation. The average peak frequency of power spectral density in PETCO(2) appeared at 0.0078 Hz. Cross correlations were obtained after impulse exercise. The peak cross correlations between VE and PETCO(2), HR and PETCO(2), and VE and HR were 0.834 with a time delay of -7 sec, 0.813 with a time delay of 7 sec and 0.701 with a time delay of -15 sec, respectively. We demonstrated that PETCO(2) homeodynamics was interactively maintained by PETCO(2) itself, CO(2) transportation (product of cardiac output and mixed venous CO(2) content) into the lungs by heart pumping and CO(2) elimination by ventilation, and it oscillates as a result of their interactions.

  2. Frequency modulation television analysis: Threshold impulse analysis. [with computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program is developed to calculate the FM threshold impulse rates as a function of the carrier-to-noise ratio for a specified FM system. The system parameters and a vector of 1024 integers, representing the probability density of the modulating voltage, are required as input parameters. The computer program is utilized to calculate threshold impulse rates for twenty-four sets of measured probability data supplied by NASA and for sinusoidal and Gaussian modulating waveforms. As a result of the analysis several conclusions are drawn: (1) The use of preemphasis in an FM television system improves the threshold by reducing the impulse rate. (2) Sinusoidal modulation produces a total impulse rate which is a practical upper bound for the impulse rates of TV signals providing the same peak deviations. (3) As the moment of the FM spectrum about the center frequency of the predetection filter increases, the impulse rate tends to increase. (4) A spectrum having an expected frequency above (below) the center frequency of the predetection filter produces a higher negative (positive) than positive (negative) impulse rate.

  3. Method of reducing impulsive noise in electromagnetic geophysical data

    SciTech Connect

    Spies, B.R.

    1990-07-31

    This patent describes a method of reducing impulsive noise in electromagnetic geophysical data. It comprises: providing receiving antenna means for receiving an electromagnetic signal. The receiving antenna means receiving impulsive noise; providing noise sensor means for receiving the impulsive noise and placing the noise sensor means so as to receive the impulsive noise that is received by the receiving antenna means and so as to minimize the reception of the electromagnetic signal; simultaneously receiving the electromagnetic signal with the receiving antenna means so as to create a signal record and receiving the impulsive noise with the noise sensor means so as to create a noise record; examining the noise record for occurrences of the impulsive noise by comparing the noise record with a threshold noise value and identifying those instances of time in which the noise record exceeds the threshold; removing those portions of the signal record which are simultaneous with the identified instances in which the noise records exceeds the threshold, wherein the signal record has reduced impulsive noise.

  4. Waiting Impulsivity: The Influence of Acute Methylphenidate and Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Chang-Webb, Yee Chien; Morris, Laurel S.; Cooper, Ella; Sethi, Arjun; Baek, Kwangyeol; Grant, Jon; Robbins, Trevor W.; Harrison, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ability to wait and to weigh evidence is critical to behavioral regulation. These behaviors are known as waiting and reflection impulsivity. In Study 1, we examined the effects of methylphenidate, a dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, on waiting and reflection impulsivity in healthy young individuals. In study 2, we assessed the role of learning from feedback in disorders of addiction. Methods: We used the recently developed 4-Choice Serial Reaction Time task and the Beads task. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers were tested twice in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial with 20mg methylphenidate. In the second study, we analyzed premature responses as a function of prior feedback in disorders of addiction. Results: Study 1: Methylphenidate was associated with greater waiting impulsivity to a cue predicting reward along with faster responding to target onset without a generalized effect on reaction time or attention. Methylphenidate influenced reflection impulsivity based on baseline impulsivity. Study 2: More premature responses occurred after premature responses in stimulant-dependent subjects. Conclusions: We show that methylphenidate has dissociable effects on waiting and reflection impulsivity. Chronic stimulant exposure impairs learning from prior premature responses, suggesting a failure to learn that premature responding is suboptimal. These findings provide a greater mechanistic understanding of waiting impulsivity. PMID:26136351

  5. Impulsivity and rapid decision-making for reward.

    PubMed

    Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Adam, Robert J; Urner, Maren; van der Leer, Leslie; Bahrami, Bahador; Bays, Paul M; Husain, Masud

    2012-01-01

    Impulsivity is a feature of many brain disorders. Although often defined as the predisposition to act with an inadequate degree of deliberation, forethought, or control, it has proven difficult to measure. This may in part be due to the fact that it is a multifaceted construct, with impulsive decisions potentially arising as a result of a number of underlying mechanisms. Indeed, a "functional" degree of impulsivity may even promote effective behavior in healthy participants in a way that can be advantageous under certain circumstances. Although many tasks have been developed to study impulsivity, few examine decisions made rapidly, for time-sensitive rewards. In the current study we examine behavior in 59 adults on a manual "Traffic Light" task which requires participants to take risks under time pressure, if they are to maximize reward. We show that behavioral variables that index rapid anticipatory responding in this paradigm are correlated with one, specific self-report measure of impulsivity: "lack of premeditation" on the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. Participants who scored more highly on this subscale performed better on the task. Moreover, anticipatory behavior reduced significantly with age (18-79 years), an effect that continued to be upheld after correction for potential age differences in the ability to judge the timing of responses. Based on these findings, we argue that the Traffic Light task provides a parametric method to study one aspect of impulsivity in health and disease: namely, rapid decision-making in pursuit of risky, time-sensitive rewards.

  6. Simulation of impulse effects from explosive charges containing metal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, K.; Nance, D. V.; Menon, S.

    2010-06-01

    The propagation of an explosive blast wave containing inert metal particles is investigated numerically using a robust two-phase methodology with appropriate models to account for real gas behavior, inter-phase interactions, and inter-particle collisions to study the problem of interest. A new two-phase Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation is proposed that can handle the dense nature of the flow-field. The velocity and momentum profiles of the gas and particle phases are analyzed and used to elucidate the inter-phase momentum transfer, and its effect on the impulsive aspects of heterogeneous explosive charges. The particles are found to pick up significant amounts of momentum and kinetic energy from the gas, and by virtue of their inertia, are observed to sustain it for a longer time. The impulse characteristics of heterogeneous explosives are compared with a homogeneous explosive containing the same amount of high explosive, and it is observed that the addition of solid particles augments the impulsive loading significantly in the near-field, and to a smaller extent in the far-field. The total impulsive loading is found to be insensitive to the particle size added to the explosive charge above a certain cut-off radius, but the individual impulse components are found to be sensitive, and particles smaller than this cut-off size deliver about 8% higher total impulse than the larger ones. Overall, this study provides crucial insights to understand the impulsive loading characteristics of heterogeneous explosives.

  7. Negative emotion-driven impulsivity predicts substance dependence problems.

    PubMed

    Verdejo-García, Antonio; Bechara, Antoine; Recknor, Emily C; Pérez-García, Miguel

    2007-12-01

    Impulsivity is predominant among users of several drugs of abuse including alcohol, cocaine, and amphetamines, and it is considered a risk factor for later development of alcohol and substance abuse and dependence. However, there is little consensus on how impulsivity should be defined and measured, and there are few studies on the relationship between separate dimensions of impulsivity and substance dependence. We used a multidimensional measure of impulsivity (the UPPS scale) to examine differences between 36 individuals with substance dependence (ISD) and 36 drug-free controls on the dimensions of urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking. In addition, we examined which dimensions of impulsivity better predicted addiction-related problems as measured with the addiction severity index. Results revealed that ISD show high scores on dimensions of urgency, lack of perseverance, and lack of premeditation (effect sizes ranging from 1.10 to 1.96), but not on sensation seeking. Among the different impulsivity dimensions, urgency was the best predictor of severity of medical, employment, alcohol, drug, family/social, legal and psychiatric problems in ISD, explaining 13-48% of the total variance of these indices. Furthermore, urgency scores alone correctly classified 83% of the participants in the ISD group. Urgency is characterized by a tendency to act impulsively in response to negative emotional states. Thus, our results could have important implications for novel treatment approaches for substance dependence focused on emotional regulation.

  8. Alexithymia, emotion dysregulation, impulsivity and aggression: A multiple mediation model.

    PubMed

    Velotti, Patrizia; Garofalo, Carlo; Petrocchi, Chiara; Cavallo, Francesca; Popolo, Raffaele; Dimaggio, Giancarlo

    2016-03-30

    There is a need to better understand the antecedent of aggressive behaviors in order to tailor treatments and reduce the associated damage to the others and the self. Possible mechanisms underlying aggression are poor emotional awareness and emotion dysregulation, as well as impulsivity. Here, we examined the relationships among alexithymia, emotion dysregulation, impulsivity and aggression, comparing a mixed psychiatric sample (N=257) and a community sample (N=617). The clinical sample reported greater levels of alexithymia, emotion dysregulation, trait impulsivity and aggression, than the community sample. Furthermore, in the community sample, emotion dysregulation and impulsivity mediated the relationship (i.e., accounted for the shared variance) between alexithymia and aggression. In the clinical sample, only emotion dysregulation explained the alexithymia-aggression link. In particular, specific dimensions of the emotion dysregulation (i.e., Negative Urgency) and impulsivity constructs (i.e., cognitive and motor impulsivity) played a unique role in explaining these associations. Finally, controlling for depressive symptoms reduced some of the findings involving impulsivity to nonsignificant results. Overall, our findings add to the extant literature attesting to the relevance of alexithymia and emotion dysregulation for understanding aggression, and providing concrete recommendation for the treatment and prevention of aggressive tendencies.

  9. "Impulsivity": relations between self-report and behavior.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Leigh; Kohl, Krista; Morgan, Theresa A; Clark, Lee Anna

    2013-03-01

    The trait of "impulsivity" is difficult to place within a personality framework due to the many potential pathways to impulsive behavior and the lack of consensus regarding the structure of the trait(s). This lack of consensus also hinders systematic investigation into relations between "impulsivity" and its behavioral manifestations. Undergraduates (Sample 1 N = 507) completed a battery of self-report measures, all purporting to assess trait "impulsivity"; a subset (n = 408) and Sample 2 (N = 388) also completed a retrospective questionnaire about specific behaviors they may have engaged in over the past year, and another subset of Sample 1 agreed to complete (n = 208) and actually completed (n = 152) a 2-week prospective measure of impulsive behaviors. Finally, a subset of Sample 1 (n = 321) and Sample 2 completed an omnibus self-report inventory in a follow-up study. Structural equation modeling confirmed a 3-factor structure of what we call impulsigenic traits-traits that are manifested in impulsive behavior. This finding is consistent with previous research and supports the growing consensus that "impulsivity" is a colloquial label attached to a group of distinct traits that have phenotypically similar behavioral manifestations. Each of these impulsigenic traits relates differentially to impulsive behavior and to broad temperamental dimensions. The results also show clear 2-factor structures of both daily and less frequent (yearly/semiyearly) impulsive behaviors. Finally, a unique method of data collection permitted an investigation of relations between the impulsigenic and other personality traits and observed behaviors, demonstrating the predictive utility of personality traits to discrete, in situ behaviors.

  10. Alcohol Increases Impulsivity and Abuse Liability in Heavy Drinking Women

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Stephanie Collins; Levin, Frances R.; Evans, Suzette M.

