Science.gov

Sample records for synthetic aperture radar

  1. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  2. Optical synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilovitsh, Asaf; Zach, Shlomo; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2013-06-01

    A method is proposed for increasing the resolution of an object and overcoming the diffraction limit of an optical system installed on top of a moving imaging system, such as an airborne platform or satellite. The resolution improvement is obtained via a two-step process. First, three low resolution differently defocused images are captured and the optical phase is retrieved using an improved iterative Gershberg-Saxton based algorithm. The phase retrieval allows numerical back propagation of the field to the aperture plane. Second, the imaging system is shifted and the first step is repeated. The obtained optical fields at the aperture plane are combined and a synthetically increased lens aperture is generated along the direction of movement, yielding higher imaging resolution. The method resembles a well-known approach from the microwave regime called the synthetic aperture radar in which the antenna size is synthetically increased along the platform propagation direction. The proposed method is demonstrated via Matlab simulation as well as through laboratory experiment.

  3. SEASAT Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of radar imagery from space altitudes is discussed and the advantages of radar over passive sensor systems are outlined. Specific reference is made to the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar. Possible applications include oil spill monitoring, snow and ice reconnaissance, mineral exploration, and monitoring phenomena in the urban environment.

  4. Superresolution and Synthetic Aperture Radar

    SciTech Connect

    DICKEY,FRED M.; ROMERO,LOUIS; DOERRY,ARMIN W.

    2001-05-01

    Superresolution concepts offer the potential of resolution beyond the classical limit. This great promise has not generally been realized. In this study we investigate the potential application of superresolution concepts to synthetic aperture radar. The analytical basis for superresolution theory is discussed. The application of the concept to synthetic aperture radar is investigated as an operator inversion problem. Generally, the operator inversion problem is ill posed. A criterion for judging superresolution processing of an image is presented.

  5. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Gillian

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) allows all-weather, day and night, surface surveillance and has the ability to detect, classify and geolocate objects at long stand-off ranges. Bistatic SAR, where the transmitter and the receiver are on separate platforms, is seen as a potential means of countering the vulnerability of conventional monostatic SAR to electronic countermeasures, particularly directional jamming, and avoiding physical attack of the imaging platform. As the receiving platform can be totally passive, it does not advertise its position by RF emissions. The transmitter is not susceptible to jamming and can, for example, operate at long stand-off ranges to reduce its vulnerability to physical attack. This thesis examines some of the complications involved in producing high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery. The effect of bistatic operation on resolution is examined from a theoretical viewpoint and analytical expressions for resolution are developed. These expressions are verified by simulation work using a simple 'point by point' processor. This work is extended to look at using modern practical processing engines for bistatic geometries. Adaptations of the polar format algorithm and range migration algorithm are considered. The principal achievement of this work is a fully airborne demonstration of bistatic SAR. The route taken in reaching this is given, along with some results. The bistatic SAR imagery is analysed and compared to the monostatic imagery collected at the same time. Demonstrating high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery using two airborne platforms represents what I believe to be a European first and is likely to be the first time that this has been achieved outside the US (the UK has very little insight into US work on this topic). Bistatic target characteristics are examined through the use of simulations. This also compares bistatic imagery with monostatic and gives further insight into the utility of bistatic SAR.

  6. Imaging synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Burns, Bryan L.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    A linear-FM SAR imaging radar method and apparatus to produce a real-time image by first arranging the returned signals into a plurality of subaperture arrays, the columns of each subaperture array having samples of dechirped baseband pulses, and further including a processing of each subaperture array to obtain coarse-resolution in azimuth, then fine-resolution in range, and lastly, to combine the processed subapertures to obtain the final fine-resolution in azimuth. Greater efficiency is achieved because both the transmitted signal and a local oscillator signal mixed with the returned signal can be varied on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of radar motion. Moreover, a novel circuit can adjust the sampling location and the A/D sample rate of the combined dechirped baseband signal which greatly reduces processing time and hardware. The processing steps include implementing a window function, stabilizing either a central reference point and/or all other points of a subaperture with respect to doppler frequency and/or range as a function of radar motion, sorting and compressing the signals using a standard fourier transforms. The stabilization of each processing part is accomplished with vector multiplication using waveforms generated as a function of radar motion wherein these waveforms may be synthesized in integrated circuits. Stabilization of range migration as a function of doppler frequency by simple vector multiplication is a particularly useful feature of the invention; as is stabilization of azimuth migration by correcting for spatially varying phase errors prior to the application of an autofocus process.

  7. Synthetic aperture radar target simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, H. A.; Held, D. N.; Goldstein, R. M.; Bickler, T. C.

    1984-01-01

    A simulator for simulating the radar return, or echo, from a target seen by a SAR antenna mounted on a platform moving with respect to the target is described. It includes a first-in first-out memory which has digital information clocked in at a rate related to the frequency of a transmitted radar signal and digital information clocked out with a fixed delay defining range between the SAR and the simulated target, and at a rate related to the frequency of the return signal. An RF input signal having a frequency similar to that utilized by a synthetic aperture array radar is mixed with a local oscillator signal to provide a first baseband signal having a frequency considerably lower than that of the RF input signal.

  8. Differential Optical Synthetic Aperture Radar

    DOEpatents

    Stappaerts, Eddy A.

    2005-04-12

    A new differential technique for forming optical images using a synthetic aperture is introduced. This differential technique utilizes a single aperture to obtain unique (N) phases that can be processed to produce a synthetic aperture image at points along a trajectory. This is accomplished by dividing the aperture into two equal "subapertures", each having a width that is less than the actual aperture, along the direction of flight. As the platform flies along a given trajectory, a source illuminates objects and the two subapertures are configured to collect return signals. The techniques of the invention is designed to cancel common-mode errors, trajectory deviations from a straight line, and laser phase noise to provide the set of resultant (N) phases that can produce an image having a spatial resolution corresponding to a synthetic aperture.

  9. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  10. Synthetic Aperture Radar Missions Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, S.

    2000-01-01

    This report reviews the history of the LightSAR project and summarizes actions the agency can undertake to support industry-led efforts to develop an operational synthetic aperture radar (SAR) capability in the United States.

  11. Clutter free synthetic aperture radar correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.

    1977-01-01

    A synthetic aperture radar correlation system including a moving diffuser located at the image plane of a radar processor is described. The output of the moving diffuser is supplied to a lens whose impulse response is at least as wide as that of the overall processing system. A significant reduction in clutter results is given.

  12. Exploiting Decorrelations In Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Villasenor, John D.

    1994-01-01

    Temporal decorrelation between synthetic-aperture-radar data acquired on subsequent passes along same or nearly same trajectory serves as measure of change in target scene. Based partly on mathematical models of statistics of correlations between first- and second-pass radar echoes. Also based partly on Fourier-transform relations between radar-system impulse response and decorrelation functions particularly those expressing decorrelation effects of rotation and horizontal shift of trajectories between two passes.

  13. Analysis of synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Some problems faced in applications of radar measurements in hydrology are: (1) adequate calibration of the radar systems and direct digital data will be required in order that repeatable data can be acquired for hydrologic applications; (2) quantitative hydrologic research on a large scale will be prohibitive with aircraft mounted synthetic aperture radar systems due to the system geometry; (3) spacecraft platforms appear to be the best platforms for radar systems when conducting research over watersheds larger than a few square kilometers; (4) experimental radar systems should be designed to avoid use of radomes; and (5) cross polarized X and L band data seem to discriminate between good and poor hydrologic cover better than like polarized data.

  14. Complex synthetic aperture radar data compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirillo, Francis R.; Poehler, Paul L.; Schwartz, Debra S.; Rais, Houra

    2002-08-01

    Existing compression algorithms, primarily designed for visible electro-optical (EO) imagery, do not work well for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. The best compression ratios achieved to date are less than 10:1 with minimal degradation to the phase data. Previously, phase data has been discarded with only magnitude data saved for analysis. Now that the importance of phase has been recognized for Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR), Coherent Change Detection (CCD), and polarimetry, requirements exist to preserve, transmit, and archive the both components. Bandwidth and storage limitations on existing and future platforms make compression of this data a top priority. This paper presents results obtained using a new compression algorithm designed specifically to compress SAR imagery, while preserving both magnitude and phase information at compression ratios of 20:1 and better.

  15. Performance limits for Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-02-01

    The performance of a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system depends on a variety of factors, many which are interdependent in some manner. It is often difficult to ''get your arms around'' the problem of ascertaining achievable performance limits, and yet those limits exist and are dictated by physics, no matter how bright the engineer tasked to generate a system design. This report identifies and explores those limits, and how they depend on hardware system parameters and environmental conditions. Ultimately, this leads to a characterization of parameters that offer optimum performance for the overall SAR system. For example, there are definite optimum frequency bands that depend on weather conditions and range, and minimum radar PRF for a fixed real antenna aperture dimension is independent of frequency. While the information herein is not new to the literature, its collection into a single report hopes to offer some value in reducing the ''seek time''.

  16. Nonlinear synthetic aperture radar imaging using a harmonic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Kyle A.; Mazzaro, Gregory J.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Nguyen, Lam H.; Martone, Anthony F.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of linear and nonlinear targets. Data are collected using a linear/nonlinear step frequency radar. We show that it is indeed possible to produce SAR images using a nonlinear radar. Furthermore, it is shown that the nonlinear radar is able to reduce linear clutter by at least 80 dB compared to a linear radar. The nonlinear SAR images also show the system's ability to detect small electronic devices in the presence of large linear clutter. The system presented here has the ability to completely ignore a 20-inch trihedral corner reflector while detecting a RF mixer with a dipole antenna attached.

  17. Soviet oceanographic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) research

    SciTech Connect

    Held, D.N.; Gasparovic, R.F.; Mansfield, A.W.; Melville, W.K.; Mollo-Christensen, E.L.; Zebker, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    Radar non-acoustic anti-submarine warfare (NAASW) became the subject of considerable scientific investigation and controversy in the West subsequent to the discovery by the Seasat satellite in 1978 that manifestations of underwater topography, thought to be hidden from the radar, were visible in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the ocean. In addition, the Seasat radar produced images of ship wakes where the observed angle between the wake arms was much smaller than expected from classical Kelvin wake theory. These observations cast doubt on the radar oceanography community's ability to adequately explain these phenomena, and by extension on the ability of existing hydrodynamic and radar scattering models to accurately predict the observability of submarine-induced signatures. If one is of the opinion that radar NAASW is indeed a potentially significant tool in detecting submerged operational submarines, then the Soviet capability, as evidenced throughout this report, will be somewhat daunting. It will be shown that the Soviets have extremely fine capabilities in both theoretical and experimental hydrodynamics, that Soviet researchers have been conducting at-sea radar remote sensing experiments on a scale comparable to those of the United States for several years longer than we have, and that they have both an airborne and spaceborne SAR capability. The only discipline that the Soviet Union appears to be lacking is in the area of digital radar signal processing. If one is of the opinion that radar NAASW can have at most a minimal impact on the detection of submerged submarines, then the Soviet effort is of little consequence and poses not threat. 280 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Digital exploitation of synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, H. L.; Shuchman, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A digital processing and analysis scheme for use with digitized synthetic aperture radar data was developed. Using data from a four channel system, the imagery is preprocessed using specially designed software and then analyzed using preexisting facilities originally intended for use with MSS type data. Geometric and radiometric correction may be performed if desired, as well as classification analysis, Fast Fourier transform, filtering and level slice and display functions. The system provides low cost output in real time, permitting interactive imagery analysis. System information flow diagrams as well as sample output products are shown.

  19. Lossless compression of synthetic aperture radar images

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R.W.; Magotra, N.; Mandyam, G.D.

    1996-02-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has been proven an effective sensor in a wide variety of applications. Many of these uses require transmission and/or processing of the image data in a lossless manner. With the current state of SAR technology, the amount of data contained in a single image may be massive, whether the application requires the entire complex image or magnitude data only. In either case, some type of compression may be required to losslessly transmit this data in a given bandwidth or store it in a reasonable volume. This paper provides the results of applying several lossless compression schemes to SAR imagery.

  20. Cancellation of singularities for synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caday, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In a basic model for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging, one wishes to recover a function or distribution f from line integrals over circles whose centers lie on a given curve γ. In this paper, we consider the problem of recovering the singularities (wavefront set) of f given its SAR data, and specifically whether it is possible to choose a singular f whose singularities are hidden from γ, meaning that its SAR data is smooth. We show that f 's singularities can be hidden to leading order if a certain discrete reflection map is the identity, and give examples where this is the case. Finally, numerical experiments illustrate the hiding of singularities.

  1. Synthetic aperture radar autofocus via semidefinite relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuang-Hung; Wiesel, Ami; Munson, David C

    2013-06-01

    The autofocus problem in synthetic aperture radar imaging amounts to estimating unknown phase errors caused by unknown platform or target motion. At the heart of three state-of-the-art autofocus algorithms, namely, phase gradient autofocus, multichannel autofocus (MCA), and Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus (FMCA), is the solution of a constant modulus quadratic program (CMQP). Currently, these algorithms solve a CMQP by using an eigenvalue relaxation approach. We propose an alternative relaxation approach based on semidefinite programming, which has recently attracted considerable attention in other signal processing problems. Experimental results show that our proposed methods provide promising performance improvements for MCA and FMCA through an increase in computational complexity.

  2. Synthetic aperture radar processing with tiered subapertures

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-06-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is used to form images that are maps of radar reflectivity of some scene of interest, from range soundings taken over some spatial aperture. Additionally, the range soundings are typically synthesized from a sampled frequency aperture. Efficient processing of the collected data necessitates using efficient digital signal processing techniques such as vector multiplies and fast implementations of the Discrete Fourier Transform. Inherent in image formation algorithms that use these is a trade-off between the size of the scene that can be acceptably imaged, and the resolution with which the image can be made. These limits arise from migration errors and spatially variant phase errors, and different algorithms mitigate these to varying degrees. Two fairly successful algorithms for airborne SARs are Polar Format processing, and Overlapped Subaperture (OSA) processing. This report introduces and summarizes the analysis of generalized Tiered Subaperture (TSA) techniques that are a superset of both Polar Format processing and OSA processing. It is shown how tiers of subapertures in both azimuth and range can effectively mitigate both migration errors and spatially variant phase errors to allow virtually arbitrary scene sizes, even in a dynamic motion environment.

  3. Multi-mission, autonomous, synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Thomas J.; Wilson, Michael L.; Madsen, David; Jensen, Mark; Sullivan, Stephanie; Addario, Michael; Hally, Iain

    2014-05-01

    Unmanned aerial systems (UASs) have become a critical asset in current battlespaces and continue to play an increasing role for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) missions. With the development of medium-to-low altitude, rapidly deployable aircraft platforms, the ISR community has seen an increasing push to develop ISR sensors and systems with real-time mission support capabilities. This paper describes recent flight demonstrations and test results of the RASAR (Real-time, Autonomous, Synthetic Aperture Radar) sensor system. RASAR is a modular, multi-band (L and X) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging sensor designed for self-contained, autonomous, real-time operation with mission flexibility to support a wide range of ISR needs within the size, weight and power constraints of Group III UASs. The sensor command and control and real-time image formation processing are designed to allow integration of RASAR into a larger, multi-intelligence system of systems. The multi-intelligence architecture and a demonstration of real-time autonomous cross-cueing of a separate optical sensor will be presented.

  4. Motion measurement for synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3-D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Detection of small, slow ground targets using Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Curtis; Chapin, Elaine; Rosen, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) along-track interferometry (ATI) is a technique for sensing Earth-surface motion. The technique involves interferometrically combining data from two radar images acquired from phase centers separated along the platform flight track.

  6. Eliminating Clutter in Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.

    1979-01-01

    Diffusion technique reduces clutter noise in coherent SAR (synthetic-aperature radar) image signal without degrading its resolution. Technique makes radar-mapped terrain features more obvious.It also has potential application in holographic microscopy.

  7. Triangulation using synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sherman S. C.; Howington-Kraus, Annie E.

    1991-01-01

    For the extraction of topographic information about Venus from stereoradar images obtained from the Magellan Mission, a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) compilation system was developed on analytical stereoplotters. The system software was extensively tested by using stereoradar images from various spacecraft and airborne radar systems, including Seasat, SIR-B, ERIM XCL, and STAR-1. Stereomodeling from radar images was proven feasible, and development is on a correct approach. During testing, the software was enhanced and modified to obtain more flexibility and better precision. Triangulation software for establishing control points by using SAR images was also developed through a joint effort with the Defense Mapping Agency. The SAR triangulation system comprises four main programs, TRIDATA, MODDATA, TRISAR, and SHEAR. The first two programs are used to sort and update the data; the third program, the main one, performs iterative statistical adjustment; and the fourth program analyzes the results. Also, input are flight data and data from the Global Positioning System and Inertial System (navigation information). The SAR triangulation system was tested with six strips of STAR-1 radar images on a VAX-750 computer. Each strip contains images of 10 minutes flight time (equivalent to a ground distance of 73.5 km); the images cover a ground width of 22.5 km. All images were collected from the same side. With an input of 44 primary control points, 441 ground control points were produced. The adjustment process converged after eight iterations. With a 6-m/pixel resolution of the radar images, the triangulation adjustment has an average standard elevation error of 81 m. Development of Magellan radargrammetry will be continued to convert both SAR compilation and triangulation systems into digital form.

  8. Multistatic synthetic aperture radar image formation.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, V; Swoboda, J; Yarman, C E; Yazici, B

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we consider a multistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging scenario where a swarm of airborne antennas, some of which are transmitting, receiving or both, are traversing arbitrary flight trajectories and transmitting arbitrary waveforms without any form of multiplexing. The received signal at each receiving antenna may be interfered by the scattered signal due to multiple transmitters and additive thermal noise at the receiver. In this scenario, standard bistatic SAR image reconstruction algorithms result in artifacts in reconstructed images due to these interferences. In this paper, we use microlocal analysis in a statistical setting to develop a filtered-backprojection (FBP) type analytic image formation method that suppresses artifacts due to interference while preserving the location and orientation of edges of the scene in the reconstructed image. Our FBP-type algorithm exploits the second-order statistics of the target and noise to suppress the artifacts due to interference in a mean-square sense. We present numerical simulations to demonstrate the performance of our multistatic SAR image formation algorithm with the FBP-type bistatic SAR image reconstruction algorithm. While we mainly focus on radar applications, our image formation method is also applicable to other problems arising in fields such as acoustic, geophysical and medical imaging.

  9. Georeferencing on Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeilzade, M.; Amini, J.; Zakeri, S.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the SAR1 geometry imaging, SAR images include geometric distortions that would be erroneous image information and the images should be geometrically calibrated. As the radar systems are side looking, geometric distortion such as shadow, foreshortening and layover are occurred. To compensate these geometric distortions, information about sensor position, imaging geometry and target altitude from ellipsoid should be available. In this paper, a method for geometric calibration of SAR images is proposed. The method uses Range-Doppler equations. In this method, for the image georeferencing, the DEM2 of SRTM with 30m pixel size is used and also exact ephemeris data of the sensor is required. In the algorithm proposed in this paper, first digital elevation model transmit to range and azimuth direction. By applying this process, errors caused by topography such as foreshortening and layover are removed in the transferred DEM. Then, the position of the corners on original image is found base on the transferred DEM. Next, original image registered to transfer DEM by 8 parameters projective transformation. The output is the georeferenced image that its geometric distortions are removed. The advantage of the method described in this article is that it does not require any control point as well as the need to attitude and rotational parameters of the sensor. Since the ground range resolution of used images are about 30m, the geocoded images using the method described in this paper have an accuracy about 20m (subpixel) in planimetry and about 30m in altimetry. 1 Synthetic Aperture Radar 2 Digital Elevation Model

  10. Ambiguity Of Doppler Centroid In Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chi-Yung; Curlander, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Paper discusses performances of two algorithms for resolution of ambiguity in estimated Doppler centroid frequency of echoes in synthetic-aperture radar. One based on range-cross-correlation technique, other based on multiple-pulse-repetition-frequency technique.

  11. Synthetic aperture radar signal processing: Trends and technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, John C.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology is presented in vugraph form. The following topics are covered: an SAR ground data system; SAR signal processing algorithms; SAR correlator architectures; and current and future trends.

  12. Oil Slick Characterization Using Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Breivik, O.; Brekke, C.; Skrunes, S.; Holt, B.

    2015-12-01

    Oil spills are a hazard worldwide with potential of causing high impact disasters, and require an active oil spill response capability to protect personnel, the ecosystem, and the energy supply. As the amount of oil in traditionally accessible reserves decline, there will be increasing oil extraction from the Arctic and deep-water wells, both new sources with high risk and high cost for monitoring and response. Although radar has long been used for mapping the spatial extent of oil slicks, it is only since the Deepwater Horizon spill that synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been shown capable of characterizing oil properties within a slick, and therefore useful for directing response to the recoverable thicker slicks or emulsions. Here we discuss a 2015 Norwegian oil-on-water spill experiment in which emulsions of known quantity and water-to-oil ratio along with a look-alike slick of plant oil were released in the North Sea and imaged with polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) by NASA's UAVSAR instrument for several hours following release. During the experiment, extensive in situ measurements were made from ship or aircraft with meteorological instruments, released drift buoys, and optical/IR imagers. The experiment was designed to provide validation data for development of a physical model relating polarization-dependent electromagnetic scattering to the dielectric properties of oil mixed with ocean water, which is the basis for oil characterization with SAR. Data were acquired with X-, C-, and L-band satellite-based SARs to enable multi-frequency comparison of characterization capabilities. In addition, the data are used to develop methods to differentiate mineral slicks from biogenic look-alikes, and to better understand slick weathering and dispersion. The results will provide a basis for modeling oil-in-ice spills, currently a high priority for nations involved in Arctic oil exploration. Here we discuss the Norwegian experiment, the validation data, and the results of

  13. Experiments In Calibration Of Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    Report describes international collaboration on experiments in calibration of synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) systems. Purposes of experiments were to: address problems associated with calibration of data, cross-calibrate between sets of imaging-radar data obtained by different systems, test designs of ground calibration equipment, and find candidate sites for calibration of future satellite-borne SAR systems.

  14. Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR) Polarimetric Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.; Perrine, Martin; McLinden, Matthew; Valett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR) is a state-of-the-art radar system developed at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center for the development and implementation of digital beamforming radar techniques. DBSAR was recently upgraded to polarimetric operation in order to enhance its capability as a science instrument. Two polarimetric approaches were carried out which will be demonstrated in upcoming flight campaigns.

  15. Interference Mitigation Effects on Synthetic Aperture Radar Coherent Data Products

    SciTech Connect

    Musgrove, Cameron

    2015-07-01

    For synthetic aperture radars radio frequency interference from sources external to the radar system and techniques to mitigate the interference can degrade the quality of the image products. Usually the radar system designer will try to balance the amount of mitigation for an acceptable amount of interference to optimize the image quality. This dissertation examines the effect of interference mitigation upon coherent data products of fine resolution, high frequency synthetic aperture radars using stretch processing. Novel interference mitigation techniques are introduced that operate on single or multiple apertures of data that increase average coherence compared to existing techniques. New metrics are applied to evaluate multiple mitigation techniques for image quality and average coherence. The underlying mechanism for interference mitigation techniques that affect coherence is revealed.

  16. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry of Okmok volcano, Alaska: radar observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Mann, Dörte; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Meyer, David

    2000-01-01

    ERS-1/ERS-2 synthetic aperture radar interferometry was used to study the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano in Alaska. First, we derived an accurate digital elevation model (DEM) using a tandem ERS-1/ERS-2 image pair and the preexisting DEM. Second, by studying changes in interferometric coherence we found that the newly erupted lava lost radar coherence for 5-17 months after the eruption. This suggests changes in the surface backscattering characteristics and was probably related to cooling and compaction processes. Third, the atmospheric delay anomalies in the deformation interferograms were quantitatively assessed. Atmospheric delay anomalies in some of the interferograms were significant and consistently smaller than one to two fringes in magnitude. For this reason, repeat observations are important to confidently interpret small geophysical signals related to volcanic activities. Finally, using two-pass differential interferometry, we analyzed the preemptive inflation, coeruptive deflation, and posteruptive inflation and confirmed the observations using independent image pairs. We observed more than 140 cm of subsidence associated with the 1997 eruption. This subsidence occurred between 16 months before the eruption and 5 months after the eruption, was preceded by ∼18 cm of uplift between 1992 and 1995 centered in the same location, and was followed by ∼10 cm of uplift between September 1997 and 1998. The best fitting model suggests the magma reservoir resided at 2.7 km depth beneath the center of the caldera, which was ∼5 km from the eruptive vent. We estimated the volume of the erupted material to be 0.055 km3 and the average thickness of the erupted lava to be ∼7.4 m. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Stereoscopic Height Estimation from Multiple Aspect Synthetic Aperture Radar Images

    SciTech Connect

    DELAURENTIS,JOHN M.; DOERRY,ARMIN W.

    2001-08-01

    A Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image is a two-dimensional projection of the radar reflectivity from a 3-dimensional object or scene. Stereoscopic SAR employs two SAR images from distinct flight paths that can be processed together to extract information of the third collapsed dimension (typically height) with some degree of accuracy. However, more than two SAR images of the same scene can similarly be processed to further improve height accuracy, and hence 3-dimensional position accuracy. This report shows how.

  18. Synthetic Aperture Radar Image Formation in Reconfigurable Logic

    SciTech Connect

    DUDLEY,PETER A.

    2001-06-01

    This paper studies the implementation of polar format, synthetic aperture radar image formation in modern Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA's). The polar format algorithm is described in rough terms and each of the processing steps is mapped to FPGA logic. This FPGA logic is analyzed with respect to throughput and circuit size for compatibility with airborne image formation.

  19. Synthetic aperture radar processing with polar formatted subapertures

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-10-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses the motion of a small real antenna to synthesize a larger aperture, and thereby achieve very fine azimuth resolution. Efficient SAR image formation requires modelling the radar echo and compensating (focusing) the delay and phase for various positions in the target scene. Polar-Format processing is one successful algorithm developed to process large scenes at fine resolutions, but is still limited, especially at resolutions near a wavelength. This paper shows how using tiers of subapertures can overcome the limitations of Polar-Format processing and increase the focused scene size substantially while using only efficient vector multiplies and Fast Fourier Transforms.

  20. A system model and inversion for synthetic aperture radar imaging.

    PubMed

    Soumekh, M

    1992-01-01

    A system model and its corresponding inversion for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging are presented. The system model incorporates the spherical nature of a radar's radiation pattern at far field. The inverse method based on this model performs a spatial Fourier transform (Doppler processing) on the recorded signals with respect to the available coordinates of a translational radar (SAR) or target (inverse SAR). It is shown that the transformed data provide samples of the spatial Fourier transform of the target's reflectivity function. The inverse method can be modified to incorporate deviations of the radar's motion from its prescribed straight line path. The effects of finite aperture on resolution, reconstruction, and sampling constraints for the imaging problem are discussed.

  1. Analysis of synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Average radar response for L-band like polarized system appeared to be related to the watershed runoff coefficients when the viewing angle was approximately 42 deg off nadir. Four requirements for radar systems used to verify applications of active microwave for water resources were identified: (1) first generation digital data will be required; (2) radar should be calibrated both internally and externally; (3) new systems should avoid radom use; and (4) images should be geometrically rectified prior to delivery to the user.

  2. The NASA Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, Yunling; Kim, Yunjin; van Zyl, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    None given. (From introduction): ...we will briefly describe the instrument characteristics, the evolution of the various radar modes, the instrument performance and improvement in the knowledge of the positioning and attitude information of the radar. In addition, we will summarize the [rogress of the data processing effort, especially in the interferometry processing. Finally, we will address the issue of processing and calibrating the cross-track interferometry (XTI) data.

  3. Soil-penetrating synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Boverie, B.; Brock, B.C.; Doerry, A.W.

    1994-12-01

    This report summarizes the results for the first year of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort. This effort included a system study, preliminary data acquisition, and preliminary algorithm development. The system study determined the optimum frequency and bandwidth, surveyed soil parameters and targets, and defined radar cross section in lossy media. The data acquisition imaged buried objects with a rail-SAR. Algorithm development included a radar echo model, three-dimensional processing, sidelobe optimization, phase history data interpolation, and clutter estimation/cancellation.

  4. Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A pilot study of a spaceborne sidelooking radar is summarized. The results of the system trade studies are given along with the electrical parameters for the proposed subsystems. The mechanical aspects, packaging, thermal control and dynamics of the proposed design are presented. Details of the data processor are given. A system is described that allows the data from a pass over the U. S. to be in hard copy form within two hours. Also included are the proposed schedule, work breakdown structure, and cost estimate.

  5. Synthetic aperture radar and digital processing: An introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicenzo, A.

    1981-01-01

    A tutorial on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is presented with emphasis on digital data collection and processing. Background information on waveform frequency and phase notation, mixing, Q conversion, sampling and cross correlation operations is included for clarity. The fate of a SAR signal from transmission to processed image is traced in detail, using the model of a single bright point target against a dark background. Some of the principal problems connected with SAR processing are also discussed.

  6. Synthetic aperture radar/LANDSAT MSS image registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, H. E. (Editor); Oberholtzer, J. D. (Editor); Anuta, P. E. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Algorithms and procedures necessary to merge aircraft synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and LANDSAT multispectral scanner (MSS) imagery were determined. The design of a SAR/LANDSAT data merging system was developed. Aircraft SAR images were registered to the corresponding LANDSAT MSS scenes and were the subject of experimental investigations. Results indicate that the registration of SAR imagery with LANDSAT MSS imagery is feasible from a technical viewpoint, and useful from an information-content viewpoint.

  7. Forward imaging for obstacle avoidance using ultrawideband synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lam H.; Wong, David C.; Stanton, Brian; Smith, Gregory

    2003-09-01

    In support of the Army vision for increased mobility, survivability, and lethality, we are investigating the use of ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology to enhance unmanned ground vehicle missions. The ability of UWB radar technology to detect objects concealed by foilage could provide an important obstacle avoidance capability for robotic vehicles. This would improve the speed and maneuverability of these vehicles and consequently increase the probability of survivability of U.S. forces. This technology would address the particular challenges that confront robotic vehicles such as large rocks hidden in tall grass and voids such as ditches and bodies of water. ARL has designed and constructed an instrumentation-grade low frequency, UWB synthetic aperture radar for evaluation of the target signatures and underlying phenomenology of stationary tactical targets concealed by foilage and objects buried in the ground. The radar (named BoomSAR) is installed in teh basekt of a 30-ton boom lift and can be operated while the entire boom lift is driven forward slowly, with the boom arm extended as high as 45 m to generate a synthetic aperture. In this paper, we investigate the potential use of the UWB radar in the forward imaging configuration. The paper describes the forward imaging radar and test setup at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. We present imagery of "positive" obstacles such as trees, fences, wires, mines, etc., as well as "negative" obstacles such as ditches. Imagery of small targets such as plastic mines is also included. We provide eletromagnetic simulations of forward SAR imagery of plastic mines and compare that to the measurement data.

  8. Ionospheric effects on synthetic aperture radar at VHF

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1997-02-01

    Synthetic aperture radars (SAR) operated from airplanes have been used at VHF because of their enhanced foliage and ground penetration compared to radars operated at UHF. A satellite-borne VHF SAR would have considerable utility but in order to operate with high resolution it would have to use both a large relative bandwidth and a large aperture. The presence of the ionosphere in the propagation path of the radar will cause a deterioration of the imaging because of dispersion over the bandwidth and group path changes in the imaged area over the collection aperture. In this paper we present calculations of the effects of a deterministic ionosphere on SAR imaging for a radar operated with a 100 MHz bandwidth centered at 250 MHz and over an angular aperture of 23{degrees}. The ionosphere induces a point spread function with an approximate half-width of 150 m in the slant-range direction and of 25 m in the cross-range direction compared to the nominal resolution of 1.5 m in both directions.

  9. Optimum frequency for subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.; Patitz, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    A subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar (SISAR) has potential for application in areas as diverse as non-proliferation programs for nuclear weapons to environmental monitoring. However, most conventional synthetic-aperture radars operate at higher microwave frequencies which do not significantly penetrate below the soil surface. This study attempts to provide a basis for determining optimum frequencies and frequency ranges which will allow synthetic-aperture imaging of buried targets. Since the radar return from a buried object must compete with the return from surface clutter, the signal-to-clutter ratio is an appropriate measure of performance for a SISAR. A parameter-based modeling approach is used to model the complex dielectric constant of the soil from measured data obtained from the literature. Theoretical random-surface scattering models, based on statistical solutions to Maxwell's equations, are used to model the clutter. These models are combined to estimate the signal-to-clutter ratio for canonical targets buried in several soil configurations. Initial results indicate that the HF spectrum (3--30 MHz), although it could be used to detect certain targets under some conditions, has limited practical value for use with SISAR, while the upper vhf through uhf spectrum ([approximately]100 MHz--1 GHz) shows the most promise for a general purpose SISAR system. Recommendations are included for additional research.

  10. Speckle reduction in synthetic-aperture-radar imagery.

    PubMed

    Harvey, E R; April, G V

    1990-07-01

    Speckle appearing in synthetic-aperture-radar images degrades the information contained in these images. Speckle noise can be suppressed by adapted local processing techniques, permitting the definition of statistical parameters inside a small window centered on each pixel of the image. Two processing algorithms are examined; the first one uses the intensity as a variable, and the second one works on a homomorphic transformation of the image intensity. A statistical model for speckle noise that takes into account correlation in multilook imagery has been used to develop these processing algorithms. Several experimental results of processed Seasat-A syntheticaperture-radar images are discussed.

