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Sample records for synchrotron storage ring

  1. National Synchrotron Light Source II storage ring vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hseuh, Hsiao-Chaun; Hetzel, Charles; Leng, Shuwei; Wilson, King; Xu, Huijuan; Zigrosser, Douglas

    2016-04-05

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II, completed in 2014, is a 3-GeV synchrotron radiation (SR) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory and has been in steady operation since. With a design electron current of 500 mA and subnanometer radians horizontal emittance, this 792-m circumference storage ring is providing the highest flux and brightness x-ray beam for SR users. Also, the majority of the storage ring vacuum chambers are made of extruded aluminium. Chamber sections are interconnected using low-impedance radiofrequency shielded bellows. SR from the bending magnets is intercepted by water-cooled compact photon absorbers resided in the storage ring chambers. Finally, this paper presents the design of the storage ring vacuum system, the fabrication of vacuum chambers and other hardware, the installation, the commissioning, and the continuing beam conditioning of the vacuum systems.

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source II storage ring vacuum systems

    DOE PAGES

    Hseuh, Hsiao-Chaun; Hetzel, Charles; Leng, Shuwei; ...

    2016-04-05

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II, completed in 2014, is a 3-GeV synchrotron radiation (SR) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory and has been in steady operation since. With a design electron current of 500 mA and subnanometer radians horizontal emittance, this 792-m circumference storage ring is providing the highest flux and brightness x-ray beam for SR users. Also, the majority of the storage ring vacuum chambers are made of extruded aluminium. Chamber sections are interconnected using low-impedance radiofrequency shielded bellows. SR from the bending magnets is intercepted by water-cooled compact photon absorbers resided in the storage ring chambers. Finally, thismore » paper presents the design of the storage ring vacuum system, the fabrication of vacuum chambers and other hardware, the installation, the commissioning, and the continuing beam conditioning of the vacuum systems.« less

  3. CIRCE: A dedicated storage ring for coherent THz synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, W.R.; Munson, D.V.; Nishimura, H.; Robin, D.S.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.D.; Thur, W.G.; Jung, J.Y.; Wan, W.

    2003-08-12

    We present the concepts for an electron storage ring dedicated to and optimized for the production of stable coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) over the far-infrared terahertz wavelength range from 200 mm to about one cm. CIRCE (Coherent InfraRed CEnter) will be a 66 m circumference ring located on top of the ALS booster synchrotron shielding tunnel and using the existing ALS injector. This location provides enough floor space for both the CIRCE ring, its required shielding, and numerous beamlines. We briefly outline a model for CSR emission in which a static bunch distortion induced by the synchrotron radiation field is used to significantly extend the stable CSR emission towards higher frequencies. This model has been verified with experimental CSR results. We present the calculated CIRCE photon flux where a gain of 6-9 orders of magnitude is shown compared to existing far-IR sources. Additionally, the particular design of the dipole vacuum chamber has been optimized to allow an excellent transmission of these far-infrared wavelengths. We believe that the CIRCE source can be constructed for a modest cost.

  4. Initial scientific uses of coherent synchrotron radiation inelectron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Basov, D.N.; Feikes, J.; Fried, D.; Holldack, K.; Hubers, H.W.; Kuske, P.; Martin, M.C.; Pavlov, S.G.; Schade, U.; Singley, E.J.; Wustefeld, G.

    2004-11-23

    The production of stable, high power, coherent synchrotron radiation at sub-terahertz frequency at the electron storage ring BESSY opens a new region in the electromagnetic spectrum to explore physical properties of materials. Just as conventional synchrotron radiation has been a boon to x-ray science, coherent synchrotron radiation may lead to many new innovations and discoveries in THz physics. With this new accelerator-based radiation source we have been able to extend traditional infrared measurements down into the experimentally poorly accessible sub-THz frequency range. The feasibility of using the coherent synchrotron radiation in scientific applications was demonstrated in a series of experiments: We investigated shallow single acceptor transitions in stressed and unstressed Ge:Ga by means of photoconductance measurements below 1 THz. We have directly measured the Josephson plasma resonance in optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} for the first time and finally we succeeded to confine the sub-THz radiation for spectral near-field imaging on biological samples such as leaves and human teeth.

  5. Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2012-04-09

    The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring design. The talk will start with an overview of the latest developments and advances in the design of synchrotron light sources based on the concept of an 'ultimate' storage ring. The review will establish how bright a ring based light source might be, where the frontier of technological challenges are, and what the limits of accelerator physics are. Emphasis will be given to possible improvements in accelerator design and developments in technology toward the goal of achieving an ultimate storage ring. An ultimate storage ring (USR), defined as an electron ring-based light source having an emittance in both transverse planes at the diffraction limit for the range of X-ray wavelengths of interest for a scientific community, would provide very high brightness photons having high transverse coherence that would extend the capabilities of X-ray imaging and probe techniques beyond today's performance. It would be a cost-effective, high-coherence 4th generation light source, competitive with one based on energy recovery linac (ERL) technology, serving a large number of users studying material, chemical, and biological sciences. Furthermore, because of the experience accumulated over many decades of ring operation, it would have the great advantage of stability and reliability. In this paper we consider the design of an USR having 10-pm-rad emittance. It is a tremendous challenge to design a storage ring having such an extremely low emittance, a factor of 100 smaller than those in existing light sources, especially such that it has adequate dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. In many ultra-low emittance designs, the injection acceptances are not large enough for accumulation of the electron beam, necessitating on-axis injection where stored electron bunches are completely replaced with newly injected ones. Recently, starting with the MAX-IV 7-bend achromatic cell, we

  6. Storage ring development at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Krinsky, S.; Bittner, J.; Fauchet, A.M.; Johnson, E.D.; Keane, J.; Murphy, J.; Nawrocky, R.J.; Rogers, J.; Singh, O.V.; Yu, L.H.

    1991-09-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Transverse Beam Profile Monitor; Bunch Length Measurements in the VUV Storage Ring; Photoelectric Effect Photon Beam Position Monitors; RF Receivers for Processing Electron Beam Pick-up Electrode Signals; Real-Time Global Orbit Feedback Systems; Local Orbit Feedback; Active Interlock System for High Power Insertion Devices in the X-ray Ring; Bunch Lengthening Cavity for the VUV Ring; SXLS Storage Ring Design.

  7. Users program for storage-ring based FEL and synchrotron sources of the Duke FEL Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, K.D.; Barnett, G.; Burnham, B.

    1995-12-31

    The storage ring at the Duke FEL Laboratory was first operated with a stored e-beam in November, 1994. It has now achieved operation energies in excess 1 GeV with more than 100 mA current at 280 MeV. The ring has several ports for FEL and synchrotron light source research. The circulating ring current can be synchronized with the seperate Mark III FEL operating in the 2-9.5 {mu}m IR region. This allows low optical jitter (10-20 ps) between the two sources and thus pump-probe operation. The ring has been configured to drive a number of light sources including the OK-4 FEL system capable of FEL operation between 400 and 65 nm, an inverse Compton scattering source using this undulator which will yield 4-200 MeV gammas, an undulator source at approximately 40 {angstrom} (not an FEL), a mm FEL with inverse compton scattering providing 1-100 keV x-rays and two synchrotron ports from the bend magnets for which the {lambda}{sub c} = 11-12 {angstrom} for 1 GeV. The broadly tunable FEL sources and their associated inverse compton scattering are extremely bright. The initial research proposals, submitted to the Laboratory emphasizes photoelectron spectroscopy, PEEM, high resolution vacuum UV of gases, solid spectroscopy and photochemistry in the UV, X-ray microprobe studies, X-ray microscopy, X-ray holography, X-ray crystallography, Mossbauer spectroscopy, nuclear spectroscopy, neutron production, photon activation therapy and broadband synchrotron as a probe of fast reaction in the IR and near IR.

  8. Electric field detection of coherent synchrotron radiation in a storage ring generated using laser bunch slicing

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, I.; Shimosato, H.; Bito, M.; Furusawa, K.; Adachi, M.; Zen, H.; Kimura, S.; Katoh, M.; Shimada, M.; Yamamoto, N.; Hosaka, M.; Ashida, M.

    2012-03-12

    The electric field of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) generated by laser bunch slicing in a storage ring has been detected by an electro-optic sampling method. The gate pulses for sampling are sent through a large-mode-area photonic-crystal fiber. The observed electric field profile of the CSR is in good agreement with the spectrum of the CSR observed using Fourier transform far-infrared spectrometry, indicating good phase stability in the CSR. The longitudinal density profiles of electrons modulated by laser pulses were evaluated from the electric field profile.

  9. Rf stability, control and bunch lengthening in electron synchrotron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wachtel, J.M.

    1989-09-01

    A self-consistent theory for nonlinear longitudinal particle motion and rf cavity excitation in a high energy electron storage ring is developed. Coupled first order equations for the motion of an arbitrary number of particles and for the field in several rf cavities are given in the form used in control system theory. Stochastic quantum excitation of synchrotron motion is included, as are the effects of rf control system corrections. Results of computations for double cavity bunch lengthening are given. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The new 1.5 GeV storage ring for synchrotron radiation: MAX II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Å.; Eriksson, M.; Lindgren, L.-J.; Röjsel, P.; Werin, S.

    1995-02-01

    The MAX laboratory at Lund University, Sweden, today operates an accelerator system consisting of a 100 MeV racetrack microtron and a 550 MeV storage ring (MAX I). At the moment (July 1994) a new storage ring MAX II is near completion and will start first injections within 2 months. This work gives an overview of the MAX II project including the first beamlines and a description of the accelerator system. MAX II is a 1.5 GeV third generation light source optimized for the VUV and soft-x-ray region. It consists of a ten cell double bend achromat lattice forming the 90 m circumference ring. Injection is done at 500 MeV from the existing storage ring MAX I, and ramping up to full energy will take place in MAX II. The straight sections have a length of 3.2 m and eight sections are free to house insertion devices. At start up the ring will be equipped with one 7.5 T superconducting wiggler and one 1.8 T multipole wiggler. Two more undulators are ordered and under construction. To be able to achieve the project a few shortcuts have been made in the design of the storage ring: (1) Nonzero dispersion is allowed in the straight sections, (2) chromaticity correction is built into the quadrupole magnets, and (3) the length of the straight sections is limited to 3.2 m. The project is progressing on time. Extraction of an electron beam from the MAX I storage ring has been achieved and has successfully been transported into the MAX II building. The MAX II ring is under assembly with most of the sections already mounted. First injection is planned to take place in August 1994.

  11. Design and project status of the National Synchrotron Light Source; storage rings (2. 5 GeV, 0. 7 GeV) for the generation of bright synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    van Steenbergen, A

    1980-01-01

    Two high intensity storage rings are being constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the generation of intense fluxes of synchrotron radiation in the vuv wavelength region (700 MeV ring, lambda/sub c/ = 31.5 A) and in the x-ray wavelength region (2.5 GeV ring, lambda/sub c/ = 2.5 A). A description is given of the facility, the main features of the storage rings are presented and the basic parameters are enumerated. High field superconducting wigglers, to lower the short wavelength cutoff in the x-ray ring, and undulators, for flux enhancement or a free electron laser experiment will be incorporated and parameters are given here. Special design aspects to optimize the electron storage rings as dedicated synchrotron radiation sources will be emphasized and the status of the project will be given.

  12. Measurement of Photon Statistics of Wiggler Radiation from AN Electron Storage Ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Toshiya

    1990-01-01

    The photon statistics of wiggler light from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) storage ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have been measured using an analog photon-counting technique. The linear wiggler produces fundamental wavelength light and the third harmonic light at 532 nm for ring energies ~650 MeV and 375 MeV, respectively. The average ring current was ~50 mA for one-electron-bunch operation. The bunch was ~480 psec long and the wiggler light was emitted every 170.2 nsec. The number of photons emitted by an electron bunch was repetitively measured for a given coherence volume. The photon counting distribution, which is the probability of finding n photons versus n, was obtained. The experimental results show that the wiggler radiation is consistent with multi-mode thermal radiation, whereas the bending magnet light gives rise to a distribution consistent with a Neyman Type-A distribution instead of Poisson when the light of large bandwith through a Pyrex window is collected. Near field and electron beam emittance effects have proven to have an important influence on the transverse coherence of the emitted radiation.

  13. Heavy ion storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  14. Observation of Synchrotron Sidebands in a Storage-Ring-Based Seeded Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Labat, M.; Hosaka, M.; Yamamoto, N.; Shimada, M.; Katoh, M.; Couprie, M. E.

    2009-01-09

    Seeded free-electron lasers (FELs) are among the future fourth-generation light sources in the vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectral regions. We analyze the seed temporal coherence preservation in the case of coherent harmonic generation FELs, including spectral narrowing and structure degradation. Indeed, the electron synchrotron motion driven by the seeding laser can cause sideband growth in the FEL spectrum.

  15. Storage Rings for Science with: Electron-Positron Collisions, Hadron Collisions and Synchrotron Light

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki,S.

    2009-05-04

    The author is honored to receive the 2009 Robert Wilson Prize and the recognition that comes with it. The citation for the prize reads, 'For his outstanding contribution to the design and construction of accelerators that has led to the realization of major machines for fundamental science on two continents and his promotion of international collaboration.' In this article, he will discuss the two construction projects, which he led, one (TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} Collider at KEK) in Japan and the other (RHIC at BNL) in the USA, covering project issues and lessons learned from these projects. Although both of them were built on separate continents, it is interesting to note that they are both built on long off-shore islands. He will also add comments on his recent engagement in the development of the Conceptual Design for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II).

  16. Storage ring working group report

    SciTech Connect

    Krinsky, S.

    1997-01-01

    Over the last two decades great progress has been made in the development of storage rings with small transverse emittance. It is now a good time to consider the possibility of achieving very short bunches m storage rings. From the perspective of synchrotron radiation source development, there are at least two motivations for obtaining short electron bunches: (1) the generation of sub- picosecond x-ray pulses and (2) the coherent emission of sub- picosecond pulses of far infrared radiation. A useful short-term goal is the experimental study of bunches with 1 ps rms length both at high ({approx_gt} 1 GeV) and low ({approx_lt} 150 MeV) electron energies. Experiments on 1 ps bunches are now feasible and can yield new insight into the high frequency impedance of storage rings and the associated phenomena which can result in bunch lengthening. Achievement of 1 ps bunches can also be expected to allow the first observation of coherent synchrotron radiation in a storage ring, in the millimeter wavelength regime. A longer-term objective is the realization of 100 fs bunches. Achievement of this goal not only will advance understanding of storage rings but will open up new opportunities in synchrotron radiation based research at both x-ray and far infrared wavelengths. It is now an appropriate time to carry forward theoretical investigations clarifying the fundamental limitations on bunch length, and to devise schemes to minimize it.

  17. An Inside Look: NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, Gregory

    2013-10-21

    Look inside the storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source II, under construction at Brookhaven Lab. Exactly 843 magnets now encircle the ring. Their job will be to steer, stabilize, and store electrons racing around at near light speed.

  18. An Inside Look: NSLS-II Storage Ring

    ScienceCinema

    Fries, Gregory

    2016-10-19

    Look inside the storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source II, under construction at Brookhaven Lab. Exactly 843 magnets now encircle the ring. Their job will be to steer, stabilize, and store electrons racing around at near light speed.

  19. APS storage ring vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Benaroya, R.; Choi, M.; Dortwegt, R.J.; Goeppner, G.A.; Gonczy, J.; Krieger, C.; Howell, J.; Nielsen, R.W.; Roop, B.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source synchrotron radiation facility, under construction at the Argonne National Laboratory, incorporates a large ring for the storage of 7 GeV positrons for the generation of photon beams for the facility's experimental program. The Storage Ring's 1104 m circumference is divided into 40 functional sectors. The sectors include vacuum, beam transport, control, acceleration and insertion device components. The vacuum system, which is designed to operate at a pressure of 1 n Torr, consists of 240 connected sections, the majority of which are fabricated from an aluminum alloy extrusion. The sections are equipped with distributed NeG pumping, photon absorbers with lumped pumping, beam position monitors, vacuum diagnostics and valving. The details of the vacuum system design, selected results of the development program and general construction plans are presented. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Fourth-generation storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, J. N.

    1999-11-16

    It seems clear that a linac-driven free-electron laser is the accepted prototype of a fourth-generation facility. This raises two questions: can a storage ring-based light source join the fourth generation? Has the storage ring evolved to its highest level of performance as a synchrotrons light source? The answer to the second question is clearly no. The author thinks the answer to the first question is unimportant. While the concept of generations has been useful in motivating thought and effort towards new light source concepts, the variety of light sources and their performance characteristics can no longer be usefully summed up by assignment of a ''generation'' number.

  1. Longitudinal dynamics in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The single-particle equations of motion are derived for charged particles in a storage ring. Longitudinal space charge is included in the potential assuming an infinitely conducting circular beam pipe with a distributed inductance. The framework uses Hamilton's equations with the canonical variables phi and W. The Twiss parameters for longitudinal motion are also defined for the small amplitude synchrotron oscillations. The space-charge Hamiltonian is calculated for both parabolic bunches and ''matched'' bunches. A brief analysis including second-harmonic rf contributions is also given. The final sections supply calculations of dynamical quantities and particle simulations with the space-charge effects neglected.

  2. Features of the compact photon storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hironari; Tsutsui, Hiroshi; Shimoda, Koichi; Mima, Kunioki

    1993-07-01

    The compact photon storage ring (PhSR) is a hybrid machine that features both linac driven FEL and storage ring driven FEL. The lasing condition is determined by the exactly circular electron storage ring, but a continuous electron injection is possible without disturbing the lasing. An effect of coherent synchrotron radiation takes an important role in the lasing. It is found that the compact PhSR is promising in lasing up to a wavelength of less than 10 μm with 10 A accumulated current.

  3. Stable CSR in storage rings: A model

    SciTech Connect

    Sannibale, Fernando; Byrd, John M.; Loftsdottir, Agusta; Venturini, Marco; Abo-Bakr, Michael; Feikes, Jorge; Holldack, Karsten; Kuske, Peter; Wustefeld, Godehart; Hubers, Heinz-Willerm; Warnock, Robert

    2005-01-03

    A comprehensive historical view of the work done on coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in storage rings is given in reference [1]. Here we want just to point out that even if the issue of CSR in storage rings was already discussed over 50 years ago, it is only recently that a considerable number of observations have been reported. In fact, intense bursts of coherent synchrotron radiation with a stochastic character were measured in the terahertz frequency range, at several synchrotron light source storage rings [2-8]. It has been shown [8-11], that this bursting emission of CSR is associated with a single bunch instability, usually referred as microbunching instability (MBI), driven by the fields of the synchrotron radiation emitted by the bunch itself. Of remarkably different characteristics was the CSR emission observed at BESSY II in Berlin, when the storage ring was tuned into a special low momentum compaction mode [12, 13]. In fact, the emitted radiation was not the quasi-random bursting observed in the other machines, but a powerful and stable flux of broadband CSR in the terahertz range. This was an important result, because it experimentally demonstrated the concrete possibility of constructing a stable broadband source with extremely high power in the terahertz region. Since the publication of the first successful experiment using the ring as a CSR source [14], BESSY II has regular scheduled user s shifts dedicated to CSR experiments. At the present time, several other laboratories are investigating the possibility of a CSR mode of operation [15-17] and a design for a new ring optimized for CSR is at an advanced stage [18]. In what follows, we describe a model that first accounts for the BESSY II observations and then indicates that the special case of BESSY II is actually quite general and typical when relativistic electron storage rings are tuned for short bunches. The model provides a scheme for predicting and optimizing the performance of ring

  4. Storage ring injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Some basic issues involved in injecting the beam into storage rings with the principal parameters of those studied at the workshop have been considered. The main conclusion is that straightforward adjustments of the storage ring parameters makes injection easy. The largest number of injected turns is fourteen, and the phase space dilution allowance seems adequate to ensure very small beam loss during injection. The adjustments also result in lower bending magnet fields, and high field superconducting magnets (e.g., 5 Tesla) are not necessary. The design changes do not necessarily affect the Keil-Schnell criterion for stability of the longitudinal microwave instability, although that criterion appears to be irrelevant. Because the beams are expected to be unstable, but with slow growth rates, the vacuum chamber impedances required to give equal risetimes for the various designs are compared for systems posing various degrees of difficulty for injection. Finally, the impact of the parameters on cost is noted, and a system is considered that cuts the length of the linac in half by using doubly charged ions.

  5. Electron Storage Ring Development for ICS Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Loewen, Roderick

    2015-09-30

    There is an increasing world-wide interest in compact light sources based on Inverse Compton Scattering. Development of these types of light sources includes leveraging the investment in accelerator technology first developed at DOE National Laboratories. Although these types of light sources cannot replace the larger user-supported synchrotron facilities, they offer attractive alternatives for many x-ray science applications. Fundamental research at the SLAC National Laboratory in the 1990’s led to the idea of using laser-electron storage rings as a mechanism to generate x-rays with many properties of the larger synchrotron light facilities. This research led to a commercial spin-off of this technology. The SBIR project goal is to understand and improve the performance of the electron storage ring system of the commercially available Compact Light Source. The knowledge gained from studying a low-energy electron storage ring may also benefit other Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) source development. Better electron storage ring performance is one of the key technologies necessary to extend the utility and breadth of applications of the CLS or related ICS sources. This grant includes a subcontract with SLAC for technical personnel and resources for modeling, feedback development, and related accelerator physics studies.

  6. Storage-ring Electron Cooler for Relativistic Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Fanglei; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Douglas, David R.; Guo, Jiquan; Johnson, Rolland P.; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong

    2016-05-01

    Application of electron cooling at ion energies above a few GeV has been limited due to reduction of electron cooling efficiency with energy and difficulty in producing and accelerating a high-current high-quality electron beam. A high-current storage-ring electron cooler offers a solution to both of these problems by maintaining high cooling beam quality through naturally-occurring synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. However, the range of ion energies where storage-ring electron cooling can be used has been limited by low electron beam damping rates at low ion energies and high equilibrium electron energy spread at high ion energies. This paper reports a development of a storage ring based cooler consisting of two sections with significantly different energies: the cooling and damping sections. The electron energy and other parameters in the cooling section are adjusted for optimum cooling of a stored ion beam. The beam parameters in the damping section are adjusted for optimum damping of the electron beam. The necessary energy difference is provided by an energy recovering SRF structure. A prototype linear optics of such storage-ring cooler is presented.

  7. Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) are two promising methods for microbunching linac electron beams. Because both schemes increase the energy spread of the seeded beam, they cannot drive a coherent radiator turn-by-turn in a storage ring. However, reversing the seeding process following the radiator minimizes the impact on the electron beam and may allow coherent radiation at or near the storage ring repetition rate. In this paper we describe the general idea and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. Electron storage rings can drive high average power light sources, and free-electron lasers (FELs) are now producing coherent light sources of unprecedented peak brightness While there is active research towards high repetition rate FELs (for example, using energy recovery linacs), at present there are still no convenient accelerator-based sources of high repetition rate, coherent radiation. As an alternative avenue, we recently proposed to establish steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring. By maintaining steady-state coherent microbunching at one point in the storage ring, the beam generates coherent radiation at or close to the repetition rate of the storage ring. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a microbunched beam in a storage ring by using reversible versions of linac seeding schemes.

  8. Coherent synchrotron radiation and bunch stability in a compactstorage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, Marco; Warnock, Robert; Ruth, Ronald; Ellison, James A.

    2004-04-09

    We examine the effect of the collective force due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in an electron storage ring with small bending radius. In a computation based on time-domain integration of the nonlinear Vlasov equation, we find the threshold current for a longitudinal microwave instability induced by CSR alone. The model accounts for suppression of radiation at long wave lengths due to shielding by the vacuum chamber. In a calculation just above threshold, small ripples in the charge distribution build up over a fraction of a synchrotron period, but then die out to yield a relatively smooth but altered distribution with eventual oscillations in bunch length. The instability evolves from small noise on an initial smooth bunch of r.m.s.length much greater than the shielding cutoff. The paper includes a derivation and extensive analysis of the complete impedance function Z for synchrotron radiation with parallel plate shielding. We find corrections to the lowest approximation to the coherent force which involve ''off-diagonal'' values of Z, that is, fields with phase velocity not equal to the particle velocity.

  9. Smoothing analysis of HLSII storage ring magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; He, Xiao-Ye; Tang, Zheng; Yao, Qiu-Yang

    2016-12-01

    Hefei Light Source (HLS) has been upgraded to improve the quality and stability of the synchrotron light, and the new facility is named HLSII. However, a final accurate adjustment is required to smooth the beam orbit after the initial instalment and alignment of the magnets. We implement a reliable smoothing method for the beam orbit of the HLSII storage ring. In addition to greatly smoothing and stabilizing the beam orbit, this method also doubles the work efficiency and significantly reduces the number of magnets adjusted and the range of the adjustments. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275192) and the Upgrade Project of Hefei Light Source

  10. Introductory statistical mechanics for electron storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jowett, John M.

    1987-02-01

    These lectures concentrate on statistical phenomena in electron storage rings. A stored electron beam is a dissipative, fluctuating system far from equilibrium whose mathematical description can be based upon non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Stochastic differential equations are used to describe the quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation which is the main cause of randomness in electron dynamics. Fluctuating radiation reaction forces can be described via stochastic terms in Hamilton's equations of motion. Normal modes of particle motion, radiation damping effects, quantum diffusion in single-particle phase space are all discussed in this statistical formalism. (AIP)

  11. Orbit stability and feedback control in synchrotron radiation rings

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.H.

    1989-01-01

    Stability of the electron orbit is essential for the utilization of a low emittance storage ring as a high brightness radiation source. We discuss the development of the measurement and feedback control of the closed orbit, with emphasis on the activities as the National Synchrotron Light Source of BNL. We discuss the performance of the beam position detectors in use and under development: the PUE rf detector, split ion chamber detector, photo-emission detector, solid state detector, and the graphite detector. Depending on the specific experiments, different beamlines require different tolerances on the orbit motion. Corresponding to these different requirements, we discuss two approaches to closed orbit feedback: the global and local feedback systems. Then we describe a new scheme for the real time global feedback by implementing a feedback system based upon a harmonic analysis of both the orbit movements and the correction magnetic fields. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A new storage-ring light source

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alex

    2015-06-01

    A recently proposed technique in storage ring accelerators is applied to provide potential high-power sources of photon radiation. The technique is based on the steady-state microbunching (SSMB) mechanism. As examples of this application, one may consider a high-power DUV photon source for research in atomic and molecular physics or a high-power EUV radiation source for industrial lithography. A less challenging proof-of-principle test to produce IR radiation using an existing storage ring is also considered.

  13. Beam properties of UVSOR storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuga, T.; Hasumoto, M.; Kinoshita, T.; Yonehara, H.

    1985-10-01

    UVSOR constructed at the IMS (Institute for Molecular Science) is an electron storage ring dedicated to synchrotron radiation research in molecular science and its related fields. The first beam was stored on 10th Nov. in 1983. From that time on, efforts have been devoted to improvement of the performance of the ring. During the accelerator studies, some inconvenient phenomena were found. One of the big problems is ion trapping effect. Trapped ions change the operating point and enhance the coupling between horizontal and vertical oscillations. As a result, the beam height is enlarged considerably at high beam current. The beam is shaken slightly in the vertical plane and the electrostatic clearing field is applied to solve this problem. The bunch length is somewhat longer than the expected value. This effect is also a problem to be solved.

  14. Storage rings for investigation of ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1987-08-01

    In this survey, we give a brief description of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, and examples for their use in ion-atom collision physics. The compression of the phase space distribution of the ions by electron cooling, and the gain factors of in-ring experiments compared to single-pass experiments are explained. Some examples of a new generation of ion-atom collision experiments which may become feasible with storage rings are given. These include the studies of angular differential single- and double-electron capture cross sections, the production of slow highly charged recoil ions, and atomic collision processes using decelerated and crossed beam. 30 refs.

  15. Radiation Safety Design for SSRL Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Khater, Hesham; Liu, James; Fasso, Alberto; Prinz, Alyssa; Rokni, Sayed; /SLAC

    2007-02-12

    In 2003, the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) has upgraded its storage ring to a 3rd generation storage ring (SPEAR3). SPEAR3 is deigned to operate at 500 mA stored beam current and 3 GeV energy. The 234-meter circumference SPEAR3 ring utilizes 60-cm-thick concrete lateral walls, 30-cm-thick concrete roof, as well as 60-cm or 90-cm-thick concrete ratchet walls. A total of 3.5 x 10{sup 15} e{sup -}/y will be injected into the ring with an injection power of 4 W and an injection efficiency of 75%. Normal beam losses occur due to both injection and stored beam operations in the total of 20 low loss as well as 3 high loss limiting apertures. During the 6-minutes injection period, an instantaneous power loss of 0.05 W occurs at each low loss aperture. When averaged over the operational year, the loss of both the injection and stored beams is equivalent to an average loss of 2 mW at each low loss aperture. On the other hand, the average losses in the high loss apertures are 16 mW for the injection septum, 47 mW for the beam abort dump, and 13 mW for the ring stoppers. The shielding requirements for losses in the new ring were based on a generic approach that used both FLUKA Monte Carlo particle generation and transport code and empirical computer codes and formulae.

  16. DESIGN OF VISIBLE DIAGNOSTIC BEAMLINE FOR NSLS2 STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, W.; Fernandes, H.; Hseuh, H.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28

    A visible synchrotron light monitor (SLM) beam line has been designed at the NSLS2 storage ring, using the bending magnet radiation. A retractable thin absorber will be placed in front of the first mirror to block the central x-rays. The first mirror will reflect the visible light through a vacuum window. The light is guided by three 6-inch diameter mirrors into the experiment hutch. In this paper, we will describe design work on various optical components in the beamline. The ultra high brightness NSLS-II storage ring is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It will have 3GeV, 500mA electron beam circulating in the 792m ring, with very low emittance (0.9nm.rad horizontal and 8pm.rad vertical). The ring is composed of 30 DBA cells with 15 fold symmetry. Three damping wigglers will be installed in long straight sections 8, 18 and 28 to lower the emittance. While electrons pass through the bending magnet, synchrotron radiation will be generated covering a wide spectrum. There are other insertion devices in the storage ring which will generate shorter wavelength radiation as well. Synchrotron radiation has been widely used as diagnostic tool to measure the transverse and longitudinal profile. Three synchrotron light beam lines dedicated for diagnostics are under design and construction for the NSLS-II storage ring: two x-ray beam lines (pinhole and CRL) with the source points from Cell 22 BM{_}A (first bending in the DBA cell) and Cell22 three-pole wiggler; the third beam line is using visible part of radiation from Cell 30 BM{_}B (second bending magnet from the cell). Our paper focuses on the design of the visible beam line - SLM.

  17. Introductory statistical mechanics for electron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Jowett, J.M.

    1986-07-01

    These lectures introduce the beam dynamics of electron-positron storage rings with particular emphasis on the effects due to synchrotron radiation. They differ from most other introductions in their systematic use of the physical principles and mathematical techniques of the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of fluctuating dynamical systems. A self-contained exposition of the necessary topics from this field is included. Throughout the development, a Hamiltonian description of the effects of the externally applied fields is maintained in order to preserve the links with other lectures on beam dynamics and to show clearly the extent to which electron dynamics in non-Hamiltonian. The statistical mechanical framework is extended to a discussion of the conceptual foundations of the treatment of collective effects through the Vlasov equation.

  18. Status of the Mini-Ring project: a compact electrostatic storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, J.; Montagne, G.; Ales, J.; Bredy, R.; Chen, L.; Martin, S.; Cederquist, H.; Schmidt, H.

    2008-12-08

    The idea of building a small, cheap and transportable electrostatic storage ring emerged in the Lyon and Stockholm groups as a collaborative work in the framework of the ITS-LEIF European network. Such a ring could be devoted to experiments where the ring needs to be transported to different facilities that can deliver exotic particles or means of excitation (e.-g. highly charged ions, X--ray synchrotron...). The design of the so-called Mini-Ring and ion trajectory simulations will be presented. First preliminary results have demonstrated the storage of stable Ar{sup +} ion beams in the millisecond time range. The storage time is presently limited by the poor vacuum conditions (P = 2x10{sup -7} mbar) in the chamber, a feature that is going to be improved in the future.

  19. Capacitive energy storage and recovery for synchrotron magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, K.

    2014-06-01

    Feasibility studies on capacitive energy storage and recovery in the main-ring synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex were conducted by circuit simulation. The estimated load fluctuation was 96 MVA in total for dipole magnets, which is likely to induce a serious disturbance in the main grid. It was found that the energy stored in the magnets after the excitation period can be recovered to the storage capacitor by controlling the voltage across the energy-storage capacitor using a pulse-width-modulation converter and reused in the next operational cycle. It was also found that the power fluctuation in the main grid can be reduced to 12 MVA. An experimental evaluation of an aluminum metalized film capacitor revealed that capacitance loss was induced by a fluctuating voltage applied to the storage capacitor when applying the proposed method. The capacitance loss was induced by corona discharge around the edges of segmented electrodes of a self-healing capacitor. The use of aluminum-zinc alloy was evaluated as a countermeasure to mitigate the effect induced by the corona discharge. For a zinc content of 8%, which was optimized experimentally, a capacitor with a sufficient life time expectancy of 20 years and a working potential gradient of 250 V/μm was developed.

  20. Capacitive energy storage and recovery for synchrotron magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Koseki, K.

    2014-06-15

    Feasibility studies on capacitive energy storage and recovery in the main-ring synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex were conducted by circuit simulation. The estimated load fluctuation was 96 MVA in total for dipole magnets, which is likely to induce a serious disturbance in the main grid. It was found that the energy stored in the magnets after the excitation period can be recovered to the storage capacitor by controlling the voltage across the energy-storage capacitor using a pulse-width-modulation converter and reused in the next operational cycle. It was also found that the power fluctuation in the main grid can be reduced to 12 MVA. An experimental evaluation of an aluminum metalized film capacitor revealed that capacitance loss was induced by a fluctuating voltage applied to the storage capacitor when applying the proposed method. The capacitance loss was induced by corona discharge around the edges of segmented electrodes of a self-healing capacitor. The use of aluminum-zinc alloy was evaluated as a countermeasure to mitigate the effect induced by the corona discharge. For a zinc content of 8%, which was optimized experimentally, a capacitor with a sufficient life time expectancy of 20 years and a working potential gradient of 250 V/μm was developed.

  1. Capacitive energy storage and recovery for synchrotron magnets.

    PubMed

    Koseki, K

    2014-06-01

    Feasibility studies on capacitive energy storage and recovery in the main-ring synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex were conducted by circuit simulation. The estimated load fluctuation was 96 MVA in total for dipole magnets, which is likely to induce a serious disturbance in the main grid. It was found that the energy stored in the magnets after the excitation period can be recovered to the storage capacitor by controlling the voltage across the energy-storage capacitor using a pulse-width-modulation converter and reused in the next operational cycle. It was also found that the power fluctuation in the main grid can be reduced to 12 MVA. An experimental evaluation of an aluminum metalized film capacitor revealed that capacitance loss was induced by a fluctuating voltage applied to the storage capacitor when applying the proposed method. The capacitance loss was induced by corona discharge around the edges of segmented electrodes of a self-healing capacitor. The use of aluminum-zinc alloy was evaluated as a countermeasure to mitigate the effect induced by the corona discharge. For a zinc content of 8%, which was optimized experimentally, a capacitor with a sufficient life time expectancy of 20 years and a working potential gradient of 250 V/μm was developed.

  2. Application of permanent magnets in accelerators and electron storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbach, K.

    1985-04-01

    The use of permanent-magnet systems in high-energy accelerators and as sources of synchrotron radiation in electron-storage rings is discussed in a review of recent experimental investigations. Consideration is given to the generic advantages of permanent magnets over electromagnets (higher field strength per magnet size) in small-scale configurations; the magnetic properties of some charge-sheet-equivalent-permanent-magnet materials (CSEMs); and the design of pure-CSEM and CSEM-Fe-hybrid multipole magnetic lenses, dipoles, and undulator/wiggler systems for use in free-electron lasers and the production of elliptically polarized synchrotron light. Drawings and diagrams are provided.

  3. Sub-nm emittance lattice design for CANDLE storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A.; Zanyan, G.; Sahakyan, V.; Tsakanov, V.

    2016-10-01

    The most effective way to increase the brilliance of synchrotron light sources is the reduction of beam emittance. Following the recent developments in low emittance lattice design, a new sub-nm emittance lattice based on implementation of multi-band achromat concept and application of longitudinal gradient bending magnets was developed for CANDLE storage ring. The paper presents the main design considerations, linear and non-linear beam dynamics aspects of the new lattice proposed.

  4. A new method for beam stacking in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Recently, I developed a new beam stacking scheme for synchrotron storage rings called 'longitudinal phase-space coating' (LPSC). This scheme has been convincingly validated by multi-particle beam dynamics simulations and has been demonstrated with beam experiments at the Fermilab Recycler. Here, I present the results from both simulations and experiments. The beam stacking scheme presented here is the first of its kind.

  5. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  6. The cryogenic storage ring CSR.

    PubMed

    von Hahn, R; Becker, A; Berg, F; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; Fadil, H; Fellenberger, F; Froese, M; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; Heber, O; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lange, M; Laux, F; Lohmann, S; Menk, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; O'Connor, A P; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schippers, S; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Schweikhard, L; Sieber, T; Shornikov, A; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Ullrich, J; Urbain, X; Vogel, S; Wilhelm, P; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm(-3) is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10(-14) mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  7. Coherent synchrotron radiation in the isochronous muon collider ring

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    To achieve the luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} in a {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, two bunches per sign of N = 2 {times} 10{sup 12} particles each and a betatron function of {beta}* = 3 mm at the interaction point (IP) are required. This small {beta}* at the IP constrains the size of the bunch to be {sigma}{sub z} {approximately} {beta}*. To maintain this rather short bunch without excessive rf power consumption, an isochronous lattice has been chosen for the final collider ring. One of the important advantages of muons as opposed to electrons is that at up to at least TeV energy it is possible to accelerate muons in circular machines as their synchrotron radiation is reduced by a factor of (m{sub e}/m{sub {mu}}){sup 2} {approximately} 23 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} with respect to electrons. Nevertheless, the large number of muons in a short bunch suggests the possibility of strong shielded coherent synchrotron radiation. First, the author uses the well known formulae to evaluate the power of shielded coherent synchrotron radiation in the isochronous muon collider ring. Finally, following the results obtained by Kheifets and Zotter for a bunch with a Gaussian longitudinal charge distribution the author shows that the coherent synchrotron radiation in the isochronous {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider ring is negligible if the rms bunch length is larger than {approx} 0.3 mm.

  8. Design study of the storage ring EUTERPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Boling; Botman, J. I. M.; Timmermans, C. J.; Hagedoorn, H. L.

    1992-05-01

    At present the 400 MeV electron storage ring EUTERPE is being constructed at the Eindhoven University of Technology. It is a university project set up for studies of charged particle beam dynamics and applications of synchroton radiation, and for the education of students in these fields. The design of the ring is described in this paper. Considering the requirements of users in different fields, a lattice based on a so-called triple bend achromat structure with a high flexibility has been chosen. With this lattice, different optical options, including the HBSB (high brightness, small beam), the SBL (short bunch length) and the HLF (high light flux) modes can be realized. A small emittance of 7 nm rad and a short bunch length of the order of several mm can be achieved. In the first phase the synchrotron radiation in the UV and XUV region (the critical wavelength is 8.3 nm) will be provided from the regular dipole magnets. Later on, a 10 T wiggler magnet and other special inserters will be added, and other applications and beam dynamics studies will be feasible. Bending magnets are of the parallel faced C configuration. The effective aperture of the vacuum chamber is 2.3 cm (vertical) in the bending magnets and 4.7 cm elsewhere with a working vacuum condition of 10-9 Torr. Collective effects have been studied initially. First calculations indicate that a lifetime of several hours, influenced by the Touschek effect and residual gas scattering will be achievable for a 200 mA beam in the HLF mode for the standard rf parameters. A 70 MeV racetrack microtron will serve as injector for the ring.

  9. Spin Filtering in Storage Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, N. N.; Pavlov, F. F.

    The spin filtering in storage rings is based on a multiple passage of a stored beam through a polarized internal gas target. Apart from the polarization by the spin-dependent transmission, a unique geometrical feature of interaction with the target in such a filtering process, pointed out by H.O. Meyer,1 is a scattering of stored particles within the beam. A rotation of the spin in the scattering process affects the polarization buildup. We derive here a quantum-mechanical evolution equation for the spin-density matrix of a stored beam which incorporates the scattering within the beam. We show how the interplay of the transmission and scattering within the beam changes from polarized electrons to polarized protons in the atomic target. After discussions of the FILTEX results on the filtering of stored protons,2 we comment on the strategy of spin filtering of antiprotons for the PAX experiment at GSI FAIR.3.

  10. The MAX IV storage ring project

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Pedro F.; Leemann, Simon C.; Sjöström, Magnus; Andersson, Åke

    2014-01-01

    The MAX IV facility, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, features two electron storage rings operated at 3 GeV and 1.5 GeV and optimized for the hard X-ray and soft X-ray/VUV spectral ranges, respectively. A 3 GeV linear accelerator serves as a full-energy injector into both rings as well as a driver for a short-pulse facility, in which undulators produce X-ray pulses as short as 100 fs. The 3 GeV ring employs a multibend achromat (MBA) lattice to achieve, in a relatively short circumference of 528 m, a bare lattice emittance of 0.33 nm rad, which reduces to 0.2 nm rad as insertion devices are added. The engineering implementation of the MBA lattice raises several technological problems. The large number of strong magnets per achromat calls for a compact design featuring small-gap combined-function magnets grouped into cells and sharing a common iron yoke. The small apertures lead to a low-conductance vacuum chamber design that relies on the chamber itself as a distributed copper absorber for the heat deposited by synchrotron radiation, while non-evaporable getter (NEG) coating provides for reduced photodesorption yields and distributed pumping. Finally, a low main frequency (100 MHz) is chosen for the RF system yielding long bunches, which are further elongated by passively operated third-harmonic Landau cavities, thus alleviating collective effects, both coherent (e.g. resistive wall instabilities) and incoherent (intrabeam scattering). In this paper, we focus on the MAX IV 3 GeV ring and present the lattice design as well as the engineering solutions to the challenges inherent to such a design. As the first realisation of a light source based on the MBA concept, the MAX IV 3 GeV ring offers an opportunity for validation of concepts that are likely to be essential ingredients of future diffraction-limited light sources. PMID:25177978

  11. Ring artifacts removal from synchrotron CT image slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhouping; Wiebe, Sheldon; Chapman, Dean

    2013-06-01

    Ring artifacts can occur in reconstructed images from x-ray Computerized Tomography (CT) as full or partial concentric rings superimposed on the scanned structures. Due to the data corruption by those ring artifacts in CT images, qualitative and quantitative analysis of these images are compromised. In this paper, we propose to correct the ring artifacts on the reconstructed synchrotron radiation (SR) CT image slices. The proposed correction procedure includes the following steps: (1). transform the reconstructed CT images into polar coordinates; (2) apply discrete two-dimensional (2D) wavelet transform to the polar image to decompose it into four image components: low pass band image component, as well as the components from horizontal, vertical and diagonal details bands; (3). apply 2D Fourier transform to the vertical details band image component only, since the ring artifacts become vertical lines in the polar coordinates; (4). apply Gaussian filtering in Fourier domain along the abscissa direction to suppress the vertical lines, since the information of the vertical lines in Fourier domain is completely condensed to that direction; (5). perform inverse Fourier transform to get the corrected vertical details band image component; (6). perform inverse wavelet transform to get the corrected polar image; (7). transform the corrected polar image back to Cartesian coordinates to get the CT image slice with reduced ring artifacts. This approach has been successfully used on CT data acquired from the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamline in Canadian Light Source (CLS), and the results show that the ring artifacts in original SR CT images have been effectively suppressed with all the structure information in the image preserved.

  12. Experimental determination of storage ring optics using orbit response measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranek, J.

    1997-02-01

    The measured response matrix giving the change in orbit at beam position monitors (BPMs) with changes in steering magnet excitation can be used to accurately calibrate the linear optics in an electron storage ring [1-8]. A computer code called LOCO (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits) was developed to analyze the NSLS X-Ray Ring measured response matrix to determine: the gradients in all 56 quadrupole magnets; the calibration of the steering magnets and BPMs; the roll of the quadrupoles, steering magnets, and BPMs about the electron beam direction; the longitudinal magnetic centers of the orbit steering magnets; the horizontal dispersion at the orbit steering magnets; and the transverse mis-alignment of the electron orbit in each of the sextupoles. Random orbit measurement error from the BPMs propagated to give only 0.04% rms error in the determination of individual quadrupole gradients and 0.4 mrad rms error in the determination of individual quadrupole rolls. Small variations of a few parts in a thousand in the quadrupole gradients within an individual family were resolved. The optics derived by LOCO gave accurate predictions of the horizontal dispersion, the beta functions, and the horizontal and vertical emittances, and it gave good qualitative agreement with the measured vertical dispersion. The improved understanding of the X-Ray Ring has enabled us to increase the synchrotron radiation brightness. The LOCO code can also be used to find the quadrupole family gradients that best correct for gradient errors in quadrupoles, in sextupoles, and from synchrotron radiation insertion devices. In this way the design periodicity of a storage ring's optics can be restored. An example of periodicity restoration will be presented for the NSLS VUV Ring. LOCO has also produced useful results when applied to the ALS storage ring [8].

  13. INSTABILITY ISSUES AT THE SNS STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,S.Y.

    1999-06-28

    The impedance and beam instability issues of the SNS storage ring is reviewed, and the effort toward solutions at the BNL is reported. Some unsettled issues are raised, indicating the direction of planned works.

  14. APS storage ring vacuum system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, J.R.; Gagliano, J.; Goeppner, G.A.

    1997-06-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring was designed to operated with 7-GeV, 100-mA positron beam with lifetimes > 20 hours. The lifetime is limited by residual gas scattering and Touschek scattering at this time. Photon-stimulated desorption and microwave power in the rf cavities are the main gas loads. Comparison of actual system gas loads and design calculations will be given. In addition, several special features of the storage ring vacuum system will be presented.

  15. Storage rings, internal targets and PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1986-11-01

    Storage rings with internal targets are described, using PEP as an example. The difference between electrons and heavier particles such as protons, antiprotons, and heavy ions is also discussed because it raises possibilities of bypass insertions for more exotic experiments. PEP is compared to other rings in various contexts to verify the assertion that it is an ideal ring for many fundamental and practical applications that can be carried on simultaneously. (LEW)

  16. Status and upgrade of the VEPP-4 storage-ring facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levichev, E. B.

    2016-12-01

    The VEPP-4 facility is an e + e - collider with a beam energy up to 2 GeV. The scientific program includes topics in high-energy and nuclear physics, as well as various investigations using synchrotron radiation and polarized or unpolarized charged-particle beams. An energy upgrade to 5 GeV is planned, and reliable and efficient operation of the storage-ring complex upon increased energy must be provided. We discuss the recent experimental results and the opportunities to be created by the energy upgrade.

  17. Development of a longitudinal density monitor for storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotorev, M.; Beche, J.-F.; Byrd, J.; Datte, P.; De Santis, S.; Denes, P.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, A.; Riot, V.; Schoenlein, R.; Turner, W.

    2003-05-28

    We report on development of a new storage ring operations tool for measurement of longitudinal beam density profile. The technique mixes synchrotron light with light from a mode locked solid-state laser oscillator in a non-linear crystal and detects the up-converted radiation with a photo-multiplier. The laser is phase locked to the storage ring RF system. The laser choices available for repetition frequency, pulse length and phase modulation give a very wide range of options for matching the bunch configuration of particular storage rings. Progress in the technology of solid-state lasers ensures this system can be made robust for routine use in storage ring operations. A very large number of important applications are possible including measurement of the fraction of untrapped particles prior to acceleration, the population of particles in the nominally unfilled RF buckets in a bunch train (''ghost bunches''), longitudinal tails, the diffusion of particles into the beam abort gap and th e normal bunch parameters of longitudinal shape and intensity. We are currently investigating application to two devices: (1) the 1.9 GeV ALS electron storage ring at LBNL with 328 RF buckets, 2ns bucket spacing, 276 nominally filled bunches, 15-30ps rms bunch length and (2) the 7 TeV LHC proton collider under construction at CERN with 35,640 RF buckets, 2.5 ns bucket spacing, 2,808 nominally filled bunches, 280-620 ps rms bunch length. A proof of principle experiment is being conducted on ALS. The results of the ALS experiment and detailed analyses of the application to LHC and its requirements are described.

  18. Dedicated storage rings for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    The use of internal targets in circulating beams of electron storage and stretcher rings has been widely discussed recently as a method of achieving high luminosity under conditions of low background, and good energy resolution, with minimal demands for beam from an injecting accelerator. In the two critical areas of the technology, ring design and target development, research is very active, and the prospects for major advances are very bright. Reasonable extrapolations of the current state of the art suggest for many problems in nuclear physics, particularly polarization physics of the nucleon and few body nuclei, internal target measurement may be the optimum experimental technique. This paper, discusses the comparative merit of internal target rings and external beam experiments, reviews briefly current research efforts in the critical areas of the technology, and establishes one goal for the discussions at the workshop. It appears that storage rings dedicated to internal target physics may offer a powerful option for future advances in nuclear physics.

  19. Nonlinear dynamics aspects of modern storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Helleman, R.H.G.; Kheifets, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    It is argued that the nonlinearity of storage rings becomes an essential problem as the design parameters of each new machine are pushed further and further. Yet the familiar methods of classical mechanics do not allow determination of single particle orbits over reasonable lengths of time. It is also argued that the single particle dynamics of a storage ring is possibly one of the cleanest and simplest nonlinear dynamical systems available with very few degrees of freedom. Hence, reasons are found for accelerator physicists to be interested in nonlinear dynamics and for researchers in nonlinear dynamics to be interested in modern storage rings. The more familiar methods of treating nonlinear systems routinely used in acclerator theory are discussed, pointing out some of their limitations and pitfalls. 39 refs., 1 fig. (LEW)

  20. Latest on polarization in electron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The field of beam polarization in electron storage rings is making rapid progress in recent several years. This report is an attempt to summarize some of these developments concerning how to produce and maintain a high level of beam polarization. Emphasized will be the ideas and current thoughts people have on what should and could be done on electron rings being designed at present such as HERA, LEP and TRISTAN. 23 references.

  1. Resonant condition for storage ring short wavelength FEL with power exceeding Renieri limit

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Burnham, B.; Wu, Y.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of operating a storage ring FEL with resonant conditions providing for preservation of electron beam structure on an optical wave scale. We suggest tuning the storage ring betatron and synchrotron tunes on one of the high (N-th) order resonances to compensate dynamic diffusion of optical phase. This mode of operation does not require isochronicity of the ring lattice. In these conditions optical phase will be restored after N turns around the ring and stochastic conditions used in the derivation of Renieri limit are no longer applicable. We discuss the influence of high order terms in electron motion, RF frequency stability, and synchrotron radiation effects on preservation of optical phase.

  2. Ring design of the Prague synchrotron for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodozhentsev, A.; Makoveev, V.; Minashkin, V.; Shevtsov, V.; Sidorov, G.; Prokesh, K.; Sedlak, J.; Kuzmiak, M.

    1998-04-01

    The paper presents main elements of a dedicated proton synchrotron for hadron therapy. The beam parameters for active scanning of tumours are discussed. The output energy of the beam should be variable in the range 60-220 MeV. The average current of the proton beam is equal to 10 nA. The repetition rate of the accelerator is chosen of 1 Hz to get a spill time for slow extraction of about 500 ms. The timing cycle of the accelerator including the quasi-adiabatic capture process and acceleration is described. The RF gymnastics is utilized to prepare the unbunched beam for slow extraction. The magnetic elements of the ring, compact RF and VCO systems are presented in the paper. The maximum magnet field of the dipole magnet should be 1.2 T and the maximum magnetic field on the pole of the quadrupole lenses should be less than 1 T. The resonator should work on the first harmonic with a frequency from 1.298 MHz till 4.804 MHz. The length of the resonator should be less than 1 m. The maximum voltage on the accelerator gap should be about 2 kV.

  3. Dissociative recombination: Results from storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Mats

    2005-05-27

    The focus of this article is on the measurement of product branching ratios in the dissociative recombination of polyatomic molecular ions with electrons by means of ion storage rings. Recombination of ions of interest in astrophysics, plasma-assisted combustion, thermonuclear fusion, protein fragmentation, and atmospheric physics are reviewed and discussed.

  4. Measurements of the electron cloud in the APS storage ring.

    SciTech Connect

    Harkey, K. C.

    1999-04-16

    Synchrotron radiation interacting with the vacuum chamber walls in a storage ring produce photoelectrons that can be accelerated by the beam, acquiring sufficient energy to produce secondary electrons in collisions with the walls. If the secondary-electron yield (SEY) coefficient of the wall material is greater than one, as is the case with the aluminum chambers in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring, a runaway condition can develop. As the electron cloud builds up along a train of stored positron or electron bunches, the possibility exists that a transverse perturbation of the head bunch will be communicated to trailing bunches due to interaction with the cloud. In order to characterize the electron cloud, a special vacuum chamber was built and inserted into the ring. The chamber contains 10 rudimentary electron-energy analyzers, as well as three targets coated with different materials. Measurements show that the intensity and electron energy distribution are highly dependent on the temporal spacing between adjacent bunches and the amount of current contained in each bunch. Furthermore, measurements using the different targets are consistent with what would be expected based on the SEY of the coatings. Data for both positron and electron beams are presented.

  5. Electric dipole moment planning with a resurrected BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron electron analog ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard M.; Talman, John D.

    2015-07-01

    There has been much recent interest in directly measuring the electric dipole moments (EDM) of the proton and the electron, because of their possible importance in the present day observed matter/antimatter imbalance in the Universe. Such a measurement will require storing a polarized beam of "frozen spin" particles, 15 MeV electrons or 230 MeV protons, in an all-electric storage ring. Only one such relativistic electric accelerator has ever been built—the 10 MeV "electron analog" ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1954; it can also be referred to as the "AGS analog" ring to make clear it was a prototype for the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) proton ring under construction at that time at BNL. (Its purpose was to investigate nonlinear resonances as well as passage through "transition" with the newly invented alternating gradient proton ring design.) By chance this electron ring, long since dismantled and its engineering drawings disappeared, would have been appropriate both for measuring the electron EDM and to serve as an inexpensive prototype for the arguably more promising, but 10 times more expensive, proton EDM measurement. Today it is cheaper yet to "resurrect" the electron analog ring by simulating its performance computationally. This is one purpose for the present paper. Most existing accelerator simulation codes cannot be used for this purpose because they implicitly assume magnetic bending. The new ual/eteapot code, described in detail in an accompanying paper, has been developed for modeling storage ring performance, including spin evolution, in electric rings. Illustrating its use, comparing its predictions with the old observations, and describing new expectations concerning spin evolution and code performance, are other goals of the paper. To set up some of these calculations has required a kind of "archeological physics" to reconstitute the detailed electron analog lattice design from a 1991 retrospective report by Plotkin as well

  6. The CERN intersecting storage rings (ISR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Kurt

    2012-03-01

    The CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) was the first facility ever built providing colliding hadron beams. It mainly operated with protons with beam energies of 15 to 31 GeV. The ISR was conceived in the years 1960 to 1964 and was approved in 1965. It came into operation at the beginning of 1971 and was decommissioned as a collider in 1983. A number of accelerator technologies have been either much improved or developed at the ISR which subsequently have become enabling technologies for a number of hadron storage rings and large colliders. Prominent examples of such technologies are ultra-high vacuum technology, beam diagnostics based on Schottky signals and stochastic cooling. The experiences obtained with the ISR were later exploited at the proton-antiproton facility in the CERN SPS, the Tevatron at Fermilab, the RHIC at Brookhaven and, finally, by the LHC at CERN.