    2013-01-01

    Heavy drinking has increased in recent years and has been linked to numerous health-related risks, particularly in women. A number of factors may play a role in exacerbating the risks linked to heavy drinking, such as impulsivity, which itself is related to a number of risky behaviors. The present study investigated the effects of alcohol (0, 0.5, 0.75 g/kg) on impulsivity in female heavy drinkers (n = 23) and female light drinkers (n = 23) using a double-blind, placebo-controlled outpatient design; all women were tested during follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Each session, participants completed a range of tasks including subjective measures of abuse liability, cognitive performance tasks, three behavioral impulsivity tasks, and a risk-taking task. Alcohol increased impulsivity on the Immediate and Delayed Memory Task (IMT and DMT) and Delay Discounting task. Heavy drinkers scored higher on impulsivity self-reports and were more impulsive on the IMT and the GoStop task than light drinkers. The high dose of alcohol further increased impulsive performance on the IMT and DMT in heavy drinkers. There were no group differences or alcohol effects on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task. Alcohol increased sedative-like effects more in light drinkers and increased stimulant-like effects and alcohol liking more in heavy drinkers. In summary, female heavy drinkers are less sensitive to the negative effects of alcohol, report more positive effects of alcohol, and are more impulsive than female light drinkers. Moreover, impulsive responding was exacerbated by alcohol drinking among female heavy drinkers, indicating that women who drink at this level are at increased risk for developing alcohol use disorders and engaging in other risky behaviors, particularly after drinking. PMID:23066857

  11. A study of epileptogenic network structures in rat hippocampal cultures using first spike latencies during synchronization events.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Mohan; Amrutur, Bharadwaj; Srinivas, Kalyan V; Sikdar, Sujit K

    2012-10-01

    Study of hypersynchronous activity is of prime importance for combating epilepsy. Studies on network structure typically reconstruct the network by measuring various aspects of the interaction between neurons and subsequently measure the properties of the reconstructed network. In sub-sampled networks such methods lead to significant errors in reconstruction. Using rat hippocampal neurons cultured on a multi-electrode array dish and a glutamate injury model of epilepsy in vitro, we studied synchronous activity in neuronal networks. Using the first spike latencies in various neurons during a network burst, we extract various recurring spatio-temporal onset patterns in the networks. Comparing the patterns seen in control and injured networks, we observe that injured networks express a wide diversity in their foci (origin) and activation pattern, while control networks show limited diversity. Furthermore, we note that onset patterns in glutamate injured networks show a positive correlation between synchronization delay and physical distance between neurons, while control networks do not.

  12. Image synchronization for 3D application using the NanEye sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Ricardo M.; Wäny, Martin; Santos, Pedro; Dias, Morgado

    2015-03-01

    Based on Awaiba's NanEye CMOS image sensor family and a FPGA platform with USB3 interface, the aim of this paper is to demonstrate a novel technique to perfectly synchronize up to 8 individual self-timed cameras. Minimal form factor self-timed camera modules of 1 mm x 1 mm or smaller do not generally allow external synchronization. However, for stereo vision or 3D reconstruction with multiple cameras as well as for applications requiring pulsed illumination it is required to synchronize multiple cameras. In this work, the challenge to synchronize multiple self-timed cameras with only 4 wire interface has been solved by adaptively regulating the power supply for each of the cameras to synchronize their frame rate and frame phase. To that effect, a control core was created to constantly monitor the operating frequency of each camera by measuring the line period in each frame based on a well-defined sampling signal. The frequency is adjusted by varying the voltage level applied to the sensor based on the error between the measured line period and the desired line period. To ensure phase synchronization between frames of multiple cameras, a Master-Slave interface was implemented. A single camera is defined as the Master entity, with its operating frequency being controlled directly through a PC based interface. The remaining cameras are setup in Slave mode and are interfaced directly with the Master camera control module. This enables the remaining cameras to monitor its line and frame period and adjust their own to achieve phase and frequency synchronization. The result of this work will allow the realization of smaller than 3mm diameter 3D stereo vision equipment in medical endoscopic context, such as endoscopic surgical robotic or micro invasive surgery.

  13. Examining Interactivity in Synchronous Virtual Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Parker, Michele A.; Deale, Deborah F.

    2012-01-01

    Interaction is crucial to student satisfaction in online courses. Adding synchronous components (virtual classroom technologies) to online courses can facilitate interaction. In this study, interaction within a synchronous virtual classroom was investigated by surveying 21 graduate students in an instructional technology program in the…

  14. Multiple-access channels without synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.; Posner, E. C.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses models for multiple-access communications which take into account the fact that the channel users may not be able to synchronize their transmissions. It is shown that for a broad class of such channels, the capacity region is the same as it would be with user synchronization. Some open problems are discussed.

  15. Complexity in synchronized and non-synchronized states: A comparative analysis and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Sanjay K.; Fataf, Nur Aisyah Abdul; Said, Mohd Rushdan Md; Mukherjee, Sayan; Banerjee, Santo

    2017-01-01

    This analysis shows the dynamics of a hyperchaotic system changes from its original state to a synchronized state with nonlinear controller. The decreasing complexity of the coupled systems also quantifies the loss of information from its original state to the synchronized state. We proposed and modified a chaos synchronization based secure communication scheme to implement in case of non synchronization. The scheme is designed and illustrated using examples and simulations. Security analysis of the proposed scheme is also investigated. This analysis gives a new direction on chaos based cryptography in case of the coupled systems completely in non synchronized state.

  16. Impulse radar imaging system for concealed object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podd, F. J. W.; David, M.; Iqbal, G.; Hussain, F.; Morris, D.; Osakue, E.; Yeow, Y.; Zahir, S.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    Electromagnetic systems for imaging concealed objects at checkpoints typically employ radiation at millimetre and terahertz frequencies. These systems have been shown to be effective and provide a sufficiently high resolution image. However there are difficulties and current electromagnetic systems have limitations particularly in accurately differentiating between threat and innocuous objects based on shape, surface emissivity or reflectivity, which are indicative parameters. In addition, water has a high absorption coefficient at millimetre wavelength and terahertz frequencies, which makes it more difficult for these frequencies to image through thick damp clothing. This paper considers the potential of using ultra wideband (UWB) in the low gigahertz range. The application of this frequency band to security screening appears to be a relatively new field. The business case for implementing the UWB system has been made financially viable by the recent availability of low-cost integrated circuits operating at these frequencies. Although designed for the communication sector, these devices can perform the required UWB radar measurements as well. This paper reports the implementation of a 2 to 5 GHz bandwidth linear array scanner. The paper describes the design and fabrication of transmitter and receiver antenna arrays whose individual elements are a type of antipodal Vivaldi antenna. The antenna's frequency and angular response were simulated in CST Microwave Studio and compared with laboratory measurements. The data pre-processing methods of background subtraction and deconvolution are implemented to improve the image quality. The background subtraction method uses a reference dataset to remove antenna crosstalk and room reflections from the dataset. The deconvolution method uses a Wiener filter to "sharpen" the returned echoes which improves the resolution of the reconstructed image. The filter uses an impulse response reference dataset and a signal

  17. Amplitude dynamics favors synchronization in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesus; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study phase synchronization in random complex networks of coupled periodic oscillators. In particular, we show that, when amplitude dynamics is not negligible, phase synchronization may be enhanced. To illustrate this, we compare the behavior of heterogeneous units with both amplitude and phase dynamics and pure (Kuramoto) phase oscillators. We find that in small network motifs the behavior crucially depends on the topology and on the node frequency distribution. Surprisingly, the microscopic structures for which the amplitude dynamics improves synchronization are those that are statistically more abundant in random complex networks. Thus, amplitude dynamics leads to a general lowering of the synchronization threshold in arbitrary random topologies. Finally, we show that this synchronization enhancement is generic of oscillators close to Hopf bifurcations. To this aim we consider coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units modeling neuron dynamics. PMID:27108847

  18. Clustering versus non-clustering phase synchronizations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuai; Zhan, Meng

    2014-03-15

    Clustering phase synchronization (CPS) is a common scenario to the global phase synchronization of coupled dynamical systems. In this work, a novel scenario, the non-clustering phase synchronization (NPS), is reported. It is found that coupled systems do not transit to the global synchronization until a certain sufficiently large coupling is attained, and there is no clustering prior to the global synchronization. To reveal the relationship between CPS and NPS, we further analyze the noise effect on coupled phase oscillators and find that the coupled oscillator system can change from CPS to NPS with the increase of noise intensity or system disorder. These findings are expected to shed light on the mechanism of various intriguing self-organized behaviors in coupled systems.

  19. Transient performance of permanent magnet synchronous motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borger, W. U.

    The performance of a permanent magnet synchronous machine is presented for transient conditions including: starting, load application and load removal. The machine studied possesses asynchronous torque for starting as well as synchronous torque for high efficiency and high power factor during normal operation. The transient performance of the synchronous machine is compared with a high efficiency induction machine of the same rating. The comparison presented is strictly analytical and is approached by developing the required equations for the idealized synchronous and induction machines. Solutions for the equations are approximated on the digital computer. Although the study is not universal in scope, it shows that the permanent magnet synchronous motor rivals the induction machine in weight and in transient performance while at the same time besting the induction machine from an efficiency and power factor standpoint.

  20. Decoder synchronization for deep space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, J. I.; Cheung, K.-M.; Chauvin, T. H.; Rabkin, J.; Belongie, M. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Standards (CCSDS) recommends that space communication links employ a concatenated, error-correcting, channel-coding system in which the inner code is a convolutional (7,1/2) code and the outer code is a (255,223) Reed-Solomon code. The traditional implementation is to perform the node synchronization for the Viterbi decoder and the frame synchronization for the Reed-Solomon decoder as separate, sequential operations. This article discusses a unified synchronization technique that is required for deep space missions that have data rates and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR's) that are extremely low. This technique combines frame synchronization in the bit and symbol domains and traditional accumulated-metric growth techniques to establish a joint frame and node synchronization. A variation on this technique is used for the Galileo spacecraft on its Jupiter-bound mission.

  1. Amplitude dynamics favors synchronization in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesus; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study phase synchronization in random complex networks of coupled periodic oscillators. In particular, we show that, when amplitude dynamics is not negligible, phase synchronization may be enhanced. To illustrate this, we compare the behavior of heterogeneous units with both amplitude and phase dynamics and pure (Kuramoto) phase oscillators. We find that in small network motifs the behavior crucially depends on the topology and on the node frequency distribution. Surprisingly, the microscopic structures for which the amplitude dynamics improves synchronization are those that are statistically more abundant in random complex networks. Thus, amplitude dynamics leads to a general lowering of the synchronization threshold in arbitrary random topologies. Finally, we show that this synchronization enhancement is generic of oscillators close to Hopf bifurcations. To this aim we consider coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units modeling neuron dynamics.

  2. [Synchronous carcinoma of the colorectum].

    PubMed

    Pisciotta, M; Gulotta, G; Profita, G; Amoroso, S; Mineo, R; Rodolico, V

    1991-06-30

    The incidence of synchronous carcinoma of the large intestine is rising in relation to a greater oncogenic environmental charge and increased average life expectancy. There is also a constant risk of not recognising the disease, especially in the case of small carcinoma and, to a greater extent, in patients operated during the occlusive phase. Having underlined the diagnostic value of a correct preparation of the colon prior to instrumental tests, the authors emphasise the importance of a careful intraoperative exploration of the viscera, its preliminary confinement in occluded subjects and repeated surgery in the event of doubts regarding the monolocation of the tumour. Lastly, they underline the importance of postoperative radiological and endoscopic controls since these tests mark both the successful outcome of treatment and the start of follow-up.

