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Sample records for synchronous impulse reconstruction

  1. Synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Litzenberg, Dale W.; Hadley, Scott W.; Tyagi, Neelam; Balter, James M.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2007-01-15

    Variations in target volume position between and during treatment fractions can lead to measurable differences in the dose distribution delivered to each patient. Current methods to estimate the ongoing cumulative delivered dose distribution make idealized assumptions about individual patient motion based on average motions observed in a population of patients. In the delivery of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multi-leaf collimator (MLC), errors are introduced in both the implementation and delivery processes. In addition, target motion and MLC motion can lead to dosimetric errors from interplay effects. All of these effects may be of clinical importance. Here we present a method to compute delivered dose distributions for each treatment beam and fraction, which explicitly incorporates synchronized real-time patient motion data and real-time fluence and machine configuration data. This synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction method properly accounts for the two primary classes of errors that arise from delivering IMRT with an MLC: (a) Interplay errors between target volume motion and MLC motion, and (b) Implementation errors, such as dropped segments, dose over/under shoot, faulty leaf motors, tongue-and-groove effect, rounded leaf ends, and communications delays. These reconstructed dose fractions can then be combined to produce high-quality determinations of the dose distribution actually received to date, from which individualized adaptive treatment strategies can be determined.

  2. Obstacle avoidance and concealed target detection using the Army Research Lab ultra-wideband synchronous impulse reconstruction (UWB SIRE) forward imaging radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lam; Wong, David; Ressler, Marc; Koenig, Francois; Stanton, Brian; Smith, Gregory; Sichina, Jeffrey; Kappra, Karl

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), as part of a mission and customer funded exploratory program, has developed a new low-frequency, ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for forward imaging to support the Army's vision of an autonomous navigation system for robotic ground vehicles. These unmanned vehicles, equipped with an array of imaging sensors, will be tasked to help detect man-made obstacles such as concealed targets, enemy minefields, and booby traps, as well as other natural obstacles such as ditches, and bodies of water. The ability of UWB radar technology to help detect concealed objects has been documented in the past and could provide an important obstacle avoidance capability for autonomous navigation systems, which would improve the speed and maneuverability of these vehicles and consequently increase the survivability of the U. S. forces on the battlefield. One of the primary features of the radar is the ability to collect and process data at combat pace in an affordable, compact, and lightweight package. To achieve this, the radar is based on the synchronous impulse reconstruction (SIRE) technique where several relatively slow and inexpensive analog-to-digital (A/D) converters are used to sample the wide bandwidth of the radar signals. We conducted an experiment this winter at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) to support the phenomenological studies of the backscatter from positive and negative obstacles for autonomous robotic vehicle navigation, as well as the detection of concealed targets of interest to the Army. In this paper, we briefly describe the UWB SIRE radar and the test setup in the experiment. We will also describe the signal processing and the forward imaging techniques used in the experiment. Finally, we will present imagery of man-made obstacles such as barriers, concertina wires, and mines.

  3. Adaptive impulsive cluster synchronization in community network with nonidentical nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaoli; Gan, Luyining; Wu, Zhaoyan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, cluster synchronization in community network with nonidentical nodes is investigated. Through introducing proper adaptive strategy into impulsive control scheme, adaptive impulsive controllers are designed for achieving the cluster synchronization. In this adaptive impulsive control scheme, for any given networks, the impulsive gains can adjust themselves to proper values according to the proposed adaptive strategy when the impulsive intervals are fixed. The impulsive instants can be estimated by solving a sequence of maximum value problems when the impulsive gains are fixed. Both community networks without and with coupling delay are considered. Based on the Lyapunov function method and mathematical analysis technique, two synchronization criteria are derived. Several numerical examples are performed to verify the effectiveness of the derived theoretical results.

  4. Impulsive stabilization and impulsive synchronization of discrete-time delayed neural networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wu-Hua; Lu, Xiaomei; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates the problems of impulsive stabilization and impulsive synchronization of discrete-time delayed neural networks (DDNNs). Two types of DDNNs with stabilizing impulses are studied. By introducing the time-varying Lyapunov functional to capture the dynamical characteristics of discrete-time impulsive delayed neural networks (DIDNNs) and by using a convex combination technique, new exponential stability criteria are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities. The stability criteria for DIDNNs are independent of the size of time delay but rely on the lengths of impulsive intervals. With the newly obtained stability results, sufficient conditions on the existence of linear-state feedback impulsive controllers are derived. Moreover, a novel impulsive synchronization scheme for two identical DDNNs is proposed. The novel impulsive synchronization scheme allows synchronizing two identical DDNNs with unknown delays. Simulation results are given to validate the effectiveness of the proposed criteria of impulsive stabilization and impulsive synchronization of DDNNs. Finally, an application of the obtained impulsive synchronization result for two identical chaotic DDNNs to a secure communication scheme is presented.

  5. Impulsive synchronization of fractional Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy complex networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weiyuan; Li, Changpin; Wu, Yujiang

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on impulsive synchronization of fractional Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy complex networks. A novel comparison principle is built for the fractional impulsive system. Then a synchronization criterion is established for the fractional T-S fuzzy complex networks by utilizing the comparison principle. The method is also illustrated by applying the fractional T-S fuzzy Rössler's complex networks. PMID:27586628

  6. Synchronization of Memristor-Based Coupling Recurrent Neural Networks With Time-Varying Delays and Impulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Chuandong; Huang, Tingwen; He, Xing

    2015-12-01

    Synchronization of an array of linearly coupled memristor-based recurrent neural networks with impulses and time-varying delays is investigated in this brief. Based on the Lyapunov function method, an extended Halanay differential inequality and a new delay impulsive differential inequality, some sufficient conditions are derived, which depend on impulsive and coupling delays to guarantee the exponential synchronization of the memristor-based recurrent neural networks. Impulses with and without delay and time-varying delay are considered for modeling the coupled neural networks simultaneously, which renders more practical significance of our current research. Finally, numerical simulations are given to verify the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  7. Exponential synchronization for fuzzy cellular neural networks with time-varying delays and nonlinear impulsive effects.

    PubMed

    Pu, Hao; Liu, Yanmin; Jiang, Haijun; Hu, Cheng

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the globally exponential synchronization of delayed fuzzy cellular neural networks with nonlinear impulsive effects are concerned. By utilizing inequality techniques and Lyapunov functional method, some sufficient conditions on the exponential synchronization are obtained based on [Formula: see text]-norm. Finally, a simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  8. Impulsive synchronization of coupled dynamical networks with nonidentical Duffing oscillators and coupling delays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengxin; Duan, Zhisheng; Cao, Jinde

    2012-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate the synchronization problem of coupled dynamical networks with nonidentical Duffing-type oscillators without or with coupling delays. Different from cluster synchronization of nonidentical dynamical networks in the previous literature, this paper focuses on the problem of complete synchronization, which is more challenging than cluster synchronization. By applying an impulsive controller, some sufficient criteria are obtained for complete synchronization of the coupled dynamical networks of nonidentical oscillators. Furthermore, numerical simulations are given to verify the theoretical results. PMID:22463016

  9. Impulsive synchronization schemes of stochastic complex networks with switching topology: average time approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaojie; Yu, Wenwu; Huang, Tingwen

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a novel impulsive control law is proposed for synchronization of stochastic discrete complex networks with time delays and switching topologies, where average dwell time and average impulsive interval are taken into account. The side effect of time delays is estimated by Lyapunov-Razumikhin technique, which quantitatively gives the upper bound to increase the rate of Lyapunov function. By considering the compensation of decreasing interval, a better impulsive control law is recast in terms of average dwell time and average impulsive interval. Detailed results from a numerical illustrative example are presented and discussed. Finally, some relevant conclusions are drawn.

  10. Impulsive practical tracking synchronization of networked uncertain Lagrangian systems without and with time-delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Mihua; Zhou, Jin; Cai, Jianping

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a procedure for studying tracking synchronization of networked Lagrangian systems via impulsive control, where each agent is allowed to be nonidentical, even uncertain dynamics. Some algebraic criteria for tracking synchronization without and with time-delays are established respectively. It turns out that these criteria can provide a novel impulsive control strategy to synchronize globally networked Lagrangian systems to a given time-varying target trajectory with a desired tracking error bound (called as practical tracking synchronization). A distinctive feature of the developed control strategy is fully to take into account the effects of impulsive constraints, and thereby to yield impulsive synchronization motion of networked Lagrangian systems, provided that each agent instantaneously interacts with its neighbors only at some discrete moments. As a direct application of the theoretical results, practical tracking synchronization of nonidentical 3-DOF mobile robots without and with time-delays is discussed in detail. Simulation results illustrate and visualize the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed control technique.

  11. Impulsive control of stochastic systems with applications in chaos control, chaos synchronization, and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunguang; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    Real systems are often subject to both noise perturbations and impulsive effects. In this paper, we study the stability and stabilization of systems with both noise perturbations and impulsive effects. In other words, we generalize the impulsive control theory from the deterministic case to the stochastic case. The method is based on extending the comparison method to the stochastic case. The method presented in this paper is general and easy to apply. Theoretical results on both stability in the pth mean and stability with disturbance attenuation are derived. To show the effectiveness of the basic theory, we apply it to the impulsive control and synchronization of chaotic systems with noise perturbations, and to the stability of impulsive stochastic neural networks. Several numerical examples are also presented to verify the theoretical results.

  12. Tomographic reconstruction of the pulse-echo spatiotemporal impulse response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nghia Q.; Abbey, Craig K.; Yapp, Rebecca D.; Insana, Michael F.

    2010-03-01

    Virtually every area of ultrasonic imaging research requires accurate estimation of the spatiotemporal impulse response of the instrument, and yet accurate measurements are difficult to achieve. The impulse response can also be difficult to predict numerically for a specific device because small unknown perturbations in array properties can generate significant changes in predicted pulse-echo field patterns. A typical measurement for a 1-D array transducer employs a line scatterer oriented perpendicular to the scan plane. Echoes from line scatterers located throughout the field of view constitute estimates of shift-varying line response functions. We propose an inverse-problem approach to the reconstruction of point-spread functions from line-spread functions. A collection of echoes recorded for a range of line-scatterer rotation angles are treated as projections of sound pressure onto the transducer array surface. Although the reconstruction is mathematically equivalent to filtered backprojection, it provides significant advantages with respect to interpolation that confound straightforward implementations. Field II predictions used to model measurements made on commercial systems suggest the reconstruction accuracy is with 0.32% for noiseless echo data. Application of the method to data acquired from a commercial system are evaluated from the perspective of deconvolution.

  13. Anti-phase synchronization and symmetry-breaking bifurcation of impulsively coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Haibo; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Liping; Yu, Jianjiang

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the synchronization in two mechanical oscillators coupled by impacts which can be considered as a class of state-dependent impulsively coupled oscillators. The two identical oscillators are harmonically excited in a counter phase, and the synchronous (anti-phase synchronization) and the asynchronous motions are considered. One- and two-parameter bifurcations of the system have been studied by varying the amplitude and the frequency of external excitation. Numerical simulations show that the system could exhibit complex phenomena, including symmetry and asymmetry periodic solutions, quasi-periodic solutions and chaotic solutions. In particular, the regimes in anti-phase synchronization are identified, and it is found that the symmetry-breaking bifurcation plays an important role in the transition from synchronous to asynchronous motion.

  14. A novel adaptive-impulsive synchronization of fractional-order chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Y. T. Andrew; Li, Xian-Feng; Chu, Yan-Dong; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    A novel adaptive-impulsive scheme is proposed for synchronizing fractional-order chaotic systems without the necessity of knowing the attractors’ bounds in priori. The nonlinear functions in these systems are supposed to satisfy local Lipschitz conditions but which are estimated with adaptive laws. The novelty is that the combination of adaptive control and impulsive control offers a control strategy gathering the advantages of both. In order to guarantee the convergence is no less than an expected exponential rate, a combined feedback strength design is created such that the symmetric axis can shift freely according to the updated transient feedback strength. All of the unknown Lipschitz constants are also updated exponentially in the meantime of achieving synchronization. Two different fractional-order chaotic systems are employed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the novel adaptive-impulsive control scheme. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundations of China (Grant Nos. 11161027 and 11262009), the Key Natural Science Foundation of Gansu Province, China (Grant No. 1104WCGA195), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20136204110001).

  15. pth moment exponential stochastic synchronization of coupled memristor-based neural networks with mixed delays via delayed impulsive control.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinsong; Cao, Jinde; Qiu, Jianlong

    2015-05-01

    This paper concerns the pth moment synchronization in an array of generally coupled memristor-based neural networks with time-varying discrete delays, unbounded distributed delays, as well as stochastic perturbations. Hybrid controllers are designed to cope with the uncertainties caused by the state-dependent parameters: (a) state feedback controllers combined with delayed impulsive controller; (b) adaptive controller combined with delayed impulsive controller. Based on an impulsive differential inequality, the properties of random variables, the framework of Filippov solution, and Lyapunov functional method, sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee that the considered coupled memristor-based neural networks can be pth moment globally exponentially synchronized onto an isolated node under both of the two classes of hybrid impulsive controllers. Finally, numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  16. Impulsive synchronization of Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities via multiple integral approach.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, A; Rakkiyappan, R; Cao, Jinde

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies the impulsive synchronization of Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities via multiple integral approach. The array of neural networks are coupled in a random fashion which is governed by Bernoulli random variable. The aim of this paper is to obtain the synchronization criteria, which is suitable for both exactly known and partly unknown transition probabilities such that the coupled neural network is synchronized with mixed time-delay. The considered impulsive effects can be synchronized at partly unknown transition probabilities. Besides, a multiple integral approach is also proposed to strengthen the Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities. By making use of Kronecker product and some useful integral inequalities, a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional was designed for handling the coupled neural network with mixed delay and then impulsive synchronization criteria are solvable in a set of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the theoretical results.

  17. Exponential Synchronization of Coupled Stochastic Memristor-Based Neural Networks With Time-Varying Probabilistic Delay Coupling and Impulsive Delay.

    PubMed

    Bao, Haibo; Park, Ju H; Cao, Jinde

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the exponential synchronization of coupled stochastic memristor-based neural networks with probabilistic time-varying delay coupling and time-varying impulsive delay. There is one probabilistic transmittal delay in the delayed coupling that is translated by a Bernoulli stochastic variable satisfying a conditional probability distribution. The disturbance is described by a Wiener process. Based on Lyapunov functions, Halanay inequality, and linear matrix inequalities, sufficient conditions that depend on the probability distribution of the delay coupling and the impulsive delay were obtained. Numerical simulations are used to show the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  18. Exponential synchronization of discontinuous neural networks with time-varying mixed delays via state feedback and impulsive control.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinsong; Cao, Jinde; Ho, Daniel W C

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates drive-response synchronization for a class of neural networks with time-varying discrete and distributed delays (mixed delays) as well as discontinuous activations. Strict mathematical proof shows the global existence of Filippov solutions to neural networks with discontinuous activation functions and the mixed delays. State feedback controller and impulsive controller are designed respectively to guarantee global exponential synchronization of the neural networks. By using Lyapunov function and new analysis techniques, several new synchronization criteria are obtained. Moreover, lower bound on the convergence rate is explicitly estimated when state feedback controller is utilized. Results of this paper are new and some existing ones are extended and improved. Finally, numerical simulations are given to verify the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  19. Reconstruction of time-delay systems using small impulsive disturbances.

    PubMed

    Prokhorov, M D; Ponomarenko, V I

    2009-12-01

    We propose a method for the reconstruction of time-delayed feedback systems from time series. The method is based on the analysis of the system response to a weak external disturbance having the form of rectangular pulses. To apply the method one must have access to the state variable of the system in order to perturb it and the time series of the driving signal and the system response having at least about one hundred points on the time interval equal to the delay time. The method is intended to recover delays in low-order time-delay systems performing periodic oscillations, but can also be applied to systems in chaotic regimes in the presence of high level of noise. We verify the method by applying it to both numerical and experimental data.

  20. Tomographic reconstruction of indoor spatial temperature distributions using room impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleisteiner, M.; Barth, M.; Raabe, A.

    2016-03-01

    Temperature can be estimated by acoustic travel time measurements along known sound paths. By using a multitude of known sound paths in combination with a tomographic reconstruction technique a spatial and temporal resolution of the temperature field can be achieved. Based on it, this article focuses on an experimental method in order to determine the spatially differentiated development of room temperature with only one loudspeaker and one microphone. The theory of geometrical room acoustics is being used to identify sound paths under consideration of reflections. The travel time along a specific sound path is derived from the room impulse response. Temporal variances in room impulse response can be attributed primarily to a change in air temperature and airflow. It is shown that in the absence of airflow a 3D acoustic monitoring of the room temperature can be realized with a fairly limited use of hardware.

  1. Where the ocean influences the impulse response and its effect on synchronous changes of acoustic travel time.

    PubMed

    Spiesberger, John L

    2011-12-01

    In 1983, sounds at 133 Hz, 0.06 s resolution were transmitted in the Pacific for five days at 2 min intervals over 3709 km between bottom-mounted instruments maintained with atomic clocks. In 1989, a technique was developed to measure changes in acoustic travel time with an accuracy of 135 microseconds at 2 min intervals for selected windows of travel time within the impulse response. The data have short-lived 1 to 10 ms oscillations of travel time with periods less than a few days. Excluding tidal effects, different windows exhibited significant synchronized changes in travel time for periods shorter than 10 h. In the 1980s, this phenomenon was not understood because internal waves have correlation lengths of a few kilometers which are smaller than the way sound was thought to sample the ocean along well-separated and distinct rays corresponding to different windows. The paradox's resolution comes from modern theories that replace the ray-picture with finite wavelength representations that predict sound can be influenced in the upper ocean over horizontal scales such as 20 km or more. Thus, different windows are influenced by the same short-scale fluctuations of sound speed. This conclusion is supported by the data and numerical simulations of the impulse response.

  2. Application of damage detection methods using passive reconstruction of impulse response functions.

    PubMed

    Tippmann, J D; Zhu, X; Lanza di Scalea, F

    2015-02-28

    In structural health monitoring (SHM), using only the existing noise has long been an attractive goal. The advances in understanding cross-correlations in ambient noise in the past decade, as well as new understanding in damage indication and other advanced signal processing methods, have continued to drive new research into passive SHM systems. Because passive systems take advantage of the existing noise mechanisms in a structure, offshore wind turbines are a particularly attractive application due to the noise created from the various aerodynamic and wave loading conditions. Two damage detection methods using a passively reconstructed impulse response function, or Green's function, are presented. Damage detection is first studied using the reciprocity of the impulse response functions, where damage introduces new nonlinearities that break down the similarity in the causal and anticausal wave components. Damage detection and localization are then studied using a matched-field processing technique that aims to spatially locate sources that identify a change in the structure. Results from experiments conducted on an aluminium plate and wind turbine blade with simulated damage are also presented. PMID:25583863

  3. Application of damage detection methods using passive reconstruction of impulse response functions.

    PubMed

    Tippmann, J D; Zhu, X; Lanza di Scalea, F

    2015-02-28

    In structural health monitoring (SHM), using only the existing noise has long been an attractive goal. The advances in understanding cross-correlations in ambient noise in the past decade, as well as new understanding in damage indication and other advanced signal processing methods, have continued to drive new research into passive SHM systems. Because passive systems take advantage of the existing noise mechanisms in a structure, offshore wind turbines are a particularly attractive application due to the noise created from the various aerodynamic and wave loading conditions. Two damage detection methods using a passively reconstructed impulse response function, or Green's function, are presented. Damage detection is first studied using the reciprocity of the impulse response functions, where damage introduces new nonlinearities that break down the similarity in the causal and anticausal wave components. Damage detection and localization are then studied using a matched-field processing technique that aims to spatially locate sources that identify a change in the structure. Results from experiments conducted on an aluminium plate and wind turbine blade with simulated damage are also presented.

  4. Are executive function and impulsivity antipodes? A conceptual reconstruction with special reference to addiction

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, Warren K.; Jarmolowicz, David P.; Mueller, E. Terry; Gatchalian, Kirstin M.; McClure, Samuel M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Although there is considerable interest in how either executive function (EF) or impulsivity relate to addiction, there is little apparent overlap between these research areas. Objectives The present paper aims to determine if components of these two constructs are conceptual antipodes—widely separated on a shared continuum. Methods EFs and impulsivities were compared and contrasted. Specifically, the definitions of the components of EF and impulsivity, the methods used to measure the various components, the populations of drug users that show deficits in these components, and the neural substrates of these components were compared and contrasted. Results Each component of impulsivity had an antipode in EF. EF, however, covered a wider range of phenomena, including compulsivity. Conclusions Impulsivity functions as an antipode of certain components of EF. Recognition of the relationship between EF and impulsivity may inform the scientific inquiry of behavioral problems such as addiction. Other theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:22441659

  5. Synchronization between EMG at Different Uterine Locations Investigated Using Time-Frequency Ridge Reconstruction: Comparison of Pregnancy and Labor Contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrien, Jérémy; Steingrimsdottir, Thora; Marque, Catherine; Karlsson, Brynjar

    2010-12-01

    The extraction of the frequency components of a signal can be useful for the characterization of the underlying system. One method for isolating a frequency component of a signal is by the extraction and reconstruction of the local maxima or ridge of its time-frequency representation. We compare here the performances of two well-known ridge reconstruction methods, namely the Carmona and Marseille methods, on synthetic signals as well as real electrohysterogram (EHG). We show that Carmona's method presents lower reconstruction errors. We then used the separately reconstructed frequency components of the EHG independently for labor prediction using a synchronization measure. We show that the proposed synchronization parameters present similar prediction rate to classical parameters obtained directly from the time-frequency representation but also seem to provide information complementary to the classical parameters and may thus improve the accuracy in labor prediction when they are used jointly.

  6. Mode shape reconstruction of an impulse excited structure using continuous scanning laser Doppler vibrometer and empirical mode decomposition.

    PubMed

    Kyong, Yongsoo; Kim, Daesung; Dayou, Jedol; Park, Kyihwan; Wang, Semyung

    2008-07-01

    For vibration testing, discrete types of scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) have been developed and have proven to be very useful. For complex structures, however, SLDV takes considerable time to scan the surface of structures and require large amounts of data storage. To overcome these problems, a continuous scan was introduced as an alternative. In this continuous method, the Chebyshev demodulation (or polynomial) technique and the Hilbert transform approach have been used for mode shape reconstruction with harmonic excitation. As an alternative, in this paper, the Hilbert-Huang transform approach is applied to impact excitation cases in terms of a numerical approach, where the vibration of the tested structure is modeled using impulse response functions. In order to verify this technique, a clamped-clamped beam was chosen as the test rig in the numerical simulation and real experiment. This paper shows that with additional innovative steps of using ideal bandpass filters and nodal point determination in the postprocessing, the Hilbert-Huang transformation can be used to create a better mode shape reconstruction even in the impact excitation case.

  7. [Biological effects of smog. VIII. Impulse cytophotometric cell cycle analysis of synchronized Syrian hamster kidney cell cultures (line 14-b)].

    PubMed

    Giebel, P; Seemayer, N H

    1984-10-01

    Syrian hamster kidney cultures of line 14-1b were synchronized by excess of thymidine. Thereafter in the phase of DNA synthesis cell cultures were exposed to extract and fractions of city smog, derived from a polluted area at the river Rhine and Ruhr. Using impulscytophotometry and estimation of mitotic frequency cell cycle analyses were conducted on synchronized exposed and control cultures. The total extract obtained by methanol treatment of city smog was further fractionated by organic solvents leading to fractions of cyclohexane, polyaromates and propanol. Cell cycle progression of synchronized cultures was inhibited in a dose dependent manner by increasing concentration of city smog extract and its fractions. This inhibition led to a prolongation of DNA synthetic phase and to an accumulation of cells in G2(+ M)-phase. The total cell cycle showed a prolongation of 3-5 h. The strongest effect was induced by the total extract. We have to emphasize that already amounts of city smog which were found in air volumes of 2-5 m3 exerted strong effects. With a declining sequence of toxicity followed the fractions of cyclohexane, propanol and of polyaromates. Our results show, that samples of city smog from polluted areas contain substances which induce heavy alterations in cell cycle progression of mammalian cells in vitro. These highly effective toxic substances are dangerous for human health, especially after a long-time exposition.

  8. Sensing through the wall imaging using the Army Research Lab ultra-wideband synchronous impulse reconstruction (UWB SIRE) radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lam; Ressler, Marc; Sichina, Jeffrey

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), as part of a mission and customer funded exploratory program, has developed a new low-frequency, ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The radar is capable of penetrating enclosed areas (buildings) and generating SAR imagery. This supports the U.S. Army's need for intelligence on the configuration, content, and human presence inside these enclosed areas. The radar system is mounted on a ground based vehicle traveling along the road and is configured with an array of antennas pointing toward the enclosed areas of interest. This paper will describe an experiment conducted recently at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland. In this paper we briefly describe the UWB SIRE radar and the test setup in the experiment. We will also describe the signal processing and the image techniques used to produce the SAR imagery. Finally, we will present SAR imagery of the building and its internal structure from different viewing directions.

  9. Reconstruction of sound quadratic properties from non-synchronous measurements with insufficient or without references: Proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, Jerome; Liang, Yu; Leclère, Quentin

    2015-08-01

    In inverse acoustics, the reconstruction of (distant) sound fields from microphone array measurements is fundamentally limited by the size of the array and by the microphone density. One approach to simulate large arrays and/or high microphone density is to scan the object of interest by sequentially moving a small prototype array. This typically requires a sufficient number of high-quality fixed references in order to preserve the phase relationships between consecutive snapshots or that measurements are made in the near-field in order to allow the successive reconstruction of local "patches" of the source by deliberately neglecting waves not radiating through the array (patch holography). In the present work, a solution is introduced to reconstruct the quadratic properties (e.g. source power, quadratic flux, sound intensity) of the radiating object from non-synchronous (sequential) measurements when references are insufficient in quantity or in quality. Remarkably, it also operates without any reference at all in certain conditions. It relies on the assumptions that the sound field is (i) stationary and (ii) spatially correlated and boils down to the factorization of a structured covariance matrix. This is undertaken within a Bayesian probabilistic approach where the source field is encoded by unobservable latent variables which are iteratively reconstructed by using the Expected-Maximization (EM) algorithm. The method is shown to return virtually similar results as if all data were captured simultaneously-or sequentially with sufficient high-quality references. As a consequence, it bears an advantage in terms of cost and simplicity. In addition, it is ultimately able to synthesize statistically equivalent realizations of the source field, which may turn out useful for numerical simulation of sound propagation. A solution is also provided within the Bayesian framework for automatically setting the regularization parameter to its optimal value.

  10. Cyclic reconstruction of 4D retinal blood flow with pulse synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoll, Tilman; Lasser, Theo; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2009-02-01

    Doppler OCT systems allow nowadays to visualize quantitative and qualitative angiographic maps of retinal tissue. We equipped the instrument with a pulse oximeter and recorded the pulse synchronously with the resonant Doppler flow data. Recombination of tomograms according to the heart beat cycles yields full volumes for each cycle instant. We believe such multi-dimensional functional information and the ability to monitor dynamic processes over time to open exciting perspectives that ultimately contribute to a better understanding of retinal physiology and patho-physiology in-vivo.

  11. Reconstruction of complex networks with delays and noise perturbation based on generalized outer synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiang; Chen, Shihua; Lu, Jun-an; Ning, Di

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes an approach to identify the topological structure and unknown system parameters of a weighted complex dynamical network with delay and noise perturbation. Based on the Barbalat-type invariance principle for stochastic differential equations, an effective adaptive feedback technique with an updated law is developed to realize generalized outer synchronization. The unknown topological structure and parameters are identified simultaneously through the established technique. The weight configuration matrix was found to be unnecessarily symmetric. Numerical examples are examined to illustrate the effectiveness of the analytical results.

  12. Instantaneous Impulses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlichson, Herman

    2000-01-01

    Describes an experiment that extends Newton's instantaneous-impulse method of orbital analysis to a graphical method of orbit determination. Discusses the experiment's usefulness for teaching both horizontal projectile motion and instantaneous impulse. (WRM)

  13. Synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON): A statistical model based iterative image reconstruction method to eliminate limited-view artifacts and to mitigate the temporal-average artifacts in time-resolved CT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Li, Yinsheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In x-ray computed tomography (CT), a violation of the Tuy data sufficiency condition leads to limited-view artifacts. In some applications, it is desirable to use data corresponding to a narrow temporal window to reconstruct images with reduced temporal-average artifacts. However, the need to reduce temporal-average artifacts in practice may result in a violation of the Tuy condition and thus undesirable limited-view artifacts. In this paper, the authors present a new iterative reconstruction method, synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON), to eliminate limited-view artifacts using data acquired within an ultranarrow temporal window that severely violates the Tuy condition. Methods: In time-resolved contrast enhanced CT acquisitions, image contrast dynamically changes during data acquisition. Each image reconstructed from data acquired in a given temporal window represents one time frame and can be denoted as an image vector. Conventionally, each individual time frame is reconstructed independently. In this paper, all image frames are grouped into a spatial–temporal image matrix and are reconstructed together. Rather than the spatial and/or temporal smoothing regularizers commonly used in iterative image reconstruction, the nuclear norm of the spatial–temporal image matrix is used in SMART-RECON to regularize the reconstruction of all image time frames. This regularizer exploits the low-dimensional structure of the spatial–temporal image matrix to mitigate limited-view artifacts when an ultranarrow temporal window is desired in some applications to reduce temporal-average artifacts. Both numerical simulations in two dimensional image slices with known ground truth and in vivo human subject data acquired in a contrast enhanced cone beam CT exam have been used to validate the proposed SMART-RECON algorithm and to demonstrate the initial performance of the algorithm. Reconstruction errors and temporal fidelity

  14. Synchronicity from synchronized chaos

    DOE PAGES

    Duane, Gregory

    2015-04-01

    The synchronization of loosely-coupled chaotic oscillators, a phenomenon investigated intensively for the last two decades, may realize the philosophical concept of “synchronicity”—the commonplace notion that related events mysteriously occur at the same time. When extended to continuous media and/or large discrete arrays, and when general (non-identical) correspondences are considered between states, intermittent synchronous relationships indeed become ubiquitous. Meaningful synchronicity follows naturally if meaningful events are identified with coherent structures, defined by internal synchronization between remote degrees of freedom; a condition that has been posited as necessary for synchronizability with an external system. The important case of synchronization between mind andmore » matter is realized if mind is analogized to a computer model, synchronizing with a sporadically observed system, as in meteorological data assimilation. Evidence for the ubiquity of synchronization is reviewed along with recent proposals that: (1) synchronization of different models of the same objective process may be an expeditious route to improved computational modeling and may also describe the functioning of conscious brains; and (2) the nonlocality in quantum phenomena implied by Bell’s theorem may be explained in a variety of deterministic (hidden variable) interpretations if the quantum world resides on a generalized synchronization “manifold”.« less

  15. Synchronicity from synchronized chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Duane, Gregory

    2015-04-01

    The synchronization of loosely-coupled chaotic oscillators, a phenomenon investigated intensively for the last two decades, may realize the philosophical concept of “synchronicity”—the commonplace notion that related events mysteriously occur at the same time. When extended to continuous media and/or large discrete arrays, and when general (non-identical) correspondences are considered between states, intermittent synchronous relationships indeed become ubiquitous. Meaningful synchronicity follows naturally if meaningful events are identified with coherent structures, defined by internal synchronization between remote degrees of freedom; a condition that has been posited as necessary for synchronizability with an external system. The important case of synchronization between mind and matter is realized if mind is analogized to a computer model, synchronizing with a sporadically observed system, as in meteorological data assimilation. Evidence for the ubiquity of synchronization is reviewed along with recent proposals that: (1) synchronization of different models of the same objective process may be an expeditious route to improved computational modeling and may also describe the functioning of conscious brains; and (2) the nonlocality in quantum phenomena implied by Bell’s theorem may be explained in a variety of deterministic (hidden variable) interpretations if the quantum world resides on a generalized synchronization “manifold”.

  16. [Affective disorders and impulsivity].

    PubMed

    Belzeaux, R; Correard, N; Mazzola-Pomietto, P; Adida, M; Cermolacce, M; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    Impulsivity is a complex and important phenomenon in mood disorders. Impulse control disorders, as defined in DSM, are more frequent in mood disorders especially in Bipolar Disorder type I, and are associated with a more severe course of illness. Dimensional studies demonstrate that impulsivity is a core manifestation of bipolar disorder both as state- and trait-dependent markers in patients. Comorbid substance use disorders are often associated with a higher level of impulsivity whereas the relation between suicidal behaviors and higher impulsivity remains uncertain. Moreover, neuropsychological tests were used to study correlation between clinical impulsivity and laboratory measurements of impulsivity. Level of correlation remains weak and several explanations are proposed in the literature.

  17. Genetics of impulsive behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as the tendency to act without foresight, comprises a multitude of constructs and is associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Dissecting different aspects of impulsive behaviour and relating these to specific neurobiological circuits would improve our understanding of the etiology of complex behaviours for which impulsivity is key, and advance genetic studies in this behavioural domain. In this review, we will discuss the heritability of some impulsivity constructs and their possible use as endophenotypes (heritable, disease-associated intermediate phenotypes). Several functional genetic variants associated with impulsive behaviour have been identified by the candidate gene approach and re-sequencing, and whole genome strategies can be implemented for discovery of novel rare and common alleles influencing impulsivity. Via deep sequencing an uncommon HTR2B stop codon, common in one population, was discovered, with implications for understanding impulsive behaviour in both humans and rodents and for future gene discovery. PMID:23440466

  18. Impulsive action: emotional impulses and their control

    PubMed Central

    Frijda, Nico H.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Rietveld, Erik

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel theoretical view on impulsive action, integrating thus far separate perspectives on non-reflective action, motivation, emotion regulation, and impulse control. We frame impulsive action in terms of directedness of the individual organism toward, away, or against other givens – toward future states and away from one’s present state. First, appraisal of a perceived or thought-of event or object on occasion, rapidly and without premonition or conscious deliberation, triggers a motive to modify one’s relation to that event or object. Situational specifics of the event as perceived and appraised motivate and guide selection of readiness for a particular kind of purposive action. Second, perception of complex situations can give rise to multiple appraisals, multiple motives, and multiple simultaneous changes in action readiness. Multiple states of action readiness may interact in generating action, by reinforcing or attenuating each other, thereby yielding impulse control. We show how emotion control can itself result from a motive state or state of action readiness. Our view links impulsive action mechanistically to states of action readiness, which is the central feature of what distinguishes one kind of emotion from another. It thus provides a novel theoretical perspective to the somewhat fragmented literature on impulsive action. PMID:24917835

  19. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  20. Impulsivity and Academic Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderman, Eric M.; Cupp, Pamela K.; Lane, Derek

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relations between academic cheating and impulsivity in a large sample of adolescents enrolled in high school health education classes. Results indicated that impulsivity predicts academic cheating for students who report extensive involvement in cheating. However, students who engage in extensive cheating are less likely…

  1. Rethinking Impulsivity in Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klonsky, E. David; May, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Elevated impulsivity is thought to facilitate the transition from suicidal thoughts to suicidal behavior. Therefore, impulsivity should distinguish those who have attempted suicide (attempters) from those who have only considered suicide (ideators-only). This hypothesis was examined in three large nonclinical samples: (1) 2,011 military recruits,…

  2. Rethinking impulsivity in suicide.

    PubMed

    Klonsky, E David; May, Alexis

    2010-12-01

    Elevated impulsivity is thought to facilitate the transition from suicidal thoughts to suicidal behavior. Therefore, impulsivity should distinguish those who have attempted suicide (attempters) from those who have only considered suicide (ideators-only). This hypothesis was examined in three large nonclinical samples: (1) 2,011 military recruits, (2) 1,296 college students, and (3) 399 high school students. In sample 1, contrary to traditional models of suicide risk, a unidimensional measure of impulsivity failed to distinguish attempters from ideators-only. In samples 2 and 3, which were administered a multidimensional measure of impulsivity (i.e., the UPPS impulsive behavior scale; Whiteside & Lynam, 2001), different impulsivity-related traits characterized attempters and ideators-only. Whereas both attempters and ideators-only exhibited high urgency (the tendency to act impulsive in the face of negative emotions), only attempters exhibited poor premeditation (a diminished ability to think through the consequences of one's actions). Neither attempters nor ideators-only exhibited high sensation seeking or lack of perseverance. Future research should continue to distinguish impulsivity-related traits that predict suicide ideation from those that predict suicide attempts, and models of suicide risk should be revised accordingly. PMID:21198330

  3. Impulsiveness in professional fighters.

    PubMed

    Banks, Sarah J; Mayer, Brittany; Obuchowski, Nancy; Shin, Wanyong; Lowe, Mark; Phillips, Michael; Modic, Michael; Bernick, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Sports involving repeated head trauma are associated with risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Among the behavioral manifestations of CTE is increased impulsiveness. Here, the authors investigate the relationship between impulsiveness and exposure to head trauma in a large group of active professional fighters. Fighters tended to report less impulsiveness than did non-fighting control respondents. Overall, greater fight exposure was associated with higher levels of a specific form of impulsiveness, although there were differences between mixed martial arts fighters and boxers. Fight exposure was associated with reduction in volume of certain brain structures, and these changes were also associated with impulsiveness patterns. Longitudinal studies of professional fighters are important to understand the risk for neuropsychiatric problems. PMID:24515676

  4. Impulse-induced localized control of chaos in starlike networks.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Ricardo; Palmero, Faustino; Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Locally decreasing the impulse transmitted by periodic pulses is shown to be a reliable method of taming chaos in starlike networks of dissipative nonlinear oscillators, leading to both synchronous periodic states and equilibria (oscillation death). Specifically, the paradigmatic model of damped kicked rotators is studied in which it is assumed that when the rotators are driven synchronously, i.e., all driving pulses transmit the same impulse, the networks display chaotic dynamics. It is found that the taming effect of decreasing the impulse transmitted by the pulses acting on particular nodes strongly depends on their number and degree of connectivity. A theoretical analysis is given explaining the basic physical mechanism as well as the main features of the chaos-control scenario. PMID:27415258

  5. Impulse-induced localized control of chaos in starlike networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón, Ricardo; Palmero, Faustino; Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Locally decreasing the impulse transmitted by periodic pulses is shown to be a reliable method of taming chaos in starlike networks of dissipative nonlinear oscillators, leading to both synchronous periodic states and equilibria (oscillation death). Specifically, the paradigmatic model of damped kicked rotators is studied in which it is assumed that when the rotators are driven synchronously, i.e., all driving pulses transmit the same impulse, the networks display chaotic dynamics. It is found that the taming effect of decreasing the impulse transmitted by the pulses acting on particular nodes strongly depends on their number and degree of connectivity. A theoretical analysis is given explaining the basic physical mechanism as well as the main features of the chaos-control scenario.

  6. Impulse-induced localized control of chaos in starlike networks.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Ricardo; Palmero, Faustino; Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Locally decreasing the impulse transmitted by periodic pulses is shown to be a reliable method of taming chaos in starlike networks of dissipative nonlinear oscillators, leading to both synchronous periodic states and equilibria (oscillation death). Specifically, the paradigmatic model of damped kicked rotators is studied in which it is assumed that when the rotators are driven synchronously, i.e., all driving pulses transmit the same impulse, the networks display chaotic dynamics. It is found that the taming effect of decreasing the impulse transmitted by the pulses acting on particular nodes strongly depends on their number and degree of connectivity. A theoretical analysis is given explaining the basic physical mechanism as well as the main features of the chaos-control scenario.

  7. Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Lü, Jinhu; Chen, Shihua; Yu, Xinghuo

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

  8. Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wen; Lü, Jinhu; Chen, Shihua; Yu, Xinghuo

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

  9. Synchronous demodulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A synchronous demodulator includes a switch which is operated in synchronism with an incoming periodic signal and both divides and applies that signal to two signal channels. The two channels each include a network for computing and holding, for a predetermined length of time, the average signal value on that channel and applies those valves, in the form of two other signals, to the inputs of a differential amplifier. The networks may be R-C networks. The output of the differential amplifier may or may not form the output of the synchronous detector and may or may not be filtered. The output will not include a periodic signal due to the presence of a dc offset. Additionally, the output will not contain any substantial ripple due to periodic components in the input signal. In a somewhat more complex version, containing twice the structural components of the above synchronous demodulator with a more complex switching mechanism, essentially all ripple due to periodic components in the input signal are eliminated.

  10. Synchronizing Fireflies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Ying; Gall, Walter; Nabb, Karen Mayumi

    2006-01-01

    "Imagine a tenth of a mile of river front with an unbroken line of trees with fireflies on ever leaf flashing in synchronism. ... Then, if one's imagination is sufficiently vivid, he may form some conception of this amazing spectacle." So wrote the naturalist Hugh Smith. In this article we consider how one might model mathematically the…

  11. Irresistible impulse: psychiatric viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Weil, F

    1989-01-01

    The responses of the psychiatric profession to the legal criteria applied to irresistible impulse in cases of psychotic offenders are examined. An illustrative case, and its legal consequences, support the desirability of the psychiatric approach.

  12. Impulsivity and methamphetamine use.

    PubMed

    Semple, Shirley J; Zians, Jim; Grant, Igor; Patterson, Thomas L

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between methamphetamine (meth) use and impulsivity in a sample of 385 HIV-negative heterosexually identified meth users. Participants who scored highest on a self-report measure of impulsivity were compared with those who scored lower in terms of background characteristics, meth use patterns, use of alcohol and other illicit drugs, sexual risk behavior, and psychiatric health variables. Methamphetamine users in the high impulsivity group were younger, less educated, used larger quantities of meth, were more likely to be binge users, had a larger number of sexual partners, engaged in more unprotected vaginal and oral sex, and scored higher on the Beck Depression Inventory as compared with those in the low impulsivity group. In a logistic regression analysis, Beck depression was the factor that best distinguished between meth users who scored high and those who scored low on impulsivity. Neurophysiological pathways that may underlie the relationship between impulsivity and meth use are discussed. PMID:16135337

  13. Channel Modeling and Time Delay Estimation for Clock Synchronization Among Seaweb Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, P; Rice, J; Clark, G A

    2012-07-08

    From simulations, tracking of the impulse response is feasible. Potential to benefit other functions such as ranging between two nodes. Potential to combine the features of different protocols to create a new and more realistic clock-synchronization protocol.

  14. Optically measured explosive impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, Matthew M.; McNesby, Kevin L.

    2014-06-01

    An experimental technique is investigated to optically measure the explosive impulse produced by laboratory-scale spherical charges detonated in air. Explosive impulse has historically been calculated from temporal pressure measurements obtained via piezoelectric transducers. The presented technique instead combines schlieren flow visualization and high-speed digital imaging to optically measure explosive impulse. Prior to an explosive event, schlieren system calibration is performed using known light-ray refractions and resulting digital image intensities. Explosive charges are detonated in the test section of a schlieren system and imaged by a high-speed digital camera in pseudo-streak mode. Spatiotemporal schlieren intensity maps are converted using an Abel deconvolution, Rankine-Hugoniot jump equations, ideal gas law, triangular temperature decay profile, and Schardin's standard photometric technique to yield spatiotemporal pressure maps. Temporal integration of individual pixel pressure profiles over the positive pressure duration of the shock wave yields the explosive impulse generated for a given radial standoff. Calculated explosive impulses are shown to exhibit good agreement between optically derived values and pencil gage pressure transducers.

  15. Impulse-Momentum Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengrant, David

    2011-01-01

    Multiple representations are a valuable tool to help students learn and understand physics concepts. Furthermore, representations help students learn how to think and act like real scientists.2 These representations include: pictures, free-body diagrams,3 energy bar charts,4 electrical circuits, and, more recently, computer simulations and animations.5 However, instructors have limited choices when they want to help their students understand impulse and momentum. One of the only available options is the impulse-momentum bar chart.6 The bar charts can effectively show the magnitude of the momentum as well as help students understand conservation of momentum, but they do not easily show the actual direction. This paper highlights a new representation instructors can use to help their students with momentum and impulse—the impulse-momentum diagram (IMD).

  16. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, S.K.

    1993-12-21

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring. 4 figures.

  17. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Stanley K.

    1993-01-01

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring.

  18. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes.

  19. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-10-10

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes. 9 figs.

  20. Relativistic impulse dynamics.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Classical electrodynamics has some annoying rough edges. The self-energy of charges is infinite without a cutoff. The calculation of relativistic trajectories is difficult because of retardation and an average radiation reaction term. By reconceptuallizing electrodynamics in terms of exchanges of impulses rather than describing it by forces and potentials, we eliminate these problems. A fully relativistic theory using photonlike null impulses is developed. Numerical calculations for a two-body, one-impulse-in-transit model are discussed. A simple relationship between center-of-mass scattering angle and angular momentum was found. It reproduces the Rutherford cross section at low velocities and agrees with the leading term of relativistic distinguishable-particle quantum cross sections (Møller, Mott) when the distance of closest approach is larger than the Compton wavelength of the particle. Magnetism emerges as a consequence of viewing retarded and advanced interactions from the vantage point of an instantaneous radius vector. Radiation reaction becomes the local conservation of energy-momentum between the radiating particle and the emitted impulse. A net action is defined that could be used in developing quantum dynamics without potentials. A reinterpretation of Newton's laws extends them to relativistic motion.

  1. [Obsession-impulsion infanticide].

    PubMed

    Gourévitch, Michel

    2006-01-01

    In 1836, the case-history of a young mother, the victim of a phobia of the impulsion to murder her infant. Esquirol considers her case as one of homocidial monomania, and classifies her among psychotic patients who have actually killed.

  2. Irresistible impulse: legal viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Borichansky, L

    1989-01-01

    The legal point of view concerning irresistible impulse as an exemption from criminal liability is discussed. A defendant who pleads that at the time of committing an illegal act he was suffering from a mental disease must prove to the court that his version is the most possible one.

  3. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  4. Development of Network Synchronization Predicts Language Abilities.

    PubMed

    Doesburg, Sam M; Tingling, Keriann; MacDonald, Matt J; Pang, Elizabeth W

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization of oscillations among brain areas is understood to mediate network communication supporting cognition, perception, and language. How task-dependent synchronization during word production develops throughout childhood and adolescence, as well as how such network coherence is related to the development of language abilities, remains poorly understood. To address this, we recorded magnetoencephalography while 73 participants aged 4-18 years performed a verb generation task. Atlas-guided source reconstruction was performed, and phase synchronization among regions was calculated. Task-dependent increases in synchronization were observed in the theta, alpha, and beta frequency ranges, and network synchronization differences were observed between age groups. Task-dependent synchronization was strongest in the theta band, as were differences between age groups. Network topologies were calculated for brain regions associated with verb generation and were significantly associated with both age and language abilities. These findings establish the maturational trajectory of network synchronization underlying expressive language abilities throughout childhood and adolescence and provide the first evidence for an association between large-scale neurophysiological network synchronization and individual differences in the development of language abilities.

  5. Impulsive phase transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Bely-Dubau, Francoise; Brown, John C.; Dulk, George A.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Enome, Shinzo; Gabriel, Alan H.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Melrose, Donald; Neidig, Donald F.

    1986-01-01

    The transport of nonthermal electrons is explored. The thick-target electron beam model, in which electrons are presumed to be accelerated in the corona and typically thermalized primarily in the chromosphere and photosphere, is supported by observations throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. At the highest energies, the anisotropy of gamma-ray emission above 10 MeV clearly indicates that these photons are emitted by anisotropically-directed particles. The timing of this high-energy gamma-radiation with respect to lower-energy hard X-radiation implies that the energetic particles have short life-times. For collisional energy loss, this means that they are stopped in the chromosphere or below. Stereoscopic (two-spacecraft) observations at hard X-ray energies (up to 350 keV) imply that these lower-energy (but certainly nonthermal) electrons are also stopped deep in the chromosphere. Hard X-ray images show that, in spatially resolved flares whose radiation consists of impulsive bursts, the impulsive phase starts with X-radiation that comes mostly from the foot-points of coronal loops whose coronal component is outlined by microwaves.

  6. Teaching about Impulse and Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Bill

    2004-01-01

    This American Association of Physics Teachers/Physics Teaching Resource Agents (APPT/PTRA) spiral-bound manual features labs and demos physics teachers can use to give students hands-on opportunities to learn about impulse and momentum. "Make-and-take activities" include AAPT Apparatus Contest winners "An Air Impulse Rocket," "A Fan Driven…

  7. Advanced concepts. [specific impulse, mass drivers, electromagnetic launchers, and the rail gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    The relative strengths of those interactions which enable propulsive forces are listed as well as the specific impulse of various propellants. Graphics show the linear synchronous motor of the mass driver, the principle of the direct current electromagnetic launcher, and the characteristics of the rail gun.

  8. Impulse control in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, G W

    1974-05-01

    Pigeons were given a small, immediate food reinforcement for pecking a key, and a larger, delayed reinforcement for not pecking this key. Most subjects pecked the key on more than 95% of trials. However, when pecking a differently colored key at an earlier time prevented this option from becoming available, three of 10 subjects consistently pecked it, thereby forcing themselves to wait for the larger reward. They did not peck the earlier key when it did not prevent this option. This is an experimental example of psychological impulse and a learnable device to control it. Although only a minority of the subjects learned it, the fact that such learning is possible at all argues for a theory of delayed reward that can predict change of preference as a function of elapsing time.

  9. Recent Insights into the Neurobiology of Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with various psychopathologies, and elevated impulsivity is typically disadvantageous. This manuscript reviews recent investigations into the neurobiology of impulsivity using human imaging techniques and animal models. Both human imaging and preclinical pharmacological manipulations have yielded important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsivity. A more thorough understanding of the complex neurobiology underlying aspects of impulsivity may provide insight into new treatment options that target elevated impulsivity and psychopathologies such as addictions. PMID:25431750

  10. Qualifying an impulse digitizer for measurements in HV impulse tests

    SciTech Connect

    McComb, T.R. ); Kuffel, J. . Research Div.); Malewski, R. ); Schon, K. )

    1990-07-01

    Working groups are presently engaged in preparing a standard on digital recorders for measurement in HV impulse tests. This paper shows how the main tests described in the proposed standard can be applied towards qualifying an impulse digitizer for HV Impulse measurements. Experimental results from the application of these techniques to different digitizers are presented. A major problem in using digital recorders in HV laboratories is electromagnetic interference. Previous low frequency measurements have indicated that high frequencies can be a problem and this paper reports some measurements at high frequencies. The consequences of these measurements for electromagnetic compatibility are discussed.

  11. Inverse anticipating chaos synchronization.

    PubMed

    Shahverdiev, E M; Sivaprakasam, S; Shore, K A

    2002-07-01

    We derive conditions for achieving inverse anticipating synchronization where a driven time-delay chaotic system synchronizes to the inverse future state of the driver. The significance of inverse anticipating chaos in delineating synchronization regimes in time-delay systems is elucidated. The concept is extended to cascaded time-delay systems.

  12. Performance analysis of GPS receivers in impulsive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Amin, Moeness

    2005-06-01

    The use of GPS has broadened to include mounting on or inside manned or autonomous vehicles which makes it subject to interference generated from motor emissions. Many sources of interference are typically modeled as impulsive noise whose characteristics may vary in terms of power, pulse width, and pulse occurrences. In this paper, we examine the effect of impulsive noise on GPS delay lock loops (DLL). We consider the DLL for the GPS Coarse Acquisition code (C/A), which is used in civilian applications, but also needed in military GPS receivers to perform signal acquisition and tracking. We focus on the statistics of the noise components of the early, late, punctual correlators, which contribute to the discriminator error. The discriminator noise components are produced from the correlation between the impulsive noise and the early, late and punctual reference C/A code. Due to long time averaging, these components assume Gaussian distributions. The discriminator error variance is derived, incorporating the front-end precorrelation filter. It is shown that the synchronization error variance is significantly affected by the power of the received impulsive noise, the precorrelation filter, and the sample rate.