  11. Proceedings of the Third Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The Third Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) Workshop was held on 23-24 May 1991 at JPL. Thirty oral presentations were made and 18 poster papers displayed during the workshop. Papers from these 25 presentations are presented which include analyses of AIRSAR operations and studies in SAR remote sensing, ecology, hydrology, soil science, geology, oceanography, volcanology, and SAR mapping and data handling. Results from these studies indicate the direction and emphasis of future orbital radar-sensor missions that will be launched during the 1990's.

  12. A perspective of synthetic aperture radar for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skolnik, M. I.

    1978-01-01

    The characteristics and capabilities of synthetic aperture radar are discussed so as to identify those features particularly unique to SAR. The SAR and Optical images were compared. The SAR is an example of radar that provides more information about a target than simply its location. It is the spatial resolution and imaging capability of SAR that has made its application of interest, especially from spaceborne platforms. However, for maximum utility to remote sensing, it was proposed that other information be extracted from SAR data, such as the cross section with frequency and polarization.

  13. Speckle reduction in synthetic-aperture-radar imagery.

    PubMed

    Harvey, E R; April, G V

    1990-07-01

    Speckle appearing in synthetic-aperture-radar images degrades the information contained in these images. Speckle noise can be suppressed by adapted local processing techniques, permitting the definition of statistical parameters inside a small window centered on each pixel of the image. Two processing algorithms are examined; the first one uses the intensity as a variable, and the second one works on a homomorphic transformation of the image intensity. A statistical model for speckle noise that takes into account correlation in multilook imagery has been used to develop these processing algorithms. Several experimental results of processed Seasat-A syntheticaperture-radar images are discussed. PMID:19768064

  14. Real-time programmable acoustooptic synthetic aperture radar processor.

    PubMed

    Haney, M; Psaltis, D

    1988-05-01

    The acoustooptic time-and-space integrating approach to real-time synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing is reviewed, and novel hybrid optical/electronic techniques, which generalize the basic architecture, are described. The generalized architecture is programmable and has the ability to compensate continuously for range migration changes in the parameters of the radar/target geometry and anomalous platform motion. The new architecture is applicable to the spotlight mode of SAR, particularly for applications in which real-time onboard processing is required.

  15. Probing the Martian Subsurface with Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, B. A.; Maxwell, T. A.; Freeman, A.

    2005-01-01

    Many regions of the martian surface are covered by fine-grained materials emplaced by volcanic, fluvial, or aeolian processes. These mantling deposits likely hide ancient channel systems (particularly at smaller scale lengths) and volcanic, impact, glacial, or shoreline features. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) offers the capability to probe meters below the surface, with imaging resolution in the 10 s of m range, to reveal the buried terrain and enhance our understanding of Mars geologic and climate history. This presentation focuses on the practical applications of a Mars orbital SAR, methods for polarimetric and interferometric radar studies, and examples of such techniques for Mars-analog sites on the Moon and Earth.

  16. The NASA/JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, Yunling; Kim,Yunjin; vanZyl, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we will briefly describe the instrument characteristics, the evolution of various radar modes, the instrument performance and improvement in the knowledge of the positioning and attitude information of the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This system operates in the fully polarimetric mode in the P, L, and C band simultaneously or in the interferometric mode in both the L and C band simultaneously. We also summarize the progress of the data processing effort, especially in the interferometry processing and we address the issue of processing and calibrating the cross-track interferometry data.

  17. Autonomous system for initializing synthetic aperture radar seeker acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, P.C.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described of guiding a missile having an active seeker including a synthetic aperture radar operating in a squint mode to a target aircraft having a search radar therein the maximum range of active seeker acquisition being within said missile's maneuver capability to intercept, and the maximum range of active seeker acquisition not exceeding the capability of the active seeker, said method comprising the steps of: launching said missile in response to detection of the search radar; implementing a passive seeker mode of operation to passively guide said missile towards said target aircraft in a manner to avoid detection of said missile by said target aircraft; transferring from said passive seeker mode to an active seeker mode in response to detected shutdown of said search radar; maneuvering said missile to execute a turn angle away from said target aircraft such that the search field of said synthetic aperture radar sweeps through an entire target uncertainty volume, said turn angle being within a first preselected limit and a second preselected limit such that said target aircraft does not cross over said missile's terminal flight path; and intercepting said target aircraft within a lethal range of said missile.

  18. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar imagery of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, T. L.; Cannella, M. E.; Jansen, R. W.; Chubb, S. R.; Carande, R. E.; Foley, E. W.; Goldstein, R. M.; Valenzuela, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    The advent of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) imagery brought to the ocean remote sensing field techniques used in radio astronomy. Whilst details of the interferometry differ between the two fields, the basic idea is the same: Use the phase information arising from positional differences of the radar receivers and/or transmitters to probe remote structures. The interferometric image is formed from two complex synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. These two images are of the same area but separated in time. Typically the time between these images is very short -- approximately 50 msec for the L-band AIRSAR (Airborne SAR). During this short period the radar scatterers on the ocean surface do not have time to significantly decorrelate. Hence the two SAR images will have the same amplitude, since both obtain the radar backscatter from essentially the same object. Although the ocean surface structure does not significantly decorrelate in 50 msec, surface features do have time to move. It is precisely the translation of scattering features across the ocean surface which gives rise to phase differences between the two SAR images. This phase difference is directly proportional to the range velocity of surface scatterers. The constant of proportionality is dependent upon the interferometric mode of operation.

  19. Time-frequency analysis of synthetic aperture radar signals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.

    1996-08-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has become an important tool for remote sensing of the environment. SAR is a set of digital signal processing algorithms that are used to focus the signal returned to the radar because radar systems in themselves cannot produce the high resolution images required in remote sensing applications. To reconstruct an image, several parameters must be estimated and the quality of output image depends on the degree of accuracy of these parameters. In this thesis, we derive the fundamental SAR algorithms and concentrate on the estimation of one of its critical parameters. We show that the common technique for estimating this particular parameter can sometimes lead to erroneous results and reduced quality images. We also employ time-frequency analysis techniques to examine variations in the radar signals caused by platform motion and show how these results can be used to improve output image quality.

  20. Multiregion level-set partitioning of synthetic aperture radar images.

    PubMed

    Ben Ayed, Ismail; Mitiche, Amar; Belhadj, Ziad

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image segmentation into a given but arbitrary number of gamma homogeneous regions via active contours and level sets. The segmentation of SAR images is a difficult problem due to the presence of speckle which can be modeled as strong, multiplicative noise. The proposed algorithm consists of evolving simple closed planar curves within an explicit correspondence between the interiors of curves and regions of segmentation to minimize a criterion containing a term of conformity of data to a speckle model of noise and a term of regularization. Results are shown on both synthetic and real images.

  1. Stationary and moving target shadow characteristics in synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Bickel, Douglas L.; Doerry, Armin W.

    2014-05-01

    An occluded or dark region in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, known as a shadow, is created when incident radar energy is obstructed by a target with height from illuminating resolution cells immediately behind the target in the ground plane. Shadows depend on the physical dimensions and mobility of a target, platform and radar imaging parameters, and scene clutter. Target shadow dimensions and intensity can be important radar observables in SAR imagery for target detection, location, and tracking or even identification. Stationary target shadows can provide insight as to the physical dimensions of a target, while moving target shadows may show more accurately the location and motion of the target over time versus Doppler energy which may be shifted or smeared outside the scene. However, SAR shadows prove difficult to capture as a target or platform moves, since the quality of the no-return area may quickly be washed-out in a scene over many clutter resolution cells during an aperture. Prior work in the literature has been limited to describing partial shadow degradation effects from platform or target motion of vehicles such as static target shadow tip or interior degradation during an aperture, or shadow degradation due to target motion solely in cross-range. In this paper, we provide a more general formulation of SAR shadow dimensions and intensity for non-specific targets with an arbitrary motion.

  2. Smart antennas for space-borne synthetic aperture radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, F.; Gao, S.; Mao, C.; Wang, Z.; Patyuchenko, A.; Younis, M.; Krieger, G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper discusses smart antennas for space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). First, some recent development in smart antennas for space-borne SAR is reviewed. Then, the paper presents a low-cost space-borne SAR system using digital beam forming on receive. The smart antenna system is also discussed, and some results are shown. The antenna system, consisting of a parabolic reflector and multi-feed array, is designed and optimized for dual-band dual-polarized digital beam-forming performance. The operating frequencies are at X and Ka bands with the center frequency of 9.6 and 35.75 GHz, respectively. The stacked dipoles and square patches with parasitic elements are employed as the feed elements at X and Ka bands. Dual-band antenna arrays are combined in the same aperture, which not only reduce the aperture of the feed array, but also coincide the center of dual-band feed arrays.

  3. Hardware system concept For student's space synthetic aperture radar (ESA SSETI-ESMO project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawidowicz, Bartek; Filipek, Tomasz; Piotrkowski, Michał

    2006-02-01

    In this paper a concept of a cheap, lightweight, low power satellite radar for Moon's surface mapping is presented. This radar is designed to work in two modes: two-dimensional imaging (Synthetic Aperture Radar - SAR) and three-dimensional imaging (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar - IfSAR). The proposed radar system performs the functions both of a radar system and a high data rate communication system. This enables costs and weight reduction which is very important in space applications.

  4. A simulation of synthetic aperture radar imaging of ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    A simulation of radar imaging of ocean waves with synthetic aperture techniques is presented. The modelling is simplistic from the oceanographic and electromagnetic viewpoint in order to minimize the computational problems, yet reveal some of the physical problems associated with the imaging of moving ocean waves. The model assumes: (1) The radar illuminates a one-dimensional, one harmonic ocean wave. (2) The scattering is assumed to be governed by geometrical optics. (3) The radar is assumed to be down-looking, with Doppler processing (range processing is suppressed due to the one-dimensional nature of the problem). (4) The beamwidth of the antenna (or integration time) is assumed to be sufficiently narrow to restrict the specular points of the peaks and troughs of the wave. The results show that conventional processing of the image gives familiar results if the ocean waves are stationary. When the ocean wave dispersion relationship is satisfied, the image is smeared due to the motion of the specular points over the integration time. In effect, the image of the ocean is transferred to the near field of the synthetic aperture.

  5. A VLSI implementation for synthetic aperture radar image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premkumar, A.; Purviance, J.

    1990-01-01

    A simple physical model for the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is presented. This model explains the one dimensional and two dimensional nature of the received SAR signal in the range and azimuth directions. A time domain correlator, its algorithm, and features are explained. The correlator is ideally suited for VLSI implementation. A real time SAR architecture using these correlators is proposed. In the proposed architecture, the received SAR data is processed using one dimensional correlators for determining the range while two dimensional correlators are used to determine the azimuth of a target. The architecture uses only three different types of custom VLSI chips and a small amount of memory.

  6. Synthetic aperture radar images with composite azimuth resolution

    DOEpatents

    Bielek, Timothy P; Bickel, Douglas L

    2015-03-31

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is produced by using all phase histories of a set of phase histories to produce a first pixel array having a first azimuth resolution, and using less than all phase histories of the set to produce a second pixel array having a second azimuth resolution that is coarser than the first azimuth resolution. The first and second pixel arrays are combined to produce a third pixel array defining a desired SAR image that shows distinct shadows of moving objects while preserving detail in stationary background clutter.

  7. SEASAT views oceans and sea ice with synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. L.; Holt, B.

    1982-01-01

    Fifty-one SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the oceans and sea ice are presented. Surface and internal waves, the Gulf Stream system and its rings and eddies, the eastern North Pacific, coastal phenomena, bathymetric features, atmospheric phenomena, and ship wakes are represented. Images of arctic pack and shore-fast ice are presented. The characteristics of the SEASAT SAR system and its image are described. Maps showing the area covered, and tables of key orbital information, and listing digitally processed images are provided.

  8. Two target height effects on interferometric synthetic aperture radar coherence

    SciTech Connect

    YOCKY,DAVID A.; JAKOWATZ JR.,CHARLES V.

    2000-03-07

    Useful products generated from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) complex data include height measurement, coherent change detection, and classification. The IFSAR coherence is a spatial measure of complex correlation between two collects, a product of IFSAR signal processing. A tacit assumption in such IFSAR signal processing is that one height target exists in each range-Doppler cell. This paper presents simulations of IFSAR coherence if two targets with different heights exist in a given range-Doppler cell, a condition in IFSAR collections produced by layover. It also includes airborne IFSAR data confirming the simulation results. The paper concludes by exploring the implications of the results on IFSAR classification and height measurements.

  9. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar studies of Alaska volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C.; Power, J.; Dzurisin, D.; Thatcher, W.; Masterlark, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imaging is a recently developed geodetic technique capable of measuring ground-surface deformation with centimeter to subcentimeter vertical precision and spatial resolution of tens-of-meter over a relatively large region (~104 km2). The spatial distribution of surface deformation data, derived from InSAR images, enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic and tectonic processes associated with volcanoes. This paper summarizes our recent InSAR studies of several Alaska volcanoes, which include Okmok, Akutan, Kiska, Augustine, Westdahl, and Peulik volcanoes.

  10. Wavenumber shift in search and rescue synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, George W.; Mansfield, Arthur W.; Poehler, Paul L.; Rais, Houra

    1998-09-01

    The wavenumber shift is an important tool in multiple pass synthetic aperture radar interferometry. In addition to overcoming baseline decorrelation, it has proven to have additional benefits. Chief among these is the ability to filter out much of the decorrelated signal, leaving the coherent portion. In the presence of foliage induced temporal decorrelation, this corresponds to filtering out much of the foliage return while strengthening any coherent ground return. We will examine this and other benefits of the wavenumber shift within the context of the Search and Rescue SAR program. An example based on ERS 1/2 data is provided.

  11. Apodized RFI filtering of synthetic aperture radar images

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    Fine resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems necessarily require wide bandwidths that often overlap spectrum utilized by other wireless services. These other emitters pose a source of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) to the SAR echo signals that degrades SAR image quality. Filtering, or excising, the offending spectral contaminants will mitigate the interference, but at a cost of often degrading the SAR image in other ways, notably by raising offensive sidelobe levels. This report proposes borrowing an idea from nonlinear sidelobe apodization techniques to suppress interference without the attendant increase in sidelobe levels. The simple post-processing technique is termed Apodized RFI Filtering (ARF).

  12. Convolutional neural networks for synthetic aperture radar classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Profeta, Andrew; Rodriguez, Andres; Clouse, H. Scott

    2016-05-01

    For electro-optical object recognition, convolutional neural networks (CNNs) are the state-of-the-art. For large datasets, CNNs are able to learn meaningful features used for classification. However, their application to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been limited. In this work we experimented with various CNN architectures on the MSTAR SAR dataset. As the input to the CNN we used the magnitude and phase (2 channels) of the SAR imagery. We used the deep learning toolboxes CAFFE and Torch7. Our results show that we can achieve 93% accuracy on the MSTAR dataset using CNNs.

  13. Logarithmic Laplacian Prior Based Bayesian Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuanghui; Liu, Yongxiang; Li, Xiang; Bi, Guoan

    2016-04-28

    This paper presents a novel Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging (ISAR) algorithm based on a new sparse prior, known as the logarithmic Laplacian prior. The newly proposed logarithmic Laplacian prior has a narrower main lobe with higher tail values than the Laplacian prior, which helps to achieve performance improvement on sparse representation. The logarithmic Laplacian prior is used for ISAR imaging within the Bayesian framework to achieve better focused radar image. In the proposed method of ISAR imaging, the phase errors are jointly estimated based on the minimum entropy criterion to accomplish autofocusing. The maximum a posterior (MAP) estimation and the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) are utilized to estimate the model parameters to avoid manually tuning process. Additionally, the fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Hadamard product are used to minimize the required computational efficiency. Experimental results based on both simulated and measured data validate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the traditional sparse ISAR imaging algorithms in terms of resolution improvement and noise suppression.

  14. Signal based motion compensation for synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    John Kirk

    1999-06-07

    The purpose of the Signal Based Motion Compensation (SBMC) for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) effort is to develop a method to measure and compensate for both down range and cross range motion of the radar in order to provide high quality focused SAR imagery in the absence of precision measurements of the platform motion. Currently SAR systems require very precise navigation sensors for motion compensation. These sensors are very expensive and are often supplied in pairs for reliability. In the case of GPS they can be jammed, further degrading performance. This makes for a potentially very expensive and possibly vulnerable SAR system. SBMC can eliminate or reduce the need for these expensive navigation sensors thus reducing the cost of budget minded SAR systems. The results on this program demonstrated the capability of the SBMC approach.

  15. Simulation of synthetic aperture radar 4: Summary and recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Peter M.; Bell, Herbert H.

    1990-04-01

    Four experiments were conducted to identify digital feature data base requirements for simulating synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The results indicate that lines of communication and large areal features are the principal cues used in SAR image interpretation. The results also indicate that depiction of small, individual features is required to create a simulation with acceptable realism. These small individual features may be depicted generically without adversely affecting SAR operator task performance. This approach has been proposed by the Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) as the basis for a new Digital Feature Analysis Data (DFAD) product (Level 3-C) to support high-resolution radar simulation. We recommend that the Air Force accept the proposed Level 3-C DFAD specification for SAR simulation.

  16. Interference Mitigation Effects on Synthetic Aperture Radar Coherent Data Products

    SciTech Connect

    Musgrove, Cameron

    2014-05-01

    For synthetic aperture radar image products interference can degrade the quality of the images while techniques to mitigate the interference also reduce the image quality. Usually the radar system designer will try to balance the amount of mitigation for the amount of interference to optimize the image quality. This may work well for many situations, but coherent data products derived from the image products are more sensitive than the human eye to distortions caused by interference and mitigation of interference. This dissertation examines the e ect that interference and mitigation of interference has upon coherent data products. An improvement to the standard notch mitigation is introduced, called the equalization notch. Other methods are suggested to mitigation interference while improving the quality of coherent data products over existing methods.

  17. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar imaging for arbitrary flight trajectories.

    PubMed

    Yarman, Can Evren; Yazici, Birsen; Cheney, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analytic, filtered backprojection (FBP) type inversion method for bistatic synthetic aperture radar (BISAR). We consider a BISAR system where a scene of interest is illuminated by electromagnetic waves that are transmitted, at known times, from positions along an arbitrary, but known, flight trajectory and the scattered waves are measured from positions along a different flight trajectory which is also arbitrary, but known. We assume a single-scattering model for the radar data, and we assume that the ground topography is known but not necessarily flat. We use microlocal analysis to develop the FBP-type reconstruction method. We analyze the computational complexity of the numerical implementation of the method and present numerical simulations to demonstrate its performance.

  18. Passive synthetic aperture radar imaging of ground moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacks, Steven; Yazici, Birsen

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we present a method for imaging ground moving targets using passive synthetic aperture radar. A passive radar imaging system uses small, mobile receivers that do not radiate any energy. For these reasons, passive imaging systems result in signicant cost, manufacturing, and stealth advantages. The received signals are obtained by multiple airborne receivers collecting scattered waves due to illuminating sources of opportunity such as commercial television, radio, and cell phone towers. We describe a novel forward model and a corresponding ltered-backprojection type image reconstruction method combined with entropy optimization. Our method determines the location and velocity of multiple targets moving at dierent velocities. Furthermore, it can accommodate arbitrary imaging geometries. we present numerical simulations to verify the imaging method.

  19. A comparison of spotlight synthetic aperture radar image formation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Knittle, C.D.; Doren, N.E.; Jakowatz, C.V.

    1996-10-01

    Spotlight synthetic aperture radar images can be formed from the complex phase history data using two main techniques: (1) polar-to-cartesian interpolation followed by two-dimensional inverse Fourier transform (2DFFT), and (2) convolution backprojection (CBP). CBP has been widely used to reconstruct medical images in computer aided tomography, and only recently has been applied to form synthetic aperture radar imagery. It is alleged that CBP yields higher quality images because (1) all the Fourier data are used and (2) the polar formatted data is used directly to form a 2D Cartesian image and therefore 2D interpolation is not required. This report compares the quality of images formed by CBP and several modified versions of the 2DFFT method. We show from an image quality point of view that CBP is equivalent to first windowing the phase history data and then interpolating to an exscribed rectangle. From a mathematical perspective, we should expect this conclusion since the same Fourier data are used to form the SAR image. We next address the issue of parallel implementation of each algorithm. We dispute previous claims that CBP is more readily parallelizable than the 2DFFT method. Our conclusions are supported by comparing execution times between massively parallel implementations of both algorithms, showing that both experience similar decreases in computation time, but that CBP takes significantly longer to form an image.

  20. Minimum description length synthetic aperture radar image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Galland, Frédéric; Bertaux, Nicolas; Réfrégier, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    We present a new minimum description length (MDL) approach based on a deformable partition--a polygonal grid--for automatic segmentation of a speckled image composed of several homogeneous regions. The image segmentation thus consists in the estimation of the polygonal grid, or, more precisely, its number of regions, its number of nodes and the location of its nodes. These estimations are performed by minimizing a unique MDL criterion which takes into account the probabilistic properties of speckle fluctuations and a measure of the stochastic complexity of the polygonal grid. This approach then leads to a global MDL criterion without an undetermined parameter since no other regularization term than the stochastic complexity of the polygonal grid is necessary and noise parameters can be estimated with maximum likelihood-like approaches. The performance of this technique is illustrated on synthetic and real synthetic aperture radar images of agricultural regions and the influence of different terms of the model is analyzed.

  1. Synthetic aperture radar and interferometry development at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1993-04-01

    Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must be acquired in inclement weather or during night as well as day. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides such a capability. SAR systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex information processing capability of modern digital electronics to provide high resolution imagery. SAR complements photographic and other optical imaging capabilities because of the minimum constrains on time-of-day and atmospheric conditions and because of the unique responses of terrain and cultural targets to radar frequencies. Interferometry is a method for generating a three-dimensional image of terrain. The height projection is obtained by acquiring two SAR images from two slightly differing locations. It is different from the common method of stereoscopic imaging for topography. The latter relies on differing geometric projections for triangulation to define the surface geometry whereas interferometry relies on differences in radar propagation times between the two SAR locations. This paper presents the capabilities of SAR, explains how SAR works, describes a few SAR applications, provides an overview of SAR development at Sandia, and briefly describes the motion compensation subsystem.

  2. Experiment in Onboard Synthetic Aperture Radar Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Single event upsets (SEUs) are a threat to any computing system running on hardware that has not been physically radiation hardened. In addition to mandating the use of performance-limited, hardened heritage equipment, prior techniques for dealing with the SEU problem often involved hardware-based error detection and correction (EDAC). With limited computing resources, software- based EDAC, or any more elaborate recovery methods, were often not feasible. Synthetic aperture radars (SARs), when operated in the space environment, are interesting due to their relevance to NASAs objectives, but problematic in the sense of producing prodigious amounts of raw data. Prior implementations of the SAR data processing algorithm have been too slow, too computationally intensive, and require too much application memory for onboard execution to be a realistic option when using the type of heritage processing technology described above. This standard C-language implementation of SAR data processing is distributed over many cores of a Tilera Multicore Processor, and employs novel Radiation Hardening by Software (RHBS) techniques designed to protect the component processes (one per core) and their shared application memory from the sort of SEUs expected in the space environment. The source code includes calls to Tilera APIs, and a specialized Tilera compiler is required to produce a Tilera executable. The compiled application reads input data describing the position and orientation of a radar platform, as well as its radar-burst data, over time and writes out processed data in a form that is useful for analysis of the radar observations.

  3. Phase and amplitude phase restoration in synthetic aperture radar imaging.

    PubMed

    Soumekh, M; Choi, J H

    1992-01-01

    Methods for addressing two types of multiplicative noise in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging are presented. The authors consider a multiplicative noise with a real phase (i.e. the SAR signal's phase is contaminated but its amplitude is uncorrupted) that possesses unknown functional characteristics with respect to the radar signal's temporal frequencies. A perturbation solution for phase reconstruction from amplitude is developed from a wave equation governing the SAR signal and a Riccati equation that relates the amplitude and phase functions of the SAR signal. This solution is converted into a noniterative analytical solution in terms of the moments and powers of the log amplitude function. Next, the authors consider a multiplicative noise with a complex phase (i.e. both the amplitude and phase of the SAR signal are contaminated) that varies linearly with respect to the radar signal's temporal frequencies. The two wave equations governing the SAR signal at two temporal frequencies of the radar signal are combined to derive a method to reconstruct the complex phase error function.

  4. Addendum to proceedings of the 1978 Synthetic Aperture Radar Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Various research projects on synthetic aperture radar are reported, including SAR calibration techniques. Slot arrays, sidelobe suppression, and wide swaths on satellite-borne radar were examined. The SAR applied to remote sensing was also considered.

  5. Optical synthetic-aperture radar processor archietecture with quadratic phase-error correction

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.M.; Mason, J.J. )

    1990-10-15

    Uncompensated phase errors limit the image quality of synthetic-aperture radar. We present an acousto-optic synthetic-aperture radar processor architecture capable of measuring the quadratic phase error. This architecture allows for the error signal to be fed back to the processor to generate the corrected image.

  6. Optical synthetic-aperture radar processor architecture with quadratic phase-error correction.

    PubMed

    Dickey, F M; Mason, J J

    1990-10-15

    Uncompensated phase errors limit the image quality of synthetic-aperture radar. We present an acousto-optic synthetic-aperture radar processor architecture capable of measuring the quadratic phase error. This architecture allows for the error signal to be fed back to the processor to generate the corrected image.

  7. Spatially variant apodization for squinted synthetic aperture radar images.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Rubio, Carlos F; Llorente-Romano, Sergio; Burgos-García, Mateo

    2007-08-01

    Spatially variant apodization (SVA) is a nonlinear sidelobe reduction technique that improves sidelobe level and preserves resolution at the same time. This method implements a bidimensional finite impulse response filter with adaptive taps depending on image information. Some papers that have been previously published analyze SVA at the Nyquist rate or at higher rates focused on strip synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This paper shows that traditional SVA techniques are useless when the sensor operates with a squint angle. The reasons for this behaviour are analyzed, and a new implementation that largely improves the results is presented. The algorithm is applied to simulated SAR images in order to demonstrate the good quality achieved along with efficient computation.

  8. Moving receive beam method and apparatus for synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Kare, Jordin T.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the performance of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems by reducing the effect of "edge losses" associated with nonuniform receiver antenna gain. By moving the receiver antenna pattern in synchrony with the apparent motion of the transmitted pulse along the ground, the maximum available receiver antenna gain can be used at all times. Also, the receiver antenna gain for range-ambiguous return signals may be reduced, in some cases, by a large factor. The beam motion can be implemented by real-time adjustment of phase shifters in an electronically-steered phased-array antenna or by electronic switching of feed horns in a reflector antenna system.

  9. Seamless Synthetic Aperture Radar Archive for Interferometry Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S.; Baru, C.; Bryson, G.; Buechler, B.; Crosby, C.; Fielding, E.; Meertens, C.; Nicoll, J.; Youn, C.

    2014-11-01

    The NASA Advancing Collaborative Connections for Earth System Science (ACCESS) seamless synthetic aperture radar (SAR) archive (SSARA) project is a collaboration between UNAVCO, the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and OpenTopography at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) to design and implement a seamless distributed access system for SAR data and derived interferometric SAR (InSAR) data products. A unified application programming interface (API) has been created to search the SAR archives at ASF and UNAVCO, 30 and 90-m SRTM DEM data available through OpenTopography, and tropospheric data from the NASA OSCAR project at JPL. The federated query service provides users a single access point to search for SAR granules, InSAR pairs, and corresponding DEM and tropospheric data products from the four archives, as well as the ability to search and download pre-processed InSAR products from ASF and UNAVCO.

  10. Performance limits for maritime Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR).

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-11-01

    The performance of an Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) system depends on a variety of factors, many which are interdependent in some manner. In this report we specifically examine ISAR as applied to maritime targets (e.g. ships). It is often difficult to get your arms around the problem of ascertaining achievable performance limits, and yet those limits exist and are dictated by physics. This report identifies and explores those limits, and how they depend on hardware system parameters and environmental conditions. Ultimately, this leads to a characterization of parameters that offer optimum performance for the overall ISAR system. While the information herein is not new to the literature, its collection into a single report hopes to offer some value in reducing the seek time.

  11. Topography estimation with interferometric synthetic aperture radar using fringe detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Qian; Vesecky, John F.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are presented for using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometry data to estimate surface topography. An expression is given to relate the elevation of a ground point to the phase difference of SAR images received from two spatially separated antennas. An iterative algorithm which solves for the position and elevation of each point in the image simultaneously is developed. One of the critical issues that determines the accuracy of the terrain mapping is the phase unwrapping. An approach to the problem by fringe line detection is proposed. The algorithms are tested with two Seasat SAR images of terrain near Yellowstone National Park. The resultant elevation map is compared with a USGS terrain elevation model. The error of the SAR elevation with respect to the digital terrain map is about 8.2 percent of the total terrain variation.

  12. Application of microprocessors to spacecraft synthetic aperture radar processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    A ground-based digital synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processor capable of correlating images from raw spacecraft data at real-time rates is currently under development. The processor design requirements are particularly formidable due to (1) range migration effects resulting from planetary curvature and rotation, (2) antenna beam pointing errors, and (3) variation of the Doppler reference function with changing orbital parameters. Based upon the current effort, this paper describes a candidate real-time on-board SAR processing implementation approach that might evolve for future spacecraft applications. Key features include the use of custom large scale integration (LSI) charge-coupled device (CCD) technology to accomplish the correlation functions and microprocessor technology to effect control.

  13. Theory and design of interferometric synthetic aperture radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Martin, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    A derivation of the signal statistics, an optimal estimator of the interferometric phase, and the expression necessary to calculate the height-error budget are presented. These expressions are used to derive methods of optimizing the parameters of the interferometric synthetic aperture radar system (InSAR), and are then employed in a specific design example for a system to perform high-resolution global topographic mapping with a one-year mission lifetime, subject to current technological constraints. A Monte Carlo simulation of this InSAR system is performed to evaluate its performance for realistic topography. The results indicate that this system has the potential to satisfy the stringent accuracy and resolution requirements for geophysical use of global topographic data.

  14. SEASAT synthetic-aperture radar data user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Huneycutt, B.; Holt, B. M.; Held, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The SEASAT Synthetic-Aperture Radar (SAR) system, the data processors, the extent of the image data set, and the means by which a user obtains this data are described and the data quality is evaluated. The user is alerted to some potential problems with the existing volume of SEASAT SAR image data, and allows him to modify his use of that data accordingly. Secondly, the manual focuses on the ultimate focuses on the ultimate capabilities of the raw data set and evaluates the potential of this data for processing into accurately located, amplitude-calibrated imagery of high resolution. This allows the user to decide whether his needs require special-purpose data processing of the SAR raw data.

  15. An algorithm to retrieve precipitation with synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ya'nan; Liu, Zhikun; An, Dawei

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a new type of rainfall retrieval algorithm, called the model-oriented statistical and Volterra integration. It is a combination of the model-oriented statistical (MOS) and Volterra integral equation (VIE) approaches. The steps involved in this new algorithm can be briefly illustrated as follows. Firstly, information such as the start point and width of the rain is obtained through pre-analysis of the data received by synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Secondly, the VIE retrieval algorithm is employed over a short distance to obtain information on the shape of the rain. Finally, the rain rate can be calculated by using the MOS retrieval algorithm. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm is effective and simple, and can lead to time savings of nearly 50% compared with MOS. An example of application of SAR data is also discussed, involving the retrieval of precipitation information over the South China Sea.

  16. Perceptual compression of magnitude-detected synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, John D.; Werness, Susan A.

    1994-01-01

    A perceptually-based approach for compressing synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery is presented. Key components of the approach are a multiresolution wavelet transform, a bit allocation mask based on an empirical human visual system (HVS) model, and hybrid scalar/vector quantization. Specifically, wavelet shrinkage techniques are used to segregate wavelet transform coefficients into three components: local means, edges, and texture. Each of these three components is then quantized separately according to a perceptually-based bit allocation scheme. Wavelet coefficients associated with local means and edges are quantized using high-rate scalar quantization while texture information is quantized using low-rate vector quantization. The impact of the perceptually-based multiresolution compression algorithm on visual image quality, impulse response, and texture properties is assessed for fine-resolution magnitude-detected SAR imagery; excellent image quality is found at bit rates at or above 1 bpp along with graceful performance degradation at rates below 1 bpp.

  17. Computing Ocean Surface Currents from Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, Waqas A.

    Ocean surface currents play an important role in ocean-atmosphere interactions and global ocean circulation, and are also significant for fishing, ocean navigation, and search & rescue. Existing in-situ and remote sensing techniques for measuring ocean surface currents are limited by spatial and temporal data coverage, and thermal IR feature tracking methods are limited by clouds and weak thermal gradients. High-resolution spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) offers repeatable cloud-penetrating measurements of the ocean surface. This research explores methods for ocean surface current measurement through satellite-based SAR. The major part of this research is concerned with the development and application of a semi-automated algorithm to generate ocean surface currents at ˜1.9 km resolution from sequential spaceborne C-band SAR intensity images using the Maximum Cross-Correlation(MCC) method. The primary geographical area of study is the coastal California Current System (CCS), and nearly two years (2008-2009) of 30-min lag data from the Envisat ASAR and ERS-2 AMI SAR sensors is analyzed. The velocity wavenumber spectrum of the derived MCC SAR currents agrees with the k-2 power law as predicted by submesoscale resolution models, and also shows seasonal mesoscale variability. The derived MCC SAR currents are validated against High frequency (HF) radar currents, and the two show some agreement in vector direction, with MCC SAR vectors oriented slightly anti-clockwise relative to HF radar vectors. The unimodal mean-symmetric residual histograms indicate that errors between the two datasets are random, except for a mean positive bias of ≈ 11 cm/s in MCC SAR currents relative to HF radar currents. This magnitude difference occurs primarily in the along-shore component ( ≈ 6 cm/s) and is negligible in the cross-shore component. Doppler Centroid Cross-Track (XT) radial currents from Envisat Wide Swath Mode (WSM) scenes are compared with HF radar radial currents

  18. Three-dimensional subsurface imaging synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Moussally, G.J.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this applied research and development project is to develop a system known as `3-D SISAR`. This system consists of a ground penetrating radar with software algorithms designed for the detection, location, and identification of buried objects in the underground hazardous waste environments found at DOE storage sites. Three-dimensional maps of the object locations will be produced which can assist the development of remediation strategies and the characterization of the digface during remediation operations. It is expected that the 3-D SISAR will also prove useful for monitoring hydrocarbon based contaminant migration after remediation. The underground imaging technique being developed under this contract utilizes a spotlight mode Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) approach which, due to its inherent stand-off capability, will permit the rapid survey of a site and achieve a high degree of productivity over large areas. When deployed from an airborne platform, the stand-off techniques is also seen as a way to overcome practical survey limitations encountered at vegetated sites.

