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Sample records for syndrome therapie cellulaire

  1. Therapy of autoinflammatory syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Hal M.

    2015-01-01

    The therapy of autoinflammatory syndromes is an excellent example of the power of translational research. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and immunologic basis of this newly identified classification of disease have allowed for the application of novel, effective, targeted treatments with life-changing effects on patients. Although colchicine and TNF-α inhibitors are important therapies for specific autoinflammatory syndromes, the novel IL-1–targeted drugs are particularly effective for many of these diseases. Recently, the pharmaceutical industry has adopted a strategy of confirming the efficacy of new targeted drugs in often-ignored patients with orphan diseases, and US Food and Drug Administration policies have allowed for accelerated approval of these drugs, creating a win-win situation for patients and industry. This article reviews the general approach to the therapy of autoinflammatory diseases, focusing on current approved therapies and novel approaches that might be used in the future. PMID:20004774

  2. Electroconvulsive therapy and Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Xie, Xinhui; Chen, Yang; Tian, Yanghua; Wang, Honghao; Wang, Keyong; Wang, Kai

    2013-09-01

    Klinefelter syndrome is a common sex chromosome disorder characterized by the presence of 1 or more extra X chromosomes, and the most prevalent karyotype is 47,XXY. Epidemiological studies have showed that patients with Klinefelter syndrome had a significantly increased risk of psychosis. We presented a case of a patient with Klinefelter syndrome who was characterized by psychiatric symptoms. The patients had been refractory to clozapine and sodium valproate, but a remarkable improvement occurred after a cycle of 11 sessions of modified electroconvulsive therapy.

  3. Therapy-related preleukemic syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.L.; Bagby, G.C. Jr.; Richert-Boe, K.; Magenis, R.E.; Koler, R.D.

    1981-04-01

    Eight patients developed the preleukemic syndrome after having been exposed to cytotoxic drugs for other primary diseases. All eight subsequently developed acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL). Survival following the onset of the preleukemic syndrome ranged from 5-34 months with a median of 11 months. Once overt leukemia developed median survival was three months. No patient responded to conventional antileukemic therapy. A higher incidence of chromosomal abnormalities was noted in bone marrow cells of this group (five of six) when compared with a larger group of preleukemic patients not known to have been exposed to mutagens (four of 21). In addition, two patients had second chromosome studies after overt leukemia developed and there was no evidence of cytogenetic clonal evolution. The clinical course and cytogenetic data in these patients attest to the relevance of our criteria in identifying the preleukemic syndrome and suggest that the leukemic clone was fully established during the preleukemic phase. Thus, patients previously exposed to cytotoxic therapy who develop the preleukemic syndrome may be viewed as having early leukemia.

  4. Therapy of the burnout syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Korczak, Dieter; Wastian, Monika; Schneider, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence, diagnostics and therapy of the burnout syndrome are increasingly discussed in the public. The unclear definition and diagnostics of the burnout syndrome are scientifically criticized. There are several therapies with unclear evidence for the treatment of burnout in existence. Objectives The health technology assessment (HTA) report deals with the question of usage and efficacy of different burnout therapies. Methods For the years 2006 to 2011, a systematic literature research was done in 31 electronic databases (e.g. EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO). Important inclusion criteria are burnout, therapeutic intervention and treatment outcome. Results 17 studies meet the inclusion criteria and are regarded for the HTA report. The studies are very heterogeneous (sample size, type of intervention, measuring method, level of evidence). Due to their study design (e.g. four reviews, eight randomized controlled trials) the studies have a comparable high evidence: three times 1A, five times 1B, one time 2A, two times 2B and six times 4. 13 of the 17 studies are dealing with the efficacy of psychotherapy and psychosocial interventions for the reduction of burnout (partly in combination with other techniques). Cognitive behaviour therapy leads to the improvement of emotional exhaustion in the majority of the studies. The evidence is inconsistent for the efficacy of stress management and music therapy. Two studies regarding the efficacy of Qigong therapy do not deliver a distinct result. One study proves the efficacy of roots of Rhodiola rosea (evidence level 1B). Physical therapy is only in one study separately examined and does not show a better result than standard therapy. Discussion Despite the number of studies with high evidence the results for the efficacy of burnout therapies are preliminary and do have only limited reach. The authors of the studies complain about the low number of skilled studies for the therapy of burnout. Furthermore, they point

  5. Directed Therapy for Exfoliation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Angelilli, Allison; Ritch, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is an age-related disorder of the extracellular matrix that leads the production of abnormal fibrillar material that leads to elevated intraocular pressure and a relatively severe glaucoma. Exfoliation material is deposited in numerous ocular tissues and extraocular organs. XFS is associated with ocular ischemia, cerebrovascular disease, neurodegenerative disease and cardiovascular disease. Current modalities of treatment include intraocular pressure lowering with topical antihypertensives, laser trabeculoplasty and filtration surgery. The disease paradigm for XFS should be expanded to include directed therapy designed specifically to target the underlying disease process. Potential targets include preventing the formation or promoting the depolymerization of exfoliation material. Novel therapies targeting trabecular meshwork may prove particularly useful in the care of exfoliative glaucoma. The systemic and ocular associations of XFS underscore the need for a comprehensive search for neuroprotective agents in its treatment. PMID:19888433

  6. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roizen, Nancy J.

    2005-01-01

    In their role as committed advocates, parents of children with Down syndrome have always sought alternative therapies, mainly to enhance cognitive function but also to improve their appearance. Nutritional supplements have been the most frequent type of complementary and alternative therapy used. Cell therapy, plastic surgery, hormonal therapy,…

  7. Extrapyramidal syndrome following chloroquine therapy.

    PubMed

    Singhi, S; Singhi, P; Singh, M

    1979-02-01

    Chloroquine is considered essentially nontoxic when used for the chemosuppression of malaria, but gastrointestinal upsets, headache, blurring of vision, pruritus, and uritcaria may occur during chloroquine therapy. Recently, Bhargava et al. and Eronini and Eronini have reported the extrapyramidal syndrome (EPS) following chloroquine therapy in adults. The clinical manifestations included upward rolling of the eyeballs, retraction of neck and back, trismus with marked difficulty in speech, and coarse tremors. Observations of 4 instances of EPS in children following chloroquine therapy for malaria are reported. A 2-1/2 year old girl was admitted to the All India Institute of Medical Sciences Hospital with a 4 day history of intermittent high grade pyrexia with chills and rigors. Following treatment with oral chloroquine in the recommended therapeutic dosage, the fever responded, but the child became drowsy and developed paroxysms of involuntary movements of the tongue, torticollis, torsion dystonia of the limbs, and parosysms of tonic muscular spasms. She completely recovered spontaneously within 48 hours. The 2nd case was that of a 12-year old female brought to the hospital with a 15-day history of intermittent high grade fever with chills and rigors. The patient was started on chloroquine sulfate in the recommended therapeutic dose. After an interval of 4 days she developed coarse tremors of the hands, upward rolling of the eyeballs, episodic deviation of the angle of the mouth towards the left, and trismus. These symptoms disappeared spontaneously within 8 hours. A 6-year old girl, the 3rd case, developed episodes of opisthotonous, upward rolling of the eyeballs, protrusions of the tongue, intermittent writhing movements of the upper limbs, and drowsiness following the ingestion of 6 tablets of chloroquine sulfate for suspected diagnosis of malaria. She spontaneously recovered from EPS over a period of about 48 hours. The 4th case, a 7-year old boy, gave a history

  8. Delayed Stress Response Syndrome: Family Therapy Indications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figley, Charles R.; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

    1978-01-01

    The delayed stress response syndrome is a form of chronic catastrophic stress disorder. The theoretical nature of the syndrome and its most characteristic symptoms are delineated within the context of treating Vietnam combat veterans. The paper outlines treatment implications within a family therapy program. (Author)

  9. Gene therapy for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fillat, Cristina; Altafaj, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    The presence of an additional copy of HSA21 chromosome in Down syndrome (DS) individuals leads to the overexpression of 30-50% of HSA21 genes. This upregulation can, in turn, trigger a deregulation on the expression of non-HSA21 genes. Moreover, the overdose of HSA21 microRNAs (miRNAs) may result in the downregulation of its target genes. Additional complexity can also arise from epigenetic changes modulating gene expression. Thus, a myriad of transcriptional and posttranscriptional alterations participate to produce abnormal phenotypes in almost all tissues and organs of DS individuals. The study of the physiological roles of genes dysregulated in DS, as well as their characterization in murine models with gene(s) dosage imbalance, pointed out several genes, and functional noncoding elements to be particularly critical in the etiology of DS. Recent findings indicate that gene therapy strategies-based on the introduction of genetic elements by means of delivery vectors-toward the correction of phenotypic abnormalities in DS are also very promising tool to identify HSA21 and non-HSA21 gene candidates, contributing to DS phenotype. In this chapter, we focus on the impact of normalizing the expression levels of up or downregulated genes to rescue particular phenotypes of DS. Attempts toward gene-based treatment approaches in mouse models will be discussed as new opportunities to ameliorate DS alterations.

  10. Cognitive Therapy for Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Barbara; Blanchard, Edward B.

    1994-01-01

    Randomly assigned 20 patients with irritable bowel syndrome to intensive, individualized cognitive therapy or to daily gastrointestinal symptom monitoring. Pre- to posttreatment evaluations showed significantly greater gastrointestinal symptom reduction for those receiving cognitive therapy than for those in symptom monitoring. At posttreatment,…

  11. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Physical Therapy or Surgery?

    PubMed

    2017-03-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome causes pain, numbness, and weakness in the wrist and hand. Nearly 50% of all work-related injuries are linked to carpal tunnel syndrome, and people with this injury are more likely to miss work because of it. Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome can be treated with physical therapy or surgery. Although surgery may be considered when the symptoms are severe, more than a third of patients do not return to work within 8 weeks after an operation. Based on the potential side effects and risks of surgery, patients often ask if they might try physical therapy first. An article in the March 2017 issue of JOSPT assesses the effectiveness of therapy and surgery to treat carpal tunnel syndrome. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(3):162. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0503.

  12. Acquired Bartter syndrome following gentamicin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, J.; Patel, M. L.; Gupta, K. K.; Pandey, S.; Dinkar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity may manifest as nonoliguric renal failure or tubular dysfunction, such as Fanconi-like syndrome, Bartter-like syndrome (BS), or distal renal tubular acidosis. We report a case who developed severe renal tubular dysfunction on the the 7th day of gentamicin therapy, resulting in metabolic alkalosis, refractory hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia, and polyuria. The patient was diagnosed as a case of transient BS associated with gentamicin exposure. The patient recovered with conservative management. PMID:27942182

  13. Anton syndrome during oxygen-ozone therapy.

    PubMed

    Avcı, Sema; Büyükcam, Fatih; Demir, Ömer Faruk; Özkan, Seda

    2015-06-01

    Ozone (O₃) gas is a molecule that consists of 3 oxygen atoms, found out in the mid-19th century [1]. Ozone gas preserves humans from detrimental influences of ultraviolet radiation [1]. In spite of harmful effects of O₃ gas, investigators think that it has excessive curative effects [1]. Nowadays, O₃ therapy is used for many fields of medicine in precise therapeutic doses [1] and [2]. It is known that O₃ therapy is helpful in dental procedures, cerebrovascular diseases, tinnitus, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, hypercholesterolemia, sensorial hypoacusis, senile dementia, multiple sclerosis, irradiation sensitive tumors, herpes simplex and herpes zoster virus infections, muscular hypertonia, and chronic otitis media, etc.[2]. The complications and disadvantages of O₃ therapy could be observed in the future. Herein, we presented a case of ischemic stroke after an oxygen-O₃ therapy, which is called also Anton syndrome.

  14. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome are cancer syndromes which affect multiple organs and lead to significant decline in quality of life in affected patients. These syndromes are rare and typically affect the adolescent and young adult population, resulting in greater cumulative years of life lost. Improved understanding of the underpinnings of the genetic pathways underlying these syndromes and the rapid evolution of targeted therapies in general have made it possible to develop therapeutic options for these patients and other genetic cancer syndromes. Targeted therapies especially antiangiogenics and inhibitors of the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway have shown activity in selected group of patients affected by these syndromes or in patients harboring specific sporadic mutations which are otherwise characteristic of these syndromes. Unfortunately due to the rare nature, patients with these syndromes are not the focus of clinical trials and unique results seen in these patients can easily go unnoticed. Most of the data suggesting benefits of targeted therapies are either case reports or small case series. Thus, a literature review was indicated. In this review we explore the use of molecularly targeted therapy options in Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome.

  15. Atypical Takotsubo syndrome during anagrelide therapy.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Riccardo; Rognoni, Andrea; Ardizzone, Fabio; Maccio, Sergio; Santagostino, Alberto; Rognoni, Giorgio

    2009-07-01

    Anagrelide is a phosphodiesterase III inhibitor utilized in the treatment of essential thrombocythemia. Anagrelide can be responsible for positive inotropic and chonotropic activity of the cardiovascular system. Moreover, it can induce vasospam directly on the epicardial coronary arteries. In the literature, it is well reported that this inhibitor can determine serious cardiovascular side effects, including congestive heart failure, arrhythmia and acute coronary syndrome. We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman who developed a mid-ventricular Takotsubo syndrome while on anagrelide therapy. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as left ventricular ballooning syndrome, is characterized by a reversible ventricular contractile dysfunction with akinesis and expansion of apical segments and hyperkinesis of the basal segments. Recently, atypical cases with akinesia and dilation of mid-ventricular segment and hypercontraction of the apical segments, also called mid-ventricular and inverted Takotsubo syndrome, have been described. Even though the pathogenesis of Takotsubo syndrome is poorly understood, several mechanisms have been proposed, including catecholamine-induced myocardial stunning, and ischemia-mediated stunning due to multivessel epicardial or microvascular spasm. We think that in our case, the adverse response of anagrelide therapy was determined, by accumulated dosage of the drug, through an intensive inotropic stimulation and a sympathetic hyperactivation in a vulnerable myocardium. To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports of an association between anagrelide therapy and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  16. [Combined treatment of palmoplantar syndrome in patients under antitumor therapy].

    PubMed

    Kruglova, L S; Shatokhina, E A; Elfimov, M A; Illarionov, V E; Chervinskaya, A V; Portnov, V V; Filatova, E V; Petrova, M S

    2016-01-01

    Observation covered 12 patients under various antitumor medications. Group 1 was formed of patients with developed palmoplantar syndrome varying in severity, who received complex treatment including IR-therapy and local antioxidant medication. Group 2 included patients without palmoplantar syndrome, who received preventive treatment with IR-therapy. All patients of group 1 demonstrated lower severity of palmoplantar syndrome manifestations. In group 2, 80% of the patients avoided palmoplantar syndrome development, and 20% of the patients had light course of the syndrome manifestations. Patients at high risk of palmoplantar syndrome under antitumor therapy are recommended to undergo IR-therapy and local antioxidant medication.

  17. [The Reiter syndrome. 2. Diagnosis, therapy, prognosis].

    PubMed

    Miehle, W

    1979-02-01

    The incomplete form, the so-called Reiter-trias (three-fold Reiter's syndrome) and the form supplemented by skin- and mucous-membrane-lesions are presented. Iritis, conjunctivitis, urethritis as well as visceral complications are being discussed referring to their appearance and frequency. Of essential importance seems to be a specific analysis which will bring to light the often fleeting (eyes, urogenital-region) or willingly concealed (urethritis) symptoms. A differential diagnosis, recommendations for therapy and a prognostic outlook are concluding this short demonstration of Reiter's syndrome.

  18. [Diagnosis and therapy of fibromyalgia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Köllner, V; Bernardy, K; Sommer, C; Häuser, W

    2009-05-01

    The meaningfulness of the term fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), possible diagnostic criteria, and the therapeutic procedure, were for a long time points of contention between different professional associations. In an interdisciplinary S3 guideline on the definition, pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapy of FMS, it has now been possible to work out a consensus that is accepted by all involved professional associations and patient representatives on the basis of the available evidence. The most important results for clinical practice are presented and discussed here using case examples. The number of FMS patients in Germany is estimated to lie at 1.6 million (2% of the population), and 80-90% of those affected are women. FMS is classified under the functional somatic syndromes of the diseases of the musculoskeletal system and of the connective tissue (ICD 10 M 79.7). Comorbidities with other functional somatic syndromes and mental disorders are frequent. The clinical diagnosis of an FMS can ensue both by examining the tender points and also based on symptoms. Basic therapy includes elucidation and psychoeducation, aerobic endurance training adapted to the individual performance capability, operant behavioural therapy, and as a drug-based therapy option, amitriptyline 25-50mg/d (all level of evidence 1a). A graded therapeutic procedure which includes the patients in the decision-making is recommended.

  19. [Intensive therapy for patients with Guillian-Barré syndrome].

    PubMed

    Buus, Lone; Tønnesen, Else K

    2014-10-13

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is the leading cause of acute flaccid paralysis in the industrialized world. Approximately 25% of the patients suffering from Guillain-Barré syndrome develop respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation and intensive therapy. We seek answers to when it is optimal to start respiratory supportive therapy and review various complications associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  20. Advances in medical therapies for Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tritos, Nicholas A; Biller, Beverly M K

    2012-02-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a heterogeneous disorder of diverse etiologies, leading to cortisol excess. Endogenous CS is caused by tumors secreting adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) (either eutopically or ectopically), cortisol, or very rarely corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Definitive therapy of endogenous CS optimally involves tumor resection. Indications for medical therapy include acutely ill patients in preparation for surgery, those for whom surgery is not indicated (such as patients with unknown tumor location or unresectable lesions, and patients unfit for surgery for medical reasons), or patients who remain hypercortisolemic postoperatively. In the current article, the published literature has been reviewed to summarize data on medical therapies used in CS. Several agents are either used "off label" or being studied as potential therapies for CS. Medications suppressing adrenal steroidogenesis currently in use include ketoconazole, metyrapone, mitotane, or etomidate. In addition, the investigational agent LCI699 is under study. Centrally acting agents, which suppress ACTH secretion, include cabergoline, octreotide, as well as the investigational agents pasireotide, bexarotene, and lapatinib, which are being studied in patients with pituitary tumors. Mifepristone, a type 2 glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, was recently approved by the FDA as a new therapy for CS. Although not definitive at present, medical therapies have an important role in the management of CS patients. It is anticipated that understanding the pathogenesis of these tumors at a molecular level may spawn the development of rationally designed, highly efficacious medical therapies for CS in the future.

  1. Upfront allogeneic stem cell transplantation after reduced-intensity/nonmyeloablative conditioning for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: a study by the Société Française de Greffe de Moelle et de Thérapie Cellulaire.

    PubMed

    Damaj, Gandhi; Mohty, Mohammad; Robin, Marie; Michallet, Mauricette; Chevallier, Patrice; Beguin, Yves; Nguyen, Stephanie; Bories, Pierre; Blaise, Didier; Maillard, Natacha; Rubio, Marie Therese; Fegueux, Nathalie; Cornillon, Jerome; Clavert, Aline; Huynh, Anne; Adès, Lionel; Thiébaut-Bertrand, Anne; Hermine, Olivier; Vigouroux, Stephane; Fenaux, Pierre; Duhamel, Alain; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim

    2014-09-01

    Cytoreduction before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes remains a debatable issue. After excluding patients who had received preconditioning induction chemotherapy, we analyzed 128 consecutive patients with myelodysplastic syndrome who received reduced-intensity or nonmyeloablative conditioning (RIC/NMA) allo-SCT. Among them, 40 received azacitidine (AZA) before transplant (AZA group) and 88 were transplanted up front (best supportive care [BSC] group). At diagnosis, 55 patients had intermediate 2 or high-risk scores per the International Prognostic Scoring System and 33 had a high cytogenetic risk score. Progression to a more advanced disease before allo-SCT was recorded in 22 patients. Source of stem cells were blood (n = 112) or marrow (n = 16) from sibling (n = 78) or HLA-matched unrelated (n = 50) donors. With a median follow-up of 60 months, 3-year overall survival, relapse-free survival, cumulative incidence of relapse, and nonrelapse mortality were, respectively, 53% versus 53% (P = .69), 37% versus 42% (P = .78), 35% versus 36% (P = .99), and 20% versus 23% (P = .74), for the AZA group and BSC group, respectively. Multivariate analysis confirmed the absence of statistical differences in outcome between the AZA and BSC groups, after adjusting for potential confounders using the propensity score approach. The absence of cytoreduction before RIC/NMA allo-SCT did not seem to alter the outcome. However, our results emphasize the need to perform prospective protocols to delineate the role of debulking strategy and to identify subsets of patients who may benefit from this approach.

  2. Music Therapy: A Therapeutic Intervention for Girls with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Kathleen A.

    The paper reviews music therapy, the educational background of music therapists, music therapy's various settings, and its use as an intervention with girls with Rett Syndrome. Sample music therapy programs for three girls (aged 5, 14, and 20 years) with Rett Syndrome are presented. The sample programs provide: student descriptions; the girls'…

  3. Physical Therapy as Good as Surgery for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164278.html Physical Therapy as Good as Surgery for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Study Conservative approach ... FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery is a common approach to treat carpal tunnel syndrome. But, ...

  4. [Evidence-based therapy of Raynaud's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Distler, M; Distler, J; Ciurea, A; Kyburz, D; Müller-Ladner, U; Reich, K; Distler, O

    2006-07-01

    Raynaud's syndrome has a prevalence of 3-5% in the general population. Despite its high frequency, the majority of available therapies have not been validated in randomized controlled trials. Effective therapies with a high level of evidence include the calcium channel blocker nifedipine. As analyzed by meta-analyses, nifedipine showed improvement of the peripheral circulation, as well as reduction of both the intensity and frequency of attacks in patients with primary and secondary Raynaud's syndrome as compared to placebo. Similar results in a metaanalysis were obtained for intravenous infusions of iloprost in patients with secondary Raynaud's phenomenon associated with systemic sclerosis. In addition, intravenous infusions of iloprost improved healing of fingertip ulcers in patients with systemic sclerosis. Therapies with significant effects in single randomized controlled trials include angiotensin II-receptor type 1 antagonists (losartan), the calcium channel blockers felodipine und amlodipine, serotonin-reuptake-inhibitors (fluoxetine) und phosphodiesterase-V-inhibitors (sildenafil, vardenafil). However, the results for these promising substances have to be confirmed in long-term trials with larger patient numbers.

  5. Growth hormone replacement therapy in Costello syndrome.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, Panagiota; Christoforidis, Athanasios; Vargiami, Euthymia; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I

    2014-12-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is considered an overgrowth disorder given the macrosomia that is present at birth .However, shortly after birth the weight drops dramatically and the patients are usually referred for failure to thrive. Subsequently, affected patients develop the distinctive coarse facial appearance and are at risk for cardiac anomalies and solid tumor malignancies. Various endocrine disorders, although not very often, have been reported in patients with CS, including growth hormone deficiency, hypoglycemia, ACTH deficiency, cryptorchidism and hypothyroidism. We report a case of Costello syndrome with hypothyroidism, cryptorchidism and growth hormone deficiency and we evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of growth hormone replacement therapy. The index patient is a paradigm of successful and safe treatment with growth hormone for almost 7 years. Since patients with CS are at increased risk for cardiac myopathy and tumor development they deserve close monitoring during treatment.

  6. Emerging Therapies for Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Scott M.; Wilensky, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    In the majority of cases acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are caused by activation and aggregation of platelets and subsequent thrombus formation leading to a decrease in coronary artery blood flow. Recent focus on the treatment of ACS has centered on reducing the response of platelets to vascular injury as well as inhibiting fibrin deposition. Novel therapies include more effective P2Y12 receptor blockers thereby reducing inter-individual variability, targeting the platelet thrombin receptor (protease activated receptor 1) as well as directly inhibiting factor Xa or thrombin activity. In this review we discuss the clinical data evaluating the effectiveness of these various new ACS treatment options. PMID:22028691

  7. Allo-SCT for  Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms in blast phase: a study from the Societe Française de Greffe de Moelle et de Therapie Cellulaire (SFGM-TC).

    PubMed

    Cahu, X; Chevallier, P; Clavert, A; Suarez, F; Michallet, M; Vincent, L; Vigouroux, S; Blaise, D; Mariette, C; Bilger, K; Robin, M; Yakoub-Agha, I; Peffault de Latour, R; Mohty, M

    2014-06-01

    Progression of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative (MPN) or myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an adverse event in the course of the disease. Although allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (allo-SCT) is considered as the only curative therapy, few data exist on the outcome of patients with Philadelphia-negative MPN or MDS/MPN in blast phase who received an allo-SCT. Sixty patients were included in this retrospective study. AML was secondary to an MPN in 43 cases, whereas AML evolved from an MDS/MPN in 17 cases. Patients received allo-SCT in CR or advanced disease in 26 cases and 34 cases, respectively. With a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 25-44), OS and leukemia-free survival (LFS) were, respectively, 18% and 9% at 3 years. CR at transplant was associated with an improved LFS in univariate and multivariate analysis. The 3-year LFS was 18% for patients undergoing allo-SCT in CR versus 3% in advanced disease (P=0.008). Absence of thrombosis and an intermediate or favorable AML karyotype were associated with an improved outcome for patients who received allo-SCT in CR. New strategies are needed to improve the outcome of patients with MPN-MDS/MPN in blast phase.

  8. Review of pharmacological therapies in fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses the current status of drug therapy for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and is based on interdisciplinary FMS management guidelines, meta-analyses of drug trial data, and observational studies. In the absence of a single gold-standard medication, patients are treated with a variety of drugs from different categories, often with limited evidence. Drug therapy is not mandatory for the management of FMS. Pregabalin, duloxetine, milnacipran, and amitriptyline are the current first-line prescribed agents but have had a mostly modest effect. With only a minority of patients expected to experience substantial benefit, most will discontinue therapy because of either a lack of efficacy or tolerability problems. Many drug treatments have undergone limited study and have had negative results. It is unlikely that these failed pilot trials will undergo future study. However, medications, though imperfect, will continue to be a component of treatment strategy for these patients. Both the potential for medication therapy to relieve symptoms and the potential to cause harm should be carefully considered in their administration. PMID:24433463

  9. Evaluation and therapy of polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loy, R; Seibel, M M

    1988-12-01

    The amenorrhea associated with bilateral polycystic ovaries, described by Stein and Leventhal, actually represents a syndrome involving various organs and systems. Clinically, this symptom complex commonly presents as menstrual disturbances, infertility, excessive body weight, and hirsutism. An understanding of the pathophysiology that underlies these symptoms provides a logical basis for evaluation and treatment of the syndrome. The diagnostic approach may involve biochemical determinations (baseline, stimulated, and suppressed) and radiologic testing. Therapy is directed at chronic anovulation, the hyperandrogenism responsible for hirsutism and acne, and the prophylaxis against endometrial and breast carcinomas. Ovulation can be induced with various agents, many of which have a risk of ovarian hyperstimulation in the PCOD patient. The use of GnRH agonists with HMG or FSH for ovulation induction will probably increase in the future. Although classic wedge resection has little place in modern management of PCOD, the recent laparoscopic ovarian cautery remains largely unstudied with respect to long-term postoperative plasma androgen levels and pelvic adhesions. It is too premature to evaluate this new surgical therapy. Hirsutism is effectively treated with estrogen-progestin combinations, medroxyprogesterone acetate, androgen receptor blockers (spironolactone, cimetidine, cyproterone acetate, and cyproheptadine), and glucocorticoids. To date, the available GnRH agonists have not been found selective enough to be used in the treatment of hirsutism, owing to possible long-term complications. Most medical approaches should include electrolysis for permanent hair removal. At present, gynecologic surgery seems to have little place in the management of hirsutism.

  10. Cognitive - Behavioral Therapy in Central Sensitivity Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Williams, David A

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a formal therapeutic approach that encourages selfmanagement of illnesses in accordance with the BioPsychoSocial model. CBT is composed of numerous skills grounded in known principles of behavioral and cognitive change. Each skill is designed to influence one of the facets associated with the perception of pain (i.e., sensory factors, emotional factors, or cognitive factors). Across the various Central Sensitivity Syndromes (CSS), CBT is thought to be beneficial to at least a portion of individuals afflicted. This paper provides a description of CBT, some recommendations for integrating CBT into clinical practice, and a brief review of the evidence supporting the use of CBT with various forms of CSS.

  11. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Yoga as Remedial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kavuri, Vijaya; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Malamud, Ariel; Selvan, Senthamil R.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a group of symptoms manifesting as a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder in which patients experience abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating that is often relieved with defecation. IBS is often associated with a host of secondary comorbidities such as anxiety, depression, headaches, and fatigue. In this review, we examined the basic principles of Pancha Kosha (five sheaths of human existence) concept from an Indian scripture Taittiriya Upanishad and the pathophysiology of a disease from the Yoga approach, Yoga Vasistha's Adhi (originated from mind) and Vyadhi (ailment/disease) concept. An analogy between the age old, the most profound concept of Adhi-Vyadhi, and modern scientific stress-induced dysregulation of brain-gut axis, as it relates to IBS that could pave way for impacting IBS, is emphasized. Based on these perspectives, a plausible Yoga module as a remedial therapy is provided to better manage the primary and secondary symptoms of IBS. PMID:26064164

  12. Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Iron Chelation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Angelucci, Emanuele; Urru, Silvana Anna Maria; Pilo, Federica; Piperno, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Over recent decades we have been fortunate to witness the advent of new technologies and of an expanded knowledge and application of chelation therapies to the benefit of patients with iron overload. However, extrapolation of learnings from thalassemia to the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) has resulted in a fragmented and uncoordinated clinical evidence base. We’re therefore forced to change our understanding of MDS, looking with other eyes to observational studies that inform us about the relationship between iron and tissue damage in these subjects. The available evidence suggests that iron accumulation is prognostically significant in MDS, but levels of accumulation historically associated with organ damage (based on data generated in the thalassemias) are infrequent. Emerging experimental data have provided some insight into this paradox, as our understanding of iron-induced tissue damage has evolved from a process of progressive bulking of organs through high-volumes iron deposition, to one of ‘toxic’ damage inflicted through multiple cellular pathways. Damage from iron may, therefore, occur prior to reaching reference thresholds, and similarly, chelation may be of benefit before overt iron overload is seen. In this review, we revisit the scientific and clinical evidence for iron overload in MDS to better characterize the iron overload phenotype in these patients, which differs from the classical transfusional and non-transfusional iron overload syndrome. We hope this will provide a conceptual framework to better understand the complex associations between anemia, iron and clinical outcomes, to accelerate progress in this area. PMID:28293409

  13. Hepatorenal syndrome: Update on diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Juan G; Cramp, Matthew E

    2017-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a manifestation of extreme circulatory dysfunction and entails high morbidity and mortality. A new definition has been recently recommended by the International Club of Ascites, according to which HRS diagnosis relies in serum creatinine changes instead that on a fixed high value. Moreover, new data on urinary biomarkers has been recently published. In this sense, the use of urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin seems useful to identify patients with acute tubular necrosis and should be employed in the diagnostic algorithm. Treatment with terlipressin and albumin is the current standard of care. Recent data show that terlipressin in intravenous continuous infusion is better tolerated than intravenous boluses and has the same efficacy. Terlipressin is effective in reversing HRS in only 40%-50% of patients. Serum bilirubin and creatinine levels along with the increase in blood pressure and the presence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome have been identified as predictors of response. Clearly, there is a need for further research in novel treatments. Other treatments have been assessed such as noradrenaline, dopamine, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, renal and liver replacement therapy, etc. Among all of them, liver transplant is the only curative option and should be considered in all patients. HRS can be prevented with volume expansion with albumin during spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and after post large volume paracentesis, and with antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with advanced cirrhosis and low proteins in the ascitic fluid. This manuscript reviews the recent advances in the diagnosis and management of this life-threatening condition. PMID:28293378

  14. [Kinetic therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chechenin, M G; Voevodin, S V; Pronichev, E Iu; Shuliveĭstrov, Iu V

    2004-01-01

    The authors evaluated the clinical and physiological effects of kinetic therapy (KT) in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Forty-six patients with ARDS underwent successive postural positioning in accordance with two regimens: 1) lateral, prone, contralateral, supine positions; 2) prone, lateral, contralateral, supine positions. The criterion for changing each position was the change in monitoring indices: SpO2, PaO2, and thoracopulmonary compliance (C). KT was performed until a respirator was withdrawn from the patient. In 25 patients, each maneuver of positioning was made during 30-minute propofol sedation. The control group included 24 patients with ARDS who received neither KT nor propofol sedation. KT caused a decrease in Vd/Vt, Qs/Qt and an increase in PaO2/FiO2 and C was more intensive, as compared with the control group. The duration of the patient's prone position was 3.2-0.7 hours and that of the supine position was 3.4-0.8 hours. The right and left lateral positions lasted 1.1-0.2 and 1.3-0.2 hours, respectively. KT regimen 1 was found to be more effective than KT regimen 2. Propofol sedation enhanced the efficiency of KT. The latter reduced death rates in patients with ARDS.

  15. Systemic therapy of Cushing’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cushing’s disease (CD) in a stricter sense derives from pathologic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion usually triggered by micro- or macroadenoma of the pituitary gland. It is, thus, a form of secondary hypercortisolism. In contrast, Cushing’s syndrome (CS) describes the complexity of clinical consequences triggered by excessive cortisol blood levels over extended periods of time irrespective of their origin. CS is a rare disease according to the European orphan regulation affecting not more than 5/10,000 persons in Europe. CD most commonly affects adults aged 20–50 years with a marked female preponderance (1:5 ratio of male vs. female). Patient presentation and clinical symptoms substantially vary depending on duration and plasma levels of cortisol. In 80% of cases CS is ACTH-dependent and in 20% of cases it is ACTH-independent, respectively. Endogenous CS usually is a result of a pituitary tumor. Clinical manifestation of CS, apart from corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH-), ACTH-, and cortisol-producing (malign and benign) tumors may also be by exogenous glucocorticoid intake. Diagnosis of hypercortisolism (irrespective of its origin) comprises the following: Complete blood count including serum electrolytes, blood sugar etc., urinary free cortisol (UFC) from 24 h-urine sampling and circadian profile of plasma cortisol, plasma ACTH, dehydroepiandrosterone, testosterone itself, and urine steroid profile, Low-Dose-Dexamethasone-Test, High-Dose-Dexamethasone-Test, after endocrine diagnostic tests: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultra-sound, computer tomography (CT) and other localization diagnostics. First-line therapy is trans-sphenoidal surgery (TSS) of the pituitary adenoma (in case of ACTH-producing tumors). In patients not amenable for surgery radiotherapy remains an option. Pharmacological therapy applies when these two options are not amenable or refused. In cases when pharmacological therapy becomes necessary, Pasireotide should be used

  16. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Risaku

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome affects military personnel and civilians following the uncontrolled dispersal of radiation, such as that caused by detonation of nuclear devices and inappropriate medical treatments. Therefore, there is a growing need for medical interventions that facilitate the improved recovery of victims and patients. One promising approach may be cell therapy, which, when appropriately implemented, may facilitate recovery from whole body injuries. This editorial highlights the current knowledge regarding the use of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the benefits and limitations of which are under investigation. Establishing successful therapies for acute radiation syndrome may require using such a therapeutic approach in addition to conventional approaches.

  17. [Gorlin syndrome: photodynamic therapy, as a useful adjunct to surgery].

    PubMed

    Huguier, V; Wierzbicka-Hainaut, E; Fray, J; Guillet, G; Dagrégorio, G

    2012-04-01

    Gorlin syndrome, also called nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is well known by dermatologists. Since its onset, 10 years ago, photodynamic therapy has found new applications and is now currently used to cure single or multiple basal cell carcinomas, with good results and without residual scars. We recall some of the basic principles of this technique, as well as its indications in Gorlin syndrome, which we illustrate with one case. Plastic surgeons must consider this relatively new technique, developed by dermatologists, as a useful adjunct to surgery in the management of Gorlin syndrome.

  18. Sick sinus syndrome as a complication of mediastinal radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjola-Sintonen, S.; Toetterman, K.J.K.; Kupari, M. )

    1990-06-01

    A 33-year-old man who had received mediastinal radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease 12 years earlier developed a symptomatic sick sinus syndrome requiring the implantation of a permanent pacemaker. The sick sinus syndrome and a finding of an occult constrictive pericarditis were considered to be due to the previous mediastinal irradiation. A ventricular pacemaker was chosen because mediastinal radiotherapy also increases the risk of developing atrioventricular conduction defects.

  19. HIV Therapy, Metabolic Syndrome, and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Pao, Vivian; Lee, Grace A.; Grunfeld, Carl

    2011-01-01

    People with HIV infection have metabolic abnormalities that resemble metabolic syndrome (hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and insulin resistance), which is known to predict increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, there is not one underlying cause for these abnormalities and they are not linked to each other. Rather, individual abnormalities can be affected by the host response to HIV itself, specific HIV drugs, classes of HIV drugs, HIV-associated lipoatrophy, or restoration to health. Furthermore, one component of metabolic syndrome, increased waist circumference, occurs less frequently in HIV infection. Thus, HIV infection supports the concept that metabolic syndrome does not represent a syndrome based on a common underlying pathophysiology. As might be predicted from these findings, the prevalence of CVD is higher in people with HIV infection. It remains to be determined whether CVD rates in HIV infection are higher than might be predicted from traditional risk factors, including smoking. PMID:18366987

  20. Physical therapy in the management of myofacial pain dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Talaat, A M; el-Dibany, M M; el-Garf, A

    1986-01-01

    A study of the effectiveness of physical therapy for patients with myofacial pain dysfunction syndrome was performed. Clinical evaluation of 120 patients revealed marked male preponderance, distribution according to age showed a great prevalence of the third decade, and most common chief complaints were pain and muscle tenderness. Patients were classified randomly into three equal groups treated by muscle relaxant drugs, shortwave diathermy, and ultrasonic therapy, respectively. Regular follow-up was carried out for 6 to 12 months to assess patients' responses to different forms of treatment. Evaluation revealed marked relief of symptoms by the use of physical therapy, and the best results were obtained by the use of ultrasonic therapy.

  1. Successful nutritional therapy for superior mesenteric artery syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chan, Dedrick Kok Hong; Mak, Kenneth Seck Wai; Cheah, Yee Lee

    2012-11-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome is an uncommon cause of duodenal outlet obstruction. Symptoms and signs suggestive of this condition are nonspecific, and a high index of suspicion coupled with appropriate imaging studies are necessary for diagnosis. We present the case of a 70-year-old man who developed SMA syndrome following prolonged hospitalisation for a surgically treated bleeding duodenal ulcer. His SMA syndrome resolved after successful nonoperative management based on accepted guidelines for nutritional therapy, thus avoiding the need for reoperation and its attendant risks in a malnourished patient.

  2. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome: response to electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Karadenizli, Demet; Dilbaz, Nesrin; Bayam, Goksel

    2005-12-01

    Tourette syndrome is a chronic disease characterized by vocal and motor ticks. Self-injurious behavior is observed in one third of the patients and can be life-threatening. Current medical therapy includes dopamine receptor antagonists and atypical antipsychotics. In certain cases, there has been some evidence about the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The case study below is a Tourette syndrome patient with self-injurious behavior and psychotic features and poor response to medical therapy. Two years of remission was achieved after 7 sessions of ECT and carbamezapine maintance therapy. In conclusion, ECT can be used as an efficacious treatment modality for Tourette patients with self-injurious behavior, psychotic features, or for those that are unresponsive to traditional methods.

  3. Dance Therapy with Physical Therapy for Children with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupont, Blanche Burt; Schulmann, Diana

    This study sought to investigate effects of a dance program on bilateral toe-standing balance and single-point static balance skills of a group of children with Down Syndrome. Thirteen experimental and 10 control group students between the ages of 3 and 13 years were assessed on toe-standing balance and single-point standing balance on the right…

  4. Family Therapy of Terroristic Trauma: Psychological Syndromes and Treatment Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Reviews pertinent literature on terroristic trauma and combines this information with the author's experience in treating adults, children, and family victims and survivors of recent terrorist attacks. Describes the psychological syndromes resulting from terrorism and discusses the relevant individual and family therapy modalities for treating…

  5. [A new treatment: thermal therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome].

    PubMed

    Masuda, Akinori; Munemoto, Takao; Tei, Chuwa

    2007-06-01

    Thermal therapy using far-infrared ray dry sauna was performed for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Symptoms such as fatigue, pain, and low-grade fever were dramatically improved on two patients. And prednisolone administration was discontinued and became socially rehabilitated 6 months after discharge. On other 11 patients with CFS, physical symptoms such as fatigue and pain improved, too. Furthermore, we reported that repeated thermal therapy had relaxation effect and diminishes appetite loss and subjective complaints in mildly depressed patients. These results suggest that repeated thermal therapy may be a promising method for the treatment of CFS.

  6. Asperger's syndrome: diagnosis, comorbidity and therapy.

    PubMed

    Tarazi, F I; Sahli, Z T; Pleskow, J; Mousa, S A

    2015-03-01

    Asperger's syndrome (AS), a behavioral disorder that is related to autism, is associated with abnormal social functioning and repetitive behaviors but not with a decrease in intelligence or linguistic functionality. This article reviews the clinical diagnosis of AS and discusses the comorbid disorders that may be present with AS, as well as the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pharmacotherapies given to AS patients, as reported in preclinical and clinical studies. AS may be present with several comorbid disorders including: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and Tourette's syndrome. The difficulty in distinguishing AS from autism results in treating the comorbid disorder symptoms, rather than treating the symptoms of AS. Accordingly, there is a great need to further understand the psychobiology of AS and its association with other disorders, which should expand the pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutic options and improve the quality of life for AS patients.

  7. Medical training therapy in lumbar syndromes.

    PubMed

    Broll-Zeitvogel, E; Grifka, J; Bauer, J; Roths, P H; Degryse, P

    1999-11-01

    Chronic low back pain can be considered to be one of the most frequently treated and most costly diseases in modern industrial societies. Dysfunctions and imbalances of the spine-supporting muscles increase the risk of low back pain. Consequently preventive treatment and rehabilitation have to aim at preserving and restoring the full capacity of the spine-supporting muscles as well as training coordination and spine-friendly behaviour. In addition to various measures of pain therapy, physiotherapeutic treatment including neuro-physiotherapy, physical treatment (eg electrotherapy), balneotherapy and supportive behavioural training, medical rehabilitation therapy (MRT) ranks among the most effective ways of treating low back pain. MRT applies guidelines and methods of exercise methodology within medically indicated programmes of preventive treatment and rehabilitation. Various objectives of MRT are outlined with special regard to the stages of MRT treatment, emphasizing positive adaptation of the neuro-muscular system in the course of rehabilitation. Physicians are responsible for MRT diagnosis and control. Taking into account the base disorder and the progress of therapy physiotherapists and the physicians in charge determine MRT objectives and treatment strategies.

  8. [Medical training therapy in lumbar syndromes].

    PubMed

    Broll-Zeitvogel, E; Grifka, J; Bauer, J; Roths, P H; Degryse, P

    1999-11-01

    Chronic low back pain can be considered to be one of the most frequently treated and most costly diseases in modern industrial societies. Dysfunctions and imbalances of the spine-supporting muscles increase the risk of low back pain. Consequently preventive treatment and rehabilitation have to aim at preserving and restoring the full capacity of the spine-supporting muscles as well as training coordination and spine-friendly behaviour. In addition to various measures of pain therapy, physiotherapeutic treatment including neuro-physiotherapy, physical treatment (eg electrotherapy), balneotherapy and supportive behavioural training, medical rehabilitation therapy (MRT) ranks among the most effective ways of treating low back pain. MRT applies guidelines and methods of exercise methodology within medically indicated programmes of preventive treatment and rehabilitation. Various objectives of MRT are outlined with special regard to the stages of MRT treatment, emphasizing positive adaptation of the neuro-muscular system in the course of rehabilitation. Physicians are responsible for MRT diagnosis and control. Taking into account the base disorder and the progress of therapy physiotherapists and the physicians in charge determine MRT objectives and treatment strategies.

  9. Pathogenesis of Hepatorenal Syndrome: Implications for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Durand, François; Graupera, Isabel; Ginès, Pere; Olson, Jody C; Nadim, Mitra K

    2016-02-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are prone to develop acute kidney injury (AKI) due to a number of causes, including bacterial infections with or without septic shock, hypovolemia, administration of nephrotoxic drugs, and intrinsic kidney diseases, among others. Most importantly, patients with advanced cirrhosis develop a distinctive cause of AKI, characterized by rapidly progressive glomerular filtration rate loss associated with marked disturbances in circulatory function in the absence of obvious pathologic abnormalities in the kidneys, known as hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Decreased kidney function results from intense renal vasoconstriction secondary to the complex circulatory changes of cirrhosis with splanchnic vasodilatation and effective hypovolemia. Beyond activation of vasoactive systems, factors including impaired renal blood flow autoregulation and systemic inflammation may play a role in the development of HRS. Most patients improve with albumin and vasopressors; however, the prognosis of HRS remains very poor. Novel biomarkers may be helpful in distinguishing HRS from other causes of AKI in patients with cirrhosis.

  10. Shoulder Impingement Syndromes: Implications on Physical Therapy Examination and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    A painful shoulder presents challenges in examination, diagnosis and intervention for the physical therapist because of the complexity of the structures involved. A common cause of shoulder pain is shoulder impingement syndrome. This was first described as a condition in which the soft tissues of the subacromial space were chronically entrapped and compressed between the humeral head and the subacromial arch. This definition does not account for the myriad potential causes of shoulder impingement conditions, as forms of impingement other than subacromial soft tissue compression may explain different symptomatic shoulder injuries. This paper describes shoulder impingement syndromes that have been hypothesized, identified and analyzed in the literature. Physical Therapy examination and intervention for these syndromes are also discussed. PMID:25792938

  11. Effects of testosterone therapy on bipolar disorder with Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Kazuhiro; Jono, Tadashi; Nishi, Yoshitomo; Ushijima, Hirokage; Ikeda, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is widely associated with cognitive impairment and language problems. KS patients may also exhibit psychiatric symptoms. We present the case of an 18-year-old man with KS who experienced rapidly repeating relapses of manic episodes. He was unresponsive to the usual pharmacotherapies for bipolar disorders such as mood stabilizers and second-generation antipsychotics. Mood was eventually improved with testosterone therapy in addition to pharmacotherapy, with no relapse of manic episodes for 3 years after discharge. Testosterone therapy may prevent relapsing manic episodes of bipolar disorder in patients with KS.

  12. Le naevus bleu cellulaire atypique du poignet: à propos d'un cas et revue de la literature

    PubMed Central

    Boussakri, Hassan; Roux, Jean Luc; Durand, Luc; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Le naevus bleu cellulaire atypique est une entité pathologique rare et sa localisation au niveau du poignet est exceptionnelle. Il est Considéré comme une Variante à des caractéristiques intermédiaires entre le naevus bleu cellulaire typique et le naevus bleu malin, dont l’évolution est incertaine. Le but de notre travail est d'attirer l'attention sur cette variété lésionnelle rare et de discuter les diagnostiques différentiels, ainsi que décrire les aspects histologique et les options thérapeutiques possibles. PMID:25426206

  13. Epigenetics, fragile X syndrome and transcriptional therapy.

    PubMed

    Tabolacci, Elisabetta; Chiurazzi, Pietro

    2013-11-01

    Epigenetics refers to the study of heritable changes in gene expression that occur without a change in DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms therefore include all transcriptional controls that determine how genes are expressed during development and differentiation, but also in individual cells responding to environmental stimuli. The purpose of this review is to examine the basic principles of epigenetic mechanisms and their contribution to human disorders with a particular focus on fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common monogenic form of developmental cognitive impairment. FXS represents a prototype of the so-called repeat expansion disorders due to "dynamic" mutations, namely the expansion (known as "full mutation") of a CGG repeat in the 5'UTR of the FMR1 gene. This genetic anomaly is accompanied by epigenetic modifications (mainly DNA methylation and histone deacetylation), resulting in the inactivation of the FMR1 gene. The presence of an intact FMR1 coding sequence allowed pharmacological reactivation of gene transcription, particularly through the use of the DNA demethylating agent 5'-aza-2'-deoxycytydine and/or inhibitors of histone deacetylases. These treatments suggested that DNA methylation is dominant over histone acetylation in silencing the FMR1 gene. The importance of DNA methylation in repressing FMR1 transcription is confirmed by the existence of rare unaffected males carrying unmethylated full mutations. Finally, we address the potential use of epigenetic approaches to targeted treatment of other genetic conditions.

  14. Diagnosis and therapy of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pengo, Vittorio; Denas, Gentian; Padayattil, Seena J; Zoppellaro, Giacomo; Bison, Elisa; Banzato, Alessandra; Hoxha, Ariela; Ruffatti, Amelia

    2015-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a clinical condition that has not been well defined yet. Although the clinical component is well established, the laboratory part is a mood issue. According to current guidelines, 3 tests (lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin, and anti β2-glycoprotein I antibodies) are officially recommended to assess the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. According to test positivity, patients are classified into categories in clinical studies. However, it is now clear that classification categories have a different impact on the clinical course of APS. Indeed, patients and healthy carriers with a full positive antibody profile (triple positivity) are those at the highest risk of events. Patients with a single test positivity are those at a lower risk. In this review, on the basis of a laboratory profile, we grade the diagnosis of APS into definite, probable/possible, and uncertain. We also discuss secondary prevention of thrombotic APS, prevention of pregnancy morbidity, and treatment of catastrophic APS. Finally, new tools in laboratory diagnosis and treatment are highlighted.

  15. Contemporary medical therapy for polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lanham, M S M; Lebovic, D I; Domino, S E

    2006-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a multi-system endocrinopathy with long-term metabolic and cardiovascular health consequences. Patients typically present due to symptoms of irregular menstruation, hair growth, or infertility; however, recent management options are aimed at further treating underlying glucose-insulin abnormalities as well as androgen excess for proactive control of symptoms. By a 2003 international consensus conference, diagnosis is made by two out of three criteria: chronic oligoovulation or anovulation after excluding secondary causes, clinical or biochemical evidence of hyperandrogenism (but not necessarily hirsutism due to inter-patient variability in hair follicle sensitivity), and radiological evidence of polycystic ovaries. Traditional medical treatment options include oral contraceptive pills, cyclic progestins, ovulation induction, and anti-androgenic medications (aldosterone antagonist, 5alpha-reductase antagonist, and follicle ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor). Recent pharmacotherapies include insulin-sensitizing medications metformin and two thiazolidinediones (rosiglitazone/Avandia and pioglitazone/Actos), a CYP19 aromatase inhibitor (letrozole/Femara), and statins to potentially lower testosterone levels.

  16. Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Desmond J.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

  17. Iron chelation therapy in thalassemia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cianciulli, Paolo

    2009-12-29

    Transfusional hemosiderosis is a frequent complication in patients with transfusion dependent chronic diseases such as thalassemias and severe type of sickle cell diseases. As there are no physiological mechanisms to excrete the iron contained in transfused red cells (1 unit of blood contains approximately 200 mg of iron) the excess of iron is stored in various organs. Cardiomyopathy is the most severe complication covering more than 70% of the causes of death of thalassemic patients. Although the current reference standard iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) has been used clinically for over four decades, its effectiveness is limited by a demanding therapeutic regimen that leads to poor compliance. Despite poor compliance, because of the inconvenience of subcutaneous infusion, DFO improved considerably the survival and quality of life of patients with thalassemia. Deferiprone since 1998 and Deferasirox since 2005 were licensed for clinical use. The oral chelators have a better compliance because of oral use, a comparable efficacy to DFO in iron excretion and probably a better penetration to myocardial cells. Considerable increase in iron excretion was documented with combination therapy of DFO and Deferiprone. The proper use of the three chelators will improve the prevention and treatment of iron overload, it will reduce complications, and improve survival and quality of life of transfused patients.

  18. Iron Chelation Therapy in Thalassemia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cianciulli, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Transfusional hemosiderosis is a frequent complication in patients with transfusion dependent chronic diseases such as thalassemias and severe type of sickle cell diseases. As there are no physiological mechanisms to excrete the iron contained in transfused red cells (1 unit of blood contains approximately 200 mg of iron) the excess of iron is stored in various organs. Cardiomyopathy is the most severe complication covering more than 70% of the causes of death of thalassemic patients. Although the current reference standard iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) has been used clinically for over four decades, its effectiveness is limited by a demanding therapeutic regimen that leads to poor compliance. Despite poor compliance, because of the inconvenience of subcutaneous infusion, DFO improved considerably the survival and quality of life of patients with thalassemia. Deferiprone since 1998 and Deferasirox since 2005 were licensed for clinical use. The oral chelators have a better compliance because of oral use, a comparable efficacy to DFO in iron excretion and probably a better penetration to myocardial cells. Considerable increase in iron excretion was documented with combination therapy of DFO and Deferiprone. The proper use of the three chelators will improve the prevention and treatment of iron overload, it will reduce complications, and improve survival and quality of life of transfused patients. PMID:21415999

  19. Development of Metabolic Syndrome Associated to Cancer Therapy: Review.

    PubMed

    Casco, Stephania; Soto-Vega, Elena

    2016-12-01

    Long-term childhood cancer survivors are at great risk of developing late adverse effects after treatment, such as, reduced growth, obesity, decreased fertility, high blood pressure, cardiovascular diseases, impaired glucose, another form of cancer, among others organ dysfunctions, some of them are part of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome and cancer connection is still not entirely understood, but there are some notions about it. Metabolic alterations produced during childhood cancer are more likely determined by treatments like radiotherapy, chemotherapy, glucocorticoids therapy, and surgery. Cancer treatment is associated to vascular alterations, hormone deficiencies, changes in insulin sensitivity, lipid metabolism, and inflammatory mediators. Obesity has been considered a crucial component in metabolic syndrome; obesity risk factors during childhood cancer include cranial radiation, female gender, and exposure to glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone. In addition, local radiotherapy or surgery may cause endocrine deficiencies, depends on the directly damage of endocrine organs. Patients who received some types of cancer treatment should be evaluated periodically to early diagnostic metabolic disorders associated to antineoplastic therapy.

  20. Developing therapies for the metabolic syndrome: challenges, opportunities, and… the unknown

    PubMed Central

    Matfin, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome refers to a clustering of established and emerging cardiovascular disease risk factors within a single individual. The established risk factors, such as obesity, diabetes, dyslipidaemia and hypertension, and other emerging risk factors are closely related to central obesity (especially intra-abdominal adiposity) and insulin resistance. However, debate continues about the very existence of the metabolic syndrome. Despite the controversies, many existing and new therapies are targeting the metabolic syndrome and component risk factors. To date, no therapies have been approved specifically for treating the metabolic syndrome. In this article some of the challenges and opportunities in developing therapies for the metabolic syndrome are discussed. PMID:23148153

  1. Outcomes of Cord Blood Transplantation Using Reduced-Intensity Conditioning for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: A Study on Behalf of Eurocord and Cord Blood Committee of Cellular Therapy and Immunobiology Working Party, Chronic Malignancies Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the Societé Française de Greffe de Moelle et Therapie Cellulaire.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Erick; Cornillon, Jérôme; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Chevallier, Patrice; Cornelissen, Jan J; Andersen, Niels S; Maillard, Natacha; Nguyen, Stephanie; Blaise, Didier; Deconinck, Eric; Veelken, Hendrik; Milpied, Noel; Van Gelder, Michel; Peffault de Latour, Regis; Gluckman, Eliane; Kröger, Nicolaus; Schetelig, Johannes; Rocha, Vanderson

    2015-08-01

    Outcomes after umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)/small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) are unknown. We analyzed outcomes of 68 patients with poor-risk CLL/SLL who underwent reduced-intensity (RIC) UCBT from 2004 to 2012. The median age was 57 years and median follow-up 36 months; 17 patients had del 17p/p53mutation, 19 patients had fludarabine-refractory disease, 11 relapsed after autologous stem cell transplantation, 8 had diagnosis of prolymphocytic leukemia, 4 had Richter syndrome, and 8 underwent transplantation with progressive or refractory disease. The most common RIC used was cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, and total body irradiation (TBI) in 82%; 15 patients received antithymocyte globulin. Most of the cord blood grafts were HLA mismatched and 76% received a double UCBT. Median total nucleated cells collected was 4.7 × 10(7)/kg. The cumulative incidences (CI) of neutrophil and platelet engraftment were 84% and 72% at 60 and 180 days respectively; day 100 graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (grade II to IV) was 43% and 3-year chronic GVHD was 32%. The CI of relapse, nonrelapse mortality, overall survival, and progression-free survival (PFS) at 3 years were 16%, 39%, 54%, and 45%, respectively. Fludarabine-sensitive disease at transplantation and use of low-dose TBI regimens were associated with acceptable PFS. In conclusion, use of RIC-UCBT seems to be feasible in patients with poor-risk CLL/SLL and improved outcomes were observed in patients with fludarabine-sensitive disease who received low-dose TBI regimens.

  2. Current therapies for Morquio A syndrome and their clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sawamoto, Kazuki; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Mackenzie, William G.; Theroux, Mary C.; Pizarro, Christian; Yabe, Hiromasa; Orii, Kenji E.; Mason, Robert W.; Orii, Tadao; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Morquio A syndrome is characterized by a unique skeletal dysplasia, leading to short neck and trunk, pectus carinatum, laxity of joints, kyphoscoliosis, and tracheal obstruction. Cervical spinal cord compression/inability, a restrictive and obstructive airway, and/or bone deformity and imbalance of growth, are life-threatening to Morquio A patients, leading to a high morbidity and mortality. It is critical to review the current therapeutic approaches with respect to their efficacy and limitations. Areas covered Patients with progressive skeletal dysplasia often need to undergo orthopedic surgical interventions in the first two decades of life. Recently, we have treated four patients with a new surgery to correct progressive tracheal obstruction. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been approved clinically. Cell-based therapies such as hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) and gene therapy are typically one-time, permanent treatments for enzyme deficiencies. We report here on four Morquio A patients treated with HSCT approved in Japan and followed for at least ten years after treatment. Gene therapy is under investigation on mouse models but not yet available as a therapeutic option. Expert opinion ERT and HSCT in combination with surgical intervention(s) are a therapeutic option for Morquio A; however, the approach for bone and cartilage lesion remains an unmet challenge. PMID:28217429

  3. Plates-formes de microscopie et fluorescence par resonance de plasmons de surface appliquees a l'imagerie cellulaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabot, Vincent

    L'elaboration de nouveaux medicaments repose sur les etudes pharmacologiques, dont le role est d'identifier de nouveaux composes actifs ou de nouvelles cibles pharmacologiques agissant entre autres au niveau cellulaire. Recemment, la detection basee sur la resonance des plasmons de surface (SPR) a ete appliquee a l'etude de reponses cellulaires. Cette methode de detection, permettant d'observer des variations d'indice de refraction associes a de faibles changements de masse a la surface d'un metal, a l'avantage de permettre l'etude d'une population de cellules vivantes en temps reel, sans necessiter l'introduction d'agents de marquage. Pour effectuer la detection au niveau de cellules individuelles, on peut employer la microscopie SPR, qui consiste a localiser spatialement la detection par un systeme d'imagerie. Cependant, la detection basee sur la SPR est une mesure sans marquage et les signaux mesures sont attribues a une reponse moyennee des differentes sources cellulaires. Afin de mieux comprendre et identifier les composantes cellulaires generant le signal mesure en SPR, il est pertinent de combiner la microscopie SPR avec une modalite complementaire, soit l'imagerie de fluorescence. C'est dans cette problematique que s'insere ce projet de these, consistant a concevoir deux plates-formes distinctes de microscopie SPR et de fluorescence optimisees pour l'etude cellulaire, de sorte a evaluer les possibilites d'integration de ces deux modalites en un seul systeme. Des substrats adaptes pour chaque plate-forme ont ete concus et realises. Ces substrats employaient une couche d'argent passivee par l'ajout d'une mince couche d'or. La stabilite et la biocompatibilite des substrats ont ete validees pour l'etude cellulaire. Deux configurations permettant d'ameliorer la sensibilite en sondant les cellules plus profondement ont ete evaluees, soit l'emploi de plasmons de surface a longue portee et de guides d'onde a gaine metallique. La sensibilite accrue de ces

  4. Diffuse alveolar damage syndrome associated with amiodarone therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Jirik, F. R.; Henning, H.; Huckell, V. F.; Ostrow, D. V.

    1983-01-01

    Amiodarone is an effective antiarrhythmic that has been used in Europe for over a decade and has been available for investigational use in North America for a shorter time. It has several well recognized side effects. Recent reports have related pulmonary disorders to the use of this drug; fibrosing alveolitis has been found by lung biopsy. Amiodarone's toxicity to the lung does not appear to be dose-related. Besides cessation of amiodarone administration, management of this complication includes steroid therapy. A case is described of nonspecific diffuse alveolar damage syndrome in a patient who had received amiodarone. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:6839242

  5. [Long QT syndrome. History, genetics, clinical symptoms, causes and therapy].

    PubMed

    Krönauer, T; Friederich, P

    2015-08-01

    The long QT syndrome is caused by a change in cardiac repolarization due to functional ion channel defects. A differentiation is made between a congenital (cLQTS) and an acquired (aLQTS) form of the disease. The disease results in the name-giving prolongation of the QT interval in the electrocardiogram and represents a predisposition for cardiac arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. This article summarizes the current knowledge on the history, pathophysiology, clinical symptoms and therapy of cLQTS and aLQTS. This knowledge of pathophysiological features of the symptoms allows the underlying anesthesiological approach for individualized perioperative concepts for patients suffering from LQTS to be derived.

  6. Monoclonal antibody therapy in the treatment of Reye's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Treon, S P; Broitman, S A

    1992-11-01

    A role for lipopolysaccharides (endotoxins, LPS) in 7 the pathogenesis of Reye's syndrome (RS) has previously been suggested. Impairment of hepatic LPS clearance can lead to systemic endotoxemia as previous studies by this and other laboratories have suggested for several hepatic disorders including RS. Systemic LPS may mediate many of the clinical findings associated with RS by eliciting monokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and interleukin-8. Monoclonal antibody therapy directed at LPS, and monokines may represent a novel approach to the treatment of RS.

  7. Should we consider MMF therapy after rituximab for nephrotic syndrome?

    PubMed

    Filler, Guido; Huang, Shih-Han Susan; Sharma, Ajay P

    2011-10-01

    The management of steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome, especially in patients who have failed to respond to cytotoxic drugs, such as cyclophosphamide, remains challenging. Rituximab represents a new (off-label) therapeutic option. In a significant portion of patients, it has a short serum half-life following the recovery of CD20-positive cells. The addition of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as a maintenance therapy is also an attractive option, but one which requires testing in a prospective randomized clinical trial with therapeutic drug monitoring and mechanistic ancillary studies.

  8. Macrophage activation syndrome in the era of biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Grom, Alexei A; Horne, AnnaCarin; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) refers to acute overwhelming inflammation caused by a 'cytokine storm'. Although increasingly recognized as a life-threatening complication of various rheumatic diseases, clinically, MAS is strikingly similar to primary and secondary forms of haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). Not surprisingly, many rheumatologists prefer the term secondary HLH rather than MAS to describe this condition, and efforts to change the nomenclature are in progress. The pathophysiology of MAS remains elusive, but observations in animal models, as well as data on the effects of new anticytokine therapies on rates and clinical presentations of MAS in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), provide clues to the understanding of this perplexing clinical phenomenon. In this Review, we explore the latest available evidence and discuss potential diagnostic challenges in the era of increasing use of biologic therapies.

  9. Pharmacologic management of Cushing syndrome : new targets for therapy.

    PubMed

    Sonino, Nicoletta; Boscaro, Marco; Fallo, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    The successful treatment of Cushing syndrome depends on specific therapy directed against the etiology of hypercortisolism. In addition to surgical procedures, various drugs have been employed in the management of this difficult disease. Compounds with neuromodulatory properties have been effective in only a limited number of cases of hypothalamic-pituitary-dependent Cushing disease, the most common form of Cushing syndrome. These agents include serotonin antagonists (cyproheptadine, ketanserin, ritanserin), dopamine agonists (bromocriptine, cabergoline), GABA agonists (valproic acid [sodium valproate]), and somatostatin analogs (octreotide). Interesting new avenues at the pituitary level involve the potential use of thiazolidinedione compounds, such as rosiglitazone, and of retinoic acid, which are ligands of different nuclear hormone receptors involved in hypothalamic-pituitary regulation. The most exciting news, however, in the pharmacologic approach to Cushing syndrome refers to the adrenal corticotropin (adrenocorticotropic hormone; ACTH)-independent forms, in which aberrant adrenal receptors, through the binding of their respective ligands, could lead to chronic cortisol overproduction. They include receptors for gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), beta-adrenergic agonists, luteinizing hormone (LH)/human chorionic gonadotropin, serotonin (5-HT(4) receptor), vasopressin (V(1) receptor), and angiotensin II (AT(1) receptor). In GIP-dependent Cushing syndrome, the most frequent subtype of ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia associated with the presence of aberrant adrenocortical hormone receptors described so far, octreotide administration before each meal showed clinical efficacy only in the first few months, probably because of somatostatin receptor downregulation in GIP-secreting cells. Long-term medical treatments with propranolol and the gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog leuprorelin (leuprolide acetate) were effective in patients with

  10. Vitamin Therapy and Children with Down's Syndrome: A Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruess, James B.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Following a brief outline of vitamin therapy's effects on schizophrenia and learning disabilities, research is reviewed on vitamin therapy for children with Down's Syndrome, concluding with a discussion of critical responses to research endorsing vitamin therapy. It is concluded that vitamin therapy contributes nothing to the development of…

  11. Children with Down Syndrome Improved in Motor Functioning and Muscle Tone Following Massage Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Field, Tiffany; Largie, Shay; Mora, Dana; Bornstein, Joan; Waldman, Ronnie

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-one moderate to high functioning young children (mean age, two years) with Down syndrome receiving early intervention (physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy) were randomly assigned to additionally receive two 0.5-hour massage therapy or reading sessions (control group) per week for two months. On the first and last day…

  12. Cervical Syndrome – the Effectiveness of Physical Therapy Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Kasumovic, Mersija; Gorcevic, Emir; Gorcevic, Semir; Osmanovic, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The cervical syndrome refers to a set of disorders caused by the changes in the cervical spine and the soft-tissue surrounding it, with pain as the predominant symptom. Sore neck has been a common problem among a large section of today`s population. The factors contributing to this issue include the modern lifestyle, prolonged sitting and incorrect, fixed or constrained working postures. The root of these difficulties is found in the mechanical disorders of the cervical spine structures, poor body posture and jerky body movements. In the Scandinavian countries neck pain is considered to be a public health problem. Methods: The study evaluated 25 patients with an established diagnosis of cervical syndrome. The research was conducted at the PI Institute of Occupational and Sports Medicine of Zenica–Doboj Canton. Each patient received twenty physical therapy treatment sessions. Results and conclusions: The study included 25 patients suffering from the cervical syndrome. The statistical analysis of gender distribution indicated that 36% of the patients were male, while 64% were female. The mean age of study participants was 46.76±4,23. The patients ranged in age from 39 to 54 years, with no statistically significant difference in the mean age of male and female patients, p=0.691. Analysing the types of occupational activities performed by the patients, the study found a positive relation between neck pain and prolonged sitting at work. The patients who performed office work made up 76% of the total number. Each method of physical therapy applied in the treatment of neck pain patients proved useful. However, the combination of electrotherapy, kinesiotherapy and manual massage proved to be most effective. Conclusion: The cervical syndrome is a common medical condition primarily affecting adult population, with prevalence being higher among women and office workers. The condition places a considerable socioeconomic burden on the afflicted

  13. [Therapy of subclinical (subdiagnostic) syndromes of schizophrenia spectrum].