  7. Mass and Lifetime Measurements in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Weick, H.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Winkler, M.; Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Scheidenberger, C.

    2007-05-22

    Masses of nuclides covering a large area of the chart of nuclides can be measured in storage rings where many ions circulate at the same time. In this paper the recent progress in the analysis of Schottky mass spectrometry data is presented as well as the technical improvements leading to higher accuracy for isochronous mass measurements with a time-of-flight detector. The high sensitivity of the Schottky method down to single ions allows to measure lifetimes of nuclides by observing mother and daughter nucleus simultaneously. In this way we investigated the decay of bare and H-like 140Pr. As we could show the lifetime can be even shortened compared to those of atomic nuclei despite of a lower number of electrons available for internal conversion or electron capture.All these techniques will be implemented with further improvements at the storage rings of the new FAIR facility at GSI in the future.

  8. A Linear Theory of Microwave Instability in Electron Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2011-07-06

    The well-known Haissinski distribution provides a stable equilibrium of longitudinal beam distribution in electron storage rings below a threshold current. Yet, how to accurately determine this threshold, above which the Haissinski distribution becomes unstable, is not firmly established in theory. In this paper, we will show how to apply the Laguerre polynomials in an analysis of this stability that are associated with the potential-well distortion. Our approach provides an alternative to the discretization method proposed by Oide and Yokoya. Moreover, it reestablishes an essential connection to the theory of mode coupling originated by Sacherer. Our new and self-consistent method is applied to study the microwave instability driven by commonly known impedances, including coherent synchrotron radiation in free space.

  9. The magnet design for the HLS storage ring upgrade project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Wei-Min; Feng, Guang-Yao; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Shan-Cai; Li, Wei; Liang, Jun-Jun

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of the Hefei Light Source (HLS), in particular to get higher brilliance synchrotron radiation and increase the number of straight section insertion devices, an upgrade project called HLSII will be launched soon. The storage ring lattice, which has a double bend achromatic structure with four periods, comprises eight dipoles, 32 quadrupoles and 32 combined function sextupoles. The design and analysis of the magnets are shown in this paper, along with the optimization of the multipurpose combined function magnet, which consists of three magnets: skew quadrupole, horizontal dipole and vertical dipole, with the main sextupole magnet. This type of magnet is the first one that has been designed and used in China. The mechanical design and fabrication procedures for the magnets are also presented.

  10. Feasibility of a ring FEL at low emittance storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapov, I.

    2015-09-01

    A scheme for generating coherent radiation at latest generation low emittance storage rings such as PETRA III at DESY (Balewski et al., 2004 [1]) is proposed. The scheme is based on focusing and subsequent defocusing of the electron beam in the longitudinal phase space at the undulator location. The expected performance characteristics are estimated for radiation in the wavelength range of 500-1500 eV. It is shown that the average brightness is increased by several orders of magnitude compared to spontaneous undulator radiation, which can open new perspectives for photon-hungry soft X-ray spectroscopy techniques.

  11. Beam-based modeling and control of storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranek, J.

    1997-05-01

    Analysis of the measured orbit response matrix is a powerful technique for debugging the linear optics of storage rings. The orbit response matrix is the change in orbit at the beam position monitors (BPMs) with changes in steering magnet excitation. Results will be presented from a computer code called LOCO (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits) that has been used to analyze the response matrices from several synchrotron light sources including the ALS, APS, NSLS VUV, NSLS X-Ray, and SRRC storage rings. The analysis accurately determines the individual quadrupole magnet gradients as well as the gains of BPMs and the calibrations of the steering magnets. The coupling terms of the response matrix such as the shift in vertical orbit from horizontal steering magnets can be included in the analysis to give the role of the quadrupoles, BPMs and steering magnets. The LOCO code can also be used to find the changes in quadrupole gradient that best compensate for gradient errors from insertion devices and sextupoles. In this way the design periodicity of the linear optics can be restored.

  12. Upgrade of BPM Electronics for the SPring-8 Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Shigeki; Fujita, Takahiro; Shoji, Masazumi; Takashima, Takeo

    2006-11-20

    SPring-8, a 3rd generation synchrotron light source, has operated since 1997. Improvement of BPM performance is required as a part of upgrading activities of the storage ring as a light source. We have developed new electronics circuits for signal processing of the storage ring BPM, with target performance of sub-{mu}m range resolution with sufficiently fast measurement speed and good long-term stability. A set of the new circuits consists of multiplexers, an RF amplifier, a mixer, an IF amplifier, and a local oscillator for analog signal processing. The IF amplifier outputs are sampled with 16-bit 2-MSPS ADC on ADC boards and the data are sent to a DSP board. The sampled data are processed and converted to position information in the DSP. A multiplexing method was employed to have a better stability of the performance by cancellation of variation common to each channel. Evaluation of the performance by using a prototype shows that position resolution well into the sub-{mu}m range has been achieved with a bandwidth of 1 kHz, and long-term stability of within 1 {mu}m has also been achieved.

  13. Lattice design of a quasi-isochronous ring for a storage-ring FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ohgaki, H.; Robin, D.; Yamazaki, T.

    1995-12-31

    Design work for a Quasi-Isochronous Ring (QI-Ring) dedicated to Storage Ring FELs in Electrotechnical Laboratory has been completed. The motivation for this work is to shorten the electron bunch length in order to get a high peak current in a compact Storage-Ring (SR). By placing an inverted dipole field in a location where the energy dispersion function is relatively large, one can reduce the momentum compaction factor ({alpha}) and shorten a bunch length in a SR. The main requirements for the QI-Ring are: 1.5GeV maximum beam energy; 80m circumference; two 10m-long dispersion free straight sections for insertion devices. A few meters dispersion free straight sections for RF cavities and injection bumpers; and a wide tune ability in betatron functions and momentum compaction factor ({alpha}). As shown in figure 1, the lattice includes two 49 degree, 3 T superconducting bending magnets to reduce the circumference of the ring, a -8 degree normal inverted dipole magnet (ID), 4 families quadrupole magnets (QF, QD, QFA, QDA), and 3 families sextupole magnets. Each quadrupole family has a specific function: QF & QD control the betatron tunes, and QFA & QDA control the {alpha} and suppress the energy dispersion in a straight section. In this type of ring it is important to compensate the second order momentum compaction factor ({alpha}{sub 2}), so at least three families of sextupoles are required.

  14. A storage ring for the JULIC cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. A.; Prasuhn, D.; Schott, W.; Wiedner, C. A.

    1985-05-01

    The storage ring COSY is planned to provide higher intensity and resolution for nuclear structure experiments using the light heavy ion beams (p, d, τ, α) of the JULIC cyclotron and the magnet spectrograph BIG KARL. The ring contains the measuring target of BIG KARL as an internal target, two rf cavities for compensating the mean energy loss in the target and providing additional acceleration of the stored beam and an e --cooling section. In the recirculator mode, i.e., without e --cooling, a luminosity of L = 3.64 × 10 30 particles/(cm 2 s) is obtained for an experiment with 41 MeV protons and a 50 μg/cm 212C target at a spectrograph resolution p/d p = 10 4 and 100% duty factor. This corresponds to a gain in L of 546.5 in comparison with the same experiment without a storage ring. In the recirculator mode with acceleration L = 1.17 × 10 32 p/(cm 2 s) and 98.8% duty factor results for 1500 MeV protons on the same target at the same resolution. Using e --cooling L and the feasible p/d p can be enhanced, however, at a reduced duty factor.

  15. Low emittance lattice for the storage ring of the Turkish Light Source Facility TURKAY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nergiz, Z.; Aksoy, A.

    2015-06-01

    The TAC (Turkish Accelerator Center) project aims to build an accelerator center in Turkey. The first stage of the project is to construct an Infra-Red Free Electron Laser (IR-FEL) facility. The second stage is to build a synchrotron radiation facility named TURKAY, which is a third generation synchrotron radiation light source that aims to achieve a high brilliance photon beam from a low emittance electron beam at 3 GeV. The electron beam parameters are highly dependent on the magnetic lattice of the storage ring. In this paper a low emittance storage ring for TURKAY is proposed and the beam dynamic properties of the magnetic lattice are investigated. Supported by Turkish Republic Ministry of Development (DPT2006K120470)

  16. APS Storage Ring vacuum chamber fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Goeppner, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The 1104-m circumference Advanced Photon Source Storage Ring Vacuum System is composed of 240 individual sections, which are fabricated from a combination of aluminum extrusions and machined components. The vacuum chambers will have 3800 weld joints, each subject to strict vacuum requirements, as well as a variety of related design criteria. The vacuum criteria and chamber design are reviewed, including a discussion of the weld joint geometries. The critical fabrication process parameters for meeting the design requirements are discussed. The experiences of the prototype chamber fabrication program are presented. Finally, the required facilities preparation for construction activity is briefly described. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Design Considerations for High Energy Electron -- Positron Storage Rings

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Richter, B.

    1966-11-01

    High energy electron-positron storage rings give a way of making a new attack on the most important problems of elementary particle physics. All of us who have worked in the storage ring field designing, building, or using storage rings know this. The importance of that part of storage ring work concerning tests of quantum electrodynamics and mu meson physics is also generally appreciated by the larger physics community. However, I do not think that most of the physicists working tin the elementary particle physics field realize the importance of the contribution that storage ring experiments can make to our understanding of the strongly interacting particles. I would therefore like to spend the next few minutes discussing the sort of things that one can do with storage rings in the strongly interacting particle field.

  18. A practical method to generate brilliant hard x-rays with a tabletop electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; Amano, D.; Miyade, H.

    1995-12-31

    With electron storage rings not only synchrotron radiation(SR) but also bremsstrahlung(BS) from a thin target placed in the electron orbit are mechanisms to generate brilliant x-ray beams. The calculated brilliance of BS with a 50 MeV storage ring, which is nearly 10{sup 13} photons/s, mrad{sup 2}, mm{sup 2}, 0.1% band width for 100 keV x-rays, exceeds that of SR from a 1 GeV storage ring. This photon energy spectrum is almost constant and extend up to the electron energy. The reasons for this high brilliance with this new radiation scheme is that the electron beams penetrating the thin target are utilized repeatedly, the narrow angular divergence of BS is determined by the kinematics of relativistic electron as same as SR, and the x-ray source size of the order of 1 {mu}m is determined by the size of thin target instead of electron beam sizes. Continuous injection of electron beam to the storage ring at full energy is the way to keep high and constant beam current. Peak current and repetition rate determine x-ray out put power. Note that the power of x-ray beam is also provided from a RF cavity of the storage ring. In this paper we will report some experimental results and discuss further application on a coherent bremsstrahlung generated from a set of stacked foils placed in the electron orbit of the ring. Resulting from these investigations the photon storage ring which is based on a 50 MeV exact circular electron storage ring could provide wide range of coherent and incoherent radiations from far infrared to hard x-ray in a practical amount of radiation power.

  19. Effectiveness of rf phase modulation for increasing bunch length in electron storage rings

    PubMed

    Orsini; Mosnier

    2000-04-01

    Aiming at increasing the apparent bunch length and hence the beam lifetime in electron storage rings, rf phase modulation near one parametric resonance has been experimentally investigated. Since the possible benefit of this technique depends greatly on the ring parameters, we studied the effect of such a modulation for different rf parameters on the longitudinal emittance. Theoretical predictions and results of simulations are compared and discussed. It is shown that synchrotron radiation tends to spoil the parametric resonance. In particular, a criterion for island survival has been found.

  20. Astrochemistry at the Cryogenic Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreckel, Holger; Becker, Arno; Blaum, Klaus; Breitenfeldt, Christian; George, Sebastian; Göck, Jürgen; Grieser, Manfred; Grussie, Florian; Guerin, Elisabeth; Heber, Oded; Karthein, Jonas; Krantz, Claude; Meyer, Christian; Mishra, Preeti; Novotny, Oldrich; O'Connor, Aodh; Saurabh, Sunny; Schippers, Stefan; Spruck, Kaija; Kumar, S. Sunil; Urbain, Xavier; Vogel, Stephen; von Hahn, Robert; Wilhelm, Patrick; Wolf, Andreas; Zajfman, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Almost 200 different molecular species have been identified in space, and this number continues to grow steadily. This surprising molecular diversity bears witness to an active reaction network, in which molecular ions are the main drivers of chemistry in the gas phase. To study these reactions under controlled conditions in the laboratory is a major experimental challenge. The new Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) that has recently been commissioned at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg will serve as an ideal testbed to study cold molecular ions in the gas phase. With residual gas densities of <140 cm-3 and temperatures below 10K, the CSR will allow for merged beams collision studies involving molecular ions, neutral atoms, free electrons and photons under true interstellar conditions.

  1. Unicell structure for superconducting storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Jackson, J.; Keohane, G.; Lee, Y.Y.; Phillips, R.; Plate, S.; Repeta, L.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, L.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanically integrated, magnetically decoupled storage rings were designed for a heavy ion collider for 100 GeV/amu Au, at B = 2.7T. New concepts were developed, including detailed engineering design and cost estimates. A ''unicell'' contains a half-cell of both rings within a single He vessel. The unicell design is optimized for economical mass production. Survey pads welded to the laminations provide external fiducials to locate the magnet cores. Roller bearing self aligning supports accommodate cool-down shrinkage. The design tolerates relative motion of components resulting from longitudinal shrinkage in the approx.15 m long unicell without affecting performance. Magnetic and physical lengths are the same, eliminating waste space. ''Achromatic'' quadrupoles with sextupoles at both ends are located on a common precision beam tube which aligns and supports a pick-up electrode. The unicell accommodates longer dipoles compared to conventional designs, reducing B/sub max/, stored energy, and the volume of iron and superconductor. Applications to future machines will be discussed.

  2. Synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Craievich, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Several developed countries such as the USA, URSS, England, France, Italy, Sweden and Japan have one or more of these synchrotron light facilities operating or under construction. Some developing countries have constructed (China) or are building (Taiwan, India, Korea, Brazil) synchrotron light facilities. The construction of the Brazilian synchrotron source began in June, 1987. After two years of activities, the injector linac for the electron storage ring is in its final stage of construction. These Proceedings contain the Invited Lectures presented at the Workshop by specialists working on synchrotron light applications and related instrumentation and by members of LNLS regarding technical details of the Brazilian project. The II Workshop Synchrotron Light: Applications and Related Instrumentation was dedicated to oral presentations about applications of synchrotron light, most of which were not covered during the I Workshop, organized by LNLS in 1988, and the Proceedings of which were published by World Scientific. The II Workshop included discussions on the application possibilities for the newly designed LNLS 1.15 GeV storage ring, and on the modifications which would eventually be necessary for the work-station and instrumentation projects currently in progress at LNLS and at various external user laboratories.

  3. STUDY OF THE STABILITY OF PARTICLE MOTION IN STORAGE RINGS. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jack J. Shi

    2012-09-07

    During this period, our research was concentrated on the study of beam-beam effects in large storage-ring colliders and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect in light sources. Our group was involved in and made significant contribution to several international accelerator projects such as the US-LHC project for the design of the LHC interaction regions, the luminosity upgrade of Tevatron and HERA, the design of eRHIC, and the U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) for the future LHC luminosity upgrade.

  4. A super-bright storage ring alternative to an energy recovery linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borland, Michael

    2006-02-01

    One of the promised characteristics of an energy recovery linac (ERL) as a synchrotron light source is the very low emittance of the electron beam. A difficulty with ERLs is that, as yet, no one has demonstrated a gun that delivers average currents comparable to what has been demonstrated in storage rings, i.e., 0.1-1 A, with the required emittance and for the long periods of time necessary for a user facility. As an alternative to an ERL, one might consider a super-bright storage ring with short lifetime, requiring fast top-up. We present a possible replacement ring for the Advanced Photon Source with 0.5-micron normalized emittance at 7 GeV, along with a discussion of design challenges and operating considerations.

  5. Measurement of storage ring motion at the advanced light source

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, G.F.

    1997-05-01

    The mechanical stability of the Advanced Light Source storage ring is examined over a period of 1.5 years from the point of view of floor motion. The storage ring beam position monitor stability is examined under various operating conditions.

  6. A design of a quasi-isochronous storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; Trbojevic, D.

    1993-07-01

    Isochronous electron storage rings may offer advantages for future high luminosity meson factories. A Quasi-isochronous lattice based on the design principle of flexible {gamma}{tau} lattice is studied. The emittance and chromatic properties of such a lattice are studied. Applications of this design techniques for electron storage rings will be discussed.

  7. Collective Effects in a Diffraction Limited Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Ryutaro; Bane, Karl L.F.

    2015-10-20

    Our paper gives an overview of collective effects that are likely to appear and possibly limit the performance in a diffraction-limited storage ring (DLSR) that stores a high-intensity ultra-low-emittance beam. Beam instabilities and other intensity-dependent effects that may significantly impact the machine performance are covered. The latter include beam-induced machine heating, Touschek scattering, intra-beam scattering, as well as incoherent tune shifts. The general trend that the efforts to achieve ultra-low emittance result in increasing the machine coupling impedance and the beam sensitivity to instability is reviewed. The nature of coupling impedance in a DLSR is described, followed by a series of potentially dangerous beam instabilities driven by the former, such as resistive-wall, TMCI (transverse mode coupling instability), head-tail and microwave instabilities. Additionally, beam-ion and CSR (coherent synchrotron radiation) instabilities are also treated. Means to fight against collective effects such as lengthening of the bunch with passive harmonic cavities and bunch-by-bunch transverse feedback are introduced. Numerical codes developed and used to evaluate the machine coupling impedance, as well as to simulate beam instability using the former as inputs are described.

  8. Collective Effects in a Diffraction Limited Storage Ring

    DOE PAGES

    Nagaoka, Ryutaro; Bane, Karl L.F.

    2015-10-20

    Our paper gives an overview of collective effects that are likely to appear and possibly limit the performance in a diffraction-limited storage ring (DLSR) that stores a high-intensity ultra-low-emittance beam. Beam instabilities and other intensity-dependent effects that may significantly impact the machine performance are covered. The latter include beam-induced machine heating, Touschek scattering, intra-beam scattering, as well as incoherent tune shifts. The general trend that the efforts to achieve ultra-low emittance result in increasing the machine coupling impedance and the beam sensitivity to instability is reviewed. The nature of coupling impedance in a DLSR is described, followed by a seriesmore » of potentially dangerous beam instabilities driven by the former, such as resistive-wall, TMCI (transverse mode coupling instability), head-tail and microwave instabilities. Additionally, beam-ion and CSR (coherent synchrotron radiation) instabilities are also treated. Means to fight against collective effects such as lengthening of the bunch with passive harmonic cavities and bunch-by-bunch transverse feedback are introduced. Numerical codes developed and used to evaluate the machine coupling impedance, as well as to simulate beam instability using the former as inputs are described.« less

  9. VUV optical ring resonator for Duke storage ring free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.H.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The conceptual design of the multifaceted-mirror ring resonator for Duke storage ring VUV FEL is presented. The expected performance of the OK-4 FEL with ring resonator is described. We discuss in this paper our plans to study reflectivity of VUV mirrors and their resistivity to soft X-ray spontaneous radiation from OK-4 undulator.

  10. Steady State Microbunching for High Brilliance and High Repetition Rate Storage Ring-Based Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alex; Ratner, Daniel; Jiao, Yi; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

    2012-09-06

    Electron-based light sources have proven to be effective sources of high brilliance, high frequency radiation. Such sources are typically either linac-Free Electron Laser (FEL) or storage ring types. The linac-FEL type has high brilliance (because the beam is microbunched) but low repetition rate. The storage ring type has high repetition rate (rapid beam circulation) but comparatively low brilliance or coherence. We propose to explore the feasibility of a microbunched beam in a storage ring that promises high repetition rate and high brilliance. The steady-state-micro-bunch (SSMB) beam in storage ring could provide CW sources for THz, EUV, or soft X-rays. Several SSMB mechanisms have been suggested recently, and in this report, we review a number of these SSMB concepts as promising directions for high brilliance, high repetition rate light sources of the future. The trick of SSMB lies in the RF system, together with the associated synchrotron beam dynamics, of the storage ring. Considering various different RF arrangements, there could be considered a number of scenarios of the SSMB. In this report, we arrange these scenarios more or less in order of the envisioned degree of technical challenge to the RF system, and not in the chronological order of their original references. Once the stored beam is steady-state microbunched in a storage ring, it passes through a radiator repeatedly every turn (or few turns). The radiator extracts a small fraction of the beam energy as coherent radiation with a wavelength corresponding to the microbunched period of the beam. In contrast to an FEL, this radiator is not needed to generate the microbunching (as required e.g. by SASE FELs or seeded FELs), so the radiator can be comparatively simple and short.

  11. Storage ring mass spectrometry for nuclear structure and astrophysics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. H.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Uesaka, T.; Xu, H. S.

    2016-07-01

    In the last two and a half decades ion storage rings have proven to be powerful tools for precision experiments with unstable nuclides in the realm of nuclear structure and astrophysics. There are presently three storage ring facilities in the world at which experiments with stored radioactive ions are possible. These are the ESR in GSI, Darmstadt/Germany, the CSRe in IMP, Lanzhou/China, and the R3 storage ring in RIKEN, Saitama/Japan. In this work, an introduction to the facilities is given. Selected characteristic experimental results and their impact in nuclear physics and astrophysics are presented. Planned technical developments and the envisioned future experiments are outlined.

  12. Effects of CSR Generated from Upstream Bends in a Laser Plasma Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.; Qiang, J.; Venturini, M.

    2013-08-28

    The recent proposal [1] of a Laser Plasma Storage Ring (LPSR) envisions the use of a laser-plasma (LP) acceleration module to inject an electron beam into a compact 500 MeV storage ring. Electron bunches generated by LP methods are naturally very short (tens of femtoseconds), presenting peak currents on the order of 10 kA or higher. Of obvious concern is the impact of collective effects and in particular Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on the beam dynamics in the storage ring. Available simulation codes (e.g. Elegant [2]) usually include transient CSR effects but neglect the contribution of radiation emitted from trailing magnets. In a compact storage ring, with dipole magnets close to each other, cross talking between different magnets could in principle be important.In this note we investigate this effect for the proposed LPSR and show that, in fact, this effect is relatively small. However our analysis also indicates that CSR effects in general would be quite strong and deserve a a careful study.

  13. Steady-State Microbunching in a Storage Ring for Generating Coherent Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel F.; Chao, Alexander W.; /SLAC

    2011-05-19

    Synchrotrons and storage rings deliver radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum at high repetition rates, and free electron lasers (FELs) produce radiation pulses with high peak brightness. However, at present few light sources can generate both high repetition rate and high brightness outside the optical range. We propose to create steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring to produce coherent radiation at a high repetition rate or in continuous wave (CW) mode. In this paper we describe a general mechanism for producing SSMB and give sample parameters for EUV lithography and sub-millimeter sources. We also describe a similar arrangement to produce two pulses with variable spacing for pump-probe experiments. With technological advances, SSMB could reach the soft X-ray range (< 10 nm).

  14. Measurement of the beam longitudinal profile in a storage ring bynon-linear laser mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Beche, J.-F.; Byrd, J.; De Santis, S.; Denes, P.; Placidi, M.; Turner, W.; Zolotorev, M.

    2004-05-03

    We report on the development of a new technique for the measurement of the longitudinal beam profile in storage rings. This technique, which has been successfully demonstrated at the Advanced Light Source, mixes the synchrotron radiation with the light from a mode-locked solid state laser oscillator in a non-linear crystal. The up-converted radiation is then detected with a photomultiplier and processed to extract, store, and display the required information. The available choices of laser repetition frequency, pulse width, and phase modulation give a wide range of options for matching the bunch configuration of a particular storage ring. Besides the dynamic measurement of the longitudinal profile of each bunch, the instrument can monitor the evolution of the bunch tails, the presence of untrapped particles and their diffusion into nominally empty RF buckets (''ghostbunches'').

  15. Applications of differential algebra to single-particle dynamics in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.

    1991-09-01

    Recent developments in the use of differential algebra to study single-particle beam dynamics in charged-particle storage rings are the subject of this paper. Chapter 2 gives a brief review of storage rings. The concepts of betatron motion and synchrotron motion, and their associated resonances, are introduced. Also introduced are the concepts of imperfections, such as off-momentum, misalignment, and random and systematic errors, and their associated corrections. The chapter concludes with a discussion of numerical simulation principles and the concept of one-turn periodic maps. In Chapter 3, the discussion becomes more focused with the introduction of differential algebras. The most critical test for differential algebraic mapping techniques -- their application to long-term stability studies -- is discussed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 presents a discussion of differential algebraic treatment of dispersed betatron motion. The paper concludes in Chapter 6 with a discussion of parameterization of high-order maps.

  16. Analysis of sextupole effects on β function beating in the SSRF storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Shun-Qiang; Hou, Jie; Chen, Guang-Ling; Liu, Gui-Min

    2008-07-01

    In a storage ring, asymmetry of the β function with momentum deviation is the main reason for asymmetry of the dynamic aperture. This paper applies simulation method based on AT code in Matlab to investigate sensitivity of the β function beating and the tune shift to quadrupole field error with the presence of bending field error in the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) storage ring. Sextupole effect on the variation trend is analyzed. Dynamics of the lattice for working points close to and away from the second order structural resonance stop-band are compared. These results show that the β function beating with momentum deviation doesn't lie in the influence of the second order structural resonance stop-bands completely, but it is relevant to lattice structure. Supported by SSRF Project

  17. Physics issues in diffraction limited storage ring design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wei; Bai, ZhengHe; Gao, WeiWei; Feng, GuangYao; Li, WeiMin; Wang, Lin; He, DuoHui

    2012-05-01

    Diffraction limited electron storage ring is considered a promising candidate for future light sources, whose main characteristics are higher brilliance, better transverse coherence and better stability. The challenge of diffraction limited storage ring design is how to achieve the ultra low beam emittance with acceptable nonlinear performance. Effective linear and nonlinear parameter optimization methods based on Artificial Intelligence were developed for the storage ring physical design. As an example of application, partial physical design of HALS (Hefei Advanced Light Source), which is a diffraction limited VUV and soft X-ray light source, was introduced. Severe emittance growth due to the Intra Beam Scattering effect, which is the main obstacle to achieve ultra low emittance, was estimated quantitatively and possible cures were discussed. It is inspiring that better performance of diffraction limited storage ring can be achieved in principle with careful parameter optimization.

  18. Progress Report on the g-2 Storage Ring Magnet System

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, G.A.; Cullen, J.; Danby, G.; Green, M.A.; Jackson, J.; Jia, L.; Krienen, F.; Meier, R.; Meng, W.; Morse, W.; Pai, C.; Polk, I.; Prodell, A.; Shutt, R.; Snydstrup, L.; Yamamoto, A.

    1995-06-01

    The 3.1 GeV muon storage ring for the g-2 experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory has three large solenoid magnets that form a continuous 1.451 tesla storage ring dipole with an average beam bend radius of 7.1 meters. In addition to the three storage ring solenoids, there is an inflector dipole with nested dipole coils that create very little stray magnetic field. A superconducting shield on the inflector gets rid of most of the remaining stray flux. This paper reports on the progress made on the storage ring solenoid magnet system and the inflector as of June 1995. The results of cryogenic system tests are briefly reported.

  19. The performance of the Duke FEL storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Burnham, B.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    1995-12-31

    The commissioning of the Duke FEL storage ring has been completed. During commissioning, we have conducted a series of performance measurements on the storage ring lattice and the electron beam parameters. In this paper, we will discuss the techniques used in the measurements, present measurement results, and compare the measured parameters with the design specifications. In addition, we will present the expected OK-4 FEL performance based on the measured beam parameters.

  20. Commissioning and Early Operation Experience of the NSLS-II Storage Ring RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Cupolo, J.; Dilgen, T.; Rose, B.; Gash, W.; Ravindranath, V.; Yeddulla, M.; Papu, J.; Davila, P.; Holub, B.; Tagger, J.; Sikora, R.; Ramirez, G.; Kulpin, J.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a 3 GeV electron X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The storage ring RF system, essential for replenishing energy loss per turn of the electrons, consists of digital low level RF controllers, 310 kW CW klystron transmitters, CESR-B type superconducting cavities, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system for beam current up to 200mA.

  1. Measurement of photon statistics of wiggler radiation from an electron storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Toshiya; Teich, Malvin C.; Marshall, T. C.; Galayda, John

    1991-07-01

    The number of visible photons emitted by an electron bunch moving through a wiggler in the Brookhaven Synchrotron Light Source storage ring was repetitively measured using an analog photon counting technique, and the photon counting distribution, which is the probability of finding n photons versus n, was obtained. The photoelectron-counting distribution of detected spontaneous light from the wiggler obeys a negative-binomial distribution consistent with a multi-electron, multimode description of the light generation process. In the absence of the wiggler, the bending-magnet light emerging from the pyrex exit port obeys the Neyman type-A distribution.

  2. Safe operating conditions for NSLS-II Storage Ring Frontends commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, S.; Amundsen, C.; Ha, K.; Hussein, A.

    2015-04-02

    The NSLS-II Storage Ring Frontends are designed to safely accept the synchrotron radiation fan produced by respective insertion device when the electron beam orbit through the ID is locked inside the predefined Active Interlock Envelope. The Active Interlock is getting enabled at a particular beam current known as AI safe current limit. Below such current the beam orbit can be anywhere within the limits of the SR beam acceptance. During the FE commissioning the beam orbit is getting intentionally disturbed in the particular ID. In this paper we explore safe operating conditions for the Frontends commissioning.

  3. Theory of a modified Wadsworth monochromator matched to a low energy storage ring source

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    The concave diffraction grating in the Wadsworth mounting has been popular with synchrotron radiation spectroscopists because of its use of parallel light. This is well matched to experimental stations which are a great distance away from the source as would be the case in using a high energy synchrotron. For low energy storage rings the working distance is quite small and in this case it is appropriate to use a collimating mirror. Large collection angles are possible with this arrangement and reasonable resolution can be obtained using spherical surfaces. Astigmatism is much lower than for Rowland circle mountings. These questions are analyzed using an optical path function development and calculations are presented which include the aberrations both in the two optics and those caused by the large extension of the source in the direction of the radiation emission.

  4. Calculations for shortening the bunch length in storage rings using a harmonic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hao; Wu, Cong-Feng; He, Duo-Hui

    2014-08-01

    Using the Hefei Light Source phase II project (HLS- II) as an example, a theoretical analysis of shortening the bunch lengths using a higher harmonic cavity (HHC) is given. The threshold voltage of an active HHC and the threshold tuning angle of a passive HHC are first analysed. The optimum tuning angle for the constant detuning scenario and the optimum harmonic voltage for the constant voltage scenario are presented. The calculated results show that the reduced bunch length is about half that of the nominal bunch. The bunch lengths vary from 11 mm at 0.1 A to 7 mm at 0.4 A for the constant detuning scenario, while the bunch lengths are around 7 mm over the beam current range for the constant voltage scenario. In addition, the synchrotron frequency spread is increased. It indicates that HHC may be used to reduce the bunch length and increase the Landau damping of synchrotron oscillations in a storage ring.

  5. Direct Observation of Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Short Electron Bunches in Storage Rings.

    PubMed

    Evain, C; Roussel, E; Le Parquier, M; Szwaj, C; Tordeux, M-A; Brubach, J-B; Manceron, L; Roy, P; Bielawski, S

    2017-02-03

    In recent synchrotron radiation facilities, the use of short (picosecond) electron bunches is a powerful method for producing giant pulses of terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation. Here we report on the first direct observation of these pulse shapes with a few picoseconds resolution, and of their dynamics over a long time. We thus confirm in a very direct way the theories predicting an interplay between two physical processes. Below a critical bunch charge, we observe a train of identical THz pulses (a broadband Terahertz comb) stemming from the shortness of the electron bunches. Above this threshold, a large part of the emission is dominated by drifting structures, which appear through spontaneous self-organization. These challenging single-shot THz recordings are made possible by using a recently developed photonic time stretch detector with a high sensitivity. The experiment has been realized at the SOLEIL storage ring.

  6. Direct Observation of Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Short Electron Bunches in Storage Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evain, C.; Roussel, E.; Le Parquier, M.; Szwaj, C.; Tordeux, M.-A.; Brubach, J.-B.; Manceron, L.; Roy, P.; Bielawski, S.

    2017-02-01

    In recent synchrotron radiation facilities, the use of short (picosecond) electron bunches is a powerful method for producing giant pulses of terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation. Here we report on the first direct observation of these pulse shapes with a few picoseconds resolution, and of their dynamics over a long time. We thus confirm in a very direct way the theories predicting an interplay between two physical processes. Below a critical bunch charge, we observe a train of identical THz pulses (a broadband Terahertz comb) stemming from the shortness of the electron bunches. Above this threshold, a large part of the emission is dominated by drifting structures, which appear through spontaneous self-organization. These challenging single-shot THz recordings are made possible by using a recently developed photonic time stretch detector with a high sensitivity. The experiment has been realized at the SOLEIL storage ring.

  7. Analytical Approach to Eigen-Emittance Evolution in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Boaz; /SLAC

    2006-05-16

    This dissertation develops the subject of beam evolution in storage rings with nearly uncoupled symplectic linear dynamics. Linear coupling and dissipative/diffusive processes are treated perturbatively. The beam distribution is assumed Gaussian and a function of the invariants. The development requires two pieces: the global invariants and the local stochastic processes which change the emittances, or averages of the invariants. A map based perturbation theory is described, providing explicit expressions for the invariants near each linear resonance, where small perturbations can have a large effect. Emittance evolution is determined by the damping and diffusion coefficients. The discussion is divided into the cases of uniform and non-uniform stochasticity, synchrotron radiation an example of the former and intrabeam scattering the latter. For the uniform case, the beam dynamics is captured by a global diffusion coefficient and damping decrement for each eigen-invariant. Explicit expressions for these quantities near coupling resonances are given. In many cases, they are simply related to the uncoupled values. Near a sum resonance, it is found that one of the damping decrements becomes negative, indicating an anti-damping instability. The formalism is applied to a number of examples, including synchrobetatron coupling caused by a crab cavity, a case of current interest where there is concern about operation near half integer {nu}{sub x}. In the non-uniform case, the moment evolution is computed directly, which is illustrated through the example of intrabeam scattering. Our approach to intrabeam scattering damping and diffusion has the advantage of not requiring a loosely-defined Coulomb Logarithm. It is found that in some situations there is a small difference between our results and the standard approaches such as Bjorken-Mtingwa, which is illustrated by comparison of the two approaches and with a measurement of Au evolution in RHIC. Finally, in combining IBS

  8. Design of a novel electrostatic ion storage ring at KACST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Alshammari, S. M.; Welsch, C. P.; Alharbi, H. H.

    2013-05-01

    A new electrostatic storage ring for beams at energies up to 30 keV·q is currently under development at the National Centre for Mathematics and Physics (NCMP), King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). The ring design is based on the existing electrostatic storage rings, but stretches significantly beyond them in that it shall form the core of a unique flexible experimental facility at KACST. The lattice of this ring has been designed in a way that enables the use of state-of-the-art experimental methods to study electron-ion, laser-ion, and ion-neutral beams interactions. The lattice design also allows for a future upgrade of the ring to a double storage ring structure that would enable ion-ion beam interactions to be performed. In this paper, we present the design of this ring with a focus on beam dynamics calculations for the 7° single-bend racetrack layout. The study is principally based on the SIMION8 program. We complemented this study further by using purpose-written routine and MAD-X simulation code. An in-depth investigation into beam stability under consideration of non-linear field components in the electrostatic optical elements, is presented. Finally, different working points and stability regions are discussed.

  9. Radiation Safety Considerations for Design of the SPEAR3 Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, Sayed H.

    2003-03-17

    The SPEAR3 storage ring at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is an upgrade of the existing SPEAR2 ring to a 3rd-generation storage ring with beam parameters of 3 GeV of electron beam energy, 18 nm-radian emittance and up to 500 mA of circulating current. While the existing injector will not be changed, the 234-m-circumference SPEAR2 ring components will be completely replaced with new components including C-shaped dipoles. The concrete shielding walls are to remain unchanged. This restriction, when considered in conjunction with the significant increase in the current and loss of self-shielding in the dipole magnets, requires careful study of the SPEAR3 shielding. This paper describes the methodology used for calculating the required shielding in a generic method. The criteria used for the design of shielding and beam loss estimates for various modes of beam operation are also presented. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used extensively in generating source term data (dose rate as a function of angle for photons and neutrons) for both thin and thick targets. Attenuation profiles of neutrons and photons in concrete and lead shield materials are also presented. These data are being used to evaluate the shielding requirements for the lateral and ratchet walls. The current status of this approach will be discussed. Other issues presented include the use of active devices that are part of the radiation safety systems for the SPEAR3.

  10. An electrostatic storage ring for atomic and molecular science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, T.; Chida, K.; Noda, K.; Watanabe, I.

    2002-04-01

    An electrostatic storage ring with a circumference of 8.1 m was designed for the research of atomic and molecular science. The race-track ring consists of two 160° deflectors, four 10° deflectors and four quadrupole doublets. For the 160° deflectors, a cylindrical shape has been adopted. In this ring, there are four types of stable regions with and without waists of the beam envelope in the middle of the deflectors. A beam test was performed with 20-keV ion beams from an ECR ion source. The observed lifetimes of beams stored in each stable region were different under the same conditions, except for the tune values. The lifetimes did not depend much on the injected beam intensity for a current of less than about 100 nA. The design and performance of the electrostatic storage ring are presented.

  11. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M. )

    1994-10-10

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics, issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. I will discuss in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of our discussion is inspired by the problems we have encountered and the useful things we have learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is our work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  12. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.

    1993-11-01

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics. Issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. The author discusses in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of the discussion is inspired by the problems that were encountered and the useful things learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is the work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  13. Higher-order modes in the APS storage ring waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, S.O.; Kustom, R.L.

    1993-07-01

    Twelve higher-order modes (HOMs) in the single-cell accelerating cavities for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring were calculated to have complex impedances that will cause coupled-bunched instabilities near or below the 300mA positron current which is the design goal. Some of these modes couple, through the coupling loop, from the storage ring cavity into the waveguide. This study investigates the transmission of these modes from the cavity into the waveguide. The standing wave ratio (VSWR) of a WR2300 hybrid waveguide component has been measured at each HOM frequency, and its effect on the transmitted modes in the waveguide is studied.

  14. Lattice optimization for the HLS-II storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zheng-He; Wang, Lin; Jia, Qi-Ka; Li, Wei-Min

    2013-01-01

    The upgrade project of the Hefei Light Source (HLS), named HLS-II, is under way, which includes the reconstruction of its storage ring. The HLS-II storage ring has lower emittance and more straight sections available for insertion devices as compared with the present HLS storage ring. The scan method is applied to the linear lattice optimization for the HLS-II storage ring to get thorough information about the lattice. To reduce the amount of computation, several scans with different grid spacing values are conducted. In addition, the calculation of the chromatic sextupole strength for the achromatic mode is included in the scan, which is useful for nonlinear lattice optimization. To better analyze the obtained solutions in the scan, the lattice properties and the variables of quadrupole strengths are statistically analyzed. The process of selecting solutions is described in detail, including the choice of the working point, the settings for the emittance and optical functions, and the restriction of maximum magnet strength. Two obtained lattices, one for the achromatic mode and the other for the non-achromatic mode, are presented, including their optical functions and optimized dynamic apertures.

  15. Longitudinal instability studies at the SURF II storage ring at NIST.

    SciTech Connect

    Harkay, K.C.; Sereno, N.S.

    1998-08-27

    Measurements of the longitudinal instability observed in the storage ring at the Synchrotrons Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF II) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NET) were performed to understand the mechanism driving the instability. The instability, studied in depth by Ralcowsky and others, manifests itself in broad resonance features in the horizontal and vertical motion spectrum of the synchrotrons light from DC to a few kHz. Also observed are multiple synchrotrons harmonics that modulate the revolution harmonics; these are characteristic of longitudinal phase oscillations. These spectral features of the motion are found to be correlated with the periodic lengthening and shortening of the bunch length on time scales from {approximately}0.1 ms to 20 ms, depending on machine and radio-frequency (rf) system parameters. In this report, the growth rate of the instability is determined from measurements using an rf pickup electrode. The measured growth rates are compared to computed growth rates from an analytical model. Recommendations are made regarding options to control or mitigate the instability. In light of upgrade plans for SURF III, a few comments are presented about the beam lifetime.

  16. Radiation protection at synchrotron radiation facilities.

    PubMed

    Liu, J C; Vylet, V

    2001-01-01

    A synchrotron radiation (SR) facility typically consists of an injector, a storage ring, and SR beamlines. The latter two features are unique to SR facilities, when compared to other types of accelerator facilities. The SR facilities have the characteristics of low injection beam power, but high stored beam power. The storage ring is generally above ground with people occupying the experimental floor around a normally thin concrete ring wall. This paper addresses the radiation issues, in particular the shielding design, associated with the storage ring and SR beamlines. Normal and abnormal beam losses for injection and stored beams, as well as typical storage ring operation, are described. Ring shielding design for photons and neutrons from beam losses in the ring is discussed. Radiation safety issues and shielding design for SR beamlines, considering gas bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation, are reviewed. Radiation source terms and the methodologies for shielding calculations are presented.

  17. SECONDARY ELECTRON PRODUCTION AT THE SNS STORAGE RING COLLIMATOR.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,S.Y.

    1999-03-29

    Secondary electron (SE) production is briefly reviewed. If the collimator of the SNS storage ring allows proton beam scraping to take place, the electron yield might be quite large. At the AGS Booster, by steering the Au{sup 31+} ion beam into the electrostatic inflector, beam scraping effect on SE production is studied. The results of this experiment can be translated into the situation of proton beam scraping at the SNS collimator. It seems sufficient to support a new look of the SNS ring collimator design.

  18. Evidences for isochronous behavior in electron and ion storage for a low energy electrostatic storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanjers, T. L.; Sullivan, M. R.; Reddish, T. J.; Hammond, P.

    2014-02-01

    The temporal width of a stored bunch of low energy (~30 eV) electrons circulating in desk-top sized passive electrostatic storage ring has been observed to be unchanging with orbit number. The storage ring has been operated with a range of asymmetric voltages for both stored electron and ion bunches with a particular focus on controllably probing the edges of stable storage regions to explore variations in the temporal widths as a function of storage time. For electron storage an operating condition is identified in which the temporal width approaches a constant value after a period of increase - isochronous behavior. Measurements using stored ions indicate similar behavior can be achieved. Possible mechanisms for the observed behavior are discussed.

  19. The KACST Heavy-Ion Electrostatic Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuqhim, A. A.; Alshammari, S. M.; El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Papash, A. I.; Welsch, C. P.

    2011-10-01

    A novel Electrostatic Storage Ring (ESR) for beams at energies up to 30keV/q is now being constructed at the National Centre for Mathematics and Physics (NCMP), King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). The ring is designed to be the core of a highly flexible experimental platform that will combine a large package of complementary beam techniques for atomic and molecular physics and related fields. The lattice design had to cover the different experimental techniques that the ring will be equipped with, such as e.g. Electron-Ion, Laser-Ion, Ion-Ion or Ion-Neutral beams, in both crossed and merged-beam configurations. The development of such an ESR is realized in a staged approach, in which a simple and early-run adaptation of the ring is built first, and then this basic version is upgraded to a higher symmetry of the ultimate version of the ring. Here, we report a general overview of this technical development with a focus on the layout of the first built stage of the ring.

  20. The KACST Heavy-Ion Electrostatic Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Almuqhim, A. A.; Alshammari, S. M.; El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Papash, A. I.; Welsch, C. P.

    2011-10-27

    A novel Electrostatic Storage Ring (ESR) for beams at energies up to 30keV/q is now being constructed at the National Centre for Mathematics and Physics (NCMP), King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). The ring is designed to be the core of a highly flexible experimental platform that will combine a large package of complementary beam techniques for atomic and molecular physics and related fields. The lattice design had to cover the different experimental techniques that the ring will be equipped with, such as e.g. Electron-Ion, Laser-Ion, Ion-Ion or Ion-Neutral beams, in both crossed and merged-beam configurations. The development of such an ESR is realized in a staged approach, in which a simple and early-run adaptation of the ring is built first, and then this basic version is upgraded to a higher symmetry of the ultimate version of the ring. Here, we report a general overview of this technical development with a focus on the layout of the first built stage of the ring.

  1. Storage Ring Measurements of Electron Impact Ionization for Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Becker, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Lestinsky, M.; Müller, A.; Novotný, O.; Repnow, R.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.; Wolf, A.; Savin, D. W.

    2013-07-01

    The interpretation of astrophysical spectra requires knowledge of the charge state distribution (CSD) of the plasma. The CSD is determined by the rates of ionization and recombination. Thus, accurate electron impact ionization (EII) data are needed to calculate the CSD of the solar atmosphere as well as for other electron-ionized astrophysical objects, such as stars, supernovae, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies. We are studying EII for astrophysically important ions using the TSR storage ring located at the Max Plank Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Storage ring measurements are largely free of the metastable contamination found in other experimental geometries, resulting in unambiguous EII data. We have found discrepancies of about 10% - 30% between our measured cross sections and those commonly used in CSD models. Because it is impractical to perform experimental measurements for every astrophysically relevant ion, theory must provide the bulk of the necessary EII data. These experimental results provide an essential benchmark for such EII calculations.

  2. Lattice study for the HLS-II storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zheng-He; Wang, Lin; Jia, Qi-Ka; Li, Wei-Min

    2013-04-01

    The Hefei Light Source (HLS) is undergoing a major upgrade project, named HLS- II, in order to obtain lower emittance and more insertion device straight sections. Undulators are the main insertion devices in the HLS- II storage ring. In this paper, based on the database of lattice parameters built for the HLS- II storage ring obtained by the global scan method, we use the quantity related to the undulator radiation brightness to more directly search for high brightness lattices. Lattice solutions for achromatic and non-achromatic modes are easily found with lower emittance, smaller beta functions at the center of the insertion device straight sections and lower dispersion in nonzero dispersion straight sections compared with the previous lattice solutions. In this paper, the superperiod lattice with alternating high and low horizontal beta functions in long straight sections for the achromatic mode is studied using the multiobjective particle swarm optimization algorithm.

  3. Global coupling and decoupling of the APS storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Y.C.; Liu, J.; Teng, L.C.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes a study of controlling the coupling between the horizontal and the vertical betatron oscillations in the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. First, we investigate the strengthening of coupling using two families of skew quadrupoles. Twenty skew quadrupoles are arranged in the 40 sectors of the storage ring and powered in such a way so as to generate both quadrature components of the required 21st harmonic. The numerical results from tracking a single particle are presented for the various configurations of skew quadrupoles. Second, we describe the global decoupling procedure to minimize the unwanted coupling effects. These are mainly due to the random roll errors of normal quadruples. It is shown that even with the rather large rms roll error of 2 mrad, the coupling effects can be compensated for with 20 skew quadrupoles each having maximum strength one order of magnitude lower than the typical normal quadrupole strength.

  4. Lasing of middle-infrared free-election lasers using the storage ring NIJI-IV.

    PubMed

    Sei, Norihiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kawakatsu

    2011-09-15

    We report for the first time to our knowledge the experimental realization of a storage ring free-electron laser (FEL) in the middle-infrared (MIR) region. A technique to adjust the optical cavity using higher harmonic FELs was developed for a fundamental FEL in the MIR region. The MIR FELs were oscillated in the wavelength region of 2475 to 2673 nm, and the relative linewidth was 5×10⁻⁴. A quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam with an energy of 700 keV was generated using FEL Compton backscattering. We were able to realize a quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam, whose energy is difficult to generate even in advanced synchrotron radiation facilities.

  5. Conceptual design of an isochronous ring to generate coherent terahertz synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama, H.; Tanaka, H.; Kumagai, N.; Kawai1, M.; Hinode, F.; Muto, T.; Nanbu, K.; Tanaka, T.; Kasamsook, K.; Akiyama, K.; Yasuda, M.

    2006-11-01

    A novel coherent light source project in the terahertz wavelength region has been developed at Tohoku University. The project may involve development of high brightness electron guns employing cathode of single crystal LaB6 for production of a very short bunch length less than 100 fs. The light source has been designed based on isochronous ring optics to preserve the short bunch length. Although the ring is not a storage ring, the lattice of isochronous optics has resulted from consideration of path length differences due to the betatron motion. The coherent terahertz photons are emitted from circulating electron bunches injected from the linac. Even though the beam is bent by dipole magnets, the bunch shape does not collapse because of the nearly complete isochronous optics of the ring. Since production of the coherent terahertz radiation requires a bunch length less than 100 fs (stdv, if Gaussian), the maximum path length difference created by passing through the dipoles is controlled to not exceed a couple of tens of femtoseconds. The predicted spectrum of the coherent terahertz radiation and its characteristics are also presented.

  6. 40-{angstrom} FEL designs for the PEP storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C.; Nuhn, H.D.; Tatchyn, R.; Winick, H.; Pellegrini, C.

    1991-12-31

    We explore the use of the 2.2-km PEP storage ring at SLAC to drive a 40-{Angstrom} free-electron laser in the self-amplified spontaneous emission configuration. Various combinations for electron-beam and undulator parameters, as well as special undulator designs, are discussed. Saturation and high peak, in-band, coherent power (460 MW) are possible with a 67-m, hybrid permanent-magnet undulator in a ring bypass. A 100-m, cusp-field undulator can achieve high average, in-band, coherent power (0.25 W) in the main ring. The existing, 25.6-m, Paladin undulator at LLNL, with the addition of optical-klystron dispersive sections, is considered for both peak and average power. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. 40- angstrom FEL designs for the PEP storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C. ); Nuhn, H.D.; Tatchyn, R.; Winick, H. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Pellegrini, C. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    We explore the use of the 2.2-km PEP storage ring at SLAC to drive a 40-{Angstrom} free-electron laser in the self-amplified spontaneous emission configuration. Various combinations for electron-beam and undulator parameters, as well as special undulator designs, are discussed. Saturation and high peak, in-band, coherent power (460 MW) are possible with a 67-m, hybrid permanent-magnet undulator in a ring bypass. A 100-m, cusp-field undulator can achieve high average, in-band, coherent power (0.25 W) in the main ring. The existing, 25.6-m, Paladin undulator at LLNL, with the addition of optical-klystron dispersive sections, is considered for both peak and average power. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Multi-objective dynamic aperture optimization for storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongjun; Yang, Lingyun

    2016-11-01

    We report an efficient dynamic aperture (DA) optimization approach using multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA), which is driven by nonlinear driving terms computation. It was found that having small low order driving terms is a necessary but insufficient condition of having a decent DA. Then direct DA tracking simulation is implemented among the last generation candidates to select the best solutions. The approach was demonstrated successfully in optimizing NSLS-II storage ring DA.

  9. A transverse electron target for heavy ion storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, Sabrina Meusel, Oliver; Kester, Oliver

    2015-01-09

    Electron-ion interaction processes are of fundamental interest for several research fields like atomic and astrophysics as well as plasma applications. To address this topic, a transverse electron target based on the crossed beam technique was designed and constructed for the application in storage rings. Using a sheet beam of free electrons in crossed beam geometry promises a good energy resolution and gives access to the interaction region for spectroscopy. The produced electron beam has a length of 10 cm in ion beam direction and a width in the transverse plane of 5 mm. Therewith, electron densities of up to 10{sup 9} electrons/cm{sup 3} are reachable in the interaction region. The target allows the adjustment of the electron beam current and energy in the region of several 10 eV to a few keV. Simulations have been performed regarding the energy resolution for electron-ion collisions and its influence on spectroscopic measurements. Also, the effect on ion-beam optics due to the space charge of the electron beam was investigated. Presently the electron target is integrated into a test bench to evaluate its performance for its dedicated installation at the storage rings of the FAIR facility. Therefore, optical diagnostics of the interaction region and charge state analysis with a magnetic spectrometer is used. Subsequently, the target will be installed temporarily at the Frankfurt Low-Energy Storage Ring (FLSR) for further test measurements.

  10. RF stations of the SPring-8 storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, M.; Ego, H.; Kawashima, Y.; Ohashi, Y.; Ohshima, T.; Takashima, T.

    1997-05-01

    Construction of three RF stations in the storage ring of SPring-8 has been completed. Twenty four single-cell cavities of which inside dimensions are trimmed completely systematically were installed in the storage ring. A group of eight single-cell cavities as a component of the storage ring is occupied in an RF station. A series of processes such as installation of couplers, evacuation, baking and connection of waveguides were carried out. Three klystrons and their power equipments were also installed. Low power control system which includes tuner control, feedback such as phase lock loop and keeping voltage in a cavity constant was constructed and tuned. From August to December in 1996, high power test up to 800 kW were carried out in each RF station without serious trouble and particularly it was verified that water cooling system for cavity could keep the water temperature in the range of 29.89 to 30.15 degrees. But some bugs on klystron power equipments were found. We report on the construction processes and the results of high power test.

  11. Characterization of electron clouds in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator using TE-wave transmission

    SciTech Connect

    De Santis, S.; Byrd, J. M.; Billing, M.; Palmer, M.; Sikora, J.; Carlson, B.

    2010-01-02

    A relatively new technique for measuring the electron cloud density in storage rings has been developed and successfully demonstrated [S. De Santis, J.M. Byrd, F. Caspers, A. Krasnykh, T. Kroyer, M.T.F. Pivi, and K.G. Sonnad, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 094801 (2008).]. We present the experimental results of a systematic application of this technique at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator. The technique is based on the phase modulation of the TE mode transmitted in a synchrotron beam pipe caused by the periodic variation of the density of electron plasma. Because of the relatively simple hardware requirements, this method has become increasingly popular and has been since successfully implemented in several machines. While the principles of this technique are straightforward, quantitative derivation of the electron cloud density from the measurement requires consideration of several effects, which we address in detail.

  12. Generation of ultrashort coherent vacuum ultraviolet pulses using electron storage rings: a new bright light source for experiments.

    PubMed

    De Ninno, G; Allaria, E; Coreno, M; Curbis, F; Danailov, M B; Karantzoulis, E; Locatelli, A; Menteş, T O; Nino, M A; Spezzani, C; Trovò, M

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that seeded harmonic generation on electron storage rings can produce coherent optical pulses in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range. The experiment is performed at Elettra, where coherent pulses are generated at 132 nm, with a duration of about 100 fs. The light source has a repetition rate of 1 kHz and adjustable polarization; it is very bright, with a peak power several orders of magnitude above that of spontaneous synchrotron radiation. Owing to high stability, the source is used in a test photoemission electron microscopy experiment. We anticipate that seeded harmonic generation on storage rings can lead to unprecedented developments in time-resolved femtosecond spectroscopy and microscopy.