  19. Convex model-based synthetic aperture radar processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chad P.

    The use of radar often conjures up images of small blobs on a screen. But current synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems are able to generate near-optical quality images with amazing benefits compared to optical sensors. These SAR sensors work in all weather conditions, day or night, and provide many advanced capabilities to detect and identify targets of interest. These amazing abilities have made SAR sensors a work-horse in remote sensing, and military applications. SAR sensors are ranging instruments that operate in a 3D environment, but unfortunately the results and interpretation of SAR images have traditionally been done in 2D. Three-dimensional SAR images could provide improved target detection and identification along with improved scene interpretability. As technology has increased, particularly regarding our ability to solve difficult optimization problems, the 3D SAR reconstruction problem has gathered more interest. This dissertation provides the SAR and mathematical background required to pose a SAR 3D reconstruction problem. The problem is posed in a way that allows prior knowledge about the target of interest to be integrated into the optimization problem when known. The developed model is demonstrated on simulated data initially in order to illustrate critical concepts in the development. Then once comprehension is achieved the processing is applied to actual SAR data. The 3D results are contrasted against the current "gold-standard." The results are shown as 3D images demonstrating the improvement regarding scene interpretability that this approach provides.

  20. Augmenting synthetic aperture radar with space time adaptive processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, Michael; Potter, Lee C.; Ertin, Emre

    2013-05-01

    Wide-area persistent radar video offers the ability to track moving targets. A shortcoming of the current technology is an inability to maintain track when Doppler shift places moving target returns co-located with strong clutter. Further, the high down-link data rate required for wide-area imaging presents a stringent system bottleneck. We present a multi-channel approach to augment the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) modality with space time adaptive processing (STAP) while constraining the down-link data rate to that of a single antenna SAR system. To this end, we adopt a multiple transmit, single receive (MISO) architecture. A frequency division design for orthogonal transmit waveforms is presented; the approach maintains coherence on clutter, achieves the maximal unaliased band of radial velocities, retains full resolution SAR images, and requires no increase in receiver data rate vis-a-vis the wide-area SAR modality. For Nt transmit antennas and N samples per pulse, the enhanced sensing provides a STAP capability with Nt times larger range bins than the SAR mode, at the cost of O(log N) more computations per pulse. The proposed MISO system and the associated signal processing are detailed, and the approach is numerically demonstrated via simulation of an airborne X-band system.

  1. Synthetic aperture radar: not just a sensor of last resort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Lars M.; Doerry, Armin W.

    2003-08-01

    Modern high-performance Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems have evolved into highly versatile, robust, and reliable tactical sensors, offering images and information not available from other sensor systems. For example, real-time images are routinely formed by the Sandia-designed General Atomics (AN/APY-8) Lynx SAR yielding 4-inch resolution at 25 km range (representing better than arc-second resolutions) in clouds, smoke, and rain. Sandia's Real-Time Visualization (RTV) program operates an Interferometric SAR (IFSAR) system that forms three-dimensional (3D) topographic maps in near real-time with National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) level 4 performance (3 meter post spacing with 0.8-meter height accuracy) or better. When exported to 3-D rendering software, this data allows remarkable interactive fly-through experiences. Coherent Change Detection (CCD) allows detecting tire tracks on dirt roads, foot-prints, and other minor, otherwise indiscernible ground disturbances long after their originators have left the scene. Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar modes allow detecting and tracking moving vehicles. A Sandia program known as "MiniSAR" is developing technologies that are expected to culminate in a fully functioning, high-performance, real-time SAR that weighs less than 20 lbs. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of recent technology developments, as well as current on-going research and development efforts at Sandia National Laboratories.

  2. New formulation for interferometric synthetic aperture radar for terrain mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Jakowatz, C.V. Jr.; Wahl, D.E.; Eichel, P.H.; Thompson, P.A.

    1994-04-01

    The subject of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) for high-accuracy terrain elevation mapping continues to gain importance in the arena of radar signal processing. Applications to problems in precision terrain-aided guidance and automatic target recognition, as well as a variety of civil applications, are being studied by a number of researchers. Not unlike many other areas of SAR processing, the subject of IFSAR can at first glance appear to be somewhat mysterious. In this paper we show how the mathematics of IFSAR for terrain elevation mapping using a pair of spotlight mode SAR collections can be derived in a very straightforward manner. Here, we employ an approach that relies entirely on three-dimensional Fourier transforms, and utilizes no reference to range equations or Doppler concepts. The result is a simplified explanation of the fundamentals of interferometry, including an easily-seen link between image domain phase difference and terrain elevation height. The derivation builds upon previous work by the authors in which a framework for spotlight mode SAR image formation based on an analogy to three-dimensional computerized axial tomography (CAT) was developed. After outlining the major steps in the mathematics, we show how a computer simulator which utilizes three-dimensional Fourier transforms can be constructed that demonstrates all of the major aspects of IFSAR from spotlight mode collections.

  3. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar: building tomorrow's tools today

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong

    2006-01-01

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system transmits electromagnetic (EM) waves at a wavelength that can range from a few millimeters to tens of centimeters. The radar wave propagates through the atmosphere and interacts with the Earth’s surface. Part of the energy is reflected back to the SAR system and recorded. Using a sophisticated image processing technique, called SAR processing (Curlander and McDonough, 1991), both the intensity and phase of the reflected (or backscattered) signal of each ground resolution element (a few meters to tens of meters) can be calculated in the form of a complex-valued SAR image representing the reflectivity of the ground surface. The amplitude or intensity of the SAR image is determined primarily by terrain slope, surface roughness, and dielectric constants, whereas the phase of the SAR image is determined primarily by the distance between the satellite antenna and the ground targets, slowing of the signal by the atmosphere, and the interaction of EM waves with ground surface. Interferometric SAR (InSAR) imaging, a recently developed remote sensing technique, utilizes the interaction of EM waves, referred to as interference, to measure precise distances. Very simply, InSAR involves the use of two or more SAR images of the same area to extract landscape topography and its deformation patterns.

  4. Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus for synthetic aperture radar.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuang-Hung; Munson, David C

    2011-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging suffers from image focus degradation in the presence of phase errors in the received signal due to unknown platform motion or signal propagation delays. We present a new autofocus algorithm, termed Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus (FMCA), that is derived under a linear algebraic framework, allowing the SAR image to be focused in a noniterative fashion. Motivated by the mutichannel autofocus (MCA) approach, the proposed autofocus algorithm invokes the assumption of a low-return region, which generally is provided within the antenna sidelobes. Unlike MCA, FMCA works with the collected polar Fourier data directly and is capable of accommodating wide-angle monostatic SAR and bistatic SAR scenarios. Most previous SAR autofocus algorithms rely on the prior assumption that radar's range of look angles is small so that the phase errors can be modeled as varying along only one dimension in the collected Fourier data. And, in some cases, implicit assumptions are made regarding the SAR scene. Performance of such autofocus algorithms degrades if the assumptions are not satisfied. The proposed algorithm has the advantage that it does not require prior assumptions about the range of look angles, nor characteristics of the scene. PMID:21606028

  5. Identifying tropical mountain wetlands with Asymmetric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buytaert, W.; Schumann, G.

    2009-04-01

    Land cover classification in remote areas is often done with remotely sensed data. However, on classic spectrometer data, wetlands are difficult to distinguish from neighbouring grass and shrubland vegetation, despite the differences in hydrological regime and species variety. Another problem with spectrometer data is the interference of cloud cover, which is abundant in the areas where wetlands tend to occur. Radar measurements, which are not affected by cloud cover, are sensitive to soil moisture. As such, they have the potential to identify wetlands from well drained grasslands. In this study, Asymmetric Synthetic Aperture Radar from the ESA ENVISAT satellite are used to identify wetlands in the Ecuadorian paramo ecosystem. This ecosystem occurs above the treeline (3500 m) and is characterised by highly intermingled grass- and wetlands. By comparing ASAR data from different months, hydrologically active zones can be identified. Corroboration with field observations and rain gauge data show that the areas identified with ASAR coincide with locations with a high tendency for saturation and ponding. By linking precipitation data from local raingauges with the ASAR images, the hydrological regime of the area can be characterised. This information is valuable for hydrological and ecological studies, particularly in the paramo region, which has an important water supply function and is a hotspot for biodiversity.

  6. Logarithmic Laplacian Prior Based Bayesian Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuanghui; Liu, Yongxiang; Li, Xiang; Bi, Guoan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging (ISAR) algorithm based on a new sparse prior, known as the logarithmic Laplacian prior. The newly proposed logarithmic Laplacian prior has a narrower main lobe with higher tail values than the Laplacian prior, which helps to achieve performance improvement on sparse representation. The logarithmic Laplacian prior is used for ISAR imaging within the Bayesian framework to achieve better focused radar image. In the proposed method of ISAR imaging, the phase errors are jointly estimated based on the minimum entropy criterion to accomplish autofocusing. The maximum a posterior (MAP) estimation and the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) are utilized to estimate the model parameters to avoid manually tuning process. Additionally, the fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Hadamard product are used to minimize the required computational efficiency. Experimental results based on both simulated and measured data validate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the traditional sparse ISAR imaging algorithms in terms of resolution improvement and noise suppression. PMID:27136551

  7. Logarithmic Laplacian Prior Based Bayesian Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuanghui; Liu, Yongxiang; Li, Xiang; Bi, Guoan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging (ISAR) algorithm based on a new sparse prior, known as the logarithmic Laplacian prior. The newly proposed logarithmic Laplacian prior has a narrower main lobe with higher tail values than the Laplacian prior, which helps to achieve performance improvement on sparse representation. The logarithmic Laplacian prior is used for ISAR imaging within the Bayesian framework to achieve better focused radar image. In the proposed method of ISAR imaging, the phase errors are jointly estimated based on the minimum entropy criterion to accomplish autofocusing. The maximum a posterior (MAP) estimation and the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) are utilized to estimate the model parameters to avoid manually tuning process. Additionally, the fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Hadamard product are used to minimize the required computational efficiency. Experimental results based on both simulated and measured data validate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the traditional sparse ISAR imaging algorithms in terms of resolution improvement and noise suppression. PMID:27136551

  8. Synthetic aperture radar signal processing on the MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.; Seiler, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Satellite-borne Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR) sense areas of several thousand square kilometers in seconds and transmit phase history signal data several tens of megabits per second. The Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) has a variable swath of 20 to 50 km and acquired data over 100 kms along track in about 13 seconds. With the simplification of separability of the reference function, the processing still requires considerable resources; high speed I/O, large memory and fast computation. Processing systems with regular hardware take hours to process one Seasat image and about one hour for a SIR-B image. Bringing this processing time closer to acquisition times requires an end-to-end system solution. For the purpose of demonstration, software was implemented on the present Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) configuration for processing Seasat and SIR-B data. The software takes advantage of the high processing speed offered by the MPP, the large Staging Buffer, and the high speed I/O between the MPP array unit and the Staging Buffer. It was found that with unoptimized Parallel Pascal code, the processing time on the MPP for a 4096 x 4096 sample subset of signal data ranges between 18 and 30.2 seconds depending on options.

  9. Synthetic aperture radar signal processing on the MPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.; Seiler, E. J.

    1987-07-01

    Satellite-borne Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR) sense areas of several thousand square kilometers in seconds and transmit phase history signal data several tens of megabits per second. The Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) has a variable swath of 20 to 50 km and acquired data over 100 kms along track in about 13 seconds. With the simplification of separability of the reference function, the processing still requires considerable resources; high speed I/O, large memory and fast computation. Processing systems with regular hardware take hours to process one Seasat image and about one hour for a SIR-B image. Bringing this processing time closer to acquisition times requires an end-to-end system solution. For the purpose of demonstration, software was implemented on the present Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) configuration for processing Seasat and SIR-B data. The software takes advantage of the high processing speed offered by the MPP, the large Staging Buffer, and the high speed I/O between the MPP array unit and the Staging Buffer. It was found that with unoptimized Parallel Pascal code, the processing time on the MPP for a 4096 x 4096 sample subset of signal data ranges between 18 and 30.2 seconds depending on options.

  10. Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus for synthetic aperture radar.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuang-Hung; Munson, David C

    2011-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging suffers from image focus degradation in the presence of phase errors in the received signal due to unknown platform motion or signal propagation delays. We present a new autofocus algorithm, termed Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus (FMCA), that is derived under a linear algebraic framework, allowing the SAR image to be focused in a noniterative fashion. Motivated by the mutichannel autofocus (MCA) approach, the proposed autofocus algorithm invokes the assumption of a low-return region, which generally is provided within the antenna sidelobes. Unlike MCA, FMCA works with the collected polar Fourier data directly and is capable of accommodating wide-angle monostatic SAR and bistatic SAR scenarios. Most previous SAR autofocus algorithms rely on the prior assumption that radar's range of look angles is small so that the phase errors can be modeled as varying along only one dimension in the collected Fourier data. And, in some cases, implicit assumptions are made regarding the SAR scene. Performance of such autofocus algorithms degrades if the assumptions are not satisfied. The proposed algorithm has the advantage that it does not require prior assumptions about the range of look angles, nor characteristics of the scene.

  11. Unexploded ordnance detection experiments using ultrawideband synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, Clyde C.; Marinelli, Vincent R.; Ressler, Marc A.; Ton, Tuan T.

    1998-09-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has several technology development programs that are evaluating the use of ultra- wideband synthetic aperture radar (UWB SAR) to detect and locate targets that are subsurface or concealed by foliage. Under these programs, a 1-GHz-bandwidth, low-frequency, fully polarimetric UWB SAR instrumentation system was developed to collect the data needed to support foliage and ground- penetrating radar studies. The radar was integrated onto a 150-ft-high mobile boomlift platform in 1995 and was thus named the BoomSAR. In 1997, under the sponsorship of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), ARL began a project focused on enhancing the detection and discrimination of unexploded ordnance (UXO). The program's technical approach is to collect high-quality, precision data to support phenomenological investigations of electromagnetic wave propagation through varying dielectric media, which in turn supports the development of algorithms for automatic target detection. For this project, a UXO test site was set up at the Steel Crater Test Area -- an existing test site that already contained subsurface mines, tactical vehicles, 55-gallon drums, storage containers, wires, pipes, and arms caches located at Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), Arizona. More than 600 additional pieces of inert UXO were added to the Steel Crater Test Area, including bombs (250, 500, 750, 1000, and 2000 lb), mortars (60 and 81 mm), artillery shells (105 and 155 mm), 2.75-in. rockets, submunitions (M42, BLU-63, M68, BLU-97, and M118), and mines (Gator, VS1.6, M12, PMN, and POM- Z). In the selection of UXO to be included at YPG, an emphasis was placed on the types of munitions that may be present at CONUS test and training ranges.

  12. Terrain topography measurement using multipass polarimetric synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, Dale L.; Lee, Jong-Sen; Ainsworth, Thomas L.; Grunes, Mitchell R.

    2000-05-01

    A method has been investigated for the measurement of topography using airborne fully polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. Terrain slopes in both the range and azimuthal directions have been estimated using multipass flight geometries. Using these slope values, the Poisson equation was then solved to create a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the terrain topography. The method measures polarimetric orientation angles which are then converted into terrain slopes in the azimuthal direction. The conversion of these orientation angles into terrain slopes requires additional knowledge of the radar look angle and the range direction terrain slopes. The solution for slopes is, therefore, a problem coupled between the range and azimuthal directions. For specialized multipass flight geometries these orthogonal terrain slopes are solved for, and maps of terrain slopes are produced. In particular, the processing of two-pass orthogonal and two-pass antiparallel (headings Θ and Θ+ 180°) NASA - Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne SAR data sets has been carried out for an area in central California. When orthogonal slopes are derived using either of these data sets, a digital elevation model may be generated. The L band, polarimetric SAR (POLSAR) DEM created by this solution is compared to a coregistered C band, interferometric SAR (IFSAR) DEM. Similar comparisons are made for terrain slopes in the azimuthal - range directions which are generated by the POLSAR and IFSAR elevation data. The polarimetric SAR, operating from an aircraft, or satellite, in a strip-mapping mode, is capable of measuring terrain topography for large areas provided that phase-preserving fully polarimetric data are taken. Polarimetric SAR data are also widely used for studies of crop classification, surface roughness, biomass density, and soil moisture content. All of these studies are adversely affected by scattering changes attributable to topography. The technique investigated here

  13. Feasibility of Using Synthetic Aperture Radar to Aid UAV Navigation.

    PubMed

    Nitti, Davide O; Bovenga, Fabio; Chiaradia, Maria T; Greco, Mario; Pinelli, Gianpaolo

    2015-07-28

    This study explores the potential of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to aid Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) navigation when Inertial Navigation System (INS) measurements are not accurate enough to eliminate drifts from a planned trajectory. This problem can affect medium-altitude long-endurance (MALE) UAV class, which permits heavy and wide payloads (as required by SAR) and flights for thousands of kilometres accumulating large drifts. The basic idea is to infer position and attitude of an aerial platform by inspecting both amplitude and phase of SAR images acquired onboard. For the amplitude-based approach, the system navigation corrections are obtained by matching the actual coordinates of ground landmarks with those automatically extracted from the SAR image. When the use of SAR amplitude is unfeasible, the phase content can be exploited through SAR interferometry by using a reference Digital Terrain Model (DTM). A feasibility analysis was carried out to derive system requirements by exploring both radiometric and geometric parameters of the acquisition setting. We showed that MALE UAV, specific commercial navigation sensors and SAR systems, typical landmark position accuracy and classes, and available DTMs lead to estimated UAV coordinates with errors bounded within ±12 m, thus making feasible the proposed SAR-based backup system.

  14. Target discrimination in synthetic aperture radar using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Principe, J C; Kim, M; Fisher, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses target discrimination in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery using linear and nonlinear adaptive networks. Neural networks are extensively used for pattern classification but here the goal is discrimination. We show that the two applications require different cost functions. We start by analyzing with a pattern recognition perspective the two-parameter constant false alarm rate (CFAR) detector which is widely utilized as a target detector in SAR. Then we generalize its principle to construct the quadratic gamma discriminator (QGD), a nonparametrically trained classifier based on local image intensity. The linear processing element of the QCD is further extended with nonlinearities yielding a multilayer perceptron (MLP) which we call the NL-QGD (nonlinear QGD). MLPs are normally trained based on the L(2) norm. We experimentally show that the L(2) norm is not recommended to train MLPs for discriminating targets in SAR. Inspired by the Neyman-Pearson criterion, we create a cost function based on a mixed norm to weight the false alarms and the missed detections differently. Mixed norms can easily be incorporated into the backpropagation algorithm, and lead to better performance. Several other norms (L(8), cross-entropy) are applied to train the NL-QGD and all outperformed the L(2) norm when validated by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves. The data sets are constructed from TABILS 24 ISAR targets embedded in 7 km(2) of SAR imagery (MIT/LL mission 90).

  15. Statistical assessment of model fit for synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Michael D.; O'Sullivan, Joseph A.

    2001-08-01

    Parametric approaches to problems of inference from observed data often rely on assumed probabilistic models for the data which may be based on knowledge of the physics of the data acquisition. Given a rich enough collection of sample data, the validity of those assumed models can be assessed in a statistical hypothesis testing framework using any of a number of goodness-of-fit tests developed over the last hundred years for this purpose. Such assessments can be used both to compare alternate models for observed data and to help determine the conditions under which a given model breaks down. We apply three such methods, the (chi) 2 test of Karl Pearson, Kolmogorov's goodness-of-fit test, and the D'Agostino-Pearson test for normality, to quantify how well the data fit various models for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The results of these tests are used to compare a conditionally Gaussian model for complex-valued SAR pixel values, a conditionally log-normal model for SAR pixel magnitudes, and a conditionally normal model for SAR pixel quarter-power values. Sample data for these tests are drawn from the publicly released MSTAR dataset.

  16. Lynx: A High-Resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.; Hensley, W.H.; Pace, F.; Stence, J.; Tsunoda, S.I.; Walker, B.C.; Woodring, M.

    1999-03-08

    Lynx is a high resolution, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) that has been designed and built by Sandia National Laboratories in collaboration with General Atomics (GA). Although Lynx may be operated on a wide variety of manned and unmanned platforms, it is primarily intended to be fielded on unmanned aerial vehicles. In particular, it may be operated on the Predator, I-GNAT, or Prowler II platforms manufactured by GA Aeronautical Systems, Inc. The Lynx production weight is less than 120 lb. and has a slant range of 30 km (in 4 mm/hr rain). It has operator selectable resolution and is capable of 0.1 m resolution in spotlight mode and 0.3 m resolution in stripmap mode. In ground moving target indicator mode, the minimum detectable velocity is 6 knots with a minimum target cross-section of 10 dBsm. In coherent change detection mode, Lynx makes registered, complex image comparisons either of 0.1 m resolution (minimum) spotlight images or of 0.3 m resolution (minimum) strip images. The Lynx user interface features a view manager that allows it to pan and zoom like a video camera. Lynx was developed under corporate finding from GA and will be manufactured by GA for both military and commercial applications. The Lynx system architecture will be presented and some of its unique features will be described. Imagery at the finest resolutions in both spotlight and strip modes have been obtained and will also be presented.

  17. Detection/tracking of moving targets with synthetic aperture radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newstadt, Gregory E.; Zelnio, Edmund; Gorham, Leroy; Hero, Alfred O., III

    2010-04-01

    In this work, the problem of detecting and tracking targets with synthetic aperture radars is considered. A novel approach in which prior knowledge on target motion is assumed to be known for small patches within the field of view. Probability densities are derived as priors on the moving target signature within backprojected SAR images, based on the work of Jao.1 Furthermore, detection and tracking algorithms are presented to take advantage of the derived prior densities. It was found that pure detection suffered from a high false alarm rate as the number of targets in the scene increased. Thus, tracking algorithms were implemented through a particle filter based on the Joint Multi-Target Probability Density (JMPD) particle filter2 and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF)3 that could be used in a track-before-detect scenario. It was found that the PF was superior than the UKF, and was able to track 5 targets at 0.1 second intervals with a tracking error of 0.20 +/- 1.61m (95% confidence interval).

  18. Feasibility of Using Synthetic Aperture Radar to Aid UAV Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Nitti, Davide O.; Bovenga, Fabio; Chiaradia, Maria T.; Greco, Mario; Pinelli, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the potential of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to aid Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) navigation when Inertial Navigation System (INS) measurements are not accurate enough to eliminate drifts from a planned trajectory. This problem can affect medium-altitude long-endurance (MALE) UAV class, which permits heavy and wide payloads (as required by SAR) and flights for thousands of kilometres accumulating large drifts. The basic idea is to infer position and attitude of an aerial platform by inspecting both amplitude and phase of SAR images acquired onboard. For the amplitude-based approach, the system navigation corrections are obtained by matching the actual coordinates of ground landmarks with those automatically extracted from the SAR image. When the use of SAR amplitude is unfeasible, the phase content can be exploited through SAR interferometry by using a reference Digital Terrain Model (DTM). A feasibility analysis was carried out to derive system requirements by exploring both radiometric and geometric parameters of the acquisition setting. We showed that MALE UAV, specific commercial navigation sensors and SAR systems, typical landmark position accuracy and classes, and available DTMs lead to estimate UAV coordinates with errors bounded within ±12 m, thus making feasible the proposed SAR-based backup system. PMID:26225977

  19. Range ambiguity suppression technique for the spaceborne synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, A. M.; Majmudar, Archana; Pillai, N. S.

    1988-10-01

    The aim of any spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system design is to keep the range ambiguous responses as low as possible. A higher value of range ambiguity deteriorates the SAR image quality. The wider swath requirement at higher incidence angle (greater than 45 deg) deteriorates the range ambiguity ratio (RAR) and hence the image quality of SAR quite significantly. The requirement of minimum acceptable RAR even for very nominal swath at these incidence angles may necessitate larger antenna width, very complex weighting, and highly asymmetrical antenna elevation pattern. An alternate scheme is suggested in this paper to alleviate the criticality and complexity of the design aspects for such a requirement. Here, the chirp slope of the transmitted linear frequency modulated pulses is reversed alternately. Hence, during the range compression, a significant portion of the ambiguous return is suppressed due to the mismatching with the signal reference function. The proposed method provides significant improvement in RAR and can be utilized in attaining wider swath, specifically at higher incidence angles.

  20. Synthetic aperture radar speckle reduction for circle mode SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musgrove, Cameron

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images contain a grainy pattern, called speckle, that is a consequence of a coherent imaging system. For fine resolution SAR images speckle can obscure subtle features and reduce visual appeal. Many speckle reduction methods result in a loss of image resolution and reduce visual appeal which can obscure subtle features. Another approach to maintain resolution while reducing speckle is to register and combine multiple images. For persistent surveillance applications it is more efficient for an airborne platform to fly circles around the particular area of interest. In these cases, it would be beneficial to combine multiple circle mode SAR images, however the image registration process is not so straightforward because the layover angle changes in each image. This paper develops a SAR image registration process for combining multiple circle mode SAR images to reduce speckle while preserving resolution. The registration first uses a feature matching algorithm for a coarse rotation and alignment, and then uses a fine registration and warp. Ku band SAR data from a circle mode SAR collection is used to show the effectiveness of the registration and enhanced visual appeal from multi-looking.

  1. Quantitative statistical assessment of conditional models for synthetic aperture radar.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Michael D; O'Sullivan, Joseph A

    2004-02-01

    Many applications of object recognition in the presence of pose uncertainty rely on statistical models-conditioned on pose-for observations. The image statistics of three-dimensional (3-D) objects are often assumed to belong to a family of distributions with unknown model parameters that vary with one or more continuous-valued pose parameters. Many methods for statistical model assessment, for example the tests of Kolmogorov-Smirnov and K. Pearson, require that all model parameters be fully specified or that sample sizes be large. Assessing pose-dependent models from a finite number of observations over a variety of poses can violate these requirements. However, a large number of small samples, corresponding to unique combinations of object, pose, and pixel location, are often available. We develop methods for model testing which assume a large number of small samples and apply them to the comparison of three models for synthetic aperture radar images of 3-D objects with varying pose. Each model is directly related to the Gaussian distribution and is assessed both in terms of goodness-of-fit and underlying model assumptions, such as independence, known mean, and homoscedasticity. Test results are presented in terms of the functional relationship between a given significance level and the percentage of samples that wold fail a test at that level. PMID:15376934

  2. Snow mapping in alpine regions with synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, J.; Dozier, J. ); Rott, H. . Inst. for Meteorology and Geophysics)

    1994-01-01

    For climatological and hydrological investigations, the areas covered by snow and glacial ice are important parameters. Active microwave sensors can discriminate snow from other surfaces in all weather conditions, and their spatial resolution is compatible with the topographic variation in alpine regions. Using data acquired with the NASA AIRSAR in the Oetztal Alps in 1989 and 1991, the authors examine the usage of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to map snow- and glacier-covered areas. By comparing polarimetric SAR data to images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper obtained under clear conditions one week after the SAR flight, they find that SAR data at 5.3 GHz (C-band) can discriminate between areas covered by snow from those that are ice-free. However, they are less suited to discrimination of glacier ice from snow and rock. The overall pixel-by-pixel accuracies--74% from VV polarization alone with topographic information, 76% from polarimetric SAR without any topographic information, and 79% from polarimetric SAR with topographic information--are high enough to justify the use of SAR as the data source in areas that are too cloud-covered to obtain data from the Thematic Mapper. This is especially true for snow discrimination, where accuracies exceed 80%, because mapping of a transient snow cover during a cloudy melt season is often difficult with an optical sensor. The AIRSAR survey was carried out in summer during a heavy rainstorm, when the snow surfaces were unusually rough.

  3. UHF Microstrip Antenna Array for Synthetic- Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert F.; Huang, John

    2003-01-01

    An ultra-high-frequency microstrippatch antenna has been built for use in airborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR). The antenna design satisfies requirements specific to the GeoSAR program, which is dedicated to the development of a terrain-mapping SAR system that can provide information on geology, seismicity, vegetation, and other terrain-related topics. One of the requirements is for ultra-wide-band performance: the antenna must be capable of operating with dual linear polarization in the frequency range of 350 plus or minus 80 MHz, with a peak gain of 10 dB at the middle frequency of 350 MHz and a gain of at least 8 dB at the upper and lower ends (270 and 430 MHz) of the band. Another requirement is compactness: the antenna must fit in the wingtip pod of a Gulfstream II airplane. The antenna includes a linear array of microstrip-patch radiating elements supported over square cavities. Each patch is square (except for small corner cuts) and has a small square hole at its center.

  4. Synthetic aperture radar autofocus based on a bilinear model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuang-Hung; Wiesel, Ami; Munson, David C

    2012-05-01

    Autofocus algorithms are used to restore images in nonideal synthetic aperture radar imaging systems. In this paper, we propose a bilinear parametric model for the unknown image and the nuisance phase parameters and derive an efficient maximum-likelihood autofocus (MLA) algorithm. In the special case of a simple image model and a narrow range of look angles, MLA coincides with the successful multichannel autofocus (MCA). MLA can be interpreted as a generalization of MCA to a larger class of models with a larger range of look angles. We analyze its advantages over previous extensions of MCA in terms of identifiability conditions and noise sensitivity. As a byproduct, we also propose numerical approximations to the difficult constant modulus quadratic program that lies at the core of these algorithms. We demonstrate the superior performance of our proposed methods using computer simulations in both the correct and mismatched system models. MLA performs better than other methods, both in terms of the mean squared error and visual quality of the restored image.

  5. Feasibility of Using Synthetic Aperture Radar to Aid UAV Navigation.

    PubMed

    Nitti, Davide O; Bovenga, Fabio; Chiaradia, Maria T; Greco, Mario; Pinelli, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the potential of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to aid Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) navigation when Inertial Navigation System (INS) measurements are not accurate enough to eliminate drifts from a planned trajectory. This problem can affect medium-altitude long-endurance (MALE) UAV class, which permits heavy and wide payloads (as required by SAR) and flights for thousands of kilometres accumulating large drifts. The basic idea is to infer position and attitude of an aerial platform by inspecting both amplitude and phase of SAR images acquired onboard. For the amplitude-based approach, the system navigation corrections are obtained by matching the actual coordinates of ground landmarks with those automatically extracted from the SAR image. When the use of SAR amplitude is unfeasible, the phase content can be exploited through SAR interferometry by using a reference Digital Terrain Model (DTM). A feasibility analysis was carried out to derive system requirements by exploring both radiometric and geometric parameters of the acquisition setting. We showed that MALE UAV, specific commercial navigation sensors and SAR systems, typical landmark position accuracy and classes, and available DTMs lead to estimated UAV coordinates with errors bounded within ±12 m, thus making feasible the proposed SAR-based backup system. PMID:26225977

  6. Sources of Artefacts in Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becek, K.; Borkowski, A.

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, much attention has been devoted to digital elevation models (DEMs) produced using Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR). This has been triggered by the relative novelty of the InSAR method and its world-famous product—the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEM. However, much less attention, if at all, has been paid to sources of artefacts in SRTM. In this work, we focus not on the missing pixels (null pixels) due to shadows or the layover effect, but rather on outliers that were undetected by the SRTM validation process. The aim of this study is to identify some of the causes of the elevation outliers in SRTM. Such knowledge may be helpful to mitigate similar problems in future InSAR DEMs, notably the ones currently being developed from data acquired by the TanDEM-X mission. We analysed many cross-sections derived from SRTM. These cross-sections were extracted over the elevation test areas, which are available from the Global Elevation Data Testing Facility (GEDTF) whose database contains about 8,500 runways with known vertical profiles. Whenever a significant discrepancy between the known runway profile and the SRTM cross-section was detected, a visual interpretation of the high-resolution satellite image was carried out to identify the objects causing the irregularities. A distance and a bearing from the outlier to the object were recorded. Moreover, we considered the SRTM look direction parameter. A comprehensive analysis of the acquired data allows us to establish that large metallic structures, such as hangars or car parking lots, are causing the outliers. Water areas or plain wet terrains may also cause an InSAR outlier. The look direction and the depression angle of the InSAR system in relation to the suspected objects influence the magnitude of the outliers. We hope that these findings will be helpful in designing the error detection routines of future InSAR or, in fact, any microwave aerial- or space-based survey. The

  7. Understanding Volcanic Inflation of Long Valley Caldera, California, from Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, F.; Hensley, S.; Rosen, P.; Langbein, J.

    1994-01-01

    The results using interferometric synthetic aperture radar(SAR) to measure the co-seismic displacement from the June 28, 1992 Landers earthquake suggest that this technique may be applicable to other problems in crustal deformation.

  8. Dual frequency Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mission for monitoring our dynamic planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilland, J.; Bard, S.; Key, R.; Kim, Y.; Vaze, P.; Huneycutt, B.

    2000-01-01

    Advances in spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remote sensing technology make it possible to acquire global-scale data sets that provide unique information about the Earth's continually changing surface characteristics.