    PubMed

    Gross, G

    2001-09-01

    Since 1911, when E. Bleuler thought of the so-called latent schizophrenia as the most frequent type of schizophrenia, but most seldom diagnosed as such, the question, whether there exist abortive forms of schizophrenia, was discussed again and again; so in 1932 by Mayer-Gross, who devoted to the uncharacteristic onset of schizophrenia a special chapter, in 1938 by Stern (so-called borderline neuroses) und in 1949 by Hoch and Polatin (pseudoneurotic schizophrenias). Since the 50s Huber had described by means of follow-up studies the uncharacteristic basic stages occurring long before the onset and after remission of the florid symptomatology, in 1957 the cenesthetic schizophrenia and in 1961 and 1966 the asthenic or pure defect of schizophrenia, which he also counts to the subclinical syndromes or formes frustes of endogenous psychoses just as the endogenous juvenile-asthenic failure syndromes, the larvate schizophrenia, the endogenous obsessive-compulsive disorder and the circumscribed cenesthopathy. The recognition of these subthreshold stages and types of the schizophrenia spectrum, which cannot be diagnosed by valid diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia, is the presupposition for an adequate therapy. The patients complain about subjectively experienced mainly dynamic, affective, cognitive (thought, perception and action disturbances), cenesthetic and vegetative basic symptoms, can be registered and documented by the Bonn Scale BSABS. We will deal with symptomatology, course and therapy of the mentioned sublinical syndromes. The psychopharmacological treatment is chosen according to the psychopathological cross-section picture and will be continued until improvement or remission of the symptomatology and after stepwise reduction stopped. If dynamic and affective basic symptoms predominate, we prefer antidepressants (e. g. amitriptyline-type or the newer SSRIs), in case of prevailing cognitive and cenethetic basic symptoms neuroleptics, today mainly atypical ones

  14. Mucopolysaccharidosis III (Sanfilippo Syndrome)- disease presentation and experimental therapies.

    PubMed

    Gilkes, Janine A; Heldermon, Coy D

    2014-09-01

    Sanfilippo Syndrome or Mucopolysaccharidosis Ill (MPS Ill) is a group of lysosomal storage diseases resulting from a deficiency of one of four lysosomal enzymes: Type A - heparan N-sulfatase (SGSH), Type B - a-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU), Type C - acetyl CoA a-glucosaminide acetyltransferase (HGSNAT) and Type D - N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfatase (GNS). Each of these enzymes is necessary for degradation of heparan sulfate. Deficiency of any of these enzymes manifests as a neurodegenerative disorder with accompanying somatic manifestations. Typically this presents early in life with developmental delays followed by developmental regression and usually results in death sometime during the second decade of life, though several less severe cases have been described living into late adulthood (30's to 60's). Often there is a delay of several years from time of symptom onset to diagnosis. Currently treatment is limited to supportive care. We will briefly discuss the typical natural history and presumed pathophysiology of the disease. We will also discuss current experimental therapies being pursued for treatment of this devastating disease. These include enzyme replacement, gene therapy, stem cell therapy, and substrate reduction approaches.

  15. Surfactant therapy for meconium aspiration syndrome: current status.

    PubMed

    Dargaville, Peter A; Mills, John F

    2005-01-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is an important cause of respiratory distress in the term infant. Therapy for the disease remains problematic, and newer treatments such as high-frequency ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide are being applied with increasing frequency. There is a significant disturbance of the pulmonary surfactant system in MAS, with a wealth of experimental data indicating that inhibition of surfactant function in the alveolar space is an important element of the pathophysiology of the disease. This inhibition may be mediated by meconium, plasma proteins, haemoglobin and oedema fluid, and, at least in vitro, can be overcome by increasing surfactant phospholipid concentration. These observations have served as the rationale for administration of exogenous surfactant preparations in MAS, initially as standard bolus therapy and, more recently, in association with therapeutic lung lavage. Bolus surfactant therapy in ventilated infants with MAS has been found to improve oxygenation in most studies, although there are a significant proportion of nonresponders and in many cases the effect is transient. Pooled data from randomised controlled trials of surfactant therapy suggest a benefit in terms of a reduction in the requirement for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (relative risk 0.48 in surfactant-treated infants) but no diminution of air leak or ventilator days. Current evidence would support the use of bolus surfactant therapy on a case by case basis in nurseries with a relatively high mortality associated with MAS, or the lack of availability of other forms of respiratory support such as high-frequency ventilation or nitric oxide. If used, bolus surfactant should be administered as early as practicable to infants who exhibit significant parenchymal disease, at a phospholipid dose of at least 100 mg/kg, rapidly instilled into the trachea. Natural surfactant or a third-generation synthetic surfactant should be used and the dosage repeated every 6

  16. 5'-Azacitidine for therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes after non-Hodgkin lymphoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Salaroli, Adriano; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Martelli, Maurizio; D'Elia, Gianna Maria; Nanni, Mauro; Mauro, Francesca Romana; Alimena, Giuliana

    2011-10-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes are possible complications in patients treated for previous hematologic malignancies. Therapeutic strategies in these type of disorders are still not well defined: azacitidine has been recently approved for the treatment of higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes, but few data are published relating possible efficacy in therapy-related dysplastic disorders. We reported here 4 patients treated with azacitidine for therapy related dysplasia after chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  17. Thalidomide salvage therapy following allogeneic stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma: a retrospective study from the Intergroupe Francophone du Myélome (IFM) and the Société Française de Greffe de Moelle et Thérapie Cellulaire (SFGM-TC).

    PubMed

    Mohty, M; Attal, M; Marit, G; Bulabois, C E; Garban, F; Gratecos, N; Rio, B; Vernant, J P; Sotto, J J; Cahn, J Y; Blaise, D; Jouet, J P; Facon, T; Yakoub-Agha, I

    2005-01-01

    Thalidomide is effective in multiple myeloma (MM), even in patients who have relapsed after high-dose therapy. A potent graft-versus-myeloma (GVM) effect can be induced against MM after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). In all, 31 MM patients received thalidomide as a salvage therapy after progression following allo-SCT. The median maximum daily dose of thalidomide was 200 mg (range, 50-600). Thalidomide had to be discontinued in six patients (19%) because of toxicity. In all, nine patients (29%; 95% CI, 13-45) achieved an objective response with thalidomide therapy (six partial and three very good partial responses, VGPR). Five patients developed graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after thalidomide therapy, including the three patients achieving a VGPR. These data demonstrate that thalidomide is potentially effective in MM patients failing allo-SCT.

  18. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and glycosaminoglycans replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a debilitating chronic disease characterized by discomfort or recurrent abdominal and pelvic pains in the absence of urinary tract infections. Its symptomatology includes discomfort, increased bladder pressure, sensitivity and intense pain in the bladder and pelvic areas, increased voiding frequency and urgency, or a combination of these symptoms. For these reasons, this pathology has a very negative impact on quality of life. The etiology of IC/BPS is still not well understood and different hypotheses have been formulated, including autoimmune processes, allergic reactions, chronic bacterial infections, exposure to toxins or dietary elements, and psychosomatic factors. The finding of an effective and specific therapy for IC/BPS remains a challenge for the scientific community because of the lack of a consensus regarding the causes and the inherent difficulties in the diagnosis. The last recent hypothesis is that IC/BPS could be pathophysiologically related to a disruption of the bladder mucosa surface layer with consequent loss of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). This class of mucopolysaccharides has hydrorepellent properties and their alteration expose the urothelium to many urinary toxic agents. It has been hypothesized that when these substances penetrate the bladder wall a chain is triggered in the submucosa. In order to improve the integrity and function of the bladder lining, GAG layer replenishment therapy is widely accepted as therapy for patients with IC/BPS who have poor or inadequate response to conventional therapy. Currently, Chondroitin sulfate (CS), heparin, hyaluronic acid (HA), and pentosan polysulphate (PPS), and combinations of two GAGs (CS and HA) are the available substances with different effectiveness rates in patients with IC/BPS. There are four different commercially available products for GAG replenishment including CS, heparin, HA and PPS. Each product has different concentrations and

  19. [Irritable Bowel Syndrome; gut microbiota and probiotic therapy].

    PubMed

    Tojo González, Rafael; Suarez Gonzalez, Adolfo; Rúas Madiedo, Patricia; Mancebo Mata, Alejo; Pipa Muñiz, María; Barreiro Alonso, Eva; Roman Llorente, Francisco Javier; Moro Villar, María Carmen; Arce González, Marta María; Villegas Diaz, María Francisca; Mosquera Sierra, Eugenia; Ruiz Ruiz, Mónica

    2015-02-07

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by symptoms of abdominal pain and altered bowel habits. This common disorder is managed by varying clinical styles as no dominant therapeutic strategy has emerged. The pathophysiology of IBS remains unknown, but several lines of evidence link this disorder with the gut microbiota. Although controversy exists, gut microbiota is likely contributing to symptoms of IBS, at least in some patients, through an altered fermentation process, an impaired intestinal barrier function, a harmful modulation of enteric sensorimotor function, a promotion of low-grade inflammation without tissue damage, and a harmful modulation of the brain-gut axis. Probiotic therapy has a modest effect on IBS symptomatic relief, but the actual evidence is not strong enough to support a general recommendation of use. The best results are achieved, in children, with Lactobacillus rhamnusus GG, which moderately improves abdominal pain, while in adults the benefit appears to be greatest employing Bifidobacterium species.

  20. Successful Anticoagulation Therapy for Antiphospholipid Syndrome with Mobile Aortic Thrombi

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Oh; Moon, Seong Ho; Kim, Jong Woo; Byun, Joung Hun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Yang, Jun Ho; Lee, Chung-Eun; Kim, Jong-Duk

    2016-01-01

    Hypercoagulable states have been associated with aortic thrombosis. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is one of the commonest types of acquired thrombophilia. We report the case of successful anticoagulation management in an APS patient with mobile thrombi within the aorta. A 58-year-old male patient presented to the emergency department (ED) with right-sided hemiparesis. His first symptoms were noted approximately 12–16 hours before presentation to the ED. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed acute embolic infarction of the left frontal and parietotemporal lobes. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) demonstrated mobile thrombi attached to the wall of the ascending aorta and aortic arch. The patient was diagnosed with APS based on positivity of anti-beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibodies, and was initiated on anticoagulation therapy. Repeated TEE and CTA revealed complete resolution of the thrombi after 12 days of treatment; the patient was discharged well. PMID:28042559

  1. [Multimodal therapy concepts for failed back surgery syndrome].

    PubMed

    Casser, Hans-Raimund

    2016-09-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is a frequent complication (15-40 %) of lumbar disc surgery and is rarely successfully treated by surgery with the exception of a re-prolapse associated with radicular pain. Multimodal pain treatment, however, is indicated by a lack of pathoanatomical correlates, unclear cause and psychosocial risk factors.This review describes a standardized non-operative treatment starting with broad interdisciplinary clarification by medical, psychological and physiotherapeutic means (assessment).If the conditions for multimodal pain therapy are met, the OPS 8‑918-procedure can be applied to avoid chronic developing pain. In doing so, the already issued quality standards and guidelines for documentation should be respected.

  2. Advances in antiplatelet therapy for acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Hussain; Ruparelia, Neil

    2012-07-01

    Admissions to emergency care centres with acute coronary syndromes remain one of the principal burdens on healthcare systems in the Western world. Early pharmacological treatment in these patients is crucial, lessening the impact on both morbidity and mortality, with the cornerstone of management being antiplatelet agents. While aspirin and clopidogrel have been the drugs of choice for nearly a decade, an array of newer, more potent antiplatelet agents are now available or in late stage development. Data are rapidly gathering suggesting these agents have superior anti-ischaemic properties, improving patient outcomes, but that for some agents increased vigilance and appropriate patient selection may be necessary to guard against bleeding complications. In this review, the authors aim to deliver an overview of the changing field of antiplatelet therapy and provide information about the relative risks and benefits of these newer agents, many of which will be entering widespread clinical use imminently.

  3. Successful Anticoagulation Therapy for Antiphospholipid Syndrome with Mobile Aortic Thrombi.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Oh; Moon, Seong Ho; Kim, Jong Woo; Byun, Joung Hun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Yang, Jun Ho; Lee, Chung-Eun; Kim, Jong-Duk

    2016-12-01

    Hypercoagulable states have been associated with aortic thrombosis. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is one of the commonest types of acquired thrombophilia. We report the case of successful anticoagulation management in an APS patient with mobile thrombi within the aorta. A 58-year-old male patient presented to the emergency department (ED) with right-sided hemiparesis. His first symptoms were noted approximately 12-16 hours before presentation to the ED. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed acute embolic infarction of the left frontal and parietotemporal lobes. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) demonstrated mobile thrombi attached to the wall of the ascending aorta and aortic arch. The patient was diagnosed with APS based on positivity of anti-beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibodies, and was initiated on anticoagulation therapy. Repeated TEE and CTA revealed complete resolution of the thrombi after 12 days of treatment; the patient was discharged well.

  4. Iron chelation therapy in myelodysplastic syndromes: where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Mhairi; Gore, Steven D; Zeidan, Amer M

    2014-01-01

    Anemia leading to transfusion dependency (TD) and iron overload (IO) is commonly observed in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In MDS, TD and IO have been retrospectively associated with inferior survival and worse clinical outcomes, including cardiac, hepatic and endocrine dysfunction, and, in some analyses, with leukemic progression and infectious complications. Although suggested by retrospective analyses, clear prospective documentation of the beneficial effects of iron chelation therapy (ICT) on organ function and survival in MDS patients with TD and IO is currently lacking. Consequently, the role of ICT in MDS patients with TD and IO remains a very controversial aspect in the management of MDS. In this review, the authors summarize the current knowledge regarding IO in MDS and the role of ICT. PMID:23991926

  5. Stevens-Johnson syndrome complicating adalimumab therapy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Salama, Muna; Lawrance, Ian-Craig

    2009-09-21

    The anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha medications demonstrate efficacy in the induction of remission and its maintenance in numerous chronic inflammatory conditions. With the increasing number of patients receiving anti-TNFalpha agents, however, less common adverse reactions will occur. Cutaneous eruptions complicating treatment with an anti-TNFalpha agent are not uncommon, occurring in around 20% of patients. Adalimumab, a fully humanized antibody against TNFalpha, may be expected to cause minimal immune-mediated skin reactions compared to the chimeric monoclonal antibody, infliximab. We, however, report a case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome that required hospitalization and cessation of adalimumab in a patient with Crohn's disease (CD). In this case report, a 29-year-old male with colonic and perianal CD with associated erythema nodosum and large joint arthropathy developed severe mucositis, peripheral rash and desquamation, fevers and respiratory symptoms concomitant with a second dose of 40 mg adalimumab after a 2 mo break from adalimumab therapy. Skin biopsies of the abdominal wall confirmed erythema multiforme and the patient was on no other drugs and infective etiologies were excluded. The patient responded rapidly to IV hydrocortisone and was able to be commenced on infliximab without recurrence of the Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Desquamating skin reactions have now been described in three of the TNFalpha antagonists (infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab). These reactions can be serious and prescribers need to be aware of the potential mucocutaneous side effects of these agents, especially as Stevens-Johnson syndrome is associated with significant morbidity and mortality.

  6. Anticoagulant therapy in pregnant patients with metabolic syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Mierzynski, Radzisław; Poniedzialek-Czajkowska, Elzbieta; Kimber-Trojnar, Zaneta; Leszczynska-Gorzelak, Bozena; Oleszczuk, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy is a specific state of heightened coagulability related to the increase in procoagulant agents and to the reduced fibrinolysis. Pregnancy is associated with a 4-fold increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) and this risk still increases to 14-fold during puerperium. A correlation between the metabolic syndrome and development of cardiovascular events and cerebrovascular incidents has been described. Such a relationship is referred to a hypercoagulable state due to increased serum levels of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), fibrinogen, factor (F) VII and VIII, von Willebrand factor and from endothelial activation, caused by increased circulating adhesion molecules. As to the risk of VTE, the probability for its association with cardiovascular incidents is increased by common underlying mechanisms such as the activation of platelets and the blood coagulation. A correlation between idiopathic VTE and the metabolic syndrome has been reported. The anticoagulant therapy may be recommended during the pregnancy for the treatment or the prophylaxis of VTE and, in women with artificial heart valves, for the prevention of the valve thrombosis and systemic embolisation. There are also specific conditions during pregnancy which benefit from anticoagulant use, such as recurrent fetal loss, thrombophilia and assisted reproductive technology. There are no published specific data about using of anticoagulant agents in pregnant patients with the metabolic syndrome except for a few articles addressing reproductive problems. The mechanisms of anticoagulant action were studied with the focus on heparinoids, because of their safety not only for the patient but also for the fetus. The new oral anticoagulants were also shortly described although they have been contraindicated during the pregnancy.

  7. Metabolic syndrome – Removing roadblocks to therapy: Antigenic immunotherapies☆

    PubMed Central

    Coppieters, Ken T.; von Herrath, Matthias G.

    2014-01-01

    Up to 25 per cent of the world׳s adult population may have the metabolic syndrome, a condition closely associated with central obesity. The metabolic syndrome is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes and therefore represents an important worldwide health problem. In addition to metabolic abnormalities such as raised fasting plasma glucose, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, there is consensus that obese subjects develop a state of low-grade chronic immune activation. This sustained pro-inflammatory response in fat tissue is thought to worsen insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Likewise, the immune system contributes to the detrimental cascade of events leading to plaque formation in atherosclerosis. It has long been assumed that the innate arm of the immune system was the only key player, but emerging evidence suggests that there is in fact a sizeable adaptive immune component to obesity and cardiovascular disease. From a therapeutic perspective, it could be envisioned that immune modulation drugs such as cytokine inhibitors, co-stimulation blockers or anti-T cell agents could offer benefit. It is questionable, however, whether chronic treatment with for instance biologicals will have a favorable risk/benefit profile in a silent condition such as the metabolic syndrome. An attractive alternative could be the development of antigen-specific T cell therapies, not unlike those currently in various phases of development for type 1 diabetes. In this article, we will give an overview of antigen-specific treatment modalities in type 1 diabetes, followed by a review of the evidence for T cell involvement in obesity and atherosclerosis. PMID:24749057

  8. Nocturnal oxygen therapy in patients with the Eisenmenger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, J; Aguirre, J S; Pulido, T; Martinez-Guerra, M L; Santos, E; Alvarado, P; Rosas, M; Bautista, E

    2001-11-01

    This prospective and controlled pilot study evaluates the long-term effects of nocturnal oxygen therapy (NOT) on exercise endurance, hematology variables, quality of life, and survival of 23 adult patients (mean age, 32 +/- 6 yr) with post-tricuspid congenital heart defects (ventricular septal defect = 10; patent ductus arteriosus = 13) and Eisenmenger Syndrome. All had pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure = 88 +/- 20 mm Hg), severe hypoxemia (Pa(O(2)) = 44 +/- 5 mm Hg), and secondary erythrocytosis (hematocrit = 61.5 +/- 7%). Exercise endurance (6-min walk test = 380 +/- 88 m) was limited. In a random fashion, NOT was given to one group of patients (n = 12) but withheld from a comparable control group (n = 11). At 2 yr of close follow-up, two patients in the group of control patients, and three in the treatment group died. Mean survival estimates were similar in both groups (20.7 versus 20.8 mo; chi-square log-rank, 0.08; p = NS). Likewise, none of the hematology, exercise capacity, and quality of life variables examined showed statistically significant changes that were dependent on treatment regimen. We conclude that NOT does not modify the natural history of patients with advanced Eisenmenger Syndrome.

  9. Developments in red cell rheology at the Institut de Pathologie Cellulaire.

    PubMed

    Evans, E; Mohandas, N

    1986-01-01

    The present day rheological approximation, which has been used successfully to quantitate the deformability properties of red cells, is based on the view that the cell has a liquid interior encapsulated by a viscoelastic solid membrane shell. A review of historical developments in this field shows that determination of intrinsic red cell membrane properties has not come from simple mathematical analysis of experiments. On the contrary, considerable insight has been required to bring together physical and biological methods to rationalize the unique deformability characteristics of the red blood cell. Key developments at the Institut de Pathologie Cellulaire (IPC) in the early 1970s played a role in our improved understanding of red cell rheology. In this article, we describe the material concepts of the red cell membrane held before 1970, discuss the seminal developments at Bicetre, and, finally, outline the contemporary view of red cell deformability.

  10. Differentiation Therapy With Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-25

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Thrombocytopenia

  11. Modelisation microstructurale en fatigue/fluage a froid des alliages de titane quasi alpha par le modele des automates cellulaires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutana, Mohammed Nabil

    Les proprietes d'emploi des alliages de titane sont extremement dependantes a certains aspects des microstructures developpees lors de leur elaboration. Ces microstructures peuvent etre fortement heterogenes du point de vue de leur orientation cristallographique et de leur repartition spatiale. Leurs influences sur le comportement du materiau et son endommagement precoce sont des questions qui sont actuellement soulevees. Dans le present projet de doctorat on chercher a repondre a cette question mais aussi de presenter des solutions tangibles quant a l'utilisation securitaire de ces alliages. Un nouveau modele appele automate cellulaire a ete developpe pour simuler le comportement mecanique des alliages de titane en fatigue-fluage a froid. Ces modeles ont permet de mieux comprendre la correlation entre la microstructure et le comportement mecanique du materiau et surtout une analyse detaillee du comportement local du materiau. Mots-cles: Automate cellulaire, fatigue/fluage, alliage de titane, inclusion d'Eshelby, modelisation

  12. Metabolic Syndromes Associated with HIV: Mitigating the Side Effects of Drug Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringer, William W.; Sattler, Fred R.

    2001-01-01

    HIV infection and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) are associated with such metabolic disorders as AIDS wasting syndrome, metabolic dysregulation, and abnormalities of serum lipids. Adjunctive therapies (e.g., diet and antilipid therapy); risk factor modification (e.g., smoking cessation and blood pressure control); aerobic exercise;…

  13. Novel nutraceutic therapies for the treatment of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Méndez-del Villar, Miriam; Pérez-Rubio, Karina G; Zuñiga, Laura Y; Cortez-Navarrete, Marisol; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Alejandra; González-Ortiz, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Nutraceutic therapies such as berberine, bitter melon, Gymnema sylvestre, Irvingia gabonensis, resveratrol and ursolic acid have been shown to help control metabolic syndrome (MetS). The effect of berberine on glucose and lipid metabolism, hypertension, obesity and MetS has been evaluated in animal models and humans. Most clinical trials involving bitter melon have been conducted to evaluate its effect on glucose metabolism; nevertheless, some studies have reported favorable effects on lipids and blood pressure although there is little information about its effect on body weight. Gymnema sylvestre helps to decrease body weight and blood sugar levels; however, there is limited information on dyslipidemia and hypertension. Clinical trials of Irvingia gabonensis have shown important effects decreasing glucose and cholesterol concentrations as well decreasing body weight. Resveratrol acts through different mechanisms to decrease blood pressure, lipids, glucose and weight, showing its effects on the population with MetS. Finally, there is evidence of positive effects with ursolic acid in in vitro and in vivo studies on glucose and lipid metabolism and on body weight and visceral fat. Therefore, a review of the beneficial effects and limitations of the above-mentioned nutraceutic therapies is presented. PMID:27076875

  14. Emerging Therapies for the Prevention of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ruthman, Carl A.; Festic, Emir

    2015-01-01

    The development of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) carries significant risk of morbidity and mortality. To date, pharmacologic therapy has been largely ineffective for patients with ARDS. We present our personal review aimed at outlining current and future directions for the pharmacologic prevention of ARDS. Several available risk-stratification or prediction scores strategies for identification of patients at risk of ARDS have been reported. Although not ready for the clinical everyday use, they are and will be instrumental in the ongoing and future trials of pharmacoprevention of ARDS. Several systemic medications established the potential role in ARDS prevention based on the preclinical studies and observational data. Due to potential for systemic adverse effects to neutralize any pharmacologic benefits of systemic therapy, inhaled medications appear particularly attractive candidates for ARDS prevention. This is because of their direct delivery to the site of the proposed action (lungs), while pulmonary epithelial surface is still functional. We postulate that overall morbidity and mortality rates from ARDS in the future will be contingent upon decreasing the overall incidence of ARDS through effective identification of those at risk and early application of proven supportive care and pharmacologic interventions. PMID:26002528

  15. Non-syndromic retinal ciliopathies: translating gene discovery into therapy.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Cuzcano, Alejandro; Roepman, Ronald; Cremers, Frans P M; den Hollander, Anneke I; Mans, Dorus A

    2012-10-15

    Homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing have accelerated the discovery of gene mutations and modifier alleles implicated in inherited retinal degeneration in humans. To date, 158 genes have been found to be mutated in individuals with retinal dystrophies. Approximately one-third of the gene defects underlying retinal degeneration affect the structure and/or function of the 'connecting cilium' in photoreceptors. This structure corresponds to the transition zone of a prototypic cilium, a region with increasing relevance for ciliary homeostasis. The connecting cilium connects the inner and outer segments of the photoreceptor, mediating bi-directional transport of phototransducing proteins required for vision. In fact, the outer segment, connecting cilium and associated basal body, forms a highly specialized sensory cilium, fully dedicated to photoreception and subsequent signal transduction to the brain. At least 21 genes that encode ciliary proteins are implicated in non-syndromic retinal dystrophies such as cone dystrophy, cone-rod dystrophy, Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), macular degeneration or retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The generation and characterization of vertebrate retinal ciliopathy animal models have revealed insights into the molecular disease mechanism which are indispensable for the development and evaluation of therapeutic strategies. Gene augmentation therapy has proven to be safe and successful in restoring long-term sight in mice, dogs and humans suffering from LCA or RP. Here, we present a comprehensive overview of the genes, mutations and modifier alleles involved in non-syndromic retinal ciliopathies, review the progress in dissecting the associated retinal disease mechanisms and evaluate gene augmentation approaches to antagonize retinal degeneration in these ciliopathies.

  16. Physical Therapy and Infants with Down's Syndrome: The Effects of Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Susan R.

    1981-01-01

    The neuromotor development of Down's syndrome (DS) infants is reviewed, current physical therapy approaches are cited, a neurodevelopmental treatment (NDT) approach is described, and a study on the effects of NDT on motor performance in DS infants is reported. (SB)

  17. Effect of Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy in Patients With Fabella Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fabella is a small sesamoid bone generally located in the tendon of the lateral head of the gastrocnemius behind the lateral condyle of the femur. Fabella syndrome is the occurrence of posterolateral knee pain associated with the fabella. It is a rare cause of knee pain that is often misdiagnosed. Fabella syndrome can be managed with conservative or surgical treatment. We applied radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy as a new treatment strategy for fabella syndrome and achieved a successful outcome. PMID:28119844

  18. Nutrition: A Primary Therapy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Bryan; Typpo, Katri

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate nutrition is an essential component of intensive care management of children with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is linked to patient outcomes. One out of every two children in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) will develop malnutrition or have worsening of baseline malnutrition and present with specific micronutrient deficiencies. Early and adequate enteral nutrition (EN) is associated with improved 60-day survival after pediatric critical illness, and, yet, despite early EN guidelines, critically ill children receive on average only 55% of goal calories by PICU day 10. Inadequate delivery of EN is due to perceived feeding intolerance, reluctance to enterally feed children with hemodynamic instability, and fluid restriction. Underlying each of these factors is large practice variation between providers and across institutions for initiation, advancement, and maintenance of EN. Strategies to improve early initiation and advancement and to maintain delivery of EN are needed to improve morbidity and mortality from pediatric ARDS. Both, over and underfeeding, prolong duration of mechanical ventilation in children and worsen other organ function such that precise calorie goals are needed. The gut is thought to act as a “motor” of organ dysfunction, and emerging data regarding the role of intestinal barrier functions and the intestinal microbiome on organ dysfunction and outcomes of critical illness present exciting opportunities to improve patient outcomes. Nutrition should be considered a primary rather than supportive therapy for pediatric ARDS. Precise nutritional therapies, which are titrated and targeted to preservation of intestinal barrier function, prevention of intestinal dysbiosis, preservation of lean body mass, and blunting of the systemic inflammatory response, offer great potential for improving outcomes of pediatric ARDS. In this review, we examine the current evidence regarding dose, route, and timing of nutrition

  19. Timing of therapies for Down syndrome: the sooner, the better

    PubMed Central

    Stagni, Fiorenza; Giacomini, Andrea; Guidi, Sandra; Ciani, Elisabetta; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is the unavoidable hallmark of Down syndrome (DS), with a heavy impact on public health. Accumulating evidence shows that DS is characterized by numerous neurodevelopmental alterations among which the reduction of neurogenesis, dendritic hypotrophy and connectivity alterations appear to play a particularly prominent role. Although the mechanisms whereby gene triplication impairs brain development in DS have not been fully clarified, it is theoretically possible to correct trisomy-dependent defects with targeted pharmacotherapies. This review summarizes what we know about the effects of pharmacotherapies during different life stages in mouse models of DS. Since brain alterations in DS start to be present prenatally, the prenatal period represents an optimum window of opportunity for therapeutic interventions. Importantly, recent studies clearly show that treatment during the prenatal period can rescue overall brain development and behavior and that this effect outlasts treatment cessation. Although late therapies are unlikely to exert drastic changes in the brain, they may have an impact on the hippocampus, a brain region where neurogenesis continues throughout life. Indeed, treatment at adult life stages improves or even rescues hippocampal neurogenesis and connectivity and hippocampal-dependent learning and memory, although the duration of these effects still remains, in the majority of cases, a matter of investigation. The exciting discovery that trisomy-linked brain abnormalities can be prevented with early interventions gives us reason to believe that treatments during pregnancy may rescue brain development in fetuses with DS. For this reason we deem it extremely important to expedite the discovery of additional therapies practicable in humans in order to identify the best treatment/s in terms of efficacy and paucity of side effects. Prompt achievement of this goal is the big challenge for the scientific community of researchers

  20. Methylation inhibitor therapy in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Lewis R; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2005-12-01

    The class of DNA methyltransferase inhibitors is represented by azacitidine and decitabine. Azacitidine is approved for the treatment of patients in both low- and high-risk subtypes of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and decitabine is currently under review by the FDA. Azacitidine phase III trial data, based upon the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) study 9221, showed durable clinical and symptomatic improvement in bone marrow function, a reduction in the risk of leukemic transformation, and significant improvements in the quality of life of patients treated with azacitidine compared with supportive care alone. This study also provided data suggestive of improvement in survival in MDS patients. The experience with decitabine comprises a number of phase I/II studies and a phase III trial yet to be published. While there is a strong base of experience supporting the efficacy of DNA methyltransferase inhibitors in the treatment of MDS, a number of practical issues need to be explored further. These include the optimization of the timing and duration of treatment, and the prediction of response to therapy. Along with current experience, future studies will lead to the development of treatment algorithms, strategies for selecting patients (e.g. according to age, risk, classification, and cytogenetic profile), and the combination strategies, particularly with histone deacetylase inhibitors, in the management of MDS.

  1. Short bowel syndrome in children: current and potential therapies.

    PubMed

    Uko, Victor; Radhakrishnan, Kadakkal; Alkhouri, Naim

    2012-06-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) reflects a state of malabsorption that occurs due to loss of a significant portion of the small bowel. The pathophysiology of SBS is determined largely by the process of adaptation, which is the innate attempt by the remnant portions of the intestine to increase fluid and nutrient reabsorption. In recent years, emphasis has been placed on intestinal rehabilitation with multidisciplinary teams as a comprehensive approach to the management of patients with SBS. In our institution, the multidisciplinary team members include pediatric gastroenterologists, pediatric surgeons, pediatric dieticians, physical therapists, occupational therapists, neonatologists (especially for patients still under their care), transplant surgeons, transplant coordinators and social workers. Parenteral nutrition plays a significant role in the management of SBS, but its use is associated with many potential complications, including cholestatic liver disease. Fish oil-based lipid emulsions have shown promise in their ability to reverse and also prevent the development of cholestasis in these patients. Clinical trials have shown that growth factors and other trophic hormones facilitate the process of adaptation. The most significant impact has been shown with the use of glucagon-like peptide-2 and its analog (teduglutide). Surgical interventions remain an important part of the management of SBS to facilitate adaptation and treat complications. Intestinal transplantation is a last resort option when the process of adaptation is unsuccessful. This review article is intended to provide an overview of the conventional and emerging therapies for pediatric SBS.

  2. Stroke-like migraine attack after cranial radiation therapy: the SMART syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sue Yin; Brooke, Jonathan; Dineen, Robert; O'Donoghue, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We describe a patient who experienced a prolonged episode of headache, drowsiness, seizure, unilateral weakness, delusion and hallucination due to a stroke-like migraine attack after cranial radiation therapy. Stroke-like migraine attack after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare complication of therapeutic brain irradiation.

  3. Therapy of Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome with Alpha-1- Antiproteinase or Lung Surfactant.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-15

    I AD-A239 010I it II II 11 11 1 11 lull 11 III ________________ CONTRACT NO: DAMD17-88-C-8020 TITLE : THERAPY OF ADULT RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME ...multiple names including the adult respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ), wet lung, shock lung, capillary leak syndrome , DaNang lung, post-perfusion lung...of Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome with Alpha-l-Antiproteinase or Lung Surfactant 1?. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Roger G. Spragg, M.D. 13a. TYPE OF

  4. SMART syndrome (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) in adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Amy E; Gillan, Eileen; DiMario, Francis Joseph

    2014-03-01

    SMART syndrome (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) is a rare condition that involves complex migraines with focal neurologic findings in patients following cranial irradiation for central nervous system malignancies. Little is known about the mechanisms behind the disorder, making successful treatment challenging. We report 2 new cases of SMART syndrome in pediatric patients as well as review all documented cases of the syndrome. Each of our 2 pediatric patients suffered multiple episodes. Attacks were characterized by severe headache, visual disturbance, aphasia, and weakness. Recovery occurred over several days to weeks. The data from all documented reports of SMART syndrome indicate a greater prevalence for male gender. An age-dependent pattern of onset was also observed, with a greater variability of syndrome onset in patients who received cranial irradiation at a younger age. SMART appears to be a reversible, recurrent long-term complication of radiation therapy with possible age- and gender-related influences.

  5. Hypogonadism and Sex Steroid Replacement Therapy in Girls with Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gawlik, Aneta; Hankus, Magdalena; Such, Kamila; Drosdzol-Cop, Agnieszka; Madej, Paweł; Borkowska, Marzena; Zachurzok, Agnieszka; Malecka-Tendera, Ewa

    2016-12-01

    Turner syndrome is the most common example of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism resulting from gonadal dysgenesis. Most patients present delayed, or even absent, puberty. Premature ovarian failure can be expected even if spontaneous menarche occurs. Laboratory markers of gonadal dysgenesis are well known. The choice of optimal hormone replacement therapy in children and adolescents remains controversial, particularly regarding the age at which therapy should be initiated, and the dose and route of estrogen administration. On the basis of a review of the literature, we present the most acceptable schedule of sex steroid replacement therapy in younger patients with Turner syndrome.

  6. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy in a patient with myopathic dropped head syndrome and common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Rosato, E; Molinaro, I; Pisarri, S; Salsano, F

    2011-01-01

    Prominent neck extension weakness is an uncommon clinical entity, also termed dropped-head syndrome, that may be part of a generalized neuromuscular disorder. We report here the case of a woman with dropped-head syndrome and pulmonary arterial hypertension secondary to systemic sclerosis. Subsequently, she developed common variable immunodeficiency and subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy was started. After two months from the start of therapy we did not observe any improvement in the degree of flexion of the head, although the clinical examination shows an improvement in neck extensor muscle strength. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy could be a possible therapeutic option for the treatment of myopathic neck extensor weakness.

  7. A case of Turner syndrome (46XXp-/45X) complicated with Crohn's disease after hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yutaro; Hizawa, Kazuoki; Fujita, Kouhei; Iida, Masahiro; Washio, Ema; Kai, Takahiro; Nitahata, Tomoki; Esaki, Motohiro; Iida, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    A 19-year-old woman, who had been receiving hormone replacement therapy for 13 months before the diagnosis of mosaic Turner syndrome (46XXp-/45X), developed Crohn's colitis and erythema nodosum of the lower legs. Colonoscopy revealed an anal fistula and the presence of deep longitudinal ulcers with cobblestoning in the colorectum. Therapy with prednisolone and adalimumab was effective for the intestinal and skin lesions. To date, all seven case reports of Turner syndrome in Japan have also developed Crohn's disease after hormone therapy, suggesting a possible association of sex hormones in the pathogenesis.

  8. Immune reconstitution syndromes in human immuno-deficiency virus infection following effective antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Behrens, G M; Meyer, D; Stoll, M; Schmidt, R E

    2000-08-01

    Effective antiretroviral therapy leads to rapid decrease in plasma HIV-1 RNA, frequently followed by an increase in CD4 T-helper cell counts. The improvement of immune function during highly active antiretroviral therapy has important impact on natural history of AIDS-related opportunistic disorders. Here we describe cases of unusual clinical inflammatory syndromes in CMV retinitis, hepatitis C, and atypical mycobacteriosis in HIV-1 infected patients associated with the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Pathogenetic implications and therapeutic management of these new immunopathologic syndromes are discussed.

  9. A systematic review of alternative therapies in the irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spanier, Jennifer A; Howden, Colin W; Jones, Michael P

    2003-02-10

    The irritable bowel syndrome is a common disorder associated with a significant burden of illness, poor quality of life, high rates of absenteeism, and high health care utilization. Management can be difficult and treatment unrewarding; these facts have led physicians and patients toward alternative therapies. We explored a variety of treatments that exist beyond the scope of commonly used therapies for irritable bowel syndrome. Guarded optimism exists for traditional Chinese medicine and psychological therapies, but further well-designed trials are needed. Oral cromolyn sodium may be useful in chronic unexplained diarrhea and appears as effective as and safer than elimination diets. The roles of lactose and fructose intolerance remain poorly understood. Alterations of enteric flora may play a role in irritable bowel syndrome, but supporting evidence for bacterial overgrowth or probiotic therapy is lacking.

  10. A life-saving therapy in Class I HELLP syndrome: Therapeutic plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Berber, Ilhami; Berktas, Hacı Bayram; Kuku, Irfan; Kaya, Emin; Koroglu, Mustafa; Nizam, Ilknur; Bakırhan, Fatma Acar; Ozgul, Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    HELLP syndrome, which can affect multiple organ systems and cause maternal and fetal mortality, is a serious complication of pregnancy characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, elevation of liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia. Delivering the infant usually suffices for the treatment of this syndrome. In cases with Class I HELLP syndrome, however, the clinical picture may rapidly deteriorate despite delivery. In this paper we presented the outcomes with the use of therapeutic plasma exchange in cases with class I HELLP syndrome. This study included 21 patients diagnosed with the Class I HELLP syndrome at Inonu University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Hematology between 2011 and 2014. A central venous catheter was placed and plasma exchange therapy was begun in patients unresponsive to delivery, steroid, and supportive therapy (blood and blood products, antihypertensive therapy, intravenous fluid administration, and antibiotics) within 24 hours after the diagnosis of Class I HELLP syndrome according to the Mississippi Criteria. All patients underwent therapeutic plasma exchange for three sessions each with a 1:1 volume. Hemogram and biochemical parameters of the patients were evaluated before and after the procedure. According to results, there was a statistically significant decrease in total bilirubin, LDH, AST, and ALT levels whereas a significant increase in platelet count was observed. Hemoglobin levels were increased, although this increase was not statistically significant. HELLP syndrome is primarily treated with the delivery of infant; however, some cases may show disease progression despite completion of delivery. As a potential cause of both maternal and fetal mortality, HELLP syndrome condition should be aggressively treated. Therapeutic plasma exchange is one of the available treatment options. Our study has found that postpartum use of plasma exchange therapy within 24 hours is an efficient and lifesaving treatment choice in Class I HELLP

  11. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Women: Can Therapy Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Susan G.

    1992-01-01

    Presents current research on chronic fatigue syndrome, which currently afflicts mostly females between ages of 25 and 55. Notes that, because depression is common symptom of chronic fatigue syndrome, mental health practitioners are often involved with victims and must formulate appropriate treatment strategy that considers physiological,…

  12. New and emerging therapies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an update for gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E

    2016-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder with gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. abdominal pain, straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation, nausea, and bloating) that occur alongside bowel function alterations (i.e. constipation, diarrhea, or both). Patients with irritable bowel syndrome may also experience comorbid anxiety and depression. Irritable bowel syndrome is common, with a prevalence estimated between 3% and 28%, affecting patient health and quality of life. Patients with moderate or severe irritable bowel syndrome generally seek medical care, whereas those with milder symptoms may choose self-management. Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome receive outpatient care, but irritable bowel syndrome-related hospitalizations do occur. The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome is multifactorial (i.e. genetics, immune components, changes in the gut microbiota, disturbances in physiologic stress response systems, and psychosocial factors). Management of irritable bowel syndrome can include lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, counseling, psychologic medication, and agents that affect gastrointestinal motility. A number of therapies have emerged in recent years with clinical trial data demonstrating efficacy and safety for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, including agents that target gastrointestinal motility (i.e. linaclotide), gastrointestinal opioid receptors (i.e. asimadoline, eluxadoline), and gut microbiota (i.e. rifaximin). Linaclotide has been shown to significantly improve stool frequency and abdominal pain compared with placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (number needed to treat, 5.1). Asimadoline shows efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe irritable bowel syndrome-related pain. Rifaximin provided adequate relief of global irritable bowel syndrome symptoms versus placebo for a significantly greater percentage of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (p < 0

  13. New and emerging therapies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an update for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder with gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. abdominal pain, straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation, nausea, and bloating) that occur alongside bowel function alterations (i.e. constipation, diarrhea, or both). Patients with irritable bowel syndrome may also experience comorbid anxiety and depression. Irritable bowel syndrome is common, with a prevalence estimated between 3% and 28%, affecting patient health and quality of life. Patients with moderate or severe irritable bowel syndrome generally seek medical care, whereas those with milder symptoms may choose self-management. Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome receive outpatient care, but irritable bowel syndrome-related hospitalizations do occur. The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome is multifactorial (i.e. genetics, immune components, changes in the gut microbiota, disturbances in physiologic stress response systems, and psychosocial factors). Management of irritable bowel syndrome can include lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, counseling, psychologic medication, and agents that affect gastrointestinal motility. A number of therapies have emerged in recent years with clinical trial data demonstrating efficacy and safety for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, including agents that target gastrointestinal motility (i.e. linaclotide), gastrointestinal opioid receptors (i.e. asimadoline, eluxadoline), and gut microbiota (i.e. rifaximin). Linaclotide has been shown to significantly improve stool frequency and abdominal pain compared with placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (number needed to treat, 5.1). Asimadoline shows efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe irritable bowel syndrome-related pain. Rifaximin provided adequate relief of global irritable bowel syndrome symptoms versus placebo for a significantly greater percentage of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (p < 0

  14. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H.; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2014-01-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:25107891

  15. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H Joachim

    2014-12-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

  16. SMART syndrome: a late reversible complication after radiation therapy for brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Kerklaan, Joost P; Lycklama á Nijeholt, Geert J; Wiggenraad, Ruud G J; Berghuis, Bianca; Postma, Tjeerd J; Taphoorn, Martin J B

    2011-06-01

    With intensified treatment leading to longer survival, complications of therapy for brain tumours are more frequently observed. Regarding radiation therapy, progressive and irreversible white matter disease with cognitive decline is most feared. We report on four patients with reversible clinical and radiological features occurring years after radiation for brain tumours, suggestive for the so called SMART syndrome (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy). All four patients (males, age 36-60 years) had been treated with focal brain radiation for a primary brain tumour or with whole-brain radiation therapy for brain metastases. Ranging from 2 to 10 years following radiation therapy patients presented with headache and focal neurological deficits, suggestive for tumour recurrence. Two patients also presented with focal seizures. MRI demonstrated typical cortical swelling and contrast enhancement, primarily in the parieto-occipital region. On follow-up both clinical and MRI features improved spontaneously. Three patients eventually proved to have tumour recurrence. The clinical and radiological picture of these patients is compatible with the SMART syndrome, a rare complication of radiation therapy which is probably under recognized in brain tumour patients. The pathophysiology of the SMART syndrome is poorly understood but bears similarities with the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). These four cases underline that the SMART syndrome should be considered in patients formerly treated with radiation therapy for brain tumours, who present with new neurologic deficits. Before the diagnosis of SMART syndrome can be established other causes, such as local tumour recurrence, leptomeningeal disease or ischemic disease should be ruled out.

  17. [Clinical application of moving cupping therapy based on skin reaction observation and syndrome differentiation].

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiao-Lan; Chen, Bo; Chen, Ze-Lin

    2014-12-01

    The diagnostic evidence on clinical diseases and theoretic basis of moving cupping therapy were ex- plored in the paper. By the observation of the local reaction, such as skin appearance and color, the affected location, duration of sickness and nature of disease were judged. Different moving cupping methods were selected for different disorders. It was discovered that the property of syndromes should be recognized by the palpation on skin and muscle in the moving cupping therapy so that the pathogenesis and treating principle could be carefully determined. The moving cupping therapy is the important component of body surface therapy. Skin reaction observation and syndrome differentiation is the essential guidance of the moving cupping therapy.

  18. Levetiracetam as an alternative therapy for Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Granero, MA; García-Pérez, A; Montañes, F

    2010-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a common childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by chronic tics and frequent comorbid conditions such as attention deficit disorder. Most currently used tic-suppressing drugs are frequently associated with serious adverse events. Thus, alternative therapeutic agents with more favorable side-effect profiles are being evaluated. New hypotheses and recent studies involving GABAergic system in the pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome suppose a reason for the evaluation of GABAergic drugs. Levetiracetam is a drug with an atypical GABAergic mechanism of action that might be expected to improve tics. Although trials performed to evaluate the efficacy of levetiracetam in the treatment of Tourette syndrome have provided conflicting results, it may be useful in some patients. The established safe profile of levetiracetam makes this drug an alternative for treatment if intolerance to currently used drugs appears, but additional evaluation with larger and longer duration controlled studies are necessary to assess the real efficacy in patients with Tourette syndrome. PMID:20628631

  19. Preoperative zoledronic acid therapy prevent hungry bone syndrome in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Mayilvaganan, Sabaretnam; Vijaya Sarathi, H. A.; Shivaprasad, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hungry bone syndrome is a common complication of surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism in India which often leads to prolonged hospitalization. There are varying reports on the use and efficacy of bisphosphonates in the prevention of hungry bone syndrome. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the effect of preoperative bisphosphonate therapy on rates of hungry bone syndrome in our patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. A total of 19 patients underwent surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism at our institute between January 2013 and June 2015 among whom eight did not receive preoperative bisphosphonates and 11 received intravenous zoledronic acid 4 mg, 24–48 h preoperatively. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to age, gender, duration of symptoms, preoperative serum calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, alkaline phosphatase, and the presence of radiological evidence of hyperparathyroid bone disease also did not differ between the groups. Three out of the eight patients who did not receive preoperative zoledronic acid therapy had hungry bone syndrome but none in the zoledronic acid group. The prevalence of hungry bone syndrome tended to be lower in the zoledronic acid group (P = 0.058). The need for intravenous calcium and duration of postoperative hospital stay were significantly lesser in the zoledronic acid group. Conclusion: Preoperative intravenous zoledronic acid significantly reduces the need for intravenous calcium therapy and duration of postoperative hospital stay and seems a promising option to reduce the rate of hungry bone syndrome in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:28217502

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Acute Radiation Syndrome: Innovative Medical Approaches in Military Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-30

    lymphoblastic leukemia: a randomized phase III trial. Blood. 1995;86(2):444–50. 36. Hu KX, Sun QY, Guo M, Ai HS. The radiation protection and therapy effects of...Literature 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome: innovative medical...MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13

  1. [Successful therapy of sacroiliitis in SAPHO syndrome by etanercept].

    PubMed

    Wolber, Carola; David-Jelinek, Karin; Udvardi, Astrid; Artacker, Gottfried; Volc-Platzer, Beatrix; Kurz, Herbert

    2011-04-01

    Painful, aseptic osteitis remains the major problem in the treatment of patients with SAPHO syndrome. We present a child suffering of both sacroiliitis and acne conglobata in the context of SAPHO syndrome. While acne lesions responded well to systemic isotretinoin, sacroiliitis associated pain could be controlled neither by NSAR nor by intralesional or systemic steroid injection. Worse pain limited substantially patient's mobility. This changed immediately after starting etanercept. Within a few days, pain resolved and the patient regained his mobility. This favourable response lasted for 8 months when we tried to stop etanercept under protection with the DMARD sulfazalazin. Unfortunately, within a few days, pain and immobility re-occurred requiring reinstitution of etanercept. This case demonstrates that, similar to other reports, TNF blockade is able to induce prompt and long-lasting response of SAPHO syndrome associated osteoarthritis to TNF blockade.

  2. [Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Associated with Cancer Therapy].

    PubMed

    Mitsuya, Koichi; Nakasu, Yoko; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Yasui, Hirofumi; Ikeda, Takashi; Kuji, Shiho; Onozawa, Yusuke; Endo, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome(PRES)is a subacute neurological syndrome typically manifesting with headache, cortical blindness, and seizures. This syndrome is associated with risk factors such as malignant hypertension, eclampsia, and renal failure. Numerous case reports depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The direct causal mechanisms of PRES in cancer patients have not yet been identified. Cytotoxic chemotherapy may cause direct endothelial damage, which would impact the blood brain barrier. Angiogenesis inhibitors also cause elevation in blood pressure;this is significant, because PRES onset may be solely related to hypertension. An increased number of case reports involving new molecular targeted agent suggests that incidence of PRES as an oncological emergency may increase in the future.

  3. Prospects for Gene Therapy in the Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rattazzi, Mario C.; LaFauci, Giuseppe; Brown, W. Ted

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is unarguably the definitive way to treat, and possibly cure, genetic diseases. A straightforward concept in theory, in practice it has proven difficult to realize, even when directed to easily accessed somatic cell systems. Gene therapy for diseases in which the central nervous system (CNS) is the target organ presents even greater…

  4. Outcomes of Male Patients with Alport Syndrome Undergoing Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Temme, Johanna; Kramer, Anneke; Jager, Kitty J.; Lange, Katharina; Peters, Frederick; Müller, Gerhard-Anton; Kramar, Reinhard; Heaf, James G.; Finne, Patrik; Palsson, Runolfur; Reisæter, Anna V.; Hoitsma, Andries J.; Metcalfe, Wendy; Postorino, Maurizio; Zurriaga, Oscar; Santos, Julio P.; Ravani, Pietro; Jarraya, Faical; Verrina, Enrico; Dekker, Friedo W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Patients with the hereditary disease Alport syndrome commonly require renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the second or third decade of life. This study compared age at onset of RRT, renal allograft, and patient survival in men with Alport syndrome receiving various forms of RRT (peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, or transplantation) with those of men with other renal diseases. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Patients with Alport syndrome receiving RRT identified from 14 registries in Europe were matched to patients with other renal diseases. A linear spline model was used to detect changes in the age at start of RRT over time. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to examine patient and graft survival. Results Age at start of RRT among patients with Alport syndrome remained stable during the 1990s but increased by 6 years between 2000–2004 and 2005–2009. Survival of patients with Alport syndrome requiring dialysis or transplantation did not change between 1990 and 2009. However, patients with Alport syndrome had better renal graft and patient survival than matched controls. Numbers of living-donor transplantations were lower in patients with Alport syndrome than in matched controls. Conclusions These data suggest that kidney failure in patients with Alport syndrome is now being delayed compared with previous decades. These patients appear to have superior patient survival while undergoing dialysis and superior patient and graft survival after deceased-donor kidney transplantation compared with patients receiving RRT because of other causes of kidney failure. PMID:22997344

  5. Electropalatographic Therapy for Children and Young People with Down's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleland, Joanne; Timmins, Claire; Wood, Sara E.; Hardcastle, William J.; Wishart, Jennifer G.

    2009-01-01

    Articulation disorders in Down's syndrome (DS) are prevalent and often intractable. Individuals with DS generally prefer visual to auditory methods of learning and may therefore find it beneficial to be given a visual model during speech intervention, such as that provided by electropalatography (EPG). In this study, participants with Down's…

  6. Primary therapy for small cell lung cancer reversing the Eaton-Lambert syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kalter, S.; Dhingra, H.M.; Farha, P.

    1985-02-01

    A case report is presented of a patient with small cell carcinoma of the lung associated with the classic Eaton-Lambert syndrome. He received intermittent anticholinesterase therapy, with minimal improvement. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for the primary neoplasm produced considerable improvement, with normal EMG findings after complete remission was achieved. 7 references, 1 table.

  7. Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Relatively Active and for Passive Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazelmans, Ellen; Prins, Judith; Bleijenberg, Gijs

    2006-01-01

    In chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), facilitating, initiating, and perpetuating factors are distinguished. Although somatic factors might have initiated symptoms in CFS, they do not explain the persistence of fatigue. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for CFS focuses on factors that perpetuate and prolong symptoms. Recently it has been shown that,…

  8. Implementing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in a Mental Health Center: A Benchmarking Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheeres, Korine; Wensing, Michel; Knoop, Hans; Bleijenberg, Gijs

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the success of implementing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in a representative clinical practice setting and compared the patient outcomes with those of previously published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CBT for CFS. Method: The implementation interventions were the…

  9. Oral carnitine therapy in children with cystinosis and renal Fanconi syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Gahl, W.A.; Bernardini, I.; Dalakas, M.; Rizzo, W.B.; Harper, G.S.; Hoeg, J.M.; Hurko, O.; Bernar, J.

    1988-02-01

    11 children with either cystinosis or Lowe's syndrome had a reduced content of plasma and muscle carnitine due to renal Fanconi syndrome. After treatment with oral L-carnitine, 100 mg/kg per d divided every 6 h, plasma carnitine concentrations became normal in all subjects within 2 d. Initial plasma free fatty acid concentrations, inversely related to free carnitine concentrations, were reduced after 7-20 mo of carnitine therapy. Muscle lipid accumulation, which varied directly with duration of carnitine deficiency (r = 0.73), improved significantly in three of seven rebiopsied patients after carnitine therapy. One Lowe's syndrome patient achieved a normal muscle carnitine level after therapy. Muscle carnitine levels remained low in all cystinosis patients, even though cystinotic muscle cells in culture took up L-(/sup 3/H)carnitine normally. The half-life of plasma carnitine for cystinotic children given a single oral dose approximated 6.3 h; 14% of ingested L-carnitine was excreted within 24 h. Studies in a uremic patient with cystinosis showed that her plasma carnitine was in equilibrium with some larger compartment and may have been maintained by release of carnitine from the muscle during dialysis. Because oral L-carnitine corrects plasma carnitine deficiency, lowers plasma free fatty acid concentrations, and reverses muscle lipid accumulation in some patients, its use as therapy in renal Fanconi syndrome should be considered. However, its efficacy in restoring muscle carnitine to normal, and the optimal dosage regimen, have yet to be determined.

  10. Cerebral infarction complicating intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in a patient with Miller Fisher syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Turner, B.; Wills, A.

    2000-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy is being increasingly used in a wide range of neurological conditions. However, treatment is expensive and side effects may be severe. A patient with Miller Fisher syndrome who developed cortical blindness as a consequence of occipital infarction precipitated by IVIg is reported on.

 PMID:10811710

  11. Increase in Prefrontal Cortical Volume following Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Lange, Floris P.; Koers, Anda; Kalkman, Joke S.; Bleijenberg, Gijs; Hagoort, Peter; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Toni, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disabling disorder, characterized by persistent or relapsing fatigue. Recent studies have detected a decrease in cortical grey matter volume in patients with CFS, but it is unclear whether this cerebral atrophy constitutes a cause or a consequence of the disease. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is an…

  12. Music Therapy for Children with Down Syndrome: Perceptions of Caregivers in a Special School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pienaar, Dorothea

    2012-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder resulting from chromosome 21 having three copies (trisomy 21). Cognitive functioning and anatomical features cause speech and language development delay (Kumin, 2003). Children with DS generally enjoy communication (Schoenbrodt, 2004), and respond well to interaction and social scripts. Music therapy has…

  13. Unusual case of recurrent SMART (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Ramnath Santosh; Sreedher, Gayathri; Malhotra, Konark; Guduru, Zain; Agarwal, Deeksha; Flaherty, Mary; Leichliter, Timothy; Rana, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare delayed complication of cerebral radiation therapy. A 53-year-old female initially presented with headache, confusion and left homonymous hemianopia. Her medical history was notable for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, which was treated with radiation in 1987. Her initial brain MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) revealed cortical enhancement in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. She improved spontaneously in 2 weeks and follow-up scan at 4 weeks revealed no residual enhancement or encephalomalacia. She presented 6 weeks later with aphasia. Her MRI brain revealed similar contrast-enhancing cortical lesion but on the left side. Repeat CSF studies was again negative other than elevated protein. She was treated conservatively and recovered completely within a week. Before diagnosing SMART syndrome, it is important to rule out tumor recurrence, encephalitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and stroke. Typically the condition is self-limiting, and gradually resolves.

  14. Initial experience with bosentan therapy in patients with the Eisenmenger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Douglas D; McConnell, Michael E; Book, Wendy M; Mahle, William T

    2004-07-15

    Bosentan, an endothelin-1 antagonist that can be administered orally, has been shown to be effective in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and may be of benefit to patients with the Eisenmenger syndrome. Nine patients with Eisenmenger's syndrome were treated with bosentan at a dose of 125 mg twice a day. After treatment with bosentan, 6 of 9 patients (67%) had an improvement in New York Heart Assocation classification of >/=1 grades (p = 0.03). Oxygen saturation levels increased from 79 +/- 5% to 88 +/- 6%, (p = 0.03). The side effects of bosentan therapy were minor; no significant changes in liver function tests were noted. These preliminary data suggest that oral administration of bosentan therapy for Eisenmenger's syndrome results in improved oxygenation and functional status with minimal side effects.

  15. New therapies for treating Down syndrome require quality of life measurement.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Michael J; Brixner, Diana I

    2013-04-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of cognitive deficits. Using mouse models and therapies for Alzheimer disease, researchers are exploring therapies that may improve cognitive function in people with DS. These developments shift the health economic paradigm of understanding DS from determining the appropriate screening tool to the effect of therapy on quality of life in those with DS. To date, there are no validated quality of life instruments for DS. Research should begin to develop instruments that can evaluate changes in quality of life in therapeutic trials and beyond.

  16. Low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: effective optical power.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Zhao, Cheng-Qiang; Ye, Gang; Liu, Can-Dong; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Low-power laser therapy has been used for the non-surgical treatment of mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome, although its efficacy has been a long-standing controversy. The laser parameters in low-power laser therapy are closely related to the laser effect on human tissue. To evaluate the efficacy of low-power laser therapy, laser parameters should be accurately measured and controlled, which has been ignored in previous clinical trials. Here, we report the measurement of the effective optical power of low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome. By monitoring the backside reflection and scattering laser power from human skin at the wrist, the effective laser power can be inferred. Using clinical measurements from 30 cases, we found that the effective laser power differed significantly among cases, with the measured laser reflection coefficient ranging from 1.8% to 54%. The reflection coefficient for 36.7% of these 30 cases was in the range of 10-20%, but for 16.7% of cases, it was higher than 40%. Consequently, monitoring the effective optical power during laser irradiation is necessary for the laser therapy of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  17. Optimizing therapy for myeloid disorders of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Webb, David K H

    2005-10-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) are at increased risk of leukaemia. Myeloid disorders include transient abnormal myelopoiesis (TAM), myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Mutations in the GATA-1 gene, which encodes for a transcription factor central to the normal development of the erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages, are found in cases of TAM, MDS and AML in DS children. DS children with MDS/AML mostly present between the ages of 1 and 4 years, and have a large predominance of megakaryoblastic disease (French-American-British type M7). The MDS and AML are part of a single disease entity (myeloid leukaemia of Down syndrome) that is extremely sensitive to chemotherapy. Resistant disease and relapse are rare, but treatment-related toxicity is high, and deaths in remission have exceeded those due to disease in most series. Accordingly, controlled dosage reduction is the focus of contemporary treatment studies.

  18. Behçet syndrome: from pathogenesis to novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Matarangolo, Angela; Rubino, Rosa; Inglese, Michele; De Cata, Angelo

    2016-02-01

    Behçet syndrome is a chronic disease hallmarked by inflammation of the blood vessels that is related to an autoimmune reaction caused by inherited susceptibility due to specific genes and environmental factors, probably components of infectious microorganisms, which turn on or get going the disease in genetically susceptible subjects. The more common clinical expression of the disease is represented by a triple-symptom complex of recurrent oral aphthous ulcers, genital ulcers, and uveitis, sometimes associated with inflammatory arthritis, phlebitis, iritis, as well as inflammation of the digestive tract, brain, and spinal cord. The treatment strategies used to manage the manifestations of Behçet syndrome have gradually progressed, and a number of new therapeutic resources have been implemented in recent years, allowing better control of pathogenic mechanisms, reducing symptoms and suffering, and ameliorating patient's outcome.

  19. Menopause, the metabolic syndrome, and mind-body therapies

    PubMed Central

    Innes, Kim E.; Selfe, Terry Kit; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk rises sharply with menopause, likely due to the coincident increase in insulin resistance and related atherogenic changes that together comprise the metabolic or insulin resistance syndrome, a cluster of metabolic and hemodynamic abnormalities strongly implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular disease. A growing body of research suggests that traditional mind-body practices such as yoga, tai chi, and qigong may offer safe and cost-effective strategies for reducing insulin resistance syndrome-related risk factors for cardiovascular disease in older populations, including postmenopausal women. Current evidence suggests that these practices may reduce insulin resistance and related physiological risk factors for cardiovascular disease; improve mood, well-being, and sleep; decrease sympathetic activation; and enhance cardiovagal function. However, additional rigorous studies are needed to confirm existing findings and to examine long-term effects on cardiovascular health. PMID:18779682

  20. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS): molecular pathophysiology and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Naoyuki; Hattori, Yuichi

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, extensive basic science research has led to a clear understanding of the molecular mechanisms contributing to the pathophysiology of sepsis. Sepsis is now defined as a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in which there is an identifiable focus of infection. SIRS can be also precipitated by non-infective events such as trauma, pancreatitis, and surgery. As a consequence of an overactive SIRS response, the function of various organ systems may be compromised, resulting in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death. Production and activation of multiple proinflammatory genes are likely to play a key role in the pathogenesis of MODS development. This review article focuses on the molecular mechanisms and components involved in the pathogenesis of severe sepsis. This includes cellular targets of sepsis-inducing bacterial products and their signaling pathways with a major emphasis on transcription factors and new therapeutic approaches to severe sepsis.

  1. Neurofeedback therapy in patients with acute and chronic pain syndromes--literature review and own experience.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Alicja; Biedroń, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    Pain management is based mainly on pharmacotherapy which has many limitations. Non-pharmacological techniques, like neurofeedback (EEG-biofeedback) are alternative methods of pain treatment. Data from literature confirm high efficacy of neurofeedback in pain syndromes treatment, chronic and acute as well. Neurofeedback plays an important role in management of post stroke, post traumatic headaches and in primary headaches like tension type headaches or migraine. Literature review and own experience indicate importance of number and frequency of performed neurofeedback trainings on treatment effectiveness. Satisfactory results have already been observed after 30 trainings however usually 40-60 training have to be performed. Effectiveness of such therapy in pain syndromes is usually good or less often acceptable (50% reduction of headaches). Children with tension type headaches (differently than adults) need reminder therapy every 6-12 months, otherwise recurrence of headaches is observed. Based on our own experience neurofeedback therapy seems to play role in neuropathic pain and cancer pain management.

  2. Massage Therapy Protocol for Post–Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zalta, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Background: The intent of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of massage therapy in the rehabilitation of post–anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction patellofemoral pain syndrome. The primary complications following surgical repair of the anterior cruciate ligament—classified as patellofemoral pain syndrome—are hamstring flexion contracture and quadriceps weakness, leading to patellofemoral dysfunction and retropatellar pain. Methods: Treatment included lymphatic drainage, myofascial release, neuromuscular techniques including trigger point release, muscle energy techniques and cross-fiber friction. Orthopedic physical assessment tests were used to chart changes in patellofemoral function and changes in range of motion in the knee during the course of the massage interventions. Subjective reporting on pain level and function were also documented. Results: A decrease in pain level, hamstring flexion contracture and lateral tracking of the patella were documented. Conclusion: Massage therapy was determined to be an effective complementary therapy in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:21589717

  3. Current and emerging therapies in irritable bowel syndrome: from pathophysiology to treatment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Joseph Y; Talley, Nicholas J

    2010-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder with characteristic symptoms of abdominal pain/discomfort with a concurrent disturbance in defecation. It accounts for a significant healthcare burden, and symptoms may be debilitating for some patients. Traditional symptom-based therapies have been found to be ineffective in the treatment of the entire syndrome complex, and do not modify the natural history of the disorder. Although the exact etiopathogenesis of IBS is incompletely understood, recent advances in the elucidation of the pathophysiology and molecular mechanisms of IBS have resulted in the development of novel therapies, as well as potential future therapeutic targets. This article reviews current and emerging therapies in IBS based upon: IBS as a serotonergic disorder; stimulating intestinal chloride channels; modulation of visceral hypersensitivity; altering low-grade intestinal inflammation; and modulation of the gut microbiota.

  4. Fragile X syndrome: From protein function to therapy.

    PubMed

    Bagni, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A

    2013-11-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading monogenic cause of intellectual disability and autism. The FMR1 gene contains a CGG repeat present in the 5'-untranslated region which can be unstable upon transmission to the next generation. The repeat is up to 55 CGGs long in the normal population. In patients with fragile X syndrome (FXS), a repeat length exceeding 200 CGGs generally leads to methylation of the repeat and the promoter region, which is accompanied by silencing of the FMR1 gene. The disease is a result of lack of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein leading to severe symptoms, including intellectual disability, hyperactivity, and autistic-like behavior. The FMR1 protein (FMRP) has a number of functions. The translational dysregulation of a subset of mRNAs targeted by FMRP is probably the major contribution to FXS. FMRP is also involved in mRNA transport to synapses where protein synthesis occurs. For some FMRP-bound mRNAs, FMRP is a direct modulator of mRNA stability either by sustaining or preventing mRNA decay. Increased knowledge about the role of FMRP has led to the identification of potential treatments for fragile X syndrome that were often tested first in the different animal models. This review gives an overview about the present knowledge of the function of FMRP and the therapeutic strategies in mouse and man.

  5. Update: Acute coronary syndromes (V). Personalized antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Gurbel, Paul A; Rafeedheen, Rahil; Tantry, Udaya S

    2014-06-01

    It is well established that high on-treatment platelet reactivity to adenosine diphosphate during clopidogrel therapy is an independent risk factor for ischemic event occurrences in a postpercutaneous coronary intervention patients. However, the precise role of platelet function testing remains debated. Platelet function testing to ensure optimal platelet inhibition has been recommended by some authorities to improve outcomes in patients treated with clopidogrel. Recent prospective, randomized trials of personalized antiplatelet therapy have failed to demonstrate a benefit of platelet function testing in improving outcomes. In this review article, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for clopidogrel nonreponsiveness, recent trials of platelet function testing, and other new developments in the field of personalized antiplatelet therapy.

  6. Aquaporin gene therapy corrects Sjögren's syndrome phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhennan; Yin, Hongen; Cabrera-Pérez, Javier; Guimaro, Maria C; Afione, Sandra; Michael, Drew G; Glenton, Patricia; Patel, Ankur; Swaim, William D; Zheng, Changyu; Nguyen, Cuong Q; Nyberg, Fred; Chiorini, John A

    2016-05-17

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a chronic autoimmune disease that is estimated to affect 35 million people worldwide. Currently, no effective treatments exist for Sjögren's syndrome, and there is a limited understanding of the physiological mechanisms associated with xerostomia and hyposalivation. The present work revealed that aquaporin 5 expression, a water channel critical for salivary gland fluid secretion, is regulated by bone morphogenetic protein 6. Increased expression of this cytokine is strongly associated with the most common symptom of primary Sjögren's syndrome, the loss of salivary gland function. This finding led us to develop a therapy in the treatment of Sjögren's syndrome by increasing the water permeability of the gland to restore saliva flow. Our study demonstrates that the targeted increase of gland permeability not only resulted in the restoration of secretory gland function but also resolved the hallmark salivary gland inflammation and systemic inflammation associated with disease. Secretory function also increased in the lacrimal gland, suggesting this local therapy could treat the systemic symptoms associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome.