  13. The recovery of weak impulsive signals based on stochastic resonance and moving least squares fitting.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kuosheng; Xu, Guanghua; Liang, Lin; Tao, Tangfei; Gu, Fengshou

    2014-07-29

    In this paper a stochastic resonance (SR)-based method for recovering weak impulsive signals is developed for quantitative diagnosis of faults in rotating machinery. It was shown in theory that weak impulsive signals follow the mechanism of SR, but the SR produces a nonlinear distortion of the shape of the impulsive signal. To eliminate the distortion a moving least squares fitting method is introduced to reconstruct the signal from the output of the SR process. This proposed method is verified by comparing its detection results with that of a morphological filter based on both simulated and experimental signals. The experimental results show that the background noise is suppressed effectively and the key features of impulsive signals are reconstructed with a good degree of accuracy, which leads to an accurate diagnosis of faults in roller bearings in a run-to failure test.

  14. A new automatic synchronizer

    SciTech Connect

    Malm, C.F.

    1995-12-31

    A phase lock loop automatic synchronizer, PLLS, matches generator speed starting from dead stop to bus frequency, and then locks the phase difference at zero, thereby maintaining zero slip frequency while the generator breaker is being closed to the bus. The significant difference between the PLLS and a conventional automatic synchronizer is that there is no slip frequency difference between generator and bus. The PLL synchronizer is most advantageous when the penstock pressure fluctuates the grid frequency fluctuates, or both. The PLL synchronizer is relatively inexpensive. Hydroplants with multiple units can economically be equipped with a synchronizer for each unit.

  15. Synchronization of clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitaniak, Marcin; Czolczynski, Krzysztof; Perlikowski, Przemysław; Stefanski, Andrzej; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2012-08-01

    In this report we recall the famous Huygens’ experiment which gave the first evidence of the synchronization phenomenon. We consider the synchronization of two clocks which are accurate (show the same time) but have pendula with different masses. It has been shown that such clocks hanging on the same beam can show the almost complete (in-phase) and almost antiphase synchronizations. By almost complete and almost antiphase synchronization we defined the periodic motion of the pendula in which the phase shift between the displacements of the pendula is respectively close (but not equal) to 0 or π. We give evidence that almost antiphase synchronization was the phenomenon observed by Huygens in XVII century. We support our numerical studies by considering the energy balance in the system and showing how the energy is transferred between the pendula via oscillating beam allowing the pendula’s synchronization. Additionally we discuss the synchronization of a number of different pendulum clocks hanging from a horizontal beam which can roll on the parallel surface. It has been shown that after a transient, different types of synchronization between pendula can be observed; (i) the complete synchronization in which all pendula behave identically, (ii) pendula create three or five clusters of synchronized pendula. We derive the equations for the estimation of the phase differences between phase synchronized clusters. The evidence, why other configurations with a different number of clusters are not observed, is given.

  16. Synchronization of chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pecora, Louis M.; Carroll, Thomas L.

    2015-09-15

    We review some of the history and early work in the area of synchronization in chaotic systems. We start with our own discovery of the phenomenon, but go on to establish the historical timeline of this topic back to the earliest known paper. The topic of synchronization of chaotic systems has always been intriguing, since chaotic systems are known to resist synchronization because of their positive Lyapunov exponents. The convergence of the two systems to identical trajectories is a surprise. We show how people originally thought about this process and how the concept of synchronization changed over the years to a more geometric view using synchronization manifolds. We also show that building synchronizing systems leads naturally to engineering more complex systems whose constituents are chaotic, but which can be tuned to output various chaotic signals. We finally end up at a topic that is still in very active exploration today and that is synchronization of dynamical systems in networks of oscillators.

  17. Synchronization of chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Pecora, Louis M; Carroll, Thomas L

    2015-09-01

    We review some of the history and early work in the area of synchronization in chaotic systems. We start with our own discovery of the phenomenon, but go on to establish the historical timeline of this topic back to the earliest known paper. The topic of synchronization of chaotic systems has always been intriguing, since chaotic systems are known to resist synchronization because of their positive Lyapunov exponents. The convergence of the two systems to identical trajectories is a surprise. We show how people originally thought about this process and how the concept of synchronization changed over the years to a more geometric view using synchronization manifolds. We also show that building synchronizing systems leads naturally to engineering more complex systems whose constituents are chaotic, but which can be tuned to output various chaotic signals. We finally end up at a topic that is still in very active exploration today and that is synchronization of dynamical systems in networks of oscillators.

  18. Laboratory behavioral measures of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Donald M; Mathias, Charles W; Marsh, Dawn M; Jagar, Ashley A

    2005-02-01

    Previous research and theory have conceptualized impulsivity as a multifaceted construct that requires multiple modes of measurement for accurate assessment. This article describes a software package that includes four paradigms for measuring multiple and unique aspects of impulsivity. Specifically, four tasks are described: (1) the two choice impulsivity paradigm, (2) the single key impulsivity paradigm, (3) the GoStop impulsivity paradigm, and (4) the time paradigm. These tasks measure processes related to the capacity to tolerate delay for reward, to inhibit an already initiated response, and to estimate the passage of time. These processes have been found to be important to the understanding of impulsive behaviors. The programs are flexible and allow the experimenter to manipulate a number of parameters related to delay-reward contingencies, timing, performance feedback/payment, and data output variables. Manipulation of these parameters makes the paradigms scalable to a wide range of ability levels and appropriate for samples ranging from children to adults. The four paradigms in this software package are available at no cost and can be obtained by contacting the corresponding author.

  19. Impulsivity, Risk Taking, and Timing

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Ana A.; Odum, Amy. L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relations among measures of impulsivity and timing. Impulsivity was assessed using delay and probability discounting, and self-report impulsivity (as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; BIS-11). Timing was assessed using temporal perception as measured on a temporal bisection task and time perspective (as measured by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory). One hundred and forty three college students completed these measures in a computer laboratory. The degree of delay discounting was positively correlated with the mean and range of the temporal bisection procedure. The degree of delay and probability discounting were also positively correlated. Self-reported Motor impulsiveness on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with Present Hedonism and negatively correlated with Future orientation on the ZTPI. Self-reported Non-Planning on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with Fatalism on the ZTPI. These results show that people who overestimate the passage of time (perceive time as passing more quickly) hold less value in delayed rewards. They also confirm previous results regarding the relation between delay and probability discounting, as well as highlight similarities in self-report measures of impulsivity and time perspective. PMID:22542458

  20. Impulsivity, risk taking, and timing.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Ana A; Odum, Amy L

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the relations among measures of impulsivity and timing. Impulsivity was assessed using delay and probability discounting, and self-report impulsivity (as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; BIS-11). Timing was assessed using temporal perception as measured on a temporal bisection task and time perspective (as measured by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory). One hundred and forty three college students completed these measures in a computer laboratory. The degree of delay discounting was positively correlated with the mean and range of the temporal bisection procedure. The degree of delay and probability discounting were also positively correlated. Self-reported motor impulsiveness on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with present hedonism and negatively correlated with future orientation on the ZTPI. Self-reported non-planning on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with fatalism on the ZTPI. These results show that people who overestimate the passage of time (perceive time as passing more quickly) hold less value in delayed rewards. They also confirm previous results regarding the relation between delay and probability discounting, as well as highlight similarities in self-report measures of impulsivity and time perspective.

  1. Criterion for noise-induced synchronization: Application to colloidal alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Jonah A.; Moths, Brian; Witten, Thomas A.

    2016-09-01

    Colloidal bodies of irregular shape rotate as they descend under gravity in solution. This rotational response provides a means of bringing a dispersion of identical bodies into a synchronized rotation with the same orientation using programed forcing. We use the notion of statistical entropy to derive bounds on the rate of synchronization. These bounds apply generally to dynamical systems with stable periodic motion with a phase ϕ (t ) , when subjected to an impulsive perturbation. The impulse causes a change of phase expressible as a phase map ψ (ϕ ) . We derive an upper limit on the average change of entropy Δ H Δ H in terms of this phase map; when this limit is negative, alignment must occur. For systems that have achieved a low entropy, the approaches this upper limit.

  2. Dopamine-Agonists and Impulsivity in Parkinson’s Disease: Impulsive Choices vs. Impulsive Actions

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Francesca; Ko, Ji Hyun; Miyasaki, Janis; Lang, Anthony E.; Houle, Sylvain; Valzania, Franco; Ray, Nicola J.; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2014-01-01

    The control of impulse behavior is a multidimensional concept subdivided into separate subcomponents, which are thought to represent different underlying mechanisms due to either disinhibitory processes or poor decision-making. In patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), dopamine-agonist (DA) therapy has been associated with increased impulsive behavior. However, the relationship among these different components in the disease and the role of DA is not well understood. In this imaging study, we investigated in PD patients the effects of DA medication on patterns of brain activation during tasks testing impulsive choices and actions. Following overnight withdrawal of antiparkinsonian medication, PD patients were studied with a H2 (15)O PET before and after administration of DA (1 mg of pramipexole), while they were performing the delay discounting task (DDT) and the GoNoGo Task (GNG). We observed that pramipexole augmented impulsivity during DDT, depending on reward magnitude and activated the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex and deactivated ventral striatum. In contrast, the effect of pramipexole during the GNG task was not significant on behavioral performance and involved different areas (i.e., lateral prefrontal cortex). A voxel-based correlation analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between the discounting value (k) and the activation of medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate suggesting that more impulsive patients had less activation in those cortical areas. Here we report how these different subcomponents of inhibition/impulsivity are differentially sensitive to DA treatment with pramipexole influencing mainly the neural network underlying impulsive choices but not impulsive action. PMID:24038587

  3. Synchronizing large systolic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.L.; Kung, H.T.

    1982-04-01

    Parallel computing structures consist of many processors operating simultaneously. If a concurrent structure is regular, as in the case of systolic array, it may be convenient to think of all processors as operating in lock step. Totally synchronized systems controlled by central clocks are difficult to implement because of the inevitable problem of clock skews and delays. An alternate means of enforcing necessary synchronization is the use of self-timed, asynchronous schemes, at the cost of increased design complexity and hardware cost. Realizing that different circumstances call for different synchronization methods, this paper provides a spectrum of synchronization models; based on the assumptions made for each model, theoretical lower bounds on clock skew are derived, and appropriate or best-possible synchronization schemes for systolic arrays are proposed. This paper represents a first step towards a systematic study of synchronization problems for large systolic arrays.

  4. Synchronization via Hydrodynamic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendelbacher, Franziska; Stark, Holger

    2013-12-01

    An object moving in a viscous fluid creates a flow field that influences the motion of neighboring objects. We review examples from nature in the microscopic world where such hydrodynamic interactions synchronize beating or rotating filaments. Bacteria propel themselves using a bundle of rotating helical filaments called flagella which have to be synchronized in phase. Other micro-organisms are covered with a carpet of smaller filaments called cilia on their surfaces. They beat highly synchronized so that metachronal waves propagate along the cell surfaces. We explore both examples with the help of simple model systems and identify generic properties for observing synchronization by hydrodynamic interactions.

  5. Synchronous Energy Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The synchronous technology requirements for large space power systems are summarized. A variety of technology areas including photovoltaics, thermal management, and energy storage, and power management are addressed.

  6. Frame synchronization in PCM telemetry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peavey, B.

    1971-01-01

    The frame synchronization performance characteristics are defined that can be measured under actual operating conditions. The frame synchronization process is explained, and test data on the performance of frame synchronizers and frame synchronization codes are presented. The application of frame synchronization methods in specific cases is considered in the light of code selection, frame length, and data recovery.

  7. Precise clock synchronization protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luit, E. J.; Martin, J. M. M.

    1993-12-01

    A distributed clock synchronization protocol is presented which achieves a very high precision without the need for very frequent resynchronizations. The protocol tolerates failures of the clocks: clocks may be too slow or too fast, exhibit omission failures and report inconsistent values. Synchronization takes place in synchronization rounds as in many other synchronization protocols. At the end of each round, clock times are exchanged between the clocks. Each clock applies a convergence function (CF) to the values obtained. This function estimates the difference between its clock and an average clock and corrects its clock accordingly. Clocks are corrected for drift relative to this average clock during the next synchronization round. The protocol is based on the assumption that clock reading errors are small with respect to the required precision of synchronization. It is shown that the CF resynchronizes the clocks with high precision even when relatively large clock drifts are possible. It is also shown that the drift-corrected clocks remain synchronized until the end of the next synchronization round. The stability of the protocol is proven.

  8. EEG synchronization and migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Angelini, Leonardo; Pellicoro, Mario; Hu, Kun; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2004-03-01

    We investigate phase synchronization in EEG recordings from migraine patients. We use the analytic signal technique, based on the Hilbert transform, and find that migraine brains are characterized by enhanced alpha band phase synchronization in presence of visual stimuli. Our findings show that migraine patients have an overactive regulatory mechanism that renders them more sensitive to external stimuli.

  9. Disorder induces explosive synchronization.

    PubMed

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Arenas, Alex

    2014-06-01

    We study explosive synchronization, a phenomenon characterized by first-order phase transitions between incoherent and synchronized states in networks of coupled oscillators. While explosive synchronization has been the subject of many recent studies, in each case strong conditions on the heterogeneity of the network, its link weights, or its initial construction are imposed to engineer a first-order phase transition. This raises the question of how robust explosive synchronization is in view of more realistic structural and dynamical properties. Here we show that explosive synchronization can be induced in mildly heterogeneous networks by the addition of quenched disorder to the oscillators' frequencies, demonstrating that it is not only robust to, but moreover promoted by, this natural mechanism. We support these findings with numerical and analytical results, presenting simulations of a real neural network as well as a self-consistency theory used to study synthetic networks.

  10. Commentary on Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Goldstein continues the laudable practice of reprinting articles of historical significance in the history of ADHD with this selective reprinting of material from the original article by Maurice Laufer, Eric Denhoff, and Gerald Solomons on hyperkinetic impulsive disorder (HID) in children. This article on HID is among the first articles to…

  11. Demonstrating Sound Impulses in Pipes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymer, M. G.; Micklavzina, Stan

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple, direct method to demonstrate the effects of the boundary conditions on sound impulse reflections in pipes. A graphical display of the results can be made using a pipe, cork, small hammer, microphone, and fast recording electronics. Explains the principles involved. (LZ)

  12. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-17

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2{pi} in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step {delta}t. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/{delta}t is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is ''blue shifted'' relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval {delta}t. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  13. Characteristics of Impulsive Suicide Attempts and Attempters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Thomas R.; Swann, Alan C.; Powell, Kenneth E.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; O'Carroll, Patrick W.

    2002-01-01

    Examined impulsive suicide attempts within a population-based, case-control study of nearly lethal suicide attempts among adolescents and young adults. Impulsive attempts were more likely among those who had been in a physical fight and less likely among those who were depressed. Findings suggest inadequate control of aggressive impulses as a…

  14. Adolescent Impulsivity: Findings from a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Martial

    2005-01-01

    Impulsivity is central to several psychopathological states in adolescence. However, there is little consensus concerning the definition of impulsivity and its core dimensions. In response to this lack of consensus, Whiteside and Lynam (2001, "Pers. Individ. Differ." 30, 669-689) have developed the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale, which is able to…

  15. Synchronization of Swimming Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfring, Gwynn; Lauga, Eric

    2009-11-01

    Flagellated eukaryotic cells (such as spermatozoa) have been observed to synchronize their flagella when swimming in close proximity. Using a 2D model, we find that hydrodynamic interactions alone can lead to synchronization if the waveforms of the flagella display front-back asymmetry. Depending on the nature of the asymmetry, the phase-locked conformation can minimize or maximize the energy dissipated by the co-swimming cells. We show that due to kinematic reversibility, this front-back asymmetry is necessary for synchronization in a Newtonian fluid, and discuss the differences in a non-Newtonian fluid.

  16. Carrier synchronization and detection of polyphase signals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W. C.; Simon, M. K.

    1972-01-01

    Digital communication networks used for the distribution of high-speed digital information are currently the subject of design studies for many civil and military applications. This paper presents results that are useful in such studies as well as in network planning. In particular, the paper is concerned with the problems of carrier synchronization and noisy reference detection of polyphase signals. Reconstruction of coherent references for the detection of polyphase signals is considered and analyzed for three carrier reconstruction loops, namely, Nth power (multiply-and-divide) loops, generalized Costas (I-Q) loops, and extensions of data-aided (modulation wipeoff) loops. General expressions for the error probability are developed when the reconstructed reference signals are noisy.

  17. Photoacoustic image reconstruction from ultrasound post-beamformed B-mode image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haichong K.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun Jae; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-03-01

    A requirement to reconstruct photoacoustic (PA) image is to have a synchronized channel data acquisition with laser firing. Unfortunately, most clinical ultrasound (US) systems don't offer an interface to obtain synchronized channel data. To broaden the impact of clinical PA imaging, we propose a PA image reconstruction algorithm utilizing US B-mode image, which is readily available from clinical scanners. US B-mode image involves a series of signal processing including beamforming, followed by envelope detection, and end with log compression. Yet, it will be defocused when PA signals are input due to incorrect delay function. Our approach is to reverse the order of image processing steps and recover the original US post-beamformed radio-frequency (RF) data, in which a synthetic aperture based PA rebeamforming algorithm can be further applied. Taking B-mode image as the input, we firstly recovered US postbeamformed RF data by applying log decompression and convoluting an acoustic impulse response to combine carrier frequency information. Then, the US post-beamformed RF data is utilized as pre-beamformed RF data for the adaptive PA beamforming algorithm, and the new delay function is applied by taking into account that the focus depth in US beamforming is at the half depth of the PA case. The feasibility of the proposed method was validated through simulation, and was experimentally demonstrated using an acoustic point source. The point source was successfully beamformed from a US B-mode image, and the full with at the half maximum of the point improved 3.97 times. Comparing this result to the ground-truth reconstruction using channel data, the FWHM was slightly degraded with 1.28 times caused by information loss during envelope detection and convolution of the RF information.

  18. Synchronization in complex networks

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, A.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Moreno, Y.; Zhou, C.; Kurths, J.

    2007-12-12

    Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are in the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understand synchronization phenomena in natural systems take now advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also overview the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying pattern of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

  19. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition.

  20. Impulse generation by detonation tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Marcia Ann

    Impulse generation with gaseous detonation requires conversion of chemical energy into mechanical energy. This conversion process is well understood in rocket engines where the high pressure combustion products expand through a nozzle generating high velocity exhaust gases. The propulsion community is now focusing on advanced concepts that utilize non-traditional forms of combustion like detonation. Such a device is called a pulse detonation engine in which laboratory tests have proven that thrust can be achieved through continuous cyclic operation. Because of poor performance of straight detonation tubes compared to conventional propulsion systems and the success of using nozzles on rocket engines, the effect of nozzles on detonation tubes is being investigated. Although previous studies of detonation tube nozzles have suggested substantial benefits, up to now there has been no systematic investigations over a range of operating conditions and nozzle configurations. As a result, no models predicting the impulse when nozzles are used exist. This lack of data has severely limited the development and evaluation of models and simulations of nozzles on pulse detonation engines. The first experimental investigation measuring impulse by gaseous detonation in plain tubes and tubes with nozzles operating in varying environment pressures is presented. Converging, diverging, and converging-diverging nozzles were tested to determine the effect of divergence angle, nozzle length, and volumetric fill fraction on impulse. The largest increases in specific impulse, 72% at an environment pressure of 100 kPa and 43% at an environment pressure of 1.4 kPa, were measured with the largest diverging nozzle tested that had a 12° half angle and was 0.6 m long. Two regimes of nozzle operation that depend on the environment pressure are responsible for these increases and were first observed from these data. To augment this experimental investigation, all data in the literature regarding

  1. Impulse-based methods for fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cortez, R.

    1995-05-01

    A Lagrangian numerical method based on impulse variables is analyzed. A relation between impulse vectors and vortex dipoles with a prescribed dipole moment is presented. This relation is used to adapt the high-accuracy cutoff functions of vortex methods for use in impulse-based methods. A source of error in the long-time implementation of the impulse method is explained and two techniques for avoiding this error are presented. An application of impulse methods to the motion of a fluid surrounded by an elastic membrane is presented.

  2. Avoided Crossing and Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekii, T.; Shibahashi, H.

    2013-12-01

    We examine avoided crossing of stellar pulsations in the nonlinear regime, where synchronization may occur, based on a simple model of weakly coupled van der Pol oscillators with close frequencies. For this simple case, avoided crossing is unaffected in the sense that there is a frequency difference between the symmetric and antisymmetric modes, but as a result of synchronization, unlike the linear oscillations case, the system can vibrate in only one of the modes.

  3. Synchronization of cells.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Eiichiro

    2006-01-01

    Synchronization of cells is essential to study cell cycle specific events. If, for example, one suspects that a given DNA repair pathway is used in a particular cell cycle phase, the protocol can be used to enrich cells in each phase of the cell cycle and analyze the cellular response to DNA damage. Synchronization is also useful, when a gene is essential for a particular phase of the cell cycle. If a gene is, for example, essential for mitosis, synchronization of the cells in G1 phase with concomitant inactivation of the gene enables us to study the function of the gene in interphase, and to follow synchronous cell cycle progression to M phase. Two synchronization methods: centrifugal elutriation to enrich G1, S or G2 phase cells and nocodazole-mimocine sequential treatment to enrich cells at the G1/S boundary are described. Centrifugal elutriation can be achieved in less time (0.5-2 h) and with very little physiological stress to the cells whereas synchronization by drugs, such as nocodazole and mimocine, may result in unfavorable side effects.

  4. Emotion Regulation and Impulsivity in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Liana R.N.; Grant, Jon E.; Odlaug, Brian L.

    2012-01-01

    Past research has linked both emotion regulation and impulsivity with the development and maintenance of addictions. However, no research has investigated the relationship between emotion regulation and impulsivity within young adults. In the present study, we analyzed 194 young adults (27.8% female; 21.3 ± 3.32 years old; 91.8% single; 85.1% Caucasian), grouping them as low, average, or high emotionally dysregulated, and compared self-reported impulsivity, impulsive behaviors (such as alcohol and substance use and gambling) and cognitive impulsivity. We hypothesized that those with high levels of emotion dysregulation would score higher on self-reported and cognitive impulsivity, and report more impulsive behaviors. Analysis indicated that compared to low, the high emotion dysregulation group scored significantly higher on two self-report measures of impulsivity, harm avoidance, and cognitive reasoning. No significant differences were found between groups in impulsive behaviors and cognitive impulsivity. Overall, this study highlights the relationship between emotion dysregulation and impulsivity, suggesting that emotion regulation may be an important factor to consider when assessing individuals at a higher risk for developing an addiction. PMID:22385661

  5. Neurophysiological markers of multiple facets of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Neal, Lauren B; Gable, Philip A

    2016-03-01

    Human behavior is influenced by three core personality systems: approach, avoidance, and supervisory control. The supervisory control system is inversely related to impulsivity. Although past research has related some aspects of impulsivity to frontal hemispheric asymmetry, impulsivity as a multi-faceted construct has not been studied in relation with frontal asymmetry. In addition, past work has potentially confounded impulsivity with approach-motivation. In the current study, greater relative left frontal activity was related to multiple facets of impulsivity: negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and positive urgency. Regressing both positive and negative urgency on frontal asymmetry revealed that approach-related positive urgency related to greater left frontal activity, but withdrawal-related negative urgency marginally related to greater right frontal activity. These results suggest that impulsivity, independent of affective valence, relates to greater left frontal activity. When controlling for trait approach motivation, the relationship between impulsivity and left frontal activity is unchanged.

  6. A neurogenetic approach to impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Congdon, Eliza; Canli, Turhan

    2008-12-01

    Impulsivity is a complex and multidimensional trait that is of interest to both personality psychologists and to clinicians. For investigators seeking the biological basis of personality traits, the use of neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revolutionized personality psychology in less than a decade. Now, another revolution is under way, and it originates from molecular biology. Specifically, new findings in molecular genetics, the detailed mapping and the study of the function of genes, have shown that individual differences in personality traits can be related to individual differences within specific genes. In this article, we will review the current state of the field with respect to the neural and genetic basis of trait impulsivity.

  7. A Neurogenetic Approach to Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Congdon, Eliza; Canli, Turhan

    2008-01-01

    Impulsivity is a complex and multidimensional trait that is of interest to both personality psychologists and to clinicians. For investigators seeking the biological basis of personality traits, the use of neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revolutionized personality psychology in less than a decade. Now, another revolution is under way, and it originates from molecular biology. Specifically, new findings in molecular genetics, the detailed mapping and the study of the function of genes, have shown that individual differences in personality traits can be related to individual differences within specific genes. In this article, we will review the current state of the field with respect to the neural and genetic basis of trait impulsivity. PMID:19012655

  8. Angular Synchronization by Eigenvectors and Semidefinite Programming

    PubMed Central

    Singer, A.

    2010-01-01

    The angular synchronization problem is to obtain an accurate estimation (up to a constant additive phase) for a set of unknown angles θ1, …, θn from m noisy measurements of their offsets θi − θj mod 2π. Of particular interest is angle recovery in the presence of many outlier measurements that are uniformly distributed in [0, 2π) and carry no information on the true offsets. We introduce an efficient recovery algorithm for the unknown angles from the top eigenvector of a specially designed Hermitian matrix. The eigenvector method is extremely stable and succeeds even when the number of outliers is exceedingly large. For example, we successfully estimate n = 400 angles from a full set of m=(4002) offset measurements of which 90% are outliers in less than a second on a commercial laptop. The performance of the method is analyzed using random matrix theory and information theory. We discuss the relation of the synchronization problem to the combinatorial optimization problem Max-2-Lin mod L and present a semidefinite relaxation for angle recovery, drawing similarities with the Goemans-Williamson algorithm for finding the maximum cut in a weighted graph. We present extensions of the eigenvector method to other synchronization problems that involve different group structures and their applications, such as the time synchronization problem in distributed networks and the surface reconstruction problems in computer vision and optics. PMID:21179593

  9. Neuronal synchronization along the dorsal visual pathway reflects the focus of spatial attention.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Markus; Donner, Tobias H; Oostenveld, Robert; Fries, Pascal; Engel, Andreas K

    2008-11-26

    Oscillatory neuronal synchronization, within and between cortical areas, may mediate the selection of attended visual stimuli. However, it remains unclear at and between which processing stages visuospatial attention modulates oscillatory synchronization in the human brain. We thus combined magnetoencephalography (MEG) in a spatially cued motion discrimination task with source-reconstruction techniques and characterized attentional effects on neuronal synchronization across key stages of the human dorsal visual pathway. We found that visuospatial attention modulated oscillatory synchronization between visual, parietal, and prefrontal cortex in a spatially selective fashion. Furthermore, synchronized activity within these stages was selectively modulated by attention, but with markedly distinct spectral signatures and stimulus dependence between regions. Our data indicate that regionally specific oscillatory synchronization at most stages of the human dorsal visual pathway may enhance the processing of attended visual stimuli and suggest that attentional selection is mediated by frequency-specific synchronization between prefrontal, parietal, and early visual cortex.

  10. Free segmentation in rendered 3D images through synthetic impulse response in integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Corral, M.; Llavador, A.; Sánchez-Ortiga, E.; Saavedra, G.; Javidi, B.

    2016-06-01

    Integral Imaging is a technique that has the capability of providing not only the spatial, but also the angular information of three-dimensional (3D) scenes. Some important applications are the 3D display and digital post-processing as for example, depth-reconstruction from integral images. In this contribution we propose a new reconstruction method that takes into account the integral image and a simplified version of the impulse response function (IRF) of the integral imaging (InI) system to perform a two-dimensional (2D) deconvolution. The IRF of an InI system has a periodic structure that depends directly on the axial position of the object. Considering different periods of the IRFs we recover by deconvolution the depth information of the 3D scene. An advantage of our method is that it is possible to obtain nonconventional reconstructions by considering alternative synthetic impulse responses. Our experiments show the feasibility of the proposed method.

  11. Synchronization between beating cilia.

    PubMed

    Gheber, L; Priel, Z

    1989-01-01

    A novel quantitative parameter is proposed to define and measure the degree of synchronization between two small ciliary areas. These areas can be close to or far from one another. The Pearson correlation factor is used to define the degree of synchronization by a single number. This approach is based on a computerized, dual photoelectric method which simulataneously measures the scattered light from two small areas on the ciliary epithelium or its tissue culture. The measurements were performed on tissue culture from frog's palate epithelium. It was found that: (a) the degree of synchronization decreases, as a function of distance; (b) the correlation is fairly high even at relatively large separations, when measured on the same patch; (c) on a given patch the synchronization factor is independent of the direction of the metachronal wave; (d) close disconnected ciliary cells exhibit fairly high correlation; (e) disconnected randomly choosen ciliary cells at relatively large separation distances exhibit relatively low correlation, smaller by a factor of 2 than the correlation factor at the same distances when measured along the metachronal wave; (f) the average frequencies' ratio and the metachronal wavelength can be used as first-order indicators of ciliary synchronization; (g) there is a spread of metachronal wavelengths even over a single well-organized patch.

  12. Synchronization between beating cilia.

    PubMed Central

    Gheber, L; Priel, Z

    1989-01-01

    A novel quantitative parameter is proposed to define and measure the degree of synchronization between two small ciliary areas. These areas can be close to or far from one another. The Pearson correlation factor is used to define the degree of synchronization by a single number. This approach is based on a computerized, dual photoelectric method which simulataneously measures the scattered light from two small areas on the ciliary epithelium or its tissue culture. The measurements were performed on tissue culture from frog's palate epithelium. It was found that: (a) the degree of synchronization decreases, as a function of distance; (b) the correlation is fairly high even at relatively large separations, when measured on the same patch; (c) on a given patch the synchronization factor is independent of the direction of the metachronal wave; (d) close disconnected ciliary cells exhibit fairly high correlation; (e) disconnected randomly choosen ciliary cells at relatively large separation distances exhibit relatively low correlation, smaller by a factor of 2 than the correlation factor at the same distances when measured along the metachronal wave; (f) the average frequencies' ratio and the metachronal wavelength can be used as first-order indicators of ciliary synchronization; (g) there is a spread of metachronal wavelengths even over a single well-organized patch. PMID:2930819

  13. Optimistic barrier synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    Barrier synchronization is fundamental operation in parallel computation. In many contexts, at the point a processor enters a barrier it knows that it has already processed all the work required of it prior to synchronization. The alternative case, when a processor cannot enter a barrier with the assurance that it has already performed all the necessary pre-synchronization computation, is treated. The problem arises when the number of pre-sychronization messages to be received by a processor is unkown, for example, in a parallel discrete simulation or any other computation that is largely driven by an unpredictable exchange of messages. We describe an optimistic O(log sup 2 P) barrier algorithm for such problems, study its performance on a large-scale parallel system, and consider extensions to general associative reductions as well as associative parallel prefix computations.

  14. Impulsivity and sexual assault in college men.

    PubMed

    Mouilso, Emily R; Calhoun, Karen S; Rosenbloom, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Although impulsivity has been consistently linked to perpetration of sexual aggression, results lack clarity because they do not account for the substantial heterogeneity associated with the construct. The UPPS-P model (Lynam, Smith, Whiteside, & Cyders, 2006), which was proposed to clarify the multidimensional nature of impulsivity, has yet to be applied to sexual aggression. We measured UPPS-P Impulsivity in a sample of male college students who also self-reported on perpetration of sexual aggression. As predicted, impulsivity distinguished perpetrators from nonperpetrators. Perpetrators scored higher than non-perpetrators on Negative Urgency, Positive Urgency, and lack of Premeditation. Results suggest that the impulsivity traits most relevant to sexual aggression are the tendency to act impulsively when experiencing intense emotions (Positive and Negative Urgency) and lack of forethought and planning (lack of Premeditation). PMID:23862308

  15. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery. PMID:27695171

  16. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery.

  17. Cotton buds, momentum, and impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Ed; Nuñez, Jover; Guirit, Alfredo; van Huis, Cor

    2000-01-01

    Here is a simple experiment demonstrating impulse and momentum that was picked up from a Japanese presenter at a physics teacher conference held in Cebu City. We have not been able to trace the experiment farther and have never seen it in print. After student-author Nuñez demonstrated it during an exam on conducting demonstrations, we converted the qualitative idea into a quanitative experiment and even discovered some possibilities for student research. The lab is also suitable as homework, since it uses universally available "equipment" — cotton buds (swabs), drinking straws, and a ruler.

  18. Motor inhibition, reflection impulsivity, and trait impulsivity in pathological skin picking.

    PubMed

    Snorrason, Ívar; Smári, Jakob; Ólafsson, Ragnar P

    2011-09-01

    Pathological skin picking (PSP) is often recognized as an impulse control disorder. The current study sought to investigate the relationship between PSP and different forms of impulsivity. University students that met criteria for PSP (n = 55) and university students without history of PSP (n = 55) answered a multidimensional impulsivity questionnaire (the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale) and completed 2 neurocognitive tasks that assess impulsivity (the Stop Signal Task and the Information Sampling Task). The PSP group scored significantly higher than the control group on the negative and positive urgency subscales of the UPPS, but the groups did not differ on other subscales or the neurocognitive tasks. Logistic regression demonstrated that the urgency scales added to the prediction of PSP after negative affect and other forms of impulsivity were adjusted for. The results indicate that PSP sufferers are characterized by emotion-based impulsivity and do not appear to be impulsive in other ways. PMID:21658533

  19. Approximate controllability of nonlinear impulsive differential systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Mahmudov, N. I.; Kim, J. H.

    2007-08-01

    Many practical systems in physical and biological sciences have impulsive dynamical be- haviours during the evolution process which can be modeled by impulsive differential equations. This paper studies the approximate controllability issue for nonlinear impulsive differential and neutral functional differential equations in Hilbert spaces. Based on the semigroup theory and fixed point approach, sufficient conditions for approximate controllability of impulsive differential and neutral functional differential equations are established. Finally, two examples are presented to illustrate the utility of the proposed result. The results improve some recent results.

  20. Impaired Decisional Impulsivity in Pathological Videogamers

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Michael A.; Worbe, Yulia; Bolton, Sorcha; Harrison, Neil A.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Voon, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathological gaming is an emerging and poorly understood problem. Impulsivity is commonly impaired in disorders of behavioural and substance addiction, hence we sought to systematically investigate the different subtypes of decisional and motor impulsivity in a well-defined pathological gaming cohort. Methods Fifty-two pathological gaming subjects and age-, gender- and IQ-matched healthy volunteers were tested on decisional impulsivity (Information Sampling Task testing reflection impulsivity and delay discounting questionnaire testing impulsive choice), and motor impulsivity (Stop Signal Task testing motor response inhibition, and the premature responding task). We used stringent diagnostic criteria highlighting functional impairment. Results In the Information Sampling Task, pathological gaming participants sampled less evidence prior to making a decision and scored fewer points compared with healthy volunteers. Gaming severity was also negatively correlated with evidence gathered and positively correlated with sampling error and points acquired. In the delay discounting task, pathological gamers made more impulsive choices, preferring smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards. Pathological gamers made more premature responses related to comorbid nicotine use. Greater number of hours played also correlated with a Motivational Index. Greater frequency of role playing games was associated with impaired motor response inhibition and strategy games with faster Go reaction time. Conclusions We show that pathological gaming is associated with impaired decisional impulsivity with negative consequences in task performance. Decisional impulsivity may be a potential target in therapeutic management. PMID:24146789

  1. Effect of cervicolabyrinthine impulsation on the spinal reflex apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarotskiy, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    In view of the fact that the convergence effect of vestibular impulsation may both stimulate and inhibit intra and intersystemic coordination of physiological processes, an attempt was made to define the physiological effect on the spinal reflex apparatus of the convergence of cervicolabyrinthine impulsation on a model of the unconditioned motor reflex as a mechanism of the common final pathway conditioning the formation and realization of a focused beneficial result of human motor activities. More than 100 persons subjected to rolling effect and angular acceleration during complexly coordinated muscular loading were divided according to typical variants of the functional structure of the patella reflex in an experiment requiring 30 rapid counterclockwise head revolutions at 2/sec with synchronous recording of a 20 item series of patella reflex acts. A knee jerk coefficient was used in calculations. In 85 percent of the cases 2 patellar reflexograms show typical braking and release of knee reflex and 1 shows an extreme local variant. The diagnostic and prognostic value of these tests is suggested for determining adaptive possibilities of functional systems in respect to acceleration and proprioceptive stimuli.

  2. Synchronized time stamp support

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalkowski, J.

    1994-02-16

    New software has been added to IOC core to maintain time stamps. The new software has the ability to maintain time stamps over all IOCs on a network. The purpose of this paper is to explain how EPICS will synchronize the time stamps. In addition, this paper will explain how to configure and use the new EPICS time stamp support software.

  3. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1997-02-04

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition. 14 figs.

  4. Synchronous semiconductor memory device

    SciTech Connect

    Onno, C.; Hirata, M.

    1989-11-21

    This patent describes a synchronous semiconductor memory device. It comprises: first latch means for latching a write command in synchronism with clock signal; second latch means for latching a write data in synchronism with the clock signal and for outputting two write process signals based on the write data latched thereby; pulse generating means for generating an internal write pulse signal based on the write command latched by the first latch means. The internal write pulse signal having a semiconductor memory device; write control means supplied with the internal write pulse signal and the write process signals for controlling write and read operations of the synchronous semiconductor memory device; memory means for storing the write data latched by the second latch means; and noise preventing means coupled to the second latch means and the write control means for supplying the write process signals to the write control means only in the write mode responsive to the internal write pulse signal and for setting the write process signals to fixed potentials during a time other than the write mode.

  5. Estimating synchronization signal phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Robert G.; Lord, John D.

    2015-03-01

    To read a watermark from printed images requires that the watermarking system read correctly after affine distortions. One way to recover from affine distortions is to add a synchronization signal in the Fourier frequency domain and use this synchronization signal to estimate the applied affine distortion. Using the Fourier Magnitudes one can estimate the linear portion of the affine distortion. To estimate the translation one must first estimate the phase of the synchronization signal and then use phase correlation to estimate the translation. In this paper we provide a new method to measure the phase of the synchronization signal using only the data from the complex Fourier domain. This data is used to compute the linear portion, so it is quite convenient to estimate the phase without further data manipulation. The phase estimation proposed in this paper is computationally simple and provides a significant computational advantage over previous methods while maintaining similar accuracy. In addition, the phase estimation formula gives a general way to interpolate images in the complex frequency domain.

  6. Impulsivity and the Sexes: Measurement and Structural Invariance of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyders, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Before it is possible to test whether men and women differ in impulsivity, it is necessary to evaluate whether impulsivity measures are invariant across sex. The UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale (negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking, with added subscale of positive urgency) is one measure of five…

  7. Self-synchronized fast reflectance acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Dongsheng; Suo, Jinli; Wang, Haoqian; Dai, Qionghai

    2014-11-01

    The hyper-spectrum data exhibits the structure, materials, and semantic meaning of a nature scene and its fast acquisition is of great importance due to its potential for parse these properties of dynamic scenes. Targeting for high speed hyperspectrum imaging of a nature scene, this paper proposes to capture the coded hyper-spectrum reflectance of a nature scene using low cost hardware and reconstruct the latent data using a corresponding decoding algorithm. Except for a wide spectrum light source, the imaging system includes mainly a commercially available projector color wheel and a high speed camera, which work at their own constant periods and are self-synchronized by our algorithm. The introduced light source and color wheel cost less than 50 dollars and makes the proposed approach widely available. The results on the data captured by our prototype system show that, the proposed approach can reconstruct the high precision hyper-spectrum data at real time.

  8. Impulsive model for reactive collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marron, M. T.; Bernstein, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    A simple classical mechanical model of the reactive scattering of a structureless atom A and a quasi-diatomic BC is developed which takes full advantage of energy, linear and angular momentum conservation relations but introduces a minimum of further assumptions. These are as follows: (1) the vibrational degree of freedom of the reactant (BC) and product (AB) molecules is suppressed, so the change in vibrational energy is simply a parameter; (2) straight-line trajectories are assumed outside of a reaction shell; (3) within this zone, momentum transfer occurs impulsively (essentially instantaneously) following mass transfer; (4) the impulse, which may be either positive or negative, is directed along the BC axis, which may, however, assume all orientations with respect to the incident relative velocity. The model yields differential and total cross sections and product rotational energy distributions for a given collision exoergicity Q, or for any known distribution over Q. Numerical results are presented for several prototype reactions whose dynamics have been well-studied.

  9. Reliability and Validity of Measures of Impulsive Choice and Impulsive Action in Smokers Trying to Quit

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Danielle E.; Bold, Krysten W.; Minami, Haruka; Yeh, Vivian M.; Rutten, Emily; Nadkarni, Shruti G.; Chapman, Gretchen B.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional research suggests that smokers are more impulsive than are non-smokers, but few studies have examined relations between impulsiveness and later success in quitting smoking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and predictive validity of facets of impulsiveness in adult smokers trying to quit. Baseline behavioral measures of impulsive choice (assessed with a delay discounting task) and impulsive action (assessed with a measure of behavioral disinhibition) were used as predictors of smoking cessation success over 12 weeks. The sample included 116 adult (18 years old or older) daily smokers from central New Jersey. Impulsive choice, impulsive action, and self-reported impulsiveness were not significantly related to one another at baseline. Impulsive choice had high test-retest reliability from pre- to post-quit, whereas impulsive action was less stable. Test-retest reliability from pre-quit to three weeks post-quit was moderated by achievement of seven-day abstinence. Baseline impulsive action was significantly negatively related to quitting for at least one day in the first two weeks of a quit attempt and of prolonged abstinence (no relapse over the next 10 weeks). Baseline impulsive choice was robustly associated with biochemically verified seven-day point-prevalence abstinence 12 weeks post-quit, such that those with lower delay discounting were more likely to achieve abstinence. Facets of impulsiveness appear to function largely independently in adult smokers, as indicated by their lack of inter-correlation, differential stability, and differential relations with abstinence. Impulsive action may impede initial quitting, whereas impulsive choice may be an obstacle to maintaining lasting abstinence. PMID:26751623

  10. Synchronizing quantum and classical clocks made of quantum particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Philip Caesar M.; Caballar, Roland Cristopher F.; Galapon, Eric A.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that the quantum corrections to the classical arrival time for a quantum object in a potential free region of space, as computed in Phys. Rev. A 80, 030102(R) (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevA.80.030102, can be eliminated up to a given order of ℏ by choosing an appropriate position-dependent phase for the object's wave function. This then implies that we can make the quantum arrival time of the object as close as possible to its corresponding classical arrival time, allowing us to synchronize a classical and quantum clock, which tells time using the classical and quantum arrival time of the object, respectively. We provide an example for synchronizing such a clock by making use of a quantum object with a position-dependent phase imprinted on the object's initial wave function with the use of an impulsive potential.

  11. Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder in Children's Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laufer, Maurice W.; Denhoff, Eric; Solomons, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    A very common cause of children's behavior disorder disturbance is an entity described as the hyperkinetic impulse disorder. This is characterized by hyperactivity, short attention span and poor powers of concentration, irritability, impulsiveness, variability, and poor schoolwork. The existence of this complexity may lead to many psychological…

  12. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2016-07-12

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  13. Anatomy of a SAR impulse response.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-08-01

    A principal measure of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image quality is the manifestation in the SAR image of a spatial impulse, that is, the SAR's Impulse Response (IPR). IPR requirements direct certain design decisions in a SAR. Anomalies in the IPR can point to specific anomalous behavior in the radar's hardware and/or software.

  14. Temporal Preparation, Response Inhibition and Impulsivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Angel; Trivino, Monica; Perez-Duenas, Carolina; Acosta, Alberto; Lupianez, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Temporal preparation and impulsivity involve overlapping neural structures (prefrontal cortex) and cognitive functions (response inhibition and time perception), however, their interrelations had not been investigated. We studied such interrelations by comparing the performance of groups with low vs. high non-clinical trait impulsivity during a…

  15. Semicontinuity of attractors for impulsive dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonotto, E. M.; Bortolan, M. C.; Collegari, R.; Czaja, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of collective tube conditions which assures a suitable behaviour for a family of dynamical systems close to impulsive sets. Using the collective tube conditions, we develop the theory of upper and lower semicontinuity of global attractors for a family of impulsive dynamical systems.

  16. Covert Suicidal Impulses in Maternally Deprived Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliman, Gilbert; Lubin, Harriet

    This paper discusses the development of suicidal impulses in children who have lost their mothers due to abandonment or death. The paper is based on two psychoanalytic case studies, in which the children were in therapy when the first suicidal impulses emerged. A pattern is described in which bereaved children's intense wishes to have their…

  17. Impulsivity, School Context, and School Misconduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Matt; Barton, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity holds a central place in the explanations of adolescent delinquency. Recent research suggests that neighborhood characteristics, particularly SES (socioeconomic status), perceived supervision, and collective efficacy, moderate the association between impulsivity and delinquency. However, findings to date have been equivocal, and the…

  18. Impulsivity and Psychoeducational Intervention in Hyperactive Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ronald T.

    1980-01-01

    Two psychoeducational procedures were investigated for their effects on impulsivity in 120 hyperactive children in two groups: those receiving stimulant drug therapy and those not receiving stimulant drug therapy. Results indicated that the use of psychoeducational treatment approaches are of value in altering the impulsive responses of…

  19. Impulsivity: Self-Report and Performance Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairns, E.; Harbison, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    The present study assessed the relationship between impulsivity as measured by the Matching Familiar Figures test (MFF) and by the impulsivity (IMP) factor derived from the Junior Eysenck Personality Inventory (JEPI) items identified by S. N. Bennet in 1973. (Author/RK)

  20. Assessing impulsivity changes in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Lucien; Delbeuck, Xavier; Billieux, Joël; d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Anne-Claude Juillerat; Van der Linden, Martial

    2008-01-01

    Impulsive behaviors are common in brain-damaged patients including those with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD). The objective of this study was to develop and validate a short version of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale assessing changes on 4 different dimensions of impulsivity, namely urgency, (lack of) premeditation, (lack of) perseverance, and sensation seeking, arising in the course of a neurodegenerative disease. To this end, caregivers of 83 probable AD patients completed a short questionnaire adapted from the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the data were performed and revealed that a model with 4 distinct but related latent variables corresponding to 4 different dimensions of impulsivity fit the data best. Furthermore, the results showed that lack of perseverance, followed by lack of premeditation and urgency, increased after the onset of the disease, whereas sensation seeking decreased. Overall, the multifaceted nature of impulsivity was confirmed in a sample of AD patients, whose caregivers reported significant changes regarding each facet of impulsivity. Consequently, the short version of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale opens up interesting prospects for a better comprehension of behavioral symptoms of dementia. PMID:18580596

  1. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2013-07-08

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  2. Impulsive phenomena, the impulsive character (der Triebhafte Charakter) and DSM personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Perry, J Christopher; Körner, Annett C

    2011-10-01

    Impulsive phenomena have frequently been associated with personality disorders, beginning with Reich's description of the impulsive-character (Reich, 1925/1975). However, questions remain regarding the cooccurrence of a wide variety of impulsive phenomena and whether an underlying structure influences the differential association of impulses to individual personality disorders. Adults entering residential treatment for treatment-refractory disorders were interviewed about their lifetime histories of 33 impulse items, following independent diagnostic interviews. Factor analysis suggested 12 underlying dimensions of impulsive phenomena, explaining 68% of the variance. Borderline and antisocial PDs had the highest impulse scores, followed by self-defeating, narcissistic, depressive, and passive-aggressive PDs. Schizoid, avoidant, obsessive-compulsive, and dependent types were negatively associated with impulsive phenomena. Individuals with the highest impulse scores showed higher levels of borderline, antisocial and either self-defeating or passive-aggressive personality pathology, and were characterized by high Neuroticism and Openness and low Agreeableness on the NEO-FFI. Personality disorders and the NEO-FFI personality traits both predicted unique variance in impulsive phenomena, with the former predominating. Our findings bear striking similarities to Reich's (1925/1975) descriptions of the impulsive character.

  3. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sesekin, A. N.; Nepp, A. N.

    2015-11-30

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  4. Helicopter impulsive noise - Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanism is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanism of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory-experiment are suggested.

  5. Helicopter impulsive noise: Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanism is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanism of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory-experiment are suggested.

  6. Helicopter impulsive noise - Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanisms is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanisms of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory/experiment are suggested.

  7. Successful restrained eating and trait impulsiveness.

    PubMed

    van Koningsbruggen, Guido M; Stroebe, Wolfgang; Aarts, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Restrained eaters with high scores on the Perceived Self-Regulatory Success in Dieting Scale (PSRS) are more successful than low scorers in regulating their food intake. According to the theory of temptation-elicited goal activation (Fishbach, Friedman, & Kruglanski, 2003), they have become successful because, due to earlier repeated instances of successful self-control, they formed an associative link between temptations and thoughts of dieting. It is unclear, however, why they should have been more successful in earlier attempts at self-control than their unsuccessful counterparts. We examined whether trait impulsiveness plays a role by investigating the associations between dietary restraint, trait impulsiveness, and PSRS. Results showed that the interaction between dietary restraint and impulsiveness predicted dieting success: A lower level of impulsiveness was associated with greater dieting success among restrained eaters. These results suggest that restrained eaters who are less impulsive are more likely to become successful restrained eaters as identified with the PSRS.

  8. Conversion of Impulse Voltage Generator Into Steep Wave Impulse Test-Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed Zaid; Tanwar, Surender Singh; Dayama, Ravindra; Choudhary, Rahul Raj; Mangal, Ravindra

    This paper demonstrates the alternative measures to generate the Steep wave impulse by using Impulse Voltage Generator (IVG) for high voltage testing of porcelain insulators. The modification of IVG by incorporating compensation of resistor, inductor, and capacitor has been achieved and further performance of the modified system has been analyzed by applying the generated lightning impulse and analyzing the electrical characteristics of impulse waves under standard lightning and fast rise multiple lightning waveform to determine the effect to improve rise time. The advantageous results have been received and being reported such as increase in overshoot compensation, increase in capacitive and inductive load ranges. Such further reduces the duration of oscillations of standard impulse voltages. The reduction in oscillation duration of steep front impulse voltages may be utilized in up gradation of Impulse Voltage Generator System. Stray capacitance could further be added in order to get the minimized difference of measurement between simulation and the field establishment.

  9. Synchronization and hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Thomas; Qian, Bian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2008-03-01

    Cilia and flagella commonly beat in a coordinated manner. Examples include the flagella that Volvox colonies use to move, the cilia that sweep foreign particles up out of the human airway, and the nodal cilia that set up the flow that determines the left-right axis in developing vertebrate embryos. In this talk we present an experimental study of how hydrodynamic interactions can lead to coordination in a simple idealized system: two nearby paddles driven with fixed torques in a highly viscous fluid. The paddles attain a synchronized state in which they rotate together with a phase difference of 90 degrees. We discuss how synchronization depends on system parameters and present numerical calculations using the method of regularized stokeslets.