  3. Synchronous computer mediated group discussion.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, focus groups have become increasingly popular with nursing researchers as a data collection method, as has the use of computer-based technologies to support all forms of nursing research. This article describes the conduct of a series of focus groups in which the participants were in the same room as part of a "real-time" discussion during which they also used personal computers as an interface between each other and the moderator. Synchronous Computer Mediated Group Discussion differed from other forms of focus group discussion in that participants used personal computers rather than verbal expressions to respond to specific questions, engage in communication with other participants, and to record their thoughts. This form of focus group maintained many of the features of spoken exchanges, a cornerstone of the focus group, while capturing the advantages of online discussion.

  4. Synchronized sampling improves fault location

    SciTech Connect

    Kezunovic, M.; Perunicic, B.

    1995-04-01

    Transmission line faults must be located accurately to allow maintenance crews to arrive at the scene and repair the faulted section as soon as possible. Rugged terrain and geographical layout cause some sections of power transmission lines to be difficult to reach. In the past, a variety of fault location algorithms were introduced as either an add-on feature in protective relays or stand-alone implementation in fault locators. In both cases, the measurements of current and voltages were taken at one terminal of a transmission line only. Under such conditions, it may become difficult to determine the fault location accurately, since data from other transmission line ends are required for more precise computations. In the absence of data from the other end, existing algorithms have accuracy problems under several circumstances, such as varying switching and loading conditions, fault infeed from the other end, and random value of fault resistance. Most of the one-end algorithms were based on estimation of voltage and current phasors. The need to estimate phasors introduces additional difficulty in high-speed tripping situations where the algorithms may not be fast enough in determining fault location accurately before the current signals disappear due to the relay operation and breaker opening. This article introduces a unique concept of high-speed fault location that can be implemented either as a simple add-on to the digital fault recorders (DFRs) or as a stand-alone new relaying function. This advanced concept is based on the use of voltage and current samples that are synchronously taken at both ends of a transmission line. This sampling technique can be made readily available in some new DFR designs incorporating receivers for accurate sampling clock synchronization using the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS).

  5. Statement of capabilities: Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) technology applied to mine detection and imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.G.; Gavel, D.T.; Mast, J.E.; Warhus, J.P.

    1995-03-13

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed radar and imaging technologies with potential applications in mine detection by the armed forces and other agencies involved in demining efforts. These new technologies use a patented ultra-wideband (impulse) radar technology that is compact, low-cost, and low power. Designated as Micropower Impulse Radar, these compact, self-contained radars can easily be assembled into arrays to form complete ground penetrating radar imaging systems. LLNL has also developed tomographic reconstruction and signal processing software capable of producing high-resolution 2-D and 3-D images of objects buried in materials like soil or concrete from radar data. Preliminary test results have shown that a radar imaging system using these technologies has the ability to image both metallic and plastic land mine surrogate targets buried in 5 to 10 cm of moist soil. In dry soil, the system can detect buried objects to a depth of 30 cm and more. This report describes LLNL`s unique capabilities and technologies that can be applied to the demining problem.

  6. Breast Reconstruction after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schmauss, Daniel; Machens, Hans-Günther; Harder, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Its surgical approach has become less and less mutilating in the last decades. However, the overall number of breast reconstructions has significantly increased lately. Nowadays, breast reconstruction should be individualized at its best, first of all taking into consideration not only the oncological aspects of the tumor, neo-/adjuvant treatment, and genetic predisposition, but also its timing (immediate versus delayed breast reconstruction), as well as the patient’s condition and wish. This article gives an overview over the various possibilities of breast reconstruction, including implant- and expander-based reconstruction, flap-based reconstruction (vascularized autologous tissue), the combination of implant and flap, reconstruction using non-vascularized autologous fat, as well as refinement surgery after breast reconstruction. PMID:26835456

  7. Breast reconstruction - natural tissue

    MedlinePlus

    ... After a mastectomy , some women choose to have cosmetic surgery to remake their breast. This type of surgery ... augmentation surgery Breast reconstruction - implants Mastectomy Patient Instructions Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge Mastectomy and breast reconstruction - what to ask ...

  8. Breast Reconstruction with Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... removes your breast to treat or prevent breast cancer. One type of breast reconstruction uses breast implants — silicone devices filled with silicone gel or salt water (saline) — to reshape your breasts. Breast reconstruction ...

  9. Methods of Voice Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hung-Chi; Kim Evans, Karen F.; Salgado, Christopher J.; Mardini, Samir

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews methods of voice reconstruction. Nonsurgical methods of voice reconstruction include electrolarynx, pneumatic artificial larynx, and esophageal speech. Surgical methods of voice reconstruction include neoglottis, tracheoesophageal puncture, and prosthesis. Tracheoesophageal puncture can be performed in patients with pedicled flaps such as colon interposition, jejunum, or gastric pull-up or in free flaps such as perforator flaps, jejunum, and colon flaps. Other flaps for voice reconstruction include the ileocolon flap and jejunum. Laryngeal transplantation is also reviewed. PMID:22550443

  10. Reoperative midface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Acero, Julio; García, Eloy

    2011-02-01

    Reoperative reconstruction of the midface is a challenging issue because of the complexity of this region and the severity of the aesthetic and functional sequela related to the absence or failure of a primary reconstruction. The different situations that can lead to the indication of a reoperative reconstructive procedure after previous oncologic ablative procedures in the midface are reviewed. Surgical techniques, anatomic problems, and limitations affecting the reoperative reconstruction in this region of the head and neck are discussed.

  11. Synchrony dynamics underlying effective connectivity reconstruction of neuronal circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Qin, Qing; Deng, Yun; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Jing; Cao, Yibin

    2017-04-01

    Reconstruction of effective connectivity between neurons is essential for neural systems with function-related significance, characterizing directionally causal influences among neurons. In this work, causal interactions between neurons in spinal dorsal root ganglion, activated by manual acupuncture at Zusanli acupoint of experimental rats, are estimated using Granger causality (GC) method. Different patterns of effective connectivity are obtained for different frequencies and types of acupuncture. Combined with synchrony analysis between neurons, we show a dependence of effective connection on the synchronization dynamics. Based on the experimental findings, a neuronal circuit model with synaptic connections is constructed. The variation of neuronal effective connectivity with respect to its structural connectivity and synchronization dynamics is further explored. Simulation results show that reciprocally causal interactions with statistically significant are formed between well-synchronized neurons. The effective connectivity may be not necessarily equivalent to synaptic connections, but rather depend on the synchrony relationship. Furthermore, transitions of effective interaction between neurons are observed following the synchronization transitions induced by conduction delay and synaptic conductance. These findings are helpful to further investigate the dynamical mechanisms underlying the reconstruction of effective connectivity of neuronal population.

  12. Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An engine is disclosed, including a controllable output plasma generator, a controllable heater for selectably raising a temperature of the plasma connected to an outlet of the plasma generator, and a nozzle connected to an outlet of the heater, through which heated plasma is discharged to provide thrust. In one embodiment, the source of plasma is a helicon generator. In one embodiment, the heater is an ion cyclotron resonator. In one embodiment, the nozzle is a radially diverging magnetic field disposed on a discharge side of the heater so that helically travelling particles in the beater exit the heater at high axial velocity. A particular embodiment includes control circuits for selectably directing a portion of radio frequency power from an RF generator to the helicon generator and to the cyclotron resonator so that the thrust output and the specific impulse of the engine can be selectively controlled. A method of propelling a vehicle is also disclosed. The method includes generating a plasma, heating said plasma, and discharging the heated plasma through a nozzle. In one embodiment, the nozzle is a diverging magnetic field. In this embodiment, the heating is performed by applying a radio frequency electro magnetic field to the plasma at the ion cyclotron frequency in an axially polarized DC magnetic field.

  13. Aperture Engineering for Impulse Radiating Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyo, J. S.

    The past several years have seen the development of an improved understanding of the role of aperture design for impulse radiating antennas (IRAs). The understanding began with the emergence of the concept of prompt aperture efficiency for ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas. This emergence allowed us to concentrate on ways to shape the aperture and control the field distribution within the aperture in order to maximize the prompt response from IRAs. In many high voltage UWB applications it is impossible to increase the radiated fields by increasing the source power. This is because in such instances the sources are already at the limits of linear electromagnetics. In these cases, we would like to come up with methods to improve the radiated field without altering the input impedance of the IRA. In this paper we will explore several such methods including the position of the feed arms to maximize field uniformity, the shaping of the aperture to increase radiated fields by reducing the aperture size, the relative sizing of the reflector (or lens) and the feed horn, and actually reorienting the currents on the reflector by controlling the direction of current flow. One common thread appears in all of these studies, that is the influence of Dr. Carl Baum on the direction and development of the work.

  14. High power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Brenning, N.; Lundin, D.; Helmersson, U.

    2012-05-15

    The high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge is a recent addition to plasma based sputtering technology. In HiPIMS, high power is applied to the magnetron target in unipolar pulses at low duty cycle and low repetition frequency while keeping the average power about 2 orders of magnitude lower than the peak power. This results in a high plasma density, and high ionization fraction of the sputtered vapor, which allows better control of the film growth by controlling the energy and direction of the deposition species. This is a significant advantage over conventional dc magnetron sputtering where the sputtered vapor consists mainly of neutral species. The HiPIMS discharge is now an established ionized physical vapor deposition technique, which is easily scalable and has been successfully introduced into various industrial applications. The authors give an overview of the development of the HiPIMS discharge, and the underlying mechanisms that dictate the discharge properties. First, an introduction to the magnetron sputtering discharge and its various configurations and modifications is given. Then the development and properties of the high power pulsed power supply are discussed, followed by an overview of the measured plasma parameters in the HiPIMS discharge, the electron energy and density, the ion energy, ion flux and plasma composition, and a discussion on the deposition rate. Finally, some of the models that have been developed to gain understanding of the discharge processes are reviewed, including the phenomenological material pathway model, and the ionization region model.

  15. [Impulsive-compulsive syndrome in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Nikitina, A V; Fedorova, N V

    2013-01-01

    Dopaminergic replacement therapy (DRT) is effective in treatment the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) but can lead to impulse control disorders (ICD) in some patients. ICD include pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping, binge eating, punding, dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS). Authors studied the prevalence of ICD and its impact on the quality of life and daily activities of PD patients and their relatives. Among 246 patients studied, 55 patients (23%) (28 men, mean age 66.5±9.4 years) were diagnosed with ICD. DDS was noted in 36.4%, punding in 36.4%, binge eating in 23.6%, hypersexuality in 14.5%, compulsive shopping in 14.5% and pathological gambling in 1.8%. Of these 55 patients, 10 (18.1%) had symptoms of 2 of the ICDs: 3 (5.45%) had 3 of the ICDs and 2 (3.63%) patients had 5 of the ICDs. Quality of life ranged from 25% to 89%. Treatment approaches including the adjustment of doses of levodopa and dopamine receptor agonists in PD patients with ICD are presented.

  16. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vilas, Dolores; Pont-Sunyer, Claustre; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs), a group of complex behavioral disorders, occur more commonly in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients than in the general population, with a reported prevalence up to 13.6% in some studies. The most common ICDs reported are pathological gambling (PG), hypersexuality (HS), compulsive shopping and compulsive eating. More than a quarter of the patients with ICDs have 2 or more behavioral addictions. These abnormal behaviors impair activities of daily living and have a negative impact on quality of life of patients and their families. As with many other non motor symptoms in PD, ICDs are frequently under-reported by patients and caregivers and may be under-recognized by the treating physicians. Treatment with dopamine agonists (DA) is the main risk factor for developing ICDs, and stimulation of mesolimbic D3 receptors by DA is thought to underlie their development. The DA effect seems to be a class effect and not specific for any DA. Levodopa can also induce ICDs but much less so than the DAs. The management of ICDs in PD is complex. Modifications in dopaminergic drug treatment are frequently necessary. In some cases alternative therapies such as atypical antipsychotics, antidepressants or deep brain stimulation if motor symptoms become incapacitating after adjustment of dopamine replacement therapy should be considered.