  7. Aquaporin gene therapy corrects Sjögren’s syndrome phenotype in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhennan; Yin, Hongen; Cabrera-Pérez, Javier; Guimaro, Maria C.; Afione, Sandra; Michael, Drew G.; Glenton, Patricia; Patel, Ankur; Swaim, William D.; Zheng, Changyu; Nguyen, Cuong Q.; Nyberg, Fred; Chiorini, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) is a chronic autoimmune disease that is estimated to affect 35 million people worldwide. Currently, no effective treatments exist for Sjögren’s syndrome, and there is a limited understanding of the physiological mechanisms associated with xerostomia and hyposalivation. The present work revealed that aquaporin 5 expression, a water channel critical for salivary gland fluid secretion, is regulated by bone morphogenetic protein 6. Increased expression of this cytokine is strongly associated with the most common symptom of primary Sjögren’s syndrome, the loss of salivary gland function. This finding led us to develop a therapy in the treatment of Sjögren’s syndrome by increasing the water permeability of the gland to restore saliva flow. Our study demonstrates that the targeted increase of gland permeability not only resulted in the restoration of secretory gland function but also resolved the hallmark salivary gland inflammation and systemic inflammation associated with disease. Secretory function also increased in the lacrimal gland, suggesting this local therapy could treat the systemic symptoms associated with primary Sjögren’s syndrome. PMID:27140635

  8. Pharmacologic therapy for the cancer anorexia/weight loss syndrome: A data-driven, practical approach.

    PubMed

    Jatoi, Aminah

    2006-01-01

    The cancer anorexia/weight loss syndrome occurs in over 80% of patients with incurable cancer and is associated with a poor prognosis and negative effects on quality of life. Educating patients and families plays an important role in its management, and caregivers sometimes forget that in select patients who are candidates for it, antineoplastic therapy can occasionally reverse some aspects of this syndrome. Patients may also benefit from appetite stimulants such as corticosteroids and progestational agents,and this review summarizes the benefits of using these agents as well as their contraindications.

  9. Straight Back Syndrome: positive response to spinal manipulation and adjunctive therapy – A case report

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Paul M.; Albright, Brianna; Anani, Sabine; Toner, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Straight Back Syndrome (SBS) has been recognized for over 50 years. Not to be confused with flat back syndrome in the lumbar spine, SBS patients present with an obvious loss of the thoracic kyphosis accompanied by apparent heart symptoms. The main purpose of this article is to describe a patient diagnosed with SBS, whose symptoms were successfully managed using spinal manipulative therapy as well as ancillary modalities. The use of diagnostic and laboratory tests are essential to differentially diagnose cardiac disease from SBS. Genesis and incidence of this condition is also discussed as well as roentgenometric analysis. A suggested diagnostic algorithm is presented as well. PMID:23754859

  10. Early development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome related to Pneumocystis pneumonia after antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Mok, Hoi Ping; Hart, Elizabeth; Venkatesan, Pradhib

    2014-04-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is a recognized complication after the initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We report a patient who developed life-threatening pulmonary immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) three days after initiation of cART. We reviewed published cases of IRIS after Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), in particular the time from initiation of cART to IRIS event. The median duration from the initiation of cART to the onset of IRIS was 15 days in the 33 patients reviewed. This report alerts clinicians to the rapidity of the development of pulmonary IRIS following PCP after the initiation of cART.

  11. Is riluzole a potential therapy for Rett syndrome?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2015-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with autistic features and is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) in the majority of cases. Besides symptomatic treatment, no therapeutic trials have shown effectiveness for RTT. Some perspectives in the treatment of RTT have been provided by recent works showing a phenotypic reversal by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in a RTT mouse model. Glutamate may also play an important role in the primary pathogenesis in Rett syndrome through the excitotoxic neuronal injury in experimental models. Riluzole, an agent currently approved for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a glutamatergic modulator and BDNF enhancer with neuroprotective properties. For these reasons, riluzole could potentially play an important role in the treatment of RTT symptoms. Several points regarding the use of riluzole in RTT are discussed. Further evaluation of the therapeutic effects of this agent in RTT animal models is needed before clinical trials can begin.

  12. [New perspectives on molecular and genic therapies in Down syndrome].

    PubMed

    Delabar, Jean Maurice

    2010-04-01

    Trisomy 21 was first described as a syndrome in the middle of the nineteenth century and associated to a chromosomic anomaly one hundred years later: the most salient feature of this syndrome is a mental retardation of variable intensity. Molecular mapping and DNA sequencing have allowed identifying the gene content of chromosome 21. Molecular quantitative analyses indicated that trisomy is inducing an overexpression for a large part of the triplicated genes and deregulates also pathways involving non HSA21 genes. Together with the physiological description of murine models overexpressing orthologous genes, these data have allowed to elaborate hypotheses on the cause of cognitive impairment. From these hypotheses and using murine models it is now possible to assess the efficiency of various therapeutic strategies. This paper reviews these new perspectives starting from the strategies targeting the level of HSA21 RNAs or HSA21 proteins; then it describes methods targeting activities either of proteins involved in cell cycle pathways or of proteins controlling the synaptic plasticity. It is promising that strategies targeting specific genes or specific pathways are already giving positive results.

  13. New insights into Brunner syndrome and potential for targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Palmer, E E; Leffler, M; Rogers, C; Shaw, M; Carroll, R; Earl, J; Cheung, N W; Champion, B; Hu, H; Haas, S A; Kalscheuer, V M; Gecz, J; Field, M

    2016-01-01

    We report two families with Brunner syndrome living in one state of Australia. The first family had a predicted protein-truncating variant of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) (p.S251KfsX2). Affected males had mild intellectual disability (ID), obsessive behaviour, limited friendships and were introverted and placid during clinical interview. The family disclosed episodic explosive aggression after a diagnosis was made. The second family had a missense variant in MAOA (p.R45W). Affected males had borderline-mild ID, attention deficit disorder and limited friendships. One had a history of explosive aggression in childhood and episodic symptoms of flushing, headaches and diarrhoea. Their carrier mother had normal intelligence but similar episodic symptoms. Characteristic biochemical abnormalities included high serum serotonin and urinary metanephrines and low urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and vanillylmandelic acid (VMA). Symptomatic individuals in the second family had particularly high serotonin levels, and treatment with a serotonin reuptake inhibitor and dietary modification resulted in reversal of biochemical abnormalities, reduction of 'serotonergic' symptoms and behavioural improvement. Brunner syndrome should be considered as a cause of mild ID with paroxysmal behavioural symptoms. It can be screened for with serum/urine metanephrine and serotonin measurement. Cautious treatment with a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, dietary modifications and avoidance of medications contraindicated in patients on monoamine oxidase inhibitors can improve symptoms.

  14. The locked-in syndrome: a syndrome looking for a therapy.

    PubMed

    León-Carrión, José; van Eeckhout, Philippe; Domínguez-Morales, María Del Rosario

    2002-07-01

    A review of the scientific literature on locked-in syndrome (LIS) is offered. The clinical features, diagnosis and prognosis of LIS are reviewed, and methods regarding the differential diagnosis of LIS with severe disorders of consciousness are considered. Effective treatment, physiotherapy, and methods of communication are reviewed. Although progress in the field of communication for patients with LIS is promising, it is concluded that there are new possibilities to be pursued and that a more positive outlook in the area of professional care of the patients, as well as more extensive imaginative research will facilitate new and positive strategies for this syndrome.

  15. Home ventilation therapy in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    González Mangado, Nicolás; Troncoso Acevedo, María Fernanda; Gómez García, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea is a highly prevalent disease that is often underdiagnosed at present. It has a significant economic and social welfare impact, accounting for a large part of the resources assigned to home respiratory therapies. As part of the 2014 SEPAR Year of the Chronic Patient and Domiciliary Respiratory Care sponsored by the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery, this article reviews the most recent publications on the indications and controversial issues in the treatment of sleep apnea, the latest evidence for indication of various positive pressure devices, and adjustment modes, ranging from the use of empirical formulae or mathematical estimations to modern auto-CPAP equipment, while not forgetting the gold standard of manual titration. Emphasis is placed on the need for monitoring required by patients to ensure treatment adherence and compliance. Finally, other therapies that are not the object of this article are briefly reviewed.

  16. Down syndrome: from understanding the neurobiology to therapy.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Herault, Yann; Lott, Ira T; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Reeves, Roger H; Dierssen, Mara

    2010-11-10

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common example of a neurogenetic aneuploid disorder leading to mental retardation. In most cases, DS results from an extra copy of human chromosome 21 producing deregulated gene expression in brain that gives raise to subnormal intellectual functioning. Understanding the consequences of dosage imbalance attributable to trisomy 21 (T21) has accelerated because of recent advances in genome sequencing, comparative genome analysis, functional genome exploration, and the use of model organisms. This has led to new evidence-based therapeutic approaches to prevention or amelioration of T21 effects on brain structure and function (cognition) and has important implications for other areas of research on the neurogenomics of cognition and behavior.

  17. Anti-interleukin 6 receptor therapy for hyper-IgD syndrome.

    PubMed

    Musters, Anne; Tak, Paul Peter; Baeten, Dominique L P; Tas, Sander W

    2015-10-29

    Hyper-IgD syndrome (HIDS) is a rare, severe hereditary autoinflammatory disease characterised by periodic fevers, elevated serum IgD levels and a wide range of symptoms. Although a few randomised controlled trials have been performed in this disorder, there are no straightforward treatment protocols and none of the potential therapies are registered for this indication. We report a case of a young woman with severe HIDS who failed numerous therapies. Eventually, rational treatment with a monoclonal anti-interleukin 6 receptor antibody was initiated. This therapy resulted in an impressive clinical improvement and reduction in the number of hospital admissions per year. This case report underlines the difficulty of finding a suitable treatment for rare, severe inflammatory diseases. Furthermore, we show that treating patients with targeted therapies may result in clinical benefit for the patient, as well as simultaneously teach us more about the pathophysiology of these rare, relatively understudied diseases.

  18. Remission of refractory pyoderma gangrenosum, severe acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH) syndrome using targeted antibiotic therapy in 4 patients.

    PubMed

    Join-Lambert, Olivier; Duchatelet, Sabine; Delage, Maïa; Miskinyte, Snaigune; Coignard, Hélène; Lemarchand, Nicolas; Alemy-Carreau, Murielle; Lortholary, Olivier; Nassif, Xavier; Hovnanian, Alain; Nassif, Aude

    2015-11-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum, severe acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PASH) syndrome can prove refractory to treatment and is characterized by relapses and recurrences. The combination of antibiotic therapy and surgery can produce success in the management of the syndrome. Acute treatment is required, but maintenance therapy is also necessary to prevent disease relapse. The response to antibiotic therapy is hypothesis generating, raising the issue of a modified host response. To date, anecdotal reports support the use of surgery and medical therapy, but controlled investigations with extended follow-up are necessary to substantiate preliminary data observed with individual cases.

  19. Trajectory and outcomes of speech language therapy in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS): case report.

    PubMed

    Misquiatti, Andréa Regina Nunes; Cristovão, Melina Pavini; Brito, Maria Claudia

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the trajectory and the outcomes of speech-language therapy in Prader-Willi syndrome through a longitudinal study of the case of an 8 year-old boy, along four years of speech-language therapy follow-up. The therapy sessions were filmed and documental analysis of information from the child's records regarding anamnesis, evaluation and speech-language therapy reports and multidisciplinary evaluations were carried out. The child presented typical characteristics of Prader-Willi syndrome, such as obesity, hyperfagia, anxiety, behavioral problems and self aggression episodes. Speech-language pathology evaluation showed orofacial hypotony, sialorrhea, hypernasal voice, cognitive deficits, oral comprehension difficulties, communication using gestures and unintelligible isolated words. Initially, speech-language therapy had the aim to promote the language development emphasizing social interaction through recreational activities. With the evolution of the case, the main focus became the development of conversation and narrative abilities. It were observed improvements in attention, symbolic play, social contact and behavior. Moreover, there was an increase in vocabulary, and evolution in oral comprehension and the development of narrative abilities. Hence, speech-language pathology intervention in the case described was effective in different linguistic levels, regarding phonological, syntactic, lexical and pragmatic abilities.

  20. Quinidine therapy for West syndrome with KCNTI mutation: A case report.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Masataka; Kuki, Ichiro; Kawawaki, Hisashi; Okazaki, Shin; Kim, Kiyohiro; Hattori, Yuka; Tsuji, Hitomi; Nukui, Megumi; Inoue, Takeshi; Yoshida, Yoko; Uda, Takehiro; Kimura, Sadami; Mogami, Yukiko; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-01-01

    The KCNT1 gene encodes the sodium-dependent potassium channel, with quinidine being a partial antagonist of the KCNT1 channel. Gain-of-function KCNT1 mutations cause early onset epileptic encephalopathies including migrating partial seizures of infancy (MPSI). At 5months of age, our patient presented with epileptic spasms and hypsarrhythmia by electroencephalogram. Psychomotor retardation was observed from early infancy. The patient was diagnosed with West syndrome. Consequently, various anti-epileptic drugs, adrenocorticotropic hormone therapy (twice), and ketogenic diet therapy were tried. However, the epileptic spasms were intractable. Whole exome sequencing identified a KCNT1 mutation (c.1955G>T; p.G652V). At 2years and 6months, the patient had daily epileptic spasms despite valproate and lamotrigine treatment, and was therefore admitted for quinidine therapy. With quinidine therapy, decreased epileptic spasms and decreased epileptiform paroxysmal activity were observed by interictal EEG. Regarding development, babbling, responsiveness, oral feeding and muscle tone were ameliorated. Only transient diarrhea was observed as an adverse effect. Thus, quinidine therapy should be attempted in patients with West syndrome caused by KCNT1 mutations, as reported for MPSI.

  1. Conversion from latent to symptomatic Sheehan's syndrome by pegylated interferon therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Keitaro; Kayahara, Takahisa; Seno, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Yukitaka; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2008-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with chronic hepatitis C was admitted to our hospital to receive interferon (IFN) therapy. Twenty years earlier she had received blood transfusion because of obstetric hemorrhage. Blood test showed mild hypothyroidism and a relatively elevated eosinophil count. Therapy with pegylated IFNalpha-2a was started, and two days later she complained of nausea and severe malaise. Blood test showed hyponatremia, and plasma prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol levels were all decreased. A simultaneous administration test of lutenizing hormone releasing-, corticotrophin releasing-, growth hormone releasing- and thyrotropin releasing-hormones revealed that only adrenocorticotropic hormone was responsive. Magnetic resonance imaging showed atrophy of anterior lobe of pituitary gland. We diagnosed that IFN therapy disclosed latent Sheehan's syndrome due to previous obstetric hemorrhage. Following supplementation of thyroid and adrenal cortical hormones, we were able to complete IFN therapy. Thus, before IFN therapy for woman patients it is important to suspect latent Sheehan's syndrome when the patient had a history of obstetric hemorrhage.

  2. The application and efficacy of combined neurofeedback therapy and imagery training in adolescents with Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Chuanjun; Li, Li

    2014-07-01

    We aimed to examine the effectiveness of combined neurofeedback therapy and imagery training in adolescent patients with refractory Tourette syndrome. Two patients, aged respectively 14 and 16 years, had been treated with haloperidol and tiapride; however, this medication was ineffective and accompanied by intolerable side effects. In this study, the patients completed 80 sessions of neurofeedback treatment followed by imagery training. The patients were assessed with behavior rating scales both before and after the treatment as well as during follow-up examinations to evaluate the effect of the combined therapy. Patients showed significant improvement in motor tic and vocal tic symptoms, exemplified by a reduction in the frequency and intensity of tics, indicating that neurofeedback, together with imagery training, has a positive therapeutic effect on adolescent patients with medication-refractory Tourette syndrome.

  3. Pathogenesis of Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias in Mecp2 Mutant Mice: Implication for Therapy in Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Mark D.; Wang, Tiannan; Mike, Elise; Herrera, Jose; Beavers, David L.; Huang, Teng-Wei; Ward, Christopher S.; Skinner, Steven; Percy, Alan K.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Wehrens, Xander H. T.; Neul, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Rett Syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder typically caused by mutations in Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2 (MECP2) in which 26% of deaths are sudden and of unknown cause. To explore the hypothesis that these deaths may be due to cardiac dysfunction, we characterized the electrocardiograms (ECGs) in 379 people with Rett syndrome and found that 18.5% show prolongation of the corrected QT interval (QTc), indicating a repolarization abnormality that can predispose to the development of an unstable fatal cardiac rhythm. Male mice lacking MeCP2 function, Mecp2Null/Y, also have prolonged QTc and show increased susceptibility to induced ventricular tachycardia. Female heterozygous null mice, Mecp2Null/+, show an age-dependent prolongation of QTc associated with ventricular tachycardia and cardiac-related death. Genetic deletion of MeCP2 function in only the nervous system was sufficient to cause long QTc and ventricular tachycardia, implicating neuronally-mediated changes to cardiac electrical conduction as a potential cause of ventricular tachycardia in Rett syndrome. The standard therapy for prolonged QTc in Rett syndrome, β-adrenergic receptor blockers, did not prevent ventricular tachycardia in Mecp2Null/Y mice. To determine whether an alternative therapy would be more appropriate, we characterized cardiomyocytes from Mecp2Null/Y mice and found increased persistent sodium current, which was normalized when cells were treated with the sodium channel-blocking anti-seizure drug phenytoin. Treatment with phenytoin reduced both QTc and sustained ventricular tachycardia in Mecp2Null/Y mice. These results demonstrate that cardiac abnormalities in Rett syndrome are secondary to abnormal nervous system control, which leads to increased persistent sodium current. Our findings suggest that treatment in people with Rett syndrome would be more effective if it targeted the increased persistent sodium current in order to prevent lethal cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:22174313

  4. Pathogenesis of lethal cardiac arrhythmias in Mecp2 mutant mice: implication for therapy in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Mark D; Wang, Tiannan; Mike, Elise; Herrera, Jose; Beavers, David L; Huang, Teng-Wei; Ward, Christopher S; Skinner, Steven; Percy, Alan K; Glaze, Daniel G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2011-12-14

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder typically caused by mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) in which 26% of deaths are sudden and of unknown cause. To explore the hypothesis that these deaths may be due to cardiac dysfunction, we characterized the electrocardiograms in 379 people with Rett syndrome and found that 18.5% show prolongation of the corrected QT interval (QTc), an indication of a repolarization abnormality that can predispose to the development of an unstable fatal cardiac rhythm. Male mice lacking MeCP2 function, Mecp2(Null/Y), also have prolonged QTc and show increased susceptibility to induced ventricular tachycardia. Female heterozygous null mice, Mecp2(Null/+), show an age-dependent prolongation of QTc associated with ventricular tachycardia and cardiac-related death. Genetic deletion of MeCP2 function in only the nervous system was sufficient to cause long QTc and ventricular tachycardia, implicating neuronally mediated changes to cardiac electrical conduction as a potential cause of ventricular tachycardia in Rett syndrome. The standard therapy for prolonged QTc in Rett syndrome, β-adrenergic receptor blockers, did not prevent ventricular tachycardia in Mecp2(Null/Y) mice. To determine whether an alternative therapy would be more appropriate, we characterized cardiomyocytes from Mecp2(Null/Y) mice and found increased persistent sodium current, which was normalized when cells were treated with the sodium channel-blocking anti-seizure drug phenytoin. Treatment with phenytoin reduced both QTc and sustained ventricular tachycardia in Mecp2(Null/Y) mice. These results demonstrate that cardiac abnormalities in Rett syndrome are secondary to abnormal nervous system control, which leads to increased persistent sodium current. Our findings suggest that treatment in people with Rett syndrome would be more effective if it targeted the increased persistent sodium current to prevent lethal cardiac arrhythmias.

  5. Gene Therapy for the Retinal Degeneration of Usher Syndrome Caused by Mutations in MYO7A.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Vanda S; Williams, David S

    2015-01-20

    Usher syndrome is a deaf-blindness disorder. One of the subtypes, Usher 1B, is caused by loss of function of the gene encoding the unconventional myosin, MYO7A. A variety of different viral-based delivery approaches have been tested for retinal gene therapy to prevent the blindness of Usher 1B, and a clinical trial based on one of these approaches has begun. This review evaluates the different approaches.

  6. Effect of short-term Pritikin diet therapy on the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Shelby; Samuel, Samuel

    2006-01-01

    The Pritikin Program (Aventura, FL) involves the use of a very-low-fat, low-sodium, high-fiber diet and exercise to decrease the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). This study evaluated the effect of short-term Pritikin therapy on the metabolic risk factors for CHD in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Sixty-seven subjects who had the metabolic syndrome and attended the Pritikin Longevity Center & Spa for 12-15 days were studied. Short-term Pritikin therapy improved most CHD risk factors: body mass index decreased by 3% (P<.001); systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and serum glucose and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations decreased by 10%-15% (P<.001); serum triglyceride concentration decreased by 36% (P<.001); and 37% of subjects no longer met National Cholesterol Education Program criteria for the metabolic syndrome. Serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, however, decreased by 3% (P<.05). These data demonstrate that brief treatment with a very-low-fat, low-sodium, high-fiber diet and regular exercise simultaneously improves multiple CHD risk factors in patients with the metabolic syndrome.

  7. [Midocalm in complex therapy of chronic low back pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chernysheva, T V; Bagirova, G G

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether application of midocalm is appropriate in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) from the point of view of quality of life (QL), efficacy and tolerance. The subjects were 50 patients with chronic LBP associated with spinal osteochondrosis, who underwent clinical examination and were questioned using four QL questionnaires: Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Womac osteoarthritis index Womac osteoarthritis index, Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire, and The 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). The subjects were divided into two groups. The 25 patients of Group I were administered nise in a dose of 100 mg twice a day during 10 days, the 25 patients of Group II--nise in a dose of 100 mg twice a day plus midocalm in a dose of 150 mg per day during the first two days and 450 mg per day from the third day through the tenth day. The study showed high efficacy of midocalm in complex therapy of patients with chronic LBP, as well as low rate of adverse reactions and high treatment tolerance. QL of the patients improved. Combining midocalm therapy with nise allows quicker positive effect in patients with chronic LBP and lowers need for long application of non-steroid antiinflammatory drugs.

  8. DRESS syndrome due to antibiotic therapy of osteoarticular infections in children: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, A; Abril, J C; Cano, J

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarticular infection in children frequently occurs before 10 years of age. Surgical drainage is sometimes required, whereas acute osteomyelitis can be treated with antibiotic therapy alone. The duration of antibiotic therapy varies, 2 weeks is sufficient for septic arthritis, whereas 6 weeks is often required for complicated cases. Some of these antibiotic drugs present direct complications with low clinical impact in certain individuals. Hypersensitivity to these drugs causes different reactions in children. DRESS syndrome (Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is a severe and potentially life-threatening drug reaction. It is characterised by high fever, malaise, lymphadenopathy and skin rash. From a clinical perspective, these symptoms can lead to an exacerbation of the initial infectious process for which treatment was commenced. The liver is the organ most often affected in DRESS syndrome associated with haematological changes, potentially similar to sepsis. We present two cases of children with osteoarticular infections who developed DRESS syndrome after antibiotic therapy. Both patients made a complete recovery after cessation of the antibiotic drugs used.

  9. Meconium aspiration syndrome: possible pathophysiological mechanisms and future potential therapies.

    PubMed

    Lindenskov, Paal Helge Haakonsen; Castellheim, Albert; Saugstad, Ola Didrik; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-01-01

    Does meconium cause meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) or is meconium discharge only a marker of fetal hypoxia? This dispute has lasted for centuries, but since the 1960s, detrimental effects of meconium itself on the lungs have been demonstrated in animal experiments. In clinical MAS, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn is the leading cause of death in MAS. Regarding the complex chemical composition of meconium, it is difficult to identify a single agent responsible for the pathophysiology. However, considering that meconium is stored in the intestines, partly unexposed to the immune system, aspirated meconium could be recognized as ‘danger', representing damaged self. The common denominator in the pathophysiology could therefore be activation of innate immunity. Thus, a bulk of evidence implies that meconium is a potent activator of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, complement, prostaglandins and reactive oxygen species. We hypothesize that the two main recognition systems of innate immunity, the Toll-like receptors and the complement system, recognize meconium as ‘danger', which leads not only to lung dysfunction but also to a systemic inflammatory response. This might have therapeutic implications in the future.

  10. Study on acupuncture and moxibustion therapy for female urethral syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H; Wang, S; Shang, J; Chen, G; Huang, C; Hong, H; Chen, S

    1998-06-01

    Among 180 patients with female urethral syndrome, 128 were treated by acupuncture and moxibustion and 52 by western medicine as controls. The short-term effective rate in the acupuncture and moxibustion group was 90.6% and the long-term effective rate, 80.4%; whereas the short-term effective rate of the control group was 26.9% (P < 0.01). The maximal uroflow rate increased by an average of 4.6 ml/s, after acupuncture and moxibustion treatment (P < 0.001) and the mean uroflow rate increased by an average of 3.1 ml/s (P < 0.001); on the contrary, no changes were found in the control group (P > 0.05). Sixty-nine cases from the acupuncture and moxibustion group and 39 from the control group were subjected before and after treatment to determinations of the maximal bladder pressure, maximal abdominal pressure, bladder-neck pressure, and maximal urethral closure pressure during urination. All these indexes were decreased remarkably in the acupuncture and moxibustion group, while no changes were observed in the control group.

  11. Fragile X Syndrome: from molecular pathology to therapy.

    PubMed

    Maurin, Thomas; Zongaro, Samantha; Bardoni, Barbara

    2014-10-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability due to the silencing of the FMR1 gene encoding FMRP (Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein), an RNA-binding protein involved in different steps of RNA metabolism. Of particular interest is the key role of FMRP in translational regulation. Since the first functional characterizations of FMRP, its role has been underlined by its association with actively translating polyribosomes. Furthermore, a plethora of mRNA targets of FMRP have been identified. In the absence of FMRP the deregulation of translation/transport/stability of these mRNAs has a cascade effect on many pathways, resulting into the final phenotype. We review here a set of targets of FMRP (mRNAs and proteins) that may have an impact on the FXS phenotype by deregulating some key cellular processes, such as translation, cytoskeleton remodeling and oxidative stress. The manipulation of these abnormal pathways by specific drugs may represent new therapeutic opportunities for FXS patients.

  12. Combination of Steven-Johnson syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome following carbamazepine therapy: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhawna; Sannegowda, Raghavendra Bakki; Gandhi, Pankaj; Dubey, Parul; Panagariya, Ashok

    2013-06-11

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a severe, episodic, acute mucocutaneous reaction that is most often elicited by drugs and occasionally by infections. The drugs commonly implicated as the cause of SJS are anticonvulsants, sulfonamides, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics. Carbamazepine (CBZ) has been commonly implicated in SJS. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare, life-threatening but potentially treatable condition. Among the neuroleptics, haloperidol (parenteral) is implicated as a most common drug for NMS. Though rare, association of NMS with CBZ and association of NMS with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) in a single patient after administration of neuroleptics has been reported in the literature before. However, a combination of NMS and SJS in a single patient after administration of CBZ has not been reported so far. We present a patient with seizure who developed SJS and NMS following administration of CBZ.

  13. Combination of Steven-Johnson syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome following carbamazepine therapy: a rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bhawna; Sannegowda, Raghavendra Bakki; Gandhi, Pankaj; Dubey, Parul; Panagariya, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a severe, episodic, acute mucocutaneous reaction that is most often elicited by drugs and occasionally by infections. The drugs commonly implicated as the cause of SJS are anticonvulsants, sulfonamides, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics. Carbamazepine (CBZ) has been commonly implicated in SJS. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare, life-threatening but potentially treatable condition. Among the neuroleptics, haloperidol (parenteral) is implicated as a most common drug for NMS. Though rare, association of NMS with CBZ and association of NMS with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) in a single patient after administration of neuroleptics has been reported in the literature before. However, a combination of NMS and SJS in a single patient after administration of CBZ has not been reported so far. We present a patient with seizure who developed SJS and NMS following administration of CBZ. PMID:23761563

  14. Utility of endoscopic therapy in the management of Boerhaave syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, K. J.; Buttar, N.; Wong Kee Song, L. M.; Gostout, C. J.; Cassivi, S. D.; Allen, M. S.; Nichols, F. C.; Shen, K. R.; Wigle, D. A.; Blackmon, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims: The optimal intervention for Boerhaave perforation has not been determined. Options include surgical repair with/without a pedicled muscle flap, T tube placement, esophageal resection or diversion, or an endoscopic approach. All management strategies require adequate drainage and nutritional support. Our aim was to evaluate outcomes following Boerhaave perforation treated with surgery, endoscopic therapy, or both. Patients and methods: We performed a 10-year review of our prospectively maintained databases of adult patients with Boerhaave perforations. We documented clinical presentation, extent of injury, primary intervention, “salvage” treatment (any treatment for persistent leak), and outcome. Results were analyzed using the Fisher’s exact and Kruskal – Wallis tests. Results: Between October 2004 and October 2014, 235 patients presented with esophageal leak/fistula with 17 Boerhaave perforations. Median age was 68 years. Median length of perforation was 1.25 cm (range 0.8 – 5 cm). Four patients presented with systemic sepsis (two treated with palliative stent and two surgically). Primary endotherapy was performed for eight (50 %) and primary surgery for eight (50 %) patients. Two endotherapy patients required multiple stents. Median stent duration was 61 days (range 56 – 76). “Salvage” intervention was required in 2/8 (25 %) endotherapy patients and 1/8 (13 %) surgery patient (stent). All patients healed without resection/reconstruction. There were no deaths in the surgically treated group and two in the endotherapy group (stented with palliative intent due to poor systemic condition). Readmission within 30 days occurred in 3/6 of alive endotherapy patients (50 %) and 0/8 surgery patients. Re-intervention within 30 days was required for one endotherapy patient. Conclusion: Endoscopic repair of Boerhaave perforations can be useful in carefully selected patients without evidence of systemic sepsis

  15. Sequential Combination Therapy Leading to Sustained Remission in a Patient with SAPHO Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huber, C E; Judex, A G; Freyschmidt, J; Feuerbach, S; Schölmerich, J; Müller-Ladner, U

    2009-03-27

    The SAPHO syndrome represents a variety of clinically similar disorders with the key features of hyperostotic bone lesions in combination with chronic pustular skin disease. The respective pathophysiology of bone and joint manifestations in SAPHO syndrome is still a matter of discussion. For example it does not appear to represent reactive arthritis and HLA B27 antigen, with the latter being typically present in patients with spondyloarthopathies. Treatment of SAPHO syndrome is also not well established and consists of various antiinflammatory and antirheumatic drugs. Here, we report a female patient with active SAPHO syndrome suffering from sternal swelling of unknown origin that had been known for 10 years and a 4-year-history of severe lower back pain. Remarkable were also a typical pustulous palmar erythema associated with swelling and decreased motility of both MCP-I joints. Inflammation parameters were high with an ESR 68 mm/1st hour and a CRP of 19.6 mg/l. She was initially treated with rofecoxib and doxycycline, followed by sulfasalazine with only partial clinical response. Thereafter, both articular symptoms as well as cutaneous lesions responded well to a combination therapy with methotrexate and sulfasalazine. Thus, the case illustrates nicely that methotrexate in combination with another DMARD can be successfully applied to patients with long-term active SAPHO syndrome.

  16. Physical Therapy for Metabolic Syndrome Prevention in Workers: Novel Role of Physical Therapist.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Tomonori; Nemoto, Yuki; Utumi, Takako; Munakata, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, physical therapists have usually been involved in physical therapy for patients with functional disorders associated with cerebrovascular or orthopedic diseases in hospitals. With the aging of Japanese society, the number of diseased people will progressively increase; thus, it is important to pay much more attention to disease prevention. In this regard, physical therapists are expected to play a new role in the field of preventive medicine. Metabolic syndrome or central obesity with multiple cardiometabolic risks is associated with a high risk of type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular diseases and is now a central target for early detection and intervention for disease prevention. The incidence of metabolic syndrome increases with age, and men showed a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome than women in all generations. We have been involved in the guidance of workers with metabolic syndrome for a long time, and we conducted a multicenter study to establish effective guidance for these worker. In this paper, we will use our evidence to discuss the role of physical therapists in providing guidance for preventing metabolic syndrome. We are now conducting worksite supporting exercise intervention for workers who were resistant to conventional lifestyle guidance. In addition, the unique role of physical therapists in this new trial will be introduced.

  17. Sequential Combination Therapy Leading to Sustained Remission in a Patient with SAPHO Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huber, C.E; Judex, A.G; Freyschmidt, J; Feuerbach, S; Schölmerich, J; Müller-Ladner, U

    2009-01-01

    The SAPHO syndrome represents a variety of clinically similar disorders with the key features of hyperostotic bone lesions in combination with chronic pustular skin disease. The respective pathophysiology of bone and joint manifestations in SAPHO syndrome is still a matter of discussion. For example it does not appear to represent reactive arthritis and HLA B27 antigen, with the latter being typically present in patients with spondyloarthopathies. Treatment of SAPHO syndrome is also not well established and consists of various antiinflammatory and antirheumatic drugs. Here, we report a female patient with active SAPHO syndrome suffering from sternal swelling of unknown origin that had been known for 10 years and a 4-year-history of severe lower back pain. Remarkable were also a typical pustulous palmar erythema associated with swelling and decreased motility of both MCP-I joints. Inflammation parameters were high with an ESR 68 mm/1st hour and a CRP of 19.6 mg/l. She was initially treated with rofecoxib and doxycycline, followed by sulfasalazine with only partial clinical response. Thereafter, both articular symptoms as well as cutaneous lesions responded well to a combination therapy with methotrexate and sulfasalazine. Thus, the case illustrates nicely that methotrexate in combination with another DMARD can be successfully applied to patients with long-term active SAPHO syndrome. PMID:19471601

  18. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor therapy to prevent complications as well as therapy for Ehler-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sastry, P S R K

    2002-09-01

    Matrixmetalloproteinase inhibitors have been developed as anti-cancer agents. Their usage in pancreatic cancer and other such malignancies is under trial at present. An interesting undesired-effect of one of these agents is contracture of the hand. Ehler-Danlos syndrome is an inherited group of diseases with varying types. At present there is no known treatment or prevention for the complications associated with this inherited condition. Sometimes it is the adverse events of a drug, which provides an insight into its efficacy for another indication. It is hereby being hypothesized that the matrixmetalloproteinase inhibitors especially marimastat may be an effective drug for treatment of Ehler-Danlos syndrome and/or prevention of its major complications.

  19. Group cognitive behaviour therapy for adults with Asperger syndrome and anxiety or mood disorder: a case series.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jonathan A; Lunsky, Yona

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with Asperger syndrome are at increased risk for mental health problems compared with the general population, especially with regard to mood and anxiety disorders. Generic mental health services are often ill-equipped to offer psychotherapeutic treatments to this population, and specialized supports are difficult to find. This case series used a manualized cognitive behaviour therapy group programme (Mind Over Mood) with three adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome, who were each unable to access psychotherapy through mainstream mental health services. This review highlights the benefits of a cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) group approach for adults with Asperger syndrome and suggests some potential modifications to traditional CBT provision. 

  20. The prospect of molecular therapy for Angelman syndrome and other monogenic neurologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Angelman syndrome is a monogenic neurologic disorder that affects 1 in 15,000 children, and is characterized by ataxia, intellectual disability, speech impairment, sleep disorders, and seizures. The disorder is caused by loss of central nervous system expression of UBE3A, a gene encoding a ubiquitin ligase. Current treatments focus on the management of symptoms, as there have not been therapies to treat the underlying molecular cause of the disease. However, this outlook is evolving with advances in molecular therapies, including artificial transcription factors a class of engineered DNA-binding proteins that have the potential to target a specific site in the genome. Results Here we review the recent progress and prospect of targeted gene expression therapies. Three main issues that must be addressed to advance toward human clinical trials are specificity, toxicity, and delivery. Conclusions Artificial transcription factors have the potential to address these concerns on a level that meets and in some cases exceeds current small molecule therapies. We examine the possibilities of such approaches in the context of Angelman syndrome, as a template for other single-gene, neurologic disorders. PMID:24946931

  1. [Drug therapy for irritable bowel syndrome. What works, what doesn't work and for whom?].

    PubMed

    Mönnikes, H; Schmidtmann, M; van der Voort, I R

    2006-10-01

    The therapy of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is often challenging, especially if a broad spectrum of symptoms is present and trigger factors, such as the influence of diet or stress, are lacking. Current pathogenetic concepts propose central or peripheral alterations that cause disturbed gastrointestinal function (motility, visceral sensitivity) and subsequent symptoms. These alterations are possibly related to psychological (stress, depression, anxiety) and biological (post-infectious residuals, micro-inflammation) influences. Since no universally effective medical treatment is available to treat the causes of the disease, standard medical therapy is symptom directed (especially for pain, constipation and diarrhoea). In addition to well established drugs (like spasmolytics, opioids and laxatives), newly developed compounds including those with other primarily indications (e.g. antidepressants) are available for highly differentiated individualized therapies. New medical approaches which are currently undergoing evaluation, promise further progress in the treatment of IBS.

  2. Clinical review: Acute respiratory distress syndrome - clinical ventilator management and adjunct therapy.

    PubMed

    Silversides, Jonathan A; Ferguson, Niall D

    2013-04-29

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially devastating form of acute inflammatory lung injury with a high short-term mortality rate and significant long-term consequences among survivors. Supportive care, principally with mechanical ventilation, remains the cornerstone of therapy - although the goals of this support have changed in recent years - from maintaining normal physiological parameters to avoiding ventilator-induced lung injury while providing adequate gas exchange. In this article we discuss the current evidence base for ventilatory support and adjunctive therapies in patients with ARDS. Key components of such a strategy include avoiding lung overdistension by limiting tidal volumes and airway pressures, and the use of positive end-expiratory pressure with or without lung recruitment manoeuvres in patients with severe ARDS. Adjunctive therapies discussed include pharmacologic techniques (for example, vasodilators, diuretics, neuromuscular blockade) and nonpharmacologic techniques (for example, prone position, alternative modes of ventilation).

  3. Unmasking histoplasmosis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in a patient recently started on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nabeta, Henry W; Okia, Richard; Rhein, Joshua; Lukande, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is the most common endemic mycoses among HIV-infected people. Patients with suppressed cell immunity mainly due to HIV are at increased risk of disseminated disease. Dermatological manifestations of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) and cutaneous manifestations of histoplasmosis similar to an IRIS event have been previously described. We report the case of a 43-year-old male who presented with cutaneous disseminated histoplasmosis due to Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum 4 months after the onset of the antiretroviral therapy and some improvement in the immune reconstitution. After 2 weeks of amphotericin B and itraconazole therapy, the scheduled treatment involved fluconazole maintenance therapy, which resulted in an improvement of his skin lesions. PMID:28210571

  4. Successful treatment of dwarfism secondary to long-term steroid therapy in steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sun, Linlin; Chen, Dongping; Zhao, Xuezhi; Xu, Chenggang; Mei, Changlin

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged steroid therapy is generally used for steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome in pediatric patients. However, dwarfism secondary to a long-term regimen and its successful reverse is rarely reported. The underlying mechanism of dwarfism is still poorly understood, as both long-term steroid use and nephrotic syndrome may interact or independently interfere with the process of growth. Here, we present a 17-year-old patient with dwarfism and steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome and the successful treatment by recombinant human growth factor and cyclosporine A with withdrawal of steroid. We also briefly review the current understanding and the management of dwarfism in pediatric patients with nephrotic syndrome.

  5. Metabolic syndrome in chronic hepatitis C infection: does it still matter in the era of directly acting antiviral therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Lim, TR

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is prevalent in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Given the pandemic spread of HCV infection and metabolic syndrome, the burden of their interaction is a major public health issue. The presence of metabolic syndrome accelerates the progression of liver disease in patients with HCV infection. New drug development in HCV has seen an unprecedented rise in the last year, which resulted in better efficacy, better tolerance, and a shorter treatment duration. This review describes the underlying mechanisms and clinical effects of metabolic syndrome in HCV infection, as well as their importance in the era of new directly acting antiviral therapy. PMID:25506251

  6. Growth hormone therapy for Prader–willi syndrome: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Grugni, Graziano; Sartorio, Alessandro; Crinò, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by a dysregulation of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I axis, as the consequence of a complex hypothalamic involvement. PWS’ clinical picture seems to resemble the classic non-PWS GH deficiency (GHD), including short stature, excessive body fat, decreased muscle mass, and impaired quality of life. GH therapy is able to ameliorate the phenotypic appearance of the syndrome, as well as to improve body composition, physical strength, and cognitive level. In this regard, however, some pathophysiologic and clinical questions still remain, representing a challenge to give the most appropriate care to PWS patients. Data about the prevalence of GHD in PWS children are not unequivocal, ranging from 40% to 100%. In this context, to establish whether the presence (or not) of GHD may have a different effect on clinical course during GH therapy may be helpful. In addition, the comparison of GH effects in PWS children diagnosed as small for gestational age with those obtained in subjects born appropriate for gestational age is of potential interest for future trials. Emerging information seems to demonstrate the maintenance of beneficial effects of GH therapy in PWS subjects after adolescent years. Thus, GH retesting after achievement of final height should be taken into consideration for all PWS patients. However, it is noteworthy that GH administration exerts positive effects both in PWS adults with and without GHD. Another critical issue is to clarify whether the genotype–phenotype correlations may be relevant to specific outcome measures related to GH therapy. Moreover, progress of our understanding of the role of GH replacement and concomitant therapies on bone characteristics of PWS is required. Finally, a long-term surveillance of benefits and risks of GH therapy is strongly recommended for PWS population, since most of the current studies are uncontrolled and of short duration. PMID:27330297

  7. Pharmacologic and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maneerattaporn, Monthira; Saad, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by episodic abdominal pain or discomfort in association with altered bowel habits (diarrhea and/or constipation). Other gastrointestinal symptoms, such as bloating and flatulence, are also common. A variety of factors are believed to play a role in the development of IBS symptoms, including altered bowel motility, visceral hypersensitivity, psychosocial stressors, altered brain-gut interactions, immune activation/low grade inflammation, alterations in the gut microbiome, and genetic factors. In the absence of biomarkers that can distinguish between IBS subgroups on the basis of pathophysiology, treatment of this condition is predicated upon a patient's most bothersome symptoms. In clinical trials, effective therapies have only offered a therapeutic gain over placebos of 7-15%. Evidence based therapies for the global symptoms of constipation predominant IBS (IBS-C) include lubiprostone and tegaserod; evidence based therapies for the global symptoms of diarrhea predominant IBS (IBS-D) include the probiotic Bifidobacter infantis, the nonabsorbable antibiotic rifaximin, and alosetron. Additionally, there is persuasive evidence to suggest that selected antispasmodics and antidepressants are of benefit for the treatment of abdominal pain in IBS patients. Finally, several emerging therapies with novel mechanisms of action are in development. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies including probiotics, herbal therapies and acupuncture are gaining popularity among IBS sufferers, although concerns regarding manufacturing standards and the paucity of high quality efficacy and safety data remain. PMID:21927652

  8. Phonological awareness abilities of a child with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome before and after speech therapy.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Suzana Aparecida; Fukuda, Marisa Tomoe Hebihara; Granzotti, Raphaela Barroso Guedes

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the phonological awareness abilities of a child with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) before and after speech-language therapy. The participant was a 6-year-old girl, first-grade Elementary School student, with AIDS acquired by vertical transmission. The child's phonological awareness abilities were evaluated using the Instrument of Sequential Evaluation of Phonological Awareness (CONFIAS). After this first evaluation, a closed therapeutic program (15 sessions) for phonological awareness was developed, consisting of activities for syllabic and phonemic levels. The CONFIAS was reapplied in the last session in order to investigate therapy effectiveness. In the pre-therapy assessment, the child scored 18 points in syllable tasks and 1 point in phoneme tasks, with a total score of 19 points. In the post-therapy assessment, the child scored 26 points in syllable tasks and 11 points in phoneme tasks, with a total score of 37 points. This study allowed us to characterize the performance of a child with AIDS in tasks of phonological awareness and the effectiveness of the therapeutic program. The score obtained before therapy was much lower than expected for the child's age, and presented significant improvement after speech-language therapy. Thus, professionals working with this population must be aware of therapeutic programs that approach phonological processing abilities in addition to other aspects.

  9. A novel treatment modality for myofascial pain syndrome: hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Kiralp, Mehmet Zeki; Uzun, Günalp; Dinçer, Omit; Sen, Ahmet; Yildiz, Senol; Tekin, Levent; Dursun, Hasan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy on myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). Thirty patients with the diagnosis of MPS were divided into HBO (n=20) and control groups (n=10). Patients in the HBO group received a total of 10 HBO treatments in 2 weeks. Patients in the control group received placebo treatment in a hyperbaric chamber. Pain threshold and visual analogue scale (VAS) measurements were performed immediately before and after HBO therapy and 3 months thereafter. Additionally, Pain Disability Index (PDI) and Short Form 12 Health Survey (SF-12) evaluations were done before HBO and after 3 months. HBO therapy was well tolerated with no complications. In the HBO group, pain threshold significantly increased and VAS scores significantly decreased immediately after and 3 months after HBO therapy. PDI, Mental and Physical Health SF-12 scores improved significantly with HBO therapy after 3 months compared with pretreatment values. In the control group, pain thresholds, VAS score, and Mental Health SF-12 scores did not change with placebo treatment; however, significant improvement was observed in the Physical Health SF-12 test. We concluded that HBO therapy may be a valuable alternative to other methods in the management of MPS. Our results warrant further randomized, double-blinded and placebo-controlled studies to evaluate the possible role of HBO in the management of MPS.

  10. Effect of oxandrolone therapy on adult height in Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sheanon, Nicole M; Backeljauw, Philippe F

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality in which there is complete or partial absence of the X chromosome. Turner syndrome effects 1 in every 2000 live births. Short stature is a cardinal feature of Turner Syndrome and the standard treatment is recombinant human growth hormone. When growth hormone is started at an early age a normal adult height can be achieved. With delayed diagnosis young women with Turner Syndrome may not reach a normal height. Adjuvant therapy with oxandrolone is used but there is no consensus on the optimal timing of treatment, the duration of treatment and the long term adverse effects of treatment. The objective of this review and meta-analysis is to examine the effect of oxandrolone on adult height in growth hormone treated Turner syndrome patients. Eligible trials were identified by a literature search using the terms: Turner syndrome, oxandrolone. The search was limited to English language randomized-controlled trials after 1980. Twenty-six articles were reviewed and four were included in the meta-analysis. A random effects model was used to calculate an effect size and confidence interval. The pooled effect size of 2.0759 (95 % CI 0.0988 to 4.0529) indicates that oxandrolone has a positive effect on adult height in Turner syndrome when combined with growth hormone therapy. In conclusion, the addition of oxandrolone to growth hormone therapy for treatment of short stature in Turner syndrome improves adult height. Further studies are warranted to investigate if there is a subset of Turner syndrome patients that would benefit most from growth hormone plus oxandrolone therapy, and to determine the optimal timing and duration of such therapy.

  11. Impulse control disorders and dopamine dysregulation syndrome associated with dopamine agonist therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fenu, Sandro; Wardas, Jadwiga; Morelli, Micaela

    2009-09-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged linking disorders in the impulsive-compulsive spectrum in Parkinson's disease to dopamine receptor agonist treatment. These disorders include hypersexuality, gambling and, to a minor extent, compulsive shopping and eating, as well as dopamine dysregulation syndrome, characterized by an addictive pattern toward dopamine replacement therapy and stereotyped behaviors, such as punding. These syndromes, which have only recently been recognized and are still underdiagnosed, have deleterious social consequences that warrant interventions at the clinical level and promotion of research at the preclinical level. In this review, we first provide a summary of features of Parkinson's disease and current pharmacological therapies associated with the development of dopamine dysregulation syndrome and impulsive-compulsive disorders. We also examine the dopamine receptors and brain areas important in reward and compulsive behaviors. We then critically examine the neuroadaptations in dopaminergic circuitries and the literature concerning gambling, hypersexuality, and other addictive behaviors in parkinsonian patients. Finally, we focus on suggestions pointing to a role for dopamine D(3) receptors and sensitization phenomena as the main factors which may be the origin of these disorders.

  12. Cerebral Hyperperfusion in a Child with Stroke-Like Migraine Attacks after Radiation Therapy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ardicli, Didem; Gocmen, Rahsan; Oguz, Kader K; Varan, Ali; Yalnizoglu, Dilek

    2016-08-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare complication of cranial radiotherapy characterized by migraine-like headache and transient neurological deficits with typical gyriform enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Potential underlying mechanisms are endothelial damage or dysfunction, vascular instability, vasospasm and, neuronal dysfunction.We report an 11-year-old girl with a primary diagnosis of medulloblastoma presented with acute-onset severe headache and left-sided weakness, 20 months after completing cranial radiotherapy. MRI demonstrated unilateral cortical swelling and concomitant leptomeningeal, gyral contrast enhancement, and MR perfusion imaging showed increased cortical perfusion in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. Her symptoms resolved spontaneously over several days.SMART syndrome appears to be a reversible, long-term complication of cranial radiotherapy. So far, a limited number of pediatric patients with SMART syndrome have been reported. Prompt recognition of clinical signs and radiological imaging of SMART syndrome may help prevent unnecessary interventions and initiate appropriate diagnostic workup and management.

  13. [Clinical nutrition therapy in patients with short bowel syndrome in line with principles of personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    Sahin, Péter; Molnár, Andrea; Varga, Mária; Bíró, Ilona; Kőmíves, Csilla; Fejér, Csaba; Futó, Judit; Tomsits, Erika; Topa, Lajos

    2014-12-21

    Home parenteral nutrition administered in selected care centres has been financed in Hungary since January, 2013. The authors discuss diagnostic issues, treatment and nutrition therapy of short bowel syndrome patients in line with the principles of personalised medicine. The most severe form of short bowel syndrome occurs in patients having jejunostomy, whose treatment is discussed separately. The authors give a detailed overview of home parenteral feeding, its possible complications, outcomes and adaptation of the remaining bowel. They describe how their own care centre operates where they administer home parenteral nutrition to 12 patients with short bowel syndrome (5 females and 7 males aged 51.25±14.4 years). The body mass index was 19.07±5.08 kg/m2 and 20.87±3.3 kg/m2, skeletal muscle mass was 25.7±6.3 kg and 26.45±5.38 kg, and body fat mass was 14.25±8.55 kg and 11.77±2.71 kg at the start of home parenteral nutrition and presently, respectively. The underlying conditions of short bowel syndrome were tumours in 4 patients, bowel ischaemia in four patients, surgical complications in three patients, Crohn's disease in one patient, and Crohn's disease plus tumour in one patient.

  14. Towards liver-directed gene therapy for Crigler-Najjar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Paula S Montenegro; Bosma, Piter J

    2009-04-01

    Crigler-Najjar (CN) syndrome is a recessive inherited disorder caused by deficiency of uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1. This hepatic enzyme catalyzes the glucuronidation of bilirubin, an essential step in excretion into bile of this neurotoxic compound. As a result, CN patients suffer from severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia and are at risk of bilirubin encephalopathy. Over the last decades ex vivo and in vivo gene therapy using viral and non-viral vectors has been used to correct hyperbilirubinemia in the relevant animal model for CN syndrome, the Gunn rat. Several of these approaches did result in long-term correction of serum bilirubin levels in this animal model. However, none have been translated into a clinical trial. In this review we will recapitulate the strategies used and discuss their suitability for clinical application in the near future. We will also address specific safety measures in the gene therapy protocol needed to prevent adverse effects such as bilirubin toxicity. Since CN seems an ideal model for other monogenetic inherited metabolic liver disorders, development of liver-directed gene-therapy has relevance beyond this rare disease.

  15. Cardiorenal syndrome: ultrafiltration therapy for heart failure--trials and tribulations.

    PubMed

    Kazory, Amir

    2013-10-01

    Heart failure remains the leading cause of hospitalization in older patients and is considered a growing public health problem with a significant financial burden on the health care system. The suboptimal efficacy and safety profile of diuretic-based therapeutic regimens coupled with unsatisfactory results of the studies on novel pharmacologic agents have positioned ultrafiltration on the forefront as an appealing therapeutic option for patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). In recent years, substantial interest in the use of ultrafiltration has been generated due to the advent of dedicated portable devices and promising results of trials focusing both on mechanistic and clinical aspects of this therapeutic modality. This article briefly reviews the proposed benefits of ultrafiltration therapy in the setting of ADHF and summarizes the major findings of the currently available studies in this field. The results of more recent trials on cardiorenal syndrome that present a counterpoint to previous observations and highlight certain limitations of ultrafiltration therapy are then discussed, followed by identification of major challenges and unanswered questions that could potentially hinder its more widespread use. Future studies are warranted to shed light on less well characterized aspects of ultrafiltration therapy and to further define its role in ADHF and cardiorenal syndrome.

  16. Successful Treatment of Lower Limb Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Three Weeks of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Katznelson, Rita; Segal, Shira C.; Clarke, Hance

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a treatment that delivers 100% oxygen at increased atmospheric pressures. The efficacy of HBOT for treating pain has been described in various animal pain models and may have clinical efficacy in the treatment of human chronic pain syndromes. We present our experience with posttraumatic Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type 2 in a patient who underwent 15 sessions of HBOT. A 41-year-old male with one-year history of CRPS of left foot followed by left ankle fracture demonstrated less pain, decreased swelling, less allodynia, and improvement in skin color and range of motion of the lower limb after 3 weeks of HBOT. Patient was back to work for the first time in over a year. HBOT may be considered as a valuable therapeutic tool in the treatment of long-standing CRPS. PMID:27445607

  17. Development of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boztug, Kaan; Dewey, Ricardo A; Klein, Christoph

    2006-10-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a complex primary immunodeficiency disorder associated with microthrombocytopenia, autoinnmunity and susceptibility to malignant lymphoma. At the molecular level, this rare disorder is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP). WASP is a cytosolic adaptor protein mediating the rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton upon surface receptor signaling. Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation represents a curative approach but remains problematic in light of severe risks and side effects. Recently, HSC gene therapy has emerged as an alternative treatment option. Cumulative preclinical data obtained from WASP-deficient murine models and human cells indicate a marked improvement of the impaired cellular and immunological phenotypes associated with WASP deficiency. The first clinical trial is currently being conducted to assess the feasibility, toxicity, and potential therapeutic benefit of transplanting autologous WASP-reconstituted hematopoietic stem cells.

  18. Metabolic syndrome and chronic arthritis: effects of anti-TNF-α therapy.

    PubMed

    Maruotti, Nicola; d'Onofrio, Francesca; Cantatore, Francesco Paolo

    2015-11-01

    TNF-α plays a key role in the inflammatory cytokine cascade involved in the pathogenesis of chronic arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Systemic inflammation and the increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in these patients may favor the onset of metabolic syndrome. In patients affected by chronic arthritis, TNF-α is considered as one of the factors responsible for favouring insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, which are important features of the metabolic syndrome. Even if TNF-α is a single player in the great molecular cauldron of inflammation, the use of TNF-α inhibitors may be an important approach for not only treating articular and cutaneous symptoms but also for ameliorating glucose and lipid metabolism. Nevertheless, further research and clinical trials are needed to better determine the effects of biologic therapies on metabolic components in chronic arthritis patients and to identify the most appropriate strategies on the basis of the comorbidities in these patients.

  19. Targeted Therapy with Rituximab in Felty’s Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Heylen, Line; Dierickx, Daan; Vandenberghe, Peter; Westhovens, René

    2012-01-01

    Felty’s syndrome is a rare, severe extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is no standard therapy, and several disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs have been used with varying success. Only very few reports exist in literature on the use of biologicals in this indication and this with a variable efficacy. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with severe refractory/partly undertreated RA who presented with Felty’s syndrome and pancytopenia, in whom treatment with rituximab led to an marked increase of red blood cells, neutrophils and thrombocytes. In addition, the RA disease activity status improved dramatically and treatment with steroids could be reduced. The current sparse literature on this topic is reviewed. PMID:23198005

  20. Effects of Temperature on Chronic Trapezius Myofascial Pain Syndrome during Dry Needling Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature on chronic trapezius myofascial pain syndrome during dry needling therapy. Sixty patients were randomized into two groups of dry needling (DN) alone (group A) and DN combined with heat therapy group (group B). Each patient was treated once and the therapeutic effect was assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and the 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment. Evaluation based on VAS and PPT showed that the pain of patients in groups A and B was significantly (P < 0.05) relieved at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment Compared to before treatment. There was significantly (P < 0.05) less pain in group B than group A at one and three months after treatment. The SF-36 evaluation demonstrated that the physical condition of patients in both groups showed significant (P < 0.05) improvement at one month and three months after treatment than before treatment. Our study suggests that both DN and DN heating therapy were effective in the treatment of trapezius MPS, and that DN heating therapy had better long-term effects than DN therapy. PMID:25383083

  1. Investigation of the effect of GaAs laser therapy on cervical myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Altan, Lale; Bingöl, Umit; Aykaç, Mehtap; Yurtkuran, Merih

    2005-01-01

    Low-energy laser therapy has been applied in several rheumatoid and soft tissue disorders with varying rates of success. The objective of our study was to investigate the effect of laser therapy on cervical myofascial pain syndrome with a placebo-controlled double-blind prospective study model. It was performed with a total of 53 patients (35 females and 18 males) with cervical myofascial pain syndrome. In group 1 (n = 23), GaAs laser treatment was applied over three trigger points bilaterally and also one point in the taut bands in trapezius muscle bilaterally with a frequency of 1000 Hz for 2 min over each point once a day for 10 days during a period of 2 weeks. In group 2 (n = 25), the same treatment protocol was given, but the laser instrument was switched off during applications. All patients in both groups were instructed to perform daily isometric exercises and stretching just short of pain for 2 weeks at home. Evaluations were performed just before treatment (week 0), immediately after (week 2), and 12 weeks later (week 14). Evaluation parameters included pain, algometric measurements, and cervical lateral flexion. Statistical analysis was done on data collected from three evaluation stages. The results were evaluated in 48 patients (32 females, 16 males). Week 2 and week 14 results showed significant improvement in all parameters for both groups. However, comparison of the percentage changes both immediately and 12 weeks after treatment did not show a significant difference relative to pretreatment values. In conclusion, the results of our study have not shown the superiority of GaAs laser therapy over placebo in the treatment of cervical myofascial pain syndrome, but we suggest that further studies on this topic be done using different laser types and dosages in larger patient populations.

  2. Hydrogen therapy may be an effective and specific novel treatment for acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Cui, Jianguo; Sun, Quan; Cai, Jianming

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen is the most abundant chemical element in the universe, however, it is seldom regarded as a therapeutic gas. Recent studies show that inhaled hydrogen gas (H(2)) has antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities that protect the brain against ischemia-reperfusion injury and stroke by selectively reducing hydroxyl and peroxynitrite radicals. It is also well known that more than a half of the ionizing radiation-induced cellular damage is caused by hydroxyl radicals. Studies have show that reducing hydroxyl radicals can significantly improve the protection of cells from radiation damage. In like manner, we hypothesize that hydrogen therapy may be an effective, specific and unique treatment for acute radiation syndrome.

  3. Improving clinical outcome in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and iron overload using iron chelation therapy.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Heather A

    2007-12-01

    Until recently, little information on the benefits of iron chelation therapy (ICT) in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and iron overload was known. A recent retrospective study showed improved survival in transfusion-dependent patients with MDS (Low or Intermediate-1 risk IPSS) receiving ICT, compared with those not receiving ICT; median overall survival was not reached at 160 months versus 40 months, respectively. Significantly more patients receiving ICT survived to 4 years (80% versus 44%; p < 0.03), suggesting that MDS patients with iron overload might benefit from ICT. Prospective studies to confirm the benefit of ICT in MDS are warranted.

  4. Effect of menopausal hormone therapy on components of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lovre, Dragana; Lindsey, Sarah H; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2016-05-27

    The world population is aging, and women will spend an increasing share of their lives in a postmenopausal state that predisposes to metabolic dysfunction. Thus, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in women is likely to increase dramatically. This article summarizes the effects of menopause in predisposing to components of MetS including visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and hypertension (HTN). We also summarize the effects of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) in reversing these metabolic alterations and discuss therapeutic advances of novel menopausal treatment on metabolic function.

  5. [Preventive and cessation therapy of mental disorders in patients with the acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, V E; Epifanov, A V; Zverev, K V

    2012-01-01

    An open prospective trial of 93 inpatients divided into two main groups (61 patients) - with mental disorders (31) and without mental disorders (30) and a comparison group (32 patients) was carried out. All patients survived the acute coronary syndrome (myocardial infarction, unstable angina). The efficacy and safety of both preventive and cessation therapy with pantogam active in mean doses 1.8 and 1.2 g /daily, respectively, was demonstrated in respect of heterogeneous depressive, anxiety and somatoform disorders of the neurotic level.

  6. Drug-induced lupus and antiphospholipid syndrome associated with cysteamine therapy.

    PubMed

    Krischock, Leah; Horsfield, Catherine; D'Cruz, David; Rigden, Susan P A

    2009-06-01

    Serological evidence of drug-induced lupus (DIL) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) were detected in a paediatric patient with nephropathic cystinosis during work-up for live related renal transplantation. Cysteamine was considered the most likely cause. Antinuclear (ANA) and antihistone antibodies disappeared after stopping cysteamine. ANA became positive after reintroduction of cysteamine. The patient's post-transplant course was complicated by severe thrombosis, with histological findings in her native nephrectomy consistent with APS. This is the first reported case of DIL and APS secondary to cysteamine therapy. Clinicians should exclude autoimmune abnormalities in patients with cystinosis, especially if patients report non-specific, unusual or unexplained symptoms.

  7. Rocuronium-sugammadex for electroconvulsive therapy management in neuroleptic malignant syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Casas Reza, P; Gestal Vázquez, M; Outeiro Rosato, Á; López Álvarez, S; Diéguez García, P

    2017-02-01

    Neuroleptics are a group of drugs widely used in the treatment of psychotic symptoms. Among their adverse effects is the ability to trigger a neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). The diagnosis of NMS is determined by exclusion, and its initial therapeutic management should be the withdrawal of neuroleptics, the administration of benzodiazepines, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). ECT is an effective treatment in these patients, and in those cases with a poor response to treatment with antipsychotic drugs. A review is presented on the treatment options and anaesthetic implications of ECT used to handle a patient diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia in the context of NMS.

  8. Cauda equina syndrome associated with multiple lumbar arachnoid cysts in ankylosing spondylitis: improvement following surgical therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, P J; Allcutt, D A; Bates, D; Crawford, P J

    1990-01-01

    A case of cauda equina syndrome with multiple lumbar arachnoid cysts complicating ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is described. The value of computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a non-invasive means of establishing the diagnosis is emphasised. In contrast to previously reported cases the patient showed neurological improvement following surgical therapy. Surgery may be indicated in some patients, particularly when there is nerve root compression by the arachnoid cysts and when the patient is seen early before irreversible damage to the cauda equina has occurred. Images PMID:2292702

  9. Lewis-Sumner syndrome associated with infliximab therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Davyd R; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Baker, Steven K

    2008-10-01

    We report 2 cases of Lewis-Sumner syndrome (LSS) diagnosed in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis undergoing treatment with the antitumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) monoclonal antibody infliximab. While experiencing clinical improvement in their arthritic symptoms, both patients experienced sensory deficits and weakness in multiple nerve distributions. They had electrodiagnostic evidence of motor conduction block and subsequent improvement with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). We describe the details of the cases and review the literature on immune-mediated neuropathies associated with anti-TNF-alpha therapy.

  10. Review of intravesical therapies for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosamilia, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic pain condition characterised by urinary frequency, urgency and pain or discomfort which the patient attributes to the bladder. It is a complex condition to manage and treat and requires a multi-disciplinary and multi-modal approach. As well as lifestyle and behavioural modifications, physical therapy and oral medications, intravesical treatments can be used in the treatment algorithm for BPS/IC. A number of intravesical agents are reviewed in this paper along with the available evidence for their use. PMID:26816864

  11. Analysis of Factors Associated With Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Norihisa Sato, Shuhei; Katsui, Kuniaki; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Tsuda, Toshihide; Yoshida, Atsushi; Morito, Tsuneharu; Nakagawa, Tomio; Mizuta, Akifumi; Waki, Takahiro; Niiya, Harutaka; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate factors associated with radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 702 women with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery at seven institutions between July 1995 and December 2006 were analyzed. In all patients, the whole breast was irradiated with two tangential photon beams. The criteria used for the diagnosis of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome were as follows: (1) radiotherapy to the breast within 12 months, (2) general and/or respiratory symptoms lasting for {>=}2 weeks, (3) radiographs showing lung infiltration outside the radiation port, and (4) no evidence of a specific cause. Results: Radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was seen in 16 patients (2.3%). Eleven patients (68.8%) were administered steroids. The duration of steroid administration ranged from 1 week to 3.7 years (median, 1.1 years). Multivariate analysis revealed that age ({>=}50 years; odds ratio [OR] 8.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-67.76; p = 0.04) and concurrent endocrine therapy (OR 3.05; 95% CI 1.09-8.54; p = 0.03) were significantly associated with BOOP syndrome. Of the 161 patients whose age was {>=}50 years and who received concurrent endocrine therapy, 10 (6.2%) developed BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Age ({>=}50 years) and concurrent endocrine therapy can promote the development of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Physicians should carefully follow patients who received breast-conserving therapy, especially those who are older than 50 years and received concurrent endocrine therapy during radiotherapy.

  12. Treating metabolic syndrome's metaflammation with low level light therapy: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Tania M.; Kato, Ilka T.; Deana, Alessandro M.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2014-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome comprises a constellation of morbidities such as insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, atherogenic dyslipidemia, dysglycemia and obesity (especially abdominal). Metabolic alterations are observed in major insulin target organs, increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases, type-2 diabetes and therefore mortality. Tissue alterations are characterized by immune cells infiltrates (especially activated macrophages). Released inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α induce chronic inflammation in subjects with metabolic syndrome, since inflammatory pathways are activated in the neighboring cells. The intra-abdominal adipose tissue appears to be of particular importance in the onset of the inflammatory state, and strategies contributing to modulate the inflammatory process within this adipose tissue can mitigate the metabolic syndrome consequences. Considering the low level light therapy (LLLT) recognized benefits in inflammatory conditions, we hypothesized this therapeutic approach could promote positive effects in modulating the inflammatory state of metabolic syndrome. That being the scope of this study, male C57BL/6 mice were submitted to a high-fat/high-fructose diet among 8 weeks to induce metabolic syndrome. Animals were then irradiated on the abdominal region during 21 days using an 850 nm LED (6 sessions, 300 seconds per session, 60 mW output power, ~6 J/cm2 fluence, ~19 mW/cm2 fluence rate). Before and during treatment, blood was sampled either from the retroorbital plexus or from tail puncture for glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides analysis. So far our results indicate no alterations on these metabolic parameters after LLLT. For further investigations, blood was collected for plasma inflammatory cytokine quantification and fresh ex vivo samples of liver and intra-abdominal adipose tissue were harvested for immunohistochemistry purposes.

  13. Effectiveness of hand therapy interventions in primary management of carpal tunnel syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Muller, Monique; Tsui, Deborah; Schnurr, Ronda; Biddulph-Deisroth, Lori; Hard, Julie; MacDermid, Joy C

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of hand therapy interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) based on the best available evidence. A qualitative systematic review was conducted. A literature search using 40 key terms was conducted from the earliest available date to January 2003 using seven databases. Articles were randomly assigned to two of five reviewers and evaluated according to predetermined criteria for inclusion at each of the title, abstract, and article levels. Included studies were independently scored by two reviewers using a structured effectiveness quality evaluation scale and also graded according to Sackett's Levels of Evidence. There were 2027 articles identified from the literature search, of which 345 met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-four studies were used to formulate 30 recommendations. Current evidence demonstrates a significant benefit (grade B recommendations) from splinting, ultrasound, nerve gliding exercises, carpal bone mobilization, magnetic therapy, and yoga for people with CTS.

  14. [The potential use of cannabidiol in the therapy of metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kleiner, Dénes; Ditrói, Kálmán

    2012-04-01

    Cannabidiol, a cannabinoid and serotonin receptor antagonist, may alleviate hyperphagia without the side effects of rimonabant (for example depression and reduced insulin sensitivity). Similar to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonists, it may also help the differentation of adipocytes. Cannabidiol has an immunomodulating effect, as well, that helps lessen the progression of atherosclerosis induced by high glucose level. It may also be effective in fighting ischaemic diseases, the most harmful complications of metabolic syndrome. However, it can only be administered as an adjuvant therapy because of its low binding potency, and its inhibiting effect of cytochrome P450 enzymes should also be considered. Nevertheless, it may be beneficially used in adjuvant therapy because of its few side effects.

  15. Antithrombotic therapy in acute coronary syndromes: guidelines translated for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Gharacholou, S Michael; Lopes, Renato D; Washam, Jeffrey B; Newby, L Kristin; James, Stefan K; Alexander, John H

    2010-05-01

    The use of anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy during the management of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) has been associated with improvements in short- and long-term clinical outcomes, regardless of whether patients are managed conservatively or with acute coronary revascularization. Translating the existing evidence for selection of the most appropriate antithrombotic strategy has been summarized in available guideline recommendations. Given the breadth of antithrombotic recommendations across existing U.S. and European guidelines, synthesis of these recommendations for practicing clinicians who treat patients with ACS are increasingly desired. Providing a summary of the similarities across guidelines while noting the areas where divergence exists becomes an important facet in translating optimal antithrombotic management in ACS for the treating clinician. This review highlights the important aspects of clinical practice guidelines that practicing physicians should consider when selecting antithrombotic therapies to reduce ischemic risk while minimizing hemorrhagic risk across all ACS subtypes.