  10. Solar impulsive energetic electron events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linghua

    The Sun is capable of accelerating ions from ~ tens of keV up to tens of GeV and electrons from ~ tens of eV up to hundreds of MeVs in transient events such as flares and fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The energized particles escaping into the interplanetary medium are referred to as Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events. The great majority of SEP events are impulsive SEP events that are dominated by ~1-100 keV electrons and ~MeV/nucleon ion emissions, with enhanced 3 He/ 4 He ratios up to 10 4 times the coronal values (also called electron/ 3 He-rich SEP events). This thesis is focused on solar impulsive energetic electron events, the electron part of impulsive SEP events, using electron observations from the 3-D Plasma and Energetic Particle instrument (3DP) on the WIND spacecraft near the Earth. First, I present the first comprehensive statistical study of solar energetic electron events over almost one solar cycle. I find that the occurrence rate of solar electron events shows a strong solar-cycle variation; after correction for the background effect, the estimated occurrence frequency exhibits a good power-law distribution, and the estimated occurrence rate near the Earth is ~1000/year at solar maximum and ~30/year at solar minimum for the instrumental sensitivity (~2.9×10^-4 (cm 2 s str eV) -1 for the 40 keV channel) of WIND/3DP, about one order of magnitude larger than the observed occurrence rate. Solar energetic electron events have a one-to-one association with type III radio bursts and a poor association with flares, but a close association with 3 He- rich ion emissions. These 3 He-rich electron events also have a poor association with flares but a close (~ 60%) association with west-limb CMEs. Then I present two case studies: one investigating the temporal relationship between solar impulsive electrons and type III radio emissions, and the second studying the temporal relationship between solar impulsive electrons and 3 He- rich ions. For both

  11. Socially synchronized circadian oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Guy; Herzog, Erik D.; Levine, Joel D.; Schwartz, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Daily rhythms of physiology and behaviour are governed by an endogenous timekeeping mechanism (a circadian ‘clock’). The alternation of environmental light and darkness synchronizes (entrains) these rhythms to the natural day–night cycle, and underlying mechanisms have been investigated using singly housed animals in the laboratory. But, most species ordinarily would not live out their lives in such seclusion; in their natural habitats, they interact with other individuals, and some live in colonies with highly developed social structures requiring temporal synchronization. Social cues may thus be critical to the adaptive function of the circadian system, but elucidating their role and the responsible mechanisms has proven elusive. Here, we highlight three model systems that are now being applied to understanding the biology of socially synchronized circadian oscillators: the fruitfly, with its powerful array of molecular genetic tools; the honeybee, with its complex natural society and clear division of labour; and, at a different level of biological organization, the rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus, site of the brain's circadian clock, with its network of mutually coupled single-cell oscillators. Analyses at the ‘group’ level of circadian organization will likely generate a more complex, but ultimately more comprehensive, view of clocks and rhythms and their contribution to fitness in nature. PMID:23825203

  12. Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2012-11-01

    From unicellular organisms as small as a few microns to the largest vertebrates on earth we find groups of beating flagella or cilia that exhibit striking spatio-temporal organization. This may take the form of precise frequency and phase locking as frequently found in the swimming of green algae, or beating with long-wavelength phase modulations known as metachronal waves, seen in ciliates and in our respiratory systems. The remarkable similarity in the underlying molecular structure of flagella across the whole eukaryotic world leads naturally to the hypothesis that a similarly universal mechanism might be responsible for synchronization. Although this mechanism is poorly understood, one appealing hypothesis is that it results from hydrodynamic interactions between flagella. In this talk I will describe a synthesis of recent experimental and theoretical studies of this issue that have provided the strongest evidence to date for the hydrodynamic origin of flagellar synchronization. At the unicellular level this includes studies of the beating of the two flagella of the wild type unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in their native state and under conditions of regrowth following autotomy, and of the flagellar dominance mutant ptx1, which displays unusual anti-phase synchronization. Analysis of the related multicellular organism Volvox carteri shows it to be an ideal model organism for the study of metachronal waves. Supported by BBSRC, EPSRC, ERC, and The Wellcome Trust.

  13. Digital Synchronizer without Metastability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simle, Robert M.; Cavazos, Jose A.

    2009-01-01

    A proposed design for a digital synchronizing circuit would eliminate metastability that plagues flip-flop circuits in digital input/output interfaces. This metastability is associated with sampling, by use of flip-flops, of an external signal that is asynchronous with a clock signal that drives the flip-flops: it is a temporary flip-flop failure that can occur when a rising or falling edge of an asynchronous signal occurs during the setup and/or hold time of a flip-flop. The proposed design calls for (1) use of a clock frequency greater than the frequency of the asynchronous signal, (2) use of flip-flop asynchronous preset or clear signals for the asynchronous input, (3) use of a clock asynchronous recovery delay with pulse width discriminator, and (4) tying the data inputs to constant logic levels to obtain (5) two half-rate synchronous partial signals - one for the falling and one for the rising edge. Inasmuch as the flip-flop data inputs would be permanently tied to constant logic levels, setup and hold times would not be violated. The half-rate partial signals would be recombined to construct a signal that would replicate the original asynchronous signal at its original rate but would be synchronous with the clock signal.

  14. Emergency Response Synchronization Matrix

    1999-06-01

    An emergency response to a disaster is complex, requiring the rapid integration, coordination, and synchronization of multiple levels of governmental and non-governmental organizations from numerous jurisdictions into a unified community response. For example, a community’s response actions to a fixed site hazardous materials incident could occur in an area extending from an on-site storage location to points 25 or more miles away. Response actions are directed and controlled by local governments and agencies situated withinmore » the response area, as well as by state and federal operaticns centers quite removed from the area of impact. Time is critical and the protective action decision-making process is greatly compressed. The response community must carefully plan and coordinate response operations in order to have confidence that they will be effectively implemented when faced with the potentially catastrophic nature of such releases. A graphical depiction of the entire response process via an emergency response synchronization matrix is an effective tool in optimizing the planning, exercising, and implementation of emergency plans. This system—based approach to emergency planning depicts how a community organizes its response tasks across space and time in relation to hazard actions. It provides the opportunity to make real—time adjustments as necessary for maximizing the often limited resources in protecting area residents. A response must involve the entire community and must not be limited by individual jurisdictions and organizations acting on their own without coordination, integration, and synchronization.« less

  15. Automated synchrogram analysis applied to heartbeat and reconstructed respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Claudia; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Schumann, Aicko Y.; Penzel, Thomas; Havlin, Shlomo; Kantelhardt, Jan W.

    2009-03-01

    Phase synchronization between two weakly coupled oscillators has been studied in chaotic systems for a long time. However, it is difficult to unambiguously detect such synchronization in experimental data from complex physiological systems. In this paper we review our study of phase synchronization between heartbeat and respiration in 150 healthy subjects during sleep using an automated procedure for screening the synchrograms. We found that this synchronization is significantly enhanced during non-rapid-eye-movement (non-REM) sleep (deep sleep and light sleep) and is reduced during REM sleep. In addition, we show that the respiration signal can be reconstructed from the heartbeat recordings in many subjects. Our reconstruction procedure, which works particularly well during non-REM sleep, allows the detection of cardiorespiratory synchronization even if only heartbeat intervals were recorded.

  16. Phase synchronization of instrumental music signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sayan; Palit, Sanjay Kumar; Banerjee, Santo; Ariffin, M. R. K.; Bhattacharya, D. K.

    2014-06-01

    Signal analysis is one of the finest scientific techniques in communication theory. Some quantitative and qualitative measures describe the pattern of a music signal, vary from one to another. Same musical recital, when played by different instrumentalists, generates different types of music patterns. The reason behind various patterns is the psycho-acoustic measures - Dynamics, Timber, Tonality and Rhythm, varies in each time. However, the psycho-acoustic study of the music signals does not reveal any idea about the similarity between the signals. For such cases, study of synchronization of long-term nonlinear dynamics may provide effective results. In this context, phase synchronization (PS) is one of the measures to show synchronization between two non-identical signals. In fact, it is very critical to investigate any other kind of synchronization for experimental condition, because those are completely non identical signals. Also, there exists equivalence between the phases and the distances of the diagonal line in Recurrence plot (RP) of the signals, which is quantifiable by the recurrence quantification measure τ-recurrence rate. This paper considers two nonlinear music signals based on same raga played by two eminent sitar instrumentalists as two non-identical sources. The psycho-acoustic study shows how the Dynamics, Timber, Tonality and Rhythm vary for the two music signals. Then, long term analysis in the form of phase space reconstruction is performed, which reveals the chaotic phase spaces for both the signals. From the RP of both the phase spaces, τ-recurrence rate is calculated. Finally by the correlation of normalized tau-recurrence rate of their 3D phase spaces and the PS of the two music signals has been established. The numerical results well support the analysis.

  17. An underwater chaotic lidar sensor based on synchronized blue laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Luke K.; Dunn, Kaitlin J.; Bollt, Erik M.; Cochenour, Brandon; Jemison, William D.

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel chaotic lidar system designed for underwater impulse response measurements. The system uses two recently introduced, low-cost, commercially available 462 nm multimode InGaN laser diodes, which are synchronized by a bi-directional optical link. This synchronization results in a noise-like chaotic intensity modulation with over 1 GHz bandwidth and strong modulation depth. An advantage of this approach is its simple transmitter architecture, which uses no electrical signal generator, electro-optic modulator, or optical frequency doubler.

  18. Behavioral Impulsivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, Amitai; McKay, Dean

    2016-09-01

    Background Grassi et al. (2015) collected data to examine impulsivity in individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) compared to nonpsychiatric controls. Their aim was to examine whether OCD may be fully captured by the behavioral addiction model, using the prototypical mechanism underlying drug addiction as their framework. Based on their findings, Grassi et al. concluded that OCD shares behavioral components with addictions, particularly behavioral impulsivity and risky decision making. Furthermore, the authors suggested that this model may be superior to the prevailing psychological model of OCD. Findings We argue that based on the nature of their data as well as the current dominant conceptualization of OCD in the literature, this conclusion is untenable. The authors inferred behavioral impulsivity, whereas their main finding was concerning cognitive impulsivity or difficulties in planning. Such items on the Barratt impulsiveness scale have been shown in other research to overpredict behavioral impulsive tendencies in OCD, where the nature of the condition involves doubting of action and a conservative estimate of how one's cognitions may impact behavior. Conclusions We conclude that similar to drug addiction, compulsive rituals in OCD may be governed by a negative reinforcement mechanism; the available data indicate that OCD does not share the two main components seen in addiction, namely, behavioral impulsivity and risky decision making. PMID:27156379

  19. Impulsive and non-impulsive suicide attempts in patients treated for alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wojnar, Marcin; Ilgen, Mark A.; Czyz, Ewa; Strobbe, Stephen; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Glass, Jennifer; Brower, Kirk J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Suicidal behavior has been recognized as an increasing problem among alcohol-dependent subjects. The aim of the study was to identify correlates of impulsive and non-impulsive suicide attempts among a treated population of alcohol-dependent patients. Methods A total of 154 patients with alcohol dependence consecutively admitted for addiction treatment participated in the study. Suicidal behavior was assessed together with severity of alcohol dependence, childhood abuse, impulsivity, and family history. A stop-signal procedure was used as a behavioral measure of impulsivity. Results and conclusions Lifetime suicide attempts were reported by 43% of patients in alcohol treatment; of which 62% were impulsive. Compared to patients without a suicide attempt, those with a non-impulsive attempt were more likely to have a history of sexual abuse (OR = 7.17), a family history of suicide (OR = 4.09), and higher scores on a personality measure of impulsiveness (OR = 2.27). The only significant factor that distinguished patients with impulsive suicide attempts from patients without a suicide attempt and from patients with a non-impulsive suicide attempt was a higher level of behavioral impulsivity (OR = 1.84 – 2.42). Limitations Retrospective self-report of suicide attempts and family history. Lack of diagnostic measure. PMID:18835498

  20. Psychosocial predictors of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients

    PubMed Central

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Konopa, Aleksandra; Podgórska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J.; Wojnar, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    Impulsivity is an important risk factor of severe course of alcohol dependence. However, the significance of environmental determinants of impulsivity has been underestimated. The aim of the study was to identify psychosocial factors increasing the level of impulsivity in alcoholics. Levels of impulsivity were measured in 304 alcohol-dependent patients. Stop-signal task was used to assess behavioral impulsivity, and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale to measure global and cognitive impulsivity. Correlations between impulsivity and psychosocial variables were examined. A significant association between level of impulsivity and severity of psychopathological symptoms were observed. Patients who reported childhood sexual or physical abuse, lower social support, more severe course of alcohol dependence were more impulsive, especially in cognitive domain. When entered into a linear regression analysis model, severity of alcohol dependence, psychopathology and childhood physical abuse remained significant. These results suggest that psychosocial variables are important factors associated with high levels of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:23274294

  1. Psychosocial predictors of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Konopa, Aleksandra; Podgórska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J; Wojnar, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is an important risk factor of severe course of alcohol dependence. However, the significance of environmental determinants of impulsivity has been underestimated. The aim of this study was to identify psychosocial factors increasing the level of impulsivity in alcoholics. Levels of impulsivity were measured in 304 alcohol-dependent patients. The stop-signal task was used to assess behavioral impulsivity, and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, to measure global and cognitive impulsivity. Correlations between impulsivity and psychosocial variables were examined. A significant association between level of impulsivity and severity of psychopathological symptoms was observed. Patients who reported childhood sexual or physical abuse, lower social support, and more severe course of alcohol dependence were more impulsive, especially in the cognitive domain. When entered into a linear regression analysis model, severity of alcohol dependence, psychopathology, and childhood physical abuse remained significant. These results suggest that psychosocial variables are important factors associated with high levels of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients.

  2. Psychosocial predictors of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Konopa, Aleksandra; Podgórska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J; Wojnar, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is an important risk factor of severe course of alcohol dependence. However, the significance of environmental determinants of impulsivity has been underestimated. The aim of this study was to identify psychosocial factors increasing the level of impulsivity in alcoholics. Levels of impulsivity were measured in 304 alcohol-dependent patients. The stop-signal task was used to assess behavioral impulsivity, and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, to measure global and cognitive impulsivity. Correlations between impulsivity and psychosocial variables were examined. A significant association between level of impulsivity and severity of psychopathological symptoms was observed. Patients who reported childhood sexual or physical abuse, lower social support, and more severe course of alcohol dependence were more impulsive, especially in the cognitive domain. When entered into a linear regression analysis model, severity of alcohol dependence, psychopathology, and childhood physical abuse remained significant. These results suggest that psychosocial variables are important factors associated with high levels of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:23274294

  3. Spin Stabilized Impulsively Controlled Missile (SSICM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, J. I.; Howell, W. M.

    1985-12-01

    This patent is for the Spin Stabilized Impulsively Controlled Missile (SSICM). SSICM is a missile configuration which employs spin stabilization, nutational motion, and impulsive thrusting, and a body mounted passive or semiactive sensor to achieve very small miss distances against a high speed moving target. SSICM does not contain an autopilot, control surfaces, a control actuation system, nor sensor stabilization gimbals. SSICM spins at a rate sufficient to provide frequency separation between body motions and inertial target motion. Its impulsive thrusters provide near instantaneous changes in lateral velocity, whereas conventional missiles require a significant time delay to achieve lateral acceleration.

  4. [Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Joutsa, Juho; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2013-01-01

    Of the patients having Parkinson's disease, up to third encounters some degree of impulse control problems and one out of seven suffers from true impulse control disorders such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping and binge eating. Dopaminergic drugs used in anti-Parkinson therapy, especially dopamine agonists, increase the risk of these disorders. Impulse control disorders are associated with a relatively more active dopamine-mediated neurotransmission of the mesolimbic and mesocortical system. Discontinuation of dopamine agonist medication can thus be considered as the first line treatment of these disorders. PMID:24397147

  5. Reward drive and rash impulsiveness as dimensions of impulsivity: implications for substance misuse.

    PubMed

    Dawe, Sharon; Gullo, Matthew J; Loxton, Natalie J

    2004-09-01

    One of the primary personality dimensions or traits that has consistently been linked to substance abuse is impulsivity. However, impulsivity is not a homogenous construct and although many of the measures of impulsivity are correlated, the most recent review of published factor analytic studies has proposed two independent dimensions of impulsivity: reward sensitivity, reflecting one of the primary dimension of J. A. Gray's personality theory, and rash impulsiveness. These two facets of impulsivity derived from the field of personality research parallel recent developments in the neurosciences where changes in the incentive value of rewarding substances has been linked to alterations in neural substrates involved in reward seeking and with a diminished capacity to inhibit behavior due to chronic drug exposure. In this paper, we propose a model that integrates the findings from research into individual differences with recent models of neural substrates implicated in the development of substance misuse.

  6. Psychic energy and synchronicity.

    PubMed

    Zabriskie, Beverley

    2014-04-01

    Given Jung's interest in physics' formulations of psychic energy and the concept of time, overlaps and convergences in the themes addressed in analytical psychology and in quantum physics are to be expected. These are informed by the active intersections between the matter of mind and mindfulness re matter. In 1911, Jung initiated dinners with Einstein. Jung's definition of libido in the pivotal 1912 Fordham Lectures reveals the influence of these conversations. Twenty years later, a significant period in physics, Wolfgang Pauli contacted Jung. Their collaboration led to the theory of synchronicity.

  7. Sun synchronous solar refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The primary goal of this project was to prototype a complete Sun Synchronous Solar Powered Refrigerator. The key element to the technology is the development of the hermetic motor compressor assembly. The prototype was to be developed to either the stage where Polar Products could receive additional venture capital or to the point whereby Polar could use their own capital to manufacture the systems. Our goal was to construct a prototype which would be the next step to a proven and market ready product. To demonstrate the technology under laboratory conditions was a very minimal goal.

  8. Impulsively generated fast coronal pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid oscillations in the corona are discussed from a theoretical standpoint, developing some previous work on ducted, fast magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium. In the theory, impulsively (e.g., flare) generated mhd (magnetohydrodynamic) waves are ducted by regions of low Alfven speed (high density) such as coronal loops. Wave propagation in such ducts is strongly dispersive and closely akin to the behavior of Love waves in seismology, Pekeris waves in oceanography and guided waves in fiber optics. Such flare-generated magnetoacoustic waves possess distinctive temporal signatures consisting of periodic, quasi-periodic and decay phases. The quasi-periodic phase possesses the strongest amplitudes and the shortest time scales. Time scales are typically of the order of a second for inhomogeneities (coronal loop width) of 1000 km and Alfven speeds of 1000/kms, and pulse duration times are of tens of seconds. Quasi-periodic signatures have been observed in radio wavelengths for over a decade and more recently by SMM. It is hoped that the theoretical ideas outlined may be successfully related to these observations and thus aid the interpretation of oscillatory signatures recorded by SMM. Such signatures may also provide a diagnostic of coronal conditions. New aspects of the ducted mhd waves, for example their behavior in smoothly varying as opposed to tube-like inhomogeneities, are currently under investigation. The theory is not restricted to loops but applied equally to open field regions.

  9. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Don A.; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2005-04-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period. This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered. The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  10. Behavioral Measures of Impulsivity and the Law

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Charles W.; Marsh-Richard, Dawn M.; Dougherty, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    The General Theory of Crime proposes that crime is explained by the combination of situational opportunity and lack of self-control. Impulsivity is one of the important components of self-control. Because behavioral measures of impulsivity are becoming more commonly utilized to assess forensic populations, this manuscript provides an overview of three current behavioral measures. In doing so, an example of their application is provided using a group of individuals likely to come into contact with the legal system: adolescents with Conduct Disorder. Earlier age of onset of Conduct Disorder symptoms has been shown to be an important predictor of the persistence of poor outcomes into adulthood including participation in criminal activities. This study found differential behavioral profiles across distinct measures of impulsivity by those with childhood- versus adolescent-onset Conduct Disorder. Legal implications for defining behavioral deficits using behavioral measures of impulsivity and their current limitations are discussed. PMID:19039792

  11. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2004-01-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  12. Synchronization Tomography: A Method for Three-Dimensional Localization of Phase Synchronized Neuronal Populations in the Human Brain using Magnetoencephalography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tass, P. A.; Fieseler, T.; Dammers, J.; Dolan, K.; Morosan, P.; Majtanik, M.; Boers, F.; Muren, A.; Zilles, K.; Fink, G. R.

    2003-02-01

    We present a noninvasive technique which allows the anatomical localization of phase synchronized neuronal populations in the human brain with magnetoencephalography. We study phase synchronization between the reconstructed current source density (CSD) of different brain areas as well as between the CSD and muscular activity. We asked four subjects to tap their fingers in synchrony with a rhythmic tone, and to continue tapping at the same rate after the tone was switched off. The phase synchronization behavior of brain areas relevant for movement coordination, inner voice, and time estimation changes drastically when the transition to internal pacing occurs, while their averaged amplitudes remain unchanged. Information of this kind cannot be derived with standard neuroimaging techniques like functional magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography.

  13. Extending the impulse response in order to reduce errors due to impulse noise and signal fading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Joseph A.; Rolls, Andrew J.; Sirisena, H. R.

    1988-01-01

    A finite impulse response (FIR) digital smearing filter was designed to produce maximum intersymbol interference and maximum extension of the impulse response of the signal in a noiseless binary channel. A matched FIR desmearing filter at the receiver then reduced the intersymbol interference to zero. Signal fades were simulated by means of 100 percent signal blockage in the channel. Smearing and desmearing filters of length 256, 512, and 1024 were used for these simulations. Results indicate that impulse response extension by means of bit smearing appears to be a useful technique for correcting errors due to impulse noise or signal fading in a binary channel.

  14. Impulsive Social Influence Increases Impulsive Choices on a Temporal Discounting Task in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Jodi M.; Curran, Max T.; Calderon, Vanessa; Stoeckel, Luke E.; Evins, A. Eden

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults who affiliate with friends who engage in impulsive behavior are more likely to engage in impulsive behaviors themselves, and those who associate with prosocial (i.e. more prudent, future oriented) peers are more likely to engage in prosocial behavior. However, it is difficult to disentangle the contribution of peer influence vs. peer selection (i.e., whether individuals choose friends with similar traits) when interpreting social behaviors. In this study, we combined a novel social manipulation with a well-validated delay discounting task assessing impulsive behavior to create a social influence delay discounting task, in which participants were exposed to both impulsive (smaller, sooner or SS payment) and non-impulsive (larger, later or LL payment) choices from their peers. Young adults in this sample, n = 51, aged 18–25 had a higher rate of SS choices after exposure to impulsive peer influence than after exposure to non-impulsive peer influence. Interestingly, in highly susceptible individuals, the rate of non-impulsive choices did not increase after exposure to non-impulsive influence. There was a positive correlation between self-reported suggestibility and degree of peer influence on SS choices. These results suggest that, in young adults, SS choices appear to be influenced by the choices of same-aged peers, especially for individuals who are highly susceptible to influence. PMID:24988440

  15. Numerical vorticity creation based on impulse conservation.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, D M; Chorin, A J

    1996-01-01

    The problem of creating solenoidal vortex elements to satisfy no-slip boundary conditions in Lagrangian numerical vortex methods is solved through the use of impulse elements at walls and their subsequent conversion to vortex loops. The algorithm is not uniquely defined, due to the gauge freedom in the definition of impulse; the numerically optimal choice of gauge remains to be determined. Two different choices are discussed, and an application to flow past a sphere is sketched. PMID:11607636

  16. Specific Impulse and Mass Flow Rate Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Don A.

    2005-01-01

    Specific impulse is defined in words in many ways. Very early in any text on rocket propulsion a phrase similar to .specific impulse is the thrust force per unit propellant weight flow per second. will be found.(2) It is only after seeing the mathematics written down does the definition mean something physically to scientists and engineers responsible for either measuring it or using someone.s value for it.

  17. Response of electroexplosive devices to impulsive waveforms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, L. A.; Menichelli, V. J.

    1971-01-01

    The firing characteristics of insensitive electroexplosive devices to certain impulsive waveforms have been investigated. For these waveforms, energy is delivered in a time short compared to the thermal time constant and therefore cooling plays a negligible role. One waveform is a terminated capacitor discharge wherein the regular discharge of a capacitor is terminated at a preset point. Another is a half-sine wave pulse. The theory, design, and application of both impulsive waveform generators are presented together with certain limited experimental observations.

  18. Digitized synchronous demodulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodhouse, Christopher E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A digitized synchronous demodulator is constructed entirely of digital components including timing logic, an accumulator, and means to digitally filter the digital output signal. Indirectly, it accepts, at its input, periodic analog signals which are converted to digital signals by traditional analog-to-digital conversion techniques. Broadly, the input digital signals are summed to one of two registers within an accumulator, based on the phase of the input signal and medicated by timing logic. At the end of a predetermined number of cycles of the inputted periodic signals, the contents of the register that accumulated samples from the negative half cycle is subtracted from the accumulated samples from the positive half cycle. The resulting difference is an accurate measurement of the narrow band amplitude of the periodic input signal during the measurement period. This measurement will not include error sources encountered in prior art synchronous demodulators using analog techniques such as offsets, charge injection errors, temperature drift, switching transients, settling time, analog to digital converter missing code, and linearity errors.

  19. Generalized transfers and the nonoptimality of purely radial impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkin, V. I.

    1985-07-01

    A system of variables is proposed that is convenient for the precise formulation of the problem of optimal multiple-impulse transfer between arbitrary nonrectilinear Kepler orbits. The existence of a universal two-impulse transfer with transverse impulses is demonstrated for such orbits. Calculation formulas for these impulses are obtained which generalize the corresponding formulas of two-impulse Hohmann transfer between circular orbits. In addition, a lower-bound estimate is obtained for the characteristic velocity of a one-impulse transfer between orbits having a common point, and the nonoptimality of an arbitrary radial impulse is demonstrated.

  20. Enhanced awakening probability of repetitive impulse sounds.

    PubMed

    Vos, Joos; Houben, Mark M J

    2013-09-01

    In the present study relations between the level of impulse sounds and the observed proportion of behaviorally confirmed awakening reactions were determined. The sounds (shooting sounds, bangs produced by door slamming or by container transshipment, aircraft landings) were presented by means of loudspeakers in the bedrooms of 50 volunteers. The fragments for the impulse sounds consisted of single or multiple events. The sounds were presented during a 6-h period that started 75 min after the subjects wanted to sleep. In order to take account of habituation, each subject participated during 18 nights. At equal indoor A-weighted sound exposure levels, the proportion of awakening for the single impulse sounds was equal to that for the aircraft sounds. The proportion of awakening induced by the multiple impulse sounds, however, was significantly higher. For obtaining the same rate of awakening, the sound level of each of the successive impulses in a fragment had to be about 15-25 dB lower than the level of one single impulse. This level difference was largely independent of the degree of habituation. Various explanations for the enhanced awakening probability are discussed. PMID:23967934

  1. Impulse noise generator--design and operation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, H

    1991-01-01

    In the seventies PFANDER (Pfander, 1975) proposed a screening test with an impulse noise simulator to check the particular responsivity of soldiers on vulnerability of the inner ear concerning the impulse noise-induced hearing loss. According to a system developed at the University of Oldenburg (Germany) (Klug & Radek, 1987), we have constructed an impulse noise generator designed for our specific requirements that will be presented. The simulator consists of an electrical ignited impulse noise spark gap which is supplied by a 3.5 kV high voltage source. At a distance of 1.10 m from the center of the impulse noise spark gap a peak pressure level of 155 dB with a C-Duration (Pfander, 1975) of .2 msec and with the main energy in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 2 kHz was good reproducible. It would be preferable to shift the impulse noise spectrum to lower frequencies but experimental effort has failed so far.

  2. Impulse noise generator--design and operation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, H

    1991-01-01

    In the seventies PFANDER (Pfander, 1975) proposed a screening test with an impulse noise simulator to check the particular responsivity of soldiers on vulnerability of the inner ear concerning the impulse noise-induced hearing loss. According to a system developed at the University of Oldenburg (Germany) (Klug & Radek, 1987), we have constructed an impulse noise generator designed for our specific requirements that will be presented. The simulator consists of an electrical ignited impulse noise spark gap which is supplied by a 3.5 kV high voltage source. At a distance of 1.10 m from the center of the impulse noise spark gap a peak pressure level of 155 dB with a C-Duration (Pfander, 1975) of .2 msec and with the main energy in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 2 kHz was good reproducible. It would be preferable to shift the impulse noise spectrum to lower frequencies but experimental effort has failed so far. PMID:1842469

  3. Synchronization Dynamics in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changsong; Zemanová, Lucia; Kurths, Jürgen

    Previous chapters have discussed tools from graph theory and their contribution to our understanding of the structural organization of mammalian brains and its functional implications. The brain functions are mediated by complicated dynamical processes which arise from the underlying complex neural networks, and synchronization has been proposed as an important mechanism for neural information processing. In this chapter, we discuss synchronization dynamics on complex networks. We first present a general theory and tools to characterize the relationship of some structural measures of networks to their synchronizability (the ability of the networks to achieve complete synchronization) and to the organization of effective synchronization patterns on the networks. Then, we study synchronization in a realistic network of cat cortical connectivity by modeling the nodes (which are cortical areas composed of large ensembles of neurons) by a neural mass model or a subnetwork of interacting neurons. We show that if the dynamics is characterized by well-defined oscillations (neural mass model and subnetworks with strong couplings), the synchronization patterns can be understood by the general principles discussed in the first part of the chapter. With weak couplings, the model with subnetworks displays biologically plausible dynamics and the synchronization pattern reveals a hierarchically clustered organization in the network structure. Thus, the study of synchronization of complex networks can provide insights into the relationship between network topology and functional organization of complex brain networks.

  4. Robust Sliding Window Synchronizer Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, Kue S.; Xiong, Fuqin; Pinchak, Stanley

    2004-01-01

    The development of an advanced robust timing synchronization scheme is crucial for the support of two NASA programs--Advanced Air Transportation Technologies and Aviation Safety. A mobile aeronautical channel is a dynamic channel where various adverse effects--such as Doppler shift, multipath fading, and shadowing due to precipitation, landscape, foliage, and buildings--cause the loss of symbol timing synchronization.

  5. RAM-Based frame synchronizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niswander, J. K.; Stattel, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Frame synchronizer for serial telemetry is rapidly reconfigured for changing formats. Synchronizer generates signals marking data-word boundaries, beginning of each frame, and beginning of each paragraph. Also derived are search, check, and lock status signals. Existing unit is assembled from standard random-access memory elements and MOS and low-power-Schottky logic.

  6. Digital synchronization and communication techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, William C.

    1992-01-01

    Information on digital synchronization and communication techniques is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include phase shift keying, modems, characteristics of open loop digital synchronizers, an open loop phase and frequency estimator, and a digital receiver structure using an open loop estimator in a decision directed architecture.

  7. Chua's Circuit: Control and Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimiciuc, Stefan-Andrei; Vasilovici, Ovidiu; Dimitriu, Dan-Gheorghe

    Chaos-based data encryption is one of the most reliable methods used in secure communications. This implies a good control of a chaotic system and a good synchronization between the involved systems. Here, experimental results are shown on the control and synchronization of Chua's circuits. The control of the chaotic circuit was achieved by using the switching method. The influence of the control signal characteristics (amplitude, frequency and shape) on the system's states was also investigated. The synchronization of two similar chaotic circuits was studied, emphasizing the importance of the chaotic state characteristics of the Master system in respect to those of Slave system. It was shown that the synchronization does not depend on the chaotic state type, neither on the dimension (x, y or z) used for synchronization.

  8. Neural substrates of time perception and impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Marc; Simmons, Alan N.; Flagan, Taru; Lane, Scott D.; Wackermann, Jiří; Paulus, Martin P.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies provide empirical evidence for the association between impulsivity and time perception. However, little is known about the neural substrates underlying this function. This investigation examined the influence of impulsivity on neural activation patterns during the encoding and reproduction of intervals with durations of 3, 9 and 18 seconds using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-seven subjects participated in this study, including 15 high impulsive subjects that were classified based on their self-rating. FMRI activation during the duration reproduction task was correlated with measures of two self-report questionnaires related to the concept of impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, BIS; Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, ZTPI). Behaviorally, those individuals who under-reproduced temporal intervals also showed lower scores on the ZTPI future perspective subscale and higher scores on the BIS. FMRI activation revealed an accumulating pattern of neural activity peaking at the end of the 9- and 18-s interval within right posterior insula. Activations of brain regions during the reproduction phase of the timing task, such as those related to motor execution as well as to the ‘core control network’ – encompassing the inferior frontal and medial frontal cortex, the anterior insula as well as the inferior parietal cortex – were significantly correlated with reproduced duration, as well as with BIS and ZTPI subscales. In particular, the greater activation in these regions the shorter were the reproduced intervals, the more impulsive was an individual and the less pronounced the future perspective. Activation in the core control network, thus, may form a biological marker for cognitive time management and for impulsiveness. PMID:21763642

  9. Neural substrates of time perception and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Marc; Simmons, Alan N; Flagan, Taru; Lane, Scott D; Wackermann, Jiří; Paulus, Martin P

    2011-08-11

    Several studies provide empirical evidence for the association between impulsivity and time perception. However, little is known about the neural substrates underlying this function. This investigation examined the influence of impulsivity on neural activation patterns during the encoding and reproduction of intervals with durations of 3, 9 and 18s using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-seven subjects participated in this study, including 15 high impulsive subjects that were classified based on their self-rating. FMRI activation during the duration reproduction task was correlated with measures of two self-report questionnaires related to the concept of impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, BIS; Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, ZTPI). Behaviorally, those individuals who under-reproduced temporal intervals also showed lower scores on the ZTPI future perspective subscale and higher scores on the BIS. FMRI activation revealed an accumulating pattern of neural activity peaking at the end of the 9- and 18-s intervals within right posterior insula. Activations of brain regions during the reproduction phase of the timing task, such as those related to motor execution as well as to the 'core control network' - encompassing the inferior frontal and medial frontal cortices, the anterior insula as well as the inferior parietal cortex - were significantly correlated with reproduced duration, as well as with BIS and ZTPI subscales. In particular, the greater activation in these regions the shorter were the reproduced intervals, the more impulsive was an individual and the less pronounced the future perspective. Activation in the core control network, thus, may form a biological marker for cognitive time management and for impulsiveness.

  10. [Impulsivity and compulsivity in cocaine dependent individuals].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Serrano, María José; Cesar Peraleslópez, José; Moreno-López, Laura; Santos-Ruiz, Ana; Pérez-García, Miguel; Verdejogarcía, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    A recent theoretical approach describes addiction as a dynamic behavioural change process on the impulsivity-compulsivity axis. However, on the basis of current evidence, it is still difficult to establish a selective association between the course of addiction and individual transition along this axis. The aim of this study is to categorize each of the individuals in a sample of cocaine-dependent patients (CDI) as mainly impulsive or mainly compulsive, on the basis of their performance in neuropsychological inhibition and perseveration tests, and to test the association between the assigned category and their scores in trait impulsivity, and severity of cocaine addiction (measured by means of self-report assessment tools). A total of 42 CDI and 65 healthy control individuals (HCI) were assessed using the UPPS-P Scale (to explore trait impulsivity), the Stroop and Go/No Go (to assess response inhibition), and Revised-Strategy Application and Probabilistic Reversal tests (to assess response perseveration). Forty-five per cent of the CDIs were classified as compulsive, and this subgroup scored significantly higher than the impulsive group on the UPPS-P dimensions of lack of perseverance and lack of premeditation. A substantial proportion of CDIs can be classified as compulsive. No differences between compulsive and impulsive CDIs were found with regard to severity of exposure to cocaine; however, patients classified as compulsive by means of neuropsychological tasks are less perseverative in the pursuit of long-term objectives and more prone to make under-meditated decisions, as shown by trait impulsivity assessment questionnaires. PMID:22648313

  11. Twin engine synchronizer

    SciTech Connect

    Kobus, J.R.

    1988-05-03

    This patent describes an apparatus for synchronizing the speeds of two engines, each having its own throttle level connected by an associated cable to a respective hand throttle lever, comprising moving means carried by the throttle lever of one of the engines for moving the throttle lever of the one engine independently of its associated cable and its respective hand throttle lever to increase or decrease the speed of the one engine until the speed of the one engine matches the speed of the other engine. The moving means moves the throttle lever of the one engine without moving its associated cable or its respective hand throttle lever, and actuating means mounted remote from the throttle lever of the one engine for actuating the moving means.

  12. Synchronization in neural nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidal, Jacques J.; Haggerty, John

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents an artificial neural network concept (the Synchronizable Oscillator Networks) where the instants of individual firings in the form of point processes constitute the only form of information transmitted between joining neurons. In the model, neurons fire spontaneously and regularly in the absence of perturbation. When interaction is present, the scheduled firings are advanced or delayed by the firing of neighboring neurons. Networks of such neurons become global oscillators which exhibit multiple synchronizing attractors. From arbitrary initial states, energy minimization learning procedures can make the network converge to oscillatory modes that satisfy multi-dimensional constraints. Such networks can directly represent routing and scheduling problems that consist of ordering sequences of events.

  13. Impact of DMD-SLMs errors on reconstructed Fourier holograms quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodtsov, D. Yu; Cheremkhin, P. A.; Krasnov, V. V.; Rodin, V. G.

    2016-08-01

    The quality of reconstructed impulse response of holograms displayed on a three DMD modulators of different models was experimentally evaluated. The integral parameter of modulators' optical quality - the size of sufficiently flat area of matrix surface - was estimated according to the developed technique. The results of holograms reconstruction are analyzed.

  14. Effects of acoustic impulses on hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Gerald; Müller, Reinhard; Heppelmann, Guido; Bache, Thomas

    2002-05-01

    It is well known that acoustic impulses are especially dangerous to the ear. In order to understand the damaging mechanisms involved, cases of acute acoustic trauma in man were systematically collected and documented for many years. When possible, the damaging impulses were recreated and measured, to correlate the impulses with the auditory damage they caused. Detailed pure-tone audiometry up to 16 kHz was used to determine the effects on hearing. Together with epidemiological studies on various occupations, three different damaging mechanisms can be discerned. Relatively long and massive impulses (some explosions, some airbags) often lead to damage at low frequencies, from about 0.5 to 1.5 kHz. The typical notch at about 4 to 6 kHz typically is the result of strong peaks, lasting several milliseconds, or longer. There is another notch at 12 to 14 kHz, characteristic of very short, needle-like impulses that are caused by many hand weapons, toy pistols, and firecrackers. Probable mechanisms are discussed.

  15. Impulsivity, Frontal Lobes and Risk for Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Fulton Timm; Boettiger, Charlotte Ann

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol and substance abuse disorders involve continued use of substances despite negative consequences, i.e. loss of behavioral control of drug use. The frontal cortical areas of brain oversee behavioral control through executive functions. Executive functions include abstract thinking, motivation, planning, attention to tasks and inhibition of impulsive responses. Impulsiveness generally refers to premature, unduly risky, poorly conceived actions. Dysfunctional impulsivity includes deficits in attention, lack of reflection and/or insensitivity to consequences, all of which occur in addiction (Evenden, 1999; (de Wit, 2009). Binge drinking models indicate chronic alcohol damages corticolimbic brain regions (Crews et al., 2000) causing reversal learning deficits indicative of loss of executive function (Obernier et al., 2002b). Genetics and adolescent age are risk factors for alcoholism that coincide with sensitivity to alcohol induced neurotoxicity. Cortical degeneration from alcohol abuse may increase impulsivity contributing to the development, persistence and severity of alcohol use disorders. Interestingly, abstinence results in bursts of neurogenesis and brain regrowth (Crews and Nixon, 2009). Treatments for alcoholism, including naltrexone pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy may work through improving executive functions. This review will examine the relationships between impulsivity and executive function behaviors to changes in cortical structure during alcohol dependence and recovery. PMID:19410598

  16. Nutritional recommendations for synchronized swimming.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sherry; Benardot, Dan; Mountjoy, Margo

    2014-08-01

    The sport of synchronized swimming is unique, because it combines speed, power, and endurance with precise synchronized movements and high-risk acrobatic maneuvers. Athletes must train and compete while spending a great amount of time underwater, upside down, and without the luxury of easily available oxygen. This review assesses the scientific evidence with respect to the physiological demands, energy expenditure, and body composition in these athletes. The role of appropriate energy requirements and guidelines for carbohydrate, protein, fat, and micronutrients for elite synchronized swimmers are reviewed. Because of the aesthetic nature of the sport, which prioritizes leanness, the risks of energy and macronutrient deficiencies are of significant concern. Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport and disordered eating/eating disorders are also of concern for these female athletes. An approach to the healthy management of body composition in synchronized swimming is outlined. Synchronized swimmers should be encouraged to consume a well-balanced diet with sufficient energy to meet demands and to time the intake of carbohydrate, protein, and fat to optimize performance and body composition. Micronutrients of concern for this female athlete population include iron, calcium, and vitamin D. This article reviews the physiological demands of synchronized swimming and makes nutritional recommendations for recovery, training, and competition to help optimize athletic performance and to reduce risks for weight-related medical issues that are of particular concern for elite synchronized swimmers. PMID:24667278

  17. Optimal waveforms design for ultra-wideband impulse radio sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zhou, Zheng; Zou, Weixia; Li, Dejian; Zhao, Chong

    2010-01-01

    Ultra-wideband impulse radio (UWB-IR) sensors should comply entirely with the regulatory spectral limits for elegant coexistence. Under this premise, it is desirable for UWB pulses to improve frequency utilization to guarantee the transmission reliability. Meanwhile, orthogonal waveform division multiple-access (WDMA) is significant to mitigate mutual interferences in UWB sensor networks. Motivated by the considerations, we suggest in this paper a low complexity pulse forming technique, and its efficient implementation on DSP is investigated. The UWB pulse is derived preliminarily with the objective of minimizing the mean square error (MSE) between designed power spectrum density (PSD) and the emission mask. Subsequently, this pulse is iteratively modified until its PSD completely conforms to spectral constraints. The orthogonal restriction is then analyzed and different algorithms have been presented. Simulation demonstrates that our technique can produce UWB waveforms with frequency utilization far surpassing the other existing signals under arbitrary spectral mask conditions. Compared to other orthogonality design schemes, the designed pulses can maintain mutual orthogonality without any penalty on frequency utilization, and hence, are much superior in a WDMA network, especially with synchronization deviations. PMID:22163511

  18. Auto-programmable impulse neural circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watula, D.; Meador, J.

    1990-01-01

    Impulse neural networks use pulse trains to communicate neuron activation levels. Impulse neural circuits emulate natural neurons at a more detailed level than that typically employed by contemporary neural network implementation methods. An impulse neural circuit which realizes short term memory dynamics is presented. The operation of that circuit is then characterized in terms of pulse frequency modulated signals. Both fixed and programmable synapse circuits for realizing long term memory are also described. The implementation of a simple and useful unsupervised learning law is then presented. The implementation of a differential Hebbian learning rule for a specific mean-frequency signal interpretation is shown to have a straightforward implementation using digital combinational logic with a variation of a previously developed programmable synapse circuit. This circuit is expected to be exploited for simple and straightforward implementation of future auto-adaptive neural circuits.

  19. Using Dual Process Models to Examine Impulsivity Throughout Neural Maturation.

    PubMed

    Leshem, Rotem

    2016-01-01

    The multivariate construct of impulsivity is examined through neural systems and connections that comprise the executive functioning system. It is proposed that cognitive and behavioral components of impulsivity can be divided into two distinct groups, mediated by (1) the cognitive control system: deficits in top-down cognitive control processes referred to as action/cognitive impulsivity and (2) the socioemotional system: related to bottom-up affective/motivational processes referred to as affective impulsivity. Examination of impulsivity from a developmental viewpoint can guide future research, potentially enabling the selection of more effective interventions for impulsive individuals, based on the cognitive components requiring improvement. PMID:27186976

  20. Synchronization in growing heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Cheng, S. C.; Avalos, E.; Drugova, O.; Osipov, G.; Lai, Pik-Yin; Chan, C. K.

    2009-04-01

    Synchronization of heterogeneous systems that consist of oscillatory and passive elements are studied in cardiac myocytes/fibroblasts co-cultures. It is found that beating clusters of cardiac myocytes surrounded by fibroblasts will be formed. The beatings of the cardiac myocyte clusters are not correlated at early times, but get synchronized as the cultures mature. This synchronization can be understood by a Kuramoto model with a time-increasing coupling strength. Our findings show that the growth of the coupling strength between clusters is linear, while the overall wave dynamics of the system is controlled by the passive fibroblast in the system which presumably is growing exponentially.

  1. Disentangling impulsiveness, aggressiveness and impulsive aggression: an empirical approach using self-report measures.

    PubMed

    García-Forero, Carlos; Gallardo-Pujol, David; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Andrés-Pueyo, Antonio

    2009-06-30

    There is confusion in the literature concerning the concept of impulsive aggression. Based on previous research, we hypothesize that impulsivity and aggression may be related, though not as closely as to consider them the same construct. So, our aim was to provide empirical evidence of the relationship between the impulsivity and aggressiveness constructs when considered as traits. Two widely used questionnaires [Barratt's Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and Aggression Questionnaire-Refined (AQ-R)] were administered to 768 healthy respondents. Product-moment and canonical correlations were then calculated. In addition, a principal components analysis was conducted to explore whether impulsive aggression can be defined phenotypically as the expression of a single trait. The common variance between impulsivity and aggressiveness was never higher than 42%. The principal components analysis reveals that one component is not enough to represent all the variables. In conclusion, our results show that impulsivity and aggressiveness are two separate, although related constructs. This is particularly important in view of the misconceptions in the literature.

  2. Reaction of communities to impulse noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshagiri, B. V.

    1981-01-01

    In order to assess the reaction of communities to impulse noise, a sociological survey was conducted in three communities in Ontario, Canada. The dominant industrial noise in these locations is due to drop forging operations. Nearly 600 completed interviews were recorded. Detailed sound level measurements were carried out in the areas surveyed. The results clearly indicate the extent of adverse reaction to the forging noise. This research has been compared with the reaction of the respondents to traffic noise prevailing in their communities. Regression lines are presented showing the relationship between the percent of people disturbed by the forging noise and the sound level of the impulses.

  3. Impulsive nonconformity in female chat room users.

    PubMed

    Fullwood, Chris; Galbraith, Niall; Morris, Neil

    2006-10-01

    Heavy chat room use has been associated with social isolation, introversion, impulse control problems, and risk taking. Such characteristics form part of the cluster of traits associated with schizotypy. This study used multiple regression to examine the relationship between age, sex, four dimensions of schizotypy, and frequency of reported chat room use. The only significant association with schizotypy was between frequency of chat room use and impulsive nonconformity (IN) in females. These findings may be explained by the increased risk associated with female chat room use.

  4. International comparison of HV impulse measuring systems

    SciTech Connect

    McComb, T.R.; Hughes, R.C.; Lightfoot, H.A.; Schon, K.; Schulte, R.; McKnight, R.; Zhang, Y.X.

    1989-04-01

    Present standards for qualifying HV impulse measuring systems by unit-step-response parameters are complex and difficult to apply and some systems, which have response parameters within the limits of the standards, have unacceptable errors. This paper takes the first step in providing a simplified method based on simultaneous measurements of an HV impulse by a reference system and the system under test. Comparative measurements have been made in four National Laboratories and the relative differences are reported. The results are discussed and the further work which is required is outlined.

  5. Optimal noncoplanar interorbital single-impulse flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirpichnikov, S. N.

    1990-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the problem of finding minimum-fuel orbits for single-impulse transfers between specified noncoplanar boundary Keplerian orbits. In transfers between noncoplanar circular orbits, the Hohmann single-impulse transfer in the initial orbit plane is shown to be globally optimal from the energy standpoint. Approximate optimal solutions are obtained in the practically important case of weakly elliptical boundary orbits with a small angle between the planes. The optimal solutions obtained here can be used as initial approximations when determining real orbits for interorbital and interplanetary flights.

  6. Test-retest reliability of behavioral measures of impulsive choice, impulsive action, and inattention.

    PubMed

    Weafer, Jessica; Baggott, Matthew J; de Wit, Harriet

    2013-12-01

    Behavioral measures of impulsivity are widely used in substance abuse research, yet relatively little attention has been devoted to establishing their psychometric properties, especially their reliability over repeated administration. The current study examined the test-retest reliability of a battery of standardized behavioral impulsivity tasks, including measures of impulsive choice (i.e., delay discounting, probability discounting, and the Balloon Analogue Risk Task), impulsive action (i.e., the stop signal task, the go/no-go task, and commission errors on the continuous performance task), and inattention (i.e., attention lapses on a simple reaction time task and omission errors on the continuous performance task). Healthy adults (n = 128) performed the battery on two separate occasions. Reliability estimates for the individual tasks ranged from moderate to high, with Pearson correlations within the specific impulsivity domains as follows: impulsive choice (r range: .76-.89, ps < .001); impulsive action (r range: .65-.73, ps < .001); and inattention (r range: .38-.42, ps < .001). Additionally, the influence of day-to-day fluctuations in mood, as measured by the Profile of Mood States, was assessed in relation to variability in performance on each of the behavioral tasks. Change in performance on the delay discounting task was significantly associated with change in positive mood and arousal. No other behavioral measures were significantly associated with mood. In sum, the current analysis demonstrates that behavioral measures of impulsivity are reliable measures and thus can be confidently used to assess various facets of impulsivity as intermediate phenotypes for drug abuse. PMID:24099351

  7. Time synchronized video systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, Ron

    1994-01-01

    The idea of synchronizing multiple video recordings to some type of 'range' time has been tried to varying degrees of success in the past. Combining this requirement with existing time code standards (SMPTE) and the new innovations in desktop multimedia however, have afforded an opportunity to increase the flexibility and usefulness of such efforts without adding costs over the traditional data recording and reduction systems. The concept described can use IRIG, GPS or a battery backed internal clock as the master time source. By converting that time source to Vertical Interval Time Code or Longitudinal Time Code, both in accordance with the SMPTE standards, the user will obtain a tape that contains machine/computer readable time code suitable for use with editing equipment that is available off-the-shelf. Accuracy on playback is then determined by the playback system chosen by the user. Accuracies of +/- 2 frames are common among inexpensive systems and complete frame accuracy is more a matter of the users' budget than the capability of the recording system.

  8. Noncoherent Symbol Synchronization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin

    2005-01-01

    Traditional methods for establishing symbol synchronization (sync) in digital communication receivers assume that carrier sync has already been established, i.e., the problem is addressed at the baseband level assuming that a 'perfect' estimate of carrier phase is available. We refer to this approach as coherent symbol sync. Since, for NRZ signaling, a suppressed carrier sync loop such as an I-Q Costas loop includes integrate-and-dump (I and D) filters in its in-phase (1) and quadrature (Q) arms, the traditional approach is to first track the carrier in the absence of symbol sync information, then feed back the symbol sync estimate to these filters, and then iterate between the two to a desirable operating level In this paper, we revisit the symbol sync problem by examining methods for obtaining such sync in the absence of carrier phase information, i.e., so-called noncoherent symbol sync loops. We compare the performance of these loops with that of a well-known coherent symbol sync loop and examine the conditions under which one is preferable over the other.

  9. Delay time modulation induced oscillating synchronization and intermittent anticipatory/lag and complete synchronizations in time-delay nonlinear dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, D V; Lakshmanan, M

    2007-03-01

    Existence of a new type of oscillating synchronization that oscillates between three different types of synchronizations (anticipatory, complete, and lag synchronizations) is identified in unidirectionally coupled nonlinear time-delay systems having two different time-delays, that is feedback delay with a periodic delay time modulation and a constant coupling delay. Intermittent anticipatory, intermittent lag, and complete synchronizations are shown to exist in the same system with identical delay time modulations in both the delays. The transition from anticipatory to complete synchronization and from complete to lag synchronization as a function of coupling delay with suitable stability condition is discussed. The intermittent anticipatory and lag synchronizations are characterized by the minimum of the similarity functions and the intermittent behavior is characterized by a universal asymptotic -32 power law distribution. It is also shown that the delay time carved out of the trajectories of the time-delay system with periodic delay time modulation cannot be estimated using conventional methods, thereby reducing the possibility of decoding the message by phase space reconstruction.

  10. Synchronization by small time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruessner, G.; Cheang, S.; Jensen, H. J.

    2015-02-01

    Synchronization is a phenomenon observed in all of the living and in much of the non-living world, for example in the heart beat, Huygens' clocks, the flashing of fireflies and the clapping of audiences. Depending on the number of degrees of freedom involved, different mathematical approaches have been used to describe it, most prominently integrate-and-fire oscillators and the Kuramoto model of coupled oscillators. In the present work, we study a very simple and general system of smoothly evolving oscillators, which continue to interact even in the synchronized state. We find that under very general circumstances, synchronization generically occurs in the presence of a (small) time delay. Strikingly, the synchronization time is inversely proportional to the time delay.