  9. Ice island detection and characterization with airborne synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, M.O.; Sackinger, W.M. )

    1990-04-15

    A 1:300,000 scale airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of an area of the Arctic Ocean adjacent to the Queen Elizabeth Islands, Canadian High Arctic, is examined to determine the number and characteristics of ice islands in the image and to assess the capability of airborne and satellite SAR to detect ice islands. Twelve ice islands have been identified, and their dimensions range from as large as 5.7 km by 8.7 km to as small as 0.15 km by 0.25 km. A significant SAR characteristic of the shelf ice portions of ice islands is a return with a ribbed texture of alternating lighter and darker grey tones resulting from the indulating shelf ice surfaces of the ice islands. The appearance of the ribbed texture varies according to the ice islands' orientation relative to the illumination direction and consequently the incidence angle. Some ice islands also include extensive areas of textureless dark tone attached to the shelf ice. The weak returns correspond to (1) multiyear landfast sea ice that was attached to the front of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf at the time of calving and which has remained attached since then and (2) multiyear pack ice that has become attached and consolidated since the calving, indicating that ice islands can increase their area and mass significantly as they drift. Ice islands are easily discernible in SAR images and for the future SAR represents a promising technique to obtain a census of ice islands in the Arctic Ocean. However, any SAR-based census probably will be conservative because ice islands smaller than 300-400 m across are likely to remain undetected, particularly in areas of heavy ice ridging which produces strong SAR clutter.

  10. NASA-ISRO synthetic aperture radar: science and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Raj; Rosen, Paul; Misra, Tapan

    2016-05-01

    NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR), a novel SAR concept will be utilized to image wide swath at high resolution of stripmap SAR. It will have observations in L- and S-bands to understand highly spatial and temporally complex processes such as ecosystem disturbances, ice sheet changes, and natural hazards including earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes, and landslides. NISAR with several advanced features such as 12 days interferometric orbit, achievement of high resolution and wide swath images through SweepSAR technology and simultaneous data acquisition in dual frequency would support a host of applications. The primary objectives of NISAR are to monitor ecosystems including monitoring changes in ecosystem structure and biomass estimation, carbon flux monitoring; mangroves and wetlands characterization; alpine forest characterization and delineation of tree-line ecotone, land surface deformation including measurement of deformation due to co-seismic and inter-seismic activities; landslides; land subsidence and volcanic deformation, cryosphere studies including measurements of dynamics of polar ice sheet, ice discharge to the ocean, Himalayan snow and glacier dynamics, deep and coastal ocean studies including retrieval of ocean parameters, mapping of coastal erosion and shore-line change; demarcation of high tide line (HTL) and low tide line (LTL) for coastal regulation zones (CRZ) mapping, geological studies including mapping of structural and lithological features; lineaments and paleo-channels; geo-morphological mapping, natural disaster response including mapping and monitoring of floods, forest fires, oil spills, earthquake damage and monitoring of extreme weather events such as cyclones. In addition to the above, NISAR would support various other applications such as enhanced crop monitoring, soil moisture estimation, urban area development, weather and hydrological forecasting.

  11. Forest Profiling with Multiple Observation Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Chapman, B. D.; Dutra, L. V.; Dos Santos, J. R.; Goncalves, F. G.; Mura, J. C.; Freitas, C. D.; Graca, P. M.; Drake, J.

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of the vertical structure of forest vegetation bear on ecosystem state, such as biodiversity, carbon dynamics, and fire susceptibility, and the estimation of forest biomass. Global monitoring of vertical vegetation structure is one of the most important and as yet unrealized goals of forest remote sensing. The Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) phase and coherence observations are directly sensitive to the vertical distribution of electromagnetic dielectric in the forest medium. This dielectric distribution in turn depends on vegetation density as a function of the vertical coordinate. Multiple InSAR observations--multiple baseline, multiple frequency, and/or multiple polarization--must be used to uniquely estimate vegetation density profiles. This talk explains the need for multiple observation strategies and the benefits of multiple- baseline, multiple-frequency, and multiple-polarization strategies. Multiple baseline tropical forest profiles from C-band (wavelength=0.056 m) InSAR will be shown, as well as results from L-band (0.25 m) few-baseline observations over La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Both surface-deformation measurements and those relevant to vertical-vegetation structure may result from a single InSAR mission design, provided, for example, that multiple nonzero baselines are flown along with the zero-baseline configuration preferred for deformation. The possibility of mutually improving the accuracy of deformation and structure in a simultaneous- measurement scenario will be discussed. There is also potential synergy with other remote sensing missions, such as the Tandem X InSAR mission, for delivering forest structure.

  12. The Information Content of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar: Vegetation and Underlying Surface Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, Robert N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper first gives a heuristic description of the sensitivity of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar to vertical vegetation distributions and underlying surface topography. A parameter estimation scenario is then described in which the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar cross-correlation amplitude and phase are the observations from which vegetation and surface topographic parameters are estimated. It is shown that, even in the homogeneous-layer model of the vegetation, the number of parameters needed to describe the vegetation and underlying topography exceeds the number of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar observations for single-baseline, single-frequency, single-incidence-angle, single-polarization Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar. Using ancillary ground-truth data to compensate for the underdetermination of the parameters, forest depths are estimated from the INSAR data. A recently-analyzed multibaseline data set is also discussed and the potential for stand-alone Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar parameter estimation is assessed. The potential of combining the information content of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar with that of infrared/optical remote sensing data is briefly discussed.

  13. The Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C, X-Band Synthetic Aperture radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) Mission Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. L.; Stofan, E. R.; Farr, T.; Plaut, J.; vanZyl, J.; Kobrick, M.; Holt, B.; Way, J. B.; Ottl, H.; Schmullius, C.; Nithack, J.; Calamia, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C, X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) was launched on space shuttle Endeavour at 7:05 AM EDT, Saturday, April 9, 1994. Soon after launch, the radars were activated and began around the clock operations which lasted for the next 10 days.

  14. Tundra Fire Effects Mapping from Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, L. K.; Bourgeau-Chavez, L. L.; French, N. H.; Loboda, T. V.; Chavez, M. C.; Hawkins, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Traditional electro-optical, satellite-based methods of fire detection and monitoring are severely limited in the arctic due to persistent cloud cover and short growing seasons. Radar data can provide an alternative to traditional electro-optical methods due to all-weather imaging capabilities. Previous research in boreal forests and current evaluation in the Alaskan tundra shows that synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data can be used successfully to map burn perimeters and distinguish burned and unburned areas within the perimeter over a longer period of time than optical sensors. Results will be presented on the use of SAR data to measure spatial variations in the microwave signature across a fire scar as well as temporally throughout the growing season and across multiple years. The extensive historical archive of ERS-1 and -2 SAR data has been used to characterize three burned areas in the tundra regions of Alaska. These fires include the 1993 Wainwright fires in the north-western part of the North Slope (Fig 1), the 1999 Uvgoon fire in the Noatak National Preserve and 2007 Anaktuvuk River fire north of the Brooks Range in the central area of the North Slope. The data record includes pre-burn, burn, and post-burn observations until the fire scars are no longer discernible on the landscape. Our results show that burned areas are visible reliably five years post burn and then faintly apparent thereafter up to 12 or more years post-burn. Conversely, our analysis of electro-optical (Landsat) imagery shows near complete obscuration of the fire scar one year post-burn (Loboda et al. 2013). Also presented are results of an analysis of the effects of post-fire soil moisture, as measured in weather and climate datasets, on the SAR signature measured from the available image data archive. Reference: Loboda, T L, N H F French, C Hight-Harf, L Jenkins, M E Miller. 2013. Mapping fire extent and burn severity in Alaskan tussock tundra: An analysis of the spectral response of

  15. High Resolution Ionospheric Mapping Using Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.; Chotoo, K.; Roth, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs) are imaging radar systems that utilize the Doppler history of signals acquired during satellite flyby to produce high resolution images of the Earth. With modern sensors, operating at frequencies between about 1 GHz (L-band) and 10 GHz (X-band), radar images with resolutions in the meter to sub-meter range can be produced. The presence of the ionosphere is significantly affecting the propagation properties of the microwave signals transmitted by these systems, causing distortions of signal polarization and phase. These distortions can lead to a wide range of imaging artifacts including image range shifts, interferometric phase biases, loss of image focus, change of image geometry, and Faraday rotation. While these artifacts are particularly pronounced at L-band, they are still observable in data acquired at C- or even X-band. In recent years, a wealth of methods for measuring and correcting ionospheric influence were developed. These methods are self-calibration procedures that measure ionosphere-induced distortions to infer the two-dimensional TEC maps that affected the data. These TEC maps are then removed from the data to produce high performance SAR images. Besides being effective in correcting SAR observations, these self-calibration methods are producing high quality TEC information with sub-TECU sensitivity and sub-kilometer spatial resolution. The intent of this paper is to utilize SAR-derived ionospheric information and make the case for SAR as a data source for ionospheric research. After a short summary of ionosphere-induced distortions, the concept of TEC estimation from SAR is introduced. Here, the current state-of-the-art of ionospheric TEC estimation is presented, including Faraday rotation-based, interferometric, correlation-based, and autofocus-based techniques. For every approach, performance numbers are given that quantify the achievable TEC estimation accuracy as a function of system parameters, scene

  16. Temporal Stability of Soil Moisture and Radar Backscatter Observed by the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR)

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Pathe, Carsten; Doubkova, Marcela; Sabel, Daniel; Bartsch, Annett; Hasenauer, Stefan; Blöschl, Günter; Scipal, Klaus; Martínez-Fernández, José; Löw, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The high spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture is the result of atmospheric forcing and redistribution processes related to terrain, soil, and vegetation characteristics. Despite this high variability, many field studies have shown that in the temporal domain soil moisture measured at specific locations is correlated to the mean soil moisture content over an area. Since the measurements taken by Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) instruments are very sensitive to soil moisture it is hypothesized that the temporally stable soil moisture patterns are reflected in the radar backscatter measurements. To verify this hypothesis 73 Wide Swath (WS) images have been acquired by the ENVISAT Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) over the REMEDHUS soil moisture network located in the Duero basin, Spain. It is found that a time-invariant linear relationship is well suited for relating local scale (pixel) and regional scale (50 km) backscatter. The observed linear model coefficients can be estimated by considering the scattering properties of the terrain and vegetation and the soil moisture scaling properties. For both linear model coefficients, the relative error between observed and modelled values is less than 5 % and the coefficient of determination (R2) is 86 %. The results are of relevance for interpreting and downscaling coarse resolution soil moisture data retrieved from active (METOP ASCAT) and passive (SMOS, AMSR-E) instruments.

  17. Screening of Earthen Levees Using Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aanstoos, J. V.; O'Hara, C.; Prasad, S.; Dabbiru, L.; Nobrega, R.; Lee, M.

    2009-12-01

    Earthen levees protect large areas of populated and cultivated land in the US from flooding. As shown recently with hurricanes Katrina and Ike and the recent floods in the Midwest, the potential loss of life and property associated with the catastrophic failure of levees can be extremely large. Over the entire US, there are over 100,000 miles of levee structures of varying designs and conditions. Currently, there are limited processes in place to prioritize the monitoring of large numbers of dam and levee structures. Levee managers and federal agencies need to assess levee health rapidly with robust techniques that identify, classify and prioritize levee vulnerabilities with lower costs than traditional soil-boring programs, which can cost many of millions of dollars and provide information about the subsurface only in the immediate vicinity of a small-diameter borehole. This paper reports preliminary results of a project studying the use of airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) as an aid to the levee screening process. The SAR sensor being studied is the NASA UAVSAR (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle SAR), a fully polarimetric L-band SAR which is specifically designed to acquire airborne repeat track SAR data for differential interferometric measurements. The instrument is capable of sub-meter ground sample distance. NASA has imaged with this instrument 230 km of levees along the lower Mississippi River for use in this study. SAR interferometric mode is capable of identifying vertical displacements on the order of a few millimeters. Its multipolarization measurements can penetrate soil to as much as one meter depth. Thus it is valuable in detecting changes in levees that will be key inputs to a levee vulnerability classification system. Once vulnerable levee reaches have been identified, further actions such as more detailed examination or repairs can be focused on these higher-priority sections. We report on the use of various feature detection algorithms being applied

  18. Model-Based Information Extraction From Synthetic Aperture Radar Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzner, Shari A.

    2011-07-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is a remote sensing technology for imaging areas of the earth's surface. SAR has been successfully used for monitoring characteristics of the natural environment such as land cover type and tree density. With the advent of higher resolution sensors, it is now theoretically possible to extract information about individual structures such as buildings from SAR imagery. This information could be used for disaster response and security-related intelligence. SAR has an advantage over other remote sensing technologies for these applications because SAR data can be collected during the night and in rainy or cloudy conditions. This research presents a model-based method for extracting information about a building -- its height and roof slope -- from a single SAR image. Other methods require multiple images or ancillary data from specialized sensors, making them less practical. The model-based method uses simulation to match a hypothesized building to an observed SAR image. The degree to which a simulation matches the observed data is measured by mutual information. The success of this method depends on the accuracy of the simulation and on the reliability of the mutual information similarity measure. Electromagnetic theory was applied to relate a building's physical characteristics to the features present in a SAR image. This understanding was used to quantify the precision of building information contained in SAR data, and to identify the inputs needed for accurate simulation. A new SAR simulation technique was developed to meet the accuracy and efficiency requirements of model-based information extraction. Mutual information, a concept from information theory, has become a standard for measuring the similarity between medical images. Its performance in the context of matching a simulation image to a SAR image was evaluated in this research, and it was found to perform well under certain conditions. The factors that affect its performance

  19. Shuttle Imaging Radar-C mission operations - Technology test bed for Earth Observing System synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, J. P.; Collins, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    The mission operations for the Space Radar Lab (SRL), particularly in the areas of real-time replanning and science activity coordination, are presented. The two main components of SRL are the Shuttle Imaging Radar-C and the X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar. The Earth Observing System SAR will be a multispectral, multipolarization radar satellite that will provide information over an entire decade, permitting scientists to monitor large-scale changes in the earth's environment over a long period of time.

  20. Synthetic-aperture-radar imaging with a solid-state laser.

    PubMed

    Green, T J; Marcus, S; Colella, B D

    1995-10-20

    We report the operation of an imaging Nd:YAG microchip-laser synthetic-aperture radar, with which we imaged two-dimensional (2-D) models of military targets. The images obtained showed spatial resolution significantly better than the diffraction limit of the real aperture in the along-track dimension. The signal processing is described, and the measurement sensitivity is both predicted and verified. In addition, 2-D images with high resolution in both dimensions were generated by using an asymmetric aperture to match the along-track synthetic-aperture resolution with the across-track diffraction-limited resolution.

  1. Phase correction system for automatic focusing of synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Eichel, Paul H.; Ghiglia, Dennis C.; Jakowatz, Jr., Charles V.

    1990-01-01

    A phase gradient autofocus system for use in synthetic aperture imaging accurately compensates for arbitrary phase errors in each imaged frame by locating highlighted areas and determining the phase disturbance or image spread associated with each of these highlight areas. An estimate of the image spread for each highlighted area in a line in the case of one dimensional processing or in a sector, in the case of two-dimensional processing, is determined. The phase error is determined using phase gradient processing. The phase error is then removed from the uncorrected image and the process is iteratively performed to substantially eliminate phase errors which can degrade the image.

  2. Synthetic-aperture imaging laser radar: laboratory demonstration and signal processing.

    PubMed

    Beck, Steven M; Buck, Joseph R; Buell, Walter F; Dickinson, Richard P; Kozlowski, David A; Marechal, Nicholas J; Wright, Timothy J

    2005-12-10

    The spatial resolution of a conventional imaging laser radar system is constrained by the diffraction limit of the telescope's aperture. We investigate a technique known as synthetic-aperture imaging laser radar (SAIL), which employs aperture synthesis with coherent laser radar to overcome the diffraction limit and achieve fine-resolution, long-range, two-dimensional imaging with modest aperture diameters. We detail our laboratory-scale SAIL testbed, digital signal-processing techniques, and image results. In particular, we report what we believe to be the first optical synthetic-aperture image of a fixed, diffusely scattering target with a moving aperture. A number of fine-resolution, well-focused SAIL images are shown, including both retroreflecting and diffuse scattering targets, with a comparison of resolution between real-aperture imaging and synthetic-aperture imaging. A general digital signal-processing solution to the laser waveform instability problem is described and demonstrated, involving both new algorithms and hardware elements. These algorithms are primarily data driven, without a priori knowledge of waveform and sensor position, representing a crucial step in developing a robust imaging system.

  3. Overview of independent component analysis technique with an application to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery processing.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Simone

    2003-01-01

    We present an overview of independent component analysis, an emerging signal processing technique based on neural networks, with the aim to provide an up-to-date survey of the theoretical streams in this discipline and of the current applications in the engineering area. We also focus on a particular application, dealing with a remote sensing technique based on synthetic aperture radar imagery processing: we briefly review the features and main applications of synthetic aperture radar and show how blind signal processing by neural networks may be advantageously employed to enhance the quality of remote sensing data.

  4. The DESDynI Synthetic Aperture Radar Array-Fed Reflector Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Ghaemi, Hirad; Giersch, Louis; Harcke, Leif; Hodges, Richard; Hoffman, James; Johnson, William; Jordan, Rolando; Khayatian, Behrouz; Rosen, Paul; Sadowy, Gregory; Shaffer, Scott; Shen, Yuhsyen; Veilleux, Louise; Wu, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    DESDynI is a mission being developed by NASA with radar and lidar instruments for Earth-orbit remote sensing. This paper focuses on the design of a largeaperture antenna for the radar instrument. The antenna comprises a deployable reflector antenna and an active switched array of patch elements fed by transmit/ receive modules. The antenna and radar architecture facilitates a new mode of synthetic aperture radar imaging called 'SweepSAR'. A system-level description of the antenna is provided, along with predictions of antenna performance.

  5. Development of a synthetic aperture radar design approach for wide-swath implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jean, B. R.

    1981-01-01

    The first phase of a study program to develop an advanced synthetic aperture radar design concept is presented. Attributes of particular importance for the system design include wide swath coverage, reduced power requirements, and versatility in the selection of frequency, polarization and incident angle. The multiple beam configuration provides imaging at a nearly constant angle of incidence and offers the potential of realizing a wide range of the attributes desired for an orbital imaging radar for Earth resources applications.

  6. Method for providing a polarization filter for processing synthetic aperture radar image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C. (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A polarization filter can maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of a polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and help discriminate between targets or enhance image features, e.g., enhance contrast between different types of target. The method disclosed is based on the Stokes matrix/ Stokes vector representation, so the targets of interest can be extended targets, and the method can also be applied to the case of bistatic polarimetric radars.

  7. IFP V4.0:a polar-reformatting image formation processor for synthetic aperture radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2005-09-01

    IFP V4.0 is the fourth generation of an extraordinarily powerful and flexible image formation processor for spotlight mode synthetic aperture radar. It has been successfully utilized in processing phase histories from numerous radars and has been instrumental in the development of many new capabilities for spotlight mode SAR. This document provides a brief history of the development of IFP, a full exposition of the signal processing steps involved, and a short user's manual for the software implementing this latest iteration.

  8. A global search and rescue concept using synthetic aperture radar and passive user targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A terrestrial search and rescue concept is defined embodying the use of passive radio-frequency reflectors in conjunction with an orbiting synthetic aperture radar to detect, identify, and locate users. An airborne radar test was conducted to evaluate the basic concept. In this test simple corner-reflector targets were successfully imaged. Results from this investigation were positive and indicate that the concept can be used to investigate new approaches focused on the development of a global search and rescue system.

  9. A Comparison of SIR-B Synthetic Aperture Radar Data with Ocean Internal Wave Measurements.

    PubMed

    Gasparovic, R F; Apel, J R; Thompson, D R; Tochko, J S

    1986-06-20

    An image from the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) shows internal wave features in an area south of Long Island, New York Coincident oceanographic measurements are used in conjunction with hydrodynamic interaction and electromagnetic scattering models to estimate the expected SAR image intensity modulations associated with the internal waves. There is reasonable agreement between the predicted and observed internal wave signatures.

  10. Terahertz inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging using self-mixing interferometry with a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Lui, H S; Taimre, T; Bertling, K; Lim, Y L; Dean, P; Khanna, S P; Lachab, M; Valavanis, A; Indjin, D; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G; Rakić, A D

    2014-05-01

    We propose a terahertz (THz)-frequency synthetic aperture radar imaging technique based on self-mixing (SM) interferometry, using a quantum cascade laser. A signal processing method is employed which extracts and exploits the radar-related information contained in the SM signals, enabling the creation of THz images with improved spatial resolution. We demonstrate this by imaging a standard resolution test target, achieving resolution beyond the diffraction limit.

  11. Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging on a Cuda-Enabled Mobile Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatica, M.; Philllips, E.

    2014-12-01

    This talk will present the details of a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging on the smallest CUDA-capable platform available, the Jetson TK1. The results indicate that GPU accelerated embedded platforms have considerable potential for this type of workload and in conjunction with low power consumption, light weight and standard programming tools, could open new horizons in the embedded space.

  12. An atlas of November 1978 synthetic aperture radar digitized imagery for oil spill studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, H. E.; Oderman, W.; Crosswell, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    A data set is described which consists of digitized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery plus correlative data and some preliminary analysis results. This data set should be of value to experimenters who are interested in the SAR instrument and its application to the detection and monitoring of oil on water and other distributed targets.

  13. Basics of Polar-Format algorithm for processing Synthetic Aperture Radar images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a background to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation using the Polar Format (PFA) processing algorithm. This is meant to be an aid to those tasked to implement real-time image formation using the Polar Format processing algorithm.

  14. Wavefront curvature limitations and compensation to polar format processing for synthetic aperture radar images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-01-01

    Limitations on focused scene size for the Polar Format Algorithm (PFA) for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation are derived. A post processing filtering technique for compensating the spatially variant blurring in the image is examined. Modifications to this technique to enhance its robustness are proposed.

  15. A compact implementation of a real time acousto-optic synthetic aperture radar processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaik, Kamran; Lesh, James R.; Hemmati, Hamid

    1988-01-01

    The architecture of a real-time acoustooptic synthetic aperture radar processor is reviewed and recent efforts to develop a compact processor are presented. It employs an acoustooptic device operated in the space integrating mode to compress the signal in range.

  16. Synthetic aperture radar observation of ocean roughness from rolls in an unstable marine boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Liu, W. T.; Weissman, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Simultaneous synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and cloud photographic observations of the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Florida were made from a high-altitude aircraft when there was an unstable marine boundary layer. The synthetic aperture radar images show unusual kilometer-sized features on the ocean surface which are related to clouds. The ocean near shore was cloud-free and had no radar features, while from 30 to 330 km offshore there were clouds and prominent kilometer-sized features in the SAR image. These radar features are most prominent when the radar was looking upwind, are less prominent when the radar was looking downwind, and disappear entirely when the radar was looking crosswind. Since ocean radar echo strengths are believed to be controlled primarily by ocean waves satisfying the Bragg relation, these radar features most likely resulted from local enhancements of short gravity waves with 17- to 34-cm wavelengths, which in turn are surface expressions of roll convections in a kilometer-thick unstable marine boundary layer.

  17. Eliminating Doppler Effects in Synthetic-Aperture Radar Optical Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantindes, N. J.; Bicknell, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Pair of photodetectors generates correction signals. Instrument detects Doppler shifts in radar and corrects processing parameters so ambiguities caused by shifts not manifested as double or overlapping images.

  18. Special Issue on Results from Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (Sir-C/X-SAR): Foreword

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jefferey J.

    1996-01-01

    The two flights of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour represent a major advance in remote sensing technology for studies of planetary surfaces.

  19. Internal wave observations made with an airborne synthetic aperture imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Apel, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Synthetic aperture L-band radar flown aboard the NASA CV-990 has observed periodic striations on the ocean surface off the coast of Alaska which have been interpreted as tidally excited oceanic internal waves of less than 500 m length. These radar images are compared to photographic imagery of similar waves taken from Landsat 1. Both the radar and Landsat images reveal variations in reflectivity across each wave in a packet that range from low to high to normal. The variations point to the simultaneous existence of two mechanisms for the surface signatures of internal waves: roughening due to wave-current interactions, and smoothing due to slick formation.

  20. High-resolution planetary imaging via spotlight-mode synthetic aperture radar.

    PubMed

    Webb, J H; Munson, D R; Stacy, N S

    1998-01-01

    We consider the application of a spotlight-mode synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging technique to the problem of high-resolution lunar imaging and other related radar astronomy problems. This approach offers improved image quality, compared with conventional processing, at the expense of slightly increased computational effort. Results of the processing of lunar data acquired with the 12.6 cm wavelength radar system at Arecibo Observatory are presented, and compared with the best available published result, by Stacy (1993), which uses focusing techniques from stripmap SAR.

  1. User guide to the Magellan synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Stephen D.; Mcconnell, Shannon L.; Leff, Craig E.; Austin, Richard S.; Beratan, Kathi K.; Rokey, Mark J.

    1995-01-01

    The Magellan radar-mapping mission collected a large amount of science and engineering data. Now available to the general scientific community, this data set can be overwhelming to someone who is unfamiliar with the mission. This user guide outlines the mission operations and data set so that someone working with the data can understand the mapping and data-processing techniques used in the mission. Radar-mapping parameters as well as data acquisition issues are discussed. In addition, this user guide provides information on how the data set is organized and where specific elements of the set can be located.

  2. Study of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Sources of geometric and radiometric fidelity errors in AN/APQ-102A radar imagery are discussed, along with a digital computer program to correct the distortions. The major effort, a computer program which will process digitalized recorded AN/APQ-102A phase histories into imagery, is described. All computer programs are listed.

  3. Three-dimensional subsurface imaging Synthetic Aperture Radar

    SciTech Connect

    Wuenschel, E.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes the development of a system known as 3-D SISAR. This system consists of a ground penetrating radar with software algorithms designed for the detection, location, and identification of buried objects in the underground hazardous waste environments at DOE storage sites.

  4. Target-adaptive polarimetric synthetic aperture radar target discrimination using maximum average correlation height filters.

    PubMed

    Sadjadi, Firooz A; Mahalanobis, Abhijit

    2006-05-01

    We report the development of a technique for adaptive selection of polarization ellipse tilt and ellipticity angles such that the target separation from clutter is maximized. From the radar scattering matrix [S] and its complex components, in phase and quadrature phase, the elements of the Mueller matrix are obtained. Then, by means of polarization synthesis, the radar cross section of the radar scatters are obtained at different transmitting and receiving polarization states. By designing a maximum average correlation height filter, we derive a target versus clutter distance measure as a function of four transmit and receive polarization state angles. The results of applying this method on real synthetic aperture radar imagery indicate a set of four transmit and receive angles that lead to maximum target versus clutter discrimination. These optimum angles are different for different targets. Hence, by adaptive control of the state of polarization of polarimetric radar, one can noticeably improve the discrimination of targets from clutter.

  5. Effects of changing rice cultural practices on C-band synthetic aperture radar backscatter using Envisat advanced synthetic aperture radar data in the Mekong River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam-Dao, Nguyen; Le Toan, Thuy; Apan, Armando; Bouvet, Alexandre; Young, Frank; Le-van, Trung

    2009-11-01

    Changes in rice cultivation systems have been observed in the Mekong River Delta, Vietnam. Among the changes in cultural practices, the change from transplanting to direct sowing, the use of water-saving technology, and the use of high production method could have impacts on radar remote sensing methods previously developed for rice monitoring. Using Envisat (Environmental Satellite) ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar) data over the province of An Giang, this study showed that the radar backscattering behaviour is much different from that of the reported traditional rice. At the early stage of the season, direct sowing on fields with rough and wet soil surface provides very high backscatter values for HH (Horizontal transmit - Horizontal receive polarisation) and VV (Vertical transmit - Vertical receive polarisation) data, as a contrast compared to the very low backscatter of fields covered with water before emergence. The temporal increase of the backscatter is therefore not observed clearly over direct sowing fields. Hence, the use of the intensity temporal change as a rice classifier proposed previously may not apply. Due to the drainage that occurs during the season, HH, VV and HH/VV are not strongly related to biomass, in contrast with past results. However, HH/VV ratio could be used to derive the rice/non-rice classification algorithm for all conditions of rice fields in the test province. The mapping results using the HH/VV polarization ratio at a single date in the middle period of the rice season were assessed using statistical data at different districts in the province, where very high accuracy was found. The method can be applied to other regions, provided that the synthetic aperture radar data are acquired during the peak period of the rice season, and that few training fields provide adjusted threshold values used in the method.

  6. The NASA/JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yun-Jin; Lou, Yun-Ling; vanZyl, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    The NASA/JPL airborne SAR (AIRSAR) system operates in the fully polarimetric mode at P-, L- and C-band simultaneously or in the interferometric mode in both L- and C-band simultaneously. The system became operational in late 1987 and flew its first mission aboard a DC-8 aircraft operated by NASA's Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Since then, the AIRSAR has flown missions every year and acquired images in North, Central and South America, Europe and Australia. In this paper, we will briefly describe the instrument characteristics, the evolution of the various radar modes, the instrument performance, and improvement in the knowledge of the positioning and attitude information of the radar. In addition, we will summarize the progress of the data processing effort especially in the interferometry processing. Finally, we will address the issue of processing and calibrating the cross-track interferometry (XTI) data.

  7. Phase unwrapping through fringe-line detection in synthetic aperture radar interferometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Q; Vesecky, J F; Zebker, H A

    1994-01-10

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar presents a new technology for performing high-resolution topographic mapping. One of the factors critical to mapping accuracy is phase unwrapping. This paper presents a new algorithm that unwraps phase through fringe-line detection. The algorithm is effective in preventing error propagation, it preserves the image resolution, and, in the mean time, it produces negligible local errors. An edge-segment linking approach and a curve-fitting approach are investigated, and their performances are compared. Test results of the algorithm are shown with the actual interferometric SEASAT synthetic aperture radar images over large-relief terrain near Yellowstone National Park with a short baseline, and results are shown over relatively flat terrain in Death Valley of California with a long baseline.

  8. The comparison between the synthetic aperture radar imageries and the surface truth of ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiao, S. V.

    1978-01-01

    Ocean waves measured offshore of Marineland, Florida, by the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) are compared with the surface truth data. The Fourier transform of SAR imageries are taken and the corrections of the wave directions and wave lengths due to the relative velocities between SAR and waves are considered. Favorable comparisons are obtained for the peak frequencies, wave directions, and directional distributions. However, the one-dimensional SAR spectra are quite different from the surface truth wave height spectra.

  9. Information extraction and transmission techniques for spaceborne synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, V. S.; Yurovsky, L.; Watson, E.; Townsend, K.; Gardner, S.; Boberg, D.; Watson, J.; Minden, G. J.; Shanmugan, K. S.

    1984-01-01

    Information extraction and transmission techniques for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery were investigated. Four interrelated problems were addressed. An optimal tonal SAR image classification algorithm was developed and evaluated. A data compression technique was developed for SAR imagery which is simple and provides a 5:1 compression with acceptable image quality. An optimal textural edge detector was developed. Several SAR image enhancement algorithms have been proposed. The effectiveness of each algorithm was compared quantitatively.

  10. Mapping Ocean Surface Topography with a Synthetic-Aperture Interferometry Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2006-01-01

    We propose to apply the technique of synthetic aperture radar interferometry to the measurement of ocean surface topography at spatial resolution approaching 1 km. The measurement will have wide ranging applications in oceanography, hydrology. and marine geophysics. The oceanographic and related societal applications are briefly discussed in the paper. To meet the requirements for oceanographic applications, the instrument must be flown in an orbit with proper sampling of ocean tides.

  11. Synthetic aperture radar images of ocean waves, theories of imaging physics and experimental tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Durden, S. L.; Smith, M. P.; Napolitano, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The physical mechanism for the synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging of ocean waves is investigated through the use of analytical models. The models are tested by comparison with data sets from the SEASAT mission and airborne SAR's. Dominant ocean wavelengths from SAR estimates are biased towards longer wavelengths. The quasispecular scattering mechanism agrees with experimental data. The Doppler shift for ship wakes is that of the mean sea surface.

  12. A Dual-polarized Microstrip Subarray Antenna for an Inflatable L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zawadzki, Mark; Huang, John

    1999-01-01

    Inflatable technology has been identified as a potential solution to the problem of achieving small mass, high packaging efficiency, and reliable deployment for future NASA spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) antennas. Presently, there exists a requirement for a dual-polarized L-band SAR antenna with an aperture size of 10m x 3m, a center frequency of 1.25GHz, a bandwidth of 80MHz, electronic beam scanning, and a mass of less than 100kg. The work presented below is part of the ongoing effort to develop such an inflatable antenna array.

  13. Two antenna, two pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Ana; Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2005-06-28

    A multi-antenna, multi-pass IFSAR mode utilizing data driven alignment of multiple independent passes can combine the scaling accuracy of a two-antenna, one-pass IFSAR mode with the height-noise performance of a one-antenna, two-pass IFSAR mode. A two-antenna, two-pass IFSAR mode can accurately estimate the larger antenna baseline from the data itself and reduce height-noise, allowing for more accurate information about target ground position locations and heights. The two-antenna, two-pass IFSAR mode can use coarser IFSAR data to estimate the larger antenna baseline. Multi-pass IFSAR can be extended to more than two (2) passes, thereby allowing true three-dimensional radar imaging from stand-off aircraft and satellite platforms.

  14. Synthetic Aperture Radar: The NCCS Enables Search and Rescue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    For as long as planes have gone down, dedicated men and women have used ever-improving technologies to aid their search for survivors. Nearly 2,000 general aviation crashes occur each year in U.S.-and many, like the Montana incident, occur without witnesses. On average, every day in the U.S. one airplane is reported missing. The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) organizes search missions for about 100 aircraft each year. Some of these are not found before the searches called off, and are discovered only by chance long after the crash. In some cases, the crash site is never found. NASA Search and Rescue Mission is using NCCS rescues to develop tools for processing radar data that can help these effort

  15. Evaluation Digital Elevation Model Generated by Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makineci, H. B.; Karabörk, H.