  16. Bridging therapy in antiphospholipid syndrome and antiphospholipid antibodies carriers: case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Raso, Samuele; Sciascia, Savino; Kuzenko, Anna; Castagno, Irene; Marozio, Luca; Bertero, Maria Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    Peri-operative management of patients on warfarin involves assessing and balancing individual risks for thromboembolism and bleeding. The timing of warfarin withdrawal and a tailored pre/postoperative management (including the substitution of heparin in place of warfarin, the so-called bridging therapy) is critical in patients with prothrombotic conditions. The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the most common cause of acquired thrombophilia. In this particular subset of patients, as the risk of thrombosis is higher than in general population, bridging therapy can represent a real challenge for treating physicians. Only few studies have been designed to address this topic. We aim to report our experience and to review the available literature in the peri-procedural management of APS and antiphospholipid antibody-positive patients, reporting adverse events and attempting to identify potential risk factor associated with thrombosis or bleeding complications.

  17. Plasmapheresis as adjuvant therapy in Stevens-Johnson syndrome and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Hung, Po-Cheng; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Wong, Alex M-C

    2014-04-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a severe idiosyncratic reaction, most commonly triggered by medications, which is characterized by fever and mucocutaneous lesions, leading to necrosis and sloughing of the epidermis. Aside from skin and mucosal manifestations, SJS may also compromise heart, liver, kidney, lung, and gastrointestinal tract. Although cholestatic liver disease has been reported to occur in SJS, hepatic encephalopathy (HE) as a delayed complication has never been reported. We report a 4-year-old female child with anticonvulsant-induced SJS complicated by HE who was completely cured with a combination of systemic corticosteroid, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and plasmapheresis therapy. We suggested that plasmapheresis may be used as an adjuvant therapy for SJS with HE.

  18. Endovascular therapy for advanced post-thrombotic syndrome: Proceedings from a multidisciplinary consensus panel

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Suresh; Kahn, Susan R; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Comerota, Anthony J; Parpia, Sameer; Meleth, Sreelatha; Earp, Diane; Williams, Rick; Sista, Akhilesh K; Marston, William; Rathbun, Suman; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Razavi, Mahmood K; Jaff, Michael R; Kearon, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) and chronic iliac vein obstruction suffer major physical limitations and impairment of health-related quality of life. Currently there is a lack of evidence-based treatment options for these patients. Early studies suggest that imaging-guided, catheter-based endovascular therapy can eliminate iliac vein obstruction and saphenous venous valvular reflux, resulting in reduced PTS severity; however, these observations have not been rigorously validated. A multidisciplinary expert panel meeting was convened to plan a multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate endovascular therapy for the treatment of advanced PTS. This article summarizes the findings of the panel, and is expected to assist in developing a National Institutes of Health-sponsored clinical trial and other studies to improve the care of patients with advanced PTS. PMID:27247235

  19. Multimodal therapy for category III chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome in UPOINTS phenotyped patients

    PubMed Central

    MAGRI, VITTORIO; MARRAS, EMANUELA; RESTELLI, ANTONELLA; WAGENLEHNER, FLORIAN M.E.; PERLETTI, GIANPAOLO

    2015-01-01

    The complex network of etiological factors, signals and tissue responses involved in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) cannot be successfully targeted by a single therapeutic agent. Multimodal approaches to the therapy of CP/CPPS have been and are currently being tested, as in the frame of complex diagnostic-therapeutic phenotypic approaches such as the urinary, psychosocial, organ-specific, infection, neurological and muscle tenderness (UPOINTS) system. In this study, the effect of combination therapy on 914 patients diagnosed, phenotyped and treated in a single specialized prostatitis clinic was analyzed. Patients received α-blockers, Serenoa repens (S. repens) extracts combined or not with supplements (lycopene and selenium) and, in the presence of documented or highly suspected infection, antibacterial agents. Combination treatment induced marked and significant improvements of National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) prostatitis symptom scores, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) sexual dysfunction scores, urinary peak flow rates and bladder voiding efficiency. These improvements, assessed after a 6-month course of therapy, were sustained throughout a follow-up period of 18 months. A clinically appreciable reduction of ≥6 points of the total NIH-CPSI score was achieved in 77.5% of patients subjected to combination therapy for a period of 6 months. When the patients were divided in two cohorts, depending on the diagnosis of CP/CPPS [inflammatory (IIIa) vs. non-inflammatory (IIIb) subtypes], significant improvements of all signs and symptoms of the syndrome were observed in both cohorts at the end of therapy. Intergroup comparison showed that patients affected by the IIIa sub-category of CP/CPPS showed more severe signs and symptoms (NIH-CPSI total, pain and quality of life impact scores, and Qmax) at baseline when compared with IIIb patients. However, the improvement of symptoms after

  20. Predicting the response to cytotoxic therapy for childhood nephrotic syndrome: superiority of response to corticosteroid therapy over histopathologic patterns.

    PubMed

    Schulman, S L; Kaiser, B A; Polinsky, M S; Srinivasan, R; Baluarte, H J

    1988-12-01

    To determine the utility of steroid response in classifying childhood nephrotic syndrome, we reviewed 119 biopsies in 92 children aged 1 to 16 years who had been followed for a mean of 7.2 years. Steroid responses were classified as steroid resistant, steroid dependent, and frequent relapser as defined by the International Study of Kidney Disease in Children. Biopsy specimens were classified as showing focal glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) in 39 children, as showing lipoid nephrosis in 28, and as questionable in another 25 with either focal global sclerosis, IgM nephropathy, or mesangial prominence and tubular changes. A strong agreement (p less than 0.01) was found between children whose FSGS was steroid resistant and children whose lipoid nephrosis resulted in frequent relapses. The length of the remission after therapy with chlorambucil or cyclophosphamide was determined in 84 children. A significantly shorter length of remission after cytotoxic drug therapy (p less than 0.05) was identified for patients with FSGS versus those with lipoid nephrosis; this difference became more significant for steroid-resistant patients in comparison with those who were steroid dependent or were frequent relapsers (p less than 0.005). Among all steroid-resistant patients, those with FSGS had shorter remissions than patients with other histologic changes (p less than 0.001). The data suggest that patterns of response to corticosteroid therapy correlate with the histologic abnormality. Thus steroid-sensitive patients need not undergo renal biopsy before receiving cytotoxic drugs. Steroid-resistant patients would benefit from a biopsy, because the findings tend to predict the outcome.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome: innovative medical approaches in military medicine.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Erik B; Varney, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    After a radiological or nuclear event, acute radiation syndrome (ARS) will present complex medical challenges that could involve the treatment of hundreds to thousands of patients. Current medical doctrine is based on limited clinical data and remains inadequate. Efforts to develop medical innovations that address ARS complications are unlikely to be generated by industry because of market uncertainties specific to this type of injury. A prospective strategy could be the integration of cellular therapy to meet the medical demands of ARS. The most clinically advanced cellular therapy to date is the administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Results of currently published investigations describing MSC safety and efficacy in a variety of injury and disease models demonstrate the unique qualities of this reparative cell population in adapting to the specific requirements of the damaged tissue in which the cells integrate. This report puts forward a rationale for the further evaluation of MSC therapy to address the current unmet medical needs of ARS. We propose that the exploration of this novel therapy for the treatment of the multivariate complications of ARS could be of invaluable benefit to military medicine.

  2. Efficacy of cupping therapy in patients with the fibromyalgia syndrome-a randomised placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lauche, Romy; Spitzer, Julia; Schwahn, Barbara; Ostermann, Thomas; Bernardy, Kathrin; Cramer, Holger; Dobos, Gustav; Langhorst, Jost

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to test the efficacy of cupping therapy to improve symptoms and quality of life in patients diagnosed with the fibromyalgia syndrome. Participants were randomly assigned to cupping therapy, sham or usual care. Cupping was administered five times at twice weekly intervals on the upper and lower back. The primary outcome measure was pain intensity at day 18. Secondary outcomes included functional disability, quality of life, fatigue and sleep quality as well as pressure pain sensitivity, satisfaction and safety at day 18 and 6 months. Altogether 141 patients were included in this study (139 females, 55.8 ± 9.1 years). After 18 days patients reported significant less pain after cupping compared to usual care (difference −12.4; 95% CI: −18.9; −5.9, p < 0.001) but not compared to sham (difference −3.0; 95% CI: −9.9, 3.9, p = 0.396). Further effects were found for quality of life compared to usual care. Patients were mildly satisfied with cupping and sham cupping; and only minor side effects were observed. Despite cupping therapy being more effective than usual care to improve pain intensity and quality of life, effects of cupping therapy were small and comparable to those of a sham treatment, and as such cupping cannot be recommended for fibromyalgia at the current time. PMID:27853272

  3. Case Report: The Effects of Massage Therapy on a Woman with Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wakefield, Mary Lillias

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) refers to a group of conditions resulting from compression of the neurovascular structures of the thoracic outlet. The parameters for physical therapy include myofascial release (MFR), neuromuscular therapy (NMT), muscle strengthening, and stretching. This case study examined the effects of neuromuscular therapy, massage, and other manual therapies on a 56-year-old female presenting with bilateral numbness over the forearms and hands on waking. Numbness occurred most days, progressing to “dead rubbery” forearms and hands once or twice a month. Methods The treatment plan was implemented over eight weeks and consisted of six, 50-minute bodywork sessions. Several nonbodywork strategies were also employed to address potential contributing factors to the TOS symptomology experienced by the client. Objective measurements included posture analysis (PA), range of movement (ROM), and Roos and Adson’s tests. The Measure Your Own Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP2), a client-generated measure of clinical outcome, was used to measure clinical change. Results MYMOP2 overall profile score results demonstrated an improvement of 2.25 from pretreatment to post-treatment measurement. Clinically meaningful change was measured by the individual and was indicative of substantial symptom improvement where a score change of over one was considered as meaningful. Conclusions A course of massage was effective for numbness symptoms in an individual with TOS, and results lasted over a year without additional treatments. Further research is needed to fully understand the effects of massage for TOS symptoms. PMID:25452819

  4. Exacerbation of BMI after cessation of growth hormone therapy in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oto, Yuji; Tanaka, Yuriko; Abe, Yoshiko; Obata, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Yoshino, Atsunori; Murakami, Nobuyuki; Nagai, Toshiro

    2014-03-01

    Long-term treatment with growth hormone (GH) in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) improves not only height velocity, height standard deviation score, and final height, but also the degree of obesity and body composition abnormalities. Anecdotally, PWS patients tend to suffer from severe obesity and its complications after cessation of GH therapy. However, there have been no studies to investigate changes in body mass index (BMI) and adipose tissue distribution after cessation of GH therapy in young PWS patients. Therefore, we investigated changes in the BMI-standard deviation score (SDS) and adipose tissue distribution after cessation of GH therapy in PWS patients. We evaluated 14 PWS patients. BMI-SDS was calculated at 0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months before and after cessation of GH treatment. We also evaluated subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) (cm(2)) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) (cm(2)) area in 8 of the 14 study patients with single slice abdominal computed tomography at the level of the umbilicus. The BMI-SDS significantly increased at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after cessation of GH therapy (P = 0.039, P = 0.008, P = 0.003, P = 0.003, respectively). There was a tendency toward increases in VAT at 12 and 24 months after cessation of GH therapy, but the increases did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.062, P = 0.125, respectively). Therefore, cessation of GH therapy in PWS patients worsened BMI. To maintain good body composition and prevent complications of obesity, long-term use of GH in adult PWS patients may be advisable.

  5. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in a child with Wernicke encephalopathy treated with fludrocortisone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Min Jeong; Kim, Soon Chul; Joo, Chan Uhng; Kim, Sun Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale for this case report: Cerebral Salt-Wasting Syndrome (CSWS) is characterized by hyponatremia and sodium wasting in the urine.[1] These conditions are triggered by various neurosurgical disorders such as subarachnoid hemorrhage, brain tumor, head injury, and brain surgery.[2,3] To our knowledge, CSWS caused by Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) has been rarely reported. Presenting concerns of the patient: A 2-year-old male patient presented to our hospital due to a seizure attack. He had been neglected and refused to take food for a long time (body weight < 3rd percentile). During admission, the patient showed low serum osmolality, high urine osmolality, dehydration state, increased urine output, and negative water balance, a diagnosis of CSWS was made. Diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes: Brain MRI displayed symmetrical lesions of T2WI and FLAIR high signal intensity in the peri-aqueductal and hypothalamic areas, which suggests Wernicke encephalopathy. For the early diagnosis of WE, neuroimaging studies can be an important marker. Thiamine hydrochloride was administered at a dose of 100 mg/day for 3 weeks. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was subsequently diagnosed due to persistent hyponatremia, dehydrated state, and high urine sodium with massive urination. Main lessons learned from this case: Wernicke encephalopathy is a very rare cause of cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in pediatrics patients. The patient had a good outcome after hypertonic solution and fludrocortisone therapy. PMID:27603336

  6. Biofeedback therapy for chronic constipation in a patient with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corral, Juan E; Kataria, Rahul; Vickers, Dawn; Koutouby, Raghad; Moshiree, Baharak

    2015-01-01

    Constipation is a common feature of Prader-Willi syndrome. Research exploring the prevalence, cause and treatment options for constipation is limited and lacks objective measurements such as anorectal manometry. We report a case of a 16-year-old lady with Prader-Willi syndrome presenting with rectal pain and constipation for 2 years despite multiple medications and weekly enemas. She also noted passive fecal incontinence that required frequent manual disimpactions. Anorectal manometry revealed an abnormal relaxation of the puborectalis and external sphincter muscles on push maneuvers suggesting dyssynergic defecation and rectal hypersensitivity. Contraction and relaxation of her pelvic muscles were recorded with electromyography. Relaxation of the puborectalis muscle improved significantly after three biofeedback sessions. Patient was successfully tapered off laxatives and has been maintained on linaclotide only. Dyssynergic defecation may be a common finding in Prader-Willi syndrome. In selected cases we recommend anorectal manometry to identify neuromuscular dysfunction and subsequent biofeedback therapy depending on the degree of mental retardation to minimize overuse of laxatives.

  7. Biofeedback therapy for chronic constipation in a patient with Prader-Willi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Juan E.; Kataria, Rahul; Vickers, Dawn; Koutouby, Raghad; Moshiree, Baharak

    2015-01-01

    Constipation is a common feature of Prader-Willi syndrome. Research exploring the prevalence, cause and treatment options for constipation is limited and lacks objective measurements such as anorectal manometry. We report a case of a 16-year-old lady with Prader-Willi syndrome presenting with rectal pain and constipation for 2 years despite multiple medications and weekly enemas. She also noted passive fecal incontinence that required frequent manual disimpactions. Anorectal manometry revealed an abnormal relaxation of the puborectalis and external sphincter muscles on push maneuvers suggesting dyssynergic defecation and rectal hypersensitivity. Contraction and relaxation of her pelvic muscles were recorded with electromyography. Relaxation of the puborectalis muscle improved significantly after three biofeedback sessions. Patient was successfully tapered off laxatives and has been maintained on linaclotide only. Dyssynergic defecation may be a common finding in Prader-Willi syndrome. In selected cases we recommend anorectal manometry to identify neuromuscular dysfunction and subsequent biofeedback therapy depending on the degree of mental retardation to minimize overuse of laxatives. PMID:26423048

  8. A case of West syndrome well controlled by very short and low-dose ACTH therapy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Miyamoto, S; Sejima, H; Yamaguchi, S

    1999-02-01

    The case of a 5-month-old boy with tuberous sclerosis and West syndrome is reported. Tonic spasms were noted from the age of 4 months. High-dose pyridoxal phosphate could not control the seizures completely. Very short and low-dose adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy (i.e. 0.011 mg/kg per dose, 12 times in 20 days) controlled the seizures, while pyridoxal phosphate was on. Early tapering of ACTH was successfully done while abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG) findings remained. Although side effects such as hypertension and brain shrinkage were transiently observed, both the cognitive and seizure prognoses were excellent at the age of 3 years and 2 months. The good response to a small dosage of ACTH might be due to some responsiveness of the high-dose pyridoxal phosphate and the underlying cause of tuberous sclerosis with normal development before onset. The present case illustrates that the duration and dosage of ACTH therapy in West syndrome should be modified according to the individual's requirements.

  9. A Placebo-Controlled Trial of Simvastatin Therapy in Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wassif, Christopher A.; Kratz, Lisa; Sparks, Susan E.; Wheeler, Courtney; Bianconi, Simona; Gropman, Andrea; Calis, Karim A.; Kelley, Richard I.; Tierney, Elaine; Porter, Forbes D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a multiple malformation/cognitive impairment syndrome characterized by the accumulation of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC), a precursor sterol of cholesterol. Simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor that crosses the blood-brain-barrier, has been proposed for treatment of SLOS based on in vitro and in vivo studies suggesting that simvastatin increases expression of hypomorphic DHCR7 alleles. Methods Safety and efficacy of simvastatin therapy in 23 mild to typical SLOS patients was evaluated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The cross-over trial consisted of two 12 month treatment phases separated by a 2 month wash-out period. Results No safety issues were identified in this study. Plasma dehydrocholesterol levels decreased significantly 8.9 ± 8.4% on placebo to 6.1 ± 5.5% on simvastatin (p<0.005) and we observed a trend toward decreased cerebral spinal fluid dehydrocholesterol levels. A significant improvement (p=0.017, paired t-test) was observed in the Aberrant Behavior Checklist-C Irritability when subjects were on simvastatin. Conclusions This paper reports the first randomized, placebo-controlled trial designed to test the safety and efficacy of simvastatin therapy in SLOS. Simvastatin appears to be relatively safe in SLOS patients, improves the serum dehydrocholesterol/total sterol ratio, and significantly improves irritability symptoms in mild to classical SLOS patients. PMID:27513191

  10. Two examples of 'cuboid syndrome' with active bone pathology: why did manual therapy help?

    PubMed

    Matthews, Mark Lewis Gordon; Claus, Andrew Philip

    2014-10-01

    Cuboid syndrome describes lateral midfoot pain localised to the cuboid bone. Previously reported case studies promoted joint mobilisation or manipulation interventions. The assumed mechanism was correction of a subtle disruption to the calcaneocuboid joint position. There is an absence of evidence for correction of joint position, but there is evidence of neurophysiological mechanisms for pain modulation. This case study reports on a patient who suffered two occurrences of cuboid syndrome on opposite feet, three years apart. With both occurrences, joint mobilisation achieved rapid and lasting resolution of severe pain and functional limitations. This occurred despite the presence of an active bone pathology at the symptomatic cuboid (demonstrated with nuclear imaging), which could represent a stress reaction, transient osteoporosis, ischaemic necrosis, infection or neoplasm. This case contributes three considerations for clinical reasoning and manual therapy research. 1. Active local bone pathology could exist in other patients with pain at the cuboid, and other conditions where symptoms resolve with joint mobilisation. 2. Rapid and lasting symptom resolution fits with a hypothesis that joint mobilisation acted to reverse neurological sensitisation. 3. Lasting symptom resolution may be clinically associated with manual therapy, but mechanisms extending beyond temporary analgesia are yet to be identified.

  11. Transesophageal pacing for prognostic evaluation of preexcitation syndrome and assessment of protective therapy.

    PubMed

    Critelli, G; Grassi, G; Perticone, F; Coltorti, F; Monda, V; Condorelli, M

    1983-02-01

    An esophageal lead was used to perform decremental atrial pacing and elective induction of atrial fibrillation (AF) in 5 patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White (W-P-W) syndrome before and after amiodarone therapy. In the control state, 1:1 atrioventricular (AV) conduction over the accessory pathway ranged from 220 to 260 ms (mean 232). The shortest R-R interval during AF ranged from 190 to 210 ms (mean 198). The ventricular rate ranged from 175 to 212 beats/min (mean 196). After amiodarone therapy, the shortest cycle length with 1:1 AV conduction increased in all patients, ranging from 290 to 540 ms (mean 370); during AF, no preexcited beat was present in 2 patients, whereas the minimal preexcited R-R interval in the remaining 3 was 290, 240, and 370 ms, respectively. The ventricular response during AF decreased in all patients. Thus, esophageal pacing is a useful method for identifying patients at risk with the W-P-W syndrome and for assessing appropriate management in individual patients. Amiodarone provides protection against life-threatening arrhythmias in these patients.

  12. A Rare Cause of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension Resistant to Therapy in The Newborn: Short-Rib Polydactyly Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Demir, Nihat; Peker, Erdal; Ece, İbrahim; Kaba, Sultan; Ağengin, Kemal; Tuncer, Oğuz

    2015-01-01

    Short-rib polydactyly syndrome is an autosomal recessively inherited lethal skeletal dysplasia. The syndrome is characterized by marked narrow fetal thorax, short extremities, micromelia, cleft palate/lip, polydactyly, cardiac and renal abnormalities, and genital malformations. In cases with pulmonary hypoplasia, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn can develop. In this paper, we present a term newborn with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, which has developed secondary to short-rib polydactyly syndrome and was resistant to therapy with inhaled nitric oxide and oral sildenafil.

  13. Occurrence of DNET and other brain tumors in Noonan syndrome warrants caution with growth hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Geoffrey D; SantaCruz, Karen; Hart, Blaine; Clericuzio, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder caused by mutations in the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway that is well known for its relationship with oncogenesis. An 8.1-fold increased risk of cancer in Noonan syndrome has been reported, including childhood leukemia and solid tumors. The same study found a patient with a dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNET) and suggested that DNET tumors are associated with NS. Herein we report an 8-year-old boy with genetically confirmed NS and a DNET. Literature review identified eight other reports, supporting the association between NS and DNETs. The review also ascertained 13 non-DNET brain tumors in individuals with NS, bringing to 22 the total number of NS patients with brain tumors. Tumor growth while receiving growth hormone (GH) occurred in our patient and one other patient. It is unknown whether the development or progression of tumors is augmented by GH therapy, however there is concern based on epidemiological, animal and in vitro studies. This issue was addressed in a 2015 Pediatric Endocrine Society report noting there is not enough data available to assess the safety of GH therapy in children with neoplasia-predisposition syndromes. The authors recommend that GH use in children with such disorders, including NS, be undertaken with appropriate surveillance for malignancies. Our case report and literature review underscore the association of NS with CNS tumors, particularly DNET, and call attention to the recommendation that clinicians treating NS patients with GH do so with awareness of the possibility of increased neoplasia risk.

  14. Immuno-therapy of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Extracorporeal Immuno-Lympho-Plasmo-Sorption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Methods Results Summary and conclusions Introduction: Existing Medical Management of the Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) does not include methods of specific immunotherapy and active detoxication. Though the Acute Radiation Syndromes were defined as an acute toxic poisonous with development of pathological processes: Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS), Toxic Multiple Organ Injury (TMOI), Toxic Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome(TMODS), Toxic Multiple Organ Failure (TMOF). Radiation Toxins of SRD Group play an important role as the trigger mechanisms in development of the ARS clinical symptoms. Methods: Immuno-Lympho-Plasmo-Sorption is a type of Immuno-therapy which includes prin-ciples of immunochromato-graphy, plasmopheresis, and hemodialysis. Specific Antiradiation Antitoxic Antibodies are the active pharmacological agents of immunotherapy . Antiradia-tion Antitoxic Antibodies bind selectively to Radiation Neurotoxins, Cytotoxins, Hematotox-ins and neutralize their toxic activity. We have developed the highly sensitive method and system for extracorporeal-immune-lypmh-plasmo-sorption with antigen-specific IgG which is clinically important for treatment of the toxic and immunologic phases of the ARS. The method of extracorporeal-immune-lypmh-plasmo-sorption includes Antiradiation Antitoxic Antibodies (AAA) immobilized on microporous polymeric membranes with a pore size that is capable to provide diffusion of blood-lymph plasma. Plasma of blood or lymph of irradiated mammals contains Radiation Toxins (RT) that have toxic and antigenic properties. Radiation Toxins are Antigen-specific to Antitoxic blocking antibodies (Immunoglobulin G). Plasma diffuses through membranes with immobilized AAA and AA-antibodies bind to the polysaccharide chain of tox-ins molecules and complexes of AAA-RT that are captured on membrane surfaces. RT were removed from plasma. Re-transfusion of plasma of blood and lymph had been provided. We show a statistical significant

  15. Development of cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention for patients with Dhat syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salam, K. P. Abdul; Sharma, Mahendra P.; Prakash, Om

    2012-01-01

    Dhat syndrome is a culture-bound syndrome prevalent in the natives of the Indian subcontinent characterized by excessive concern about harmful consequences of loss of semen (ICD-10). Treatment offered to the patients suffering from it continues to be esoteric, unstructured and without standardization. The present study aimed to develop and examine the feasibility of Cognitive – Behavior Therapy module for patients with Dhat syndrome. A draft module was developed based on existing theoretical knowledge and suggestions from five mental health professionals. This module was then applied on five patients with Dhat syndrome to assess and judge the suitability of the module. The pre and post-assessments were carried out using Sexual Knowledge and Attitude Questionnaire - II, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, The Cognitive-Somatic Anxiety Scale, Screener for Somatoform Disorder, International Index for Erectile Function, Clinical Global Impressions, The World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment - BREF. Experiences and insights gained from each patient were used to refine the module before applying on the next patient. The final module consisted of the following components was developed: Basic sex education, cognitive restructuring, relaxation training, imaginal desensitization, masturbatory training as homework and Kegel's exercises and ‘start-stop technique’ and ‘squeeze technique’ for sexual dysfunctions. Results of the study reveal that it is feasible to carry out the CBT module in clinical settings. Number of sessions ranged from 11 to 16 sessions. The duration of the session was 45 minutes on the average. Findings of the present study revealed improvement in sexual knowledge, anxiety, depressive and somatic symptoms. Implications and limitations of the study are highlighted and suggestions for future research offered. PMID:23372242

  16. Development of cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention for patients with Dhat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salam, K P Abdul; Sharma, Mahendra P; Prakash, Om

    2012-10-01

    Dhat syndrome is a culture-bound syndrome prevalent in the natives of the Indian subcontinent characterized by excessive concern about harmful consequences of loss of semen (ICD-10). Treatment offered to the patients suffering from it continues to be esoteric, unstructured and without standardization. The present study aimed to develop and examine the feasibility of Cognitive - Behavior Therapy module for patients with Dhat syndrome. A draft module was developed based on existing theoretical knowledge and suggestions from five mental health professionals. This module was then applied on five patients with Dhat syndrome to assess and judge the suitability of the module. The pre and post-assessments were carried out using Sexual Knowledge and Attitude Questionnaire - II, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, The Cognitive-Somatic Anxiety Scale, Screener for Somatoform Disorder, International Index for Erectile Function, Clinical Global Impressions, The World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment - BREF. Experiences and insights gained from each patient were used to refine the module before applying on the next patient. The final module consisted of the following components was developed: Basic sex education, cognitive restructuring, relaxation training, imaginal desensitization, masturbatory training as homework and Kegel's exercises and 'start-stop technique' and 'squeeze technique' for sexual dysfunctions. Results of the study reveal that it is feasible to carry out the CBT module in clinical settings. Number of sessions ranged from 11 to 16 sessions. The duration of the session was 45 minutes on the average. Findings of the present study revealed improvement in sexual knowledge, anxiety, depressive and somatic symptoms. Implications and limitations of the study are highlighted and suggestions for future research offered.

  17. Kinesio taping compared to physical therapy modalities for the treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Erkan; Zinnuroglu, Murat; Tugcu, Ilknur

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the efficacy of kinesio tape and physical therapy modalities in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Patients (n = 55) were treated with kinesio tape (n = 30) three times by intervals of 3 days or a daily program of local modalities (n = 25) for 2 weeks. Response to treatment was evaluated with the Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scale. Patients were questioned for the night pain, daily pain, and pain with motion. Outcome measures except for the Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scale were assessed at baseline, first, and second weeks of the treatment. Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scale was evaluated only before and after the treatment. Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scale and visual analog scale scores decreased significantly in both treatment groups as compared with the baseline levels. The rest, night, and movement median pain scores of the kinesio taping (20, 40, and 50, respectively) group were statistically significantly lower (p values were 0.001, 0.01, and 0.001, respectively) at the first week examination as compared with the physical therapy group (50, 70, and 70, respectively). However, there was no significant difference in the same parameters between two groups at the second week (0.109, 0.07, and 0.218 for rest, night, and movement median pain scores, respectively). Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scale scores of the kinesio taping group were significantly lower at the second week as compared with the physical therapy group. No side effects were observed. Kinesio tape has been found to be more effective than the local modalities at the first week and was similarly effective at the second week of the treatment. Kinesio taping may be an alternative treatment option in the treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome especially when an immediate effect is needed.

  18. Subacromial impingement syndrome as a consequence of botulinum therapy to the upper trapezii: a case report.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Zachary; Richardson, James K

    2007-07-01

    Scapular upward rotation is predominantly achieved via a force coupling involving the upper and lower trapezius and the serratus anterior. Although studies have shown a relationship between abnormal scapular motion and subacromial impingement, it has been unclear whether the altered scapular biomechanics represent a cause, or consequence, of impingement. We present a 49-year-old woman with refractory myofascial pain of many years duration who developed subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) following a series of botulinum toxin injections to the bilateral upper trapezii. Although botulinum therapy effectively reduced the patient's refractory myofascial pain, signs and symptoms of SIS developed in association with the upper trapezii weakness after the third set of injections. Botulinum therapy was discontinued and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication markedly reduced the new symptoms, which completely resolved within 3 months. This case, which afforded a unique opportunity to follow the consequences of weakening scapular stabilizers over time, provides evidence for the etiologic role of scapular dyskinesis in SIS and shows that SIS is a potential complication of botulinum therapy for myofascial pain involving the scapular stabilizers.

  19. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome in a case of cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Naofumi; Shinohara, Kenji; Ota, Ituro; Muraki, Kazuhiko; Shimohakamada, Yoko

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) in adult T-cell lymphoma. A 69-year-old man suffered from cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma, which was treated with radiation to the skin and combination chemotherapy of CHOP-V-MMV and VEPA-B. After 14 months of these therapies, anemia and thrombocytopenia appeared, and bone marrow aspiration smears showed immature myeloblasts, dysplastic erythroblasts, and micromegakaryocytes. Therapy-related MDS of refractory anemia with an excess of blasts was diagnosed. Cytogenetic study of the bone marrow cells showed 5q- and additional abnormalities. Rearrangement of the MLL gene was observed in the bone marrow cells. Mutations of N-ras codons at 12,13, and 61, p53 tumor suppressor gene, and monoclonal integration of human T-lymphotrophic virus -1 provirus DNA were not observed in the bone marrow cells. The patient died of pneumonia 21 months after diagnosis of cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma.

  20. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related malignancies in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Wendy B; Little, Richard F; Wilson, Wyndham H; Yarchoan, Robert

    2006-07-01

    Since the beginning of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, malignancies have been an important feature of this disease. Several cancers, including Kaposi sarcoma (KS), certain aggressive B-cell lymphomas, and cervical cancer, are considered AIDS-defining when they occur in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. Most AIDS-defining tumors are associated with one of 3 DNA viruses: KS-associated herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus, or human papillomavirus. With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the incidence of KS and certain lymphomas has decreased, whereas that of other tumors, such as cervical cancer, has undergone little change. Several new drugs and therapies have been developed for KS and AIDS-related lymphomas, and these treatments, plus the development of HAART, have contributed to improvements in morbidity and mortality. At the same time, the improved overall survival of patients with HAART has contributed to an increase in the number of patients living with AIDS in developed countries such as the United States. With the development of HAART and improved prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections, an increasing percentage of the deaths in AIDS patients have been from malignancies. Strategies for prevention, screening, and therapy remain important areas of research in this developing field.

  1. Genetics and Epigenetics of Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Response to Drug Therapy: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Shahrabi, Saeid; Khosravi, Abbas; Shahjahani, Mohammad; Rahim, Fakher; Saki, Najmaldin

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of hematologic neoplasms ocurring mostly in the elderly. The clinical outcome of MDS patients is still poor despite progress in treatment approaches. About 90% of patients harbor at least one somatic mutation. This review aimed to assess the potential of molecular abnormalities in understanding pathogenesis, prognosis, diagnosis and in guiding choice of proper therapy in MDS patients. Papers related to this topic from 2000 to 2016 in PubMed and Scopus databases were searched and studied. The most common molecular abnormalities were TET2, ASXL1 as well as molecules involved in spliceosome machinery (U2AF1, SRSF2 and SF3B1). Patients with defects in TET2 molecule show better response to treatment with azacitidine. IDH and DNMT3A mutations are associated with a good response to decitabine therapy. In addition, patients with del5q subtype harboring TP53 mutation do not show a good response to lenalidomide therapy. In general, the results of this study show that molecular abnormalities can be associated with the occurrence of a specific morphological phenotype in patients. Therefore, considering the morphology of patients, different gene profiling methods can be selected to choice the most appropriate therapeutic measure in these patients in addition to faster and more cost-effective diagnosis of molecular abnormalities. PMID:28058097

  2. Directed Therapy: An Approach to the Improved Treatment of Exfoliation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Angelilli, Allison; Ritch, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is an age-related, generalized disorder of the extracellular matrix characterized by the production and progressive accumulation of a fibrillar extracellular material in many ocular tissues and is the most common identifiable cause of open-angle glaucoma worldwide. Exfoliation syndrome plays an etiologic role in open-angle glaucoma, angle-closure glaucoma, cataract, and retinal vein occlusion. It is accompanied by an increase in serious complications at the time of cataract extraction, such as zonular dialysis, capsular rupture, and vitreous loss. It is associated systemically with an increasing number of vascular disorders, hearing loss, and Alzheimer's disease. Exfoliation syndrome appears to be a disease of elastic tissue microfibrils. Directed therapy simply means devising specific treatments for specific diseases. There was little incentive to attempt to distinguish between various open-angle glaucomas if the treatments were essentially the same. However, this view also prevented the application of directed therapy in those instances in which such was available and applicable. Pilocarpine has multiple beneficial actions in eyes with XFS. Not only does it lower IOP, but by increasing aqueous outflow, it should enable the trabecular meshwork to clear more rapidly, and by limiting pupillary movement, should slow the progression of the disease. Theoretically, miotics should be the first line of treatment. Pilocarpine 2% q.h.s. can provide sufficient limitation of pupillary mobility without causing these side effects. In 2007, two common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the coding region of the lysyl oxidase-like 1 (LOXL1) gene located on chromosome 15 were specifically associated with XFS and XFG. LOXL1 is a member of the lysyl oxidase family of enzymes, which are essential for the formation, stabilization, maintenance, and remodelling of elastic fibers and prevent age-related loss of elasticity of tissues. LOXL1 protein is a major

  3. A Case of Acute Budd-Chiari Syndrome Complicating Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome Presenting as Acute Abdomen and Responding to Tight Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yasushi; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman with primary antiphospholipid syndrome was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department of our hospital with fever, acute abdomen, watery diarrhea, and extremely high levels of inflammatory parameters. She had a history of left lower limb deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism and was taking warfarin potassium. Acute gastroenteritis was suspected and an antibiotic was administered, but symptoms progressed. Abdominal ultrasonography showed occlusion of the left hepatic vein and the middle hepatic vein and her D-dimer level was high. Accordingly, Budd-Chiari syndrome was diagnosed and high-dose intravenous infusion of heparin was initiated. Her abdominal symptoms improved and the levels of inflammatory parameters and D-dimer decreased rapidly. It is known that antiphospholipid syndrome can be complicated by Budd-Chiari syndrome that usually occurs as subacute or chronic onset, but acute onset is rare. It is difficult to diagnose acute Budd-Chiari syndrome complicating antiphospholipid syndrome and this complication generally has a poor outcome. However, the present case can get early diagnosis and successful treatment with tight anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27672472

  4. A Controlled Comparison of Cognitive Therapy and Self-Help Support Groups in the Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Annette; Blanchard, Edward B.

    1995-01-01

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (n=34) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment conditions for 8 weeks: individualized cognitive treatment, support group, or control. Results indicated significantly greater reductions in gastrointestinal symptoms and amelioration of depression and anxiety for the cognitive therapy group, and these results…

  5. TNF receptor inhibitor therapy for the treatment of children with idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS)

    PubMed Central

    Yanik, Gregory A.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Levine, John E.; Schultz, Kirk R.; Wall, Donna A.; Langholz, Bryan; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Alangaden, Keith; Goyal, Rakesh K.; White, Eric S.; Collura, Jennifer M.; Skeens, Micah A.; Eid, Saada; Pierce, Elizabeth M; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS) is an acute, non-infectious lung disorder associated with high morbidity and mortality following hematopoietic cell transplantation. Previous studies have suggested a role for TNFα in the pathogenesis of IPS. We report a multi-center phase II trial investigating a soluble TNF binding protein, etanercept (Enbrel®, Amgen) for the treatment of pediatric patients with IPS. Eligible patients were <18 years, within 120 days post-transplant, with radiographic evidence of a diffuse pneumonitis. All patients underwent a pre-therapy broncho-alveolor lavage (BAL) to establish the diagnosis of IPS. Systemic corticosteroids (2.0 mg/kg/day) plus etanercept (0.4 mg/kg twice weekly × 8 doses) were administered. Response was defined as survival and discontinuation of supplemental oxygen support by day 28 of study. Thirty-nine patients (median age 11y, range 1–17y) were enrolled, with 11 of 39 patients non-evaluable due to identification of pathogens from their pre-therapy BAL. In the remaining 28 patients, the median FiO2 at study entry was 45%, with 17 of 28 requiring mechanical ventilation. Complete responses were seen in 20 (71%) patients, with a median time to response 10 days (range 1–24). Response rates were higher for patients not requiring mechanical ventilation at study entry (100% vs. 53%,p=0.01). Overall survival at 28 days and 1-year post-therapy were 89% (95% CI:70–96) and 63% (95% CI:42–79) respectively. Plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly increased at onset of therapy, subsequently decreasing in responding patients. The addition of etanercept to high dose corticosteroids was associated with high response rates and survival in children with IPS. PMID:25270958

  6. Impact of advanced medical therapy for the outcome of an adult patient with Eisenmenger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ereminienė, Eglė; Kinderytė, Marija; Miliauskas, Skaidrius

    2017-01-01

    Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) is the most severe form of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) associated with congenital heart disease. It is an extremely devastating condition with a serious impact on patients' life. Classical therapy of ES remains directed to avoid complications, such as erythrocytosis, treatment of congestive heart failure, prevention of infection, and secondary haematological abnormalities such as iron deficiency and coagulation disorders. However, the only effective treatment is heart-lung transplantation; still, morbidity and mortality after transplantation remain substantially high. Furthermore, waiting lists for heart-lung transplantation are long. Recent studies examining the use of advanced medical treatment in patients with ES have shown that it may have beneficial effects in patients with ES; however, additional studies need to be done to confirm its efficacy and appropriate clinical use. A 41-year-old female admitted to the Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences due to progressive dyspnea on minimal effort, heart failure symptoms leading to NYHA functional class III-IV. After clinical and instrumental investigations, ES secondary to unrepaired patent ductus arteriosus with severe PAH was diagnosed. Treatment with sildenafil was initiated together with the standard pharmacological therapy, and the patient was added to the waiting list for the heart and lung transplantation. After 24 months of stable condition, her clinical status deteriorated, and combination therapy (sildenafil and ambrisentan) was initiated. Clinical symptoms and exercise capacity improved, and she has been stable for 4 years thereafter. Our experience of the management of an adult patient with ES showed the benefits of treatment with advanced therapy with pulmonary vasodilators that improved the patient's quality of life and delayed the need for heart and lung transplantation.

  7. [Therapy strategies for acute coronary syndrome and after coronary interventions. Antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants].

    PubMed

    Divchev, D; Nienaber, C; Ince, H

    2011-11-01

    There is ongoing development of new therapeutic regimens in the use of antithrombotic agents and anticoagulants focussing on acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with an increasing impact on current guidelines over the last years. This was especially accompanied by an increase in innovative percutaneous coronary interventional (PCI) methods in patients with ACS, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) with a need for therapeutics with more sufficient and effective antiplatelet action. On the other hand, newer direct and indirect thrombin inhibitors with primary use in prevention and therapy of thromboembolic events have been shown to have beneficial and even superior effects in ACS with or without PCI. The current review aims to report on the evidence-based use of approved antithrombotic agents and anticoagulants in ACS with special focus on PCI according to the actualized European guidelines.

  8. Corticoid therapy for overlapping syndromes in an HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Yu; Kodama, Shoko; Higuchi, Makiko; Nakamura, Akihiro; Nakamura, Masataka; Kaieda, Tomoe; Takahama, Soichiro; Minami, Rumi; Miyamura, Tomoya; Suematsu, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection disturbs the host's immune function and often coexists with various autoimmune and/or systemic rheumatic diseases with manifestations that sometimes overlap with each other. We herein present the case of a 43-year-old Japanese man infected with HIV who exhibited elevated serum creatine kinase and transaminases levels without any symptoms. He was diagnosed with autoimmune hepatitis, polymyositis and Sjögren's syndrome and received combined antiretroviral therapy (cART); however, the laboratory abnormalities persisted. We successfully administered cART with the addition of oral prednisolone, and the patient's condition recovered without side effects related to the metabolic or immunosuppressive effects of these drugs.

  9. [Surfactant and ambroxol in the therapy of idiopathic respiratory syndrome in newborn infants].

    PubMed

    Carrera, G; Liberatore, A; Riboni, G; Clementi, M

    1991-11-01

    The Authors have carried out a study on 30 newborns, affected by idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome (IRDS), divided into 3 statistically comparable groups, treated, in addition to mechanical ventilation, respectively with Tokio-Akita (TA) surfactant, placebo (both by endotracheal administration) and ambroxol given by intravenous infusion. The clinical evolution of the three groups was studied, above all as related to mortality, ventilation length, oxygen need, immediate and successive pulmonary complications and cerebral haemorrhage. Mortality was lower in the group treated with ambroxol, while the ventilation length, the average insufflation pressure and the oxygen need were lower in the group treated with surfactant, compared with the other two groups. Pulmonary complications were present only in the group treated with placebo and ambroxol, whereas cerebral haemorrhage rate is higher in the group treated with surfactant. On the basis of the results achieved, some important observations are suggested and possible aetiological therapies of IRDS are formulated.

  10. Possible induction of West syndrome by oxcarbazepine therapy in a patient with complex partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Veerapandiyan, Aravindhan; Singh, Piyush; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2012-03-01

    Oxcarbazepine has been reported to precipitate myoclonic, generalised tonic-clonic, absence, and complex partial seizures, and carbamazepine to precipitate absences, myoclonic seizures and spasms. Here, we report a one-year, six-month-old girl with complex partial seizures who developed infantile spasms, developmental regression, and hypsarrhythmia during the two weeks directly following initiation of oxcarbazepine (14 mg/kg/day). All of these resolved within a few days after discontinuation of this medication. Although we cannot rule out that the above association may have been coincidental, or that the improvement may have been due to concurrent therapy, this case raises the possibility that oxcarbazepine, like carbamazepine, may precipitate infantile spasms and West syndrome.

  11. Synthesis of ganglioside epitopes for oligosaccharide specific immunoadsorption therapy of Guillian-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Søren M; Ling, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Ping; Townson, Kate; Willison, Hugh J; Bundle, David R

    2004-04-21

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is a postinfectious, autoimmune neuropathy resulting in neuromuscular paralysis. Auto-antibodies, often induced by bacterial infection, bind to human gangliosides possessing monosialoside and diasialoside epitopes and impair the function of nerve junctions, where these ganglioside structures are highly enriched. Truncated gangliosides representive of GD3, GQ1b and GM2 epitopes have been synthesized as methyl glycosides and as a glycosides of an eleven carbon tether. The synthetic oligosaccharide ligands are structural mimics of these highly complex ganglioside epitopes and via their ability to neutralize or remove auto-antibodies have the potential for therapy, either as soluble blocking ligands administered systemically, or as immuno-affinity ligands for use as extracorporeal immunoadsorbents.

  12. Potential Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Sjögren Syndrome With Human Chorionic Gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Rao, C V

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Sjögren syndrome (SS) ameliorate during pregnancy, through dampening (immunotolerance) of the maternal immune system which protects the fetus from rejection. A large number of studies have shown that human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) contributes to this tolerance. Studies on animal models have reaffirmed that hCG treatment mimics the benefits of pregnancy. Based on the scientific evidence, randomized clinical trials comparing hCG with current therapies and/or placebo are recommended for RA, SS, and for other autoimmune diseases such as, type 1 diabetes and ankylosing spondylitis, which also get better during pregnancy and hCG treatment seems to help.

  13. Exposure and mindfulness based therapy for irritable bowel syndrome--an open pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ljótsson, Brjánn; Andréewitch, Sergej; Hedman, Erik; Rück, Christian; Andersson, Gerhard; Lindefors, Nils

    2010-09-01

    We conducted a study of a group therapy based on exposure and mindfulness in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Out of 49 outpatients, most of whom were referred from gastroenterological clinics, 34 entered into the 10-week treatment. Patients were assessed before, immediately after and 6 months after treatment. The assessments consisted of a gastrointestinal symptom diary, self-report questionnaires covering quality of life, gastrointestinal specific anxiety, general functioning, and a psychiatric interview. At post-treatment, the mean reduction in symptoms was 41% and 50% of patients showed clinically significant improvement in symptom level. Patients also showed marked improvement on other outcome measures. Treatment gains were maintained at follow-up. The results support the use of exposure and mindfulness based strategies in the treatment of IBS, but further randomised studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of the treatment.

  14. Stem-Cell Gene Therapy for the Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boztug, Kaan; Schmidt, Manfred; Schwarzer, Adrian; Banerjee, Pinaki P.; Díez, Inés Avedillo; Dewey, Ricardo A.; Böhm, Marie; Nowrouzi, Ali; Ball, Claudia R.; Glimm, Hanno; Naundorf, Sonja; Kühlcke, Klaus; Blasczyk, Rainer; Kondratenko, Irina; Maródi, László; Orange, Jordan S.; von Kalle, Christof; Klein, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder associated with thrombocytopenia, eczema, and autoimmunity. We treated two patients who had this disorder with a transfusion of autologous, genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). We found sustained expression of WAS protein expression in HSC, lymphoid and myeloid cells, and platelets after gene therapy. T and B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and monocytes were functionally corrected. After treatment, the patients’ clinical condition markedly improved, with resolution of hemorrhagic diathesis, eczema, autoimmunity, and predisposition to severe infection. Comprehensive insertion-site analysis showed vector integration that targeted multiple genes controlling growth and immunologic responses in a persistently polyclonal hematopoiesis. (Funded by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and others; German Clinical Trials Register number, DRKS00000330.) PMID:21067383

  15. Photodynamic therapy with the silicon phthalocyanine pc 4 induces apoptosis in mycosis fungoides and sezary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lam, Minh; Lee, Yoojin; Deng, Min; Hsia, Andrew H; Morrissey, Kelly A; Yan, Chunlin; Azzizudin, Kashif; Oleinick, Nancy L; McCormick, Thomas S; Cooper, Kevin D; Baron, Elma D

    2010-01-01

    Our current focus on the effects of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) using silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 photosensitizer on malignant T lymphocytes arose due to preclinical observations that Jurkat cells, common surrogate for human T cell lymphoma, were more sensitive to Pc 4-PDT-induced killing than epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Mycosis fungoides (MF) as well as Sezary syndrome (SS) are variants of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) in which malignant T-cells invade the epidermis. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of Pc 4-PDT in peripheral blood cells obtained from patients with SS and in skin biopsies of patients with MF. Our data suggest that Pc 4-PDT preferentially induces apoptosis of CD4(+)CD7(-) malignant T-lymphocytes in the blood relative to CD11b(+) monocytes and nonmalignant T-cells. In vivo Pc 4-PDT of MF skin also photodamages the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2.

  16. [Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome: toward a new molecular-targeted therapy and a new cytomorphological and molecular definition].

    PubMed

    Moles, M-P; Landry, J; Roche-Lestienne, C; Godon, A; Schmidt-Tanguy, A; Gardembas, M; Le Clech, C; Verret, J-L; Zandecki, M; Blanchet, O

    2005-01-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome is characterised by chronic hypereosinophilia leading to tissue damage, and after exclusion of reactive eosinophilia. Until recently no specific or efficient therapeutic was available. In 2003, a recurrent interstitial deletion 4q12 leading to the fusion of the FIP1L1 and PDGFRA genes was detected in hypereosinophilic syndromes. The resulting protein has constitutive tyrosine kinase activity which explains clinical and cytological remission of hypereosinophilic syndrome after treatment by a specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib mesylate or Glivec, usually used in chronic myeloid leukaemia. Here we report a patient with hypereosinophilic syndrome associated to peculiar morphology of neutrophilic series and the 4q12 deletion. He presented clinical and haematological remission since the introduction of imatinib mesylate therapy.

  17. Antibody Therapy in the Management of Shiga Toxin-Induced Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tzipori, Saul; Sheoran, Abhineet; Akiyoshi, Donna; Donohue-Rolfe, Arthur; Trachtman, Howard

    2004-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disease that can lead to acute renal failure and often to other serious sequelae, including death. The majority of cases are attributed to infections with Escherichia coli, serotype O157:H7 strains in particular, which cause bloody diarrhea and liberate one or two toxins known as Shiga toxins 1 and 2. These toxins are thought to directly be responsible for the manifestations of HUS. Currently, supportive nonspecific treatment is the only available option for the management of individuals presenting with HUS. The benefit of antimicrobial therapy remains uncertain because of several reports which claim that such intervention can in fact exacerbate the syndrome. There have been only a few specific therapies directed against neutralizing the activities of these toxins, but none so far has been shown to be effective. This article reviews the literature on the mechanism of action of these toxins and the clinical manifestations and current management and treatment of HUS. The major focus of the article, however, is the development and rationale for using neutralizing human antibodies to combat this toxin-induced disease. Several groups are currently pursuing this approach with either humanized, chimeric, or human antitoxin antibodies produced in transgenic mice. They are at different phases of development, ranging from preclinical evaluation to human clinical trials. The information available from preclinical studies indicates that neutralizing specific antibodies directed against the A subunit of the toxin can be highly protective. Such antibodies, even when administered well after exposure to bacterial infection and onset of diarrhea, can prevent the occurrence of systemic complications. PMID:15489355

  18. Safety of "pain exposure" physical therapy in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    van de Meent, Hendrik; Oerlemans, Margreet; Bruggeman, Almar; Klomp, Frank; van Dongen, Robert; Oostendorp, Rob; Frölke, Jan Paul

    2011-06-01

    "Pain exposure" physical therapy (PEPT) is a new treatment for patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) that consists of a progressive-loading exercise program and management of pain-avoidance behavior without the use of specific CRPS-1 medication or analgesics. The aim of this study was to investigate primarily whether PEPT could be applied safely in patients with CRPS-1. Twenty patients with CRPS-1 were consecutively enrolled in the study after giving informed consent. The diagnosis of CRPS-1 was defined using the Bruehl and Harden/IASP diagnostic criteria. CRPS-1 was diagnosed between 3 and 18 months after the inciting event (trauma). According to a multiple single-case design (baseline [A1], treatment [B], follow-up [A2]), multiple baseline and follow-up measurements were performed to evaluate changes in CRPS signs and symptoms and to assess functional parameters. When comparing the baseline with the follow-up phase, patients improved significantly with respect to pain on the visual analogue scale (57%), pain intensity (48%), muscle strength (52%), arm/shoulder/hand disability (36%), 10-meter walking speed (29%), pain disability index (60%), kinesiophobia (18%), and the domains of perceived health change in the SF-36 survey (269%). Three patients initially showed increased vegetative signs but improved in all other CRPS parameters and showed good functional recovery at follow-up. We conclude that PEPT is a safe and effective treatment for patients with CRPS-1. A progressive-loading exercise program and management of pain-avoidance behavior without the use of specific medication ("pain exposure" physical therapy) is safe and effective for patients with complex regional pain syndrome.

  19. HIV-associated metabolic and morphologic abnormality syndrome. Welcome therapy may have unwelcome effects.

    PubMed

    Cohan, G R

    2000-04-01

    Metabolic and morphologic complications of HAART are probably caused by several interrelated and complex physiologic processes that are just beginning to be understood. Whether there is validity to the current theories regarding mitochondrial toxicity of NRTIs, lipid pathway interruptions of protease inhibitors, or the host immune response itself as the primary culprit remains to be seen. In the interim, physicians should use great caution and be circumspect in their judgment with regard to "quick-fix" treatments of these complications. Furthermore, scientifically unsupported decisions about switching antiretroviral agents in an attempt to alleviate a particular toxic effect may place the patient at risk for antiretroviral-therapy failure. Formal adoption of a case definition of HAMMAS remains a priority for the scientific community, because anecdotal observations compiled to date do not yet constitute a discrete syndrome. A clear case definition, possibly modeled after criteria for defining rheumatic diseases, will greatly facilitate properly designed research trials to elucidate causes and possible treatments of this troublesome syndrome.

  20. Therapy insight: Cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome--when all you can eat is yourself.

    PubMed

    Laviano, Alessandro; Meguid, Michael M; Inui, Akio; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Rossi-Fanelli, Filippo

    2005-03-01

    Tumor growth is associated with profound metabolic and neurochemical alterations, which can lead to the onset of anorexia-cachexia syndrome. Anorexia is defined as the loss of the desire to eat, while cachexia results from progressive wasting of skeletal muscle mass--and to a lesser extent adipose tissue--occurring even before weight loss becomes apparent. Cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome is highly prevalent among cancer patients, has a large impact on morbidity and mortality, and impinges on patient quality of life. However, its clinical relevance is frequently overlooked, and treatments are usually only attempted during advanced stages of the disease. The pathogenic mechanisms of cachexia and anorexia are multifactorial, but cytokines and tumor-derived factors have a significant role, thereby representing a suitable therapeutic target. Energy expenditure in anorexia is frequently increased while energy intake is decreased, which further exacerbates the progressive deterioration of nutritional status. The optimal therapeutic approach to anorectic-cachectic cancer patients should be based on both changes in dietary habits, achieved via nutritional counseling; and drug therapy, aimed at interfering with cytokine expression or activity. Our improved understanding of the influence a tumor has on the host's metabolism is advancing new therapeutic approaches, which are likely to result in better preservation of nutritional status if started concurrently with specific antineoplastic treatment.

  1. Gene/cell therapy approaches for Immune Dysregulation Polyendocrinopathy Enteropathy X-linked syndrome.

    PubMed

    Passerini, Laura; Santoni de Sio, Francesca R; Porteus, Matthew H; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome is a rare autoimmune disease due to mutations in the gene encoding for Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), a transcription factor fundamental for the function of thymus-derived (t) regulatory T (Treg) cells. The dysfunction of Treg cells results in the development of devastating autoimmune manifestations affecting multiple organs, eventually leading to premature death in infants, if not promptly treated by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Novel gene therapy strategies can be developed for IPEX syndrome as more definitive cure than allogeneic HSCT. Here we describe the therapeutic approaches, alternative to HSCT, currently under development. We described that effector T cells can be converted in regulatory T cells by LV-mediated FOXP3-gene transfer in differentiated T lymphocytes. Despite FOXP3 mutations mainly affect a highly specific T cell subset, manipulation of stem cells could be required for long-term remission of the disease. Therefore, we believe that a more comprehensive strategy should aim at correcting FOXP3-mutated stem cells. Potentials and hurdles of both strategies will be highlighted here.

  2. Molecular Analysis, Pathogenic Mechanisms, and Readthrough Therapy on a Large Cohort of Kabuki Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Micale, Lucia; Augello, Bartolomeo; Maffeo, Claudia; Selicorni, Angelo; Zucchetti, Federica; Fusco, Carmela; De Nittis, Pasquelena; Pellico, Maria Teresa; Mandriani, Barbara; Fischetto, Rita; Boccone, Loredana; Silengo, Margherita; Biamino, Elisa; Perria, Chiara; Sotgiu, Stefano; Serra, Gigliola; Lapi, Elisabetta; Neri, Marcella; Ferlini, Alessandra; Cavaliere, Maria Luigia; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Monica, Matteo Della; Scarano, Gioacchino; Faravelli, Francesca; Ferrari, Paola; Mazzanti, Laura; Pilotta, Alba; Patricelli, Maria Grazia; Bedeschi, Maria Francesca; Benedicenti, Francesco; Prontera, Paolo; Toschi, Benedetta; Salviati, Leonardo; Melis, Daniela; Di Battista, Eliana; Vancini, Alessandra; Garavelli, Livia; Zelante, Leopoldo; Merla, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a multiple congenital anomalies syndrome characterized by characteristic facial features and varying degrees of mental retardation, caused by mutations in KMT2D/MLL2 and KDM6A/UTX genes. In this study, we performed a mutational screening on 303 Kabuki patients by direct sequencing, MLPA, and quantitative PCR identifying 133 KMT2D, 62 never described before, and four KDM6A mutations, three of them are novel. We found that a number of KMT2D truncating mutations result in mRNA degradation through the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, contributing to protein haploinsufficiency. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the reduction of KMT2D protein level in patients’ lymphoblastoid and skin fibroblast cell lines carrying KMT2D-truncating mutations affects the expression levels of known KMT2D target genes. Finally, we hypothesized that the KS patients may benefit from a readthrough therapy to restore physiological levels of KMT2D and KDM6A proteins. To assess this, we performed a proof-of-principle study on 14 KMT2D and two KDM6A nonsense mutations using specific compounds that mediate translational readthrough and thereby stimulate the re-expression of full-length functional proteins. Our experimental data showed that both KMT2D and KDM6A nonsense mutations displayed high levels of readthrough in response to gentamicin treatment, paving the way to further studies aimed at eventually treating some Kabuki patients with readthrough inducers. PMID:24633898

  3. Double-blind randomized controlled trial of low-level laser therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Jamie; Chong, Su L; Amirjani, Nasim; Chan, K Ming

    2004-08-01

    Several studies have suggested that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is effective in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). In a double-blind randomized controlled trial of LLLT, 15 CTS patients, 34 to 67 years of age, were randomly assigned to either the control group (n = 8) or treatment group (n =7). Both groups were treated three times per week for 5 weeks. Those in the treatment group received 860 nm galium/aluminum/arsenide laser at a dosage of 6 J/cm2 over the carpal tunnel, whereas those in the control group were treated with sham laser. The primary outcome measure was the Levine Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire, and the secondary outcome measures were electrophysiological data and the Purdue pegboard test. All patients completed the study without adverse effects. There was a significant symptomatic improvement in both the control (P = 0.034) and treatment (P =0.043) groups. However, there was no significant difference in any of the outcome measures between the two groups. Thus, LLLT is no more effective in the reduction of symptoms of CTS than is sham treatment.

  4. Intravenous Vitamin C Administered as Adjunctive Therapy for Recurrent Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bharara, Amit; Grossman, Catherine; Syed, Aamer; DeWilde, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This case report summarizes the first use of intravenous vitamin C employed as an adjunctive interventional agent in the therapy of recurrent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The two episodes of ARDS occurred in a young female patient with Cronkhite-Canada syndrome, a rare, sporadically occurring, noninherited disorder that is characterized by extensive gastrointestinal polyposis and malabsorption. Prior to the episodes of sepsis, the patient was receiving nutrition via chronic hyperalimentation administered through a long-standing central venous catheter. The patient became recurrently septic with Gram positive cocci which led to two instances of ARDS. This report describes the broad-based general critical care of a septic patient with acute respiratory failure that includes fluid resuscitation, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and vasopressor support. Intravenous vitamin C infused at 50 mg per kilogram body weight every 6 hours for 96 hours was incorporated as an adjunctive agent in the care of this patient. Vitamin C when used as a parenteral agent in high doses acts “pleiotropically” to attenuate proinflammatory mediator expression, to improve alveolar fluid clearance, and to act as an antioxidant. PMID:27891260

  5. Guillain-Barré syndrome during adalimumab therapy for Crohn´s disease: coincidence or consequence?

    PubMed

    Cançado, Guilherme Grossi Lopes; Vilela, Eduardo Garcia

    2017-04-01

    We report the case of a 64-year-old patient diagnosed with extensive ileal Crohn´s disease who developed Guillain-Barré syndrome after starting biological therapy with adalimumab. Neurologic involvement associated with inflammatory bowel diseases is recognized as an extra-intestinal manifestation. After the breakthrough of antitumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α) agents, an increasing number of cases of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies have been reported; however, only one case has been described in a patient with Crohn´s disease. Although a causal relationship between Guillain-Barré syndrome and TNF-α antagonist therapy cannot be proven, this report emphasizes the need to monitor for neurologic signs and symptoms in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, with or without biological therapy, to avoid severe and irreversible complications associated with demyelinating diseases.

  6. Additive effects of low-level laser therapy with exercise on subacromial syndrome: a randomised, double-blind, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Abrisham, Seyyed Mohammad Jalil; Kermani-Alghoraishi, Mohammad; Ghahramani, Rahil; Jabbari, Latife; Jomeh, Hossein; Zare, Maryam

    2011-10-01

    The subacromial syndrome is the most common source of shoulder pain. The mainstays of conservative treatment are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and exercise therapy. Recently, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been popularized in the treatment of various musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study is to evaluate the additive effects of LLLT with exercise in comparison with exercise therapy alone in treatment of the subacromial syndrome. We conducted a randomised clinical study of 80 patients who presented to clinic with subacromial syndrome (rotator cuff and biceps tendinitis). Patients were randomly allocated into two groups. In group I (n = 40), patients were given laser treatment (pulsed infrared laser) and exercise therapy for ten sessions during a period of 2 weeks. In group II (n = 40), placebo laser and the same exercise therapy were given for the same period. Patients were evaluated for the pain with visual analogue scale (VAS) and shoulder range of motion (ROM) in an active and passive movement of flexion, abduction and external rotation before and after treatment. In both groups, significant post-treatment improvements were achieved in all parameters (P = 0.00). In comparison between the two groups, a significant improvement was noted in all movements in group I (P = 0.00). Also, there was a substantial difference between the groups in VAS scores (P = 0.00) which showed significant pain reduction in group I. This study indicates that LLLT combined exercise is more effective than exercise therapy alone in relieving pain and in improving the shoulder ROM in patients with subacromial syndrome.

  7. IMPACT OF CHRONIC ANTI-CHOLESTEROL THERAPY ON DEVELOPMENT OF MICROVASCULAR RAREFACTION IN THE METABOLIC SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Goodwill, Adam G.; Frisbee, Stephanie J.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; James, Milinda E.; Frisbee, Jefferson C.

    2011-01-01

    Object The obese Zucker rat (OZR) model of the metabolic syndrome is partly characterized by moderate hypercholesterolemia in addition to other contributing co-morbidities. Previous results suggest that vascular dysfunction in OZR is associated with chronic reduction in vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and chronic inflammation, both frequently associated with hypercholesterolemia. As such, we evaluated the impact of chronic cholesterol reducing therapy on the development of impaired skeletal muscle arteriolar reactivity and microvessel density in OZR and its impact on chronic inflammation and NO bioavailability. Materials and Methods Beginning at 7 weeks of age, male OZR were treated with gemfibrozil, probucol, atorvastatin or simvastatin (in chow) for 10 weeks. Subsequently, plasma and vascular samples were collected for biochemical/molecular analyses, while arteriolar reactivity and microvessel network structure were assessed using established methodologies after 3, 6 and 10 weeks of drug therapy Results All interventions were equally effective at reducing total cholesterol, although only the statins also blunted the progressive reductions to vascular NO bioavailability, evidenced by greater maintenance of acetylcholine-induced dilator responses, an attenuation of adrenergic constrictor reactivity, and an improvement in agonist-induced NO production. Comparably, while minimal improvements to arteriolar wall mechanics were identified with any of the interventions, chronic statin treatment reduced the rate of microvessel rarefaction in OZR. Associated with these improvements was a striking statin-induced reduction in inflammation in OZR, such that numerous markers of inflammation were correlated with improved microvascular reactivity and density. However, using multivariate discriminant analyses, plasma RANTES, IL-10, MCP-1 and TNF-α were determined to be the strongest contributors to differences between groups, although their relative importance varied

  8. Cell and Gene Therapy for Genetic Diseases: Inherited Disorders Affecting the Lung and Those Mimicking Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Keeler, Allison M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Some of the first human gene therapy trials targeted diseases of the lung and provided important information that will continue to help shape future trials. Here we describe both cell and gene therapies for lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin disorder as well as fatty acid oxidation disorders that mimic sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Human clinical gene therapy trials for cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin have been performed using a variety of vectors including adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and nonviral vectors. No human clinical gene therapy trials have been performed for disorders of fatty acid oxidation; however, important proof-of-principle studies have been completed for multiple fatty acid oxidation disorders. Important achievements have been made and have yet to come for cell and gene therapies for disorders of the lung and those mimicking SIDS. PMID:22642257

  9. Cell and gene therapy for genetic diseases: inherited disorders affecting the lung and those mimicking sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Allison M; Flotte, Terence R

    2012-06-01

    Some of the first human gene therapy trials targeted diseases of the lung and provided important information that will continue to help shape future trials. Here we describe both cell and gene therapies for lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin disorder as well as fatty acid oxidation disorders that mimic sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Human clinical gene therapy trials for cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin have been performed using a variety of vectors including adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and nonviral vectors. No human clinical gene therapy trials have been performed for disorders of fatty acid oxidation; however, important proof-of-principle studies have been completed for multiple fatty acid oxidation disorders. Important achievements have been made and have yet to come for cell and gene therapies for disorders of the lung and those mimicking SIDS.

  10. Evaluation and art therapy treatment of the burnout syndrome in oncology units.

    PubMed

    Italia, Simona; Favara-Scacco, Cinzia; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Russo, Giovanna

    2008-07-01

    We undertook a pilot study to evaluate and potentially reduce the level of burnout in the operators of two oncology centers. The study included 65 doctors and nurses of an adult (Group A) and a pediatric oncology unit (Group B). We used the Maslach Burnout Inventory to estimate the level of burnout obtained in three dimensions: emotional exhaustion, distancing (cognitive and emotional) and reduced personal achievement. Data showed a medium-high level of burnout in Group A and a medium-low level in Group B. In the second part of the study, Group B underwent a program of art therapy interventions with the aim of reducing the level of burnout. Comparing the responses from Group B participants before and after the intervention indicated a statistically significant decreased level of burnout. In conclusion, burnout syndrome exists among oncology unit personnel and can be effectively treated with art therapies. Attention devoted to this aspect is required in order to improve the workers' well-being, thus enhancing attention and dedication to patients.

  11. [Effects of piracetam therapy in a case of Lance-Adams syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Ai; Kumada, Satoko; Yokochi, Fusako; Hachiya, Yasuo; Hanafusa, Yukiko; Tomita, Sunao; Okiyama, Ryoich; Kurihara, Eiji

    2009-09-01

    We report a 17-year-old female patient with Lance-Adams syndrome caused by anoxic encephalopathy during a severe attack of bronchial asthma. She had difficulty in writing because of action myoclonus in her arms. She also exhibited freezing gait and was unable to walk without cane. Although her gait disturbance resembled those seen in patients with parkinsonism secondary to anoxic encephalopathy, surface electromyography revealed that it was caused by action myoclonus in her legs. The presence of giant somatosensory evoked potentials and enhanced cortical reflexes in response to the electrical stimulation to her posterior tibial nerves supported our diagnosis. A combined therapy with valproate sodium, clonazepam and piracetam (15 g/day) was not effective. However, her freezing gait remarkably improved and she was able to walk without help, after the treatment with sufficient dose of piracetam (21 g/day). Cortical hyperexcitability as revealed by electrophysiological examination also improved. We concluded that the combined therapy with antiepileptic drugs and piracetam was effective in the treatment for action myoclonus. However, because the effects seemed dose-related, the dosage of piracetam needed to be increased until the optimum effects were obtained.

  12. Shoulder functionality after manual therapy in subjects with shoulder impingement syndrome: a case series.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Rizo, Alberto Marcos; López-Hervás, Antonia; Herrera-Monge, Patricia; Gutiérrez-Leonard, Ana; Piña-Pozo, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the differences in functionality of the upper limb in subjects suffering from shoulder impingement syndrome after intervention by two manual therapy protocols. Randomized, single-blind study with a sample of 22 subjects (58 ± 10.86 years old) divided into two groups. The conventional-group (n = 11) received mobilizations of the shoulder and the experimental-group (n = 11) was treated with soft tissue techniques in the cervical and upper thoracic regions. These two groups received electrotherapy and postural advices. The treatment lasted three weeks (15 daily sessions of 1 h and 30 min). Both active and passive range of motion (ROM) and self-perceived functionality of the upper limb (DASH questionnaire) were measured. The experimental group showed a significant improvement in the DASH scores and both groups improved mobility in the intra-group comparison pre-intervention versus post-intervention (p < .05), but not statistically significant differences were found in the between-group comparison (p > .05). Our results suggest that a combined treatment with electrotherapy, postural hygiene and manual therapy, regardless of the protocol, improves shoulder mobility and functionality.