  13. Continuously tunable narrowband pulses in the THz gap from laser-modulated electron bunches in a storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungelenk, P.; Höner, M.; Huck, H.; Khan, S.; Mai, C.; Meyer auf der Heide, A.; Evain, C.; Szwaj, C.; Bielawski, S.

    2017-02-01

    This article reports on the generation of narrowband coherent synchrotron radiation from an electron storage ring. For the first time, this kind of radiation was now produced with continuously tunable frequencies in the so-called "THz gap" (between 1.2 and 5.6 THz), whereas previous experiments were limited to below 750 GHz. The experiment was performed at the DELTA storage ring in Dortmund, Germany, employing the interaction of external intensity-modulated laser pulses with an electron bunch, which causes a periodic longitudinal modulation of the charge density on a sub-millimeter scale. Furthermore, a strong influence of third-order dispersion in the laser pulses on the bandwidth and peak intensity of the THz radiation was observed. This effect is discussed in detail based on numerical simulations of the laser pulse generation and laser-electron interaction, and a modification of the laser system for compensating third-order dispersion is proposed.

  14. Gas bremsstrahlung studies for medium energy electron storage rings using FLUKA Monte Carlo code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahani, Prasanta Kumar; Haridas, G.; Sinha, Anil K.; Hannurkar, P. R.

    2016-02-01

    Gas bremsstrahlung is generated due to the interaction of the stored electron beam with residual gas molecules of the vacuum chamber in a storage ring. As the opening angle of the bremsstrahlung is very small, the scoring area used in Monte Carlo simulation plays a dominant role in evaluating the absorbed dose. In the present work gas bremsstrahlung angular distribution and absorbed dose for the energies ranging from 1 to 5 GeV electron storage rings are studied using the Monte Carlo code, FLUKA. From the study, an empirical formula for gas bremsstrahlung dose estimation was deduced. The results were compared with the data obtained from reported experimental values. The results obtained from simulations are found to be in very good agreement with the reported experimental data. The results obtained are applied in estimating the gas bremsstrahlung dose for 2.5 GeV synchrotron radiation source, Indus-2 at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, India. The paper discusses the details of the simulation and the results obtained.

  15. Improved temperature regulation of process water systems for the APS storage ring.

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, C.; Dortwegt, R.

    2002-10-10

    Beam stability and operational reliability of critical mechanical systems are key performance issues for synchrotron accelerators such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Stability is influenced by temperature fluctuations of the process water (PW) used for cooling and/or temperature conditioning storage ring (SR) components such as vacuum chambers, magnets, absorbers, etc. Operational reliability is crucial in maintaining facility beam operations and remaining within downtime ''budgets.'' Water systems for the APS storage ring were originally provided with a distributive control system (DCS) capable of regulation to {+-}1.0 F, as specified by facility design requirements. After several years of operation, a particular mode of component mortality indicated a need for upgrade of the temperature control system. The upgrade that was implemented was chosen for both improved component reliability and temperature stability (now on the order of {+-}0.2 F for copper components and {+-}0.05 F for aluminum components). The design employs a network of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) for temperature control that functions under supervision of the existing DCS. The human-machine interface (HMI) of the PLC system employs RSView32 software. The PLC system also interfaces with the EPICS accelerator control system to provide monitoring of temperature control parameters. Eventual supervision of the PLC system by EPICS is possible with this design.

  16. Compensation for booster leakage field in the Duke storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Hao, Hao; Mikhailov, Stepan F.; Popov, Victor; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Ying. K.

    2017-01-01

    The High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) at Duke University is an accelerator-driven Compton gamma-ray source, providing high flux gamma-ray beam from 1 MeV to 100 MeV for photo-nuclear physics research. The HIGS facility operates three accelerators, a linac pre-injector (0.16 GeV), a booster injector (0.16—1.2 GeV), and an electron storage ring (0.24—1.2 GeV). Because of the proximity of the booster injector to the storage ring, the magnetic field of the booster dipoles close to the ring can significantly alter the closed orbit in the storage ring being operated in the low energy region. This type of orbit distortion can be a problem for certain precision experiments which demand a high degree of energy consistency of the gamma-ray beam. This energy consistency can be achieved by maintaining consistent aiming of the gamma-ray beam, and therefore a steady electron beam orbit and angle at the Compton collision point. To overcome the booster leakage field problem, we have developed an orbit compensation scheme. This scheme is developed using two fast orbit correctors and implemented as a feedforward which is operated transparently together with the slow orbit feedback system. In this paper, we will describe the development of this leakage field compensation scheme, and report the measurement results, which demonstrate the effectiveness of the scheme. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175180, 11475167) and US DOE (DE-FG02-97ER41033)

  17. Los Alamos high-current proton storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G. P.; Hardekopf, R. A.; Jason, A. J.; Clout, P. N.; Sawyer, G. A.

    1985-05-01

    The Proton Storage Ring (PSR), whose installation was recently completed at Los Alamos, is a fast-cycling high-current accumulator designed to produce intense 800 MeV proton pulses for driving a spallation neutron source. The ring converts long beam pulses from the LAMPF linear accelerator into short bunches well matched to requirements of a high-resolution neutron-scattering materials science program. The initial performance goal for this program is to provide 100-(MU)A average current at the neutron production target within a 12-Hz pulse rate. Operation at 20 (MU)A is scheduled for September 1985, with full intensity within the next year. The storage ring was originally designed to function in a second mode in which six 1-ns bunches are accumulated and separately extracted every LAMPF macropulse. Implementation of this mode, which would serve a fast-neutron nuclear-physics program, was deferred in favor of initial concentration on the neutron-scattering program. The PSR design and status is summarized. Unique machine features include high peak current, two-step charge-stripping injection, a low-impedance buncher amplifier to counter beam-loading, and a high-repetition-rate strip-line extraction kicker.

  18. Beam Loss Monitors for NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Cameron, P.

    2011-03-28

    The shielding for the NSLS-II storage ring will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam losses in two cells of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of <10% top-off injection beam current. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed levels for a period of time that could cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring system will have beam loss monitors that will measure where the beam charge is lost around the ring, to warn operators if losses approach the design limits. To measure the charge loss quantitatively, we propose measuring the electron component of the shower as beam electrons hit the vacuum chamber (VC) wall. This will be done using the Cerenkov light as electrons transit ultra-pure fused silica rods placed close to the inner edge of the VC. The entire length of the rod will collect light from the electrons of the spread out shower resulting from the small glancing angle of the lost beam particles to the VC wall. The design and measurements results of the prototype Cerenkov BLM will be presented.

  19. Relativistic klystron driven compact high gradient accelerator as an injector to an X-ray synchrotron radiation ring

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L.

    1990-01-01

    A compact high gradient accelerator driven by a relativistic klystron is utilized to inject high energy electrons into an X-ray synchrotron radiation ring. The high gradients provided by the relativistic klystron enables accelerator structure to be much shorter (typically 3 meters) than conventional injectors. This in turn enables manufacturers which utilize high energy, high intensity X-rays to produce various devices, such as computer chips, to do so on a cost effective basis.

  20. Ionization cooling in a low-energy proton storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David V.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    At the FFAG05 meeting, Mori and Okabe presented a scenario in which the lifetime of protons in a low-energy storage ring ({approx}10 MeV) is extended by energy-loss in a wedge foil, and this enables greater neutron production from the foil. The lifetime extension is due to the cooling effect of this energy loss. We have previously analyzed ionization cooling for muons at optimal cooling energies. The same equations, with appropriate adaptations, can be used to analyze the dynamic situation for proton-material interactions at low energies. In this note we discuss this extension and calculate cooling and heating effects at these very different parameters. The ring could provide a practical application of ionization cooling methods.

  1. Nomenclature and name assignment rules for the APS storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, G.

    1992-03-16

    Because the APS accelerators are moving into the fabrication/assembly/installation stage, it is important for consistent naming conventions to be used throughout the project. The intent of this note is to dictate the rules to be adhered to when naming devices in the storage ring. These rules are generic in nature, and shall be applied in principle to the other machines as well. It is essential that every component have a unique and, hopefully, easily recognizable name. Every ASD and XFD group, except for magnets, must interface with the control system. For this reason all device names were developed keeping in mind their actual function, such as controlling or monitoring some device in the ring. Even though magnets are not directly interfaced to the control system, their power supplies are; therefore, a magnet will have the same name as its associated power supply.

  2. ELASR - An electrostatic storage ring for atomic and molecular physics at KACST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ghazaly, Mohamed O. A.

    A new ELectrostAtic Storage Ring (ELASR) has been designed and built at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It was developed to be the core of a new storage ring laboratory for atomic and molecular physics at KACST. ELASR follows the standard design of the pioneering storage ring ELISA and it thereby features a racetrack single-bend shaped ring. Complementary simulation code packages were used to work out the design under the requirements of the projected experiments. This paper reports a short description of the ELASR storage ring through an overview of its design and construction.

  3. Ultra Cold Photoelectron Beams for Ion Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, D. A.; Krantz, C.; Shornikov, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Hoffmann, J.; Wolf, A.; Jaroshevich, A. S.; Kosolobov, S. N.; Terekhov, A. S.

    2009-08-04

    An ultra cold electron target with a cryogenic GaAs photocathode source, developed for the Heidelberg TSR, delivers electron currents up to a few mA with typical kinetic energies of few keV and provides unprecedented energy resolution below 1 meV for electron-ion recombination merged-beam experiments. For the new generation of low-energy electrostatic storage rings, cold electron beams from a photocathode source can bring additional benefits, improving the cooling efficiency of stored ions and making it possible to cool even heavy, slow molecules by electron beams of energies of only a few eV or even below.

  4. Analysis ob beam losses at PSR (Proton Storage Ring)

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Plum, M.A.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    Beam losses and the resulting component activation at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have limited operating currents to about 30..mu..A average at a repetition rate of 15 Hz. Loss rates were found to be approximately proportional to the circulating current and can be understood by a detailed accounting of emittance growth in the two step injection process along with Coulomb scattering of the stored beam during multiple traversals of the injection foil. Calculations and simulations of the losses are in reasonable agreement with measurements.

  5. Manufacture of the ALS storage ring vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Kurt

    1991-08-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) storage ring has a 4.9 meter magnetic radius and an antechamber type vacuum chamber. These two requirements makes conventional bent tube manufacturing techniques difficult. The ALS sector vacuum chambers have been made by machining two halves out of aluminum plate and welding at the mid plane. Each of these chambers have over 50 penetrations with metal sealed flanges and seven metal sealed poppet valves which use the chamber wall as the valve seat. The sector chambers are 10 meters long and some features in the chambers must be located to .25 mm. This paper describes how and how successfully these features have been achieved.

  6. Geometric phase of atoms in a magnetic storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; You, L.

    2006-12-15

    A magnetically trapped atom experiences an adiabatic geometric (Berry's) phase due to changing field direction. We investigate theoretically such an Aharonov-Bohm-like geometric phase for atoms adiabatically moving inside a storage ring as demonstrated in several recent experiments. Our result shows that this phase shift is easily observable in a closed-loop interference experiment, and thus the shift has to be accounted for in the proposed inertial sensing applications. The spread in phase shift due to the atom transverse distribution is quantified through numerical simulations.

  7. Optical distortions in electron/positron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.L.; Donald, M.; Servranckx, R.

    1983-01-01

    We have studied the optical distortions in the PEP electron/positron storage ring for various optical configurations using the computer programs DIMAT, HARMON, PATRICIA, and TURTLE. The results are shown graphically by tracing several thousand trajectories from one interaction region to the next using TURTLE and by tracing a few selected rays several hundred turns using the programs DIMAT and PATRICIA. The results show an interesting correlation between the calculated optical cleanliness of a particular lattice configuration and the observed operating characteristics of the machine.

  8. Magnet design for a low-emittance storage ring

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Martin; Anderberg, Bengt; Lindgren, Lars-Johan

    2014-01-01

    The MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring, currently under construction, pursues the goal of low electron beam emittance by using a multi-bend achromat magnet lattice, which is realised by having several consecutive magnet elements precision-machined out of a common solid iron block, 2.3–3.4 m long. With this magnet design solution, instead of having 1320 individual magnets, the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring is built up using 140 integrated ‘magnet block’ units, containing all these magnet elements. Major features of this magnet block design are compactness, vibration stability and that the alignment of magnet elements within each unit is given by the mechanical accuracy of the CNC machining rather than individual field measurement and adjustment. This article presents practical engineering details of implementing this magnet design solution, and mechanical + magnetic field measurement results from the magnet production series. At the time of writing (spring 2014), the production series, which is totally outsourced to industry, is roughly half way through, with mechanical/magnetic QA conforming to specifications. It is the conclusion of the authors that the MAX IV magnet block concept, which has sometimes been described as new or innovative, is from a manufacturing point of view simply a collection of known mature production methods and measurement procedures, which can be executed at fixed cost with a low level of risk. PMID:25177980

  9. PEP-X: An Ultimate Storage Ring Based on Fourth-Order Geometric Achromats

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai; Bane, Karl; Hettel, Robert; Nosochkov, Yuri; Wang, Min-Huey; /SLAC

    2012-04-06

    We have designed an 'ultimate' storage ring for the PEP-X light source that achieves the diffraction limited emittances (at 1.5 {angstrom}) of 12 pm-rad in both horizontal and vertical planes with a 4.5-GeV beam. These emittances include the contribution of intrabeam scattering at a nominal current of 200 mA in 3300 bunches. This quality beam in conjunction with a conventional 4-m undulator in a straight section can generate synchrotron radiation having a spectral brightness above 10{sup 22} [photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW] at a 10 keV photon energy. The high coherence at the diffraction limit makes PEP-X competitive with 4th generation light sources based on an energy recovery linac. In addition, the beam lifetime is several hours and the dynamic aperture is large enough to allow off-axis injection. The alignment and stability tolerances, though challenging, are achievable. A ring with all these properties is only possible because of several major advances in mitigating the effects of nonlinear resonances.

  10. Beam Loss Control for the NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Choi, J.

    2011-03-28

    The shielding design for the NSLS-II storage ring is designed for the full injected beam losses in two periods of the ring around the injection point, but for the remainder of the ring its shielded for {le} 10% top-off injection beam. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed these levels for time sufficient to cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring (LCM) system will control the beam losses to the more heavily shielded injection region while monitoring the losses outside this region. To achieve this scrapers are installed in the injection region to intercept beam particles that might be lost outside this region. The scrapers will be thin (< 1Xrad) that will allow low energy electrons to penetrate and the subsequent dipole will separate them from the stored beam. These thin scrapers will reduce the radiation from the scraper compared to thicker scrapers. The dipole will provide significant local shielding for particles that hit inside the gap and a source for the loss monitor system that will measure the amount of beam lost in the injection region.

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema

    Steve Dierker

    2016-07-12

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Dierker

    2008-03-12

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  13. An electrostatic storage ring for atomic and molecular physics, at KACST - a status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ghazaly, Mohamed O. A.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatic storage ring has been designed following the pioneering storage ring ELISA [1], and it is currently being built as a new core laboratory for atomic and molecular collisions at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. In this paper, the design of the electrostatic storage ring together with an outline on the status of the construction are given.

  14. The DELTA Synchrotron Light Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.

    2004-05-12

    Synchrotron radiation sources like DELTA, the Dortmund Electron Accelerator, a third generation synchrotron light source, need an optical monitoring system to measure the beam size at different points of the ring with high resolution and accuracy. These measurements also allow an investigation of the emittance of the storage ring, an important working parameter for the efficiency of working beamlines with experiments using the synchrotron radiation. The resolution limits of the different types of optical synchrotron light monitors at DELTA are investigated. The minimum measurable beamsize with the normal synchrotron light monitor using visible light at DELTA is about 80 {mu}m. Due to this a synchrotron light interferometer was built up and tested at DELTA. The interferometer uses the same beamline in the visible range. The minimum measurable beamsize is with about 8 {mu}m one order of magnitude smaller. This resolution is sufficient for the expected small vertical beamsizes at DELTA. The electron beamsize and emittance were measured with both systems at different electron beam energies of the storage ring. The theoretical values of the present optics are smaller than the measured emittance. So possible reasons for beam movements are investigated.

  15. Coupling measurement and correction at the SSRF storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, ManZhou; Hou, Jie; Li, HaoHu

    2011-12-01

    Brightness is an important parameter for 3rd generation light source. Correcting the emittance coupling is a realistic way to increase brightness without any additional equipment in a machine under operation. The main sources of emittance coupling are betatron coupling and vertical dispersion. At the SSRF storage ring, tune split and LOCO are used to measure the respective betatron and emittance coupling. Both of these sources can be corrected by skew quadrupoles. By measuring the skew quadrupole-coupling response matrix, betatron coupling can be changed from 0.014% to 2%. But the vertical dispersion changes at the same time. LOCO can find the suitable setting to correct simultaneously the betatron coupling and vertical dispersion. The emittance coupling can be reduced to 0.17% by this method. More simulations show the potential for smaller emittance coupling if more skew quadrupoles are employed.

  16. Impedance Calculations for the NSLS-II Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Blednykh,A.; Ferreira, M.; Krinsky, S.

    2009-05-04

    Impedance of two vacuum chamber components, Bellows and BPM, is considered in some detail. In order to avoid generation of Higher-Order Modes (HOM's) in the NSLS-II bellows, we designed a new low-impedance RF shielding consisting of 6 wide and 2 narrow metal plates without opening slots between them. The short-range wakepotential has been optimized taking into account vertical offset of RF fingers from their nominal position. The results were compared with data of bellows designed at other laboratories. Narrow-band impedance of the BPM Button has been studied. TE-modes in the BPM button were suppressed by a factor of 8 by modification of existing housings. Two new types of housings are shown. The total impedance of the NSLS-II storage ring is discussed in terms of the loss factor and the vertical kick factor for a 3mm-Gaussian bunch.

  17. Considerations for the use of synchrotron radiation sources to measure sub-keV x-ray photoabsorption cross sections in transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Tirsell, K.G.; Del Grande, N.K.

    1988-02-01

    Sub-keV x-ray photoabsorption cross section measurements in transmission have been made using synchrotron radiation beam lines on the VUV storage ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and on the SPEAR storage ring at Stanford. The experimental considerations associated with making absolute measurements are reviewed, along with techniques for resolving difficulties. Suggestions for future measurements are included.

  18. Proceedings of the workshop on polarized targets in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-08-01

    Polarization phenomena have played an increasingly important part in the study of nuclei and nucleons in recent years. Polarization studies have been hampered by the relatively few and rather fragile polarized targets which are presently available. The concept of polarized gas targets in storage rings opens a much wider range of possibilities than is available in the external target geometry. This novel method will represent a considerable advance in nuclear physics and will continue to receive much attention in plans for future facilities. An internal, polarized-target station is being planned for the cooler ring at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Internal targets are compatible with recent designs of electron accelerators proposed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Southeastern Universities Research Association. The key to nuclear-science programs based on internal targets pivots on recent developments in polarized atomic beam methods, which include the more recent laser-driven polarized targets. The workshop drew together a unique group of physicists in the fields of high-energy, nuclear and atomic physics. The meeting was organized in a manner that stimulated discussion among the 58 participants and focused on developments in polarized target technology and the underlying atomic physics. An impressive array of future possibilities for polarized targets as well as current developments in polarized target technology were discussed at the workshop. Abstracts of individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base.

  19. Electron clearing in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.A.; Allen, J.; Borden, M.J.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Macek, R.J.; Wang, T.S.

    1995-05-01

    The instability observed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) has been tentatively identified as an electron-proton instability. A source of electrons must exist for this instability to occur. The PSR injection section contains the stripper foil, and therefore provides several strong sources of electrons. An electron clearing system was installed in the injection section to clear out these electrons. The system comprised: (1) a foil biasing system to clear the SEM and thermionic electrons, (2) a pair of low-field bending magnets with a Faraday cup to clear the convoy electrons, and (3) two pairs of clearing electrodes, one upstream and one downstream of the stripper foil, to clear the remaining electrons. This paper discusses the design and performance of the Electron Clearing System, and its effect on the instability. Also presented are some results from other charge-collection experiments that suggest there is also substantial electron production in parts of the ring other than the injection section.

  20. Compton backscattering of intracavity storage ring free-electron laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dattoli, G.; Giannessi, L.; Torre, A.

    1995-12-31

    We discuss the{gamma}-ray production by Compton backscattering of intracavity storage ring Free-Electron Laser radiation. We use a semi-analytical model which provides the build up of the signal combined with the storage ring damping mechanism and derive simple relations yielding the connection between backscattered. Photons brightness and the intercavity laser equilibrium intensity.

  1. Mass and lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei in storage rings.

    PubMed

    Franzke, Bernhard; Geissel, Hans; Münzenberg, Gottfried

    2008-01-01

    Mass and lifetime measurements lead to the discovery and understanding of basic properties of matter. The isotopic nature of the chemical elements, nuclear binding, and the location and strength of nuclear shells are the most outstanding examples leading to the development of the first nuclear models. More recent are the discoveries of new structures of nuclides far from the valley of stability. A new generation of direct mass measurements which allows the exploration of extended areas of the nuclear mass surface with high accuracy has been opened up with the combination of the Experimental Storage Ring ESR and the FRragment Separator FRS at GSI Darmstadt. In-flight separated nuclei are stored in the ring. Their masses are directly determined from the revolution frequency. Dependent on the half-life two complementary methods are applied. Schottky Mass Spectrometry SMS relies on the measurement of the revolution frequency of electron cooled stored ions. The cooling time determines the lower half-life limit to the order of seconds. For Isochronous Mass Spectrometry IMS the ring is operated in an isochronous ion-optical mode. The revolution frequency of the individual ions coasting in the ring is measured using a time-of-flight method. Nuclides with lifetimes down to microseconds become accessible. With SMS masses of several hundreds nuclides have been measured simultaneously with an accuracy in the 2 x 10(-7)-range. This high accuracy and the ability to study large areas of the mass surface are ideal tools to discover new nuclear structure properties and to guide improvements for theoretical mass models. In addition, nuclear half-lives of stored bare and highly charged ions have been measured. This new experimental development is a significant progress since nuclear decay characteristics are mostly known for neutral atoms. For bare and highly charged ions new nuclear decay modes become possible, such as bound-state beta decay. Dramatic changes in the nuclear lifetime

  2. Steady State Analysis of Short-wavelength, High-gainFELs in a Large Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Bane, K.; Cai, Y.; Chao, A.; Hettel, R.; Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA

    2007-10-15

    Storage ring FELs have operated successfully in the low-gain regime using optical cavities. Discussions of a high-gain FEL in a storage ring typically involve a special bypass to decouple the FEL interaction from the storage ring dynamics. In this paper, we investigate the coupled dynamics of a high-gain FEL in a large storage ring such as PEP and analyze the equilibrium solution. We show that an FEL in the EUV and soft x-ray regimes can be integrated into a very bright storage ring and potentially provides three orders of magnitude improvement in the average brightness at these radiation wavelengths. We also discuss possibilities of seeding with HHG sources to obtain ultra-short, high-peak power EUV and soft x-ray pulses.

  3. Central RF frequency measurement of the HLS-II storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jia-Jun; Yang, Yong-Liang; Sun, Bao-Gen; Wu, Fang-Fang; Cheng, Chao-Cai; Tang, Kai; Wei, Jun-Hao

    2016-04-01

    Central RF frequency is a key parameter of storage rings. This paper presents the measurement of central RF frequency of the HLS-II storage ring with the sextupole modulation method. Firstly, the basis of central RF frequency measurement of the electron storage ring is briefly introduced. Then, the error sources and the optimized measurement method for the HLS-II storage ring are discussed. The workflow of a self-compiled Matlab script used in central RF frequency measurement is also described. Finally, the results achieved by using two data processing methods to cross-check each other are shown. The measured value of the central RF frequency demonstrates that the circumference deviation of the HLS-II storage ring is less than 1 mm. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11105141, 11175173) and the upgrade project of Hefei Light Source

  4. 3 GeV Booster Synchrotron Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2009-06-02

    Synchrotron light cna be produced from a relativistic particle beam circulating in a storage ring at extremely high intensity and brilliance over a large spectral region reaching from the far infrared regime to hard x-rays. The particles, either electrons or positrons, radiate as they are deflected in the fields of the storage ring bending magnets or of magnets specially optimized for the production of synchrotron light. The synchrotron light being very intense and well collimated in the forward direction has become a major tool in a large variety of research fields in physics, chemistry, material science, biology, and medicine.

  5. New waveguide-type HOM damper for ALS storage ring cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Baptiste, Kenneth; Julian, James

    2004-06-28

    The ALS storage ring 500 MHz RF system uses two re-entrant accelerating cavities powered by a single 320kW PHILLIPS YK1305 klystron. During several years of initial operation, the RF cavities were not equipped with effective passive HOM damper systems. Longitudinal beam stability was achieved through cavity temperature control and the longitudinal feedback system (LFB), which was often operating at the edge of its capabilities. As a result, longitudinal beam stability was a significant operations issue at the ALS. During two consecutive shutdown periods (April 2002 and 2003) we installed E-type HOM dampers on the main and third harmonic cavities. These devices dramatically decreased the Q-values of the longitudinal anti-symmetric HOM modes. The next step is to damp the rest of the longitudinal HOM modes in the main cavities below the synchrotron radiation damping level. This will hopefully eliminate the need for the LFB and set the stage for a possible increase in beam current. The ''waveguide'' type of HOM damper was the only option that didn't significantly compromise the vacuum performance of the RF cavity. The design process and the results of the low level measurements of the new waveguide dampers are presented in this paper.

  6. Microscopic study on lasing characteristics of the UVSOR storage ring free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hama, H. |; Yamazaki, J.; Kinoshita, T.

    1995-12-31

    Characteristics of storage ring free electron laser (SRFEL) at a short wavelength region (UV and visible) has been studied at the UVSOR facility, Institute for Molecular Science. We have measured the laser power evolution by using a biplanar photodiode, and the micro-macro temporal structure of both the laser and the electron bunch with a dualsweep streak camera. The saturated energy of the laser micropulse in the gain-switching (Q-switching) mode has been measured as a function of the ring current. We have not observed a limitation of the output power yet within the beam current can be stored. We have analyzed the saturated micropulse energy based on a model of gain reduction due to the bunch-heating. The bunch-heating process seems to be very complicate. We derived time dependent gain variations from the shape of macropulse and the bunch length. Those two gain variations are almost consistent with each other but slightly different in detail. The gain may be not only simply reduced by the energy spread but also affected by the phase space rotation due to synchrotron oscillation of the electron bunch. As reported in previous issue, the lasing macropulse consists of a couple of micropulses that are simultaneously evolved. From high resolution two-dimensional spectra taken by the dual-sweep streak camera, we noticed considerable internal substructures of the laser micropulse in both the time distribution and the spectral shape. There are a couple of peaks separated with almost same distance in a optical bunch. Such substructure does not seem to result from statistical fluctuations of laser seeds. Although the origin of the substructure of macropulse is not dear at the present, we are going to discuss about SRFEL properties.

  7. Design of the muon collider isochronous storage ring lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trbojevic, D.; Ng, K. Y.; Courant, E. D.; Lee, S. Y.; Johnstone, C.; Gallardo, J.; Palmer, R.; Tepikian, S.

    1996-04-01

    The muon collider would extend the limitations of e+ e- colliders and provide new physics potentials, with possible discovery of the heavy Higgs bosons. At the maximum energy of 2 TeV the projected luminosity is of the order of 1035 cm-2 s-1. The colliding μ+ μ- bunches have to be focused to a very small transverse size of 2.8 μm, which is accomplished by the betatron functions at the crossing point of β*=3 mm. This requires a longitudinal space of the same length, 3 mm. These very short bunches at 2 TeV could circulate only in a quasi-isochronous storage ring where the momentum compaction is very close to zero. We report on a design of a muon collider isochronous lattice. The momentum compaction is brought to zero by having the average value of the dispersion function through dipoles equal to zero. This is accomplished by a combination of FODO cells with a low-beta insertion. The dispersion function oscillates between negative and positive values.

  8. Variable input coupler design for storage ring cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.

    1995-08-18

    Magnetic loop type input couplers are used for coupling rf power from waveguides to the storage ring cavities: In a high rf power and high beam current accelerating cavity, the change in beam loading results in high reflected power due to input rf mismatch. The coupler can be matched for a specific loading condition, but cannot be matched in other conditions. The input mismatch results in poor rf power efficiency and overheating of the ceramic window in the coupler. Therefore, coupling through the coupling loop must be adjustable for maximum operating power efficiency and coupler reliability. The adjustment of coupling can be made by changing the magnetic flux linkage through the loop area. This can be done either mechanically by moving the coupling loop position or electronically by using impedance matching to change the properties of low loss material such as ferrite. In the existing coupler design, to change the coupling the coupler loop is turned physically for matching. The cavity vacuum must be broken and pumped down again; this can cause long system down time.

  9. The electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR - Mechanical concept and realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hahn, R.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Kühnel, K.-U.; Lange, M.; Menk, S.; Laux, F.; Orlov, D. A.; Repnow, R.; Schröter, C. D.; Shornikov, A.; Sieber, T.; Ullrich, J.; Wolf, A.; Rappaport, M.; Zajfman, D.

    2011-12-01

    A new and technologically challenging project, the electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring CSR, is presently under construction at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. Applying liquid helium cooling, the CSR, with 35 m circumference, will provide a low temperature environment of only a few Kelvin and an extremely high vacuum of better than 10 -13 mbar. To realize these conditions the mechanical design has been completed and now the first quarter section is in the construction phase. For the onion skin structure of the cryogenic system we have at the outer shell the cryostat chambers, realized by welded rectangular stainless steel frames with aluminum plates. The next two shells are fabricated as aluminum shields kept at 80 and 40 K. The inner vacuum chambers for the experimental vacuum consist of stainless steel chambers cladded with external copper sheets connected to the LHe lines for optimized thermal equilibration and cryopumping. Additional large surface 2 K units are installed for cryogenic pumping of H 2. The mechanical concepts and the realization will be presented in detail.

  10. A pinger system for the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hardek, T.W.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    Developers at the Proton Storage Ring have long desired a modulator and electrode combination capable of kicking the 800-MeV proton beam enough to conduct tune measurements with full intensity beams. At present this has been accomplished by reducing the voltage on one extraction kicker modulator and turning the other off. This method requires that all of the accumulated beam be lost on the walls of the vacuum chamber. In addition to tune measurements a more recent desire is to sweep out beam that may have leaked into the area between bunches. A four-meter electrode has been designed and constructed for the purpose. The design is flexible in that the electrode may be split in the center and rotated in order to provide vertical and horizontal electrodes each 2 meters long. In addition two solid-state pulse modulators that can provide 10kV in burst mode at up to 700 KHz have been purchased. This hardware and its intended use are described. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Planning and Prototyping for a Storage Ring Measurement of the Proton Electric Dipole Moment

    SciTech Connect

    Talman, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Electron and proton EDM's can be measured in "frozen spin" (with the beam polarization always parallel to the orbit, for example) storage rings. For electrons the "magic" kinetic energy at which the beam can be frozen is 14.5 MeV. For protons the magic kinetic energy is 230 MeV. The currently measured upper limit for the electron EDM is much smaller than the proton EDM upper limit, which is very poorly known. Nevertheless, because the storage ring will be an order of magnitude cheaper, a sensible plan is to first build an all-electric electron storage ring as a prototype. Such an electron ring was successfully built at Brookhaven, in 1954, as a prototype for their AGS ring. This leaves little uncertainty concerning the cost and performance of such a ring. (This is documentedin one of the Physical Review papers mentioned above.)

  12. Beam Loss Monitors in the NSLS Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer,S.L.; Fedurin, M.

    2009-05-04

    Beam loss monitors (BLM) have been used for more than two decades in the VUV ring at the NSLS. These have proved useful for optimizing injection and operation of the ring. Recently similar monitors have been installed in the X-ray ring and are being used to better understand injection, as well as operation of the ring. These units have been compared with the Bergoz BLMs, which have been mostly useful for understanding operating beam losses.

  13. Comparison of beam transport simulations to measurements at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, C.; Neri, F.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Blind, B.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Sander, O.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1997-10-01

    The ability to model and simulate beam behavior in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an important diagnostic and predictive tool. This paper gives the results of an effort to model the ring apertures and lattice and use beam simulation programs to track the beam. The results are then compared to measured activation levels from beam loss in the ring. The success of the method determines its usefulness in evaluating the effects of planned upgrades to the Proton Storage Ring.

  14. Electron cloud development in the Proton Storage Ring and in theSpallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Furman, M.A.

    2002-10-08

    We have applied our simulation code "POSINST" to evaluatethe contribution to the growth rate of the electron-cloud instability inproton storage rings. Recent simulation results for the main features ofthe electron cloud in the storage ring of the Spallation Neutron Source(SNS) at Oak Ridge, and updated results for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR)at Los Alamos are presented in this paper. A key ingredient in our modelis a detailed description of the secondary emitted-electron energyspectrum. A refined model for the secondary emission process includingthe so-called true secondary, rediffused and backscattered electrons hasrecently been included in the electron-cloud code.

  15. Effects of magnetic non-linearities on a stored proton beam and their implications for superconducting storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.; Evans, L.

    1985-06-01

    A nonlinear lens may be used to study the effect of high-order multipolar field imperfections on a stored proton beam. Such a nonlinear lens is particulary suitable to simulate field imperfections of the types encountered in coil dominated superconducting magnets. We have studied experimentally at the SPS the effect of high order (5th and 8th) single isolated resonances driven by the nonlinear lens. The width of these resonances is of the order one expects to be caused by field errors in superconducting magnets of the SSC type. The experiment shows that, in absence of tune modulation, these resonances are harmless. Slow crossings of the resonance, on the other hand, have destructive effects on the beam, much more so than fast crossings caused by synchrotron oscillations. In the design of future storage rings, sources of low-frequency tune modulation should be avoided as a way to reduce the harmful effects of high order multipolar field imperfection.

  16. Multiple-bunch-length operating mode design for a storage ring using hybrid low alpha and harmonic cavity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weiwei; Wang, Lin; Li, Heting

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we design a simultaneous three bunch length operating mode at the HLS-II (Hefei Light Source II) storage ring by installing two harmonic cavities and minimizing the momentum compaction factor. The short bunches (2.6 mm) presented in this work will meet the requirement of coherent millimeter-wave and sub-THz radiation experiments, while the long bunches (20 mm) will efficiently increase the total beam current. Therefore, this multiple-bunch-length operating mode allows present synchrotron users and coherent millimeter-wave users (or sub THz users) to carry out their experiments simultaneously. Since the relatively low energy characteristic of HLS-II we achieve the multiple-bunch-length operating mode without multicell superconducting RF cavities, which is technically feasible.

  17. Synchrotron light source data book

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.

    1989-01-01

    The ''Synchrotron Light Source Data Book'' is as its name implies a collection of data on existing and planned synchrotron light sources. The intention was to provide a compendium of tools for the design of electron storage rings as synchrotron radiation sources. The slant is toward the accelerator physicist as other booklets such as the X-ray Data Booklet, edited by D. Vaughan (LBL PUB-490), address the 'use' of synchrotron radiation. It is hoped that the booklet serves as a pocket sized reference to facilitate back of the envelope type calculations. It contains some useful formulae in 'practical units' and a brief description of many of the existing and planned light source lattices.

  18. Commissioning results of the narrow-band beam position monitor system upgrade in the APS storage ring.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, O.

    1999-04-20

    When using a low emittance storage ring as a high brightness synchrotron radiation source, it is critical to maintain a very high degree of orbit stability, both for the short term and for the duration of an operational fill. A fill-to-fill reproducibility is an additional important requirement. Recent developments in orbit correction algorithms have provided tools that are capable of achieving a high degree of orbit stability. However, the performance of these feedback systems can be severely limited if there are errors in the beam position monitors (BPMs). The present orbit measurement and correction system at the APS storage ring utilizes 360 broad-band-type BPMs that provide turn-by-turn diagnostics and an ultra-stable orbit: < 1.8 micron rms vertically and 4.5 microns rms horizontally in a frequency band of 0.017 to 30 Hz. The effects of beam intensity and bunch pattern dependency on these BPMs have been significantly reduced by employing offset compensation correction. Recently, 40 narrow-band switching-type BPMs have been installed in the APS storage ring, two in each of 20 operational insertion device straight sections, bringing the total number of beam position monitors to 400. The use of narrow-band BPM electronics is expected to reduce sensitivity to beam intensity, bunch pattern dependence, and long-term drift. These beam position monitors are used for orbit correction/feedback and machine protection interlocks for the insertion device beamlines. The commissioning results and overall performance for orbit stability are provided.

  19. Measurement of the thermal noise of a proton beam in the NAP-M storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Dement'ev, E.M.; Dikanskii, N.S.; Medvedko, A.S.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Pestrikov, D.V.

    1980-08-01

    Measurements of the spectra and power of the noise of uncooled and cooled proton beams in the NAP-M storage ring are reported. Features of the noise of the cooled beam due to particle interaction are analyzed.

  20. Theories of statistical equilibrium in electron-positron colliding-beam storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schonfeld, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    In this lecture I introduce you to some recent theoretical work that represents a significant and long overdue departure from the mainstream of ideas on the physics of colliding- beam storage rings. The goal of the work in question is to understand analytically - without recourse to computer simulation - the role that dissipation and noise play in the observed colliding-beam behavior of electron-positron storage rings.

  1. Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.T.

    1984-06-01

    The Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop was held to consider two vacuum-related problems that bear on the design of storage rings and beam lines for synchrotron radiation facilities. These problems are gas desorption from the vacuum chamber walls and carbon deposition on optical components. Participants surveyed existing knowledge on these topics and recommended studies that should be performed as soon as possible to provide more definitive experimental data on these topics. This data will permit optimization of the final design of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its associated beam lines. It also should prove useful for other synchrotron radiation facilities as well.

  2. Status of SESAME Synchrotron Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarawneh, Hamed

    2013-04-01

    During this presentation, I will talk about the current status of the SESAME synchrotron radiation source (SESAME: Synchrotron light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East). SESAME is an international research center located in Allan, Jordan and the accelerator complex consists of new storage ring of an energy of 2.5 GeV injected at 800 MeV and the injector is based on the upgraded 22.5 MeV Microtron and 800 MeV booster from the BESSY-I machine donated by Germany. The results of the design work and the optimizations of the beam optics for the SESAME storage ring and booster accelerators' lattices will be presented. I will also report on the status of the storage ring main sub-systems and the scientific case of the SESAME facility with the planned day-one beamlines.

  3. Fiberoptics-Based Instrumentation for Storage Ring BeamDiagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, John M.; De Santis, Stefano; Yin, Yan

    2007-04-18

    In several cases, coupling synchrotron light into opticalfibers can substantially facilitate the use of beam diagnosticinstrumentation, that measures longitudinal beam properties by detectingsynchrotron radiation. It has been discussed in [1]with some detail, howfiberoptics can bring the light at relatively large distances from theaccelerator, where a variety of devices can be used to measure beamproperties and parameters. Light carried on a fiber can be easilyswitched between instruments so that each one of them has 100 percent ofthe photons available, rather than just a fraction , when simultaneousmeasurements are not indispensable. From a more general point of view,once synchrotron light is coupled into the fiber, the vast array oftechniques and optoelectronic devices, developed by the telecommunicationindustry becomes available.In this paper we present the results of ourexperiments at the Advanced Light Source, where we tried to assess thechallenges and limitations of the coupling process and determine whatlevel of efficiency one can typically expect to achieve.

  4. Total water storage dynamics derived from tree-ring records and terrestrial gravity observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutzfeldt, Benjamin; Heinrich, Ingo; Merz, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    For both societal and ecological reasons, it is important to understand past and future subsurface water dynamics but estimating subsurface water storage is notoriously difficult. In this pilot study, we suggest the reconstruction of subsurface water dynamics by a multi-disciplinary approach combining hydrology, dendrochronology and geodesy. In a first step, nine complete years of high-precision gravimeter observations are used to estimate water storage changes in the subsurface at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell in the Bavarian Forest, Germany. The record is extended to 63 years by calibrating a hydrological model against the 9 years of gravimeter observations. The relationship between tree-ring growth and water storage changes is evaluated as well as that between tree-ring growth and supplementary hydro-meteorological data. Results suggest that tree-ring growth is influenced primarily by subsurface water storage. Other variables related to the overall moisture status (e.g., Standardized Precipitation Index, Palmer Drought Severity Index, streamflow) are also strongly correlated with tree-ring width. While these indices are all indicators of water stored in the landscape, water storage changes of the subsurface estimated by depth-integral measurements give us the unique opportunity to directly reconstruct subsurface water storage dynamics from records of tree-ring width. Such long reconstructions will improve our knowledge of past water storage variations and our ability to predict future developments. Finally, knowing the relationship between subsurface storage dynamics and tree-ring growth improves the understanding of the different signal components contained in tree-ring chronologies.

  5. Ring-toric lens for focus-error sensing in optical data storage.

    PubMed

    Descour, M R; Simon, D I; Yeh, W H

    1999-03-10

    We discuss the design and performance of diffractive ring-toric lenses for focus-error sensing in optical data storage. A ring-toric lens images a point source of light to a ring-shaped image. Focus-error sensing is accomplished by means of monitoring the change in ring radius: The ring expands in response to a diverging wave front, and the ring contracts in response to a converging wave front. We describe the use of a segmented phi detector to generate a focus-error signal (FES). We found that the FES slope, a measure of sensitivity to disk defocus, is higher for the ring-toric lenses described in this paper than for other techniques such as the astigmatic and the obscuration methods. We measured an FES slope of 0.7 per micrometer of disk defocus (microm(-1)). The corresponding theoretical FES slope is 0.96 microm(-1).

  6. TSR: A storage and cooling ring for HIE-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. A.; Blaum, K.; Davinson, T.; Flanagan, K.; Freeman, S. J.; Grieser, M.; Lazarus, I. H.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Lotay, G.; Page, R. D.; Raabe, R.; Siesling, E.; Wenander, F.; Woods, P. J.

    2016-06-01

    It is planned to install the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR, currently at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored, cooled secondary beams that is rich and varied, spanning from studies of nuclear ground-state properties and reaction studies of astrophysical relevance, to investigations with highly-charged ions and pure isomeric beams. In addition to experiments performed using beams recirculating within the ring, the cooled beams can be extracted and exploited by external spectrometers for high-precision measurements. The capabilities of the ring facility as well as some physics cases will be presented, together with a brief report on the status of the project.

  7. Low Energy Storage Rings: Opening Routes for Beyond State-of-the-art Research

    SciTech Connect

    Welsch, Carsten P.

    2011-10-27

    Electrostatic storage rings have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics at the ultra-low energy range from 1 to 100 keV/A. Due to the mass independence of the electrostatic rigidity these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged bio-molecules. Their beam dynamics is, however, fundamentally different to magnetic storage rings and therefore needs to be investigated in detail to optimize storage ring performance and experimental output. This paper first gives an overview of existing electrostatic storage rings and their experimental programs. Second, future machines in Heidelberg, Stockholm and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) are described and the main challenges are summarized. Finally, the focus is set on a flexible storage ring facility presently being built up at the King Abdulaziz Center for Science and Technology (KACST) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, that addresses a broad user community and will allow for a next-generation experimental program in the low energy regime.

  8. Low Energy Storage Rings: Opening Routes for Beyond State-of-the-art Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Carsten P.

    2011-10-01

    Electrostatic storage rings have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics at the ultra-low energy range from 1 to 100 keV/A. Due to the mass independence of the electrostatic rigidity these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged bio-molecules. Their beam dynamics is, however, fundamentally different to magnetic storage rings and therefore needs to be investigated in detail to optimize storage ring performance and experimental output. This paper first gives an overview of existing electrostatic storage rings and their experimental programs. Second, future machines in Heidelberg, Stockholm and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) are described and the main challenges are summarized. Finally, the focus is set on a flexible storage ring facility presently being built up at the King Abdulaziz Center for Science and Technology (KACST) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, that addresses a broad user community and will allow for a next-generation experimental program in the low energy regime.

  9. NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON-STORAGE-RINGS TO MUON COLLIDERS: PHYSICS AND FACILITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2001-06-18

    Intense muon sources for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams ({nu} factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multi-turn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and developments, and will briefly be discussed here. A muon collider requires basically the same number of muons as for the muon storage ring neutrino factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both {+-} {mu}. We present some physics possibilities, muon storage ring based neutrino facility concept, site specific examples including collaboration feasibility studies, and upgrades to a full collider.

  10. Storage ring cross section measurements for electron impact ionization of Fe8+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, M.; Becker, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Lestinsky, M.; Müller, A.; Novotný, O.; Pindzola, M. S.; Repnow, R.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.; Wolf, A.; Savin, D. W.

    2016-04-01

    We have measured electron impact ionization (EII) for Fe8+ forming Fe9+ from below the ionization threshold to 1200 eV. These measurements were carried out at the TSR heavy ion storage ring. The objective of using a storage ring is to store the ion beam initially so that metastable levels decay, thereby allowing for measurements on a well-defined ground-level ion beam. In this case, however, some metastable levels were too long lived to be removed. We discuss several methods for quantifying the metastable fraction, which we estimate to be ˜30%-40%. Although metastables remain problematic, the present storage ring work improves upon other experimental geometries by limiting the metastable contamination to only a few long-lived excited levels. We discuss some future prospects for obtaining improved measurements of Fe8+ and other ions with long-lived metastable levels.

  11. Capture, acceleration and bunching rf systems for the MEIC booster and storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaoheng; Guo, Jiquan; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC), proposed by Jefferson Lab, consists of a series of accelerators. The electron collider ring accepts electrons from CEBAF at energies from 3 to 12 GeV. Protons and ions are delivered to a booster and captured in a long bunch before being ramped and transferred to the ion collider ring. The ion collider ring accelerates a small number of long ion bunches to colliding energy before they are re-bunched into a high frequency train of very short bunches for colliding. Two sets of low frequency RF systems are needed for the long ion bunch energy ramping in the booster and ion collider ring. Another two sets of high frequency RF cavities are needed for re-bunching in the ion collider ring and compensating synchrotron radiation energy loss in the electron collider ring. The requirements from energy ramping, ion beam bunching, electron beam energy compensation, collective effects, beam loading and feedback capability, RF power capability, etc. are presented. The preliminary designs of these RF systems are presented. Concepts for the baseline cavity and RF station configurations are described, as well as some options that may allow more flexible injection and acceleration schemes.

  12. Photoswitchable Molecular Rings for Solar-Thermal Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Durgun, E; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-03-21

    Solar-thermal fuels reversibly store solar energy in the chemical bonds of molecules by photoconversion, and can release this stored energy in the form of heat upon activation. Many conventional photoswichable molecules could be considered as solar thermal fuels, although they suffer from low energy density or short lifetime in the photoinduced high-energy metastable state, rendering their practical use unfeasible. We present a new approach to the design of chemistries for solar thermal fuel applications, wherein well-known photoswitchable molecules are connected by different linker agents to form molecular rings. This approach allows for a significant increase in both the amount of stored energy per molecule and the stability of the fuels. Our results suggest a range of possibilities for tuning the energy density and thermal stability as a function of the type of the photoswitchable molecule, the ring size, or the type of linkers.

  13. Single Cell Synchrotron FT-IR Microspectroscopy Reveals a Link between Neutral Lipid and Storage Carbohydrate Fluxes in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jamme, Frédéric; Vindigni, Jean-David; Méchin, Valérie; Cherifi, Tamazight; Chardot, Thierry; Froissard, Marine

    2013-01-01

    In most organisms, storage lipids are packaged into specialized structures called lipid droplets. These contain a core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids, and various proteins which vary depending on the species. Hydrophobic structural proteins stabilize the interface between the lipid core and aqueous cellular environment (perilipin family of proteins, apolipoproteins, oleosins). We developed a genetic approach using heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of the Arabidopsis thaliana lipid droplet oleosin and caleosin proteins AtOle1 and AtClo1. These transformed yeasts overaccumulate lipid droplets, leading to a specific increase in storage lipids. The phenotype of these cells was explored using synchrotron FT-IR microspectroscopy to investigate the dynamics of lipid storage and cellular carbon fluxes reflected as changes in spectral fingerprints. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data showed a clear effect on storage carbohydrates and more specifically, a decrease in glycogen in our modified strains. These observations were confirmed by biochemical quantification of the storage carbohydrates glycogen and trehalose. Our results demonstrate that neutral lipid and storage carbohydrate fluxes are tightly connected and co-regulated. PMID:24040242

  14. ACCELERATORS: Preliminary application of turn-by-turn data analysis to the SSRF storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-Hui; Zhao, Zhen-Tang

    2009-07-01

    There is growing interest in utilizing the beam position monitor turn-by-turn (TBT) data to debug accelerators. TBT data can be used to determine the linear optics, coupled optics and nonlinear behaviors of the storage ring lattice. This is not only a useful complement to other methods of determining the linear optics such as LOCO, but also provides a possibility to uncover more hidden phenomena. In this paper, a preliminary application of a β function measurement to the SSRF storage ring is presented.

  15. Statistical analyses of the magnet data for the advanced photon source storage ring magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Carnegie, D.W.; Doose, C.; Hogrefe, R.; Kim, K.; Merl, R.

    1995-05-01

    The statistics of the measured magnetic data of 80 dipole, 400 quadrupole, and 280 sextupole magnets of conventional resistive designs for the APS storage ring is summarized. In order to accommodate the vacuum chamber, the curved dipole has a C-type cross section and the quadrupole and sextupole cross sections have 180{degrees} and 120{degrees} symmetries, respectively. The data statistics include the integrated main fields, multipole coefficients, magnetic and mechanical axes, and roll angles of the main fields. The average and rms values of the measured magnet data meet the storage ring requirements.

  16. Ground Movement in SSRL Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Sunikumar, Nikita; /UCLA /SLAC

    2011-08-25

    Users of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) are being affected by diurnal motion of the synchrotron's storage ring, which undergoes structural changes due to outdoor temperature fluctuations. In order to minimize the effects of diurnal temperature fluctuations, especially on the vertical motion of the ring floor, scientists at SSRL tried three approaches: painting the storage ring white, covering the asphalt in the middle of the ring with highly reflective Mylar and installing Mylar on a portion of the ring roof and walls. Vertical motion in the storage ring is measured by a Hydrostatic Leveling System (HLS), which calculates the relative height of water in a pipe that extends around the ring. The 24-hr amplitude of the floor motion was determined using spectral analysis of HLS data, and the ratio of this amplitude before and after each experiment was used to quantitatively determine the efficacy of each approach. The results of this analysis showed that the Mylar did not have any significant effect on floor motion, although the whitewash project did yield a reduction in overall HLS variation of 15 percent. However, further analysis showed that the reduction can largely be attributed to a few local changes rather than an overall reduction in floor motion around the ring. Future work will consist of identifying and selectively insulating these local regions in order to find the driving force behind diurnal floor motion in the storage ring.

  17. The low energy kaon program at the celsius storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalà, A.; Barbera, R.; Gulino, M.; Librizzi, F.; Mascali, A.; Nicotra, D.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A. C.; Russo, G.; Santoro, A.; Turrisi, R.; Dunin, V.; Ekström, C.; Ericsson, G.; Höistad, B.; Johansson, J.; Johansson, T.; Westerberg, L.; Zlomaczhuk, J.

    1997-02-01

    The CLAMSUD spectrometer has been recently installed at the jet-target position of the CELSIUS ring at "THE SVEDBERG LABORATORY." The physical purpose is the study of kaon production at energies below the N-N threshold. Due to the low cross-section and short lifetime of kaons we increased the solid angle by means of two quadrupoles positioned at the entrance of the dipole. The experimental quality of the measurements due both to the beam characteristics and to the CLAMSUD detector will be shown.

  18. Large magnetic storage ring for Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, A. S.; Garvie, C. S.; Riis, E.

    2006-04-15

    Cold atomic clouds and Bose-Einstein condensates have been stored in a 10 cm diameter vertically oriented magnetic ring. An azimuthal magnetic field enables low-loss propagation of atomic clouds over a total distance of 2 m, with a heating rate of less than 50 nK/s. The vertical geometry was used to split an atomic cloud into two counter-rotating clouds which were recombined after one revolution. The system will be ideal for studying condensate collisions and ultimately Sagnac interferometry.

  19. Resonance method to produce a polarisation asymmetry in electron-positron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Pulsed solenoids of a few tens of ampere turns, operated in synchronism with the ..gamma..(g-2/2) 'th harmonic of the orbit period, can be used to prevent a stored electron beam from becoming polarised through the emission of synchrotron radiation. With such low fields it is easy to arrange that only some of the stored bunches are affected. This makes it possible to produce collisions between counter-rotating electrons and positrons stored in a single ring in which the electron and positron polarisations are not equal and opposite. 8 refs.

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source safety-analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1982-07-01

    This document covers all of the safety issues relating to the design and operation of the storage rings and injection system of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The building systems for fire protection, access and egress are described together with air and other gaseous control or venting systems. Details of shielding against prompt bremstrahlung radiation and synchrotron radiation are described and the administrative requirements to be satisfied for operation of a beam line at the facility are given.

  1. Multi-pulse extraction from Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring for radiographic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.; Neri, F.; Rust, K.; Redd, D.B.

    1997-08-01

    In Proton Radiography, one of the goals is a motion picture of a rapidly moving object. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) in its normal operating mode, delivers a single pulse approximately 120 ns wide (fwhm). In development runs at the PSR, the authors successfully demonstrated operation of a technique to deliver two pulses, each 40 nsec wide, with adjustable spacing.

  2. Evaluation of Pinhole Camera Resolution for NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev,I.

    2008-05-04

    The NSLS-II Storage Ring provides ultrabright radiation sources with extra-small sizes of the circulating electron beam. The beam dimensions will be monitored with a pinhole camera. In this paper they discuss the possible design and ultimate achievable resolution of the system. Modeling is based on the SRW code as well as numerical calculations using MATLAB.

  3. Design and optimization of a longitudinal feedback kicker cavity for the HLS-II storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Z. Wu, W.; He, Duo-Hui; K. Wu, Y.

    2013-03-01

    In the Hefei Light Source (HLS) storage ring, multibunch operation is used to obtain a high luminosity. Multibunch instabilities can severely limit light source performance with a variety of negative impacts, including beam loss, low injection efficiency, and overall degradation of the beam quality. Instabilities of a multibunch beam can be mitigated using certain techniques including increasing natural damping (operating at a higher energy), lowering the beam current, and increasing Landau damping. However, these methods are not adequate to stabilize a multibunch electron beam at a low energy and with a high current. In order to combat beam instabilities in the HLS storage ring, active feedback systems including a longitudinal feedback system (LFB) and a transverse feedback system (TFB) will be developed as part of the HLS upgrade project, the HLS- II storage ring project. As a key component of the longitudinal bunch-by-bunch feedback system, an LFB kicker cavity with a wide bandwidth and high shunt impedance is required. In this paper we report our work on the design of the LFB kicker cavity for the HLS- II storage ring and present the new tuning and optimization techniques developed in designing this high performance LFB kicker.

  4. Exciton storage in a nanoscale Aharonov-Bohm ring with electric field tuning.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andrea M; Campo, Vivaldo L; Portnoi, Mikhail E; Römer, Rudolf A

    2009-03-06

    We study analytically the optical properties of a simple model for an electron-hole pair on a ring subjected to perpendicular magnetic flux and in-plane electric field. We show how to tune this excitonic system from optically active to optically dark as a function of these external fields. Our results offer a simple mechanism for exciton storage and readout.