  17. Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Magnus, F.; Tryggvason, T. K.; Sveinsson, O. B.; Olafsson, S.

    2012-10-01

    Here we discuss reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering sputtering (HiPIMS) [1] of Ti target in an Ar/N2 and Ar/O2 atmosphere. The discharge current waveform is highly dependent on both the pulse repetition frequency and discharge voltage. The discharge current increases with decreasing frequency or voltage. This we attribute to an increase in the secondary electron emission yield during the self-sputtering phase of the pulse, as nitride [2] or oxide [3] forms on the target. We also discuss the growth of TiN films on SiO2 at temperatures of 22-600 ^oC. The HiPIMS process produces denser films at lower growth temperature and the surface is much smoother and have a significantly lower resistivity than dc magnetron sputtered films on SiO2 at all growth temperatures due to reduced grain boundary scattering [4].[4pt] [1] J. T. Gudmundsson, N. Brenning, D. Lundin and U. Helmersson, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A, 30 030801 (2012)[0pt] [2] F. Magnus, O. B. Sveinsson, S. Olafsson and J. T. Gudmundsson, J. Appl. Phys., 110 083306 (2011)[0pt] [3] F. Magnus, T. K. Tryggvason, S. Olafsson and J. T. Gudmundsson, J. Vac. Sci. Technol., submitted 2012[0pt] [4] F. Magnus, A. S. Ingason, S. Olafsson and J. T. Gudmundsson, IEEE Elec. Dev. Lett., accepted 2012

  18. Electro-impulse de-icing - A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumwalt, G. W.

    1988-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the Electro-Impulse De-Icing (EIDI) system are examined. The design and operation of the EIDI are described. The effect of repeated impulsive loads on the structure and skin of the aircraft surface is investigated. It is observed that the wing skin directly over the coil receives the greatest stresses. Data from the testing of metal leading edges reveal that after 11,500 impulses cracks appear in the sheet brackets attaching the ribs to the coil beams. The composite leading edge was evaluated for fatigue, and after 20,000 impulses no cracks were detected. The advantages of the band-aid coil mount are discussed.

  19. Digitally Recorded Impulse Voltage Waveform and its Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shuji; Ichikawa, Hironori; Saitou, Tatsunori; Harada, Tatsuya; Hanai, Masahiro

    Whereas high resolution digital recorders are used in recording the impulse voltage tests in prominent accreditation laboratories worldwide, a usage of an 8 bit recorder is also allowed by IEC publication. An 8 bit recorder is, due to its nature, known to record a waveform with 0.4% vertical resolution and it has not been appreciated for determining a peak value of lightning impulse in the reference measuring system where the scale factor is often evaluated with 0.1% or less uncertainty. This paper demonstrates simulation in which an 8 bit record with an internal noise is fed into the lightning impulse parameter determination software and the computed parameters were compared with theoretical values. The results show that, if suitable software is used, errors in parameters deduced from an 8 bit record is as small as those derived from a 12 bit record, suggesting an inexpensive 8 bit recorder can replace a 12 bit in impulse voltage measurements.

  20. 5. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1. SMALL PELTONDOBLE IMPULSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1. SMALL PELTON-DOBLE IMPULSE WHEEL IN FOREGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  1. 69. Credit TCL. Housing of Pelton exciter impulse wheel and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. Credit TCL. Housing of Pelton exciter impulse wheel and attached General Electric 60 kW exciter generator. - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  2. 12. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 SMALL PELTONDOBLE IMPULSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 SMALL PELTON-DOBLE IMPULSE WHEEL, HAND-CONTROLLED GATE VALVE, AND NOZZLE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  3. Analysis on Impulse Characteristics of PDRE with Exhaust Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hong-bo; Weng, Chun-sheng; Lv, Xiao-jing; Li, Ning

    2014-06-01

    The exhaust characteristics related to impulse was investigated in a pulse detonation rocket engine (PDRE) by tunable diode laser absorption sensing system. The instantaneous parameters of temperature, velocity and pressure were obtained for exhaust at engine exit. Analysis on impulse characteristics based on control volume of the PDRE was conducted for a single operation circle with experimental results. It was concluded that the impulse (3.26 N·s) achieved by exhaust measurements was in agreement with that (3.09 N·s) by a load cell. The impulse caused by exhaust momentum experienced an extremely sharp ascending, a steep rising and a slow increment in sequence. The exhausts during the sharp ascending and steep rising were under expansion with high mass weighted average temperature (>1266 K), so there was a possible promotion for exhausts utilizing.

  4. Inadequacy of single-impulse transfers for path constrained rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. A.; Soileau, K. M.

    1987-01-01

    The use of single-impulse techniques to maneuver from point to point about a large space structure (LSS) with an arbitrary geometrical configuration and spin is examined. Particular consideration is given to transfers with both endpoints on the forbidden zone surface. Clohessy-Wiltshire equations of relative motion are employed to solve path constrained rendezvous problems. External and internal transfers between arbitrary points are analyzed in terms of tangential departure and arrival conditions. It is observed that single-impulse techniques are inadequate for transferring about the exterior of any LSS; however, single-impulse transfers are applicable for transfers in the interior of LSSs. It is concluded that single-impulse transducers are not applicable for path constrained rendezvous guidance.

  5. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.; Phelan, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on a sheet-fed pilot-scale shoe press to compare impulse drying and double-felted pressing. Both an IPST (Institute of Paper Science and Technology) ceramic coated and Beloit Type A press roll were evaluated for lienrboard sheet structures having a wide range of z-direction permeability. Purpose was to find ways of correcting sheet sticking problems observed in previous pilot-scale shoe press experiments. Results showed that impulse drying was superior to double felted pressing in both press dryness and in important paper physical properties. Impulse drying critical temperature was found to depend on specific surface of the heated layer of the sheet, thermal properties of the press roll surface, and choice of felt. Impulse drying of recycled and two-ply liner was demonstrated for both Southern Pile and Douglas fir-containing furnishes.

  6. Impulsivity and the reinforcing value of cigarette smoking.

    PubMed

    Doran, Neal; McChargue, Dennis; Cohen, Lee

    2007-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that impulsivity would predict perceptions of positive and negative reinforcement from smoking. The secondary hypothesis was that the relationship between impulsivity and smoking reinforcement expectations would be mediated by the character trait of self-directedness. College students (n=202) who reported smoking cigarettes participated in the survey study. Hierarchical regression analyses confirmed that impulsivity predicted expectations about positive (beta=.22, p=.001) and negative (beta=.25, p=.001) reinforcement from smoking. These relationships were also mediated by self-directedness. Results suggest that impulsive smokers in the early stages of dependence may smoke because they expect smoking to be extremely pleasurable as well as to help dispel bouts with negative affect. Furthermore, their elevated expectations about smoking may be related to difficulties adapting to challenging environments and working toward long-term goals.

  7. Some impulsive rendezvous trajectories and their possible optimality.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Two- and three-impulse trajectories are investigated for fixed-time, fixed-angle rendezvous between vacant circular coplanar orbits, for trip angles less than, or equal to 2 pi in magnitude. For two-impulse trajectories, general features of the characteristic velocity function are outlined. Parameters of the intermediate orbit are reviewed. Attention is given to limiting cases. Computation of the adjoint system helps to define the domain of possible optimality foajectories: it is a closed domain in the trip time, trip angle plane. Waiting periods on terminal orbits are considered. The domain of possible optimality is defined using Lawden's primer vrtory. This domain extends to infinity if the radius ratio of terminal orbits is less than 15.6. Three-impulse trajectories are tried in cases where two-impulse trajectories, with or without cost, have been found nonoptimal. Improvements on the characteristic velocity are thus obtained.

  8. Effects of spinal and peripheral nerve lesions on the intersegmental synchronization of the spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurons in the cat lumbosacral spinal cord.

    PubMed

    García, C A; Chávez, D; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    2004-05-06

    In the anesthetized and paralyzed cat, spontaneous negative cord dorsum potentials (nCDPs) appeared synchronously in the L3 to S1 segments, both ipsi- and contralaterally. The acute section of both the intact sural and the superficial peroneal nerve increased the variability of the spontaneous nCDPs without affecting their intersegmental coupling. On the other hand, the synchronization between the spontaneous nCDPs recorded in segments L5-L6 was strongly reduced following an interposed lesion of the left (ipsilateral) dorsolateral spinal quadrant and it was almost completely abolished by an additional lesion of the contralateral dorsolateral quadrant at the same level. Our observations support the existence of a system of spontaneously active dorsal horn neurons that is bilaterally distributed along the lumbosacral segments and affects, in a synchronized and organized manner, impulse transmission along many reflex pathways, including those mediating presynaptic inhibition.

  9. Image reconstruction with acoustic radiation force induced shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAleavey, Stephen A.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Stutz, Deborah L.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2003-05-01

    Acoustic radiation force may be used to induce localized displacements within tissue. This phenomenon is used in Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI), where short bursts of ultrasound deliver an impulsive force to a small region. The application of this transient force launches shear waves which propagate normally to the ultrasound beam axis. Measurements of the displacements induced by the propagating shear wave allow reconstruction of the local shear modulus, by wave tracking and inversion techniques. Here we present in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo measurements and images of shear modulus. Data were obtained with a single transducer, a conventional ultrasound scanner and specialized pulse sequences. Young's modulus values of 4 kPa, 13 kPa and 14 kPa were observed for fat, breast fibroadenoma, and skin. Shear modulus anisotropy in beef muscle was observed.

  10. Pre-attentive information processing and impulsivity in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Swann, Alan C; Lijffijt, Marijn; Lane, Scott D; Steinberg, Joel L; Acas, Michelle D; Cox, Blake; Moeller, F Gerard

    2013-12-01

    Early responses to stimuli can be measured by sensory evoked potentials (EP) using repeated identical stimuli, S1 and S2. Response to S1 may represent efficient stimulus detection, while suppression of response to S2 may represent inhibition. Early responses to stimuli may be related to impulsivity. We compared EP reflecting stimulus detection and inhibition in bipolar disorder and healthy controls, and investigated relationships to impulsivity. Subjects were 48 healthy controls without family histories of mood disorder and 48 with bipolar disorder. EP were measured as latencies and amplitudes for auditory P50 (pre-attentional), N100 (initial direction of attention) and P200 (initial conscious awareness), using a paired-click paradigm, with identical stimuli 0.5 s apart. Impulsivity was measured by questionnaire and by laboratory tests for inability to suppress responses to stimuli or to delay response for a reward. Analyses used general linear models. S1 amplitudes for P50, N100, and P200, and gating of N100 and P200, were lower in bipolar disorder than in controls. P50 S1 amplitude correlated with accurate laboratory-task responding, and S2 amplitude correlated with impulsive task performance and fast reaction times, in bipolar disorder. N100 and P200 EP did not correlate with impulsivity. These findings were independent of symptoms, treatment, or substance-use history. EPs were not related to questionnaire-measured or reward-based impulsivity. Bipolar I disorder is characterized by reduced pre-attentional and early attentional stimulus registration relative to controls. Within bipolar disorder, rapid-response impulsivity correlates with impaired pre-attentional response suppression. These results imply specific relationships between ERP-measured response inhibition and rapid-response impulsivity.