    2016-06-01

    Digital elevation model, showing the physical and topographical situation of the earth, is defined a tree-dimensional digital model obtained from the elevation of the surface by using of selected an appropriate interpolation method. DEMs are used in many areas such as management of natural resources, engineering and infrastructure projects, disaster and risk analysis, archaeology, security, aviation, forestry, energy, topographic mapping, landslide and flood analysis, Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Digital elevation models, which are the fundamental components of cartography, is calculated by many methods. Digital elevation models can be obtained terrestrial methods or data obtained by digitization of maps by processing the digital platform in general. Today, Digital elevation model data is generated by the processing of stereo optical satellite images, radar images (radargrammetry, interferometry) and lidar data using remote sensing and photogrammetric techniques with the help of improving technology. One of the fundamental components of remote sensing radar technology is very advanced nowadays. In response to this progress it began to be used more frequently in various fields. Determining the shape of topography and creating digital elevation model comes the beginning topics of these areas. It is aimed in this work , the differences of evaluation of quality between Sentinel-1A SAR image ,which is sent by European Space Agency ESA and Interferometry Wide Swath imaging mode and C band type , and DTED-2 (Digital Terrain Elevation Data) and application between them. The application includes RMS static method for detecting precision of data. Results show us to variance of points make a high decrease from mountain area to plane area.

  16. Estimation of Canopy Water Content in Konza Parry Grasslands Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Measurements During FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; van Zyl, Jacob J.; Asrar, Ghassem

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an algorithm to retrieve the canopy water contents of natural grasslands and pasture from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. The development on this algorithm involves three interrelated steps: (1) calibration of SAR data for ground topographic variations, (2) development and validation of backscatter model for cross-polarized ratio. The polarimetric radar data acquired by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory AIRSAR system during the 1989 First International Satellite land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) used for this study. The SAR data have been calibrated and corrected for the topographical effects by using the digital elevation map of the study area.

  17. Synthetic aperture radar target detection, feature extraction, and image formation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian

    1994-01-01

    This report presents new algorithms for target detection, feature extraction, and image formation with the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology. For target detection, we consider target detection with SAR and coherent subtraction. We also study how the image false alarm rates are related to the target template false alarm rates when target templates are used for target detection. For feature extraction from SAR images, we present a computationally efficient eigenstructure-based 2D-MODE algorithm for two-dimensional frequency estimation. For SAR image formation, we present a robust parametric data model for estimating high resolution range signatures of radar targets and for forming high resolution SAR images.

  18. A parametric study of rate of advance and area coverage rate performance of synthetic aperture radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; William H. Hensley, Jr.; Burns, Bryan L.; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-11-01

    The linear ground distance per unit time and ground area covered per unit time of producing synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, termed rate of advance (ROA) and area coverage rate (ACR), are important metrics for platform and radar performance in surveillance applications. These metrics depend on many parameters of a SAR system such as wavelength, aircraft velocity, resolution, antenna beamwidth, imaging mode, and geometry. Often the effects of these parameters on rate of advance and area coverage rate are non-linear. This report addresses the impact of different parameter spaces as they relate to rate of advance and area coverage rate performance.

  19. X-SAR: The X-band synthetic aperture radar on board the Space Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Marian U.

    1993-05-01

    The X-band synthetic aperture radar (X-SAR) is the German/Italian contribution to the NASA/JPL Shuttle Radar Lab missions as part of the preparation for the Earth Observation System (EOS) program. The Shuttle Radar Lab is a combination of several radars: an L-band (1.2 GHz) and a C-band (5.3 GHz) multipolarization SAR known as SIR-C (Shuttle Imaging Radar); and an X-band (9.6 GHz) vertically polarized SAR which will be operated synchronously over the same target areas to deliver calibrated multifrequency and multipolarization SAR data at multiple incidence angles from space. A joint German/Italian project office at DARA (German Space Agency) is responsible for the management of the X-SAR project. The space hardware has been developed and manufactured under industrial contract by Dornier and Alenia Spazio. Besides supporting all the technical and scientific tasks, DLR, in cooperation with ASI (Agencia Spaziale Italiano) is responsible for mission operation, calibration, and high precision SAR processing. In addition, DLR developed an airborne X-band SAR to support the experimenters with campaigns to prepare for the missions. The main advantage of adding a shorter wavelength (3 cm) radar to the SIR-C radars is the X-band radar's weaker penetration into vegetation and soil and its high sensitivity to surface roughness and associated phenomena. The performance of each of the three radars is comparable with respect to radiometric and geometric resolution.

  20. X-SAR: The X-band synthetic aperture radar on board the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Marian U.

    1993-01-01

    The X-band synthetic aperture radar (X-SAR) is the German/Italian contribution to the NASA/JPL Shuttle Radar Lab missions as part of the preparation for the Earth Observation System (EOS) program. The Shuttle Radar Lab is a combination of several radars: an L-band (1.2 GHz) and a C-band (5.3 GHz) multipolarization SAR known as SIR-C (Shuttle Imaging Radar); and an X-band (9.6 GHz) vertically polarized SAR which will be operated synchronously over the same target areas to deliver calibrated multifrequency and multipolarization SAR data at multiple incidence angles from space. A joint German/Italian project office at DARA (German Space Agency) is responsible for the management of the X-SAR project. The space hardware has been developed and manufactured under industrial contract by Dornier and Alenia Spazio. Besides supporting all the technical and scientific tasks, DLR, in cooperation with ASI (Agencia Spaziale Italiano) is responsible for mission operation, calibration, and high precision SAR processing. In addition, DLR developed an airborne X-band SAR to support the experimenters with campaigns to prepare for the missions. The main advantage of adding a shorter wavelength (3 cm) radar to the SIR-C radars is the X-band radar's weaker penetration into vegetation and soil and its high sensitivity to surface roughness and associated phenomena. The performance of each of the three radars is comparable with respect to radiometric and geometric resolution.

  1. Evaluation of synthetic aperture radar for oil-spill response. Final report, June 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hover, G.L.; Mastin, G.A.; Axline, R.M.; Bradley, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    This report provides a detailed evaluation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) as a potential technology improvement over the Coast Guard's existing side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) for oil-spill surveillance applications. The U.S. Coast Guard Research and Development Center (RD Center), Environmental Safety Branch, sponsored a joint experiment including the U.S. Coast Guard, Sandia National Laboratories, and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hazardous Materials Division. Radar imaging missions were flown on six days over the coastal waters off Santa Barbara, CA, where there are constant natural seeps of oil. Both the Coast Guard SLAR and the Sandia National Laboratories SAR were employed to acquire simultaneous images of oil slicks and other natural sea surface features that impact oil-spill interpretation. Surface truth and other environmental data were also recorded during the experiment. The experiment data were processed at Sandia National Laboratories and delivered to the RD Center on a PC-based computer workstation for analysis by experiment participants. Synthetic aperture radar, Side looking airborne radar, Oil slicks.

  2. Estimates of surface roughness derived from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane L.; Farr, Tom G.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1992-01-01

    Radar remote sensing data provide a unique perspective of the earth's crust and the processes that have influenced its evolution. Physically based models are required, however, to relate the geophysical quantities being measured by the radar sensor to useful geologic information. In this study, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data over the Cima volcanic field in the Mojave Desert of California are quantitatively connected with microtopography through inversion of a radar backscatter model. Changes in surface roughness inferred from the derived microtopography are modeled and found to be consistent with aeolian mantling as surfaces age. Estimated rates of aeolian deposition for the Cima area are compared to the Lunar Crater volcanic field in Nevada. Rates of deposition appear to be higher at Cima volcanic field, most likely because of its proximity to Soda Lake, the main source of the aeolian material.

  3. Remote sensing satellite formation for bistatic synthetic aperture radar observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Errico, Marco; Moccia, Antonio

    2001-12-01

    In recent years the Italian Space Agency has been proceeding to the definition and launch of small missions. In this ambit, the BISSAT mission was proposed and selected along with five other missions for a competitive Phase A study. BISSAT mission concept consists in flying a passive SAR on board a small satellite, which observes the area illuminated by an active SAR, operating on an already existing large platform. Several scientific applications of bistatic measurements can be envisaged: improvement of image classification and pattern recognition, derivation of medium-resolution digital elevation models, velocity measurements, measurements of sea-wave spectra. BISSAT payload is developed on the basis of the X-band SAR of the COSMO/SkyMed mission, while BISSAT bus is based on an upgrade of MITA. Orbit design has been performed, leading to the same orbit parameters apart from the ascending node right ascension (5.24 degree(s) shift) and the time of the passage on the ascending node (1.17s shift). A minimum distance at the passage of the orbit crossing point of about 42 km (5.7s) is computed. To maintain adequate swath overlap along the orbit, attitude maneuver or antenna electronic steering must be envisaged and traded-off taking into account radar performance and cost of hardware upgrade.

  4. Operational Use of Civil Space-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Donald R. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a remote-sensing technology which uses the motion of the aircraft or spacecraft carrying the radar to synthesize an antenna aperture larger than the physical antenna to yield a high-spatial resolution imaging capability. SAR systems can thus obtain high-spatial resolution geophysical measurements of the Earth over wide surface areas, under all-weather, day/night conditions. This report was prepared to document the results of a six-month study by an Ad Hoc Interagency Working Group on the Operational Use of Civil (i.e., non-military) Space-based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). The Assistant Administrator of NOAA for Satellite and Information Services convened this working group and chaired three meetings of the group over a six-month period. This action was taken in response to a request by the Associate Administrator of NASA for Mission to Planet Earth for an assessment of operational applications of SAR to be accomplished in parallel with a separate study requested of the Committee on Earth Studies of the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council on the scientific results of SAR research missions. The representatives of participating agencies are listed following the Preface. There was no formal charter for the working group or long term plans for future meetings. However, the working group may be reconstituted in the future as a coordination body for multiagency use of operational SAR systems.

  5. NASA L-SAR instrument for the NISAR (NASA-ISRO) Synthetic Aperture Radar mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, James P.; Shaffer, Scott; Perkovic-Martin, Dragana

    2016-05-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the United States and the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) have partnered to develop an Earth-orbiting science and applications mission that exploits synthetic aperture radar to map Earth's surface every 12 days or less. To meet demanding coverage, sampling, and accuracy requirements, the system was designed to achieve over 240 km swath at fine resolution, and using full polarimetry where needed. To address the broad range of disciplines and scientific study areas of the mission, a dual-frequency system was conceived, at L-band (24 cm wavelength) and S-band (10 cm wavelength). To achieve these observational characteristics, a reflector-feed system is considered, whereby the feed aperture elements are individually sampled to allow a scan-on-receive ("SweepSAR") capability at both L-band and S-band. The instrument leverages the expanding capabilities of on-board digital processing to enable real-time calibration and digital beamforming. This paper describes the mission characteristics, current status of the L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (L-SAR) portion of the instrument, and the technology development efforts in the United States that are reducing risk on the key radar technologies needed to ensure proper SweepSAR operations.

  6. Complex phase error and motion estimation in synthetic aperture radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumekh, M.; Yang, H.

    1991-06-01

    Attention is given to a SAR wave equation-based system model that accurately represents the interaction of the impinging radar signal with the target to be imaged. The model is used to estimate the complex phase error across the synthesized aperture from the measured corrupted SAR data by combining the two wave equation models governing the collected SAR data at two temporal frequencies of the radar signal. The SAR system model shows that the motion of an object in a static scene results in coupled Doppler shifts in both the temporal frequency domain and the spatial frequency domain of the synthetic aperture. The velocity of the moving object is estimated through these two Doppler shifts. It is shown that once the dynamic target's velocity is known, its reconstruction can be formulated via a squint-mode SAR geometry with parameters that depend upon the dynamic target's velocity.

  7. Application of the interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) correlation file for use in feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simental, Edmundo; Guthrie, Verner

    2002-11-01

    Fine resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) have been widely used for the purpose of creating viable terrain maps. A map is only as good as the information it contains. Therefore, it is a major priority of the mapmakers that the data that goes into the process be as complete and accurate as possible. In this paper, we analyze IFSAR correlation/de-correlation data to help in terrain feature information. The correlation data contains the correlation coefficient between the bottom and top IFSAR radar channels. It is a 32-bit floating-point number. This number is a measure of the absolute complex correlation coefficient between the signals that are received in each channel. The range of these numbers in between zero and unity. Unity indicates 100% correlation and zero indicates no correlation. The correlation is a function of several system parameters including signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), local geometry, and scattering mechanism. These two radar channels are physically close together and signals are inherently highly correlated. Significant difference is found beyond the fourth decimal place. We have concentrated our analysis on small features that are easily detectable in the correlation/de-correlation data and not so easily detectable in the elevation or magnitude data.

  8. Feasibility study of synthetic aperture infrared laser radar techniques for imaging of static and moving objects.

    PubMed

    Yoshikado, S; Aruga, T

    1998-08-20

    Techniques for two types of 10-mum band synthetic aperture infrared laser radar using a hypothetical reference point target (RPT) are presented. One is for imaging static objects with a single two-dimensional scanning aperture. Through the simple manipulation of a reference wave phase, a desired image can be obtained merely by the two-dimensional Fourier transformation of the correlator output between the intermediate frequency signals of the reference and object waves. The other, with a one-dimensional aperture array, is for moving objects that pass across the array direction without attitude change. We performed imaging by using a two-dimensional RPT correlation method. We demonstrate the capability of these methods for imaging and evaluate the necessary conditions for signal-to-noise ratio and random phase errors in signal reception through numerical simulations in terms of feasibility.

  9. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry to Measure Earth's Surface Topography and Its Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürgmann, Roland; Rosen, Paul A.; Fielding, Eric J.

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) from Earth-orbiting spacecraft provides a new tool to map global topography and deformation of the Earth's surface. Radar images taken from slightly different viewing directions allow the construction of digital elevation models of meter-scale accuracy. These data sets aid in the analysis and interpretation of tectonic and volcanic landscapes. If the Earth's surface deformed between two radar image acquisitions, a map of the surface displacement with tens-of-meters resolution and subcentimeter accuracy can be constructed. This review gives a basic overview of InSAR for Earth scientists and presents a selection of geologic applications that demonstrate the unique capabilities of InSAR for mapping the topography and deformation of the Earth.

  10. Signature predictions of surface targets undergoing turning maneuvers in spotlight synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garren, David A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates methodologies for predicting the smear signatures in broadside spotlight synthetic aperture radar imagery collections due to surface targets that are undergoing turning maneuvers. This analysis examines the case of broadside geometry wherein the radar moves with constant speed and heading on a level flight path. This investigation concentrates moving target smear issues that yield some defocus in the range direction, although much smaller in magnitude than the motion induced smearing in the radar cross-range direction. This paper focuses on the case of a target that executes a turning maneuver during the SAR collection interval. The SAR simulations are shown to give excellent agreement between the moving target signatures and the predicted shapes of the central contours.

  11. Origin of storm footprints on the sea seen by synthetic aperture radar.

    PubMed

    Atlas, D

    1994-11-25

    Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar can detect storm footprints on the sea. Coastal weather radar from Cape Hatteras provides evidence that the echo-free hole at the footprint core is the result of wave damping by rain. The increased radar cross section of the sea surrounding the echo-free hole results from the divergence of the precipitation-forced downdraft impacting the sea. The footprint boundary is the gust front; its oriention is aligned with the direction of the winds aloft, which are transported down with the downdraft, and its length implies downdraft impact 1 hour earlier at a quasi-stationary impact spot. The steady, localized nature of the storm remains a mystery.

  12. Feature discrimination and detection probability in synthetic aperture radar imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipes, R. G.; Butman, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    Images obtained using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems can only represent the intensities of resolution cells in the scene of interest probabilistically since radar receiver noise and Rayleigh scattering of the transmitted radiation are always present. Consequently, when features to be identified differ only by their contribution to the mean power of the radar return, discrimination can be treated by detection theory. In this paper, we develop a 'sufficient statistic' for discriminating between competing features and compare it with some suboptimal methods frequently used. Discrimination is measured by probability of detection error and depends on number of samples or 'looks', signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and ratio of mean power returns from the competing features. Our results show discrimination and image quality rapidly saturate with SNR (very small improvement for SNR not less than 10 dB) but continue to improve with increasing number of looks.

  13. Shuttle synthetic aperture radar implementation study, volume 1. [flight instrument and ground data processor system for collecting raw imaged radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlis, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    Results of an implementation study for a synthetic aperture radar for the space shuttle orbiter are described. The overall effort was directed toward the determination of the feasibility and usefulness of a multifrequency, multipolarization imaging radar for the shuttle orbiter. The radar is intended for earth resource monitoring as well as oceanographic and marine studies.

  14. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)—its past, present and future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Rykhus, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Very simply, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) involves the use of two or more synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the same area to extract landscape topography and its deformation patterns. A SAR system transmits electromagnetic waves at a wavelength that can range from a few millimeters to tens of centimeters and therefore can operate during day and night under all-weather conditions. Using SAR processing technique (Curlander and McDonough, 1991), both the intensity and phase of the reflected (or backscattered) radar signal of each ground resolution element (a few meters to tens of meters) can be calculated in the form of a complex-valued SAR image that represents the reflectivity of the ground surface. The amplitude or intensity of the SAR image is determined primarily by terrain slope, surface roughness, and dielectric constants, whereas the phase of the SAR image is determined primarily by the distance between the satellite antenna and the ground targets. InSAR imaging utilizes the interaction of electromagnetic waves, referred to as interference, to measure precise distances between the satellite antenna and ground resolution elements to derive landscape topography and its subtle change in elevation.

  15. Remote sensing of land scenarios with an airborne 94-GHz synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essen, Helmut; Makaruschka, R.; Baars, E. Peter

    1996-06-01

    The scattering process of electromagnetic waves is dominated by the match between wavelength and the geometric dimensions of surface structures. With respect to the microwave radar bands millimeter-waves are better matched to small surface features of terrain. Therefore this frequency band is able to gain additional information on the terrain of interest. For high resolution imaging SAR is the favorite solution also for millimeter-wave frequencies. Compared to more classical radar bands millimeter-waves offer advantages in the SAR processing, because due to the higher primary resolution at a given antenna aperture sources of image distortions such as range migration or depth of focus can be neglected at these frequencies. Moreover the inherently short aperture time for a given resolution improves the relation to the time constant of flight instabilities and makes motion compensation a simple process. A coherent, polarimetric, high range resolution radar, operating at a nominal frequency of 94 GHz, has been installed onboard an aircraft to allow remote sensing measurements in a side looking synthetic aperture approach. The radar-raw-data were registered together with time code and inertial data of the aircraft and later on evaluated by an off-line SAR-processor. The resulting images then had to undergo an automatic recognition process to extract certain complex targets using a knowledge based production system. The paper describes the measurement system and discusses the evaluation procedures with emphasis on the applied SAR algorithm. Examples of radar images at 94 GHz are shown and samples of pattern recognition derived from the SAR images are shown.

  16. Correction of motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Heard, Freddie E.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    2008-06-24

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  17. A digital system to produce imagery from SAR data. [Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes a digital processing algorithm and its associated system design for producing images from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. The proposed system uses the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach to perform the two-dimensional correlation process. The range migration problem, which is often a major obstacle to efficient processing, can be alleviated by approximating the locus of echoes from a point target by several linear segments. SAR data corresponding to each segment is correlated separately, and the results are coherently summed to produce full-resolution images. This processing approach exhibits greatly improved computation efficiency relative to conventional digital processing methods.

  18. Generation of topographic terrain models utilizing synthetic aperture radar and surface level data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Topographical terrain models are generated by digitally delineating the boundary of the region under investigation from the data obtained from an airborne synthetic aperture radar image and surface elevation data concurrently acquired either from an airborne instrument or at ground level. A set of coregistered boundary maps thus generated are then digitally combined in three dimensional space with the acquired surface elevation data by means of image processing software stored in a digital computer. The method is particularly applicable for generating terrain models of flooded regions covered entirely or in part by foliage.

  19. Towards a Semantic Interpretation of Urban Areas with Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hondt, O.; Guillaso, S.; Hellwich, O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a method to detect and reconstruct building parts from tomographic Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) airborne data. Our approach extends recent works in two ways: first, the radiometric information is used to guide the extraction of geometric primitives. Second, building facades and roofs are extracted thanks to geometric classification rules. We demonstrate our method on a 3 image L-Band airborne dataset over the city of Dresden, Germany. Experiments show how our technique allows to use the complementarity between the radiometric image and the tomographic point cloud to extract buildings parts in challenging situations.

  20. Monitoring of the Greenland Ice Sheet using ERS-1 synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert; Fahnestock, Mark; Kwok, Ron

    1993-01-01

    ERS-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery is shown to be suitable for monitoring the climate of the Greenland ice sheet and for measuring changes in its marginal position. Four distinct hydrologic zones are easily recognized. Zone boundaries align closely with elevation. Seasonal changes in at least one of these zones indicate that late Winter is a better time than late Summer for the collection of images intended for long term monitoring. Subtle variations of the backscatter intensity from the highest portions of the ice sheet where melting never occurs are believed to indicate surface topography.

  1. Noise and speckle reduction in synthetic aperture radar imagery by nonparametric Wiener filtering.

    PubMed

    Caprari, R S; Goh, A S; Moffatt, E K

    2000-12-10

    We present a Wiener filter that is especially suitable for speckle and noise reduction in multilook synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. The proposed filter is nonparametric, not being based on parametrized analytical models of signal statistics. Instead, the Wiener-Hopf equation is expressed entirely in terms of observed signal statistics, with no reference to the possibly unobservable pure signal and noise. This Wiener filter is simple in concept and implementation, exactly minimum mean-square error, and directly applicable to signal-dependent and multiplicative noise. We demonstrate the filtering of a genuine two-look SAR image and show how a nonnegatively constrained version of the filter substantially reduces ringing.

  2. A study of image quality for radar image processing. [synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. W.; Kaupp, V. H.; Waite, W. P.; Macdonald, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    Methods developed for image quality metrics are reviewed with focus on basic interpretation or recognition elements including: tone or color; shape; pattern; size; shadow; texture; site; association or context; and resolution. Seven metrics are believed to show promise as a way of characterizing the quality of an image: (1) the dynamic range of intensities in the displayed image; (2) the system signal-to-noise ratio; (3) the system spatial bandwidth or bandpass; (4) the system resolution or acutance; (5) the normalized-mean-square-error as a measure of geometric fidelity; (6) the perceptual mean square error; and (7) the radar threshold quality factor. Selective levels of degradation are being applied to simulated synthetic radar images to test the validity of these metrics.

  3. Reduction and coding of synthetic aperture radar data with Fourier transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilley, David G.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, aboard the Space Radar Laboratory (SRL), the two roles of Fourier Transforms for ocean image synthesis and surface wave analysis have been implemented with a dedicated radar processor to significantly reduce Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) ocean data before transmission to the ground. The object was to archive the SAR image spectrum, rather than the SAR image itself, to reduce data volume and capture the essential descriptors of the surface wave field. SAR signal data are usually sampled and coded in the time domain for transmission to the ground where Fourier Transforms are applied both to individual radar pulses and to long sequences of radar pulses to form two-dimensional images. High resolution images of the ocean often contain no striking features and subtle image modulations by wind generated surface waves are only apparent when large ocean regions are studied, with Fourier transforms, to reveal periodic patterns created by wind stress over the surface wave field. Major ocean currents and atmospheric instability in coastal environments are apparent as large scale modulations of SAR imagery. This paper explores the possibility of computing complex Fourier spectrum codes representing SAR images, transmitting the coded spectra to Earth for data archives and creating scenes of surface wave signatures and air-sea interactions via inverse Fourier transformations with ground station processors.

  4. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar detection and estimation based 3D image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Christian D.; Moses, Randolph L.

    2006-05-01

    This paper explores three-dimensional (3D) interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) image reconstruction when multiple scattering centers and noise are present in a radar resolution cell. We introduce an IFSAR scattering model that accounts for both multiple scattering centers and noise. The problem of 3D image reconstruction is then posed as a multiple hypothesis detection and estimation problem; resolution cells containing a single scattering center are detected and the 3D location of these cells' pixels are estimated; all other pixels are rejected from the image. Detection and estimation statistics are derived using the multiple scattering center IFSAR model. A 3D image reconstruction algorithm using these statistics is then presented, and its performance is evaluated for a 3D reconstruction of a backhoe from noisy IFSAR data.

  5. Optical range-curvature correction for synthetic-aperture radar /SAR/ signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felstead, E. B.

    1980-01-01

    In synthetic-aperture radar (SAR), the radar signal, recorded as an interferogram, exhibits a defect known as range curvature. The two dimensions of the interferogram are coupled and cannot be processed separately, leading to image degradation. Two variations of a method of correcting for range curvature are presented. They both involve the insertion of a cylindrical lens or lenses near the region of the Fourier-transform plane of a standard tilted-plane SAR processor. Variable tilt of the lens(es) controls the amount of correction. In the presence of pointing errors of the SAR antenna, an extra cross-coupling factor is introduced. It is corrected by a simple rotation of the range-curvature corrector.

  6. Real-time optical processor for synthetic aperture radar image formation

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, K.T.; Molley, P.A.; Dickey, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    An acousto-optic processor which forms synthetic aperture radar images in real-time is described. It employs a space and time integrating architecture to perform the required two dimensional matched filtering operation as a sequence of one dimensional processes. The matched filtering in range is performed on each radar return pulse using the acousto-optic device. The azimuthal matched filtering is performed using a fixed reference mask and a charge-coupled device operating in the time delay and integrate mode. This fixed mask architecture has been modified to include a background subtraction capability to reduce the effects of unwanted bias terms on image quality. The effectiveness of this technique will be analyzed for two different time bandwidth product cases. SAR imagery formed using the real-time optical processor is also presented.

  7. Concepts and Technologies for Synthetic Aperture Radar from MEO and Geosynchronous orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, Wendy N.; Madsen, Soren; Moussessian, Alina; Chen, Curtis

    2004-01-01

    The area accessible from a spaceborne imaging radar, e.g. a synthetic aperture radar (SAR), generally increases with the elevation of the satellite while the map coverage rate is a more complicated function of platform velocity and beam agility. The coverage of a low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite is basically given by the fast ground velocity times the relatively narrow swath width. The instantaneously accessible area will be limited to some hundreds of kilometers away from the sub-satellite point. In the other extreme, the sub-satellite point of a SAR in geosynchronous orbit will move relatively slowly, while the area which can be accessed at any given time is very large, reaching thousands of kilometers from the subsatellite point. To effective1y use the accessibility provided by a high vantage point, very large antennas with electronically steered beams are required.

  8. Real-time implementation of frequency-modulated continuous-wave synthetic aperture radar imaging using field programmable gate array.

    PubMed

    Quan, Yinghui; Li, Yachao; Hu, Guibin; Xing, Mengdao

    2015-06-01

    A new miniature linear frequency-modulated continuous-wave radar which mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle is presented. It allows the accomplishment of high resolution synthetic aperture radar imaging in real-time. Only a Kintex-7 field programmable gate array from Xilinx is utilized for whole signal processing of sophisticated radar imaging algorithms. The proposed hardware architecture achieves remarkable improvement in integration, power consumption, volume, and computing performance over its predecessor designs. The realized design is verified by flight campaigns.

  9. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar imaging using ultraNarrowband continuous waveforms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Yazici, Birsen

    2012-08-01

    We consider synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging using ultra-narrowband continuous waveforms (CW). Due to the high Doppler resolution of CW signals, we refer to this imaging modality as Doppler Synthetic Aperture Radar (DSAR). We present a novel model and an image formation method for the bistatic DSAR for arbitrary imaging geometries. Our bistatic DSAR model is formed by correlating the translated version of the received signal with a scaled or frequencyshifted version of the transmitted CW signal over a finite time window. High frequency analysis of the resulting model shows that the correlated signal is the projections of the scene reflectivity onto the bistatic iso-Doppler curves. We next use microlocal techniques to develop a filtered-backprojection (FBP) type image reconstruction method. The FBP inversion results in backprojection of the correlated signal onto the bistatic iso- Doppler curves as opposed to the bistatic iso-range curves, performed in the traditional wideband SAR imaging. We show that our method takes advantage of the velocity, as well as the acceleration of the antennas in certain directions to form a high resolution SAR image. Our bistatic DSAR imaging method is applicable for arbitrary flight trajectories, nonflat topography, and can accommodate system related parameters. We present resolution analysis and extensive numerical experiments to demonstrate the performance of our imaging method.

  10. Change Detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar Images Based on Deep Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Gong, Maoguo; Zhao, Jiaojiao; Liu, Jia; Miao, Qiguang; Jiao, Licheng

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel change detection approach for synthetic aperture radar images based on deep learning. The approach accomplishes the detection of the changed and unchanged areas by designing a deep neural network. The main guideline is to produce a change detection map directly from two images with the trained deep neural network. The method can omit the process of generating a difference image (DI) that shows difference degrees between multitemporal synthetic aperture radar images. Thus, it can avoid the effect of the DI on the change detection results. The learning algorithm for deep architectures includes unsupervised feature learning and supervised fine-tuning to complete classification. The unsupervised feature learning aims at learning the representation of the relationships between the two images. In addition, the supervised fine-tuning aims at learning the concepts of the changed and unchanged pixels. Experiments on real data sets and theoretical analysis indicate the advantages, feasibility, and potential of the proposed method. Moreover, based on the results achieved by various traditional algorithms, respectively, deep learning can further improve the detection performance.

  11. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar imaging using ultraNarrowband continuous waveforms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Yazici, Birsen

    2012-08-01

    We consider synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging using ultra-narrowband continuous waveforms (CW). Due to the high Doppler resolution of CW signals, we refer to this imaging modality as Doppler Synthetic Aperture Radar (DSAR). We present a novel model and an image formation method for the bistatic DSAR for arbitrary imaging geometries. Our bistatic DSAR model is formed by correlating the translated version of the received signal with a scaled or frequencyshifted version of the transmitted CW signal over a finite time window. High frequency analysis of the resulting model shows that the correlated signal is the projections of the scene reflectivity onto the bistatic iso-Doppler curves. We next use microlocal techniques to develop a filtered-backprojection (FBP) type image reconstruction method. The FBP inversion results in backprojection of the correlated signal onto the bistatic iso- Doppler curves as opposed to the bistatic iso-range curves, performed in the traditional wideband SAR imaging. We show that our method takes advantage of the velocity, as well as the acceleration of the antennas in certain directions to form a high resolution SAR image. Our bistatic DSAR imaging method is applicable for arbitrary flight trajectories, nonflat topography, and can accommodate system related parameters. We present resolution analysis and extensive numerical experiments to demonstrate the performance of our imaging method. PMID:22481825

  12. Onboard Data Compression of Synthetic Aperture Radar Data: Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimesh, Matthew A.; Moision, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instruments on spacecraft are capable of producing huge quantities of data. Onboard lossy data compression is commonly used to reduce the burden on the communication link. In this paper an overview is given of various SAR data compression techniques, along with an assessment of how much improvement is possible (and practical) and how to approach the problem of obtaining it. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instruments on spacecraft are capable of acquiring huge quantities of data. As a result, the available downlink rate and onboard storage capacity can be limiting factors in mission design for spacecraft with SAR instruments. This is true both for Earth-orbiting missions and missions to more distant targets such as Venus, Titan, and Europa. (Of course for missions beyond Earth orbit downlink rates are much lower and thus potentially much more limiting.) Typically spacecraft with SAR instruments use some form of data compression in order to reduce the storage size and/or downlink rate necessary to accommodate the SAR data. Our aim here is to give an overview of SAR data compression strategies that have been considered, and to assess the prospects for additional improvements.

  13. Swell dissipation from 10 years of Envisat advanced synthetic aperture radar in wave mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopa, Justin E.; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Husson, Romain; Jiang, Haoyu; Chapron, Bertrand; Collard, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    Swells are found in all oceans and strongly influence the wave climate and air-sea processes. The poorly known swell dissipation is the largest source of error in wave forecasts and hindcasts. We use synthetic aperture radar data to identify swell sources and trajectories, allowing a statistically significant estimation of swell dissipation. We mined the entire Envisat mission 2003-2012 to find suitable storms with swells (13 < T < 18 s) that are observed several times along their propagation. This database of swell events provides a comprehensive view of swell extending previous efforts. The analysis reveals that swell dissipation weakly correlates with the wave steepness, wind speed, orbital wave velocity, and the relative direction of wind and waves. Although several negative dissipation rates are found, there are uncertainties in the synthetic aperture radar-derived swell heights and dissipation rates. An acceptable range of the swell dissipation rate is -0.1 to 6 × 10-7 m-1 with a median of 1 × 10-7 m-1.

  14. Feature-enhanced synthetic aperture radar image formation based on nonquadratic regularization.

    PubMed

    Cetin, M; Karl, W C

    2001-01-01

    We develop a method for the formation of spotlight-mode synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images with enhanced features. The approach is based on a regularized reconstruction of the scattering field which combines a tomographic model of the SAR observation process with prior information regarding the nature of the features of interest. Compared to conventional SAR techniques, the method we propose produces images with increased resolution, reduced sidelobes, reduced speckle and easier-to-segment regions. Our technique effectively deals with the complex-valued, random-phase nature of the underlying SAR reflectivities. An efficient and robust numerical solution is achieved through extensions of half-quadratic regularization methods to the complex-valued SAR problem. We demonstrate the performance of the method on synthetic and real SAR scenes.