  13. Testosterone supplementation therapy in the treatment of patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Jason R; Kovac, Jason; Pastuszak, Alexander W; Lamb, Dolores J; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2014-11-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) comprises a clinical complex of patient risk factors, including increased waist circumference, high triglyceride levels, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, high blood pressure, and insulin resistance, the presence of which increases the likelihood of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. With a quarter of the American adult population affected, MetS and type 2 diabetes mellitus have been referred to as the most significant public health threats of the 21st century. Lifestyle modification and weight loss are recommended, however, no specific pharmacologic treatment is known. Given that low levels of testosterone have been implicated in the pathogenesis of MetS and an inverse relationship exists between circulating testosterone levels and the development of MetS, it is tempting to speculate that men with MetS may benefit from testosterone supplementation therapy. As such, our review examines the role of testosterone and the use of testosterone supplementation therapy as a treatment in men with MetS.

  14. Incidence, etiology and timing of infections following azacitidine therapy for myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Trubiano, Jason A; Dickinson, Michael; Thursky, Karin A; Spelman, Timothy; Seymour, John F; Slavin, Monica A; Worth, Leon J

    2017-02-28

    We examine the infective complications occurring during azacitidine (AZA) therapy in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A retrospective review of patients receiving ≥1 cycle of AZA for MDS or AML was performed. Patient demographics, infection prophylaxis/episodes and outcomes were evaluated. Sixty eight patients received 884 AZA cycles. Bacterial infections occurred in 25% of cycle-1 and 27% of cycle-2 AZA therapy. Febrile neutropenia complicated 5.3% of AZA cycles, bacteremia 2% and invasive Aspergillosis 0.3%. Using Poisson modeling, a very high IPSS-R (RR 10.26, 95% CI 1.20, 87.41, p= .033) was identified as an independent risk factor for infection. Infection-related attributable mortality was 23%. The burden of infection is high in AZA-treated patients, associated with high attributable mortality. Over 25% of AZA cycles 1 and 2 were complicated by infection, predominantly bacterial, rates dropping to <10% after cycle-5.

  15. Low-level laser therapy of myofascial pain syndromes of patients with osteoarthritis of knee and hip joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparyan, Levon V.

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of the given research is the comparison of efficiency of conventional treatment of myofascial pain syndromes of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of hip and knee joints and therapy with additional application of low level laser therapy (LLLT) under dynamic control of clinical picture, rheovasographic, electromyographic examinations, and parameters of peroxide lipid oxidation. The investigation was made on 143 patients with OA of hip and knee joints. Patients were randomized in 2 groups: basic group included 91 patients, receiving conventional therapy with a course of LLLT, control group included 52 patients, receiving conventional treatment only. Transcutaneous ((lambda) equals 890 nm, output peak power 5 W, frequency 80 - 3000 Hz) and intravenous ((lambda) equals 633 nm, output 2 mW in the vein) laser irradiation were used for LLLT. Studied showed, that clinical efficiency of LLLT in the complex with conventional treatment of myofascial pain syndromes at the patients with OA is connected with attenuation of pain syndrome, normalization of parameters of myofascial syndrome, normalization of the vascular tension and parameters of rheographic curves, as well as with activation of antioxidant protection system.

  16. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia after treatment with temozolomide in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue Jung; Park, Tae Sung; Lee, Seung Tae; Song, Jaewoo; Suh, Borum; Kim, Se Hoon; Jang, Seon Jung; Lee, Chang Hoon; Choi, Jong Rak

    2009-01-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia after treatment with temozolomide have rarely been described in the literature. Only 10 cases in association with temozolomide have been documented. The cases included anaplastic astrocytoma (4 cases), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (2 cases), low grade astrocytoma (2 cases), low grade oligodendroglioma (1 case), and one case of secondary Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. Here we report a novel case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia associated with der(1;7)(q10;p10) in a glioblastoma multiforme patient treated with temozolomide. Results of bone marrow morphology, chromosome, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, as well as the clinical history, strongly suggest a treatment-related etiology in our case. In past reports, karyotypes in cases of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia mostly demonstrated abnormalities in chromosomes 5 and 7. However, we report a case of temozolomide-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with der(1;7)(q10;p10), possibly the first reported case, to the authors' knowledge.

  17. Static Magnetic Field Therapy for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Colbert, Agatha P.; Markov, Marko S.; Carlson, Nels; Gregory, William L.; Carlson, Hans; Elmer, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility of conducting trials of static magnetic field (SMF) therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), to collect preliminary data on the effectiveness of two SMF dosages and to explore the influence of a SMF on median nerve conduction. Design Randomized, double blind, sham controlled trial with 6-week intervention and 12-week follow-up. Setting University hospital outpatient clinics Participants Women and men (N=60), ages 21–65, with electrophysiologically-confirmed CTS diagnosis, recruited from the general population. Interventions Participants wore nightly either neodymium magnets that delivered either 15 or 45mTesla (mT) to the contents of the carpal canal, or a non-magnetic disk. Main Outcome Measures Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Function Severity Scale (FSS) of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) and 4 median nerve parameters: sensory distal latency, sensory nerve action potential amplitude, motor distal latency and compound motor action potential amplitude). Results 58 of 60 randomized participants completed the study. There were no significant between-group differences for change in the primary endpoint SSS or for FSS or median nerve conduction parameters. For the SSS and the FSS each group showed a reduction at 6-weeks indicating improvement in symptoms. Conclusions This study demonstrated the feasibility and safety of testing SMF therapy for CTS. There were no between-group differences observed for the BCTQ or median nerve parameters following 6 weeks of SMF therapy. Significant within-group, symptomatic improvements of the same magnitude were experienced by participants in both active and sham magnet groups. Future studies are needed to optimize SMF dosimetry and resolve issues related to the use of sham controls in SMF trials. PMID:20599049

  18. Effectiveness of aquatic therapy in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome: a randomized controlled open study.

    PubMed

    Evcik, Deniz; Yigit, Ilknur; Pusak, Hasan; Kavuncu, Vural

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of aquatic exercises in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). A total of 63 patients were included and allocated to two groups. Group I (n = 33) received an aquatic exercise program and Group II (n = 30) received a home-based exercise program for 60 min, 3x a week, over 5 weeks. Patients were evaluated for pain (visual analogue scale, VAS), number of tender points (NTP), Beck depression inventory (BDI), and functional capacity (fibromyalgia impact questionnaire, FIQ). All assessment parameters were measured at baseline, and at weeks 4, 12, and 24. There were statistically significant differences in FIQ and NTP in both groups at the end and during follow-up (P < 0.05). Group I showed a statistically significant decrease in BDI scores after 4 and 12 weeks (P < 0.05) that remained after 24 weeks (P < 0.001). In Group II, a significant decrease in BDI scores was observed at the end and during follow-up (P < 0.001). Also, a significant improvement was found in VAS at weeks 4 and 12 in both groups (P < 0.001). The average of reduction in pain scores was 40% in Group1 and 21% in Group II. However, this was still significant at week 24 only in the aquatic therapy group. A comparison of the two groups showed no statistically significant difference for FIQ, NTP, and BDI scores except VAS (P < 0.001) Our results showed that both aquatic therapy and home-based exercise programs have beneficial effects on FIQ, BDI, and NTP. In pain management, only aquatic therapy seems to have long-term effects.

  19. New and emerging anticoagulant therapy for atrial fibrillation and acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davis, Estella M; Packard, Kathleen A; Knezevich, Jon T; Campbell, Jennifer A

    2011-10-01

    Abstract Thrombosis is an underlying cause of many cardiovascular disorders, and generation of thrombi in the arterial circulation can lead to unstable angina, myocardial infarction, or ischemic stroke. Antithrombotic therapy is widely used, with proven benefit to prevent ischemic stroke and thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) or to prevent further ischemic complications in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Traditional anticoagulants (including unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, and warfarin) and antiplatelet agents (including aspirin, clopidogrel, and prasugrel) are typically used for these indications. Limitations to their use include variable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, inability to inhibit fibrin-bound thrombin, risk of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, delayed onset of action, numerous drug interactions, need for substantial laboratory monitoring and dosage titrations, hyporesponsiveness or resistance, hypersensitivity, adverse events, and bleeding. To overcome some of the limitations of traditional agents, new antithrombotic agents under development are highly selective for specific coagulation factors blocking the synthesis of thrombin. Clinicians must have an understanding of the new anticoagulants to aid in the selection of appropriate therapies for patients. We describe the most relevant phases II and III clinical trials that evaluated several recent emerging anticoagulant drugs for use in patients with AF or ACS. The advantages of many new agents include predictable pharmaco-dynamic response and pharmacokinetic parameters, allowing for fixed oral dosing with no need for laboratory monitoring. For patients with AF, dabigatran is already approved for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism, rivaroxaban appears to be an effective alternative to warfarin in high-risk patients, and apixaban may also be an effective alternative to aspirin in patients unable to take warfarin

  20. The Benefit of Movement: Dance/Movement Therapy and Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albin, Chloe M.

    2016-01-01

    There are various forms of therapies for children with disabilities, including physical therapy, speech therapy, and alternative therapies such as music and dance therapy. Each form of therapy has its benefits for those with disabilities, but ultimately the success of the therapy rests on the attention paid to the individual. Especially for…

  1. Effectiveness of PELOID therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized controlled single blind study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metin Ökmen, Burcu; Kasapoğlu Aksoy, Meliha; Güneş, Aygül; Eröksüz, Riza; Altan, Lale

    2017-02-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome(CTS) is the most common neuromuscular cause of upper extremity disability. We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of peloid therapy in patients with CTS. This randomized, controlled, single-blind study enrolled 70 patients between the ages of 30 to 65 who had a diagnosis of either mild, mild-to-moderate, or moderate CTS. The patients were randomized into two groups using random number table. In the first group, (Group 1)(n = 35), patients were given splint (every night for 6 weeks) + peloid treatment(five consecutive days a week for 2 weeks) and in the second group, (Group 2)(n = 28), patients received splint treatment(every night for 6 weeks) alone. The patients were assessed by using visual analog scale(VAS) for pain, electroneuromyography(ENMG), the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire(BCTSQ), hand grip strength(HGS), finger grip strength(FGS), and Short Form-12(SF-12). The data were obtained before treatment(W0), immediately after treatment(W2), and one month after treatment(W6). Both in Group 1 and 2, there was a statistically significant improvement in all the evaluation parameters at W2 and W6 when compared to W0(p < 0.05). Comparison of the groups with each other revealed significantly better results for VAS, BCTSQ, mSNCV, SF-12 in Group 1 than in Group 2 at W2(p < 0.05). There was also a statistically significant difference in favor of Group 1 for VAS, BCTSQ, FGS and MCS at W6 when compared to W0 (p < 0.05). The results of our study demonstrated that in patients with CTS; peloid + splint treatment was more effective than splint treatment alone in pain, functionality and life quality both at after treatment(W2) and one month after treatment (W6). We may suggest peloid as a supplementary therapeutic agent in CTS.

  2. International patterns of dual antiplatelet therapy duration after acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Héctor; Pocock, Stuart; Danchin, Nicolas; Annemans, Lieven; Gregson, John; Medina, Jesús; Van de Werf, Frans

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe international patterns of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) duration after acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and explore its determinants and correlation with clinical events. Methods EPICOR (long-tErm follow-uP of anti-thrombotic management patterns In acute CORonary syndrome patients) is a prospective, international, observational study of 10 568 ACS hospital survivors enrolled in 555 centres from 20 countries across Europe and Latin America between 2010 and 2011, with telephone follow-up at quarterly intervals up to 24 months to assess treatment continuation and clinical events. Results Of 8593 patients discharged on DAPT, 4859 (57%) remained on uninterrupted DAPT at end of follow-up. There were minor differences in rates of DAPT discontinuation according to age, gender, risk factors, therapeutic strategy or region, but major differences between countries. By study end, 555 of evaluable patients (5.7%) died, 727 (10.0%) experienced new cardiovascular (CV) events, 496 new coronary events (6.82%) and 154 (2.11%) clinically relevant bleeding (14 (6.7%) fatal). Most CV events and deaths (85%) occurred while on DAPT. DAPT interruption was associated with increased risk of CV events in the following week (HR 2.29; 95% CI 1.08 to 4.84) but not specifically with time to first coronary event or mortality. Conclusions Despite guideline recommendations, most patients with ACS in Europe and Latin America remained on DAPT beyond 12 months, country being the most important determinant of DAPT duration. Increase in short-term CV risk was seen after switching from DAPT to less medication, as compared with continued DAPT, with no long-term effect on coronary or mortality risk. Trial registration number NCT01171404; Results. PMID:27504002

  3. Effect of Testosterone Replacement Therapy on Cognitive Performance and Depression in Men with Testosterone Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to evaluate the effect of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) on cognitive function and depression in men with testosterone deficiency syndrome. Materials and Methods We carried out a prospective, placebo-controlled trial involving 106 men with total testosterone levels <3.3 ng/mL and symptoms of hypogonadism. Based on whether the patients received TRT (injection with 1,000 mg testosterone undecanoate) or a placebo (advice to modify lifestyle), the study population was divided into a TRT group (n=54) and a control group (n=52). Results The age among patients in the TRT and control groups was 56.7±12.6 years and 57.8±11.4 years, respectively (p> 0.05). At baseline, no significant differences between the TRT and control groups were noted regarding serum testosterone or prostate-specific antigen levels, or regarding the scores for aging symptoms (Aging Males' Symptoms scale), erectile function (5-item International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire), cognitive function (Korean Mini-Mental State Examination), and depression (Beck Depression Inventory). At 8 months after intervention total serum testosterone levels and erectile function scores had significantly increased (p<0.05), whereas the scores for aging symptoms and depression had significantly decreased (p<0.05) in the TRT group; no significant improvement in any parameters was noted for the control group. Notably, significant improvement in cognitive function was noted among patients with cognitive impairment at baseline (cognitive function score <25) who received TRT. Conclusions TRT may be considered in men with testosterone deficiency syndrome if low testosterone levels are associated with depression or cognitive impairment. PMID:28053949

  4. [Regional intraosseous thrombolytic therapy in comprehensive treatment of patients with diabetic foot syndrome].

    PubMed

    Beliaev, A N; Rodin, A N; Kozlov, S A

    The authors assessed efficacy of regional intraosseous administration of urokinase medac in comprehensive treatment of patients with complicated forms of diabetic foot syndrome by means of analysing therapeutic results in a total of 65 patients presenting with pyonecrotic complications of diabetic foot. The patients were subdivided into 2 groups. The control group was composed of 35 patients receiving basic therapy. The study group comprised 30 patients subjected to comprehensive treatment including regional intraosseous (into the heel bone of the affected limb) administration of urokinase medac at a dose of 100 thousand IU for 5 days. Efficacy of treatment was evaluated by the course of the wound process, indices of haemostasis, free radical oxidation, results of surgical treatment. In patients of the Study Group the terms of wound purification from pyonecrotic masses amounted to 9.8±0.3 days, which was by 4.7 days less than in the Control Group patients (p<0.01), marginal epithelialization of wounds also occurred averagely by 6.4 days faster. On day 22 of using the basic therapy alone, the haemostasis system preserved the condition of coagulation activity. The Study Group patients as early as on day 5 of treatment demonstrated shifts towards normocoagulation. In the Control Group by day 22 of treatment, the level of malonic dialdehyde decreased by 18.5%, the index of catalase activity increased by 24.6% (p<0.05); in the Study Group the level of malonic dialdehyde decreased by 42.6% and catalase activity increased by 69.4% (p<0.01). On the background of using urokinase the number of high amputations decreased by 18% and the number of operations with the supporting function preserved decreased by 12% as compared with basic therapy alone. A conclusion was made that additional use of regional intraosseous administration of urokinase medac as compared with basic therapy alone promoted a more significant decrease in the coagulation activity of blood and the level of

  5. Myelodysplastic syndrome after autologous bone marrow transplantation: an additional late complication of curative cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Miller, J S; Arthur, D C; Litz, C E; Neglia, J P; Miller, W J; Weisdorf, D J

    1994-06-15

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a complication of conventional antineoplastic therapy but has rarely been reported after autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). We reviewed records of 206 patients who underwent ABMT for lymphoma at the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN) between 1974 and 1993. Of 206 patients who underwent ABMT for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) or Hodgkin's disease (HD), 9 patients developed an MDS or secondary acute leukemia between 5 and 60 months (median 34 months) post-BMT. Two patients had relapsed after transplant and received additional therapy before the diagnosis of MDS. They were censored from the statistical analysis, resulting in a cumulative incidence of 14.5% +/- 11.6% (95% confidence interval) at 5 years. Three patients (15.2% +/- 18.0%) had HD, and four (14.0% +/- 14.7%) had NHL. In vitro BM purging had no affect on the incidence of MDS, although patients receiving peripheral blood stem cells had a projected MDS incidence of 31% +/- 33% versus 10.5% +/- 12% if BM cells were used (p = .0035). The patients had received a median of 14 cycles (range, 6 to 40) of chemotherapy before autologous transplantation; Five of nine patients received radiation therapy before BMT conditioning, and all patients received radiation before the diagnosis of MDS. No BM cytogenetic abnormalities were evident pretransplant in three of three patients studied, and all nine had normal pretransplant BM morphology. All patients had morphologic BM findings typical of MDS, and six of six studied had clonal cytogenetic abnormalities. At the diagnosis of MDS, all nine patients were without clinical, radiographic, or autopsy evidence of recurrent lymphoma; Three of the nine patients have died from complications of cytopenias at 23, 36, and 45 months after transplant (3 to 10 months after the diagnosis of MDS), whereas 6 survive 8 to 63 months after transplantation (1 to 34 months post-MDS). These data emphasize the cumulative leukemogenic potential of

  6. A Critical Appraisal of Growth Hormone Therapy in Growth Hormone Deficiency and Turner Syndrome Patients in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yavaş Abalı, Zehra; Darendeliler, Feyza; Neyzi, Olcay

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of abnormal growth, identification of the underlying cause, and appropriate treatment of the medical condition is an important issue for children with short stature. Growth hormone (GH) therapy is widely used in GH-deficient children and also in non-GH-deficient short stature cases who have findings conforming to certain indications. Efficacy of GH therapy has been shown in a multitude of short- and long-term studies. Age at onset of GH therapy is the most important factor for a successful treatment outcome. Optimal dosing is also essential. The aim of this review was to focus on challenges in the early diagnosis and appropriate management of short stature due to GH deficiency (GHD) and Turner syndrome. These are the most frequent two indications for GH therapy in Turkey approved by the Ministry of Health for coverage by the national insurance system. PMID:27354120

  7. Outcome following Gene Therapy in Patients with Severe Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abina, Salima Hacein-Bey; Gaspar, H. Bobby; Blondeau, Johanna; Caccavelli, Laure; Charrier, Sabine; Buckland, Karen; Picard, Capucine; Six, Emmanuelle; Himoudi, Nourredine; Gilmour, Kimberly; McNicol, Anne-Marie; Hara, Havinder; Xu-Bayford, Jinhua; Rivat, Christine; Touzot, Fabien; Mavilio, Fulvio; Lim, Annick; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Héritier, Sébastien; Lefrere, Francois; Magalon, Jeremy; Pengue-Koyi, Isabelle; Honnet, Géraldine; Blanche, Stéphane; Sherman, Eric A.; Male, Frances; Berry, Charles; Malani, Nirav; Bushman, Frederic D.; Fischer, Alain; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Galy, Anne; Cavazzana, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Importance Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare primary immunodeficiency associated with severe microthrombocytopenia. Partially HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is associated with significant co-morbidity. Objective To assess the outcome and safety of autologous HSC gene therapy in WAS. Design Gene-corrected autologous HSC were infused in 7 consecutive WAS patients (age range: 0.8 to 15.5 years, mean 7 years) following myeloablative conditioning. Setting and participants: Patients with severe WAS lacking HLA-matched related or unrelated HSC donors were treated between December 2010 and January 2014. The follow up of patients in this intermediate analysis ranged from 9 to 42 months. Intervention A single infusion of gene-modified CD34+ cells with an advanced lentiviral vector. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) Primary outcomes were improvement at 24 months in eczema, the frequency and severity of infections, bleeding tendency, autoimmunity and reduction in disease-related days of hospitalization. Secondary outcomes were improvement in immunological and haematological parameters, and evidence for safety through vector integration analysis. Results Six out of the 7 patients were alive at the time of last follow-up (mean and median follow-up time: 28 and 27 months respectively) and showed sustained clinical benefit. One patient died 7 months after treatment from pre-existing drug- resistant herpes virus infections. Eczema and susceptibility to infections resolved in all 6 patients. Autoimmunity improved in 5/5 patients. No severe bleeding episodes were recorded after treatment, and at last follow up 6/6 patients were free from blood product support and thrombopoietic agonists. Hospitalization days were reduced from 25 days (median) in the 2 years pretreatment to 0 days (median) in the 2 years post treatment. All 6 surviving patients exhibited high-level, stable engraftment of functionally corrected lymphoid cells. The degree of

  8. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia following chemotherapy (paclitaxel and carboplatin) and radiation therapy in ovarian cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, M; Nakayama, K; Rahman, M T; Rahman, M; Katagiri, H; Katagiri, A; Ishibashi, T; Iida, K; Nakayama, N; Miyazaki, K

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the incidence of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) and therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) that occur during chemotherapy for ovarian cancer has increased. While alkylating agents and topoisomerase II inhibitors are particularly mutagenic and have strong leukemogenic potential, paclitaxel and combination chemotherapy/radiation therapy also appear to induce t-MDS. The present authors report a case of t-MDS that developed during chemotherapy and radiation therapy for ovarian cancer. The patient was a 75-year-old woman who received six courses of cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/cisplatin (CAP) therapy after initial surgery for Stage IIIc grade ovarian cancer in 1995. Beginning in February 2005, the patient experienced multiple recurrences due to sternal metastasis. Chemotherapy, including paclitaxel and carboplatin (TC), was administered intermittently and was combined with radiation therapy to a sternal metastatic lesion. Pancytopenia was observed in December 2008, and she was diagnosed with t-MDS (WHO subtype, refractory cytopenias with multilineage dysplasia [RCMD]): the time from first chemotherapy to t-MDS onset was 106 months. Without evidence of blast crisis, the recurrent lesions continued to grow and caused multiple cerebral infarctions, from which she eventually died. The cumulative doses of paclitaxel and carboplatin administered to this patient were 1,968 mg and 6,480 mg, respectively.

  9. Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... worsens. Treatment options for myofascial pain syndrome include physical therapy and trigger point injections. Pain medications and relaxation ... syndrome typically includes medications, trigger point injections or physical therapy. No conclusive evidence supports using one therapy over ...

  10. The effectiveness of low laser therapy in subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomized placebo controlled double‐blind prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Sebnem Koldas; AY, Saime; Evcik, Deniz

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Conflicting results were reported about the effectiveness of Low level laser therapy on musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of 850‐nm gallium arsenide aluminum (Ga‐As‐Al) laser therapy on pain, range of motion and disability in subacromial impingement syndrome. METHODS: A total of 52 patients (33 females and 19 males with a mean age of 53.59±11.34 years) with subacromial impingement syndrome were included. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups. Group I (n = 30, laser group) received laser therapy (5 joule/cm2 at each point over maximum 5‐6 painful points for 1 minute). Group II (n = 22, placebo laser group) received placebo laser therapy. Initially cold pack (10 minutes) was applied to all of the patients. Also patients were given an exercise program including range of motion, stretching and progressive resistive exercises. The therapy program was applied 5 times a week for 14 sessions. Pain severity was assessed by using visual analogue scale. Range of motion was measured by goniometer. Disability was evaluated by using Shoulder Pain and Disability Index. RESULTS: In group I, statistically significant improvements in pain severity, range of motion except internal and external rotation and SPADI scores were observed compared to baseline scores after the therapy (p<0.05). In Group II, all parameters except range of motion of external rotation were improved (p<0.05). However, no significant differences were recorded between the groups (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The Low level laser therapy seems to have no superiority over placebo laser therapy in reducing pain severity, range of motion and functional disability. PMID:21120304

  11. Recurrent stent thrombosis in a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome and dual anti-platelet therapy non-responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Lee, You-Hong; Yang, Hyoung-Mo; Tahk, Seung-Jea; Hong, You-Sun; Park, Jin-Sun; Seo, Kyoung-Woo; Choi, Yong-Woo; Noh, Choong-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), the most common acquired hypercoagulable condition, is diagnosed by persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies and episodes of vascular thrombosis. It may be an important predisposing factor for stent thrombosis, resulting in poor outcomes. Also, anti-platelet therapy non-responsiveness is associated with stent thrombosis. We report a case of a 39-year-old man who after undergoing successful percutaneous coronary intervention for significant coronary artery disease suffered repeated stent thrombosis events leading to ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Eventually, he underwent coronary artery bypass surgery because of uncontrolled thrombosis and was diagnosed as having APS and dual antiplatelet therapy non-responsiveness.

  12. Refractory Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis and Intravenous Immunoglobulin as Salvage Therapy: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Karter, Dennis; Altshuler, Jerry; Altshuler, Diana; Schwartz, David; Torregrossa, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Infections from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis (SDSE) can cause a wide variety of infections, ranging from mild cellulitis to invasive disease, such as endocarditis and streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS). Despite prompt and appropriate antibiotics, mortality rates associated with shock have remained exceedingly high, prompting the need for adjunctive therapy. IVIG has been proposed as a possible adjunct, given its ability to neutralize a wide variety of superantigens and modulate a dysregulated inflammatory response. We present the first reported cases of successful IVIG therapy for reversing shock in the treatment of SDSE TSLS. PMID:27597908

  13. A manual therapy intervention improves symptoms in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Maddali Bongi, Susanna; Signorini, Massimo; Bassetti, Massimo; Del Rosso, Angela; Orlandi, Martina; De Scisciolo, Giuseppe

    2013-05-01

    In carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), manual therapy interventions (MTI) reduce tissue adhesion and increase wrist mobility. We evaluated the efficacy of a MTI in relieving CTS signs and symptoms. Twenty-two CTS patients (pts) (41 hands) were treated with a MTI, consisting in 6 treatments (2/week for 3 weeks) of soft tissues of wrist and hands and of carpal bones. Pts were assessed for hand sensitivity, paresthesia, hand strength, hand and forearm pain, night awakening; Phalen test, thenar eminence hypotrophy and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS). Median nerve was studied by sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) and distal motor latency (DML). CTS was scored as minimal, mild, medium, severe and extreme. We considered as control group the same pts assessed before treatment: at baseline (T0a) and after 12 weeks (T0b). Pts were evaluated at the end of treatment (T1) and after 24-week (T2) follow-up. At T0b, versus T0a, forearm pain and Phalen test positivity were increased and hand strength reduced (p < 0.05). BCTQ-SSS and BCTQ-FSS scores improved at T1 versus T0b (p < 0.05) with the amelioration maintained at T2. At T1, the number of pts with paresthesia, night awakening, hypoesthesia, Phalen test, hand strength reduction and hand sensitivity was reduced with the lacking of symptoms maintained at T2 (p < 0.05). No changes in SNCV, DML and CTS scoring were shown. MTI improved CTS signs and symptoms, with benefits maintained at follow-up. Thus, it may be valid as a conservative therapy.

  14. Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome after hematopoietic cell transplantation for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, S; Suzuki, R; Hatano, K; Fukushima, K; Iida, H; Morishima, S; Suehiro, Y; Fukuda, T; Uchida, N; Uchiyama, H; Ikeda, H; Yokota, A; Tsukasaki, K; Yamaguchi, H; Kuroda, J; Nakamae, H; Adachi, Y; Matsuoka, K-I; Nakamura, Y; Atsuta, Y; Suzumiya, J

    2017-04-03

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (t-AML/MDS) represent severe late effects in patients receiving hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for lymphoma. The choice between high-dose therapy with autologous HCT and allogeneic HCT with reduced-intensity conditioning remains controversial in patients with relapsed lymphoma. We retrospectively analyzed incidence and risk factors for the development of t-AML/MDS in lymphoma patients treated with autologous or allogeneic HCT. A total of 13 810 lymphoma patients who received autologous (n=9963) or allogeneic (n=3847) HCT between 1985 and 2012 were considered. At a median overall survival (OS) of 52 and 46 months in autologous and allogeneic HCT groups, respectively, lymphoma patients receiving autologous HCT (1.38% at 3 years after autologous HCT) had a significant risk for developing t-AML/MDS compared to allogeneic HCT (0.37% at 3 years after allogeneic HCT, P<0.001). Significant risk factors for the development of t-AML/MDS after autologous and allogeneic HCT were high-stage risk at HCT (P=0.04) or secondary malignancies (P<0.001) and receiving cord blood stem cell (P=0.03) or involved field radiotherapy (P=0.002), respectively. Strategies that carefully select lymphoma patients for autologous HCT, by excluding lymphoma patients with high-stage risk at HCT, may allow the identification of individual lymphoma patients at particular high risk for t-AML/MDS.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 3 April 2017; doi:10.1038/bmt.2017.52.

  15. Multidisciplinary therapy reduces risk factors for metabolic syndrome in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Josiane Aparecida Alves; da Silva, Danilo Fernandes; Nardo, Claudia Christina Sanchez; Carolino, Idalina Diair Regla; Hernandes, Florencio; Nardo, Nelson

    2013-02-01

    This study aims to assess the effects of a 16-week multidisciplinary program of obesity treatment on the control of metabolic syndrome (MS) and dyslipidemia in obese adolescents. Eighty-six adolescents aged 10-18 years were allocated in either the intervention group (IG; n = 44) or control group (CG; n = 42). IG was submitted to a multidisciplinary intervention based on cognitive behavioral therapy that aimed to modify eating habits and exercise behavior. We analyzed, before and after the intervention period, anthropometric parameters, body composition, bone mineral density, cardiorespiratory fitness, blood pressure, glucose, insulin, and lipid profile of the subjects. MS was classified according to International Diabetes Federation (2007) and the presence of dyslipidemia according to Back et al. (Arq Bras Cardiol 85:4-36, 2005). In the beginning of the intervention, the median number (range) of risk factors for MS present was 2.0 (0.0-5.0) in the IG and 2.0 (0.0-4.0) in the CG. After the intervention, this parameter reduced significantly in the IG (1.0 (0.0-5.0); p = 0.004) while no change was observed in the CG (2.0 (0.0-4.0); p = 0.349). In addition, we observed improvements in body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, maximal oxygen uptake, absolute and relative body fat, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and total cholesterol in the IG which was not identified in the CG. Conclusio n: We suggest that a 16-week multidisciplinary intervention based on cognitive behavioral therapy was adequate to reduce risk factors for MS in obese adolescents.

  16. Intravenous vitamin C as adjunctive therapy for enterovirus/rhinovirus induced acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fowler Iii, Alpha A; Kim, Christin; Lepler, Lawrence; Malhotra, Rajiv; Debesa, Orlando; Natarajan, Ramesh; Fisher, Bernard J; Syed, Aamer; DeWilde, Christine; Priday, Anna; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar

    2017-02-04

    We report a case of virus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) treated with parenteral vitamin C in a patient testing positive for enterovirus/rhinovirus on viral screening. This report outlines the first use of high dose intravenous vitamin C as an interventional therapy for ARDS, resulting from enterovirus/rhinovirus respiratory infection. From very significant preclinical research performed at Virginia Commonwealth University with vitamin C and with the very positive results of a previously performed phase I safety trial infusing high dose vitamin C intravenously into patients with severe sepsis, we reasoned that infusing identical dosing to a patient with ARDS from viral infection would be therapeutic. We report here the case of a 20-year-old, previously healthy, female who contracted respiratory enterovirus/rhinovirus infection that led to acute lung injury and rapidly to ARDS. She contracted the infection in central Italy while on an 8-d spring break from college. During a return flight to the United States, she developed increasing dyspnea and hypoxemia that rapidly developed into acute lung injury that led to ARDS. When support with mechanical ventilation failed, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was initiated. Twelve hours following ECMO initiation, high dose intravenous vitamin C was begun. The patient's recovery was rapid. ECMO and mechanical ventilation were discontinued by day-7 and the patient recovered with no long-term ARDS sequelae. Infusing high dose intravenous vitamin C into this patient with virus-induced ARDS was associated with rapid resolution of lung injury with no evidence of post-ARDS fibroproliferative sequelae. Intravenous vitamin C as a treatment for ARDS may open a new era of therapy for ARDS from many causes.

  17. NPY and cohorts in regulating appetite, obesity and metabolic syndrome: beneficial effects of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kalra, S P; Kalra, P S

    2004-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y is the most potent physiological appetite transducer known. The NPY network is the conductor of the hypothalamic appetite regulating orchestra in the arcuate nucleus-paraventricular nucleus (ARC-PVN) of the hypothalamus. NPY and cohorts, AgrP, GABA and adrenergic transmitters, initiate appetitive drive directly through Y1, Y5, GABAA and alpha1 receptors, co-expressed in the magnocellular PVN (mPVN) and ARC neurons and by simultaneously repressing anorexigenic melanocortin signaling in the ARC-PVN axis. The circadian and ultradian rhythmicities in NPY secretion imprint the daily circadian and episodic feeding patterns. Although a number of afferent hormonal signals from the periphery can directly modulate NPYergic signaling, the reciprocal circadian and ultradian rhythmicities of anorexigenic leptin from adipocytes and orexigenic ghrelin from stomach, encode a corresponding pattern of NPY discharge for daily meal patterning. Subtle and progressive derangements produced by environmental and genetic factors in this exquisitely intricate temporal relationship between the two opposing humoral signals and the NPY network promote hyperphagia and abnormal rate of weight gain culminating in obesity and attendant metabolic disorders. Newer insights at cellular and molecular levels demonstrate that a breakdown of the integrated circuit due both to high and low abundance of NPY at target sites, underlies hyperphagia and increased adiposity. Consequently, interruption of NPYergic signaling at a single locus with NPY receptor antagonists may not be the most efficacious therapy to suppress hyperphagia and obesity. Central leptin gene therapy in rodents has been shown to subjugate, i.e. bring under homeostatic control, NPYergic signaling and suppress the age-related and dietary obesity for extended periods and thus shows promise as a newer treatment modality to curb the pandemic of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  18. Intravenous vitamin C as adjunctive therapy for enterovirus/rhinovirus induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fowler III, Alpha A; Kim, Christin; Lepler, Lawrence; Malhotra, Rajiv; Debesa, Orlando; Natarajan, Ramesh; Fisher, Bernard J; Syed, Aamer; DeWilde, Christine; Priday, Anna; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of virus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) treated with parenteral vitamin C in a patient testing positive for enterovirus/rhinovirus on viral screening. This report outlines the first use of high dose intravenous vitamin C as an interventional therapy for ARDS, resulting from enterovirus/rhinovirus respiratory infection. From very significant preclinical research performed at Virginia Commonwealth University with vitamin C and with the very positive results of a previously performed phase I safety trial infusing high dose vitamin C intravenously into patients with severe sepsis, we reasoned that infusing identical dosing to a patient with ARDS from viral infection would be therapeutic. We report here the case of a 20-year-old, previously healthy, female who contracted respiratory enterovirus/rhinovirus infection that led to acute lung injury and rapidly to ARDS. She contracted the infection in central Italy while on an 8-d spring break from college. During a return flight to the United States, she developed increasing dyspnea and hypoxemia that rapidly developed into acute lung injury that led to ARDS. When support with mechanical ventilation failed, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was initiated. Twelve hours following ECMO initiation, high dose intravenous vitamin C was begun. The patient’s recovery was rapid. ECMO and mechanical ventilation were discontinued by day-7 and the patient recovered with no long-term ARDS sequelae. Infusing high dose intravenous vitamin C into this patient with virus-induced ARDS was associated with rapid resolution of lung injury with no evidence of post-ARDS fibroproliferative sequelae. Intravenous vitamin C as a treatment for ARDS may open a new era of therapy for ARDS from many causes. PMID:28224112

  19. Electroacupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for sub-syndromal depression among undergraduates: a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tianwei; Guo, Zhuo; Zhang, Wenyue; Ma, Wenhao; Yang, Xinjing; Yang, Xueqin; Hwang, Jiwon; He, Xiaotian; Chen, Xinyi; Ya, Tu

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with sub-syndromal depression (SSD) are at increased risk of incident depressive disorders; however, the ideal therapeutic approach to SSD remains unknown. Objective To evaluate the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), alone or in combination, on depressive symptoms. Methods Undergraduate students with SSD were recruited and allocated to one of four groups based on their preferences: EA (n=6), CBT (n=10), EA+CBT (n=6), and untreated control (n=11) groups. Six weeks of treatment were provided in the first three groups. Clinical outcomes were measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression (HAMD-17) rating scale, Center for Epidemiologic Depression (CES-D) scale, WHO Quality of Life-Brief version (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire, and clinical remission rate. Results All 33 subjects were included in an intent-to-treat analysis. Statistically significant improvements in HAMD-17, CES-D, and WHOQOL-BREF scores and a higher remission rate were found in the EA, CBT, and EA+CBT intervention groups compared with the control group (all p<0.05). No significant differences were found between the three intervention groups. HAMD-17 factor score analysis revealed that EA reduced sleep disturbance scores more than CBT or EA+CBT (p<0.05), and CBT reduced retardation scores more than EA (p<0.01). EA+CBT reduced anxiety/somatisation scores more than EA or CBT (p<0.05) and retardation scores more than EA (p<0.05). Conclusions Early intervention may alleviate depressive symptoms in SSD. EA and CBT may have differential effects on certain symptoms. Combination therapy targeting both physical and psychological symptoms may represent an ideal strategy for SSD intervention. However, randomised trials with larger sample sizes are needed. Trial registration number ChiCTR-TRC-10000889; Results. PMID:27083200

  20. [Efficacy of complex therapy with metformin and ramipril combination for patients with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kaĭdashev, I P; Savchenko, L H; Kaĭdasheva, E I; Kutsenko, N L; Kutsenko, L O; Solokhina, I L; Mamontova, T V

    2010-01-01

    We have studied efficiency of a complex therapy with metformin and ramipril combination (1000 mg and 5 mg per day) respectively in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS). The group of patients with MS which answered the basic criteria IDF (2005) was determined. Carbohydrate and Lipidic metabolism were studied. Patients were characterized with raised weight index (WI), arterial hypertension, increased concentration of triglycerides in blood serum, of glucose, of HbAlc level and S-peptide, and also high level of endotelin (1-38) and CD32+CD40+circulating particles of endothelium. Three months treatment lead to decrease in WI, arterial pressure, triglycerides concentration, HbAlc, glucose, except CD32+CD40+. Six months treatment lead to more expressed positive dynamics. Thus, metformin and ramipril combination in patients with MS leads to decrease in insulin resistancy, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism normalization, to restoration of endothelium functions that is possible to consider as prophylaxis of the development of type 2 diabetes melitus and its cardiovascular complications.

  1. Effects of Hormone Therapy on Oxidative Stress in Postmenopausal Women with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Martha A.; Zacarías-Flores, Mariano; Castrejón-Delgado, Lizett; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Ana Karen; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oral hormone therapy (HT) on oxidative stress (OS) in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome (MetS). A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out. We formed four groups of 25 women each; healthy (HW) and MetS women (MSW) were assigned to HT (1 mg/day of estradiol valerate plus 5 mg/10 day of medroxiprogesterone) or placebo. We measured plasma lipoperoxides, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, total plasma antioxidant status and uric acid, as OS markers. Alternative cut-off values of each parameter were defined and a stress score (SS) ranging from 0 to 7 was used as total OS. MetS was defined according to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) criteria. Participants were seen at baseline, 3 and 6 months. After 6 months, MetS decreased in MSW-HT (48%), their triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) improved; in the other groups no difference was found. SS in MSW-HT decreased (3.8 ± 0.3 to 1.7 ± 0.3, p < 0.05) and OS was also reduced (44%), this effect was evident since 3 mo. HW-HT with high OS also decreased (40%). In placebo groups there was no change. Our findings suggest that HT improve lipids and OS associated to MetS in postmenopausal women. PMID:27563883

  2. Sinus Venosus Atrial Septal Defect Complicated by Eisenmenger Syndrome and the Role of Vasodilator Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anuwatworn, Amornpol; Bendaly, Edgard; Prescott-Focht, Julia A.; Clark, Richard; Jonsson, Orvar

    2016-01-01

    Sinus venosus atrial septal defect is a rare congenital, interatrial communication defect at the junction of the right atrium and the vena cava. It accounts for 5–10% of cases of all atrial septal defects. Due to the rare prevalence and anatomical complexity, diagnosing sinus venous atrial septal defects poses clinical challenges which may delay diagnosis and treatment. Advanced cardiac imaging studies are useful tools to diagnose this clinical entity and to delineate the anatomy and any associated communications. Surgical correction of the anomaly is the primary treatment. We discuss a 43-year-old Hispanic female patient who presented with dyspnea and hypoxia following a laparoscopic myomectomy. She had been diagnosed with peripartum cardiomyopathy nine years ago at another hospital. Transesophageal echocardiography and computed tomographic angiography of the chest confirmed a diagnosis of sinus venosus atrial septal defect. She was also found to have pulmonary arterial hypertension and Eisenmenger syndrome. During a hemodynamic study, she responded to vasodilator and she was treated with Ambrisentan and Tadalafil. After six months, her symptoms improved and her pulmonary arterial hypertension decreased. We also observed progressive reversal of the right-to-left shunt. This case illustrates the potential benefit of vasodilator therapy in reversing Eisenmenger physiology, which may lead to surgical repair of the atrial septal defect as the primary treatment. PMID:27974976

  3. Mutational hierarchies in myelodysplastic syndromes dynamically adapt and evolve upon therapy response and failure.

    PubMed

    Mossner, Maximilian; Jann, Johann-Christoph; Wittig, Janina; Nolte, Florian; Fey, Stephanie; Nowak, Verena; Obländer, Julia; Pressler, Jovita; Palme, Iris; Xanthopoulos, Christina; Boch, Tobias; Metzgeroth, Georgia; Röhl, Henning; Witt, Stephanie H; Dukal, Helene; Klein, Corinna; Schmitt, Steffen; Gelß, Patrick; Platzbecker, Uwe; Balaian, Ekaterina; Fabarius, Alice; Blum, Helmut; Schulze, Torsten J; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Trumpp, Andreas; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Medyouf, Hind; Nowak, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Clonal evolution is believed to be a main driver for progression of various types of cancer and implicated in facilitating resistance to drugs. However, the hierarchical organization of malignant clones in the hematopoiesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and its impact on response to drug therapy remain poorly understood. Using high-throughput sequencing of patient and xenografted cells, we evaluated the intratumoral heterogeneity (n= 54) and reconstructed mutational trajectories (n = 39) in patients suffering from MDS (n = 52) and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia-1 (n = 2). We identified linear and also branching evolution paths and confirmed on a patient-specific level that somatic mutations in epigenetic regulators and RNA splicing genes frequently constitute isolated disease-initiating events. Using high-throughput exome- and/or deep-sequencing, we analyzed 103 chronologically acquired samples from 22 patients covering a cumulative observation time of 75 years MDS disease progression. Our data revealed highly dynamic shaping of complex oligoclonal architectures, specifically upon treatment with lenalidomide and other drugs. Despite initial clinical response to treatment, patients' marrow persistently remained clonal with rapid outgrowth of founder-, sub-, or even fully independent clones, indicating an increased dynamic rate of clonal turnover. The emergence and disappearance of specific clones frequently correlated with changes of clinical parameters, highlighting their distinct and far-reaching functional properties. Intriguingly, increasingly complex mutational trajectories are frequently accompanied by clinical progression during the course of disease. These data substantiate a need for regular broad molecular monitoring to guide clinical treatment decisions in MDS.

  4. Electroconvulsive therapy for depression following acute coronary syndromes: a concern for the anesthesiologist.

    PubMed

    Pourafkari, Nosratollah; Pourafkari, Leili; Nader, Nader D

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of depression in patients with cardiovascular disease is higher than general population and especially following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a significant number of patients report a wide spectrum of behavioral and mood changes attributable to clinical depression. Treatment of depression following ACS event is particularly challenging since most of the therapeutic modalities are associated with increasing the systemic sympathetic tone from neurogenic or pharmacologic sources. Increased activity of the adrenergic and catecholamine activity may further deter the myocardial oxygen supply and demand therefore treating depression should be carefully evaluated for its risk benefit ratio. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is recommended for patients with severe depression, in whom behavioral and pharmacologic treatments have failed. Patients who refuse to take medications or present with any psychological emergency such as harming self or others, are also candidates for ECT. ECT is also associated with sudden surges of catecholamines and may cause recurrent myocardial ischemia and fatal dysrhythmias in patients convalescing from an ACS event. Herein, we provide an overview and practical guidelines for management of patients presented for ECT following ACS.

  5. Conservative treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome: comparison between laser therapy and Fascial Manipulation(®).

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Elisa; Pintucci, Marco; Cultrera, Pina; Baldini, Enrico; Stecco, Antonio; Petrocelli, Antonio; Pasquetti, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    The etiopathogenesis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is multifactorial and most cases are classified as idiopathic (Thurston 2013). A randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the effectiveness of Fascial Manipulation(®) (FM) and Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for CTS. This prospective trial included 42 patients (70 hands with symptoms) with clinical and electroneuromyographic diagnosis of CTS. The patients were randomly assigned to receive multiple sessions of FM or multiple session of LLLT. The Visual Analogic Scale (VAS) and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) were performed at baseline, end of treatment and after three months. The group that received FM showed a significant reduction in subjective pain perception and an increased function assessed by BCTQ at the end of the treatment and follow-up. The group that received LLLT showed an improvement in the BCTQ at the end of the treatment but the improvement level was not sustained at the three month follow-up. FM is a valid alternative treatment for CTS.

  6. Gene therapy for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome--long-term efficacy and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Braun, Christian Jörg; Boztug, Kaan; Paruzynski, Anna; Witzel, Maximilian; Schwarzer, Adrian; Rothe, Michael; Modlich, Ute; Beier, Rita; Göhring, Gudrun; Steinemann, Doris; Fronza, Raffaele; Ball, Claudia Regina; Haemmerle, Reinhard; Naundorf, Sonja; Kühlcke, Klaus; Rose, Martina; Fraser, Chris; Mathias, Liesl; Ferrari, Rudolf; Abboud, Miguel R; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kondratenko, Irina; Maródi, László; Glimm, Hanno; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Schambach, Axel; Albert, Michael Heinrich; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Klein, Christoph

    2014-03-12

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is characterized by microthrombocytopenia, immunodeficiency, autoimmunity, and susceptibility to malignancies. In our hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy (GT) trial using a γ-retroviral vector, 9 of 10 patients showed sustained engraftment and correction of WAS protein (WASP) expression in lymphoid and myeloid cells and platelets. GT resulted in partial or complete resolution of immunodeficiency, autoimmunity, and bleeding diathesis. Analysis of retroviral insertion sites revealed >140,000 unambiguous integration sites and a polyclonal pattern of hematopoiesis in all patients early after GT. Seven patients developed acute leukemia [one acute myeloid leukemia (AML), four T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), and two primary T-ALL with secondary AML associated with a dominant clone with vector integration at the LMO2 (six T-ALL), MDS1 (two AML), or MN1 (one AML) locus]. Cytogenetic analysis revealed additional genetic alterations such as chromosomal translocations. This study shows that hematopoietic stem cell GT for WAS is feasible and effective, but the use of γ-retroviral vectors is associated with a substantial risk of leukemogenesis.

  7. Coronary ectasia in a man on breast cancer therapy presenting with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Dana C.; Rifai, Luay; Patel, Parag V.

    2016-01-01

    Limited data exist on the association between breast cancer treatments and coronary artery disease anatomy, particularly in males. We describe an unusual case of diffuse coronary ectasia in a man with breast cancer presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). A 66-year-old man with breast cancer on paclitaxel, tamoxifen, and carboplatin chemotherapy regimen, presents with new onset chest pain. Electrocardiogram reveals anterolateral ST-segment depressions and elevated troponin I level. Emergent angiography revealed grossly ectatic coronary arteries with a total thrombotic occlusion of the mid right coronary artery. Serial intracoronary aspiration thrombectomy revealed fragments of red thrombus. Intracoronary tenectaplase was ultimately administered to restore perfusion. The patient clinically improved and warfarin was added to his cardiac regimen. Laboratory work up for connective tissue disease was negative. Although paclitaxel has been implicated in coronary artery neointima and media proliferation in the setting of drug-eluting stents, we believe our case is the first to describe massive coronary ectasia with significant thrombus burden requiring complex coronary intervention and thrombolysis in the setting of breast cancer therapy in a man. PMID:27843802

  8. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harinder; Leung, Anskar Y. H.; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2), the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2), transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2), tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT), RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11), DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL), and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21). A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS. PMID:27023522

  9. Comparison of efficacy of kinesiological taping and subacromial injection therapy in subacromial impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Subaşı, Volkan; Çakır, Tuncay; Arıca, Zuhal; Sarıer, Rahime Nur; Filiz, Meral Bilgilisoy; Doğan, Şebnem Koldaş; Toraman, Naciye Füsun

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of kinesiological taping and subacromial injection therapy in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). Seventy patients diagnosed with SIS were randomly assigned to group 1 (n = 35, injection group) or group 2 (n = 35, kinesiological taping group). Betamethasone plus prilocaine was injected to subacromial space in the patients in group 1. In group 2, tape was applied three times for a period of five consecutive days with a 2-day recovery interval. A 3-month exercise program was prescribed for both groups including stretching and strengthening exercises. All patients were assessed at baseline and at 1 and 3 months post-intervention. Assessments were made by visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, range of motion (ROM) measurements, specific tests, and Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI). Significant differences were detected in VAS and SPADI scores as well as ROM measurements in both groups when compared to baseline (p > 0.05). No significant differences were detected between the groups except for active flexion degree in favor of group 1 (p = 0.004). Both kinesiological taping and steroid injection in conjunction with an exercise program were found to be effective in the treatment of SIS. Kinesio taping may be an alternative treatment option in the rehabilitation of SIS especially when a non-invasive technique is needed.

  10. CYP2C19 polymorphisms in acute coronary syndrome patients undergoing clopidogrel therapy in Zhengzhou population.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y M; Zhao, Z C; Zhang, L; Li, H Z; Li, Z; Sun, H L

    2016-05-25

    The goal of this study was to explore the polymorphisms of CYP2C19 (CYP2C19*2, CYP2C19*3) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on clopidogrel therapy in Zhengzhou city for guidance on clinical medication and reduction in the incidence of thromboembolic events. Two hundred and thirty-four ACS patients undergoing PCI were included in the study, including 171 males (average age = 64.13 ± 12 years) and 63 females (average age = 67.86 ± 10.20 years). Pyrosequencing analysis detected CYP2C19*2/*3 genotypes, which were divided into wild-type homozygous C/C, mutant heterozygous C/T, and mutant homozygous T/T. This study further explored the relationship between CYP2C19 polymorphisms and clopidogrel resistance in ACS patients. Gene frequencies of C/C, C/T, and T/T for CYP2C19*2 were 39.74, 50, and 10.26%, respectively, while the frequencies of C/C, C/T, and T/T for CYP2C19*3 were 94.02, 5.55, and 0.43%, respectively. According to platelet aggregation analysis, 203 cases normally responded to clopidogrel (86.8%) and 31 cases were clopidogrel resistant (13.2%). There was a correlation between gender and genotype distribution but none between age and genotype. In addition, patients with clopidogrel resistance were treated with ticagrelor antiplatelet therapy instead of clopidogrel, and only 1 case in all patients suffered thrombotic events during a 3-12 month follow-up. In conclusion, CYP2C19*2/*3 polymorphisms may be associated with clopidogrel resistance. Wild-type homozygote and single mutant heterozygote of CYP2C19*2/*3 can be given a normal dose of clopidogrel, while carriers with single mutant homozygote or double mutant heterozygote require ticagrelor antiplatelet therapy as an alternative.

  11. [Piriformis muscle syndrome: etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2013-01-01

    The term 'piriformis syndrome' (PS), introduced by Robinson in 1947, implies a group of signs and symptoms caused by piriformis muscle (PM) disorders. Since PM disorders lead to irritation/compression of the anatomic structures passing under its belly, the main clinical PS signs and symptoms are actually the clinical signs and symptoms of irritation/ compression of neural and vascular structures passing through the infrapiriform foramen: sciatic nerve/SN, inferior gluteal nerve, posterior femoral cutaneous nerve, pudendal nerve, inferior gluteal artery and vein and inferior pudendal artery and vein. The clinical picture is usually dominated by signs and symptoms of irritation/compression of SN (SN irritation --> low back and buttock pain, sciatica,paresthesias in distribution of SN; SN compression --> low back and buttock pain,sciatica, paresthesias and neurologic deficit in distribution of SN). Irritation/compression of other structures can result in the following signs and symptoms: inferior gluteal nerve --> atrophy of gluteal muscles; posterior femoral cutaneous nerve --> pain, paresthesias and sensory disturbances in the posterior thigh; pudendal nerve --> pudendal neuralgia, painful sexual intercourse (dyspareunia), sexual dysfunction, urination and defecation problems; inferior gluteal artery --> ischemic buttock pain; inferior pudendal artery --> ischemic pain in the area of external sex organs, perineum and rectum, sexual dysfunction, urination and defecation problems; inferior gluteal vein --> venous stasis in gluteal area; inferior pudendal vein --> venous stasis in external sex organs and rectum. Functional/non-organic and organic PM disorders can cause PS: spasm, shortening, hypertrophy, anatomic variations, edema, fibrosis, adhesions, hematoma, atrophy, cyst, bursitis, abscess, myositis ossificans, endometriosis, tumors (functional disorders: PM spasm and shortening). The most common causes for PS are PM spasm, shortening and hypertrophy and anatomic

  12. Potential of Advexin: a p53 gene-replacement therapy in Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nemunaitis, Jackie M; Nemunaitis, John

    2008-12-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. The majority of families fulfilling definition of Li-Fraumeni syndrome demonstrate inherited abnormalities involving the p53 gene. Cells with dysfunctional p53 are predisposed to the development of cancer phenotype. Advexin (Introgen Therapeutics Inc., TX, USA) is an adenoviral-based experimental therapeutic that provides delivery of wild-type p53 to cancer cells and demonstrates anticancer activity following adequate expression of p53. Theoretically, correction of p53 function in cancer developing in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome through treatment with Advexin will provide anti-tumor activity. One patient with Li-Fraumeni syndrome has been reported to have responded to Advexin. This review will summarize background knowledge of Li-Fraumeni syndrome, mechanisms of Advexin and clinical response of cancer to Advexin with a focus on Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

  13. Effectiveness of PELOID therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized controlled single blind study.

    PubMed

    Metin Ökmen, Burcu; Kasapoğlu Aksoy, Meliha; Güneş, Aygül; Eröksüz, Riza; Altan, Lale

    2017-02-16

    Carpal tunnel syndrome(CTS) is the most common neuromuscular cause of upper extremity disability. We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of peloid therapy in patients with CTS. This randomized, controlled, single-blind study enrolled 70 patients between the ages of 30 to 65 who had a diagnosis of either mild, mild-to-moderate, or moderate CTS. The patients were randomized into two groups using random number table. In the first group, (Group 1)(n = 35), patients were given splint (every night for 6 weeks) + peloid treatment(five consecutive days a week for 2 weeks) and in the second group, (Group 2)(n = 28), patients received splint treatment(every night for 6 weeks) alone. The patients were assessed by using visual analog scale(VAS) for pain, electroneuromyography(ENMG), the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire(BCTSQ), hand grip strength(HGS), finger grip strength(FGS), and Short Form-12(SF-12). The data were obtained before treatment(W0), immediately after treatment(W2), and one month after treatment(W6). Both in Group 1 and 2, there was a statistically significant improvement in all the evaluation parameters at W2 and W6 when compared to W0(p < 0.05). Comparison of the groups with each other revealed significantly better results for VAS, BCTSQ, mSNCV, SF-12 in Group 1 than in Group 2 at W2(p < 0.05). There was also a statistically significant difference in favor of Group 1 for VAS, BCTSQ, FGS and MCS at W6 when compared to W0 (p < 0.05). The results of our study demonstrated that in patients with CTS; peloid + splint treatment was more effective than splint treatment alone in pain, functionality and life quality both at after treatment(W2) and one month after treatment (W6). We may suggest peloid as a supplementary therapeutic agent in CTS.

  14. Long-term therapy with cytochrome c, flavin mononucleotide and thiamine diphosphate for a patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, E; Osari, S; Yamanouchi, H; Matsuda, H; Goto, Y; Nonaka, I

    1996-01-01

    Cardiocrome, containing cytochrome c, flavin mononucleotide and thiamine diphosphate, was administered intravenously for 22 months to a patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome. This combined therapy alleviated the patient's easy fatigability, motor disability, corneal edema and chilblains, but was not effective for his ophthalmoplegia, blepharoptosis or hearing loss. Truncal ataxia, dysphagia and an atrioventricular block appeared even with this therapy. Although the abnormal distribution of cerebral blood flow demonstrated by single photon emission computed tomography was improved, serial cranial magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiological examination revealed progressive changes. In conclusion, this therapy was favorably effective for impaired skeletal muscle function and corneal edema, but not for ocular movements, central nervous system symptoms or cardiac conduction abnormalities, because irreversible degeneration had probably occurred in these organs.

  15. Multimodal physical therapy management of a 48-year-old female with post-stroke complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Anandkumar, Sudarshan; Manivasagam, Murugavel

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a 48-year-old female who presented with complaints of right shoulder pain, hyperesthesias and swelling of the hand along with added symptoms of pain centralization following a cerebrovascular accident. On clinical evaluation, the patient satisfied the Budapest diagnostic criteria for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type-1. Physical therapy management (1st three sessions) was initially focused on pain neurophysiology education with an aim to reduce kinesiophobia and reconceptualise her pain perception. The patient had an immediate significant improvement in her pain and functional status. Following this, pain modulation in the form of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, kinesio tape application, "pain exposure" physical therapy and exercise therapy was carried out for a period of 7 weeks. The patient had complete resolution of her symptoms which was maintained at a six-month follow-up.

  16. A case of chronic hepatitis C developing insulin-dependent diabetes, thyroid autoimmunity and stiff-person syndrome as complications of interferon therapy.

    PubMed

    Scavone, G; Zaccardi, F; Manto, A; Caputo, S; Pitocco, D; Ghirlanda, G

    2010-08-01

    We describe the case of a 66-year-old man with chronic hepatitis C who developed type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and thyroid autoimmunity during Interferon alpha (INFalpha) therapy and then stiff-person syndrome (SPS). This is the first reported case in which SPS has appeared as complication of IFNalpha therapy.

  17. LEGO[R] Therapy and the Social Use of Language Programme: An Evaluation of Two Social Skills Interventions for Children with High Functioning Autism and Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Gina; Granader, Yael; Humphrey, Ayla; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2008-01-01

    LEGO[R] therapy and the Social Use of Language Programme (SULP) were evaluated as social skills interventions for 6-11 year olds with high functioning autism and Asperger Syndrome. Children were matched on CA, IQ, and autistic symptoms before being randomly assigned to LEGO or SULP. Therapy occurred for 1 h/week over 18 weeks. A no-intervention…

  18. [Equine Cushing syndrome (ECS). Case report, review of its diagnosis and therapy and substantial differences from Cushing syndrome in dogs].

    PubMed

    Fey, K; Jonigkeit, E; Moritz, A

    1998-02-01

    Equine and canine Cushing's syndrome, both of which are the result of elevated cortisol levels, show some different pathogenetical and clinical features and require different therapeutical approaches. In older horses the equine Cushing's syndrome (ECS) is not uncommon. Nearly all cases result from excessive hormone production in cells of the pars intermedia of the pituitary. Besides elevated levels of adrenocorticotrope hormone (ACTH), high peripheral levels of pro-opiomelanocortin, beta-endorphines and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone can be measured. In middle-aged and geriatric dogs, Cushing's syndrome is the most frequently diagnosed endocrinologic abnormality. 80-85% of cases are pituitary-dependent and 15-20% are caused by cortisol producing tumors of the adrenals. 90% of pituitary lesions can be identified as adenomas, which are localised in most cases in the pars distalis of the gland, but may occur rarely in the pars intermedia, too. Clinical symptoms in both species are characterised by wasting despite good appetite or polyphagia, reduction of muscle mass with altered fat deposition and lethargy. Whereas polydipsia/polyuria is a very common feature in dogs with Cushing's syndrome, in horses it is almost invariably a sign of concurrent secondary diabetes mellitus. A typical symptom in ECS is a continuously growing haircoat (hirsutism), whereas in canine Cushing's syndrome generalised alopecia may bring the owner to consult a veterinarian. The symptoms and diagnostic procedures in a 33-year-old mare are described. Useful diagnostic tests are reviewed with special attention to species differences in reacting to them. The therapeutic approach with dopamine-agonists such as bromocriptine and pergolide as well as cyproheptadine to ECS is reviewed.

  19. Unilateral adrenalectomy can be an alternative therapy for infantile onset Cushing' s syndrome caused by ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hamajima, Takashi; Maruwaka, Kaori; Homma, Keiko; Matsuo, Kumihiro; Fujieda, Kenji; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2010-01-01

    We report herein the case of a 1-year-old boy with McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) who presented with infantile-onset Cushing' s syndrome caused by ACTH independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH). Abdominal CT, MRI, and adrenal scintigraphy with (131)I-adosterol identified bilateral adrenal involvement with the left adrenal gland being larger and functionally more active. Unilateral adrenalectomy of the left gland was performed and ameliorated many clinical symptoms, such as Cushingoid appearance and height restriction, and it also normalized many endocrinological data, such as diurnal rhythms of ACTH and cortisol, ACTH and cortisol responses to CRH, and urinary 24 hr free cortisol. Glucocorticoid was replaced for the first 1 year and 6 months after the operation. One adrenal crisis episode occurred at 3 weeks after the operation, but none have occurred since. These results suggest that unilateral adrenalectomy of the larger gland can be an alternative therapy for infantile onset Cushing' s syndrome caused by AIMAH with MAS, when asymmetric involvement is evident and the smaller gland is not markedly enlarged.

  20. Somatic mutations predict outcomes of hypomethylating therapy in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Seon-Hee; Kim, Hye-Jung; Kwon, Yong-Rim; Hur, Eun-Hye; Goo, Bon-Kwan; Choi, Yun-Suk; Lee, Sug Hyung; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Je-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Although hypomethylating therapy (HMT) is the first line therapy in higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), predicting response to HMT remains an unresolved issue. We aimed to identify mutations associated with response to HMT and survival in MDS. A total of 107 Korean patients with MDS who underwent HMT (57 responders and 50 non-responders) were enrolled. Targeted deep sequencing (median depth of coverage 1,623X) was performed for 26 candidate MDS genes. In multivariate analysis, no mutation was significantly associated with response to HMT, but a lower hemoglobin level (<10g/dL, OR 3.56, 95% CI 1.22-10.33) and low platelet count (<50,000/μL, OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.05-5.93) were independent markers of poor response to HMT. In the subgroup analysis by type of HMT agents, U2AF1 mutation was significantly associated with non-response to azacitidine, which was consistent in multivariate analysis (OR 14.96, 95% CI 1.67-134.18). Regarding overall survival, mutations in DNMT1 (P=0.031), DNMT3A (P=0.006), RAS (P=0.043), and TP53 (P=0.008), and two clinical variables (male-gender, P=0.002; IPSS-R H/VH, P=0.026) were independent predicting factors of poor prognosis. For AML-free survival, mutations in DNMT3A (P<0.001), RAS (P=0.001), and TP53 (P=0.047), and two clinical variables (male-gender, P=0.024; IPSS-R H/VH, P=0.005) were independent predicting factors of poor prognosis. By combining these mutations and clinical predictors, we developed a quantitative scoring model for response to azacitidine, overall- and AML-free survival. Response to azacitidine and survival rates became worse significantly with increasing risk-scores. This scoring model can make prognosis prediction more reliable and clinically applicable. PMID:27419369

  1. Upper extremity acute compartment syndrome during tissue plasminogen activator therapy for pulmonary embolism in a morbidly obese patient

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Serkan; Duymus, Tahir Mutlu; Mutlu, Serhat; Ketenci, Ismail Emre; Ulusoy, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are more frequently observed in morbidly obese patients. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a thrombolytic agent which dissolves the thrombus more rapidly than conventional heparin therapy and reduces the mortality and morbidity rates associated with PE. Compartment syndrome is a well-known and documented complication of thrombolytic treatment. In awake, oriented and cooperative patients, the diagnosis of compartment syndrome is made based on clinical findings including swelling, tautness, irrational and continuous pain, altered sensation, and severe pain due to passive stretching. These clinical findings may not be able to be adequately assessed in unconscious patients. Presentation of case In this case report, we present compartment syndrome observed, for which fasciotomy was performed on the upper right extremity of a 46-year old morbidly obese, conscious female patient who was receiving tPA due to a massive pulmonary embolism. Discussion Compartment syndrome had occurred due to the damage caused by the repeated unsuccessful catheterisation attempts to the brachial artery and the accompanying tPA treatment. Thus, the bleeding that occurred in the volar compartment of the forearm and the anterior compartment of the arm led to acute compartment syndrome (ACS). After relaxation was brought about in the volar compartment of the forearm and the anterior compartment of the arm, the circulation in the limb was restored. Conclusion As soon as the diagnosis of compartment syndrome is made, an emergency fasciotomy should be performed. Close follow-up is required to avoid wound healing problems after the fasciotomy. PMID:25618841

  2. Targeted therapy of short-bowel syndrome with teduglutide: the new kid on the block.

    PubMed

    Vipperla, Kishore; O'Keefe, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Extensive intestinal resection impairs the absorptive capacity and results in short-bowel syndrome-associated intestinal failure (SBS-IF), when fluid, electrolyte, acid-base, micro-, and macronutrient homeostasis cannot be maintained on a conventional oral diet. Several factors, including the length and site of the resected intestine, anatomical conformation of the remnant bowel, and the degree of postresection intestinal adaptation determine the disease severity. While mild SBS patients achieve nutritional autonomy with dietary modification (eg, hyperphagia, small frequent meals, and oral rehydration fluids), those with moderate-to-severe disease may develop SBS-IF and become dependent on parenteral support (PS) in the form of intravenous fluids and/or nutrition for sustenance of life. SBS-IF is a chronic debilitating disease associated with a poor quality of life, and carries significant morbidity and health care costs. Medical management of SBS-IF is primarily focused on individually tailored symptomatic treatment strategies, such as antisecretory and antidiarrheal agents to mitigate fluid losses, and PS. However, PS administration is associated with potentially life-threatening complications, such as central venous thromboses, bloodstream infections, and liver disease. In pursuit of a targeted therapy to augment intestinal adaptation, research over the past 2 decades has identified glucagon-like peptide, an intestinotrophic gut peptide that has been shown to enhance intestinal absorptive capacity by causing an increase in the villus length, crypt depth, and mesenteric blood flow and by decreasing gastrointestinal motility and secretions. Teduglutide, a recombinant analog of glucagon-like peptide-2, is the first targeted therapeutic agent to gain approval for use in adult SBS-IF. Teduglutide was shown to result in significant (20%-100%) reduction in PS-volume requirement and have a satisfactory safety profile in three randomized control trials. Further research

  3. Zinc supplementation as an adjunct to standard therapy in childhood nephrotic syndrome - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Girish Chandra; Jain, Shikha; Das, Rashmi Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the role of zinc as add on treatment to the “recommended treatment” of nephrotic syndrome (NS) in children. METHODS All the published literature through the major databases including Medline/Pubmed, Embase, and Google Scholar were searched till 31st December 2015. Reference lists from the articles were reviewed to identify additional pertinent articles. Retrieved papers concerning the role of zinc in childhood NS were reviewed by the authors, and the data were extracted using a standardized data collection tool. Randomized trials (RCTs) comparing zinc vs placebo was included. Effect of zinc was studied in both steroid sensitive and steroid dependent/frequent relapsing NS. The primary outcome measure was the risk of relapse in 12 mo. The secondary outcome measures were mean relapse rate per patient in 12 mo, mean relapse rate per patient in 6 mo, risk of infection associated relapse in 12 mo, cumulative dose of steroids in two groups, mean length of time to next relapse, adverse effects of therapy, and change in serum zinc levels. RESULTS Of 54 citations retrieved, a total of 6 RCTs were included. Zinc was used at a dose of 10-20 mg/d, for the duration that varied from 6-12 mo. Compared to placebo, zinc reduced the frequency of relapses, induced sustained remission/no relapse, reduced the proportion of infection episodes associated with relapse with a mild adverse event in the form of metallic taste. The GRADE evidence generated was of “very low-quality”. CONCLUSION Zinc may be a useful additive in the treatment of childhood NS. The evidence generated mostly was of “very low-quality”. We need more good quality RCTs in different country setting as well different subgroups of children before any firm recommendation can be made. PMID:27872827

  4. Persistence of the benefit of an antioxidant therapy in children and teenagers with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parisotto, Eduardo Benedetti; Giaretta, Andréia Gonçalves; Zamoner, Ariane; Moreira, Emilia Addison Machado; Fröde, Tânia Silvia; Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi; Filho, Danilo Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of an antioxidant intervention in biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) in the blood of Down syndrome (DS) children and teenagers during four different stages. A control group was composed by healthy children (n=18), assessed once, and a Down group composed by DS patients (n=21) assessed at the basal period (t0), as well as after 6 months of antioxidant supplementation (t1), after 12 months (after interruption of the antioxidant intervention for 6 months) (t2), and again after further 6 months of antioxidant supplementation (t3). Biomarkers of inflammation (myeloperoxidase activity - MPO and levels of IL-1β and TNF-α) and OS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances - TBARS, protein carbonyls - PC), reduced glutathione (GSH), uric acid (UA) and vitamin E levels, as well as antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activities, were measured after each period. After the antioxidant supplementation, the activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, GGT and MPO were downregulated, while TBARS contents were strongly decreased, the contents of GSH and vitamin E were significantly increased, and no changes in G6PD and GST activity as well as in UA and PC levels were detected. After the interruption of the antioxidant therapy for 6 months, DS patients showed elevated GPx and GGT activities and also elevated UA and TBARS levels. No changes in SOD, CAT, GR, GST, G6PD and MPO activities as well as in GSH, vitamin E, PC, TNF-α and IL-1β levels were detected. The results showed that the antioxidant intervention persistently attenuated the systemic oxidative damage in DS patients even after a relatively long period of cessation of the antioxidant intervention.