  11. Synchronous identification of friendly targets

    SciTech Connect

    Telle, John M.; Roger, Stutz A.

    1998-01-01

    A synchronous communication targeting system for use in battle. The present invention includes a transceiver having a stabilizing oscillator, a synchronous amplifier and an omnidirectional receiver, all in electrical communication with each other. A remotely located beacon is attached to a blackbody radiation source and has an amplitude modulator in electrical communication with a optical source. The beacon's amplitude modulator is set so that the optical source transmits radiation frequency at approximately the same or lower amplitude than that of the blackbody radiation source to which the beacon is attached. The receiver from the transceiver is adapted to receive frequencies approximately at or below blackbody radiation signals and sends such signals to the synchronous amplifier. The synchronous amplifier then rectifies and amplifies those signals which correspond to the predetermined frequency to therefore identify whether the blackbody radiation source is friendly or not.

  12. Optimistic barrier synchronization. Contractor report

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, D.M.

    1992-07-01

    Barrier synchronization is a fundamental operation in parallel computation. In many contexts, at the point a processor enters a barrier it knows that is has already processed all work required of it prior to the synchronization. This paper treats the alternative case, when a processor cannot enter a barrier with the assurance that it has already performed all necessary pre-synchronization computation. The proble marises when the number of pre-synchronization messages to be received by a processor is unknown, for example, in a parallel discrete simulation or any other computation that is largely driven by an unpredictable exchange of messages. The authors describe an optimistic O(log2P) barrier algorithm for such problems, study its performance on a large-scale parallel system, and consider extensions to general associative reductions, as well as associative parallel prefix computations.

  13. Engineering synchronization of chaotic oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanaban, E.; Dana, Syamal K.

    2011-04-19

    We propose a controller based coupling design for engineering synchronization in chaotic oscillators for unidirectional as well as bi-directional mode. In the synchronization regimes, it is possible to amplify/ attenuate a chaotic attractor with respect to other chaotic attractors. Numerical examples are presented for a Lorenz system, a Roessler oscillator, and a Sprott system. Physical implementation of the scheme is done in electronic circuit to design the controller for verification of the theory.

  14. Synchronous reactive programming in Ptolemy

    SciTech Connect

    Boulanger, F.; Vidal-Naquet, G.

    1996-12-31

    Synchronous reactive languages allow a high level deterministic description of reactive systems such as control-command systems. Their well defined mathematical semantics makes it possible to check formal properties on the control of a system. In previous work, we developed an object-oriented execution model for synchronous reactive modules. This model is implemented as a set of tools and a C++ class library, and allows us to use object-oriented methodologies and tools for the design of complex applications with both transformational and reactive parts. Among these design tools, the Ptolemy system stands as an object-oriented framework that supports various execution models, or {open_quotes}domains{close_quotes}. We are currently working on a translator from the output format of the Lustre and Esterel compilers to the Ptolemy language. Since no existing domain matches the reactive synchronous execution model, we also plan to develop a SEC (Synchronous Execution and Communication) domain. Such a domain will provide support for the execution of synchronous modules in Ptolemy. One of the most interesting features of Ptolemy is the communication between domains. Therefore we discuss the interface of the SEC domain to other domains to determine the meaning of communications between them. The main goal is to allow the use of synchronous reactive modules for the control of the behavior of data-flow or discrete event processes.

  15. Cardiorespiratory synchronization during Zen meditation.

    PubMed

    Cysarz, Dirk; Büssing, Arndt

    2005-09-01

    The impact of meditation on cardiorespiratory synchronization with respect to breathing oscillations and the modulations of heart rate induced by respiration (respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) was investigated in this study. Four different exercises (spontaneous breathing, mental task, Zen meditation, and Kinhin meditation) were consecutively performed by nine subjects mainly without any experience in meditation. An electrocardiogram and a respiratory trace were recorded simultaneously. On this basis the degree of cardiorespiratory synchronization was quantified by a technique which has been adopted from the analysis of weakly coupled chaotic oscillators. Both types of meditation showed a high degree of synchronization, whereas heartbeat and respiration were hardly synchronized during spontaneous breathing. During the mental task exercise the extent of synchronization was slightly higher than during spontaneous breathing. These results were largely determined by the breathing frequency because the two types of meditation induce low breathing frequencies which led to a pronounced and in-phase RSA. During the meditation the low breathing frequencies led to a decrease in the high frequency of heart rate variability, whereas the low frequency and the extent of RSA increased. The heart rate primarily reflected the degree of physical effort. The high degree of cardiorespiratory synchronization during meditation in unexperienced meditators suggests that the physiological implications of meditation does not require prior experience in meditation.

  16. Quantifying Neural Oscillatory Synchronization: A Comparison between Spectral Coherence and Phase-Locking Value Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark J.; Bonizzi, Pietro; Karel, Joël; De Weerd, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization or phase-locking between oscillating neuronal groups is considered to be important for coordination of information among cortical networks. Spectral coherence is a commonly used approach to quantify phase locking between neural signals. We systematically explored the validity of spectral coherence measures for quantifying synchronization among neural oscillators. To that aim, we simulated coupled oscillatory signals that exhibited synchronization dynamics using an abstract phase-oscillator model as well as interacting gamma-generating spiking neural networks. We found that, within a large parameter range, the spectral coherence measure deviated substantially from the expected phase-locking. Moreover, spectral coherence did not converge to the expected value with increasing signal-to-noise ratio. We found that spectral coherence particularly failed when oscillators were in the partially (intermittent) synchronized state, which we expect to be the most likely state for neural synchronization. The failure was due to the fast frequency and amplitude changes induced by synchronization forces. We then investigated whether spectral coherence reflected the information flow among networks measured by transfer entropy (TE) of spike trains. We found that spectral coherence failed to robustly reflect changes in synchrony-mediated information flow between neural networks in many instances. As an alternative approach we explored a phase-locking value (PLV) method based on the reconstruction of the instantaneous phase. As one approach for reconstructing instantaneous phase, we used the Hilbert Transform (HT) preceded by Singular Spectrum Decomposition (SSD) of the signal. PLV estimates have broad applicability as they do not rely on stationarity, and, unlike spectral coherence, they enable more accurate estimations of oscillatory synchronization across a wide range of different synchronization regimes, and better tracking of synchronization-mediated information

  17. Quantifying Neural Oscillatory Synchronization: A Comparison between Spectral Coherence and Phase-Locking Value Approaches.

    PubMed

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark J; Bonizzi, Pietro; Karel, Joël; De Weerd, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization or phase-locking between oscillating neuronal groups is considered to be important for coordination of information among cortical networks. Spectral coherence is a commonly used approach to quantify phase locking between neural signals. We systematically explored the validity of spectral coherence measures for quantifying synchronization among neural oscillators. To that aim, we simulated coupled oscillatory signals that exhibited synchronization dynamics using an abstract phase-oscillator model as well as interacting gamma-generating spiking neural networks. We found that, within a large parameter range, the spectral coherence measure deviated substantially from the expected phase-locking. Moreover, spectral coherence did not converge to the expected value with increasing signal-to-noise ratio. We found that spectral coherence particularly failed when oscillators were in the partially (intermittent) synchronized state, which we expect to be the most likely state for neural synchronization. The failure was due to the fast frequency and amplitude changes induced by synchronization forces. We then investigated whether spectral coherence reflected the information flow among networks measured by transfer entropy (TE) of spike trains. We found that spectral coherence failed to robustly reflect changes in synchrony-mediated information flow between neural networks in many instances. As an alternative approach we explored a phase-locking value (PLV) method based on the reconstruction of the instantaneous phase. As one approach for reconstructing instantaneous phase, we used the Hilbert Transform (HT) preceded by Singular Spectrum Decomposition (SSD) of the signal. PLV estimates have broad applicability as they do not rely on stationarity, and, unlike spectral coherence, they enable more accurate estimations of oscillatory synchronization across a wide range of different synchronization regimes, and better tracking of synchronization-mediated information

  18. Quantifying Neural Oscillatory Synchronization: A Comparison between Spectral Coherence and Phase-Locking Value Approaches.

    PubMed

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark J; Bonizzi, Pietro; Karel, Joël; De Weerd, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization or phase-locking between oscillating neuronal groups is considered to be important for coordination of information among cortical networks. Spectral coherence is a commonly used approach to quantify phase locking between neural signals. We systematically explored the validity of spectral coherence measures for quantifying synchronization among neural oscillators. To that aim, we simulated coupled oscillatory signals that exhibited synchronization dynamics using an abstract phase-oscillator model as well as interacting gamma-generating spiking neural networks. We found that, within a large parameter range, the spectral coherence measure deviated substantially from the expected phase-locking. Moreover, spectral coherence did not converge to the expected value with increasing signal-to-noise ratio. We found that spectral coherence particularly failed when oscillators were in the partially (intermittent) synchronized state, which we expect to be the most likely state for neural synchronization. The failure was due to the fast frequency and amplitude changes induced by synchronization forces. We then investigated whether spectral coherence reflected the information flow among networks measured by transfer entropy (TE) of spike trains. We found that spectral coherence failed to robustly reflect changes in synchrony-mediated information flow between neural networks in many instances. As an alternative approach we explored a phase-locking value (PLV) method based on the reconstruction of the instantaneous phase. As one approach for reconstructing instantaneous phase, we used the Hilbert Transform (HT) preceded by Singular Spectrum Decomposition (SSD) of the signal. PLV estimates have broad applicability as they do not rely on stationarity, and, unlike spectral coherence, they enable more accurate estimations of oscillatory synchronization across a wide range of different synchronization regimes, and better tracking of synchronization-mediated information

  19. Bright and dark sides of impulsivity: performance of women with high and low trait impulsivity on neuropsychological tasks.

    PubMed

    Perales, Jose C; Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio; Moya, Maribel; Lozano, Oscar; Perez-Garcia, Miguel

    2009-11-01

    We administered a multidimensional measure of trait impulsivity (the UPPS-P impulsivity scale; Cyders et al., 2007) to a nonclinical sample of 155 individuals and selected 32 participants at the two ends of the trait impulsivity continuum: high (HI, n = 15) and low (LI, n = 17) impulsive women. We further tested these extreme groups on neuropsychological measures of motor impulsivity (go/no-go, d2), delay discounting (Now or Later Questionnaire), reflection impulsivity (Matching Familiar Figures Test), self-regulation (Revised-Strategy Application Test), and decision making (Iowa Gambling Task). High-trait-impulsivity women were found to commit more commission errors in the initial stage of the go/no-go task but also to make fewer omission errors in the d2 test than did low-trait-impulsivity women. Both effects can be accounted for by a lower response criterion in impulsive women. On the other hand, measures of delay discounting, reflection impulsivity, self-regulation, and decision making did not yield significant differences between the two groups. This pattern of results supports the idea that trait impulsivity in healthy women is linked to neurocognitive mechanisms involved in response monitoring and inhibition, but not to mechanisms involved in self-regulation or decision making. These findings temper the assumption that impulsivity is the core cause of dysfunctional risky and/or impulsive behavior in psychopathological or neuropsychological profiles. PMID:19358009

  20. Project Reconstruct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helisek, Harriet; Pratt, Donald

    1994-01-01

    Presents a project in which students monitor their use of trash, input and analyze information via a database and computerized graphs, and "reconstruct" extinct or endangered animals from recyclable materials. The activity was done with second-grade students over a period of three to four weeks. (PR)

  1. Vaginal reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lesavoy, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients.

  2. Ultrahigh Specific Impulse Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Anne Charmeau; Brandon Cunningham; Samim Anghaie

    2009-02-09

    Research on nuclear thermal propulsion systems (NTP) have been in forefront of the space nuclear power and propulsion due to their design simplicity and their promise for providing very high thrust at reasonably high specific impulse. During NERVA-ROVER program in late 1950's till early 1970's, the United States developed and ground tested about 18 NTP systems without ever deploying them into space. The NERVA-ROVER program included development and testing of NTP systems with very high thrust (~250,000 lbf) and relatively high specific impulse (~850 s). High thrust to weight ratio in NTP systems is an indicator of high acceleration that could be achieved with these systems. The specific impulse in the lowest mass propellant, hydrogen, is a function of square root of absolute temperature in the NTP thrust chamber. Therefor optimizing design performance of NTP systems would require achieving the highest possible hydrogen temperature at reasonably high thrust to weight ratio. High hydrogen exit temperature produces high specific impulse that is a diret measure of propellant usage efficiency.

  3. Impulse noise trauma during army weapon firing.

    PubMed

    Munjal, K R; Singh, V P

    1997-04-01

    A 100 infanty personnel firing modern weapons such as the Anti Tank Guided Missile, 106mm Recoiless Gun (RCL), 84mm Rocket Launcher (RL) and 81mm Mortar were studied for the effect of impulse noise on the ear and the evolution of the Temporary Threshold Shift (TTS), Recovery Time (RT) and Permanent Threshold Shift (PTS) was traced. PMID:23119288

  4. Functional impulsivity and reinforcement sensitivity theory.

    PubMed

    Smillie, Luke D; Jackson, Chris J

    2006-02-01

    In this article, we attempt to integrate Dickman's (1990) descriptive concept of Functional Impulsivity (FI) with Gray's (1970, 1991) Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST). Specifically, we consider that FI bears great conceptual similarity to Gray's concept of reward-reactivity, which is thought to be caused by the combined effects of a Behavioral Activation System (BAS) and Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS). In our first study, we examine the construct validity and structural correlates of FI. Results indicate that FI is related positively to measures of BAS and Extraversion, negatively to measures of BIS and Neuroticism, and is separate from Psychoticism and typical trait Impulsivity, which Dickman calls Dysfunctional Impulsivity (DI). In our second study, we use a go/no-go discrimination task to examine the relationship between FI and response bias under conditions of rewarding and punishing feedback. Results indicate that FI, along with two measures of BAS, predicted the development of a response bias for the rewarded alternative. In comparison, high DI appeared to reflect indifference toward either reward or punishment. We consider how these findings might reconcile the perspectives of Gray and Dickman and help clarify the broader understanding of Impulsivity.

  5. How Many Impulsivities? A Discounting Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel

    2013-01-01

    People discount the value of delayed and uncertain outcomes, and how steeply individuals discount is thought to reflect how impulsive they are. From this perspective, steep discounting of delayed outcomes (which fails to maximize long-term welfare) and shallow discounting of probabilistic outcomes (which fails to adequately take risk into account)…

  6. Impulsive Behaviors in Patients With Pathological Buying.

    PubMed

    Zander, Heike; Claes, Laurence; Voth, Eva M; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2016-09-01

    Aim To investigate impulsive behaviors in pathological buying (PB). Methods The study included three groups matched for age and gender: treatment seeking outpatients with PB (PB+), treatment seeking psychiatric inpatients without PB (PB-), and a healthy control group (HC). PB was assessed by means of the Compulsive Buying Scale and by the impulse control disorder (ICD) module of the research version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-ICD). All participants answered questionnaires concerning symptoms of borderline personality disorder, self-harming behaviors, binge eating and symptoms of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In addition, comorbid ICDs were assessed using the SCID-ICD. Results The PB+ and PB- groups did not differ with regard to borderline personality disorder or ADHD symptoms, but both groups reported significantly more symptoms than the HC group. Frequencies of self-harming behaviors did not differ between the three groups. Patients with PB were more often diagnosed with any current ICD (excluding PB) compared to those without PB and the HC group (38.7% vs. 12.9% vs. 12.9%, respectively, p=.017). Discussion Our findings confirm prior research suggesting more impulsive behaviors in patients with and without PB compared to healthy controls. The results of the questionnaire-based assessment indicate that outpatients with PB perceive themselves equally impulsive and self-harm as frequently as inpatients without PB; but they seem to suffer more often from an ICD as assessed by means of an interview.

  7. Arbitration between controlled and impulsive choices.

    PubMed

    Economides, M; Guitart-Masip, M; Kurth-Nelson, Z; Dolan, R J

    2015-04-01

    The impulse to act for immediate reward often conflicts with more deliberate evaluations that support long-term benefit. The neural architecture that negotiates this conflict remains unclear. One account proposes a single neural circuit that evaluates both immediate and delayed outcomes, while another outlines separate impulsive and patient systems that compete for behavioral control. Here we designed a task in which a complex payout structure divorces the immediate value of acting from the overall long-term value, within the same outcome modality. Using model-based fMRI in humans, we demonstrate separate neural representations of immediate and long-term values, with the former tracked in the anterior caudate (AC) and the latter in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Crucially, when subjects' choices were compatible with long-run consequences, value signals in AC were down-weighted and those in vmPFC were enhanced, while the opposite occurred when choice was impulsive. Thus, our data implicate a trade-off in value representation between AC and vmPFC as underlying controlled versus impulsive choice.

  8. Impulsive Behaviors in Patients With Pathological Buying.

    PubMed

    Zander, Heike; Claes, Laurence; Voth, Eva M; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2016-09-01

    Aim To investigate impulsive behaviors in pathological buying (PB). Methods The study included three groups matched for age and gender: treatment seeking outpatients with PB (PB+), treatment seeking psychiatric inpatients without PB (PB-), and a healthy control group (HC). PB was assessed by means of the Compulsive Buying Scale and by the impulse control disorder (ICD) module of the research version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-ICD). All participants answered questionnaires concerning symptoms of borderline personality disorder, self-harming behaviors, binge eating and symptoms of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In addition, comorbid ICDs were assessed using the SCID-ICD. Results The PB+ and PB- groups did not differ with regard to borderline personality disorder or ADHD symptoms, but both groups reported significantly more symptoms than the HC group. Frequencies of self-harming behaviors did not differ between the three groups. Patients with PB were more often diagnosed with any current ICD (excluding PB) compared to those without PB and the HC group (38.7% vs. 12.9% vs. 12.9%, respectively, p=.017). Discussion Our findings confirm prior research suggesting more impulsive behaviors in patients with and without PB compared to healthy controls. The results of the questionnaire-based assessment indicate that outpatients with PB perceive themselves equally impulsive and self-harm as frequently as inpatients without PB; but they seem to suffer more often from an ICD as assessed by means of an interview. PMID:27415604

  9. Designing a Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer for Stochastic Linear and Nonlinear Impulsive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ayati, Moosa; Alwan, Mohamad; Liu Xinzhi; Khaloozadeh, Hamid

    2011-11-30

    State observation (estimation) is a very important issue in system analysis and control. This paper develops a new observer called Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer (SAIO) for the state estimation of impulsive systems. The proposed observer is applicable to linear and nonlinear stochastic impulsive systems. In addition, the effect of parametric uncertainty is considered and unknown parameters of the system are estimated by suitable adaptation laws. Impulsive system theory, particularly stochastic Lyapunov-like function, is used to analyze the stability and convergence of the state estimations. The main advantages of the proposed observer are: 1) it gives continuous estimation from discrete time measurements of the system output, and 2) it is useful for state estimation when continuous measurements are impossible or expensive. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed observer and we believe that it has many applications in control and estimation theories.

  10. Synchronization configurations of two coupled double pendula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koluda, Piotr; Perlikowski, Przemyslaw; Czolczynski, Krzysztof; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2014-04-01

    We consider the synchronization of two self-excited double pendula hanging from a horizontal beam which can roll on the parallel surface. We show that such pendula can obtain four different robust synchronous configurations. Our approximate analytical analysis allows to derive the synchronization conditions and explains the observed types of synchronizations. We consider the energy balance in the system and show how the energy is transferred between the pendula via the oscillating beam allowing the pendula' synchronization.

  11. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  12. Measuring Impulsivity in Adolescents with Serious Substance and Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laetitia L.; Whitmore, Elizabeth A.; Raymond, Kristen M.; Crowley, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Adolescents with substance use and conduct disorders have high rates of aggression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), all of which have been characterized in part by impulsivity. Developing measures that capture impulsivity behaviorally and correlate with self-reported impulsivity has been difficult. One promising behavioral…

  13. Stability analysis of impulsive functional systems of fractional order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamova, Ivanka; Stamov, Gani

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a class of impulsive fractional functional differential systems is investigated. Sufficient conditions for stability of the zero solution are proved, extending the corresponding theory of impulsive functional differential equations. The investigations are carried out by using the comparison principle, coupled with the Lyapunov function method. We apply our results to an impulsive single species model of Lotka-Volterra type.

  14. Teaching Emotional Intelligence to Impulsive-Aggressive Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, Martin; Long, Nicholas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes complex issues involved in helping impulsive-aggressive youth who are devoid of emotional intelligence. Reviews anatomy of impulsivity and the irrational beliefs used as defense mechanisms by impulsive-aggressive students. Discusses two alternative intervention strategies, Life Space Crisis Intervention techniques and the Self Control…

  15. An Exploration of Taiwanese Adolescents' Impulsive Buying Tendency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Lin, Hung-Ming

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine via a questionnaire the personal characteristics and impulsive buying tendencies of 15- to 19-year-old Taiwanese adolescents. Results indicated that the impulsive buying was significantly associated with gender, age, and amount of pocket money available. Females indicated more impulsive buying than did…

  16. The Effect of Individual Differences on Adolescents' Impulsive Buying Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Chuang, Shin-Chieh

    2005-01-01

    This study posits a relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Impulsive Buying Tendency (IBT). A survey of 574 adolescents found that high-EI adolescents manifested less impulsive behavior than did low-EI adolescents, and high-IBT adolescents were more likely to engage in more impulsive buying behavior than were low-IBT adolescents.…

  17. Noncoherent DTTLs for Symbol Synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin; Tkacenko, Andre

    2007-01-01

    Noncoherent data-transition tracking loops (DTTLs) have been proposed for use as symbol synchronizers in digital communication receivers. [Communication- receiver subsystems that can perform their assigned functions in the absence of synchronization with the phases of their carrier signals ( carrier synchronization ) are denoted by the term noncoherent, while receiver subsystems that cannot function without carrier synchronization are said to be coherent. ] The proposal applies, more specifically, to receivers of binary phase-shift-keying (BPSK) signals generated by directly phase-modulating binary non-return-to-zero (NRZ) data streams onto carrier signals having known frequencies but unknown phases. The proposed noncoherent DTTLs would be modified versions of traditional DTTLs, which are coherent. The symbol-synchronization problem is essentially the problem of recovering symbol timing from a received signal. In the traditional, coherent approach to symbol synchronization, it is necessary to establish carrier synchronization in order to recover symbol timing. A traditional DTTL effects an iterative process in which it first generates an estimate of the carrier phase in the absence of symbol-synchronization information, then uses the carrier-phase estimate to obtain an estimate of the symbol-synchronization information, then feeds the symbol-synchronization estimate back to the carrier-phase-estimation subprocess. In a noncoherent symbol-synchronization process, there is no need for carrier synchronization and, hence, no need for iteration between carrier-synchronization and symbol- synchronization subprocesses. The proposed noncoherent symbolsynchronization process is justified theoretically by a mathematical derivation that starts from a maximum a posteriori (MAP) method of estimation of symbol timing utilized in traditional, coherent DTTLs. In that MAP method, one chooses the value of a variable of interest (in this case, the offset in the estimated symbol

  18. Impulsive personality traits in male pedophiles versus healthy controls: is pedophilia an impulsive-aggressive disorder?

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lisa J; Gans, Sniezyna Watras; McGeoch, Pamela G; Poznansky, Olga; Itskovich, Yelena; Murphy, Sean; Klein, Erik; Cullen, Ken; Galynker, Igor I

    2002-01-01

    Pedophilia is characterized by sexual attraction to prepubescent children. Despite the extensive literature documenting the pervasive and pernicious effects of childhood sexual abuse, there is surprisingly little psychiatric literature on pedophilia and its etiology remains enigmatic. In recent years, the psychiatric literature on the phenomenology, neurobiology, and treatment of impulsive-aggressive disorders has grown significantly. As some investigators have conceptualized pedophilia as an impulsive-aggressive disorder, it is of interest whether recent advances in the study of impulsive-aggressive disorders might shed light on pathological mechanisms underlying pedophilia. In the following study, 20 male subjects with a DSM-IV diagnosis of pedophilia, heterosexual type were recruited from an outpatient facility for sexual offenders and compared to 24 demographically similar control subjects. Groups were compared on three personality instruments--the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II (MCMI-II), the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), and the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Impairment-Questionnaire (DAPI-Q)--to assess for select impairment in impulsive-aggressive personality traits. Pedophiles showed severe and pervasive personality impairment relative to controls. Although there was evidence of impulsivity, the findings do not suggest a predominance of impulsive-aggressive traits, and in fact provide evidence of inhibition, passive-aggression, and harm avoidance. The notion of "compulsive-aggression" in pedophilia is proposed.

  19. Impulsive for life? The nature of long-term impulsivity in domestic dogs

    PubMed Central

    Riemer, Stefanie; Mills, Daniel; Wright, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Individual differences in impulsivity occur at a cognitive and/or behavioural level and are associated with differing life outcomes. However there is a lack of empirical evidence to support the long-term stability of these characteristics in non-human animals. This study reports on the stability of convergent measures of impulsivity in domestic dogs assessed more than six years apart. Measures were (1) owner assessment by means of a questionnaire, the validated ‘Dog Impulsivity Assessment Scale’ (DIAS) and (2) dogs’ performance in a delayed reward choice test. Dogs had 15 minutes free access to two food dispensers, one dispensing a piece of food immediately, the other dispensing three pieces after a delay, which increased by one second every other time the dogs sampled it. Maximum delay reached in this task reflects decision making, or cognitive impulsivity, whereas the rate of extra presses on the delayed reward device during the delay can be considered as a measure of motor or behavioural impulsivity. DIAS scores were strongly and significantly correlated across years. The maximum delay reached in the behaviour test was also highly stable, whereas paw pressing rate was uncorrelated between the years. These results demonstrate that cognitive but not motor impulsivity is highly consistent over time in dogs. PMID:24136014

  20. Attentional blink and impulsiveness: evidence for higher functional impulsivity in non-blinkers compared to blinkers.

    PubMed

    Troche, Stefan J; Rammsayer, Thomas H

    2013-08-01

    The attentional blink (AB) represents a fundamental limit of information processing. About 5-10 % of all subjects, however, do not show the AB. Because of the low base rate of these so-called non-blinkers, studies on mechanisms underlying non-blinkers' absent AB are extremely scant. The few existent studies found non-blinkers to be faster and more efficient in information processing compared to blinkers. A personality trait that has been linked previously to speed and efficiency of information processing as well as to the magnitude of the AB is impulsivity. Therefore, the present study investigated whether 15 non-blinkers and 15 blinkers differed from each other in functional and/or dysfunctional impulsivity. To obtain a better understanding of the underlying processing mechanisms, the P300 component in the event-related potential was recorded during performance on the AB task. Our results indicated higher functional impulsivity in non-blinkers compared to blinkers but no differences between the two groups in dysfunctional impulsivity. As indicated by shorter P300 latency, non-blinkers processed information faster than blinkers after the AB period but slower during the AB period. These speed effects, however, were not associated with functional impulsivity. Thus, impulsivity and speed of information processing appear to represent two rather independent sources for non-blinkers' absent AB.

  1. How Synchronization Protects from Noise

    PubMed Central

    Tabareau, Nicolas; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Pham, Quang-Cuong

    2010-01-01

    The functional role of synchronization has attracted much interest and debate: in particular, synchronization may allow distant sites in the brain to communicate and cooperate with each other, and therefore may play a role in temporal binding, in attention or in sensory-motor integration mechanisms. In this article, we study another role for synchronization: the so-called “collective enhancement of precision”. We argue, in a full nonlinear dynamical context, that synchronization may help protect interconnected neurons from the influence of random perturbations—intrinsic neuronal noise—which affect all neurons in the nervous system. More precisely, our main contribution is a mathematical proof that, under specific, quantified conditions, the impact of noise on individual interconnected systems and on their spatial mean can essentially be cancelled through synchronization. This property then allows reliable computations to be carried out even in the presence of significant noise (as experimentally found e.g., in retinal ganglion cells in primates). This in turn is key to obtaining meaningful downstream signals, whether in terms of precisely-timed interaction (temporal coding), population coding, or frequency coding. Similar concepts may be applicable to questions of noise and variability in systems biology. PMID:20090826

  2. Bodily synchronization underlying joke telling

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, R. C.; Nie, Lin; Franco, Alison; Richardson, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in video and time series analysis have greatly enhanced our ability to study the bodily synchronization that occurs in natural interactions. Past research has demonstrated that the behavioral synchronization involved in social interactions is similar to dynamical synchronization found generically in nature. The present study investigated how the bodily synchronization in a joke telling task is spread across different nested temporal scales. Pairs of participants enacted knock–knock jokes and times series of their bodily activity were recorded. Coherence and relative phase analyses were used to evaluate the synchronization of bodily rhythms for the whole trial as well as at the subsidiary time scales of the whole joke, the setup of the punch line, the two-person exchange and the utterance. The analyses revealed greater than chance entrainment of the joke teller’s and joke responder’s movements at all time scales and that the relative phasing of the teller’s movements led those of the responder at the longer time scales. Moreover, this entrainment was greater when visual information about the partner’s movements was present but was decreased particularly at the shorter time scales when explicit gesturing in telling the joke was performed. In short, the results demonstrate that a complex interpersonal bodily “dance” occurs during structured conversation interactions and that this “dance” is constructed from a set of rhythms associated with the nested behavioral structure of the interaction. PMID:25177287

  3. Analysis of chaotic FM system synchronization for bistatic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappu, Chandra S.; Verdin, Berenice; Flores, Benjamin C.; Boehm, James; Debroux, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    We propose a scheme for bistatic radar that uses a chaotic system to generate a wideband FM signal that is reconstructed at the receiver via a conventional phase lock loop. The setup for the bistatic radar includes a 3 state variable drive oscillator at the transmitter and a response oscillator at the receiver. The challenge is in synchronizing the response oscillator of the radar receiver utilizing a scaled version of the transmitted signal sr(t, x) = αst(t, x) where x is one of three driver oscillator state variables and α is the scaling factor that accounts for antenna gain, system losses, and space propagation. For FM, we also assume that the instantaneous frequency of the received signal, xs, is a scaled version of the Lorenz variable x. Since this additional scaling factor may not be known a priori, the response oscillator must be able to accept the scaled version of x as an input. Thus, to achieve synchronization we utilize a generalized projective synchronization technique that introduces a controller term -μe where μ is a control factor and e is the difference between the response state variable xs and a scaled x. Since demodulation of sr(t) is required to reconstruct the chaotic state variable x, the phase lock loop imposes a limit on the minimum error e. We verify through simulations that, once synchronization is achieved, the short-time correlation of x and xs is high and that the self-noise in the correlation is negligible over long periods of time.

  4. Voltage impulse induced bistable magnetization switching in multiferroic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, T. X.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Lou, J.; Liu, M.; Yang, X.; Gao, Y.; Rand, S.; Sun, N. X.

    2012-03-01

    We report on voltage impulse induced reversible bistable magnetization switching in FeGaB/lead zirconate titanate (PZT) multiferroic heterostructures at room temperature. This was realized through strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling between ferroelectric PZT and ferromagnetic FeGaB layer. Two reversible and stable voltage-impulse induced mechanical strain states were obtained in the PZT by applying an electric field impulse with its amplitude smaller than the electric coercive field, which led to reversible voltage impulse induced bistable magnetization switching. These voltage impulse induced bistable magnetization switching in multiferroic heterostructures provides a promising approach to power efficient bistable magnetization switching that is crucial for information storage.

  5. Different subtypes of impulsivity differentiate uncontrolled eating and dietary restraint.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Margaret A; Morgan, Michael J; Yeomans, Martin R

    2013-10-01

    The current study explored the relationship between three subtypes of impulsivity (Reflection Impulsivity, Impulsive Choice, and Impulsive Action) and measures of uncontrolled eating (TFEQ-D) and restraint (TFEQ-R). Eighty women classified as scoring higher or lower on TFEQ-D and TFEQ-R completed the Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFFT20), Delay Discounting Task (DDT), a Go No Go task, Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), and the Barrett Impulsivity Scale-11 (BIS-11). To test whether these relationships were affected by enforced controls overeating, half of the participants fasted the night before and ate breakfast in the laboratory before testing and half had no such control. Women scoring higher on the TFEQ-D were significantly more impulsive on the MFFT20 and BIS-11 overall but not on DDT, Go No Go or BART. Women scoring higher on TFEQ-R were significantly less impulsive on the Go No Go task but did not differ on other measures. The eating manipulation modulated responses on the BART and BIS-11 non-planning scale depending on TFEQ-D classification. These results confirm recent data that high scores on TFEQ-D are related to impulsivity, but imply this relates more to Reflection Impulsivity rather than Impulsive Choice or Action. In contrast restrained eating was associated with better inhibitory control. Taken together, these results suggest that subtypes of impulsivity further differentiate uncontrolled eating and restraint, and suggest that a poor ability to reflect on decisions may underlie some aspects of overeating.

  6. Barratt Impulsivity and Neural Regulation of Physiological Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Sien; Hu, Jianping; Wu, Po-Lun; Chao, Herta H.; Li, Chiang-shan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Theories of personality have posited an increased arousal response to external stimulation in impulsive individuals. However, there is a dearth of studies addressing the neural basis of this association. Methods We recorded skin conductance in 26 individuals who were assessed with Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and performed a stop signal task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging data were processed and modeled with Statistical Parametric Mapping. We used linear regressions to examine correlations between impulsivity and skin conductance response (SCR) to salient events, identify the neural substrates of arousal regulation, and examine the relationship between the regulatory mechanism and impulsivity. Results Across subjects, higher impulsivity is associated with greater SCR to stop trials. Activity of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) negatively correlated to and Granger caused skin conductance time course. Furthermore, higher impulsivity is associated with a lesser strength of Granger causality of vmPFC activity on skin conductance, consistent with diminished control of physiological arousal to external stimulation. When men (n = 14) and women (n = 12) were examined separately, however, there was evidence suggesting association between impulsivity and vmPFC regulation of arousal only in women. Conclusions Together, these findings confirmed the link between Barratt impulsivity and heightened arousal to salient stimuli in both genders and suggested the neural bases of altered regulation of arousal in impulsive women. More research is needed to explore the neural processes of arousal regulation in impulsive individuals and in clinical conditions that implicate poor impulse control. PMID:26079873

  7. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L. L.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship. PMID:26217251

  8. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L L

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship.

  9. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L L

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship. PMID:26217251

  10. Relative rates of growth of annoyance of impulsive and non-impulsive noises.

    PubMed

    Fidell, Sanford; Silvati, Laura; Pearsons, Karl

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-nine people judged the relative annoyance of five variable level signals and 29 impulsive and non-impulsive fixed-level signals in an adaptive paired comparison study. Signals were presented for judgment as heard indoors in a facility capable of accurately reproducing the very low-frequency content of sonic booms. When the annoyance of sonic booms unaccompanied by rattle was compared with that of sounds containing more higher-frequency energy (an aircraft flyover and an octave band of noise centered at 1 kHz), the relative rate of growth of annoyance, as expressed in C-weighted SEL units, was nearly 2:1. In other words, to maintain subjective equality of annoyance, each increase in level of sonic booms had to be matched by nearly twice the increase in level of an aircraft flyover or an octave band of noise centered at 1 kHz. Relative rates of growth of annoyance of sonic booms accompanied by rattle and of non-impulsive sounds, including both low- (63-Hz octave band of noise) and high-frequency energy (1-kHz octave band of noise and an aircraft flyover), were closer to 1:1. Relative rates of growth of annoyance for sonic booms unaccompanied by rattle and low-frequency sounds (63 Hz) were also about 1:1. These differences in relative rates of growth of annoyance of impulsive and non-impulsive sounds are as plausibly attributed to their relative low-frequency content as to impulsiveness per se. It may therefore be more useful for some purposes to express the annoyance of impulsive signals and other environmental noises containing substantial low-frequency energy in terms of effective (duration-corrected) loudness level rather than commonplace ASEL or CSEL. PMID:11837963

  11. Impulsive action and impulsive choice across substance and behavioral addictions: cause or consequence?

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2014-11-01

    Substance use disorders are prevalent and debilitating. Certain behavioral syndromes ('behavioral addictions') characterized by repetitive habits, such as gambling disorder, stealing, shopping, and compulsive internet use, may share clinical, co-morbid, and neurobiological parallels with substance addictions. This review considers overlap between substance and behavioral addictions with a particular focus on impulsive action (inability to inhibit motor responses), and impulsive choice (preference for immediate smaller rewards to the detriment of long-term outcomes). We find that acute consumption of drugs with abuse potential is capable of modulating impulsive choice and action, although magnitude and direction of effect appear contingent on baseline function. Many lines of evidence, including findings from meta-analyses, show an association between chronic drug use and elevated impulsive choice and action. In some instances, elevated impulsive choice and action have been found to predate the development of substance use disorders, perhaps signifying their candidacy as objective vulnerability markers. Research in behavioral addictions is preliminary, and has mostly focused on impulsive action, finding this to be elevated versus controls, similar to that seen in chronic substance use disorders. Only a handful of imaging studies has explored the neural correlates of impulsive action and choice across these disorders. Key areas for future research are highlighted along with potential implications in terms of neurobiological models and treatment. In particular, future work should further explore whether the cognitive deficits identified are state or trait in nature: i.e. are evident before addiction perhaps signaling risk; or are a consequence of repetitive engagement in habitual behavior; and effects of novel agents known to modulate these cognitive abilities on various addictive disorders.

  12. Remote synchronization in star networks.

    PubMed

    Bergner, A; Frasca, M; Sciuto, G; Buscarino, A; Ngamga, E J; Fortuna, L; Kurths, J

    2012-02-01

    We study phase synchronization in a network motif with a starlike structure in which the central node's (the hub's) frequency is strongly detuned against the other peripheral nodes. We find numerically and experimentally a regime of remote synchronization (RS), where the peripheral nodes form a phase synchronized cluster, while the hub remains free with its own dynamics and serves just as a transmitter for the other nodes. We explain the mechanism for this RS by the existence of a free amplitude and also show that systems with a fixed or constant amplitude, such as the classic Kuramoto phase oscillator, are not able to generate this phenomenon. Further, we derive an analytic expression which supports our explanation of the mechanism.

  13. Cluster synchronization in oscillatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belykh, Vladimir N.; Osipov, Grigory V.; Petrov, Valentin S.; Suykens, Johan A. K.; Vandewalle, Joos

    2008-09-01

    Synchronous behavior in networks of coupled oscillators is a commonly observed phenomenon attracting a growing interest in physics, biology, communication, and other fields of science and technology. Besides global synchronization, one can also observe splitting of the full network into several clusters of mutually synchronized oscillators. In this paper, we study the conditions for such cluster partitioning into ensembles for the case of identical chaotic systems. We focus mainly on the existence and the stability of unique unconditional clusters whose rise does not depend on the origin of the other clusters. Also, conditional clusters in arrays of globally nonsymmetrically coupled identical chaotic oscillators are investigated. The design problem of organizing clusters into a given configuration is discussed.

  14. Chaotic synchronization system and electrocardiogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Liuqing; Dai, Xinlai; Li, Baodong

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical model of chaotic synchronization of the heart-blood flow coupling dynamics is proposed, which is based on a seven dimension nonlinear dynamical system constructed by three subsystems of the sinoatrial node natural pacemaker, the cardiac relaxation oscillator and the dynamics of blood-fluid in heart chambers. The existence and robustness of the self-chaotic synchronization of the system are demonstrated by both methods of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. The spectrum of Lyapunov exponent, the Lyapunov dimension and the Kolmogorov entropy are estimated when the system was undergoing the state of self-chaotic synchronization evolution. The time waveform of the dynamical variable, which represents the membrane potential of the cardiac integrative cell, shows a shape which is similar to that of the normal electrocardiogram (ECG) of human, thus implies that the model possesses physiological significance functionally.

  15. Digital data detection and synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noack, T. L.; Morris, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The primary accomplishments have been in the analysis and simulation of receivers and bit synchronizers. It has been discovered that tracking rate effects play, a rather fundamental role in both receiver and synchronizer performance, but that data relating to recorder time-base-error, for the proper characterization of this phenomenon, is in rather short supply. It is possible to obtain operationally useful tape recorder time-base-error data from high signal-to-noise ratio tapes using synchronizers with relatively wideband tracking loops. Low signal-to-noise ratio tapes examined in the same way would not be synchronizable. Additional areas of interest covered are receiver false lock, cycle slipping, and other unusual phenomena, which have been described to some extent in this and earlier reports and simulated during the study.

  16. Multidimensional Examination of Impulsivity in Relation to Disordered Gambling

    PubMed Central

    MacKillop, James; Miller, Joshua D.; Fortune, Erica; Maples, Jessica; Lance, Charles E.; Campbell, W. Keith; Goodie, Adam S.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity has been consistently associated with pathological gambling (PG), but the diversity of definitions and measures of impulsivity has led to ambiguity with regard to which indices are independently relevant. Toward clarifying this relationship, the current study examined indices from an array of commonly-used impulsivity measures in relation to PG severity in an adult community sample of frequent gamblers (N = 353). These included both survey assessments and behavioral tasks. Using a factor analytic approach, four latent factors were identified among 19 indices and were designated reward sensitivity, punishment sensitivity, delay discounting, and cognitive impulsivity. All four latent variables were positively and independently related to PG severity, albeit at a trend level for cognitive impulsivity in a combined model. These findings reveal four generally independent domains of impulsivity that are related to PG severity, clarify which assessment measures aggregate in each domain, and illustrate the importance of measurement specificity in studying impulsivity in relation to PG and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:24708148

  17. [Anti-impulsivity drugs and their mechanisms of action].

    PubMed

    Ohmura, Yu; Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2014-04-01

    Higher impulsivity could be a risk factor for drug addiction, criminal involvement, and suicide. Moreover, poor inhibitory control is observed in several psychiatric disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Thus it is preferred that clinical drugs have anti-impulsive effects in addition to the therapeutic effects on the primary disease. At least it is better to use clinical drugs that do not increase impulsivity. We have developed a 3-choice serial reaction time task and examined the effects of clinical drugs on impulsivity in rats using the task. We have found several anti-impulsive drugs (lithium, tandospirone, and milnacipran) and elucidated the mechanism of action in some of these drugs. For example, we demonstrated that milnacipran enhanced the control of impulsive action by activating D1-like receptors in the infralimbic cortex. In this review, we introduce recent advances in this field and suggest future directions to develop anti-impulsive drugs. PMID:25080806

  18. Subjective field study of response to impulsive helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    Subjects, located outdoors and indoors, judged the noisiness and other subjective noise characteristics of flyovers of two helicopters and a propeller driven airplane as part of a study of the effects of impulsiveness on the subjective response to helicopter noise. In the first experiment, the impulsive characteristics of one helicopter was controlled by varying the main rotor speed while maintaining a constant airspeed in level flight. The second experiment which utilized only the helicopters, included descent and level flight operations. The more impulsive helicopter was consistently judged less noisy than the less impulsive helicopter at equal effective perceived noise levels (EPNL). The ability of EPNL to predict noisiness was not improved by the addition of either of two proposed impulse corrections. A subjective measure of impulsiveness, however, which was not significantly related to the proposed impulse corrections, was found to improve the predictive ability of EPNL.

  19. Impulsivity/sociability and reinforcement in verbal operant conditioning.

    PubMed

    Gupta, B S; Nagpal, M

    1978-05-01

    The present investigation was designed to study the relationship between impulsivity/sociability and modes of reinforcement in verbal operant conditioning. Two 2x3 randomized block designs, one each for impulsivity and sociability, were replicated ten times. One hundred and twenty undergraduate female students (60 for impulsivity and 60 for sociability) were individually subjected to Taffel's verbal conditioning procedure. When the conditioning scores of high and low scorers on the impulsivity and sociability scales were compared, it was found that under rewarding conditions ('good' and 'buzzer' in respect of sociability and 'good' in respect of impulsivity) the high scorers' score and under punishing conditions ('electric shock') the low scorers' score was the higher of the two. The study also revealed that the high scorers (on the impulsivity scale) conditioned more under rewarding conditions while the low scorers (both on the impulsivity and sociability scales) conditioned more under punishing ones.

  20. A review of impulsive phase phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review is given of impulsive phase phenomena in support of the models used to compute the energies of the different components of the flares under study. The observational characteristics of the impulsive phase are discussed as well as the evidence for multi-thermal or non-thermal phenomena. The significance of time delays between hard X-rays and microwaves is discussed in terms of electron beams and Alfven waves, two-step acceleration, and secondary bursts at large distances from the primary source. Observations indicating the occurrence of chromospheric evaporation, coronal explosions, and thermal conduction fronts are reviewed briefly, followed by the gamma ray and neutron results. Finally, a preferred flare scenario and energy source are presented involving the interactions in a complex of magnetic loops with the consequent reconnection and electron acceleration.

  1. A Class of Solvable Impulse Control Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Luis H. R.

    2004-05-15

    We consider a class of stochastic impulse control problems where the controlled process evolves according to a linear, regular, and time homogeneous diffusion. We state a set of easily verifiable sufficient conditions under which the problem is explicitly solvable. We also state an algebraic equation from which the optimal impulse boundary can be determined and, given this threshold, we present the value of the optimal policy interms of the minimal increasing r-excessive mapping for the controlled diffusion. We also consider the comparative static properties of the optimal policy and state a set of typically satisfied conditions under which increased volatility unambiguously increases the value of the optimal policy and expands the continuation region where exercising the irreversible policy is suboptimal. We also illustrate our results explicitly in two models based on geometric Brownian motion.

  2. Elegant impulser developed for flat beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M. J., LLNL

    1998-05-26

    The following report describes the design, construction, and checkout of a high-voltage (HV) impulser built for the heavy ion fusion (HIF) project [1]. The purpose of this impulser is to provide an adjustable diode voltage source of sufficient quality and level to allow the optimization of beam transport and accelerator sections of HIF [2, 3]. An elegant, low-impedance, high-energy storage capacitor circuit has been selected for this application. Circuit parameters of the retrofit to the diode region [4] have been included to provide the controlled rise time. The critical part of this circuit that is common to all candidates is the impedance matching component. The following report provides a description of the implemented circuit, the basic circuit variables for wave shaping, screening techniques revealing the weakest circuit component, and the resulting output of the injector.

  3. Thin film eddy current impulse deicer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Samuel O.; Zieve, Peter B.

    1990-01-01

    Two new styles of electrical impulse deicers has been developed and tested in NASA's Icing Research Tunnel. With the Eddy Current Repulsion Deicing Boot (EDB), a thin and flexible spiral coil is encapsulated between two thicknesses of elastomer. The coil, made by an industrial printed circuit board manufacturer, is bonded to the aluminum aircraft leading edge. A capacitor bank is discharged through the coil. Induced eddy currents repel the coil from the aluminum aircraft structure and shed accumulated ice. A second configuration, the Eddy Current Repulsion Deicing-Strip (EDS) uses an outer metal erosion strip fastened over the coil. Opposite flowing eddy currents repel the strip and create the impulse deicing force. The outer strip serves as a surface for the collection and shedding of ice and does not require any structural properties. The EDS is suitable for composite aircraft structures. Both systems successfully dispelled over 95 percent of the accumulated ice from airfoils over the range of the FAA icing envelope.

  4. Globally optimal impulsive transfers via Green's theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazelrigg, G. A., Jr.

    1984-08-01

    For certain classes of trajectories the cost function (characteristic velocity) can be written as a 'quasilinear' function of the change in state. In the case presented, impulsive transfers between coplanar, coaxial orbits with transfer time and angle unrestricted, Green's theorem can be used to determine the optimal transfer between given terminal states. This is done in a manner which places no restrictions on the number of impulses used and leads to globally optimal results. These results are used to show that the Hohmann transfer and the biparabolic transfer provide global minima in their respective regions. The regions in which monoelliptic and biparabolic trajectories are globally optimal are also defined for elliptic terminal states. The results are applicable to the case in which restrictions are placed on the radius of closest approach or greatest recession from the center of the force field.

  5. The Stomach-Derived Hormone Ghrelin Increases Impulsive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Hansson, Caroline; Fenander, Maya; Richard, Jennifer E; Dickson, Suzanne L; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as impaired decision making, is associated with many psychiatric and behavioral disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as well as eating disorders. Recent data indicate that there is a strong positive correlation between food reward behavior and impulsivity, but the mechanisms behind this relationship remain unknown. Here we hypothesize that ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach and known to increase food reward behavior, also increases impulsivity. In order to assess the impact of ghrelin on impulsivity, rats were trained in three complementary tests of impulsive behavior and choice: differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL), go/no-go, and delay discounting. Ghrelin injection into the lateral ventricle increased impulsive behavior, as indicated by reduced efficiency of performance in the DRL test, and increased lever pressing during the no-go periods of the go/no-go test. Central ghrelin stimulation also increased impulsive choice, as evidenced by the reduced choice for large rewards when delivered with a delay in the delay discounting test. In order to determine whether signaling at the central ghrelin receptors is necessary for maintenance of normal levels of impulsive behavior, DRL performance was assessed following ghrelin receptor blockade with central infusion of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. Central ghrelin receptor blockade reduced impulsive behavior, as reflected by increased efficiency of performance in the DRL task. To further investigate the neurobiological substrate underlying the impulsivity effect of ghrelin, we microinjected ghrelin into the ventral tegmental area, an area harboring dopaminergic cell bodies. Ghrelin receptor stimulation within the VTA was sufficient to increase impulsive behavior. We further evaluated the impact of ghrelin on dopamine-related gene expression and dopamine turnover in brain areas key in impulsive behavior control. This study provides the first

  6. State observer for synchronous motors

    DOEpatents

    Lang, Jeffrey H.

    1994-03-22

    A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

  7. Synchronization with sound propagation delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haché, A.

    2010-04-01

    Complex systems that synchronize with acoustic signals, like chanting crowds and musical ensembles, have the intrinsic ability to maintain synchrony without external aid or visual cues, even when spread over wide areas. According to two models, the counterintuitive self-synchronization happens when the system's components have a spatial distribution that is sufficiently uniform. The roles of system size and density are examined for arrangements in 1, 2 and 3 dimensions. Asynchrony is predicted to become vanishingly small at high densities, and results suggest ways on how to minimize asynchrony in real-world situations.

  8. Optimized multiparty quantum clock synchronization

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Av, Radel; Exman, Iaakov

    2011-07-15

    A multiparty protocol for distributed quantum clock synchronization has been claimed to provide universal limits on the clock accuracy, viz., that accuracy monotonically decreases with the number n of party members. But this is only true for synchronization when one limits oneself to W states. This work shows that the usage of Z (Symmetric Dicke) states, a generalization of W states, results in improved accuracy, having a maximum when Left-Floor n/2 Right-Floor of its members have their qubits with a |1> eigenstate.