  15. Detection of landmines and UXO using advanced synthetic aperture radar technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Eric; Peichl, Markus; Dill, Stephan; Heinzel, Andreas; Bischeltsrieder, Florian

    2016-05-01

    A main problem of effective landmine and UXO decontamination is efficient and reliable detection and localization of suspicious objects in reasonable time. This requirement demands for fast sensors investigating large areas with sufficient spatial resolution and sensitivity. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a suitable tool and is considered as a complementing sensor since nearly two decades. However, most GPRs operate in very close distance to ground in a rather punctual method of operation. In contrast, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is a technique allowing fast and laminar stand-off investigation of an area. TIRAMI-SAR is imaging radar at lower microwaves for fast close-in detection of buried and unburied objects on a larger area. This allows efficient confirmation of a threat by investigating such regions of detection by other sensors. For proper object detection sufficient spatial resolution is required. Hence the SAR principle is applied. SAR for landmine/UXO detection can be applied by side-looking radar moved on safe ground along the area of interest, being typically the un-safe ground. Additionally, reliable detection of buried and unburied objects requires sufficient suppression of background clutter. For that purpose TIRAMI-SAR is using several antennas in multi-static configuration and wave polarization together with advanced SAR processing. The advantages and necessity of a multi-static antenna configuration for this kind of GPR approach is illustrated in the paper.

  16. An algorithm for operational flood mapping from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data using fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulvirenti, L.; Pierdicca, N.; Chini, M.; Guerriero, L.

    2011-02-01

    An algorithm developed to map flooded areas from synthetic aperture radar imagery is presented in this paper. It is conceived to be inserted in the operational flood management system of the Italian Civil Protection and can be used in an almost automatic mode or in an interactive mode, depending on the user's needs. The approach is based on the fuzzy logic that is used to integrate theoretical knowledge about the radar return from inundated areas taken into account by means of three electromagnetic scattering models, with simple hydraulic considerations and contextual information. This integration aims at allowing a user to cope with situations, such as the presence of vegetation in the flooded area, in which inundation mapping from satellite radars represents a difficult task. The algorithm is designed to work with radar data at L, C, and X frequency bands and employs also ancillary data, such as a land cover map and a digital elevation model. The flood mapping procedure is tested on an inundation that occurred in Albania on January 2010 using COSMO-SkyMed very high resolution X-band SAR data.

  17. Footprints of storms on the sea: A view from spaceborne synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, David

    1994-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) on board Seasat observed images of stormlike echoes on the sea in 1978. The core of these images is usually an echo-free hole which is attributed to the damping of the short (30-cm) radar detectable gravity waves by the intense rain in the storm core. Although 'the beating down of waves by rain' is consistent with observations by seafarers and with the first scientific explanation of the phenomenon by Reynolds (1875), neither theory nor experiment has provided definitive support. One experiment appears to provide the key; it shows that the kenetic energy of the rain produces sufficient turbulence in a thin fresh water layer to damp 30-cm waves in 10-20 s, thus producing the echo-free hole. A sequence of positive feedbacks then serves to damp the longer waves. The angular dependence of the sea surface echo cross sections seen by Seasat SAR outside the echo-free hole indicates winds diverging from the downdraft induced by the intense rain core. The wind-generated waves and associated echoes extend out to a sharply defined gust front. The sea surface footprint thus mimics the features of a storm microburst. The variations in surface radar cross section due to a combination of rain and wind effects impacts spaceborne measurements of surface winds by scatterometry and rainfall measurements by radar. Portions of this synthesis remain speculative but serve as hypotheses for further research.

  18. Oil detection in a coastal marsh with polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, Amina; Suzuoki, Yukihiro; Jones, Cathleen E.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's airborne Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) was deployed in June 2010 in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. UAVSAR is a fully polarimetric L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensor for obtaining data at high spatial resolutions. Starting a month prior to the UAVSAR collections, visual observations confirmed oil impacts along shorelines within northeastern Barataria Bay waters in eastern coastal Louisiana. UAVSAR data along several flight lines over Barataria Bay were collected on 23 June 2010, including the repeat flight line for which data were collected in June 2009. Our analysis of calibrated single-look complex data for these flight lines shows that structural damage of shoreline marsh accompanied by oil occurrence manifested as anomalous features not evident in pre-spill data. Freeman-Durden (FD) and Cloude-Pottier (CP) decompositions of the polarimetric data and Wishart classifications seeded with the FD and CP classes also highlighted these nearshore features as a change in dominant scattering mechanism. All decompositions and classifications also identify a class of interior marshes that reproduce the spatially extensive changes in backscatter indicated by the pre- and post-spill comparison of multi-polarization radar backscatter data. FD and CP decompositions reveal that those changes indicate a transform of dominant scatter from primarily surface or volumetric to double or even bounce. Given supportive evidence that oil-polluted waters penetrated into the interior marshes, it is reasonable that these backscatter changes correspond with oil exposure; however, multiple factors prevent unambiguous determination of whether UAVSAR detected oil in interior marshes.

  19. Differential Synthetic Aperture Ladar

    SciTech Connect

    Stappaerts, E A; Scharlemann, E

    2005-02-07

    We report a differential synthetic aperture ladar (DSAL) concept that relaxes platform and laser requirements compared to conventional SAL. Line-of-sight translation/vibration constraints are reduced by several orders of magnitude, while laser frequency stability is typically relaxed by an order of magnitude. The technique is most advantageous for shorter laser wavelengths, ultraviolet to mid-infrared. Analytical and modeling results, including the effect of speckle and atmospheric turbulence, are presented. Synthetic aperture ladars are of growing interest, and several theoretical and experimental papers have been published on the subject. Compared to RF synthetic aperture radar (SAR), platform/ladar motion and transmitter bandwidth constraints are especially demanding at optical wavelengths. For mid-IR and shorter wavelengths, deviations from a linear trajectory along the synthetic aperture length have to be submicron, or their magnitude must be measured to that precision for compensation. The laser coherence time has to be the synthetic aperture transit time, or transmitter phase has to be recorded and a correction applied on detection.

  20. Contribution of multitemporal polarimetric synthetic aperture radar data for monitoring winter wheat and rapeseed crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betbeder, Julie; Fieuzal, Remy; Philippets, Yannick; Ferro-Famil, Laurent; Baup, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the contribution of multitemporal polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data for winter wheat and rapeseed crops parameters [height, leaf area index, and dry biomass (DB)] estimation, during their whole vegetation cycles in comparison to backscattering coefficients and optical data. Angular sensitivities and dynamics of polarimetric indicators were also analyzed following the growth stages of these two common crop types using, in total, 14 radar images (Radarsat-2), 16 optical images (Formosat-2, Spot-4/5), and numerous ground data. The results of this study show the importance of correcting the angular effect on SAR signals especially for copolarized signals and polarimetric indicators associated to single-bounce scattering mechanisms. The analysis of the temporal dynamic of polarimetric indicators has shown their high potential to detect crop growth changes. Moreover, this study shows the high interest of using SAR parameters (backscattering coefficients and polarimetric indicators) for crop parameters estimation during the whole vegetation cycle instead of optical vegetation index. They particularly revealed their high potential for rapeseed height and DB monitoring [i.e., Shannon entropy polarimetry (r2=0.70) and radar vegetation index (r2=0.80), respectively].

  1. Rain effects on the hurricane observations over the ocean by C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guosheng; Li, Xiaofeng; Perrie, William; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    A composite radar scattering model composed of the atmosphere radiative transfer model, and the ocean surface Bragg wave theory is developed to analyze the impact of hurricane rain on the normalized radar-backscatter cross section (NRCS) measured in the VV and cross-polarized C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) channels. The model results are validated against SAR and SFMR measured wind speeds and rain rates for two hurricane cases. The contribution of rain to the NRCS is backscatter from two parts: the atmosphere column and the ocean surface. In the atmosphere, microwave attenuation and the rain-induced volume backscattering are simulated by the model. We find that the impact of raindrops in the atmosphere is almost negligible for the VV polarization, but important for the cross polarization. On the ocean surface, comparisons between our model and other existing models without rain lead to the conclusion that the VV polarization NRCS can be simulated reasonably well without considering the non-Bragg scattering mechanisms. Similar to the wave breaking mechanism, the microwave diffraction on the craters, crowns, and stalks, produced by rain drops, is also negligible for VV polarization. However, the non-Bragg scattering is important for the cross-polarized NRCS simulations. Finally, we performed simulations to understand the VV-polarized NRCS behavior under different wind speeds at various rain rates.

  2. Universal multifractal scaling of synthetic aperture radar images of sea-ice

    SciTech Connect

    Falco, T.; Francis, F.; Lovejoy, S.; Schertzer, D.; Kerman, B.; Drinkwater, M.

    1996-07-01

    Multifrequency, multipolarization imaging radar scattering coefficient data sets, acquired by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) over sea-ice, were studied in order to reveal their scale-invariant properties. Two distinct scenes were acquired at C-band (5.6 cm) and L-band (25 cm) wavelengths for three different linear polarizations (HH, VV, and HV). These sea-ice radar scattering coefficient fields were investigated by applying both Fourier and multifractal analysis techniques. The (multi) scaling of the data is clearly exhibited in both scenes for all three polarizations at L-band and for the HV polarization at C-band. The fields presenting this symmetry were found to be well described by universal multifractals. The corresponding parameters {alpha}, C{sub 1}, and H were determined for all these fields and were found to vary little with only the parameter H (characterizing the degree of nonconservation) displaying some systematic sensitivity to polarization. The values found for the universal multifractal parameters are {alpha} {approx} 1.85 {+-} 0.05, C{sub 1} {approx} 0.0086 {+-} 0.0041, and H {approx} {minus}0.15 {+-} 0.05.

  3. A new look at spotlight mode synthetic aperture radar as tomography: imaging 3-D targets.

    PubMed

    Jakowatz, C V; Thompson, P A

    1995-01-01

    A new 3D tomographic formulation of spotlight mode synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is developed. This extends the pioneering work of Munson et al. (1983), who first formally described SAR in terms of tomography but who made the simplifying assumption that the target scene was 2D. The present authors treat the more general and practical case in which the radar target reflectivities comprise a 3D function. The main goal is to demonstrate that the demodulated radar return data from a spotlight mode collection represent a certain set of samples of the 3D Fourier transform of the target reflectivity function and to do so using a tomographic paradigm instead of traditional range-Doppler analysis. They also show that the tomographic approach is useful in interpreting the reconstructed 2D SAR image corresponding to a 3D scene. Specifically, the well-known SAR phenomenon of layover is easily explained in terms of tomographic projections and is shown to be analogous to the projection effect in conventional optical imaging.

  4. Signal processing techniques for forward imaging using ultrawideband synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lam H.; Ton, Tuan T.; Wong, David C.; Ressler, Marc A.

    2003-09-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), as part of a customer and mission-funded exploratory development program, has been developing a prototype of low-frequency, ultra-wideband (UWB) forward-imaging synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to support the U.S. Army's vision for increased mobility and survivability of unmanned ground vehicle missions. The ability of the UWB radar technology to detect objects under foilage could provide an important obstacle-avoidance capability for robotic vehicles, which could improve the speed and maneuverability of these vehicles and consequently increase the survivability of the U.S. forces. In a recent experiment at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), we exercised the UWB SAR radar in forward-looking mode and collected data to support the investigation. This paper discusses the signal processing algorithms and techniques that we developed and applied to the recent UWB SAR forward-looking data. The algorithms include motion data processing, self-interference signal (SIR) removal, radio frequency interference (RFI) signal removal, forward-looking image formation, and visualization techniques. We present forward-loking SAR imagery and also volumetric imagery of some targets.

  5. General adaptive-neighborhood technique for improving synthetic aperture radar interferometric coherence estimation.

    PubMed

    Vasile, Gabriel; Trouvé, Emmanuel; Ciuc, Mihai; Buzuloiu, Vasile

    2004-08-01

    A new method for filtering the coherence map issued from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometric data is presented. For each pixel of the interferogram, an adaptive neighborhood is determined by a region-growing technique driven by the information provided by the amplitude images. Then pixels in the derived adaptive neighborhood are complex averaged to yield the filtered value of the coherence, after a phase-compensation step is performed. An extension of the algorithm is proposed for polarimetric interferometric SAR images. The proposed method has been applied to both European Remote Sensing (ERS) satellite SAR images and airborne high-resolution polarimetric interferometric SAR images. Both subjective and objective performance analysis, including coherence edge detection, shows that the proposed method provides better results than the standard phase-compensated fixed multilook filter and the Lee adaptive coherence filter.

  6. Adaptive-neighborhood speckle removal in multitemporal synthetic aperture radar images.

    PubMed

    Ciuc, M; Bolon, P; Trouve, E; Buzuloiu, V; Rudant, J P

    2001-11-10

    We present a new method for multitemporal synthetic aperture radar image filtering using three-dimensional (3D) adaptive neighborhoods. The method takes both spatial and temporal information into account to derive the speckle-free value of a pixel. For each pixel individually, a 3D adaptive neighborhood is determined that contains only pixels belonging to the same distribution as the current pixel. Then statistics computed inside the established neighborhood are used to derive the filter output. It is shown that the method provides good results by drastically reducing speckle over homogeneous areas while retaining edges and thin structures. The performances of the proposed method are compared in terms of subjective and objective measures with those given by several classical speckle-filtering methods.

  7. On the importance of path for phase unwrapping in synthetic aperture radar interferometry.

    PubMed

    Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Dixon, Timothy H; Wdowinski, Shimon; Cabral-Cano, Enrique

    2011-07-01

    Phase unwrapping is a key procedure in interferometric synthetic aperture radar studies, translating ambiguous phase observations to topography, and surface deformation estimates. Some unwrapping algorithms are conducted along specific paths based on different selection criteria. In this study, we analyze six unwrapping paths: line scan, maximum coherence, phase derivative variance, phase derivative variance with branch-cut, second-derivative reliability, and the Fisher distance. The latter is a new path algorithm based on Fisher information theory, which combines the phase derivative with the expected variance to get a more robust path, potentially performing better than others in the case of low image quality. In order to compare only the performance of the paths, the same unwrapping function (phase derivative integral) is used. Results indicate that the Fisher distance algorithm gives better results in most cases. PMID:21743520

  8. Parameters estimation of sinusoidal frequency modulation signal with application in synthetic aperture radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Zhaofa; Zhao, Bin; Xu, Liang

    2016-04-01

    A method for estimating the parameters of the sinusoidal frequency modulation (SFM) signal is presented in this paper. Based on the modified discrete sinusoid frequency modulation transform (DSFMT), the SFM signal can be transformed into the DSFMT domain where it is energy-concentrated and then the parameters can be estimated by the global maximum. To search for the location of the global maximum with less computational load, particle swarm optimization is used in this paper. Then the algorithm is used in the synthetic aperture radar imaging with high frequency vibration of the platform, and the focus performance can be improved significantly. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the method proposed in this paper.

  9. Filtering and segmentation of the Cassini synthetic aperture radar images on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratsolis, E.; Bampasidis, G.; Solomonidou, A.; Coustenis, A.; Hirtzig, M.

    2011-10-01

    A filtering technique is applied to obtain the restored synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. One of the major problems hampering the derivation of meaningful texture information from SAR imagery is the speckle noise. It overlays "real" structures and causes gray value variations even in homogeneous parts of the image. Our method, the TSPR (total sum preserving regularization) filter, is based on probabilistic methods and regards an image as a random element drawn from a prespecified set of possible images optimized by a synchronous local iterative method. The despeckle filter can be used as intermediate stage for the extraction of meaningful regions that correspond to structural units in the scene or distinguish objects of interest like lakes, drainage networks, equatorial dunes or impact craters, where different textures appear.

  10. Implementation of a fast time-domain processor for FMCW Synthetic Aperture Radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frioud, Max; Wellig, Peter; Stanko, Stephan; Meier, Erich

    2015-10-01

    For the purpose of getting sensitive information relevant to civil or military security, high-resolution airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provides the possibility to organize missions at short notice regardless of the daylight and of the weather conditions. The use of compact millimeter-wave FMCW SAR systems allows reaching these goals more safely and at lower cost using unmanned lightweight platforms. As a counterpart these platforms are relatively unstable, making the data-processing more difficult. In order to reach optimum focusing quality also in unfavorable flight conditions or for highly non-linear tracks we developed a fast Time-Domain Processor that relies on parallelization using the GPU resources. A production areal processing rate as high as 6 km2/h using 20 cm ground pixel spacing on a single PC station was achieved. The processing quality and efficiency is demonstrated using real data from the MIRANDA35 Ka-band SAR system.

  11. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Indian Space Research Organisation Synthetic Aperture Radar Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawden, G. W.; Rosen, P. A.; Dubayah, R.; Hager, B. H.; Joughin, I. R.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Indian Space Research Organisation are planning a synthetic aperture radar (currently named NISAR) mission for launch in 2020. The mission is a dual L- and S-band polarimetric SAR satellite with a 12-day interferometric orbit and 240 km wide ground swath. The 3-year mission will have a circular sun synchronous orbit (6 am and 6 pm) with a 98° inclination and 747 km altitude that will provide systematic global coverage. Its primary science objectives are to: measure solid Earth surface deformation (earthquakes, volcanic unrest, land subsidence/uplift, landslides); track and understand cryosphere dynamics (glaciers, ice sheets, sea ice, and permafrost); characterize and track changes in vegetation structure and wetlands for understanding ecosystem dynamics and carbon cycle; and support global disaster response. We will describe the current mission concept: the satellite design/capabilities, spacecraft, launch vehicle, and data flow.

  12. Two-target height effects on interferometric synthetic aperture radar coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Charles V., Jr.

    2000-08-01

    Useful products generated from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) complex data include height measurement, coherent change detection, and classification. The IFSAR coherence is a spatial measure of complex correlation between two collects, a product of IFSAR signal processing. A tacit assumption in such IFSAR signal processing is that the terrain height is constant across an averaging box used in the process of correlating the two images. This paper presents simulations of IFSAR coherence if two target with different heights exist in a given correlation cell, a condition in IFSAR collections produced by layover. It also includes airborne IFSAR data confirming the simulation results. The paper concludes by exploring the implications of the results on IFSAR height measurements and classification.

  13. Simulation of synthetic aperture radar 3: Evaluation of prototype digital feature analysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Peter M.; Bell, Herbert H.

    1989-12-01

    This experiment evaluated the suitability of the Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) prototype Level 3c Digital Feature Analysis Data (DFAD) for the simulation of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). The suitability of Prototype Level 3c DFAD was evaluated by comparing simulations generated from samples of Level 3c and from samples of DFAD previously demonstrated to be adequate for SAR simulation; these products, however, were unsuitable for production in the quantities required to meet Air Force needs. B-1B Offensive Systems Officers performed a navigation update task using simulated and actual SAR images. Crosshair placement accuracy, operator confidence in the placement, and ratings of acceptability for use in a Weapon System Trainer were recorded using both simulated and actual SAR images. The results indicated that SAR simulation can be supported as well by Level 3c DFAD as by the other products.

  14. Comparison of synthetic aperture radar and impact-echo imaging for detecting delamination in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Popovics, J. S.; Ham, S.; Ghasr, M. T.; Zoughi, R.

    2014-02-18

    In this paper we evaluate the utility of microwave and mechanical wave nondestructive testing techniques to detect delamination in reinforced concrete bridge deck mock-up samples. The mechanical wave tests comprise air-coupled impact-echo measurements, while the microwave measurements comprise three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar imaging using wideband reflectometery in the frequency range of 1–4 GHz. The results of these investigations are presented in terms of images that are generated from these data. Based on a comparison of the results, we show that the two methods are complementary, in that provide distinct capabilities for defect detection. More specifically, the former approach is unable to detect depth of a delaminated region, while the latter may provide this information. Therefore, the two methods may be used in a complementary fashion (i.e., data fusion) to give more comprehensive information about the 3D location of delamination.

  15. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry by using ultra-narrowband continuous waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazıcı, Birsen; Yanik, H. Cagri

    2014-06-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) uses the phase difference between two SAR images acquired at different positions to infer ground topography. Conventional IFSAR technique is based on wideband transmitted waveforms. As a result, the interferometric phase forms an iso-Doppler surface containing the height information. In this work, we present a novel interferometric SAR technique using ultra-narrowband continuous waveforms to infer ground topography. Due to high Doppler resolution of the transmitted waveforms, we refer to this technique as the Doppler-IFSAR. We form SAR images by backprojecting onto iso-Doppler contours. We present the interferometric phase model for Doppler-IFSAR and outline the relationship between the height and interferometric phase.

  16. Analysis of wideband forward looking synthetic aperture radar for sensing land mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovvali, Narayan; Carin, Lawrence

    2004-08-01

    Signal processing algorithms are considered for the analysis of wideband, forward looking synthetic aperture radar data and for sensing metal and plastic land mines, with principal application to unpaved roads. Simple prescreening algorithms are considered for reduction of the search space required for a subsequent classifier. The classifier employs features based on viewing the target at multiple ranges, with classification implemented via a support vector machine and a relevance vector machine (RVM). Concerning classifier training, we consider cases for which training is performed on both mine and nonmine (clutter) data. In addition, motivated by the fact that the clutter statistics may vary significantly between the training and testing data, we also consider RVM implementation when we only train on mine data.

  17. Preparations to use Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) in sea ice remote sensing in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppäranta, M.; Kuittinen, R.; Kemppainen, H.

    Remote sensing methods are largely used in ice mapping in the Baltic Sea. The next significant step will come true in next decade with satellite Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR); in particular, SAR is weather independent and provides information of ice roughness. As an early phase of a joint Finnish-Swedish research programme BEPERS (Bothnian Experiment in Preparation for ERS-1), a field experiment ``BEPERS Pilot Study'' was carried through in 1987. The French VARAN-S X-band SAR was chartered for this experiment. Four study areas of around 10 × 50 km size were chosen representing different ice types and conditions. Intensive ground and remote sensing observations were made for correct interpretation of the SAR images. Digital analyses of the SAR images showed that the ice cover could be classified into four classes: 1) open water or bare smooth ice, 2) smooth of slightly deformed ice, 3) ridges and 4) leads with brash ice.

  18. Use of Seasat synthetic aperture radar and Landsat multispectral scanner subsystem data for Alaskan glaciology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Ormsby, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Three Seasat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and three Landsat multispectral scanner subsystem (MSS) scenes of three areas of Alaska were analyzed for hydrological information. The areas were: the Dease Inlet in northern Alaska and its oriented or thaw lakes, the Ruth and Tokositna valley glaciers in south central Alaska, and the Malaspina piedmont glacier on Alaska's southern coast. Results for the first area showed that the location and identification of some older remnant lake basins were more easily determined in the registered data using an MSS/SAR overlay than in either SAR or MSS data alone. Separately, both SAR and MSS data were useful for determination of surging glaciers based on their distinctive medial moraines, and Landsat data were useful for locating the glacier firn zone. For the Malaspina Glacier scenes, the SAR data were useful for locating heavily crevassed ice beneath glacial debris, and Landsat provided data concerning the extent of the debris overlying the glacier.

  19. Comparison of real-time acousto-optic SAR (synthetic aperture radar) processor architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, K.T.; Dickey, F.M.; Molley, P.A.

    1987-08-01

    A comparison of real-time acousto-optic processors for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image formation has been performed. These processors take advantage of the high processing speed and large time bandwidth product of acousto-optic devices (AOD's) in combination with the multichannel correlation capability of charge coupled devices (CCD) to form the SAR image in real time. They offer significant size, weight and power consumption advantages compared to conventional optical or digital processors. Architectures utilizing both spatial carriers and subtraction schemes for elimininating the unwanted bias terms have been analyzed. Also, multichannel architectures for complex (quadrature) processing have been addressed. In addition to imaging performance, the impact of these approaches on system complexity, real-time processing speed and required component capabilities are discussed. Results from both our analysis and the experimental implementation of a selected group of these architectures are presented. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Method and apparatus for Delta Kappa synthetic aperture radar measurement of ocean current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) employed for delta k measurement of ocean current from a spacecraft without the need for a narrow beam and long observation times. The SAR signal is compressed to provide image data for different sections of the chirp band width, equivalent to frequencies and a common area for the separate image fields is selected. The image for the selected area at each frequency is deconvolved to obtain the image signals for the different frequencies and the same area. A product of pairs of signals is formed, Fourier transformed and squared. The spectrum thus obtained from different areas for the same pair of frequencies are added to provide an improved signal to noise ratio. The shift of the peak from the center of the spectrum is measured and compared to the expected shift due to the phase velocity of the Bragg scattering wave. Any difference is a measure of current velocity v sub o (delta k).

  1. Mesoscale Near-Surface Wind Speed Variability Mapping with Synthetic Aperture Radar

    PubMed Central

    Young, George; Sikora, Todd; Winstead, Nathaniel

    2008-01-01

    Operationally-significant wind speed variability is often observed within synthetic aperture radar-derived wind speed (SDWS) images of the sea surface. This paper is meant as a first step towards automated distinguishing of meteorological phenomena responsible for such variability. In doing so, the research presented in this paper tests feature extraction and pixel aggregation techniques focused on mesoscale variability of SDWS. A sample of twenty eight SDWS images possessing varying degrees of near-surface wind speed variability were selected to serve as case studies. Gaussian high- and low-pass, local entropy, and local standard deviation filters performed well for the feature extraction portion of the research while principle component analysis of the filtered data performed well for the pixel aggregation. The findings suggest recommendations for future research.

  2. On the importance of path for phase unwrapping in synthetic aperture radar interferometry.

    PubMed

    Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Dixon, Timothy H; Wdowinski, Shimon; Cabral-Cano, Enrique

    2011-07-01

    Phase unwrapping is a key procedure in interferometric synthetic aperture radar studies, translating ambiguous phase observations to topography, and surface deformation estimates. Some unwrapping algorithms are conducted along specific paths based on different selection criteria. In this study, we analyze six unwrapping paths: line scan, maximum coherence, phase derivative variance, phase derivative variance with branch-cut, second-derivative reliability, and the Fisher distance. The latter is a new path algorithm based on Fisher information theory, which combines the phase derivative with the expected variance to get a more robust path, potentially performing better than others in the case of low image quality. In order to compare only the performance of the paths, the same unwrapping function (phase derivative integral) is used. Results indicate that the Fisher distance algorithm gives better results in most cases.

  3. Sea ice type maps from Alaska synthetic aperture radar facility imagery: An assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterer, Florence M.; Gineris, Denise; Kwok, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery received at the Alaskan SAR Facility is routinely and automatically classified on the Geophysical Processor System (GPS) to create ice type maps. We evaluated the wintertime performance of the GPS classification algorithm by comparing ice type percentages from supervised classification with percentages from the algorithm. The root mean square (RMS) difference for multiyear ice is about 6%, while the inconsistency in supervised classification is about 3%. The algorithm separates first-year from multiyear ice well, although it sometimes fails to correctly classify new ice and open water owing to the wide distribution of backscatter for these classes. Our results imply a high degree of accuracy and consistency in the growing archive of multiyear and first-year ice distribution maps. These results have implications for heat and mass balance studies which are furthered by the ability to accurately characterize ice type distributions over a large part of the Arctic.

  4. On the soil roughness parameterization problem in soil moisture retrieval of bare surfaces from Synthetic Aperture Radar 1959

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthetic Aperture Radar has shown its large potential for retrieving soil moisture maps at regional scales. However, since the backscattered signal is determined by several surface characteristics, the retrieval of soil moisture is an ill-posed problem when using single configuration imagery. Unles...

  5. Operational Mapping of Soil Moisture Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Data: Application to the Touch Basin (France)

    PubMed Central

    Baghdadi, Nicolas; Aubert, Maelle; Cerdan, Olivier; Franchistéguy, Laurent; Viel, Christian; Martin, Eric; Zribi, Mehrez; Desprats, Jean François

    2007-01-01

    Soil moisture is a key parameter in different environmental applications, such as hydrology and natural risk assessment. In this paper, surface soil moisture mapping was carried out over a basin in France using satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired in 2006 and 2007 by C-band (5.3 GHz) sensors. The comparison between soil moisture estimated from SAR data and in situ measurements shows good agreement, with a mapping accuracy better than 3%. This result shows that the monitoring of soil moisture from SAR images is possible in operational phase. Moreover, moistures simulated by the operational Météo-France ISBA soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer model in the SIM-Safran-ISBA-Modcou chain were compared to radar moisture estimates to validate its pertinence. The difference between ISBA simulations and radar estimates fluctuates between 0.4 and 10% (RMSE). The comparison between ISBA and gravimetric measurements of the 12 March 2007 shows a RMSE of about 6%. Generally, these results are very encouraging. Results show also that the soil moisture estimated from SAR images is not correlated with the textural units defined in the European Soil Geographical Database (SGDBE) at 1:1000000 scale. However, dependence was observed between texture maps and ISBA moisture. This dependence is induced by the use of the texture map as an input parameter in the ISBA model. Even if this parameter is very important for soil moisture estimations, radar results shown that the textural map scale at 1:1000000 is not appropriate to differentiate moistures zones.

  6. Polarimetric analysis of radar backscatter from ground-based scatterometers and wheat biomass monitoring with advanced synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lei; Tong, Ling; Li, Yuxia; Chen, Yan; Tan, Longfei; Guo, Caizheng

    2016-04-01

    This article presents an analysis of the scattering measurements for an entire wheat growth cycle by ground-based scatterometers at a frequency of 5.3 GHz. Since wheat ears are related to wheat growth and yield, the radar backscatter of wheat was analyzed at two different periods, i.e., with and without wheat ears. Simultaneously, parameters such as wheat and soil characteristics as well as volume scattering and soil scattering were analyzed for the two periods during the entire growth cycle. Wheat ears have been demonstrated to have a great influence on radar backscatter; therefore, a modified version of water-cloud model used for retrieving biomass should consider the effect of wheat ears. This work presents two retrieval models based on the water-cloud model and adopts the advanced integral equation model to simulate the soil backscatter before the heading stage and the backscatter from the layer under wheat ears after the heading stage. The research results showed that the biomass retrieved from the advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) images to agree well with the data measured in situ after setting the modified water-cloud model for the growth stages with ears. Furthermore, it was concluded that wheat ears should form an essential component of theoretical modeling as they influence the final yield.

  7. Polarimetric analysis of radar backscatter from ground-based scatterometers and wheat biomass monitoring with advanced synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lei; Tong, Ling; Li, Yuxia; Chen, Yan; Tan, Longfei; Guo, Caizheng

    2016-04-01

    This article presents an analysis of the scattering measurements for an entire wheat growth cycle by ground-based scatterometers at a frequency of 5.3 GHz. Since wheat ears are related to wheat growth and yield, the radar backscatter of wheat was analyzed at two different periods, i.e., with and without wheat ears. Simultaneously, parameters such as wheat and soil characteristics as well as volume scattering and soil scattering were analyzed for the two periods during the entire growth cycle. Wheat ears have been demonstrated to have a great influence on radar backscatter; therefore, a modified version of water-cloud model used for retrieving biomass should consider the effect of wheat ears. This work presents two retrieval models based on the water-cloud model and adopts the advanced integral equation model to simulate the soil backscatter before the heading stage and the backscatter from the layer under wheat ears after the heading stage. The research results showed that the biomass retrieved from the advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) images to agree well with the data measured in situ after setting the modified water-cloud model for the growth stages with ears. Furthermore, it was concluded that wheat ears should form an essential component of theoretical modeling as they influence the final yield.

  8. On the convergence of the phase gradient autofocus algorithm for synthetic aperture radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging is a class of coherent range and Doppler signal processing techniques applied to remote sensing. The aperture is synthesized by recording and processing coherent signals at known positions along the flight path. Demands for greater image resolution put an extreme burden on requirements for inertial measurement units that are used to maintain accurate pulse-to-pulse position information. The recently developed Phase Gradient Autofocus algorithm relieves this burden by taking a data-driven digital signal processing approach to estimating the range-invariant phase aberrations due to either uncompensated motions of the SAR platform or to atmospheric turbulence. Although the performance of this four-step algorithm has been demonstrated, its convergence has not been modeled mathematically. A new sensitivity study of algorithm performance is a necessary step towards this model. Insights that are significant to the application of this algorithm to both SAR and to other coherent imaging applications are developed. New details on algorithm implementation identify an easily avoided biased phase estimate. A new algorithm for defining support of the point spread function is proposed, which promises to reduce the number of iterations required even for rural scenes with low signal-to-clutter ratios.

  9. A High Resolution, Light-Weight, Synthetic Aperture Radar for UAV Application

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.; Hensley, W.H.; Stence, J.; Tsunoda, S.I. Pace, F.; Walker, B,C.; Woodring, M.

    1999-05-27

    (U) Sandia National Laboratories in collaboration with General Atomics (GA) has designed and built a high resolution, light-weight, Ku-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) known as "Lynx". Although Lynx can be operated on a wide variety of manned and unmanned platforms, its design is optimized for use on medium altitude Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVS). In particular, it can be operated on the Predator, I-GNAT, and Prowler II platforms manufactured by GA. (U) The radar production weight is less than 120 lb and operates within a 3 GHz band from 15.2 GHz to 18.2 GHz with a peak output power of 320 W. Operating range is resolution and mode dependent but can exceed 45 km in adverse weather (4 mm/hr rain). Lynx has operator selectable resolution and is capable of 0.1 m resolution in spotlight mode and 0.3 m resolution in stripmap mode, over substantial depression angles (5 to 60 deg) and squint angles (broadside ±45 deg). Real-time Motion Compensation is implemented to allow high-quality image formation even during vehicle turns and other maneuvers.

  10. Analyses of Multi-Year Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery of Dry-Fallen Intertidal Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade, M.; Melchionna, S.; Kemme, L.