  5. Exciton Storage in a Nanoscale Aharonov-Bohm Ring with Electric Field Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Andrea M.; Roemer, Rudolf A.; Campo, Vivaldo L. Jr.; Portnoi, Mikhail E.

    2009-03-06

    We study analytically the optical properties of a simple model for an electron-hole pair on a ring subjected to perpendicular magnetic flux and in-plane electric field. We show how to tune this excitonic system from optically active to optically dark as a function of these external fields. Our results offer a simple mechanism for exciton storage and readout.

  6. Polarization fields and phase space densities in storage rings: Stroboscopic averaging and the ergodic theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, James A.; Heinemann, Klaus

    2007-10-01

    A class of orbital motions with volume preserving flows and with vector fields periodic in the “time” parameter θ is defined. Spin motion coupled to the orbital dynamics is then defined, resulting in a class of spin-orbit motions which are important for storage rings. Phase space densities and polarization fields are introduced. It is important, in the context of storage rings, to understand the behavior of periodic polarization fields and phase space densities. Due to the 2π time periodicity of the spin-orbit equations of motion the polarization field, taken at a sequence of increasing time values θ,θ+2π,θ+4π,…, gives a sequence of polarization fields, called the stroboscopic sequence. We show, by using the Birkhoff ergodic theorem, that under very general conditions the Cesàro averages of that sequence converge almost everywhere on phase space to a polarization field which is 2π-periodic in time. This fulfills the main aim of this paper in that it demonstrates that the tracking algorithm for stroboscopic averaging, encoded in the program SPRINT and used in the study of spin motion in storage rings, is mathematically well-founded. The machinery developed is also shown to work for the stroboscopic average of phase space densities associated with the orbital dynamics. This yields a large family of periodic phase space densities and, as an example, a quite detailed analysis of the so-called betatron motion in a storage ring is presented.

  7. Statistical properties of wiggler and bending-magnet radiation from the Brookhaven vacuum-ultraviolet electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Teich, M.C. ); Tanabe, T.; Marshall, T.C. ); Galayda, J. )

    1990-12-31

    The photoelectron counts of spontaneous light from the wiggler in the Brookhaven electron storage ring obey the negative-binomial distribution, in accord with the predictions of a multielectron, multimode theory. The bending-magnet light emerging from the Pyrex exit port of the storage ring obeys the Neyman type-A distribution.

  8. Statistical properties of Wiggler and bending-magnet radiation from the Brookhaven vacuum-ultraviolet electron storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Malvin C.; Tanabe, Toshiya; Marshall, Thomas C.; Galayda, John

    1990-12-01

    The photoelectron counts of spontaneous light from the wiggler in the Brookhaven electron storage ring obey the negative-binomial distribution, in accord with the predictions of a multielectron, multimode theory. The bending-magnet light emerging from the Pyrex exit port of the storage ring obeys the Neyman type-A distribution.

  9. Intrabeam scattering studies at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlichman, M. P.; Hartung, W.; Heltsley, B.; Peterson, D. P.; Rider, N.; Rubin, D.; Sagan, D.; Shanks, J.; Wang, S. T.; Campbell, R.; Holtzapple, R.

    2013-10-01

    Intrabeam scattering (IBS) limits the emittance and single-bunch current that can be achieved in electron or positron storage ring colliders, damping rings, and light sources. Much theoretical work on IBS exists, and while the theories have been validated in hadron and ion machines, the presence of strong damping makes IBS in lepton machines a different phenomenon. We present the results of measurements at CesrTA of IBS-dominated beams, and compare the data with theory. The beams we study have parameters typical of those specified for the next generation of wiggler-dominated storage rings: low emittance, small bunch length, and an energy of a few GeV. Our measurements are in good agreement with IBS theory, provided a tail-cut procedure is applied.

  10. Nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics in low energy storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2013-06-01

    Electrostatic storage rings operate at very low energies in the keV range and have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Because of the mass independence of electric rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged biomolecules, opening up unique research opportunities. However, earlier measurements have shown strong limitations in maximum beam intensity, fast decay of the stored ion current, and reduced beam lifetime. The nature of these effects has not been fully understood and an improved understanding of the physical processes influencing beam motion and stability in such rings is needed. In this paper, a comprehensive study into nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics studies is presented on the examples of a number of existing and planned electrostatic storage rings using the BETACOOL, OPERA-3D, and MAD-X simulation software. A detailed investigation into ion kinetics, under consideration of effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target, is carried out and yields a consistent explanation of the physical effects in a whole class of storage rings. The lifetime, equilibrium momentum spread, and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with the target are estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the Test Storage Ring, where a low-intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions, are reproduced. Based on these simulations, the conditions for stable ring operation with an extremely low-emittance beam are presented. Finally, results from studies into the interaction of 3-30 keV ions with a gas jet target are summarized.

  11. Progress of the commissioning of the DELTA storage ring FEL facility

    SciTech Connect

    Noelle, D.; Geisler, A.; Ridder, M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper will present the status of the ongoing commissioning of the DELTA storage-ring FEL facility. The commissioning of the LINAC started in autumn `94. The operation of the booster started in spring `95, the first stored beam was achieved end of march `95. During the summer of `95 the commissioning of the main storage ring will be started. Simultaneously, the first FEL FELICTA I was built. All FEL hardware is in house, the undulator is already mounted in the storage-ring. Thus first operation of the undulator with electron beam, will take place immediately after the first stored beam in DELTA. Therefore, first spontanous photons are to be expected in late summer `95. As soon as DELTA provides stable and rather reliable operation the experiments on FELICITA I will start. 16 mA total average current in DELTA at 500 MeV should be sufficient to reach the laser threshold in the FEL mode of FELICITA I. Operating the device as an optical klystron should result in lasing at substantial less currents.

  12. Radiation Belts Storage Ring : What the Cluster-CIS data can tell us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, I. S.; Ganushkina, N.; Amariutei, O. A.; Reme, H.

    2013-12-01

    Following the launch by NASA of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) twin spacecraft, now named the Van Allen Probes, the discovery of a storage ring was announced: Baker et al., Science, 2013. This transient feature was observed during September 2012, following the arrival of an interplanetary shock, was located between L=3.0 and L=3.5 and consisted of about 4 to 6 MeV electrons. During that period the Cluster spacecraft had a high-inclination orbit, with a perigee just above 2 Re. The CIS experiment onboard Cluster is sensitive to penetrating energetic electrons (E > 2 MeV), which produce background counts and thus allow to localize the boundaries of the outer and inner radiation belts (Ganushkina et al., JGR, 2011). A search was undertaken in the September 2012 CIS data for eventual signatures of the storage ring, and indeed a small increase of the instrument background was observed between L=3.0 and L=3.5. This is clearly separated from the main outer radiation belt, which presents a much stronger background due to higher fluxes of relativistic electrons. A mono-energetic ion drift band was also observed by CIS inside the storage ring, at about 5 keV for He+ and O+ ions. This result provides an independent confirmation for the storage ring. In addition, it allows also to examine Cluster and Double Star data from earlier years, covering a full solar cycle, for other such signatures of a transient storage ring. It results that this 3-belt structure is seen several times.

  13. Calculations of neutron and photon source terms and attenuation profiles for the generic design of the SPEAR3 storage ring shield.

    PubMed

    Rokni, S H; Khater, H; Liu, J C; Mao, S; Vincke, H

    2005-01-01

    The FLUKA Monte Carlo particle generation and transport code was used to calculate shielding requirements for the 3 GeV, 500 mA SPEAR3 storage ring at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. The photon and neutron dose equivalent source term data were simulated for a 3 GeV electron beam interacting with two typical target/shielding geometries in the ring. The targets simulated are a rectangular block of 0.7 cm thick copper and a 5 cm thick iron block, both tilted at 1 degree relative to the beam direction. Attenuation profiles for neutrons and photons in concrete and lead as a function of angle at different shield thicknesses were calculated. The first, second and equilibrium attenuation lengths of photons and neutrons in the shield materials are derived from the attenuation profiles. The source term data and the attenuation lengths were then used to evaluate the shielding requirements for the ratchet walls of all front-ends of the SPEAR3 storage ring.

  14. High intensity polarized atomic beam source for polarized internal storage ring targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiemenz, P.

    1989-05-01

    In collaboration with the Max-Planck-Institut (MPI) für Kernphysik in Heidelberg and the University of Marburg we presently design and construct a high intensity polarized atomic beam source. It is intended to deliver 1*1017 atoms/sec in one hyperfine state into a storage cell for FILTEX. FILTEX is an abbreviation for FILTer EXperiment aiming to polarize storage ring beams. The structure and the vacuum chambers of this source are completed and installed at the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring (TSR). Vacuum pumps, gauges etc. are mounted and partly connected to a logical operation system. When atomic beam nozzle and skimmer geometries and distances as well as the nozzle temperature are optimized, the final geometrical arrangement or our new hybrid sixpole magnets will be decided and the whole source should be completed by the end of 1989.

  15. Symplectic orbit and spin tracking code for all-electric storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard M.; Talman, John D.

    2015-07-01

    Proposed methods for measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the proton use an intense, polarized proton beam stored in an all-electric storage ring "trap." At the "magic" kinetic energy of 232.792 MeV, proton spins are "frozen," for example always parallel to the instantaneous particle momentum. Energy deviation from the magic value causes in-plane precession of the spin relative to the momentum. Any nonzero EDM value will cause out-of-plane precession—measuring this precession is the basis for the EDM determination. A proposed implementation of this measurement shows that a proton EDM value of 10-29e -cm or greater will produce a statistically significant, measurable precession after multiply repeated runs, assuming small beam depolarization during 1000 s runs, with high enough precision to test models of the early universe developed to account for the present day particle/antiparticle population imbalance. This paper describes an accelerator simulation code, eteapot, a new component of the Unified Accelerator Libraries (ual), to be used for long term tracking of particle orbits and spins in electric bend accelerators, in order to simulate EDM storage ring experiments. Though qualitatively much like magnetic rings, the nonconstant particle velocity in electric rings gives them significantly different properties, especially in weak focusing rings. Like the earlier code teapot (for magnetic ring simulation) this code performs exact tracking in an idealized (approximate) lattice rather than the more conventional approach, which is approximate tracking in a more nearly exact lattice. The Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi (BMT) equation describing the evolution of spin vectors through idealized bend elements is also solved exactly—original to this paper. Furthermore the idealization permits the code to be exactly symplectic (with no artificial "symplectification"). Any residual spurious damping or antidamping is sufficiently small to permit reliable tracking for the

  16. Induction synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Ken; Kishiro, Junichi

    2000-08-01

    A novel proton synchrotron employing induction cells instead of radio frequency cavities is proposed. The major feature of the barrier bucket acceleration, where acceleration and longitudinal focusing are independently achieved is theoretically discussed with the help of multi-particle simulations. It is proved that barrier bucket acceleration allows ultimate use of longitudinal phase-space and is quite effective to substantially increase the beam intensity in synchrotrons. Engineering aspects of key devices to realize the novel synchrotron, a ferri/ferro-magnetic material loaded induction cell and a modulator being rapidly switched in synchronization with beam acceleration are described in detail. The idea is applied to an existing machine (the KEK 12 GeV-PS) and high-intensity proton rings such as JHF, ESS, and SNS and their predicted improvement in machine performance is given with numerical values for each case.

  17. Crystalline beam in a storage ring: How long can it last?

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-Ping; Sessler, A.M.; Wei, Jie

    1994-08-01

    The ground state of a crystalline beam in a realistic storage ring is well understood by now. No crystalline beam exists in a constant gradient storage ring, but in an alternating gradient (AG) ring crystalline beams exist at all density as long as the beam energy is smaller than the transition energy. However, since the Hamiltonian is time dependent, the total energy of the beam is not a constant of motion. As a result, the crystalline beam will gradually heat up and eventually melt if not refrigerated. Here, we show that if the frequency due to the AG lattice is lower than twice the betatron frequency, heat will transfer into the system extremely fast so that a crystalline beam can not last a meaningful period of time (except at very low density). On the other hand, if the AG lattice frequency is higher than twice the betatron frequency, the heat transfer is slow, and the -crystalline beam can last for a long time. We therefore arrive at the conclusion that in order for a crystalline beam to be conveniently observed, the storage ring should be designed such that the AG lattice frequency is as high as possible while the betatron frequency is kept as low as possible.

  18. Source challenges resulting of the first applications of a UV storage ring FEL on Super-ACO

    SciTech Connect

    Couprie, M.E.; Bakker, R.; Nahon, L. |

    1995-12-31

    Since 1992, significant progresses were achieved on the Super-ACO (S-ACO) storage ring Free Electron Laser (FEL) in the UV. The operation at the nominal energy 800 MeV has several consequences: higher average power in the UV (25 mW at 60 mA and more recently 100 mW at 100 mA available for the users), 10 hours of lasing for the same injection of positrons, providing enough time for performing an user experiment, compatibility with the users of synchrotron radiation (SR) in the temporal structure mode for 120 mA with the possibility of closing the four insertion devices of S-ACO. The main difficulties to extend the FEL optical performances come from the small gain (2%), limiting a rapid extention of the spectral range (either in the laser mode or by coherent harmonic generation from the FEL itself in the undulator) or linewidth narrowing. The installation of a 500 MHz harmonic cavity for bunch length reduction and gain increase is under consideration{hor_ellipsis} The stability of the FEL temporal and spectral was systematically followed versus time, for various scales (from ns to half an hour) with different detectors. The stability of the laser source has been significantly improved with a longitudinal feedback system allowing the jitter of the 25 ps RMS laser micropulse to be reduced from 150-200 ps down to 10-20 ps. the intensity fluctuations to be damped down 1% and the spectral drift to be smaller than the resolution of the scanning Fabry-Perot (0.01{angstrom}) at perfect synchronism. The laser can work during more than 3 consecutive hours without readjustments. In addition, according to the ring current, the positron beam is submitted to coherent modes of synchrotron oscillations. Right now, a Pedersen type longitudinal feedback damps the dipolar modes of such oscillation. The quadrupolar modes in the 120-60 mA range leading to a rather unstable FEL are on the way to be damped with an additional feedback.

  19. Compact synchrotron light source of the HSRC.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Takayama, T; Hori, T

    1998-05-01

    A 700 MeV synchrotron radiation source optimized in order to be incorporated in the university laboratory is under commissioning at Hiroshima University. The storage ring is of a racetrack type with two long straight sections for installing undulators. The bending field is as strong as 2.7 T, produced by normal-conducting magnet technology, and delivers synchrotron radiation with a critical wavelength of 1.42 nm. The strong magnetic field also enables a low-energy injection scheme to be employed owing to the fast radiation damping. A 150 MeV microtron has been adopted as the injector.

  20. Synchrotron radiation beam splitting and filtering by a polycapillary array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkadiev, V.; Bzhaumikhov, A.; Erko, A.; Schäfers, F.; Chevallier, P.; Populus, P.

    1997-02-01

    We present experimental data on a novel type of optical element for synchrotron radiation applications in the X-ray region: namely a straight glass capillary array. The spectral reflectance and transmittance for two capillary samples with length of 10 mm and 19 mm have been measured in the photon energy range from 7 to 30 keV using synchrotron radiation from the DCI storage ring at LURE, Orsay. High reflectance (up to 50%) and good energy-filtering properties were obtained. This opens up the possibility to use a capillary array as an effective beam-splitter and as a high-energy filter in synchrotron radiation beamlines.

  1. Modeling Systematic Error Effects for a Sensitive Storage Ring EDM Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Edward; Imig, Astrid

    2009-10-01

    The Storage Ring EDM Collaboration has obtained a set of measurements detailing the sensitivity of a storage ring polarimeter for deuterons to small geometrical and rate changes. Various schemes, such as the calculation of the cross ratio [1], can cancel effects due to detector acceptance differences and luminosity differences for states of opposite polarization. Such schemes fail at second-order in the errors, becoming sensitive to geometrical changes, polarization magnitude differences between opposite polarization states, and changes to the detector response with changing data rates. An expansion of the polarimeter response in a Taylor series based on small errors about the polarimeter operating point can parametrize such effects, primarily in terms of the logarithmic derivatives of the cross section and analyzing power. A comparison will be made to measurements obtained with the EDDA detector at COSY-J"ulich. [4pt] [1] G.G. Ohlsen and P.W. Keaton, Jr., NIM 109, 41 (1973).

  2. Recombination and Ionization Measurements at the Heidelberg Heavy Ion Storage Ring TSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, M.; Lestinsky, M.; Novotný, O.; Savin, D. W.; Bernhardt, D.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Krantz, C.; Grieser, M.; Repnow, R.; Wolf, A.

    2011-05-01

    Knowledge of the charge state distribution (CSD) of astrophysical plasmas is important for the interpretation of spectroscopic data. To accurately calculate CSDs, reliable rate coefficients are needed for dielectronic recombination (DR), which is the dominant electron-ion recombination mechanism for most ions, and for electron impact ionization (EII). We are carrying out DR and EII measurements of astrophysically important ions using the TSR storage ring at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Storage ring measurements are largely free of the metastable contamination found in other experimental geometries, resulting in more unambiguous DR and EII reaction rate measurements. The measured data can be used in plasma modelling as well as for benchmarking theoretical atomic calculations.

  3. Intense inverse compton {gamma}-ray source from Duke storage ring FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    We suggest using FEL intracavity power in the Duke storage ring fortrays production via Inverse Compton Backscattering (ICB). The OK-4 FEL driven by the Duke storage ring will tens of watts of average lasing power in the UV/VUV range. Average intracavity power will be in kilowatt range and can be used to pump ICB source. The {gamma}-rays with maximum energy from 40 MeV to 200 MeV with intensity of 0.1-5 10{sup 10}{gamma} per second can be generated. In this paper we present expected parameters of {gamma}-ray beam parameters including its intensity and distribution. We discuss influence of e-beam parameters on collimated {gamma}-rays spectrum and optimization of photon-electron interaction point.

  4. An ion-beam injection line for the ELASR storage ring at KACST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Behery, S. A.; Almuqhim, A. A.; Almalki, M. H.; Alshammari, S. M.; Alrashdi, A. O.; Alamer, H. S.; Jabr, A. S.; Lanazi, A. Z.

    2016-01-01

    A versatile ion injector beam-line has been developed for the specific use in the multi-purpose low-energy, storage ring facility at the King Abdulaziz City for Sciences and Technology (KACST) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It incorporates a purpose-developed, high-resolution mass analyzing magnet and it is thereby dedicated to provide the ELASR storage ring with beams of ions of specific mass. It is also intended to operate independently as a single-pass experiment. This versatile ion-injection line was constructed in a staged approach, in which an axial injection version was built first, commissioned and is currently operating. The injection line in its final design is now being assembled and commissioned at KACST.

  5. CRYOGENIC AND VACUUM TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF THE LOW-ENERGY ELECTROSTATIC CRYOGENIC STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, D. A.; Lange, M.; Froese, M.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Mallinger, V.; Sieber, T.; Weber, T.; Wolf, A.; Rappaport, M.

    2008-03-16

    The cryogenic and vacuum concepts for the electrostatic Cryogenic ion Storage Ring (CSR), under construction at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, is presented. The ring will operate in a broad temperature range from 2 to 300 K and is required to be bakeable up to 600 K. Extremely high vacuum and low temperatures are necessary to achieve long lifetimes of the molecular ions stored in the ring so that the ions will have enough time to cool by radiation to their vibrational and rotational ground states. To test cryogenic and vacuum technological aspects of the CSR, a prototype is being built and will be connected to the commercial cryogenic refrigerator recently installed, including a specialized 2-K connection system. The first results and the status of current work with the prototype are also presented.

  6. Overall design concepts for the APS storage ring machine protection system

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.; Fuja, R.; Votaw, A.; Wang, X.; Shu, D.; Stepp, J.; Arnold, N.; Nawrocki, G.; Decker, G.; Chung, Y.

    1995-07-01

    The basic design and status of the machine protection system for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring are discussed. The machine is passively safe to the bending magnet sources, but the high power of the insertion devices requires missteering conditions to be identified and the beam aborted in less than one millisecond. The basic aspects of waterflow, temperature, beam position, etc. monitoring are addressed. Initial commissioning of subsystems and sensors is statused.

  7. A storage ring experiment to detect a proton electric dipole moment

    DOE PAGES

    Anastassopoulos, V.; Andrianov, S.; Baartman, R.; ...

    2016-11-29

    We describe a new experiment to detect a permanent electric dipole moment of the proton with a sensitivity of 10$-$29e cm by using polarized “magic” momentum 0.7 GeV/c protons in an all-electric storage ring. Systematic errors relevant to the experiment are discussed and techniques to address them are presented. The measurement is sensitive to new physics beyond the Standard Model at the scale of 3000 TeV.

  8. Magnet power supply control of the NSLS VUV and x-ray storage rings transfer lines

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.D.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Singh, O.; Smith, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The transfer lines for NSLS VUV and x-ray storage rings have been split. New power supplies have been incorporated with existing ones. The existing microprocessor system has been upgraded in order to control the additional functions. This system expands the input/output port of the microprocessor to an addressable serial/parallel link to each magnet power supply. The implementation of this system will be discussed.

  9. Studies of Electron-Ion Interactions Using the CRYRING Heavy-Ion Storage Ring Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    were measured at CRYRING but not ASTRID, and relative cross sections were measured over a broader energy range in ASTRID as compared with CRYRING. We...storage ring facility, has proved to be a powerful tool for measurements of branching ratios in recombination of polyatomic molecular ions. However...because well-resolved mass peaks facilitate the measurement of product branching ratios. Deuterated molecules and peak fitting procedures will be applied to

  10. Dynamical aspects on FEL interaction in single passage and storage ring devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dattoli, G.; Renieri, A.

    1995-12-31

    The dynamical behaviour of the free-electron lasers is investigated using appropriate scaling relations valid for devices operating in the low and high gain regimes, including saturation. The analysis is applied to both single passage and storage ring configurations. In the latter case the interplay between the interaction of the electron bean with the laser field and with the accelerator environment is investigated. In particular we discuss the effect of FEL interaction on the microwave instability.

  11. A storage ring experiment to detect a proton electric dipole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastassopoulos, V.; Andrianov, S.; Baartman, R.; Baessler, S.; Bai, M.; Benante, J.; Berz, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bowcock, T.; Brown, K.; Casey, B.; Conte, M.; Crnkovic, J. D.; D'Imperio, N.; Fanourakis, G.; Fedotov, A.; Fierlinger, P.; Fischer, W.; Gaisser, M. O.; Giomataris, Y.; Grosse-Perdekamp, M.; Guidoboni, G.; Hacıömeroǧlu, S.; Hoffstaetter, G.; Huang, H.; Incagli, M.; Ivanov, A.; Kawall, D.; Kim, Y. I.; King, B.; Koop, I. A.; Lazarus, D. M.; Lebedev, V.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S.; Lee, Y. H.; Lehrach, A.; Lenisa, P.; Levi Sandri, P.; Luccio, A. U.; Lyapin, A.; MacKay, W.; Maier, R.; Makino, K.; Malitsky, N.; Marciano, W. J.; Meng, W.; Meot, F.; Metodiev, E. M.; Miceli, L.; Moricciani, D.; Morse, W. M.; Nagaitsev, S.; Nayak, S. K.; Orlov, Y. F.; Ozben, C. S.; Park, S. T.; Pesce, A.; Petrakou, E.; Pile, P.; Podobedov, B.; Polychronakos, V.; Pretz, J.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ramberg, E.; Raparia, D.; Rathmann, F.; Rescia, S.; Roser, T.; Kamal Sayed, H.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Senichev, Y.; Sidorin, A.; Silenko, A.; Simos, N.; Stahl, A.; Stephenson, E. J.; Ströher, H.; Syphers, M. J.; Talman, J.; Talman, R. M.; Tishchenko, V.; Touramanis, C.; Tsoupas, N.; Venanzoni, G.; Vetter, K.; Vlassis, S.; Won, E.; Zavattini, G.; Zelenski, A.; Zioutas, K.

    2016-11-01

    A new experiment is described to detect a permanent electric dipole moment of the proton with a sensitivity of 10-29 e ṡ cm by using polarized "magic" momentum 0.7 GeV/c protons in an all-electric storage ring. Systematic errors relevant to the experiment are discussed and techniques to address them are presented. The measurement is sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model at the scale of 3000 TeV.

  12. Harmonics suppression in electromagnets with application to the ALS storage ring corrector magnet design

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.D.

    1991-01-28

    This memo presents an analytical development for prediction of skew harmonics in a iron core C-magnet to due arbitrarily positioned electromagnet coils. A structured approach is presented for the suppression of an arbitrary number of harmonic components to arbitrarily low values. Application of the analytical harmonic strength calculations coupled to the structured harmonic suppression approach is presented in the context of the design of the ALS storage ring corrector magnets.

  13. A possible approach to reduce the emittance of HLS- II storage ring using a Robinson wiggler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-Yi; Liu, Gong-Fa; Xu, Wei; Li, Wei-Min; Li, Yong-Jun

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we present some preliminary studies on using a Robinson wiggler to reduce the horizontal beam emittance in the Hefei Light Source II (HLS- II) storage ring. A proof-of-principle lattice demonstrates that it is possible to reduce its emittance by 50% with a 2-meter long wiggler. This encouraging result suggests a feasible option to significantly improve the machine performance at a relatively low cost.

  14. A storage ring experiment to detect a proton electric dipole moment.

    PubMed

    Anastassopoulos, V; Andrianov, S; Baartman, R; Baessler, S; Bai, M; Benante, J; Berz, M; Blaskiewicz, M; Bowcock, T; Brown, K; Casey, B; Conte, M; Crnkovic, J D; D'Imperio, N; Fanourakis, G; Fedotov, A; Fierlinger, P; Fischer, W; Gaisser, M O; Giomataris, Y; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guidoboni, G; Hacıömeroğlu, S; Hoffstaetter, G; Huang, H; Incagli, M; Ivanov, A; Kawall, D; Kim, Y I; King, B; Koop, I A; Lazarus, D M; Lebedev, V; Lee, M J; Lee, S; Lee, Y H; Lehrach, A; Lenisa, P; Levi Sandri, P; Luccio, A U; Lyapin, A; MacKay, W; Maier, R; Makino, K; Malitsky, N; Marciano, W J; Meng, W; Meot, F; Metodiev, E M; Miceli, L; Moricciani, D; Morse, W M; Nagaitsev, S; Nayak, S K; Orlov, Y F; Ozben, C S; Park, S T; Pesce, A; Petrakou, E; Pile, P; Podobedov, B; Polychronakos, V; Pretz, J; Ptitsyn, V; Ramberg, E; Raparia, D; Rathmann, F; Rescia, S; Roser, T; Kamal Sayed, H; Semertzidis, Y K; Senichev, Y; Sidorin, A; Silenko, A; Simos, N; Stahl, A; Stephenson, E J; Ströher, H; Syphers, M J; Talman, J; Talman, R M; Tishchenko, V; Touramanis, C; Tsoupas, N; Venanzoni, G; Vetter, K; Vlassis, S; Won, E; Zavattini, G; Zelenski, A; Zioutas, K

    2016-11-01

    A new experiment is described to detect a permanent electric dipole moment of the proton with a sensitivity of 10(-29) e ⋅ cm by using polarized "magic" momentum 0.7 GeV/c protons in an all-electric storage ring. Systematic errors relevant to the experiment are discussed and techniques to address them are presented. The measurement is sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model at the scale of 3000 TeV.

  15. Observation of Magnetic Resonances in Electron Clouds in a Positron Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Ng, J.S.T.; Cooper, F.; Kharakh, D.; King, F.; Kirby, R.E.; Kuekan, B.; Spencer, Cherrill M.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Wang, L.F.; /SLAC

    2011-08-24

    The first experimental observation of magnetic resonances in electron clouds is reported. The resonance was observed as a modulation in cloud intensity for uncoated as well as TiN-coated aluminum surfaces in the positron storage ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. Electron clouds frequently arise in accelerators of positively charged particles, and severely impact the machines performance. The TiN coating was found to be an effective remedy, reducing the cloud intensity by three orders of magnitude.

  16. A storage ring experiment to detect a proton electric dipole moment

    SciTech Connect

    Anastassopoulos, V.; Andrianov, S.; Baartman, R.; Baessler, S.; Bai, M.; Benante, J.; Berz, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bowcock, T.; Brown, K.; Casey, B.; Conte, M.; Crnkovic, J. D.; D’Imperio, N.; Fanourakis, G.; Fedotov, A.; Fierlinger, P.; Fischer, W.; Gaisser, M. O.; Giomataris, Y.; Guidoboni, G.; Hacıömeroğlu, S.; Hoffstaetter, G.; Huang, H.; Incagli, M.; Ivanov, A.; Kawall, D.; Kim, Y. I.; King, B.; Koop, I. A.; Lazarus, D. M.; Lebedev, V.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S.; Lee, Y. H.; Lehrach, A.; Lenisa, P.; Levi Sandri, P.; Luccio, A. U.; Lyapin, A.; MacKay, W.; Maier, R.; Makino, K.; Malitsky, N.; Marciano, W. J.; Meng, W.; Meot, F.; Metodiev, E. M.; Miceli, L.; Moricciani, D.; Morse, W. M.; Nagaitsev, S.; Nayak, S. K.; Orlov, Y. F.; Ozben, C. S.; Park, S. T.; Pesce, A.; Petrakou, E.; Pile, P.; Podobedov, B.; Polychronakos, V.; Pretz, J.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ramberg, E.; Raparia, D.; Rathmann, F.; Rescia, S.; Roser, T.; Kamal Sayed, H.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Senichev, Y.; Sidorin, A.; Silenko, A.; Simos, N.; Stahl, A.; Stephenson, E. J.; Ströher, H.; Syphers, M. J.; Talman, J.; Talman, R. M.; Tishchenko, V.; Touramanis, C.; Tsoupas, N.; Venanzoni, G.; Vetter, K.; Vlassis, S.; Won, E.; Zavattini, G.; Zelenski, A.; Zioutas, K.

    2016-11-29

    We describe a new experiment to detect a permanent electric dipole moment of the proton with a sensitivity of 10$-$29e cm by using polarized “magic” momentum 0.7 GeV/c protons in an all-electric storage ring. Systematic errors relevant to the experiment are discussed and techniques to address them are presented. The measurement is sensitive to new physics beyond the Standard Model at the scale of 3000 TeV.

  17. Cascade Problems in Some Atomic Lifetime Measurements at a Heavy-Ion Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E; Hoffmann, J; Krantz, C; Wolf, A; Ishikawa, Y; Santana, J

    2008-10-09

    Lifetimes of 3s{sup 2}3p{sup k} ground configuration levels of Al-, Si-, P-, and S-like ions of Be, Co, and Ni have been measured at a heavy-ion storage ring. Some of the observed decay curves show strong evidence of cascade repopulation from specific 3d levels that feature lifetimes in the same multi-millisecond range as the levels of the ground configuration.

  18. elegantRingAnalysis : an interface for high-throughput analysis of storage ring lattices using elegant.

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, M. D.; APS Operations Division

    2005-05-01

    The code elegant is widely used for simulation of linacs for drivers for free-electron lasers. Less well known is that elegant is also a very capable code for simulation of storage rings. In this paper, we show a newly developed graphical user interface that allows the user to easily take advantage of these capabilities. The interface is designed for use on a Linux cluster, providing very high throughput. It can also be used on a single computer. Among the features it gives access to are basic calculations (Twiss parameters, radiation integrals), phase-space tracking, nonlinear dispersion, dynamic aperture (on-and off-momentum), frequency map analysis, and collective effects (IBS, bunch-lengthening). Using a cluster, it is easy to get highly detailed dynamic aperture and frequency map results in a surprisingly short time.

  19. The double electrostatic ion ring experiment: a unique cryogenic electrostatic storage ring for merged ion-beams studies.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R D; Schmidt, H T; Andler, G; Björkhage, M; Blom, M; Brännholm, L; Bäckström, E; Danared, H; Das, S; Haag, N; Halldén, P; Hellberg, F; Holm, A I S; Johansson, H A B; Källberg, A; Källersjö, G; Larsson, M; Leontein, S; Liljeby, L; Löfgren, P; Malm, B; Mannervik, S; Masuda, M; Misra, D; Orbán, A; Paál, A; Reinhed, P; Rensfelt, K-G; Rosén, S; Schmidt, K; Seitz, F; Simonsson, A; Weimer, J; Zettergren, H; Cederquist, H

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of a novel type of storage device currently under construction at Stockholm University, Sweden, using purely electrostatic focussing and deflection elements, in which ion beams of opposite charges are confined under extreme high vacuum cryogenic conditions in separate "rings" and merged over a common straight section. The construction of this double electrostatic ion ring experiment uniquely allows for studies of interactions between cations and anions at low and well-defined internal temperatures and centre-of-mass collision energies down to about 10 K and 10 meV, respectively. Position sensitive multi-hit detector systems have been extensively tested and proven to work in cryogenic environments and these will be used to measure correlations between reaction products in, for example, electron-transfer processes. The technical advantages of using purely electrostatic ion storage devices over magnetic ones are many, but the most relevant are: electrostatic elements which are more compact and easier to construct; remanent fields, hysteresis, and eddy-currents, which are of concern in magnetic devices, are no longer relevant; and electrical fields required to control the orbit of the ions are not only much easier to create and control than the corresponding magnetic fields, they also set no upper mass limit on the ions that can be stored. These technical differences are a boon to new areas of fundamental experimental research, not only in atomic and molecular physics but also in the boundaries of these fields with chemistry and biology. For examples, studies of interactions with internally cold molecular ions will be particular useful for applications in astrophysics, while studies of solvated ionic clusters will be of relevance to aeronomy and biology.

  20. Single bunch injection system for storage ring FEL using an rf photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, P. G.; Lancaster, J. A.; Madey, J. M. J.; Sachtschale, R.; Jones, R.

    1997-05-01

    RF photoinjectors have gained acceptance as the source of choice for high-brightness electron accelerators, but have been quite expensive to build and difficult to operate. In this paper we describe the successful operation of an inexpensive, simple and reliable rf photoinjector suitable for single bunch injection into storage rings. For optimum storage ring FEL and Compton Backscatter performance, we require that the electrons be injected to specified ring rf buckets and no others. The injector-linac electron gun is a single-cell s-band rf gun with a LaB6 cathode. The gun is followed by an a-magnet momentum filter and buncher. The LaB6 cathode can be operated in a pure thermionic mode, a laser switched photoemission mode, or in a combined mode. The laser is a near-UV TEA nitrogen laser with a 600 ps pulse, and 0-50 Hz repetition rate. We routinely inject 0.1 nC bunches at 270 MeV. The ratio of charge in the primary ring bucket to that in the other buckets is better than 1000.

  1. Intra-Beam Scattering, Impedance, and Instabilities in Ultimate Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl; /SLAC

    2012-03-28

    We have investigated collective effects in an ultimate storage ring, i.e. one with diffraction limited emittances in both planes, using PEP-X as an example. In an ultimate ring intra-beam scattering (IBS) sets the limit of current that can be stored. In PEP-X, a 4.5 GeV ring running round beams at 200 mA in 3300 bunches, IBS doubles the emittances to 11.5 pm at the design current. The Touschek lifetime is 11 hours. Impedance driven collective effects tend not to be important since the beam current is relatively low. We have investigated collective effects in PEP-X, an ultimate storage ring, i.e. one with diffraction limited emittances (at one angstrom wavelength) in both planes. In an ultimate ring intra-beam scattering (IBS) sets the limit of current that can be stored. In PEP-X, IBS doubles the emittances to 11.5 pm at the design current of 200 mA, assuming round beams. The Touschek lifetime is quite large in PEP-X, 11.6 hours, and - near the operating point - increases with decreasing emittance. It is, however, a very sensitive function of momentum acceptance. In an ultimate ring like PEP-X impedance driven collective effects tend not to be important since the beam current is relatively low. Before ultimate PEP-X can be realized, the question of how to run a machine with round beams needs serious study. For example, in this report we assumed that the vertical emittance is coupling dominated. It may turn out that using vertical dispersion is a preferable way to generate round beams. The choice will affect IBS and the Touschek effect.

  2. BEAM DIAGNOSTICS USING BPM SIGNALS FROM INJECTED AND STORED BEAMS IN A STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.M.; Shaftan; T.; Cheng; W.X.; Fliller; R.; Heese; R.; Singh; O.; Willeke; F.

    2011-03-28

    Many modern light sources are operating in top-off injection mode or are being upgraded to top-off injection mode. The storage ring always has the stored beam and injected beam for top-off injection mode. So the BPM data is the mixture of both beam positions and the injected beam position cannot be measured directly. We propose to use dedicated wide band BPM electronics in the NSLS II storage ring to retrieve the injected beam trajectory with the singular value decomposition (SVD) method. The beam position monitor (BPM) has the capability to measure bunch-by-bunch beam position. Similar electronics can be used to measure the bunch-by-bunch beam current which is necessary to get the injection beam position. The measurement precision of current needs to be evaluated since button BPM sum signal has position dependence. The injected beam trajectory can be measured and monitored all the time without dumping the stored beam. We can adjust and optimize the injected beam trajectory to maximize the injection efficiency. We can also measure the storage ring acceptance by mapping the injected beam trajectory.

  3. Ionization and Recombination Measurements at the Heidelberg Heavy Ion Storage Ring TSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, D. W.; Hahn, M.; Lestinsky, M.; Novonty, O.; Bernhardt, D.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Krantz, C.; Wolf, A.

    2011-05-01

    Reliable ionization balance calculations are needed to analyze spectra from a wide range of cosmic sources including photoionized objects such as AGNs and X-ray binaries and electron ionized objects such as as stars, supernovae, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies. These theoretical charge state distributions (CSD) depend in turn upon the underlying atomic data. Of particular importance are reliable rate coefficients for dielectronic recombination (DR), which is the dominant electron-ion recombination recombination mechanism for most ions, and for electron impact ionization (EII). We are carrying out DR and EII measurements of astrophysically important ions using the heavy ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. The storage ring measurements are largely free of the metastable contamination found in other experimental geometries. Storage ring measurements therefore result in more precise DR and EII reaction rate measurements. The measured rate coefficients can be used in modeling cosmic and laboratory plasmas as well as in the benchmarking of theoretical atomic calculations. Here we report results for selected recent DR and EII measurements.

  4. Recombination and Ionization Measurements at the Heidelberg Heavy Ion Storage Ring TSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Bernhardt, D.; Krantz, C.; Lestinsky, M.; Mueller, A.; Novotny, O.; Schippers, S.; Wolf, A.; Savin, D. W.

    2010-03-01

    Reliable ionization balance calculations are needed to analyze spectra from a wide range of cosmic sources including photoionized objects such as AGNs and X-ray binaries and electron ionized objects such as as stars, supernovae, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies. These theoretical charge state distributions (CSD) depend in turn upon the underlying atomic data. Of particular importance are reliable rate coefficients for dielectronic recombination (DR), which is the dominant electron-ion recombination recombination mechanism for most ions, and for electron impact ionzation (EII). We are carrying out DR and EII measurements of astrophysically important ions using the heavy ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Insitute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. The storage ring measurements are largely free of the metastable contamination found in other experimental geometries. Storage ring measurements therefore result in more precise DR and EII reaction rate measurements. The measured rate coefficients can be used in plasma modelling as well as in the benchmarking of theoretical atomic calculations. Here we report recent DR and EII measurements of Mg VIII and Fe XII.

  5. TIG welding of aluminum alloys for the APS storage ring - a UHV application

    SciTech Connect

    Goeppner, G.A.

    1996-05-29

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) incorporates a 7-GeV positron storage ring 1104 meters in circumference. The storage ring vacuum system is designed to maintain a pressure of 1 nTorr or less with a circulating current of 300 mA to enable beam lifetimes of greater than 10 hours. The vacuum chamber is an aluminum extrusion of 6063T5 alloy. There are 235 separate aluminum vacuum chambers in the storage ring connected by stainless steel bellows assemblies. Aluminum was chosen for the vacuum chamber because it can be economically extruded and machined, has good thermal conductivity, low thermal emissivity, a low outgassing rate, low residual radioactivity, and is non-magnetic. The 6063 aluminum-silicon-magnesium alloy provides high strength combined with good machining and weldability characteristics. The extrusion process provides the interior surface finish needed for the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environments There are six different vacuum chambers with the same extrusion cross section. The average vacuum chamber length is 171.6 inches. The extruded vacuum chambers are welded to flange assemblies made up of machined 2219 aluminum alloy pieces and 2219 aluminum vacuum flanges from a commercial source.

  6. Small-amplitude synchrotron tune near transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    The separatrices of the rf buckets near transition are mapped when the synchronous phase is neither 0 or {pi}. The small-amplitude synchronous tune is derived when the rf frequency is changed. Synchrotron radiation is present in all electron storage ring. As a result, the synchronous phase is always offset from {phi}{sub s} = {pi} to compensate for the power loss. Even for proton storage rings with negligible synchrotron radiation, the synchronous phase is also required to be offset from {phi}{sub s} = 0 or {pi} slightly to compensate for beam loading. Thus for all storage rings operating near transition, beam particles reside in accelerating buckets instead of stationary bucket. It is of interest to map these buckets and see how they evolve near transition. When the rf frequency is varied, the closed orbit is pushed radially inward or outward. The momentum of the particle synchronous with the rf is thus changed. By measuring the small-amplitude synchrotron tune as a function of the rf frequency, the lowest first few orders of the slip factor can be inferred. Here, we derive this relationship up to the lowest first three orders of the slip factor when the particle velocity is not ultra-relativistic.

  7. Compact IR synchrotron beamline design.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Thierry

    2017-03-01

    Third-generation storage rings are massively evolving due to the very compact nature of the multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice which allows amazing decreases of the horizontal electron beam emittance, but leaves very little place for infrared (IR) extraction mirrors to be placed, thus prohibiting traditional IR beamlines. In order to circumvent this apparent restriction, an optimized optical layout directly integrated inside a SOLEIL synchrotron dipole chamber that delivers intense and almost aberration-free beams in the near- to mid-IR domain (1-30 µm) is proposed and analyzed, and which can be integrated into space-restricted MBA rings. Since the optics and chamber are interdependent, the feasibility of this approach depends on a large part on the technical ability to assemble mechanically the optics inside the dipole chamber and control their resulting stability and thermo-mechanical deformation. Acquiring this expertise should allow dipole chambers to provide almost aberration-free IR synchrotron sources on current and `ultimate' MBA storage rings.

  8. Non-Gaussian beam dynamics in low energy antiproton storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta-López, J.; Hunt, J. R.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    In low energy antiproton facilities, where electron cooling is fundamental, the cooling forces together with heating phenomena causing emittance blow-up, such as Intra Beam Scattering (IBS), result in highly non-Gaussian beam distributions. In these cases, a precise simulation of IBS effects is essential to realistically evaluate the long term beam evolution, taking into account the non-Gaussian characteristics of the beam. Here, we analyse the beam dynamics in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA), which is a new small synchrotron currently being constructed at CERN to decelerate antiprotons to energies as low as 100 keV. Simulations are performed using the code BETACOOL, comparing different models of IBS.

  9. Fluorescence dynamics of biological systems using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gratton, E.; Mantulin, W.W.; Weber, G.; Royer, C.A.; Jameson, D.M.; Reininger, R.; Hansen, R.

    1996-09-01

    A beamline for time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of biological systems is under construction at the Synchrotron Radiation Center. The fluorometer, operating in the frequency domain, will take advantage of the time structure of the synchrotron radiation light pulses to determine fluorescence lifetimes. Using frequency-domain techniques, the instrument can achieve an ultimate time resolution on the order of picoseconds. Preliminary experiments have shown that reducing the intensity of one of the fifteen electron bunches in the storage ring allows measurement of harmonic frequencies equivalent to the single-bunch mode. This mode of operation of the synchrotron significantly extends the range of lifetimes that can be measured. The wavelength range (encompassing the visible and ultraviolet), the range of measurable lifetimes, and the stability and reproducibility of the storage ring pulses should make this beamline a versatile tool for the investigation of the complex fluorescence decay of biological systems. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. A new data acquisition system for Schottky signals in atomic physics experiments at GSI's and FAIR's storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trageser, C.; Brandau, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Müller, A.; Nolden, F.; Sanjari, S.; Stöhlker, T.

    2015-11-01

    A new continuous and broadband data acquisition system for measurements of Schottky-signals of ions revolving in a storage ring has been implemented. This set-up is capable of recording the radio frequency (RF) signal of the ions that circulate in the storage ring with a sustained acquisition rate of more than 3.5× {10}7 IQ-samples per second. This allows several harmonics of the full momentum acceptance of a storage ring to be measured at the same time. The RF signal analyzer modules are complemented by further electronic modules such as counters, precision clocks and synchronization modules that facilitate a seamless integration with main experimental data acquisitions for atomic and nuclear physics. In this contribution, the setup and first results from a test run at the experimental storage ring at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, are presented.

  11. Present status of the NIJI-IV storage-ring free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, T.; Yamada, K.; Sei, N.

    1995-12-31

    The tunable region of the free-electron-laser (FEL) wavelength with the NIJI-IV system is now 348{approximately}595 nm. After the lasing at 352 nm in 1994, the quality of the electron beam stored in the ring has been improved further, and the highest peak intensity of the laser obtained so far is more than 300 times as high as that of the resonated spontaneous emission. The macro-temporal structure of the lasing has been greatly improved. Recently, a single-bunch injection system was completed, and the system has been installed in the injector linac, which is expected to increase the peak stored-beam current. The commissioning and the test of the new system is under way. The beam transporting system from the linac to the ring is also being modified by increasing the number of quadrupole magnets. The experiments related to the FEL in the ultraviolet wavelength region will be begun in this coming May. The results and the status of the FEL experiments will be presented at the Conference.

  12. New insights into globoids of protein storage vacuoles in wheat aleurone using synchrotron soft X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Regvar, Marjana; Eichert, Diane; Kaulich, Burkhard; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Pongrac, Paula; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Kreft, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Mature developed seeds are physiologically and biochemically committed to store nutrients, principally as starch, protein, oils, and minerals. The composition and distribution of elements inside the aleurone cell layer reflect their biogenesis, structural characteristics, and physiological functions. It is therefore of primary importance to understand the mechanisms underlying metal ion accumulation, distribution, storage, and bioavailability in aleurone subcellular organelles for seed fortification purposes. Synchrotron radiation soft X-ray full-field imaging mode (FFIM) and low-energy X-ray fluorescence (LEXRF) spectromicroscopy were applied to characterize major structural features and the subcellular distribution of physiologically important elements (Zn, Fe, Na, Mg, Al, Si, and P). These direct imaging methods reveal the accumulation patterns between the apoplast and symplast, and highlight the importance of globoids with phytic acid mineral salts and walls as preferential storage structures. C, N, and O chemical topographies are directly linked to the structural backbone of plant substructures. Zn, Fe, Na, Mg, Al, and P were linked to globoid structures within protein storage vacuoles with variable levels of co-localization. Si distribution was atypical, being contained in the aleurone apoplast and symplast, supporting a physiological role for Si in addition to its structural function. These results reveal that the immobilization of metals within the observed endomembrane structures presents a structural and functional barrier and affects bioavailability. The combination of high spatial and chemical X-ray microscopy techniques highlights how in situ analysis can yield new insights into the complexity of the wheat aleurone layer, whose precise biochemical composition, morphology, and structural characteristics are still not unequivocally resolved. PMID:21447756

  13. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    DOE PAGES

    Harkay, K. C.; Rosenberg, R. A.

    2003-03-20

    Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in amore » positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Furthermore, such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.« less

  14. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Harkay, K. C.; Rosenberg, R. A.

    2003-03-20

    Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Furthermore, such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  15. Diffraction-limited storage rings - a window to the science of tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Mikael; van der Veen, J Friso; Quitmann, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes the contributions in this special issue on Diffraction-Limited Storage Rings. It analyses the progress in accelerator technology enabling a significant increase in brightness and coherent fraction of the X-ray light provided by storage rings. With MAX IV and Sirius there are two facilities under construction that already exploit these advantages. Several other projects are in the design stage and these will probably enhance the performance further. To translate the progress in light source quality into new science requires similar progress in aspects such as optics, beamline technology, detectors and data analysis. The quality of new science will be limited by the weakest component in this value chain. Breakthroughs can be expected in high-resolution imaging, microscopy and spectroscopy. These techniques are relevant for many fields of science; for example, for the fundamental understanding of the properties of correlated electron materials, the development and characterization of materials for data and energy storage, environmental applications and bio-medicine.

  16. Storage Ring Section for a Polarized Gas Target with High Angular Acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garishvili, A.; Lorentz, B.; Nass, A.; Lehrach, A.; Lenisa, P.; Maier, R.; Martin, S.; Rathmann, F.; Statera, M.; Steffens, E.; Ströher, H.

    2008-02-01

    In the framework of the FAIR project [1], the PAX collaboration [2] has suggested new experiments using polarized protons and antiprotons. In order to provide polarized antiprotons, the polarization buildup by spin-dependent attenuation due to nuclear interaction (spin-filtering) must be studied. The goal of these investigations is to understand the physics of the spin-filtering process with stored protons at COSY, and to shed light on the role of polarized electrons for the polarization buildup. Later on, the spin-dependence of the proton-antiproton interaction will be investigated at the Antiproton Decelerator ring (AD) of CERN. In order to carry out these investigations, a storage ring section has to be developed which minimizes the spin-independent losses due to single Coulomb scattering.

  17. CHEER, Canadian high energy electron ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemingway, R. J.

    The Institute of Particle Physics (IPP) in Canada have received funds from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) to pursue a study which looks at the feasibility of adding an external electron storage ring at one of the long straight sections of the Tevatron. The machine, as currently configured, has a 300 MeV Linac injector, a 300 MeV accumulator ring, a 2 GeV booster synchrotron, and a 10 GeV storage ring holding 120 mA of either electrons or positrons. Particular attention has been paid to beam polarisation and the design of the interaction region.

  18. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  19. Biomonitoring of environmental pollution using growth tree rings of Tipuana tipu: Quantification by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldo, S. M.; Canteras, F. B.; Moreira, S.

    2014-02-01

    Currently, many studies use the bioindicators to qualitatively and/or quantitatively measure pollution. The analyses of tree growth rings represent one such bioindicator as changes in the environment are often recorded as impressions in the wood. The main objective of the present study is to examine the growth rings of Tipuana tipu - a member of the Leguminosae family that is native to Argentina and Bolivia and was introduced in Brazil as an ornamental plant - for potentially toxic elements. T. tipu is one of the most common trees in the urban landscape of Sao Paulo city and would provide an accurate reflection of environment changes. Tree ring samples previously dated using Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence were collected from strategic locations in Sao Paulo. These locations include Piracicaba (SP) that has little access and small flow traffic and the campus of the University of São Paulo. Some trace elements present concentrations higher than considered as normal in some periods. In São Paulo city, samples collected from the campus of University of São Paulo (Butantã), showed the highest toxicity, with concentrations above the tolerable limit for the elements: Cr, Cu, and Pb. For the samples collected in Piracicaba city, one sample presented highest concentrations for the majority of the elements when compared to the other four samples collected at the same place, exceeding the toxicity limits for: Cr, Ni, Cu, and Pb.

  20. COUPLING IMPEDANCE OF CESR-B RF CAVITY FOR THE NSLS-II STORAGE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    BLEDNYKH,A.; KRINSKY, S.; ROSE, J.

    2007-06-25

    CESR-B type superconducting cavities are under consideration for acceleration of the electron beam in the 3GeV NSLS-II storage ring. In this paper we present detailed investigation of longitudinal and transverse impedance of CESR-B cavity and transitions. Ferrite material is included in impedance analysis. Its effect on short range wake potential has been studied using GdfidL code. The summary results of loss factors and kick factors are presented for a 3mm rms bunch length.

  1. IMPEDANCE OF ELECTRON BEAM VACUUM CHAMBERS FOR THE NSLS-II STORAGE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    BLEDNYKH,A.; KRINSKY, S.

    2007-06-25

    In this paper we discuss computation of the coupling impedance of the vacuum chambers for the NSLS-II storage ring using the electromagnetic simulator GdfidL [1]. The impedance of the vacuum chambers depends on the geometric dimensions of the cross-section and height of the slot in the chamber wall. Of particular concern is the complex geometry of the infrared extraction chambers to be installed in special large-gap dipole magnets. In this case, wakefields are generated due to tapered transitions and large vertical-aperture ports with mirrors near the electron beam.

  2. Minimum emittance in electron storage rings with uniform or nonuniform dipoles.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-x.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2009-06-01

    A simple treatment of minimum emittance theory in storage rings is presented, favoring vector and matrix forms for a more concise picture. Both conventional uniform dipoles and nonuniform dipoles with bending radius variation are treated. Simple formulas are given for computing the minimum emittance, optimal lattice parameters, as well as effects of nonoptimal parameters. For nonuniform dipoles, analytical results are obtained for a three-piece sandwich dipole model. Minimization of the effective emittance for light sources is given in detail. Usefulness of gradient and/or nonuniform dipoles for reducing the effective emittance is addressed.

  3. Conditioning of the vacuum system of the TPS storage ring without baking in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C. K.; Chang, C. C.; Shueh, C.; Yang, I. C.; Wu, L. H.; Chen, B. Y.; Cheng, C. M.; Huang, Y. T.; Chuang, J. Y.; Cheng, Y. T.; Hsiao, Y. M.; Sheng, Albert

    2017-04-01

    To shorten the machine downtime, a maintenance procedure without baking in situ has been developed and applied to maintain and to upgrade the vacuum system of the TPS storage ring. The data of photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) reveal no obvious discrepancy between baking and not baking the vacuum system in situ. A beam-conditioning dose of extent only 11.8 A h is required to recover quickly the dynamic pressure of an unbaked vacuum system to its pre-intervention value according to the TPS maintenance experience.

  4. A statistical analysis of the beam position measurement in the Los Alamos proton storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kolski, Jeff S; Macek, Robert J; Mc Crady, Rodney C

    2010-01-01

    The beam position monitors (BPMs) are the main diagnostic in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). They are used in several applications during operations and tuning including orbit bumps and measurements of the tune, closed orbit (CO), and injection offset. However the BPM data acquisition system makes use of older technologies, such as matrix switches, that could lead to faulty measurements. This is the first statistical study of the PSR BPM perfonnance using BPM measurements. In this study, 101 consecutive CO measurements are analyzed. Reported here are the results of the statistical analysis, tune and CO measurement spreads, the BPM single turn measurement error, and examples of the observed data acquisition errors.

  5. The amplitude and phase control of the ALS Storage Ring RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C.C.; Taylor, B.; Baptiste, K.

    1995-03-01

    A 500MHz, 300KW Klystron power amplifier provides RF power to the ALS Storage Ring. In order to accommodate the amplitude and phase changes during beam stacking and decay, which demand continuously varying power levels from the Klystron, four loops are used to keep the system operating properly, with two of those loops dedicated to keeping the two cavity tuners on tune. Description of the control loops and their performance data will be given. Using the modulation anode of the Klystron in the amplitude loop will be discussed.

  6. Control of coupled-bunch instabilities in high current storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambertson, G.