  9. The Hydraulic Ram (Or Impulse) Pump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2014-01-01

    The hydraulic impulse pump utilizes a fraction of the momentum of a flowing stream to lift a small portion of that water to a higher level. There it may be accumulated in an elevated cistern to provide sufficient water for several families, for the pump works 24 h a day with no additional source of energy. The operation of the pump is described,…

  10. Cigarette Cravings, Impulsivity, and the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Potvin, Stéphane; Tikàsz, Andràs; Dinh-Williams, Laurence Lê-Anh; Bourque, Josiane; Mendrek, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    Craving is a core feature of tobacco use disorder as well as a significant predictor of smoking relapse. Studies have shown that appetitive smoking-related stimuli (e.g., someone smoking) trigger significant cravings in smokers impede their self-control capacities and promote drug seeking behavior. In this review, we begin by an overview of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies investigating the neural correlates of smokers to appetitive smoking cues. The literature reveals a complex and vastly distributed neuronal network underlying smokers’ craving response that recruits regions involved in self-referential processing, planning/regulatory processes, emotional responding, attentional biases, and automatic conducts. We then selectively review important factors contributing to the heterogeneity of results that significantly limit the implications of these findings, namely between- (abstinence, smoking expectancies, and self-regulation) and within-studies factors (severity of smoking dependence, sex-differences, motivation to quit, and genetic factors). Remarkably, we found that little to no attention has been devoted to examine the influence of personality traits on the neural correlates of cigarette cravings in fMRI studies. Impulsivity has been linked with craving and relapse in substance and tobacco use, which prompted our research team to examine the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings in an fMRI study. We found that the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings was mediated by fronto-cingulate mechanisms. Given the high prevalence of cigarette smoking in several psychiatric disorders that are characterized by significant levels of impulsivity, we conclude by identifying psychiatric patients as a target population whose tobacco-smoking habits deserve further behavioral and neuro-imaging investigation. PMID:26441686

  11. The hydraulic ram (or impulse) pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Allan

    2014-03-01

    The hydraulic impulse pump utilizes a fraction of the momentum of a flowing stream to lift a small portion of that water to a higher level. There it may be accumulated in an elevated cistern to provide sufficient water for several families, for the pump works 24 h a day with no additional source of energy. The operation of the pump is described, along with a working demonstration model constructed from plastic waste pipe and fittings.

  12. Impulsivity, Stimulant Abuse, and Dopamine Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    London, E D

    2016-01-01

    The nonmedical use of amphetamine-type stimulants is a worldwide problem, with substantial medical and social consequences. Nonetheless, the identification of a pharmacological treatment for amphetamine use disorder remains elusive. Stimulant users exhibit neurochemical evidence of dopamine-system dysfunction as well as impulsive behaviors that may interfere with the success of treatments for their addiction. This review focuses on the potential role of dopaminergic neurotransmission in impulsivity, both in healthy individuals and chronic stimulant users who meet criteria for methamphetamine dependence. Presented are findings related to the potential contributions of signaling through dopamine D1- and D2-type receptors to self-control impulsivity in methamphetamine- dependent users. The information available points to signaling through striatal D2-type dopamine receptors as a potential therapeutic target for stimulant use disorders, but medications that target D2-type dopamine receptors have not been successful in treating stimulant-use disorders, possibly because D2-type receptors are downregulated. Other means to augment D2-type receptor signaling are therefore under consideration, and one promising approach is the addition of exercise training as an adjunct to behavioral treatment for addiction. PMID:27288074

  13. Impulsive Injection for Compressor Stator Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Bright, Michelle M.

    2005-01-01

    Flow control using impulsive injection from the suction surface of a stator vane has been applied in a low speed axial compressor. Impulsive injection is shown to significantly reduce separation relative to steady injection for vanes that were induced to separate by an increase in vane stagger angle of 4 degrees. Injected flow was applied to the airfoil suction surface using spanwise slots pitched in the streamwise direction. Injection was limited to the near-hub region, from 10 to 36 percent of span, to affect the dominant loss due to hub leakage flow. Actuation was provided externally using high-speed solenoid valves closely coupled to the vane tip. Variations in injected mass, frequency, and duty cycle are explored. The local corrected total pressure loss across the vane at the lower span region was reduced by over 20 percent. Additionally, low momentum fluid migrating from the hub region toward the tip was effectively suppressed resulting in an overall benefit which reduced corrected area averaged loss through the passage by 4 percent. The injection mass fraction used for impulsive actuation was typically less than 0.1 percent of the compressor through flow.

  14. Cognitive impulsivity in specific learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Donfrancesco, Renato; Mugnaini, Daniele; Dell'Uomo, Andrea

    2005-08-01

    Many studies on cognitive impulsivity in learning disabled children have been criticized for their methodological limitations, and they have not dealt with the different types of learning disability. The aim of this study was to overcome these limitations and to assess if there was a significant cognitive impulsivity in reading disorder and/or spelling disorder by using the 20-item Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFF20). A total of 110 children (second through eighth grades) were recruited from a cohort of children assessed for the first time in a National Health clinic specialized in the study of specific learning disabilities. In all, 30 dyslexic children and 25 children with spelling disorder (all children without an ADHD comorbidity) were compared with 55 children of a control group on the MMF20 (accuracy and time latency). Results showed that the children with reading disorder were less accurate than the children with spelling disability (p<0.05). Both these groups performed less accurately than the control group. Subjects with dyslexia were faster than both the other groups in response time (p<0.05), clearly showing a significantly higher cognitive impulsivity than the other groups. Hence, data seem to confirm the idea that, similar to ADHD children, dyslexic children have impaired frontal/prefrontal functions. Clinical and treatment implications are discussed. PMID:15981139

  15. Impulsive Reconnection in the Sun's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2009-01-01

    Recent high-resolution observations from the Hinode mission show dramatically that the Sun's atmosphere is filled with explosive activity ranging from chromospheric explosions that reach heights of Mm, to coronal jets that can extend to solar radii, to giant coronal mass ejections (CME) that reach the edge of the heliosphere. The driver for all this activity is believed to be 3D magnetic reconnection. From the large variation observed in the temporal behavior of solar activity, it is clear that reconnection in the corona must take on a variety of distinct forms. The explosive nature of jets and CMEs requires that the reconnection be impulsive in that it stays off until a substantial store of free energy has been accumulated, but then turns on abruptly and stays on until much of this free energy is released. The key question, therefore, is what determines whether the reconnection is impulsive or not. We present some of the latest observations and numerical models of explosive and non-explosive solar activity. We argue that, in order for the reconnection to be impulsive, it must be driven by a quasi-ideal instability. We discuss the generality of our results for understanding 31) reconnection in other contexts.

  16. Impulse noise generated by starter pistols

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, Deanna K.; Finan, Donald S.; Soendergaard, Jacob; Flamme, Gregory A.; Murphy, William J.; Lankford, James E.; Stewart, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study describes signals generated by .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols in the context of noise-induced hearing loss risk for sports officials and athletes. Design Acoustic comparison of impulses generated from typical .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols firing blanks were made to impulses generated from comparable firearms firing both blanks and live rounds. Acoustic characteristics are described in terms of directionality and distance from the shooter in a simulated outdoor running track. Metrics include peak sound pressure levels (SPL), A-weighted equivalent 8-hour level (LeqA8), and maximum permissible number of individual shots, or maximum permissible exposures (MPE) for the unprotected ear. Results Starter pistols produce peak SPLs above 140 dB. The numbers of MPEs are as few as five for the .22-caliber starter pistol, and somewhat higher (≤25) for the .32-caliber pistol. Conclusion The impulsive sounds produced by starter pistols correspond to MPE numbers that are unacceptably small for unprotected officials and others in the immediate vicinity of the shooter. At the distances included in this study, the risk to athletes appears to be low (when referencing exposure criteria for adults), but the sound associated with the starter pistol will contribute to the athlete’s overall noise exposure. PMID:23373743

  17. Landmine detection and imaging using Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR)

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.G.; Gravel, D.T.; Mast, J.E.; Warhus, J.P.

    1995-08-07

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed radar and imaging technologies with potential applications in mine detection by the armed forces and other agencies involved in determining efforts. These new technologies use a patented ultra-wideband (impulse) radar technology that is compact, low-cost, and low power. Designated as Micropower hnpulse Radar, these compact, self-contained radars can easily be assembled into arrays to form complete ground penetrating radar imaging systems. LLNL has also developed tomographic reconstruction and signal processing software capable of producing high-resolution 2-D and 3-D images of objects buried in materials like soil or concrete from radar data. Preliminary test results have shown that a radar imaging system using these technologies has the ability to image both metallic and plastic land mine surrogate targets buried in 5 to 10 cm of moist soil. In dry soil, the system can detect buried objects to a depth of 30 cm and more. This report describes our initial test results and plans for future work.

  18. Fermi Timing and Synchronization System

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.; Staples, J.; Doolittle, L.; Byrd, J.; Ratti, A.; Kaertner, F.X.; Kim, J.; Chen, J.; Ilday, F.O.; Ludwig, F.; Winter, A.; Ferianis, M.; Danailov, M.; D'Auria, G.

    2006-07-19

    The Fermi FEL will depend critically on precise timing of its RF, laser and diagnostic subsystems. The timing subsystem to coordinate these functions will need to reliably maintain sub-100fs synchronicity between distant points up to 300m apart in the Fermi facility. The technology to do this is not commercially available, and has not been experimentally demonstrated in a working facility. Therefore, new technology must be developed to meet these needs. Two approaches have been researched by different groups working with the Fermi staff. At MIT, a pulse transmission scheme has been developed for synchronization of RF and laser devices. And at LBL, a CW transmission scheme has been developed for RF and laser synchronization. These respective schemes have advantages and disadvantages that will become better understood in coming years. This document presents the work done by both teams, and suggests a possible system design which integrates them both. The integrated system design provides an example of how choices can be made between the different approaches without significantly changing the basic infrastructure of the system. Overall system issues common to any synchronization scheme are also discussed.

  19. Synchronization by elastic neuronal latencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi, Roni; Timor, Reut; Marom, Shimon; Abeles, Moshe; Kanter, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Psychological and physiological considerations entail that formation and functionality of neuronal cell assemblies depend upon synchronized repeated activation such as zero-lag synchronization. Several mechanisms for the emergence of this phenomenon have been suggested, including the global network quantity, the greatest common divisor of neuronal circuit delay loops. However, they require strict biological prerequisites such as precisely matched delays and connectivity, and synchronization is represented as a stationary mode of activity instead of a transient phenomenon. Here we show that the unavoidable increase in neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulation serves as a nonuniform gradual stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops. This apparent nuisance is revealed to be an essential mechanism in various types of neuronal time controllers, where synchronization emerges as a transient phenomenon and without predefined precisely matched synaptic delays. These findings are described in an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on a circuit of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro, and are corroborated and extended by simulations of circuits composed of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with time-dependent latencies. These findings announce a cortical time scale for time controllers based on tens of microseconds stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops per spike. They call for a reexamination of the role of the temporal periodic mode in brain functionality using advanced in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  20. Tweaking synchronization by connectivity modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Paul; Peron, Thomas; Eroglu, Deniz; Stemler, Thomas; Ramírez Ávila, Gonzalo Marcelo; Rodrigues, Francisco A.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Natural and man-made networks often possess locally treelike substructures. Taking such tree networks as our starting point, we show how the addition of links changes the synchronization properties of the network. We focus on two different methods of link addition. The first method adds single links that create cycles of a well-defined length. Following a topological approach, we introduce cycles of varying length and analyze how this feature, as well as the position in the network, alters the synchronous behavior. We show that in particular short cycles can lead to a maximum change of the Laplacian's eigenvalue spectrum, dictating the synchronization properties of such networks. The second method connects a certain proportion of the initially unconnected nodes. We simulate dynamical systems on these network topologies, with the nodes' local dynamics being either discrete or continuous. Here our main result is that a certain number of additional links, with the relative position in the network being crucial, can be beneficial to ensure stable synchronization.

  1. Tweaking synchronization by connectivity modifications.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Paul; Peron, Thomas; Eroglu, Deniz; Stemler, Thomas; Ramírez Ávila, Gonzalo Marcelo; Rodrigues, Francisco A; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Natural and man-made networks often possess locally treelike substructures. Taking such tree networks as our starting point, we show how the addition of links changes the synchronization properties of the network. We focus on two different methods of link addition. The first method adds single links that create cycles of a well-defined length. Following a topological approach, we introduce cycles of varying length and analyze how this feature, as well as the position in the network, alters the synchronous behavior. We show that in particular short cycles can lead to a maximum change of the Laplacian's eigenvalue spectrum, dictating the synchronization properties of such networks. The second method connects a certain proportion of the initially unconnected nodes. We simulate dynamical systems on these network topologies, with the nodes' local dynamics being either discrete or continuous. Here our main result is that a certain number of additional links, with the relative position in the network being crucial, can be beneficial to ensure stable synchronization.

  2. Tweaking synchronization by connectivity modifications.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Paul; Peron, Thomas; Eroglu, Deniz; Stemler, Thomas; Ramírez Ávila, Gonzalo Marcelo; Rodrigues, Francisco A; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Natural and man-made networks often possess locally treelike substructures. Taking such tree networks as our starting point, we show how the addition of links changes the synchronization properties of the network. We focus on two different methods of link addition. The first method adds single links that create cycles of a well-defined length. Following a topological approach, we introduce cycles of varying length and analyze how this feature, as well as the position in the network, alters the synchronous behavior. We show that in particular short cycles can lead to a maximum change of the Laplacian's eigenvalue spectrum, dictating the synchronization properties of such networks. The second method connects a certain proportion of the initially unconnected nodes. We simulate dynamical systems on these network topologies, with the nodes' local dynamics being either discrete or continuous. Here our main result is that a certain number of additional links, with the relative position in the network being crucial, can be beneficial to ensure stable synchronization. PMID:27415259

  3. PCM synchronization by word stuffing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butman, S.

    1969-01-01

    When a transmitted word, consisting of a number of pulses, is detected and removed from the data stream, the space left by the removal is eliminated by a memory buffer. This eliminates the need for a clock synchronizer thereby removing instability problems.

  4. Sports Medicine Meets Synchronized Swimming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenz, Betty J.; And Others

    This collection of articles contains information about synchronized swimming. Topics covered include general physiology and cardiovascular conditioning, flexibility exercises, body composition, strength training, nutrition, coach-athlete relationships, coping with competition stress and performance anxiety, and eye care. Chapters are included on…

  5. Speed control for synchronous motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, H.; Schott, J.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback circuit controls fluctuations in speed of synchronous ac motor. Voltage proportional to phase angle is developed by phase detector, rectified, amplified, compared to threshold, and reapplied positively or negatively to motor excitation circuit. Speed control reduces wow and flutter of audio turntables and tape recorders, and enhances hunting in gyroscope motors.

  6. Impulsivity and Cigarette Craving among Adolescent Daily and Occasional Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Amanda R.; Burris, Jessica L.; Froeliger, Brett; Saladin, Michael E.; Carpenter, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Impulsivity is a multi-dimensional construct that is robustly related to cigarette smoking. While underlying factors that account for this relation are not well understood, craving has been proposed as a central mechanism linking impulsivity to smoking. In order to further refine our understanding of associations between impulsivity and cigarette craving, the current study examined the association between impulsivity and tonic and cue-elicited craving among a sample of adolescent smokers. We expected trait impulsivity would be positively associated with both tonic and cue-elicited craving, and that this relationship would be stronger among daily vs. occasional smokers. Methods 106 smokers (ages 16–20) completed questionnaires and reported their cigarette craving prior to and immediately following presentation of each of three counterbalanced cue types: (a) in vivo smoking, (b) alcohol, and (c) neutral cue. Results Impulsivity was positively associated with tonic craving for daily smokers (β=.38; p=.005), but not occasional smokers (β=.01; p=.95), with a significant impulsivity x smoker group interaction (β=1.31; p=.03). Impulsivity was unrelated to craving following smoking or alcohol cue, regardless of smoker group (all p’s>.16). Conclusions Results suggest a moderated effect in which impulsivity is positively associated with tonic craving for daily smokers, but not occasional smokers. Tonic craving may serve as a mechanism linking impulsivity, smoking persistence, and nicotine dependence among daily smokers. PMID:25665916

  7. Impulsivity, risky behaviors and accidents in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Wnorowska, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Podgórska, Anna; Barry, Kristen; Blow, Frederic C; Brower, Kirk J; Wojnar, Marcin

    2013-03-01

    Impulsivity and alcohol drinking are both considered as important predictors of unintentional as well as intentional injuries. However, relationships of impulsivity with risky behaviors and a history of accidents have not been investigated in alcohol dependence. The aim of this study was to analyze relationships between the frequency of risky behaviors and level of behavioral as well as cognitive impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients. By means of Barratt's Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and stop-signal task, the levels of cognitive and behavioral impulsivity among 304 alcohol-dependent patients were measured. Also, patients were asked to answer questions from the Short Inventory of Problems applying to risky behaviors and accidents after alcohol drinking. In addition participants completed a questionnaire to assess frequency of other behaviors from the analyzed spectrum (use of other drugs, driving or aggressive behavior after alcohol drinking). The statistical analysis revealed a significant association between impulsivity and frequency of risky behaviors in alcohol-dependent patients. Individuals with higher scores in BIS behaved more frequently in a risky way and had significantly more accidents after alcohol drinking. The association with risky behaviors was strongest for non-planning and attentional impulsivity subscales, whereas frequency of accidents was particularly associated with motor impulsivity. A multivariate analysis revealed that impulsivity was the most important predictor of risky behaviors, but did not significantly predict a history of accidents. Our study confirms that impulsivity is an important correlate of risky behaviors in alcohol-dependent individuals, along with global psychopathology and severity of alcohol dependence.

  8. Relationships of impulsiveness and depressive symptoms in alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Topolewska-Wochowska, Aleksandra; Serafin, Piotr; Sadowska-Mazuryk, Joanna; Pupek-Pyzioł, Julia; Brower, Kirk J.; Wojnar, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms as well as high levels of impulsivity are subjects of special interest in alcohol dependence, as these factors are considered to influence the course of this disorder. However, until now mutual relationships between impulsivity and depression have not been investigated thoroughly in alcohol-dependent patients. Methods By means of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and stop-signal task, levels of impulsivity among 304 alcohol-dependent patients were measured. The stop-signal task was used as a manipulation-free method of estimating the level of behavioral impulsiveness, and the BIS-11 is a self report measure of global as well as cognitive impulsivity. Patients were also asked to complete the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hopelessness Scale (BHS). The results were analyzed in order to examine relationships between impulsiveness and depressive symptoms. Results Statistical analyses revealed significant associations between impulsiveness and severity of depressive symptoms. Individuals with higher scores on the BDI were more impulsive on the BIS-11, whereas patients with higher scores on the BHS were more impulsive on both the stop-signal task and BIS-11. The strongest correlations were found with the attention impulsivity subscale of BIS-11. Adjusting for other variables, a linear regression analysis revealed that cognitive impulsivity was the strongest predictor of depression severity. Limitations The main limitation of the study is a not fully representative sample, with exclusion of patients with active mood disorders Conclusions The results indicate a strong association between depressive symptoms and impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients, and suggest an important distinction between hopelessness and other depressive symptoms. PMID:22030134

  9. The utility of rat models of impulsivity in developing pharmacotherapies for impulse control disorders

    PubMed Central

    Winstanley, Catharine A

    2011-01-01

    High levels of impulsive behaviours are a clinically significant symptom in a range of psychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, personality disorders, pathological gambling and substance abuse. Although often measured using questionnaire assessments, levels of different types of impulsivity can also be determined using behavioural tests. Rodent analogues of these paradigms have been developed, and similar neural circuitry has been implicated in their performance in both humans and rats. In the current review, the methodology underlying the measurement of different aspects of impulsive action and choice are considered from the viewpoint of drug development, with a focus on the continuous performance task (CPT), stop-signal task (SST), go/no-go and delay-discounting paradigms. Current issues impeding translation between animal and human studies are identified, and comparisons drawn between the acute effects of dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic compounds across species. Although the field could benefit from a more systematic determination of different pharmacological agents across paradigms, there are signs of strong concordance between the animal and human data. However, the type of impulsivity measured appears to play a significant role, with the SST and delay discounting providing more consistent effects for dopaminergic drugs, while the CPT and SST show better predictive validity so far for serotonergic and noradrenergic compounds. Based on the available data, it would appear that these impulsivity models could be used more widely to identify potential pharmacotherapies for impulse control disorders. Novel targets within the glutamatergic and serotonergic system are also suggested. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-4 PMID:21410459

  10. Impulsive choice and response in dopamine agonist-related impulse control behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Voon, Valerie; Reynolds, Brady; Brezing, Christina; Gallea, Cecile; Skaljic, Meliha; Ekanayake, Vindhya; Fernandez, Hubert; Potenza, Marc N; Dolan, Raymond J; Hallett, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Dopaminergic medication-related Impulse Control Disorders (ICDs) such as pathological gambling and compulsive shopping have been reported in Parkinson disease (PD). Hypothesis We hypothesized that dopamine agonists (DAs) would be associated with greater impulsive choice, or greater discounting of delayed rewards, in PD patients with ICDs (PDI). Methods Fourteen PDI patients, 14 PD controls without ICDs and 16 medication-free matched normal controls were tested on (i) the Experiential Discounting Task (EDT), a feedback-based intertemporal choice task, (ii) spatial working memory and (iii) attentional set shifting. The EDT was used to assess impulsivity choice (hyperbolic K-value), reaction time (RT) and decision conflict RT (the RT difference between high conflict and low conflict choices). PDI patients and PD controls were tested on and off DA. Results On the EDT, there was a group by medication interaction effect [F(1,26)=5.62; p=0.03] with pairwise analyses demonstrating that DA status was associated with increased impulsive choice in PDI patients (p=0.02) but not in PD controls (p=0.37). PDI patients also had faster RT compared to PD controls F(1,26)=7.51 p=0.01]. DA status was associated with shorter RT [F(3,24)=8.39, p=0.001] and decision conflict RT [F(1,26)=6.16, p=0.02] in PDI patients but not in PD controls. There were no correlations between different measures of impulsivity. PDI patients on DA had greater spatial working memory impairments compared to PD controls on DA (t=2.13, df=26, p=0.04). Conclusion Greater impulsive choice, faster RT, faster decision conflict RT and executive dysfunction may contribute to ICDs in PD. PMID:19838863

  11. Synchronization control of memristor-based recurrent neural networks with perturbations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiping; Li, Lixiang; Peng, Haipeng; Xiao, Jinghua; Yang, Yixian

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, the synchronization control of memristor-based recurrent neural networks with impulsive perturbations or boundary perturbations is studied. We find that the memristive connection weights have a certain relationship with the stability of the system. Some criteria are obtained to guarantee that memristive neural networks have strong noise tolerance capability. Two kinds of controllers are designed so that the memristive neural networks with perturbations can converge to the equilibrium points, which evoke human's memory patterns. The analysis in this paper employs the differential inclusions theory and the Lyapunov functional method. Numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of our results.

  12. Sensorimotor Synchronization across the Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drewing, Knut; Aschersleben, Gisa; Li, Shu-Chen

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigates the contribution of general processing resources as well as other more specific factors to the life-span development of sensorimotor synchronization and its component processes. Within a synchronization tapping paradigm, a group of 286 participants, 6 to 88 years of age, were asked to synchronize finger taps with…

  13. High speed synchronizer card utilizing VLSI technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speciale, Nicholas; Wunderlich, Kristin

    1988-01-01

    A generic synchronizer card capable of providing standard NASA communication block telemetry frame synchronization and quality control was fabricated using VLSI technology. Four VLSI chip sets are utilized to shrink all the required functions into a single synchronizer card. The application of VLSI technology to telemetry systems resulted in an increase in performance and a decrease in cost and size.

  14. Delay synchronization of temporal Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qiang; Xie, Cheng-jun; Liang, Yi; Niu, Yu-jun; Lin, Da

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the delay synchronization between two temporal Boolean networks base on semi-tensor product method, which improve complete synchronization. Necessary and sufficient conditions for delay synchronization are drawn base on algebraic expression of temporal Boolean networks. A example is presented to show the effectiveness of theoretical analysis.

  15. Delay-induced destabilization of entrainment of nerve impulses on ephaptically coupled nerve fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Mohit H.; McIver, John K.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.

    2009-01-01

    We study the effect of delay on the synchronization of two nerve impulses traveling along two ephaptically coupled, unmyelinated nerve fibers. The system is modeled as a pair of delay-coupled Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations. A multiple-scale perturbation approach is used for the analysis of these equations in the limit of weak coupling. In the absence of delay, two pulses with identical speeds are shown to be entrained precisely. However, as the delay is increased beyond a critical value, we show that this precise entrainment becomes unstable. We make quantitative estimates for the actual values of delay at which this can occur in the case of squid giant axons and compare them with the relevant time scales involved.

  16. Analysis of impulse signals with Hylaty ELF station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulak, A.; Mlynarczyk, J.; Ostrowski, M.; Kubisz, J.; Michalec, A.

    2012-04-01

    Lighting discharges generate electromagnetic field pulses that propagate in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. The attenuation in the ELF range is so small that the pulses originating from strong atmospheric discharges can be observed even several thousand kilometers away from the individual discharge. The recorded waveform depends on the discharge process, the Earth-ionosphere waveguide properties on the source-receiver path, and the transfer function of the receiver. If the distance from the source is known, an inverse method can be used for reconstructing the current moment waveform and the charge moment of the discharge. In order to reconstruct the source parameters from the recorded signal a reliable model of the radio wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide as well as practical signal processing techniques are necessary. We present two methods, both based on analytical formulas. The first method allows for fast calculation of the charge moment of relatively short atmospheric discharges. It is based on peak amplitude measurement of the recorded magnetic component of the ELF EM field and it takes into account the receiver characteristics. The second method, called "inverse channel method" allows reconstructing the complete current moment waveform of strong atmospheric discharges that exhibit the continuing current phase, such as Gigantic Jets and Sprites. The method makes it possible to fully remove from the observed waveform the distortions related to the receiver's impulse response as well as the influence of the Earth-ionosphere propagation channel. Our ELF station is equipped with two magnetic antennas for Bx and By components measurement in the 0.03 to 55 Hz frequency range. ELF Data recording is carried out since 1993, with continuous data acquisition since 2005. The station features low noise level and precise timing. It is battery powered and located in the sparsely populated area, far from major electric power lines, which results in high

  17. Self-reported impulsivity, but not behavioral choice or response impulsivity, partially mediates the effect of stress on drinking behavior.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Ansell, Emily B; Reynolds, Brady; Potenza, Marc N; Sinha, Rajita

    2013-01-01

    Stress and impulsivity contribute to alcohol use, and stress may also act via impulsivity to increase drinking behavior. Impulsivity represents a multi-faceted construct and self-report and behavioral assessments may effectively capture distinct clinically relevant factors. The present research investigated whether aspects of impulsivity mediate the effect of stress on alcohol use. A community-based sample of 192 men and women was assessed on measures of cumulative stress, alcohol use, self-reported impulsivity, and behavioral choice and response impulsivity. Data were analyzed using regression and bootstrapping techniques to estimate indirect effects of stress on drinking via impulsivity. Cumulative adversity exhibited both direct effects and indirect effects (via self-reported impulsivity) on drinking behavior. Additional models examining specific types of stress indicated direct and indirect effects of trauma and recent life events, and indirect effects of major life events and chronic stressors on drinking behavior. Overall, cumulative stress was associated with increased drinking behavior, and this effect was partially mediated by self-reported impulsivity. Self-reported impulsivity also mediated the effects of different types of stress on drinking behavior. These findings highlight the value of mediation models to examine the pathways through which different types of stress increase drinking behavior. Treatment and prevention strategies should focus on enhancing stress management and self-control.

  18. Differences between Impulsive and Non-Impulsive Suicide Attempts among Individuals Treated in Emergency Rooms of South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Meerae; Lee, Soojung

    2016-01-01

    Objective A considerable proportion of suicide attempts are the result of sudden desires. Understanding such impulsive suicide attempts is necessary for effective interventions. We evaluated the impulsivity of suicide attempters treated in emergency rooms. The aim of the study was to identify the characteristics of impulsive suicide attempts by comparing these individuals to those who attempted to commit suicide in a non-impulsive manner. Methods This study analyzed suicide attempters who visited the emergency departments of seven selected university hospitals. A total of 269 medical records in which impulsivity of suicide attempt were confirmed were subject to be analyzed. The impulsivity of the suicide attempt was examined using a summative score of items 6 and 15 on the Suicide Intent Scale. Results A total of 48.0% of the participants were impelled by sudden inclinations to attempt suicide. Impulsive attempters were younger, unmarried and less physical illness than non-impulsive attempters, whereas no significant differences were found on psychiatric history and previous suicide history. Impulsive suicide attempters had suicide ideations that were not as severe (χ2=55.33, p<0.001) or intense (t=-8.38, p<0.001) as their counterparts'. Furthermore, medical results of impulsive suicide attempts were better than non-impulsive suicide attempts (t=-3.77, p<0.001). Conclusion The results suggested that a considerable proportion of suicide attempts were the result of sudden inclinations. Impulsive attempts were made in relatively earlier stages of suicide ideation; consequently, they have less intent than non-impulsive attempts. PMID:27482239

  19. Energetic electrons in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A new analysis was made of a thermal flare model proposed by Brown, Melrose, and Spicer (1979) and Smith and Lilliequist (1979). They assumed the source of impulsive hard X-rays to be a plasma at a temperature of order 10 to the 8th power K, initially located at the apex of a coronal arch, and confined by ion-acoustic turbulence in a collisionless conduction front. Such a source would expand at approximately the ion-sound speed, C sub S = square root of (k T sub e/m sub i), until it filled the arch. Brown, Melrose, and Spicer and Smith and Brown (1980) argued that the source assumed in this model would not explain the simultaneous impulsive microwave emission. In contrast, the new results presented herein suggest that this model leads to the development of a quasi-Maxwellian distribution of electrons that explains both the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. This implies that the source sizes can be determined from observations of the optically-thick portions of microwave spectra and the temperatures obtained from associated hard X-ray observations. In this model, the burst emission would rise to a maximum in a time, t sub r, approximately equal to L/c sub s, where L is the half-length of the arch. New observations of these impulsive flare emissions were analyzed herein to test this prediction of the model. Observations made with the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft and the Bern Radio Observatory are in good agreement with the model.

  20. Electron acceleration in impulsive solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, S.R.; Benz, A.O.; Treumann, R.A.

    1982-12-01

    Simultaneous observations of the hard X-ray, microwave, and type III and DCIM (decimetric)radio bursts associated with the 1978 December 4 solar flare have been used to study the physical parameters relevant to the acceleration and propagation of energetic electrons during the impulsive phase of a solar flare. The hard X-ray observations were made with the X-ray spectrometer aboard the ISEE 3 spacecraft. The radio spectra in metric and decimetric bands were recorded with the radiospectrograph located at Durnten, near Zurich, Switzerland. The microwave observations were made at the Sagamore Hill and Bern observatories. The three metric type III bursts coincided with the three most prominent hard X-ray peaks. This is the fist time a clear one-to-one association between single type III bursts and hard X-ray peaks has been established. The average delay of the type III bursts with respect to the X-ray peaks was 0.5 s. The harder the X-ray spectrum, the higher was the drift rate of the associated type III burst. The characteristic electron energies inferred from the drift rate are of the order of 70 keV. The observed increase in the high-frequency cutoff of the metric type III bursts during the impulsive phase has been examined in terms of the decreasing altitude of the electron acceleration/injection region, the increasing hardness of the electron spectrum, and the decreasing acceleration time. A pulsating decimetric continuum (DCIM) was also found to be present during and before the impulsive phase. The DCIM source seems to coincide spatially with the electron acceleration region and the (projected) origin of the associated type II shock.ction region.

  1. Proton hopping: a proposed mechanism for myelinated axon nerve impulses.

    PubMed

    Kier, Lemont B; Tombes, Robert M

    2013-04-01

    Myelinated axon nerve impulses travel 100 times more rapidly than impulses in non-myelinated axons. Increased speed is currently believed to be due to 'hopping' or 'saltatory propagation' along the axon, but the mechanism by which impulses flow has never been adequately explained. We have used modeling approaches to simulate a role for proton hopping in the space between the plasma membrane and myelin sheath as the mechanism of nerve action-potential flow.

  2. Stochastic Impulse Control of Non-Markovian Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Djehiche, Boualem; Hamadene, Said Hdhiri, Ibtissam

    2010-02-15

    We consider a class of stochastic impulse control problems of general stochastic processes i.e. not necessarily Markovian. Under fairly general conditions we establish existence of an optimal impulse control. We also prove existence of combined optimal stochastic and impulse control of a fairly general class of diffusions with random coefficients. Unlike, in the Markovian framework, we cannot apply quasi-variational inequalities techniques. We rather derive the main results using techniques involving reflected BSDEs and the Snell envelope.

  3. Lyapunov Control of Quantum Systems with Impulsive Control Fields

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Sun, Jitao

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the Lyapunov control of finite-dimensional quantum systems with impulsive control fields, where the studied quantum systems are governed by the Schrödinger equation. By three different Lyapunov functions and the invariant principle of impulsive systems, we study the convergence of quantum systems with impulsive control fields and propose new results for the mentioned quantum systems in the form of sufficient conditions. Two numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method. PMID:23766712

  4. Nerve impulses increase glial intercellular permeability.

    PubMed

    Marrero, H; Orkand, R K

    1996-03-01

    Coordinating the activity of neurons and their satellite glial cells requires mechanisms by which glial cells detect neuronal activity and change their properties as a result. This study monitors the intercellular diffusion of the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow (LY), following its injection into glial cells of the frog optic nerve, and demonstrates that nerve impulses increase the permeability of interglial gap junctions. Consequently, the spatial buffer capacity of the neuroglial cell syncytium for potassium, other ions, and small molecules will be enhanced; this may facilitate glial function in maintaining homeostasis of the neuronal microenvironment. PMID:8833199

  5. Impulse absorption by horizontal magnetic granular chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Dingxin; Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Guijie; Sun, Lingyu

    2016-02-01

    The granular medium is known as a protecting material for shock mitigation. We study the impulse absorption of an alignment of magnetic spheres placed horizontally under a non-uniform magnetic field. The phenomenon of the wave dispersion is presented. This system can absorb 85% ˜ 95% (88% ˜ 98%) of the incident peak force (energy) under the applied magnetic field strength in 0.1 T ˜ 1.0 T. The shock attenuation capacities are enhanced by the increment of field strength. With an intelligent control system, it is conceivable that the magnetic granular chain may offer possibilities in developing adaptive shock protectors.

  6. Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviours in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Averbeck, BB; O’Sullivan, SS; Djamshidian, A

    2014-01-01

    Impulsive compulsive behaviours (ICBs) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) are a common and devastating side effect of dopamine replacement therapy. In this review we describe the phenomenology, prevalence and risk factors of these patients. Results of behavioural studies assessing the neuropsychological profile emphasize that the ICBs, which are behavioural addictions, are not hedonically motivated. Rather, other factors such as the inability to cope with uncertainty may be triggering ICBs. New insights from functional imaging studies, strengthening the incentive salience hypothesis are discussed and therapeutic guidelines for the management of ICBs in PD are given. PMID:24313567

  7. The genetic correlation between procrastination and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Loehlin, John C; Martin, Nicholas G

    2014-12-01

    The reported genetic correlation of 1.0 between the traits of procrastination and impulsivity (Gustavson, D. E., Miyake, A., Hewitt, J. K., & Friedman, N. P. (2014). Psychological Science), which was held to support an evolutionary origin of the relationship between the two traits, was tested in data from two large samples of twins from Australia. A genetic correlation of 0.299 was obtained. It was concluded that, although the presence of a genetic correlation between the two traits was supported, the modest magnitude of the correlation was such as to be consistent with many possible hypotheses, evolutionary and otherwise, about causal relationships between the traits in question. PMID:25431285

  8. The genetic correlation between procrastination and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Loehlin, John C; Martin, Nicholas G

    2014-12-01

    The reported genetic correlation of 1.0 between the traits of procrastination and impulsivity (Gustavson, D. E., Miyake, A., Hewitt, J. K., & Friedman, N. P. (2014). Psychological Science), which was held to support an evolutionary origin of the relationship between the two traits, was tested in data from two large samples of twins from Australia. A genetic correlation of 0.299 was obtained. It was concluded that, although the presence of a genetic correlation between the two traits was supported, the modest magnitude of the correlation was such as to be consistent with many possible hypotheses, evolutionary and otherwise, about causal relationships between the traits in question.

  9. Targeting engineering synchronization in chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Sourav K.; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2016-07-01

    A method of targeting engineering synchronization states in two identical and mismatch chaotic systems is explained in detail. The method is proposed using linear feedback controller coupling for engineering synchronization such as mixed synchronization, linear and nonlinear generalized synchronization and targeting fixed point. The general form of coupling design to target any desire synchronization state under unidirectional coupling with the help of Lyapunov function stability theory is derived analytically. A scaling factor is introduced in the coupling definition to smooth control without any loss of synchrony. Numerical results are done on two mismatch Lorenz systems and two identical Sprott oscillators.

  10. Three Centuries of Synchronous Forest Defoliator Outbreaks in Western North America

    PubMed Central

    Flower, Aquila

    2016-01-01

    Insect outbreaks often occur synchronously across large spatial scales, but the long-term temporal stability of the phenomenon and the mechanisms behind it are not well understood. In this study, I use a widespread lepidopteran defoliator native to western North America—the western spruce budworm—as a case study to explore patterns of and potential causes for synchronous population fluctuations. Analyses of synchrony are typically severely limited by the short historical records available for many species. To overcome this limitation, I compiled multi-century dendrochronological reconstructions of western spruce budworm outbreaks from across much of the species’ range. This allowed me to analyze synchrony at a sub-continental spatial scale over the last three centuries. I found statistically significant synchrony among regional outbreak records up to 2,000 km apart and identified numerous outbreak periods that occurred synchronously across much of the species’ range. I quantified spatial and temporal associations between climate and synchronous outbreak periods using paleoclimate reconstructions. The spatial patterns of outbreak histories and climate records were remarkably similar, with higher similarity in outbreak histories apparent between regions with more similar climate conditions. Synchronous outbreaks typically occurred during periods of average or above average moisture availability preceded by periods of low moisture availability. My results suggest that climatic variability has played a key role in synchronizing western spruce budworm population fluctuations in disjunct forests across western North America for at least the last three centuries. Widespread synchrony appears to be a natural part of this species’ population dynamics, though synchronous outbreaks have occurred more frequently during the 20th century than during prior centuries. This study uses a novel combination of statistical methods and dendrochronological data to provide

  11. Diagnostics and Impulse Performance of Laser-Ablative Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Sasoh, Akihiro; Mori, Koichi; Anju, Kohei; Suzuki, Koji; Shimono, Masaya; Sawada, Keisuke

    2008-04-28

    Pressure time variations and associated flows induced by pulsed laser ablation were experimentally studied using the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and framing Schlieren visualization. The combination of either aluminum or polyacetal target and TEA CO{sub 2} laser pulse were examined. The VISAR measurement resolved that the pressure modulated from the laser power variation in the impulse generation processes. Integrated impulse induced by repetative CO{sub 2} laser pulses was measured using a torsion-type impulse balance. The effect of the ambient pressure was significant. The measured impulse characteristics were closely associated with target surface morphology and fluid dynamics.

  12. Minimum impulse transfers to rotate the line of apsides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phong, Connie; Sweetser, Theodore H.

    2005-01-01

    Transfer between two coplanar orbits can be accomplished via a single impulse if the two orbits intersect. Optimization of a single-impulse transfer, however, is not possible since the transfer orbit is completely constrained by the initial and final orbits. On the other hand, two-impulse transfers are possible between any two terminal orbits. While optimal scenarios are not known for the general two-impulse case, there are various approximate solutions to many special cases. We consider the problem of an inplane rotation of the line of apsides, leaving the size and shape of the orbit unaffected.

  13. Minimum impulse transfers to rotate the line of apsides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phong, Connie; Sweetser, Theodore H.

    2005-01-01

    While an optimal scenario for the general two-impulse transfer between coplanar orbits is not known, there are optimal scenarios for various special cases. We consider in-plane rotations of the line of apsides. Numerical comparisons with a trajectory optimization program support the claim that the optimal deltaV required by two impulses is about half that required by a single impulse, regardless of semi-major axes. We observe that this estimate becomes more conservative with larger angles of rotation and eccentricities, and thus also present a more accurate two-impulse rotation deltaV estimator.

  14. Dissecting Impulsivity and its Relationships to Drug Addictions

    PubMed Central

    Ashenhurst, James R.; Cervantes, M. Catalina; James, Alexander S.; Groman, Stephanie M.; Pennington, Zachary T.

    2015-01-01

    Addictions are often characterized as forms of impulsive behavior. That said, it is often noted that impulsivity is a multidimensional construct, spanning several psychological domains. This review describes the relationship between varieties of impulsivity and addiction-related behaviors, the nature of the causal relationship between the two and the underlying neurobiological mechanisms that promote impulsive behaviors. We conclude that the available data strongly supports the notion that impulsivity is both a risk factor for, and a consequence of, drug and alcohol consumption. While the evidence indicating that subtypes of impulsive behavior are uniquely informative – either biologically or with respect to their relationships to addictions – is convincing, multiple lines of study link “distinct” subtypes of impulsivity to low dopamine D2 receptor function and perturbed serotonergic transmission, revealing shared mechanisms between the subtypes. Therefore, a common biological framework involving monoaminergic transmitters in key frontostriatal circuits may link multiple forms of impulsivity to drug self-administration and addiction-related behaviors. Further dissection of these relationships is needed before the next phase of genetic and genomic discovery will be able to reveal the biological sources of the vulnerability for addiction indexed by impulsivity. PMID:24654857

  15. Sleep and Impulsivity in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Scullin, Michael K.; Sollinger, Ann B.; Land, Julia; Wood-Siverio, Cathy; Zanders, Lavezza; Lee, Raven; Freeman, Alan; Goldstein, Felicia C.; Bliwise, Donald L.; Factor, Stewart A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Impulsive behavior and poor sleep are important non-motor features of Parkinson’s disease (PD) that negatively impact the quality of life of patients and their families. Previous research suggests a higher level of sleep complaints in PD patients who demonstrate impulsive behaviors, but the nature of the sleep disturbances has yet to be comprehensively tested. Methods Consecutive idiopathic PD patients (N=143) completed the Minnesota Impulse Disorder Interview and a sleep questionnaire that assessed sleep efficiency, excessive daytime sleepiness, restless legs symptoms, snoring, dreams/nightmares, and nocturia. Patients were also given a Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale motor examination and they completed cognitive testing. Results Impulsive PD patients endorsed more sleep complaints than non-impulsive PD patients. The group difference was primarily attributable to poor sleep efficiency (e.g., greater nocturnal awakenings), p < .01, and greater daytime sleepiness, p < .01, in the impulsive PD patients. Interestingly, restless legs symptoms were also greater in the impulsive PD patients, p < .05. The results could not be explained by medications or disease severity. Conclusions Poor sleep efficiency, restless legs symptoms, and increased daytime sleepiness are associated with impulsivity in PD. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether sleep disturbances precede impulsivity in PD. PMID:23880026

  16. Impulsive control of a financial model [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jitao; Qiao, Fei; Wu, Qidi

    2005-02-01

    In this Letter, several new theorems on the stability of impulsive control systems are presented. These theorem are then used to find the conditions under which an advertising strategy can be asymptotically control to the equilibrium point by using impulsive control. Given the parameters of the financial model and the impulsive control law, an estimation of the upper bound of the impulse interval is given, i.e., number of advert can been decreased (i.e., can decrease cost) for to obtain the equivalent advertising effect.The result is illustrated to be efficient through a numerical example.

  17. Impulsive noise of printers: measurement metrics and their subjective correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Terrence; Otto, Norman; Bray, Wade; Stephan, Mike

    2005-09-01

    In the office and home computing environments, printer impulsive noise has become a significant contributor to user perceived quality or lack thereof, and can affect the user's comfort level and ability to concentrate. Understanding and quantifying meaningful metrics for printer impulsivity is becoming an increasingly important goal for printer manufacturers. Several methods exist in international standards for measuring the impulsivity of noise. For information technology equipment (ITE), the method for detection of impulsive noise is provided in ECMA-74 and ISO 7779. However, there is a general acknowledgement that the current standard method of determining impulsivity by simply measuring A-weighted sound pressure level (SPL) with the impulsive time weighting, I, applied is inadequate to characterize impulsive noise and ultimately to predict user satisfaction and acceptance. In recent years, there has been a variety of new measurement methods evaluated for impulsive noise for both environmental and machinery noise. This paper reviews several of the available metrics, applies the metrics to several printer impulsive noise sources, and makes an initial assessment of their correlation to the subjective impressions of users. It is a review and continuation of the work presented at InterNoise 2005 (Baird, Bray, and Otto).

  18. Minimum-fuel multiple-impulse apsidal orbital transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirpichnikov, S. N.

    1990-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the problem of minimum-fuel impulse transfers between specified nonintersecting Keplerian boundary orbits. The qualitative criteria of optimal single-impulse transfer orbits are defined, and multiple-impulse minimum-fuel apsidal transfers are investigated for the case of orbits with a common line of apsides. For circular (coplanar and noncoplanar) boundary orbits, the global optimality of the single-impulse Hohmann transfer in the plane of the initial orbit is demonstrated in the case where the ratio of the initial orbit radius to the final orbit radius does not exceed 4.828.

  19. Genetic association of impulsivity in young adults: a multivariate study

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, S; Narayanan, B; Meda, S A; Gelernter, J; Han, S; Sawyer, B; Aslanzadeh, F; Stevens, M C; Hawkins, K A; Anticevic, A; Potenza, M N; Pearlson, G D

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is a heritable, multifaceted construct with clinically relevant links to multiple psychopathologies. We assessed impulsivity in young adult (N~2100) participants in a longitudinal study, using self-report questionnaires and computer-based behavioral tasks. Analysis was restricted to the subset (N=426) who underwent genotyping. Multivariate association between impulsivity measures and single-nucleotide polymorphism data was implemented using parallel independent component analysis (Para-ICA). Pathways associated with multiple genes in components that correlated significantly with impulsivity phenotypes were then identified using a pathway enrichment analysis. Para-ICA revealed two significantly correlated genotype–phenotype component pairs. One impulsivity component included the reward responsiveness subscale and behavioral inhibition scale of the Behavioral-Inhibition System/Behavioral-Activation System scale, and the second impulsivity component included the non-planning subscale of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and the Experiential Discounting Task. Pathway analysis identified processes related to neurogenesis, nervous system signal generation/amplification, neurotransmission and immune response. We identified various genes and gene regulatory pathways associated with empirically derived impulsivity components. Our study suggests that gene networks implicated previously in brain development, neurotransmission and immune response are related to impulsive tendencies and behaviors. PMID:25268255

  20. Impulse source versus dodecahedral loudspeaker for measuring parameters derived from the impulse response in room acoustics.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Ricardo; Arana, Miguel; Machín, Jorge; Arregui, Abel

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the performance of dodecahedral and impulse sources when measuring acoustic parameters in enclosures according to ISO 3382-1 [Acoustics-Measurement of room acoustic parameters. Part 1: Performance spaces (International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2009)]. In general, methods using speakers as a sound source are limited by their frequency response and directivity. On the other hand, getting impulse responses from impulse sources typically involves a lack of repeatability, and it is usually necessary to average several measurements for each position. Through experiments in different auditoriums that recreate typical situations in which the measurement standard is applied, it is found that using impulse sources leads to greater variation in the results, especially at low frequencies. However, this prevents subsequent dispersions due to variables that this technique does not require, such as the orientation of the emitting source. These dispersions may be relevant at high frequencies exceeding the established tolerance criteria for certain parameters. Finally, a new descriptor for dodecahedral sources reflecting the influence their lack of omnidirectionality produces on measuring acoustic parameters is proposed.

  1. Impulsivity and the sexes: measurement and structural invariance of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale.

    PubMed

    Cyders, Melissa A

    2013-02-01

    Before it is possible to test whether men and women differ in impulsivity, it is necessary to evaluate whether impulsivity measures are invariant across sex. The UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale (negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking, with added subscale of positive urgency) is one measure of five dispositions toward rash action that has shown to have robust and clinically useful relationships among risk-taking outcomes. In the current research, the author examined (a) the psychometric measurement invariance of the UPPS-P across sex, (b) the scale's structural invariance across sex, and (c) whether the five impulsivity traits differentially relate to risk outcomes as a function of sex. In a sample of 1,372 undergraduates, the author found evidence for measurement and invariance across sex: Thus, comparisons of men and women on the UPPS-P can be considered valid. Additionally, although males tend to report higher levels of sensation seeking and positive urgency (and possibly lack of perseverance), the relationships between the UPPS-P traits and risk outcomes were generally invariant across sex. The UPPS-P appears to function comparably across males and females, and mean differences on this scale between the sexes can be thought to reflect trait-level differences. PMID:22096214

  2. Experience dependent plasticity alters cortical synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Kilgard, M.P.; Vazquez, J.L.; Engineer, N.D.; Pandya, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    Theories of temporal coding by cortical neurons are supported by observations that individual neurons can respond to sensory stimulation with millisecond precision and that activity in large populations is often highly correlated. Synchronization is highest between neurons with overlapping receptive fields and modulated by both sensory stimulation and behavioral state. It is not yet clear whether cortical synchronization is an epiphenomenon or a critical component of efficient information transmission. Experimental manipulations that generate receptive field plasticity can be used to test the relationship between synchronization and receptive fields. Here we demonstrate that increasing receptive field size in primary auditory cortex by repeatedly pairing a train of tones with nucleus basalis (NB) stimulation increases synchronization, and decreasing receptive field size by pairing different tone frequencies with NB stimulation decreases synchronization. These observations seem to support the conclusion that neural synchronization is simply an artifact caused by common inputs. However, pairing tone trains of different carrier frequencies with NB stimulation increases receptive field size without increasing synchronization, and environmental enrichment increases synchronization without increasing receptive field size. The observation that receptive fields and synchronization can be manipulated independently suggests that common inputs are only one of many factors shaping the strength and temporal precision of cortical synchronization and supports the hypothesis that precise neural synchronization contributes to sensory information processing. PMID:17317055

  3. Partial sleep deprivation impacts impulsive action but not impulsive decision-making.

    PubMed

    Demos, K E; Hart, C N; Sweet, L H; Mailloux, K A; Trautvetter, J; Williams, S E; Wing, R R; McCaffery, J M

    2016-10-01

    Sleep deprivation may lead to increased impulsivity, however, previous literature has focused on examining effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD) rather than the more common condition, partial sleep deprivation (PSD) or 'short sleep'. Moreover, it has been unclear whether PSD impacts impulse-related cognitive processes, and specifically if it differentially affects impulsive action versus impulsive decision-making. We sought to determine if short compared to long sleep (6 vs. 9h/night) impacts impulsive action via behavioral inhibition (Go/No-Go), and/or impulsive decision-making processes of risk taking (Balloon Analogue Risk Task [BART]) and preferences for immediate over delayed rewards (Delay Discounting). In a within-subject design, 34 participants (71% female, mean age=37.0years, SD=10.54) were assigned to four consecutive nights of 6h/night (short sleep) and 9h/night (long sleep) in their own home in random counterbalanced order. Sleep was measured via wrist-worn actigraphs to confirm adherence to the sleep schedules (mean short sleep=5.9h, SD=0.3; mean long sleep=8.6h, SD=0.3, p<0.001). The Go/No-Go, BART, and Delay Discounting tasks were completed following both sleep conditions. Participants had more inhibition errors on the Go/No-Go task after short (mean false alarms=19.79%, SD=14.51) versus long sleep (mean=15.97%, SD=9.51, p=0.039). This effect was strongest in participants reporting longer habitual time in bed (p=0.04). There were no differences in performance following long- versus short-sleep for either delay discounting or the BART (p's>0.4). Overall, these results indicate that four days of PSD diminishes behavioral inhibition abilities, but may not alter impulsive decision-making. These findings contribute to the emerging understanding of how partial sleep deprivation, currently an epidemic, impacts cognitive ability. Future research should continue to explore the connection between PSD and cognitive functions, and ways to minimize the

  4. Partial sleep deprivation impacts impulsive action but not impulsive decision-making.

    PubMed

    Demos, K E; Hart, C N; Sweet, L H; Mailloux, K A; Trautvetter, J; Williams, S E; Wing, R R; McCaffery, J M

    2016-10-01

    Sleep deprivation may lead to increased impulsivity, however, previous literature has focused on examining effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD) rather than the more common condition, partial sleep deprivation (PSD) or 'short sleep'. Moreover, it has been unclear whether PSD impacts impulse-related cognitive processes, and specifically if it differentially affects impulsive action versus impulsive decision-making. We sought to determine if short compared to long sleep (6 vs. 9h/night) impacts impulsive action via behavioral inhibition (Go/No-Go), and/or impulsive decision-making processes of risk taking (Balloon Analogue Risk Task [BART]) and preferences for immediate over delayed rewards (Delay Discounting). In a within-subject design, 34 participants (71% female, mean age=37.0years, SD=10.54) were assigned to four consecutive nights of 6h/night (short sleep) and 9h/night (long sleep) in their own home in random counterbalanced order. Sleep was measured via wrist-worn actigraphs to confirm adherence to the sleep schedules (mean short sleep=5.9h, SD=0.3; mean long sleep=8.6h, SD=0.3, p<0.001). The Go/No-Go, BART, and Delay Discounting tasks were completed following both sleep conditions. Participants had more inhibition errors on the Go/No-Go task after short (mean false alarms=19.79%, SD=14.51) versus long sleep (mean=15.97%, SD=9.51, p=0.039). This effect was strongest in participants reporting longer habitual time in bed (p=0.04). There were no differences in performance following long- versus short-sleep for either delay discounting or the BART (p's>0.4). Overall, these results indicate that four days of PSD diminishes behavioral inhibition abilities, but may not alter impulsive decision-making. These findings contribute to the emerging understanding of how partial sleep deprivation, currently an epidemic, impacts cognitive ability. Future research should continue to explore the connection between PSD and cognitive functions, and ways to minimize the

  5. Analysis of remote synchronization in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Cardillo, Alessio; Fiasconaro, Alessandro; Fortuna, Luigi; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesus; Frasca, Mattia

    2013-12-01

    A novel regime of synchronization, called remote synchronization, where the peripheral nodes form a phase synchronized cluster not including the hub, was recently observed in star motifs [Bergner et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 026208 (2012)]. We show the existence of a more general dynamical state of remote synchronization in arbitrary networks of coupled oscillators. This state is characterized by the synchronization of pairs of nodes that are not directly connected via a physical link or any sequence of synchronized nodes. This phenomenon is almost negligible in networks of phase oscillators as its underlying mechanism is the modulation of the amplitude of those intermediary nodes between the remotely synchronized units. Our findings thus show the ubiquity and robustness of these states and bridge the gap from their recent observation in simple toy graphs to complex networks. PMID:24387542

  6. Synchronous clock stopper for microprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchin, David A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A synchronous clock stopper circuit for inhibiting clock pulses to a microprocessor in response to a stop request signal, and for reinstating the clock pulses in response to a start request signal thereby to conserve power consumption of the microprocessor when used in an environment of limited power. The stopping and starting of the microprocessor is synchronized, by a phase tracker, with the occurrences of a predetermined phase in the instruction cycle of the microprocessor in which the I/O data and address lines of the microprocessor are of high impedance so that a shared memory connected to the I/O lines may be accessed by other peripheral devices. The starting and stopping occur when the microprocessor initiates and completes, respectively, an instruction, as well as before and after transferring data with a memory. Also, the phase tracker transmits phase information signals over a bus to other peripheral devices which signals identify the current operational phase of the microprocessor.