  5. Low Level Laser Therapy Versus Pharmacotherapy in Improving Myofascial Pain Disorder Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khalighi, Hamid Reza; Mortazavi, Hamed; Mojahedi, Seyed Masoud; Azari-Marhabi, Saranaz; Moradi Abbasabadi, Faranak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) lead to masticatory muscle pain, jaw movement disability and limitation in mouth opening. Pain is the chief complaint in 90% of the TMD patients which leads to disability and severe socioeconomic costs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effects of low level laser therapy (LLLT) compared to pharmacotherapy with NSAIDs (naproxen) in myofascial pain disorder syndrome (MPDS). Methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 40 MPDS patients were divided into two groups. One group received naproxen 500 mg bid for 3 weeks as treatment modality and also had placebo laser sessions. The other group received active laser (diode 810 nm CW) as treatment and placebo drug. Pain intensity was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) and maximum painless mouth opening was also measured as a functional index every session and at 2 months follow up. Data was collected and analyzed with SPSS software. Independent t test was used to analyze the data. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Low level laser caused significant reduction in pain intensity (P < 0.05) and a significant increase in mouth opening. In naproxen group neither pain intensity nor maximum mouth opening had significant improvement. Pain relief, in subjective VAS was observed in third session in LLLT group, but did not occur in naproxen group. Maximum mouth opening increased significantly in laser group compared to the naproxen group from the eighth session. Conclusion: Treatment with LLLT caused a significant improvement in mouth opening and pain intensity in patients with MPDS. Similar improvement was not observed in naproxen group. PMID:27330698

  6. Low-level laser therapy and myofacial pain dysfunction syndrome: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Shirani, Amir Mansour; Gutknecht, Norbert; Taghizadeh, Mahshid; Mir, Maziar

    2009-09-01

    Myofacial pain dysfunction syndrome (MPDS) is the most common reason for pain and limited function of the masticatory system. The effects of low-level lasers (LLLs) for controlling the discomfort of patients are investigated frequently. However, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a particular source producing 660 nm and 890 nm wavelengths that was recommended to reduce of the pain in the masticatory muscles. This was a double-blind and placebo-controlled trial. Sixteen MPDS patients were randomly divided into two groups. For the laser group, two diode laser probes (660 nm (nanometers), 6.2 J/cm(2), 6 min, continuous wave, and 890 nm, 1 J/cm(2) (joules per square centimetre), 10 min, 1,500 Hz (Hertz)) were used on the painful muscles. For the control group, the treatment was similar, but the patients were not irradiated. Treatment was given twice a week for 3 weeks. The amount of patient pain was recorded at four time periods (before and immediately after treatment, 1 week after, and on the day of complete pain relief). A visual analog scale (VAS) was selected as the method of pain measurement. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), the t-test and the paired t-test were used to analyze the data. In each group the reduction of pain before and after the treatment was meaningful, but, between the two groups, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) was more effective (P = 0.031) According to this study, this type of LLLT was the effective treatment for pain reduction in MPDS patients.

  7. Effectiveness of ultrasound therapy for myofascial pain syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Peng; Wang, Xiaoju; Lin, Qiang; Cheng, Kai; Li, Xueping

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this review was to assess the therapeutic effect of ultrasound (US) on myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). Date sources PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library were searched to find relevant studies from January 1966 to May 2016 using keywords. Four investigators performed the data extraction. Study selection Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the outcomes of pain and physical function between MPS patients receiving and not receiving US were selected by two researchers independently. Data extraction Data were extracted from the RCTs. Risk of bias and study quality were evaluated following the recommendations of Cochrane Collaboration. Standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Data synthesis A total of 10 studies involving 428 MPS patients were included. US therapy significantly reduced pain intensity (SMD [CI]=−1.41 [−2.15, −0.67], P=0.0002) and increased pain threshold (SMD [CI]=1.08 [0.55, 1.60], P<0.0001), but had no significant effect on cervical range of motion (ROM) of lateral flexion (SMD [CI]=0.40 [−0.19, 0.99], P=0.19), rotation (SMD [CI]=0.10 [−0.33, 0.52], P=0.66), or extension or flexion (SMD [CI]=0.16 [−0.35, 0.68], P=0.53). Heterogeneity between studies was mainly attributed to differences in the follow-up time, parameter of US, course of treatment, and the control group. The overall risk of bias from the included studies was high, and the evidence proving these effect calculations were assessed as low quality. Conclusion Owing to the high risk of bias and the across-trial heterogeneity of the studies, the current evidence is not clear enough to support US as an effective method to treat MPS. Clinical trials with methodological rigorousness and adequate power are needed to confirm it in the future. PMID:28331357

  8. MeCP2 and Rett syndrome: reversibility and potential avenues for therapy.

    PubMed

    Gadalla, Kamal K E; Bailey, Mark E S; Cobb, Stuart R

    2011-10-01

    Mutations in the X-linked gene MECP2 (methyl CpG-binding protein 2) are the primary cause of the neurodevelopmental disorder RTT (Rett syndrome), and are also implicated in other neurological conditions. The expression product of this gene, MeCP2, is a widely expressed nuclear protein, especially abundant in mature neurons of the CNS (central nervous system). The major recognized consequences of MECP2 mutation occur in the CNS, but there is growing awareness of peripheral effects contributing to the full RTT phenotype. MeCP2 is classically considered to act as a DNA methylation-dependent transcriptional repressor, but may have additional roles in regulating gene expression and chromatin structure. Knocking out Mecp2 function in mice recapitulates many of the overt neurological features seen in RTT patients, and the characteristic postnatally delayed onset of symptoms is accompanied by aberrant neuronal morphology and deficits in synaptic physiology. Evidence that reactivation of endogenous Mecp2 in mutant mice, even at adult stages, can reverse aspects of RTT-like pathology and result in apparently functionally mature neurons has provided renewed hope for patients, but has also provoked discussion about traditional boundaries between neurodevelopmental disorders and those involving dysfunction at later stages. In the present paper we review the neurobiology of MeCP2 and consider the various genetic (including gene therapy), pharmacological and environmental interventions that have been, and could be, developed to attempt phenotypic rescue in RTT. Such approaches are already providing valuable insights into the potential tractability of RTT and related conditions, and are useful pointers for the development of future therapeutic strategies.

  9. Efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy as an adjuvant in periodontal treatment in Down syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Martins, Fabiana; Simões, Alyne; Oliveira, Marcio; Luiz, Ana Claudia; Gallottini, Marina; Pannuti, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) has characteristics that include mental retardation, a characteristic phenotype, congenital heart defects, immune disorders, and increased risk of periodontal disease (PD). Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is the combined use of photosensitizers associated with low-level laser (LLL) and oxygen, leading to singlet oxygen formation, which contributes to the antibacterial activity of the phagocytes, killing bacteria. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of aPDT as an adjuvant to conventional periodontal treatment of PD in DS patients. A double-blinded, controlled, randomized, split-mouth study was conducted. A total of 13 DS subjects who were 18 years or older and who presented at least one tooth in each quadrant of the mouth with probing pocket depth (PPD) equal to or greater than 5 mm were included. The patients were evaluated at three different times: at the baseline, PPD were obtained. After 1 week, conventional scaling and root planing (SRP) was performed, and two randomly selected quadrants also received aPDT. One month after SRP, all the patients were reevaluated. Periodontal conditions were improved among all the participants. The PDT-with-SRP group presented a nonsignificant reduction in PPD (mean = 1.27 mm, median = 1.17 mm) relative to that of the SRP group (mean = 1.00 mm, median = 0.95 mm). Changes over time were compared using the Wilcoxon test. A significant reduction in median PPD was observed in both groups (p = 0.001). Both types of periodontal treatment, with and without PDT, were similarly effective and were associated with good clinical response.

  10. Targeted therapy of short-bowel syndrome with teduglutide: the new kid on the block

    PubMed Central

    Vipperla, Kishore; O’Keefe, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Extensive intestinal resection impairs the absorptive capacity and results in short-bowel syndrome-associated intestinal failure (SBS-IF), when fluid, electrolyte, acid-base, micro-, and macronutrient homeostasis cannot be maintained on a conventional oral diet. Several factors, including the length and site of the resected intestine, anatomical conformation of the remnant bowel, and the degree of postresection intestinal adaptation determine the disease severity. While mild SBS patients achieve nutritional autonomy with dietary modification (eg, hyperphagia, small frequent meals, and oral rehydration fluids), those with moderate-to-severe disease may develop SBS-IF and become dependent on parenteral support (PS) in the form of intravenous fluids and/or nutrition for sustenance of life. SBS-IF is a chronic debilitating disease associated with a poor quality of life, and carries significant morbidity and health care costs. Medical management of SBS-IF is primarily focused on individually tailored symptomatic treatment strategies, such as antisecretory and antidiarrheal agents to mitigate fluid losses, and PS. However, PS administration is associated with potentially life-threatening complications, such as central venous thromboses, bloodstream infections, and liver disease. In pursuit of a targeted therapy to augment intestinal adaptation, research over the past 2 decades has identified glucagon-like peptide, an intestinotrophic gut peptide that has been shown to enhance intestinal absorptive capacity by causing an increase in the villus length, crypt depth, and mesenteric blood flow and by decreasing gastrointestinal motility and secretions. Teduglutide, a recombinant analog of glucagon-like peptide-2, is the first targeted therapeutic agent to gain approval for use in adult SBS-IF. Teduglutide was shown to result in significant (20%–100%) reduction in PS-volume requirement and have a satisfactory safety profile in three randomized control trials. Further

  11. Early statin therapy in acute coronary syndromes: the successful cycle of evidence, guidelines, and implementation.

    PubMed

    Waters, David D; Ku, Ivy

    2009-10-06

    That statins should be prescribed for patients before hospital discharge after an episode of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a Level of Evidence: 1A recommendation of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Joint Task Force. This level of recommendation is based upon 2 clinical trials: the MIRACL (Myocardial Ischemia Reduction with Aggressive Cholesterol Lowering) and PROVE-IT (Pravastatin or Atorvastatin Evaluation and Infection Therapy) trials. In the MIRACL trial, 3,086 patients with unstable angina or non-Q-wave myocardial infarction were randomized within 4 days of the event to atorvastatin 80 mg/day or to placebo and followed for 16 weeks. The primary composite end point occurred in 14.8% of atorvastatin patients and 17.4% of placebo patients, a 16% relative risk reduction (p = 0.048). In the PROVE-IT trial, 4,162 patients hospitalized with an ACS within the preceding 10 days were randomized to atorvastatin 80 mg/day or pravastatin 40 mg/day and were followed for a mean of 24 months. The primary event rate was 22.4% in the atorvastatin group and 26.3% in the pravastatin group, a 16% relative risk reduction (p = 0.005). A strong trend toward a reduction in total mortality was seen in the atorvastatin group (2.2% vs. 3.2%, p = 0.07). Using a composite end point of death, myocardial infarction, and rehospitalization for ACS, the difference between the treatment groups is already statistically significant at 30 days and remains so throughout the follow-up period. Comprehensive treatment programs in ACS patients that include initiation of statins before hospital discharge have been shown to improve outcomes such as recurrent myocardial infarction and total mortality at 1 year. Guidelines prove their utility when their implementation improves outcomes across a broad population at risk, such as in this instance.

  12. Effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the treatment of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Kiyani, Abolghasem; Dehghan, Farnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common neuropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a new and noninvasive treatment including extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in the treatment of CTS. Materials and Methods: This study is a clinical trial conducted on 60 patients with moderate CTS in selected health centers of Isfahan Medical University from November 2014 to April 2015. Patients with CTS were randomly divided into two groups. Conservative treatment including wrist splint at night for 3 months, consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for 2 weeks, and oral consumption of Vitamin B1 for a month was recommended for both groups. The first group was treated with ESWT, one session per week for 4 weeks. Focus probe with 0.05, 0.07, 0.1, and 0.15 energy and shock numbers 800, 900, 1000, and 1100 were used from the first session to the fourth, respectively. The evaluated parameters were assessed before treatment and after 3 and 6 months. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 19, Student’s t-test, and Chi-square test. Results: All parameters were significantly decreased in the ESWT group after 3 months. These results remained almost constant after 6 months compared with 3 months after treatment. However, only two parameters considerably improved after 3 months of treatment in the control group. The entire indexes in the control group implicated the regression of results in long-term period. Conclusion: It is recommended to use ESWT as a conservative treatment in patients with CTS. PMID:27563630

  13. Safe, efficient, and reproducible gene therapy of the brain in the dog models of Sanfilippo and Hurler syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ellinwood, N Matthew; Ausseil, Jérôme; Desmaris, Nathalie; Bigou, Stéphanie; Liu, Song; Jens, Jackie K; Snella, Elizabeth M; Mohammed, Eman E A; Thomson, Christopher B; Raoul, Sylvie; Joussemet, Béatrice; Roux, Françoise; Chérel, Yan; Lajat, Yaouen; Piraud, Monique; Benchaouir, Rachid; Hermening, Stephan; Petry, Harald; Froissart, Roseline; Tardieu, Marc; Ciron, Carine; Moullier, Philippe; Parkes, Jennifer; Kline, Karen L; Maire, Irène; Vanier, Marie-Thérèse; Heard, Jean-Michel; Colle, Marie-Anne

    2011-02-01

    Recent trials in patients with neurodegenerative diseases documented the safety of gene therapy based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors deposited into the brain. Inborn errors of the metabolism are the most frequent causes of neurodegeneration in pre-adulthood. In Sanfilippo syndrome, a lysosomal storage disease in which heparan sulfate oligosaccharides accumulate, the onset of clinical manifestation is before 5 years. Studies in the mouse model showed that gene therapy providing the missing enzyme α-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase to brain cells prevents neurodegeneration and improves behavior. We now document safety and efficacy in affected dogs. Animals received eight deposits of a serotype 5 AAV vector, including vector prepared in insect Sf9 cells. As shown previously in dogs with the closely related Hurler syndrome, immunosuppression was necessary to prevent neuroinflammation and elimination of transduced cells. In immunosuppressed dogs, vector was efficiently delivered throughout the brain, induced α-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase production, cleared stored compounds and storage lesions. The suitability of the procedure for clinical application was further assessed in Hurler dogs, providing information on reproducibility, tolerance, appropriate vector type and dosage, and optimal age for treatment in a total number of 25 treated dogs. Results strongly support projects of human trials aimed at assessing this treatment in Sanfilippo syndrome.

  14. Translating molecular advances in fragile X syndrome into therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, Randi J; Des-Portes, Vincent; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Jacquemont, Sébastien; Gomez-Mancilla, Baltazar

    2014-04-01

    Fragile X syndrome is an inherited disease with cognitive, behavioral, and neurologic manifestations, resulting from a single genetic mutation. A variety of treatments that target individual symptoms of fragile X syndrome are currently utilized with limited efficacy. Research in animal models has resulted in the development of potential novel pharmacologic treatments that target the underlying molecular defect in fragile X syndrome, rather than the resultant symptoms. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of fragile X syndrome and summarizes the ongoing clinical research programs.

  15. Physiological responses to psychological challenge under hypnosis in patients considered to have the hyperventilation syndrome: implications for diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, L J; Conway, A; Nixon, P G

    1986-01-01

    Thirty patients who were considered to have the hyperventilation syndrome on clinical grounds (history and observation) were referred for testing: 29 patients completed a forced hyperventilation provocation test, and 28 underwent hypnosis during which time a psychological challenge was introduced which was meaningful to each individual patient. In 19/27 of these patients the PetCO2 fell by an average of 18.2 mmHg and persisted spontaneously for more than three minutes. In 10 normal controls studied in a similar fashion there was an average fall of 5 mmHg. The difference in response between responders and controls/non-responders was highly significant (P less than 0.001). A review of the literature is presented for comparison. It is considered that a psychological challenge under hypnosis may have important implications for diagnosis and therapy in some patients considered to have the hyperventilation syndrome. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:3081708

  16. Treatment results of high dose cabergoline as an adjuvant therapy in six patients with established severe ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saharkhiz, Nasrin; Akbari Sene, Azadeh; Salehpour, Saghar; Tamimi, Maryam; Vasheghani Farahani, Masoumeh; Sheibani, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The beneficial role of cabergoline as a prophylactic agent to prevent ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome (OHSS) among high-risk patients has been demonstrated in previous studies. But data for its role as a treatment for established severe OHSS is still limited. We represent the treatment results of high dose oral cabergoline in management of six patients after the syndrome is established. Case: High-dose oral cabergoline (1 mg daily for eight days) was prescribed as an adjuvant to symptomatic treatment for six hospitalized patients with established severe OHSS following infertility treatment cycles. In two cases OHSS resolved rapidly despite the occurrence of ongoing pregnancy. Conclusion: Considering the treatment outcomes of our patients, high dose cabergoline did not eliminate the need for traditional treatments, but it was a relatively effective and safe therapy in management of established severe OHSS, and prevented the increase in its severity following the occurrence of pregnancy. PMID:25469130

  17. A case of West syndrome with atypical massive gray matter heterotopia that is well controlled by ACTH therapy.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, M; Shima, M; Nakai, H; Nishino, M; Fukuzumi, A; Yoshioka, A

    1996-06-01

    A 4 month old female infant with atypical asymmetrical massive gray matter heterotopia diagnosed as West syndrome is described. Her seizure initially appeared as afebrile general tonic and clonic convulsion and progressed to typical West syndrome consisting of clusters of myoclonic spasms of the extremities, mainly on the left side, accompanied by head and eye deviation to the right side. Electroencephalogram (EEG) presented typical hypsarrhythmia and cranial computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed massive heterotopic gray matter in the right hemisphere with the same density or intensity as cortical gray matter. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), using N-isopropyl-p-123I-iodoamphetamine (123 I-IMP), demonstrated decreased blood flow in the ectopic lesion. Although clinical response to several anti-epileptic drugs was poor, her seizures were well controlled by relatively low dose adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy of 0.015 mg/kg per day followed by a combination of valproic acid and clonazepam.

  18. Psychological Therapies in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Altayar, Osama; Prokop, Larry J.; Sood, Amit; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood disease with few effective treatments. Psychosocial factors are believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of IBS. Objective. To evaluate the evidence for psychological therapies in IBS treatment. Methods. We searched six medical databases through February 6, 2014, for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of psychological therapies for the treatment of IBS. Two independent reviewers identified the RCTs, extracted the data, and assessed trial quality. We used the random-effect model to pool standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) across trials. Results. 15 RCTs that mostly evaluated cognitive behavioral therapy were included. Psychological therapies were associated with improvement in IBS symptoms severity scales (SMD −0.618; 95% CI: −0.853 to −0.383), IBS-Quality of Life (SMD 0.604; 95% CI: 0.440 to 0.768), and abdominal pain (SMD −0.282; 95% CI: −0.562 to −0.001). No statistically significant effect was observed on diarrhea or constipation. Limitations. The trials were at increased risk of bias and the overall sample size was small leading to imprecision. Conclusion. Psychological therapies may improve the quality of life and symptom severity in IBS. The effect size noted is moderate to large and is clinically meaningful. PMID:25802514

  19. The additional effect of orthotic devices on exercise therapy for patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Swart, Nynke M; van Linschoten, Robbart; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study is to determine "the additional effect of... function" for patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). The additional effect of orthotic devices over exercise therapy on pain and function. A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane and PEDro. Randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials of patients diagnosed with PFPS evaluating a clinically relevant outcome were included. Treatment had to include exercise therapy combined with orthotics, compared with an identical exercise programme with or without sham orthotics. Data were summarised using a best evidence synthesis. Eight trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria, of which three had a low risk of bias. There is moderate evidence for no additive effectiveness of knee braces to exercise therapy on pain (effect sizes (ES) varied from -0.14 to 0.04) and conflicting evidence on function (ES -0.33). There is moderate evidence for no difference between knee braces and exercise therapy versus placebo knee braces and exercise therapy on pain and function (ES -0.1-0.10). More studies of high methodological quality are needed to draw definitive conclusions.

  20. Current diagnosis and therapy of complex regional pain syndrome: refining diagnostic criteria and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Burton, Allen W; Bruehl, Stephen; Harden, R Norman

    2005-09-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome is a clinically challenging entity both in terms of accurate diagnosis and effective treatment. Complex regional pain syndrome is a post-traumatic painful neurologic syndrome involving the somatosensory, sympathetic and often the somatomotor systems. This complex condition consists of local neurogenic inflammation out of proportion to injury; severe pain in the skin, subcutaneous tissues and joints; and a central hyperexcitability that is often compounded with a sympathetic component. The syndrome is multifaceted manifesting both central and peripheral neurologic pathophysiology, frequently including a prominent psychosocial component. The wide array of possible patient presentations and antecedent pathologies also complicate successful treatment. To further add to the clinical challenges of complex regional pain syndrome, the epidemiology and natural history of complex regional pain syndrome are only partially known; evidence concerning complex regional pain syndrome treatment has grown slowly, due in large part to the vagaries of diagnosis; and research data--when they are available--are difficult to interpret. Thus, in spite of our evolving understanding of this neurologic disorder, in many cases complex regional pain syndrome remains difficult to diagnose and treat successfully.

  1. Linezolid-Induced Near-Fatal Serotonin Syndrome During Escitalopram Therapy: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Ranganath R.; Kulkarni, Pratibha R.

    2013-01-01

    Linezolid is a synthetic antimicrobial agent of the oxazolidinone class with weak, nonspecific inhibitor of monoamine oxidase enzymes. Concomitant therapy with an adrenergic or serotonergic agent or consuming tyramine (>100 mg/day) may induce serotonin syndrome (SS). We present a case report of near-fatal adverse interaction between linezolid and escitalopram inducing SS in a 65-year-old woman with sepsis, under empirical antibiotic treatment. This report also summarizes the current relevant literature as identified via PubMed, EMBASE, and PsycINFO, supplemented with a manual search of cross references. PMID:24379509

  2. Long-term oral appliance therapy in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a controlled study on temporomandibular side effects.

    PubMed

    Doff, Michiel H J; Veldhuis, Steffanie K B; Hoekema, Aarnoud; Slater, James J R Huddleston; Wijkstra, P J; de Bont, Lambert G M; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess variations in the occurrence of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and the risk of developing pain and function impairment of the temporomandibular complex in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients treated with either an oral appliance (mandibular advancement device) or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in a 2-year follow-up study. In addition, we assessed the relationship between the mean mandibular protrusion and the frequency of wearing the appliance during follow-up with the occurrence of pain and function impairment of the temporomandibular complex. Fifty-one patients were randomized to oral appliance therapy and 52 patients to CPAP therapy. TMDs (diagnosed according to the Axis I Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD), pain intensity and disability and mandibular function impairment were recorded at baseline, after 2 months, 1 year and 2 years of therapy. Only in the initial period of treatment the occurrence of pain-related TMDs was considerably higher (24%) in the oral appliance group compared to CPAP (6%). Oral appliance therapy furthermore resulted in more temporomandibular pain compared to CPAP (odds ratio 2.33, 95% confidence interval (1.22-4.43)). However, there were no limitations in mandibular function in both groups during the (entire) follow-up period. Although generally not serious and of transient nature, oral appliance therapy results in more pain-related TMDs in the initial period of use compared with CPAP therapy. Oral appliance therapy is associated with increased pain in the temporomandibular complex in the initial period of use. Because of the transient nature, this pain is not a reason to contra-indicate an oral appliance in OSAS patients. Moreover, TMDs and the risk of developing pain and function impairment of the temporomandibular complex appear limited with long-term oral appliance use.

  3. The acute phase reactant, fibrinogen, as a guide to plasma exchange therapy for acute Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sanjay, Rashmi; Flanagan, Janice; Sodano, Donata; Gorson, Kenneth C; Ropper, Allan H; Weinstein, Robert

    2006-07-01

    The Guillian Barré syndrome is an acute inflammatory disorder for which plasma exchange is effective treatment. Up to 10% relapse after plasma exchange suggesting that treatment sometimes finishes before disease activity has resolved. We studied whether plasma fibrinogen, an inflammatory marker, might be used to determine when to discontinue plasma exchange in patients with acute Guillain-Barré syndrome. We conducted a post-hoc analysis of apheresis database and hospital records of patients treated with plasma exchange for acute Guillain-Barré syndrome during 1999-2004. Data were analyzed from 28 patients who underwent a total of 29 courses of plasma exchange for acute Guillain-Barré syndrome. The mean (+/-SD) plasma fibrinogen concentration was 422.5 (+/-96.4) mg/dl at the time of presentation and, in 17 of the 29, it was above 400 mg/dl (reference range 200-400). Twenty of the 21 patients whose fibrinogen fell by more than 30% from baseline by the time of the final plasma exchange treatment had neurological improvement. There was improvement in only 3 of the 8 instances where fibrinogen decreased by less than 30% by the end of plasma exchange therapy. A > or =30% decrease in fibrinogen by the conclusion of plasma exchange was significantly associated with sustained neurological improvement (P = 0.0025). The plasma fibrinogen level appears to reflect disease activity in acute Guillain-Barré syndrome. A <30% fall in fibrinogen level despite plasma exchange may indicate the need to continue plasma exchange to maximize the benefit of treatment or minimize the risk of relapse. Therapeutic plasma exchange need not be extended when plasma fibrinogen remains > or =30% below its level at presentation by the time of the final planned plasma exchange procedure.

  4. Brain Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Findings in the Stroke-like Migraine Attacks after Radiation Therapy (SMART) Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cibeira, Emilio; Calleja-Castaño, Patricia; Gonzalez de la Aleja, Jesus; Sierra-Hidalgo, Fernando; Ruiz Morales, Juan; Salvador-Alvarez, Elena; Ramos-Gonzalez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    A 41-year-old male presented with an acute onset of headache, confusion, seizures, and unilateral focal neurological deficit 25 years after receiving whole-brain radiation therapy to treat a cerebellar medulloblastoma. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a thick unilateral parieto-occipital cortical contrast enhancement. A diagnosis of "Stroke-like Migraine Attacks after Radiation Therapy" (SMART) syndrome was made. Here, we describe the brain MR spectroscopy findings of SMART, showing a decrease in N-acetyl-aspartate and increased levels of creatine and choline, corresponding with neuronal destruction or transient neuronal impairment with mild nonspecific gliosis. The absence of a lactate peak suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction, vasospasm or ischemic mechanisms were not involved.

  5. Salvage therapy with high dose Intravenous Immunoglobulins in acquired Von Willebrand Syndrome and unresponsive severe intestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 91-year-old woman affected with acquired Von Willebrand (VW) syndrome and intestinal angiodysplasias presented with severe gastrointestinal bleeding (hemoglobin 5 g/dl). Despite replacement therapy with VW factor/factor VIII concentrate qid, bleeding did not stop (eleven packed red blood cell units were transfused over three days). High circulating levels of anti-VW factor immunoglobulin M were documented immunoenzimatically. Heart ultrasound showed abnormalities of the mitral and aortic valves with severe flow alterations. When intravenous immunoglobulins were added to therapy, prompt clinical and laboratory responses occurred: complete cessation of bleeding, raise in hemoglobin, VW factor antigen, VW ristocetin cofactor and factor VIII levels as well as progressive reduction of the anti-VWF autoantibody levels. PMID:24926417

  6. Effect of Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy on Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) on hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) syndrome. Methods In this monocentric, randomized, patient-assessor blinded, placebo-controlled trial, patients with HSP were randomly divided into the rESWT (n=17) and control (n=17) groups. Treatment was administered four times a week for 2 weeks. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score and Constant-Murley score (CS) were assessed before and after treatment, and at 2 and 4 weeks. The Modified Ashworth Scale and Fugl-Meyer Assessment scores and range of motion of the shoulder were also assessed. Results VAS scores improved post-intervention and at the 2-week and 4-week follow-up in the intervention group (p<0.05). Respective differences in VAS scores between baseline and post-intervention in the intervention and control groups were –1.69±1.90 and –0.45±0.79, respectively (p<0.05), between baseline and 2-week follow-up in the intervention and control groups were –1.60±1.74 and –0.34±0.70, respectively (p<0.05), and between baseline and 4-week follow-up in the intervention and control groups were –1.61±1.73 and –0.33±0.71, respectively (p<0.05). Baseline CS improved from 19.12±11.02 to 20.88±10.37 post-intervention and to 20.41±10.82 at the 2-week follow-up only in the intervention group (p<0.05). Conclusion rESWT consisting of eight sessions could be one of the effective and safe modalities for pain management in people with HSP. Further studies are needed to generalize and support these results in patients with HSP and a variety conditions, and to understand the mechanism of rESWT for treating HSP. PMID:27446789

  7. [Physical therapy for four patients with severe axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome in acute stage].

    PubMed

    Kakou, Hiroaki; Shitama, Hideo; Kimura, Yoshiko; Saeki, Satoru; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2009-03-01

    We describe four male patients suffering from quadriplegia caused by axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome. They were diagnosed with axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome based on their clinical course and electrophysiological findings. Three patients had severe pain, two had marked elevation of serum creatine kinase, one had finger contracture, and two required mechanical ventilation. Two of the patients recovered during the period from nadir to discharge in the Hughes functional grading scale and Barthel index. A physical therapist should understand the characteristics of severe axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome in an acute stage, and consider the psychological status of the patients.

  8. The effectiveness and cost evaluation of pain exposure physical therapy and conventional therapy in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1. Rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pain Exposure Physical Therapy is a new treatment option for patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1. It has been evaluated in retrospective as well as in prospective studies and proven to be safe and possibly effective. This indicates that Pain Exposure Physical Therapy is now ready for clinical evaluation. The results of an earlier performed pilot study with an n = 1 design, in which 20 patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 were treated with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy, were used for the design and power calculation of the present study. After completion and evaluation of this phase III study, a multi-centre implementation study will be conducted. The aim of this study is to determine whether Pain Exposure Physical Therapy can improve functional outcomes in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1. Methods/design This study is designed as a single-blinded, randomized clinical trial. 62 patients will be randomized with a follow-up of 9 months to demonstrate the expected treatment effect. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 is diagnosed in accordance with the Bruehl/International Association for the Study of Pain criteria. Conventional therapy in accordance with the Dutch guideline will be compared with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy. Primary outcome measure is the Impairment level SumScore, restricted version. Discussion This is the first randomized controlled study with single blinding that has ever been planned in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 and does not focus on a single aspect of the pain syndrome but compares treatment strategies based on completely different pathophysiological and cognitive theories. Trial registration Clinical trials NCT00817128; National Trial Register NTR2090 PMID:22515496

  9. A Systematic Overview of Reviews for Complementary and Alternative Therapies in the Treatment of the Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Häuser, Winfried; Dobos, Gustav; Langhorst, Jost

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This systematic overview of reviews aimed to summarize evidence and methodological quality from systematic reviews of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for the fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Methods. The PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases were screened from their inception to Sept 2013 to identify systematic reviews and meta-analyses of CAM interventions for FMS. Methodological quality of reviews was rated using the AMSTAR instrument. Results. Altogether 25 systematic reviews were found; they investigated the evidence of CAM in general, exercised-based CAM therapies, manipulative therapies, Mind/Body therapies, acupuncture, hydrotherapy, phytotherapy, and homeopathy. Methodological quality of reviews ranged from lowest to highest possible quality. Consistently positive results were found for tai chi, yoga, meditation and mindfulness-based interventions, hypnosis or guided imagery, electromyogram (EMG) biofeedback, and balneotherapy/hydrotherapy. Inconsistent results concerned qigong, acupuncture, chiropractic interventions, electroencephalogram (EEG) biofeedback, and nutritional supplements. Inconclusive results were found for homeopathy and phytotherapy. Major methodological flaws included missing details on data extraction process, included or excluded studies, study details, and adaption of conclusions based on quality assessment. Conclusions. Despite a growing body of scientific evidence of CAM therapies for the management of FMS systematic reviews still show methodological flaws limiting definite conclusions about their efficacy and safety.

  10. Prognostic Factors of the Efficacy of High-dose Corticosteroid Therapy in Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelet Count Syndrome During Pregnancy: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Ren, Chenchen; Mao, Minhong; Cui, Shihong

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the factors which can affect the efficacy of corticosteroid (CORT) therapy in the management of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. Research articles reporting the efficacy of CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients were searched in several electronic databases including EMBASE, Google Scholar, Ovid SP, PubMed, and Web of Science. Study selection was based on predefined eligibility criteria. Efficacy was defined by the changes from baseline in HELLP syndrome indicators after CORT therapy. Meta-analyses were carried out with Stata software. Data of 778 CORT-treated HELLP syndrome patients recruited in 22 studies were used in the analyses. Corticosteroid treatment to HELLP syndrome patients was associated with significant changes from baseline in platelet count; serum levels of aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH); mean blood pressure; and urinary output. Lower baseline platelet count predicted higher change in platelet count after CORT therapy. Lower baseline platelet count and lower baseline urinary output predicted greater changes in LDH levels after CORT therapy. There was also an inverse relationship between the change from baseline in LDH levels and intensive care duration. Higher CORT doses were associated with greater declines in the aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and LDH levels. Incidence of cesarean delivery was inversely associated with the gestation age. The percentage of nulliparous women had a positive association with the intensive care stay duration. High-dose CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients provides benefits in improving disease markers and reducing intensive care duration, especially in cases such as mothers with much lower baseline platelet count and LDH levels.

  11. The effects of vagus nerve stimulation therapy on patients with intractable seizures and either Landau-Kleffner syndrome or autism.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong D

    2003-06-01

    Acquired and developmental comorbid conditions, including language and behavioral disorders, are often associated with epilepsy. Although the relationship between these disorders is not fully understood, their close association may indicate that they share common features, suggesting that these conditions may respond to the same therapies. Not only has vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy been proven to reduce the frequency of pharmacoresistant seizures in epilepsy patients, but preliminary studies also indicate that VNS therapy may improve neurocognitive performance. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesized that VNS therapy would improve the quality of life of patients with either Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) or autism, independent of its effects on seizures. Data were retrospectively queried from the VNS therapy patient outcome registry (Cyberonics, Inc; Houston, TX, USA). A constant cohort of 6 LKS patients and 59 autistic patients were identified. Among the LKS patients, 3 patients at 6 months experienced at least a 50% reduction in seizure frequency as compared with baseline. Physicians reported quality-of-life improvements in all areas assessed for at least 3 of the 6 children. More than half of the patients with autism (58%) experienced at least a 50% reduction in seizure frequency at 12 months. Improvements in all areas of quality of life monitored were reported for most patients, particularly for alertness (76% at 12 months). Although these preliminary findings are encouraging, a prospective study using standardized measurement tools specific to these disorders and a longer-term follow-up are necessary to better gauge the efficacy of VNS therapy among these patient populations.

  12. Targeting P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/P-selectin interactions as a novel therapy for metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Patel, Madhukar S; Miranda-Nieves, David; Chen, Jiaxuan; Haller, Carolyn A; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2016-12-09

    Obesity-induced insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome continue to pose an important public health challenge worldwide as they significantly increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Advances in the pathophysiologic understanding of this process has identified that chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role. In this regard, given that both animal models and human studies have demonstrated that the interaction of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) with P-selectin is not only critical for normal immune response but also is upregulated in the setting of metabolic syndrome, PSGL-1/P-selectin interactions provide a novel target for preventing and treating resultant disease. Current approaches of interfering with PSGL-1/P-selectin interactions include targeted antibodies, recombinant immunoglobulins that competitively bind P-selectin, and synthetic molecular therapies. Experimental models as well as clinical trials assessing the role of these modalities in a variety of diseases have continued to contribute to the understanding of PSGL-1/P-selectin interactions and have demonstrated the difficulty in creating clinically relevant therapeutics. Most recently, however, computational simulations have further enhanced our understanding of the structural features of PSGL-1 and related glycomimetics, which are responsible for high-affinity selectin interactions. Leveraging these insights for the design of next generation agents has thus led to development of a promising synthetic method for generating PSGL-1 glycosulfopeptide mimetics for the treatment of metabolic syndrome.

  13. Effectiveness of low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: design of a randomized single-blinded controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common neuropathy in the upper extremity, resulting from the compression of the median nerve at wrist level. Clinical studies are essentials to present evidence on therapeutic resources use at early restoration on peripheral nerve functionality. Low-level laser therapy has been widely investigated in researches related to nerve regeneration. Therefore, it is suggested that the effect of low-level laser therapy associated with other conservative rehabilitation techniques may positively affect symptoms and overall hand function in compressive neuropathies such as carpal tunnel syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy in addition to orthoses therapy and home orientations in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods/Design Patients older than 18 years old will be included, with clinical diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, excluding comorbidies. A physiotherapist will conduct intervention, with a blinding evaluator. Randomization will be applied to allocate the patients in each group: with association or not to low-level laser therapy. All of them will be submitted to orthoses therapy and home orientations. Outcome will be assessed through: pain visual analogic scale, Semmes Weinstein monofilaments™ threshold sensibility test, Pinch Gauge™, Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and two point discrimination test. Discussion This paper describes the design of a randomized controlled trial, which aim to assess the effectiveness of conservative treatment added to low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Trial registration Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (ReBec) - 75ddtf / Universal Trial Number: U1111-1121-5184 PMID:23237204

  14. Newborn screening and prenatal diagnosis for Rett syndrome: implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Amir, Ruthie E; Sutton, V Reid; Van den Veyver, Ignatia B

    2005-09-01

    Most girls with Rett syndrome develop normally prior to the appearance of the typical symptoms. A presymptomatic phase is also observed in many inborn errors of metabolism that are included in newborn screening programs. Diagnostic testing for mutations or large genomic rearrangements involving methyl-CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) is highly sensitive and identifies mutations in up to 95% of female individuals with classic Rett syndrome. This has prompted some to ask whether MECP2 testing should be included in newborn and prenatal screening programs. We review current and evolving practices in these programs, emphasizing their relevance to Rett syndrome. The availability of a reliable test and the characteristic early latent phase, which creates a window of opportunity for early treatment, favor universal newborn screening for Rett syndrome. However, the high cost and the lack of an effective presymptomatic treatment make universal newborn screening for Rett syndrome impractical at present. In contrast, prenatal diagnosis should be offered to the parents of an affected child if the responsible mutation has been identified in the index case.

  15. Grapes (Vitis vinifera) as a Potential Candidate for the Therapy of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akaberi, Maryam; Hosseinzadeh, Hosein

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with several disorders, including hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia as well as cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Plant-derived polyphenols, compounds found in numerous plant species, play an important role as potential treatments for components of metabolic syndrome. Studies have provided evidence for protective effects of various polyphenol-rich foods against metabolic syndrome. Fruits, vegetables, cereals, nuts, and berries are rich in polyphenolic compounds. Grapes (Vitis vinifera), especially grape seeds, stand out as rich sources of polyphenol potent antioxidants and have been reported helpful for inhibiting the risk factors involved in the metabolic syndrome such as hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension. There are also many studies about gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, and anti-obesity effects of grape polyphenolic compounds especially proanthocyanidins in the literature. The present study investigates the protective effects of grape seeds in metabolic syndrome. The results of this study show that grape polyphenols have significant effects on the level of blood glucose, lipid profile, blood pressure, as well as beneficial activities in liver and heart with various mechanisms. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of grape polyphenols is discussed. More detailed mechanistic investigations and phytochemical studies for finding the exact bioactive component(s) and molecular signaling pathways are suggested.

  16. [Experiences with therapy of pediatric sleep apnea syndrome and obstructive nasopharyngeal respiratory pattern with nasal BIPAP and CPAP therapy].

    PubMed

    Zwacka, G; Scholle, S

    1995-03-01

    Sleep-apnea in childhood shows a frequency similar to adults but it is caused by many other reasons. Therapeutic effects of nasal CPAP and BIPAP can replace surgical ENT-Therapy in large extent mainly in ages at 2-5 years. But also in older children is it possible to treat obstructive sleep apnea and hypoventilation neuromuscular diseases by BIPAP. Examples for treatment of children by BIPAP who are two years old were given. Other demonstrated cases cover children with stridor congenitus, obstructive sleep apnea, hypoventilation, adenoidal breathing disturbances with primary surgical treated tonsillar hyperplasia and one case of thoracal postobstructive malformation with therapeutic BIPAP options.

  17. Evaluation of the Effects of Intravenous and Percutaneous Low Level Laser Therapy in the Management of Shoulder Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Momenzadeh, Sirous; Akhyani, Vahid; Razaghi, Zahra; Ebadifar, Asghar; Abbasi, Mohammadzaki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) treatment is challenging with a high recurrence rate and still lacks a clear treatment frame. Therefore research on new, more efficient and long lasting effect treatment modalities is necessary. This study looked at the effects of intravenous laser therapy (IVL) and percutaneous low level laser (PLLL) in the management of shoulder MPS. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 30 patients fulfilling inclusion criteria were randomly equally allocated to 3 groups, control, IVL and PLLL. Control group received 12 sessions of placebo low level laser, IVL group received 12 sessions of IVL therapy, and PLLL group received 12 sessions of PLLL therapy. All patients were trained for better body posture, body mechanics, gentle massage of trigger points, stretching exercises of affected muscle (trapezius), and received 10 mg of oral nortriptyline regimen every night for 3 months. Outcomes included pain severity, functional disability, and quality of life. Patients were assessed using Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Pain Disability Index (PDI), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-12). Data collected were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), Mann-Whitney and t tests. Results: The mean of PDI and maximum pain intensity during day and night significantly reduced in both PLLL and IVL groups compared to control group. Although pain severity and PDI reduction was more pronounced in IVL group compared to PLLL group, the differences were not statistically significant. Also, quality of life statistically significantly improved in both IVL and PLLL groups compared to control group was more, and although higher in IVL group, the difference was not statistically significant when compared to PLLL group. No side effects were observed in the intervention groups. Conclusion: Intravenous laser and PLLL therapy had a positive effect on pain severity and PDI reduction, and quality of life in this study. Also no adverse event was recorded. Thus

  18. Two years of growth hormone therapy in young children with Prader-Willi syndrome: physical and neurodevelopmental benefits.

    PubMed

    Myers, Susan E; Whitman, Barbara Y; Carrel, Aaron L; Moerchen, Victoria; Bekx, M Tracy; Allen, David B

    2007-03-01

    Infants with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) typically display failure to thrive and decreased muscle mass with excess body fat for age. Growth hormone (GH) therapy in children with PWS improves, but does not normalize, body composition and muscle strength and agility. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of earlier GH therapy on anthropometric measurements, body composition, and psychomotor development in affected PWS infants and toddlers. Twenty-five subjects, ages 4-37 months, were randomized to 2 years of GH therapy (1 mg/m(2)/day) or 1 year of observation without GH treatment and then placed on GH (1.5 mg/m(2).day) for 1 year only. Anthropometric measurements were obtained by standard methods: percent body fat, lean body mass, and total body bone mineral density by dual x-ray absorptiometry; motor constructs of mobility and stability by the Toddler Infant Motor Evaluation; and cognitive and language function by the Capute Scales of Infant Language and Cognitive Development. GH-treated PWS subjects demonstrated normalization of length/height standard deviation scores (SDS), faster head growth, increased lean body mass accrual, and decreased percent body fat (P < 0.005 for all parameters), as well as improved language (P = 0.05) and cognitive (P = 0.02) quotient Z-scores compared with similarly aged untreated PWS subjects after 1 year into the study. PWS subjects treated before their first birthday spoke their first words at a mean age of 14.4 +/- 2.8 months and walked independently at 23.3 +/- 4.8 months. GH therapy was well-tolerated; however, one PWS subject experienced scoliosis progression. As greater benefits were seen in our study with early treatment, prompt referral to a pediatric endocrinologist for consideration of GH therapy is recommended for PWS at an early age.

  19. Post reperfusion syndrome during liver transplantation: From pathophysiology to therapy and preventive strategies

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gamberini, Lorenzo; Laici, Cristiana; Bardi, Tommaso; Ercolani, Giorgio; Lorenzini, Laura; Faenza, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    This review aims at evaluating the existing evidence regarding post reperfusion syndrome, providing a description of the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved and possible management and preventive strategies. A PubMed search was conducted using the MeSH database, “Reperfusion” AND “liver transplantation” were the combined MeSH headings; EMBASE and the Cochrane library were also searched using the same terms. 52 relevant studies and one ongoing trial were found. The concept of post reperfusion syndrome has evolved through years to a multisystemic disorder. The implications of the main organ, recipient and procedure related factors in the genesis of this complex syndrome are discussed in the text as the novel pharmacologic and technical approaches to reduce its incidence. However the available evidence about risk factors, physiopathology and preventive measures is still confusing, the presence of two main definitions and the numerosity of possible confounding factors greatly complicates the interpretation of the studies. PMID:26819522

  20. Treatment of Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Recommendations of Recent Evidence-Based Interdisciplinary Guidelines with Special Emphasis on Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Buskila, Dan; Shir, Yoram; Sommer, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Current evidence indicates that there is no single ideal treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). First choice treatment options remain debatable, especially concerning the importance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments. Methods. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines on FMS in Canada, Germany, and Israel were compared for their first choice and CAM-recommendations. Results. All three guidelines emphasized a patient-tailored approach according to the key symptoms. Aerobic exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, and multicomponent therapy were first choice treatments. The guidelines differed in the grade of recommendation for drug treatment. Anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin) and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran) were strongly recommended by the Canadian and the Israeli guidelines. These drugs received only a weak recommendation by the German guideline. In consideration of CAM-treatments, acupuncture, hypnosis/guided imagery, and Tai Chi were recommended by the German and Israeli guidelines. The Canadian guidelines did not recommend any CAM therapy. Discussion. Recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines concur on the importance of treatment tailored to the individual patient and further emphasize the need of self-management strategies (exercise, and psychological techniques). PMID:24348701

  1. More effects of extracorporeal magnetic innervation and terazosin therapy than terazosin therapy alone for non-inflammatory chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Paick, J-S; Lee, S C; Ku, J H

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether extracorporeal magnetic innervation (ExMI) combined with alpha-blocker therapy is more effective than alpha-blocker monotherapy for patients with non-inflammatory chronic prostatitis (CP)/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS), category IIIB. Patients were randomized to either terazosin monotherapy (group 1, n=21) or terazosin combined with ExMI therapy (group 2, n=19). Patients in group 2 had 12 treatment sessions of ExMI twice a week during 6 weeks. None of the patients experienced any side effects from treatment. The changes in each domain of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (CPSI) measured on week 6 were not significantly different between the groups. However, the difference (median, 25-75th percentiles) between the two groups in total NIH-CPSI scores was -4 (-11.5, -2) for group 1 and -12 (-17.3, -2.3) for group 2, respectively (P=0.047). At 6 weeks, 47.6% (10 of 21) of group 1 had a >25% decrease in total NIH-CPSI compared with 78.9% (15 of 19) of group 2 (P=0.041). Also, more patients in group 2 (78.9%) were rated as responders with a 6-point decrease in NIH-CPSI compared with group 1 (47.6%) (P=0.041). The early results suggest that ExMI combined with alpha-blocker therapy has better effect than alpha-blocker monotherapy for the treatment of CP/CPPS.

  2. Towards a therapy for Angelman syndrome by targeting a long non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Meng, Linyan; Ward, Amanda J; Chun, Seung; Bennett, C Frank; Beaudet, Arthur L; Rigo, Frank

    2015-02-19

    Angelman syndrome is a single-gene disorder characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay, behavioural uniqueness, speech impairment, seizures and ataxia. It is caused by maternal deficiency of the imprinted gene UBE3A, encoding an E3 ubiquitin ligase. All patients carry at least one copy of paternal UBE3A, which is intact but silenced by a nuclear-localized long non-coding RNA, UBE3A antisense transcript (UBE3A-ATS). Murine Ube3a-ATS reduction by either transcription termination or topoisomerase I inhibition has been shown to increase paternal Ube3a expression. Despite a clear understanding of the disease-causing event in Angelman syndrome and the potential to harness the intact paternal allele to correct the disease, no gene-specific treatment exists for patients. Here we developed a potential therapeutic intervention for Angelman syndrome by reducing Ube3a-ATS with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). ASO treatment achieved specific reduction of Ube3a-ATS and sustained unsilencing of paternal Ube3a in neurons in vitro and in vivo. Partial restoration of UBE3A protein in an Angelman syndrome mouse model ameliorated some cognitive deficits associated with the disease. Although additional studies of phenotypic correction are needed, we have developed a sequence-specific and clinically feasible method to activate expression of the paternal Ube3a allele.

  3. Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome during Infliximab Therapy in a Patient with Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schoehl, Johanna; Mechie, Nicolae-Catalin; Schwoerer, Harald; Moerer, Onnen; Quintel, Michael; Buck, Cordula; Ellenrieder, Volker; Neesse, Albrecht; Amanzada, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of a noninfectious interstitial lung disease is a rare but life-threatening side effect of infliximab, an antitumor necrosis factor alpha antibody. The following case report of a patient with Crohn disease shows an extremely dramatic progression to a severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:27920644

  4. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome during zuclopenthixol therapy in X-linked cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Gozalbo, M E; van Waardenburg, D A; Forget, P P; Spaapen, L J; Verrips, A; Vroomen, P C

    2001-10-01

    An 8 year-old boy with X-ALD under treatment with simvastatin developed a severe adverse reaction when the dose of his other medication, zuclopenthixol was increased. Both drugs were withdrawn after a diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome was made.

  5. The Effects of Assisted Cycling Therapy (Act) and Voluntary Cycling on Reaction Time and Measures of Executive Function in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringenbach, S. D. R.; Holzapfel, S. D.; Mulvey, G. M.; Jimenez, A.; Benson, A.; Richter, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reports of positive effects of aerobic exercise on cognitive function in persons with Down syndrome are extremely limited. However, a novel exercise intervention, termed assisted cycling therapy (ACT), has resulted in acutely improved cognitive planning ability and reaction times as well as improved cognitive planning after 8 weeks of…

  6. Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome: a clinical and morphologic study of 65 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Michels, S.D.; McKenna, R.W.; Arthur, D.C.; Brunning, R.D.

    1985-06-01

    This study consists of 65 patients (pts) who developed a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (39 pts) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (26 pts) following chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy; the interval from the onset of therapy to bone marrow abnormality ranged from 11 to 192 months (median, 58). Thirty-three patients had been previously treated for lymphoproliferative diseases, 29 for carcinoma, and three for a nonneoplastic disorder. Approximately 30% of the cases presenting in the MDS phase evolved to AML in one to 12 months (median, 3.5). The AML in 49% of the cases was not readily classified according to French-American-British (FAB) criteria; the primary difficulty in classification related to the involvement of multiple cell lines. Among the cases that could be classified, all FAB types were represented except for M1; M2 was the most frequent type. Clonal chromosome abnormalities were found in marrow specimens from 22 of 24 (92%) patients studied with G banding; 11 had abnormalities of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. The median survival for all patients was four months with no significant difference between those treated and not treated with antileukemic therapy. The median survival was three months for the patients presenting with AML, six months for the patients with AML following an MDS, and four months for the patients with an MDS that did not evolve to AML. The findings in the present study suggest that there are three stages of therapy-related panmyelosis: (1) pancytopenia with associated myelodysplastic changes, (2) a frank MDS, and (3) overt AML. Many patients will present in the stage of overt AML that differs from de novo AML primarily by the high incidence of trilineage involvement, difficulty in classification, frequent cytogenetic abnormalities, and poor response to antileukemic therapy.

  7. [A Case of a Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Serious Hand-Foot Syndrome Induced by High-Dose Cytarabine Therapy].

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Hiroaki; Aoi, Miki; Yuge, Masaaki; Sugimura, Yuriko; Kitamura, Kunio; Yamamura, Masumi; Tachi, Tomoya; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2016-07-01

    A 40's year-old female patient with acute myeloblastic leukemia received high-dose cytarabine(HD-Ara-C)as her third induction therapy. Because the pharmacist in charge noticed on a prior interview that she had experienced a mild skin eruption similar to hand-foot syndrome(HFS)in the previous round oftherapy(idarubicin and cytarabine), heparinoid lotion and hypoallergenic soap were used to prevent HFS. However, HFS occurred on day 3, and further developed on day 6 to grade 3 with painful erythema, swelling, and paresthesia affecting the entire surface of both hands. We cared for her with moisturization, lifestyle guidance, rotation of steroid ointment, and occlusive dressing techniques according to a multidisciplinary team approach composed ofa hematologist, dermatologist, pharmacist, and nurse. Her symptoms resolved on day 40.

  8. The clinical practice of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for children and young people with a diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, Kate; Stallard, Paul; Kucia, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Children and young people diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome (AS) have significant social-communication difficulties and impaired empathy and theory of mind skills. These difficulties place them at risk of developing mental health problems, particularly anxiety, depression and obsessive compulsive disorder. Although Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is recognised as an effective intervention for these problems in both child and adult populations, little research has specifically looked at the use of CBT with children and young people with an AS diagnosis. However, limited evidence suggests that CBT, if suitably adapted, is a feasible and potentially helpful treatment option. This paper focuses on the clinical practice of CBT and explores how the underpinning therapeutic relationship can be modified to meet the cognitive needs of this particular group of young clients.

  9. A Korean patient with Guillain-Barré syndrome following acute hepatitis E whose cholestasis resolved with steroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Sung Bok; Lee, Sang Soo; Jung, Hee Cheul; Kim, Hong Jun; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae Hyo; Jung, Woon Tae; Lee, Ok Jae; Song, Dae Hyun

    2016-09-01

    Autochthonous hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen in developed countries, and several cases of acute HEV infection have been reported in South Korea. However, there have been no reports on HEV-associated Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) in Korea. We recently experienced the case of a 58-year-old Korean male with acute HEV infection after ingesting raw deer meat. Persistent cholestasis was resolved by the administration of prednisolone. At 2.5 months after the clinical presentation of HEV infection, the patient developed weakness of the lower limbs, and was diagnosed with GBS associated with acute hepatitis E. To our knowledge, this is the second report on supportive steroid therapy for persistent cholestasis due to hepatitis E, and the first report of GBS in a Korean patient with acute HEV infection.

  10. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute leukemia after multiple myeloma in the era of novel agents.

    PubMed

    Gertz, Morie A; Terpos, Evangelos; Dispenzieri, Angela; Kumar, Shaji; Shah, Rupin A; Orlowski, Robert; Kastritis, Efstathios; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Shah, Jatin

    2015-06-01

    Survival for patients with multiple myeloma has increased. Both melphalan and lenalidomide are associated with subsequent development of myelodysplasia. We reviewed the cases of all patients with multiple myeloma who had subsequent development of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL) during a 12-year period in three centers. Of 55 patients identified, two received only lenalidomide before myelodysplasia developed. The median time between the diagnoses of multiple myeloma and MDS/ANLL was 52.7 months. Median survival after the diagnosis of MDS or ANLL was 6.7 months. Treatment of MDS comprised allogeneic stem cell transplant in eight patients (median survival, 219 days; one patient alive at 624 days) and a hypomethylating agent in 21 patients (response of stable or better in five patients). Myelodysplasia remains a devastating complication of therapy for multiple myeloma, with short survival and poor response rates to available modalities.

  11. Radiation Therapy for Gorham-Stout Syndrome: Results of a National Patterns-of-Care Study and Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Heyd, Reinhard; Micke, Oliver; Surholt, Christine; Berger, Bernhard; Martini, Carmen; Fueller, Juergen; Schimpke, Thomas; Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases conducted a national patterns-of-care study to investigate the value of radiation therapy (RT) in the management of Gorham-Stout syndrome. Methods and Materials: In 2009 a structured questionnaire was circulated to 230 German RT institutions to assess information about the number of patients, the RT indication and technique, and the target volume definition, as well as accompanying treatments, outcome data, and early or late radiation toxicity. Results: In November 2009 responses were available from 197 departments (85.6%): 29 university hospitals (14.7%), 89 community hospitals (45.2%), and 79 private RT offices (40.1%). Of these institutions, 8 (4.0%) had experience using RT, for a total of 10 cases in various anatomic sites. Four patients underwent irradiation postoperatively, and six patients received primary RT. The total doses applied after computed tomography-based treatment planning ranged from 30 to 45 Gy. After a median follow-up period of 42 months, local disease progression was avoided in 8 cases (80.0%). In 2 of these cases a progression occurred beyond the target volume. Acute and late toxicity was mild; in 4 patients RT was associated with Grade I side effects according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. The literature analysis of 38 previously published articles providing results after the use of RT in 44 patients showed stable or regressive disease in 77.3%. Conclusions: RT may prevent disease progression effectively in Gorham-Stout syndrome in 77% to 80% of cases. Total doses ranging from 30 to 45 Gy applied after computed tomography-based treatment planning are recommended.

  12. Androgen receptor roles in insulin resistance and obesity in males: the linkage of androgen-deprivation therapy to metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yu, I-Chen; Lin, Hung-Yun; Sparks, Janet D; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed malignancies in men. Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) is the first-line treatment and fundamental management for men with advanced PCa to suppress functions of androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling. ADT is effective at improving cancer symptoms and prolonging survival. However, epidemiological and clinical studies support the notion that testosterone deficiency in men leads to the development of metabolic syndrome that increases cardiovascular disease risk. The underlying mechanisms by which androgen/AR signaling regulates metabolic homeostasis in men are complex, and in this review, we discuss molecular mechanisms mediated by AR signaling that link ADT to metabolic syndrome. Results derived from various AR knockout mouse models reveal tissue-specific AR signaling that is involved in regulation of metabolism. These data suggest that steps be taken early to manage metabolic complications associated with PCa patients receiving ADT, which could be accomplished using tissue-selective modulation of AR signaling and by treatment with insulin-sensitizing agents.

  13. Amyloid A amyloidosis secondary to hyper IgD syndrome and response to IL-1 blockage therapy.

    PubMed

    Kallianidis, A F; Ray, A; Goudkade, D; de Fijter, J W

    2016-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman with a history of genetically confirmed hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) was admitted because of chronic diarrhoea. During admission she developed a rapidly progressive nephrotic syndrome. Reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis was confirmed after colonic and renal biopsy which showed deposition of amyloid. After initial treatment with high-dosed corticosteroids, therapy was switched to anakinra, an IL-1 receptor antagonist, but her symptoms persisted. After cessation of anakinra, a marked exacerbation of the intestinal symptoms was noted. Nine months after the initial diagnosis of reactive amyloidosis without any amelioration of the symptoms and a decreasing quality of life, our patient declined further treatment and died soon after. This case demonstrates that AA amyloidosis does occur in patients with HIDS and can present with intestinal symptoms and proteinuria. Once amyloidosis is diagnosed the goal of treatment is to prevent further complications. In this case report we give an overview of previous cases with amyloidosis complicating HIDS with the treatments received and propose a step-up treatment plan for future cases.

  14. EXTL2 and EXTL3 inhibition with siRNAs as a promising substrate reduction therapy for Sanfilippo C syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Canals, Isaac; Benetó, Noelia; Cozar, Mónica; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by an impaired degradation of heparan sulfate (HS). It presents severe and progressive neurodegeneration and currently there is no effective treatment. Substrate reduction therapy (SRT) may be a useful option for neurological disorders of this kind, and several approaches have been tested to date. Here we use different siRNAs targeting EXTL2 and EXTL3 genes, which are important for HS synthesis, as SRT in Sanfilippo C patients’ fibroblasts in order to decrease glycosaminoglycan (GAG) storage inside the lysosomes. The results show a high inhibition of the EXTL gene mRNAs (around 90%), a decrease in GAG synthesis after three days (30–60%) and a decrease in GAG storage after 14 days (up to 24%). Moreover, immunocytochemistry analyses showed a clear reversion of the phenotype after treatment. The in vitro inhibition of HS synthesis genes using siRNAs shown here is a first step in the development of a future therapeutic option for Sanfilippo C syndrome. PMID:26347037

  15. EXTL2 and EXTL3 inhibition with siRNAs as a promising substrate reduction therapy for Sanfilippo C syndrome.

    PubMed

    Canals, Isaac; Benetó, Noelia; Cozar, Mónica; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel

    2015-09-08

    Sanfilippo syndrome is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by an impaired degradation of heparan sulfate (HS). It presents severe and progressive neurodegeneration and currently there is no effective treatment. Substrate reduction therapy (SRT) may be a useful option for neurological disorders of this kind, and several approaches have been tested to date. Here we use different siRNAs targeting EXTL2 and EXTL3 genes, which are important for HS synthesis, as SRT in Sanfilippo C patients' fibroblasts in order to decrease glycosaminoglycan (GAG) storage inside the lysosomes. The results show a high inhibition of the EXTL gene mRNAs (around 90%), a decrease in GAG synthesis after three days (30-60%) and a decrease in GAG storage after 14 days (up to 24%). Moreover, immunocytochemistry analyses showed a clear reversion of the phenotype after treatment. The in vitro inhibition of HS synthesis genes using siRNAs shown here is a first step in the development of a future therapeutic option for Sanfilippo C syndrome.

  16. Description of common musculoskeletal findings in Williams Syndrome and implications for therapies.

    PubMed

    Copes, L E; Pober, B R; Terilli, C A

    2016-07-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), is a relatively rare genetic disorder affecting ∼1/10,000 persons. Since the disorder is caused by a micro-deletion of ∼1.5 Mb, it is not surprising that the manifestations of WS are extremely broad, involving most body systems. In this paper, we primarily focus on the musculoskeletal aspects of WS as these findings have not been the subject of a comprehensive review. We review the MSK features commonly seen in individuals with WS, along with related sensory and neurological issues interacting with and compounding underlying MSK abnormalities. We end by providing perspective, particularly from the vantage point of a physical therapist, on therapeutic interventions to address the most common MSK and related features seen in WS. Clin. Anat. 29:578-589, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Testosterone deficiency syndrome: benefits, risks, and realities associated with testosterone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Jacob; Barkin, Jack

    2016-02-01

    Testosterone deficiency syndrome, which has sometimes been termed age-related or late-onset hypogonadism, is a syndrome characterized by both clinical manifestations as well as a biochemical deficiency of testosterone. This condition is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, accounting for billions of dollars in health care costs. There is some evidence that suggests that restoring testosterone levels in these individuals may help to manage or delay progression of the associated morbidities. Furthermore, despite controversies in the literature and media, testosterone replacement has proven to be quite safe in most men with minimal if any adverse effects when dosing to achieve the eugonadal range. It is nevertheless very important for clinicians to be aware of the possible risks and contraindications of treatment to ensure proper patient selection and appropriate monitoring.

  18. Yang/Qi Invigoration: An Herbal Therapy for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome with Yang Deficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Jihang; Ko, Kam Ming

    2015-01-01

    According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory, Yang and Qi are driving forces of biological activities in the human body. Based on the crucial role of the mitochondrion in energy metabolism, we propose an extended view of Yang and Qi in the context of mitochondrion-driven cellular and body function. It is of interest that the clinical manifestations of Yang/Qi deficiencies in TCM resemble those of chronic fatigue syndrome in Western medicine, which is pathologically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. By virtue of their ability to enhance mitochondrial function and its regulation, Yang- and Qi-invigorating tonic herbs, such as Cistanches Herba and Schisandrae Fructus, may therefore prove to be beneficial in the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome with Yang deficiency. PMID:25763095

  19. Pathologic Femoral Neck Fracture Due to Fanconi Syndrome Induced by Adefovir Dipivoxil Therapy for Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2016-01-01

    In Fanconi syndrome, hypophosphatemic osteomalacia is caused by proximal renal tubule dysfunction which leads to impaired reabsorption of amino acids, glucose, urate, and phosphate. We present a rare case of a 43-year-old Korean male who was found to have insufficiency stress fracture of the femoral neck secondary to osteomalacia due to Fanconi syndrome. He had been receiving low-dose adefovir dipivoxil (ADV, 10 mg/day) for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection for 7 years and he subsequently developed severe hypophosphatemia and proximal renal tubule dysfunction. The incomplete femoral neck fracture was fixed with multiple cannulated screws to prevent further displacement of the initial fracture. After cessation of ADV and correction of hypophosphatemia with oral phosphorus supplementation, the patient's clinical symptoms, such as bone pain, muscle weakness, and laboratory findings improved. PMID:27247753

  20. A biochemical and physicochemical comparison of two recombinant enzymes used for enzyme replacement therapies of hunter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yo Kyung; Sohn, Young Bae; Sohn, Jong Mun; Lee, Jieun; Chang, Mi Sun; Kwun, Younghee; Kim, Chi Hwa; Lee, Jin Young; Yook, Yeon Joo; Ko, Ah-Ra; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2014-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II (MPS II, Hunter syndrome; OMIM 309900) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency in the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), leading to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). For enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) of Hunter syndrome, two recombinant enzymes, idursulfase (Elaprase(®), Shire Human Genetic Therapies, Lexington, MA) and idursulfase beta (Hunterase(®), Green Cross Corporation, Yongin, Korea), are currently available in Korea. To compare the biochemical and physicochemical differences between idursulfase and idursulfase beta, we examined the formylglycine (FGly) content, specific enzyme activity, mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) content, sialic acid content, and in vitro cell uptake activity of normal human fibroblasts of these two enzymes.The FGly content, which determines the enzyme activity, of idursulfase beta was significantly higher than that of idursulfase (79.4 ± 0.9 vs. 68.1 ± 2.2 %, P < 0.001). In accordance with the FGly content, the specific enzyme activity of idursulfase beta was significantly higher than that of idursulfase (42.6 ± 1.1 vs. 27.8 ± 0.9 nmol/min/μg protein, P < 0.001). The levels of M6P and sialic acid were not significantly different (2.4 ± 0.1 vs 2.4 ± 0.3 mol/mol protein for M6P and 12.3 ± 0.7 vs. 12.4 ± 0.4 mol/mol protein for sialic acid). However, the cellular uptake activity of the normal human fibroblasts in vitro showed a significant difference (Kuptake, 5.09 ± 0.96 vs. 6.50 ± 1.28 nM protein, P = 0.017).In conclusion, idursulfase beta exhibited significantly higher specific enzyme activity than idursulfase, resulting from higher FGly content. These biochemical differences may be partly attributed to clinical efficacy. However, long-term clinical evaluations of Hunter syndrome patients treated with these two enzymes will be needed to demonstrate the clinical implications of significant difference of the enzyme activity and the FGly content.