  11. Switched impulsive control of the endocrine disruptor diethylstilbestrol singular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, Iman; Shafiee, Masoud; Ibeas, Asier; de la Sen, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, a switched and impulsive controller is designed to control the Endocrine Disruptor Diethylstilbestrol mechanism which is usually modeled as a singular system. Then the exponential stabilization property of the proposed switched and impulsive singular model is discussed under matrix inequalities. A design algorithm is given and applied for the physiological process of endocrine disruptor diethylstilbestrol model to illustrate the effectiveness of the results.

  12. Internal ellipsoidal estimates of reachable set of impulsive control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Matviychuk, Oksana G.

    2014-11-18

    A problem of estimating reachable sets of linear impulsive control system with uncertainty in initial data is considered. The impulsive controls in the dynamical system belong to the intersection of a special cone with a generalized ellipsoid both taken in the space of functions of bounded variation. Assume that an ellipsoidal state constraints are imposed. The algorithms for constructing internal ellipsoidal estimates of reachable sets for such control systems and numerical simulation results are given.

  13. Response inhibition and its relation to multidimensional impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Wilbertz, Tilmann; Deserno, Lorenz; Horstmann, Annette; Neumann, Jane; Villringer, Arno; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Boehler, Carsten N; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2014-12-01

    Impulsivity is a multidimensional construct that has been suggested as a vulnerability factor for several psychiatric disorders, especially addiction disorders. Poor response inhibition may constitute one facet of impulsivity. Trait impulsivity can be assessed by self-report questionnaires such as the widely used Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). However, regarding the multidimensionality of impulsivity different concepts have been proposed, in particular the UPPS self-report questionnaire ('Urgency', 'Lack of Premeditation', 'Lack of Perseverance', 'Sensation Seeking') that is based on a factor analytic approach. The question as to which aspects of trait impulsivity map on individual differences of the behavioral and neural correlates of response inhibition so far remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated 52 healthy individuals that scored either very high or low on the BIS-11 and underwent a reward-modulated Stop-signal task during fMRI. Neither behavioral nor neural differences were observed with respect to high- and low-BIS groups. In contrast, UPPS subdomain Urgency best explained inter-individual variability in SSRT scores and was further negatively correlated to right IFG/aI activation in 'Stop>Go' trials - a key region for response inhibition. Successful response inhibition in rewarded compared to nonrewarded stop trials yielded ventral striatal (VS) activation which might represent a feedback signal. Interestingly, only participants with low Urgency scores were able to use this VS feedback signal for better response inhibition. Our findings indicate that the relationship of impulsivity and response inhibition has to be treated carefully. We propose Urgency as an important subdomain that might be linked to response inhibition as well as to the use of reward-based neural signals. Based on the present results, further studies examining the influence of impulsivity on psychiatric disorders should take into account Urgency as an important

  14. Reflection impulsivity in binge drinking: behavioural and volumetric correlates

    PubMed Central

    Banca, Paula; Lange, Iris; Worbe, Yulia; Howell, Nicholas A.; Irvine, Michael; Harrison, Neil A.; Moutoussis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The degree to which an individual accumulates evidence prior to making a decision, also known as reflection impulsivity, can be affected in psychiatric disorders. Here, we study decisional impulsivity in binge drinkers, a group at elevated risk for developing alcohol use disorders, comparing two tasks assessing reflection impulsivity and a delay discounting task, hypothesizing impairments in both subtypes of impulsivity. We also assess volumetric correlates of reflection impulsivity focusing on regions previously implicated in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. Sixty binge drinkers and healthy volunteers were tested using two different information‐gathering paradigms: the beads task and the Information Sampling Task (IST). The beads task was analysed using a behavioural approach and a Bayesian model of decision making. Delay discounting was assessed using the Monetary Choice Questionnaire. Regression analyses of primary outcomes were conducted with voxel‐based morphometry analyses. Binge drinkers sought less evidence prior to decision in the beads task compared with healthy volunteers in both the behavioural and computational modelling analysis. There were no group differences in the IST or delay discounting task. Greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the beads task was associated with smaller dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal volumes. In contrast, greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the IST was associated with greater dorsal cingulate and precuneus volumes. Binge drinking is characterized by impaired reflection impulsivity suggesting a deficit in deciding on the basis of future outcomes that are more difficult to represent. These findings emphasize the role of possible therapeutic interventions targeting decision‐making deficits. PMID:25678093

  15. Reflection impulsivity in binge drinking: behavioural and volumetric correlates.

    PubMed

    Banca, Paula; Lange, Iris; Worbe, Yulia; Howell, Nicholas A; Irvine, Michael; Harrison, Neil A; Moutoussis, Michael; Voon, Valerie

    2016-03-01

    The degree to which an individual accumulates evidence prior to making a decision, also known as reflection impulsivity, can be affected in psychiatric disorders. Here, we study decisional impulsivity in binge drinkers, a group at elevated risk for developing alcohol use disorders, comparing two tasks assessing reflection impulsivity and a delay discounting task, hypothesizing impairments in both subtypes of impulsivity. We also assess volumetric correlates of reflection impulsivity focusing on regions previously implicated in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. Sixty binge drinkers and healthy volunteers were tested using two different information-gathering paradigms: the beads task and the Information Sampling Task (IST). The beads task was analysed using a behavioural approach and a Bayesian model of decision making. Delay discounting was assessed using the Monetary Choice Questionnaire. Regression analyses of primary outcomes were conducted with voxel-based morphometry analyses. Binge drinkers sought less evidence prior to decision in the beads task compared with healthy volunteers in both the behavioural and computational modelling analysis. There were no group differences in the IST or delay discounting task. Greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the beads task was associated with smaller dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal volumes. In contrast, greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the IST was associated with greater dorsal cingulate and precuneus volumes. Binge drinking is characterized by impaired reflection impulsivity suggesting a deficit in deciding on the basis of future outcomes that are more difficult to represent. These findings emphasize the role of possible therapeutic interventions targeting decision-making deficits.

  16. Properties of Impulsive Events in a Polar Coronal Hole

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    and the results strongly suggest they could be the source of the fast wind . The recurrence of impulsive events is reported for the first time. Solar...using statistical methods and the results strongly suggest they could be the source of the fast wind . The recurrence of impulsive events is reported...presumably induced by magnetic reconnection phenomena, are potential candidates to contribute to the coronal heating and the solar wind (see i.e. D

  17. Manipulation of plasma grating by impulsive molecular alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Peifen; Wu, Jian; Zeng, Heping

    2013-11-25

    We experimentally demonstrated that multiphoton-ionization-induced plasma grating in air could be precisely manipulated by impulsive molecular alignment. In the linear region, the impulsively aligned molecules modulated the diffraction efficiency of the plasma grating for a time-delayed femtosecond laser pulse. In the nonlinear region, the third harmonic generation from the plasma grating was either enhanced or suppressed by following the alignment of the molecules.

  18. Heritability and Longitudinal Stability of Impulsivity in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Niv, Sharon; Tuvblad, Catherine; Raine, Adrian; Wang, Pan; Baker, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Impulsivity is a multifaceted personality construct that plays an important role throughout the lifespan in psychopathological disorders involving self-regulated behaviors. Its genetic and environmental etiology, however, is not clearly understood during the important developmental period of adolescence. This study investigated the relative influence of genes and environment on self-reported impulsive traits in adolescent twins measured on two separate occasions (waves) between the ages of 11 and 16. An adolescent version of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) developed for this study was factored into subscales reflecting inattention, motor impulsivity, and non-planning. Genetic analyses of these BIS subscales showed moderate heritability, ranging from 33–56% at the early wave (age 11–13 years) and 19–44% at the later wave (age 14–16 years). Moreover, genetic influences explained half or more of the variance of a single latent factor common to these subscales within each wave. Genetic effects specific to each subscale also emerged as significant, with the exception of motor impulsivity. Shared twin environment was not significant for either the latent or specific impulsivity factors at either wave. Phenotypic correlations between waves ranged from r = 0.25 to 0.42 for subscales. The stability correlation between the two latent impulsivity factors was r = 0.43, of which 76% was attributable to shared genetic effects, suggesting strong genetic continuity from mid to late adolescence. These results contribute to our understanding of the nature of impulsivity by demonstrating both multidimensionality and genetic specificity to different facets of this complex construct, as well as highlighting the importance of stable genetic influences across adolescence. PMID:22089391

  19. Timing calibration and synchronization of surface and fluorescence detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, P.; Bellido, J.; Bertou, Xavier; Covault, C.E.; Fick, B.E.; Gemmeke, H.; Kleifges, M.; Mostafa, M.; Menshikov, A.; Meyer, F.; Pryke, C.; Sommers, P.; Vanderpan, E.; Vernotte, F.; Wiencke, L.

    2005-08-01

    Reconstruction of cosmic ray arrival directions for Surface Detectors (SD) and Fluorescence Detectors (FD) of the Pierre Auger Observatory requires accurate timing (25 nanoseconds or better) between measurements at individual detectors and instrument triggers. Timing systems for both SD and FD are based on Motorola Oncore UT+ GPS receivers installed into custom-built time-tagging circuits that are calibrated in the laboratory to a statistical precision of better than 15 ns. We describe timing calibration and synchronization methods applied in the field for both the SD and the FD systems in four areas: (1) checks of timing offsets within the SD using co-located station pairs and timing residuals on reconstructed showers, (2) calibration within the FD using a custom-build LED calibration system, (3) calibration between SD and FD using laser signals fed simultaneously into an SD station and across the FD via the Central Laser Facility (CLF), and (4) studies of synchronization between FD and SD through the analysis of events detected by both systems, called hybrid events. These hybrid events allow for a much more accurate reconstruction of the shower and for relatively tight constraints on timing calibration offsets. We demonstrate that statistical and systematic timing uncertainties have no significant impact on the event reconstruction.

  20. Hazard from intense low-frequency acoustic impulses. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Price, G.R.

    1986-10-01

    It was predicted that because the ear is spectrally tuned, it should be most affected by intense impulses with spectral peaks near the frequency where it is tuned best (3.0 kHz for the human ear) and progressively less affected by impulses at lower frequencies. This prediction is counter to all the DRCs for impulse noise; therefore, an adequate test is essential. In order to augment the data on hearing loss to low-spectral-frequency impulses, three groups of cats (eight, nine, and ten animals) were exposed on one occasion to 50 impulses from a 105-mm howitzer at peak SPLs of 153, 159, and 166 dB. Threshold shifts were measured electrophysiologically on the day of exposure (CTS) and following a 2-month recovery period (PTS). Maximum PTSs appeared at 4 kHz (even though the spectral peak of the impulse had been at about 100 Hz), and CTSs recovered into PTSs about half as large. Furthermore, the group data, even small CTSs tended to have a permanent component. These data raise the question as to whether or not any threshold shift persisting an hour or two after exposure to high levels should be considered tolerable. When compared with data from rifle fire exposures, the data confirmed the earlier prediction that as the spectral frequency drops, hazard declines at the rate of a little more than 3 dB/oct, contrary to the rating by existing DRCs.

  1. An overview of measuring impulsive behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Dent, Claire L; Isles, Anthony R

    2014-06-16

    Impulsive behavior is a key constituent of many psychiatric illnesses, with maladaptive response control being a feature of disorders such as ADHD, schizophrenia, mania, and addiction. In order to understand the neurological underpinnings of impulsivity, a number of behavioral tasks have been developed for use with animal models. Data from studies with rats and other animals have led to the idea of the existence of dissociable components of impulsivity, which in turn informs studies of human disorders and potentially the development of specific therapies. Increasingly, mouse models are being used to investigate the known genetic contribution to psychiatric disorders in which abnormal response control leads to altered impulsive behaviors. In order to maximize the potential of these mouse models, it is important that researchers take into account the non-unitary nature of response control and impulsivity. In this article, we briefly review the tasks available to behavioral neuroscientists and how these can be used in order to tease apart the contribution of a specific genetic lesion into the discrete aspects of impulsive behavior.