    1991-04-01

    Intense particle beams may be subject to coupled-bunch instabilities that would grow at rates greater than the bunch oscillation frequencies. The suppression of the growth requires both reduction of the driving impedances and active feedback of bunch motions. The shunt impedances of higher-order cavity resonances can be reduced by passive dampers and the beam impedance within the band of the fundamental resonance can be reduced by rf feedback around the cavity and power amplifier. The feedback of bunch motions composed of numerous coupled-bunch modes requires broad-band systems for which the amplifiers are costly. Examples proposed for electron storage rings are presented. 10 refs, 5 figs.

  7. Broadband impedance calculations and single bunch instabilities estimations of of the HLS-II storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing-Kun; Wang, Lin; Li, Wei-Min; Gao, Wei-Wei

    2015-12-01

    The upgrade project of the Hefei Light Source storage ring is under way. In this paper, the broadband impedances of resistive wall and coated ceramic vacuum chamber are calculated using the analytic formula, and the wake fields and impedances of other designed vacuum chambers are simulated by CST code, and then a broadband impedance model is obtained. Using the theoretical formula, longitudinal and transverse single bunch instabilities are discussed. With the carefully-designed vacuum chamber, we find that the thresholds of the beam instabilities are higher than the beam current goal. Supported by Natural Science Foundation of China (11175182, 11175180)

  8. Mass Measurements of Proton-rich Nuclides at the Cooler Storage Ring at IMP

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. H.; Xu, H. S.; Wang, M.; Zhou, X. H.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xia, J. W.; Hu, Z. G.; Huang, W. X.; Liu, Y.; Ma, X.; Mao, R. S.; Mei, B.; Sun, Z. Y.; Wang, J. S.; Xiao, G. Q.; Yan, X. L.; Yang, J. C.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhang, X. Y.; and others

    2011-11-30

    Recent results and progress of mass measurements of proton-rich nuclei using isochronous mass spectrometry (IMS) are reported. The nuclei under investigation were produced via fragmentation of relativistic energy heavy ions of {sup 78}Kr and {sup 58}Ni. After in-flight separation by the fragment separator RIBLL-2, the nuclei were injected and stored in the experimental storage ring CSRe, and their masses were determined from measurements of the revolution times. The impact of these measurements on the stellar nucleosynthesis in the rp-process is discussed.

  9. On the Absorber Thickness of Microcalorimetric Detectors in Experiments at Nuclear Storage Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, V. A.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Scholz, P.

    2016-07-01

    Low-temperature calorimetric detectors are now successfully used in experiments on Lamb-Shift measurements at experimental storage rings. Strong Doppler broadening of the detected X-ray lines is a prominent feature of these experiments. Accordingly, an optimization procedure for the absorber thickness is proposed that considers the self-width of the X-ray detector line, the Doppler broadening, and the absorption efficiency, taking into account the possibility of the escape of secondary radiation. The optimum thickness for Sn-absorbers in this type of experiments is determined as 0.17 mm.

  10. Laser cooling of {sup 24}Mg{sup +} in the ASTRID storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, J.S.; Hangst, J.S.; Poulsen, O.; Shi, P. |; Schiffer, J.P. |; Wanner, B.

    1994-05-01

    Laser cooling of {sup 24}Mg{sup +} has now begun at the ASTRID storage ring. In contrast to {sup 7}Li{sup +}, which has been used up to now, it is now possible for the laser to interact with all of the beam. In this paper some of the results from the first beam time with {sup 24}Mg{sup +} are described. By frequency chirping a single laser, laser cooling has been performed on a coasting beam, and first evidence of sympathetic transverse cooling has been observed.

  11. Calculation of the intensity of Touschek electrons in the VEPP-4M storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, S. A. Nikolaev, I. B.

    2012-07-15

    Formulas for calculating the intensity of intrabeam scattering of electrons in the Born approximation for the one- and two-dimensional collision models have been obtained for the nonrelativistic and relativistic cases. The Baier-Katkov-Strakhovenko two-dimensional relativistic model with Coulomb corrections has been analyzed. Formulas in the ultrarelativistic limit have been obtained using this model. Different models have been compared. The intensities of Touschek electrons and the polarization contribution have been calculated under the conditions of the detection of scattered particles at the VEPP-4M storage ring. The calculations have been compared to experimental data.

  12. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Haeberli, W.

    1992-02-01

    Polarized gas targets of atomic hydrogen and deuterium have significant advantages over conventional polarized targets, e.g. chemical and isotopic purity, large polarization including deuteron tensor polarization, absence of strong magnetic fields, rapid polarization reversal. While in principle the beam of polarized atoms from an atomic beam source (Stern-Gerlach spin separation) can be used as a polarized target, the target thickness achieved is too small for most applications. We propose to increase the target thickness by injecting the polarized atoms into a storage cell. Provided the atoms survive several hundred wall collisions without losing their polarization, it will be possible to achieve a target thickness of 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2} by injection of polarized atoms from an atomic-beam source into suitable cells. Such targets are very attractive as internal targets in storage rings.

  13. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Haeberli, W.

    1992-02-01

    Polarized gas targets of atomic hydrogen and deuterium have significant advantages over conventional polarized targets, e.g. chemical and isotopic purity, large polarization including deuteron tensor polarization, absence of strong magnetic fields, rapid polarization reversal. While in principle the beam of polarized atoms from an atomic beam source (Stern-Gerlach spin separation) can be used as a polarized target, the target thickness achieved is too small for most applications. We propose to increase the target thickness by injecting the polarized atoms into a storage cell. Provided the atoms survive several hundred wall collisions without losing their polarization, it will be possible to achieve a target thickness of 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2} by injection of polarized atoms from an atomic-beam source into suitable cells. Such targets are very attractive as internal targets in storage rings.

  14. A Pulsed Modulator Power Supply for the g-2 Muon Storage Ring Injection Kicker

    SciTech Connect

    Mi,J.; Lee, Y.Y.; Morse, W. M.; Pai, C.; Pappas, G.; Sanders, R.; Semertzidis, Y.

    1999-03-29

    This paper describes the pulse modulator power supplies used to drive the kicker magnets that inject the muon beam into the g-2 storage ring that has been built at Brookhaven. Three modulators built into coaxial structures consisting of a series circuit of an energy storage capacitor, damping resistor and a fast thyratron switch are used to energize three magnets that kick the beam into the proper orbit. A 100 kV charging power supply is used to charge the capacitor to 95 kV. the damping resistor shapes the magnet current waveform to a 450 nanosecond half-sine to match the injection requirements. this paper discusses the modulator design, construction and operation.

  15. A PULSED MODULATOR POWER SUPPLY FOR THE G-2 MUON STORAGE RING INJECTION KICKER.

    SciTech Connect

    MI,J.LEE,Y.Y.MORSE,W.M.PAI,C.I.PAPPAS,G.C.SANDERS,Y.SEMERTIZIDIS,Y.,ET AL.

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes the pulse modulator power supplies used to drive the kicker magnets that inject the muon beam into the 8-2 storage ring that has been built at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Three modulators built into coaxial structures consisting of a series circuit of an energy storage capacitor, a damping resistor and a fast thyratron switch are used to energize three magnets that kick the beam into the proper orbit. A 100 kV charging power supply is used to charge the capacitor to 95kV. The damping resistor shapes the magnet current waveform to a 450 nanosecond half-sine to match the injection requirements. This paper discusses the modulator design, construction and operation.

  16. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2012-03-29

    The physics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by ultra-relativistic electron bunches, known since the last century, has become increasingly important with the development of high peak current free electron lasers and shorter bunch lengths in storage rings. Coherent radiation can be described as a low frequency part of the familiar synchrotron radiation in bending magnets. As this part is independent of the electron energy, the fields of different electrons of a short bunch can be in phase and the total power of the radiation will be quadratic with the number of electrons. Naturally the frequency spectrum of the longitudinal electron distribution in a bunch is of the same importance as the overall electron bunch length. The interest in the utilization of high power radiation from the terahertz and far infrared region in the field of chemical, physical and biological processes has led synchrotron radiation facilities to pay more attention to the production of coherent radiation. Several laboratories have proposed the construction of a facility wholly dedicated to terahertz production using the coherent radiation in bending magnets initiated by the longitudinal instabilities in the ring. Existing synchrotron radiation facilities also consider such a possibility among their future plans. There is a beautiful introduction to CSR in the 'ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter' N 35 (Editor C. Biscari). In this paper we recall the basic properties of CSR from the theory and what new effects, we can get from the precise simulations of the coherent radiation using numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. In particular, transverse variation of the particle energy loss in a bunch, discovered in these simulations, explains the slice emittance growth in bending magnets of the bunch compressors and transverse de-coherence in undulators. CSR may play same the role as the effect of quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation in damping rings. It can limit the minimum

  17. Improvement of current limitation in the storage ring NIJI-IV

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, M.; Kawai, M.; Hamada, S.

    1995-12-31

    The storage ring NIJI-IV dedicated to free-electron lasers was completed in December 1990. Lasing at 595-352 nm by using the NIJI-IV was accomplished by April 1994. The NIJI-IV has 16 rf-buckets. The electron bunch contributed to FEL gain of the NIJI-IV is only one of 16. In order to get the redundant bunch, make beam quality better, and make the FEL operation easier, a single bunch injection (SBI) system by using a short pulse beam from an electron gun was prepared. The quality of the beam accelerated and bunched by a buncher section has already been investigated. It was convinced that the accelerated short pulse beam satisfies the performance required on the SBI of the NIJI-IV. At present, the operation of the SBI system is being tested. Storage efficiency (the ratio of storage current to injection current) and limitation of storage current by using the SBI system will be reported in this conference. We expect lasing at below 352nm by the SBI.

  18. Orbit correction using an eigenvector method with constraints for synchrotron radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Kentaro; Obina, Takashi; Kobayashi, Yukinori; Nakamura, Norio; Takaki, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Hiroshi

    2009-06-01

    An eigenvector method with constraints (EVC) is proposed as a new orbit correction scheme for synchrotron light sources. EVC efficiently corrects the global orbit in a storage ring, and can simultaneously perform exact correction of local orbits without deterioration of the global orbit. To demonstrate the advantages of EVC over the ordinary eigenvector method (EV), we carried out experimental studies at the Photon Factory storage ring (PF-ring) and the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR) at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The performance of EVC was systematically examined at PF-ring and PF-AR. The experimental results agreed well with the simulated ones. Consequently, we confirmed that EVC easily realized orbit correction for both global and local orbits, and that it was very effective for the beam stabilization of synchrotron radiation (SR) sources.

  19. Synchrotron-based Infrared-microspectroscopy reveals the impact of land management on carbon storage in soil micro-aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C.; Dalal, Ram C.; Menzies, Neal W.; Kopittke, Peter M.

    2015-04-01

    Carbon stabilization in soil microaggregates results from chemical and biological processes that are highly sensitive to changes in land use. Indeed, such processes govern soil capability to store carbon, this being essential for soil health and productivity and to regulate emissions of soil organic carbon (SOC) as CO2. The identification of carbon functionalities using traditional mid-infrared analysis can be linked to carbon metabolism in soil but differences associated to land use are generally limited. The spatial resolution of synchrotron-based Infrared-microspectroscopy allows mapping microaggregate-associated forms of SOC because it has 1000 times higher brightness than a conventional thermal globar source. These maps can contribute to better understand molecular organization of SOC, physical protection in the soil particles and co-localization of carbon sources with microbial processes. Spatially-resolved analyses of carbon distribution in micro-aggregates (<200 μm diameter) have been conducted using FTIR microspectroscopy (Infrared Microspectroscopy beamline, Australian Synchrotron). Two soil types (Ferralsol and Vertisol, World Reference Base 2014) were collected from undisturbed areas and from a location(s) immediately adjacent which has a long history of agricultural use (>20 years). Soils were gently screened (250 μm) to obtain intact microaggregates which were humidified and frozen at -20°C, and sectioned (200 μm thickness) using a diamond knife and a cryo-ultramicrotome. The sections were placed between CaF2 windows and the spectra were acquired in transmission mode. The maps obtained (5 µm step-size over ca. 150 × 150 µm) revealed carbon distribution in microaggregates from soils under contrasting land management, namely undisturbed and cropping land. Accumulation of aromatic and carboxylic functions on specific spots and marginal co-localization with clays was observed, which suggests processes other than organo-mineral associations being

  20. Exact transfer functions for the PEP storage ring magnets and some general characteristics and techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1982-05-01

    The exact, ion-optical transfer functions for the dipoles, quadrupoles and sextupoles of the PEP standard PODC cell are calculated for any single particle with initial coordinates (r, p, s). Modifications resulting from radiative energy loss are also calculated and discussed. These functions allow one to characterize individual magnets or classes of magnets by their aberrations and thereby simplify their study and correction. In contrast to high-energy spectrometers where aberrations are often analyzed away, those in storage rings drive series of high order resonances, even for perfect magnets (2), that can produce stop bands and other effects which can seriously limit performance. Thus, one would like to eliminate them altogether or failing this to develop local and global correction schemes. Even then, one should expect higher order effects to influence injection, extraction or single-pass systems either because of orbit distortions or overly large phase spece distortions such as may occur in low-beta insertions or any final-focus optics. The term exact means that the results here are based on solving the relativistic Lorentz force equation with accurate representations of measured magnetostatic fields. Such fields satisfy Maxwell's equations and are the actual fields seen by a particle as it propagates around a real storage ring. This is discussed in detail and illustrated with examples that show that this is possible, practical and may even be useful.

  1. Study of magnetic hysteresis effects in a storage ring using precision tune measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Hao, Hao; Mikhailov, Stepan F.; Xu, Wei; Li, Jing-Yi; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Ying. K.

    2016-12-01

    With the advances in accelerator science and technology in recent decades, the accelerator community has focused on the development of next-generation light sources, for example diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs), which require precision control of the electron beam energy and betatron tunes. This work is aimed at understanding magnet hysteresis effects on the electron beam energy and lattice focusing in circular accelerators, and developing new methods to gain better control of these effects. In this paper, we will report our recent experimental study of the magnetic hysteresis effects and their impacts on the Duke storage ring lattice using the transverse feedback based precision tune measurement system. The major magnet hysteresis effects associated with magnet normalization and lattice ramping are carefully studied to determine an effective procedure for lattice preparation while maintaining a high degree of reproducibility of lattice focusing. The local hysteresis effects are also studied by measuring the betatron tune shifts which result from adjusting the setting of a quadrupole. A new technique has been developed to precisely recover the focusing strength of the quadrupole by returning it to a proper setting to overcome the local hysteresis effect. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175180, 11475167) and US DOE (DE-FG02-97ER41033)

  2. Recombination and Ionization Measurements at the Heidelberg Heavy Ion Storage Ring TSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestinsky, Michael; Lukic, D.; Savin, D. W.; Hoffmann, J.; Krantz, C.; Orlov, D. A.; Wolf, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Borovyk, O.; Schmidt, E. W.; Yu, D.; Schippers, S.; Müller, A.; Badnell, N. R.

    2008-05-01

    Much of our knowledge of the universe rests on our ability to interpret spectra collected from various cosmic sources. This analysis requires reliably understanding the underlying charge state distribution (CSD) for the observed gas. In turn, this depends on accurate rate coefficients for dielectronic recombination (DR) and electron impact ionization (EII), which play important roles in determining the CSD for a wide range of cosmic objects. To address these needs we have an ongoing experimental program carrying out DR and EII measurements for astrophysically important ions of cosmically abundant elements. Measurements are performed using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Storage rings are currently the only laboratory method capable of studying the astrophysically relevant DR channels for the majority of cosmically important ions. They are also the only method capable of studying EII using beams of ions with multiple electrons in the valence shell which are free of metastable contamination, allowing for unambiguous EII laboratory data. We use our results to produce rate coefficients for plasma modelling. We are also providing our data to atomic theorist to benchmark their calculations. Here we report our recent results for DR measurements of Fe XI and Fe X and show an early status report on the analysis of recent EII measurements of C IV, C V and O IV. This work has been supported in part by NASA, the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research, and the German Research Council.

  3. Waveguide Structures for RF Undulators with Applications to FELs and Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Yeddulla, M.; Geng, H.G.; Huang, Z.; Ma, Z.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    RF undulators, suggested a long time ago, have the advantage of fast dynamic control of polarization, undulator strength and wavelength. However, RF undulators require very strong RF fields in order to produce radiation of the same order as conventional static devices. Very high power RF energy confined inside a waveguide or a cavity can provide the necessary RF fields to undulate the electron beam. However, the wall losses in the waveguide should be low enough to make it practically feasible as a CW or quasi CW undulator and, hence, competitive with static devices for applications to storage rings and FELs. Here we present various waveguide structures such as smooth walled and corrugated walled waveguides and various RF modes. We will show that there are some advantages in operating with higher order modes and also with hybrid modes in the corrugated guide. We will show that the RF power requirement for some of these modes will permit a quasi CW operation of the undulator, thus permitting its operation in a storage ring.

  4. Use of the Halbach perturbation theory for the multipole design of the ALS storage ring sextupole

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, S.

    1995-02-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) storage ring sextupole is a unique multi-purpose magnet. It is designed to operate in the primary or sextupole mode and in three auxiliary trim modes: horizontal steering, vertical steering, and skew quadrupole. Klaus Halbach developed a perturbation theory for iron-dominated magnets which provides the basis for this design. Many magnet designers, certainly those who have been exposed to Klaus, are familiar with this theory and have used it for such things as evaluating the effect of assembly alignment errors. The ALS sextupole design process was somewhat novel in its use of the perturbation theory to design essential features of the magnet. In particular, the steering and skew quadrupole functions are produced by violating sextupole symmetry and are thus perturbations of the normal sextupole excitation. The magnet was designed such that all four modes are decoupled and can be excited independently. This paper discusses the use of Halbach`s perturbation theory to design the trim functions and to evaluate the primary asymmetry in the sextupole mode, namely, a gap in the return yoke to accommodate the vacuum chamber. Prototype testing verified all operating modes of the magnet and confirmed the expected performance from calculations based upon the Halbach perturbation theory. A total of 48 sextupole magnets of this design are now installed and operating successfully in the ALS storage ring.

  5. The large superconducting solenoids for the g-2 muon storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, G.; Cullen, J.; Danby, G.

    1994-12-01

    The g-2 muon storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory consists of four large superconducting solenoids. The two outer solenoids, which are 15.1 meters in diameter, share a common cryostat. The two inner solenoids, which are 13.4 meters in diameter, are in separate cryostats. The two 24 turn inner solenoids are operated at an opposite polarity from the two 24 turn outer solenoids. This generates a dipole field between the inner and outer solenoids. The flux between the solenoids is returned through a C shaped iron return yoke that also shapes the dipole field. The integrated field around the 14 meter diameter storage ring must be good to about 1 part in one million over the 90 mm dia. circular cross section where the muons are stored, averaged over the azimuth. When the four solenoids carry their 5300 A design current, the field in the 18 centimeter gap between the poles is 1.45 T. When the solenoid operates at its design current 5.5 MJ is stored between the poles. The solenoids were wound on site at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The cryostats were built around the solenoid windings which are indirectly cooled using two-phase helium.

  6. The Conversion and operation of the Cornell electron storage ring as a test accelerator (cesrta) for damping rings research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, M.A.; Alexander, J.; Byrd, J.; Celata, C.M.; Corlett, J.; De Santis, S.; Furman, M.; Jackson, A.; Kraft, R.; Munson, D.; Penn, G.; Plate, D.; Rawlins, A.; Venturini, M.; Zisman, M.; Billing, M.; Calvey, J.; Chapman, S.; Codner, G.; Conolly, C.; Crittenden, J.; Dobbins, J.; Dugan, G.; Fontes, E.; Forster, M.; Gallagher, R.; Gray, S.; Greenwald, S.; Hartill, D.; Hopkins, W.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Livezey, J.; Lyndaker, A.; Medjidzade, V.; Meller, R.; Peck, S.; Peterson, D.; Rendina, M.; Revesz, P.; Rice, D.; Rider, N.; Rubin, D.; Sagan, D.; Savino, J.; Seeley, R.; Sexton, J.; Shanks, J.; Sikora, J.; Smolenski, K.; Strohman, C.; Temnykh, A.; tigner, M.; Whitney, W.; Williams, H.; Vishniakou, S.; Wilkens, T.; Harkay, K.; Holtzapple, R.; Smith, E.; Jones, J.; Wolski, A.; He, Y.; Ross, M.; Tan, C.Y.; Zwaska, R.; Flanagan, J.; Jain, P.; Kanazawa, K.; Ohmi, K.; Sakai, H.; Shibata, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Kharakh, D.; Pivi, M.; Wang, L.

    2009-05-01

    In March of 2008, the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) concluded twenty eight years of colliding beam operations for the CLEO high energy physics experiment. We have reconfigured CESR as an ultra low emittance damping ring for use as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for International Linear Collider (ILC) damping ring R&D. The primary goals of the CesrTA program are to achieve a beam emittance approaching that of the ILC Damping Rings with a positron beam, to investigate the interaction of the electron cloud with both low emittance positron and electron beams, to explore methods to suppress the electron cloud, and to develop suitable advanced instrumentation required for these experimental studies (in particular a fast x-ray beam size monitor capable of single pass measurements of individual bunches). We report on progress with the CESR conversion activities, the status and schedule for the experimental program, and the first experimental results that have been obtained.

  7. Localized Chromaticity Correction of Low-Beta Insertions in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, M.; Helm, R.; Moshammer, I.H.; Forest, E.; Robin, David; Zholents, A.A.; Sullivan, M.; Irwin, J.

    1993-05-01

    The correction of the chromaticity of low-beta insertions in the storage rings is usually made with sextupole lenses in the ring's arcs. When decreasing the beta functions at the insertion point (IP), this technique becomes fairly ineffective, since it fails to properly correct the higher order chromatic aberrations. Here we consider the approach where the chromatic effects of the quadrupole lenses generating low beta functions at the IP are corrected locally with two families of sextupoles, one family for each plane. Each family has two pairs of sextupoles which are located symmetrically on both sides of the IP. The sextupole-like aberrations of individual sextupoles are eliminated by utilizing optics forming a -I transformation between sextupoles in the pair. The optics also includes bending magnets which preserve equal dispersion functions at the two sextupoles in each pair. At sextupoles in one family, the vertical beta function is made large and the horizontal is made small. The situation is reversed in the sextupoles of the other family. The betatron phase advances from the IP to the sextupoles are chosen to eliminate a second order chromatic aberration. The application of the localized chromatic correction is demonstrated using as an example the lattice design for the Low Energy Ring of the SLAC/LBL/LLNL PEP-II B Factory.

  8. Lattice Design for PEP-X Ultimate Storage Ring Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y.; Wang, M.-H.; Hettel, R.O.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    SLAC expertise in designing and operating high current storage rings and the availability of the 2.2-km PEP-II tunnel present an opportunity for building a next generation light source - PEP-X - that would replace the SPEAR3 storage ring in the future. The PEP-X 'baseline' design, with 164 pm-rad emittance at 4.5 GeV beam energy and a current of 1.5 A, was completed in 2010. As a next step, a so-called 'ultimate' PEP-X lattice, reducing the emittance to 11 pm-rad at zero current, has been designed. This emittance approaches the diffraction limited photon emittance for multi-keV photons, providing near maximum photon brightness and high coherence. It is achieved by using 7-bend achromat cells in the ring arcs and a 90-m damping wiggler in one of the 6 long straight sections. Details of the lattice design, dynamic aperture, and calculations of the intra-beam scattering effect and Touschek lifetime at a nominal 0.2 A current are presented. Accelerator-based light sources are in high demand for many experimental applications. The availability of the 2.2-km PEP-II tunnel at SLAC presents an opportunity for building a next generation light source - PEP-X - that would replace the existing SPEAR3 light source in the future. The PEP-X study started in 2008, and the 'baseline' design, yielding 164 pm-rad emittance at 4.5 GeV beam energy and a current of 1.5 A, was completed in 2010. This relatively conservative design can be built using existing technology. However, for a long term future, it is natural to investigate a more aggressive, so-called 'ultimate' ring design. The goal is to reduce the electron emittance in both x and y planes to near the diffraction limited photon emittance of 8 pm-rad at hard X-ray photon wavelength of 0.1 nm. This would provide a near maximum photon brightness and significant increase in photon coherence. This study was motivated by the advances in low emittance design at MAX-IV. The latter was used as a starting point for the PEP-X arc lattice

  9. LIGHT SOURCE: Optics for the lattice of the compact storage ring for a Compton X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pei-Cheng; Wang, Yu; Shen, Xiao-Zhe; Huang, Wen-Hui; Yan, Li-Xin; Du, Ying-Chao; Li, Ren-Kai; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2009-06-01

    We present two types of optics for the lattice of a compact storage ring for a Compton X-ray source. The optics design for different operation modes of the storage ring are discussed in detail. For the pulse mode optics, an IBS-suppression scheme is applied to optimize the optics for lower IBS emittance growth rate; as for the steady mode, the method to control momentum compact factor is adopted [Gladkikh P, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 050702] to obtain stability of the electron beam.

  10. Effects of construction and alignment errors on the orbit functions of the advanced photon source storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bizek, H.; Crosbie, E.; Lessner, E.; Teng, L.; Wirsbinski, J.

    1991-01-01

    The orbit functions for the Advanced Photon Source Storage Ring have been studied using the simulation code RACETRACK. Non-linear elements are substituted into the storage ring lattice to simulate the effects of construction and alignment errors in the quadrupole, dipole, and sextupole magnets. The effects of these errors on the orbit distortion, dispersion, and beta functions are then graphically analyzed to show the rms spread of the functions across several machines. The studies show that the most significant error is displacement of the quadrupole magnets. Further studies using a 3 bump correction routine show that these errors can be corrected to acceptable levels. 1 ref., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Mitigation of the electron-cloud effect in the PSR and SNS proton storage rings by tailoring the bunch profile

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.; Furman, M.A.

    2003-05-20

    For the storage ring of the Spallation Neutron Source(SNS) at Oak Ridge, and for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos, both with intense and very long bunches, the electroncloud develops primarily by the mechanism of trailing-edge multipacting. We show, by means of simulations for the PSR, how the resonant nature of this mechanism may be effectively broken by tailoring the longitudinal bunch profile at fixed bunch charge, resulting in a significant decrease in the electron-cloud effect. We briefly discuss the experimental difficulties expected in the implementation of this cure.

  12. Application of FEL technique for constructing high-intensity, monochromatic, polarized gamma-sources at storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N.

    1995-12-31

    A possibility to construct high-intensity tunable monochromatic{gamma}-source at high energy storage rings is discussed. It is proposed to produce {gamma}-quanta by means of Compton backscattering of laser photons on electrons circulating in the storage. The laser light wavelength is chosen in such a way that after the scattering, the electron does not leave the separatrix. So as the probability of the scattering is rather small, energy oscillations are damped prior the next scattering. As a result, the proposed source can operate in {open_quotes}parasitic{close_quote} mode not interfering with the main mode of the storage ring operation. Analysis of parameters of existent storage rings (PETRA, ESRF, Spring-8, etc) shows that the laser light wavelength should be in infrared, {lambda}{approximately} 10 - 400 {mu}m, wavelength band. Installation at storage rings of tunable free-electron lasers with the peak and average output power {approximately} 10 MW and {approximately} 1 kW, respectively, will result in the intensity of the {gamma}-source up to {approximately} 10{sup 14}s{sup -1} with tunable {gamma}-quanta energy from several MeV up to several hundreds MeV. Such a {gamma}-source will reveal unique possibilities for precision investigations in nuclear physics.

  13. Beam dynamics in an ultra-low energy storage rings (review of existing facilities and feasibility studies for future experiments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2014-03-01

    Storage rings operating at ultra-low energies and in particular electrostatic storage rings have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Due to the mass independence of the electrostatic rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged bio-molecules. However, earlier measurements showed strong limitations on beam intensity, fast decay of ion current, reduced life time etc. The nature of these effects was not fully understood. Also a large variety of experiments in future generation ultra-low energy storage and decelerator facilities including in-ring collision studies with a reaction microscope require a comprehensive investigation of the physical processes involved into the operation of such rings. In this paper, we present review of non-linear and long term beam dynamics studies on example of the ELISA, AD Recycler, TSR and USR rings using the computer codes BETACOOL, OPERA-3D and MAD-X. The results from simulations were benchmarked against experimental data of beam losses in the ELISA storage ring. We showed that decay of beam intensity in ultra-low energy rings is mainly caused by ion losses on ring aperture due to multiple scattering on residual gas. Beam is lost on ring aperture due to small ring acceptance. Rate of beam losses increases at high intensities because of the intra-beam scattering effect adds to vacuum losses. Detailed investigations into the ion kinetics under consideration of the effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target have been carried out as well. The life time, equilibrium momentum spread and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with this internal gas jet target were estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the TSR ring, where low intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93 keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions have been reproduced. Based on these simulations

  14. Mechanical design upgrade of the APS storage ring rf cavity tuner

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.; Bromberek, D.; Kang, Y.

    1997-08-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring (SR) rf system employs four banks of four spherical, single-cell resonant cavities. Each cavity is tuned by varying the cavity volume through insertion/retraction of a copper piston located at the circumference of the cavity and oriented perpendicular to the accelerator beam. During the commissioning of the APS SR, the tuners and cavity tuner ports were prone to extensive arcing and overheating. The existing tuners were modified to eliminate the problems, and two new, redesigned tuners were installed. In both cases marked improvements were obtained in the tuner mechanical performance. As measured by tuner piston and flange surface temperatures, tuner heating has been reduced by a factor of five in the new version. Redesign considerations discussed include tuner piston-to-housing alignment, tuner piston and housing materials and cooling configurations, and tuner piston sliding electrical contacts. The tuner redesign is also distinguished by a modular, more maintainable assembly.

  15. Schottky Mass Measurements of Cooled Proton-Rich Nuclei at the GSI Experimental Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Radon, T.; Schlitt, B.; Beckert, K.; Bosch, F.; Eickhoff, H.; Franzke, B.; Geissel, H.; Hausmann, M.; Irnich, H.; Klepper, O.; Kluge, H.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kraus, G.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nickel, F.; Nolden, F.; Patyk, Z.; Reich, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schwab, W.; Steck, M.; Suemmerer, K.; Kerscher, T.; Beha, T.; Loebner, K.E.; Fujita, Y.; Jung, H.C.; Wollnik, H.; Novikov, Y.

    1997-06-01

    High-precision mass measurements of proton-rich isotopes in the range of 60{le}Z{le}84 were performed using the novel technique of Schottky spectrometry. Projectile fragments produced by {sup 209}Bi ions at 930{ital A} MeV were separated with the magnetic spectrometer FRS and stored and cooled in the experimental storage ring (ESR). A typical mass resolving power of 350000 and a precision of 100keV were achieved in the region A{approx}200 . Masses of members of {alpha} chains linked by precise Q{sub {alpha}} values but not yet connected to the known masses were determined. In this way it is concluded that {sup 201}Fr and {sup 197}At are proton unbound. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Recombination of simple molecular ions studied in storage ring: dissociative recombination of H2O+

    PubMed

    Rosen; Derkatch; Semaniak; Neau; al-Khalili; Le Padellec A; Vikor; Thomas; Danared; af Ugglas M; Larsson

    2000-01-01

    Dissociative recombination of vibrationally relaxed H2O+ ions with electrons has been studied in the heavy-ion storage ring CRYRING. Absolute cross-sections have been measured for collision energies between 0 eV and 30 eV. The energy dependence of the cross-section below 0.1 eV is found to be much steeper than the E-1 behaviour associated with the dominance of the direct recombination mechanism. Resonant structures found at 4 eV and 11 eV have been attributed to the electron capture to Rydberg states converging to electronically excited ionic states. Complete branching fractions for all dissociation channels have been measured at a collision energy of 0 eV. The dissociation process is dominated by three-body H + H + O breakup that occurs with a branching ratio of 0.71.

  17. Electron Spectroscopy In Heavy-Ion Storage Rings: Resonant and Non-Resonant Electron Transfer Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, S.; Stoehlker, Th.; Trotsenko, S.; Kozhuharov, Ch.; Spillmann, U.; Bosch, F.; Liesen, D.; Winters, D.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Shabaev, V.; Tupitsyn, I.; Kozhedub, Y.; Rothard, H.; Reuschl, R.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.; Voitkiv, A.; Surzhykov, A.; Fischer, D.; Doerner, R.

    2011-06-01

    Whereas our understanding of total cross sections for ionization and capture processes in ion-atom collisions is widely viewed as having arrived at a state of adequate maturity, the same cannot be said at all about the dynamics of collisions, multi-electron processes or the electron continua (in target and projectile) which are at the origin of total cross sections. We depict how these processes can be studied favourably in storage ring environments. We present examples of resonant and non-resonant electron transfer processes, radiative and non-radiative. This is elucidated via the relation of the electron nucleus bremsstrahlung at the high energy tip of the bremsstrahlung spectrum to the radiative electron capture cusp (RECC) and a new approach to determining molecular orbital binding energies in superheavy quasi-molecules in resonant KK charge transfer.

  18. The Heidelberg test storage ring for heavy ions and its use for atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1986-11-01

    A brief description of the Heavy-Ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) presently being built at the Max-Planck Institut in Heidelberg is given. It will be able to store ions injected from the tandem postaccelerator combination up to about 30 MeV/nucleon for a charge to mass ratio of 0.5. One of the main purposes of the TSR will be the study of electron cooling. Some atomic physics experiments are discussed using the electron cooling device which provides an electron-ion collision facility with good energy resolution and ion beams of high currents and low emittances. Here the possibilities for measurements of spontaneous and laser-induced radiative recombination and dielectronic recombination in the electron cooling section are discussed.

  19. Dissociative recombination measurements of NH{sup +} using an ion storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Novotný, O.; Savin, D. W.; Berg, M.; Bing, D.; Buhr, H.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Krantz, C.; Mendes, M. B.; Nordhorn, C.; Repnow, R.; Schwalm, D.; Yang, B.; Wolf, A.; Geppert, W.

    2014-09-10

    We have investigated dissociative recombination (DR) of NH{sup +} with electrons using a merged beams configuration at the TSR heavy-ion storage ring located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. We present our measured absolute merged-beams recombination rate coefficient for collision energies from 0 to 12 eV. From these data, we have extracted a cross section, which we have transformed to a plasma rate coefficient for the collisional plasma temperature range from T {sub pl} = 10 to 18,000 K. We show that the NH{sup +} DR rate coefficient data in current astrochemical models are underestimated by up to a factor of approximately nine. Our new data will result in predicted NH{sup +} abundances lower than those calculated by present models. This is in agreement with the sensitivity limits of all observations attempting to detect NH{sup +} in interstellar clouds.

  20. Photodissociation of an Internally Cold Beam of CH+ Ions in a Cryogenic Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, A. P.; Becker, A.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; von Hahn, R.; Hechtfischer, U.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lohmann, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schwalm, D.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Vogel, S.; Wolf, A.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the photodissociation of CH+ in the Cryogenic Storage Ring at ambient temperatures below 10 K. Owing to the extremely high vacuum of the cryogenic environment, we were able to store CH+ beams with a kinetic energy of ˜60 keV for several minutes. Using a pulsed laser, we observed Feshbach-type near-threshold photodissociation resonances for the rotational levels J =0 - 2 of CH+, exclusively. In comparison to updated, state-of-the-art calculations, we find excellent agreement in the relative intensities of the resonances for a given J , and we can extract time-dependent level populations. Thus, we can monitor the spontaneous relaxation of CH+ to its lowest rotational states and demonstrate the preparation of an internally cold beam of molecular ions.

  1. Beam pinging, sweeping, shaking, and electron/ion collecting, at the Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hardek, T.W.; Macek, R.J.; Plum, M.A.; Wang, T.S.F.

    1993-06-01

    We have built, installed and tested a pinger for use as a general diagnostic at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). Two 4-m-long parallel-plate electrodes with a plate spacing of 10.2 cm provide kicks of up to 1.1 mrad. A pair of solid-state pulsers may be operated in a single-pulse mode for beam pinging (tune measurements) or in a burst mode at up to 700 kHz pulse rates for beam sweeping. During our 1992 operating period we used the pinger for beam sweeping, for beam shaking, for measuring the tune shift, and we have used it as an ion chamber. Using the pinger as an ion chamber during production conditions has yielded some surprising results.

  2. NEW DEVELOPMENTS ON THE E-P INSTABILITY AT THE PROTON STORAGE RING (PSR)

    SciTech Connect

    R. MACEK

    2001-01-01

    New results are reported from an R and D program aimed at greater understanding and control of the e-p instability observed at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). Numerous characteristics of the electron cloud for both stable and unstable beams in PSR were measured with ANL electron analyzers and various collection plates. Strong suppression of the electron flux density by TiN coating of the vacuum chamber in a straight section was also observed, thereby confirming an essential role for secondary emission at the walls. Landau Damping by a variety of techniques including higher rf voltage, transverse coupling, multipole fields in the lattice, and the use of inductive inserts has been effective in controlling the e-p instability. By these methods, the instability threshold has been raised significantly to 9.7 micro Coulombs per stored pulse.

  3. Recent experience with inductive insert at the proton storage ring (PSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.-Y; Griffin, J. E.; Wildman, D.; Popovic, M.; Browman, A. A.; Fitzgerald, D. H.; Macek, R. J.; Plum, M. A.; Spickermann, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    In a Fermilab-Los Alamos collaboration, inductances constructed of ferrite cores sufficient to cancel a large fraction of the space charge potential-well distortion were installed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) as one means of raising the threshold for the two-stream e-p instability. When operating at higher intensities and with sufficient inductance added for full space-charge compensation, an unacceptable longitudinal self-bunching, microwavelike, instability was encountered. Heating the cores to N 130 C proved to be an effective cure, and was found to be a means for tuning the inductance over a limited but useful range. The heated inductors were an essential ingredient in achieving a record accumulation of 9.7 pC/pulse. An engineered version of the inductors is now installed for routine operation of the PSR. A summary of the inductor characteristics, theory of operation, experimental results, and interpretation will be presented.

  4. Beam pinging, sweeping, shaking, and electron/ion collecting, at the Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hardek, T.W.; Macek, R.J.; Plum, M.A.; Wang, T.S.F.

    1993-01-01

    We have built, installed and tested a pinger for use as a general diagnostic at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). Two 4-m-long parallel-plate electrodes with a plate spacing of 10.2 cm provide kicks of up to 1.1 mrad. A pair of solid-state pulsers may be operated in a single-pulse mode for beam pinging (tune measurements) or in a burst mode at up to 700 kHz pulse rates for beam sweeping. During our 1992 operating period we used the pinger for beam sweeping, for beam shaking, for measuring the tune shift, and we have used it as an ion chamber. Using the pinger as an ion chamber during production conditions has yielded some surprising results.

  5. Active Damping of the E-P Instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.; Assadi, S.; Byrd, J.M.; Deibele, C.E.; Henderson, S.D.; Lee, S.Y.; McCrady, R.C.; Pivi, M.F.T.; Plum, M.A.; Walbridge, S.B.; Zaugg, T.J.; /Los Alamos

    2008-03-17

    A prototype of an analog, transverse (vertical) feedback system for active damping of the two-stream (e-p) instability has been developed and successfully tested at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). This system was able to improve the instability threshold by approximately 30% (as measured by the change in RF buncher voltage at instability threshold). The feedback system configuration, setup procedures, and optimization of performance are described. Results of several experimental tests of system performance are presented including observations of instability threshold improvement and grow-damp experiments, which yield estimates of instability growth and damping rates. A major effort was undertaken to identify and study several factors limiting system performance. Evidence obtained from these tests suggests that performance of the prototype was limited by higher instability growth rates arising from beam leakage into the gap at lower RF buncher voltage and the onset of instability in the horizontal plane, which had no feedback.

  6. Active damping of the e-p instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R. J.; Assadi, S.; Byrd, J. M.; Deibele, C. E.; Henderson, S. D.; Lee, S. Y.; McCrady, R. C.; Pivi, M. F. T.; Plum, M. A.; Walbridge, S. B.; Zaugg, T. J.

    2007-12-15

    A prototype of an analog, transverse (vertical) feedback system for active damping of the two-stream (e-p) instability has been developed and successfully tested at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). This system was able to improve the instability threshold by approximately 30% (as measured by the change in RF buncher voltage at instability threshold). The feedback system configuration, setup procedures, and optimization of performance are described. Results of several experimental tests of system performance are presented including observations of instability threshold improvement and grow-damp experiments, which yield estimates of instability growth and damping rates. A major effort was undertaken to identify and study several factors limiting system performance. Evidence obtained from these tests suggests that performance of the prototype was limited by higher instability growth rates arising from beam leakage into the gap at lower RF buncher voltage and the onset of instability in the horizontal plane, which had no feedback.

  7. Introduction to the magnet and vacuum systems of an electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1982-08-15

    An accelerator or storage ring complex is a concerted interplay of various functional systems. For the convenience of discussion we can divide it into the following systems: injector, magnet, RF, vacuum, instrumentation and control. In addition, the conventional construction of the building and radiation safety consideration are also needed and finally the beam lines, detector, data acquisition and analysis set-ups for research programs. Dr. L. Teng has given a comprehensive review of the whole complex and the operation of such a facility. I concentrate on the description of magnet and vacuum systems. Only the general function of each system and the basic design concepts will be introduced, no detailed engineering practice will be given which will be best done after a machine design is produced. For further understanding and references a table of bibliography is provided at the end of the paper.

  8. Lasing of infrared free-election lasers using the storage ring NIJI-IV.

    PubMed

    Sei, Norihiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kawakatsu

    2009-06-15

    We report for the first time to our knowledge the experimental achievement of a storage ring free-electron laser (FEL) device dedicated to applications in the IR region. IR FELs were oscillated in the wavelength region of 1392-1502 nm, and the relative linewidth was 3 x 10(-4). The maximum power of the IR FEL transmitted through a vacuum window was approximately 0.3 mW, and the intracavity power was approximately 2 W. We have already observed an intensive quasi-monochromatic x ray by using FEL Compton backscattering. The results of our study are expected to lead to applications in which an IR FEL and a quasi-monochromatic x ray will be used simultaneously.

  9. STORAGE RING CROSS SECTION MEASUREMENTS FOR ELECTRON IMPACT IONIZATION OF Fe{sup 7+}

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Novotný, O.; Savin, D. W.; Becker, A.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Repnow, R.; Wolf, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.; Lestinsky, M.

    2015-11-01

    We have measured electron impact ionization for Fe{sup 7+} from the ionization threshold up to 1200 eV. The measurements were performed using the TSR heavy ion storage ring. The ions were stored long enough prior to measurements to remove most metastables, resulting in a beam of 94% ground-level ions. Comparing with the previously recommended atomic data, we find that the Arnaud and Raymond cross section is up to about 40% larger than our measurement, with the largest discrepancies below about 400 eV. The cross section of Dere agrees to within 10%, which is about the magnitude of the experimental uncertainties. The remaining discrepancies between our measurement and the Dere calculations are likely due to shortcomings in the theoretical treatment of the excitation-autoionization contribution.

  10. Software package for modeling spin–orbit motion in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Zyuzin, D. V.

    2015-12-15

    A software package providing a graphical user interface for computer experiments on the motion of charged particle beams in accelerators, as well as analysis of obtained data, is presented. The software package was tested in the framework of the international project on electric dipole moment measurement JEDI (Jülich Electric Dipole moment Investigations). The specific features of particle spin motion imply the requirement to use a cyclic accelerator (storage ring) consisting of electrostatic elements, which makes it possible to preserve horizontal polarization for a long time. Computer experiments study the dynamics of 10{sup 6}–10{sup 9} particles in a beam during 10{sup 9} turns in an accelerator (about 10{sup 12}–10{sup 15} integration steps for the equations of motion). For designing an optimal accelerator structure, a large number of computer experiments on polarized beam dynamics are required. The numerical core of the package is COSY Infinity, a program for modeling spin–orbit dynamics.

  11. Vacuum system development status for the APS (Advanced Photon Source) storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wherle, R.; Nielson, R.; Kim, S.

    1989-01-01

    The status of the design and fabrication of a prototype sector of the storage ring vacuum system for the Advanced Photon Source is described. The 26.5-m-long prototype sector will be assembled within a full-scale magnet and tunnel mockup to study interspacial component relationships for maintenance, as well as the vacuum system operational performance. Each completed vacuum section is mounted as an integral part of the modular structure that contains the magnets and magnet power supplies on a common base. Unique automatic machine welding designs and techniques are employed in the fabrication of the aluminium vacuum chambers from extrusions. Special chamber bending procedures and measurements checks are used to maintain the required flatness of the insider chamber light gap surfaces. Photo-electron yields due to low-energy photons in the narrow channel gap of the vacuum chamber and their potential effects on the overall outgassing rate are found to be negligible. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Magnetic design of trim excitations for the advanced light source storage ring sextupole

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, S.

    1995-06-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) storage ring sextupole is a unique multi-purpose magnet. It is designed to operate as a sextupole with three auxiliary trim modes: horizontal steering, vertical steering, and skew quadrupole. A perturbation theory for iron-dominated magnets developed by Klaus Halbach provides the basis for this design. The three trim excitations are produced by violating sextupole symmetry and are thus perturbations of the normal sextupole excitation. The magnet was designed such that all four modes are decoupled and can be excited independently. This paper discusses the use of Halbach`s perturbation theory to design the trim functions and to evaluate the primary asymmetry in the sextupole mode, namely, a gap in the return yoke to accommodate the vacuum chamber.

  13. Magnetic design of trim excitations for the Advanced Light Source storage ring sextupole

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, S.

    1996-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) storage ring sextupole is a unique multi-purpose magnet. It is designed to operate as a sextupole with three auxiliary trim modes: horizontal steering, vertical steering, and skew quadrupole. A perturbation theory for iron-dominated magnets developed by Klaus Halbach provides the basis for this design. The three trim excitations are produced by violating sextupole symmetry and are thus perturbations of the normal sextupole excitation. The magnet was designed such that all four modes are decoupled and can be excited independently. This paper discusses the use of Halbach`s perturbation theory to design the trim functions and to evaluate the primary asymmetry in the sextupole mode, namely, a gap in the return yoke to accommodate the vacuum chamber.

  14. Photodissociation of an Internally Cold Beam of CH^{+} Ions in a Cryogenic Storage Ring.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, A P; Becker, A; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; von Hahn, R; Hechtfischer, U; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lohmann, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schwalm, D; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Vogel, S; Wolf, A

    2016-03-18

    We have studied the photodissociation of CH^{+} in the Cryogenic Storage Ring at ambient temperatures below 10 K. Owing to the extremely high vacuum of the cryogenic environment, we were able to store CH^{+} beams with a kinetic energy of ∼60  keV for several minutes. Using a pulsed laser, we observed Feshbach-type near-threshold photodissociation resonances for the rotational levels J=0-2 of CH^{+}, exclusively. In comparison to updated, state-of-the-art calculations, we find excellent agreement in the relative intensities of the resonances for a given J, and we can extract time-dependent level populations. Thus, we can monitor the spontaneous relaxation of CH^{+} to its lowest rotational states and demonstrate the preparation of an internally cold beam of molecular ions.

  15. Lattice design and optimization for the PEP-X ultra low emittance storage ring at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Min-Huey; Nosochkov, Yuri; Bane, Karl; Cai, Yunhai; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Xiaobiao; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    SLAC is developing a long-range plan to transfer the evolving scientific programs at SSRL from the SPEAR3 light source to a much higher performing photon source. One of the possibilities is a new PEP-X 4.5 GeV storage ring that would be housed in the 2.2 km PEP-II tunnel. The PEP-X is designed to produce photon beams having brightness near 10{sup 22} (ph/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW) at 10 keV with 3.5 m undulator at beam current of 1.5 A. This report presents an overview of the PEP-X baseline lattice design and describes the lattice optimization procedures in order to maximize the beam dynamic aperture. The complete report of PEP-X baseline design is published in SLAC report.

  16. The trigger system for the external target experiment in the HIRFL cooling storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Jin-Xin; Lu, Yi-Ming; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-08-01

    A trigger system was designed for the external target experiment in the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). Considering that different detectors are scattered over a large area, the trigger system is designed based on a master-slave structure and fiber-based serial data transmission technique. The trigger logic is organized in hierarchies, and flexible reconfiguration of the trigger function is achieved based on command register access or overall field-programmable gate array (FPGA) logic on-line reconfiguration controlled by remote computers. We also conducted tests to confirm the function of the trigger electronics, and the results indicate that this trigger system works well. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11079003), the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-YW-N27), and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP).

  17. Distributed Non-evaporable Getter pumps for the storage ring of the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Dortwegt, R.; Benaroya, R.

    1993-07-01

    A pair of distributed Non-evaporable Getter (NeG) strip assemblies is installed in each of 236 aluminum vacuum chambers of the 1104-m storage ring of the Advanced Photon Source. Distributed pumping is provided to remove most of the gas resulting from photon-stimulated desorption occurring along the outer walls of the chambers. This is an efficient way of pumping because conductance is limited along the beam axis. The St-707 NeG strips are conditioned at 450{degree}C for 45 min. with 42 A. Base pressures obtained are also as low as 4 {times} 10{sup 11} Torr. The NeG strip assemblies are supported by a series of electrically isolated, 125-mm-long, interlocking stainless steel carriers. These unique interlocking carrier elements provide flexibility along the vacuum chamber curvature (r=38.96 m) and permit removal and installation of assemblies with as little as 150 mm external clearance between adjacent chambers.

  18. Scientific potential and design considerations for an undulator beam line on Aladdin storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A. J.; Bader, S. D.; Dehmer, Joseph L.; Kim, S. H.; Knapp, G. S.; Shenoy, G. K.; Veal, B. W.; Young, C. E.; Brown, F. C.; Weaver, J. W.

    1985-04-08

    The unique features of undulator radiation, i.e., high photon flux and brightness, partial coherence, small beam divergence, spectral tunability, etc., mandate that undulators be included in the future plans for Aladdin. This will make it possible to perform the next generation of experiments in photon-stimulated spectroscopies. A team of scientists (see Appendix) has now been assembled to build an insertion device (ID) and the associated beam line at Aladdin. In considering the specifications for the ID, it was assumed that the ID beamline will be an SRC user facility. Consequently, design parameters were chosen with the intent of maximizing experimental flexibility consistent with a conservative design approach. A tunable ''clamshell'' undulator device was Chosen with a first harmonic tunable from 35 to 110 eV to operate on a 1 GeV storage ring. Higher harmonics will be utilized for experiments needing higher photon energies.

  19. An ultimate storage ring lattice with vertical emittance generated by damping wigglers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao

    2015-01-06

    We discuss the approach of generating round beams for ultimate storage rings using vertical damping wigglers (with horizontal magnetic field). The vertical damping wigglers provide damping and excite vertical emittance. This eliminates the need to generate large linear coupling that is impractical with traditional off-axis injection. We use a PEP-X compatible lattice to demonstrate the approach. This lattice uses separate quadrupole and sextupole magnets with realistic gradient strengths. Intrabeam scattering effects are calculated. As a result, the horizontal and vertical emittances are 22.3 pm and 10.3 pm, respectively, for a 200 mA, 4.5 GeV beam, with a vertical damping wiggler of a total length of 90 m, a peak field of 1.5 T and a wiggler period of 100 mm.

  20. UHV seal studies for the advanced photon source storage ring vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Gonczy, J.D.; Ferry, R.J.; Niemann, R.C.; Roop, B.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) Storage Ring Vacuum Chambers (SRVC) are constructed of aluminum. The chamber design incorporates aluminum alloy 2219-T87 Conflat flanges welded to an aluminum alloy 6063-T5 extruded chamber body. Vacuum connections to the aluminum Conflat chamber flanges are by means of 304 stainless steel Conflat flanges. To evaluate the Conflat seal assemblies relative to vacuum bake cycles, a Conflat Bake Test Assembly (CBTA) was constructed, and thermal cycling tests were performed between room temperature and 150{degrees}C on both stainless steel to aluminum Conflat assemblies and aluminum to aluminum Conflat assemblies. A Helicoflex Bake Test Assembly (HBTA) was similarly constructed to evaluate Helicoflex seals. Both Conflat and Helicoflex seals were studied in a SRVC Sector String Test arrangement of five SRVC sections. The CBTA, HBTA and SRVC tests and their results are reported. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Proposals for synchrotron light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1985-06-01

    Ever since it was first applied in the 1960's synchrotron radiation from an accelerating electron beam has been gaining popularity as a powerful tool for research and development in a wide variety of fields of science and technology. By now there are some 20 facilities operating either parasitically or dedicatedly for synchrotron radiation research in different parts of the world. In addition there are another 20 facilities either in construction or in various stages of proposal and design. The experiences gained from the operating facilities and the recent development of insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators as radiation sources led to a new set of requirements on the design of synchrotron radiation storage rings for optimum utility. The surprisingly uniform applicability and unanimous acceptance of these criteria give assurance that they are indeed valid criteria derived form mature considerations and experiences. Instead of describing the design of each of these new facilities it is, thus, more effective to discuss these desirable design features and indicate how they are incorporated in the design using machines listed as examples. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Electron Cloud Generation and Trapping in a Quadrupole Magnet at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, Robert J.; Browman, Andrew A.; Ledford, John E.; Borden, Michael J.; O'Hara, James F.; McCrady, Rodney C.; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Spickermann, Thomas; Zaugg, Thomas J.; Pivi, Mauro T.F.; /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    Recent beam physics studies on the two-stream e-p instability at the LANL proton storage ring (PSR) have focused on the role of the electron cloud generated in quadrupole magnets where primary electrons, which seed beam-induced multipacting, are expected to be largest due to grazing angle losses from the beam halo. A new diagnostic to measure electron cloud formation and trapping in a quadrupole magnet has been developed, installed, and successfully tested at PSR. Beam studies using this diagnostic show that the 'prompt' electron flux striking the wall in a quadrupole is comparable to the prompt signal in the adjacent drift space. In addition, the 'swept' electron signal, obtained using the sweeping feature of the diagnostic after the beam was extracted from the ring, was larger than expected and decayed slowly with an exponential time constant of 50 to 100 {micro}s. Other measurements include the cumulative energy spectra of prompt electrons and the variation of both prompt and swept electron signals with beam intensity. Experimental results were also obtained which suggest that a good fraction of the electrons observed in the adjacent drift space for the typical beam conditions in the 2006 run cycle were seeded by electrons ejected from the quadrupole.

  3. Precision analog signal processor for beam position measurements in electron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.A.; Unser, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    Beam position monitors (BPM) in electron and positron storage rings have evolved from simple systems composed of beam pickups, coaxial cables, multiplexing relays, and a single receiver (usually a analyzer) into very complex and costly systems of multiple receivers and processors. The older may have taken minutes to measure the circulating beam closed orbit. Today instrumentation designers are required to provide high-speed measurements of the beam orbit, often at the ring revolution frequency. In addition the instruments must have very high accuracy and resolution. A BPM has been developed for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley which features high resolution and relatively low cost. The instrument has a single purpose; to measure position of a stable stored beam. Because the pickup signals are multiplexed into a single receiver, and due to its narrow bandwidth, the receiver is not intended for single-turn studies. The receiver delivers normalized measurements of X and Y posit ion entirely by analog means at nominally 1 V/mm. No computers are involved. No software is required. Bergoz, a French company specializing in precision beam instrumentation, integrated the ALS design m their new BPM analog signal processor module. Performance comparisons were made on the ALS. In this paper we report on the architecture and performance of the ALS prototype BPM.