  1. Corticosteroid Therapy for Management of Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelet Count (HELLP) Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Minhong; Chen, Chen

    2015-12-03

    BACKGROUND Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome is a severe condition of pregnancy that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Corticoteroid (CORT) therapy is common in the management of HELLP syndrome. This study evaluates the efficacy of CORT therapy to patients with HELLP Syndrome. MATERIAL AND METHODS A literature search was carried out in multiple electronic databases. Meta-analyses of means difference and odds ratio were carried under the random-effects model. RESULTS Fifteen studies (675 CORT treated and 787 control HELLP patients) were included. CORT treatment significantly improved platelet count (mean difference between CORT treated and controls in changes from baseline, MD: 38.08 [15.71, 60.45]×109; p=0.0009), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (MD: -440 [-760, -120] IU/L; p=0.007), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (MD: -143.34 [-278.69, -7.99] IU/L; p=0.04) but the decrease in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels was not statistically significant (MD: -48.50 [-114.32, 17.32] IU/L; p=0.15). Corticosteroid treatment was also associated with significantly less blood transfusion rate (odds ratio, OR: 0.42 [0.24, 0.76]; p=0.004) and hospital/ICU stay (MD: -1.79 [-3.54, -0.05] days; p=0.04). Maternal mortality (OR: 1.27 [0.45, 3.60]; p=0.65), birth weight (MD: 0.09 [-0.11, 0.28]; p=0.38) and the prevalence of morbid conditions (OR: 0.79 [0.58, 1.08]; p=0.14) did not differ significantly between both groups. CONCLUSIONS Corticosteroid administration to HELLP patients improves platelet count, and the serum levels of LDH and ALT, and reduces hospital/ICU stay and blood transfusion rate, but is not significantly associated with better maternal mortality and overall morbidity.

  2. Esophageal ulcer caused by cytomegalovirus: resolution during combination antiretroviral therapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mönkemüller, K E; Wilcox, C M

    2000-08-01

    A 36-year-old man with a 5-year history of untreated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection had odynophagia for 14 days. Fifteen days earlier, he had begun taking trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole and combination antiretroviral therapy that included lamivudine, zidovudine, and nelfinavir. He had no history of opportunistic infection. The CD4 lymphocyte count was 67/microL and HIV-RNA level was 359,396 copies/mL. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a large, well-circumscribed esophageal ulceration 31 cm from the incisors. Histopathologic examination of esophageal biopsy specimens showed cytopathic changes diagnostic of cytomegalovirus (CMV). In situ DNA hybridization was positive for CMV. While combination antiretroviral therapy was continued, the esophageal symptoms resolved within 4 days of endoscopy without specific therapy for CMV. Follow-up endoscopy 4 weeks later revealed a normal-appearing esophagus, and the patient has remained symptom-free for 10 months.

  3. Genetic Syndromes and Genes Involved in the Development of the Female Reproductive Tract: A Possible Role for Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Connell, Mt; Owen, Cm; Segars, Jh

    2013-01-01

    Müllerian and vaginal anomalies are congenital malformations of the female reproductive tract resulting from alterations in the normal developmental pathway of the uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes, and vagina. The most common of the Müllerian anomalies affect the uterus and may adversely impact reproductive outcomes highlighting the importance of gaining understanding of the genetic mechanisms that govern normal and abnormal development of the female reproductive tract. Modern molecular genetics with study of knock out animal models as well as several genetic syndromes featuring abnormalities of the female reproductive tract have identified candidate genes significant to this developmental pathway. Further emphasizing the importance of understanding female reproductive tract development, recent evidence has demonstrated expression of embryologically significant genes in the endometrium of adult mice and humans. This recent work suggests that these genes not only play a role in the proper structural development of the female reproductive tract but also may persist in adults to regulate proper function of the endometrium of the uterus. As endometrial function is critical for successful implantation and pregnancy maintenance, these recent data suggest a target for gene therapy. Future research will be needed to determine if gene therapy may improve reproductive outcomes for patients with demonstrated deficient endometrial expression related to abnormal gene expression.

  4. Efficacy of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for the Treatment of Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Moayednia, Amir; Emadi, Masoud; Khorami, Mohammad Hatef; Haghdani, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for symptoms alleviation in chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS). Materials and Methods. 40 patients with CPPS were randomly allocated into either the treatment or sham group. In the first group, patients were treated by ESWT once a week for 4 weeks by a defined protocol. In the sham group, the same protocol was applied but with the probe being turned off. The follow-up assessments were done at 1, 2, 3, and 12 weeks by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain and NIH-developed Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI). Results. Pain domain scores at follow-up points in both treatment and sham groups were reduced, more so in the treatment group, which were significant at weeks 2, 3, and 12. Urinary scores became significantly different at weeks 3 and 12. Also, quality of life (QOL) and total NIH-CPSI scores at all four follow-up time points reduced more significantly in the treatment group as compared to the sham group. Noticeably, at week 12 a slight deterioration in all variables was observed compared to the first 3 weeks of the treatment period. Conclusions. our findings confirmed ESWT therapy as a safe and effective method in CPPS in short term. PMID:24000311

  5. Validity of Outcome Prediction Scoring Systems in Korean Patients with Severe Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghyun; Yeo, Hye Ju; Yoon, Seong Hoon; Lee, Seung Eun; Cho, Woo Hyun; Jeon, Doo Soo; Kim, Yun Seong; Son, Bong Soo; Kim, Do Hyung

    2016-06-01

    Recently, several prognostic scoring systems for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have been published. The aim of this study was to validate the established scoring systems for outcome prediction in Korean patients. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 50 patients on ECMO therapy in our center from 2012 to 2014. A calculation of outcome prediction scoring tools was performed and the comparison across various models was conducted. In our study, the overall hospital survival was 46% and successful weaning rate was 58%. The Predicting Death for Severe ARDS on V-V ECMO (PRESERVE) score showed good discrimination of mortality prediction for patients on ECMO with AUC of 0.80 (95% CI 0.66-0.90). The respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II score also showed fair prediction ability with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.65-0.89) and AUC of 0.78 (95% CI 0.64-0.88), respectively. However, the ECMOnet score failed to predict mortality with AUC of 0.51 (95% CI 0.37-0.66). When evaluating the predictive accuracy according to optimal cut-off point of each scoring system, RESP score had a best specificity of 91.3% and 66.7% of sensitivity, respectively. This study supports the clinical usefulness of the prognostic scoring tools for severe ARDS with ECMO therapy when applying to the Korean patients receiving ECMO.

  6. Increased PD-1/STAT1 ratio may account for the survival benefit in decitabine therapy for lower risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Chang, Chun-Kang; He, Qi; Guo, Juan; Tao, Ying; Wu, Ling-Yun; Xu, Feng; Wu, Dong; Zhou, Li-Yu; Su, Ji-Ying; Song, Lu-Xi; Xiao, Chao; Li, Xiao

    2017-04-01

    Decitabine is an effective therapy for patients with lower risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). However, the mechanisms of decitabine's therapeutic effect are not well established. Forty-four lower risk MDS patients received decitabine therapy. 59.1% patients achieved treatment response, and 53.8% patients who were RBC/platelet-dependent cast off the transfusion burden. The median overall survival (OS) was 19.0 months after decitabine treatment. Moreover, polarization toward type 1 in the CD8 + subset was enhanced, and a significantly increased expression of the PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-1/STAT1 ratio was observed in these lower risk MDS. The patients with amplification of PD-1/STAT1 ratio (2-4) achieved longer OS. Thus, our results suggest that the effect mechanism of decitabine toward lower risk MDS may be the moderate increase of PD-1/STAT1, which contributes to hematopoietic improvement. These findings suggest that a different PD-1-related strategy from those used to treat higher risk patients could be used for lower risk MDS patients.

  7. Lung inflammatory and oxidative alterations after exogenous surfactant therapy fortified with budesonide in rabbit model of meconium aspiration syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mikolka, P; Kopincová, J; Košútová, P; Čierny, D; Čalkovská, A; Mokrá, D

    2016-12-22

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) triggers inflammatory and oxidative pathways which can inactivate both pulmonary surfactant and therapeutically given exogenous surfactant. Glucocorticoid budesonide added to exogenous surfactant can inhibit inflammation and thereby enhance treatment efficacy. Neonatal meconium (25 mg/ml, 4 ml/kg) was administered intratracheally (i.t.) to rabbits. When the MAS model was prepared, animals were treated with budesonide i.t. (Pulmicort, 0.25 mg/kg, M+B); with surfactant lung lavage (Curosurf®, 10 ml/kg, 5 mg phospholipids/ml, M+S) followed by undiluted Curosurf® i.t. (100 mg phospholipids/kg); with combination of budesonide and surfactant (M+S+B); or were untreated (M); or served as controls with saline i.t. instead of meconium (C). Animals were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 h. Cell counts in the blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), lung edema formation (wet/dry weight ratio), oxidative damage of lipids/ proteins and inflammatory expression profiles (IL-2, IL-6, IL-13, TNF-alpha) in the lung homogenate and plasma were determined. Combined surfactant+budesonide therapy was the most effective in reduction of neutrophil counts in BAL, oxidative damage, levels and mRNA expression of cytokines in the lung, and lung edema formation compared to untreated animals. Curosurf fortified with budesonide mitigated lung inflammation and oxidative modifications what indicate the perspectives of this treatment combination for MAS therapy.

  8. The place of occupational therapy in rehabilitation strategies of complex regional pain syndrome: Comparative study of 60 cases.

    PubMed

    Rome, L

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the value of combining occupational therapy (OT) with physical therapy (PT) for the rehabilitation of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and to measure its effectiveness on activities of daily life. Sixty patients with CRPS type 1 were recruited and interviewed between September 1, 2014 and February 1, 2015. Thirty patients had undergone PT and thirty had undergone PT+OT. They were administered the short-form of the "Assessment of Life Habits" questionnaire (v.3.0 LIFE-H) created in Canada. This questionnaire consists of 16 items exploring activities of daily living, which were used to compare the effectiveness of the two rehabilitation protocols. The results of each test were submitted to the Wilcoxon test. After confirming the complexity of CRPS in terms of its etiology, clinical signs and progression, rehabilitation was effective, especially for pain. The patients who received PT+OT had on average 10% better dressing and undressing function, 25% better for meal preparation, and 20% better on personal care than those who underwent PT only. In CRPS, OT combined with PT brings a real benefit in restoring the essential activities of daily life. This strategy could be implemented as soon the diagnosis confirmed and continued for a very long time. It helps to avoid the risk of dependence on third parties.

  9. CNS-directed gene therapy for the treatment of neurologic and somatic mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Motas, Sandra; Haurigot, Virginia; Garcia, Miguel; Marcó, Sara; Ribera, Albert; Roca, Carles; Sánchez, Víctor; Molas, Maria; Bertolin, Joan; Maggioni, Luca; León, Xavier; Ruberte, Jesús; Bosch, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPSII) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by severe neurologic and somatic disease caused by deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), an enzyme that catabolizes the glycosaminoglycans heparan and dermatan sulphate. Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) currently constitutes the only approved therapeutic option for MPSII. However, the inability of recombinant IDS to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits ERT efficacy in treating neurological symptoms. Here, we report a gene therapy approach for MPSII through direct delivery of vectors to the CNS. Through a minimally invasive procedure, we administered adeno-associated virus vectors encoding IDS (AAV9-Ids) to the cerebrospinal fluid of MPSII mice with already established disease. Treated mice showed a significant increase in IDS activity throughout the encephalon, with full resolution of lysosomal storage lesions, reversal of lysosomal dysfunction, normalization of brain transcriptomic signature, and disappearance of neuroinflammation. Moreover, our vector also transduced the liver, providing a peripheral source of therapeutic protein that corrected storage pathology in visceral organs, with evidence of cross-correction of nontransduced organs by circulating enzyme. Importantly, AAV9-Ids-treated MPSII mice showed normalization of behavioral deficits and considerably prolonged survival. These results provide a strong proof of concept for the clinical translation of our approach for the treatment of Hunter syndrome patients with cognitive impairment. PMID:27699273

  10. [Phantom limb pain syndrome: therapeutic approach using mirror therapy in a Geriatric Department].

    PubMed

    González García, Paloma; Manzano Hernández, M Pilar; Muñoz Tomás, M Teresa; Martín Hernández, Carlos; Forcano García, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    The clinical use of mirror visual feedback was initially introduced to alleviate phantom pain by restoring motor function through plastic changes in the human primary motor cortex. It is a promising novel technique that gives a new perspective to neurological rehabilitation. Using this therapy, the mirror neuron system is activated and decrease the activity of those systems that perceive protopathic pain, making somatosensory cortex reorganization possible. This paper reports the results of the mirror therapy in three patients with phantom limb pain after recent lower limb amputation, showing its analgesic effects and its benefits as a comprehensive rehabilitation instrument for lower limb amputee geriatric patients.

  11. A randomised trial of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): statistical analysis plan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The publication of protocols by medical journals is increasingly becoming an accepted means for promoting good quality research and maximising transparency. Recently, Finfer and Bellomo have suggested the publication of statistical analysis plans (SAPs).The aim of this paper is to make public and to report in detail the planned analyses that were approved by the Trial Steering Committee in May 2010 for the principal papers of the PACE (Pacing, graded Activity, and Cognitive behaviour therapy: a randomised Evaluation) trial, a treatment trial for chronic fatigue syndrome. It illustrates planned analyses of a complex intervention trial that allows for the impact of clustering by care providers, where multiple care-providers are present for each patient in some but not all arms of the trial. Results The trial design, objectives and data collection are reported. Considerations relating to blinding, samples, adherence to the protocol, stratification, centre and other clustering effects, missing data, multiplicity and compliance are described. Descriptive, interim and final analyses of the primary and secondary outcomes are then outlined. Conclusions This SAP maximises transparency, providing a record of all planned analyses, and it may be a resource for those who are developing SAPs, acting as an illustrative example for teaching and methodological research. It is not the sum of the statistical analysis sections of the principal papers, being completed well before individual papers were drafted. Trial registration ISRCTN54285094 assigned 22 May 2003; First participant was randomised on 18 March 2005. PMID:24225069

  12. Reduction in glutamine/glutamate levels in the cerebral cortex after adrenocorticotropic hormone therapy in patients with west syndrome.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Mitsutoshi; Togashi, Noriko; Sakamoto, Osamu; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Onuma, Akira; Iinuma, Kazuie; Kure, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    West syndrome (WS), an intractable epileptic encephalopathy of infancy, is refractory to many antiepileptic drugs; however, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is an effective treatment for WS. The mechanism behind the efficacy of ACTH is mediated by biochemical processes that remain unknown. We examined the effects of ACTH therapy with tetracosactide (TCS), a synthetic ACTH analogue, on brain metabolism in patients with WS, using (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (¹H-MRS). In six patients with cryptogenic WS, we performed single-voxel ¹H-MRS at the occipital lobe cortex. Measurements were taken prior to TCS treatment, a few days after therapy, and several months after therapy. Data were also compared with subjects having only mild psychomotor delays. The metabolites measured were glutamine plus glutamate (Glx), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), and myoinositol (mI); each was expressed as a ratio with creatine plus phosphocreatine (total creatine: tCr). The Glx/tCr ratio was significantly reduced after the TCS treatment. The NAA/tCr ratio was also significantly reduced after the treatment compared with the control group, although the change in NAA signal was heterogeneous among patients, correlating with respective outcomes. The Cho/tCr and mI/tCr ratios were not affected by TCS treatment. The reduction in Glx suggests a decrease in the glutamate-glutamine cycle, which plays a pivotal role in synthesizing neurotransmitters such as glutamate and GABA. TCS-induced Glx reduction may induce changes in synaptic signal transduction, thereby accounting for the effect of TCS on WS. The change in NAA indicates altered neuronal activity, which may be correlated with outcome in WS patients.

  13. Gene therapy with bilirubin-UDP-glucuronosyltransferase in the Gunn rat model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Murphree, S S; Willer, S S; Bolli, R; French, B A

    1998-03-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome type 1 (CN type 1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by nonhemolytic jaundice resulting from mutations to the gene encoding bilirubin-UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UDPGT). The Gunn rat is an accurate animal model of this disease because the bilirubin-UDPGT gene in this strain carries a premature stop codon. The primary objective of this study was to complement this deficiency in vivo using liver-directed gene therapy. The efficiency of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5)-mediated gene transfer to the neonatal rat liver was first assessed by intravenous (i.v.) injection of an Ad5 vector carrying a nuclear-localized LacZ gene. An Ad5 vector expressing the cDNA encoding human bilirubin-UDPGT (Ad5/CMV/hUG-Br1) was then generated and injected i.v. into neonatal Gunn rats. Plasma samples were collected and bilirubin levels were determined at regular intervals. Although the mean level of bilirubin in homozygous Gunn rats 1-2 days after birth was already 14.5-fold higher than that of heterozygous siblings, treatment with Ad5/CMV/hUG-Br1 reduced plasma bilirubin to normal levels within 1 week. Plasma bilirubin in the treated homozygous rats remained normal for 4 weeks before gradually climbing to intermediate levels that were approximately half that of untreated homozygotes by 12 weeks. Administration of Ad5-mediated gene therapy to neonatal Gunn rats effectively complemented the deficiency in bilirubin-UDPGT, resulting in substantial reductions in plasma bilirubin over a 3-month period. The efficacy of Ad5-mediated gene therapy in neonates suggests that this approach might be effective against other hepatic disorders, including autosomal recessive deficiencies in lipid metabolism and vascular homeostasis.

  14. Outcome of Long-Term Bisphosphonate Therapy in McCune-Albright Syndrome and Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Majoor, Bas Cj; Appelman-Dijkstra, Natasha M; Fiocco, Martha; van de Sande, Michiel Aj; Dijkstra, Pd Sander; Hamdy, Neveen At

    2017-02-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare bone disorder characterized by fibrous dysplasia (FD), endocrinopathies, and café-au-lait patches. FD patients have been shown to respond favorably to treatment with bisphosphonates, but data are scarce in the more severe polyostotic form (PFD), including MAS, and factors determining treatment outcome are not known, particularly in the long-term. We evaluated the biochemical (bone turnover markers [BTMs]) and clinical (pain reduction) outcome of bisphosphonate therapy in 11 patients with MAS and 30 patients with PFD: median duration of treatment 6 years (range, 2 to 25 years). Prognostic factors for treatment outcome were identified in both groups. Patients with MAS were younger at diagnosis (p = 0.001), all had precocious puberty, and four (36%) had additional growth hormone (GH) excess associated with severe craniofacial FD. Extent of skeletal disease was more severe in MAS compared to PFD. MAS patients had higher serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) concentrations (p = 0.005), higher skeletal burden scores (p < 0.001), and more fractures (p = 0.021). MAS patients had also higher levels of FGF-23 (p = 0.008) and higher prevalence of hypophosphatemia (p = 0.013). Twenty-four of 30 PFD patients (80%) demonstrated a complete clinical and biochemical response within a year of starting treatment (p = 0.015), compared to only four of 11 MAS patients (36%). There were no nonresponders. In the whole group, FGF-23, total ALP, P1NP, and CTX positively correlated with skeletal burden scores (all p ≤ 0.001), which was the only significant risk factor for an incomplete response to bisphosphonate therapy (p < 0.01). Our data suggest a beneficial and safe outcome of long-term bisphosphonate therapy in the majority of patients with PFD, although response to therapy was limited by the higher skeletal disease burden in MAS patients. In the PFD/MAS population studied, the only identified prognostic factor

  15. Progressive neurodegenerative syndrome in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia receiving intravenous immunoglobulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Sag, Aslihan Taskiran; Saka, Esen; Ozgur, Tuba Turul; Sanal, Ozden; Ayvaz, Deniz Cagdas; Elibol, Bulent; Kurne, Asli Tuncer

    2014-09-01

    A progressive encephalopathy of unknown etiology has been described in patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders. In this report, we characterize the clinical features of this progressive neurodegenerative dementing disorder in a young man with Bruton agammaglobulinemia, through neuropsychological tests and a video sequence. The clinical course of the encephalopathy seems rather uniform: Cognition, especially frontal lobe function, is affected in the early stages, and some patients develop movement disorders. The syndrome causes severe cognitive and physical disability, and can eventually be fatal. The autoimmunity results from dysregulated immune responses, but the underlying mechanism has not yet been fully explained.

  16. rt-PA with Antithrombotic Therapies in a Case with Capsular Warning Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fuseya, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Miyuki; Matsuda, Eri; Takada, Kozue; Watanabe, Kiwamu; Fujitake, Junko; Nakaya, Yoshifumi

    2017-01-01

    We herein report a case of capsular warning syndrome (CWS) that was successfully treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). A 70-year-old woman had repeated stereotyped transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) of right hemiparesis and dysarthria. After hospitalization, argatroban, aspirin, and cilostazol were started but were ineffective. Thirteen hours after the first episode of TIAs, severe symptoms occurred. Magnetic resonance imaging showed acute infarctions in the internal capsule to corona radiata, so we used rt-PA. Since then, the TIAs have not occurred, and the symptoms have considerably improved. This case suggests that rt-PA might be effective and safe for use in treating CWS. PMID:28202868

  17. A simple method to predict response to immunosuppressive therapy in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saunthararajah, Yogen; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Wesley, Robert; Wang, Qiong J; Barrett, A John

    2003-10-15

    Immunosuppression with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) or cyclosporine (CSA) can be used to treat the cytopenia associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Previously, we identified HLA-DR15, younger age, and shorter duration of red cell transfusion dependence as pretreatment variables that correlate significantly with a response. Using these pretreatment variables we have devised a simple method to prospectively identify patients with low or high probabilities of response to immunosuppression. The ability of this system to predict response was confirmed in a separate cohort of 23 patients with MDS treated with immunosuppression.

  18. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help improve skills. They may include speech, physical, occupational, and/or educational therapy. With support and treatment, many people with Down syndrome live happy, productive lives. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  19. Klinefelter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Testosterone therapy may be prescribed. This can help: Grow body hair Improve appearance of muscles Improve concentration Improve mood and self esteem Increase energy and sex drive Increase strength Most men with this syndrome are not able to get ...

  20. Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Look, Kathy

    Tourette Syndrome has a history of being misdiagnosed or undiagnosed due to its unusual and complex symptoms. This paper describes: the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome; its etiology; age of onset; therapeutic methods, such as drug therapy, psychotherapy, diet control, and hypnosis; educational implications; and employment prospects. Several…

  1. Angiogenesis Research to Improve Therapies for Vascular Leak Syndromes, Intra-Abdominal Adhesions, and Arterial Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    and resuspended in phospate buffer saline (PBS) before use. Preparation of magnetic opsonins Super - paramagnetic beads (1 mm diameter, tosyl-coated...permeability in experimental model systems. These therapies include the following: (i) a newly developed nanoparticle -based oral delivery system for...inhibitors utilized in this study: Lodamin and an Fc-conjugated endostatin fragment. • investigated the efficacy of Lodamin (a nanoparticle -based oral

  2. Repair of atrial septal defect with Eisenmenger syndrome after long-term sildenafil therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hwue; Yu, Jeong Jin; Yun, Tae-Jin; Lee, Yonghee; Kim, Yong Beom; Choi, Hyung Soon; Jhang, Won Kyoung; Shin, Hong Ju; Park, Jeong-Jun; Seo, Dong-Man; Ko, Jae-Kon; Park, In-Sook

    2010-05-01

    We report a woman with atrial septal defect and severe pulmonary hypertension with 25.0 Wood unit.m(2) of indexed total pulmonary vascular resistance. She underwent successful corrective repair of atrial septal defect after 2 years of treatment with sildenafil, and has been monitored for 4 years after repair. This case supports a "treat and repair" approach using advanced pulmonary vasodilator therapy in selected patients with inoperable severe pulmonary hypertension associated with atrial septal defect.

  3. Effect of radial shock wave therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: A prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yung-Tsan; Ke, Ming-Jen; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chang, Chih-Ya; Lin, Ching-Yueh; Li, Tsung-Ying; Shih, Feng-Mei; Chen, Liang-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Three recent studies demonstrated the positive effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for treating carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). However, none have entirely proved the effects of ESWT on CTS because all studies had a small sample size and lacked a placebo-controlled design. Moreover, radial ESWT (rESWT) has not been used to treat CTS. We conducted a prospective randomized, controlled, double-blinded study to assess the effect of rESWT for treating CTS. Thirty-four enrolled patients (40 wrists) were randomized into intervention and control groups (20 wrists in each). Participants in the intervention group underwent three sessions of rESWT with nightly splinting, whereas those in the control group underwent sham rESWT with nightly splinting. The primary outcome was visual analog scale (VAS), whereas the secondary outcomes included the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ), cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve, sensory nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve, and finger pinch strength. Evaluations were performed before treatment and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the third rESWT session. A significantly greater improvement in the VAS, BCTQ scores, and CSA of the median nerve was noted in the intervention group throughout the study as compared to the control group (except for BCTQ severity at week 12 and CSA at weeks 1 and 4) (p < 0.05). This is the first study to assess rESWT in a randomized placebo-controlled trial and demonstrate that rESWT is a safe and effective method for relieving pain and disability in patients with CTS. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:977-984, 2016.

  4. Cinacalcet therapy in patients affected by primary hyperparathyroidism associated to Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndrome type 1 (MEN1).

    PubMed

    Giusti, Francesca; Cianferotti, Luisella; Gronchi, Giorgio; Cioppi, Federica; Masi, Laura; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colao, Annamaria; Ferolla, Piero; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2016-06-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is the main endocrinopathy associated with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome. Cinacalcet is a calcimimetic agent licensed for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with end-stage renal disease, and for the reduction of marked hypercalcemia in patients with parathyroid carcinoma and sporadic hyperparathyroidism requiring surgery but for whom parathyroidectomy is contraindicated. It may provide a medical alternative for the management of primary hyperparathyroidism in subjects affected by Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1. In this longitudinal, intervention study, 33 MEN1 patients had been enrolled, 10 males and 23 females with a mean age of 40 ± 11.9 years, range 20-63. Primary hyperparathyroidism was the first clinical manifestation in 12 patients. All subjects commenced with Cinacalcet 30 mg/day, 22 patients starting therapy with calcimimetics as an alternative to surgery, and 11 patients opting for the medication after the onset of persistent post-surgical primary hyperparathyroidism. Duration of follow-up was 12 months. The results of this study show significant reductions in serum calcium. The changes in hormonal secretions of pituitary and gastroenteropancreatic glands were not significant, demonstrating the overall safety of this drug in this disease. Cinacalcet has been well tolerated by 28 patients, whereas five individuals complained of heartburn and grade 1 nausea, which did not prevent the completion of the study. In conclusion, Cinacalcet has resulted to be well tolerated and safe in patients with MEN1 syndrome and the calcium homeostasis was stabilized.

  5. Cabergoline plus metformin therapy effects on menstrual irregularity and androgen system in polycystic ovary syndrome women with hyperprolactinemia

    PubMed Central

    Ghaneei, Azam; Jowkar, Akram; Hasani Ghavam, Mohammad Reza; Ghaneei, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background: 30% of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) show mild, transient hyperprolactinemia. It is suggested that a reduction of the dopamine inhibitory effect might raise both prolactin and luteinizing hormone. Objective: To investigate the adjuvant cabergoline therapy effects on menstrual irregularity and androgen system in PCOS women with hyperprolactinemia. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was done on 110 polycystic ovary syndrome women with increased serum prolactin concentration [1.5 fold more than normal level (>37.5 ng/ml)]. Participants were divided into two groups: Case group (n=55) treated with metformin 1gr/day and cabergoline 0.5 mg/week for 4 months and control group (n=55) treated with metformin 1g/day and placebo weekly. Testosterone, prolactin, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate level were measured before and four months after intervention in two groups. Also, situation of menstrual cycles asked and recorded before and after intervention. Results: We found decrease in the mean of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, weight and total testosterone level in the two groups after intervention but their changes were not significant. Patients in case group showed a significant decrease in serum prolactin level before and after intervention (p<0.001), but no difference was found in control group. All patients in both studied groups had irregular menstrual cycles, which regulate after intervention and the difference was significant (p=0.02). Conclusion: The results showed that cabergoline can be used as a safe administration in PCOS patients with hyperprolactinemia to improve the menstrual cycles. Considering that the administration of cabergoline plus metformin may reduce the required duration and dose of metformin, patient acceptability of this approach is higher. PMID:25999998

  6. [The low FODMAP diet as a therapy for irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    van der Waaij, Laurens A; Stevens, Janneke

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a very common, sometimes disabling disorder for which there is a lack of effective treatments. Many patients report that the make-up of the diet has an effect on their symptoms. The western diet consists of many different molecules. Some of them are small, fermentable and cannot be absorbed (FODMAPs). The low FODMAP diet was recently developed in Australia. In randomised controlled trials 37-45% of IBS patients experience symptom reduction with this diet. The low FODMAP diet starts with a 6-week elimination phase. If symptoms decrease substantially, it is followed by a structured reintroduction phase of the various FODMAPs over several weeks, after which patients are left with a diet that is simpler to follow.

  7. Myasthenia gravis and myasthenic syndrome: simulation of twitch strength with or without therapy.

    PubMed

    Nigrovic, Vladimir; Amann, Anton; Bhatt, Shashi

    2005-12-01

    To examine the quantitative relationship between indirectly evoked twitch and decreases in the number of either postsynaptic receptors or acetylcholine molecules released by a single stimulus, we studied these variables in a computer-simulated model of neuromuscular transmission. Twitch strength decreased if the number of receptors decreased to below 30% of normal or the number of acetylcholine molecules released by a stimulus decreased to below 80%. Inhibition of acetylcholine hydrolysis to 50% restored twitch strength in the presence of a decreased number of receptors. However, twitch strength was more easily restored to normalcy by augmenting the release of acetylcholine, if the release was diminished by disease. The simulations mimic the clinically known therapeutic outcomes in certain disorders of neuromuscular transmission. These results provide useful quantitative insights into the relationship between acetylcholine receptors or the stimulus-induced release of acetylcholine and muscle function in myasthenia gravis or Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome.

  8. Endovascular therapy for left main compression syndrome. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Caldera, Angel E; Cruz-Gonzalez, Ignacio; Bezerra, Hiram G; Cury, Ricardo C; Palacios, Igor F; Cockrill, Barbara A; Inglessis-Azuaje, Ignacio

    2009-06-01

    Extrinsic compression of the left main coronary artery (LMCA) can occur in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension and enlarged pulmonary artery trunk. It has been usually described in the setting of congenital defects such as atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, and, more rarely, isolated persistent ductus arteriosus. Functional and structural evaluation of such patients can currently be performed noninvasively with the use of cardiac CT scanning and/or MRI. The optimal management of symptomatic patients remains unknown. We report a case of extrinsic compression of the LMCA in a symptomatic patient with Eisenmenger syndrome who underwent unprotected LMCA stent implantation. We also performed a literature review of the reported cases concerning patients treated with LMCA stent implantation for the management of this condition.

  9. Melatonin and the metabolic syndrome: a tool for effective therapy in obesity-associated abnormalities?

    PubMed

    Nduhirabandi, F; du Toit, E F; Lochner, A

    2012-06-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities associated with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. Apart from its powerful antioxidant properties, the pineal gland hormone melatonin has recently attracted the interest of various investigators as a multifunctional molecule. Melatonin has been shown to have beneficial effects in cardiovascular disorders including ischaemic heart disease and hypertension. However, its role in cardiovascular risk factors including obesity and other related metabolic abnormalities is not yet established, particularly in humans. New emerging data show that melatonin may play an important role in body weight regulation and energy metabolism. This review will address the role of melatonin in the MetS focusing on its effects in obesity, insulin resistance and leptin resistance. The overall findings suggest that melatonin should be exploited as a therapeutic tool to prevent or reverse the harmful effects of obesity and its related metabolic disorders.

  10. The challenge of individualised risk assessment and therapy planning in elderly high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients.

    PubMed

    Stauder, Reinhard

    2012-09-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent one of the most frequent and serious haematologic diseases of the elderly. Effective therapies exist ranging from best supportive care to haematologic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Decision making, however, is rather complex in this group of patients because ageing is a multidimensional process involving not only physiological changes but also changes in functional, social, emotional and cognitive capacities. All these factors can have a significant impact on the efficacy and tolerability of a potential therapy and therefore have to be thoroughly assessed before deciding on individual treatment regimens. Risk assessment tools are available both to classify the stage and prognosis of MDS and to meet the needs of elderly patients. A tool explicitly focussing on elderly MDS patients, however, is still missing. The current report approached this issue by combining the well established MDS-risk score 'International Prognostic Scoring System' (IPSS) with the 'Multidimensional Geriatric Assessment' (MGA). As decision making is most complex in high-risk MDS patients, the new algorithm is presented exemplarily for this group of patients. In a first step, MDS-related risk is identified using IPSS, in a second step, patients are assigned to one of three risk categories of the MGA (go-go/fit, slow-go/vulnerable, no-go/frail). While go-go patients might be subjected to therapies comparable to those given to younger patients, in no-go patients, a palliative therapy combined with best supportive care will probably be most appropriate. In slow-go patients, age-related life expectancy taken from public age statistics should be compared to the MDS-related life expectancy. Based on this combined assessment procedure and also on treatment tolerance in terms of the expectations/wishes of the patient and his/her family, an individualised therapeutic approach should be developed. Specific treatment recommendations for these three groups of

  11. Levamisole therapy in children with frequently relapsing and steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome: a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Kuźma-Mroczkowska, Elżbieta; Pańczyk-Tomaszewska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Numerous studies suggest that levamisole, an antihelmintic agent with an immunomodulatory effect, reduces the number of relapses in children with frequently relapsing and steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome (FRNS/SDNS). The aim of the study was to present a single center’s experience in treatment of FRNS and SDNS with levamisole. Material and methods Among 72 children with FRNS/SDNS treated in our department with levamisole in the years 1984-2011 we studied in detail 53 patients (mean age: 6.5 ±3.0 years), in whom the medication was administered for at least 6 months. In these 53 patients we evaluated: the course of the disease before levamisole, the renal biopsy result, medications used, prednisone dose on levamisole initiation, duration of levamisole treatment, time to first relapse and number of relapses on levamisole, and levamisole side effects. Results The duration of nephrotic syndrome was 3.4 ±2.9 years, and the number of relapses before levamisole treatment was 6.0 ±3.4. The dose of prednisone on initiation of levamisole treatment was 1.2 ±0.6 mg/kg/24 h, and the duration of levamisole treatment was 15.0 ±7.3 months. During levamisole treatment proteinuria relapsed in 34/53 (64.2%) children, and the time to first relapse was 8.8 ±8.1 months. During levamisole therapy relapses of the disease decreased significantly (2.7 ±2.0 vs. 1.8 ±2.1 relapses/year, p = 0.02). Time to first relapse correlated with total number of relapses (R = –0.59, p < 0.001) and number of relapses in one year during levamisole treatment (R = –0.60, p < 0.001). Conclusions Levamisole is effective in reducing the number of relapses in children with frequently relapsing and steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome. Early relapse of proteinuria on levamisole treatment in children with FRNS/SDNS suggests low efficacy of further treatment. PMID:27833440

  12. Long QT syndrome: how effective therapy in a single patient favorably influenced the long-term clinical course and genetic understanding of this hereditary disorder.

    PubMed

    Lowengrub, Katherine M; Moss, Deborah R; Moss, David A; Moss, Arthur J

    2015-01-01

    The story of the long QT syndrome involved a chance interaction that took place in 1957 when Dr. Moss was shown a unique series of ECGs with a prolonged QT interval in a young deaf boy whose recurrent syncope culminated in sudden death. Who could have predicted that this clinical experience would lead to innovative and effective new therapy for a patient with the long QT syndrome several years later and the subsequent formation of the International Long QT Registry? This Registry has stimulated interactions among and between patients and physicians and has enhanced collaborations involving clinical, genetic, and basic-science investigators. The net result has been a significant improvement in the diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of patients with the long QT syndrome and an overall advancement in the science of medicine - two of the many satisfactions that physicians can experience in the clinical practice of medicine.

  13. Transformation of Sézary syndrome into CD30+ anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma after alemtuzumab therapy with evidence of clonal unity.

    PubMed

    Nevet, Mariela Judith; Zuckerman, Tsila; Sahar, Dvora; Bergman, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized mouse antibody targeting the CD52 cell surface, which has been effective in patients with advanced stage mycosis fungoides (MF) including erythrodermic MF and Sézary syndrome. There are a few descriptions of large cell transformation after its administration. A young patient with an acute onset of Sézary syndrome treated initially unsuccessfully with fludarabine and cyclophosphamide and later on successfully with alemtuzumab has been described. Three weeks after the beginning of therapy, however, she developed transformed T-cell lymphoma indistinguishable from CD30 anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. After bone marrow transplantation, the transformed CD30 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma recurred as a transformed CD30 plaque MF. All 3 types of lesions showed the same T-cell receptor clonal gene rearrangement, which supports the notion that Sézary syndrome, CD30 anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, and MF are interrelated.

  14. A Case of Mycobacterium riyadhense in an Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Patient with a Suspected Paradoxical Response to Antituberculosis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Badreddine, Samar Assem

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old male patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) presented with clinical picture suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis. He was commenced on antituberculosis therapy (ATT) with signs of improvement. Then he developed cervical lymph node abscess which was drained. Steroid was started for presumed paradoxical response to ATT which results in clinical regression. The culture result revealed Mycobacterium riyadhense. This report addresses the rarity of this bacteria in medical literature. It reviews clinical presentations and medical treatment particularly in the setting of coinfections. PMID:27703819

  15. Purinergic signaling and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome: From viral entry to therapy.

    PubMed

    Passos, Daniela F; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Leal, Daniela Br

    2015-08-12

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a serious condition associated to severe immune dysfunction and immunodeficiency. Mechanisms involved in HIV-associated immune activation, inflammation and loss of CD4+ T cells have been extensively studied, including those concerning purinergic signaling pathways. Purinergic signaling components are involved in viral entry and replication and disease progression. Research involving the participation of purinergic signaling in HIV infection has been not only important to elucidate disease mechanisms but also to introduce new approaches to therapy. The involvement of purinergic signaling in the pathogenesis of HIV infection and its implications in the control of the HIV infection are reviewed in this paper.

  16. [Resistance to therapy in primary nephrotic syndrome: effect of MDR1 gene activity].

    PubMed

    Stachowski, J; Zanker, C B; Runowski, D; Zaniew, M; Peszko, A; Medyńska, A; Zwolińska, D; Rogowska-Kalisz, A; Hyla-Klekot, L; Szprygner, K; Weglarska, J; Sieniawska, M; Musiał, W; Maciejewski, J; Baldamus, C A

    2000-04-01

    MDR1 gene encodes for a transmembranous glycoprotein, gp-170, which acts as a drug export pump and is also a cyclosporine(CsA)-binding protein. This study aimed at evaluating MDR1 expression in NS sensitive(S) and resistant(R) to therapy (steroids/S/, cyclophosphamide/C/, CsA) patients. Twenty six boys, 13 girls aged 3-8 years were included to the study. MDR1 was analysed using: 1) evaluation of gp-170 activity according to DiC2/3/ [3,3-Diethyloxa-carbocyanine Iodide] by means of flow cytometry and as 2) mRNA expression of MDR1 determined by RT-PCR. The analysis was performed in the lymphocyte subset CD4/CD45RA presenting suppressor-inducer activity. Negative control, Jurkat-T-cell line, not expressing the MDR1 phenotype, was transfected with viral expression vector containing a full-length cDNA for the human MDR1 gene. We found that: in SR-NS the high expression of MDR1 was associated mainly with the suppressor-inducer T-cells (CD45RA+CD4+) and was subsequently enhanced during an ineffective treatment with C and/or CsA. C-R-NS and CsA-R-NS were partially reversible by S- and R-Verapamil; this was in vitro confirmed by inhibition of export pump activity, gp-170. SS-NS, C-S-NS and CsA-S-NS presented the low expression and activity of MDR1 comparing to R-children (p < 0.001) and healthy controls (p < 0.00001). Resistance to therapy in NS patients seems to be resulted from the enhanced expression of MDR1 gene and subsequent high activity of export pump P-gp-170. Calcium channel blockers may reverse the MRD1-related resistance in the therapy of NS. Analysis of MDR1 may help to detect of suspected therapy resistance in NS.

  17. Gene therapy in the treatment of Fanconi anemia, a progressive bone marrow failure syndrome.

    PubMed

    Williams, David A; Croop, James; Kelly, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease characterized by progressive, fatal bone marrow failure, congenital anomalies and predisposition to cancer. Although stem cell transplantation is therapeutic, human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling donors are available to a minority of patients. In murine models and human cells in vitro, gene transfer corrects the FA cellular phenotype of chromosomal breakage in response to DNA-damaging agents, suggesting therapeutic use of gene transfer is possible. However, disease-specific characteristics make application of viral vector technology difficult. Multiple studies are currently underway to develop a gene therapy approach for treating this disease, including phase I trials.

  18. The effect of vitamin D replacement therapy on insulin resistance and androgen levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Selimoglu, H; Duran, C; Kiyici, S; Ersoy, C; Guclu, M; Ozkaya, G; Tuncel, E; Erturk, E; Imamoglu, S

    2010-04-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is one of the common features of the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and recent studies indicate the possible role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of IR and glucose metabolism. Aim of this study was aimed to determine the effect of vitamin D replacement therapy on glucose metabolism, insulin, and androgen levels in obese, insulin-resistant women with PCOS. Eleven women with PCOS were included in the study. Mean age of the patients was 23.6+/-5.7 yr, body mass index 33.9+/-5.1 kg/m(2). Six patients (54.5%) had acantosis nigricans and 10 (90.9%) oligoamenorrhea. The mean Ferriman Gallwey score was 14.1+/-4.6. Only 2 women were within the normal limits of vitamin D levels as >20 ng/ml. Three weeks after the administration of the single dose of 300,000 units of vitamin D3 orally, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 significantly increased from 16.9+/-16 ng/ml to 37.1+/-14.6 ng/ml (p: 0.027) and only 2 women were detected to have vitamin D3 levels <20 ng/ml. Although glucose and insulin levels were decreased non-significantly, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-IR significantly decreased from 4.41+/-1.38 to 3.67+/-1.48 (p: 0.043). No significant alterations were witnessed at the levels of DHEAS, total and free testosterone, androstenedione. No correlation was found between vitamin D with HOMA and other hormonal parameters. In conclusion, women with PCOS have mostly insufficient vitamin D levels, and vitamin D replacement therapy may have a beneficial effect on IR in obese women with PCOS.

  19. Nasal pillows as an alternative interface in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome initiating continuous positive airway pressure therapy.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Silke; Garvey, John F; Swan, Valerie; Behan, Renata; McNicholas, Walter T

    2011-06-01

    Side-effects directly due to the nasal mask are common in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) commencing continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Recently, nasal pillows have been designed to overcome these issues. Limited evidence exists of the benefits and effectiveness of these devices. Twenty-one patients (19 male, 49±10years) with the established diagnosis of OSAS [apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI): 52±22] and who had a successful CPAP titration were commenced on CPAP therapy (10±2cmH2O), and randomized to 4weeks of a nasal pillow (P) and a standard nasal mask (M) in a crossover design. Outcome measures were objective compliance, AHI, quality of life, Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS) and CPAP side-effects. There was no difference in compliance (M versus P: 5.1±1.9h versus 5.0±1.7h; P=0.701) and AHI (2.6±2.7 versus 3.0±2.9; P=0.509). Quality of life and ESS improved with CPAP, but there was no difference in the extent of improvement between both devices. Usage of nasal pillows resulted in less reported pressure on the face and more subjects found the nasal pillow the more comfortable device. However, there was no clear overall preference for either device at the end of the study (mask=57%, pillow=43%; P=0.513). The applied CPAP pressure did not correlate with compliance, AHI and ESS. Furthermore, no differences in outcome parameters were noted comparing groups with CPAP pressure <10 and ≥10cm H(2) O. Nasal pillows are equally effective in CPAP therapy, but do not generally lead to improved compliance.

  20. Resolution of C1q deposition but not of the clinical nephrotic syndrome after immunomodulating therapy in focal sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tibor Fülöp, Tibor; Csongrádi, Éva; Lerant, Anna A.; Lewin, Matthew; Lewin, Jack R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The natural evolution of C1q nephropathy (C1qNP) during immunosuppressive treatment is relatively little studied or understood. Case Presentation: A 30 year-old Caucasian female was referred to us for further management of biopsy-proven C1qNP and severe nephrotic syndrome. Serologic work-up remained negative, including complement C3 and C4 levels and repeated testing for antinuclear antibodies. A renal biopsy revealed minimal change nephropathy vs. focal sclerosis on light microscopy and C1qNP on immunopathology. She has failed trials of high-dose oral prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil 1,500 mg twice a day and a subsequent regimen of monthly IV cyclophosphamide 750 mg × 9 cycles. She also received the maximum tolerated angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and spironolactone therapy. Random urine protein-to-creatinine (UPC) ratio predicted proteinuria in the range between 5-35 gm/day, while serum creatinine rose progressively from 1.0 mg/dL to 1.4 mg/dL (to convert to μmol/L, multiply by 88.4). A decision was made to repeat renal biopsy to reassess the underlying histology. The biopsy revealed focal sclerosis but no C1q deposition. Conclusions: Our case illustrates at least two points: first, an established pathologic diagnosis does not obviate the need for repeated renal biopsy later on, should diagnostic uncertainty persist. Second, histological diagnoses may evolve over time, especially in a patient receiving active and powerful immune-modulating treatment. In our case, the clinical nephrosis did not change with immunosuppressive therapy while C1q deposition ceased, making this latter entity likely the immunologically mediated process. PMID:25964890

  1. Beneficial effect of pyruvate therapy on Leigh syndrome due to a novel mutation in PDH E1α gene.

    PubMed

    Koga, Yasutoshi; Povalko, Nataliya; Katayama, Koujyu; Kakimoto, Noriko; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Naito, Etsuo; Tanaka, Masashi

    2012-02-01

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is a progressive untreatable degenerating mitochondrial disorder caused by either mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations. A patient was a second child of unconsanguineous parents. On the third day of birth, he was transferred to neonatal intensive care units because of severe lactic acidosis. Since he was showing continuous lactic acidosis, the oral supplementation of dichloroacetate (DCA) was introduced on 31st day of birth at initial dose of 50 mg/kg, followed by maintenance dose of 25 mg/kg/every 12 h. The patient was diagnosed with LS due to a point mutation of an A-C at nucleotide 599 in exon 6 in the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α gene, resulting in the substitution of aspartate for threonine at position 200 (N200T). Although the concentrations of lactate and pyruvate in blood were slightly decreased, his clinical conditions were deteriorating progressively. In order to overcome the mitochondrial or cytosolic energy crisis indicated by lactic acidosis as well as clinical symptoms, we terminated the DCA and administered 0.5 g/kg/day TID of sodium pyruvate orally. We analyzed the therapeutic effects of DCA or sodium pyruvate in the patient, and found that pyruvate therapy significantly decreased lactate, pyruvate and alanine levels, showed no adverse effects such as severe neuropathy seen in DCA, and had better clinical response on development and epilepsy. Though the efficacy of pyruvate on LS will be evaluated by randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study design in future, pyruvate therapy is a possible candidate for therapeutic choice for currently incurable mitochondrial disorders such as LS.

  2. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of oral antioxidant supplement therapy in patients with dry eye syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jehn-Yu; Yeh, Po-Ting; Hou, Yu-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of oral antioxidant supplementation in the treatment of patients with dry eye syndrome (DES). Methods A prospective, randomized, double-blinded study compared the effects of an antioxidant supplement (containing anthocyanosides, astaxanthin, vitamins A, C, and E, and several herbal extracts, including Cassiae semen and Ophiopogonis japonicus) with placebo on patients with DES. We assessed dry eye symptoms, visual acuity, Schirmer’s test, tear film breakup time, cornea and conjunctiva fluorescein staining, serum anti-SSA/anti-SSB antibodies, and the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in tears. The supplementation period was 8 weeks and patients were followed up every 4 weeks for 16 weeks. A linear mixed model was used to compare the groups, while within-group differences were tested by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results Forty-three patients, 20 and 23 in treatment and placebo groups, respectively, completed the study. Liver and renal functions were normal. Diastolic blood pressure decreased in the treatment group. There were no significant differences in systolic blood pressure, dry eye symptoms, serum anti-SSA and anti-SSB, visual acuity, intraocular pressure, or fluorescein corneal staining between the groups. Tear film breakup time scores and Schirmer’s test without topical anesthesia significantly improved in the treatment group. Tear ROS level differed between the groups and decreased after treatment. Overall subjective impression revealed a significant improvement with treatment compared with placebo. Conclusion Oral antioxidant supplementations may increase tear production and improve tear film stability by reducing tear ROS. The vegetable-based antioxidant supplement used in this study is safe and can be utilized as an adjuvant therapy to conventional artificial tear therapy for patients with DES. PMID:27274185

  3. Severe alcohol withdrawal syndrome: Evolution of care and impact of adjunctive therapy on course and complications of 171 intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Puscas, Mircea; Hasoon, Mohammed; Eechevarria, Carlos; Cooper, Tracy; Tamura, Leslie; Chebbo, Ahmad; W Carlson, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This single site retrospective observational study assessed the evolution of sedation therapy for severe alcohol withdrawal syndrome in the intensive care unit. Patient records for 2 intervals were reviewed: Interval 1, which included 87 intensive care unit patients admitted January 2005 through September 2007, for whom benzodiazedpine monotherapy was utilized; and Interval 2, January 2010 through December 2010, for whom 54 of 84 (64.3%) intensive care unit patients, including all those intubated, received adjunctive agents, including dexmedetomidine or propofol. Clinical management was similar for both intervals, as well as prevalence of alcohol withdrawal syndrome versus total adult hospital admissions and comorbid conditions. Overall, respiratory failure (53 versus 39%), seizures (36 versus 18%), and pneumonia (51 versus 38%) were less frequent during Interval 2 (all p < .05), with lower benzodiazedpine basal dose requirements for those given adjunctive therapy. However, if instances of pneumonia or respiratory failure related to seizures prior to intensive care unit admission are excluded, the prevalence of these complications was similar (p = ns) for Interval 1 and Interval 2. Intensive care unit and hospital length of stay were not altered by adjunctive therapy, which was typically employed for more severely affected patients. High intensity sedation with adjunctive drugs led to few cardiovascular adverse events and may have facilitated management, but did not alter intensive care unit course of severe alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

  4. The role of rifaximin therapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome without constipation.

    PubMed

    Schey, Ron; Rao, Satish S C

    2011-08-01

    Alterations in gut flora may play an important role in the pathophysiology of bowel symptoms, especially in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). If so, antibiotics that affect gut flora may offer a novel approach for the management of patients with IBS. Here, we discuss the results of two identically designed, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (TARGET 1 and TARGET 2) of a poorly absorbed antibiotic, rifaximin, in patients with IBS. In these studies, 1260 patients (females 76.1 and 72.1%, respectively) who had IBS without constipation were randomized to receive either rifaximin 550 mg or placebo, three-times daily for 2 weeks. Subsequently, daily symptoms were assessed and patients were followed up for 10 weeks. The primary outcome measure - adequate relief of global IBS symptoms during the first 4 weeks after treatment - was met in significantly more patients who received rifaximin than placebo (p < 0.001). In addition, more patients in the rifaximin group than in the placebo group (p < 0.001) reported an adequate relief of bloating, and an improvement in abdominal pain and stool consistency - secondary outcome measures. The incidence of adverse events with rifaximin was similar to placebo, and the drug was well tolerated. In summary, a 2-week course of rifaximin provided significant relief of IBS symptoms, as well as bloating and abdominal pain.

  5. High dose pulsatile dexamethasone therapy in children with opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rostásy, K; Wilken, B; Baumann, M; Müller-Deile, K; Bieber, I; Gärtner, J; Möller, P; Angelini, P; Hero, B

    2006-10-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) is a rare movement disorder characterized by chaotic eye movements, myoclonus, and ataxia associated with severe irritability. Different treatment modalities including steroids and cyclophosphamide have been tried in the past often with significant side effects and variable success. Here we present 11 children, diagnosed with OMS between 1999 and 2005 and treated with high dose dexamethasone pulses. Main symptoms at presentation were opsoclonus (11/11), ataxia and/or myoclonus (11/11), irritability (10/11) associated with a neuroblastoma in four children. Number of dexamethasone pulses ranged from 6 to 60 pulses. No major side effects were reported. In 6/11 children a complete and sustained remission of OMS symptoms was achieved after 6 to 29 pulses of dexamethasone. Two children from this group have a normal development and no neurological sequelae. Two further children have minor delays in fine- and gross-motor skills. Two children despite a complete recovery of OMS symptoms have persisting developmental problems. 5/11 children still require regular dexamethasone pulses in addition to daily prednisolone (n = 1) or have received cyclophosphamide pulses meanwhile (n = 2). All children continue to have developmental and neurological difficulties. In summary treatment with high dose pulsatile dexamethasone appears to be safe and beneficial in a subgroup of patients with OMS.

  6. Oxidative stress and Down syndrome. Do antioxidants play a role in therapy?

    PubMed

    Muchová, J; Žitňanová, I; Ďuračková, Z

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a phenomenon associated with imbalance between production of free radicals and reactive metabolites (e.g. superoxide and hydrogen peroxide) and the antioxidant defences. Oxidative stress in individuals with Down syndrome (DS) has been associated with trisomy of the 21st chromosome resulting in DS phenotype as well as with various morphological abnormalities, immune disorders, intellectual disability, premature aging and other biochemical abnormalities. Trisomy 21 in patients with DS results in increased activity of an important antioxidant enzyme Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) which gene is located on the 21st chromosome along with other proteins such as transcription factor Ets-2, stress inducing factors (DSCR1) and precursor of beta-amyloid protein responsible for the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer disease. Mentioned proteins are involved in the management of mitochondrial function, thereby promoting mitochondrial theory of aging also in people with DS. In defence against toxic effects of free radicals and their metabolites organism has built antioxidant defence systems. Their lack and reduced function increases oxidative stress resulting in disruption of the structure of important biomolecules, such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. This leads to their dysfunctions affecting pathophysiology of organs and the whole organism. This paper examines the impact of antioxidant interventions as well as positive effect of physical exercise on cognitive and learning disabilities of individuals with DS. Potential therapeutic targets on the molecular level (oxidative stress markers, gene for DYRK1A, neutrophic factor BDNF) after intervention of natural polyphenols are also discussed.

  7. Towards a therapy for Angelman syndrome by reduction of a long non-coding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Linyan; Ward, Amanda J.; Chun, Seung; Bennett, C. Frank; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Rigo, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a single gene disorder characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay, behavioral uniqueness, speech impairment, seizures, and ataxia1,2. It is caused by maternal deficiency of the imprinted gene UBE3A, encoding an E3 ubiquitin ligase3-5. All patients carry at least one copy of paternal UBE3A, which is intact but silenced by a nuclear-localized long non-coding RNA, UBE3A antisense transcript (UBE3A-ATS)6-8. Murine Ube3a-ATS reduction by either transcription termination or topoisomerase I inhibition increased paternal Ube3a expression9,10. Despite a clear understanding of the disease-causing event in AS and the potential to harness the intact paternal allele to correct disease, no gene-specific treatment exists for patients. Here we developed a potential therapeutic intervention for AS by reducing Ube3a-ATS with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). ASO treatment achieved specific reduction of Ube3a-ATS and sustained unsilencing of paternal Ube3a in neurons in vitro and in vivo. Partial restoration of UBE3A protein in an AS mouse model ameliorated some cognitive deficits associated with the disease. Although additional studies of phenotypic correction are needed, for the first time we developed a sequence-specific and clinically feasible method to activate expression of the paternal Ube3a allele. PMID:25470045

  8. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in the Pathogenesis of Rett Syndrome: Implications for Mitochondria-Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Shulyakova, Natalya; Andreazza, Ana C.; Mills, Linda R.; Eubanks, James H.

    2017-01-01

    First described over 50 years ago, Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused primarily by mutations of the X-linked MECP2 gene. RTT affects predominantly females, and has a prevalence of roughly 1 in every 10,000 female births. Prior to the discovery that mutations of MECP2 are the leading cause of RTT, there were suggestions that RTT could be a mitochondrial disease. In fact, several reports documented altered mitochondrial structure, and deficiencies in mitochondrial enzyme activity in different cells or tissues derived from RTT patients. With the identification of MECP2 as the causal gene, interest largely shifted toward defining the normal function of MeCP2 in the brain, and how its absence affects the neurodevelopment and neurophysiology. Recently, though, interest in studying mitochondrial function in RTT has been reignited, at least in part due to observations suggesting systemic oxidative stress does play a contributing role in RTT pathogenesis. Here we review data relating to mitochondrial alterations at the structural and functional levels in RTT patients and model systems, and present a hypothesis for how the absence of MeCP2 could lead to altered mitochondrial function and elevated levels of cellular oxidative stress. Finally, we discuss the prospects for treating RTT using interventions that target specific aspects of mitochondrial dysfunction and/or oxidative stress. PMID:28352216

  9. Diamel Therapy in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Reduces Hyperinsulinaemia, Insulin Resistance, and Hyperandrogenaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Yero, Arturo; Santana Pérez, Felipe; Ovies Carballo, Gisel; Cabrera-Rode, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    For to determine the effect of Diamel on the insulin resistance, insulin sensitivity, and sexual hormones results in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). A study was carried out on 37 patients with this disorder. A triple-blind clinical trial was designed in which the Diamel food supplement was compared with a placebo. The women with reproductive ages were randomly distributed in two groups, with 18 and 19 women respectively, and they took Diamel or placebo and were followed up during 6 months with clinical and biochemical evaluation. A significant decrease in the HOMA-IR from the initial value at six months was observed in the group with Diamel. The insulin sensitivity improved considerably in this group. The rate of menstrual recovery was higher in the group with Diamel, and two patients from this group obtained pregnancy. The hormone levels shows a significant decrease in testosterone at 3 months in the group with Diamel compared with the control group. The LH also decreases in the same group when comparing the start with 6 months.We concluded that the Diamel decreases insulin resistance and improves sensitivity to this hormone in women with PCOS, with improvement in the levels of LH and testosterone. PMID:22778733

  10. Noradrenergic System in Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease A Target for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Cristy; Fahimi, Atoossa; Das, Devsmita; Mojabi, Fatemeh S; Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Salehi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Locus coeruleus (LC) neurons in the brainstem send extensive noradrenergic (NE)-ergic terminals to the majority of brain regions, particularly those involved in cognitive function. Both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down syndrome (DS) are characterized by similar pathology including significant LC degeneration and dysfunction of the NE-ergic system. Extensive loss of NE-ergic terminals has been linked to alterations in brain regions vital for cognition, mood, and executive function. While the mechanisms by which NE-ergic abnormalities contribute to cognitive dysfunction are not fully understood, emergent evidence suggests that rescue of NE-ergic system can attenuate neuropathology and cognitive decline in both AD and DS. Therapeutic strategies to enhance NE neurotransmission have undergone limited testing. Among those deployed to date are NE reuptake inhibitors, presynaptic α-adrenergic receptor antagonists, NE prodrugs, and β-adrenergic agonists. Here we examine alterations in the NE-ergic system in AD and DS and suggest that NE-ergic system rescue is a plausible treatment strategy for targeting cognitive decline in both disorders.

  11. Constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome: A review of current and emerging drug therapies

    PubMed Central

    Jadallah, Khaled A; Kullab, Susan M; Sanders, David S

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent medical condition that adversely affects patient quality of life and constitutes a significant economic burden on healthcare resources. A large proportion of patients suffer from the constipation subtype of IBS (IBS-C), most commonly afflicting older individuals and those with a lower socioeconomic status. Conventional pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment options have limited efficacies and/or significant adverse events, which lead to increased long-term health care expenditures. Failure to effectively treat IBS-C patients over the past decades has largely been due to a poor understanding of disease pathophysiology, lack of a global view of the patient, and an inappropriate selection of patients and treatment endpoints in clinical trials. In recent years, however, more effective and safer drugs have been developed for the treatment of IBS-C. The advancement in the area of pharmacologic treatment is based on new knowledge of the pathophysiologic basis of IBS-C and the development of drugs with increased selectivity within pharmacologic classes with recognized efficacies. This narrative review covers the spectrum of available drugs and their mechanisms of action, as well as the efficacy and safety profiles of each as determined in relevant clinical trials that have investigated treatment options for IBS-C and chronic constipation. A brief summary of laxative-based treatment options is presented, followed by up-to-date assessments for three classes of drugs: prokinetics, prosecretory agents, and bile acid modulators. PMID:25083062

  12. A-type lamins and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jose M; Pla, Davinia; Perez-Sala, Dolores; Andres, Vicente

    2011-06-01

    Lamin A and lamin C (A-type lamins, both encoded by the LMNA gene) are major components of the mammalian nuclear lamina, a complex proteinaceous structure that acts as a scaffold for protein complexes that regulate nuclear structure and function. Abnormal accumulation of farnesylated-progerin, a mutant form of prelamin A, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a devastating disorder that causes the death of affected children at an average age of 13.5 years, predominantly from premature atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction or stroke. Remarkably, progerin is also present in normal cells and appears to progressively accumulate during aging of non-HGPS cells. Therefore, understanding how this mutant form of lamin A provokes HGPS may shed significant insight into physiological aging. In this review, we discuss recent advances into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying HGPS, the main murine models of the disease, and the therapeutic strategies developed in cellular and animal models with the aim of reducing the accumulation of farnesylated-progerin, as well as their use in clinical trials of HGPS.

  13. Alveolar echinococcosis of the liver: percutaneous stent therapy in Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, J; Görich, J; Kramme, E; Merkle, E; Sokiranski, R; Kern, P; Brambs, H J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Infiltration of the hepatic veins in the alveolar echinococcosis can lead to the development of the Budd-Chiari syndrome. The medical and surgical treatment of this condition is generally unsatisfactory. The results of successful interventional treatment with percutaneous stent implantation in the hepatic veins are reported. METHODS: Using a transjugular approach, metal mesh stents (Boston Scientific, Medi-Tech Accuflex 8/60 mm) were placed in the median and left hepatic veins of a 53 year old woman. After the intervention, oral chemotherapy with albendazole (2 x 400 mg/day) was continued, but no anticoagulants were given. RESULTS: Stent placement was performed without complications. The clinical picture improved rapidly: normalisation of portal blood flow was confirmed by Doppler ultrasound and there was improvement of liver function, reduction of oesophageal varices, and disappearance of ascites. A follow-up examination at 15 months showed no evidence of stent occlusion. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of portal hypertension in alveolar echinococcosis of the liver is problematic. In selected patients with portal hypertension secondary to hepatic vein stenoses but no cirrhosis, percutaneous stent placement in the hepatic veins represents a promising treatment alternative. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9026484

  14. Therapy in endocrine disease: treatment of hirsutism in the polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Renato; Gambineri, Alessandra

    2014-02-01

    Hirsutism is a common medical complaint among women of reproductive age, and it affects the majority of women with the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Increased rate of androgen production and its availability in tissue represent the main pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for hirsutism. In addition, androgens may be generated de novo in the hair follicle; therefore, circulating androgen levels do not quantify the real exposure of the hair follicle to androgens, as a quota is locally generated. Hirsutism is a clinical sign and not a disease in itself; its presence does not therefore necessarily require treatment, particularly in mild-to-moderate forms, and when an affected woman does not worry about it. Physicians should decide whether hirsutism is to be treated or not by evaluating not only the severity of the phenomenon but also the subjective perception of the patient, which does not necessarily correspond to the true extent of hair growth. In any case, a physician should manage a woman with hirsutism only on the basis of a diagnosis of the underlying cause, and after a clear explanation of the efficacy of each therapeutic choice. Cosmetic procedures and pharmacological intervention are commonly used in the treatment of hirsutism and are discussed in this paper. Importantly, there are different phenotypes of women with hirsutism and PCOS that may require specific attention in the choice of treatment. In particular, when obesity is present, lifestyle intervention should be always considered, and if necessary combined with pharmacotherapy.

  15. Early environmental therapy rescues brain development in a mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Begenisic, Tatjana; Sansevero, Gabriele; Baroncelli, Laura; Cioni, Giovanni; Sale, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS), the most common genetic disorder associated with intellectual disabilities, is an untreatable condition characterized by a number of developmental defects and permanent deficits in the adulthood. Ts65Dn mice, the major animal model for DS, display severe cognitive and synaptic plasticity defects closely resembling the human phenotype. Here, we employed a multidisciplinary approach to investigate, for the first time in developing Ts65Dn mice, the effects elicited by early environmental enrichment (EE) on brain maturation and function. We report that exposure to EE resulted in a robust increase in maternal care levels displayed by Ts65Dn mothers and led to a normalization of declarative memory abilities and hippocampal plasticity in trisomic offspring. The positive effects of EE on Ts65Dn phenotype were not limited to the cognitive domain, but also included a rescue of visual system maturation. The beneficial EE effects were accompanied by increased BDNF and correction of over-expression of the GABA vesicular transporter vGAT. These findings highlight the beneficial impact of early environmental stimuli and their potential for application in the treatment of major functional deficits in children with DS.

  16. Epigallocatechin gallate: A useful therapy for cognitive disability in Down syndrome?

    PubMed

    Stagni, Fiorenza; Giacomini, Andrea; Emili, Marco; Guidi, Sandra; Ciani, Elisabetta; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental alterations and cognitive disability are constant features of Down syndrome (DS), a genetic condition due to triplication of chromosome 21. DYRK1A is one of the triplicated genes that is thought to be strongly involved in brain alterations. Treatment of Dyrk1A transgenic mice with epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), an inhibitor of DYRK1A, improves cognitive performance, suggesting that EGCG may represent a suitable treatment of DS. Evidence in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS shows that EGCG restores hippocampal development, although this effect is ephemeral. Other studies, however, show no effects of treatment on hippocampus-dependent memory. On the other hand, a pilot study in young adults with DS shows that EGCG transiently improves some aspects of memory. Interestingly, EGCG plus cognitive training engenders effects that are more prolonged. Studies in various rodent models show a positive impact of EGCG on brain and behavior, but other studies show no effect. In spite of these discrepancies, possibly due to heterogeneity of protocols/timing/species, EGCG seems to exert some beneficial effects on the brain. It is possible that protocols of periodic EGCG administration to individuals with DS (alone or in conjunction with other treatments) may prevent the disappearance of its effects.

  17. Pneumonia, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, and Early Immune-Modulator Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Yil

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is caused by infectious insults, such as pneumonia from various pathogens or related to other noninfectious events. Clinical and histopathologic characteristics are similar across severely affected patients, suggesting that a common mode of immune reaction may be involved in the immunopathogenesis of ARDS. There may be etiologic substances that have an affinity for respiratory cells and induce lung cell injury in cases of ARDS. These substances originate not only from pathogens, but also from injured host cells. At the molecular level, these substances have various sizes and biochemical characteristics, classifying them as protein substances and non-protein substances. Immune cells and immune proteins may recognize and act on these substances, including pathogenic proteins and peptides, depending upon the size and biochemical properties of the substances (this theory is known as the protein-homeostasis-system hypothesis). The severity or chronicity of ARDS depends on the amount of etiologic substances with corresponding immune reactions, the duration of the appearance of specific immune cells, or the repertoire of specific immune cells that control the substances. Therefore, treatment with early systemic immune modulators (corticosteroids and/or intravenous immunoglobulin) as soon as possible may reduce aberrant immune responses in the potential stage of ARDS. PMID:28208675

  18. Reflections on the constraints and opportunities in therapy in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Alison M

    2006-08-25

    More than 20 years of clinical and research experience with affected people in the British Isles has provided insight into particular challenges for therapists, educators, or parents wishing to facilitate learning and to support the development of skills in people with Rett syndrome. This paper considers the challenges in two groups: those due to constraints imposed by the disabilities associated with the disorder and those stemming from the opportunities, often masked by the disorder, allowing the development of skills that depend on less-affected areas of the brain. Because the disorder interferes with the synaptic links between neurones, the functions of the brain that are most dependent on complex neural networks are the most profoundly affected. These functions include speech, memory, learning, generation of ideas, and the planning of fine movements, especially those of the hands. In contrast, spontaneous emotional and hormonal responses appear relatively intact. Whereas failure to appreciate the physical limitations of the disease leads to frustration for therapist and client alike, a clear understanding of the better-preserved areas of competence offers avenues for real progress in learning, the building of satisfying relationships, and achievement of a quality of life.