  2. Filament eruptions and the impulsive phase of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Moore, R. L.; Kane, S. R.; Zirin, H.

    1988-01-01

    Filament motion during the onset of the solar flare impulsive phase is examined. The impulsive phase onset is established from profiles of about 30 keV X-ray fluxes and the rapid flare brightenings characteristic of the H-alpha flash phase. The filament motion begins several minutes before the impulsive or flash phase of the flare. No new accleration is observed in the motion of the filament during the onset of the impulsive phase for at least two of the four flares. The most common H-alpha brightenings associated with the impulsive phase lie near the magnetic inversion line roughly centered under the erupting filament. Filament speeds at the onset of the impulsive or flash phase lie in the range 30-180 km/s. These characteristics indicate that the filament eruption is not driven by the flare plasma pressure, but instead marks an eruption of magnetic field driven by a global MHD instability of the field configuration in the region of the flare.

  3. Noise sampling issues for impact/impulse noise surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, Mary M.; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    2003-04-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) has been recognized as a serious health concern for decades. ISO Standard 1999:1990 provides a means to predict noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) based on LAeq measurements in the working environments of workers. This standard seems to work well for predicting hearing loss in continuous noise fields. However, it is possible that ISO 1999 does not apply well to impact, impulsive, or other transient noise fields. NIOSH and University of Pittsburgh are currently developing noise-sampling strategies to measure impact and impulse noise in a manufacturing environment with the aim of developing new impulsive noise metrics. As part of the study, broadband impact/impulse pressure measurements will be made. Issues such as instrumentation, data quality, repeatability, spatial sampling, equipment portability, and calibration are addressed. Also, the annotation, digitization, and editing of the waveforms will be discussed. As part of the project, an archival database of manufacturing impulse/impact will be created to support the future algorithmic development. The ultimate goal of the project is to develop new metrics to characterize the hazards of impact/impulse noise that will complement ISO 1999 for predicting NIHL.

  4. Determination of acoustical transfer functions using an impulse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, J.

    1985-02-01

    The Transfer Function of a system may be defined as the relationship of the output response to the input of a system. Whilst recent advances in digital processing systems have enabled Impulse Transfer Functions to be determined by computation of the Fast Fourier Transform, there has been little work done in applying these techniques to room acoustics. Acoustical Transfer Functions have been determined for auditoria, using an impulse method. The technique is based on the computation of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of a non-ideal impulsive source, both at the source and at the receiver point. The Impulse Transfer Function (ITF) is obtained by dividing the FFT at the receiver position by the FFT of the source. This quantity is presented both as linear frequency scale plots and also as synthesized one-third octave band data. The technique enables a considerable quantity of data to be obtained from a small number of impulsive signals recorded in the field, thereby minimizing the time and effort required on site. As the characteristics of the source are taken into account in the calculation, the choice of impulsive source is non-critical. The digital analysis equipment required for the analysis is readily available commercially.

  5. Periodicity-based kurtogram for random impulse resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoqiang; Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Lei, Yaguo

    2015-08-01

    The kurtogram developed from spectral kurtosis has been proven as an efficient tool for extracting the fault impulses in the diagnosis of rolling element bearings and gearboxes. Although the optimal narrowband chosen for demodulation by kurtogram is accurate and effective in experimental environment, this approach is very sensitive to large random impulses that are frequently encountered in industrial applications. The narrowband with maximum kurtosis is always associated with large interferential impulses, rather than the bearing fault. To overcome this limitation, the periodic component to aperiodic component ratio (PAR) is utilized in this article to differentiate the two types of impulses. The novel method named the PAR-based kurtogram focuses on finding the significant frequency band with periodic impulses. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by simulations, a test rig of locomotive rolling element bearings, and bearing data from the Case Western Reserve University. The results show that the PAR-based kurtogram improves the robustness to interference from aperiodic impulses significantly, which is very useful for bearing faults diagnosis.

  6. Beyond discounting: possible experimental models of impulse control.

    PubMed

    Monterosso, J; Ainslie, G

    1999-10-01

    Animal studies of impulsivity have typically used one of three models: a delay of reward procedure, a differential reinforcement for low rate responding (DRL) procedure, or an autoshaping procedure. In each of these paradigms, we argue, measurement of impulsivity is implicitly or explicitly equated with the effect delay has on the value of reward. The steepness by which delay diminishes value (the temporal discount function) is treated as an index of impulsivity. In order to provide a better analog of human impulsivity, this model needs to be expanded to include the converse of impulsivity - self-control. Through mechanisms such as committing to long range interests before the onset of temptation, or through bundling individual choices into classes of choices that are made at once, human decision-making can often look far less myopic than single trial experiments predict. For people, impulsive behavior may be more often the result of the breakdown of self-control mechanisms than of steep discount functions. Existing animal models of self-control are discussed, and future directions are suggested for psychopharmacological research.

  7. [Functional and dysfunctional impulsivity in young binge drinkers].

    PubMed

    Adan, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The pattern of binge drinking (BD), found especially among young people, has become an important social and health problem. However, its prevalence has not been carefully studied until recently, together with its consequences in the mid and long run and the possible risk factors. The aim of this work is to study, for the first time, the possible differences in the dimensions of functional and dysfunctional impulsivity in Dickman's model among university students with BD and non-consumers of alcohol or control group. 80 subjects (40 men) with a pattern of BD and 80 controls (40 men) participated in the study, aged 18 to 25 (21,38 ± 1,91). They all completed Dickman's Impulsivity Inventory (DII, 1990). Several variables known to affect the results, such as circadian typology, were controlled for. The scores on dysfunctional impulsivity were higher in the BD group compared to the controls, while no differences were found according to functional impulsivity. Men showed a higher degree of impulsivity than women, both functional and dysfunctional, although in dysfunctional impulsivity this is significant only in the BD group. The DII has proven sensitive to detecting BD, and thus it could become an assessment tool to take into account in preventive or treatment approaches in the future.

  8. Periodic and Aperiodic Synchronization in Skilled Action

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Synchronized action is considered as a manifestation of shared skill. Most synchronized behaviors in humans and other animals are based on periodic repetition. Aperiodic synchronization of complex action is found in the experimental task of synchronous speaking, in which naive subjects read a common text in lock step. The demonstration of synchronized behavior without a periodic basis is presented as a challenge for theoretical understanding. A unified treatment of periodic and aperiodic synchronization is suggested by replacing the sequential processing model of cognitivist approaches with the more local notion of a task-specific sensorimotor coordination. On this view, skilled action is the imposition of constraints on the co-variation of movement and sensory flux such that the boundary conditions that define the skill are met. This non-cognitivist approach originates in the work of John Dewey. It allows a unification of the treatment of sensorimotor synchronization in simple rhythmic behavior and in complex skilled behavior and it suggests that skill sharing is a uniquely human trait of considerable import. PMID:22232583

  9. An extended active control for chaos synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rong-An; Liu, Ya-Li; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2009-04-01

    By introducing a control strength matrix, the active control theory in chaotic synchronization is developed. With this extended method, chaos complete synchronization can be achieved more easily, i.e., a much smaller control signal is enough to reach synchronization in most cases. Numerical simulations on Rossler, Liu's four-scroll, and Chen system confirmed this and show that the synchronization result depends on the control strength significantly. Especially, in the case of Liu and Chen systems, the response systems' largest Lyapunov exponents' variation with the control strength is not monotone and there exist minima. It is novel for Chen system that the synchronization speed with a special small strength is higher than that of the usual active control which, as a special case of the extended method, has a much larger control strength. All these results indicate that the control strength is an important factor in the actual synchronization. So, with this extended active control, one can make a better and more practical synchronization scheme by adjusting the control strength matrix.

  10. System Synchronizes Recordings from Separated Video Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nail, William; Nail, William L.; Nail, Jasper M.; Le, Doung T.

    2009-01-01

    A system of electronic hardware and software for synchronizing recordings from multiple, physically separated video cameras is being developed, primarily for use in multiple-look-angle video production. The system, the time code used in the system, and the underlying method of synchronization upon which the design of the system is based are denoted generally by the term "Geo-TimeCode(TradeMark)." The system is embodied mostly in compact, lightweight, portable units (see figure) denoted video time-code units (VTUs) - one VTU for each video camera. The system is scalable in that any number of camera recordings can be synchronized. The estimated retail price per unit would be about $350 (in 2006 dollars). The need for this or another synchronization system external to video cameras arises because most video cameras do not include internal means for maintaining synchronization with other video cameras. Unlike prior video-camera-synchronization systems, this system does not depend on continuous cable or radio links between cameras (however, it does depend on occasional cable links lasting a few seconds). Also, whereas the time codes used in prior video-camera-synchronization systems typically repeat after 24 hours, the time code used in this system does not repeat for slightly more than 136 years; hence, this system is much better suited for long-term deployment of multiple cameras.

  11. Global interactions, information flow, and chaos synchronization.

    PubMed

    Paredes, G; Alvarez-Llamoza, O; Cosenza, M G

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the relationship between the emergence of chaos synchronization and the information flow in dynamical systems possessing homogeneous or heterogeneous global interactions whose origin can be external (driven systems) or internal (autonomous systems). By employing general models of coupled chaotic maps for such systems, we show that the presence of a homogeneous global field, either external or internal, for all times is not indispensable for achieving complete or generalized synchronization in a system of chaotic elements. Complete synchronization can also appear with heterogeneous global fields; it does not requires the simultaneous sharing of the field by all the elements in a system. We use the normalized mutual information and the information transfer between global and local variables to characterize complete and generalized synchronization. We show that these information measures can characterize both types of synchronized states and also allow us to discern the origin of a global interaction field. A synchronization state emerges when a sufficient amount of information provided by a field is shared by all the elements in the system, on the average over long times. Thus, the maximum value of the top-down information transfer can be used as a predictor of synchronization in a system, as a parameter is varied.

  12. Periodic and aperiodic synchronization in skilled action.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Synchronized action is considered as a manifestation of shared skill. Most synchronized behaviors in humans and other animals are based on periodic repetition. Aperiodic synchronization of complex action is found in the experimental task of synchronous speaking, in which naive subjects read a common text in lock step. The demonstration of synchronized behavior without a periodic basis is presented as a challenge for theoretical understanding. A unified treatment of periodic and aperiodic synchronization is suggested by replacing the sequential processing model of cognitivist approaches with the more local notion of a task-specific sensorimotor coordination. On this view, skilled action is the imposition of constraints on the co-variation of movement and sensory flux such that the boundary conditions that define the skill are met. This non-cognitivist approach originates in the work of John Dewey. It allows a unification of the treatment of sensorimotor synchronization in simple rhythmic behavior and in complex skilled behavior and it suggests that skill sharing is a uniquely human trait of considerable import.

  13. The nature of impulsivity: visual exposure to natural environments decreases impulsive decision-making in a delay discounting task.

    PubMed

    Berry, Meredith S; Sweeney, Mary M; Morath, Justice; Odum, Amy L; Jordan, Kerry E

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of visual exposure to natural environments for human well-being in areas of stress reduction, mood improvement, and attention restoration are well documented, but the effects of natural environments on impulsive decision-making remain unknown. Impulsive decision-making in delay discounting offers generality, predictive validity, and insight into decision-making related to unhealthy behaviors. The present experiment evaluated differences in such decision-making in humans experiencing visual exposure to one of the following conditions: natural (e.g., mountains), built (e.g., buildings), or control (e.g., triangles) using a delay discounting task that required participants to choose between immediate and delayed hypothetical monetary outcomes. Participants viewed the images before and during the delay discounting task. Participants were less impulsive in the condition providing visual exposure to natural scenes compared to built and geometric scenes. Results suggest that exposure to natural environments results in decreased impulsive decision-making relative to built environments.