  7. Multiobjective synchronization of coupled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yang; Wang, Zidong; Wong, W. K.; Kurths, Jürgen; Fang, Jian-an

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, multiobjective synchronization of chaotic systems is investigated by especially simultaneously minimizing optimization of control cost and convergence speed. The coupling form and coupling strength are optimized by an improved multiobjective evolutionary approach that includes a hybrid chromosome representation. The hybrid encoding scheme combines binary representation with real number representation. The constraints on the coupling form are also considered by converting the multiobjective synchronization into a multiobjective constraint problem. In addition, the performances of the adaptive learning method and non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm-II as well as the effectiveness and contributions of the proposed approach are analyzed and validated through the Rössler system in a chaotic or hyperchaotic regime and delayed chaotic neural networks.

  8. Parallel integrated frame synchronizer chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghuman, Parminder Singh (Inventor); Solomon, Jeffrey Michael (Inventor); Bennett, Toby Dennis (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A parallel integrated frame synchronizer which implements a sequential pipeline process wherein serial data in the form of telemetry data or weather satellite data enters the synchronizer by means of a front-end subsystem and passes to a parallel correlator subsystem or a weather satellite data processing subsystem. When in a CCSDS mode, data from the parallel correlator subsystem passes through a window subsystem, then to a data alignment subsystem and then to a bit transition density (BTD)/cyclical redundancy check (CRC) decoding subsystem. Data from the BTD/CRC decoding subsystem or data from the weather satellite data processing subsystem is then fed to an output subsystem where it is output from a data output port.

  9. Synchronous network of distant telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhilyaev, B.; Svyatogorov, O.; Verlyuk, I.; Andreev, M.; Sergeev, A.; Lovkaya, M.; Antov, A.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Bogdanovski, R.; Avgoloupis, S.; Seiradakis, J.; Contadakis, M. E.

    The Synchronous Network of distant Telescopes (SNT) represents an innovative approach in observational astrophysics. The authors present an unique existing realization of the SNT-conception. It was founded within the international collaboration between astronomical observatories of Ukraine, Russia, Bulgaria and Greece. All the telescopes of the Network are equipped with standardized photometric systems (based on photo-multipliers). The unified timing systems (based on GPS-receivers) synchronize all the apertures to UTC with an accuracy of 1 microsecond and better. The essential parts of the SNT are the original software for operating and data processing. The described international Network successfully works for more than 10 years. The obtained unique observational data made it possible to discover new fine-scale features and flare-triggered phenomena in flaring red dwarfs, as well as the recently found high-frequency variability in some chromospherically active stars.

  10. Producing Newborn Synchronous Mammalian Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Thornton, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    A method and bioreactor for the continuous production of synchronous (same age) population of mammalian cells have been invented. The invention involves the attachment and growth of cells on an adhesive-coated porous membrane immersed in a perfused liquid culture medium in a microgravity analog bioreactor. When cells attach to the surface divide, newborn cells are released into the flowing culture medium. The released cells, consisting of a uniform population of synchronous cells are then collected from the effluent culture medium. This invention could be of interest to researchers investigating the effects of the geneotoxic effects of the space environment (microgravity, radiation, chemicals, gases) and to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies involved in research on aging and cancer, and in new drug development and testing.

  11. Changes in motor unit synchronization following central nervous lesions in man.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, S F; Swash, M; Ingram, D A; Stephens, J A

    1993-01-01

    1. Single motor unit spike trains have been recorded during voluntary isometric contraction of the affected intrinsic hand muscles of patients with unilateral central nervous lesions. These have been compared with similar recordings made from the patients' unaffected hand muscles and with recordings made from the hand muscles of healthy subjects. 2. Cross-correlation analysis was performed between the times of occurrence of the motor unit spike trains. The time course of central cross-correlogram peaks constructed for normal subjects and stroke patients was used to infer properties of the underlying common EPSPs and the impulse-generating properties of the motoneurones. The results of this analysis were compared between the two groups. In addition, the size and time course of cross-correlogram peaks obtained from the patients were related both to the patients' clinical state and to their hand and fine finger function. 3. Central nervous lesions were found to result in either a narrowing or broadening of the time course of motor unit synchronization. These changes were attributed either to an increase in the size of common EPSPs with respect to synaptic noise, or to the effects of presynaptic synchronization of motoneurone inputs. 4. Longitudinal studies of motor unit discharges in the year following the stroke demonstrated, in some patients, differences in the level of motor unit synchronization. These paralleled improvements in the patients' fine motor control. Pooled data from patients with varying deficits of fine motor control confirmed that loss or reduction of motor unit synchronization was associated with a corresponding slowing in the performance of rapidly alternating finger movements. 5. The results of the present study suggest that the branched common presynaptic inputs that generate motor unit synchronization are either of corticospinal tract origin or are intimately dependent on its function. Differences in the strength and time course of motor unit

  12. Conveyor-belt clock synchronization

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Maccone, Lorenzo; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Wong, Franco N.C.; Lloyd, Seth

    2004-10-01

    A protocol for synchronizing distant clocks is proposed that does not rely on the arrival times of the signals which are exchanged, and an optical implementation based on coherent-state pulses is described. This protocol is not limited by any dispersion that may be present in the propagation medium through which the light signals are exchanged. Possible improvements deriving from the use of quantum-mechanical effects are also addressed.

  13. The LASSO experiment. [clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serene, B.

    1979-01-01

    An international coordinated experimental assessment of a system which promises to provide a synchronization of clocks bound to time and frequency standard laboratories, with an accuracy of one nanosecond using existing or near ground-based laser stations via a geostationary satellite (SIRIO-2) is detailed. The system performance and the technical details concerning the on-board equiment, the ground segment, and the operational configuration are discussed. Finally, the future prospects of the LASSO experiment and possible implementations are examined together.

  14. Digital-data receiver synchronization

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F.; Turner, Gary W.

    2005-08-02

    Digital-data receiver synchronization is provided with composite phase-frequency detectors, mutually cross-connected comparison feedback or both to provide robust reception of digital data signals. A single master clock can be used to provide frequency signals. Advantages can include fast lock-up time in moderately to severely noisy conditions, greater tolerance to noise and jitter when locked, and improved tolerance to clock asymmetries.

  15. Trait Impulsivity and Anhedonia: Two Gateways for the Development of Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed

    Houeto, Jean-Luc; Magnard, Robin; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Belin, David; Carnicella, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Apathy and impulsivity are two major comorbid syndromes of Parkinson's disease (PD) that may represent two extremes of a behavioral spectrum modulated by dopamine-dependent processes. PD is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta to which are attributed the cardinal motor symptoms of the disorder. Dopamine replacement therapy (DRT), used widely to treat these motor symptoms, is often associated with deficits in hedonic processing and motivation, including apathy and depression, as well as impulse control disorders (ICDs). ICDs comprise pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping, binge eating, compulsive overuse of dopaminergic medication, and punding. More frequently observed in males with early onset PD, ICDs are associated not only with comorbid affective symptoms, such as depression and anxiety, but also with behavioral traits, such as novelty seeking and impulsivity, as well as with personal or familial history of alcohol use. This constellation of associated risk factors highlights the importance of inter-individual differences in the vulnerability to develop comorbid psychiatric disorders in PD patients. Additionally, withdrawal from DRT in patients with ICDs frequently unmasks a severe apathetic state, suggesting that apathy and ICDs may be caused by overlapping neurobiological mechanisms within the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical networks. We suggest that altered hedonic and impulse control processes represent distinct prodromal substrates for the development of these psychiatric symptoms, the etiopathogenic mechanisms of which remain unknown. Specifically, we argue that deficits in hedonic and motivational states and impulse control are mediated by overlapping, yet dissociable, neural mechanisms that differentially interact with DRT to promote the emergence of ICDs in vulnerable individuals. Thus, we provide a novel heuristic framework for basic and clinical research to better

  16. Adaptive filter for reconstruction of stereo audio signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisowski, Krzysztof

    2004-05-01

    The paper presents a new approach to reconstruction of impulsively disturbed stereo audio signals. The problems of restoration of large blocks of missing samples are outlined. Present methods of removing of covariance defect are discussed. Model of stereophonic signal is defined and Kalman filter appropriate for this model is introduced. Modifications of the filter directing to the new method of reconstruction of block of missing samples are discussed. Projection based algorithm allows to recover samples of left (or right) stereo channel using additional information included in undistorted samples from the other channel.

  17. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-03-22

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron's tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network's activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits.

  18. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron’s tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network’s activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits. PMID:26961000

  19. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-03-22

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron's tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network's activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits. PMID:26961000

  20. Intonation contour in synchronous speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bei; Cummins, Fred

    2003-10-01

    Synchronous Speech (Syn-S), obtained by having pairs of speakers read a prepared text together, has been shown to result in interesting properties in the temporal domain, especially in the reduction of inter-speaker variability in supersegmental timing [F. Cummins, ARLO 3, 7-11 (2002)]. Here we investigate the effect of synchronization among speakers on the intonation contour, with a view to informing models of intonation. Six pairs of speakers (all females) read a short text (176 words) both synchronously and solo. Results show that (1) the pitch accent height above a declining baseline is reduced in Syn-S, compared with solo speech, while the pitch accent location is consistent across speakers in both conditions; (2) in contrast to previous findings on duration matching, there is an asymmetry between speakers, with one speaker exerting a stronger influence on the observed intonation contour than the other; (3) agreement on the boundaries of intonational phrases is greater in Syn-S and intonation contours are well matched from the first syllable of the phrase and throughout.

  1. Synchronizer of transmission for vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, N.

    1986-02-25

    A synchronizer of a transmission for vehicles is described comprising: a double-mesh prevention member provided on a shift-and-select lever shaft and adapted to restrict the movement of fork shafts of the transmission. The double-mesh prevention member has at least two engaging portions for engaging first and second forward fork shafts, a first gap between the first engaging portion and the first forward fork shaft is greater than a second gap between the second engaging portion and the second forward fork shaft; a pin carried by the first forward fork shaft and biased substantially radially outwardly from the first forward fork shaft by resilient means; and a cam provided on the shift-and-select lever shaft, the cam is shaped and adapted to engage the pin, when the shift-and-select lever shaft is operated to shift to the reverse position, to press the pin so as to move the first forward fork shaft axially until the first forward fork shaft engages the first engaging portion, and thereafter to press the pin radially into the first forward fork shaft; whereby, upon shifting to the reverse position, the first forward fork shaft is moved by the pin and cam to put a synchronizer for forward gears into effect, thereby to attain synchronization between an input shaft and an output shaft of the transmission, but is prevented by the first engaging portion from moving far enough to engage a forward gear.

  2. Temporal integration in sensorimotor synchronization.

    PubMed

    Mates, J; Müller, U; Radil, T; Pöppel, E

    1994-01-01

    Abstract The concept of a temporal integration process in the timing mechanisms in the brain, postulated on the basis of experimental observations from various paradigms (for a review see P$oUppel, 1978), has been explored in a sensorimotor synchronization task. Subjects synchronized their finger taps to sequences of auditory stimuli with interstimulus-onset intervals (ISIs) between 300 and 4800 msec in different trials. Each tonal sequence consisted of 110 stimuli; the tones had a frequency of 500 Hz and a duration of 100 msec. As observed previously, response onsets preceded onsets of the stimuli by some tens of milliseconcls for ISIs in the range from about 600 to 1800 msec. For ISIs longer than or equal to 2400 msec, the ability to time the response sequence in such a way that the response 5 were placed right ahead of the stimuli started to break clown, i.e., the task was fulfilled by reactions to the stimuli rather than by advanced responses. This observation can he understood within the general framework of a temporal integration puce 55 that is supposed to have a maximal capacity (integration interval) of approximately 3 sec. Only if successive stimuli fall within one integration period, can motor programs be initiated properly by a prior stimulus and thus lead to an appropriate synchronization between the stimulus sequence and corresponding motor acts.

  3. Low cost impulse compatible wideband antenna

    DOEpatents

    Rosenbury, Erwin T.; Burke, Gerald J.; Nelson, Scott D.; Stever, Robert D.; Governo, George K.; Mullenhoff, Donald J.

    2002-01-01

    An antenna apparatus and method for building the antenna is disclosed. Impulse signals travel through a feed point of the antenna with respect to a ground plane. A geometric fin structure is connected to the feed point, and through a termination resistance to the ground plane. A geometric ridge structure connected to the ground is positioned with respect to the fin in order to receive and radiate electromagnetic energy from the impulse signal at a predetermined impedance and over a predetermined set of frequencies. The fin and ridge can be either a wire or a planar surface. The fin and ridge may be disposed within a radiation cavity such as a horn. The radiation cavity is constructed of stamped and etched metal sheets bent and then soldered together. The fin and ridge are also formed from metal sheets or wires. The fin is attached to the feed point and then to the cavity through a termination resistance. The ridge is attached to the cavity and disposed with respect to the fin in order to achieve a particular set of antenna characteristics.

  4. Force-Time Entropy of Isometric Impulse.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Newell, Karl M

    2016-01-01

    The relation between force and temporal variability in discrete impulse production has been viewed as independent (R. A. Schmidt, H. Zelaznik, B. Hawkins, J. S. Frank, & J. T. Quinn, 1979 ) or dependent on the rate of force (L. G. Carlton & K. M. Newell, 1993 ). Two experiments in an isometric single finger force task investigated the joint force-time entropy with (a) fixed time to peak force and different percentages of force level and (b) fixed percentage of force level and different times to peak force. The results showed that the peak force variability increased either with the increment of force level or through a shorter time to peak force that also reduced timing error variability. The peak force entropy and entropy of time to peak force increased on the respective dimension as the parameter conditions approached either maximum force or a minimum rate of force production. The findings show that force error and timing error are dependent but complementary when considered in the same framework with the joint force-time entropy at a minimum in the middle parameter range of discrete impulse.

  5. Parameters Determination of Oscillatory Impulse Current Waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shuji; Nishimura, Seisuke; Seki, Shingo

    This paper proposes numerical techniques to distil waveform parameters out of digitally measured data of oscillatory impulse current. The first method, to be used for liner circuit, based on a curve-fitting technique in which a smooth analytical curve is defined to fit the noise-superposed measured data. The waveform parameters are derived from the curve. The algorithm is examined its performance using a measured waveform data which is obtained from a circuit composed of linear elements only. It is not rare when impulse current is measured in a circuit with non-linear element, namely an arrester. After carefully observed behaviours of the circuit current when the non-linear element turns on and off, authors developed two algorithms capable to determine the parameters from the recorded data obtained from a circuit having a ZnO arrester. The developed algorithm processed the waveform data generated by TDG which is to be issued in 2009 as a part of IEC 61083-2. The details of the algorithm are to be demonstrated in the paper.

  6. Examining Impulse-Variability in Kicking.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Andrew; Molina, Sergio L; McKibben, Jonathon; Stodden, David F

    2016-07-01

    This study examined variability in kicking speed and spatial accuracy to test the impulse-variability theory prediction of an inverted-U function and the speed-accuracy trade-off. Twenty-eight 18- to 25-year-old adults kicked a playground ball at various percentages (50-100%) of their maximum speed at a wall target. Speed variability and spatial error were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA with built-in polynomial contrasts. Results indicated a significant inverse linear trajectory for speed variability (p < .001, η2= .345) where 50% and 60% maximum speed had significantly higher variability than the 100% condition. A significant quadratic fit was found for spatial error scores of mean radial error (p < .0001, η2 = .474) and subject-centroid radial error (p < .0001, η2 = .453). Findings suggest variability and accuracy of multijoint, ballistic skill performance may not follow the general principles of impulse-variability theory or the speed-accuracy trade-off.

  7. Synchronization transition in networked chaotic oscillators: the viewpoint from partial synchronization.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chenbo; Lin, Weijie; Huang, Liang; Wang, Xingang

    2014-05-01

    Synchronization transition in networks of nonlocally coupled chaotic oscillators is investigated. It is found that in reaching the state of global synchronization the networks can stay in various states of partial synchronization. The stability of the partial synchronization states is analyzed by the method of eigenvalue analysis, in which the important roles of the network topological symmetry on synchronization transition are identified. Moreover, for networks possessing multiple topological symmetries, it is found that the synchronization transition can be divided into different stages, with each stage characterized by a unique synchronous pattern of the oscillators. Synchronization transitions in networks of nonsymmetric topology and nonidentical oscillators are also investigated, where the partial synchronization states, although unstable, are found to be still playing important roles in the transitions.

  8. Different subtypes of impulsivity differentiate uncontrolled eating and dietary restraint.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Margaret A; Morgan, Michael J; Yeomans, Martin R

    2013-10-01

    The current study explored the relationship between three subtypes of impulsivity (Reflection Impulsivity, Impulsive Choice, and Impulsive Action) and measures of uncontrolled eating (TFEQ-D) and restraint (TFEQ-R). Eighty women classified as scoring higher or lower on TFEQ-D and TFEQ-R completed the Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFFT20), Delay Discounting Task (DDT), a Go No Go task, Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), and the Barrett Impulsivity Scale-11 (BIS-11). To test whether these relationships were affected by enforced controls overeating, half of the participants fasted the night before and ate breakfast in the laboratory before testing and half had no such control. Women scoring higher on the TFEQ-D were significantly more impulsive on the MFFT20 and BIS-11 overall but not on DDT, Go No Go or BART. Women scoring higher on TFEQ-R were significantly less impulsive on the Go No Go task but did not differ on other measures. The eating manipulation modulated responses on the BART and BIS-11 non-planning scale depending on TFEQ-D classification. These results confirm recent data that high scores on TFEQ-D are related to impulsivity, but imply this relates more to Reflection Impulsivity rather than Impulsive Choice or Action. In contrast restrained eating was associated with better inhibitory control. Taken together, these results suggest that subtypes of impulsivity further differentiate uncontrolled eating and restraint, and suggest that a poor ability to reflect on decisions may underlie some aspects of overeating. PMID:23702263

  9. X-ray Diffraction and Multi-Frame Phase Contrast Imaging Diagnostics for IMPULSE at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Adam; Carlson, Carl; Young, Jason; Curtis, Alden; Jensen, Brian; Ramos, Kyle; Yeager, John; Montgomery, David; Fezza, Kamel

    2013-07-08

    The diagnostic needs of any dynamic loading platform present unique technical challenges that must be addressed in order to accurately measure in situ material properties in an extreme environment. The IMPULSE platform (IMPact system for Ultrafast Synchrotron Experiments) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is no exception and, in fact, may be more challenging, as the imaging diagnostics must be synchronized to both the experiment and the 60 ps wide x-ray bunches produced at APS. The technical challenges of time-resolved x-ray diffraction imaging and high-resolution multi-frame phase contrast imaging (PCI) are described in this paper. Example data from recent IMPULSE experiments are shown to illustrate the advances and evolution of these diagnostics with a focus on comparing the performance of two intensified CCD cameras and their suitability for multi-frame PCI. The continued development of these diagnostics is fundamentally important to IMPULSE and many other loading platforms and will benefit future facilities such as the Dynamic Compression Sector at APS and MaRIE at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  10. Spectral Analysis of Synchronization in Mobile Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Naoya; Kurths, Jürgen; Díaz-Guilera, Albert

    2011-09-01

    We here analyze a system consisting of agents moving in a two-dimensional space that interact with other agents if they are within a finite range. Considering the motion and the interaction of the agents, the system can be understood as a network with a time-dependent topology. Dynamically, the agents are assumed to be identical oscillators, and the system will eventually reach a state of complete synchronization. In a previous work, we have shown that two qualitatively different mechanisms leading to synchronization in such mobile networks exist, namely global synchronization and local synchronization, depending on the parameters that characterize the oscillatory dynamics and the motion of the agents [1]. In this contribution we show that the spectral pattern differs between the two synchronization mechanisms. For global synchronization the spectrum is flat, which means that all eigenmodes contribute identically. For local synchronization, instead, the synchronization dynamics is determined mostly by the eigenmodes whose eigenvalues are close to zero. This result suggests that the global synchronization mechanism achieves fast synchronization by efficiently using the fast decaying eigenmodes (larger eigenvalues).

  11. 33 CFR 183.586 - Pressure impulse test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pressure impulse test. 183.586...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Tests § 183.586 Pressure impulse test. A fuel... pressure test under § 183.580. (b) If the tank is non-metallic, fill it to capacity with a gasoline...

  12. Choice Impulsivity: Definitions, Measurement Issues, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Kristen R.; Mitchell, Marci R.; Wing, Victoria C.; Balodis, Iris M.; Bickel, Warren K.; Fillmore, Mark; Lane, Scott D.; Lejuez, C. W.; Littlefield, Andrew K.; Luijten, Maartje; Mathias, Charles W.; Mitchell, Suzanne H.; Napier, T. Celeste; Reynolds, Brady; Schütz, Christian G.; Setlow, Barry; Sher, Kenneth J.; Swann, Alan C.; Tedford, Stephanie E.; White, Melanie J.; Winstanley, Catharine A.; Yi, Richard; Potenza, Marc N.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Background Impulsivity critically relates to many psychiatric disorders. Given the multi-faceted construct that impulsivity represents, defining core aspects of impulsivity is vital for the assessment and understanding of clinical conditions. Choice impulsivity (CI), involving the preferential selection of smaller sooner rewards over larger later rewards, represents one important type of impulsivity. Method The International Society for Research on Impulsivity (InSRI) convened to discuss the definition and assessment of CI and provide recommendations regarding measurement across species. Results Commonly used preclinical and clinical CI behavioral tasks are described, and considerations for each task are provided to guide CI task selection. Differences in assessment of CI (self-report, behavioral) and calculating CI indices (e.g., area-under-the-curve, indifference point, steepness of discounting curve) are discussed along with properties of specific behavioral tasks used in preclinical and clinical settings. Conclusions The InSRI group recommends inclusion of measures of CI in human studies examining impulsivity. Animal studies examining impulsivity should also include assessments of CI and these measures should be harmonized in accordance with human studies of the disorders being modeled in the preclinical investigations. The choice of specific CI measures to be included should be based on the goals of the study and existing preclinical and clinical literature using established CI measures. PMID:25867841

  13. Validity of proposed DSM-5 ADHD impulsivity symptoms in children.

    PubMed

    Ünsel Bolat, Gül; Ercan, Eyüp Sabri; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Bilaç, Öznur; Massuti, Rafael; Uysal Özaslan, Taciser; Bolat, Hilmi; Rohde, Luis Augusto

    2016-10-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) working group on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) proposed the inclusion of four new impulsivity symptoms. However, they were not included in DSM-5 due to the lack of sufficient evidence. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance of the proposed four ADHD impulsivity symptoms with respect to: (a) ADHD factor structure; (b) performance in predicting clinical impairment; (c) specificity for ADHD diagnosis and (d) best symptomatic threshold to predict clinical impairment. The sample comprised 416 children (31 ADHD subjects according to both DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5, 20 ADHD subjects according to just one diagnostic system and 365 controls) from 12 schools. Diagnoses were derived using semi-structured interviews and ADHD rating scales. Results from confirmatory factor analysis indicate that addition of the four new impulsivity items provided a slightly better factor structure if compared to models including only 18 items. Regression analyses showed that only one of the new impulsivity symptoms (impatient) was part of the list of best predictors of impairment. None of the four new impulsivity items was specifically associated with ADHD diagnosis. The best cutoff point in the hyperactivity/impulsivity dimension for predicting impairment did not change significantly. Overall, our findings suggest that the determination on how to best capture impulsivity dimension as part of the ADHD construct needs more investigation and that there is not enough evidence to include these four assessed impulsivity symptoms as part of the ADHD criteria.

  14. Impulsivity in internet addiction: a comparison with pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae Woo; Choi, Jung-Seok; Shin, Young-Chul; Lee, Jun-Young; Jung, Hee Yeon; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2012-07-01

    Internet addiction has been considered to be associated with poor impulse control. The aim of this study is to compare the trait impulsivity of those suffering from Internet addiction with that of individuals suffering from pathological gambling. Twenty-seven patients diagnosed with Internet addiction (age: 24.78±4.37 years), 27 patients diagnosed with pathological gambling (age: 25.67±3.97 years), and 27 healthy controls (age: 25.33±2.79 years) were enrolled in this study. All patients were men seeking treatment. Trait impulsivity and the severity of the Internet addiction and pathological gambling were measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, the Young's Internet Addiction Test, and the South Oaks Gambling Screen, respectively. The Beck Depression Inventory and the Beck Anxiety Inventory were also administered to all subjects. Our results show that those suffering from Internet addiction showed increased levels of trait impulsivity which were comparable to those of patients diagnosed with pathological gambling. Additionally, the severity of Internet addiction was positively correlated with the level of trait impulsivity in patients with Internet addiction. These results state that Internet addiction can be conceptualized as an impulse control disorder and that trait impulsivity is a marker for vulnerability to Internet addiction.

  15. Impulsivity, Coping, Stress, and Problem Gambling among University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.; Hulsey, C. Duncan

    2002-01-01

    The authors investigated whether coping styles moderated the relationship between (a) impulsivity and stress and (b) stress and gambling behavior and tested whether impulsive persons who use avoidant or emotion-focused coping under high-stress conditions are most likely to gamble. Among 202 university student volunteers, 33% of men but only 3% of…

  16. Temperament and Character Dimensions: Correlates of Impulsivity in Morphine Addicts

    PubMed Central

    Abassi, Moslem; Abolghasemi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Given the role of temperament and character dimensions on impulsivity in addicts, the purpose of this study was to temperament and character dimensions: correlates of impulsivity in morphine addicts. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine and verify the association of temperament and character dimensions with impulsivity in morphine addicts. Patients and Methods: The research method was descriptive and correlational. The study sample consisted of 120 morphine addicts referred to drug addiction treatment centers in Ardabil city in 2013. The participants were selected through convenience sampling method from 5 centers. We used impulsivity scale as well as temperament and character inventory to collect data. Results: The results showed that significant relationship existed between impulsivity and characteristics such as novelty seeking, harm avoidance, reward dependence, persistence, self-directedness, and cooperativeness, while no significant relationship between impulsivity and self-transcendence was observed. The results of the multiple regression analysis showed that 47% of the impulsivity variance was explained by temperament and character dimensions. Conclusions: These findings suggest that temperament and character dimensions are associated with impulsivity. The findings also have important implications for prevention, pathology, and treatment in the morphine addicts. PMID:26870706

  17. Angular Impulse and Balance Regulation During the Golf Swing.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Travis J; Wilcox, Rand R; McNitt-Gray, Jill L

    2016-08-01

    Our aim was to determine how skilled players regulate linear and angular impulse while maintaining balance during the golf swing. Eleven highly-skilled golf players performed swings with a 6-iron and driver. Components contributing to linear and angular impulse generated by the rear and target legs (resultant horizontal reaction force [RFh], RFh-angle, and moment arm) were quantified and compared across the group and within a player (α = .05). Net angular impulse generated by both the rear and target legs was greater for the driver than the 6-iron. Mechanisms used to regulate angular impulse generation between clubs varied across players and required coordination between the legs. Increases in net angular impulse with a driver involved increases in target leg RFh. Rear leg RFh-angle was maintained between clubs whereas target leg RFh became more aligned with the target line. Net linear impulse perpendicular to the target line remained near zero, preserving balance, while net linear impulse along the target line decreased in magnitude. These results indicate that the net angular impulse was regulated between clubs by coordinating force generation of the rear and target legs while sustaining balance throughout the task. PMID:26958870

  18. Sex Differences in Impulsivity: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Catharine P.; Copping, Lee T.; Campbell, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Men are overrepresented in socially problematic behaviors, such as aggression and criminal behavior, which have been linked to impulsivity. Our review of impulsivity is organized around the tripartite theoretical distinction between reward hypersensitivity, punishment hyposensitivity, and inadequate effortful control. Drawing on evolutionary,…

  19. Impulse Magnetic Fields Generated by Electrostatic Discharges in Protoplanetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tunyi, I.; Guba, P.; Roth, L. E.; Timko, M.

    2002-01-01

    We examine quantitative aspects associated with the hypothesis of nebular lightnings as a source of impulse magnetic fields. Our findings support our previous accretion model in which a presence of impulse magnetic fields was of a key necessity. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. The effects of heroin administration and drug cues on impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jermaine D; Vadhan, Nehal P; Luba, Rachel R; Comer, Sandra D

    2016-08-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and continued use despite negative consequences. Behavioral impulsivity is a strong predictor of the initiation and maintenance of drug addiction. Preclinical data suggest that heroin may exacerbate impulsive characteristics in an individual but this has yet to be assessed in clinical samples. The current secondary data analysis sought to investigate the effects of heroin on impulsivity along with the effects of exposure to drug cues. Using the current data set, we also tentatively assessed the etiological relationship between impulsivity and heroin abuse. Sixteen heroin-dependent participants were recruited to complete Immediate Memory Task/Delayed Memory Task (IMT/DMT) and GoStop tasks following repeated heroin administration, following acute heroin administration, and following a drug cue exposure session. Four preceding days of active heroin availability, compared to four preceding days of placebo drug availability, increased impulsivity assessed using the IMT and DMT. Presentation of drug cues similarly acted to increase impulsivity assessments on all three tasks. It also appears that heavier users were more susceptible to the influence of drug cues on impulsivity. The present study represents a step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between opioid abuse and impulsivity. A better understanding of these factors could provide critical insight into the maintenance of heroin use and relapse. PMID:27062912

  1. Individual Differences in Impulsive Choice and Timing in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galtress, Tiffany; Garcia, Ana; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Individual differences in impulsive choice behavior have been linked to a variety of behavioral problems including substance abuse, smoking, gambling, and poor financial decision-making. Given the potential importance of individual differences in impulsive choice as a predictor of behavioral problems, the present study sought to measure the extent…

  2. Spectral analysis of impulse noise for hearing conservation purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Stevin, G.O.

    1982-12-01

    Damage-risk criteria for impulse noise does not presently take the spectrum of the impulse into account; however, it is known that the human auditory system is spectrally tuned. The present paper advocates the extension to impulse noise of the noise dose concept which is widely used for continuous noise. This approach is based upon sound exposure instead of sound pressure. An A-weighting filter or an octave band analysis can then be used to take the spectral content of the impulses into account. The equipment needed for applying these procedures for impulse noise is an integrating sound level meter or a digital Fourier processor. Generalized spectral methods have been evaluated by means of an impulse simulation applied to a mathematical model of the human hearing mechanism. The results of this simulation agree with the most recent experiments on impulse noise and fully support the proposed rating methods. This conclusion must be emphasized as it leads the derivation of a uniform procedure for predicting loudness and damage risk for hearing which is applicable for continuous noise as well as for impulse noise.

  3. Spectral analysis of impulse noise for hearing conservation purposes.

    PubMed

    Stevin, G O

    1982-12-01

    Damage-risk criteria for impulse noise does not presently take the spectrum of the impulse into account; however, it is known that the human auditory system is spectrally tuned. The present paper advocates the extension to impulse noise of the noise dose concept which is widely used for continuous noise. This approach is based upon sound exposure instead of sound pressure. An A-weighting filter or an octave band analysis can then be used to take the spectral content of the impulses into account. The equipment needed for applying these procedures for impulse noise is an integrating sound level meter or a digital Fourier processor. Generalized spectral methods have been evaluated by means of an impulse simulation applied to a mathematical model of the human hearing mechanism. The results of this simulation agree with the most recent experiments on impulse noise and fully support the proposed rating methods. This conclusion must be emphasized as it leads the derivation of a uniform procedure for predicting loudness and damage risk for hearing which is applicable for continuous noise as well as for impulse noise.

  4. Two-meter laser material response impulse measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Karin; Cates, Michael C.

    1988-02-01

    Impulse generated by Excimer Laser Target interactions has been extensively studied at Maxwell Labs. Inc. Results are presented of impulse measurements on aluminum targets using the SDIO/MLI Two Meter Laser operating with KrF as the lasing media. The results of previous MLI impulse measurements using XeF laser media are summarized. The work presented was motivated by earlier impulse measurements also taken on the Two Meter Laser. The data showed much higher impulse to energy ratios than predicted. Additionally, work done elsewhere gave lower I/E values than those found at MLI. The initial MLI impulse studies used a Fotonic gauge as a velocity sensor. As a check on its accuracy, impulse was measured using a simple pendulum; the results agreed with the Fotonic gauge data. A careful investigation of the pendulum experimental technique followed; no problem were found. The S-Cubed ZOOS code was also examined. It is a 1 and 1/2-D code, and only accounts for impulse delivered under the Laser footprint. Additional momentum, however, is provided outside the laser spot via the plasma cloud that results from the laser target interaction.

  5. Domain-Specific Impulsivity in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsukayama, Eli; Duckworth, Angela Lee; Kim, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is a salient individual difference in children with well-established predictive validity for life outcomes. The current investigation proposes that impulsive behaviors vary systematically by domain. In a series of studies with ethnically and socioeconomically diverse samples of middle school students, we find that schoolwork-related…

  6. Optimum Three Impulse Trajectory Generator with Patched Conic Trajectory Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, M. H.; Pines, S.; Horsewood, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Optimal multi-impulse trajectories were investigated as a nominal about which asymptotic expansion was used to obtain approximations of optimal low thrust trajectories. The work consisted of the analysis and description of an optimal 3-impulse trajectory program. A patched-conic trajectory model was specifically designed for compatibility with the subsequent addition of the low thrust expansion approximation.

  7. Individual differences in impulsivity predict anticipatory eye movements.

    PubMed

    Cirilli, Laetitia; de Timary, Philippe; Lefèvre, Phillipe; Missal, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Impulsivity is the tendency to act without forethought. It is a personality trait commonly used in the diagnosis of many psychiatric diseases. In clinical practice, impulsivity is estimated using written questionnaires. However, answers to questions might be subject to personal biases and misinterpretations. In order to alleviate this problem, eye movements could be used to study differences in decision processes related to impulsivity. Therefore, we investigated correlations between impulsivity scores obtained with a questionnaire in healthy subjects and characteristics of their anticipatory eye movements in a simple smooth pursuit task. Healthy subjects were asked to answer the UPPS questionnaire (Urgency Premeditation Perseverance and Sensation seeking Impulsive Behavior scale), which distinguishes four independent dimensions of impulsivity: Urgency, lack of Premeditation, lack of Perseverance, and Sensation seeking. The same subjects took part in an oculomotor task that consisted of pursuing a target that moved in a predictable direction. This task reliably evoked anticipatory saccades and smooth eye movements. We found that eye movement characteristics such as latency and velocity were significantly correlated with UPPS scores. The specific correlations between distinct UPPS factors and oculomotor anticipation parameters support the validity of the UPPS construct and corroborate neurobiological explanations for impulsivity. We suggest that the oculomotor approach of impulsivity put forth in the present study could help bridge the gap between psychiatry and physiology. PMID:22046334

  8. Optimal impulsive trajectories for orbital rendezvous between elliptic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ching-Wei

    1992-01-01

    This study uses and extends primer vector theory to obtain a minimum-fuel two or multiple impulse solution for co-planar and non co-planar elliptic-to-elliptic, time-fixed rendezvous. Lawden's conditions for an optimal impulsive trajectory and three additional methods to improve the non-optimal multiple impulse are introduced. To extend a 3-Impulse differential cost function provided by Jezewski and Rozendaal, the general differential cost function for an N-Impulse trajectory is developed. This approach defines the gradient vector for any set of boundary conditions. To determine the number of impulses, times, and locations for multiple-impulse optimal trajectories automatically, a computer program is developed. This software has been thoroughly tested in a wide variety of rendezvous situations. The singularity for a transfer angle of 180 degrees and the singular case of sin I = 0 are also accounted for in the program. Part of this work was accomplished using the Generalized Reduced Gradient method using its associated GRG2 computer code. The effects of inclination between the vehicle and target orbits, the initial positions of the vehicle and target, and the direction of the major axes are considered. Numerical results for several different orbit configurations are produced and discussed. The results are compared with the Hohmann/Hohmann type transfer and/or the optimal, finite, three-impulse transfer.

  9. Impulsivity and Parkinson’s disease: More than just disinhibition☆

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Francesca; Ray, Nicola; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years it has become clear that impulsivity is a complex behaviour composed of different domains and dependent on different neural networks. The proposed pathogenetic mechanisms for the emergence of impulsivity disorders in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) can be broadly separated into three potentially interacting processes: the contribution of premorbid susceptibility to impulsivity, the contribution of the disease itself to the behaviour and the potential contribution of therapeutic agents. Growing evidence suggests that dopamine and the subthalamic nucleus are playing a certain role in the pathophysiology of different aspects of impulsivity. In this review, we summarise the main concepts defining various components of impulsivity both in healthy subjects and patients affected by PD. PMID:21683964

  10. Demonstration scheme for impulse response of various systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadir, Abdul; Ali, Aamir

    2013-03-01

    In linear system theory impulse response of any system is of great significance. It is the impulse response which is helpful in determining the convolution in continuous time system (unit sample response in Digital Signal Processing). The impulse response of simple systems can be calculated from the system differential equation or from the transfer function of the system (by taking the inverse Fourier Transform of transfer function). To the best of author's knowledge there exists no such scheme in the literature so far showing any practical method that can demonstrate the impulse response of a system on the oscilloscope. In this paper the method of demonstrating the impulse response of any linear system to the undergraduate students is presented. The approach is simple and is developed with minimum component count.

  11. Impulsive Pressurization of Neuronal Cells for Traumatic Brain Injury Study

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ruqiang; Lim, Jung Yul

    2011-01-01

    A novel impulsive cell pressurization experiment has been developed using a Kolsky bar device to investigate blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). We demonstrate in this video article how blast TBI-relevant impulsive pressurization is applied to the neuronal cells in vitro. This is achieved by using well-controlled pressure pulse created by a specialized Kolsky bar device, with complete pressure history within the cell pressurization chamber recorded. Pressurized neuronal cells are inspected immediately after pressurization, or further incubated to examine the long-term effects of impulsive pressurization on neurite/axonal outgrowth, neuronal gene expression, apoptosis, etc. We observed that impulsive pressurization at about 2 MPa induces distinct neurite loss relative to unpressurized cells. Our technique provides a novel method to investigate the molecular/cellular mechanisms of blast TBI, via impulsive pressurization of brain cells at well-controlled pressure magnitude and duration. PMID:22005926

  12. A systematic review of impulsivity in eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Samantha E

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to conduct a systematic review of the current literature that examines impulsivity in individuals with eating disorders (ED). Studies were obtained from Embase, Pubmed and Psycinfo, and were included if they assessed impulsivity in individuals over 18 years of age with an ED diagnosis and published in the last 10 years. The methodological quality of the studies was rated. Twelve studies were included in this review, with methodological quality varying across studies. Findings suggest that impulsivity is best assessed multi-modally, with a combination of self-report, behavioural and physiological measures. In general, impulsivity was found to differentiate individuals with EDs from controls, as well as across diagnostic subtypes. The current findings have important clinical implications for our understanding and treatment of both impulsivity and eating disorders.

  13. Impulse Testing of Corporate-Fed Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel method for detecting faults in antenna arrays. The method, termed Impulse Testing, was developed for corporate-fed patch arrays where the element is fed by a probe and is shorted at its center. Impulse Testing was devised to supplement conventional microwave measurements in order to quickly verify antenna integrity. The technique relies on exciting each antenna element in turn with a fast pulse (or impulse) that propagates through the feed network to the output port of the antenna. The resulting impulse response is characteristic of the path through the feed network. Using an oscilloscope, a simple amplitude measurement can be made to detect faults. A circuit model of the antenna elements and feed network was constructed to assess various fault scenarios and determine fault-detection thresholds. The experimental setup and impulse measurements for two patch array antennas are presented. Advantages and limitations of the technique are discussed along with applications to other antenna array topologies

  14. Impulse oscillometry: interpretation and practical applications.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Scott; Popler, Jonathan; Lesnick, Burton; Eid, Nemr

    2014-09-01

    Simple spirometry and body plethysmography have been routinely used in children aged > 5 years. New techniques based on physiologic concepts that were first described almost 50 years ago are emerging in research and in clinical practice for measuring pulmonary function in children. These techniques have led to an increased understanding of the pediatric lung and respiratory mechanics. Impulse oscillometry (IOS), a simple, noninvasive method using the forced oscillation technique, requires minimal patient cooperation and is suitable for use in both children and adults. This method can be used to assess obstruction in the large and small peripheral airways and has been used to measure bronchodilator response and bronchoprovocation testing. New data suggest that IOS may be useful in predicting loss of asthma control in the pediatric population. This article reviews the clinical applications of IOS, with an emphasis on the pediatric setting, and discusses appropriate coding practices for the clinician. PMID:25180727

  15. On coating adhesion during impulse plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowska-Langier, Katarzyna; Zdunek, Krzysztof; Chodun, Rafal; Okrasa, Sebastian; Kwiatkowski, Roch; Malinowski, Karol; Składnik-Sadowska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Marek J.

    2014-05-01

    The impulse plasma deposition (IPD) technique is the only method of plasma surface engineering (among plasma-based technologies) that allows a synthesis of layers upon a cold unheated substrate and which ensures a good adhesion. This paper presents a study of plasma impacts upon a copper substrate surface during the IPD process. The substrate was exposed to pulsed N2/Al plasma streams during the synthesis of AlN layers. For plasma-material interaction diagnostics, the optical emission spectroscopy method was used. Our results show that interactions of plasma lead to sputtering of the substrate material. It seems that the obtained adhesion of the layers is the result of a complex surface mechanism combined with the effects of pulsed plasma energy impacts upon the unheated substrate. An example of such a result is the value of the critical load for the Al2O3 layer, which was measured by the scratch-test method to be above 40 N.

  16. SAR impulse response with residual chirps.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-06-01

    A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

  17. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.; Maetzler, C.; Ohki, K.; Saba, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    A set of 22 simple, impulsive solar flares, identified in the OSO-5 hard X-ray data, were analyzed together with coincident microwave and meterwave radio observations. The rise times and fall times of the X-ray bursts are found to be highly correlated and effectively equal, strongly suggesting a flare energizing mechanism that is reversible. The good time resolution available for these observations reveals that the microwave emission is influenced by an additional process, evident in the tendency of the microwave emission to peak later and decay more slowly than the symmetric X-ray bursts. Meterwave emission is observed in coincidence with the 5 events which show the strongest time correlation between the X-ray and microwave burst structure. This meterwave emission is characterized by U-burst radiation, indicating confinement of the flare source.

  18. Walking Through the Impulse-Momentum Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugland, Ole Anton

    2013-02-01

    Modern force platforms are handy tools for investigating forces during human motion. Earlier they were very expensive and were mostly used in research laboratories. But now even platforms that can measure in two directions are quite affordable. In this work we used the PASCO 2-Axis Force Platform. The analysis of the data can serve as a nice illustration of qualitative or quantitative use of the impulse-momentum theorem p - p0 = ∫t0t Fdt = I. The most common use of force platforms is to study the force from the base during the push-off period of a vertical jump. I think this is an activity of great value, and I would recommend it. The use of force platforms in teaching is well documented in research literature.1-4

  19. Synchronizing noisy nonidentical oscillators by transient uncoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandon, Aditya; Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Timme, Marc; Chakraborty, Sagar

    2016-09-01

    Synchronization is the process of achieving identical dynamics among coupled identical units. If the units are different from each other, their dynamics cannot become identical; yet, after transients, there may emerge a functional relationship between them—a phenomenon termed "generalized synchronization." Here, we show that the concept of transient uncoupling, recently introduced for synchronizing identical units, also supports generalized synchronization among nonidentical chaotic units. Generalized synchronization can be achieved by transient uncoupling even when it is impossible by regular coupling. We furthermore demonstrate that transient uncoupling stabilizes synchronization in the presence of common noise. Transient uncoupling works best if the units stay uncoupled whenever the driven orbit visits regions that are locally diverging in its phase space. Thus, to select a favorable uncoupling region, we propose an intuitive method that measures the local divergence at the phase points of the driven unit's trajectory by linearizing the flow and subsequently suppresses the divergence by uncoupling.

  20. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization

    SciTech Connect

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L.

    2015-01-15

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an “all or none” phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera)

  1. Spatio-temporal synchronization of recurrent epidemics.

    PubMed Central

    He, Daihai; Stone, Lewi

    2003-01-01

    Long-term spatio-temporal datasets of disease incidences have made it clear that many recurring epidemics, especially childhood infections, tend to synchronize in-phase across suburbs. In some special cases, epidemics between suburbs have been found to oscillate in an out-of-phase ('antiphase') relationship for lengthy periods. Here, we use modelling techniques to help explain the presence of in-phase and antiphase synchronization. The nonlinearity of the epidemic dynamics is often such that the intensity of the outbreak influences the phase of the oscillation thereby introducing 'shear', a factor that is found to be important for generating antiphase synchronization. By contrast, the coupling between suburbs via the immigration of infectives tends to enhance in-phase synchronization. The emerging synchronization depends delicately on these opposite factors. We use theoretical results from continuous time models to provide a framework for understanding the relationship between synchronization patterns for different model structures. PMID:12965019

  2. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an "all or none" phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera).

  3. Impulsivity, risky behaviors and accidents in alcohol-dependent patients

    PubMed Central

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Wnorowska, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Podgórska, Anna; Barry, Kristen; Blow, Frederic C.; Brower, Kirk J.; Wojnar, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity and alcohol drinking are both considered as important predictors of unintentional as well as intentional injuries. However, relationships of impulsivity with risky behaviors and a history of accidents have not been investigated in alcohol dependence. The aim of this study was to analyze relationships between the frequency of risky behaviors and level of behavioral as well as cognitive impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients. By means of Barratt’s Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and stop-signal task, the levels of cognitive and behavioral impulsivity among 304 alcohol-dependent patients were measured. Also, patients were asked to answer questions from the Short Inventory of Problems applying to risky behaviors and accidents after alcohol drinking. In addition participants completed a questionnaire to assess frequency of other behaviors from the analyzed spectrum (use of other drugs, driving or aggressive behavior after alcohol drinking). The statistical analysis revealed a significant association between impulsivity and frequency of risky behaviors in alcohol-dependent patients. Individuals with higher scores in BIS behaved more frequently in a risky way and had significantly more accidents after alcohol drinking. The association with risky behaviors was strongest for non-planning and attentional impulsivity subscales, whereas frequency of accidents was particularly associated with motor impulsivity. A multivariate analysis revealed that impulsivity was the most important predictor of risky behaviors, but did not significantly predict a history of accidents. Our study confirms that impulsivity is an important correlate of risky behaviors in alcohol-dependent individuals, along with global psychopathology and severity of alcohol dependence. PMID:23246707

  4. Explosive synchronization coexists with classical synchronization in the Kuramoto model.

    PubMed

    Danziger, Michael M; Moskalenko, Olga I; Kurkin, Semen A; Zhang, Xiyun; Havlin, Shlomo; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Explosive synchronization has recently been reported in a system of adaptively coupled Kuramoto oscillators, without any conditions on the frequency or degree of the nodes. Here, we find that, in fact, the explosive phase coexists with the standard phase of the Kuramoto oscillators. We determine this by extending the mean-field theory of adaptively coupled oscillators with full coupling to the case with partial coupling of a fraction f. This analysis shows that a metastable region exists for all finite values of f > 0, and therefore explosive synchronization is expected for any perturbation of adaptively coupling added to the standard Kuramoto model. We verify this theory with GPU-accelerated simulations on very large networks (N ∼ 10(6)) and find that, in fact, an explosive transition with hysteresis is observed for all finite couplings. By demonstrating that explosive transitions coexist with standard transitions in the limit of f → 0, we show that this behavior is far more likely to occur naturally than was previously believed. PMID:27369869

  5. Explosive synchronization coexists with classical synchronization in the Kuramoto model.

    PubMed

    Danziger, Michael M; Moskalenko, Olga I; Kurkin, Semen A; Zhang, Xiyun; Havlin, Shlomo; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Explosive synchronization has recently been reported in a system of adaptively coupled Kuramoto oscillators, without any conditions on the frequency or degree of the nodes. Here, we find that, in fact, the explosive phase coexists with the standard phase of the Kuramoto oscillators. We determine this by extending the mean-field theory of adaptively coupled oscillators with full coupling to the case with partial coupling of a fraction f. This analysis shows that a metastable region exists for all finite values of f > 0, and therefore explosive synchronization is expected for any perturbation of adaptively coupling added to the standard Kuramoto model. We verify this theory with GPU-accelerated simulations on very large networks (N ∼ 10(6)) and find that, in fact, an explosive transition with hysteresis is observed for all finite couplings. By demonstrating that explosive transitions coexist with standard transitions in the limit of f → 0, we show that this behavior is far more likely to occur naturally than was previously believed.