  4. Synchrotron light source data book: Version 4, Revision 05/96

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.B.

    1996-05-01

    This book is as its name implies a collection of data on existing and planned synchrotron light sources. The intention was to provide a compendium of tools for the design of electron storage rings as synchrotron radiation sources. The slant is toward the accelerator physicist as other booklets such as the X-Ray Data Booklet address the use of synchrotron radiation. It is hoped that the booklet serves as a pocket sized reference to facilitate back of the envelope type calculations. It contains some useful formulae in practical units and a brief description of many of the existing and planned light source lattices.

  5. Laser-synchrotron hybrid experiments: ``A photon to tickle, a photon to poke``

    SciTech Connect

    Ederer, D.L.; Rubensson, J.E.; Mueller, D.R.; Shuker, R.; O`Brien, W.L.; Jai, J.; Dong, Q.Y.; Callcott, T.A.; Carr, G.L.; Williams, G.P.; Hirschmugl, C.J.; Etemad, S.; Inam, A.; Tanner, D.B.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper we present the preliminary results from a new experimental technique to synchronize the pulses from a mode-locked NdYAG laser to the light pulses in the VUV storage ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). We describe a method to electronically change the delay time between the laser pulses and the synchrotron pulses. We also illustrate a method to overlap the synchrotron pulses with the laser pulses in space and time. Preliminary results will be presented for two experiments.

  6. Laser-synchrotron hybrid experiments: A photon to tickle, a photon to poke''

    SciTech Connect

    Ederer, D.L.; Rubensson, J.E.; Mueller, D.R. ); Shuker, R. ); O'Brien, W.L.; Jai, J.; Dong, Q.Y.; Callcott, T.A. ); Carr, G.L. . Corporate Research Center); Williams, G.P.; Hirschmugl, C.J

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present the preliminary results from a new experimental technique to synchronize the pulses from a mode-locked NdYAG laser to the light pulses in the VUV storage ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). We describe a method to electronically change the delay time between the laser pulses and the synchrotron pulses. We also illustrate a method to overlap the synchrotron pulses with the laser pulses in space and time. Preliminary results will be presented for two experiments.

  7. Time domain analysis of coherent terahertz synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübers, H.-W.; Semenov, A.; Holldack, K.; Schade, U.; Wüstefeld, G.; Gol'tsman, G.

    2005-10-01

    The time structure of coherent terahertz synchrotron radiation at the electron storage ring of the Berliner Elektronensynchrotron und Speicherring Gesellschaft has been analyzed with a fast superconducting hot-electron bolometer. The emission from a single bunch of electrons was found to last ˜1500ps at frequencies around 0.4THz, which is much longer than the length of an electron bunch in the time domain (˜5ps). It is suggested that this is caused by multiple reflections at the walls of the beam line. The quadratic increase of the power with the number of electrons in the bunch as predicted for coherent synchrotron radiation and the transition from stable to bursting radiation were determined from a single storage ring fill pattern of bunches with different populations.

  8. Optical components and systems for synchrotron radiation: an introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    A brief description of the nature and origins of synchrotron radiation is given with special reference to its geometrical optical properties and the use of storage rings as light souces. The geographical distribution of SR sources in the world is reviewed and some discussion of the level of experimental activity is given. Estimates of future levels of experimental activity are also made both for existing storage rings and those planned for the future. Calculations of the approximate number of mirrors and gratings that will be required are offered. Some general considerations are outlined showing how synchrotron radiation optical systems couple to the light source and indicating which parameters need to be maximized for best overall performance.

  9. Achieving a precision field in the muon g-2 storage ring magnet at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, H. Erik; Muon g-2 Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab will measure the anomalous magnetic moment aμ of the muon. The target precision is 140 parts per billion (ppb), a four-fold improvement over the previous Brookhaven E821 measurement which found a 3.5 standard deviation discrepancy from the Standard Model prediction. This precision requires knowing the magnetic field strength in the muon storage ring with an uncertainty of 70 ppb. The magnet is first shimmed to achieve an average uniformity of one part per million (ppm). The field in the muon storage volume will be periodically measured and continuously monitored using proton NMR with single shot precision of 10 ppb. This magnet was successfully commissioned in October, 2015 and the shimming of the field to achieve the ultimate uniformity has been ongoing since that time. We will present the final results of this year-long process, describing some of the unique instrumentation and analysis routines we have developed along the way. DOE Grant DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  10. Performance of a hydrogen/deuterium polarized gas target in a storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Buuren, L. D.; Szczerba, D.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Bulten, H. J.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Klous, S.; Kolster, H.; Lang, J.; Mul, F. A.; Poolman, H. R.; Simani, M. C.

    2001-12-01

    The performance of a high-density polarized hydrogen/deuterium gas target internal to a medium-energy electron storage ring is presented. Compared to our previous electron scattering experiments with tensor-polarized deuterium at NIKHEF (Zhou et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 378 (1996) 40; Ferro-Luzzi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 2630; Van den Brand et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78 (1997) 1235; Bouwhuis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 687; Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 687) the target figure of merit, ( polarization) 2× luminosity, was improved by more than an order of magnitude. The target density was increased by upgrading the flux of nuclear-polarized atoms injected into the storage cell and by using a longer (60 cm) and colder (˜70 K) storage cell. A maximal target thickness of 1.2 (1.1)±0.1×10 14 nuclei/ cm2 was achieved with deuterium (hydrogen). With typical beam currents of 110 mA, this corresponds to a luminosity of about 8.4 (7.8)±0.8×10 31e- nuclei cm -2 s-1. By reducing the molecular background and using a stronger target guide field, a higher polarization was achieved. The target was used in combination with a 720 MeV polarized electron beam stored in the AmPS ring (NIKHEF) to measure spin observables in electron-proton and electron-deuteron scattering. Scattered electrons were detected in a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer. Ejected hadrons were detected in a single time-of-flight scintillator array. The product of beam and target vector polarization, PePt, was determined from the known spin-correlation parameters of e' p quasi-elastic (or elastic) scattering. With the deuterium (hydrogen) target, values up to PePt=0.49±0.03 (0.32±0.03) were obtained with an electron beam polarization of Pe=0.62±0.04 (0.56±0.03) as measured with a Compton backscattering polarimeter (Passchier et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 414 (1998) 4988). From this, we deduce a cell-averaged target polarization of Pt=0.78±0.07 (0.58±0.07), including

  11. 1000-TeV in the Center-Of-Mass: Introduction to High-Energy Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J D

    1982-09-01

    The lecture discusses, in a pedagogic way, a hypothetical 500 TeV proton storage ring accelerator. It gives machine parameters, discusses linear optics and betatron motions, surveys questions of errors, tolerances and nonlinear resonances, and discusses some of the demands on the detection apparatus, especially the apparent inevitability of multiple interactions per bunch crossing. (GHT)

  12. Dynamic View on Nanostructures: A Technique for Time Resolved Optical Luminescence Using Synchrotron Light Pulses at SRC, APS, and CLS

    SciTech Connect

    Heigl, F.; Jurgensen, A.; Zhou, X.-T.; Lam, S.; Murphy, M.; Ko, J.Y.P.; Sham, T.K.; Rosenberg, R.A.; Gordon, R.; Brewe, D.; Regier, T.; Armelao, L. )

    2007-01-22

    We present an experimental technique using the time structure of synchrotron radiation to study time resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence. In particular we are taking advantage of the bunched distribution of electrons in a synchrotron storage ring, giving short x-ray pulses (10-10{sup 2} picoseconds) which are separated by non-radiating gaps on the nano- to tens of nanosecond scale - sufficiently wide to study a broad range of optical decay channels observed in advanced nanostructured materials.

  13. Simulation and Optimization of Synchrotron Infrared Micro-Spectroscopic Beamlines using Wave Optics Computation: ESRF and SOLEIL's Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Chubar, O.; Polack, F.; Lagarde, B.; Dumas, P.; Susini, J.; Cotte, M.; Scheidt, K.; Elleaume, P.

    2007-01-19

    Applications of the 'Synchrotron Radiation Workshop' (SRW) computer code to the design and optimization of the mid-infrared micro-spectroscopic beamlines at the ESRF and SOLEIL storage ring are described. The agreement found between SRW simulation, at various positions from the source to the spectrometer, ray tracing calculations and intensity profile measurements demonstrates that SRW is readily an excellent approach to optimize any synchrotron infrared beamline.

  14. Report of the second workshop on synchrotron radiation sources for x-ray lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.Q.; Craft, B.; Williams, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    The reported workshop is part of an effort to implement a US-based x-ray lithography program. Presentations include designs for three storage rings (one superconducting and two conventional) and an overview of a complete lithography program. The background of the effort described, the need for synchrotron radiation, and the international competition in the area are discussed briefly. The technical feasibility of x-ray lithography is discussed, and synchrotron performance specifications and construction options are given, as well as a near-term plan. It is recommended that a prototype synchrotron source be built as soon as possible, and that a research and development plan on critical technologies which could improve cost effectiveness of the synchrotron source be established. It is further recommended that a small number of second generation prototype synchrotrons be distributed to IC manufacturing centers to expedite commercialization. (LEW)

  15. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M.

    1992-12-31

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  16. Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  17. Complete elliptical ring geometry provides energy and instrument calibration for synchrotron-based two-dimensional X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Hart, Michael L; Drakopoulos, Michael; Reinhard, Christina; Connolley, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    A complete calibration method to characterize a static planar two-dimensional detector for use in X-ray diffraction at an arbitrary wavelength is described. This method is based upon geometry describing the point of intersection between a cone's axis and its elliptical conic section. This point of intersection is neither the ellipse centre nor one of the ellipse focal points, but some other point which lies in between. The presented solution is closed form, algebraic and non-iterative in its application, and gives values for the X-ray beam energy, the sample-to-detector distance, the location of the beam centre on the detector surface and the detector tilt relative to the incident beam. Previous techniques have tended to require prior knowledge of either the X-ray beam energy or the sample-to-detector distance, whilst other techniques have been iterative. The new calibration procedure is performed by collecting diffraction data, in the form of diffraction rings from a powder standard, at known displacements of the detector along the beam path.

  18. Single differential projectile ionization cross sections d σ/dEe for 50 AMeV U28+ in the ESR storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, Siegbert; Hillenbrand, Pierre-Michel; Stoehlker, Thomas; Litvinov, Yuri; Appa-Sparc Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    The very high intensity beams of relativistic high Z ions with incident collision energies up to 2.7AGeV requested for experiments using the SIS100 synchrotron of FAIR require that 1.3 1011 ions at 2.6Hz be injected from SIS12/18 into SIS100. The needed luminosity of the beam can only be achieved for such high Z ions when - considering the space charge limit (~A/q2) - a low charge state q of the ion to be accelerated keeps the particle density at the highest feasible level. For a thorough understanding of beam loss it is imperative that the mechanisms active in projectile ionization be understood quantitatively to provide benchmarks for advancedab initio theories beyond first order. We have embarked on an experimental investigation of single differential projectile ionization cross sections d σ/dEe (SDCS) for single and multiple ionization of U28+in the ESR storage ring by measuring the electron loss to continuum (ELC) cusp at 00 with respect to the beam axis employing our imaging forward electron spectrometer. This was motivated by the high relative fraction of multiple ionization estimated to exceed 40%. We report first results for absolute projectile ionization SDCS for U28+. We find a remarkably high asymmetry for the ELC cusp. This is at strong variance with the line shape expected for validity of first order theories.

  19. An injection system for PEP-based asymmetric storage ring collider for the copious production of B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.

    1989-09-18

    The proposed asymmetric energy B-factory utilizing PEP will require high energy, low emittance sources of positrons and electrons suitable for filling the storage rings. Proposed characteristics of this collider operating at a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} have been studied by LBL (Apiary-III). The design consists of two rings, a large 9 GeV ring (PEP or a modification thereof) plus a smaller 3.1 GeV ring, each with a circulating current of 3 Amperes. Ideally the fill time should be much shorter than the luminosity life-time of the rings (set by the size of the low energy ring). As the luminosity lifetime of the collider is not expected to be very high, the PEP-based B-factory should have a powerful, dedicated injector. For the purpose of estimating the characteristics of the injection system the maximum time for a complete fill of the positron ring is taken to be {approx}100 seconds. The design of the injection system is discussed in this paper. 1 ref., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Synchrotron Radiation, Polarization, Devices and New Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, Marie-Emmanuelle; Valléau, Mathieu

    Synchrotron radiation is emitted by accelerated relativistic charged particles. In accelerators, it is produced when the particle trajectory is subjected to a magnetic field, either in bending magnets or in specific insertion devices (undulators or wigglers) made of an alternated succession of magnets, allowing the number of curvatures to be increased and the radiation to be reinforced. Synchrotron radiation, tunable from infra-red to x-rays, has a low divergence and small size source, and it can provide different types of polarization. It produces radiation pulses, whose duration results from that of the electron bunch from which they are generated. The repetition rate also depends on the accelerator type: high (typically MHz for storage rings, kHz for superconducting linear accelerators) and 10 to 100 Hz (for normal conducting linear accelerators). Longitudinally coherent radiation can also be generatedf or long bunches with respect to the emitted wavelength or thanks to the Free Electron Laser process.

  1. Initial test results of the Los Alamos proton-storage-ring bump-magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, C.R.; Barlow, D.B.; Redd, D.B.

    1997-09-01

    An upgrade program for increasing the stored beam current in the LANSCE Proton Storage is presently under way. Part of the upgrade effort has been to design, specify, and add four bump-magnet/modulator systems to the ring. This paper describes the initial test results of the first bump-magnet/modulator system. The paper begins with an overview of the pulsed-power system including important specifications of the modulator, magnet, cabling, and control system. In the main portion of the paper, waveforms and test data are included showing the accuracy, repeatability, and stability of the magnet-current pulses. These magnet pulses are programmable both in rise and fall time as well as in amplitude. The amplitude can be set between 50 and 300 A, the rise-time is fixed at 1 ms, and the linear fall-time can be varied between 500 {mu}s and 1500 {mu}s. Other issues such as loading effects and power dissipation in the magnet-bore beamtube are examined and reported.

  2. Ion storage ring measurements of dielectronic recombination for astrophysically relevant Feq+ ions

    SciTech Connect

    Savin, D W; Badnell, N R; Bartsch, T; Brandau, C; Chen, M H; Grieser, M; Gwinner, G; Hoffknecht, A; Kahn, S M; Linkemann, J; Muller, A; Repnow, R; Saghiri, A A; Schippers, S; Schmitt, M; Schwalm, D; Wolf, A

    2000-06-06

    Iron ions provide many valuable plasma diagnostics for cosmic plasmas. The accuracy of these diagnostics, however, often depends on an accurate understanding of the ionization structure of the emitting gas. Dielectronic recombination (DR) is the dominant electron-ion recombination mechanism for most iron ions in cosmic plasmas. Using the heavy-ion storage ring at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany, we have measured the low temperature DR rates for Fe{sup q+} where q = 15, 17, 18, and 19. These rates are important for photoionized gases which form in the media surrounding active galactic nuclei, X-ray binaries, and cataclysmic variables. Our results demonstrate that commonly used theoretical approximations for calculating low temperature DR rates can easily under- or over-estimate the DR rate by a factor of {approx} 2 or more. As essentially all DR rates used for modeling photoionized gases are calculated using these approximations, our results indicate that new DR rates are needed for almost all charge states of cosmically abundant elements. Measurements are underway for other charge states of iron.

  3. HISTRAP: Proposal for a Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the physics capabilities of HISTRAP together with a brief description of the facility and a sampling of the beams which will be available for experimentation, and surveys some of the lines of investigation in the physics of multicharged ions, molecular ion spectroscopy, condensed beams, and nuclear physics that will become possible with the advent of HISTRAP. Details of the accelerator design are discussed, including computer studies of beam tracking in the HISTRAP lattice, a discussion of the HHIRF tandem and ECR/RFQ injectors, and a description of the electron beam cooling system. In the past three years, HISTRAP has received substantial support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory management and staff. The project has used discretionary funds to develop hardware prototypes and carry out design studies. Construction has been completed on a vacuum test stand which models 1/16 of the storage ring and has attained a pressure of 4 x 10/sup -12/ Torr; a prototype rf cavity capable of accelerating beams up to 90 MeV/nucleon and decelerating to 20 keV/nucleon; and a prototype dipole magnet, one of the eight required for the HISTRAP lattice. This paper also contains a summary of the work on electron cooling carried out by one of our staff members at CERN. Building structures and services are described. Details of cost and schedule are also discussed. 77 refs.

  4. DISSOCIATIVE RECOMBINATION MEASUREMENTS OF HCl{sup +} USING AN ION STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Novotný, O.; Stützel, J.; Savin, D. W.; Becker, A.; Buhr, H.; Domesle, C.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Repnow, R.; Schwalm, D.; Yang, B.; Wolf, A.; Geppert, W.; Spruck, K.

    2013-11-01

    We have measured dissociative recombination (DR) of HCl{sup +} with electrons using a merged beams configuration at the TSR heavy-ion storage ring located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. We present the measured absolute merged beams recombination rate coefficient for collision energies from 0 to 4.5 eV. We have also developed a new method for deriving the cross section from the measurements. Our approach does not suffer from approximations made by previously used methods. The cross section was transformed to a plasma rate coefficient for the electron temperature range from T = 10 to 5000 K. We show that the previously used HCl{sup +} DR data underestimate the plasma rate coefficient by a factor of 1.5 at T = 10 K and overestimate it by a factor of three at T = 300 K. We also find that the new data may partly explain existing discrepancies between observed abundances of chlorine-bearing molecules and their astrochemical models.

  5. The Darmstadt Antiproton Project (PANDA) at the High Energy Storage Ring at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Klaus J.

    2002-11-20

    Recently GSI presented the plans for a major new international research facility. A key feature of this new facility will be the delivery of intense, high-quality secondary beams which embody the production of antiprotons. For the antiproton beams a 50 Tm storage ring is planned, including electron and stochastic cooling, will be able to handle antiproton beams in the momentum range from 1.5 up to 15 GeV/c. The design luminosity is 2 x 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The PANDA Experiment will take place at an internal target and will cover the aspects of the structure of hadrons and the properties of hadronic matter in the corresponding energy range. The main topics to be addressed are: Spectroscopy of charmonium; Search for charmed hybrids and glueballs; Interaction of open and hidden charm with nucleons and nuclei; Single and double hypernuclei; Open charm spectroscopy; CP-Violation in the charm sector; Deeply Virtual Comptom Scattering, etc. The major part of the experimental program will make use of a general purpose detector PANDA. The concept of this detector is presented.

  6. A new current regulator for the APS storage ring correction magnet bipolar switching mode converters.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2004-01-01

    The correction magnets in the Advanced Photon Source's storage ring are powered by PWM-controlled bipolar switching-mode converters. These converters are designed to operate at up to {+-}150 A. The original control circuit used a polarity detection circuit with a hysteresis to determine which IGBT was needed to regulate the current with a given polarity. Only the required IGBT was switched with PWM pulses while others were held on or off continuously. The overall IGBT switching losses were minimized by the design. The shortcoming of the design was that the converter's output was unstable near zero current because of the hysteresis. To improve the stability, a new current regulator using a different PWM method has been developed to eliminate the requirement of the polarity detection. With the new design, converters can operate smoothly in the full range of {+-}150 A. The new design also meets tighter specs in terms of the ripple current and dynamic response. This paper describes the design of the new regulator and the test results.

  7. A multi-length bunch design for electron storage rings with odd buckets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liang-Jing; Li, Wei-Min; Wang, Lin; Xiang, Dao; Huang, Xiao-Biao

    2015-07-01

    A scheme with two superconducting RF cavities is designed to upgrade electron storage rings with odd buckets to multi-length bunches. In this paper, the Hefei Light Source II (HLS II) is given as an example for odd buckets. As it is designed for 45 buckets, which is a multiple of 3, simultaneous generation of three different lengths of bunches is proposed with the presently applied user optics. The final result, without low-α optics, is to fill HLS II with long bunches of length 50 ps, medium bunches of 23 ps and short bunches of 6 ps. Every third bucket can be filled with short bunches, of which the current limit is up to 6.6 mA, more than 60 times the limit for low-α mode. Moreover, particle tracking simulations to examine the beam dynamics, performed by ELEGANT, and calculations of the beam instabilities are presented in this paper. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11327902, 11175180, 11175182) and U.S. DOE (DE-AC02-76SF00515)

  8. X-ray BPM-based feedback system at the APS storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, O.; Erwin, L.; Decker, G.; Laird, R.; Lenkszus, F.

    2000-05-17

    At the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring, the X-ray beam position monitors (X-BPMs) measure accurate photon position down to the submicron level. This level of stable measurement has been possible due to (1) superior thermal insulation and vibration damping of the X-ray BPM support structure, (2) minimal dependence on the bunch pattern and intensity variations, and (3) use of ultrastable preamplifiers and processing electronics. A new X-BPM interface is under development and will be discussed here. This interface will be integrated into the existing rf-based orbit feedback systems. To study preliminary results, an experimental X-BPM orbit feedback set-up was developed and implemented in one of the bending magnet beamlines. The results from this set-up are encouraging. For an operational fill, a typical orbit drift of 30 microns (at X-ray BPMs) has been reduced to less than 5 microns. The fill-to-fill photon orbit reproducibility has been improved from 75 microns to less than 10 microns.

  9. Dynamic Aperture and Tolerances for PEP-X Ultimate Storage Ring Design

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, M.; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y.; Wang, M.-H.; Hettel, R.O.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    A lattice for the PEP-X ultimate storage ring light source, having 11 pm-rad natural emittance at a beam energy of 4.5 GeV at zero current, using 90 m of damping wiggler and fitting into the existing 2.2-km PEP-II tunnel, has been recently designed. Such a low emittance lattice requires very strong sextupoles for chromaticity correction, which in turn introduce strong non-linear field effects that limit the beam dynamic aperture. In order to maximize the dynamic aperture we choose the cell phases to cancel the third and fourth order geometric resonances in each 8-cell arc. Four families of chromatic sextupoles and six families of geometric (or harmonic) sextupoles are added to correct the chromatic and amplitude-dependent tunes. To find the best settings of the ten sextupole families, we use a Multi-Objective Genetic Optimizer employing elegant to optimize the beam lifetime and dynamic aperture simultaneously. Then we evaluate dynamic aperture reduction caused by magnetic field multipole errors, magnet fabrication errors and misalignments. A sufficient dynamic aperture is obtained for injection, as well as workable beam lifetime.

  10. Water-Induced Morphology Changes in BaO/gamma-Al2O3 NOx Storage Materials: an FTIR, TPD, and Time-Resolved Synchrotron XRD Study

    SciTech Connect

    Szanyi,J.; Kwak, J.; Kim, D.; Wang, X.; Chimentao, R.; Hanson, J.; Epling, W.; Peden, C.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of water on the morphology of BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based NO{sub x} storage materials was investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, and time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques. The results of this multispectroscopy study reveal that in the presence of water surface Ba-nitrates convert to bulk nitrates and water facilitates the formation of large Ba(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} particles. The conversion of surface to bulk Ba-nitrates is completely reversible (i.e., after the removal of water from the storage material a significant fraction of the bulk nitrates reconverts to surface nitrates). NO{sub 2} exposure of a H{sub 2}O-containing (wet) BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sample results in the formation of nitrites and bulk nitrates exclusively (i.e., no surface nitrates form). After further exposure to NO{sub 2}, the nitrites completely convert to bulk nitrates. The amount of NO{sub x} taken up by the storage material, however, is essentially unaffected by the presence of water regardless of whether the water was dosed prior to or after NO{sub 2} exposure. On the basis of the results of this study, we are now able to explain most of the observations reported in the literature on the effect of water on NO{sub x} uptake on similar storage materials.

  11. Assessing noise sources at synchrotron infrared ports

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Ph.; Dumas, P.; Schilcher, T.; Nadji, A.; Luedeke, A.; Hubert, N.; Cassinari, L.; Boege, M.; Denard, J.-C.; Stingelin, L.; Nadolski, L.; Garvey, T.; Albert, S.; Gough, Ch.; Quack, M.; Wambach, J.; Dehler, M.; Filhol, J.-M.

    2012-01-01

    Today, the vast majority of electron storage rings delivering synchrotron radiation for general user operation offer a dedicated infrared port. There is growing interest expressed by various scientific communities to exploit the mid-IR emission in microspectroscopy, as well as the far infrared (also called THz) range for spectroscopy. Compared with a thermal (laboratory-based source), IR synchrotron radiation sources offer enhanced brilliance of about two to three orders of magnitude in the mid-IR energy range, and enhanced flux and brilliance in the far-IR energy range. Synchrotron radiation also has a unique combination of a broad wavelength band together with a well defined time structure. Thermal sources (globar, mercury filament) have excellent stability. Because the sampling rate of a typical IR Fourier-transform spectroscopy experiment is in the kHz range (depending on the bandwidth of the detector), instabilities of various origins present in synchrotron radiation sources play a crucial role. Noise recordings at two different IR ports located at the Swiss Light Source and SOLEIL (France), under conditions relevant to real experiments, are discussed. The lowest electron beam fluctuations detectable in IR spectra have been quantified and are shown to be much smaller than what is routinely recorded by beam-position monitors. PMID:22186638

  12. X-ray nanoprobes and diffraction-limited storage rings: opportunities and challenges of fluorescence tomography of biological specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Martin D.; Ryan, Christopher G.; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray nanoprobes require coherent illumination to achieve optic-limited resolution, and so will benefit directly from diffraction-limited storage rings. Here, the example of high-resolution X-ray fluorescence tomography is focused on as one of the most voracious demanders of coherent photons, since the detected signal is only a small fraction of the incident flux. Alternative schemes are considered for beam delivery, sample scanning and detectors. One must consider as well the steps before and after the X-ray experiment: sample preparation and examination conditions, and analysis complexity due to minimum dose requirements and self-absorption. By understanding the requirements and opportunities for nanoscale fluorescence tomography, one gains insight into the R&D challenges in optics and instrumentation needed to fully exploit the source advances that diffraction-limited storage rings offer. PMID:25177992

  13. Mini-proceedings of the workshop on heavy ion physics and instrumentation for a 15-Tm booster and storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    The goal of this workshop was to probe in depth a few of the areas of possible physics made possible by the availability of an intermediate energy heavy-ion physics facility. There was a special emphasis on physics that would be possible only with a storage/cooler ring. Topics discussed were nuclei far from stability, quantum electrodynamics, giant resonances and photonuclear reactions, and high energy gamma-ray production. Individual papers in this meeting were abstracted separately.

  14. Longitudinal phase-space coating of beam in a storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, C. M.

    2014-06-01

    In this Letter, I report on a novel scheme for beam stacking without any beam emittance dilution using a barrier rf system in synchrotrons. The general principle of the scheme called longitudinal phase-space coating, validation of the concept via multi-particle beam dynamics simulations applied to the Fermilab Recycler, and its experimental demonstration are presented. In addition, it has been shown and illustrated that the rf gymnastics involved in this scheme can be used in measuring the incoherent synchrotron tune spectrum of the beam in barrier buckets and in producing a clean hollow beam in longitudinal phase space. The method of beam stacking in synchrotrons presented here is the first of its kind.

  15. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 20 years of synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-08-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is now operating as a fully dedicated light source with low emittance electron optics, delivering high brightness photon beams to 25 experimental stations six to seven months per year. On October 1, 1993 SSRL became a Division of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, rather than an Independent Laboratory of Stanford University, so that high energy physics and synchrotron radiation now function under a single DOE contract. The SSRL division of SLAC has responsibility for operating, maintaining and improving the SPEAR accelerator complex, which includes the storage ring and a 3 GeV injector. SSRL has thirteen x-ray stations and twelve VUV/Soft x-ray stations serving its 600 users. Recently opened to users is a new spherical grating monochromator (SGM) and a multiundulator beam line. Circularly polarized capabilities are being exploited on a second SGM line. New YB{sub 66} crystals installed in a vacuum double-crystal monochromator line have sparked new interest for Al and Mg edge studies. One of the most heavily subscribed stations is the rotation camera, which has been recently enhanced with a MAR imaging plate detector system for protein crystallography on a multipole wiggler. Under construction is a new wiggler-based structural molecular biology beam line with experimental stations for crystallography, small angle scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plans for new developments include wiggler beam lines and associated facilities specialized for environmental research and materials processing.

  16. Status of the variable momentum compaction storage ring experiment in SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, P.; Amiry, A.; Pellegrini, C.

    1993-09-01

    Variable momentum compaction lattices have been proposed for electron-positron colliders and synchrotron radiation sources to control synchrotron tune and bunch length. To address questions of single particle stability limits, a study has been initiated to change the SPEAR lattice into a variable momentum compaction configuration for experimental investigation of the beam dynamics. In this paper, we describe a model-based method used to transform SPEAR from the injection lattice to the low momentum compaction configuration. Experimental observations of the process are reviewed.

  17. High-resolution storage-ring measurements of the dissociative recombination of H{sub 3}{sup +} using a supersonic expansion ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kreckel, Holger; Crabtree, Kyle N.; Tom, Brian A.; Novotny, Oldrich; Lestinsky, Michael; Buhr, Henrik; Petrignani, Annemieke; Berg, Max H.; Bing, Dennis; Grieser, Manfred; Krantz, Claude; Mendes, Mario B.; Nordhorn, Christian; Repnow, Roland; Stuetzel, Julia; Wolf, Andreas; Thomas, Richard D.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2010-10-15

    We have performed measurements of the dissociative electron recombination (DR) of H{sub 3}{sup +} at the ion storage ring TSR utilizing a supersonic expansion ion source. The ion source has been characterized by continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy. We present high-resolution DR rate coefficients for different nuclear spin modifications of H{sub 3}{sup +} combined with precise fragment imaging studies of the internal excitation of the H{sub 3}{sup +} ions inside the storage ring. The measurements resolve changes in the energy dependence between the ortho-H{sub 3}{sup +} and para-H{sub 3}{sup +} rate coefficients at low center-of-mass collision energies. Analysis of the imaging data indicates that the stored H{sub 3}{sup +} ions may have higher rotational temperatures than previously assumed, most likely due to collisional heating during the extraction of the ions from the ion source. Simulations of the ion extraction shed light on possible origins of the heating process and how to avoid it in future experiments.

  18. Flux and brightness calculations for various synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.M.; Hulbert, S.L.

    1991-11-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) storage rings are powerful scientific and technological tools. The first generation of storage rings in the US., e.g., SURF (Washington, D.C.), Tantalus (Wisconsin), SSRL (Stanford), and CHESS (Cornell), revolutionized VUV, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray science. The second (present) generation of storage rings, e.g. the NSLS VUV and XRAY rings and Aladdin (Wisconsin), have sustained the revolution by providing higher stored currents and up to a factor of ten smaller electron beam sizes than the first generation sources. This has made possible a large number of experiments that could not performed using first generation sources. In addition, the NSLS XRAY ring design optimizes the performance of wigglers (high field periodic magnetic insertion devices). The third generation storage rings, e.g. ALS (Berkeley) and APS (Argonne), are being designed to optimize the performance of undulators (low field periodic magnetic insertion devices). These extremely high brightness sources will further revolutionize x-ray science by providing diffraction-limited x-ray beams. The output of undulators and wigglers is distinct from that of bending magnets in magnitude, spectral shape, and in spatial and angular size. Using published equations, we have developed computer programs to calculate the flux, central intensity, and brightness output bending magnets and selected wigglers and undulators of the NSLS VUV and XRAY rings, the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Following is a summary of the equations used, the graphs and data produced, and the computer codes written. These codes, written in the C programming language, can be used to calculate the flux, central intensity, and brightness curves for bending magnets and insertion devices on any storage ring.

  19. Status of the High Brilliance Synchrotron Light Source BESSY-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, E.

    1997-05-01

    The construction of BESSY-II at Berlin-Adlershof has entered the decisive phase: The injector complex comprising a 50 MeV racetrack microtron and a booster synchrotron with 10 Hz repetition rate and a final energy of 1.9 GeV has been set up ready for commissioning in the 2nd quarter of 1997. All major storage ring components are in house and the assembly of the 240 m DBA storage ring in 16-fold symmetry has started. Stored beam is expected for the 2nd quarter of 1998. The paper describes the status of the project.

  20. The main dipole prototype for KfK Synchrotron Radiation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.; Miasnikov, Yu.; Nagaenko, M.

    1996-07-01

    The KfK Synchrotron Radiation Source is designed to be a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring with circulating current 100 mA and critical radiation wave length 0.2 nm. The storage ring consists of dipoles and quadrupoles. The prototype dipole magnet has been built by Efremov Research Institute, Russia and will be delivered in KfK, Karlsruhe at the end of June this year. A magnetic measurements facility has been set up for magnetic field mapping, which includes Hall probe field mapping and rotating coil harmonic analysis system. The results of the measurements are shown.

  1. Damping higher order modes in the PEP-II B-Factory storage ring collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weathersby, Stephen

    2007-05-01

    The PEP-II B-Factory storage ring collider at SLAC provides crucial experimental evidence for the physics of CP violation. To investigate rare B-meson decays requires high luminosity which comes mainly from increasing bunch currents and reducing bunch sizes. Electromagnetic effects of intense bunch fields in the form of wake fields couple into accelerator components, inducing Joule heating at levels detrimental to vacuum chamber components. Additionally, wake fields contribute to beam instability, decreasing luminosity. These effects are limiting B-factory performance. Computer simulations and experimental evidence indicate that beam collimators produce wake fields in the form of dipole and quadrupole waveguide modes which can propagate tens of meters from their source before depositing energy at remote locations. Simulations confirm that coupling through narrow slots into bellows cavities occurs for beam pipe modes. Two proposals are set forth to mitigate wake field effects. The first proposal is to reduce the quality factor of resonant structures with a water cooled dielectric lossy material. Electromagnetic energy coupling into resonant structures can be isolated and safely dissipated. Prototype devices have been built and have been shown to reduce resistive heating in large pumping chambers coupled to the beam chamber. Designs and simulations which incorporate such techiques into bellows devices are presented. The second proposal incorporates novel devices introduced in the accelerator vacuum chamber which selectively traps dipole and quadrupole propagating wake fields before they can couple into sensitive beam line components without introducing impedance to the beam. Scattering parameter analysis is used to tailor device response to specific modes. Dangerous modes are extracted from the beam chamber, trapped and dissipated in a water cooled lossy material. Modes which represent an impedance to the beam are not affected. After design optimization, production

  2. Assessment of neutron skyshine near unmodified Accumulator Debuncher storage rings under Mu2e operational conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.Donald; /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    Preliminary plans for providing the proton beam needed by the proposed Mu2e experiment at Fermilab will require the transport of 8 GeV protons to the Accumulator/Debuncher where they be processed into an intensity and time structure useful for the experiment. The intensities involved are far greater that those encountered with antiprotons of the same kinetic energy in the same beam enclosures under Tevatron Collider operational conditions, the operating parameters for which the physical facilities of the Antiproton Source were designed. This note explores some important ramifications of the proposed operation for radiation safety and demonstrates the need for extensive modifications of significant portions of the shielding of the Accumulator Debuncher storage rings; notably that underneath the AP Service Buildings AP10, AP30, and AP50. While existing shielding is adequate for the current operating mode of the Accumulator/Debuncher as part of the Antiproton Source used in the Tevatron Collider program, without significant modifications of the shielding configuration in the Accumulator/Debuncher region and/or beam loss control systems far more effective than seen in most applications at Fermilab, the proposed operational mode for Mu2e is not viable for the following reasons: 1. Due to skyshine alone, under normal operational conditions large areas of the Fermilab site would be exposed to unacceptable levels of radiation where most of the Laboratory workforce and some members of the general public who regularly visit Fermilab would receive measurable doses annually, contrary to workforce, public, and DOE expectations concerning the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle. 2. Under normal operational conditions, a sizeable region of the Fermilab site would also require fencing due to skyshine. The size of the areas involved would likely invite public inquiry about the significant and visible enlargement of Fermilab's posted radiological areas. 3. There would

  3. Performance of SISSI, the infrared beamline of the ELETTRA storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Lupi, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro; Perucchi, Andrea; Calvani, Paolo; Ortolani, Michele; Quaroni, Luca; Kiskinova, Maya

    2007-04-15

    The results of pilot experiments carried out at the new infrared beamline SISSI (Source for Imaging and Spectroscopic Studies in the Infrared) operated at the synchrotron laboratory ELETTRA in Trieste, Italy, are presented and compared with the results obtained with conventional IR sources. The main figures of merit of the infrared synchrotron radiation (IRSR) such as brightness, spectral quality, and stability are discussed. Using a pinhole scanned across the IRSR beam, the effective beam size, the intensity, and the lateral distribution for different wavelengths are determined. The results obtained on geological and biological samples are used to illustrate how the broadband nature and high brightness of the IRSR beam allow IR spectroscopy experiments on diffraction-limited sample areas in both the mid-IR and far-IR regions.

  4. Fokker-Planck analysis of transverse collective instabilities in electron storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, Ryan R.

    2016-12-01

    We analyze single bunch transverse instabilities due to wakefields using a Fokker-Planck model. We first expand on the work of T. Suzuki, Part. Accel. 12, 237 (1982) to derive the theoretical model including chromaticity, both dipolar and quadrupolar transverse wakefields, and the effects of damping and diffusion due to the synchrotron radiation. We reduce the problem to a linear matrix equation, whose eigenvalues and eigenvectors determine the collective stability of the beam. We then show that various predictions of the theory agree quite well with results from particle tracking simulations, including the threshold current for transverse instability and the profile of the unstable mode. In particular, we find that predicting collective stability for high energy electron beams at moderate to large values of chromaticity requires the full Fokker-Planck analysis to properly account for the effects of damping and diffusion due to synchrotron radiation.

  5. Conceptual design of the Argonne 6-GeV synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Crosbie, E.; Khoe, T.; Knott, M.; Kramer, S.; Kustom, R.; Lari, R.; Martin, R.; Mavrogenes, G.; Moenich, J.

    1985-10-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory Synchrotron Light Source Storage Ring is designed to have a natural emittance of 6.5 X 10/sup -9/ m for circulating 6-GeV positrons. Thirty of the 32 long straight sections, each 6.5-m long, will be available for synchrotron light insertion devices. A circulating positron current of 300 mA can be injected in about 8 min. from a booster synchrotron operating with a repetition time of 1.2 sec. The booster synchrotron will contain two different rf systems. The lower frequency system (38.97 MHz) will accept positrons from a 360-MeV linac and will accelerate them to 2.25 GeV. The higher frequency system (350.76 MHz) will accelerate the positrons to 6 GeV. The positrons will be produced from a 300-MeV electron beam on a tungsten target.

  6. Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility Project-(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, N.; Takashima, Y.; Katoh, M.; Hosaka, M.; Takami, K.; Morimoto, H.; Hori, Y.; Sasaki, S.; Koda, S.; Ito, T.; Sakurai, I.; Hara, H.; Okamoto, W.; Watanabe, N.; Takeda, Y.

    2010-06-01

    A synchrotron radiation facility that is used not only for basic research, but also for engineering and industrial research and development has been proposed to be constructed in the Central area of Japan. The key equipment of this facility is a compact electron storage ring that is able to supply hard X-rays. The circumference of the storage ring is 72 m with the energy of 1.2 GeV, the beam current of 300 mA, and the natural emittance of about 53 nm-rad. The configuration of the storage ring is based on four triple bend cells, and four of the twelve bending magnets are 5 T superconducting ones. The bending angle and critical energy are 12 degree and 4.8 keV, respectively. For the top-up operation, the electron beam will be injected from a booster synchrotron with the full energy. Currently, six beamlines are planned for the first phase starting from 2012.

  7. CsI-Silicon Particle detector for Heavy ions Orbiting in Storage rings (CsISiPHOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, M. A.; Dillmann, I.; Bosch, F.; Faestermann, T.; Gao, B.; Gernhäuser, R.; Kozhuharov, C.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Maier, L.; Nolden, F.; Popp, U.; Sanjari, M. S.; Spillmann, U.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Weick, H.

    2016-11-01

    A heavy-ion detector was developed for decay studies in the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt, Germany. This detector serves as a prototype for the in-pocket particle detectors for future experiments with the Collector Ring (CR) at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research). The detector includes a stack of six silicon pad sensors, a double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSD), and a CsI(Tl) scintillation detector. It was used successfully in a recent experiment for the detection of the β+-decay of highly charged 142Pm60+ ions. Based on the ΔE / E technique for particle identification and an energy resolution of 0.9% for ΔE and 0.5% for E (Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM)), the detector is well-suited to distinguish neighbouring isobars in the region of interest.

  8. LEPTON ACCELERATORS AND COLLIDERS: Linear optics calibration and nonlinear optimization during the commissioning of the SSRF storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Shun-Qiang; Zhang, Wen-Zhi; Li, Hao-Hu; Zhang, Man-Zhou; Hou, Jie; Zhou, Xue-Mei; Liu, Gui-Min

    2009-06-01

    Phase I commissioning of the SSRF storage ring on 3.0 GeV beam energy was started at the end of December 2007. A lot of encouraging results have been obtained so far. In this paper, calibrations of the linear optics during the commissioning are discussed, and some measured results about the nonlinearity given. Calibration procedure emphasizes correcting quadrupole magnetic coefficients with the Linear Optics from Closed Orbit (LOCO) technique. After fitting the closed orbit response matrix, the linear optics of the four test modes is substantially corrected, and the measured physical parameters agree well with the designed ones.

  9. Three-dimensional ordering of cold ion beams in a storage ring: A molecular-dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri, Yosuke

    2015-06-29

    Three-dimensional (3D) ordering of a charged-particle beams circulating in a storage ring is systematically studied with a molecular-dynamics simulation code. An ion beam can exhibit a 3D ordered configuration at ultralow temperature as a result of powerful 3D laser cooling. Various unique characteristics of the ordered beams, different from those of crystalline beams, are revealed in detail, such as the single-particle motion in the transverse and longitudinal directions, and the dependence of the tune depression and the Coulomb coupling constant on the operating points.

  10. Electric fields, electron production, and electron motion at the stripper foil in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.

    1995-05-01

    The beam instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) most likely involves coupled oscillations between electrons and protons. For this instability to occur, there must be a strong source of electrons. Investigation of the various sources of electrons in the PSR had begun. Copious electron production is expected in the injection section because this section contains the stripper foil. This foil is mounted near the center of the beam pipe, and both circulating and injected protons pass through it, thus allowing ample opportunity for electron production. This paper discusses various mechanisms for electron production, beam-induced electric fields, and electron motion in the vicinity of the foil.

  11. STORAGE RING MEASUREMENT OF ELECTRON IMPACT IONIZATION FOR Mg{sup 7+} FORMING Mg{sup 8+}

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Lestinsky, M.; Novotny, O.; Savin, D. W.; Bernhardt, D.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Wolf, A.

    2010-04-01

    We report electron impact ionization cross section measurements for Mg{sup 7+} forming Mg{sup 8+} at center of mass energies from approximately 200 eV to 2000 eV. The experimental work was performed using the heavy-ion storage ring TSR located at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, Germany. We find good agreement with distorted wave calculations using both the GIPPER code of the Los Alamos Atomic Physics Code suite and using the Flexible Atomic Code.

  12. Predicted performance of a multi-section VUV FEL with the Amsterdam pulse stretcher and storage ring AmPS

    SciTech Connect

    Bazylev, V.A.; Pitatelev, M.I.; Tulupov, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    A design is proposed to realize a VUV FEL with the Amsterdam Pulse Stretcher and Storage Ring (AmPS). The FEL is based on 4 identical undulator sections and 3 dispersive sections. The total magnetic system has a length of 12 m. 3 D simulations with the actual electron beam parameters of AmPS have been done with a version of TDA code modified for multi-sectional FELs. The spectral range between 50 and 100 nm has been considered. The simulations show that an amplification as large as 1*E5 - 1*E7 can be achieved. The amplification can be enhanced by a further optimisation procedure.

  13. Electron beam stability and beam peak to peak motion data for NSLS X-Ray storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, O.

    1993-07-01

    In the past two years, a significant reduction in electron beam motion has been achieved at the NSLS X-Ray storage ring. The implementation of global analog orbit feedbacks, based on a harmonics correction scheme, has reduced the beam motion globally. Implementation of six local analog feedback systems has reduced the beam motion even further at the corresponding beam line straight sections. This paper presents beam motion measurements, showing the improvement due to the feedback systems. Beam motion is measured using a spectrum analyzer and data is presented at various frequencies, where peaks were observed. Finally, some of the beam motion sources are discussed.

  14. Transverse beam size measurement system using visible synchrotron radiation at HLS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kai; Sun, Bao-Gen; Yang, Yong-Liang; Lu, Ping; Tang, Lei-Lei; Wu, Fang-Fang; Cheng, Chao-Cai; Zheng, Jia-Jun; Li, Hao

    2016-09-01

    An interferometer system and an imaging system using visible synchrotron radiation (SR) have been installed in the Hefei Light Source (HLS) II storage ring. Simulations of these two systems are given using Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) code. With these two systems, the beam energy spread and the beam emittance can be measured. A detailed description of these two systems and the measurement method is given in this paper. The measurement results of beam size, emittance and energy spread are given at the end. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11105141, 11175173) and Upgrade Project of Hefei Light Source

  15. Examination for optimization of synchrotron radiation spectrum for the x ray depth lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dany, Raimund

    1992-06-01

    The effect of reducing the vertical distribution of synchrotron radiation on its spectral distribution is examined through resin irradiation. The resulting filter effect is compared to that of absorption filters. Transmission coefficients of titanium, gold, and polyamide were calculated from linear absorption coefficients with the Beer law. The use of a diaphragm in X-ray depth lithography, which is the first step of the LIGA (Lithography Galvanoforming Molding) process, is discussed. A calorimetric device for determining the synchrotron radiation power and distribution was developed and tested. Measurements at the ELSA storage ring show a strong dependence of the vertical emittance on the electron current.

  16. Picosecond pump-probe using an FEL and a synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Denbeaux, G.; Straub, K.D.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Two color pump-probe experiments using both the Duke Storage Ring as a synchrotron light source for visible light the Mark III FEL as a tunable, high peak power IR source are possible. The visible synchrotron source can be used as a probe of vibrational excitation from the FEL in an experiment using vibrationally-assisted fluorescence as an indicator of overlap of the IR and the visible pulses. An optical delay line in the FEL beam will allow adjustment of the arrival time of the IR pulse relative to the visible probe. The storage ring RF booster and the Mark III FEL RF sources will be both driven by the same master oscillator with a timing jitter between sources of less than 20 psec. Exploration of coupling between electronic excitation and lifetimes of vibrational excitation of fluorescent compounds in solution can be carried out with this configuration.

  17. Experiences from nonevaporable getter-coated vacuum chambers at the MAX II synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, A.; Wallen, E.; Berglund, M.; Kersevan, R.; Hahn, M.

    2010-03-15

    Vacuum chambers coated with nonevaporable getter (NEG) materials have been used in straight sections of synchrotron light sources for the past 10 years. The MAX II storage ring, where four NEG-coated insertion device vacuum chambers and three NEG-coated dipole vacuum chambers have been installed, is the first synchrotron light source to also use NEG-coated dipole vacuum chambers. In connection with the installation of the latest two NEG-coated dipole chambers in April 2009, the evolution of the pressure and lifetime-limiting effects in MAX II has been determined from measurements with movable scrapers. The results have been compared with results from scraper measurements done in 2003, before any NEG-coated vacuum chambers were installed in the storage ring. Less than three months after the installation of the latest dipole chambers the vacuum system in MAX II was performing well with a pressure already lower than the pressure measured in 2003.

  18. Magnetic properties of the ALS (Advanced Light Source) booster synchrotron engineering model magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, R.; Green, M.I.; Hoyer, E.; Koo, Y.M.; Luchini, K.; Marks, S.; Milburn, J.; Nelson, D.H.

    1989-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is designed to be a third-generation electron storage ring producing high-brightness VUV and X-ray radiation from wiggler and undulator insertion devices. Engineering models of all lattice magnets that are to be installed in the storage ring and its booster synchrotron have been built and are being tested to verify their performance. This paper is concerned with the magnets that form the booster lattice: dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles, and corrector dipoles (steerers). After a brief outline of measurement techniques and equipment, the major design parameters of these magnets are listed. Measured effective lengths and multipole field errors are then given for each type. All engineering models meet the specifications, and tracking studies including the measured systematic field errors show acceptable performance of the booster synchrotron; hence the designs are qualified for production. 3 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. An Electron Target/cooler for Extremely Low-Energy Ion Beams at the Electrostatic Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Tetsumi; Noda, Koji; Watanabe, Ikuo

    2002-12-01

    An electrostatic storage ring for studying atomic and molecular science has been operational at KEK since May, 2000. The ring has a circumference of 8 m and can store light-to-heavy ions with an E/q of up to 30 keV. Light ions are produced with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source, while bio-molecular ions are produced with an electrospray ion source The measured 1/e-lifetimes of stored single-charge ions injected from the electron cyclotron resonance ion source are from 10 to 50 s. On the other hand, ions from the electrospray ion source have lifetimes from 12 to 20 s. These lifetimes are long enough to cool vibrationally excited molecular ions, and their intensities are tolerable for practical use, like atomic collision experiments. In order to study electron-ion collisions, an electron beam target has been designed, which will be installed in a straight section of the ring. The structure of the target is almost the same as an electron cooler consisting of an adiabatically expanded electron beam; the target can also function as an electron cooler for light-mass ions.

  20. Producing terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation at the Hefei Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, De-Rong; Xu, Hong-Liang; Shao, Yan

    2015-07-01

    This paper theoretically proves that an electron storage ring can generate coherent radiation in the THz region using a quick kicker magnet and an AC sextupole magnet. When the vertical chromaticity is modulated by the AC sextupole magnet, the vertical beam collective motion excited by the kicker produces a wavy spatial structure after a number of longitudinal oscillation periods. The radiation spectral distribution was calculated from the wavy bunch parameters at the Hefei Light Source (HLS). When the electron energy is reduced to 400 MeV, extremely strong coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at 0.115 THz should be produced. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375176)

  1. Microangiography in Living Mice Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Falei; Wang Yongting; Xie Bohua; Tang Yaohui; Guan Yongjing; Lu Haiyan; Yang Guoyuan; Xie Honglan; Du Guohao; Xiao Tiqiao

    2010-07-23

    Traditionally, there are no methods available to detect the fine morphologic changes of cerebrovasculature in small living animals such as rats and mice. Newly developed synchrotron radiation microangiography can achieve a fine resolution of several micrometers and had provided us with a powerful tool to study the cerebral vasculature in small animals. The purpose of this study is to identify the morphology of cerebrovasculature especially the structure of Lenticulostriate arteries (LSAs) in living mice using the synchrotron radiation source at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) in Shanghai, China. Adult CD-1 mice weighing 35-40 grams were anesthetized. Nonionic iodine (Omnipaque, 350 mg I /mL) was used as a contrast agent. The study was performed at the BL13W1 beam line at SSRF. The beam line was derived from a storage ring of electrons with an accelerated energy of 3.5 GeV and an average beam current of 200 mA. X-ray energy of 33.3 keV was used to produce the highest contrast image. Images were acquired every 172 ms by a x-ray camera (Photonic-Science VHR 1.38) with a resolution of 13 {mu}m/pixel. The optimal dose of contrast agent is 100 {mu}l per injection and the injecting rate is 33 {mu}l/sec. The best position for imaging is to have the mouse lay on its right or left side, with ventral side facing the X-ray source. We observed the lenticulostriate artery for the first time in living mice. Our result show that there are 4 to 5 lenticulostriate branches originating from the root of middle cerebral artery in each hemisphere. LSAs have an average diameter of 43{+-}6.8 {mu}m. There were no differences between LSAs from the left and right hemisphere (p<0.05). These results suggest that synchrotron radiation may provide a unique tool for experimental stroke research.

  2. A method for simultaneous linear optics and coupling correction for storage rings with turn-by-turn beam position monitor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Huang, Xiaobiao

    2016-08-01

    We propose a method to simultaneously correct linear optics errors and linear coupling for storage rings using turn-by-turn (TbT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. The independent component analysis (ICA) method is used to isolate the betatron normal modes from the measured TbT BPM data. The betatron amplitudes and phase advances of the projections of the normal modes on the horizontal and vertical planes are then extracted, which, combined with dispersion measurement, are used to fit the lattice model. The fitting results are used for lattice correction. The method has been successfully demonstrated on the NSLS-II storage ring.

  3. A method for simultaneous linear optics and coupling correction for storage rings with turn-by-turn beam position monitor data

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Huang, Xiaobiao

    2016-05-13

    Here, we propose a method to simultaneously correct linear optics errors and linear coupling for storage rings using turn-by-turn (TbT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. The independent component analysis (ICA) method is used to isolate the betatron normal modes from the measured TbT BPM data. The betatron amplitudes and phase advances of the projections of the normal modes on the horizontal and vertical planes are then extracted, which, combined with dispersion measurement, are used to fit the lattice model. The fitting results are used for lattice correction. Finally, the method has been successfully demonstrated on the NSLS-II storage ring.

  4. A method for simultaneous linear optics and coupling correction for storage rings with turn-by-turn beam position monitor data

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Huang, Xiaobiao

    2016-08-01

    We propose a method to simultaneously correct linear optics errors and linear coupling for storage rings using turn-by-turn (TbT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. The independent component analysis (ICA) method is used to isolate the betatron normal modes from the measured TbT BPM data. The betatron amplitudes and phase advances of the projections of the normal modes on the horizontal and vertical planes are then extracted, which, combined with dispersion measurement, are used to fit the lattice model. Furthermore, the fitting results are used for lattice correction. Our method has been successfully demonstrated on the NSLS-II storage ring.

  5. Theory and calculations of synchrotron instabilities and feedback-mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Meijssen, T.E.M.

    1981-08-12

    The properties of the phenomenon synchrotron radiation are given with general theory on the basic processes and betatron and synchrotron oscillations. A more extended theoretical view at transverse instabilities and the influence of a damping feedback system are discussed. The longitudinal case is covered. For the calculations on the longitudinal case with M equally spaced pointbunches, with N electrons each, in the storage ring, the parasitic modes of the radio-frequency cavity were measured. A description of this is given. The values of damping rates of the longitudinal feedback system found, are as expected, but too low to damp the longitudinal instabilities calculated. This might be caused by the input data. The calculated growth rates are very sensitive to changes in frequency and width of the parasitic modes, which were measured under conditions differing slightly from the operating conditions.

  6. Precision Mass Measurements of Short-Lived Nuclides at The Heavy-Ion Storage Ring in Lanzhou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuhu; Xu, Hushan; Litvinov, Yuri A.

    Recent commissioning of the Cooler Storage Ring at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou enabled us to conduct high-precision mass measurements at the Institute of Modern Physics in Lanzhou (IMP). In the past few years, mass measurements were performed using the CSRe-based isochronous mass spectrometry employing the fragmentation of the energetic beams of 58Ni, 78Kr, 86Kr, and 112Sn projectiles. Masses of short-lived nuclides of on both sides of the stability valley were addressed. Relative mass precision of down to 10-6-10-7 is routinely achieved. The mass values were used as an input for dedicated nuclear structure and astrophysics studies, providing for instance new insights into the rp-process of nucleosynthesis in X-ray bursts. In this contribution, we briefly review the so far conducted experiments and the main achieved results, as well as outline the plans for future experiments.