  19. Constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome: a review of current and emerging drug therapies.

    PubMed

    Jadallah, Khaled A; Kullab, Susan M; Sanders, David S

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent medical condition that adversely affects patient quality of life and constitutes a significant economic burden on healthcare resources. A large proportion of patients suffer from the constipation subtype of IBS (IBS-C), most commonly afflicting older individuals and those with a lower socioeconomic status. Conventional pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment options have limited efficacies and/or significant adverse events, which lead to increased long-term health care expenditures. Failure to effectively treat IBS-C patients over the past decades has largely been due to a poor understanding of disease pathophysiology, lack of a global view of the patient, and an inappropriate selection of patients and treatment endpoints in clinical trials. In recent years, however, more effective and safer drugs have been developed for the treatment of IBS-C. The advancement in the area of pharmacologic treatment is based on new knowledge of the pathophysiologic basis of IBS-C and the development of drugs with increased selectivity within pharmacologic classes with recognized efficacies. This narrative review covers the spectrum of available drugs and their mechanisms of action, as well as the efficacy and safety profiles of each as determined in relevant clinical trials that have investigated treatment options for IBS-C and chronic constipation. A brief summary of laxative-based treatment options is presented, followed by up-to-date assessments for three classes of drugs: prokinetics, prosecretory agents, and bile acid modulators.

  20. What is the value of growth hormone therapy in Prader Willi syndrome?

    PubMed

    Bridges, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Prader Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic condition caused by loss of the paternal copy of a region of imprinted genes on chromosome 15. There is severe muscular hypotonia in the neonatal period, with the onset of hyperphagia and food-seeking behaviour in childhood. All individuals with PWS have developmental delay. Without careful control of food intake and the food environment, individuals with PWS become morbidly obese and are likely to die as young adults from the complications of obesity. The aims of growth hormone (GH) treatment in PWS are distinct from the use of GH in other conditions-although GH does increase final height in PWS, the main benefits of treatment are improved body composition and better exercise capacity, which can help with the aim of preventing obesity. GH trials in PWS have demonstrated improved muscle bulk, reduced fat mass and increased levels of physical activity. GH has also been demonstrated to improve attainment of developmental and cognitive milestones in children with PWS. GH treatment appears to change respiratory status in PWS, possibly because of growth of lymphoid tissue at the start of treatment. Respiratory assessment is recommended prior to, and just after starting GH treatment. Ideal age for starting GH is not clear, although there has been a trend towards starting at younger ages. It may be that GH treatment in childhood confers benefits into adult life. There are less data to support continuing GH treatment into adult life.

  1. IMMUNE RECONSTITUTION INFLAMMATORY SYNDROME (IRIS)-ASSOCIATED BURKITT LYMPHOMA FOLLOWING COMBINATION ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Vishnu, Prakash; Dorer, Russell P.; Aboulafia, David M.

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is defined as a paradoxical worsening or unmasking of infections and autoimmune diseases, following initiation of combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). More recently, the case definition of IRIS has been broadened to include certain malignancies including Kaposi’s sarcoma, and less frequently Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Here in we describe 3 patients infected with HIV who began cART and within a median of 15 weeks each achieved non-detectable HIV viral loads, and yet within 6 months presented for medical attention with fevers, night sweats, weight loss and bulky lymphadenopathy. Laboratory studies included elevated lactate dehydrogenase and β-2 microglobulin levels and well preserved CD4+ lymphocyte counts in excess of 350 cells/µL. In each patient lymph node biopsies were diagnostic of Burkitt lymphoma (BL). Patients were managed with multi-agent chemotherapy in conjunction with cART. We also survey the medical literature of other cases of IRIS-associated BL. Although the pathogenesis of IRIS-associated BL is not well elucidated, chronic antigenic stimulation coupled with immune deterioration, followed by subsequent restoration of the immune response and aberrant cytokine expression may be a pathway to lymphomagenesis. IRIS-associated BL should be suspected in patients with normal or near normal CD4+ lymphocyte counts who develop progressive lymphadenopathy post-initiation of cART. PMID:25458079

  2. Dendritic cell functional improvement in a preclinical model of lentiviral-mediated gene therapy for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Catucci, M; Prete, F; Bosticardo, M; Castiello, M C; Draghici, E; Locci, M; Roncarolo, M G; Aiuti, A; Benvenuti, F; Villa, A

    2012-12-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare X-linked primary immunodeficiency caused by the defective expression of the WAS protein (WASP) in hematopoietic cells. It has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) are functionally impaired in WAS patients and was(-/-) mice. We have previously demonstrated the efficacy and safety of a murine model of WAS gene therapy (GT), using stem cells transduced with a lentiviral vector (LV). The aim of this study was to investigate whether GT can correct DC defects in was(-/-) mice. As DCs expressing WASP were detected in the secondary lymphoid organs of the treated mice, we tested the in vitro and in vivo function of bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs). The BMDCs showed efficient in vitro uptake of latex beads and Salmonella typhimurium. When BMDCs from the treated mice (GT BMDCs) and the was(-/-) mice were injected into wild-type hosts, we found a higher number of cells that had migrated to the draining lymph nodes compared with mice injected with was(-/-) BMDCs. Finally, we found that ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsed GT BMDCs or vaccination of GT mice with anti-DEC205 OVA fusion protein can efficiently induce antigen-specific T-cell activation in vivo. These findings show that WAS GT significantly improves DC function, thus adding new evidence of the preclinical efficacy of LV-mediated WAS GT.

  3. Moving toward an understanding of hormone replacement therapy in adolescent girls: looking through the lens of Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Marsha L

    2008-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a relatively common disorder of phenotypic females caused by loss of all or part of the second sex chromosome. Most individuals with TS have short stature and gonadal dysgenesis and are at risk for many other medical and learning problems. In the 45,X ovary, germs cells multiply quite normally during fetal development, but there is accelerated atresia of oocytes in the second half of pregnancy that produces gonadal insufficiency by birth. In girls with other karyotypes, especially those mosaic for 45,X/46,XX, gonadal function may be normal or near-normal. In this chapter, management goals for gonadal insufficiency in girls with TS are presented. The effects of estrogen deficiency and its replacement on three specific problems associated with TS-short stature, cardiovascular disease, and developmental differences in brain structure and function-are explored. General guidelines for estrogen replacement therapy using transdermal estrogen, the most physiologic option, are provided and future research goals are outlined.

  4. Acute renal replacement therapy in children with diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome: a single center 16 years of experience.

    PubMed

    Grisaru, Silviu; Morgunov, Melissa A; Samuel, Susan M; Midgley, Julian P; Wade, Andrew W; Tee, James B; Hamiwka, Lorraine A

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is becoming more prevalent among hospitalized children, its etiologies are shifting, and new treatment modalities are evolving; however, diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS) remains the most common primary disease causing AKI in young children. Little has been published about acute renal replacement therapy (ARRT) and its challenges in this population. We describe our single center's experience managing 134 pediatric patients with D+HUS out of whom 58 (43%) required ARRT over the past 16 years. In our cohort, all but one patient were started on peritoneal dialysis (PD). Most patients, 47 (81%), received acute PD on a pediatric inpatient ward. The most common recorded complications in our cohort were peritoneal fluid leaks 13 (22%), peritonitis 11 (20%), and catheter malfunction 5 (9%). Nine patients (16%) needed surgical revision of their PD catheters. There were no bleeding events related to PD despite a mean platelets count of 40.9 (±23.5) × 10(3)/mm(3) and rare use of platelets infusions. Despite its methodological limitations, this paper adds to the limited body of evidence supporting the use of acute PD as the primary ARRT modality in children with D+HUS.

  5. Pulsed vs. CW low level light therapy on osteoarticular signs and symptoms in limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barolet, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (lcSSc) was formerly known as CREST syndrome in reference to the associated clinical features: Calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, Esophageal dysfunction, Sclerodactyly, and Telangiectasias. The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) has been identified has a major player in the pathogenic process, while low level light therapy (LLLT) has been shown to modulate this cytokine superfamily. This case study was conducted to assess the efficacy of 940nm using microsecond domain pulsing and continuous wave mode (CW) on osteoarticular signs and symptoms associated with lcSSc. The patient was treated two to three times a week for 13 weeks, using a sequential pulsing mode on one elbow, and a CW mode on the other. Efficacy assessments included inflammation, symptoms, pain, and health scales, patient satisfaction, clinical global impression, and adverse effects monitoring. Significant functional and morphologic improvements were observed after LLLT, with best results seen with the pulsing mode. No significant adverse effects were noted. Two mechanisms of action may be at play. The 940nm wavelength provides inside-out heating possibly vasodilating capillaries which in turn increases catabolic processes leading to a reduction of in situ calcinosis. LLLT may also improve symptoms by triggering a cascade of cellular reactions, including the modulation of inflammatory mediators.

  6. Face-to-Face Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: The Effects on Gastrointestinal and Psychiatric Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ljótsson, Brjánn; Linton, Steven J.; Boersma, Katja; Schrooten, Martien; Repsilber, Dirk; Brummer, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a gastrointestinal disorder linked to disturbances in the gut-brain axis. Visceral hypersensitivity and pain are hallmarks of IBS and linked to the physiological and psychological burden and to the nonadaptive coping with stress. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for IBS has proven effective in reducing gastrointestinal and psychiatric symptoms in IBS by means of coping with stress. The present pilot study evaluated for the first time whether CBT for IBS affected visceral sensitivity and pain. Individual CBT was performed for 12 weeks in 18 subjects with IBS and evaluated in terms of visceral sensitivity and pain during rectal distensions using the barostat method and self-rated visceral sensitivity and gastrointestinal and psychiatric symptoms. Visceral discomfort, urge, and pain induced by the barostat were not affected by CBT but were stable across the study. However, the level of self-rated visceral sensitivity and gastrointestinal and psychiatric symptoms decreased after the intervention. Central working mechanisms and increased ability to cope with IBS-symptoms are suggested to play a key role in the alleviation of IBS symptoms produced by CBT. PMID:28210270

  7. Acupuncture therapy is more effective than artificial tears for dry eye syndrome: evidence based on a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Yang, Zongguo; Yu, Hong; Song, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background. The efficacy of acupuncture in dry eye syndrome patients remains controversial. Methods. Pubmed, Ovid, Cochrane libraries, CNKI, Wanfang, and CQVIP databases were electronically searched until October 1, 2014. Outcomes including tear break-up time (BUT), Schirmer I test (SIT), and cornea fluorescein staining (CFS) were analyzed. A meta-analysis was performed using both fixed- and random-effects models based on heterogeneity across studies. Results. Seven studies were included in this study; 198 and 185 patients were randomly treated with acupuncture and artificial tears, respectively. The overall BUT of patients in acupuncture group was significantly longer than that of the artificial tears group after treatment (P < 0.00001). The SIT was significantly higher in the acupuncture group than that in the artificial tears group after treatment (P = 0.001). The CFS of patients in acupuncture group was significantly improved compared to that in artificial group (P < 0.0001). Conclusions. Acupuncture therapy is effective for the dry eye patients, partly better than artificial tear treatment.

  8. Disease correction by combined neonatal intracranial AAV and systemic lentiviral gene therapy in Sanfilippo Syndrome type B mice.

    PubMed

    Heldermon, C D; Qin, E Y; Ohlemiller, K K; Herzog, E D; Brown, J R; Vogler, C; Hou, W; Orrock, J L; Crawford, B E; Sands, M S

    2013-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB) or Sanfilippo Syndrome type B is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from the deficiency of N-acetyl glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. We previously showed that intracranial adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based gene therapy results in partial improvements of several aspects of the disease. In an attempt to further correct the disease, MPS IIIB mice were treated at 2-4 days of age with intracranial AAV2/5-NAGLU (IC-AAV), intravenous lentiviral-NAGLU (IV-LENTI) or the combination of both (BOTH). The BOTH group had the most complete biochemical and histological improvements of any treatment group. Compared with untreated MPS IIIB animals, all treatments resulted in significant improvements in motor function (rotarod) and hearing (auditory-evoked brainstem response). In addition, each treatment group had a significantly increased median life span compared with the untreated group (322 days). The combination arm had the greatest increase (612 days), followed by IC-AAV (463 days) and IV-LENTI (358 days). Finally, the BOTH group had nearly normal circadian rhythm measures with improvement in time to activity onset. In summary, targeting both the systemic and central nervous system disease of MPS IIIB early in life appears to be the most efficacious approach for this inherited metabolic disorder.

  9. Acute myeloid leukemia after myelodysplastic syndrome and failure of therapy with hypomethylating agents: an emerging entity with a poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Elias; Ghanem, Hady; Huang, Xuelin; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; O'Brien, Susan; Faderl, Stephan; Pierce, Sherry; Choi, Sangbum; Verstovsek, Srdan; Brandt, Mark; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2014-04-01

    We assessed the outcomes of 63 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) arising from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) after hypomethylating agent failure. Their median age was 63 years. All 63 patients had received ≥ 1 salvage regimens for AML, and 35 patients (55%) had received ≥ 2. Of the 31 patients (49%) who had received high-dose cytarabine (HDAC) at first relapse, 2 (6%) achieved complete remission (CR) and 4 (13%) CR with incomplete platelet recovery (overall response rate, 19%). Of the 32 patients (51%) who had received other treatments, including investigational agents, 4 (12%) achieved CR and 4 (12%) CR with incomplete platelet recovery (overall response rate, 24%). The median response duration was 20 weeks. With a median follow-up of 42 months from the AML diagnosis, the median survival (21 weeks) was similar between the 2 groups. The 1- and 2-year survival rate was 19% and 8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified low albumin, HDAC treatment, and platelet count < 50 × 10(9)/L as independent adverse factors for CR and a platelet count < 50 × 10(9)/L and age > 65 years as independent adverse factors for survival. Thus, the outcome of AML evolving from MDS after hypomethylating agent failure is poor and not improved with HDAC. Novel therapies directed toward this emerging entity are urgently needed.

  10. Calcul par simulation des paramètres dosimétriques pour le noyau cellulaire après irradiation α in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Foll, L.; Bailly, I.; Fritsch, P.

    1998-04-01

    Determination of absorbed dose in biological targets after high LET α particules irradiation needs heavy calculations. A softwave has been developed in order to allow everyone to calculate hit probability and absorbed dose. It is particularly adapted to the study of cell cultures irradiated with electrodeposited source or α-beam accelerator. It is based first, on a random generator of α-track homogeneously distributed in 4π, second, on the evaluation of energy loss in the different media along the track and then on a statistical analysis of the results. This method is accurate and low time consuming. The target is either modelised by an ellipsoid or represented by its 3D shape recorded using confocal microscopy. Des calculs dosimétriques complexes sont nécessaires pour l'évaluation des doses délivrées dans des cibles biologiques après irradiation par des particules α de haut TEL. Un logiciel a été développé pour rendre facilement accessible le calcul de la probabilité pour atteindre la cible et de la dose absorbée. il est particulièrement adapté à l'étude des cultures cellulaires irradiées par des sources électrodéposées de radionucléides ou des accélérateurs de particules. Il repose sur un générateur de traces aléatoires, sur une approximation de la perte d'énergie dans les différents milieux traversés et sur une exploitation statistique des résultats obtenus. Cette méthode s'avère précise et rapide. La cible est modélisée par un ellipsoïde ou représentée par son image 3D obtenue en microscopie confocale.

  11. Fragile X Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Cruz, Felix F.

    1985-01-01

    Physical, psychological, and cytogenic characteristics of individuals with the Fragile X syndrome are reviewed. Prospects for therapy with folic acid, prenatal diagnosis, phenotype of heterozygote for the marker X, and unresolved issues about the syndrome are discussed. (CL)

  12. Combined therapy with melatonin and exendin-4 effectively attenuated the deterioration of renal function in rat cardiorenal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Hung; Chen, Chih-Hung; Wallace, Christopher Glenn; Chen, Yen-Ta; Yang, Chih-Chao; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ling; Chua, Sarah; Yip, Hon-Kan; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey

    2017-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that combined therapy with melatonin (Mel) and exendin-4 (Ex4) would be superior to either therapy alone for preventing the deterioration of renal function in cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). Male adult Sprague Dawley rats (n = 48) were randomly and equally divided into sham-control (SC), chronic kidney disease (CKD; induced by 5/6 nephrectomy), CRS (CKD + dilated cardiomyopathy, DCM; induced by doxorubicin 7 mg/kg i.p. every 5 days, 4 doses), CRS-Mel (20 mg/kg/day), CRS-Ex4 (10 µg/kg/day) and CRS-Mel-Ex4. They were euthanized by day 60 after CRS induction. By day 60, plasma creatinine level, urine protein/creatinine ratio and kidney injury histopathology score were highest in CRS, lowest in SC, and progressively decreased from CKD, CRS-Mel, CRS-Ex4 to CRS-Mel-Ex4 (all P<0.0001). The kidney protein expressions of inflammation (TNF-α/NF-κB/MMP-9/iNOS/RANTES), oxidative stress (NOX-1/NOX-2/NOX-4/oxidized protein), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3/cleaved PARP/Bax), DNA-damaged marker (γ-H2AX) and fibrosis (p-mad3/TFG-β) showed identical patterns of creatinine level, whereas kidney protein expressions of GLP-1R showed a progressive increase from SC to CRS-Mel-Ex4 (all P<0.0001). Cellular expressions of inflammatory (CD14/CD68), DNA/kidney-damaged (γ-H2AX/KIM-1) and podocyte/renal tubule dysfunction signaling (β-catenin/Wnt1/Wnt4) biomarkers in kidney tissue exhibited an identical pattern of creatinine level (all P<0.0001). Podocyte components (podocin/dystroglycan/p-cadherin/synatopodin) were highest in SC, lowest in CRS, and significantly progressively increased from CKD to CRS-Mel-Ex4 (all P<0.0001). In conclusion, combined Mel-Ex4 therapy was superior to either one alone in preserving renal-function and kidney architectural integrity in the setting of CRS. PMID:28337255

  13. The IDEAL DVT study, individualised duration elastic compression therapy against long-term duration of therapy for the prevention of post-thrombotic syndrome: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    ten Cate-Hoek, Arina J; Bouman, Annemieke C; Joore, Manuela A; Prins, Martin; ten Cate, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) is a serious complication of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the leg that affects 20–50% of patients. Once a patient experiences PTS there is no treatment that effectively reduces the debilitating complaints. Two randomised controlled trials showed that elastic compression stocking (ECS) therapy after DVT for 24 months can reduce the incidence of PTS by 50%. However, it is unclear whether all patients benefit to the same extent from ECS therapy or what the optimal duration of therapy for individual patients should be. ECS therapy is costly, inconvenient, demanding and sometimes even debilitating. Tailoring therapy to individual needs could save substantial costs. The objective of the IDEAL DVT study, therefore, is to evaluate whether tailoring the duration of ECS therapy on signs and symptoms of the individual patient is a safe and effective method to prevent PTS, compared with standard ECS therapy. Methods and analysis A multicentre, single-blinded, allocation concealed, randomised, non-inferiority trial. A total of 864 consecutive patients with acute objectively documented proximal DVT of the leg are randomised to either standard duration of 24 months or tailored duration of ECS therapy following an initial therapeutic period of 6 months. Signs and symptoms of PTS are recorded at regular clinic visits. Furthermore, quality of life, costs, patient preferences and compliance are measured. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients with PTS at 24 months. Ethics and dissemination Based on current knowledge the standard application of ECS therapy is questioned. The IDEAL DVT study will address the central questions that remain unanswered: Which individual patients benefit from ECS therapy and what is the optimal individual treatment duration? Primary ethics approval was received from the Maastricht University Medical Centre. Results Results of the study will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and

  14. Dynamic platelet adhesion in patients with an acute coronary syndrome: The effect of antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsoumani, Maria E; Tatsidou, Prokopia T; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Goudevenos, John A; Tselepis, Alexandros D

    2016-12-01

    Platelet adhesion and aggregation are key functions leading to thrombus formation. The effect of aspirin, clopidogrel, and ticagrelor on platelet aggregation has been well established, however, there is limited data on the effect of these drugs on platelet adhesion. We therefore evaluated the effect of these drugs on platelet adhesion in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. Citrated blood was collected from 50 ACS patients loaded with 325 mg of aspirin (baseline) and at 5 days after the administration of aspirin 100 mg/day and clopidogrel (600 mg loading dose, 75 mg/day) (n = 26) or ticagrelor (180 mg loading dose, 90 mg × 2/day) (n = 24). High on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) to clopidogrel was estimated by vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation assay. Platelet adhesion to collagen was studied for 6 min under high shear stress and was evaluated using the time to platelet recruitment (TPR), the perimeter and average area of each adherent object, number of adherent objects, and the total percent of surface coverage (SC%). Six ACS patients exhibited HTPR to clopidogrel and excluded from the platelet adhesion assays. TPR and SC% values were similar among patient groups at baseline and controls. However, all other adhesion parameters were different in ACS patients, indicating the formation of more aggregates in regard to controls. At 5 days post-treatment with either clopidogrel or ticagrelor, the TPR values were increased and the SC% values were reduced to a similar extent compared with baseline. However, significant differences were observed in the ticagrelor group in the perimeter, number of adherent objects, and the average area of each adherent object indicating a more potent inhibition of adherence-induced platelet aggregation than clopidogrel. In conclusion, aspirin does not affect platelet adherence to collagen, whereas clopidogrel and ticagrelor inhibit to a similar extent dynamic platelet adhesion at 5 days post-treatment in

  15. Astrocyte glutamine synthetase: importance in hyperammonemic syndromes and potential target for therapy.

    PubMed

    Brusilow, Saul W; Koehler, Raymond C; Traystman, Richard J; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2010-10-01

    Many theories have been advanced to explain the encephalopathy associated with chronic liver disease and with the less common acute form. A major factor contributing to hepatic encephalopathy is hyperammonemia resulting from portacaval shunting and/or liver damage. However, an increasing number of causes of hyperammonemic encephalopathy have been discovered that present with the same clinical and laboratory features found in acute liver failure, but without liver failure. Here, we critically review the physiology, pathology, and biochemistry of ammonia (i.e., NH3 plus NH4+) and show how these elements interact to constitute a syndrome that clinicians refer to as hyperammonemic encephalopathy (i.e., acute liver failure, fulminant hepatic failure, chronic liver disease). Included will be a brief history of the status of ammonia and the centrality of the astrocyte in brain nitrogen metabolism. Ammonia is normally detoxified in the liver and extrahepatic tissues by conversion to urea and glutamine, respectively. In the brain, glutamine synthesis is largely confined to astrocytes, and it is generally accepted that in hyperammonemia excess glutamine compromises astrocyte morphology and function. Mechanisms postulated to account for this toxicity will be examined with emphasis on the osmotic effects of excess glutamine (the osmotic gliopathy theory). Because hyperammonemia causes osmotic stress and encephalopathy in patients with normal or abnormal liver function alike, the term "hyperammonemic encephalopathy" can be broadly applied to encephalopathy resulting from liver disease and from various other diseases that produce hyperammonemia. Finally, the possibility that a brain glutamine synthetase inhibitor may be of therapeutic benefit, especially in the acute form of liver disease, is discussed.

  16. Restrictive transfusion practice during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Voelker, Maria T; Busch, Thilo; Bercker, Sven; Fichtner, Falk; Kaisers, Udo X; Laudi, Sven

    2015-04-01

    Recommendations concerning the management of hemoglobin levels and hematocrit in patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) still advise maintenance of a normal hematocrit. In contrast, current transfusion guidelines for critically ill patients support restrictive transfusion practice. We report on a series of patients receiving venovenous ECMO (vvECMO) for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) treated according to the restrictive transfusion regimen recommended for critically ill patients. We retrospectively analyzed 18 patients receiving vvECMO due to severe ARDS. Hemoglobin concentrations were kept between 7 and 9 g/dL with a transfusion trigger at 7 g/dL or when physiological transfusion triggers were apparent. We assessed baseline data, hospital mortality, time on ECMO, hemoglobin levels, hematocrit, quantities of packed red blood cells received, and lactate concentrations and compared survivors and nonsurvivors. The overall mortality of all patients on vvECMO was 38.9%. Mean hemoglobin concentration over all patients and ECMO days was 8.30 ± 0.51 g/dL, and hematocrit was 0.25 ± 0.01, with no difference between survivors and nonsurvivors. Mean numbers of given PRBCs showed a trend towards higher quantities in the group of nonsurvivors, but the difference was not significant (1.97 ± 1.47 vs. 0.96 ± 0.76 units; P = 0.07). Mean lactate clearance from the first to the third day was 45.4 ± 28.3%, with no significant difference between survivors and nonsurvivors (P = 0.19). In our cohort of patients treated with ECMO due to severe ARDS, the application of a restrictive transfusion protocol did not result in an increased mortality. Safety and feasibility of the application of a restrictive transfusion protocol in patients on ECMO must further be evaluated in randomized controlled trials.

  17. Irritable bowel syndrome: A disease still searching for pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Gambaccini, Dario; Stasi, Cristina; Urbano, Maria Teresa; Marchi, Santino; Usai-Satta, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most frequently diagnosed functional gastrointestinal disorder in primary and secondary care. It is characterised by abdominal discomfort, pain and changes in bowel habits that can have a serious impact on the patient’s quality of life. The pathophysiology of IBS is not yet completely clear. Genetic, immune, environmental, inflammatory, neurological and psychological factors, in addition to visceral hypersensitivity, can all play an important role, one that most likely involves the complex interactions between the gut and the brain (gut-brain axis). The diagnosis of IBS can only be made on the basis of the symptoms of the Rome III criteria. Because the probability of organic disease in patients fulfilling the IBS criteria is very low, a careful medical history is critical and should pay particular attention to the possible comorbidities. Nevertheless, the severity of the patient’s symptoms or concerns sometimes compels the physician to perform useless and/or expensive diagnostic tests, transforming IBS into a diagnosis of exclusion. The presence of alarming symptoms (fever, weight loss, rectal bleeding, significant changes in blood chemistry), the presence of palpable abdominal masses, any recent onset of symptoms in patient aged over 50 years, the presence of symptoms at night, and a familial history of celiac disease, colorectal cancer and/or inflammatory bowel diseases all warrant investigation. Treatment strategies are based on the nature and severity of the symptoms, the degree of functional impairment of the bowel habits, and the presence of psychosocial disorders. This review examines and discusses the pathophysiological aspects and the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches available for patients with symptoms possibly related to IBS, pointing out controversial issues and the strengths and weaknesses of the current knowledge. PMID:25083055

  18. Maintenance Therapy with Decitabine after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Iskra; Choi, Jaebok; Fiala, Mark A; Gao, Feng; Holt, Matthew; Cashen, Amanda F; Vij, Ravi; Abboud, Camille N; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith E; Jacoby, Meghan A; Uy, Geoffrey L; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F

    2015-10-01

    Decitabine is a hypomethylating agent that irreversibly inhibits DNA methyltransferase I, inducing leukemic differentiation and re-expression of epigenetically silenced putative tumor antigens. We assessed safety and efficacy of decitabine maintenance after allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Decitabine maintenance may help eradicate minimal residual disease, decrease the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and facilitate a graft-versus-leukemia effect by enhancing the effect of T regulatory lymphocytes. Patients with AML/MDS in complete remission (CR) after allotransplantation started decitabine between day +50 and +100. We investigated 4 decitabine doses in cohorts of 4 patients: 5, 7.5, 10, and 15 mg/m(2)/day × 5 days every 6 weeks, for a maximum 8 cycles. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined as the maximum dose at which ≤ 25% of people experience dose-limiting toxicities during the first cycle of treatment. Twenty-four patients were enrolled and 22 were evaluable. All 4 dose levels were completed and no MTD was reached. Overall, decitabine maintenance was well tolerated. Grade 3 and 4 hematological toxicities were experienced by 75% of patients, including all patients treated at the highest dose level. Nine patients completed all 8 cycles and 8 of them remain in CR. Nine patients died from relapse (n = 4), infectious complications (n = 3), and GVHD (n = 2). Most occurrences of acute GVHD were mild and resolved without interruption of treatment; 1 patient died of acute gut GVHD. Decitabine maintenance did not clearly impact the rate of chronic GVHD. Although there was a trend of increased FOXP3 expression, results were not statistically significant. In conclusion, decitabine maintenance is associated with acceptable toxicities when given in the post-allotransplantation setting. Although the MTD was not reached, the dose of 10 mg/m(2) for 5 days every 6 weeks appeared to be the

  19. Pravastatin improves pregnancy outcomes in obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome refractory to antithrombotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lefkou, Eleftheria; Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Dagklis, Themistoklis; Vosnakis, Christos; Rousso, David

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Administration of conventional antithrombotic treatment (low-dose aspirin plus low–molecular weight heparin [LDA+LMWH]) for obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) does not prevent life-threatening placenta insufficiency–associated complications such as preeclampsia (PE) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) in 20% of patients. Statins have been linked to improved pregnancy outcomes in mouse models of PE and APS, possibly due to their protective effects on endothelium. Here, we investigated the use of pravastatin in LDA+LMWH-refractory APS in patients at an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. METHODS. We studied 21 pregnant women with APS who developed PE and/or IUGR during treatment with LDA+LMWH. A control group of 10 patients received only LDA+LMWH. Eleven patients received pravastatin (20 mg/d) in addition to LDA+LMWH at the onset of PE and/or IUGR. Uteroplacental blood hemodynamics, progression of PE features (hypertension and proteinuria), and fetal/neonatal outcomes were evaluated. RESULTS. In the control group, all deliveries occurred preterm and only 6 of 11 neonates survived. Of the 6 surviving neonates, 3 showed abnormal development. Patients who received both pravastatin and LDA+LMWH exhibited increased placental blood flow and improvements in PE features. These beneficial effects were observed as early as 10 days after pravastatin treatment onset. Pravastatin treatment combined with LDA+LMWH was also associated with live births that occurred close to full term in all patients. CONCLUSION. The present study suggests that pravastatin may improve pregnancy outcomes in women with refractory obstetric APS when taken at the onset of PE or IUGR until the end of pregnancy. PMID:27454295

  20. Concurrent Therapy with a Low-carbohydrate Diet and Miglitol Remarkably Improved the Postprandial Blood Glucose and Insulin Levels in a Patient with Reactive Hypoglycemia due to Late Dumping Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Sachie; Iwahashi, Yasuyuki; Seo, Akane; Sumiyoshi, Michitaka; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Tamori, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Reactive hypoglycemia induced by late dumping syndrome is often observed after gastrectomy. However, no effective therapy has yet been fully established. We herein describe a case in which concurrent therapy with a low-carbohydrate diet using low-glycemic-index food and an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, miglitol, very effectively ameliorated the postprandial fluctuations in the blood glucose and plasma insulin levels in a patient with reactive hypoglycemia due to late dumping syndrome following total gastrectomy. The administration of miglitol under a low-carbohydrate diet using low-glycemic-index food may therefore be an ideal treatment for reactive hypoglycemia due to late dumping syndrome.

  1. Microvesicles Correlated with Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Men with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Lowered Testosterone Levels But Were Unaltered by Testosterone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Velling Magnussen, Line; Nielsen, Morten Hjuler; Nielsen, Tine Bo; Højlund, Kurt; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager; Handberg, Aase

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To investigate how circulating microvesicle phenotypes correlate with insulin sensitivity, body composition, plasma lipids, and hepatic fat accumulation. We hypothesized that changes elicited by testosterone replacement therapy are reflected in levels of microvesicles. Methods. Thirty-nine type 2 diabetic males with lowered testosterone levels were assigned to either testosterone replacement therapy or placebo and evaluated at baseline and after 24 weeks. Microvesicles were analysed by flow cytometry and defined as lactadherin-binding particles within the 0.1–1.0 μm gate. Microvesicles of platelet, monocyte, and endothelial cell origin were identified by cell-specific markers and their expression of CD36 was investigated. Results. Triglycerides correlated positively with all investigated microvesicle phenotypes in this study (p < 0.05), and indicators of hepatic fat accumulation, alanine aminotransferase, and gamma glutamyltransferase correlated with platelet and endothelial microvesicles and CD36-expressing microvesicles from platelets and monocytes (p < 0.05). BMI, waist circumference, and fat percentage correlated with CD36-expressing monocyte microvesicles (p < 0.05), while insulin sensitivity did not correlate with any microvesicle phenotypes. Microvesicle levels were unaffected by testosterone therapy. Conclusions. Metabolic syndrome components and hepatic fat accumulation correlated with microvesicle phenotypes, supporting the involvement of especially CD36 on monocytes in metabolic syndrome pathogenesis. Although testosterone therapy improved body composition measures, microvesicle phenotype levels were unaffected. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01560546). PMID:28168203

  2. Enzyme replacement therapy for treating mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio A syndrome): effect and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Shimada, Tsutomu; Bober, Michael B.; Kubaski, Francyne; Yasuda, Eriko; Mason, Robert W.; Khan, Shaukat; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Barrera, Luis A.; Mackenzie, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Following a Phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo (PBO)-controlled, multinational study in subjects with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA), enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) of elosulfase alfa has been approved in several countries. The study was designed to evaluate safety and efficacy of elosulfase alfa in patients with MPS IVA aged 5 years and older. Areas covered Outcomes of clinical trials for MPS IVA have been described. Subjects received either 2.0 mg/kg/week, 2.0 mg/kg/every other week, or PBO, for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline 6-min walk test (6MWT) distance compared to PBO. The 6MWT results improved in patients receiving 2 mg/kg weekly compared to PBO. The every other week regimen resulted in walk distances comparable to PBO. There was no change from baseline in the 3 Min Stair Climb Test in both treatment groups. Following completion of the initial study, patients, who continued to receive elosulfase alfa 2 mg/kg weekly (QW) for another 48 weeks (for a total of up to 72-week exposure), did not show additional improvement on 6MWT. Expert opinion We suggest that ERT is a therapeutic option for MPS IVA, providing a modest effect and the majority of the effects are seen in the soft tissues. PMID:26973801

  3. Advances in the development of novel antioxidant therapies as an approach for fetal alcohol syndrome prevention.

    PubMed

    Joya, Xavier; Garcia-Algar, Oscar; Salat-Batlle, Judith; Pujades, Cristina; Vall, Oriol

    2015-03-01

    Ethanol is the most common human teratogen, and its consumption during pregnancy can produce a wide range of abnormalities in infants known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). The major characteristics of FASD can be divided into: (i) growth retardation, (ii) craniofacial abnormalities, and (iii) central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction. FASD is the most common cause of nongenetic mental retardation in Western countries. Although the underlying molecular mechanisms of ethanol neurotoxicity are not completely determined, the induction of oxidative stress is believed to be one central process linked to the development of the disease. Currently, there is no known effective strategy for prevention (other than alcohol avoidance) or treatment. In the present review we will provide the state of art in the evidence for the use of antioxidants as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment using whole-embryo and culture cells models of FASD. We conclude that the imbalance of the intracellular redox state contributes to the pathogenesis observed in FASD models, and we suggest that antioxidant therapy can be considered a new efficient strategy to mitigate the effects of prenatal ethanol exposure.

  4. A Preclinical Study Evaluating AAVrh10-Based Gene Therapy for Sanfilippo Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Winner, Leanne K; Beard, Helen; Hassiotis, Sofia; Lau, Adeline A; Luck, Amanda J; Hopwood, John J; Hemsley, Kim M

    2016-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA) is predominantly a disorder of the central nervous system, caused by a deficiency of sulfamidase (SGSH) with subsequent storage of heparan sulfate-derived oligosaccharides. No widely available therapy exists, and for this reason, a mouse model has been utilized to carry out a preclinical assessment of the benefit of intraparenchymal administration of a gene vector (AAVrh10-SGSH-IRES-SUMF1) into presymptomatic MPS IIIA mice. The outcome has been assessed with time, measuring primary and secondary storage material, neuroinflammation, and intracellular inclusions, all of which appear as the disease progresses. The vector resulted in predominantly ipsilateral distribution of SGSH, with substantially less detected in the contralateral hemisphere. Vector-derived SGSH enzyme improved heparan sulfate catabolism, reduced microglial activation, and, after a time delay, ameliorated GM3 ganglioside accumulation and halted ubiquitin-positive lesion formation in regions local to, or connected by projections to, the injection site. Improvements were not observed in regions of the brain distant from, or lacking connections with, the injection site. Intraparenchymal gene vector administration therefore has therapeutic potential provided that multiple brain regions are targeted with vector, in order to achieve widespread enzyme distribution and correction of disease pathology.

  5. Thrombolytic therapy for cerebral vein thrombosis in antiphospholipid syndrome secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Hajialilo, Mehrzad; Noshad, Hamid; Mohammadian, Reza; Khabbazi, Ali Reza; Daghighi, Mohammad Hossein; Saleh, Parviz

    2012-03-01

    A 20-year-old woman was admitted to a Gynecology Hospital in her 6(th) month of pregnancy for high blood pressure and tonic-clonic seizure. Primary diagnosis was eclampsia, and for that reason she underwent cesarean section. She also had headache on frontal and parietal areas without nausea or vomiting. There was not a focal neurological sign. Rheumatology consultation was requested. Systemic lupus erythematosus and secondary antiphospholipid (APS) was confirmed. The patient had headache that continued several days after cesarean section, therefore, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance venography (MRV) were performed, and cerebral vein thrombosis was documented. Distal segment of right lateral sinus and sigmoid sinus were not appeared in brain MRV. Abnormal hypersignal intensity of right lateral sinus/coronal T2 was detected. Thrombolytic therapy with 20 mg tissue plasminogen activator on right sigmoid and transverse sinus was performed by an interventional neurologist. After this procedure, the patient(')s headache healed and she was discharged in a good condition.

  6. Thrombolytic Therapy for Cerebral Vein Thrombosis in Antiphospholipid Syndrome Secondary to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Hajialilo, Mehrzad; Noshad, Hamid; Mohammadian, Reza; Khabbazi, Ali Reza; Daghighi, Mohammad Hossein; Saleh, Parviz

    2012-01-01

    A 20-year-old woman was admitted to a Gynecology Hospital in her 6th month of pregnancy for high blood pressure and tonic-clonic seizure. Primary diagnosis was eclampsia, and for that reason she underwent cesarean section. She also had headache on frontal and parietal areas without nausea or vomiting. There was not a focal neurological sign. Rheumatology consultation was requested. Systemic lupus erythematosus and secondary antiphospholipid (APS) was confirmed. The patient had headache that continued several days after cesarean section, therefore, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance venography (MRV) were performed, and cerebral vein thrombosis was documented. Distal segment of right lateral sinus and sigmoid sinus were not appeared in brain MRV. Abnormal hypersignal intensity of right lateral sinus/coronal T2 was detected. Thrombolytic therapy with 20 mg tissue plasminogen activator on right sigmoid and transverse sinus was performed by an interventional neurologist. After this procedure, the patient's headache healed and she was discharged in a good condition. PMID:23115432

  7. Skeletal findings in the first 12 months following initiation of glucocorticoid therapy for pediatric nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Phan, V; Blydt-Hansen, T; Feber, J; Alos, N; Arora, S; Atkinson, S; Bell, L; Clarson, C; Couch, R; Cummings, EA; Filler, G; Grant, RM; Grimmer, J; Hebert, D; Lentle, B; Ma, J; Matzinger, M; Midgley, J; Pinsk, M; Rodd, C; Shenouda, N; Stein, R; Stephure, D; Taback, S; Williams, K; Rauch, F; Siminoski, K; Ward, LM

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vertebral fracture (VF) incidence following glucocorticoid (GC) initiation has not been previously reported in pediatric nephrotic syndrome. Methods VF were assessed on radiographs (Genant method); lumbar spine bone mineral density (LS BMD) was evaluated by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Results Sixty-five children were followed to 12 months post-GC initiation (median age: 5.4 years, range 2.3 to 17.9). Three of 54 children with radiographs (6%, 95% CI 2 to 15%) had incident VF at 1 year. The mean LS BMD Z-score was below the healthy average at baseline (mean ± SD −0.5 ± 1.1 p=0.001) and at 3 months (−0.6 ± 1.1 p<0.001), but not at 6 months (−0.3 ± 1.3, p=0.066) or 12 months (−0.3 ± 1.2, p=0.066). Mixed effect modeling showed a significant increase in LS BMD Z-scores between 3 and 12 months (0.22 SD, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.36, p=0.003). A sub-group (N=16; 25%) had LS BMD Z-scores that were ≤ −1.0 at 12 months. In these children, each additional 1000 mg/m2 of GC received in the first 3 months was associated with a decrease in LS BMD Z-score by 0.39 at 12 months (95% CI, −0.71 to −0.07; p=0.017). Conclusions The incidence of VF at 1 year was low and LS BMD Z-scores improved by 12 months in the majority. Twenty-five percent of children had LS BMD Z-scores ≤ −1.0 at 12 months. In these children, LS BMD Z-scores were inversely associated with early GC exposure, despite similar GC exposure compared to the rest of the cohort. PMID:23948876

  8. Good response to long-term therapy with growth hormone in a patient with 9p trisomy syndrome: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Canton, Ana Pinheiro Machado; Nishi, Mirian Yumie; Furuya, Tatiane Katsue; Roela, Rosimeire Aparecida; Jorge, Alexander Augusto Lima

    2016-04-01

    The 9p trisomy syndrome is a rare condition, clinically characterized by a wide range of dysmorphic features, intellectual disability, and, in most patients, by short stature. Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy is still controversial in syndromic disorders, the reason for which it is not currently indicated. Here we report a 7-year-old boy with 9p trisomy syndrome and marked short stature. Results of routine laboratory assessments were normal. IGF1 and IGFBP3 levels were both in the normal range (-1.6 and -0.7 SDS, respectively). GH peak in response to oral clonidine stimulation test was 3.5 μg/L, which is considered a normal response. Chromosomal analysis revealed the karyotype 47,XY, + del(9)(pter-q11:) dn. SNP array data indicated absence of mosaicism [arr 9p24.3-p13.1 (203,861-38,787,480) x3]. By the age of 8.3 years, the patient had persistent short stature (-2.9 SDS) with normal growth velocity (4.9 cm/y; -0.7 SDS), not showing spontaneous catch-up. After 5.6 years of rhGH therapy (50 μg/kg/d), height SDS improved from -2.9 to -1.0. This result suggests that rhGH therapy could be considered for patients with 9p trisomy syndrome who present with short stature. The degree of intellectual disability and the potential for social inclusion should be taken into account when recommending this treatment. Additional studies are needed to establish the benefits of height gain in these patients.

  9. Naltrexone effect on pulsatile GnRH therapy for ovulation induction in polycystic ovary syndrome: a pilot prospective study.

    PubMed

    Fulghesu, A M; Ciampelli, M; Belosi, C; Apa, R; Guido, M; Caruso, A; Mancuso, S; Lanzone, A

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the opioid influence on LH pulsatility in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of a long-term opioid antagonist (naltrexone) treatment in improving the pulsatile GnRH therapy which is successful in this syndrome. Ten obese women affected by PCOS participated in the study. Patients were hospitalized during the early follicular phase and underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with 75 g of glucose and a pulse pattern study followed by a GnRH test (100 pg i.v.). All patients were then treated for ovulation induction with pulsatile administration of GnRH (5 microg/bolus every 90 min). Since pregnancies did not occurr in any patient, after spontaneous or progestin-induced menstrual cycles, all patients received naltrexone at a dose of 50 mg/day orally for 8 weeks and during treatment repeated the basal protocol study and the ovulation induction cycle with the same modalities. The naltrexone treatment significantly reduced the insulin response to OGTT and the LH response to GnRH bolus, whereas it did not affect the FSH and LH pulsatility patterns. Concerning the ovulation induction by pulsatile GnRH, naltrexone treatment was able to improve, although not significantly, the ovulation rate (60% pre-treatment vs 90% post-treatment). Furthermore, the maximum diameter of the dominant follicle and the pre-ovulatory estradiol concentration were higher after long-term opioid blockade (follicular diameter 19.5+/-1.76 mm pre-treatment vs 21.6+/-2.19 mm post-treatment, p<0.001; maximum estradiol level 728.7+/-288.5 pmol/l pre-treatment vs 986.4+/-382.1 pmol/l post-treatment, p<0.05). During the naltrexone-pulsatile GnRH co-treatment two pregnancies occurred. In conclusion, our data show that naltrexone-pulsatile GnRH co-treatment is able to improve the ovarian responsiveness to ovulation induction in obese PCOS patients when compared to pulsatile GnRH alone. This action seems to be related to

  10. Cognitive behavioural therapy versus multidisciplinary rehabilitation treatment for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (FatiGo)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome experience extreme fatigue, which often leads to substantial limitations of occupational, educational, social and personal activities. Currently, there is no consensus regarding the treatment. Patients try many different therapies to overcome their fatigue. Although there is no consensus, cognitive behavioural therapy is seen as one of the most effective treatments. Little is known about multidisciplinary rehabilitation treatment, a combination of cognitive behavioural therapy with principles of mindfulness, gradual increase of activities, body awareness therapy and pacing. The difference in effectiveness and cost-effectiveness between multidisciplinary rehabilitation treatment and cognitive behavioural therapy is as yet unknown. The FatiGo (Fatigue-Go) trial aims to compare the effects of both treatment approaches in outpatient rehabilitation on fatigue severity and quality of life in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Methods One hundred twenty patients who meet the criteria of chronic fatigue syndrome, fulfil the inclusion criteria and sign the informed consent form will be recruited. Both treatments take 6 months to complete. The outcome will be assessed at 6 and 12 months after the start of treatment. Two weeks after the start of treatment, expectancy and credibility will be measured, and patients will be asked to write down their personal goals and score their current performance on these goals on a visual analogue scale. At 6 and 14 weeks after the start of treatment, the primary outcome and three potential mediators—self-efficacy, causal attributions and present-centred attention-awareness—will be measured. Primary outcomes are fatigue severity and quality of life. Secondary outcomes are physical activity, psychological symptoms, self-efficacy, causal attributions, impact of disease on emotional and physical functioning, present-centred attention-awareness, life satisfaction, patient personal goals

  11. LEGO therapy and the social use of language programme: an evaluation of two social skills interventions for children with high functioning autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gina; Granader, Yael; Humphrey, Ayla; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2008-11-01

    LEGO therapy and the Social Use of Language Programme (SULP) were evaluated as social skills interventions for 6-11 year olds with high functioning autism and Asperger Syndrome. Children were matched on CA, IQ, and autistic symptoms before being randomly assigned to LEGO or SULP. Therapy occurred for 1 h/week over 18 weeks. A no-intervention control group was also assessed. Results showed that the LEGO therapy group improved more than the other groups on autism-specific social interaction scores (Gilliam Autism Rating Scale). Maladaptive behaviour decreased significantly more in the LEGO and SULP groups compared to the control group. There was a non-significant trend for SULP and LEGO groups to improve more than the no-intervention group in communication and socialisation skills.

  12. Impact of enzyme replacement therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with Morquio A syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Shimada, Tsutomu; Bober, Michael B; Chinen, Yasutsugu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Montaño, Adriana M; Giugliani, Roberto; Kubaski, Francyne; Yasuda, Eriko; Rodríguez-López, Alexander; Espejo-Mojica, Angela J; Sánchez, Oscar F; Mason, Robert W; Barrera, Luis A; Mackenzie, William G; Orii, Tadao

    2015-01-01

    Patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) can present with systemic skeletal dysplasia, leading to a need for multiple orthopedic surgical procedures, and often become wheelchair bound in their teenage years. Studies on patients with MPS IVA treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) showed a sharp reduction on urinary keratan sulfate, but only modest improvement based on a 6-minute walk test and no significant improvement on a 3-minute climb-up test and lung function test compared with the placebo group, at least in the short-term. Surgical remnants from ERT-treated patients did not show reduction of storage materials in chondrocytes. The impact of ERT on bone lesions in patients with MPS IVA remains limited. ERT seems to be enhanced in a mouse model of MPS IVA by a novel form of the enzyme tagged with a bone-targeting moiety. The tagged enzyme remained in the circulation much longer than untagged native enzyme and was delivered to and retained in bone. Three-month-old MPS IVA mice treated with 23 weekly infusions of tagged enzyme showed marked clearance of the storage materials in bone, bone marrow, and heart valves. When treatment was initiated at birth, reduction of storage materials in tissues was even greater. These findings indicate that specific targeting of the enzyme to bone at an early stage may improve efficacy of ERT for MPS IVA. Recombinant N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) (erGALNS) and in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris (prGALNS) has been produced as an alternative to the conventional production in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Recombinant GALNS produced in microorganisms may help to reduce the high cost of ERT and the introduction of modifications to enhance targeting. Although only a limited number of patients with MPS IVA have been treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), beneficial effects have been reported. A wheelchair-bound patient with a severe form of MPS

  13. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia following fludarabine combination chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Carney, D A; Westerman, D A; Tam, C S; Milner, A; Prince, H M; Kenealy, M; Wolf, M; Januszewicz, E H; Ritchie, D; Came, N; Seymour, J F

    2010-12-01

    Fludarabine combination chemotherapy achieves high response rates in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and indolent lymphoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and characteristics of treatment-related myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/AML) after treatment with fludarabine in combination for lymphoproliferative disorders and identify risk factors for its development. In all, 176 patients treated with fludarabine combination were followed for a median of 41 months (range 6-125 months). In all, 19 cases of t-MDS/AML have been identified for an overall rate of 10.8%. Median overall survival post-t-MDS/AML diagnosis was 11 months. Patients developing t-MDS/AML included 11/54 with follicular lymphoma (FL) (crude rate 20.4%), 5/82 with CLL (6.1%) and 3/24 with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia or marginal zone lymphoma (12.5%). Most patients had other cytotoxic treatments (median 4, range 0-7) but three with FL had fludarabine combination as their only line of treatment. Of the eleven patients (6.3%) who received mitoxantrone with their first fludarabine combination, four (36.4%) developed t-MDS/AML (P=0.007). There was a trend toward prior cytotoxic therapy increasing the risk for t-MDS/AML (P=0.067). Fludarabine combination chemotherapy is associated with a moderate risk of t-MDS/AML particularly when combined with mitoxantrone. This complication should be considered when evaluating the potential benefit of this treatment in lymphoproliferative disorders.

  14. Cerebral hemodynamics in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    In obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) the periodic reduction or cessation of breathing due to narrowing or occlusion of the upper airway during sleep leads to daytime symptoms and increased cardiovascular risk, including stroke. The higher risk of stroke is related to the impairment in cerebral vascular autoregulation. Continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy at night is the most effective treatment for OSA. However, there is no suitable bedside monitoring method evaluating the treatment efficacy of CPAP therapy, especially to monitor the recovery of cerebral hemodynamics. NIRS is ideally suited for non-invasive monitoring the cerebral hemodynamics during sleep. In this study, we will for first time assess dynamic changes of cerebral hemodynamics during nocturnal CPAP therapy in 3 patients with OSA using NIRS. We found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, tissue oxygenation index (TOI) and blood volume associated with periodic apnea events without CPAP in all OSA patients. These oscillations were gradually attenuated and finally eliminated with the stepwise increments of CPAP pressures. The oscillations were totally eliminated in blood volume earlier than in other hemodynamic parameters. These results suggested that 1) the cerebral hemodynamic oscillations induced by OSA events can effectively be attenuated by CPAP therapy, and 2) blood flow and blood volume recovered first during CPAP therapy, followed by the recovery of oxygen consumption. Our study suggested that NIRS is a useful tool to evaluate the efficacy of CPAP therapy in patients with OSA bedside and in real time.

  15. Laser Therapy and Occlusal Stabilization Splint for Temporomandibular Disorders in Patients With Fibromyalgia Syndrome: A Randomized, Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Molina-Torres, Guadalupe; Rodríguez-Archilla, Alberto; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo; Albornoz-Cabello, Manuel; Aguilar-Ferrándiz, María Encarnación; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María

    2016-09-01

    Context • Patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) report frequent and severe symptoms from temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). The appropriate treatment of TMDs remains controversial. No studies have occurred on the efficacy of therapy with a laser or an occlusal stabilization splint in the treatment of TMDs in patients with FMS. Objective • The study intended to investigate the therapeutic effects of laser therapy and of an occlusal stabilization splint for reducing pain and dysfunction and improving the quality of sleep in patients with TMDs and FMS. Design • The research team designed a single-blinded, randomized clinical trial. Setting • The study took place in the research laboratory at the University of Granada (Granada, Spain). Participants • Participants were 58 women and men who had been diagnosed with FMS and TMDs and who were referred from the clinical setting. Intervention • Participants were randomly assigned to the occlusal-splint or the laser group. The laser group received a treatment protocol in which laser therapy was applied to the participant's tender points, and the occlusal-splint group underwent a treatment protocol in which an occlusal stabilization splint was used. Both groups underwent treatment for 12 wk. Outcomes Measures • Pain intensity, widespread pain, quality of sleep, severity of symptoms, active and passive mouth opening, and joint sounds were assessed in both groups at baseline and after the last intervention. The measurements used were (1) a visual analogue scale (VAS), (2) the Widespread Pain Index (WPI), (3) the Symptom Severity Scale (SSS), (4) the Patient's Global Impression of Change (PGIC), (5) the Pittsburgh Quality of Sleep Questionnaire Index (PSQI), (6) an assessment of the number of tender points, (7) a measurement of the active mouth opening, (8) a measurement of the vertical overlap of the incisors, and (9) the measurement of joint sounds during mouth opening and closing. Results • The group X time

  16. Country, Sex, EDSS Change and Therapy Choice Independently Predict Treatment Discontinuation in Multiple Sclerosis and Clinically Isolated Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jokubaitis, Vilija G.; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grand’Maison, François; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Boz, Cavit; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Girard, Marc; Grammond, Pierre; Iuliano, Gerardo; Fiol, Marcela; Cabrera-Gomez, Jose Antonio; Fernandez-Bolanos, Ricardo; Giuliani, Giorgio; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Cristiano, Edgardo; Herbert, Joseph; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; Bergamaschi, Roberto; van Pesch, Vincent; Moore, Fraser; Vella, Norbert; Slee, Mark; Santiago, Vetere; Barnett, Michael; Havrdova, Eva; Young, Carolyn; Sirbu, Carmen-Adella; Tanner, Mary; Rutherford, Michelle; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We conducted a prospective study, MSBASIS, to assess factors leading to first treatment discontinuation in patients with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods The MSBASIS Study, conducted by MSBase Study Group members, enrols patients seen from CIS onset, reporting baseline demographics, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores. Follow-up visits report relapses, EDSS scores, and the start and end dates of MS-specific therapies. We performed a multivariable survival analysis to determine factors within this dataset that predict first treatment discontinuation. Results A total of 2314 CIS patients from 44 centres were followed for a median of 2.7 years, during which time 1247 commenced immunomodulatory drug (IMD) treatment. Ninety percent initiated IMD after a diagnosis of MS was confirmed, and 10% while still in CIS status. Over 40% of these patients stopped their first IMD during the observation period. Females were more likely to cease medication than males (HR 1.36, p = 0.003). Patients treated in Australia were twice as likely to cease their first IMD than patients treated in Spain (HR 1.98, p = 0.001). Increasing EDSS was associated with higher rate of IMD cessation (HR 1.21 per EDSS unit, p<0.001), and intramuscular interferon-β-1a (HR 1.38, p = 0.028) and subcutaneous interferon-β-1a (HR 1.45, p = 0.012) had higher rates of discontinuation than glatiramer acetate, although this varied widely in different countries. Onset cerebral MRI features, age, time to treatment initiation or relapse on treatment were not associated with IMD cessation. Conclusion In this multivariable survival analysis, female sex, country of residence, EDSS change and IMD choice independently predicted time to first IMD cessation. PMID:22768046

  17. The Effects of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy on Depression and Anxiety in Women with Premenstrual Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Panahi, Faeze

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Little research has been done regarding the role of psychotherapy in the treatment of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) on the PMS symptoms and depression and anxiety symptoms in women with PMS. Design. In a randomized controlled trial, a total of 60 students at Mazandaran University with mild to moderate PMS who had depressive symptoms (Beck depression scores 16–47) were randomly allocated to either an experimental (n = 30) or a control (n = 30) group. The experimental group received MBCT in eight group sessions (120 min each) over 8 weeks. The control group received no intervention. All participants completed the Premenstrual Assessment Scale (PAS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) at the beginning and the end of the study. Repeated-measure ANOVA was used to analyze the data. Results. At the end of study, the experimental and control groups showed the following scores, respectively (mean ± SD): depression, 15.73 ± 6.99 and 25.36 ± 7.14; anxiety, 16.96 ± 7.78 and 26.60 ± 9.38; and total PAS, 42.86 ± 8.02 and 58.93 ± 8.47. MBCT improved depression and anxiety symptoms and total PAS score. Conclusion. MBCT intervention is acceptable and potentially beneficial in women with PMS symptoms. Psychotherapy should be considered as a treatment option for mild to moderate PMS in women with depressive symptoms. PMID:28025621

  18. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Can Improve Post Concussion Syndrome Years after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury - Randomized Prospective Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fishlev, Gregori; Bechor, Yair; Volkov, Olga; Bergan, Jacob; Friedman, Mony; Hoofien, Dan; Shlamkovitch, Nathan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Efrati, Shai

    2013-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in the US. Approximately 70-90% of the TBI cases are classified as mild, and up to 25% of them will not recover and suffer chronic neurocognitive impairments. The main pathology in these cases involves diffuse brain injuries, which are hard to detect by anatomical imaging yet noticeable in metabolic imaging. The current study tested the effectiveness of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) in improving brain function and quality of life in mTBI patients suffering chronic neurocognitive impairments. Methods and Findings The trial population included 56 mTBI patients 1–5 years after injury with prolonged post-concussion syndrome (PCS). The HBOT effect was evaluated by means of prospective, randomized, crossover controlled trial: the patients were randomly assigned to treated or crossover groups. Patients in the treated group were evaluated at baseline and following 40 HBOT sessions; patients in the crossover group were evaluated three times: at baseline, following a 2-month control period of no treatment, and following subsequent 2-months of 40 HBOT sessions. The HBOT protocol included 40 treatment sessions (5 days/week), 60 minutes each, with 100% oxygen at 1.5 ATA. “Mindstreams” was used for cognitive evaluations, quality of life (QOL) was evaluated by the EQ-5D, and changes in brain activity were assessed by SPECT imaging. Significant improvements were demonstrated in cognitive function and QOL in both groups following HBOT but no significant improvement was observed following the control period. SPECT imaging revealed elevated brain activity in good agreement with the cognitive improvements. Conclusions HBOT can induce neuroplasticity leading to repair of chronically impaired brain functions and improved quality of life in mTBI patients with prolonged PCS at late chronic stage. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00715052 PMID:24260334

  19. Growth Hormone Research Society Workshop Summary: Consensus Guidelines for Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Therapy in Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tony, Michèle; Höybye, Charlotte; Allen, David B.; Tauber, Maïthé; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Ambler, Geoffrey R.; Battista, Renaldo; Beauloye, Véronique; Berall, Glenn; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Butler, Merlin G.; Cassidy, Suzanne B.; Chihara, Kazuo; Cohen, Pinchas; Craig, Maria; Farholt, Stense; Goetghebeur, Mireille; Goldstone, Anthony P.; Greggi, Tiziana; Grugni, Graziano; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C.; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Johnson, Keegan; Kemper, Alex; Kopchick, John J.; Malozowski, Saul; Miller, Jennifer; Mogul, Harriette R.; Muscatelli, Françoise; Nergårdh, Ricard; Nicholls, Robert D.; Radovick, Sally; Rosenthal, M. Sara; Sipilä, Ilkka; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Vogels, Annick; Waters, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Recombinant human GH (rhGH) therapy in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) has been used by the medical community and advocated by parental support groups since its approval in the United States in 2000 and in Europe in 2001. Its use in PWS represents a unique therapeutic challenge that includes treating individuals with cognitive disability, varied therapeutic goals that are not focused exclusively on increased height, and concerns about potential life-threatening adverse events. Objective: The aim of the study was to formulate recommendations for the use of rhGH in children and adult patients with PWS. Evidence: We performed a systematic review of the clinical evidence in the pediatric population, including randomized controlled trials, comparative observational studies, and long-term studies (>3.5 y). Adult studies included randomized controlled trials of rhGH treatment for ≥ 6 months and uncontrolled trials. Safety data were obtained from case reports, clinical trials, and pharmaceutical registries. Methodology: Forty-three international experts and stakeholders followed clinical practice guideline development recommendations outlined by the AGREE Collaboration (www.agreetrust.org). Evidence was synthesized and graded using a comprehensive multicriteria methodology (EVIDEM) (http://bit.ly.PWGHIN). Conclusions: Following a multidisciplinary evaluation, preferably by experts, rhGH treatment should be considered for patients with genetically confirmed PWS in conjunction with dietary, environmental, and lifestyle interventions. Cognitive impairment should not be a barrier to treatment, and informed consent/assent should include benefit/risk information. Exclusion criteria should include severe obesity, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, untreated severe obstructive sleep apnea, active cancer, or psychosis. Clinical outcome priorities should vary depending upon age and the presence of physical, mental, and social disability, and treatment should be continued for as

  20. Restless legs syndrome augmentation among Japanese patients receiving pramipexole therapy: Rate and risk factors in a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Masayoshi; Nishida, Shingo; Nakamura, Masaki; Kobayashi, Mina; Matsui, Kentaro; Ito, Eiki; Usui, Akira; Inoue, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the rate of and risk factors for restless legs syndrome (RLS) augmentation in Japanese patients receiving pramipexole (PPX) treatment. Records of 231 consecutive patients with idiopathic RLS who received PPX therapy for more than one month in a single sleep disorder center were analyzed retrospectively. Augmentation was diagnosed based on the Max Planck Institute criteria; associated factors were identified by logistic regression analysis. Mean age at PPX initiation was 60.6 ± 14.9 years and mean treatment duration was 48.5 ± 26.4 months. Augmentation was diagnosed in 21 patients (9.1%). Daily PPX dose and treatment duration were significantly associated with augmentation. By analyzing the receiver operating characteristic curve, a PPX dose of 0.375 mg/day was found to be the optimal cut-off value for predicting augmentation. After stratifying patients according to PPX treatment duration, at median treatment duration of 46 months, optimal cut-off values for daily doses were 0.375 and 0.500 mg/day for <46 months and ≥46 months of treatment, respectively. The RLS augmentation with PPX treatment in Japanese patients was occurred at rate of 9.1%, being quite compatible with previously reported rates in Caucasian patients. The symptom could appear within a relatively short period after starting the treatment in possibly vulnerable cases even with a smaller drug dose. Our results support the importance of keeping doses of PPX low throughout the RLS treatment course to prevent augmentation. PMID:28264052

  1. Education, progressive muscle relaxation therapy, and exercise for the treatment of night eating syndrome. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S; Maraldo, Toni M; Vercellone, Allison C; Gagne, Danielle A

    2015-06-01

    Night eating syndrome (NES) is a circadian rhythm disorder in which food intake is shifted toward the end of the day, interfering with sleep. According to the biobehavioral model of NES, the disorder is the result of a genetic predisposition that, coupled with stress, leads to enhanced reuptake of serotonin, thereby dysregulating circadian rhythms and decreasing satiety. Using the biobehavioral model as a guide, we developed a brief behavioral intervention using education, relaxation strategies, and exercise to address the core symptoms of NES. In this pilot randomized controlled clinical trial, 44 participants with NES were randomly assigned to an educational group (E; n = 14), E plus progressive muscle relaxation therapy (PMR; n = 15); or PMR plus exercise (PMR Plus, n = 15). Participants received a baseline intervention with 1- and 3-week follow-up sessions. Effectiveness analyses showed that participants in all three groups evidenced significant reductions on measures of NES symptoms (p < .001), depression (p < .05), anxiety (p < .01), and perceived stress (p < .05). However, the only significant between group change was for the percent of food eaten after the evening meal, with the PMR group showing the greatest reduction (-30.54%), followed by the PMR Plus group (-20.42%) and the E group (-9.5%); only the difference between the PMR and E groups was statistically significant (p = .012). Reductions in NES scores were significantly associated with reductions on measures of depression (r = .47; p < .01) and perceived stress (r = .37; p < .05), but not anxiety (r = .26, p = ns). Results support the role of education and relaxation in the behavioral treatment of NES.

  2. Efficacy of low-level laser therapy for the treatment of burning mouth syndrome: a randomized, controlled trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanemberg, Juliana Cassol; López, José López; de Figueiredo, Maria Antonia Zancanaro; Cherubini, Karen; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the treatment of burning mouth syndrome (BMS). A diode laser was used in 78 BMS patients who were randomly assigned into four groups: IR1W, n=20 (830 nm, 100 mW, 5 J, 176 J/cm2, 50 s, LLLT weekly sessions, 10 sessions); IR3W, n=20 (830 nm, 100 mW, 5 J, 176 J/cm2, 50 s, three LLLT weekly sessions, 9 sessions); red laser, n=19 (685 nm, 35 mW, 2 J, 72 J/cm2, 58 s, three LLLT weekly sessions, 9 sessions); and control-group (CG), n=19. Symptoms were assessed at the end of the treatment and eight weeks later; quality of life related to oral health was assessed using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). Statistical analysis was carried out using repeated measures analysis of variance followed by the posthoc Tukey test. There was significant reduction of the symptoms in all groups at the end of the treatment, which was maintained in the follow-up. The scores of the IR1W and IR3W laser groups differed significantly from those of the CG. There was also a decrease in the OHIP-14 scores in the four groups. The IR3W laser group scores differed significantly from those of the CG. LLLT reduces the symptoms of BMS and may be an alternative therapeutic strategy for the relief of symptoms in patients with BMS.

  3. Metabolic syndrome before and after initiation of antiretroviral therapy in treatment-naïve HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, S; Schouten, JT; Atkinson, B; Brown, T; Wohl, D; McComsey, GA; Glesby, MJ; Shikuma, C; Haubrich, R; Tebas, P; Campbell, TB; Jacobson, DL

    2012-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes, many of which are associated with HIV and antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined prevalence and incidence of MetS, and risk factors for MetS in ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals starting ART. Methods MetS, defined by the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, was assessed at and after ART initiation in HIV-infected individuals who enrolled in selected AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) trials and were followed long-term after these trials as part of the ACTG Longitudinal Linked Randomized Trials cohort. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine risk factors of incident MetS. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) are reported. Results At ART initiation, the prevalence of MetS was 20%. After ART initiation, the incidence of MetS was 8.5 per 100 person-years. After adjusting for demographics and body mass index, the risk of MetS was decreased for CD4+ T-cell counts>50 cells/mm3 (aHR = 0.62, 95% CI=0.43 to 0.90 for CD4>500), and the risk was increased for HIV-1 RNA >400 copies/mL (aHR=1.55 (95% CI=1.25 to 1.92) and use of a protease-inhibitor (PI) based regimen (relative to no PI use, aHR=1.25 (95% CI=1.04 to 1.51) for any PI use). Conclusion In HIV-infected individuals on ART, virologic suppression and maintenance of high CD4+ T-cell counts may be potentially modifiable factors that can reduce the risk of MetS. The effect of MetS on the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes needs to be evaluated. PMID:22828718

  4. Vascular programming in twins: the effects of chorionicity and fetal therapy for twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, H M; Barlas, A; Matsui, H; Diemert, A; Taylor, M J O; Preece, J; Gordon, F; Greenwald, S E; Hecher, K

    2012-06-01

    We assessed vascular programming in genetically identical monochorionic twin pairs with twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) treated differently in utero by serial amnioreduction or fetal laser arterial photocoagulation. This case-control study re-assessed four twin groups at median 11 years comprising 20 pairs of monochorionic diamniotic twins: nine treated by amnioreduction (TTTS-amnio) and eleven by laser (TTTS-laser) with seven monochorionic and six dichorionic control pairs. Outcome measures were current blood pressure (BP), brachio-radial arterial stiffness derived from pulse wave velocity (PWV), resting microcirculation (Flux) and response to heating and post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia measured using laser Doppler. Potential confounders [PWV and BP at first study, current height, weight, heart rate and twin type (ex-recipient, ex-donor or heavier/lighter of pair)] were accounted for by Mixed Linear Models statistical methodology. PWV dichorionic > monochorionic (P = 0.024); systolic and diastolic BP dichorionic > TTTS-amnio and TTTS-laser (P = 0.004, P = 0.02 and P = 0.005, P = 0.02, respectively). Within-twin pair pattern of PWV discordance was similar in laser treated and dichorionic controls (heavier-born > lighter), opposite to TTTS-amnio and monochorionic controls. Flux monochorionic > dichorionic (P = 0.044) and heavier > lighter-born (P = 0.024). TTTS-laser and dichorionic diamniotic showed greatest hyperaemic responses (dichorionic > TTTS-amnio or monochorionic controls (P = 0.007, P = 0.025). Hyperaemic responses were slower in heavier-born twins (P = 0.005). In summary, monochorionic twins had lower BP, arterial stiffness and increased resting vasodilatation than dichorionic twins implying shared fetal circulation affects vascular development. Vascular responses in laser-TTTS were similar to dichorionic and opposite to TTTS-amnio suggesting a lasting effect of fetal therapy