  6. Explosive synchronization coexists with classical synchronization in the Kuramoto model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danziger, Michael M.; Moskalenko, Olga I.; Kurkin, Semen A.; Zhang, Xiyun; Havlin, Shlomo; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Explosive synchronization has recently been reported in a system of adaptively coupled Kuramoto oscillators, without any conditions on the frequency or degree of the nodes. Here, we find that, in fact, the explosive phase coexists with the standard phase of the Kuramoto oscillators. We determine this by extending the mean-field theory of adaptively coupled oscillators with full coupling to the case with partial coupling of a fraction f. This analysis shows that a metastable region exists for all finite values of f > 0, and therefore explosive synchronization is expected for any perturbation of adaptively coupling added to the standard Kuramoto model. We verify this theory with GPU-accelerated simulations on very large networks (N ˜ 106) and find that, in fact, an explosive transition with hysteresis is observed for all finite couplings. By demonstrating that explosive transitions coexist with standard transitions in the limit of f → 0, we show that this behavior is far more likely to occur naturally than was previously believed.

  7. Impulsivity and Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder: Subtype Classification Using the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale.

    PubMed

    Miller, Drew J; Derefinko, Karen J; Lynam, Donald R; Milich, Richard; Fillmore, Mark T

    2010-09-01

    This study examined the classification accuracy of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale (UPPS) in discriminating several attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) subtypes, including predominantly inattentive type (ADHD/I), combined type (ADHD/C), and combined type with behavioral problems (ADHD/ODD), between each other and a non-ADHD control group using logistic regression analyses. The sample consisted of 88 children ranging in age from 9.0 years to 12.8 years, with a mean of 10.9 years. Children were predominantly male (74%) and Caucasian (86%) and in grades 3-7. Results indicated that the UPPS performed well in classifying ADHD subtypes relative to traditional diagnostic measures. In addition, analyses indicated that differences in symptoms between subtypes can be explained by specific pathways to impulsivity. Implications for the assessment of ADHD and conceptual issues are discussed. PMID:21765593

  8. Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Ballanger, Benedicte; van Eimeren, Thilo; Moro, Elena; Lozano, Andres M.; Hamani, Clement; Boulinguez, Philippe; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Houle, Sylvain; Poon, Yu Yan; Lang, Anthony E.; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective In Parkinson disease (PD) patients, deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) may contribute to certain impulsive behavior during high-conflict decisions. A neurocomputational model of the basal ganglia has recently been proposed that suggests this behavioral aspect may be related to the role played by the STN in relaying a “hold your horses” signal intended to allow more time to settle on the best option. The aim of the present study was 2-fold: 1) to extend these observations by providing evidence that the STN may influence and prevent the execution of any response even during low-conflict decisions; and 2) to identify the neural correlates of this effect. Methods We measured regional cerebral blood flow during a Go/NoGo and a control (Go) task to study the motor improvement and response inhibition deficits associated with STN-DBS in patients with PD. Results Although it improved Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor ratings and induced a global decrease in reaction time during task performance, STN-DBS impaired response inhibition, as revealed by an increase in commission errors in NoGo trials. These behavioral effects were accompanied by changes in synaptic activity consisting of a reduced activation in the cortical networks responsible for reactive and proactive response inhibition. Interpretation The present results suggest that although it improves motor functions in PD patients, modulation of STN hyperactivity with DBS may tend at the same time to favor the appearance of impulsive behavior by acting on the gating mechanism involved in response initiation. PMID:20035509

  9. Ionospheric current contribution to the main impulse of a negative sudden impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vichare, Geeta; Rawat, Rahul; Bhaskar, Ankush; Pathan, Bashir M.

    2014-12-01

    The geomagnetic field response to a moderate-amplitude negative sudden impulse (SI-) that occurred on 14 May 2009 at 10:30 UT was examined at 97 geomagnetic observatories situated all over the globe. The response signature contains a contribution from magnetospheric as well as ionospheric currents. The main impulse (MI) is defined as the maximum depression in the observed geomagnetic field. It is observed that for low-to-high latitudes, the amplitude of the MI is larger in the afternoon to post-dusk sector than in the dawn-noon sector, indicating asymmetry in the MI amplitude. We estimated the contribution at various observatories due to the Chapman-Ferraro magnetopause currents using the Tsyganenko model (T01) and subtracted this from the observed MI amplitude to obtain the contribution due to ionospheric currents. It is found that the ionospheric currents contribute significantly to the MI amplitude of moderate SI- even at low-to-mid latitudes and that the contribution is in the same direction as that from the magnetopause currents near dusk and in the opposite direction near dawn. The equivalent current vectors reveal a clockwise (anticlockwise) ionospheric current loop in the afternoon (morning) sector during the MI of the negative pressure impulse. This evidences an ionospheric twin-cell-vortex current system (DP2) due to field-aligned currents (FACs) associated with the dusk-to-dawn convection electric field during the MI of an SI-. We also estimated the magnetic field variation due to prompt penetration electric fields, which is found to be very small at low latitudes in the present case. The studied SI- is not associated with shock, and hence no preliminary reverse impulse was evident. In addition, the summer hemisphere reveals larger MI amplitudes than the winter hemisphere, indicating once again the role of ionospheric currents.

  10. Nondestructive synchronous beam current monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, Michel Kireeff

    2014-12-15

    A fast current transformer is mounted after the deflectors of the Berkeley 88-Inch Cyclotron. The measured signal is amplified and connected to the input of a lock-in amplifier. The lock-in amplifier performs a synchronous detection of the signal at the cyclotron second harmonic frequency. The magnitude of the signal detected is calibrated against a Faraday cup and corresponds to the beam intensity. It has exceptional resolution, long term stability, and can measure the beam current leaving the cyclotron as low as 1 nA.

  11. Synchronous Sampling for Distributed Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittkamp, M.; Ettl, J.

    2015-09-01

    Sounding Rocket payloads, especially for atmospheric research, often consists of several independent sensors or experiments with different objectives. The data of these sensors can be combined in the post processing to improve the scientific results of the flight. One major requirement for this data-correlation is a common timeline for the measurements of the distributed experiments. Within this paper we present two ways to achieve absolute timing for asynchronously working experiments. The synchronization process is using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and a standard serial communication protocol for transport of timestamps and flight-states.

  12. Mutual synchronization of weakly coupled gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rozental, R. M.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Ginzburg, N. S.

    2015-09-15

    The processes of synchronization of two weakly coupled gyrotrons are studied within the framework of non-stationary equations with non-fixed longitudinal field structure. With the allowance for a small difference of the free oscillation frequencies of the gyrotrons, we found a certain range of parameters where mutual synchronization is possible while a high electronic efficiency is remained. It is also shown that synchronization regimes can be realized even under random fluctuations of the parameters of the electron beams.

  13. Desynchronization of stochastically synchronized chemical oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Snari, Razan; Tinsley, Mark R. E-mail: kshowalt@wvu.edu; Faramarzi, Sadegh; Showalter, Kenneth E-mail: kshowalt@wvu.edu; Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff; Netoff, Theoden Ivan

    2015-12-15

    Experimental and theoretical studies are presented on the design of perturbations that enhance desynchronization in populations of oscillators that are synchronized by periodic entrainment. A phase reduction approach is used to determine optimal perturbation timing based upon experimentally measured phase response curves. The effectiveness of the perturbation waveforms is tested experimentally in populations of periodically and stochastically synchronized chemical oscillators. The relevance of the approach to therapeutic methods for disrupting phase coherence in groups of stochastically synchronized neuronal oscillators is discussed.

  14. Complexity and synchronization in stochastic chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son Dang, Thai; Palit, Sanjay Kumar; Mukherjee, Sayan; Hoang, Thang Manh; Banerjee, Santo

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the complexity of a hyperchaotic dynamical system perturbed by noise and various nonlinear speech and music signals. The complexity is measured by the weighted recurrence entropy of the hyperchaotic and stochastic systems. The synchronization phenomenon between two stochastic systems with complex coupling is also investigated. These criteria are tested on chaotic and perturbed systems by mean conditional recurrence and normalized synchronization error. Numerical results including surface plots, normalized synchronization errors, complexity variations etc show the effectiveness of the proposed analysis.

  15. Relations Between Trait Impulsivity, Behavioral Impulsivity, Physiological Arousal, and Risky Sexual Behavior among Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Derefinko, Karen J.; Peters, Jessica R.; Eisenlohr-Moul, Tory A.; Walsh, Erin C.; Adams, Zachary W.; Lynam, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined how impulsivity-related traits (negative urgency, sensation seeking, and positive urgency), behavioral measures of risk taking and reward seeking, and physiological reactivity related to three different risky sexual behaviors in sexually active undergraduate men (N = 135). Regression analyses indicated that sensation seeking and behavioral risk-taking predicted unique variance in number of sexual partners. These findings suggest that, for young men, acquisition of new partners is associated with need for excitement and reward and willingness to take risks to meet those needs. Sensation seeking, behavioral risk-taking, and skin conductance reactivity to arousing stimuli was related to ever having engaged in sex with a stranger, indicating that, for men, willingness to have sex with a stranger is related not only to the need for excitement and risk-taking but also with innate responsiveness to arousing environmental triggers. In contrast, regression analyses indicated that young men who were impulsive in the context of negative emotions were less likely to use condoms, suggesting that emotion-based impulsivity may be an important factor in negligent prophylactic use. This study adds to the current understanding of the divergence between the correlates of risky sexual behaviors and may lend utility to the development of individualized HIV prevention programming. PMID:24958252

  16. Reflection of the State of Hunger in Impulse Activity of Nose Wing Muscles and Upper Esophageal Sphincter during Search behavior in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kromin, A A; Dvoenko, E E; Zenina, O Yu

    2016-07-01

    Reflection of the state of hunger in impulse activity of nose wing muscles and upper esophageal sphincter muscles was studied in chronic experiments on rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation in the absence of locomotion and during search behavior. In the absence of apparent behavioral activity, including sniffing, alai nasi muscles of hungry rabbits constantly generated bursts of action potentials synchronous with breathing, while upper esophageal sphincter muscles exhibited regular aperiodic low-amplitude impulse activity of tonic type. Latent form of food motivation was reflected in the structure of temporal organization of impulse activity of alai nasi muscles in the form of bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and in temporal structure of impulse activity of upper esophageal sphincter muscles in the form of monomodal distribution. The latent form of food motivation was manifested in the structure of temporal organization of periods of the action potentials burst-like rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, in the form of monomodal distribution, characterized by a high degree of dispersion of respiratory cycle periods. In the absence of physical activity hungry animals sporadically exhibited sniffing activity, manifested in the change from the burst-like impulse activity of alai nasi muscles to the single-burst activity type with bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and monomodal distribution of the burst-like action potentials rhythm periods, the maximum of which was shifted towards lower values, which was the cause of increased respiratory rate. At the same time, the monomodal temporal structure of impulse activity of the upper esophageal sphincter muscles was not changed. With increasing food motivation in the process of search behavior temporal structure of periods of the burst-like action potentials rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, became similar to that observed during sniffing, not accompanied by animal's locomotion, which is

  17. Reflection of the State of Hunger in Impulse Activity of Nose Wing Muscles and Upper Esophageal Sphincter during Search behavior in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kromin, A A; Dvoenko, E E; Zenina, O Yu

    2016-07-01

    Reflection of the state of hunger in impulse activity of nose wing muscles and upper esophageal sphincter muscles was studied in chronic experiments on rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation in the absence of locomotion and during search behavior. In the absence of apparent behavioral activity, including sniffing, alai nasi muscles of hungry rabbits constantly generated bursts of action potentials synchronous with breathing, while upper esophageal sphincter muscles exhibited regular aperiodic low-amplitude impulse activity of tonic type. Latent form of food motivation was reflected in the structure of temporal organization of impulse activity of alai nasi muscles in the form of bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and in temporal structure of impulse activity of upper esophageal sphincter muscles in the form of monomodal distribution. The latent form of food motivation was manifested in the structure of temporal organization of periods of the action potentials burst-like rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, in the form of monomodal distribution, characterized by a high degree of dispersion of respiratory cycle periods. In the absence of physical activity hungry animals sporadically exhibited sniffing activity, manifested in the change from the burst-like impulse activity of alai nasi muscles to the single-burst activity type with bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and monomodal distribution of the burst-like action potentials rhythm periods, the maximum of which was shifted towards lower values, which was the cause of increased respiratory rate. At the same time, the monomodal temporal structure of impulse activity of the upper esophageal sphincter muscles was not changed. With increasing food motivation in the process of search behavior temporal structure of periods of the burst-like action potentials rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, became similar to that observed during sniffing, not accompanied by animal's locomotion, which is

  18. Tape-recorded Lectures With Slide Synchronization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhue, D.

    1969-01-01

    Describes "Taped Explanation Slide Synchronization" programs used for individual study or group showing in college zoology. Discusses preparation of programs, class organization, equipment, and costs. (EB)

  19. Phase synchronization of two anharmonic nanomechanical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Matheny, Matthew H; Grau, Matt; Villanueva, Luis G; Karabalin, Rassul B; Cross, M C; Roukes, Michael L

    2014-01-10

    We investigate the synchronization of oscillators based on anharmonic nanoelectromechanical resonators. Our experimental implementation allows unprecedented observation and control of parameters governing the dynamics of synchronization. We find close quantitative agreement between experimental data and theory describing reactively coupled Duffing resonators with fully saturated feedback gain. In the synchronized state we demonstrate a significant reduction in the phase noise of the oscillators, which is key for sensor and clock applications. Our work establishes that oscillator networks constructed from nanomechanical resonators form an ideal laboratory to study synchronization--given their high-quality factors, small footprint, and ease of cointegration with modern electronic signal processing technologies. PMID:24483899

  20. Robustness of optimal synchronization in real networks.

    PubMed

    Ravoori, Bhargava; Cohen, Adam B; Sun, Jie; Motter, Adilson E; Murphy, Thomas E; Roy, Rajarshi

    2011-07-15

    Experimental studies can provide powerful insights into the physics of complex networks. Here, we report experimental results on the influence of connection topology on synchronization in fiber-optic networks of chaotic optoelectronic oscillators. We find that the recently predicted nonmonotonic, cusplike synchronization landscape manifests itself in the rate of convergence to the synchronous state. We also observe that networks with the same number of nodes, same number of links, and identical eigenvalues of the coupling matrix can exhibit fundamentally different approaches to synchronization. This previously unnoticed difference is determined by the degeneracy of associated eigenvectors in the presence of noise and mismatches encountered in real-world conditions. PMID:21838362

  1. Phase synchronization of two anharmonic nanomechanical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Matheny, Matthew H; Grau, Matt; Villanueva, Luis G; Karabalin, Rassul B; Cross, M C; Roukes, Michael L

    2014-01-10

    We investigate the synchronization of oscillators based on anharmonic nanoelectromechanical resonators. Our experimental implementation allows unprecedented observation and control of parameters governing the dynamics of synchronization. We find close quantitative agreement between experimental data and theory describing reactively coupled Duffing resonators with fully saturated feedback gain. In the synchronized state we demonstrate a significant reduction in the phase noise of the oscillators, which is key for sensor and clock applications. Our work establishes that oscillator networks constructed from nanomechanical resonators form an ideal laboratory to study synchronization--given their high-quality factors, small footprint, and ease of cointegration with modern electronic signal processing technologies.

  2. Calculation principles for a synchronous electromagnetic clutch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panasenkov, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed explanation of the calculation principles, for a synchronous salient-pole electromagnetic clutch with lumped excitation windings is supplied by direct current. Practical recommendations are given.

  3. Pilotless Frame Synchronization Using LDPC Code Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Christopher; Vissasenor, John

    2009-01-01

    A method of pilotless frame synchronization has been devised for low- density parity-check (LDPC) codes. In pilotless frame synchronization , there are no pilot symbols; instead, the offset is estimated by ex ploiting selected aspects of the structure of the code. The advantag e of pilotless frame synchronization is that the bandwidth of the sig nal is reduced by an amount associated with elimination of the pilot symbols. The disadvantage is an increase in the amount of receiver data processing needed for frame synchronization.

  4. Coupled lasers: phase versus chaos synchronization.

    PubMed

    Reidler, I; Nixon, M; Aviad, Y; Guberman, S; Friesem, A A; Rosenbluh, M; Davidson, N; Kanter, I

    2013-10-15

    The synchronization of chaotic lasers and the optical phase synchronization of light originating in multiple coupled lasers have both been extensively studied. However, the interplay between these two phenomena, especially at the network level, is unexplored. Here, we experimentally compare these phenomena by controlling the heterogeneity of the coupling delay times of two lasers. While chaotic lasers exhibit deterioration in synchronization as the time delay heterogeneity increases, phase synchronization is found to be independent of heterogeneity. The experimental results are found to be in agreement with numerical simulations for semiconductor lasers.

  5. Variety of synchronous regimes in neuronal ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, M. A.; Osipov, G. V.; Suykens, J. A. K.

    2008-09-01

    We consider a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of oscillatory activity in neurons of the snail Helix pomatia. This model has a distinctive feature: It demonstrates multistability in oscillatory and silent modes that is typical for the thalamocortical neurons. A single neuron cell can demonstrate a variety of oscillatory activity: Regular and chaotic spiking and bursting behavior. We study collective phenomena in small and large arrays of nonidentical cells coupled by models of electrical and chemical synapses. Two single elements coupled by electrical coupling show different types of synchronous behavior, in particular in-phase and antiphase synchronous regimes. In an ensemble of three inhibitory synaptically coupled elements, the phenomenon of sequential synchronous dynamics is observed. We study the synchronization phenomena in the chain of nonidentical neurons at different oscillatory behavior coupled with electrical and chemical synapses. Various regimes of phase synchronization are observed: (i) Synchronous regular and chaotic spiking; (ii) synchronous regular and chaotic bursting; and (iii) synchronous regular and chaotic bursting with different numbers of spikes inside the bursts. We detect and study the effect of collective synchronous burst generation due to the cluster formation and the oscillatory death.

  6. Synchronization and Partial Synchronization Experiments with Networks of Time-Delay Coupled Hindmarsh-Rose Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steur, Erik; Murguia, Carlos; Fey, Rob H. B.; Nijmeijer, Henk

    2016-06-01

    We study experimentally synchronization and partial synchronization in networks of Hindmarsh-Rose model neurons that interact through linear time-delay couplings. Our experimental setup consists of electric circuit board realizations of the Hindmarsh-Rose model neuron and a coupling interface in which the interaction between the circuits is defined. With this experimental setup we test the predictive value of theoretical results about synchronization and partial synchronization in networks.

  7. Gait synchronization in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Raizen, David M.; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Collective motion is observed in swarms of swimmers of various sizes, ranging from self-propelled nanoparticles to fish. The mechanisms that govern interactions among individuals are debated, and vary from one species to another. Although the interactions among relatively large animals, such as fish, are controlled by their nervous systems, the interactions among microorganisms, which lack nervous systems, are controlled through physical and chemical pathways. Little is known, however, regarding the mechanism of collective movements in microscopic organisms with nervous systems. To attempt to remedy this, we studied collective swimming behavior in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a microorganism with a compact nervous system. We evaluated the contributions of hydrodynamic forces, contact forces, and mechanosensory input to the interactions among individuals. We devised an experiment to examine pair interactions as a function of the distance between the animals and observed that gait synchronization occurred only when the animals were in close proximity, independent of genes required for mechanosensation. Our measurements and simulations indicate that steric hindrance is the dominant factor responsible for motion synchronization in C. elegans, and that hydrodynamic interactions and genotype do not play a significant role. We infer that a similar mechanism may apply to other microscopic swimming organisms and self-propelled particles. PMID:24778261

  8. High accuracy time transfer synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Paul J.; Koppang, Paul A.; Chalmers, David; Davis, Angela; Kubik, Anthony; Powell, William M.

    1995-01-01

    In July 1994, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchronization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance cesium frequency standards were transported from the USNO in Washington, DC to Los Angeles, California in the USNO's mobile earth station. Two-Way Satellite Time Transfer links between the mobile earth station and the USNO were conducted each day of the trip, using the Naval Research Laboratory(NRL) designed spread spectrum modem, built by Allen Osborne Associates(AOA). A Motorola six channel GPS receiver was used to track the location and altitude of the mobile earth station and to provide coordinates for calculating Sagnac corrections for the two-way measurements, and relativistic corrections for the cesium clocks. This paper will discuss the trip, the measurement systems used and the results from the data collected. We will show the accuracy of using two-way satellite time transfer for synchronization and the performance of the three HP 5071 cesium clocks in an operational environment.

  9. High accuracy time transfer synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Paul J.; Koppang, Paul A.; Chalmers, David; Davis, Angela; Kubik, Anthony; Powell, William M.

    1995-05-01

    In July 1994, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchronization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance cesium frequency standards were transported from the USNO in Washington, DC to Los Angeles, California in the USNO's mobile earth station. Two-Way Satellite Time Transfer links between the mobile earth station and the USNO were conducted each day of the trip, using the Naval Research Laboratory(NRL) designed spread spectrum modem, built by Allen Osborne Associates(AOA). A Motorola six channel GPS receiver was used to track the location and altitude of the mobile earth station and to provide coordinates for calculating Sagnac corrections for the two-way measurements, and relativistic corrections for the cesium clocks. This paper will discuss the trip, the measurement systems used and the results from the data collected. We will show the accuracy of using two-way satellite time transfer for synchronization and the performance of the three HP 5071 cesium clocks in an operational environment.

  10. Coronal Modeling and Synchronic Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, Jon A.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Downs, C.; Henney, C. J.; Arge, C.

    2013-07-01

    MHD simulations of the solar corona rely on maps of the solar magnetic field (typically measured at the photosphere) for input as boundary conditions. These "synoptic" maps (available from a number of ground-based and space-based solar observatories), which are perhaps better described as "diachronic," are built up over a solar rotation. A well-known problem with this approach is that the maps contain data that is as much as 27 days old. The Sun's magnetic flux is always evolving, and these changes in the flux affect coronal and heliospheric structure. Flux evolution models can in principle provide a more accurate specification, by estimating the likely state of the photospheric magnetic field on unobserved portions of the Sun. The Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport (ADAPT) model (Arge et al. 2010), which incorporates data assimilation techniques into the Worden and Harvey (2000) flux evolution model, is especially well-suited for this purpose. In this presentation we describe the use of such "synchronic" maps with coronal models. We compare results using synchronic maps versus the traditional synoptic maps. Research supported by AFOSR, NASA, and NSF.

  11. Synchronously pumped nuclear magnetic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Bulatowicz, Michael; Walker, Thad

    2015-05-01

    We present progress towards a synchronously pumped nuclear magnetic oscillator. Alkali frequency shifts and quadrupole shifts are the dominant systematic effects in dual Xe isotope co-magnetometers. By synchronously pumping the Xe nuclei using spin-exchange with an oscillating Rb polarization, the Rb and Xe spins precess transverse to the longitudinal bias field. This configuration is predicted to be insensitive to first order quadrupole interactions and alkali spin-exchange frequency shifts. A key feature that allows co-precession of the Rb and Xe spins, despite a ~ 1000 fold ratio of their gyromagnetic ratios, is to apply the bias field in the form of a sequence of Rb 2 π pulses whose repetition frequency is equal to the Rb Larmor frequency. The 2 π pulses result in an effective Rb magnetic moment of zero, while the Xe precession depends only on the time average of the pulsed field amplitude. Polarization modulation of the pumping light at the Xe NMR frequency allows co-precession of the Rb and Xe spins. We will present our preliminary experimental studies of this new approach to NMR of spin-exchange pumped Xe. Support by the NSF and Northrop Grumman Co.

  12. Causal Pathways Between Impulsiveness, Cocaine Use Consequences, and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Lister, Jamey J.; Ledgerwood, David M.; Lundahl, Leslie H.; Greenwald, Mark K.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The present study examined whether lifetime cocaine use consequences mediate the relationship between trait impulsiveness and current depression symptoms among regular cocaine users. Methods Regular cocaine users (N = 108) were assessed using: Barratt Impulsiveness Scale subscales (non-planning, attentional, motor sub-scales) to measure trait impulsiveness; a standardized Drug History and Use Questionnaire to measure cocaine use and related consequences; and Beck Depression Inventory to measure current depression symptoms. Results All impulsiveness subscales were positively associated with an earlier age of first cocaine use, a higher degree of current depression symptoms and a greater number of lifetime cocaine use consequences. In three separate simple mediation tests, lifetime cocaine use consequences partially mediated the relationship between each of the impulsiveness subscales (non-planning: R2 = .42; attentional: R2 = .40; motor: R2 = .24) and current depression symptoms. Separate moderated mediation analyses failed to demonstrate an interaction between lifetime cocaine use and cocaine-related consequences predicting depression symptoms for the mediation models. Conclusions Cocaine-related consequences function in a more nuanced manner than just an outcome of impulsiveness or cocaine use, but as a pathway between trait impulsiveness and current depression symptoms. PMID:25280245

  13. Method of reducing impulsive noise in electromagnetic geophysical data

    SciTech Connect

    Spies, B.R.

    1990-07-31

    This patent describes a method of reducing impulsive noise in electromagnetic geophysical data. It comprises: providing receiving antenna means for receiving an electromagnetic signal. The receiving antenna means receiving impulsive noise; providing noise sensor means for receiving the impulsive noise and placing the noise sensor means so as to receive the impulsive noise that is received by the receiving antenna means and so as to minimize the reception of the electromagnetic signal; simultaneously receiving the electromagnetic signal with the receiving antenna means so as to create a signal record and receiving the impulsive noise with the noise sensor means so as to create a noise record; examining the noise record for occurrences of the impulsive noise by comparing the noise record with a threshold noise value and identifying those instances of time in which the noise record exceeds the threshold; removing those portions of the signal record which are simultaneous with the identified instances in which the noise records exceeds the threshold, wherein the signal record has reduced impulsive noise.

  14. Optimal N-impulse transfer between coplanar orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broucke, Roger A.; Prado, Antonio F. B. A.

    1994-11-01

    In the present research we consider the problem of optimal (minimum delta V) time-free N-impulse transfers between any two coplanar orbits, for the cases where N is less than or equal to 4. For the two-impulse maneuver, we develop optimality conditions that lead to a non-linear system of three equations and three unknowns. The solution of this system gives us the bi-impulse transfer with minimum total delta V. For the three-impulse maneuver, we develop a new approach. We use two elliptic transfer orbits that are connected by a negligible impulse applied at an infinite distance from the main body. It is an extension of the bi-ellptic transfer, where the two orbits involved in the transfer are not co-axial. We study in detail and show regions of optimality for the most trivial cases of transfers: between two circular orbits; one circular and one elliptic orbit; two elliptic co-axial orbits. We complete the paper by developing a scheme to reduce the total delta V for some of those maneuvers, by adding a second impulse at infinity, and making it a four-impulse maneuver.

  15. Attenuation of high-level impulses by earmuffs.

    PubMed

    Zera, Jan; Mlynski, Rafal

    2007-10-01

    Attenuation of high-level acoustic impulses (noise reduction) by various types of earmuffs was measured using a laboratory source of type A impulses and an artificial test fixture compatible with the ISO 4869-3 standard. The measurements were made for impulses of peak sound-pressure levels (SPLs) from 150 to 170 dB. The rise time and A duration of the impulses depended on their SPL and were within a range of 12-400 mus (rise time) and 0.4-1.1 ms (A duration). The results showed that earmuff peak level attenuation increases by about 10 dB when the impulse's rise time and the A duration are reduced. The results also demonstrated that the signals under the earmuff cup have a longer rise and A duration than the original impulses recorded outside the earmuff. Results of the measurements were used to check the validity of various hearing damage risk criteria that specify the maximum permissible exposure to impulse noise. The present data lead to the conclusion that procedures in which hearing damage risk is assessed only from signal attenuation, without taking into consideration changes in the signal waveform under the earmuff, tend to underestimate the risk of hearing damage. PMID:17902846

  16. Response of end tidal CO2 pressure to impulse exercise.

    PubMed

    Yano, T; Afroundeh, R; Yamanak, R; Arimitsu, T; Lian, C-S; Shirkawa, K; Yunoki, T

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how end tidal CO(2) pressure (PETCO(2)) is controlled in impulse exercise. After pre-exercise at 25 watts for 5 min, impulse exercise for 10 sec with 200 watts followed by post exercise at 25 watts was performed. Ventilation (VE) significantly increased until the end of impulse exercise and significantly re-increased after a sudden decrease. Heart rate (HR) significantly increased until the end of impulse exercise and then decreased to the pre-exercise level. PETCO(2) remained constant during impulse exercise. PETCO(2) significantly increased momentarily after impulse exercise and then significantly decreased to the pre-exercise level. PETCO(2) showed oscillation. The average peak frequency of power spectral density in PETCO(2) appeared at 0.0078 Hz. Cross correlations were obtained after impulse exercise. The peak cross correlations between VE and PETCO(2), HR and PETCO(2), and VE and HR were 0.834 with a time delay of -7 sec, 0.813 with a time delay of 7 sec and 0.701 with a time delay of -15 sec, respectively. We demonstrated that PETCO(2) homeodynamics was interactively maintained by PETCO(2) itself, CO(2) transportation (product of cardiac output and mixed venous CO(2) content) into the lungs by heart pumping and CO(2) elimination by ventilation, and it oscillates as a result of their interactions.

  17. Neural correlates of choice behavior related to impulsivity and venturesomeness.

    PubMed

    Hinvest, Neal S; Elliott, R; McKie, S; Anderson, Ian M

    2011-07-01

    Impulsivity has been associated with several psychiatric disorders including drug addiction and gambling. Impulsive subjects typically have a preference for short-term over long-term rewards and make risky choices. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural correlates of self-rated impulsivity and venturesomeness during tasks involving delayed and risky choice. A broader sampling approach was taken by recruiting participants with behaviors that have been linked to impulsivity (gambling N=15, and recreational drug use N=10) and those without these behaviors (N=9). Selection between delayed or probabilistic rewards was associated with activation in fronto-parietal regions in line with previous research. When selecting between delayed rewards, activity within the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex correlated positively with impulsivity scores while activity within the orbitofrontal cortex, subgenual anterior cingulate cortex and caudate correlated positively with venturesomeness scores. Selection between probabilistic rewards revealed no correlation between scores and regional activations. The results from this study provide targets for future research investigating the neural substrates of impulsivity. They also provide targets for the further investigation into the pathophysiology of addiction and impulse-control disorders.

  18. Alexithymia, emotion dysregulation, impulsivity and aggression: A multiple mediation model.

    PubMed

    Velotti, Patrizia; Garofalo, Carlo; Petrocchi, Chiara; Cavallo, Francesca; Popolo, Raffaele; Dimaggio, Giancarlo

    2016-03-30

    There is a need to better understand the antecedent of aggressive behaviors in order to tailor treatments and reduce the associated damage to the others and the self. Possible mechanisms underlying aggression are poor emotional awareness and emotion dysregulation, as well as impulsivity. Here, we examined the relationships among alexithymia, emotion dysregulation, impulsivity and aggression, comparing a mixed psychiatric sample (N=257) and a community sample (N=617). The clinical sample reported greater levels of alexithymia, emotion dysregulation, trait impulsivity and aggression, than the community sample. Furthermore, in the community sample, emotion dysregulation and impulsivity mediated the relationship (i.e., accounted for the shared variance) between alexithymia and aggression. In the clinical sample, only emotion dysregulation explained the alexithymia-aggression link. In particular, specific dimensions of the emotion dysregulation (i.e., Negative Urgency) and impulsivity constructs (i.e., cognitive and motor impulsivity) played a unique role in explaining these associations. Finally, controlling for depressive symptoms reduced some of the findings involving impulsivity to nonsignificant results. Overall, our findings add to the extant literature attesting to the relevance of alexithymia and emotion dysregulation for understanding aggression, and providing concrete recommendation for the treatment and prevention of aggressive tendencies.

  19. Frequency modulation television analysis: Threshold impulse analysis. [with computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program is developed to calculate the FM threshold impulse rates as a function of the carrier-to-noise ratio for a specified FM system. The system parameters and a vector of 1024 integers, representing the probability density of the modulating voltage, are required as input parameters. The computer program is utilized to calculate threshold impulse rates for twenty-four sets of measured probability data supplied by NASA and for sinusoidal and Gaussian modulating waveforms. As a result of the analysis several conclusions are drawn: (1) The use of preemphasis in an FM television system improves the threshold by reducing the impulse rate. (2) Sinusoidal modulation produces a total impulse rate which is a practical upper bound for the impulse rates of TV signals providing the same peak deviations. (3) As the moment of the FM spectrum about the center frequency of the predetection filter increases, the impulse rate tends to increase. (4) A spectrum having an expected frequency above (below) the center frequency of the predetection filter produces a higher negative (positive) than positive (negative) impulse rate.

  20. Negative emotion-driven impulsivity predicts substance dependence problems.

    PubMed

    Verdejo-García, Antonio; Bechara, Antoine; Recknor, Emily C; Pérez-García, Miguel

    2007-12-01

    Impulsivity is predominant among users of several drugs of abuse including alcohol, cocaine, and amphetamines, and it is considered a risk factor for later development of alcohol and substance abuse and dependence. However, there is little consensus on how impulsivity should be defined and measured, and there are few studies on the relationship between separate dimensions of impulsivity and substance dependence. We used a multidimensional measure of impulsivity (the UPPS scale) to examine differences between 36 individuals with substance dependence (ISD) and 36 drug-free controls on the dimensions of urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking. In addition, we examined which dimensions of impulsivity better predicted addiction-related problems as measured with the addiction severity index. Results revealed that ISD show high scores on dimensions of urgency, lack of perseverance, and lack of premeditation (effect sizes ranging from 1.10 to 1.96), but not on sensation seeking. Among the different impulsivity dimensions, urgency was the best predictor of severity of medical, employment, alcohol, drug, family/social, legal and psychiatric problems in ISD, explaining 13-48% of the total variance of these indices. Furthermore, urgency scores alone correctly classified 83% of the participants in the ISD group. Urgency is characterized by a tendency to act impulsively in response to negative emotional states. Thus, our results could have important implications for novel treatment approaches for substance dependence focused on emotional regulation. PMID:17629632

  1. Waiting Impulsivity: The Influence of Acute Methylphenidate and Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Chang-Webb, Yee Chien; Morris, Laurel S.; Cooper, Ella; Sethi, Arjun; Baek, Kwangyeol; Grant, Jon; Robbins, Trevor W.; Harrison, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ability to wait and to weigh evidence is critical to behavioral regulation. These behaviors are known as waiting and reflection impulsivity. In Study 1, we examined the effects of methylphenidate, a dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, on waiting and reflection impulsivity in healthy young individuals. In study 2, we assessed the role of learning from feedback in disorders of addiction. Methods: We used the recently developed 4-Choice Serial Reaction Time task and the Beads task. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers were tested twice in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial with 20mg methylphenidate. In the second study, we analyzed premature responses as a function of prior feedback in disorders of addiction. Results: Study 1: Methylphenidate was associated with greater waiting impulsivity to a cue predicting reward along with faster responding to target onset without a generalized effect on reaction time or attention. Methylphenidate influenced reflection impulsivity based on baseline impulsivity. Study 2: More premature responses occurred after premature responses in stimulant-dependent subjects. Conclusions: We show that methylphenidate has dissociable effects on waiting and reflection impulsivity. Chronic stimulant exposure impairs learning from prior premature responses, suggesting a failure to learn that premature responding is suboptimal. These findings provide a greater mechanistic understanding of waiting impulsivity. PMID:26136351

  2. Impulsivity and rapid decision-making for reward.

    PubMed

    Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Adam, Robert J; Urner, Maren; van der Leer, Leslie; Bahrami, Bahador; Bays, Paul M; Husain, Masud

    2012-01-01

    Impulsivity is a feature of many brain disorders. Although often defined as the predisposition to act with an inadequate degree of deliberation, forethought, or control, it has proven difficult to measure. This may in part be due to the fact that it is a multifaceted construct, with impulsive decisions potentially arising as a result of a number of underlying mechanisms. Indeed, a "functional" degree of impulsivity may even promote effective behavior in healthy participants in a way that can be advantageous under certain circumstances. Although many tasks have been developed to study impulsivity, few examine decisions made rapidly, for time-sensitive rewards. In the current study we examine behavior in 59 adults on a manual "Traffic Light" task which requires participants to take risks under time pressure, if they are to maximize reward. We show that behavioral variables that index rapid anticipatory responding in this paradigm are correlated with one, specific self-report measure of impulsivity: "lack of premeditation" on the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. Participants who scored more highly on this subscale performed better on the task. Moreover, anticipatory behavior reduced significantly with age (18-79 years), an effect that continued to be upheld after correction for potential age differences in the ability to judge the timing of responses. Based on these findings, we argue that the Traffic Light task provides a parametric method to study one aspect of impulsivity in health and disease: namely, rapid decision-making in pursuit of risky, time-sensitive rewards. PMID:22661960

  3. Knee abduction angular impulses during prolonged running with wedged insoles.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Worobets, Jay T; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2013-07-01

    Wedged insoles may produce immediate effects on knee abduction angular impulses during running; however, it is currently not known whether these knee abduction angular impulse magnitudes are maintained throughout a run when fatigue sets in. If changes occur, this could affect the clinical utility of wedged insoles in treating conditions such as patellofemoral pain. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether knee abduction angular impulses are altered during a prolonged run with wedged insoles. It was hypothesized that knee abduction angular impulses would be reduced following a prolonged run with wedged insoles. Nine healthy runners participated. Runners were randomly assigned to either a 6-mm medial wedge condition or a 6-mm lateral wedge condition and then ran continuously overground for 30 min. Knee abduction angular impulses were quantified at 0 and 30 min using a gait analysis procedure. After 2 days, participants returned to perform the same test but with the other wedge type. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to evaluate main effects of wedge condition and time and interactions between wedge condition and time (α = 0.05). Paired t-tests were used for post hoc analysis (α = 0.01). No interaction effects (p = 0.958) were found, and knee abduction angular impulses were not significantly different over time (p = 0.384). Lateral wedge conditions produced lesser knee abduction angular impulses than medial conditions at 0 min (difference of 2.79 N m s, p = 0.006) and at 30 min (difference of 2.76 N m s, p < 0.001). It is concluded that significant knee abduction angular impulse changes within wedge conditions do not occur during a 30-min run. Additionally, knee abduction angular impulse differences between wedge conditions are maintained during a 30-min run.

  4. Temperament and Impulsivity Predictors of Smoking Cessation Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    López-Torrecillas, Francisca; Perales, José C.; Nieto-Ruiz, Ana; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Aims Temperament and impulsivity are powerful predictors of addiction treatment outcomes. However, a comprehensive assessment of these features has not been examined in relation to smoking cessation outcomes. Methods Naturalistic prospective study. Treatment-seeking smokers (n = 140) were recruited as they engaged in an occupational health clinic providing smoking cessation treatment between 2009 and 2013. Participants were assessed at baseline with measures of temperament (Temperament and Character Inventory), trait impulsivity (Barratt Impulsivity Scale), and cognitive impulsivity (Go/No Go, Delay Discounting and Iowa Gambling Task). The outcome measure was treatment status, coded as “dropout” versus “relapse” versus “abstinence” at 3, 6, and 12 months endpoints. Participants were telephonically contacted and reminded of follow-up face to face assessments at each endpoint. The participants that failed to answer the phone calls or self-reported discontinuation of treatment and failed to attend the upcoming follow-up session were coded as dropouts. The participants that self-reported continuing treatment, and successfully attended the upcoming follow-up session were coded as either “relapse” or “abstinence”, based on the results of smoking behavior self-reports cross-validated with co-oximetry hemoglobin levels. Multinomial regression models were conducted to test whether temperament and impulsivity measures predicted dropout and relapse relative to abstinence outcomes. Results Higher scores on temperament dimensions of novelty seeking and reward dependence predicted poorer retention across endpoints, whereas only higher scores on persistence predicted greater relapse. Higher scores on the trait dimension of non-planning impulsivity but not performance on cognitive impulsivity predicted poorer retention. Higher non-planning impulsivity and poorer performance in the Iowa Gambling Task predicted greater relapse at 3 and 6 months and 6 months

  5. Impulsivity in disorders of food and drug misuse

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Tom B.; Irvine, Michael A.; Worbe, Yulia; Collins, Phoebe; Mitchell, Simon P.; Bolton, Sorcha; Harrison, Neil A.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Voon, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests some overlap between the pathological use of food and drugs, yet how impulsivity compares across these different clinical disorders remains unclear. Substance use disorders are commonly characterized by elevated impulsivity, and impulsivity subtypes may show commonalities and differences in various conditions. We hypothesized that obese subjects with binge eating disorder (BED) and abstinent alcohol-dependent cohorts would have relatively more impulsive profiles compared to obese subjects without BED. We also predicted decision impulsivity impairment in obesity with and without BED. Methods Thirty obese subjects with BED, 30 without BED and 30 abstinent alcohol-dependent subjects and age- and gender-matched controls were tested on delay discounting (preference for a smaller immediate reward over a larger delayed reward), reflection impulsivity (rapid decision making prior to evidence accumulation) and motor response inhibition (action cancellation of a prepotent response). Results All three groups had greater delay discounting relative to healthy volunteers. Both Obese subjects without BED and alcohol dependent subjects had impaired motor response inhibition. Only Obese subjects without BED had impaired integration of available information to optimize outcomes over later trials with a cost condition. Conclusions Delay discounting appears to be a common core impairment across disorders of food and drug intake. Unexpectedly, obese subjects without BED showed greater impulsivity than obese subjects with BED. We highlight the dissociability and heterogeneity of impulsivity subtypes and add to the understanding of neurocognitive profiles across disorders involving food and drugs. Our results have therapeutic implications suggesting that disorder-specific patterns of impulsivity could be targeted. PMID:25118940

  6. Alcohol increases impulsivity and abuse liability in heavy drinking women.

    PubMed

    Reed, Stephanie Collins; Levin, Frances R; Evans, Suzette M

    2012-12-01

    Heavy drinking has increased in recent years and has been linked to numerous health-related risks, particularly in women. A number of factors may play a role in exacerbating the risks linked to heavy drinking, such as impulsivity, which itself is related to a number of risky behaviors. The present study investigated the effects of alcohol (0, 0.5, 0.75 g/kg) on impulsivity in female heavy drinkers (n = 23) and female light drinkers (n = 23) using a double-blind, placebo-controlled outpatient design; all women were tested during follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Each session, participants completed a range of tasks including subjective measures of abuse liability, cognitive performance tasks, three behavioral impulsivity tasks, and a risk-taking task. Alcohol increased impulsivity on the Immediate and Delayed Memory Task (IMT and DMT) and Delay Discounting task. Heavy drinkers scored higher on impulsivity self-reports and were more impulsive on the IMT and the GoStop task than light drinkers. The high dose of alcohol further increased impulsive performance on the IMT and DMT in heavy drinkers. There were no group differences or alcohol effects on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task. Alcohol increased sedative-like effects more in light drinkers and increased stimulant-like effects and alcohol liking more in heavy drinkers. In summary, female heavy drinkers are less sensitive to the negative effects of alcohol, report more positive effects of alcohol, and are more impulsive than female light drinkers. Moreover, impulsive responding was exacerbated by alcohol drinking among female heavy drinkers, indicating that women who drink at this level are at increased risk for developing alcohol use disorders and engaging in other risky behaviors, particularly after drinking. PMID:23066857

  7. Neuromagnetic source reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, P.S.; Mosher, J.C.; Leahy, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    In neuromagnetic source reconstruction, a functional map of neural activity is constructed from noninvasive magnetoencephalographic (MEG) measurements. The overall reconstruction problem is under-determined, so some form of source modeling must be applied. We review the two main classes of reconstruction techniques-parametric current dipole models and nonparametric distributed source reconstructions. Current dipole reconstructions use a physically plausible source model, but are limited to cases in which the neural currents are expected to be highly sparse and localized. Distributed source reconstructions can be applied to a wider variety of cases, but must incorporate an implicit source, model in order to arrive at a single reconstruction. We examine distributed source reconstruction in a Bayesian framework to highlight the implicit nonphysical Gaussian assumptions of minimum norm based reconstruction algorithms. We conclude with a brief discussion of alternative non-Gaussian approachs.

  8. Impulse radar imaging system for concealed object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podd, F. J. W.; David, M.; Iqbal, G.; Hussain, F.; Morris, D.; Osakue, E.; Yeow, Y.; Zahir, S.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    Electromagnetic systems for imaging concealed objects at checkpoints typically employ radiation at millimetre and terahertz frequencies. These systems have been shown to be effective and provide a sufficiently high resolution image. However there are difficulties and current electromagnetic systems have limitations particularly in accurately differentiating between threat and innocuous objects based on shape, surface emissivity or reflectivity, which are indicative parameters. In addition, water has a high absorption coefficient at millimetre wavelength and terahertz frequencies, which makes it more difficult for these frequencies to image through thick damp clothing. This paper considers the potential of using ultra wideband (UWB) in the low gigahertz range. The application of this frequency band to security screening appears to be a relatively new field. The business case for implementing the UWB system has been made financially viable by the recent availability of low-cost integrated circuits operating at these frequencies. Although designed for the communication sector, these devices can perform the required UWB radar measurements as well. This paper reports the implementation of a 2 to 5 GHz bandwidth linear array scanner. The paper describes the design and fabrication of transmitter and receiver antenna arrays whose individual elements are a type of antipodal Vivaldi antenna. The antenna's frequency and angular response were simulated in CST Microwave Studio and compared with laboratory measurements. The data pre-processing methods of background subtraction and deconvolution are implemented to improve the image quality. The background subtraction method uses a reference dataset to remove antenna crosstalk and room reflections from the dataset. The deconvolution method uses a Wiener filter to "sharpen" the returned echoes which improves the resolution of the reconstructed image. The filter uses an impulse response reference dataset and a signal

  9. Using Synchronous Technology to Enrich Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Charles Xiaoxue; Jaeger, David; Liu, Jinxia; Guo, Xiaoning; Xie, Nan

    2013-01-01

    To explore the potential applications of synchronous technology to enrich student learning, faculty members from an American regional state university and a Chinese regional university collaborated to find appropriate ways to integrate synchronous technology (e.g., Adobe Connect) into an educational technology program in the American university…

  10. Examining Interactivity in Synchronous Virtual Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Parker, Michele A.; Deale, Deborah F.

    2012-01-01

    Interaction is crucial to student satisfaction in online courses. Adding synchronous components (virtual classroom technologies) to online courses can facilitate interaction. In this study, interaction within a synchronous virtual classroom was investigated by surveying 21 graduate students in an instructional technology program in the…

  11. Synchronization Properties of Random Piecewise Isometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorodetski, Anton; Kleptsyn, Victor

    2016-08-01

    We study the synchronization properties of the random double rotations on tori. We give a criterion that show when synchronization is present in the case of random double rotations on the circle and prove that it is always absent in dimensions two and higher.

  12. Interference, Integration and the Synchronic Fallacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, William F.

    The purposes of this paper are to examine the effects of synchronic description in distinguishing between interference and integration in cases of language contact, and to suggest alternative methods of description suitable for the analysis of systems in motion. The "synchronic fallacy" is defined here as the belief that one can describe a…

  13. Quasars as very-accurate clock synchronizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Quasars can be employed to synchronize global data communications, geophysical measurements, and atomic clocks. It is potentially two to three orders of magnitude better than presently-used Moon-bounce system. Comparisons between quasar and clock pulses are used to develop correction or synchronization factors for station clocks.

  14. Complete synchronization and generalized synchronization of one-way coupled time-delay systems.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Meng; Wang, Xingang; Gong, Xiaofeng; Wei, G W; Lai, C-H

    2003-09-01

    The complete synchronization and generalized synchronization (GS) of one-way coupled time-delay systems are studied. We find that GS can be achieved by a single scalar signal, and its synchronization threshold for different delay times shows the parameter resonance effect, i.e., we can obtain stable synchronization at a smaller coupling if the delay time of the driven system is chosen such that it is in resonance with the driving system. Near chaos synchronization, the desynchronization dynamics displays periodic bursts with the period equal to the delay time of the driven system. These features can be easily applied to the recovery of time-delay systems.

  15. Image synchronization for 3D application using the NanEye sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Ricardo M.; Wäny, Martin; Santos, Pedro; Dias, Morgado

    2015-03-01

    Based on Awaiba's NanEye CMOS image sensor family and a FPGA platform with USB3 interface, the aim of this paper is to demonstrate a novel technique to perfectly synchronize up to 8 individual self-timed cameras. Minimal form factor self-timed camera modules of 1 mm x 1 mm or smaller do not generally allow external synchronization. However, for stereo vision or 3D reconstruction with multiple cameras as well as for applications requiring pulsed illumination it is required to synchronize multiple cameras. In this work, the challenge to synchronize multiple self-timed cameras with only 4 wire interface has been solved by adaptively regulating the power supply for each of the cameras to synchronize their frame rate and frame phase. To that effect, a control core was created to constantly monitor the operating frequency of each camera by measuring the line period in each frame based on a well-defined sampling signal. The frequency is adjusted by varying the voltage level applied to the sensor based on the error between the measured line period and the desired line period. To ensure phase synchronization between frames of multiple cameras, a Master-Slave interface was implemented. A single camera is defined as the Master entity, with its operating frequency being controlled directly through a PC based interface. The remaining cameras are setup in Slave mode and are interfaced directly with the Master camera control module. This enables the remaining cameras to monitor its line and frame period and adjust their own to achieve phase and frequency synchronization. The result of this work will allow the realization of smaller than 3mm diameter 3D stereo vision equipment in medical endoscopic context, such as endoscopic surgical robotic or micro invasive surgery.

  16. Nipple and areola reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, H A; Bostwick, J

    1989-01-01

    Nipple-areola reconstruction is an integral part of breast reconstruction. Optimum results are usually obtained when nipple-areola reconstruction is staged after the breast mound has attained its final shape and is well vascularized. The use of intradermal tattoo allows the use of a variety of nonpigmented donor sites. Women report that reconstruction of the nipple-areola enhances their overall satisfaction with breast reconstruction. The knowledgeable and skilled nurse is a valuable member of the professional team during this final phase of breast reconstruction. PMID:2479039

  17. Amplitude dynamics favors synchronization in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesus; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study phase synchronization in random complex networks of coupled periodic oscillators. In particular, we show that, when amplitude dynamics is not negligible, phase synchronization may be enhanced. To illustrate this, we compare the behavior of heterogeneous units with both amplitude and phase dynamics and pure (Kuramoto) phase oscillators. We find that in small network motifs the behavior crucially depends on the topology and on the node frequency distribution. Surprisingly, the microscopic structures for which the amplitude dynamics improves synchronization are those that are statistically more abundant in random complex networks. Thus, amplitude dynamics leads to a general lowering of the synchronization threshold in arbitrary random topologies. Finally, we show that this synchronization enhancement is generic of oscillators close to Hopf bifurcations. To this aim we consider coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units modeling neuron dynamics.

  18. Amplitude dynamics favors synchronization in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesus; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study phase synchronization in random complex networks of coupled periodic oscillators. In particular, we show that, when amplitude dynamics is not negligible, phase synchronization may be enhanced. To illustrate this, we compare the behavior of heterogeneous units with both amplitude and phase dynamics and pure (Kuramoto) phase oscillators. We find that in small network motifs the behavior crucially depends on the topology and on the node frequency distribution. Surprisingly, the microscopic structures for which the amplitude dynamics improves synchronization are those that are statistically more abundant in random complex networks. Thus, amplitude dynamics leads to a general lowering of the synchronization threshold in arbitrary random topologies. Finally, we show that this synchronization enhancement is generic of oscillators close to Hopf bifurcations. To this aim we consider coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units modeling neuron dynamics. PMID:27108847

  19. Clustering versus non-clustering phase synchronizations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuai; Zhan, Meng

    2014-03-15

    Clustering phase synchronization (CPS) is a common scenario to the global phase synchronization of coupled dynamical systems. In this work, a novel scenario, the non-clustering phase synchronization (NPS), is reported. It is found that coupled systems do not transit to the global synchronization until a certain sufficiently large coupling is attained, and there is no clustering prior to the global synchronization. To reveal the relationship between CPS and NPS, we further analyze the noise effect on coupled phase oscillators and find that the coupled oscillator system can change from CPS to NPS with the increase of noise intensity or system disorder. These findings are expected to shed light on the mechanism of various intriguing self-organized behaviors in coupled systems.