  14. [Breast reconstruction after mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Ho Quoc, C; Delay, E

    2013-02-01

    The mutilating surgery for breast cancer causes deep somatic and psychological sequelae. Breast reconstruction can mitigate these effects and permit the patient to help rebuild their lives. The purpose of this paper is to focus on breast reconstruction techniques and on factors involved in breast reconstruction. The methods of breast reconstruction are presented: objectives, indications, different techniques, operative risks, and long-term monitoring. Many different techniques can now allow breast reconstruction in most patients. Clinical cases are also presented in order to understand the results we expect from a breast reconstruction. Breast reconstruction provides many benefits for patients in terms of rehabilitation, wellness, and quality of life. In our mind, breast reconstruction should be considered more as an opportunity and a positive choice (the patient can decide to do it), than as an obligation (that the patient would suffer). The consultation with the surgeon who will perform the reconstruction is an important step to give all necessary informations. It is really important that the patient could speak again with him before undergoing reconstruction, if she has any doubt. The quality of information given by medical doctors is essential to the success of psychological intervention. This article was written in a simple, and understandable way to help gynecologists giving the best information to their patients. It is maybe also possible to let them a copy of this article, which would enable them to have a written support and would facilitate future consultation with the surgeon who will perform the reconstruction.

  15. Quantum Clock Synchronization with a Single Qudit

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Armin; Cabello, Adán; Żukowski, Marek; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Clock synchronization for nonfaulty processes in multiprocess networks is indispensable for a variety of technologies. A reliable system must be able to resynchronize the nonfaulty processes upon some components failing causing the distribution of incorrect or conflicting information in the network. The task of synchronizing such networks is related to Byzantine agreement (BA), which can classically be solved using recursive algorithms if and only if less than one-third of the processes are faulty. Here we introduce a nonrecursive quantum algorithm, based on a quantum solution of the detectable BA, which achieves clock synchronization in the presence of arbitrary many faulty processes by using only a single quantum system. PMID:25613754

  16. Synchronization Phenomena and Epoch Filter of Electroencephalogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matani, Ayumu

    Nonlinear electrophysiological synchronization phenomena in the brain, such as event-related (de)synchronization, long distance synchronization, and phase-reset, have received much attention in neuroscience over the last decade. These phenomena contain more electrical than physiological keywords and actually require electrical techniques to capture with electroencephalography (EEG). For instance, epoch filters, which have just recently been proposed, allow us to investigate such phenomena. Moreover, epoch filters are still developing and would hopefully generate a new paradigm in neuroscience from an electrical engineering viewpoint. Consequently, electrical engineers could be interested in EEG once again or from now on.

  17. Using GLONASS signal for clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouzhva, Yuri G.; Gevorkyan, Arvid G.; Bogdanov, Pyotr P.; Ovchinnikov, Vitaly V.

    1994-01-01

    Although in accuracy parameters GLONASS is correlated with GPS, using GLONASS signals for high-precision clock synchronization was, up to the recent time, of limited utility due to the lack of specialized time receivers. In order to improve this situation, in late 1992 the Russian Institute of Radionavigation and Time (RMT) began to develop a GLONASS time receiver using as a basis the airborne ASN-16 receiver. This paper presents results of estimating user clock synchronization accuracy via GLONASS signals using ASN-16 receiver in the direct synchronization and common-view modes.

  18. Complex Synchronization Phenomena in Ecological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Lewi; Olinky, Ronen; Blasius, Bernd; Huppert, Amit; Cazelles, Bernard

    2002-07-01

    Ecological and biological systems provide us with many striking examples of synchronization phenomena. Here we discuss a number of intriguing cases and attempt to explain them taking advantage of a modelling framework. One main focus will concern synchronized ecological end epidemiological cycles which have Uniform Phase growth associated with their regular recurrence, and Chaotic Amplitudes - a feature we term UPCA. Examples come from different areas and include decadal cycles of small mammals, recurrent viral epidemics such as childhood infections (eg., measles), and seasonally driven phytoplankton blooms observed in lakes and the oceans. A more detailed theoretical analysis of seasonally synchronized chaotic population cycles is presented.

  19. Synchronization Of Parallel Discrete Event Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S.

    1992-01-01

    Adaptive, parallel, discrete-event-simulation-synchronization algorithm, Breathing Time Buckets, developed in Synchronous Parallel Environment for Emulation and Discrete Event Simulation (SPEEDES) operating system. Algorithm allows parallel simulations to process events optimistically in fluctuating time cycles that naturally adapt while simulation in progress. Combines best of optimistic and conservative synchronization strategies while avoiding major disadvantages. Algorithm processes events optimistically in time cycles adapting while simulation in progress. Well suited for modeling communication networks, for large-scale war games, for simulated flights of aircraft, for simulations of computer equipment, for mathematical modeling, for interactive engineering simulations, and for depictions of flows of information.

  20. Synchronization System for Next Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zavriyev, Anton

    2014-03-27

    An alternative synchronization technique – one that would allow explicit control of the pulse train including its repetition rate and delay is clearly desired. We propose such a scheme. Our method is based on optical interferometry and permits synchronization of the pulse trains generated by two independent mode-locked lasers. As the next generation x-ray sources will be driven by a clock signal derived from a mode-locked optical source, our technique will provide a way to synchronize x-ray probe with the optical pump pulses.

  1. Are feedback loops destructive to synchronization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheshbolouki, A.; Zarei, M.; Sarbazi-Azad, H.

    2015-08-01

    We study the effects of directionality on synchronization of dynamical networks. Performing the linear stability analysis and the numerical simulation of the Kuramoto model in directed networks, we show that balancing in- and out-degrees of all nodes enhances the synchronization of sparse networks, especially in networks with high clustering coefficient and homogeneous degree distribution. Furthermore, by omitting all the feedback loops, we show that while hierarchical directed acyclic graphs are structurally highly synchronizable, their global synchronization is too sensitive to the choice of natural frequencies and is strongly affected by noise.

  2. Examining impulse-variability in overarm throwing.

    PubMed

    Urbin, M A; Stodden, David; Boros, Rhonda; Shannon, David

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine variability in overarm throwing velocity and spatial output error at various percentages of maximum to test the prediction of an inverted-U function as predicted by impulse-variability theory and a speed-accuracy trade-off as predicted by Fitts' Law Thirty subjects (16 skilled, 14 unskilled) were instructed to throw a tennis ball at seven percentages of their maximum velocity (40-100%) in random order (9 trials per condition) at a target 30 feet away. Throwing velocity was measured with a radar gun and interpreted as an index of overall systemic power output. Within-subject throwing velocity variability was examined using within-subjects repeated-measures ANOVAs (7 repeated conditions) with built-in polynomial contrasts. Spatial error was analyzed using mixed model regression. Results indicated a quadratic fit with variability in throwing velocity increasing from 40% up to 60%, where it peaked, and then decreasing at each subsequent interval to maximum (p < .001, η2 = .555). There was no linear relationship between speed and accuracy. Overall, these data support the notion of an inverted-U function in overarm throwing velocity variability as both skilled and unskilled subjects approach maximum effort. However, these data do not support the notion of a speed-accuracy trade-off. The consistent demonstration of an inverted-U function associated with systemic power output variability indicates an enhanced capability to regulate aspects of force production and relative timing between segments as individuals approach maximum effort, even in a complex ballistic skill.

  3. Micropower impulse radar technology and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, J., LLNL

    1998-04-15

    The LLNL-developed Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) technology has quickly gone from laboratory concept to embedded circuitry in numerous government and commercial systems in the last few years[l]. The main ideas behind MIR, invented by T. McEwan in the Laser Program, are the generation and detection systems for extremely low- power ultra-wideband pulses in the gigaHertz regime using low-cost components. These ideas, coupled with new antenna systems, timing and radio-frequency (RF) circuitry, computer interfaces, and signal processing, have provided the catalyst for a new generation of compact radar systems. Over the past several years we have concentrated on a number of applications of MIR which address a number of remote-sensing applications relevant to emerging programs in defense, transportation, medical, and environmental research. Some of the past commercial successes have been widely publicized [2] and are only now starting to become available for market. Over 30 patents have been filed and over 15 licenses have been signed on various aspects of the MIR technology. In addition, higher performance systems are under development for specific laboratory programs and government reimbursables. The MIR is an ultra- wideband, range-gated radar system that provides the enabling hardware technology used in the research areas mentioned above. It has numerous performance parameters that can be Selected by careful design to fit the requirements. We have improved the baseline, short- range, MIR system to demonstrate its effectiveness. The radar operates over the hand from approximately I to 4 GHz with pulse repetition frequencies up to 10 MHz. It provides a potential range resolution of I cm at ranges of greater than 20 m. We have developed a suite of algorithms for using MIR for image formation. These algorithms currently support Synthetic aperture and multistate array geometries. This baseline MIR radar imaging system has been used for several programmatic applications.

  4. Do individuals higher in impulsivity drink more impulsively? A pilot study within a high risk sample of young adults.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Angela K; Littlefield, Andrew K; Talley, Amelia E; Brown, Jennifer L

    2017-02-01

    Extant literature has established a strong relation between individual differences in "impulsivity" and alcohol consumption. However, the relation between "impulsivity," intentions-to-drink, and alcohol consumption has remained understudied. As a part of a larger study, 77 participants (60.5% female, 76.3% White, M age=20.8) completed 10days of daily diary reports regarding their intention to use alcohol and alcohol consumption. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used to estimate within-person relations between intentions-to-drink and subsequent alcohol use. All models were adjusted for participant age, biological sex, and day of the week. Results showed a strong positive association between daily intention to consume alcohol and self-reported alcohol use (β=0.50, p<0.01). Importantly, tests of interactions indicated that individuals higher in impulsivity were not significantly more likely to engage in unplanned drinking. Multilevel mediation analyses indicated significant indirect effects between impulsivity-like constructs, including positive urgency, lack-of-planning, and self-report delay discounting, and reported daily alcohol consumption via higher overall (i.e., between-person) levels of intentions-to-drink; that is, individuals who reported higher levels of these impulsivity-related constructs were more likely to intend to drink across the 10-days and, in turn, consumed more alcohol. Findings from the study suggest that treatment providers could address drinking intentions among individuals higher in impulsivity and work to establish potential replacement behaviors to reduce alcohol consumption in this population.

  5. Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules.

  6. Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-04-30

    An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules. 15 figs.