    2015-04-01

    We analyzed a great deal of high-resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of dry-fallen intertidal flats in the German Wadden Sea with respect to the imaging of sediments, macrophytes, and mussels. TerraSAR-X and Radarsat-2 images of five test areas along the German North Sea coast acquired between 2008 and 2013 form the basis for the present investigation and are used to demonstrate that pairs of SAR images, if combined through basic algebraic operations, can already provide useful indicators for morphological changes and for bivalve (oyster and mussel) beds. Depending on the type of sediment, but also on the water level and on environmental conditions (wind speed) exposed sediments may show up on SAR imagery as areas of enhanced, or reduced, radar backscattering. The (multi-temporal) analysis of series of such images allows for the detection of mussel beds, and our results show evidence that also single-acquisition, multi-polarization SAR imagery can be used for that purpose.

  11. Applying the Hough transform for detecting ground movers in synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.; Linnehan, R.; Doerry, A.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the impact of ground target motion in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and video SAR mode imagery. The observations provide an approach for optimizing algorithms that detect moving targets by using only the magnitude of a SAR image. A slowly moving target at a constant velocity in the along-track direction or accelerating in the cross-track direction often generates a ridge of intensity that is distinguishable from the background clutter. The direction and location of a detected ridge provide information about the motion of the associated target. The ridge can be approximated as a linear feature and detected using the Hough transform. This approach acts as a complement to detecting the radar shadow of a moving target, improving detection probability. The method is robust enough to discriminate between a ridge associated with a moving target and false alarms due to vegetation, boulders, or stationary manmade objects. Simulated and flight test data collected by General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI) validate the method.

  12. Low-frequency ultrawideband synthetic aperture radar: frequency subbanding for targets obscured by the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Happ, Lynn; Le, Francis; Ressler, Marc A.; Kappra, Karl A.

    1996-06-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has been investigating the potential of ultra-wideband synthetic aperture radar (UWB SAR) technology to detect and classify targets concealed by subsurface targets and foliage. Our investigative approach is to collect high-quality precision data to support phenomenological investigations of electromagnetic wave propagation through dielectric media. These investigations, in turn, support the development of algorithms for automatic target recognition. In order to achieve these goals, ARL designed and built an impulse (very short pulse) radar to collect data at a variety of test sites to measure and analyze the responses from targets, clutter, and targets embedded in clutter. The UWB BoomSAR, mounted on a 150-foot-high mobile boom lift, collects the high-quality, precision data sets needed for understanding UWB SAR system requirements and foliage penetration and ground penetration phenomenology. The BoomSAR operates with over 1 gigahertz of bandwidth covering a spectrum from 40 MHz to 1 GHz and is fully polarimetric. This bandwidth contains low frequencies needed for ground penetration while also maintaining higher frequency coverage for high resolution imagery. This paper shows a GPEN target area from data collected at Yuma Proving Grounds, AZ in low- and high- frequency subbands.

  13. Nonlinear techniques in optical synthetic aperture radar image generation and target recognition.

    PubMed

    Weaver, S; Wagner, K

    1995-07-10

    One of the most successful optical signal-processing applications to date has been the use of optical processors to convert synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data into images of the radar reflectivity of the ground. We have demonstrated real-time input to a high-space-bandwidth optical SAR imagegeneration system by using a dynamic organic holographic recording medium and SAR phase-history data. Real-time speckle reduction in optically processed SAR imagery has been accomplished by the use of multilook averaging to achieve nonlinear modulus-squared accumulation of subaperture images. We designed and assembled an all-optical system that accomplished real-time target recognition in SAR imagery. This system employed a simple square-law nonlinearity in the form of an optically addressed spatial light modulator at the SAR image plane to remove the effects of speckle phase profiles returned from complex SAR targets. The detection stage enabled the creation of an optical SAR automatic target recognition system as a nonlinear cascade of an optical SAR image generator and an optical correlator.

  14. A method for retrieving the directional ocean wave spectra from synthetic aperture radar image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lin; Yang, Jingsong; Chen, Peng

    2012-09-01

    Directional ocean wave spectra can describe the energy distribution of ocean wave and play an important role in oceanography. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can measure wave spectra based on a nonlinear mapping model between the image spectra (or cross spectra) and wave spectra. Due to the complexity of variable estimation and wave number cut off in azimuth direction in the mapping process, some scientists have been endeavoring to improve the retrieval of wave spectra. The paper proposes a method for the retrieval, which don't depend on any external information except wind direction. It separates into two parts. In part 1, the spectra for real image or the cross spectra for complex image are calculated. And the modulation transfer function (MTF) is estimated including real aperture radar (RAR) MTF and velocity bunching. Then the wave spectra are retrieved by direct dividing based on the quasi-linear relation. The 180° ambiguity is removed from the imaginary part of cross spectra or the wind direction. The significant wave height (Hs), peak wave wavelength (L) and peak wave direction (D) are extracted from the retrieval. If the angle between the D and the azimuth direction is higher than 45°, the retrieval is finished. If the angle is lower than 45°, we go on retrieving. In part 2, the first guess spectra are needed to compensate the lost wave information, which can be parametrically constructed based on the retrieved wave spectra in part 1. Finally the wave spectra are iteratively retrieved from the first guess spectra based on the nonlinear relation. The Envisat ASAR images are used to validate the method. In case 1, the RMSE between this method and SARTool on D, L, Hs is 7.6°, 19.7 m, 0.18 m respectively. In case 2, the RMSE between this method and Jason-1 on Hs is 0.5 m.

  15. SAR-EDU - An education initiative for applied Synthetic Aperture Radar remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Robert; Richter, Nicole; Auer, Stefan; Eineder, Michael; Roth, Achim; Hajnsek, Irena; Walter, Diana; Braun, Matthias; Motagh, Mahdi; Pathe, Carsten; Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Thiel, Christian; Schmullius, Christiane

    2013-04-01

    Since the 1970s, radar remote sensing techniques have evolved rapidly and are increasingly employed in all fields of earth sciences. Applications are manifold and still expanding due to the continuous development of new instruments and missions as well as the availability of very high-quality data. The trend worldwide is towards operational employment of the various algorithms and methods that have been developed. However, the utilization of operational services does not keep up yet with the rate of technical developments and the improvements in sensor technology. With the enhancing availability and variety of space borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data and a growing number of analysis algorithms the need for a vital user community is increasing. Therefore the German Aerospace Center (DLR) together with the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena (FSU) and the Technical University Munich (TUM) launched the education initiative SAR-EDU. The aim of the project is to facilitate access to expert knowledge in the scientific field of radar remote sensing. Within this effort a web portal will be created to provide seminar material on SAR basics, methods and applications to support both, lecturers and students. The overall intension of the project SAR-EDU is to provide seminar material for higher education in radar remote sensing covering the topic holistically from the very basics to the most advanced methods and applications that are available. The principles of processing and interpreting SAR data are going to be taught using test data sets and open-source as well as commercial software packages. The material that is provided by SAR-EDU will be accessible at no charge from a DLR web portal. The educational tool will have a modular structure, consisting of separate modules that broach the issue of a particular topic. The aim of the implementation of SAR-EDU as application-oriented radar remote sensing educational tool is to advocate the development and wider use of

  16. Extending interferometric synthetic aperture radar measurements from one to two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechor, Noah

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), a very effective technique for measuring crustal deformation, provides measurements in only one dimension, along the radar line of sight. Imaging radar measurements from satellite-based systems are sensitive to both vertical and across-track displacements, but insensitive to along-track displacement. Multiple observations can resolve the first two components, but the along-track component remains elusive. The best existing method to obtain the along-track displacement involves pixel-level azimuth cross-correlation. The measurements are quite coarse (typically 15 cm precision), and they require large computation times. In contrast, across-track and vertical InSAR measurements can reach centimeter-level precision and are readily derived. We present a new method to extract along-track displacements from InSAR data. The new method, multiple aperture InSAR (MAI), is based on split-beam processing of InSAR data to create forward- and backward-looking interferograms. The phase difference between the two modified interferograms provides the along-track displacement component. Thus, from each conventional InSAR pair we extract two components of the displacement vector: one along the line of sight, the other in the along-track direction. Multiple MAI observations, either at two look angles or from the ascending and descending radar passes, then yield the three-dimensional displacement field. We analyze precision of our method by comparing our solution to GPS and offset-derived along-track displacements from interferograms of the M7.1 1999, Hector Mine earthquake. The RMS error between GPS displacements and our results ranges from 5 to 8.8cm. Our method is consistent with along-track displacements derived by pixel-offsets, themselves limited to 12-15cm precision. The theoretical MAI precision depends on SNR and coherence. For SNR=100 the expected precision is 3, 11cm for coherence of 0.8, 0.4, respectively. Finally, we

  17. Atmospheric Phenomena Observed Over The South China Sea By The Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Onboard the ENVISAT Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpers, Werner; Huang, Weigen; Chan, Pak Wai; Wong, Wai Kin; Cheng, Cho Ming; Mouche, Alexis

    2010-10-01

    Atmospheric phenomena often leave fingerprints on the sea surface, which are detectable by synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Here we present some representative examples of SAR images acquired by the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) onboard the Envisat satellite over the South China Sea (SCS) which show radar signatures of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) and of coastal wind fields. On SAR images of the SCS also often radar signatures of oceanic internal waves (OIWs) are visible which have similar spatial scales as the ones originating from AGWs. Therefore we first present criteria how to distinguish between them by analyzing the structure of the radar signatures. Then we present two examples of ASAR images which show radar signatures of AGWs over the SCS. Furthermore, we present a SAR image showing radar signatures of a northerly Winter Monsoon surge event over the coastal area south of Hong Kong and compare it with a cloud image and a weather radar image. From the ASAR image we retrieve the near-surface wind field and compare it with the wind field simulated by the AIR model of the Hong Kong Observatory. The comparison shows that the AIR model can simulate quite well the wind speed as well as the position and shape of the frontal line measured by ASAR.

  18. Application of equalization notch to improve synthetic aperture radar coherent data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musgrove, Cameron; West, James C.

    2015-05-01

    Interference and interference mitigation techniques degrade synthetic aperture radar (SAR) coherent data products. Radars utilizing stretch processing present a unique challenge for many mitigation techniques because the interference signal itself is modified through stretch processing from its original signal characteristics. Many sources of interference, including constant tones, are only present within the fast-time sample data for a limited number of samples, depending on the radar and interference bandwidth. Adaptive filtering algorithms to estimate and remove the interference signal that rely upon assuming stationary interference signal characteristics can be ineffective. An effective mitigation method, called notching, forces the value of the data samples containing interference to zero. However, as the number of data samples set to zero increases, image distortion and loss of resolution degrade both the image product and any second order image products. Techniques to repair image distortions,1 are effective for point-like targets. However, these techniques are not designed to model and repair distortions in SAR image terrain. Good terrain coherence is important for SAR second order image products because terrain occupies the majority of many scenes. For the case of coherent change detection it is the terrain coherence itself that determines the quality of the change detection image. This paper proposes an unique equalization technique that improves coherence over existing notching techniques. First, the proposed algorithm limits mitigation to only the samples containing interference, unlike adaptive filtering algorithms, so the remaining samples are not modified. Additionally, the mitigation adapts to changing interference power such that the resulting correction equalizes the power across the data samples. The result is reduced distortion and improved coherence for the terrain. SAR data demonstrates improved coherence from the proposed equalization

  19. Single pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar spacecraft formations for planetary exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rego, Paul J.

    The dissertation investigates formations of a space based exploration system consisting of an interplanetary capable spacecraft and two smaller deployable spacecraft. Spacecraft formations are optimized for single pass spot-light interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) imaging during planetary flybys. Two major system models are developed; (1) relative spacecraft motion, and (2) pixel height measurement variance. A generalized nonlinear relative motion model is developed. Assumptions of circular orbit and/or equal gravity gradient are applied to the nonlinear model and shown to yield relative motion equations commonly found in the spacecraft formation flying literature. An analysis shows that the generalized trajectory model with an equal gravity gradient assumption provides sufficient accuracy for a single pass IFSAR flyby. A pixel height variance model is developed to address issues unique to single pass multiple baseline space based systems. A bistatic IFSAR system is assumed with the radar transmitter aboard the leader spacecraft and radar receivers aboard all three spacecraft. Modeled noises include internal sensor noise, spatial decorrelation noise, non-parallel ground track (grid rotation) decorrelation noise, and system parameter uncertainties. With expected observation ranges in excess of 500 kilometers, large baselines are required to maximize IFSAR height sensitivity. An analysis of optimal correlation is presented that extends the work of Rodriguez & Martin (1992) to include model uncertainties. Analysis also considers the ability of post processing algorithms to unwrap the modulo-2pi phase difference measurements, an issue of particular concern for large baseline IFSAR systems. This issue is addressed through development of maximum baseline constraints computed from post processing algorithm performance specifications. Four IFSAR formation scenarios are investigated. Each mimics the planned flyby of the Kilauea volcano by the Air Force Tech

  20. Validation of cresis synthetic aperture radar processor and optimal processing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Logan Sanders

    Sounding the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica is a vital component in determining the effect of global warming on sea level rise. Of particular importance are measurements of the bedrock topography of the outlet glaciers that transport ice from the ice sheet's interior to the margin where it calves into icebergs, contributing to sea level rise. These outlet glaciers are difficult to sound due to crevassing caused by the relatively fast movement of the ice in the glacial channel and higher signal attenuation caused by warmer ice. The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) uses multi-channel airborne radars which employ methods for achieving better resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to better sound outlet glaciers. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) techniques are used in the along-track dimension, pulse compression in the range dimension, and an antenna array in the cross-track dimension. CReSIS has developed the CReSIS SAR processor (CSARP) to effectively and efficiently process the data collected by these radars in each dimension. To validate the performance of this processor a SAR simulator was developed with the functionality to test the implementation of the processing algorithms in CSARP. In addition to the implementation of this simulator for validation of processing the data in the along-track, cross-track and range dimensions, there are a number of data-dependent processing steps that can affect the quality of the final data product. CSARP was tested with an ideal simulated point target in white Gaussian noise. The SNR change achieved by range compression, azimuth compression, array combination with and without matched filtering, and lever arm application were all within .2 dB of the theoretical expectation. Channel equalization, when paired with noise-based matched filtering, provided 1-2 dB of gain on average but significantly less than the expected gain. Extending the SAR aperture length to sound bedrock will improve the along

  1. Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Doppler anomalies due to volcanic eruption induced phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Michele, Marcello; Raucoules, Daniel; Minet, Christian

    2015-04-01

    In the frame of the EU funded "MEDSUV" supersite project, we use multiple SAR data to investigate Doppler anomalies in the SAR signal occurring during volcanic eruptions. In Synthetic Aperture Radar, variations in the Electro Magnetic Waves travel time results in a change in the Doppler frequency that adds up to the one that is naturally generated by the relative motion between the platform and the ground targets. Within the SAR system, frequencies modulations control the image focusing along the two fundamental SAR directions, the azimuth (i.e. the platform motion direction) and the range (i. e. the sensor looking direction). During the synthetic aperture process (the so called image focusing) a target on the surface is seen along different paths. In standard focusing processing it is assumed both that ground targets are stationary and that between the sensor and the target the medium is the vacuum or a totally homogeneous medium. Therefore, if there is a significant path delay variation along the paths to a specific target this can result either in image defocusing or in pixel misregistration or both. It has been shown that SAR Doppler history anomalies can occur over volcanic areas. The goal of this study is to highlight Doppler history anomalies occurring during the SAR image formation over active volcanoes on a number of test cases. To do so, we apply a sub-aperture cross correlation algorithm on Single Look Complex data. Practically, we measure any pixel misregistration between two sub-looks of the same SAR acquisition. If a pixel shift occurs, it means that the expected radar wave path has been lengthened (or shortened) during the time when ground surface scatterers were illuminated by the sensor radiation either by a ground feature velocity (e. g. water flows, vehicles) or it is refracted by a strong medium discontinuity in the air (volcanic ash plume?). If a Doppler history anomaly is detected by the sub-aperture cross correlation, we try to explore

  2. Monitoring Changes in Aboveground Biomass in Loblolly Pine Forests Using Multichannel Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasischke, Eric Stewart

    A study was conducted to evaluate using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for estimating aboveground biomass in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forests. The data set for this experiment was a multiple-frequency (C-, L- and P-band), polarimetric SAR data set collected by the NASA/JPL AIRSAR System over the Duke University Research Forest located near Durham, North Carolina. In addition to the SAR data set, a set of ground measurements were collected to describe the tree geometry and biomass characteristics from 59 different stands consisting principally of loblolly pine within the Duke Forest. The aboveground, dry weight woody biomass in these test stands ranges from < 1 to >50 kg-m^2. The first analysis performed on this data set was to produce algorithms to estimate both dry and wet weight biomasses for each of the test stands, and to distribute this biomass amongst various tree components (e.g., boles, branches, and needles/leaves) as well as the different layers within the tree canopy (e.g., canopy, subcanopy and understory) in order to better relate biomass to the radar backscattering measurements. This was accomplished by development of allometric equations to estimate biomass for individual trees, from which stand estimates on an aerial basis were derived. The biomass estimates were then statistically correlated with radar backscatter (sigma ^circ) measurements derived from the SAR data set. It was found that sigma^ circ at a variety of radar frequencies (P, L, and C-bands) and linear-polarization combinations (HH, HV, and VV) were significantly correlated (at a level of significance of p = 0.001) to either individual biomass components (e.g., bole biomass, branch biomass, needle/leaf biomass, etc.) or multiple combinations of these components. While the correlations were significant at all linear polarizations at L- and P-bands, they were only significant in the cross -polarized channel at C-band. Finally, a two-step method was developed to estimate aboveground

  3. An Autonomous Cryobot Synthetic Aperture Radar for Subsurface Exploration of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, O.; Gasiewski, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present the design and field testing of a forward-looking end-fire synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for the 'Very deep Autonomous Laser-powered Kilowatt-class Yo-yoing Robotic Ice Explorer' (VALKYRIE) ice-penetrating cryobot. This design demonstrates critical technologies that will support an eventual landing and ice penetrating mission to Jupiter's icy moon, Europa. Results proving the feasibility of an end-fire SAR system for vehicle guidance and obstacle avoidance in a sub-surface ice environment will be presented. Data collected by the SAR will also be used for constructing sub-surface images of the glacier which can be used for: (i) mapping of englacial features such as crevasses, moulins, and embedded liquid water and (ii) ice-depth and glacier bed analysis to construct digital elevation models (DEM) that can help in the selection of crybot trajectories and future drill sites for extracting long-term climate records. The project consists of three parts, (i) design of an array of four conformal cavity-backed log-periodic folded slot dipole array (LPFSA) antennas that form agile radiating elements, (ii) design of a radar system that includes RF signal generation, 4x4 transmit-receive antenna switching and isolation and digital SAR data processing and (iii) field testing of the SAR in melt holes. The antennas have been designed, fabricated, and lab tested at the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) at CU-Boulder. The radar system was also designed and integrated at CET utilizing rugged RF components and FPGA based digital processing. Field testing was performed in conjunction with VALKYRIE tests by Stone Aerospace in June, 2015 on Matanuska Glacier, Alaska. The antennas are designed to operate inside ice while being immersed in a thin layer of surrounding low-conductivity melt water. Small holes in the corners of the cavities allow flooding of these cavities with the same melt-water thus allowing for quarter-wavelength cavity-backed reflection. Testing of

  4. Estimating snow water equivalent (SWE) using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, Elias J.

    Since the early 1990s, radar interferometry and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) have been used extensively to measure changes in the Earth's surface. Previous research has presented theory for estimating snow properties, including potential for snow water equivalent (SWE) retrieval, using InSAR. The motivation behind using remote sensing to estimate SWE is to provide a more complete, continuous set of "observations" to assist in water management operations, climate change studies, and flood hazard forecasting. The research presented here primarily investigates the feasibility of using the InSAR technique at two different wavelengths (C-Band and L-Band) for SWE retrieval of dry snow within the Kuparuk watershed, North Slope, Alaska. Estimating snow distribution around meteorological towers on the coastal plain using a three-day repeat orbit of C-Band InSAR data was successful (Chapter 2). A longer wavelength L-band SAR is evaluated for SWE retrievals (Chapter 3) showing the ability to resolve larger snow accumulation events over a longer period of time. Comparisons of InSAR estimates and late spring manual sampling of SWE show a R2 = 0.61 when a coherence threshold is used to eliminate noisy SAR data. Qualitative comparisons with a high resolution digital elevation model (DEM) highlight areas of scour on windward slopes and areas of deposition on leeward slopes. When compared to a mid-winter transect of manually sampled snow depths, the InSAR SWE estimates yield a RMSE of 2.21cm when a bulk snow density is used and corrections for bracketing the satellite acquisition timing is performed. In an effort to validate the interaction of radar waves with a snowpack, the importance of the "dry snow" assumption for the estimation of SWE using InSAR is tested with an experiment in Little Cottonwood Canyon, Alta, Utah (Chapter 5). Snow wetness is shown to have a significant effect on the velocity of propagation within the snowpack. Despite the radar

  5. Indoor experimental facility for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configurations - rail-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirose, Getachew; Phelan, Brian R.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Koenig, Francois; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing an indoor experimental facility to evaluate and assess airborne synthetic-aperture-radar-(SAR)-based detection capabilities. The rail-SAR is located in a multi-use facility that also provides a base for research and development in the area of autonomous robotic navigation. Radar explosive hazard detection is one key sensordevelopment area to be investigated at this indoor facility. In particular, the mostly wooden, multi-story building houses a two (2) story housing structure and an open area built over a large sandbox. The housing structure includes reconfigurable indoor walls which enable the realization of multiple See-Through-The-Wall (STTW) scenarios. The open sandbox, on the other hand, allows for surface and buried explosive hazard scenarios. The indoor facility is not rated for true explosive hazard materials so all targets will need to be inert and contain surrogate explosive fills. In this paper we discuss the current system status and describe data collection exercises conducted using canonical targets and frequencies that may be of interest to designers of ultra-wideband (UWB) airborne, ground penetrating SAR systems. A bi-static antenna configuration will be used to investigate the effects of varying airborne SAR parameters such as depression angle, bandwidth, and integration angle, for various target types and deployment scenarios. Canonical targets data were used to evaluate overall facility capabilities and limitations. These data is analyzed and summarized for future evaluations. Finally, processing techniques for dealing with RF multi-path and RFI due to operating inside the indoor facility are described in detail. Discussion of this facility and its capabilities and limitations will provide the explosive hazard community with a great airborne platform asset for sensor to target assessment.

  6. Exploiting synthetic aperture radar imagery for retrieving vibration signatures of concealed machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Francisco; Campbell, Justin B.; Jaramillo, Monica; Dunkel, Ralf; Atwood, Thomas; Doerry, Armin; Gerstle, Walter H.; Santhanam, Balu; Hayat, Majeed M.

    2016-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that the instantaneous acceleration associated with vibrating objects that are directly imaged by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be estimated through the application of the discrete fractional Fourier transform (DFrFT) using the information contained in the complex SAR image. In general, vibration signatures may include, for example, the number of chirped sinusoids as well as their respective base frequencies and chirp rates. By further processing the DFrFT-processed data for clutter-noise rejection by means of pseudo- subspace methods, has been shown that the SAR-vibrometry method can be reliable as long as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) of the slow-time SAR signal at the range-line of interest exceeds 15dB. Meanwhile, the Nyquist theorem dictates that the maximum measurable vibration frequency is limited by half of the pulse-repetition frequency. This paper focuses on the detection and estimation of vibrations generated by machinery concealed within buildings and other structures. This is a challenging task in general because the vibration signatures of the source are typically altered by their housing structure; moreover, the SNR at the surface of the housing structure tends to be reduced. Here, experimental results for three different vibrating targets, including one concealed target, are reported using complex SAR images acquired by the General Atomics Lynx radar at resolutions of 1-ft and 4-in. The concealed vibrating target is actuated by a gear motor with an off-balance weight attached to it, which is enclosed by a wooden housing. The vibrations of the motor are transmitted to a chimney that extends above the housing structure. Using the SAR vibrometry approach, it is shown that it is possible to distinguish among the three vibrating objects based upon their vibration signatures.

  7. Surface movements of emplaced lava flows measured by synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, N. F.; Wadge, G.; Williams, C. A.; Morley, J. G.; Muller, J.-P.; Murray, J. B.; Upton, M.

    2001-06-01

    Lava flows continue to move after they have been emplaced by flow mechanisms. This movement is largely vertical and can be detected using differential synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry. There are three main components to this motion: (1) movement of surface scatterers, resulting in radar phase decorrelation, (2) measurable subsidence of the flow surface due to thermal contraction and clast repacking, and (3) time-dependent depression of the flow substrate. These effects act in proportion to the thickness of the lava flow and decay with time, although there is a time lag before the third component becomes significant. We explore these effects using SAR data from the ERS satellites over the Etna volcano, Sicily. Phase decorrelation on young, thick a'a lava flows persists for a few years and probably results from surface block rotations during flow contraction. Maximum measured subsidence rates of the 1991-1993 lava flow over a period of 70 days are about 0.7 mm day-1, but are potentially greater in areas of data decorrelation. These rates fall to <2.7 × 10-2 mm day-1 after about 20 years in flows about 50 m thick, sooner for thinner flows. Comparison with measured subsidence rates on Kilauean lava lakes suggests that thermal contraction only accounts for about one third of the observed subsidence. The remaining motion is thought to come from surface clast repacking during cooling and from creep mechanisms in the flow substrate. Measurements of postemplacement surface movement provide new constraints on the thermomechanical properties of lava flows and have cautionary implications for the interpretation of interferometric SAR data of volcanoes.

  8. Spatial Estimation of Soil Moisture Using Synthetic Aperture Radar in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meade, N. G.; Hinzman, L. D.; Kane, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    A spatially distributed Model of Arctic Thermal and Hydrologic processes (MATH) has been developed. One of the attributes of this model is the spatial and temporal prediction of soil moisture in the active layer. The spatially distributed output from this model required verification data obtained through remote sensing to assess performance at the watershed scale independently. Therefore, a neural network was trained to predict soil moisture contents near the ground surface. The input to train the neural network is synthetic aperture radar (SAR) pixel value, and field measurements of soil moisture, and vegetation, which were used as a surrogate for surface roughness. Once the network was trained, soil moisture predictions were made based on SAR pixel value and vegetation. These results were then used for comparison with results from the hydrologic model. The quality of neural network input was less than anticipated. Our digital elevation model (DEM) was not of high enough resolution to allow exact co-registration with soil moisture measurements; therefore, the statistical correlations were not as good as hoped. However, the spatial pattern of the SAR derived soil moisture contents compares favorably with the hydrologic MATH model results. Primary surface parameters that effect SAR include topography, surface roughness, vegetation cover and soil texture. Single parameters that are considered to influence SAR include incident angle of the radar, polarization of the radiation, signal strength and returning signal integration, to name a few. These factors influence the reflectance, but if one adequately quantifies the influences of terrain and roughness, it is considered possible to extract information on soil moisture from SAR imagery analysis and in turn use SAR imagery to validate hydrologic models

  9. Elastic rebound following the Kocaeli earthquake, Turkey, recorded using synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayer, Larry; Lu, Zhong

    2001-01-01

    A basic model incorporating satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry of the fault rupture zone that formed during the Kocaeli earthquake of August 17, 1999, documents the elastic rebound that resulted from the concomitant elastic strain release along the North Anatolian fault. For pure strike-slip faults, the elastic rebound function derived from SAR interferometry is directly invertible from the distribution of elastic strain on the fault at criticality, just before the critical shear stress was exceeded and the fault ruptured. The Kocaeli earthquake, which was accompanied by as much as ∼5 m of surface displacement, distributed strain ∼110 km around the fault prior to faulting, although most of it was concentrated in a narrower and asymmetric 10-km-wide zone on either side of the fault. The use of SAR interferometry to document the distribution of elastic strain at the critical condition for faulting is clearly a valuable tool, both for scientific investigation and for the effective management of earthquake hazard.

  10. Unsupervised polarimetric synthetic aperture radar image classification based on sketch map and adaptive Markov random field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junfei; Li, Lingling; Liu, Fang; Jiao, Licheng; Liu, Hongying; Yang, Shuyuan; Liu, Lu; Hao, Hongxia

    2016-04-01

    Markov random field (MRF) model is an effective tool for polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) image classification. However, due to the lack of suitable contextual information in conventional MRF methods, there is usually a contradiction between edge preservation and region homogeneity in the classification result. To preserve edge details and obtain homogeneous regions simultaneously, an adaptive MRF framework is proposed based on a polarimetric sketch map. The polarimetric sketch map can provide the edge positions and edge directions in detail, which can guide the selection of neighborhood structures. Specifically, the polarimetric sketch map is extracted to partition a PolSAR image into structural and nonstructural parts, and then adaptive neighborhoods are learned for two parts. For structural areas, geometric weighted neighborhood structures are constructed to preserve image details. For nonstructural areas, the maximum homogeneous regions are obtained to improve the region homogeneity. Experiments are taken on both the simulated and real PolSAR data, and the experimental results illustrate that the proposed method can obtain better performance on both region homogeneity and edge preservation than the state-of-the-art methods.

  11. Agricultural crop harvest progress monitoring by fully polarimetric synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Zhao, Chunjiang; Yang, Guijun; Li, Zengyuan; Chen, Erxue; Yuan, Lin; Yang, Xiaodong; Xu, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic mapping and monitoring of crop harvest on a large spatial scale will provide critical information for the formulation of optimal harvesting strategies. This study evaluates the feasibility of C-band polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) for monitoring the harvesting progress of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) fields. Five multitemporal, quad-pol Radarsat-2 images and one optical ZY-1 02C image were acquired over a farmland area in China during the 2013 growing season. Typical polarimetric signatures were obtained relying on polarimetric decomposition methods. Temporal evolutions of these signatures of harvested fields were compared with the ones of unharvested fields in the context of the entire growing cycle. Significant sensitivity was observed between the specific polarimetric parameters and the harvest status of oilseed rape fields. Based on this sensitivity, a new method that integrates two polarimetric features was devised to detect the harvest status of oilseed rape fields using a single image. The validation results are encouraging even for the harvested fields covered with high residues. This research demonstrates the capability of PolSAR remote sensing in crop harvest monitoring, which is a step toward more complex applications of PolSAR data in precision agriculture.

  12. A new method for speckle reduction in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images using optimal window size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, S.; Salehi, B.; Moloney, C.; Huang, W.; Brisco, B.

    2016-04-01

    Speckle degrades the radiometric quality of a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image and makes its visual interpretation difficult. The approaches proposed previously for speckle filtering of SAR images exploit a window of fixed size for this purpose. But a fixed size window is not sufficient as the size of objects may vary throughout the image. In this paper, a method is introduced by which each pixel in the image is filtered using a window size which is optimal for that pixel. Real and imaginary parts of a single-channel SAR image are used for the selection of the best window size for each pixel, and then intensity image is filtered by applying that window size. The Average and Minimum Mean Square Error (MMSE) filters are modified using the Adaptive Window Size method. This approach is implemented on the HH-channel of a RADARSAT-2 image acquired over the Avalon Peninsula near St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada. This filter can supress speckle effectively while retaining the details reasonably.

  13. A neural network for enhancing boundaries and surfaces in synthetic aperture radar images.

    PubMed

    Mingolla, Ennio; Ross, William; Grossberg, Stephen

    1999-04-01

    A neural network system for boundary segmentation and surface representation, inspired by a new local-circuit model of visual processing in the cerebral cortex, is used to enhance images of range data gathered by a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor. Boundary segmentation is accomplished by an improved Boundary Contour System (BCS) model which completes coherent boundaries that retain their sensitivity to image contrasts and locations. A Feature Contour System (FCS) model compensates for local contrast variations and uses the compensated signals to diffusively fill-in surface regions within the BCS boundaries. Image noise pixels that are not supported by BCS boundaries are hereby eliminated. More generally, BCS/FCS processing normalizes input dynamic range, reduces noise, and enhances contrasts between surface regions. BCS/FCS processing hereby makes structures such as motor vehicles, roads, and buildings more salient to human observers than in original imagery. The new BCS model improves image enhancement with significant reductions in processing time and complexity over previous BCS applications. The new system also outperforms several established techniques for image enhancement.

  14. Removal of systematic seasonal atmospheric signal from interferometric synthetic aperture radar ground deformation time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, Sergey V.; Trishchenko, Alexander P.; Tiampo, Kristy; González, Pablo J.; Zhang, Yu; Fernández, José

    2014-09-01

    Applying the Multidimensional Small Baseline Subset interferometric synthetic aperture radar algorithm to about 1500 Envisat and RADARSAT-2 interferograms spanning 2003-2013, we computed time series of ground deformation over Naples Bay Area in Italy. Two active volcanoes, Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei, are located in this area in close proximity to the densely populated city of Naples. For the first time, and with remarkable clarity, we observed decade-long elevation-dependent seasonal oscillations of the vertical displacement component with a peak-to-peak amplitude of up to 3.0 cm, substantially larger than the long-term deformation rate (<0.6 cm/yr). Analysis, utilizing surface weather and radiosonde data, linked observed oscillations with seasonal fluctuations of water vapor, air pressure, and temperature in the lower troposphere. The modeled correction is in a good agreement with observed results. The mean, absolute, and RMS differences are 0.014 cm, 0.073 cm, and 0.087 cm, respectively. Atmospherically corrected time series confirmed continuing subsidence at Vesuvius previously observed by geodetic techniques.

  15. A despeckle filter for the Cassini synthetic aperture radar images of Titan's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Bampasidis, Georgios; Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena

    2012-02-01

    Cassini synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, reveal surface features with shapes ranging from quasi-circular to more complex ones, interpreted as liquid hydrocarbon deposits assembled in the form of lakes or seas. One of the major problems hampering the derivation of meaningful texture information from SAR imagery is the speckle noise. It overlays real structures and causes gray value variations even in homogeneous parts of the image. We propose a filtering technique which can be applied to obtain restored SAR images. Our technique is based on probabilistic methods and regards an image as a random element drawn from a prespecified set of possible images. The despeckle filter can be used as an intermediate step for the extraction of regions of interest, corresponding to structured units in a given area or distinct objects of interest, such as lake-like features on Titan. This tool can therefore be used, among other, to study seasonal surficial changes of Titan's polar regions. In this study we also present a segmentation technique that allows us to separate the lakes from the local background.