  7. In-situ calibration: migrating control system IP module calibration from the bench to the storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Jonah M.; Chin, Michael

    2002-04-30

    The Control System for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) uses in-house designed IndustryPack(registered trademark) (IP) modules contained in compact PCI (cPCI) crates with 16-bit analog I/O to control instrumentation. To make the IP modules interchangeable, each module is calibrated for gain and offset compensation. We initially developed a method of verifying and calibrating the IP modules in a lab bench test environment using a PC with LabVIEW. The subsequent discovery that the ADCs have significant drift characteristics over periods of days of installed operation prompted development of an ''in-situ'' calibration process--one in which the IP modules can be calibrated without removing them from the cPCI crates in the storage ring. This paper discusses the original LabVIEW PC calibration and the migration to the proposed in-situ EPICS control system calibration.

  8. Stripper-foil scan studies of the first-turn beam loss mechanism in the LAMPF proton storage ring (PSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, R.: Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Wilkinson, C.

    1993-01-01

    First-turn beam losses in the LAMPF Proton Storage Ring were measured as a function of the left-right position of the carbon foil used to strip neutral hydrogen atoms to H[sup +] for proton injection into the PSR. Two foil thicknesses, 200 and 300 [mu]g/cm[sup 2], were tested. Results indicated that first-turn loss is caused predominately by magnetic field stripping of a small fraction of the H[sub 0] atoms that pass through the stripper foil without being stripped to protons, and the results were not consistent with a mechanism involving protons originating from atoms in the halo of the neutral beam incident on the stripper foil.

  9. Stripper-foil scan studies of the first-turn beam loss mechanism in the LAMPF proton storage ring (PSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, R.: Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Wilkinson, C.

    1993-06-01

    First-turn beam losses in the LAMPF Proton Storage Ring were measured as a function of the left-right position of the carbon foil used to strip neutral hydrogen atoms to H{sup +} for proton injection into the PSR. Two foil thicknesses, 200 and 300 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}, were tested. Results indicated that first-turn loss is caused predominately by magnetic field stripping of a small fraction of the H{sub 0} atoms that pass through the stripper foil without being stripped to protons, and the results were not consistent with a mechanism involving protons originating from atoms in the halo of the neutral beam incident on the stripper foil.

  10. Single-particle detection of products from atomic and molecular reactions in a cryogenic ion storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, C.; Novotný, O.; Becker, A.; George, S.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, R. von; Meyer, C.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.; Vogel, S.; Wolf, A.

    2017-04-01

    We have used a single-particle detector system, based on secondary electron emission, for counting low-energetic (∼keV/u) massive products originating from atomic and molecular ion reactions in the electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR). The detector is movable within the cryogenic vacuum chamber of CSR, and was used to measure production rates of a variety of charged and neutral daughter particles. In operation at a temperature of ∼ 6 K , the detector is characterised by a high dynamic range, combining a low dark event rate with good high-rate particle counting capability. On-line measurement of the pulse height distributions proved to be an important monitor of the detector response at low temperature. Statistical pulse-height analysis allows to infer the particle detection efficiency of the detector, which has been found to be close to unity also in cryogenic operation at 6 K.

  11. 1500 MHZ Passive SRF Cavity for Bunch Lengthening in the NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagisawa,T.; Rose, J.; Grimm, T.; Bogle, A.

    2009-05-04

    NSLS-II is a new ultra-bright 3 GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. Ion clearing gaps are required to suppress ion effects on the beam. The natural bunch length of 3mm is planned to be lengthened by means of a third harmonic cavity in order to increase the Touschek limited lifetime. After an extensive investigation of different cavity geometries, a passive, superconducting two-cell cavity has been selected for prototyping. The cavity is HOM damped with ferrite absorbers on the beam pipes. The two-cell cavity simplifies the tuner design, compared to having two independent cells. Tradeoffs between the damping of the higher order modes, thermal isolation associated with the large beam tubes, and overall cavity length are described. A copper prototype has been constructed, and measurements of fundamental and higher order modes will be compared to calculated values.

  12. Experiments with Longitudinally Polarized Electrons in a Storage Ring Using a Siberian Snake

    SciTech Connect

    H. R. Poolman; D. J. Boersma; M. Harvey; Douglas W. Higinbotham; I. Passchier; E. Six; Ricardo Alarcon; P. W. van Amersfoort; Th. S. Bauer; H. Boer Rookhuizen; J. F. J. van den Brand; L. D. van Buuren; H. J. Bulten; Rolf Ent; M. Ferro-Luzzi; D. G. Geurts; Peter Heimberg; Kees de Jager; P. Klimin; I. Koop; F. Kroes; J. van der Laan; G. Luijckx; A. Lysenko; B. Militsyn; I. Nesterenko; J. Noomen; Blaine Norum; M. J. J. van den Putte; Yu. Shatunov; J. J. M. Steijger; D. Szczerba; H. de Vries

    2000-04-24

    We report on first measurements with polarized electrons stored in a medium-energy ring and with a polarized internal target. Polarized electrons were injected at 442 MeV (653 MeV), and a partial (full) Siberian snake was employed to preserve the polarization. Longitudinal polarization at the interaction point and polarization lifetime of the stored electrons were determined with laser backscattering. Spin observables were measured for electrodisintegration of polarized {sup 3}He, with simultaneous detection of scattered electrons, protons, neutrons, deuterons, and {sup 3}He nuclei, over a large phase space.

  13. High-Current Effects in The PEP-II Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wienands, U.; Sullivan, M.K.; Akre, R.; Cheng, W.; Colocho, W.; DeBarger, S.; Decker, F.-J.; Ecklund, S.; Fisher, A.; Kharakh, D.; Krasnykh, A.; Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    High beam currents in PEP-II have been a challenge for vacuum system and ring components. For the {approx} 1 cm long bunches peak currents exceed 100 A and modest impedance can give rise to voltage spikes and discharges. During the last two runs, difficulties arose from rf seals at the 'flex flanges' in the HER. High temperatures were seen and the seals turned out to be severely damaged by discharges. In the LER, the horizontal stripline kickers of the bunch-by-bunch feedback system experiences breakdown at high bunch current-Macor pins installed for mechanical stability turned out to be a weak spot causing discharges. Finally, in the HER an experiment to shorten the ion-clearing gap in the beam revealed signs of ion-induced instability indicating that the HER has been operating quite close to the stability limit. The effects shown here are relevant to future high-intensity electron and positron rings like SuperB and PEP-X.

  14. Atomic physics and synchrotron radiation: The production and accumulation of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.M.; Meron, M.; Agagu, A.; Jones, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation can be used to produce highly-charged ions, and to study photoexcitation and photoionization for ions of virtually any element in the periodic table. To date, with few exceptions, atomic physics studies have been limited to rare gases and a few metal vapors, and to photoexcitation energies in the VUV region of the electromagnetic spectrum. These limitations can now be overcome using photons produced by high-brightness synchrotron storage rings, such as the x-ray ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven. Furthermore, calculations indicate that irradiation of an ion trap with an intense energetic photon beam will result in a viable source of highly-charged ions that can be given the name PHOBIS: the PHOton Beam Ion Source. Promising results, which encourage the wider systematic use of synchrotron radiation in atomic physics research, have been obtained in recent experiments on VUV photoemission and the production and storage of multiply-charged ions. 26 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Operational Studies of the 10 keV Electron Storage Ring UMER

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, S.; Sutter, D.; Cornacchia, M.; Beaudoin, B.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Reiser, M.; Wu, C.; O'Shea, P. G.

    2009-01-22

    The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) is now operational. UMER can operate with currents from 0.6 mA to 100 mA, ranging from the emittance dominated to the heavily space charge dominated regimes. Multiple turns have been achieved at all operating currents, from 250 turns at 0.6 mA to about 12 turns at 100 mA, but not yet optimized for operation above 25 mA. Machine development in the past year has been on understanding the single particle behavior in order to establish a strong basis for studying the effects of space charge. The effect of the earth's field has been studied and compensation implemented. Basic machine parameters such as the tune, equilibrium orbit, chromaticity and dispersion have been measured over a range of currents. We report here on these measurements and corresponding simulations.

  16. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G.; Singh, P.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  17. Wakefields in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, Brant E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; Dallin, L.; May, Tim E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, Ward A.; Warnock, Robert L.; Bizzozero, D. A.; Kramer, S.; Michaelian, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    When the electron bunches in a storage ring are sufficiently short the electrons act coherently producing radiation several orders of magnitude more intense than normal synchrotron radiation. This is referred to as Coherent Syncrotron Radiation (CSR). Due to the potential of CSR to provide a good source of Terahertz radiation for our users, the Canadian Light Source (CLS) has been researching the production and application of CSR. CSR has been produced at the CLS for many years, and has been used for a number of applications. However, resonances that permeate the spectrum at wavenumber intervals of 0.074 cm-1, and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup, have hampered some experiments. Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by rf diodes. These results are consistent with observations made by the interferometer in the THz range. Also discussed will be some practical examples of the application of CSR for the study of condensed phase samples using both transmission and Photoacoustic techniques.

  18. Real world issues for the new soft x-ray synchrotron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, B.M.

    1991-05-01

    A new generation of synchrotron radiation light sources covering the VUV, soft x-ray and hard x-ray spectral regions is under construction in several countries. They are designed specifically to use periodic magnetic undulators and low-emittance electron or positron beams to produce high-brightness near-diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation beams. An introduction to the properties of undulator radiation is followed by a discussion of some of the challenges to be faced at the new facilities. Examples of predicted undulator output from the Advanced Light Source, a third generation 1--2 GeV storage ring optimized for undulator use, are used to highlight differences from present synchrotron radiation sources, including high beam power, partial coherence, harmonics, and other unusual spectral and angular properties of undulator radiation. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Installation of a Synchrotron Radiation Beamline Facility at the J. Bennett Johnston Center. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gooden, R.

    2000-03-21

    The Johnston Center presents a unique opportunity for scientists and engineers at southern institutions to initiate and carry out original research using synchrotron radiation ranging from visible light to hard x-rays. The Science and Engineering Alliance proposes to carry out a comprehensive new synchrotron radiation research initiative at CAMD in carefully phased steps of increasing risks. (1) materials research on existing CAMD beam lines and end stations; (2) design, construction and installation of end stations on existing CAMD beam lines, and research with this new instrumentation; (3) design, construction and operation of dedicated synchrotron radiation beam lines that covers the full spectral range of the CAMD storage ring and expanded research in the new facility.

  20. Development of a tunable UV laser system synchronizing precisely with synchrotron radiation pulses from UVSOR.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, M; Tokeshi, M; Hiraya, A; Mitsuke, K

    1997-01-01

    A mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser is made to oscillate at the frequency of the UVSOR storage ring, 90.115 MHz, in a multi-bunch operation mode. The third harmonic of the laser is available in the wavelength range 243-280 nm. Synchrotron radiation from an undulator is monochromated by a grazing-incidence monochromator and introduced coaxially with the laser. The temporal profile of the photon pulses is monitored in situ by a luminescing substance/photomultiplier combination. The delay timing between the laser and synchrotron radiation can be changed from 0 to 11 ns by adjusting an electronic module that provides phase-locked loop stabilization of the laser pulse. The reliability and feasibility of this laser-synchrotron radiation combination technique are demonstrated by applying pump-probe experiments to two physical systems. The first system is photodissociation of iodomethane (CHA) with a laser photon, followed by photoionization of I and CH3 fragments with synchrotron radiation. The second, two-photon ionization of He atoms, is studied as the prototype of a time-resolved experiment. The He+ signal counts as a function of the laser-synchrotron radiation delay are found to be enhanced in a narrow time window, which can be interpreted in terms of a short lifetime of the resonant state, He*(1s2p 1P), produced by primary synchrotron radiation excitation.

  1. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's outer Van Allen belt.

    PubMed

    Baker, D N; Kanekal, S G; Hoxie, V C; Henderson, M G; Li, X; Spence, H E; Elkington, S R; Friedel, R H W; Goldstein, J; Hudson, M K; Reeves, G D; Thorne, R M; Kletzing, C A; Claudepierre, S G

    2013-04-12

    Since their discovery more than 50 years ago, Earth's Van Allen radiation belts have been considered to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is composed predominantly of megaelectron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days, depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. The spatially separated inner zone is composed of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations reveal an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (>2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for more than 4 weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage.

  2. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's Outer Van Allen belt

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; ...

    2013-02-28

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts are thought to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is comprised predominantly of mega-electron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. Thus, the spatially separated inner zone is comprised of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations revealmore » an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (E > 2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for over four weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage.« less

  3. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's Outer Van Allen belt

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, X.; Spence, H. E.; Elkington, S. R.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Goldstein, J.; Hudson, M. K.; Reeves, G. D.; Thorne, R. M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2013-02-28

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts are thought to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is comprised predominantly of mega-electron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. Thus, the spatially separated inner zone is comprised of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations reveal an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (E > 2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for over four weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage.

  4. Lifetimes of C602- and C702- dianions in a storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, S.; Andersen, J. U.; Cederquist, H.; Concina, B.; Echt, O.; Forster, J. S.; Hansen, K.; Huber, B. A.; Hvelplund, P.; Jensen, J.; Liu, B.; Manil, B.; Maunoury, L.; Brøndsted Nielsen, S.; Rangama, J.; Schmidt, H. T.; Zettergren, H.

    2006-01-01

    C602- and C702- dianions have been produced by electrospray of the monoanions and subsequent electron pickup in a Na vapor cell. The dianions were stored in an electrostatic ring and their decay by electron emission was measured up to 1 s after injection. While C702- ions are stable on this time scale, except for a small fraction of the ions which have been excited by gas collisions, most of the C602- ions decay on a millisecond time scale, with a lifetime depending strongly on their internal temperature. The results can be modeled as decay by electron tunneling through a Coulomb barrier, mainly from thermally populated triplet states about 120 meV above a singlet ground state. At times longer than about 100 ms, the absorption of blackbody radiation plays an important role for the decay of initially cold ions. The tunneling rates obtained from the modeling, combined with WKB estimates of the barrier penetration, give a ground-state energy 200±30meV above the energy of the monoanion plus a free electron and a ground-state lifetime of the order of 20 s.

  5. Application of Synchrotron Radiation in the Geological and Environmental Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    A survey of some of the different ways that synchrotrons x-ray beams can be used to study geological materials is presented here. This field developed over a period of about 30 years, and it is clear that the geological community has made major use of the many synchrotrons facilities operating around the world during this time period. This was a time of rapid change in the operational performance of the synchrotrons facilities and this in itself has made it possible for geologists to develop new and more refined types of experiments that have yielded many important results. The advance in experimental techniques has proceeded in parallel with a revolution in computing techniques that has made it possible to cope with the great amount of data accumulated in the experiments. It is reasonable, although risky, to speculate about what might be expected to develop in the field during the next five- to ten-year period. It does seem plausible that the rate of change in the performance of what might now be called conventional x-ray storage rings will slow. There are no new facilities that are superior to the ESRF, ALS, APS, or SPring8 facilities under construction or about to come into operation. Thus, performance increments in the characteristics of the x-ray sources may come through the introduction of specialized devices in existing storage rings. The free electron laser is one example of a developing new technology that should take us into new regions of performance for radiation sources and stimulate new types of experimental applications. It is also likely that major advances will come through the introduction of more sophisticated experimental devices developed for use with the very recently operational undulator or wiggler sources at the newer rings. Improved x-ray optics and x-ray detectors and more powerful computation and high-speed data transmission can bring about more refined experiments and make the synchrotrons facilities more widely available to the

  6. Laser Synchrotron Source (LSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprangle, Philip; Ting, Antonio; Esarey, Eric; Fisher, Amon; Mourou, Gerald

    1993-02-01

    The Laser Synchrotron Source (LSS) utilizes a high peak power or high average power laser to generate within a vacuum chamber a laser beam travelling in one direction to interact with an electron beam traveling in an opposite direction in order to generate high-power x-rays. A ring resonator formed by a plurality of mirrors directs the laser beam in a closed loop to impact with the electron beam to produce x-rays. Concave mirrors in the ring resonator focus the laser beam upon the point where the laser beam interacts with the electron beam to intensify the laser energy at that point. When a Radio Frequency Linear Accelerator (RF linac) is used to produce the electron beam, x-rays having a short pulse length are generated. When a betatron is used as an electron source, x-rays having a long pulse length are generated.

  7. IKNO, a user facility for coherent terahertz and UV synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sannibale, Fernando; Marcelli, Augusto; Innocenzi, Plinio

    2008-04-26

    IKNO (Innovation and KNOwledge) is a proposal for a multi-user facility based on an electron storage ring optimized for the generation of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range, and of broadband incoherent synchrotron radiation (SR) ranging from the IR to the VUV. IKNO can be operated in an ultra-stable CSR mode with photon flux in the terahertz frequency region up to nine orders of magnitude higher than in existing 3rd generation light sources. Simultaneously to the CSR operation, broadband incoherent SR up to VUV frequencies is available at the beamline ports. The main characteristics of the IKNO storage and its performance in terms of CSR and incoherent SR are described in this paper. The proposed location for the infrastructure facility is in Sardinia, Italy.

  8. Observation of Electron Cloud Instabilities and Emittance Dilution at the Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring Test Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtzapple, R. L.; Billing, M. G.; Campbell, R. C.; Dugan, G. F.; Flanagan, J.; McArdle, K. E.; Miller, M. I.; Palmer, M. A.; Ramirez, G. A.; Sonnad, K. G.; Totten, M. M.; Tucker, S. L.; Williams, H. A.

    2016-04-01

    Electron cloud related emittance dilution and instabilities of bunch trains limit the performance of high intensity circular colliders. One of the key goals of the Cornell electron-positron storage ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) research program is to improve our understanding of how the electron cloud alters the dynamics of bunches within the train. Single bunch beam diagnotics have been developed to measure the beam spectra, vertical beam size, two important dynamical effects of beams interacting with the electron cloud, for bunch trains on a turn-by-turn basis. Experiments have been performed at CesrTA to probe the interaction of the electron cloud with stored positron bunch trains. The purpose of these experiments was to characterize the dependence of beam-electron cloud interactions on the machine parameters such as bunch spacing, vertical chromaticity, and bunch current. The beam dynamics of the stored beam, in the presence of the electron cloud, was quantified using: 1) a gated beam position monitor (BPM) and spectrum analyzer to measure the bunch-by-bunch frequency spectrum of the bunch trains; 2) an x-ray beam size monitor to record the bunch-by-bunch, turn-by-turn vertical size of each bunch within the trains. In this paper we report on the observations from these experiments and analyze the effects of the electron cloud on the stability of bunches in a train under many different operational conditions.

  9. Calibration of Fast Fiber-Optic Beam Loss Monitors for the Advanced Photon Source Storage Ring Superconducting Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Dooling, J.; Harkay, K.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Sajaev, V.; Xiao, A.; Vella, Andrea K.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the calibration and use of fast fiber-optic (FO) beam loss monitors (BLMs) in the Advanced Photon Source storage ring (SR). A superconducting undulator prototype (SCU0) has been operating in SR Sector 6 (“ID6”) since the beginning of CY2013, and another undulator SCU1 (a 1.1-m length undulator that is three times the length of SCU0) is scheduled for installation in Sector 1 (“ID1”) in 2015. The SCU0 main coil often quenches during beam dumps. MARS simulations have shown that relatively small beam loss (<1 nC) can lead to temperature excursions sufficient to cause quenchingwhen the SCU0windings are near critical current. To characterize local beam losses, high-purity fused-silica FO cables were installed in ID6 on the SCU0 chamber transitions and in ID1 where SCU1 will be installed. These BLMs aid in the search for operating modes that protect the SCU structures from beam-loss-induced quenching. In this paper, we describe the BLM calibration process that included deliberate beam dumps at locations of BLMs. We also compare beam dump events where SCU0 did and did not quench.

  10. High flux circularly polarized gamma beam factory: coupling a Fabry-Perot optical cavity with an electron storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovska, I.; Cassou, K.; Chiche, R.; Cizeron, R.; Cornebise, P.; Delerue, N.; Jehanno, D.; Labaye, F.; Marie, R.; Martens, A.; Peinaud, Y.; Soskov, V.; Variola, A.; Zomer, F.; Cormier, E.; Lhermite, J.; Dolique, V.; Flaminio, R.; Michel, C.; Pinard, L.; Sassolas, B.; Akagi, T.; Araki, S.; Honda, Y.; Omori, T.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Miyoshi, S.; Takahashi, T.; Yoshitama, H.

    2016-11-01

    We report and discuss high-flux generation of circularly polarized γ-rays by means of Compton scattering. The γ-ray beam results from the collision of an external-cavity-enhanced infrared laser beam and a low emittance relativistic electron beam. By operating a non-planar bow-tie high-finesse optical Fabry-Perot cavity coupled to a storage ring, we have recorded a flux of up to (3.5 ± 0.3) × 108 photons per second with a mean measured energy of 24 MeV. The γ-ray flux has been sustained for several hours. In particular, we were able to measure a record value of up to 400 γ-rays per collision in a full bandwidth. Moreover, the impact of Compton scattering on the electron beam dynamics could be observed resulting in a reduction of the electron beam lifetime correlated to the laser power stored in the Fabry-Perot cavity. We demonstrate that the electron beam lifetime provides an independent and consistent determination of the γ-ray flux. Furthermore, a reduction of the γ-ray flux due to intrabeam scattering has clearly been identified. These results, obtained on an accelerator test facility, warrant potential scaling and revealed both expected and yet unobserved effects. They set the baseline for further scaling of the future Compton sources under development around the world.

  11. Harmonic generation in VUV/x-ray range at the Duke storage ring FEL using electron beam outcoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Burnham, B.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    We suggest using the OK-4 FEL operating in giant pulse mode to generate intracavity optical power at a level of hundreds of megawatts. These levels of power are sufficient to generate harmonics in the electron beam density. The prebunched electron beam then radiates coherently in an additional wiggler which is tuned on a harmonic of the OK-4 wavelength. The electron beam is turned by an achromatic bend into this wiggler, and harmonic radiation propagates with a small angle with respect to the OK-4 optical axis. This radiation will pass around the mirror of the OK-4 optical cavity and can then be utilized. This electron outcoupling scheme was suggested by N.A. Vinokurov as a method of optics independent outcoupling for high power FELs where electron beam bunching is provided in the master oscillator. This scheme is perfectly suited for optics independent harmonic generation. We suggest to operate the OK-4 FEL as a master oscillator in the UV range of 100 to 250 nm where conventional optics are available. This harmonic generation scheme would allow us to cover the VUV and soft X-Ray range with tunable coherent radiation. In this paper we present the possible layout of this system at the Duke storage ring and its expected operating parameters.

  12. PEGASYS/Mark II: A program of internal target physics using the Mark II detector at the PEP storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This document is a proposal to SLAC on behalf of the PEGASYS Collaboration for a program of internal target physics at PEP utilizing the Mark A detector. Having completed its tour of duty at SLC in November 1990, we propose that the Mark A detector be returned to the PEP storage ring, where it will be used in conjunction with a long gas target for studies of QCD with nucleon and nuclear targets, as well as tests of QED in lepton pair production, and a search for new neutral bosons. We expect that the detector in its new configuration could be commissioned by late 1991 and begin taking data by 1992. This document presents the physics to be accomplished with the Mark A, and describes the minimal changes to the detector that we will need to make it function for internal target experiments. We also show a possible timeline for the project, and indicate the makeup of the collaboration that will carry out the work.

  13. Observation of electron cloud instabilities and emittance dilution at the Cornell electron-positron Storage ring Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzapple, R. L.; Billing, M. G.; Campbell, R. C.; Dugan, G. F.; Flanagan, J.; McArdle, K. E.; Miller, M. I.; Palmer, M. A.; Ramirez, G. A.; Sonnad, K. G.; Totten, M. M.; Tucker, S. L.; Williams, H. A.

    2016-04-11

    Electron cloud related emittance dilution and instabilities of bunch trains limit the performance of high intensity circular colliders. One of the key goals of the Cornell electron-positron storage ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) research program is to improve our understanding of how the electron cloud alters the dynamics of bunches within the train. Single bunch beam diagnostics have been developed to measure the beam spectra, vertical beam size, two important dynamical effects of beams interacting with the electron cloud, for bunch trains on a turn-by-turn basis. Experiments have been performed at CesrTA to probe the interaction of the electron cloud with stored positron bunch trains. The purpose of these experiments was to characterize the dependence of beam-electron cloud interactions on the machine parameters such as bunch spacing, vertical chromaticity, and bunch current. The beam dynamics of the stored beam, in the presence of the electron cloud, was quantified using: 1) a gated beam position monitor (BPM) and spectrum analyzer to measure the bunch-by-bunch frequency spectrum of the bunch trains, 2) an x-ray beam size monitor to record the bunch-by-bunch, turn-by-turn vertical size of each bunch within the trains. In this study we report on the observations from these experiments and analyze the effects of the electron cloud on the stability of bunches in a train under many different operational conditions.

  14. A Design Report of the Baseline for PEP-X: an Ultra-Low Emittance Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl; Bertsche, Kirk; Cai, Yunhai; Chao, Alex; Corbett, Willian; Fox, John; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Xiaobiao; Huang, Zhirong; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Nosochkov, Yuri; Novokhatski, Sasha; Radedeau, Thomas; Raubenheimer, Tor; Rivetta, Claudio; Safranek, James; Seeman, John; Stohr, Joachim; Stupakov, Gennady; Wang, Lanfa; Wang, Min-Huey; /SLAC

    2010-06-02

    Over the past year, we have worked out a baseline design for PEP-X, as an ultra-low emittance storage ring that could reside in the existing 2.2-km PEPII tunnel. The design features a hybrid lattice with double bend achromat (DBA) cells in two arcs and theoretical minimum emittance (TME) cells in the remaining four arcs. Damping wigglers are used to reduce the horizontal emittance to 86 pm-rad at zero current for a 4.5 GeV electron beam. At a design current of 1.5 A, the horizontal emittance increases, due to intrabeam scattering, to 164 pm-rad when the vertical emittance is maintained at a diffraction limited 8 pm-rad. The baseline design will produce photon beams achieving a brightness of 10{sup 22} (ph/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW) at 10 keV in a 3.5-m conventional planar undulator. Our study shows that an optimized lattice has adequate dynamic aperture, while accommodating a conventional off-axis injection system. In this report, we present the results of study, including the lattice properties, nonlinear dynamics, intra-beam scattering and Touschek lifetime, RF system, and collective instabilities. Finally, we discuss the possibility of partial lasing at soft X-ray wavelengths using a long undulator in a straight section.

  15. Observation of electron cloud instabilities and emittance dilution at the Cornell electron-positron Storage ring Test Accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Holtzapple, R. L.; Billing, M. G.; Campbell, R. C.; ...

    2016-04-11

    Electron cloud related emittance dilution and instabilities of bunch trains limit the performance of high intensity circular colliders. One of the key goals of the Cornell electron-positron storage ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) research program is to improve our understanding of how the electron cloud alters the dynamics of bunches within the train. Single bunch beam diagnostics have been developed to measure the beam spectra, vertical beam size, two important dynamical effects of beams interacting with the electron cloud, for bunch trains on a turn-by-turn basis. Experiments have been performed at CesrTA to probe the interaction of the electron cloud withmore » stored positron bunch trains. The purpose of these experiments was to characterize the dependence of beam-electron cloud interactions on the machine parameters such as bunch spacing, vertical chromaticity, and bunch current. The beam dynamics of the stored beam, in the presence of the electron cloud, was quantified using: 1) a gated beam position monitor (BPM) and spectrum analyzer to measure the bunch-by-bunch frequency spectrum of the bunch trains, 2) an x-ray beam size monitor to record the bunch-by-bunch, turn-by-turn vertical size of each bunch within the trains. In this study we report on the observations from these experiments and analyze the effects of the electron cloud on the stability of bunches in a train under many different operational conditions.« less

  16. High flux circularly polarized gamma beam factory: coupling a Fabry-Perot optical cavity with an electron storage ring

    PubMed Central

    Chaikovska, I.; Cassou, K.; Chiche, R.; Cizeron, R.; Cornebise, P.; Delerue, N.; Jehanno, D.; Labaye, F.; Marie, R.; Martens, A.; Peinaud, Y.; Soskov, V.; Variola, A.; Zomer, F.; Cormier, E.; Lhermite, J.; Dolique, V.; Flaminio, R.; Michel, C.; Pinard, L.; Sassolas, B.; Akagi, T.; Araki, S.; Honda, Y.; Omori, T.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Miyoshi, S.; Takahashi, T.; Yoshitama, H.

    2016-01-01

    We report and discuss high-flux generation of circularly polarized γ-rays by means of Compton scattering. The γ-ray beam results from the collision of an external-cavity-enhanced infrared laser beam and a low emittance relativistic electron beam. By operating a non-planar bow-tie high-finesse optical Fabry-Perot cavity coupled to a storage ring, we have recorded a flux of up to (3.5 ± 0.3) × 108 photons per second with a mean measured energy of 24 MeV. The γ-ray flux has been sustained for several hours. In particular, we were able to measure a record value of up to 400 γ-rays per collision in a full bandwidth. Moreover, the impact of Compton scattering on the electron beam dynamics could be observed resulting in a reduction of the electron beam lifetime correlated to the laser power stored in the Fabry-Perot cavity. We demonstrate that the electron beam lifetime provides an independent and consistent determination of the γ-ray flux. Furthermore, a reduction of the γ-ray flux due to intrabeam scattering has clearly been identified. These results, obtained on an accelerator test facility, warrant potential scaling and revealed both expected and yet unobserved effects. They set the baseline for further scaling of the future Compton sources under development around the world. PMID:27857146

  17. Analysis and design of a high-current, high-voltage accurate power supply for the APS storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fathizadeh, M.

    1993-08-01

    There are 81 dipole magnets contained in the storage ring at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). These magnets are connected in series and are energized by only one 12-phase power supply. The eighty-first magnet is located in a temperature-controlled room with an NMR probe to monitor the magnetic field in the magnet and provide a reference signal for correction of the field drift due to aging of the components. The current in the magnets will be held at 497 A. The required current stability of the power supply is {plus_minus}30 ppM, the current reproducibility is {plus_minus}50 ppM, and the current ripple is {plus_minus}400 ppM. The voltage required to maintain such a current in the magnets is about 1700 V. Different schemes for regulating current in the magnets are studied. Pspice software is used to simulate the behavior and the design of such a power supply under different conditions. The pros and cons of each scheme will be given and the proper power and regulating scheme will be selected.

  18. Proceedings of the workshop on LAMPF II synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    Topics covered at the workshop include: considerations for a staged approach to synchrotron construction; consideration of energy and cost for a kaon and/or antiproton factory; changing the transition energy in the main ring for the Fermilab antiproton beam; a lattice with 50% undispersed straight sections; bunch width considerations in a stretcher ring; a self-consistent longitudinal distribution; rapid-cycling tuned rf cavity for synchrotron use; considerations on a high-shunt impedance tunable RF cavity; rotating condensers; low extraction from the stretcher ring; an antiproton source for LAMPF II; synchrotron magnet circuit; power supply and ring magnet options; and notes for a kaon factory design. (GHT)

  19. Hard X-ray Sources for the Mexican Synchrotron Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Herrera, Juan

    2016-10-01

    One of the principal tasks for the design of the Mexican synchrotron was to define the storage ring energy. The main criteria for choosing the energy come from studying the electromagnetic spectrum that can be obtained from the synchrotron, because the energy range of the spectrum that can be obtained will determine the applications available to the users of the future light source. Since there is a public demand of hard X-rays for the experiments in the synchrotron community users from Mexico, in this work we studied the emission spectra from some hard X-ray sources which could be the best options for the parameters of the present Mexican synchrotron design. The calculations of the flux and the brightness for one Bending Magnet and four Insertion Devices are presented; specifically, for a Superconducting Bending Magnet (SBM), a Superconducting Wiggler (SCW), an In Vacuum Short Period Undulator (IV-SPU), a Superconducting Undulator (SCU) and for a Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU). Two commonly available synchrotron radiation programs were used for the computation (XOP and SRW). From the results, it can be concluded that the particle beam energy from the current design is enough to have one or more sources of hard X-rays. Furthermore, a wide range of hard X-ray region can be covered by the analyzed sources, and the choice of each type should be based on the specific characteristics of the X-ray beam to perform the experiments at the involved beamline. This work was done within the project Fomix Conacyt-Morelos ”Plan Estrategico para la construccion y operación de un Sincrotron en Morelos” (224392).

  20. Systematic Vibration Studies on a Cryogen-Free ^3He/^4He Dilution Refrigerator for X-ray Spectroscopy at Storage Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, P. A.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.

    2016-08-01

    High-precision X-ray spectroscopy of highly charged ions at storage rings provides a sensitive test of quantum electrodynamics in strong Coulomb fields. To increase the precision of such experiments, silicon microcalorimeters have already been applied successfully. To minimize the interruption of beam times due to maintenance, a new cryogen-free ^3He/^4He dilution refrigerator has been designed and is under commissioning. However, in cryogen-free systems microphonic noise due to vibrations contributes considerably to the overall noise and may limit the detector energy resolution. Therefore, we report on systematic vibration studies on a cryogen-free ^3He/^4He dilution refrigerator which is specially adapted for experiments at storage rings.

  1. Five-membered rings as diazo components in optical data storage devices: an ab initio investigation of the lowest singlet excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åstrand, Per-Olof; Sommer-Larsen, Peter; Hvilsted, Søren; Ramanujam, P. S.; Bak, Keld L.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2000-07-01

    The two lowest singlet excitation energies of 18 azo dyes have been studied by ab initio quantum-chemical methods within the second-order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA). Various combinations of five-membered rings (furan, thiophene, pyrrole, oxazole, thiazole, and imidazole) have been investigated as diazo components for a potential use in optical data storage materials. It is found that the diazo compounds with two heterocyclic five-membered rings have π→π ∗ excitation energies corresponding to laser wavelengths in the region 450-500 nm whereas one five-membered ring and a phenyl group as diazo components results in wavelengths in the region 400-435 nm.

  2. Application of the Green's function method to some nonlinear problems of an electron storage ring. Part III. Beam-size enhancement due to the presence of nonlinear magnets in a ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.

    1983-01-01

    A perturbation method which allows one to find the distribution function and the beam size for a broad class of storage ring nonlinear problems is described in Part I of this work. In present note I apply this method to a particular problem. Namely, I want to evaluate an enhancement of the vertical beam size of a bunch due to the presence of the ring of nonlinear magnetic fields. The main part of the work deals with sextupole magnets. Formula for the beam size in the presence of octupole fields are also developed to the first order in the octupole strength, although octupole magnets are not widely used in present storage ring designs. This calculation is done mainly because the octupole field has the same symmetry as the beam-beam force for the head-on collision. This will give us the opportunity to compare the conduct of the bunch due to this two types of nonlinear kicks. The general terms of the applicability of the Green's function method is discussed in the first part of this work.

  3. The Possibility of Polarisation in the LHeC Ring-Ring Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, D.P.; Wienands, H.U.; Fitterer, M.; Burkhardt, H.; /CERN

    2012-05-08

    A proposal to add 60-GeV electron and positron beams to the LHC at CERN (LHeC) is currently being prepared. The provision of electron and positron longitudinal polarisation is an important component of the proposal and we are examining the feasibility of Sokolov-Ternov self-polarisation at energies up to 60 GeV in a storage ring in the LHC tunnel. But at this energy the attainable polarisation can be very strongly limited by depolarising effects. This paper summarises first calculations of the attainable polarisation including estimates of the efficacy of Siberian Snakes for weakening synchrotron sideband resonances.

  4. Microtomography using synchrotron radiation at DESY: current status and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Felix; Donath, Tilman; Dose, Thomas; Lippmann, Thomas; Martins, Rene V.; Metge, Joachim; Schreyer, Andreas

    2004-10-01

    The X-ray microtomography system which is operated at the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB of the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY in Hamburg, Germany, is presented. At the DORIS storage ring synchrotron radiation at the wiggler beamlines BW2, W2, and BW5 was used to run the microtomography apparatus as a user experiment. The development of tomography scanning techniques to investigate samples which are larger than the field of view of the X-ray detector is demonstrated for dental implants using the photon energy of 90 keV at the high energy beamline BW5. In cooperation with DESY the GKSS Research Center is setting up the high energy beamline HARWI-2 at the DORIS storage ring of DESY. This beamline will allow for tomography experiments using monochromatic X-rays from 20 to 200 keV with a beam size of 70×10 mm2. Furthermore the GKSS is operating a neutron radiography facility GENRA at the research reactor Geesthacht FRG, Geesthacht, Germany. It is intended to extend this facility by a tomography station. The combination of synchrotron radiation based microtomography with neutron tomography will allow for the development of new techniques to give new insight in the 3-dim. behavior of samples especially in materials science.

  5. Longitudinal bunch dynamics study with coherent synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, B. E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; May, T. E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, W. A.

    2016-02-01

    An electron bunch circulating in a storage ring constitutes a dynamical system with both longitudinal and transverse degrees of freedom. Through a self-interaction with the wakefields created by the bunch, certain of these degrees may get excited, defining a set of eigenmodes analogous to a spectroscopic series. The present study focuses on the longitudinal modes of a single bunch. The excitation of a mode appears as an amplitude modulation at the mode frequency of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by the bunch. The modulations are superimposed on a much larger continuum from CSR emission in the continuous mode. A given eigenmode is classified by the integer m which is the ratio of the mode frequency to the synchrotron frequency. The present measurements extend up to m =8 and focus on the region near the instability thresholds. At threshold the modes are excited sequentially, resembling a staircase when the mode frequencies are plotted as a function of bunch length or synchrotron frequency. Adjacent modes are observed to coexist at the boundaries between the modes. An energy-independent correlation is observed between the threshold current for an instability and the corresponding zero-current bunch length. Measurements were made at five beam energies between 1.0 and 2.9 GeV at the Canadian Light Source. The CSR was measured in the time domain using an unbiased Schottky diode spanning 50-75 GHz.

  6. Time-resolved synchrotron radiation excited optical luminescence: light-emission properties of silicon-based nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sham, Tsun-Kong; Rosenberg, Richard A

    2007-12-21

    The recent advances in the study of light emission from matter induced by synchrotron radiation: X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) in the energy domain and time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence (TRXEOL) are described. The development of these element (absorption edge) selective, synchrotron X-ray photons in, optical photons out techniques with time gating coincide with advances in third-generation, insertion device based, synchrotron light sources. Electron bunches circulating in a storage ring emit very bright, widely energy tunable, short light pulses (<100 ps), which are used as the excitation source for investigation of light-emitting materials. Luminescence from silicon nanostructures (porous silicon, silicon nanowires, and Si-CdSe heterostructures) is used to illustrate the applicability of these techniques and their great potential in future applications.

  7. Spatial Coherence of Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, S; Coisson, R

    2003-10-30

    Synchrotron Radiation (SR) has been widely used since the 80's as a tool for many applications of UV, soft X rays and hard X rays in condensed matter physics, chemistry and biology. The evolution of SR sources towards higher brightness has led to the design of low-emittance electron storage rings (emittance is the product of beam size and divergence), and the development of special source magnetic structures, as undulators. This means that more and more photons are available on a narrow bandwidth and on a small collimated beam; in other words there is the possibility of getting a high power in a coherent beam. In most applications, a monochromator is used, and the temporal coherence of the light is given by the monochromator bandwidth. With smaller and smaller sources, even without the use of collimators, the spatial coherence of the light has become appreciable, first in the UV and soft X ray range, and then also with hard X rays. This has made possible new or improved experiments in interferometry, microscopy, holography, correlation spectroscopy, etc. In view of these recent possibilities and applications, it is useful to review some basic concepts about spatial coherence of SR, and its measurement and applications. In particular we show how the spatial coherence properties of the radiation in the far field can be calculated with simple operations from the single-electron amplitude and the electron beam angular and position spreads. The gaussian approximation will be studied in detail for a discussion of the properties of the far field mutual coherence and the estimate of the coherence widths, and the comparison with the VanCittert-Zernike limit.

  8. A new synchrotron light source at Louisiana State University's Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockbauer, Roger L.; Ajmera, Pratul; Poliakoff, Erwin D.; Craft, Ben C.; Saile, Volker

    1990-05-01

    A 1.2-GeV synchrotron light source is being constructed at the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) at Louisiana State University. The expressed purpose of the center, which has been funded by a grant from the US Department of Energy, is to develop X-ray lithography techniques for manufacturing microcircuits, although basic science programs are also being established. The storage ring will be optimized for the soft-X-ray region and will be the first commercially manufactured electron storage ring in the United States. The magnetic lattice is based on a design developed by Chasman and Green and will allow up to three insertion devices to be installed for higher-energy and higher-intensity radiation. In addition to the lithography effort, experimental programs are being established in physics, chemistry, and related areas.

  9. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J.

    1996-05-01

    This report discusses research conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in the following areas: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy, and tomography; nuclear physics; scattering and crystallography studies of biological materials; time resolved spectroscopy; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; the 1995 NSLS annual users` meeting; 17th international free electron laser conference; micro bunches workshop; VUV machine; VUV storage ring parameters; beamline technical improvements; x-ray beamlines; x-ray storage ring parameters; the NSLS source development laboratory; the accelerator test facility (ATF); NSLS facility improvements; NSLS advisory committees; NSLS staff; VUV beamline guide; and x-ray beamline guide.

  10. Experimental Calibration of VUV Ring Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranek, J.; Kramer, S. L.

    1997-05-01

    The individual quadrupole gradients, undulator focusing, beam position monitor (BPM) gains, and orbit steering magnet calibrations in the NSLS VUV Ring were determined by analyzing the measured orbit response matrix with the computer code LOCO (J. Safranek, Beam-based Modeling and Control of Storage Rings, these proceedings.). The measured orbit response matrix is the change in orbit at the BPMs with changes in steering magnet excitation. The analysis showed beta function distortions of 25 and 35 percent horizontally and vertically. The design periodicity of the optics was restored by adjusting the quadrupole gradients to restore the periodicity of the response matrix. This lead to an increase of about 18 percent in the beam lifetime at 500 mA with a slight (3 and 7 percent) decrease in both the horizontal and vertical electron emittances as determined from the beam sizes measured using a synchrotron light monitor.

  11. Conceptual Design of an Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, Stephen

    2006-10-24

    The Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility (AGSF) creates copious quantities of antiprotons, for bottling and transportation to remote cancer therapy centers. The first step in the generation and storage process is to accelerate an intense proton beam down the Main Linac for injection into the Main Ring, which is a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron that accelerates the protons to high energy. The beam is then extracted from the ring into a transfer line and into a Proton Target. Immediately downstream of the target is an Antiproton Collector that captures some of the antiprotons and focuses them into a beam that is transported sequentially into two antiproton rings. The Precooler ring rapidly manipulates antiproton bunches from short and broad (in momentum) to long and thin. It then performs some preliminary beam cooling, in the fraction of a second before the next proton bunch is extracted from the Main Ring. Pre-cooled antiprotons are passed on to the Accumulator ring before the next antiprotons arrive from the target. The Accumulator ring cools the antiprotons, compressing them into a dense state that is convenient for mass storage over many hours. Occasionally the Accumulator ring decelerates a large number of antiprotons, injecting them into a Deceleration Linac that passes them into a waiting Penning trap.

  12. Partial coherence and imperfect optics at a synchrotron radiation source modeled by wavefront propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundy, David; Alcock, Simon G.; Alianelli, Lucia; Sutter, John P.; Sawhney, Kawal J. S.; Chubar, Oleg

    2014-09-01

    A full wave propagation of X-rays from source to sample at a storage ring beamline requires simulation of the electron beam source and optical elements in the beamline. The finite emittance source causes the appearance of partial coherence in the wave field. Consequently, the wavefront cannot be treated exactly with fully coherent wave propagation or fully incoherent ray tracing. We have used the wavefront code Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) to perform partially coherent wavefront propagation using a parallel computing cluster at the Diamond Light Source. Measured mirror profiles have been used to correct the wavefront for surface errors.

  13. SYNCH: A program for design and analysis of synchrotrons and beamlines -- user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.A.; Kenney, A.S.; Courant, E.D.; Russell, A.D.; Syphers, M.J.

    1993-12-31

    SYNCH is a computer program for use in the design and analysis of synchrotrons, storage rings, and beamlines. It has a large repertoire of commands that can be accessed in a flexible way. The input statements and the results of the calculations they invoke are saved in an internal database so that this information may be shared by other statements. SYNCH is the first accelerator program to organize its input in the form of a language. The statements, which resemble sentences, provide a natural way of describing lattices and invoking relevant calculations. The organization of the program is modular, so that it has been possible to expand its capabilities progressively.

  14. Improvements of the TROLL-2 synchrotron and new developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anevsky, S. I.; Vernyi, A. E.; Panasyuk, V. S.; Khromchenko, V. B.

    1991-10-01

    Information on radical improvements of the TROLL-2 synchrotron, a specialized pulsed synchrotron radiation source, is presented in this article. Two new variants for particle injection from a solid electromagnet to a ring one, as a specialized continuous synchrotron radiation source are considered. Particle pre-acceleration from thermal velocities to injection energy herewith may take place both in the synchronous and in the isochrone regime.

  15. Design and Fabrication of Safety Shutter for Indus-2 Synchrotron Front-ends

    SciTech Connect

    Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Dhamgaye, V.; Kumar, A.; Deb, S. K.

    2010-06-23

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of safety shutter for the Indus-2 synchrotron source on bending magnet front-ends. The purpose of the safety shutter is to absorb Bremsstrahlung radiation generated due to scattering of electron beam from residual gas ions and components of the storage ring. The safety shutter consists of a radiation absorber actuated inside a rectangular ultra high vacuum chamber by pneumatic actuator. A water-cooled copper block is mounted before the absorber block to protect it from the incident heat load due to synchrotron radiation. The top flanges of the chamber are made with rectangular knife edge sealing which is found to be better than wire seal at higher temperature. The physics aspect of safety shutter is designed using simulation code Electron Gamma Shower EGS-4 code.

  16. A program in detector development for the US synchrotron radiation community

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.; Mills, D.; Naday, S.; Gruner, S.; Siddons, P.; Arthur, J.; Wehlitz, R.; Padmore, H.

    2001-07-14

    There is a clear gulf between the capabilities of modern synchrotrons to deliver high photon fluxes, and the capabilities of detectors to measure the resulting photon, electron or ion signals. While a huge investment has been made in storage ring technology, there has not to date been a commensurate investment in detector systems. With appropriate detector technology, gains in data rates could be 3 to 4 orders of magnitude in some cases. The US community working in detector technology is under-funded and fragmented and works without the long term funding commitment required for development of the most advanced detector systems. It is becoming apparent that the US is falling behind its international competitors in provision of state-of-the-art detector technology for cutting edge synchrotron radiation based experiments.

  17. Control system features of the argonne 6 GeV synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, M.; Gunderson, G.; Lenkszus, F.; McDowell, W.

    1985-10-01

    The Argonne 6 GeV synchrotron light source design consists of an electron/positron linac, a fast-cycling 6 GeV synchrotron, and the storage ring itself. The design attributes are presented elsewhere in this conference. Three aspects of the overall design call for special attention in the control system design: First, the operation of a high energy positron accelerator in a fast cycling mode may demand high processing performance and high data throughput rates. Second, the high energy and small beam size projected (100 x 200 microns) will call for high resolution data processing and control precision in many areas. Finally, the necessity to provide independent, orthogonal control for each of up to 32 insertion device light beams both from the point of view of the experimental requirements and from the need to remove the effects of component vibration will require dedicated, high performance processors.

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source users manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beam lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.; White-DePace, S.M.

    1987-08-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source in the years to come will be based, in large part, on the size of the users community and the diversity of the scientific disciplines represented by these users. In order to promote this philosophy, this National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Users Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beam Lines, has been published. This manual serves a number of purposes. In an effort to attract new research, it will present to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture and capabilities of the various VUV and x-ray beam lines and storage rings. We anticipate that this publication will be updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes at the NSLS.

  19. Mirror and grating surface figure requirements for grazing incidence synchrotron radiation beamlines: Power loading effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, S.L.; Sharma, S.

    1987-01-01

    At present, grazing incidence mirrors are used almost exclusively as the first optical element in VUV and soft x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. The performance of these mirrors is determined by thermal and mechanical stress-induced figure errors as well as by figure errors remaining from the grinding and polishing process. With the advent of VUV and soft x-ray undulators and wigglers has come a new set of thermal stress problems related to both the magnitude and the spatial distribution of power from these devices. In many cases the power load on the entrance slits and gratings in these beamlines is no longer negligible. The dependence of thermally-induced front-end mirror figure errors on various storage ring and insertion device parameters (especially those at the National Synchrotron Light Source) and the effects of these figure errors on two classes of soft x-ray beamlines are presented.

  20. The structure study of thin semiconductor and dielectric films by diffraction of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurjev, G. S.; Fainer, N. I.; Maximovskiy, E. A.; Kosinova, M. L.; Sheromov, M. A.; Rumyantsev, Yu. M.

    1998-02-01

    The structure of semiconductor and dielectric thin (100-300 nm) films was studied by diffraction of synchrotron radiation. The diffraction experiments were performed at both the station "Anomalous scattering" of the storage ring synchrotron facility VEPP-3 and DRON-4 diffractometer. The structure of CdS thin films grown on fused silica, single Si(100) and InP(100) substrates was investigated. The structure of Cu 2S thin films grown on fused silica, single Si(100) substrates and CdS/Si(100)-heterostructure was studied. The structure study was performed on Si 3N 4 films grown on GaAs(100) substrates. The structure of thin BN layers grown on single Si(100) substrates was studied. It was established that structural parameters of above-mentioned thin films coincide on the parameters of JCPDS International Centre for Diffraction Data.

  1. On-line control of the nonlinear dynamics for synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, J.; Martin, I. P. S.; Rowland, J. H.; Bartolini, R.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a simple approach to the on-line control of the nonlinear dynamics in storage rings, based on compensation of the nonlinear resonance driving terms using beam losses as the main indicator of the strength of a resonance. The correction scheme is built on the analysis of the resonance driving terms in first perturbative order and on the possibility of using independent power supplies in the sextupole magnets, which is nowadays present in many synchrotron light sources. Such freedom allows the definition of "smart sextupole knobs" attacking each resonance separately. The compensation scheme has been tested at the Diamond light source and proved to be effective in opening up the betatron tune space, resonance free, available to the electron beam and to improve the beam lifetime.

  2. Experiments in atomic and applied physics using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    A diverse program in atomic and applied physics using x rays produced at the X-26 beam line at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source is in progress. The atomic physics program studies the properties of multiply-ionized atoms using the x rays for photo-excitation and ionization of neutral atoms and ion beams. The applied physics program builds on the techniques and results of the atomic physics work to develop new analytical techniques for elemental and chemical characterization of materials. The results are then used for a general experimental program in biomedical sciences, geo- and cosmochemistry, and materials sciences. The present status of the program is illustrated by describing selected experiments. Prospects for development of new experimental capabilities are discussed in terms of a heavy ion storage ring for atomic physics experiments and the feasibility of photoelectron microscopy for high spatial resolution analytical work. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Analysis of coupled-bunch instabilities for the NSLS-II storage ring with a 500 MHz 7-cell PETRA-III cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, G.; Blednykh, A.; Cheng, W.; Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Teytelman, D.

    2016-02-01

    The NSLS-II storage ring is designed to operate with superconducting RF-cavities with the aim to store an average current of 500 mA distributed in 1080 bunches, with a gap in the uniform filling for ion clearing. At the early stage of the commissioning (phase 1), characterized by a bare lattice without damping wigglers and without Landau cavities, a normal conducting 7-cell PETRA-III RF-cavity structure has been installed with the goal to store an average current of 25 mA. In this paper we discuss our analysis of coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the Higher Order Modes (HOMs) of the 7-cell PETRA-III RF-cavity. As a cure of the instabilities, we apply a well-known scheme based on a proper detuning of the HOMs frequencies based upon cavity temperature change, and the use of the beneficial effect of the slow head-tail damping at positive chromaticity to increase the transverse coupled-bunch instability thresholds. In addition, we discuss measurements of coupled-bunch instabilities observed during the phase 1 commissioning of the NSLS-II storage ring. In our analysis we rely, in the longitudinal case, on the theory of coupled-bunch instability for uniform fillings, while in the transverse case we complement our studies with numerical simulations with OASIS, a novel parallel particle tracking code for self-consistent simulations of collective effects driven by short and long-range wakefields.

  4. Analysis of coupled-bunch instabilities for the NSLS-II storage ring with a 500MHz 7-cell PETRA-III cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, G.; Blednykh, A.; Cheng, W.; Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Teytelman, D.

    2015-12-11

    We present the NSLS-II storage ring that is designed to operate with superconducting RF-cavities with the aim to store an average current of 500 mA distributed in 1080 bunches, with a gap in the uniform filling for ion clearing. At the early stage of the commissioning (phase 1), characterized by a bare lattice without damping wigglers and without Landau cavities, a normal conducting 7-cell PETRA-III RF-cavity structure has been installed with the goal to store an average current of 25 mA. In this paper we discuss our analysis of coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the Higher Order Modes (HOMs) of the 7-cell PETRA-III RF-cavity. As a cure of the instabilities, we apply a well-known scheme based on a proper detuning of the HOMs frequencies based upon cavity temperature change, and the use of the beneficial effect of the slow head–tail damping at positive chromaticity to increase the transverse coupled-bunch instability thresholds. In addition, we discuss measurements of coupled-bunch instabilities observed during the phase 1 commissioning of the NSLS-II storage ring. In our analysis we rely, in the longitudinal case, on the theory of coupled-bunch instability for uniform fillings, while in the transverse case we complement our studies with numerical simulations with OASIS, a novel parallel particle tracking code for self-consistent simulations of collective effects driven by short and long-range wakefields.

  5. X-ray grating interferometer for imaging at a second-generation synchrotron radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzen, Julia; Beckmann, Felix; Donath, Tilman; Ogurreck, Malte; David, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Mohr, Jürgen; Reznikova, Elena; Riekehr, Stefan; Haibel, Astrid; Schulz, Georg; Müller, Bert; Schreyer, Andreas

    2010-09-01

    X-ray phase-contrast radiography and tomography enables to increase contrast for weakly absorbing materials. Recently, x-ray grating interferometers were developed which extend the possibility of phase-contrast imaging from highly brilliant radiation sources like third-generation synchrotron even to non-coherent sources. Here, we present a setup of an x-ray grating interferometer designed and installed at low-coherence wiggler source at the GKSS beamline W2 (HARWI II) operated at the second-generation synchrotron storage ring DORIS at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY, Hamburg, Germany). The beamline is dedicated to imaging in materials science. Equipped with the grating interferometer, it is the first synchrotron radiation beamline with a three-grating setup combining the advantages of phase-contrast imaging with monochromatic radiation with very high flux and a sufficiently large field of view for centimeter sized objects. Examples of radiography on laser-welded aluminum and magnesium joints are presented to demonstrate the high potential of the new gratingbased setup in the field of materials science. In addition, the results of an off-axis phase-contrast tomography of a human urethra with 15 mm in diameter are presented showing internal structures, which cannot be resolved by the conventional tomography in absorption mode.