  7. Stratigraphic framework for Pliocene paleoclimate reconstruction: The correlation conundrum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Robinson, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Pre-Holocene paleoclimate reconstructions face a correlation conundrum because complications inherent in the stratigraphic record impede the development of synchronous reconstruction. The Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) paleoenvironmental reconstructions have carefully balanced temporal resolution and paleoclimate proxy data to achieve a useful and reliable product and are the most comprehensive pre-Pleistocene data sets available for analysis of warmer-than-present climate and for climate modeling experiments. This paper documents the stratigraphic framework for the mid-Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) reconstruction of the North Atlantic and explores the relationship between stratigraphic/temporal resolution and various paleoceanographic estimates of SST. The magnetobiostratigraphic framework for the PRISM North Atlantic region is constructed from planktic foraminifer, calcareous nannofossil and paleomagnetic reversal events recorded in deep-sea cores and calibrated to age. Planktic foraminifer census data from multiple samples within the mid-Pliocene yield multiple SST estimates for each site. Extracting a single SST value at each site from multiple estimates, given the limitations of the material and stratigraphic resolution, is problematic but necessary for climate model experiments. The PRISM reconstruction, unprecedented in its integration of many different types of data at a focused stratigraphic interval, utilizes a time slab approach and is based on warm peak average temperatures. A greater understanding of the dynamics of the climate system and significant advances in models now mandate more precise, globally distributed yet temporally synchronous SST estimates than are available through averaging techniques. Regardless of the precision used to correlate between sequences within the midd-Pliocene, a truly synoptic reconstruction in the temporal sense is unlikely. SST estimates from multiple proxies promise to further

  8. Synchronized flow in oversaturated city traffic.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Boris S; Klenov, Sergey L; Hermanns, Gerhard; Hemmerle, Peter; Rehborn, Hubert; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Based on numerical simulations with a stochastic three-phase traffic flow model, we reveal that moving queues (moving jams) in oversaturated city traffic dissolve at some distance upstream of the traffic signal while transforming into synchronized flow. It is found that, as in highway traffic [Kerner, Phys. Rev. E 85, 036110 (2012)], such a jam-absorption effect in city traffic is explained by a strong driver's speed adaptation: Time headways (space gaps) between vehicles increase upstream of a moving queue (moving jam), resulting in moving queue dissolution. It turns out that at given traffic signal parameters, the stronger the speed adaptation effect, the shorter the mean distance between the signal location and the road location at which moving queues dissolve fully and oversaturated traffic consists of synchronized flow only. A comparison of the synchronized flow in city traffic found in this Brief Report with synchronized flow in highway traffic is made.

  9. Synchronization of Arbitrarily Switched Boolean Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongwei; Liang, Jinling; Huang, Tingwen; Cao, Jinde

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the complete synchronization problem for the drive-response switched Boolean networks (SBNs) under arbitrary switching signals, where the switching signals of the response SBN follow those generated by the drive SBN at each time instant. First, the definition of complete synchronization is introduced for the drive-response SBNs under arbitrary switching signals. Second, the concept of switching reachable set starting from a given initial state set is put forward. Based on it, a necessary and sufficient condition is derived for the complete synchronization of the drive-response SBNs. Last, we give a simple algebraic expression for the switching reachable set in a given number of time steps, and two computable algebraic criteria are obtained for the complete synchronization of the SBNs. A biological example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained main results.

  10. Synchronization of coupled nonidentical genetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunguang; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2006-03-01

    The study of the collective dynamics of synchronization among genetic oscillators is essential for the understanding of the rhythmic phenomena of living organisms at both molecular and cellular levels. Genetic oscillators are biochemical networks, which can generally be modelled as nonlinear dynamic systems. We show in this paper that many genetic oscillators can be transformed into Lur'e form by exploiting the special structure of biological systems. By using a control theory approach, we provide a theoretical method for analysing the synchronization of coupled nonidentical genetic oscillators. Sufficient conditions for the synchronization as well as the estimation of the bound of the synchronization error are also obtained. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results, a population of genetic oscillators based on the Goodwin model are adopted as numerical examples.

  11. Optimal Synchronization of a Memristive Chaotic Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kountchou, Michaux; Louodop, Patrick; Bowong, Samuel; Fotsin, Hilaire; Kurths, Jurgen

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of optimal synchronization of two identical memristive chaotic systems. We first study some basic dynamical properties and behaviors of a memristor oscillator with a simple topology. An electronic circuit (analog simulator) is proposed to investigate the dynamical behavior of the system. An optimal synchronization strategy based on the controllability functions method with a mixed cost functional is investigated. A finite horizon is explicitly computed such that the chaos synchronization is achieved at an established time. Numerical simulations are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed synchronization strategy. Pspice analog circuit implementation of the complete master-slave-controller systems is also presented to show the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  12. Minimal model for spontaneous quantum synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Claudia; Galve, Fernando; Mandarino, Antonio; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Zambrini, Roberta

    2016-11-01

    We show the emergence of spontaneous synchronization between a pair of detuned quantum oscillators within a harmonic network. Our model does not involve any nonlinearity, driving, or external dissipation, thus providing the simplest scenario for the occurrence of local coherent dynamics in an extended harmonic system. A sufficient condition for synchronization is established by building upon the Rayleigh normal mode approach to vibrational systems. Our results show that mechanisms favoring synchronization, even between oscillators that are not directly coupled to each other, are transient energy depletion and crosstalk. We also address the possible buildup of quantum correlations during synchronization and show that indeed entanglement may be generated in detuned systems, starting from uncorrelated states and without any direct coupling between the two oscillators.

  13. Method and system for downhole clock synchronization

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Johnson, Monte; Moon, Justin; Koehler, Roger O.

    2006-11-28

    A method and system for use in synchronizing at least two clocks in a downhole network are disclosed. The method comprises determining a total signal latency between a controlling processing element and at least one downhole processing element in a downhole network and sending a synchronizing time over the downhole network to the at least one downhole processing element adjusted for the signal latency. Electronic time stamps may be used to measure latency between processing elements. A system for electrically synchronizing at least two clocks connected to a downhole network comprises a controlling processing element connected to a synchronizing clock in communication over a downhole network with at least one downhole processing element comprising at least one downhole clock. Preferably, the downhole network is integrated into a downhole tool string.

  14. Synchronous correlation matrices and Connes’ embedding conjecture

    SciTech Connect

    Dykema, Kenneth J.; Paulsen, Vern

    2016-01-15

    In the work of Paulsen et al. [J. Funct. Anal. (in press); preprint arXiv:1407.6918], the concept of synchronous quantum correlation matrices was introduced and these were shown to correspond to traces on certain C*-algebras. In particular, synchronous correlation matrices arose in their study of various versions of quantum chromatic numbers of graphs and other quantum versions of graph theoretic parameters. In this paper, we develop these ideas further, focusing on the relations between synchronous correlation matrices and microstates. We prove that Connes’ embedding conjecture is equivalent to the equality of two families of synchronous quantum correlation matrices. We prove that if Connes’ embedding conjecture has a positive answer, then the tracial rank and projective rank are equal for every graph. We then apply these results to more general non-local games.

  15. Repeat-PPM Super-Symbol Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, J.

    2016-11-01

    To attain a wider range of data rates in pulse position modulation (PPM) schemes with constrained pulse durations, the sender can repeat a PPM symbol multiple times, forming a super-symbol. In addition to the slot and symbol synchronization typically required for PPM, the receiver must also properly align the noisy super-symbols. We present a low-complexity approximation of the maximum-likelihood method for performing super-symbol synchronization without use of synchronization sequences. We provide simulation results demonstrating performance advantage when PPM symbols are spread by a pseudo-noise sequence, as opposed to simply repeating. Additionally, the results suggest that this super-symbol synchronization technique requires signal levels below those required for reliable communication. This validates that the PPM spreading approach proposed to CCSDS can work properly as part of the overall scheme.

  16. Visual Feedback Leader-following Attitude Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibuki, Tatsuya; Hatanaka, Takeshi; Fujita, Masayuki

    In this paper we investigate visual feedback attitude synchronization in leader-follower type visibility structures on the Special Euclidean group SE(3). We first define visual robotic networks consisting of the dynamics describing rigid body motion, visibility structures among bodies and visual measurements. We then propose a visual feedback attitude synchronization law combining a vision-based observer with the attitude synchronization law presented in our previous works. We then prove that when the leader does not rotate, the visual robotic network with the control law achieves visual feedback attitude synchronization. Moreover, for a rotating leader, we evaluate the tracking performance of the other bodies. In analysis, we employ the notion of input-to-state stability and L2-gain performance regarding the leader’s angular velocity as an external disturbance. Finally, the validity of the proposed control law and the analysis is demonstrated through simulations.

  17. Synchronization in networks of mobile oscillators.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Naoya; Kurths, Jürgen; Díaz-Guilera, Albert

    2011-02-01

    We present a model of synchronization in networks of autonomous agents where the topology changes due to agents motion. We introduce two timescales, one for the topological change and another one for local synchronization. If the former scale is much shorter, an approximation that averages out the effect of motion is available. Here we show, however, that the time required for synchronization achievement is larger than the prediction of the approximation in the opposite case, especially close to the continuum percolation transition point. The simulation results are confirmed by means of spectral analysis of the time-dependent Laplacian matrix. Our results show that the tradeoff between these two timescales, which have opposite effects on synchronization, should be taken into account for the design of mobile device networks.

  18. Chaos synchronization of general complex dynamical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Jinhu; Yu, Xinghuo; Chen, Guanrong

    2004-03-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that many large-scale complex dynamical networks display a collective synchronization motion. Here, we introduce a time-varying complex dynamical network model and further investigate its synchronization phenomenon. Based on this new complex network model, two network chaos synchronization theorems are proved. We show that the chaos synchronization of a time-varying complex network is determined by means of the inner coupled link matrix, the eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors of the coupled configuration matrix, rather than the conventional eigenvalues of the coupled configuration matrix for a uniform network. Especially, we do not assume that the coupled configuration matrix is symmetric and its off-diagonal elements are nonnegative, which in a way generalizes the related results existing in the literature.

  19. Synchronization phenomena in nephron-nephron interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Yip, Kay-Pong; Sosnovtseva, Olga V.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2001-06-01

    Experimental data for tubular pressure oscillations in rat kidneys are analyzed in order to examine the different types of synchronization that can arise between neighboring functional units. For rats with normal blood pressure, the individual unit (the nephron) typically exhibits regular oscillations in its tubular pressure and flow variations. For such rats, both in-phase and antiphase synchronization can be demonstrated in the experimental data. For spontaneously hypertensive rats, where the pressure variations in the individual nephrons are highly irregular, signs of chaotic phase and frequency synchronization can be observed. Accounting for a hemodynamic as well as for a vascular coupling between nephrons that share a common interlobular artery, we develop a mathematical model of the pressure and flow regulation in a pair of adjacent nephrons. We show that this model, for appropriate values of the parameters, can reproduce the different types of experimentally observed synchronization.

  20. Self-reported and behavioural impulsivity in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Phillipou, Andrea; Abel, Larry Allen; Castle, David Jonathan; Gurvich, Caroline; Hughes, Matthew Edward; Rossell, Susan Lee

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine how self-reported and behavioural impulsivity are related in anorexia nervosa (AN). METHODS Twenty-four females with AN and 25 healthy controls (HC) participant in the study. Self-reported impulsivity was assessed with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). The scale yields three second-order factors: Attentional, motor and non-planning. Behavioural impulsivity was investigated with the continuous performance test (CPT), a computer-based task of sustained attention in which numbers are flashed briefly on screen and participants are required to click the mouse when the same number appears consecutively. The rate of commission and omission errors can be used a measure of behavioural imulsivity. RESULTS AN participants self-reported increased attentional [AN: 20.67 (3.64), HC: 13.88 (2.91), P = 0.001] and reduced motor impulsivity [AN: 11.55 (2.28), HC: 14.08 (2.78), P = 0.002]. The rate of omission or commission errors on the CPT did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). BIS-11 and CPT measures did not significantly correlate, but attentional impulsivity was related to negative mood states in AN (depression: r = 0.52, P = 0.010, anxiety: r = 0.55, P = 0.006, stress: r = 0.57, P = 0.004). CONCLUSION The discrepancy between self-reported and behavioural impulsivity are discussed in terms of perfectionism in AN. Furthermore, it is suggested that improving negative mood states may resolve this inconsistency in AN. PMID:27679774