  20. Synchronization of oscillators coupled through an environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katriel, Guy

    2008-11-01

    We study synchronization of oscillators that are indirectly coupled through their interaction with an environment. We give criteria for the stability or instability of a synchronized oscillation. Using these criteria we investigate synchronization of systems of oscillators which are weakly coupled, in the sense that the influence of the oscillators on the environment is weak. We prove that arbitrarily weak coupling will synchronize the oscillators, provided that this coupling is of the ‘right’ sign. We illustrate our general results by applications to a model of coupled GnRH neuron oscillators proposed by Khadra and Li [A. Khadra, Y.X. Li, A model for the pulsatile secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone from synchronized hypothalamic neurons, Biophys. J. 91 (2006) 74-83.], and to indirectly weakly-coupled λ- ω oscillators.

  1. Hydrodynamic synchronization of colloidal oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Kotar, Jurij; Leoni, Marco; Bassetti, Bruno; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino; Cicuta, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Two colloidal spheres are maintained in oscillation by switching the position of an optical trap when a sphere reaches a limit position, leading to oscillations that are bounded in amplitude but free in phase and period. The interaction between the oscillators is only through the hydrodynamic flow induced by their motion. We prove that in the absence of stochastic noise the antiphase dynamical state is stable, and we show how the period depends on coupling strength. Both features are observed experimentally. As the natural frequencies of the oscillators are made progressively different, the coordination is quickly lost. These results help one to understand the origin of hydrodynamic synchronization and how the dynamics can be tuned. Cilia and flagella are biological systems coupled hydrodynamically, exhibiting dramatic collective motions. We propose that weakly correlated phase fluctuations, with one of the oscillators typically precessing the other, are characteristic of hydrodynamically coupled systems in the presence of thermal noise. PMID:20385848

  2. Pulse code modulated signal synchronizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, H. S. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A bit synchronizer for a split phase PCM transmission is reported that includes three loop circuits which receive incoming phase coded PCM signals. In the first loop, called a Q-loop, a generated, phase coded, PCM signal is multiplied with the incoming signals, and the frequency and phase of the generated signal are nulled to that of the incoming subcarrier signal. In the second loop, called a B-loop, a circuit multiplies a generated signal with incoming signals to null the phase of the generated signal in a bit phase locked relationship to the incoming signal. In a third loop, called the I-loop, a phase coded PCM signal is multiplied with the incoming signals for decoding the bit information from the PCM signal. A counter means is used for timing of the generated signals and timing of sample intervals for each bit period.

  3. Statement of capabilities: Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) technology applied to mine detection and imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.G.; Gavel, D.T.; Mast, J.E.; Warhus, J.P.

    1995-03-13

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed radar and imaging technologies with potential applications in mine detection by the armed forces and other agencies involved in demining efforts. These new technologies use a patented ultra-wideband (impulse) radar technology that is compact, low-cost, and low power. Designated as Micropower Impulse Radar, these compact, self-contained radars can easily be assembled into arrays to form complete ground penetrating radar imaging systems. LLNL has also developed tomographic reconstruction and signal processing software capable of producing high-resolution 2-D and 3-D images of objects buried in materials like soil or concrete from radar data. Preliminary test results have shown that a radar imaging system using these technologies has the ability to image both metallic and plastic land mine surrogate targets buried in 5 to 10 cm of moist soil. In dry soil, the system can detect buried objects to a depth of 30 cm and more. This report describes LLNL`s unique capabilities and technologies that can be applied to the demining problem.

  4. Collapse of Synchronization in a Memristive Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Mi; Wang, Chun-Ni; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun

    2015-12-01

    For an oscillating circuit or coupled circuits, damage in electric devices such as inductor, resistance, memristor even capacitor can cause breakdown or collapse of the circuits. These damage could be associated with external attack or aging in electric devices, and then the bifurcation parameters could be deformed from normal values. Resonators or signal generators are often synchronized to produce powerful signal series and this problem could be investigated by using synchronization in network. Complete synchronization could be induced by linear coupling in a two-dimensional network of identical oscillators when the coupling intensity is beyond certain threshold. The collective behavior and synchronization state are much dependent on the bifurcation parameters. Any slight fluctuation in parameter and breakdown in bifurcation parameter can cause transition of synchronization even collapse of synchronization in the network. In this paper, a two-dimensional network composed of the resonators coupled with memristors under nearest-neighbor connection is designed, and the network can reach complete synchronization by carefully selecting coupling intensity. The network keeps synchronization after certain transient period, then a bifurcation parameter in a resonator is switched from the previous value and the adjacent resonators (oscillators) are affected in random. It is found that the synchronization area could be invaded greatly in a diffusive way. The damage area size is much dependent on the selection of diffusive period of damage and deformation degree in the parameter. Indeed, the synchronization area could keep intact at largest size under intermediate deformation degree and coupling intensity. Supported by the National Natural Science of China under Grant Nos. 11265008 and 11365014

  5. Impulse control disorders in psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Müller, Astrid; Rein, Katharina; Kollei, Ines; Jacobi, Andrea; Rotter, Andrea; Schütz, Patricia; Hillemacher, Thomas; de Zwaan, Martina

    2011-08-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in a European psychiatric inpatient sample. Two hundred thirty four consecutive psychiatric inpatients (62% female) were examined using a module of the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV) that has been developed for ICDs (SCID-ICD). In addition to intermittent explosive disorder, pyromania, kleptomania, pathological gambling, and trichotillomania, the proposed ICDs not otherwise specified were assessed, including compulsive buying, nonparaphilic compulsive sexual behavior, pathological internet use, and pathological skin picking. Based on the SCID-ICD, a lifetime ICD rate of 23.5% and a current ICD rate of 18.8% were found. The most frequent ICDs were pathological skin picking (lifetime 7.3%, current 6.8%), compulsive buying (lifetime 6.8%, current 6.0%), and intermittent explosive disorder (lifetime 5.6%, current 3.4%). In contrast, referring to admission diagnoses taken from patients' charts only 3.8% of the inpatients were diagnosed with any current ICD. Individuals with comorbid ICD were significantly younger and had more admission diagnoses other than ICD. The results suggest high rates of ICDs among psychiatric inpatients that remain to be under-diagnosed in clinical routine.

  6. On reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is an ionized physical vapor deposition (IPVD) technique that is particularly promising for reactive sputtering applications. However, there are few issues that have to be resolved before the full potential of this technique can be realized. Here we give an overview of the key experimental findings for the reactive HiPIMS discharge. An increase in the discharge current is commonly observed with increased partial pressure of the reactive gas or decreased repetition pulse frequency. There are somewhat conflicting claims regarding the hysteresis effect in the reactive HiPIMS discharge as some report reduction or elimination of the hysteresis effect while others claim a feedback control is essential. The ion energy distribution of the metal ion and the atomic ion of the reactive gas are similar and extend to very high energies while the ion energy distribution of the working gas and the molecular ion of the reactive gas are similar and are much less energetic.

  7. Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An engine is disclosed, including a controllable output plasma generator, a controllable heater for selectably raising a temperature of the plasma connected to an outlet of the plasma generator, and a nozzle connected to an outlet of the heater, through which heated plasma is discharged to provide thrust. In one embodiment, the source of plasma is a helicon generator. In one embodiment, the heater is an ion cyclotron resonator. In one embodiment, the nozzle is a radially diverging magnetic field disposed on a discharge side of the heater so that helically travelling particles in the beater exit the heater at high axial velocity. A particular embodiment includes control circuits for selectably directing a portion of radio frequency power from an RF generator to the helicon generator and to the cyclotron resonator so that the thrust output and the specific impulse of the engine can be selectively controlled. A method of propelling a vehicle is also disclosed. The method includes generating a plasma, heating said plasma, and discharging the heated plasma through a nozzle. In one embodiment, the nozzle is a diverging magnetic field. In this embodiment, the heating is performed by applying a radio frequency electro magnetic field to the plasma at the ion cyclotron frequency in an axially polarized DC magnetic field.

  8. Wearing Your Heart on Your Face: Reading Lovesickness and the Suicidal Impulse in Chaucer.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Rebecca F

    2015-01-01

    Geoffrey Chaucer frequently depicts the emotions of his characters via the outward physical signs of the body, and he often does so using a discourse that draws on Galenic theories. A striking example of Chaucer's medicalized descriptions of emotion is his adaptation of the suicidal impulse associated with lovesickness. Chaucer reconstructs this motif in "The Knight's Tale" and The Book of the Duchess by altering his sources (Boccaccio, and Froissart and Machaut) to anatomize the emotional body of the suffering knight. Through the medicalized language of bodily health describing emotional upheavals, other characters and the reader are prompted to feel with and begin to understand and appropriately respond to the suffering individual. This reading shows Chaucer using moments of embodied emotional examination to teach his audience how to read, interpret, and respond to literature.

  9. Analysis of Dragonfly Take-off Mechanism: Initial Impulse Generated by Aerodynamic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruijie; Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Team

    2013-11-01

    Take-off is a critical part of insect flight due to not only that every single flight initiates from take-off, but also that the take-off period, despite its short duration, accounts for a relatively large fraction of the total energy consumption. Thus, studying the mechanism of insect take-off will help to improve the design of Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) in two major properties, the success rate and the energy efficiency of take-off. In this work, we study 20 cases in which dragonflies (species including Pachydiplax longipennis, Epitheca Cynosura, Epitheca princeps etc.) take off from designed platform. By high-speed photogrammetry, 3-d reconstruction and numerical simulation, we explore how dragonflies coordinate different body parts to help take-off. We evaluate how aerodynamic forces generated by wing flapping create the initial impulse, and how these forces help save energy consumption. Supported by NSF CBET-1343154.

  10. Personality and Alcohol Use: The Role of Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sunny Hyucksun; Hong, Hyokyoung Grace; Jeon, Sae-Mi

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that personality traits associated with impulsivity influence alcohol use during emerging adulthood, yet relatively few studies have examined how distinct facets of impulsivity are associated with alcohol use and abuse. We examine the influence of impulsivity traits on four patterns of alcohol use including frequency of alcohol use, alcohol-related problems, binge drinking, and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in a community sample of young individuals (N = 190). In multivariate regression analyses that controlled for peer and parental alcohol use, psychological distress, and developmental correlates (i.e., college, marriage, employment) in emerging adulthood, we found that urgency and sensation seeking were consistently related to all four constructs of alcohol use. The present study suggests that distinct impulsivity traits may play different roles in escalation of alcohol use and development of AUDs during emerging adulthood. PMID:21955874

  11. Some impulsive rendezvous trajectories and their possible optimality.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Two- and three-impulse trajectories are investigated for fixed-time, fixed-angle rendezvous between vacant circular coplanar orbits, for trip angles less than, or equal to 2 pi in magnitude. For two-impulse trajectories, general features of the characteristic velocity function are outlined. Parameters of the intermediate orbit are reviewed. Attention is given to limiting cases. Computation of the adjoint system helps to define the domain of possible optimality foajectories: it is a closed domain in the trip time, trip angle plane. Waiting periods on terminal orbits are considered. The domain of possible optimality is defined using Lawden's primer vrtory. This domain extends to infinity if the radius ratio of terminal orbits is less than 15.6. Three-impulse trajectories are tried in cases where two-impulse trajectories, with or without cost, have been found nonoptimal. Improvements on the characteristic velocity are thus obtained.

  12. Domain-Specific Impulsivity in School-Age Children

    PubMed Central

    Tsukayama, Eli; Duckworth, Angela Lee; Kim, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is a salient individual difference in children with well-established predictive validity for life outcomes. The current investigation proposes that impulsive behaviors vary systematically by domain. In a series of studies with ethnically and socioeconomically diverse samples of middle school students, we find that schoolwork-related and interpersonal-related impulsivity, as observed by teachers, parents, and the students themselves, are distinct, moderately correlated behavioral tendencies. Each demonstrates differentiated relationships with dimensions of childhood temperament, Big Five personality factors, and outcomes, such as sociometric popularity, report card grades, and classroom conduct. Implications for theoretical conceptions of impulsivity as well as for practical applications (e.g., domain-specific interventions) are discussed. PMID:24118714

  13. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.; Phelan, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on a sheet-fed pilot-scale shoe press to compare impulse drying and double-felted pressing. Both an IPST (Institute of Paper Science and Technology) ceramic coated and Beloit Type A press roll were evaluated for lienrboard sheet structures having a wide range of z-direction permeability. Purpose was to find ways of correcting sheet sticking problems observed in previous pilot-scale shoe press experiments. Results showed that impulse drying was superior to double felted pressing in both press dryness and in important paper physical properties. Impulse drying critical temperature was found to depend on specific surface of the heated layer of the sheet, thermal properties of the press roll surface, and choice of felt. Impulse drying of recycled and two-ply liner was demonstrated for both Southern Pile and Douglas fir-containing furnishes.

  14. The periodic competing Lotka-Volterra model with impulsive effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Chen, Lansun

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, the dynamic behaviour of a classical periodic Lotka-Volterra competing system with impulsive effect is investigated. By applying the Floquet theory of linear periodic impulsive equations, some conditions are obtained for the linear stability of the trivial and semi-trivial periodic solutions. It is proved that the system can be permanent if all the trivial and semi-trivial periodic solutions are linearly unstable. We use standard bifurcation theory to show the existence of nontrivial periodic solutions which arise near the semi-trivial periodic solution. As an application, a fish harvest problem is considered. We explain how two competing species, one of which in a periodic environment without impulsive effect would be doomed to extinction, can coexist with suitably periodic impulsive harvesting.

  15. Eyes Wide Shopped: Shopping Situations Trigger Arousal in Impulsive Buyers

    PubMed Central

    Serfas, Benjamin G.; Büttner, Oliver B.; Florack, Arnd

    2014-01-01

    The present study proposes arousal as an important mechanism driving buying impulsiveness. We examined the effect of buying impulsiveness on arousal in non-shopping and shopping contexts. In an eye-tracking experiment, we measured pupil dilation while participants viewed and rated pictures of shopping scenes and non-shopping scenes. The results demonstrated that buying impulsiveness is closely associated with arousal as response to viewing pictures of shopping scenes. This pertained for hedonic shopping situations as well as for utilitarian shopping situations. Importantly, the effect did not emerge for non-shopping scenes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that arousal of impulsive buyers is independent from cognitive evaluation of scenes in the pictures. PMID:25489955

  16. Pinning impulsive directed coupled delayed dynamical network and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chunnan; Wu, Quanjun; Xiang, Lan; Zhou, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the present paper is to further investigate pinning synchronisation of a complex delayed dynamical network with directionally coupling by a single impulsive controller. By developing the analysis procedure of pinning impulsive stability for undirected coupled dynamical network previously, some simple yet general criteria of pinning impulsive synchronisation for such directed coupled network are derived analytically. It is shown that a single impulsive controller can always pin a given directed coupled network to a desired homogenous solution, including an equilibrium point, a periodic orbit, or a chaotic orbit. Subsequently, the theoretical results are illustrated by a directed small-world complex network which is a cellular neural network (CNN) and a directed scale-free complex network with the well-known Hodgkin-Huxley neuron oscillators. Numerical simulations are finally given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control methodology.

  17. 12. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 SMALL PELTONDOBLE IMPULSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 SMALL PELTON-DOBLE IMPULSE WHEEL, HAND-CONTROLLED GATE VALVE, AND NOZZLE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  18. Analysis on Impulse Characteristics of PDRE with Exhaust Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hong-bo; Weng, Chun-sheng; Lv, Xiao-jing; Li, Ning

    2014-06-01

    The exhaust characteristics related to impulse was investigated in a pulse detonation rocket engine (PDRE) by tunable diode laser absorption sensing system. The instantaneous parameters of temperature, velocity and pressure were obtained for exhaust at engine exit. Analysis on impulse characteristics based on control volume of the PDRE was conducted for a single operation circle with experimental results. It was concluded that the impulse (3.26 N·s) achieved by exhaust measurements was in agreement with that (3.09 N·s) by a load cell. The impulse caused by exhaust momentum experienced an extremely sharp ascending, a steep rising and a slow increment in sequence. The exhausts during the sharp ascending and steep rising were under expansion with high mass weighted average temperature (>1266 K), so there was a possible promotion for exhausts utilizing.

  19. 69. Credit TCL. Housing of Pelton exciter impulse wheel and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. Credit TCL. Housing of Pelton exciter impulse wheel and attached General Electric 60 kW exciter generator. - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  20. Which dimensions of impulsivity are related to cigarette craving?

    PubMed

    Billieux, Joël; Van der Linden, Martial; Ceschi, Grazia

    2007-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is a very important health problem and represents the largest preventable risk factor for premature death in developed countries. A considerable body of research indicates that impulsivity is a central etiological concept in many theoretical models of tobacco addiction. The aim of this study is to analyse which dimensions of impulsivity are related to cigarette craving. To this end, 40 undergraduate psychology students were screened using the revised Questionnaire on Smoking Urges (QSU-12) and the French adaptation of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale (UPPS). This scale identifies four distinct components associated with impulsive behaviour: urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking. The results showed that urgency is a significant predictor of tobacco cravings, while depression and anxiety are not. PMID:16997490

  1. Breast Reconstruction after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schmauss, Daniel; Machens, Hans-Günther; Harder, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Its surgical approach has become less and less mutilating in the last decades. However, the overall number of breast reconstructions has significantly increased lately. Nowadays, breast reconstruction should be individualized at its best, first of all taking into consideration not only the oncological aspects of the tumor, neo-/adjuvant treatment, and genetic predisposition, but also its timing (immediate versus delayed breast reconstruction), as well as the patient’s condition and wish. This article gives an overview over the various possibilities of breast reconstruction, including implant- and expander-based reconstruction, flap-based reconstruction (vascularized autologous tissue), the combination of implant and flap, reconstruction using non-vascularized autologous fat, as well as refinement surgery after breast reconstruction. PMID:26835456

  2. Characterizing Impulse Radiating Antennas by an Intuitive Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, J.; Peyer, P.; Rauschenbach, P.; Tkac, F.; Zetik, R.

    Referring to UWB-sensor applications and impulse radio, the ideal behavior of impulse radiating antennas will be summarized and some new characteristic functions will be introduced. The time domain Friis-formula will be derived based on normalized guided and free waves. By using the p-norm, a method is introduced to define the characteristic values and functions which can either refer to an antenna or yet the whole transmission chain.

  3. Geodesics in nonexpanding impulsive gravitational waves with Λ, part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sämann, Clemens; Steinbauer, Roland; Lecke, Alexander; Podolský, Jiřˇí

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the geodesics in the entire class of nonexpanding impulsive gravitational waves propagating in an (anti-)de Sitter universe using the distributional form of the metric. Employing a five-dimensional embedding formalism and a general regularisation technique, we prove the existence and uniqueness of the geodesics crossing the wave impulse, leading to a completeness result. We also derive the explicit form of the geodesics, thereby confirming previous results derived in a heuristic approach.

  4. Internal ellipsoidal estimates of reachable set of impulsive control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Matviychuk, Oksana G.

    2014-11-18

    A problem of estimating reachable sets of linear impulsive control system with uncertainty in initial data is considered. The impulsive controls in the dynamical system belong to the intersection of a special cone with a generalized ellipsoid both taken in the space of functions of bounded variation. Assume that an ellipsoidal state constraints are imposed. The algorithms for constructing internal ellipsoidal estimates of reachable sets for such control systems and numerical simulation results are given.

  5. Electric and magnetic fields measured during a sudden impulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, S.; Adams, G. J.; Mozer, F. S.

    1974-01-01

    The electric field in the ionosphere and the magnetic field at the earth's surface in the mid-latitude region were both measured during a sudden impulse. Ionospheric conductivities deduced from this data were consistent with expectations, thus suggesting that the fluctuations in the magnetic field at the earth's surface were caused by overhead ionospheric currents that were driven by an electric field associated with the sudden impulse.

  6. Switched impulsive control of the endocrine disruptor diethylstilbestrol singular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, Iman; Shafiee, Masoud; Ibeas, Asier; de la Sen, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, a switched and impulsive controller is designed to control the Endocrine Disruptor Diethylstilbestrol mechanism which is usually modeled as a singular system. Then the exponential stabilization property of the proposed switched and impulsive singular model is discussed under matrix inequalities. A design algorithm is given and applied for the physiological process of endocrine disruptor diethylstilbestrol model to illustrate the effectiveness of the results.

  7. Manipulation of plasma grating by impulsive molecular alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Peifen; Wu, Jian; Zeng, Heping

    2013-11-25

    We experimentally demonstrated that multiphoton-ionization-induced plasma grating in air could be precisely manipulated by impulsive molecular alignment. In the linear region, the impulsively aligned molecules modulated the diffraction efficiency of the plasma grating for a time-delayed femtosecond laser pulse. In the nonlinear region, the third harmonic generation from the plasma grating was either enhanced or suppressed by following the alignment of the molecules.

  8. Reflection impulsivity in binge drinking: behavioural and volumetric correlates.

    PubMed

    Banca, Paula; Lange, Iris; Worbe, Yulia; Howell, Nicholas A; Irvine, Michael; Harrison, Neil A; Moutoussis, Michael; Voon, Valerie

    2016-03-01

    The degree to which an individual accumulates evidence prior to making a decision, also known as reflection impulsivity, can be affected in psychiatric disorders. Here, we study decisional impulsivity in binge drinkers, a group at elevated risk for developing alcohol use disorders, comparing two tasks assessing reflection impulsivity and a delay discounting task, hypothesizing impairments in both subtypes of impulsivity. We also assess volumetric correlates of reflection impulsivity focusing on regions previously implicated in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. Sixty binge drinkers and healthy volunteers were tested using two different information-gathering paradigms: the beads task and the Information Sampling Task (IST). The beads task was analysed using a behavioural approach and a Bayesian model of decision making. Delay discounting was assessed using the Monetary Choice Questionnaire. Regression analyses of primary outcomes were conducted with voxel-based morphometry analyses. Binge drinkers sought less evidence prior to decision in the beads task compared with healthy volunteers in both the behavioural and computational modelling analysis. There were no group differences in the IST or delay discounting task. Greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the beads task was associated with smaller dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal volumes. In contrast, greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the IST was associated with greater dorsal cingulate and precuneus volumes. Binge drinking is characterized by impaired reflection impulsivity suggesting a deficit in deciding on the basis of future outcomes that are more difficult to represent. These findings emphasize the role of possible therapeutic interventions targeting decision-making deficits.

  9. Response inhibition and its relation to multidimensional impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Wilbertz, Tilmann; Deserno, Lorenz; Horstmann, Annette; Neumann, Jane; Villringer, Arno; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Boehler, Carsten N; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2014-12-01

    Impulsivity is a multidimensional construct that has been suggested as a vulnerability factor for several psychiatric disorders, especially addiction disorders. Poor response inhibition may constitute one facet of impulsivity. Trait impulsivity can be assessed by self-report questionnaires such as the widely used Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). However, regarding the multidimensionality of impulsivity different concepts have been proposed, in particular the UPPS self-report questionnaire ('Urgency', 'Lack of Premeditation', 'Lack of Perseverance', 'Sensation Seeking') that is based on a factor analytic approach. The question as to which aspects of trait impulsivity map on individual differences of the behavioral and neural correlates of response inhibition so far remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated 52 healthy individuals that scored either very high or low on the BIS-11 and underwent a reward-modulated Stop-signal task during fMRI. Neither behavioral nor neural differences were observed with respect to high- and low-BIS groups. In contrast, UPPS subdomain Urgency best explained inter-individual variability in SSRT scores and was further negatively correlated to right IFG/aI activation in 'Stop>Go' trials - a key region for response inhibition. Successful response inhibition in rewarded compared to nonrewarded stop trials yielded ventral striatal (VS) activation which might represent a feedback signal. Interestingly, only participants with low Urgency scores were able to use this VS feedback signal for better response inhibition. Our findings indicate that the relationship of impulsivity and response inhibition has to be treated carefully. We propose Urgency as an important subdomain that might be linked to response inhibition as well as to the use of reward-based neural signals. Based on the present results, further studies examining the influence of impulsivity on psychiatric disorders should take into account Urgency as an important

  10. Reflection impulsivity in binge drinking: behavioural and volumetric correlates

    PubMed Central

    Banca, Paula; Lange, Iris; Worbe, Yulia; Howell, Nicholas A.; Irvine, Michael; Harrison, Neil A.; Moutoussis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The degree to which an individual accumulates evidence prior to making a decision, also known as reflection impulsivity, can be affected in psychiatric disorders. Here, we study decisional impulsivity in binge drinkers, a group at elevated risk for developing alcohol use disorders, comparing two tasks assessing reflection impulsivity and a delay discounting task, hypothesizing impairments in both subtypes of impulsivity. We also assess volumetric correlates of reflection impulsivity focusing on regions previously implicated in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. Sixty binge drinkers and healthy volunteers were tested using two different information‐gathering paradigms: the beads task and the Information Sampling Task (IST). The beads task was analysed using a behavioural approach and a Bayesian model of decision making. Delay discounting was assessed using the Monetary Choice Questionnaire. Regression analyses of primary outcomes were conducted with voxel‐based morphometry analyses. Binge drinkers sought less evidence prior to decision in the beads task compared with healthy volunteers in both the behavioural and computational modelling analysis. There were no group differences in the IST or delay discounting task. Greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the beads task was associated with smaller dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal volumes. In contrast, greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the IST was associated with greater dorsal cingulate and precuneus volumes. Binge drinking is characterized by impaired reflection impulsivity suggesting a deficit in deciding on the basis of future outcomes that are more difficult to represent. These findings emphasize the role of possible therapeutic interventions targeting decision‐making deficits. PMID:25678093

  11. Reoperative midface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Acero, Julio; García, Eloy

    2011-02-01

    Reoperative reconstruction of the midface is a challenging issue because of the complexity of this region and the severity of the aesthetic and functional sequela related to the absence or failure of a primary reconstruction. The different situations that can lead to the indication of a reoperative reconstructive procedure after previous oncologic ablative procedures in the midface are reviewed. Surgical techniques, anatomic problems, and limitations affecting the reoperative reconstruction in this region of the head and neck are discussed.

  12. Determination of acoustical transfer functions using an impulse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, J.

    1985-02-01

    The Transfer Function of a system may be defined as the relationship of the output response to the input of a system. Whilst recent advances in digital processing systems have enabled Impulse Transfer Functions to be determined by computation of the Fast Fourier Transform, there has been little work done in applying these techniques to room acoustics. Acoustical Transfer Functions have been determined for auditoria, using an impulse method. The technique is based on the computation of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of a non-ideal impulsive source, both at the source and at the receiver point. The Impulse Transfer Function (ITF) is obtained by dividing the FFT at the receiver position by the FFT of the source. This quantity is presented both as linear frequency scale plots and also as synthesized one-third octave band data. The technique enables a considerable quantity of data to be obtained from a small number of impulsive signals recorded in the field, thereby minimizing the time and effort required on site. As the characteristics of the source are taken into account in the calculation, the choice of impulsive source is non-critical. The digital analysis equipment required for the analysis is readily available commercially.

  13. Reconstructing embedding spaces of coupled dynamical systems from multivariate data.

    PubMed

    Boccaletti, S; Valladares, D L; Pecora, Louis M; Geffert, Hite P; Carroll, T

    2002-03-01

    A method for reconstructing dimensions of subspaces for weakly coupled dynamical systems is offered. The tool is able to extrapolate the subspace dimensions from the zero coupling limit, where the division of dimensions as per the algorithm is exact. Implementation of the proposed technique to multivariate data demonstrates its effectiveness in disentangling subspace dimensionalities also in the case of emergent synchronized motions, for both numerical and experimental systems.

  14. Timing calibration and synchronization of surface and fluorescence detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, P.; Bellido, J.; Bertou, Xavier; Covault, C.E.; Fick, B.E.; Gemmeke, H.; Kleifges, M.; Mostafa, M.; Menshikov, A.; Meyer, F.; Pryke, C.; Sommers, P.; Vanderpan, E.; Vernotte, F.; Wiencke, L.

    2005-08-01

    Reconstruction of cosmic ray arrival directions for Surface Detectors (SD) and Fluorescence Detectors (FD) of the Pierre Auger Observatory requires accurate timing (25 nanoseconds or better) between measurements at individual detectors and instrument triggers. Timing systems for both SD and FD are based on Motorola Oncore UT+ GPS receivers installed into custom-built time-tagging circuits that are calibrated in the laboratory to a statistical precision of better than 15 ns. We describe timing calibration and synchronization methods applied in the field for both the SD and the FD systems in four areas: (1) checks of timing offsets within the SD using co-located station pairs and timing residuals on reconstructed showers, (2) calibration within the FD using a custom-build LED calibration system, (3) calibration between SD and FD using laser signals fed simultaneously into an SD station and across the FD via the Central Laser Facility (CLF), and (4) studies of synchronization between FD and SD through the analysis of events detected by both systems, called hybrid events. These hybrid events allow for a much more accurate reconstruction of the shower and for relatively tight constraints on timing calibration offsets. We demonstrate that statistical and systematic timing uncertainties have no significant impact on the event reconstruction.

  15. V123 BEAM SYNCHRONOUS ENCODER MODULE.

    SciTech Connect

    KERNER,T.; CONKLING,C.R.; OERTER,B.

    1999-03-29

    The V123 Synchronous Encoder Module transmits events to distributed trigger modules and embedded decoders around the RHIC rings where they are used to provide beam instrumentation triggers [1,2,3]. The RHIC beam synchronous event link hardware is mainly comprised of three VMEbus board designs, the central input modules (V201), and encoder modules (V123), and the distributed trigger modules (V124). Two beam synchronous links, one for each ring, are distributed via fiber optics and fanned out via twisted wire pair cables. The V123 synchronizes with the RF system clock derived from the beam bucket frequency and a revolution fiducial pulse. The RF system clock is used to create the beam synchronous event link carrier and events are synchronized with the rotation fiducial. A low jitter RF clock is later recovered from this carrier by phase lock loops in the trigger modules. Prioritized hardware and software triggers fill up to 15 beam event code transmission slots per revolution while tracking the ramping RF acceleration frequency and storage frequency. The revolution fiducial event is always the first event transmitted which is used to synchronize the firing of the abort kicker and to locate the first bucket for decoders distributed about the ring.

  16. System Synchronizes Recordings from Separated Video Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nail, William; Nail, William L.; Nail, Jasper M.; Le, Doung T.

    2009-01-01

    A system of electronic hardware and software for synchronizing recordings from multiple, physically separated video cameras is being developed, primarily for use in multiple-look-angle video production. The system, the time code used in the system, and the underlying method of synchronization upon which the design of the system is based are denoted generally by the term "Geo-TimeCode(TradeMark)." The system is embodied mostly in compact, lightweight, portable units (see figure) denoted video time-code units (VTUs) - one VTU for each video camera. The system is scalable in that any number of camera recordings can be synchronized. The estimated retail price per unit would be about $350 (in 2006 dollars). The need for this or another synchronization system external to video cameras arises because most video cameras do not include internal means for maintaining synchronization with other video cameras. Unlike prior video-camera-synchronization systems, this system does not depend on continuous cable or radio links between cameras (however, it does depend on occasional cable links lasting a few seconds). Also, whereas the time codes used in prior video-camera-synchronization systems typically repeat after 24 hours, the time code used in this system does not repeat for slightly more than 136 years; hence, this system is much better suited for long-term deployment of multiple cameras.

  17. Periodic and aperiodic synchronization in skilled action.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Synchronized action is considered as a manifestation of shared skill. Most synchronized behaviors in humans and other animals are based on periodic repetition. Aperiodic synchronization of complex action is found in the experimental task of synchronous speaking, in which naive subjects read a common text in lock step. The demonstration of synchronized behavior without a periodic basis is presented as a challenge for theoretical understanding. A unified treatment of periodic and aperiodic synchronization is suggested by replacing the sequential processing model of cognitivist approaches with the more local notion of a task-specific sensorimotor coordination. On this view, skilled action is the imposition of constraints on the co-variation of movement and sensory flux such that the boundary conditions that define the skill are met. This non-cognitivist approach originates in the work of John Dewey. It allows a unification of the treatment of sensorimotor synchronization in simple rhythmic behavior and in complex skilled behavior and it suggests that skill sharing is a uniquely human trait of considerable import.

  18. A simple Fourier filter for suppression of the missing wedge ray artefacts in single-axis electron tomographic reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Lubomír; Kereïche, Sami; Kerïeche, Sami; Höög, Johanna L; Jůda, Pavel; Matula, Pavel; Raška, Ivan

    2014-04-01

    The limited specimen tilting range that is typically available in electron tomography gives rise to a region in the Fourier space of the reconstructed object where experimental data are unavailable - the missing wedge. Since this region is sharply delimited from the area of available data, the reconstructed signal is typically hampered by convolution with its impulse response, which gives rise to the well-known missing wedge artefacts in 3D reconstructions. Despite the recent progress in the field of reconstruction and regularization techniques, the missing wedge artefacts remain untreated in most current reconstruction workflows in structural biology. Therefore we have designed a simple Fourier angular filter that effectively suppresses the ray artefacts in the single-axis tilting projection acquisition scheme, making single-axis tomographic reconstructions easier to interpret in particular at low signal-to-noise ratio in acquired projections. The proposed filter can be easily incorporated into current electron tomographic reconstruction schemes.

  19. A simple Fourier filter for suppression of the missing wedge ray artefacts in single-axis electron tomographic reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Kováčik, Lubomír; Kerïeche, Sami; Höög, Johanna L.; Jůda, Pavel; Matula, Pavel; Raška, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    The limited specimen tilting range that is typically available in electron tomography gives rise to a region in the Fourier space of the reconstructed object where experimental data are unavailable – the missing wedge. Since this region is sharply delimited from the area of available data, the reconstructed signal is typically hampered by convolution with its impulse response, which gives rise to the well-known missing wedge artefacts in 3D reconstructions. Despite the recent progress in the field of reconstruction and regularization techniques, the missing wedge artefacts remain untreated in most current reconstruction workflows in structural biology. Therefore we have designed a simple Fourier angular filter that effectively suppresses the ray artefacts in the single-axis tilting projection acquisition scheme, making single-axis tomographic reconstructions easier to interpret in particular at low signal-to-noise ratio in acquired projections. The proposed filter can be easily incorporated into current electron tomographic reconstruction schemes. PMID:24556578

  20. Transition to complete synchronization and global intermittent synchronization in an array of time-delay systems.

    PubMed

    Suresh, R; Senthilkumar, D V; Lakshmanan, M; Kurths, J

    2012-07-01

    We report the nature of transitions from the nonsynchronous to a complete synchronization (CS) state in arrays of time-delay systems, where the systems are coupled with instantaneous diffusive coupling. We demonstrate that the transition to CS occurs distinctly for different coupling configurations. In particular, for unidirectional coupling, locally (microscopically) synchronization transition occurs in a very narrow range of coupling strength but for a global one (macroscopically) it occurs sequentially in a broad range of coupling strength preceded by an intermittent synchronization. On the other hand, in the case of mutual coupling, a very large value of coupling strength is required for local synchronization and, consequently, all the local subsystems synchronize immediately for the same value of the coupling strength and, hence, globally, synchronization also occurs in a narrow range of the coupling strength. In the transition regime, we observe a type of synchronization transition where long intervals of high-quality synchronization which are interrupted at irregular times by intermittent chaotic bursts simultaneously in all the systems and which we designate as global intermittent synchronization. We also relate our synchronization transition results to the above specific types using unstable periodic orbit theory. The above studies are carried out in a well-known piecewise linear time-delay system.

  1. Transition to complete synchronization and global intermittent synchronization in an array of time-delay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, R.; Senthilkumar, D. V.; Lakshmanan, M.; Kurths, J.

    2012-07-01

    We report the nature of transitions from the nonsynchronous to a complete synchronization (CS) state in arrays of time-delay systems, where the systems are coupled with instantaneous diffusive coupling. We demonstrate that the transition to CS occurs distinctly for different coupling configurations. In particular, for unidirectional coupling, locally (microscopically) synchronization transition occurs in a very narrow range of coupling strength but for a global one (macroscopically) it occurs sequentially in a broad range of coupling strength preceded by an intermittent synchronization. On the other hand, in the case of mutual coupling, a very large value of coupling strength is required for local synchronization and, consequently, all the local subsystems synchronize immediately for the same value of the coupling strength and, hence, globally, synchronization also occurs in a narrow range of the coupling strength. In the transition regime, we observe a type of synchronization transition where long intervals of high-quality synchronization which are interrupted at irregular times by intermittent chaotic bursts simultaneously in all the systems and which we designate as global intermittent synchronization. We also relate our synchronization transition results to the above specific types using unstable periodic orbit theory. The above studies are carried out in a well-known piecewise linear time-delay system.

  2. Physiological Synchronization in a Vigilance Dual Task.

    PubMed

    Guastello, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The synchronization of autonomic arousal levels and other physio-logical responses between people is a potentially important component of work team performance, client-therapist relationships, and other types of human interaction. This study addressed several problems: What statistical models are viable for identifying synchronization for loosely coupled human systems? How is the level of synchronization related to psychosocial variables such as empathy, subjective ratings of workload, and actual performance? Participants were 70 undergraduates who worked in pairs on a vigilance dual task in which they watched a virtual reality security camera, rang a bell when they saw the target intruder, and completed a jig-saw puzzle. Event rates either increased or decreased during the 90 min work period. The average R2 values for each person were .66, .66, .62, and .53 for the linear autoregressive model, linear autoregressive model with a synchronization component, the nonlinear autoregressive model, and the nonlinear autoregressive model with a synchronization component, respectively. All models were more accurate at a lag of 20 sec compared to 50 sec or customized lag lengths. Although the linear models were more accurate overall, the nonlinear synchronization parameters were more often related to psychological variables and performance. In particular, greater synchronization was observed with the nonlinear model when the target event rate increased, compared to when it decreased, which was expected from the general theory of synchronization. Nonlinear models were also more effective for uncovering inhibitory or dampening relationships between the co-workers as well as mutually excitatory relationships. Future research should explore the comparative model results for tasks that induce higher levels of synchronization and involve different types of internal group coordination.

  3. Dynamic response of graphene to thermal impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingchao; Huang, Xiaopeng; Yue, Yanan; Wang, Jianmei; Wang, Xinwei

    2011-12-01

    A transient molecular dynamics technique is developed to characterize the thermophysical properties of two-dimensional graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). By directly tracking the thermal-relaxation history of a GNR that is heated by a thermal impulse, we are able to determine its thermal diffusivity quickly and accurately. We study the dynamic thermal conductivity of various length GNRs of 1.99 nm width. Quantum correction is applied in all of the temperature calculations and is found to have a critical role in the thermal-transport study of graphene. The calculated specific heat of GNRs agrees well with that of graphite at 300.6 and 692.3 K, showing little effect of the unique graphene structure on its ability to store thermal energy. A strong size effect on GNR's thermal conductivity is observed and its theoretical values for an infinite-length limit are evaluated by data fitting and extrapolation. With infinite length, the 1.99-nm-wide GNR has a thermal conductivity of 149 W m-1 K-1 at 692.3 K, and 317 W m-1 K-1 at 300.6 K. Our study of the temperature distribution and evolution suggests that diffusive transport is dominant in the studied GNRs. Non-Fourier heat conduction is observed at the beginning of the thermal-relaxation procedure. Thermal waves in GNR's in-plane direction are observed only for phonons in the flexural direction (ZA mode). The observed propagation speed (c = 4.6 km s-1) of the thermal wave follows the relation of c=vg/2 (vg is the ZA phonon group velocity). Our thermal-wave study reveals that in graphene, the ZA phonons transfer thermal energy much faster than longitudinal (LA) and transverse (TA) modes. Also, ZA↔ZA energy transfer is much faster than the ZA↔LA/TA phonon energy transfer.

  4. Micropower impulse radar technology and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, J., LLNL

    1998-04-15

    The LLNL-developed Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) technology has quickly gone from laboratory concept to embedded circuitry in numerous government and commercial systems in the last few years[l]. The main ideas behind MIR, invented by T. McEwan in the Laser Program, are the generation and detection systems for extremely low- power ultra-wideband pulses in the gigaHertz regime using low-cost components. These ideas, coupled with new antenna systems, timing and radio-frequency (RF) circuitry, computer interfaces, and signal processing, have provided the catalyst for a new generation of compact radar systems. Over the past several years we have concentrated on a number of applications of MIR which address a number of remote-sensing applications relevant to emerging programs in defense, transportation, medical, and environmental research. Some of the past commercial successes have been widely publicized [2] and are only now starting to become available for market. Over 30 patents have been filed and over 15 licenses have been signed on various aspects of the MIR technology. In addition, higher performance systems are under development for specific laboratory programs and government reimbursables. The MIR is an ultra- wideband, range-gated radar system that provides the enabling hardware technology used in the research areas mentioned above. It has numerous performance parameters that can be Selected by careful design to fit the requirements. We have improved the baseline, short- range, MIR system to demonstrate its effectiveness. The radar operates over the hand from approximately I to 4 GHz with pulse repetition frequencies up to 10 MHz. It provides a potential range resolution of I cm at ranges of greater than 20 m. We have developed a suite of algorithms for using MIR for image formation. These algorithms currently support Synthetic aperture and multistate array geometries. This baseline MIR radar imaging system has been used for several programmatic applications.

  5. Synchronization of Boolean Networks with Different Update Schemes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Xingyuan; Lin, Xiaohui

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the synchronizations of Boolean networks with different update schemes (synchronized Boolean networks and asynchronous Boolean networks) are investigated. All nodes in Boolean network are represented in terms of semi-tensor product. First, we give the concept of inner synchronization and observe that all nodes in a Boolean network are synchronized with each other. Second, we investigate the outer synchronization between a driving Boolean network and a corresponding response Boolean network. We provide not only the concept of traditional complete synchronization, but also the anti-synchronization and get the anti-synchronization in simulation. Third, we extend the outer synchronization to asynchronous Boolean network and get the complete synchronization between an asynchronous Boolean network and a response Boolean network. Consequently, theorems for synchronization of Boolean networks and asynchronous Boolean networks are derived. Examples are provided to show the correctness of our theorems.

  6. Synchronous Behavior of Two Coupled Biological Neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Elson, R.C.; Selverston, A.I.; Elson, R.C.; Selverston, A.I.; Huerta, R.; Rulkov, N.F.; Rabinovich, M.I.; Abarbanel, H.D.; Selverston, A.I.; Huerta, R.; Abarbanel, H.D.

    1998-12-01

    We report experimental studies of synchronization phenomena in a pair of biological neurons that interact through naturally occurring, electrical coupling. When these neurons generate irregular bursts of spikes, the natural coupling synchronizes slow oscillations of membrane potential, but not the fast spikes. By adding artificial electrical coupling we studied transitions between synchrony and asynchrony in both slow oscillations and fast spikes. We discuss the dynamics of bursting and synchronization in living neurons with distributed functional morphology. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Synchronization of eukaryotic cells by periodic forcing.

    PubMed

    Battogtokh, Dorjsuren; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Tyson, John J

    2006-04-14

    We study a cell population described by a minimal mathematical model of the eukaryotic cell cycle subject to periodic forcing that simultaneously perturbs the dynamics of the cell cycle engine and cell growth, and we show that the population can be synchronized in a mode-locked regime. By simplifying the model to two variables, for the phase of cell cycle progression and the mass of the cell, we calculate the Lyapunov exponents to obtain the parameter window for synchronization. We also discuss the effects of intrinsic mitotic fluctuations, asymmetric division, and weak mutual coupling on the pace of synchronization. PMID:16712125

  8. Multistability of synchronous regimes in rotator ensembles.

    PubMed

    Kryukov, A K; Petrov, V S; Osipov, G V; Kurths, J

    2015-12-01

    We study collective dynamics in rotator ensembles and focus on the multistability of synchronous regimes in a chain of coupled rotators. We provide a detailed analysis of the number of coexisting regimes and estimate in particular, the synchronization boundary for different types of individual frequency distribution. The number of wave-based regimes coexisting for the same parameters and its dependence on the chain length are estimated. We give an analytical estimation for the synchronization frequency of the in-phase regime for a uniform individual frequency distribution. PMID:26723160

  9. Quantum Clock Synchronization with a Single Qudit

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Armin; Cabello, Adán; Żukowski, Marek; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Clock synchronization for nonfaulty processes in multiprocess networks is indispensable for a variety of technologies. A reliable system must be able to resynchronize the nonfaulty processes upon some components failing causing the distribution of incorrect or conflicting information in the network. The task of synchronizing such networks is related to Byzantine agreement (BA), which can classically be solved using recursive algorithms if and only if less than one-third of the processes are faulty. Here we introduce a nonrecursive quantum algorithm, based on a quantum solution of the detectable BA, which achieves clock synchronization in the presence of arbitrary many faulty processes by using only a single quantum system. PMID:25613754

  10. Quantum clock synchronization with a single qudit.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Armin; Cabello, Adán; Żukowski, Marek; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2015-01-23

    Clock synchronization for nonfaulty processes in multiprocess networks is indispensable for a variety of technologies. A reliable system must be able to resynchronize the nonfaulty processes upon some components failing causing the distribution of incorrect or conflicting information in the network. The task of synchronizing such networks is related to Byzantine agreement (BA), which can classically be solved using recursive algorithms if and only if less than one-third of the processes are faulty. Here we introduce a nonrecursive quantum algorithm, based on a quantum solution of the detectable BA, which achieves clock synchronization in the presence of arbitrary many faulty processes by using only a single quantum system.

  11. Quantum Clock Synchronization with a Single Qudit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Armin; Cabello, Adán; Żukowski, Marek; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Clock synchronization for nonfaulty processes in multiprocess networks is indispensable for a variety of technologies. A reliable system must be able to resynchronize the nonfaulty processes upon some components failing causing the distribution of incorrect or conflicting information in the network. The task of synchronizing such networks is related to Byzantine agreement (BA), which can classically be solved using recursive algorithms if and only if less than one-third of the processes are faulty. Here we introduce a nonrecursive quantum algorithm, based on a quantum solution of the detectable BA, which achieves clock synchronization in the presence of arbitrary many faulty processes by using only a single quantum system.

  12. Synchronization regimes in conjugate coupled chaotic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Karnatak, Rajat; Ramaswamy, Ram; Prasad, Awadhesh

    2009-09-01

    Nonlinear oscillators that are mutually coupled via dissimilar (or conjugate) variables display distinct regimes of synchronous behavior. In identical chaotic oscillators diffusively coupled in this manner, complete synchronization occurs only by chaos suppression when the coupled subsystems drive each other into a regime of periodic dynamics. Furthermore, the coupling does not vanish but acts as an "internal" drive. When the oscillators are mismatched, phase synchronization occurs, while in a master slave configuration, generalized synchrony results. These effects are demonstrated in a system of coupled chaotic Rossler oscillators.

  13. Paths to synchronization on complex networks.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Moreno, Yamir; Arenas, Alex

    2007-01-19

    The understanding of emergent collective phenomena in natural and social systems has driven the interest of scientists from different disciplines during decades. Among these phenomena, the synchronization of a set of interacting individuals or units has been intensively studied because of its ubiquity in the natural world. In this Letter, we show how for fixed coupling strengths local patterns of synchronization emerge differently in homogeneous and heterogeneous complex networks, driving the process towards a certain global synchronization degree following different paths. The dependence of the dynamics on the coupling strength and on the topology is unveiled. This study provides a new perspective and tools to understand this emerging phenomena. PMID:17358685

  14. Enhancing synchronization based on complex gradient networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Lai, Choy Heng

    2007-05-01

    The ubiquity of scale-free networks in nature and technological applications and the finding that such networks may be more difficult to synchronize than homogeneous networks pose an interesting phenomenon for study in network science. We argue and demonstrate that, in the presence of some proper gradient fields, scale-free networks can be more synchronizable than homogeneous networks. The gradient structure can in fact arise naturally in any weighted and asymmetrical networks; based on this we propose a coupling scheme that permits effective synchronous dynamics on the network. The synchronization scheme is verified by eigenvalue analysis and by direct numerical simulations using networks of nonidentical chaotic oscillators. PMID:17677146

  15. Conditional ramsey spectroscopy with synchronized atoms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Minghui; Holland, M J

    2015-03-13

    We investigate Ramsey spectroscopy performed on a synchronized ensemble of two-level atoms. The synchronization is induced by the collective coupling of the atoms to a heavily damped mode of an optical cavity. We show that, in principle, with this synchronized system it is possible to observe Ramsey fringes indefinitely, even in the presence of spontaneous emission and other sources of individual-atom dephasing. This could have important consequences for atomic clocks and a wide range of precision metrology applications. PMID:25815931

  16. Using GLONASS signal for clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouzhva, Yuri G.; Gevorkyan, Arvid G.; Bogdanov, Pyotr P.; Ovchinnikov, Vitaly V.

    1994-01-01

    Although in accuracy parameters GLONASS is correlated with GPS, using GLONASS signals for high-precision clock synchronization was, up to the recent time, of limited utility due to the lack of specialized time receivers. In order to improve this situation, in late 1992 the Russian Institute of Radionavigation and Time (RMT) began to develop a GLONASS time receiver using as a basis the airborne ASN-16 receiver. This paper presents results of estimating user clock synchronization accuracy via GLONASS signals using ASN-16 receiver in the direct synchronization and common-view modes.

  17. Synchronization Phenomena and Epoch Filter of Electroencephalogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matani, Ayumu

    Nonlinear electrophysiological synchronization phenomena in the brain, such as event-related (de)synchronization, long distance synchronization, and phase-reset, have received much attention in neuroscience over the last decade. These phenomena contain more electrical than physiological keywords and actually require electrical techniques to capture with electroencephalography (EEG). For instance, epoch filters, which have just recently been proposed, allow us to investigate such phenomena. Moreover, epoch filters are still developing and would hopefully generate a new paradigm in neuroscience from an electrical engineering viewpoint. Consequently, electrical engineers could be interested in EEG once again or from now on.

  18. Synchronization System for Next Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zavriyev, Anton

    2014-03-27

    An alternative synchronization technique – one that would allow explicit control of the pulse train including its repetition rate and delay is clearly desired. We propose such a scheme. Our method is based on optical interferometry and permits synchronization of the pulse trains generated by two independent mode-locked lasers. As the next generation x-ray sources will be driven by a clock signal derived from a mode-locked optical source, our technique will provide a way to synchronize x-ray probe with the optical pump pulses.

  19. Complex Synchronization Phenomena in Ecological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Lewi; Olinky, Ronen; Blasius, Bernd; Huppert, Amit; Cazelles, Bernard

    2002-07-01

    Ecological and biological systems provide us with many striking examples of synchronization phenomena. Here we discuss a number of intriguing cases and attempt to explain them taking advantage of a modelling framework. One main focus will concern synchronized ecological end epidemiological cycles which have Uniform Phase growth associated with their regular recurrence, and Chaotic Amplitudes - a feature we term UPCA. Examples come from different areas and include decadal cycles of small mammals, recurrent viral epidemics such as childhood infections (eg., measles), and seasonally driven phytoplankton blooms observed in lakes and the oceans. A more detailed theoretical analysis of seasonally synchronized chaotic population cycles is presented.

  20. Synchronization Analysis of Nonstationary Bivariate Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurths, J.

    First the concept of synchronization in coupled complex systems is presented and it is shown that synchronization phenomena are abundant in science, nature, engineer- ing etc. We use this concept to treat the inverse problem and to reveal interactions between oscillating systems from observational data. First it is discussed how time varying phases and frequencies can be estimated from time series and second tech- niques for detection and quantification of hidden synchronization is presented. We demonstrate that this technique is effective for the analysis of systems' interrelation from noisy nonstationary bivariate data and provides other insights than traditional cross correlation and spectral analysis. For this, model examples and geophysical data are discussed.