  6. Conceptual design of the Argonne 6-GeV synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Crosbie, E.; Khoe, T.; Knott, M.; Kramer, S.; Kustom, R.; Lari, R.; Martin, R.; Mavrogenes, G.; Moenich, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory Synchrotron Light Source Storage Ring is designed to have a natural emittance of 6.5 x 10/sup -9/ m for circulating 6-GeV positrons. Thirty of the 32 long straight sections, each 6.5-m long, will be available for synchrotron light insertion devices. A circulating positron current of 300 mA can be injected in about 8 min. from a booster synchrotron operating with a repetition time of 1.2 sec. The booster synchrotron will contain two different rf systems. The lower frequency system (38.97 MHz) will accept positrons from a 360-MeV linac and will accelerate them to 2.25 GeV. The higher frequency system (350.76 MHz) will accelerate the positrons to 6 GeV. The positrons will be produced from a 300-MeV electron beam on a tungsten target. A conceptual layout is shown. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Development of highly reliable synchrotron radiation lithography beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, K.; Fujii, K.; Kawase, Y.; Nagano, M.

    1988-01-01

    The reliable beamline structure for synchrotron radiation lithography has been investigated using the Photon Factory storage ring (2.5 GeV). The recently built beamline aims at attaining system reliability and safety. This beamline, one of three branch lines split from a basic beamline, is a 10/sup -7/ Pa ultrahigh-vacuum system with an oscillating mirror. In addition to a 40 ms fast closing valve (FCV) and an acoustic delay line (ADL), installed in the basic beamline, a <15 ms FCV and 40 ms ADL were set up to protect the storage ring from accidental breakdown. The FCV and ADL were placed far upstream of the oscillating mirror, to cope with accidental gas leakage caused by the oscillating mechanism. A vacuum breakdown test demonstrated that the FCV and ADL are greatly effective in vacuum protection. In order to protect operators from x-ray exposure, two auxiliary shutters made of tantalum were placed upstream of the oscillating mirror. The oscillating mirror, driven through bellows by a combination of a direct current servomotor and a cam mechanism, enabled a highly reliable oscillation. A double-structured bellows was adopted to provide against gas leakage. In addition, a silicon carbide plane mirror (40 x 17 x 4 cm) was employed because of its high-heat-resistance capability.

  8. METROLOGICAL CHALLENGES OF SYNCHROTRON RADIATION OPTICS.

    SciTech Connect

    SOSTERO,G.

    1999-05-25

    Modern third generation storage rings, require state-of-the-art grazing incidence x-ray optics, in order to monochromate the Synchrotrons Radiation (SR) source photons, and focus them into the experimental stations. Slope error tolerances in the order of 0.5 {micro}Rad RMS, and surface roughness well below 5 {angstrom} RMS, are frequently specified for mirrors and gratings exceeding 300 mm in length. Non-contact scanning instruments were developed, in order to characterize SR optical surfaces, of spherical and aspherical shape. Among these, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP), a double pencil slope measuring interferometer, has proved to be particularly reliable, and was adopted by several SR optics metrology laboratories. The ELETTRA soft x-rays and optics metrology laboratory, has operated an LTP since 1992. We review the basic operating principles of this instrument, and some major instrumental and environmental improvements, that were developed in order to detect slope errors lower than 1 {micro}Rad RMS on optical surfaces up to one metre in length. A comparison among measurements made on the same reference flat, by different interferometers (most of them were LTPs) can give some helpful indications in order to optimize the quality of measurement.

  9. Nonintercepting diagnostics for transverse beam parameters: From rings to ERLs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, Alex H.

    2006-02-01

    The characterization of particle-beam parameters in accelerators and transport lines is important to the experiment's success. The development of nonintercepting (NI) diagnostics is of growing interest in the community due to top-up operations for storage rings such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as the rapidly developing energy recovering linacs (ERLs). In both areas beam position and beam quality are relevant, and the ability to measure these in an NI manner is critical. Beam transverse size and divergence are more of a challenge, and examples of the minimally intercepting or NI measurements based on optical transition radiation (OTR), optical synchrotron radiation (OSR), X-ray synchrotron radiation (XSR), optical diffraction radiation (ODR), and undulator radiation (UR) will be presented as space permits. These are relevant to the various ERL parameter spaces and operating modes.

  10. An Influence of 7.5 T Superconducting Wiggler on Beam Parameters of Siberia-2 Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korchuganov, Vladimir; Mezentsev, Nikolai; Valentinov, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    At present the dedicated synchrotron radiation source Siberia-2 in Kurchatov Institute operates with electron energy 2.5 GeV and current up to 200 mA. In order to expand spectral range of SR and to increase brightness an installation of 7.5 T 19-pole superconducting wiggler is planned at the end of 2006. Now the wiggler is under fabrication in BINP, Novosibirsk. Such high level of a magnetic field in the wiggler will have a great influence on electron beam parameters of Siberia-2. Changes of these parameters (betatron tunes, horizontal emittance of the electron beam, momentum compaction, energy spread etc.) are discussed in the report. Different methods of compensation (global and local) of betatron functions distortion are presented. Much attention is paid to dynamic aperture calculations using analytical approximation of magnetic field behavior in transverse horizontal direction.

  11. Suppressing the Coffee-Ring Effect in Semitransparent MnO2 Film for a High-Performance Solar-Powered Energy Storage Window.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huanyu; Qian, Jiasheng; Zhou, Limin; Yuan, Jikang; Huang, Haitao; Wang, Yu; Tang, Wing Man; Chan, Helen Lai Wa

    2016-04-13

    We introduce a simple and effective method to deposit a highly uniform and semitransparent MnO2 film without coffee-ring effect (CRE) by adding ethanol into MnO2 ink for transparent capacitive energy storage devices. By carefully controlling the amount of ethanol added in the MnO2 droplet, we could significantly reduce the CRE and thus improve the film uniformity. The electrochemical properties of supercapacitor (SC) devices using semitransparent MnO2 film electrodes with or without CRE were measured and compared. The SC device without CRE shows a superior capacitance, high rate capability, and lower contact resistance. The CRE-free device could achieve a considerable volumetric capacitance of 112.2 F cm(-3), resulting in a high volumetric energy density and power density of 10 mWh cm(-3) and 8.6 W cm(-3), respectively. For practical consideration, both flexible SC and large-area rigid SC devices were fabricated to demonstrate their potential for flexible transparent electronic application and capacitive energy-storage window application. Moreover, a solar-powered energy storage window which consists of a commercial solar cell and our studied semitransparent MnO2-film-based SCs was assembled. These SCs could be charged by the solar cell and light up a light emitting diode (LED), demonstrating their potential for self-powered systems and energy-efficient buildings.

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work

  13. Experimental results from the small isochronous ring

    SciTech Connect

    Eduard Pozdeyev

    2005-05-01

    The Small Isochronous Ring (SIR) is a compact, low-energy storage ring designed to investigate the beam dynamics of high-intensity isochronous cyclotrons and synchrotrons at the transition energy. The ring was developed at Michigan State University (MSU) and has been operational since December 2003. It stores 20 keV hydrogen beams with a peak current of 10-20 microamps for up to 200 turns. The transverse and longitudinal profiles of extracted bunches are measured with an accuracy of approximately 1 mm. The high accuracy of the measurements makes the experimental data attractive for validation of multi-particle space charge codes. The results obtained in the ring show a fast growth of the energy spread induced by the space charge forces. The energy spread growth is accompanied by a breakup of the beam bunches into separated clusters that are involved in the vortex motion specific to the isochronous regime. The experimental results presented in the paper show a remarkable agreement with simulations performed with the code CYCO. In this paper, we discuss specifics of space charge effects in the isochronous regime, present results of experiments in SIR, and conduct a detailed comparison of the experimental data with results of simulations.

  14. Negative ion source development at the cooler synchrotron COSY/Jülich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felden, O.; Gebel, R.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.

    2013-02-01

    The Nuclear Physics Institute at the Forschungszentrum Jülich, a member of the Helmholtz Association, conducts experimental and theoretical basic research in the field of hadron, particle, and nuclear physics. It operates the cooler synchrotron COSY, an accelerator and storage ring, which provides unpolarized and polarized proton and deuteron beams with beam momenta of up to 3.7 GeV/c. Main activities of the accelerator division are the design and construction of the high energy storage ring HESR, a synchrotron and part of the international FAIR project, and the operation and development of COSY with injector cyclotron and ion sources. Filament driven volume sources and a charge exchange colliding beams source, based on a nuclear polarized atomic beam source, provide unpolarized and polarized H- or D- routinely for more than 6500 hours/year. Within the Helmholtz Association's initiative Accelerator Research and Development, ARD, the existing sources at COSY, as well as new sources for future programs, are investigated and developed. The paper reports about these plans, improved pulsed beams from the volume sources and the preparation of a source for the ELENA project at CERN.

  15. Optical synchrotron radiation beam imaging with a digital mask

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hao; Fiorito, Ralph; Corbett, Jeff; Shkvarunets, Anatoly; Tian, Kai; Fisher, Alan; Douglas, D.; Wilson, F.; Zhang, S.; Mok, W.; Mitsuhashi, T.

    2016-01-01

    The 3GeV SPEAR3 synchrotron light source operates in top-up injection mode with up to 500mA circulating in the storage ring (equivalently 392nC). Each injection pulse contains only 40-80 pC producing a contrast ratio between total stored charge and injected charge of about 6500:1. In order to study transient injected beam dynamics during User operations, it is desirable to optically image the injected pulse in the presence of the bright stored beam. In the present work this is done by re-imaging visible synchrotron radiation onto a digital micro-mirror-array device (DMD), which is then used as an optical mask to block out light from the bright central core of the stored beam. The physical masking, together with an asynchronously-gated, ICCD imaging camera makes it is possible to observe the weak injected beam component on a turn-by-turn basis. The DMD optical masking system works similar to a classical solar coronagraph but has some distinct practical advantages: i.e. rapid adaption to changes in the shape of the stored beam, high extinction ratio for unwanted light and minimum scattering from the primary beam into the secondary optics. In this paper we describe the DMD masking method, features of the high dynamic range point spread function for the SPEAR3 optical beam line and measurements of the injected beam in the presence of the stored beam.

  16. Development of soft X-ray polarized light beamline on Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Phase, D. M. Gupta, Mukul Potdar, S. Behera, L. Sah, R. Gupta, Ajay

    2014-04-24

    This article describes the development of a soft x-ray beamline on a bending magnet source of Indus-2 storage ring (2.5 GeV) and some preliminary results of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements using the same. The beamline layout is based on a spherical grating monochromator. The beamline is able to accept synchrotron radiation from the bending magnet port BL-1 of the Indus-2 ring with a wide solid angle. The large horizontal and vertical angular acceptance contributes to high photon flux and selective polarization respectively. The complete beamline is tested for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) ∼ 10{sup −10} mbar. First absorption spectrum was obtained on HOPG graphite foil. Our performance test indicates that modest resolving power has been achieved with adequate photon flux to carry out various absorption experiments.

  17. Ca7Ge-type hydride Mg6VNaxHy (0 ≤ x ≤ 1): High pressure synthesis, synchrotron X-ray analysis and hydrogen storage properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeichi, N.; Yan, J.; Yang, X.; Shida, K.; Tanaka, H.; Kiyobayashi, T.; Kuriyama, N.; Sakai, T.

    2012-07-01

    A powder mixture of MgH2:VH2:NaH = 6:1:n is treated under 8 GPa at 873 K using an eight-anvil apparatus in order to investigate the influence of NaH addition to Mg6VHy, a Ca7Ge-type FCC hydride. Synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) of the obtained sample reveals that Na occupies the vacant 4b site in Mg6VHy to form Mg6VNaxHy (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) as the main product while retaining its Ca7Ge-type structure. The Rietveld analysis of the SR-XRD data suggests that the bond lengths between hydrogen and magnesium remain constant through the Na addition. All the samples reversibly desorb and absorb hydrogen at 620-630 and 590-600 K, respectively, under 0.5 MPa (H2). These temperatures are, respectively, about 70 and 120 K lower than those of MgH2. The hydrogen capacity of the main product phase, Mg6VNaxHy, is estimated to be 5-6 mass% from the pressure-composition isotherms (PCIs) by taking its content rate in the specimen into account. The reaction enthalpies calculated from the van't Hoff relation of the PCIs do not significantly differ from that of MgH2. The bond lengths and energies between hydrogen and magnesium are not affected by the perturbation by the NaH addition in the lattice in Mg6VNaxHy.

  18. Prospects of high-resolution resonant X-ray inelastic scattering studies on solid materials, liquids and gases at diffraction-limited storage rings

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thorsten; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Rubensson, Jan-Erik

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic technique of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) will particularly profit from immensely improved brilliance of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs). In RIXS one measures the intensities of excitations as a function of energy and momentum transfer. DLSRs will allow for pushing the achievable energy resolution, signal intensity and the sampled spot size to new limits. With RIXS one nowadays probes a broad range of electronic systems reaching from simple molecules to complex materials displaying phenomena like peculiar magnetism, two-dimensional electron gases, superconductivity, photovoltaic energy conversion and heterogeneous catalysis. In this article the types of improved RIXS studies that will become possible with X-ray beams from DLSRs are envisioned. PMID:25177995

  19. Temporal and spectral evolution of a storage ring FEL source: Experimental results on Super-ACO and new theoretical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Couprie, M.E. ||

    1995-12-31

    The Super-ACO FEL source in UV is now used for applications like a time-resolved fluorescence in biology and two colors experiments coupling FEL and Synchrotron Radiation, which are naturally synchronized. The stability of the FEL is then a critical issue for the users. Detailed experimental studies conducted on the temporal characteristics of the laser micropulse showed various phenomena, such as a longitudinal micropulse jitter and a deformation of a longitudinal micropulse distribution. A similar analysis has been performed on the laser spectral evolution with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer, showing a spectrum narrowing, and a wavelength drift. A longitudinal feedback system developed after the first user experiment, allowed to reduce significantly the longitudinal jitter, the intensity fluctuation and the spectral drift. Nevertheless, the stability of the FEL is very dependent on any perturbation, and the observed phenomena can not be described by former models like super-mode assuming a stationary regime. A new theoretical model has then been developed, in order to simulate dynamic behaviors. A simple iterative method is employed to obtain the laser spectrum. The access to the temporal distribution requires additional complexity, because the Fourier transformation has to be performed for each pass. The comparison between the experimental data and the simulation results will be given.

  20. Analysis of coupled-bunch instabilities for the NSLS-II storage ring with a 500MHz 7-cell PETRA-III cavity

    DOE PAGES

    Bassi, G.; Blednykh, A.; Cheng, W.; ...

    2015-12-11

    We present the NSLS-II storage ring that is designed to operate with superconducting RF-cavities with the aim to store an average current of 500 mA distributed in 1080 bunches, with a gap in the uniform filling for ion clearing. At the early stage of the commissioning (phase 1), characterized by a bare lattice without damping wigglers and without Landau cavities, a normal conducting 7-cell PETRA-III RF-cavity structure has been installed with the goal to store an average current of 25 mA. In this paper we discuss our analysis of coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the Higher Order Modes (HOMs) of themore » 7-cell PETRA-III RF-cavity. As a cure of the instabilities, we apply a well-known scheme based on a proper detuning of the HOMs frequencies based upon cavity temperature change, and the use of the beneficial effect of the slow head–tail damping at positive chromaticity to increase the transverse coupled-bunch instability thresholds. In addition, we discuss measurements of coupled-bunch instabilities observed during the phase 1 commissioning of the NSLS-II storage ring. In our analysis we rely, in the longitudinal case, on the theory of coupled-bunch instability for uniform fillings, while in the transverse case we complement our studies with numerical simulations with OASIS, a novel parallel particle tracking code for self-consistent simulations of collective effects driven by short and long-range wakefields.« less

  1. Electron-deuteron scattering with a polarized deuterium gas target in the VEPP-3 electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.E.; Fedchak, J.A.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1995-08-01

    The collaborative effort between Argonne and the Budker Institute for Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk to measure the tensor analyzing power of the deuteron at high momentum transfer continues. This measurement allows the experimental separation of the deuteron charge and quadrupole form factors, which cannot be obtained from unpolarized scattering alone. Phase 2 of the experiment, which used a storage cell fed by an atomic beam source as the internal target, was completed. The limited statistics collected in this phase of the experiment are insufficient to confirm the existing data from MIT-Bates in the kinematic region up to q = 5 fm{sup -1}. It was decided to change to Phase 3 of the experiment, which uses a laser-driven polarized deuterium source and a passive storage cell as the target. All necessary parts of the Argonne source were delivered to Novosibirsk and work is underway to construct and test the target.

  2. A Numerical Algorithm to Calculate the Pressure Distribution of the TPS Front End Due to Desorption Induced by Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, I. C.; Kuan, C. K.; Chen, Y. T.; Yang, J. Y.; Hsiung, G. Y.; Chen, J. R.

    2010-06-01

    The pressure distribution is an important aspect of a UHV subsystem in either a storage ring or a front end. The design of the 3-GeV, 400-mA Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) foresees outgassing induced by photons and due to a bending magnet and an insertion device. An algorithm to calculate the photon-stimulated absorption (PSD) due to highly energetic radiation from a synchrotron source is presented. Several results using undulator sources such as IU20 are also presented, and the pressure distribution is illustrated.

  3. Optimizing the lattice design of a diffraction-limited storage ring with a rational combination of particle swarm and genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yi; Xu, Gang

    2017-02-01

    In the lattice design of a diffraction-limited storage ring (DLSR) consisting of compact multi-bend achromats (MBAs), it is challenging to simultaneously achieve an ultralow emittance and a satisfactory nonlinear performance, due to extremely large nonlinearities and limited tuning ranges of the element parameters. Nevertheless, in this paper we show that the potential of a DLSR design can be explored with a successive and iterative implementation of the multi-objective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO) and multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA). For the High Energy Photon Source, a planned kilometer-scale DLSR, optimizations indicate that it is feasible to attain a natural emittance of about 50 pm·rad, and simultaneously realize a sufficient ring acceptance for on-axis longitudinal injection, by using a hybrid MBA lattice. In particular, this study demonstrates that a rational combination of the MOPSO and MOGA is more effective than either of them alone, in approaching the true global optima of an explorative multi-objective problem with many optimizing variables and local optima. Supported by NSFC (11475202, 11405187) and Youth Innovation Promotion Association CAS (2015009)

  4. Parameter optimization for Doppler laser cooling of a low-energy heavy ion beam at the storage ring S-LSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osaki, Kazuya; Okamoto, Hiromi

    2014-05-01

    S-LSR is a compact ion storage ring constructed at Kyoto University several years ago. The ring is equipped with a Doppler laser cooling system aimed at beam crystallization. Bearing in mind hardware limitations in S-LSR, we try to find an optimum set of primary experimental parameters for the production of an ultracold heavy ion beam. Systematic molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for this purpose. It is concluded that the detuning and spot size of the cooling laser should be chosen around -42 MHz and 1.5 mm, respectively, for the most efficient cooling of 40 keV ^{24}Mg^+ beams in S-LSR. Under the optimum conditions, the use of the resonant coupling method followed by radio-frequency field ramping enables us to reach an extremely low beam temperature on the order of 0.1 K in the transverse degrees of freedom. The longitudinal degree of freedom can be cooled to close to the Doppler limit; i.e., to the mK range. We also numerically demonstrate that it is possible to establish a stable, long one-dimensionally ordered state of ions.

  5. Optimizing ring-based CSR sources

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; De Santis, S.; Hao, Z.; Martin, M.C.; Munson, D.V.; Li, D.; Nis himura, H.; Robin, D.S.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.D.; Schoenlein, R.; Jung, J.Y.; Venturini, M.; Wan, W.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.

    2004-01-01

    Coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is a fascinating phenomenon recently observed in electron storage rings and shows tremendous promise as a high power source of radiation at terahertz frequencies. However, because of the properties of the radiation and the electron beams needed to produce it, there are a number of interesting features of the storage ring that can be optimized for CSR. Furthermore, CSR has been observed in three distinct forms: as steady pulses from short bunches, bursts from growth of spontaneous modulations in high current bunches, and from micro modulations imposed on a bunch from laser slicing. These processes have their relative merits as sources and can be improved via the ring design. The terahertz (THz) and sub-THz region of the electromagnetic spectrum lies between the infrared and the microwave . This boundary region is beyond the normal reach of optical and electronic measurement techniques and sources associated with these better-known neighbors. Recent research has demonstrated a relatively high power source of THz radiation from electron storage rings: coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). Besides offering high power, CSR enables broadband optical techniques to be extended to nearly the microwave region, and has inherently sub-picosecond pulses. As a result, new opportunities for scientific research and applications are enabled across a diverse array of disciplines: condensed matter physics, medicine, manufacturing, and space and defense industries. CSR will have a strong impact on THz imaging, spectroscopy, femtosecond dynamics, and driving novel non-linear processes. CSR is emitted by bunches of accelerated charged particles when the bunch length is shorter than the wavelength being emitted. When this criterion is met, all the particles emit in phase, and a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse results with an intensity proportional to the square of the number of particles in the bunch. It is this quadratic dependence that can

  6. Oxygen storage properties of La1-xSrxFeO3-δ for chemical-looping reactions–An in-situ neutron and synchrotron X-ray study

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Daniel D.; Schreiber, Nathaniel J.; Levitas, Benjamin D.; ...

    2016-05-16

    Oxygen storage materials (OSMs) provide lattice oxygen for a number of chemical-looping reactions including natural gas combustion and methane reforming. La1–xSrxFeO3-δ has shown promise for use as an OSM in methane reforming reactions due to its high product selectivity, fast oxide diffusion, and cycle stability. Here, we investigate the structural evolution of the series La1–xSrxFeO3-δ for x = 0, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, and 1, using in situ synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction, as it is cycled under the conditions of a chemical-looping reactor (methane and oxygen atmospheres). In the compositions x = 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, and 1, we discover anmore » envelope , or temperature range, of oxygen storage capacity (OSC), where oxygen can easily and reversibly be inserted and removed from the OSM. Our in situ X-ray and neutron diffraction results reveal that while samples with higher Sr contents had a higher OSC, those same samples suffered from slower reaction kinetics and some, such as the x = 1/2 and x = 2/3 compositions, had local variations in Sr content, which led to inhomogeneous regions with varying reaction rates. Therefore, we highlight the importance of in situ diffraction studies, and we propose that these measurements are required for the thorough evaluation of future candidate OSMs. Furthermore, we recommend La2/3Sr1/3FeO3-δ as the optimal OSM in the series because its structure remains homogeneous throughout the reaction, and its OSC envelope is similar to that of the higher doped materials.« less

  7. Oxygen storage properties of La1-xSrxFeO3-δ for chemical-looping reactions–An in-situ neutron and synchrotron X-ray study

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Daniel D.; Schreiber, Nathaniel J.; Levitas, Benjamin D.; Xu, Wenqian; Rodriguez, Efrain E.; Whitfield, Pamela S.

    2016-05-16

    Oxygen storage materials (OSMs) provide lattice oxygen for a number of chemical-looping reactions including natural gas combustion and methane reforming. La1–xSrxFeO3-δ has shown promise for use as an OSM in methane reforming reactions due to its high product selectivity, fast oxide diffusion, and cycle stability. Here, we investigate the structural evolution of the series La1–xSrxFeO3-δ for x = 0, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, and 1, using in situ synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction, as it is cycled under the conditions of a chemical-looping reactor (methane and oxygen atmospheres). In the compositions x = 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, and 1, we discover an envelope , or temperature range, of oxygen storage capacity (OSC), where oxygen can easily and reversibly be inserted and removed from the OSM. Our in situ X-ray and neutron diffraction results reveal that while samples with higher Sr contents had a higher OSC, those same samples suffered from slower reaction kinetics and some, such as the x = 1/2 and x = 2/3 compositions, had local variations in Sr content, which led to inhomogeneous regions with varying reaction rates. Therefore, we highlight the importance of in situ diffraction studies, and we propose that these measurements are required for the thorough evaluation of future candidate OSMs. Furthermore, we recommend La2/3Sr1/3FeO3-δ as the optimal OSM in the series because its structure remains homogeneous throughout the reaction, and its OSC envelope is similar to that of the higher doped materials.

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

  9. A study of influence of stohastic process on the synchroton oscillations of a single electron circulated in VEPP-3 storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev, I.V.; Popik, V.M.; Salikova, T.V.

    1995-12-31

    Last year measurements of the single electron longitudinal motion were performed. The pictures of the synchrotron oscillations for long time were obtained and handled. The results of experiments are demonstrate the character of the diffusion on the phase space, caused by quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation.

  10. Effects of ring-porous and diffuse-porous stem wood anatomy on the hydraulic parameters used in a water flow and storage model.

    PubMed

    Steppe, Kathy; Lemeur, Raoul

    2007-01-01

    Calibration of a recently developed water flow and storage model based on experimental data for a young diffuse-porous beech tree (Fagus sylvatica L.) and a young ring-porous oak tree (Quercus robur L.) revealed that differences in stem wood anatomy between species strongly affect the calibrated values of the hydraulic model parameters. The hydraulic capacitance (C) of the stem storage tissue was higher in oak than in beech (939.8 versus 212.3 mg MPa(-1)). Model simulation of the elastic modulus (epsilon) revealed that this difference was linked to the higher elasticity of the stem storage tissue of oak compared with beech. Furthermore, the hydraulic resistance (R (x)) of beech was about twice that of oak (0.1829 versus 0.1072 MPa s mg(-1)). To determine the physiological meaning of the R (x) parameter identified by model calibration, we analyzed the stem wood anatomy of the beech and oak trees. Calculation of stem specific hydraulic conductivity (k (s)) of beech and oak with the Hagen-Poiseuille equation confirmed the differences in R (x) predicted by the model. The contributions of different vessel diameter classes to the total hydraulic conductivity of the xylem were calculated. As expected, the few big vessels contributed much more to total conductivity than the many small vessels. Compared with beech, the larger vessels of oak resulted in a higher k (s) (10.66 versus 4.90 kg m(-1) s(-1) MPa(-1)). The calculated ratio of k (s) of oak to beech was 2, confirming the R (x) ratio obtained by model calibration. Thus, validation of the R (x) parameter of the model led to identification of its physiological meaning.

  11. Imaging cross fault multiphase flow using time resolved high pressure-temperature synchrotron fluid tomography: implications for the geological storage of carbon dioxide within sandstone saline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seers, Thomas; Andrew, Matthew; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin; Dobson, Kate; Hodgetts, David; Lee, Peter; Menke, Hannah; Singh, Kamaljit; Parsons, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Applied shear stresses within high porosity granular rocks result in characteristic deformation responses (rigid grain reorganisation, dilation, isovolumetric strain, grain fracturing and/or crushing) emanating from elevated stress concentrations at grain contacts. The strain localisation features produced by these processes are generically termed as microfaults (also shear bands), which occur as narrow tabular regions of disaggregated, rotated and/or crushed grains. Because the textural priors that favour microfault formation make their host rocks (esp. porous sandstones) conducive to the storage of geo-fluids, such structures are often abundant features within hydrocarbon reservoirs, aquifers and potential sites of CO2 storage (i.e. sandstone saline aquifers). The porosity collapse which accompanies microfault formation typically results in localised permeability reduction, often encompassing several orders of magnitude. Given that permeability is the key physical parameter that governs fluid circulation in the upper crust, this petrophysical degradation implicates microfaults as being flow impeding structures which may act as major baffles and/or barriers to fluid flow within the subsurface. Such features therefore have the potential to negatively impact upon hydrocarbon production or CO2 injection, making their petrophysical characterisation of considerable interest. Despite their significance, little is known about the pore-scale processes involved in fluid trapping and transfer within microfaults, particularly in the presence of multiphase flow analogous to oil accumulation, production and CO2 injection. With respect to the geological storage of CO2 within sandstone saline aquifers it has been proposed that even fault rocks with relatively low phyllosilicate content or minimal quartz cementation may act as major baffles or barriers to migrating CO2 plume. Alternatively, as ubiquitous intra-reservoir heterogeneities, micro-faults also have the potential to

  12. The Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  13. Non-destructive trace element microanalysis of as-received cometary nucleus samples using synchrotron x ray fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    The Synchrotron X ray Fluorescence (SXRF) microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory, will be an excellent instrument for non-destructive trace element analyses of cometary nucleus samples. Trace element analyses of as-received cometary nucleus material will also be possible with this technique. Bulk analysis of relatively volatile elements will be important in establishing comet formation conditions. However, as demonstrated for meteorites, microanalyses of individual phases in their petrographic context are crucial in defining the histories of particular components in unequilibrated specimens. Perhaps most informative in comparing cometary material with meteorites will be the halogens and trace metals. In-situ, high spatial resolution microanalyses will be essential in establishing host phases for these elements and identifying terrestrial (collection/processing) overprints. The present SXRF microprobe is a simple, yet powerful, instrument in which specimens are excited with filtered, continuum synchrotron radiation from a bending magnet on a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring. A refrigerated cell will be constructed to permit analyses at low temperatures. The cell will consist essentially of an air tight housing with a cold stage. Kapton windows will be used to allow the incident synchrotron beam to enter the cell and fluorescent x rays to exit it. The cell will be either under vacuum or continuous purge by ultrapure helium during analyses. Several other improvements of the NSLS microprobe will be made prior to the cometary nucleus sample return mission that will greatly enhance the sensitivity of the technique.

  14. Dynamics of photon-induced processes in adsorbate-surface systems studied by laser-synchrotron pump-probe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Bernd J.; Gatzke, Johannes; Quast, T.; Will, Ingo; Wick, Manfred T.; Liero, A.; Pop, D.; Hertel, Ingolf V.

    1998-12-01

    We report on the MBI User Facility at BESSY II, presently under construction, which is dedicated to study the dynamics of photo-induced processes by combining laser and synchrotron pulses. In this paper we focus on the synchronization of a modelocked ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser to the Berlin electron storage ring for synchrotron radiation (BESSY). Two different techniques have been applied -- one based on a digital phase comparator and the other based on analog high-harmonic mixing. Both schemes may be easily adjusted to either single, multi- or hybrid-bunch operation of the synchrotron. Moreover, the temporal accuracy of the synchronization unit suitably matches the widths of the synchrotron pulses (some ten picoseconds) to be expected at BESSY II. Therefore, the currently performed test experiments at BESSY I provide the basis for time- resolved photon-induced experiments which combine laser and SR-undulator pulses in a pump-probe scheme at BESSY II. This facility will be available within the first half of 1999.

  15. Comparison of Design and Practices for Radiation Safety among Five Synchrotron Radiation Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; Asano, Yoshihiro; Casey, William R.; Donahue, Richard J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2005-06-29

    There are more and more third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities in the world that utilize low emittance electron (or positron) beam circulating in a storage ring to generate synchrotron light for various types of experiments. A storage ring based SR facility consists of an injector, a storage ring, and many SR beamlines. When compared to other types of accelerator facilities, the design and practices for radiation safety of storage ring and SR beamlines are unique to SR facilities. Unlike many other accelerator facilities, the storage ring and beamlines of a SR facility are generally above ground with users and workers occupying the experimental floor frequently. The users are generally non-radiation workers and do not wear dosimeters, though basic facility safety training is required. Thus, the shielding design typically aims for an annual dose limit of 100 mrem over 2000 h without the need for administrative control for radiation hazards. On the other hand, for operational and cost considerations, the concrete ring wall (both lateral and ratchet walls) is often desired to be no more than a few feet thick (with an even thinner roof). Most SR facilities have similar operation modes and beam parameters (both injection and stored) for storage ring and SR beamlines. The facility typically operates almost full year with one-month start-up period, 10-month science program for experiments (with short accelerator physics studies and routine maintenance during the period of science program), and a month-long shutdown period. A typical operational mode for science program consists of long periods of circulating stored beam (which decays with a lifetime in tens of hours), interposed with short injection events (in minutes) to fill the stored current. The stored beam energy ranges from a few hundreds MeV to 10 GeV with a low injection beam power (generally less than 10 watts). The injection beam energy can be the same as, or lower than, the stored beam energy

  16. X-ray phase-contrast tomography with a compact laser-driven synchrotron source.

    PubMed

    Eggl, Elena; Schleede, Simone; Bech, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Loewen, Roderick; Ruth, Ronald D; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-05-05

    Between X-ray tubes and large-scale synchrotron sources, a large gap in performance exists with respect to the monochromaticity and brilliance of the X-ray beam. However, due to their size and cost, large-scale synchrotrons are not available for more routine applications in small and medium-sized academic or industrial laboratories. This gap could be closed by laser-driven compact synchrotron light sources (CLS), which use an infrared (IR) laser cavity in combination with a small electron storage ring. Hard X-rays are produced through the process of inverse Compton scattering upon the intersection of the electron bunch with the focused laser beam. The produced X-ray beam is intrinsically monochromatic and highly collimated. This makes a CLS well-suited for applications of more advanced--and more challenging--X-ray imaging approaches, such as X-ray multimodal tomography. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first results of a first successful demonstration experiment in which a monochromatic X-ray beam from a CLS was used for multimodal, i.e., phase-, dark-field, and attenuation-contrast, X-ray tomography. We show results from a fluid phantom with different liquids and a biomedical application example in the form of a multimodal CT scan of a small animal (mouse, ex vivo). The results highlight particularly that quantitative multimodal CT has become feasible with laser-driven CLS, and that the results outperform more conventional approaches.

  17. Synchrotron radiation macromolecular crystallography: science and spin-offs

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, John R.; Mitchell, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    A current overview of synchrotron radiation (SR) in macromolecular crystallography (MX) instrumentation, methods and applications is presented. Automation has been and remains a central development in the last decade, as have the rise of remote access and of industrial service provision. Results include a high number of Protein Data Bank depositions, with an increasing emphasis on the successful use of microcrystals. One future emphasis involves pushing the frontiers of using higher and lower photon energies. With the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers, closely linked to SR developments, the use of ever smaller samples such as nanocrystals, nanoclusters and single molecules is anticipated, as well as the opening up of femtosecond time-resolved diffraction structural studies. At SR sources, a very high-throughput assessment for the best crystal samples and the ability to tackle just a few micron and sub-micron crystals will become widespread. With higher speeds and larger detectors, diffraction data volumes are becoming long-term storage and archiving issues; the implications for today and the future are discussed. Together with the rise of the storage ring to its current pre-eminence in MX data provision, the growing tendency of central facility sites to offer other centralized facilities complementary to crystallography, such as cryo-electron microscopy and NMR, is a welcome development. PMID:25866664

  18. Development of partially-coherent wavefront propagation simulation methods for 3rd and 4th generation synchrotron radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubar, Oleg; Berman, Lonny; Chu, Yong S.; Fluerasu, Andrei; Hulbert, Steve; Idir, Mourad; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Shapiro, David; Shen, Qun; Baltser, Jana

    2011-09-01

    Partially-coherent wavefront propagation calculations have proven to be feasible and very beneficial in the design of beamlines for 3rd and 4th generation Synchrotron Radiation (SR) sources. These types of calculations use the framework of classical electrodynamics for the description, on the same accuracy level, of the emission by relativistic electrons moving in magnetic fields of accelerators, and the propagation of the emitted radiation wavefronts through beamline optical elements. This enables accurate prediction of performance characteristics for beamlines exploiting high SR brightness and/or high spectral flux. Detailed analysis of radiation degree of coherence, offered by the partially-coherent wavefront propagation method, is of paramount importance for modern storage-ring based SR sources, which, thanks to extremely small sub-nanometer-level electron beam emittances, produce substantial portions of coherent flux in X-ray spectral range. We describe the general approach to partially-coherent SR wavefront propagation simulations and present examples of such simulations performed using "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) code for the parameters of hard X-ray undulator based beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), Brookhaven National Laboratory. These examples illustrate general characteristics of partially-coherent undulator radiation beams in low-emittance SR sources, and demonstrate advantages of applying high-accuracy physical-optics simulations to the optimization and performance prediction of X-ray optical beamlines in these new sources.

  19. Elliptical Undulators HU256 for Synchrotron SOLEIL

    SciTech Connect

    Batrakov, A.; Churkin, I.; Ilyin, I.; Kolokolnikov, Yu.; Rouvinski, E.; Semenov, E.; Steshov, A.; Vobly, P.; Briquez, F.; Chubar, O.; Dael, A.; Marcouile, O.; Marteau, F.; Roux, G.; Valleau, M.

    2007-01-19

    Three elliptical undulators HU256 of electromagnetic type were produced, tested and magnetically measured by the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russia) for Synchrotron Soleil (France). The undulators have a new design of a Bx and Bz closed structure for insertion vacuum chamber. In the elliptical undulator HU256 with period of the magnetic fields of 256 mm, the vertical magnetic field (Bzmax=0.44 T) formed by 27 Bz laminated dipole magnets is symmetric, and the horizontal magnetic field (Bxmax=0.33 T) formed by 28 Bx laminated dipole magnets is asymmetric. The undulator can work in standard mode as well as in a quasi-periodical mode. The vertical magnetic field may be modulated by switching on the modulation coils placed on the Bz dipoles. Two power supply systems allow us to modulate the horizontal magnetic field, and change the radiation spectrum. The magnetic calculations of the individual dipoles and dipoles in ''undulator'' environment were executed by means of Mermaid 3D Code. The magnetic measurements of the individual dipoles had confirmed the magnetic calculations. On basis of semiempirical dependences from the mechanical characteristics the estimates of the magnetic parameters for all dipoles were calculated. Sorting of dipoles in the undulators have been done, and it has improved the magnetic parameters of the assembled undulators in comparison with the statistical estimations. The magnetic measurements of the undulators HU256 were carried out at Budker INP by Hall probes and at Soleil by Hall probes and Stretched Wire. Now the 1st undulator HU256 is installed at Soleil Storage Ring.

  20. Compact superconducting ring at ritsumeikan university.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, H; Nakayama, Y; Ozutsumi, K; Yamamoto, Y; Tokunaga, Y; Saisho, H; Matsubara, T; Ikeda, S

    1998-05-01

    A compact superconducting storage ring (0.575 GeV and 300 mA) with a racetrack microtron injection system was installed at Ritsumeikan University and has been operated successfully since April 1996. As the radius of the circular electron orbit is small (0.5 m), it is possible to use a radiation beam of relatively high photon flux at a short distance from the source point. Beamlines have been constructed including those for XAFS, soft X-ray spectroscopy, VUV spectroscopy, fluorescent X-ray analysis, soft X-ray microscopy, X-ray diffraction/scattering and photoelectron spectroscopy; the photoelectron spectrometer is combined with an ion-beam-scattering spectrometer to obtain information both on the electronic states and on the atomic arrangements of a solid surface. In addition there are two beamlines, one for LIGA exposure and the other for synchrotron radiation ablation, which are devoted to producing new devices and materials. The synchrotron radiation facility is open not only to users in the University but also to researchers in industry, governmental institutions and other universities.

  1. Application of the Green's function method to some nonlinear problems of an electron storage ring: Part 1, The Green's function for the Fokker-Planck equation

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.

    1982-07-01

    For an electron storage ring the beam size evaluation including beam-beam interaction gives an example of such a problem. Another good example is finding the beam size for a nonlinear machine. The present work gives a way to solve some of these problems, at least in principle. The approach described here is an application of the well known Green's function method, which in this case is applied to the Fokker-Planck equation governing the distribution function in the phase space of particle motion. The new step made in this paper is to consider the particle motion in two degrees of freedom rather than in one dimension, a characteristic of all the previous work. This step seems to be necessary for an adequate description of the problem, at least for the class of problems which are considered below. This work consists of the formal solution of the Fokker-Planck equation in terms of its Green's function and describing the Green's function itself. The Green's function and the description of some of its properties can be found in the Appendices. I discuss the distribution function in the transverse phase space of a particle and it's Fokker-Planck equation for a simple case of a weak focusing machine. Part of this paper is devoted to describing the Green's function and solution of this equation. Then this technique is applied to a strong focusing machine and finally there is a discussion of applicability of this method, its limitations and relation to other methods. 13 refs.

  2. Determination of the angular and energy dependence of hard constituent scattering from. pi. /sup 0/ pair events at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Angelis, A.L.S.; Besch, H.J.; Blumenfeld, B.J.

    1982-08-23

    We present data on proton-proton collisions, obtained at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings, in which two roughly back-to-back ..pi../sup 0/'s of high transverse momentum (p/sub T/) were produced. The angular distribution of the dipion axis relative to the collision axis is found to be independent of both the effective mass m of the dipion system and the centre-of-mass energy ..sqrt..s of the proton-proton collision. The cross-sections dsigma/dm at the two values of ..sqrt..s satisfy a scaling law of the form dsigma/dm = G(x)/m/sup n/, where x = m(..pi../sup 0/,..pi../sup 0/)/..sqrt..s and n = 6.5 +- 0.5. We show from our data that the leading ..pi../sup 0/ carries most of the momentum of the scattered parton. Given this fact, the axis of the dipion system follows closely the direction of the scattered constituents, and we exploit this to determine the angular dependence of the hard-scattering subprocess. We also compare our data with the lowest order QCD predictions using structure functions as determined in deep-inelastic scattering and fragmentation functions from electron-positron annihilation.

  3. Precise determination of the 1s Lamb Shift in hydrogen-like heavy ions at the ESR storage ring using microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.; Bleile, A.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Grabitz, P.; Ilieva, S.; Kiselev, O.; Kilbourne, C.; McCammon, D.; Meier, J. P.; Scholz, P.

    2015-11-01

    The precise determination of the energy of the Lyman α1 and α2 lines in hydrogen-like heavy ions provides a sensitive test of quantum electrodynamics in very strong Coulomb fields. To improve the precision of such experiments, the new detector concept of microcalorimeters, which detect the temperature change of an absorber after an incoming particle or photon has deposited its energy as heat, is now exploited. The microcalorimeters for x-rays used in these experiments consist of arrays of silicon thermometers and x-ray absorbers made of high-Z material. With such detectors, a relative energy resolution of about 1 per mille is obtained in the energy regime of 50-100 keV. Two successful measurement campaigns to determine the 1s Lamb Shift in Pb81+ and Au78+ have been completed: a prototype array has been applied successfully for the determination of the 1s Lamb Shift of Pb81+ at the ESR storage ring at GSI in a first test experiment. Based on the results of this test, a full array with 32 pixels has been equipped and has recently been applied to determine the 1s Lamb Shift in Au78+ ions. The energy of the Lyman-α1 line agrees within error bars well with theoretical predictions. The obtained accuracy is already comparable to the best accuracy obtained with conventional germanium detectors for hydrogen-like uranium.

  4. Spectral radiant power measurements of VUV and soft x-ray sources using the electron storage ring BESSY as a radiometric standard source.

    PubMed

    Fischer, J; Kühne, M; Wende, B

    1984-12-01

    A method is described for measuring the spectral radiant power of VUV and soft x-ray sources using the electron storage ring BESSY as a radiometric standard source of calculable spectral radiant power and degree of polarization. An ellipsoidal grazing incidence mirror stigmatically images the stored electrons or the source under investigation in equal optical conditions into a toroidal grating monochromator. The monochromator can be rotated around its optical axis in UHV conditions to account for different degrees of polarization of the two sources. The accuracy presently available with this method is demonstrated by a measurement of the spectral concentration of radiant intensity of a laser-produced tungsten plasma in the wavelength range between 7 and 100 nm with an overall uncertainty of 10%. A detailed analysis of the contributions to this uncertainty shows that the major part of it is caused by the presently uncertain knowledge of the polarizing properties of the radiometric instrumentation and by the uncertainty of the correction procedure which accounts for the influence of higher diffraction orders of the monochromator grating. The results of the radiation measurements of the laser-produced tungsten plasma let us expect that this source type has the potential to serve as a radiometric transfer standard in the VUV and soft x-ray range below 100 nm.

  5. STORAGE RING CROSS-SECTION MEASUREMENTS FOR ELECTRON IMPACT SINGLE AND DOUBLE IONIZATION OF Fe{sup 9+} AND SINGLE IONIZATION OF Fe{sup 10+}

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Novotny, O.; Savin, D. W.; Becker, A.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Wolf, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Repnow, R.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.

    2012-11-20

    We have measured electron impact ionization from the ground state of Fe{sup 9+} and Fe{sup 10+} over the relative electron-ion collision energy ranges 200-1900 eV and 250-1800 eV, respectively. The ions were confined in an ion storage ring long enough for essentially all metastable levels to radiatively relax to the ground state. For single ionization, we find a number of discrepancies between the existing theoretical cross sections and our results. The calculations appear to neglect some excitation-autoionization (EA) channels, particularly from n = 3 to n' excitations, which are important near threshold, and those from n = 2 {yields} 3 excitations, which contribute at about 650 eV. Conversely, at higher energies the calculations appear to overestimate the importance of EA channels due to excitation into levels where n {>=} 4. The resulting experimental rate coefficients agree with the most recent theory for Fe{sup 9+} to within 16% and for Fe{sup 10+} to within 19% at temperatures where these ions are predicted to form in collisional ionization equilibrium. We have also measured double ionization of Fe{sup 9+} forming Fe{sup 11+} in the energy range 450-3000 eV and found that although there is an appreciable cross section for direct double ionization, the dominant mechanism appears to be through direct ionization of an inner shell electron producing an excited state that subsequently stabilizes through autoionization.

  6. Surface states and space charge layer dynamics on Si(111)2{times}1: A free electron laser-synchrotron radiation study

    SciTech Connect

    Marsi, M.; Couprie, M.E.; Nahon, L.; Garzella, D.; Hara, T.; Bakker, R.; Delboulbe, A.; Indlekofer, G.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.

    1997-02-01

    Combining the use of a UV storage ring free electron laser and of synchrotron radiation, a time resolved core level spectroscopy study has been performed on photoexcited Si(111)2{times}1 surfaces with subnanosecond resolution. This enabled us to measure band bending fluctuations, caused by surface carrier dynamics, during the first nanosecond after photoexcitation; differences in the Si2p core level lineshape, dependent on the pump-probe time delay, were also observed. The presence of defects was found to reduce the fluctuations and make the carrier recombination process faster. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Electron beam depolarization in a damping ring

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.

    1993-04-01

    Depolarization of a polarized electron beam injected into a damping ring is analyzed by extending calculations conventionally applied to proton synchrotrons. Synchrotron radiation in an electron ring gives rise to both polarizing and depolarizing effects. In a damping ring, the beam is stored for a time much less than the time for self polarization. Spin flip radiation may therefore be neglected. Synchrotron radiation without spin flips, however, must be considered as the resonance strength depends on the vertical betatron oscillation amplitude which changes as the electron beam is radiation damped. An expression for the beam polarization at extraction is derived which takes into account radiation damping. The results are applied to the electron ring at the Stanford Linear Collider and are compared with numerical matrix formalisms.

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  9. National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-10

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  10. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Ginzburg's invention of undulators and their role in modern synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulipanov, Gennadii N.

    2007-04-01

    Undulators — periodic magnetic structures that were originally introduced by Vitalii Ginzburg in 1947 for electromagnetic radiation generation using relativistic electrons — are among the key elements of modern synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers (FELs). In this talk, the history of three generations of storage ring-based synchrotron X-ray sources using wigglers and undulators is briefly traced. Prospects for two types of next-generation space-coherent X-ray sources are discussed, which use long undulators and energy recovery accelerators or, alternatively, employ linear accelerator-based FELs. The recently developed Novosibirsk terahertz FEL facility, currently the world' s most powerful terahertz source, is described. It was the generation of electromagnetic radiation in this range that Ginzburg discussed in his 1947 work.

  11. Development of an x-ray fluorescence microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory: Early results: Comparison with data from other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.V.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Gordon, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical predictions for the detection levels in x-ray fluorescence analysis with a synchrotron storage ring are being achieved experimentally at several laboratories. This paper is deliberately restricted to the state of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory/University of Chicago instruments. Analyses at the parts per million (ppM) level are being made using white light apertured to 20 ..mu..m and an energy dispersive system. This system is particularly useful for elements with Z > 20 in materials dominated by elements with Z < 20. Diffraction causes an interference for crystalline materials. Development of a focusing microprobe for tunable monochromatic x-rays and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) is delayed by problems in shaping an 8:1 focusing mirror to the required accuracy. Reconnaissance analyses with a wiggler source on the CHESS synchrotron have been made in the K spectrum up to Z = 80.

  12. Application of the Green's function method to some nonlinear problems of an electron storage ring: Part 2, Checking the method by a quadrupole perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.

    1982-10-01

    In the first part of this work I described a general approach to some storage ring problems. The basic concept and the main equations were developed there. The next natural step in this work should be an application of the developed technique to some particular nonlinear problem. Instead, I found it useful to apply the method to the case of a field gradient perturbation first. This happened to be plausible not only as a check of the method, but, more importantly, as a way to resolve several troublesome difficulties encountered in subsequent calculations. The present note does not contain any new results. Still, the work is felt to be necessary as a support for all the future applications of the method. I consider here the effect of a global gradient error in a weak-focusing machine and the effect of a local gradient error in a strong focusing machine. The distribution function of a particle bunch for a perturbed lattice in these cases can be written explicitly. The expansion of this distribution function as a series perturbation terms produces the first and the second order corrections to the unperturbed function. From them we calculate, then, corresponding second moments. A similar expansion of the distribution function is found by the Green's function method described of this work. The second moments are found independently with the help of this distribution function. The comparison of these two results is one way to check the method and the correctness of the calculations. This comparison is done for the first and second order perturbations. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Design of kicker magnet and power supply unit for synchrotron beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ju

    1991-03-01

    To inject beams from the positron accumulator ring (PAR) into the synchrotron, a pulsed kicker magnet is used. The specifications of this kicker magnet and the power supply unit are listed and discussed in this report.

  14. Absorbed dose-to-water protocol applied to synchrotron-generated x-rays at very high dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, P.; Crosbie, J. C.; Cornelius, I.; Berkvens, P.; Donzelli, M.; Clavel, A. H.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.

    2016-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a new radiation treatment modality in the pre-clinical stage of development at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. MRT exploits the dose volume effect that is made possible through the spatial fractionation of the high dose rate synchrotron-generated x-ray beam into an array of microbeams. As an important step towards the development of a dosimetry protocol for MRT, we have applied the International Atomic Energy Agency’s TRS 398 absorbed dose-to-water protocol to the synchrotron x-ray beam in the case of the broad beam irradiation geometry (i.e. prior to spatial fractionation into microbeams). The very high dose rates observed here mean the ion recombination correction factor, k s , is the most challenging to quantify of all the necessary corrections to apply for ionization chamber based absolute dosimetry. In the course of this study, we have developed a new method, the so called ‘current ramping’ method, to determine k s for the specific irradiation and filtering conditions typically utilized throughout the development of MRT. Using the new approach we deduced an ion recombination correction factor of 1.047 for the maximum ESRF storage ring current (200 mA) under typical beam spectral filtering conditions in MRT. MRT trials are currently underway with veterinary patients at the ESRF that require additional filtering, and we have estimated a correction factor of 1.025 for these filtration conditions for the same ESRF storage ring current. The protocol described herein provides reference dosimetry data for the associated Treatment Planning System utilized in the current veterinary trials and anticipated future human clinical trials.

  15. Source-based calibration of space instruments using calculable synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Roman; Fliegauf, Rolf; Kroth, Simone; Paustian, Wolfgang; Reichel, Thomas; Richter, Mathias; Thornagel, Reiner

    2016-10-01

    Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has more than 20 years of experience in the calibration of space-based instruments using synchrotron radiation to cover the ultraviolet (UV), vacuum UV (VUV), and x-ray spectral range. Over the past decades, PTB has performed calibrations for numerous space missions within scientific collaborations and has become an important partner for activities in this field. New instrumentation at the electron storage ring, metrology light source, creates additional calibration possibilities within this framework. A new facility for the calibration of radiation transfer source standards with a considerably extended spectral range has been put into operation. The commissioning of a large vacuum vessel that can accommodate entire space instruments opens up new prospects. Finally, an existing VUV transfer calibration source was upgraded to increase the spectral range coverage to a band from 15 to 350 nm.

  16. Considerations for NSLS-II Synchrotron Radiation Protection When Operating Damping Wigglers at Low Machine Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, S.; Podobedov, B.

    2015-12-30

    The NSLS-II storage ring vacuum chamber, including frontends (FE) and beamlines (BL), is protected from possible damage from synchrotron radiation (SR) emitted from insertion devices (IDs) by a dedicated active interlock system (AIS). The system monitors electron beam position and angle and triggers a beam dump if the beam orbit is outside of the active interlock envelope (AIE). The AIE was calculated under the assumptions of 3 GeV beam energy and ID gaps set to their minimum operating values (i.e. “fully closed”). Recently it was proposed to perform machine studies that would ramp the stored beam energy significantly below the nominal operational value of 3 GeV. These studies may potentially include the use of NSLS-II damping wigglers (DWs) for electron beam emittance reduction and control.

  17. Development of a synchrotron radiation beam monitor for the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear integrable optics applied to beam dynamics may mitigate multi-particle instabilities, but proof of principle experiments have never been carried out. The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an electron and proton storage ring currently being built at Fermilab, which addresses tests of nonlinear lattice elements in a real machine in addition to experiments on optical stochastic cooling and on the single-electron wave function. These experiments require an outstanding control over the lattice parameters, achievable with fast and precise beam monitoring systems. This work describes the steps for designing and building a beam monitor for IOTA based on synchrotron radiation, able to measure intensity, position and transverse cross-section beam.

  18. X-ray harmonics rejection on third-generation synchrotron sources using compound refractive lenses.

    PubMed

    Polikarpov, Maxim; Snigireva, Irina; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2014-05-01

    A new method of harmonics rejection based on X-ray refractive optics has been proposed. Taking into account the fact that the focal distance of the refractive lens is energy-dependent, the use of an off-axis illumination of the lens immediately leads to spatial separation of the energy spectrum by focusing the fundamental harmonic at the focal point and suppressing the unfocused high-energy radiation with a screen absorber or slit. The experiment was performed at the ESRF ID06 beamline in the in-line geometry using an X-ray transfocator with compound refractive lenses. Using this technique the presence of the third harmonic has been reduced to 10(-3). In total, our method enabled suppression of all higher-order harmonics to five orders of magnitude using monochromator detuning. The method is well suited to third-generation synchrotron radiation sources and is very promising for the future ultimate storage rings.

  19. Mirror and grating surface figure requirements for grazing incidence synchrotron radiation beamlines: Power loading effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, S.L.; Sharma, S.

    1987-10-21

    At present, grazing incidence mirrors are used almost exclusively as the first optical element in VUV and soft x-ray synchrotron radiation beam lines. The performance of these mirrors is determined by thermal and mechanical stress-induced figure errors as well as by figure errors remaining from the grinding and polishing process. With the advent of VUV and soft x-ray undulators and wigglers has come a new set of thermal stress problems related to both the magnitude and the spatial distribution of power from these devices. In many cases the power load on the entrance slits and gratings in these beamlines is no longer negligible. The dependence of thermally-induced front-end mirror figure errors on various storage ring and insertion device parameters (especially those at the NSLS) and the effects of these figure errors on a class of soft x-ray beam lines are presented. 17 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Study for ILC Damping Ring at KEKB

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, J.W.; Fukuma, H.; Kanazawa, K.I.; Koiso, H.; Masuzawa, M.; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Ohnishi, Y.; Oide, Katsunobu; Suetsugu, Y.; Tobiyama, M.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    ILC damping ring consists of very low emittance electron and positron storage rings. It is necessary for ILC damping ring to study electron cloud effects in such low emittance positron ring. We propose a low emittance operation of KEKB to study the effects.