  16. Land subsidence detection using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in Sidoarjo Mudflow area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulyta, Sendy Ayu; Taufik, Muhammad; Hayati, Noorlaila

    2016-05-01

    According to BPLS (Badan Penanggulangan Lumpur Sidoarjo) which is the Sidoarjo Mudflow Management Agency, land subsidence occurred in Porong, Sidoarjo was caused by the rocks bearing capacity decreasing which led by the mud outpouring since 2006. The subsidence varies in many ways depends on the radius of location from the mud flow center point and the geological structure. One of the most efficient technologies to monitor this multi temporal phenomenon is using the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) as an applicative Spatial Geodesy. This study used 4 (four) times series L-Band ALOS PALSAR from 2008 to 2011 Fine Beam Single data (February 2008, January 2009 and February 2010 and January 2011) which then processed by the Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) method to obtain the deformation vector at a radius of 1.5 km from the center of mudflow. The result showed that there was a significant subsidence which annually occurred on southern and western area of Sidoarjo mud flow. The deformation vector that occurred in the year 2008-2011 was up to 20 cm/year or 0.05 cm/day. For verification purpose, we also compared the result obtained from the SAR detection with the data measured by Global Position System (GPS) and some deformation monitoring results obtained from another researchs. The comparison showed a correlation that the subsidence occurred on the same location.

  17. Reducing scalloping in synthetic aperture radar images using a composite image transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landmark, Knut; Solberg, Anne H. S.

    2015-10-01

    In burst mode SAR imaging, echo intensity depends on the target's azimuth position in the antenna pattern. As a result, an amplitude modulation known as scalloping may appear, particularly in ScanSAR images of ocean areas. A denoising method, recently developed for multibeam bathymetry, can be used to reduce residual scalloping in ScanSAR images. The algorithm is analogous to a band-stop filter in the frequency domain. Here, the transform is the composition of an edge detection operator and a discrete Radon transform (DRT). The edge operator accentuates fine-scale intensity changes; the DRT focuses linear features, as each DRT component is the sum of pixel intensities along a linear graph. A descalloping filter is implemented in the DRT domain by suppressing the range direction. The restored image is obtained by applying the inverse composite transform. First, a rapidly converging iterative pseudo-inverse DRT is computed. The edge operator is a spatial filter based on a discrete approximation of the Laplace operator, but modified to make the operator invertible. The method was tested on ocean scene ScanSAR images from the Envisat Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar. The scalloping effect was significantly reduced, with no apparent distortion or smoothing of physical features.

  18. Synthetic Aperture Radar (sar) Based Classifiers for Land Applications in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, G.; Gehrke, R.; Wiatr, T.; Hovenbitzer, M.

    2016-06-01

    Land cover information is essential for urban planning and for land cover change monitoring. This paper presents an overview of the work conducted at the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG) with respect to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) based land cover classification. Two land cover classification approaches using SAR images are reported in this paper. The first method involves a rule-based classification using only SAR backscatter intensity while the other method involves supervised classification of a polarimetric composite of the same SAR image. The LBM-DE has been used for training and validation of the SAR classification results. Images acquired from the Sentinel-1a satellite are used for classification and the results have been reported and discussed. The availability of Sentinel-1a images that are weather and daylight independent allows for the creation of a land cover classification system that can be updated and validated periodically, and hence, be used to assist other land cover classification systems that use optical data. With the availability of Sentinel-2 data, land cover classification combining Sentinel-1a and Sentinel-2 images present a path for the future.

  19. Transient volcano deformation sources imaged with interferometric synthetic aperture radar: Application to Seguam Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterlark, Timothy; Lu, Zhong

    2004-01-01

    Thirty interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images, spanning various intervals during 1992–2000, document coeruptive and posteruptive deformation of the 1992–1993 eruption on Seguam Island, Alaska. A procedure that combines standard damped least squares inverse methods and collective surfaces, identifies three dominant amorphous clusters of deformation point sources. Predictions generated from these three point source clusters account for both the spatial and temporal complexity of the deformation patterns of the InSAR data. Regularized time series of source strength attribute a distinctive transient behavior to each of the three source clusters. A model that combines magma influx, thermoelastic relaxation, poroelastic effects, and petrologic data accounts for the transient, interrelated behavior of the source clusters and the observed deformation. Basaltic magma pulses, which flow into a storage chamber residing in the lower crust, drive this deformational system. A portion of a magma pulse is injected into the upper crust and remains in storage during both coeruption and posteruption intervals. This injected magma degasses and the volatile products accumulate in a shallow poroelastic storage chamber. During the eruption, another portion of the magma pulse is transported directly to the surface via a conduit roughly centered beneath Pyre Peak on the west side of the island. A small amount of this magma remains in storage during the eruption, and posteruption thermoelastic contraction ensues. This model, made possible by the excellent spatial and temporal coverage of the InSAR data, reveals a relatively simple system of interrelated predictable processes driven by magma dynamics.

  20. Seasonal subsidence and rebound in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, observed by synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffmann, J.; Zebker, H.A.; Galloway, D.L.; Amelung, F.

    2001-01-01

    Analyses of areal variations in the subsidence and rebound occurring over stressed aquifer systems, in conjunction with measurements of the hydraulic head fluctuations causing these displacements, can yield valuable information about the compressibility and storage properties of the aquifer system. Historically, stress-strain relationships have been derived from paired extensometer/piezometer installations, which provide only point source data. Because of the general unavailability of spatially detailed deformation data, areal stress-strain relations and their variability are not commonly considered in constraining conceptual and numerical models of aquifer systems. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques can map ground displacements at a spatial scale of tens of meters over 100 km wide swaths. InSAR has been used previously to characterize larger magnitude, generally permanent aquifer system compaction and land subsidence at yearly and longer timescales, caused by sustained drawdown of ground-water levels that produces intergranular stresses consistently greater than the maximum historical stress. We present InSAR measurements of the typically small-magnitude, generally recoverable deformations of the Las Vegas Valley aquifer system occurring at seasonal timescales. From these we derive estimates of the elastic storage coefficient for the aquifer system at several locations in Las Vegas Valley. These high-resolution measurements offer great potential for future investigations into the mechanics of aquifer systems and the spatial heterogeneity of aquifer system structure and material properties as well as for monitoring ongoing aquifer system compaction and land subsidence.

  1. Synthetic aperture radar imagery of airports and surrounding areas: Philadelphia Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Robert G.; Gineris, Denise J.

    1990-01-01

    The statistical description of ground clutter at an airport and in the surrounding area is addressed. These data are being utilized in a program to detect microbursts. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data were collected at the Philadelphia Airport. These data and the results of the clutter study are described. This 13 km x 10 km scene was imaged at 9.38 GHz and HH-polarization and contained airport grounds and facilities (6 percent), industrial (14 percent), residential (14 percent), fields (10 percent), forest (8 percent), and water (33 percent). Incidence angles ranged from 40 to 84 deg. Even at the smallest incidence angles, the distributed targets such as forest, fields, water, and residential rarely had mean scattering coefficients greater than -10 dB. Eighty-seven percent of the image had scattering coefficients less than -17.5 dB. About 1 percent of the scattering coefficients exceeded 0 dB, with about 0.1 percent above 10 dB. Sources which produced the largest cross sections were largely confined to the airport grounds and areas highly industrialized. The largest cross sections were produced by observing broadside large buildings surrounded by smooth surfaces.

  2. Poyang Lake wetland vegetation biomass inversion using polarimetric RADARSAT-2 synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Guozhuang; Liao, Jingjuan; Guo, Huadong; Liu, Ju

    2015-01-01

    Poyang Lake is the largest freshwater lake in China and one of the most important wetlands in the world. Vegetation, an important component of wetland ecosystems, is one of the main sources of the carbon in the atmosphere. Biomass can quantify the contribution of wetland vegetation to carbon sinks and carbon sources. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR), which can operate in all day and weather conditions and penetrate vegetation to some extent, can be used to retrieve information about vegetation structure and the aboveground biomass. In this study, RADARSAT-2 polarimetric SAR data were used to retrieve aboveground vegetation biomass in the Poyang Lake wetland. Based on the canopy backscatter model, the vegetation backscatter characteristics in the C-band were studied, and a good relation between simulated backscatter and backscatter in the RADARSAT-2 imagery was achieved. Using the backscatter model, pairs of training data were built and used to train the back propagation artificial neural network. The biomass was retrieved using this ANN and compared with the field survey results. The root-mean-square error in the biomass estimation was 45.57 g/m2. This shows that the combination of the model and polarimetric decomposition components can efficiently improve the inversion precision.

  3. Detection of Built-Up Areas Using Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar Data and Hyperspectral Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordbari, R.; Maghsoudi, Y.; Salehi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (POLSAR) is an advantageous data for information extraction about objects and structures by using the wave scattering and polarization properties. Hyperspectral remote sensing exploits the fact that all materials reflect, absorb, and emit electromagnetic energy, at specific wavelengths, in distinctive patterns related to their molecular composition. As a result of their fine spectral resolution, Hyperspectral image (HIS) sensors provide a significant amount of information about the physical and chemical composition of the materials occupying the pixel surface. In target detection applications, the main objective is to search the pixels of an HSI data cube for the presence of a specific material (target). In this research, a hierarchical constrained energy minimization (hCEM) method using 5 different adjusting parameters has been used for target detection from hyperspectral data. Furthermore, to detect the built-up areas from POLSAR data, building objects discriminated from surrounding natural media presented on the scene using Freeman polarimetric target decomposition (PTD) and the correlation coefficient between co-pol and cross-pol channels. Also, target detection method has been implemented based on the different polarization basis for using the more information. Finally a majority voting method has been used for fusing the target maps. The polarimetric image C-band SAR data acquired by Radarsat-2, over San Francisco Bay area was used for the evaluation of the proposed method.

  4. MMW target and clutter characterization using the range instrumentation synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Jerry A.; Barr, Douglas

    2010-04-01

    The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (AMRDEC) and Redstone Test Center (RTC) at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama have developed a Ka band, range instrumentation synthetic aperture radar (RISAR) for the purpose of millimeter wave (MMW) target and scene characterization. RISAR was developed as one element of the Advanced Multi-Spectral Sensor and Subsystem Test Capabilities (AMSSTC) program funded and managed by the U.S. Army Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentation (PEO STRI), Project Manager for Instrumentation, Targets and Threat Simulators (PM ITTS). The key objective of RISAR is the collection of MMW SAR data that can be used to develop high resolution target and terrain models for use in digital and real-time hardwarein- the-loop simulations. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of RISAR development and implementation. Example results of funded data collections will be presented with an emphasis on the system's 3D target modeling capabilities for ground targets, and wake characterization capabilities for littoral targets.

  5. Improved superpixel-based polarimetric synthetic aperture radar image classification integrating color features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yanxiao; Zhang, Yi; Li, Ning; Wang, Robert; Hu, Guixiang

    2016-04-01

    Various polarimetric features including scattering matrix, covariance matrix, polarimetric decomposition results, and textural or spatial information have already been used for polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) image classification. However, color features are rarely involved. We propose an improved superpixel-based PolSAR image classification integrating color features. First, we extract the color information using polarimetric decomposition. Second, by combining the color and spatial information of pixels, modified simple linear iterative clustering is used to generate small regions called superpixels. Then we apply Wishart distance to the superpixels to classify them into different classes. This method is demonstrated using the L-band Flevoland PolSAR data from AirSAR and Oberpfaffenhofen PolSAR data from ESAR. The results show that this method works well for areas with homogeneous terrains like farms in terms of both classification accuracy and computational efficiency. Furthermore, the success of the proposed method signifies that more color features can be discovered in the future research works.

  6. Registration of multitemporal low-resolution synthetic aperture radar images based on a new similarity measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Weilong; Song, Jianshe; Zhang, Xiongmei; Cai, Xingfu

    2016-01-01

    Image registration is concerned with the precise overlap of two images. One challenging problem in this area is the registration of low-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. In general, extracting feature points from such images is difficult due to the coarse observation and the severe speckle. The use of area similarity for image registration is another important branch to solve the problem. A similarity measure based on a conditional density function (cdf) is proposed. The cdf is specially tailored for SAR images, where the speckle is generally assumed as multiplicative gamma noise with unit mean. Additionally, a two-step procedure is devised for the registration of intro-model SAR images to improve the computational efficiency. First, the two images are roughly aligned considering only the translational difference. Then small blocks from the two images are accurately aligned and the center point of each block is treated as a control point, which is finally used to obtain the precise affine transformation between the two images. Five SAR image datasets are tested in the experiment part, and the results demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method.

  7. In-situ data collection for oil palm tree height determination using synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, C.; Loong, C. K.

    2016-04-01

    The oil palm is recognized as the “golden crop,” producing the highest oil yield among oil seed crops. Malaysia, the world's second largest producer of palm oil, has 16 per cent of its territory planted with oil palms. To cope with the increasing global demand on edible oil, additional areas of oil palm are forecast to increase globally by 12 to 19 million hectares by 2050. Due to the limited land bank in Malaysia, new strategies have to be developed to avoid unauthorized clearing of primary forest for the use of oil palm cultivation. Microwave remote sensing could play a part by providing relevant, timely and accurate information for a plantation monitoring system. The use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has the advantage of daylight- and weather-independence, a criterion that is very relevant in constantly cloud-covered tropical regions, such as Malaysia. Using interferometric SAR, (InSAR) topographical and tree height profiles of oil palm plantations can be created; such information is useful for mapping oil palm age profiles of the plantations in the country. This paper reports on the use of SAR and InSAR in a multisensory context to provide up-to-date information at plantation level. Remote sensing and in-situ data collection for tree height determination are described. Further research to be carried out over the next two years is outlined.

  8. Reach scale floodplain inundation dynamics observed using airborne synthetic aperture radar imagery: Data analysis and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Paul D.; Wilson, Matthew D.; Horritt, Matthew S.; Mason, David C.; Holden, Nick; Currie, Anthony

    2006-08-01

    SummaryIn this paper, we use an airborne synthetic aperture radar to map river flood inundation synoptically at fine spatial resolution (1.2 m) along a ˜16 km reach of the River Severn, west-central England. Images were obtained at four times through a large flood event between 8th and 17th November 2000 and processed using a statistical active contour algorithm to yield the flood shoreline at each time. Intersection of these data with a high vertical accuracy survey of floodplain topography obtained from airborne laser altimetry permitted the calculation of dynamic changes in inundated area, total reach storage and rates of reach dewatering. In addition, comparison of the data to gauged flow rates, the measured floodplain topography and map data giving the location of embankments and drainage channels on the floodplain yields new insights into the factors controlling the development of inundation patterns at a variety of scales. Finally, the data were used to assess the performance of a simple two-dimensional flood inundation model, LISFLOOD-FP, and allows us, for the first time, to validate the dynamic performance of the model. This process is shown to give new information into structural weaknesses of the model and suggests possible future developments, including the incorporation of a better description of floodplain hydrological processes in the hydraulic model to represent more accurately the dewatering of the floodplain.

  9. Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery of Airports and Surrounding Areas: Denver Stapleton International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Robert G.; Gineris, Denise J.

    1990-01-01

    This is the third in a series of three reports which address the statistical description of ground clutter at an airport and in the surrounding area. These data are being utilized in a program to detect microbursts. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data were collected at the Denver Stapleton Airport using a set of parameters which closely match those which are anticipated to be utilized by an aircraft on approach to an airport. These data and the results of the clutter study are described. Scenes of 13 x 10 km were imaged at 9.38 GHz and HH-, VV-, and HV-polarizations, and contain airport grounds and facilities (up to 14 percent), cultural areas (more than 50 percent), and rural areas (up to 6 percent). Incidence angles range from 40 to 84 deg. At the largest depression angles the distributed targets, such as forest, fields, water, and residential, rarely had mean scattering coefficients greater than -10 dB. From 30 to 80 percent of an image had scattering coefficients less than -20 dB. About 1 to 10 percent of the scattering coefficients exceeded 0 dB, and from 0 to 1 percent above 10 dB. In examining the average backscatter coefficients at large angles, the clutter types cluster according to the following groups: (1) terminals (-3 dB), (2) city and industrial (-7 dB), (3) warehouse (-10 dB), (4) urban and residential (-14 dB), and (5) grass (-24 dB).

  10. Synthetic Aperture Radar (sar) and Optical Imagery Data Fusion: Crop Yield Analysis in Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, S. M.

    2012-08-01

    With the expanding energy crisis and rising food prices, crop yield analysis in Southeast Asia is an increasingly important topic in this region. Rice is the most important food crop in Southeast Asia and the ability to accurately predict crop yields during a growing season is useful for decision-makers, aid providers, and commercial trade organizations. The use of optical satellite image data by itself is difficult due to the almost constant cloud in many parts of Southeast Asia. However, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), or SAR data, which can image the Earth's surface through cloud cover, is suitable for many agricultural purposes, such as the detection of rice fields, and the identification of different crop species. Crop yield analysis is difficult in this region due to many factors. Rice cropping systems are often characterized by the type of rice planted, the size of rice field, the sowing dates for different fields, different types of rice cropping systems from one area to another, as well as cultural practices such as sowing and transplanting. This paper will discuss the use of SAR data fused with optical imagery to improve the ability to perform crop yield analysis on rice crops in Southeast Asia.

  11. Method and apparatus for reducing range ambiguity in synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Kare, Jordin T.

    1999-10-26

    A modified Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system with reduced sensitivity to range ambiguities, and which uses secondary receiver channels to detect the range ambiguous signals and subtract them from the signal received by the main channel. Both desired and range ambiguous signals are detected by a main receiver and by one or more identical secondary receivers. All receivers are connected to a common antenna with two or more feed systems offset in elevation (e.g., a reflector antenna with multiple feed horns or a phased array with multiple phase shift networks. The secondary receiver output(s) is (are) then subtracted from the main receiver output in such a way as to cancel the ambiguous signals while only slightly attenuating the desired signal and slightly increasing the noise in the main channel, and thus does not significantly affect the desired signal. This subtraction may be done in real time, or the outputs of the receivers may be recorded separately and combined during signal processing.

  12. An approach for detecting changes related to natural disasters using Synthetic Aperture Radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milisavljevic, N.; Closson, D.; Holecz, F.; Collivignarelli, F.; Pasquali, P.

    2015-04-01

    Land-cover changes occur naturally in a progressive and gradual way, but they may happen rapidly and abruptly sometimes. Very high resolution remote sensed data acquired at different time intervals can help in analyzing the rate of changes and the causal factors. In this paper, we present an approach for detecting changes related to disasters such as an earthquake and for mapping of the impact zones. The approach is based on the pieces of information coming from SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) and on their combination. The case study is the 22 February 2011 Christchurch earthquake. The identification of damaged or destroyed buildings using SAR data is a challenging task. The approach proposed here consists in finding amplitude changes as well as coherence changes before and after the earthquake and then combining these changes in order to obtain richer and more robust information on the origin of various types of changes possibly induced by an earthquake. This approach does not need any specific knowledge source about the terrain, but if such sources are present, they can be easily integrated in the method as more specific descriptions of the possible classes. A special task in our approach is to develop a scheme that translates the obtained combinations of changes into ground information. Several algorithms are developed and validated using optical remote sensing images of the city two days after the earthquake, as well as our own ground-truth data. The obtained validation results show that the proposed approach is promising.

  13. Oil spill detection using synthetic aperture radar images and feature selection in shape space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yue; Zhang, Heng Zhen

    2014-08-01

    The major goal of the present study is to describe a method by which synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of oil spills can be discriminated from other phenomena of similar appearance. The optimal features of these dark formations are here identified. Because different materials have different physical properties, they form different shapes. In this case, oil films and lookalike materials have different fluid properties. In this paper, 9 shape features with a total of 95 eigenvalues were selected. Using differential evolution feature selection (DEFS), similar eigenvalues were extracted from total space of oil spills and lookalike phenomena. This process assumes that these similar eigenvalues impair classification. These similar eigenvalues are removed from the total space, and the important eigenvalues (IEs), those useful to the discrimination of the targets, are identified. At least 30 eigenvalues were found to be inappropriate for classification of our shape spaces. The proposed method was found to be capable of facilitating the selection of the top 50 IEs. This allows more accurate classification. Here, accuracy reached 94%. The results of the experiment show that this novel method performs well. It could also be made available to teams across the world very easily.

  14. Validating high-resolution California coastal flood modeling with Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) is a numerical modeling scheme used to predict coastal flooding due to sea level rise and storms influenced by climate change, currently in use in central California and in development for Southern California (Pt. Conception to the Mexican border). Using a framework of circulation, wave, analytical, and Bayesian models at different geographic scales, high-resolution results are translated as relevant hazards projections at the local scale that include flooding, wave heights, coastal erosion, shoreline change, and cliff failures. Ready access to accurate, high-resolution coastal flooding data is critical for further validation and refinement of CoSMoS and improved coastal hazard projections. High-resolution Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) provides an exceptional data source as appropriately-timed flights during extreme tides or storms provide a geographically-extensive method for determining areas of inundation and flooding extent along expanses of complex and varying coastline. Landward flood extents are numerically identified via edge-detection in imagery from single flights, and can also be ascertained via change detection using additional flights and imagery collected during average wave/tide conditions. The extracted flooding positions are compared against CoSMoS results for similar tide, water level, and storm-intensity conditions, allowing for robust testing and validation of CoSMoS and providing essential feedback for supporting regional and local model improvement.

  15. On the detection of crevasses in glacial ice with synthetic-aperture radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Billy C.

    2010-02-01

    The intent of this study is to provide an analysis of the scattering from a crevasse in Antarctic ice, utilizing a physics-based model for the scattering process. Of primary interest is a crevasse covered with a snow bridge, which makes the crevasse undetectable in visible-light images. It is demonstrated that a crevasse covered with a snow bridge can be visible in synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) images. The model of the crevasse and snow bridge incorporates a complex dielectric permittivity model for dry snow and ice that takes into account the density profile of the glacier. The surface structure is based on a fractal model that can produce sastrugi-like features found on the surface of Antarctic glaciers. Simulated phase histories, computed with the Shooting and Bouncing Ray (SBR) method, are processed into SAR images. The viability of the SBR method for predicting scattering from a crevasse covered with a snow bridge is demonstrated. Some suggestions for improving the model are given.

  16. Digital processing considerations for extraction of ocean wave image spectra from raw synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahaie, I. J.; Dias, A. R.; Darling, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The digital processing requirements of several algorithms for extracting the spectrum of a detected synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image from the raw SAR data are described and compared. The most efficient algorithms for image spectrum extraction from raw SAR data appear to be those containing an intermediate image formation step. It is shown that a recently developed compact formulation of the image spectrum in terms of the raw data is computationally inefficient when evaluated directly, in comparison with the classical method where matched-filter image formation is an intermediate result. It is also shown that a proposed indirect procedure for digitally implementing the same compact formulation is somewhat more efficient than the classical matched-filtering approach. However, this indirect procedure includes the image formation process as part of the total algorithm. Indeed, the computational savings afforded by the indirect implementation are identical to those obtained in SAR image formation processing when the matched-filtering algorithm is replaced by the well-known 'dechirp-Fourier transform' technique. Furthermore, corrections to account for slant-to-ground range conversion, spherical earth, etc., are often best implemented in the image domain, making intermediate image formation a valuable processing feature.

  17. Analysis of data acquired by synthetic aperture radar over Dade County, Florida, and Acadia Parish, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    Results of digital processing of airborne X-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data acquired over Dade County, Florida, and Acadia Parish, Louisiana are presented. The goal was to investigate the utility of SAR data for land cover mapping and area estimation under the AgRISTARS Domestic Crops and Land Cover Project. In the case of the Acadia Paris study area, LANDSAT multispectral scanner (MSS) data were also used to form a combined SAR and MSS data set. The results of accuracy evaluation for the SAR, MSS, and SAR/MSS data using supervised classification show that the combined SAR/MSS data set results in an improved classification accuracy of the five land cover classes as compared with SAR-only and MSS-only data sets. In the case of the Dade County study area, the results indicate that both HH and VV polarization data are highly responsive to the row orientation of the row crop but not to the specific vegetation which forms the row structure. On the other hand, the HV polarization data are relatively insensitive to the orientation of row crop. Therefore, the HV polarization data may be used to discriminate the specific vegetation that forms the row structure.

  18. A fast level set method for synthetic aperture radar ocean image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Bo; Li, Hongga

    2009-01-01

    Segmentation of high noise imagery like Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is still one of the most challenging tasks in image processing. While level set, a novel approach based on the analysis of the motion of an interface, can be used to address this challenge, the cell-based iterations may make the process of image segmentation remarkably slow, especially for large-size images. For this reason fast level set algorithms such as narrow band and fast marching have been attempted. Built upon these, this paper presents an improved fast level set method for SAR ocean image segmentation. This competent method is dependent on both the intensity driven speed and curvature flow that result in a stable and smooth boundary. Notably, it is optimized to track moving interfaces for keeping up with the point-wise boundary propagation using a single list and a method of fast up-wind scheme iteration. The list facilitates efficient insertion and deletion of pixels on the propagation front. Meanwhile, the local up-wind scheme is used to update the motion of the curvature front instead of solving partial differential equations. Experiments have been carried out on extraction of surface slick features from ERS-2 SAR images to substantiate the efficacy of the proposed fast level set method.

  19. Ocean-ice interaction in the marginal ice zone using synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Peng, Chich Y.; Weingartner, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Ocean-ice interaction processes in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) by wind, waves, and mesoscale features, such as up/downwelling and eddies are studied using Earth Remote-Sensing Satellite (ERS) 1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and an ocean-ice interaction model. A sequence of seven SAR images of the MIZ in the Chukchi Sea with 3 or 6 days interval are investigated for ice edge advance/retreat. Simultaneous current measurements from the northeast Chukchi Sea, as well as the Barrow wind record, are used to interpret the MIZ dynamics. SAR spectra of waves in ice and ocean waves in the Bering and Chukchi Sea are compared for the study of wave propagation and dominant SAR imaging mechanism. By using the SAR-observed ice edge configuration and wind and wave field in the Chukchi Sea as inputs, a numerical simulation has been performed with the ocean-ice interaction model. After 3 days of wind and wave forcing the resulting ice edge configuration, eddy formation, and flow velocity field are shown to be consistent with SAR observations.

  20. The Information Content of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar: Vegetation and Underlying Surface Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, Robert N.

    1996-01-01

    Drawing from recently submitted work, this paper first gives a heuristic description of the sensitivity of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) to vertical vegetation distribution and under laying surface topography. A parameter estimation scenario is then described in which the INSAR cross correlation amplitude and phase are the observations from which vegetation and surface topographic parameters are estimated. It is shown that, even in the homogeneous layer model of the vegetation, the number of parameters needed to describe the vegetation and underlying topography exceeds the number of INSAR observations for single baseline, single frequency, single incidence-angle, single polarization INSAR. Using ancillary ground truth data to compensate for the under determination of the parameters, forest depths are estimated from the INSAR data. A recently analyzed multi-baseline data set is also discussed and the potential for stand alone INSAR parameter estimation is assessed. The potential of combining the information content of INSAR with that of infrared/optical remote sensing data is briefly discussed.

  1. Change detection in synthetic aperture radar images based on image fusion and fuzzy clustering.

    PubMed

    Gong, Maoguo; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Ma, Jingjing

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents an unsupervised distribution-free change detection approach for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images based on an image fusion strategy and a novel fuzzy clustering algorithm. The image fusion technique is introduced to generate a difference image by using complementary information from a mean-ratio image and a log-ratio image. In order to restrain the background information and enhance the information of changed regions in the fused difference image, wavelet fusion rules based on an average operator and minimum local area energy are chosen to fuse the wavelet coefficients for a low-frequency band and a high-frequency band, respectively. A reformulated fuzzy local-information C-means clustering algorithm is proposed for classifying changed and unchanged regions in the fused difference image. It incorporates the information about spatial context in a novel fuzzy way for the purpose of enhancing the changed information and of reducing the effect of speckle noise. Experiments on real SAR images show that the image fusion strategy integrates the advantages of the log-ratio operator and the mean-ratio operator and gains a better performance. The change detection results obtained by the improved fuzzy clustering algorithm exhibited lower error than its preexistences.

  2. Performance evaluation of integer to integer wavelet transform for synthetic aperture radar image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Wentong; Song, Jianshe; Yuan, Lihai; Shen, Tao

    2005-11-01

    An efficient and novel imagery compression system for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) which uses integer to integer wavelet transform and Modified Set Partitioning Embedded Block Coder (M-SPECK) has been presented in this paper. The presence of speckle noise, detailed texture, high dynamic range in SAR images, and even its vast data volume show the great differences of SAR imagery. Integer to integer wavelet transform is invertible in finite precision arithmetic, it maps integers to integers, and approximates linear wavelet transforms from which they are derived. Considering in terms of computational load, compression ratio and subjective visual quality metrics, several filter banks are compared together and some factors affecting the compression performance of the integer to integer wavelet transform are discussed in details. Then the optimal filter banks which are more appropriate for the SAR images compression are given. Information of high frequency has relatively larger proportion in SAR images compared with those of nature images. Measures to modify the quantizing thresholds in traditional SPECK are taken, which could be suitable to the contents of SAR imagery for the purpose of compression. Both the integer to integer wavelet transform and modified SPECK have the desirable feature of low computational complexity. Experimental results show its superiority over the traditional approaches in the condition of tradeoffs between compression efficiency and computational complexity.

  3. Optimal waveform-based clutter suppression algorithm for recursive synthetic aperture radar imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Binqi; Gao, Yesheng; Wang, Kaizhi; Liu, Xingzhao

    2016-04-01

    A computational method for suppressing clutter and generating clear microwave images of targets is proposed in this paper, which combines synthetic aperture radar (SAR) principles with recursive method and waveform design theory, and it is suitable for SAR for special applications. The nonlinear recursive model is introduced into the SAR operation principle, and the cubature Kalman filter algorithm is used to estimate target and clutter responses in each azimuth position based on their previous states, which are both assumed to be Gaussian distributions. NP criteria-based optimal waveforms are designed repeatedly as the sensor flies along its azimuth path and are used as the transmitting signals. A clutter suppression filter is then designed and added to suppress the clutter response while maintaining most of the target response. Thus, with fewer disturbances from the clutter response, we can generate the SAR image with traditional azimuth matched filters. Our simulations show that the clutter suppression filter significantly reduces the clutter response, and our algorithm greatly improves the SINR of the SAR image based on different clutter suppression filter parameters. As such, this algorithm may be preferable for special target imaging when prior information on the target is available.

  4. Unsupervised change detection based on improved Markov random field technique using multichannel synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Sara; Valadan Zoej, Mohammad Javad

    2014-01-01

    Change detection represents an important remote sensing tool in environmental monitoring and disaster management. In this respect, multichannel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data offer great potential because of their insensitivity to atmospheric and sun-illumination conditions (over optical multispectral data) and the improved discrimination capability they may provide compared to single-channel SAR. The problem of detecting the changes caused by flooding is addressed by a contextual unsupervised technique based on a Markovian data fusion approach. However, the isotropic formulation of Markov random field (MRF) models causes oversmoothing of spatial boundaries in the final change maps. In order to reduce this drawback, an edge-preserving MRF model is proposed and formulated by using energy functions that combine the edge information extracted from the produced edge maps using competitive fuzzy rules and Canny technique, the information conveyed by each SAR channel, and the spatial contextual information. The proposed technique is experimentally validated with semisimulated data and real ASAR-ENVISAT images. Change detection results obtained by the improved MRF model exhibited a higher accuracy than its predecessors for both semisimulated (average 12%) and real (average 6%) data.

  5. Detection of flooded urban areas in high resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar images using double scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, D. C.; Giustarini, L.; Garcia-Pintado, J.; Cloke, H. L.

    2014-05-01

    Flooding is a particular hazard in urban areas worldwide due to the increased risks to life and property in these regions. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors are often used to image flooding because of their all-weather day-night capability, and now possess sufficient resolution to image urban flooding. The flood extents extracted from the images may be used for flood relief management and improved urban flood inundation modelling. A difficulty with using SAR for urban flood detection is that, due to its side-looking nature, substantial areas of urban ground surface may not be visible to the SAR due to radar layover and shadow caused by buildings and taller vegetation. This paper investigates whether urban flooding can be detected in layover regions (where flooding may not normally be apparent) using double scattering between the (possibly flooded) ground surface and the walls of adjacent buildings. The method estimates double scattering strengths using a SAR image in conjunction with a high resolution LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) height map of the urban area. A SAR simulator is applied to the LiDAR data to generate maps of layover and shadow, and estimate the positions of double scattering curves in the SAR image. Observations of double scattering strengths were compared to the predictions from an electromagnetic scattering model, for both the case of a single image containing flooding, and a change detection case in which the flooded image was compared to an un-flooded image of the same area acquired with the same radar parameters. The method proved successful in detecting double scattering due to flooding in the single-image case, for which flooded double scattering curves were detected with 100% classification accuracy (albeit using a small sample set) and un-flooded curves with 91% classification accuracy. The same measures of success were achieved using change detection between flooded and un-flooded images. Depending on the particular flooding

  6. On the extraction of directional sea-wave spectra from synthetic- aperture radar-signal arrays without matched filtering.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildey, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    An economical method of digitally extracting sea-wave spectra from synthetic-aperture radar-signal records, which can be performed routinely in real or near-real time with the reception of telemetry from Seasat satellites, would be of value to a variety of scientific disciplines. This paper explores techniques for such data extraction and concludes that the mere fact that the desired result is devoid of phase information does not, of itself, lead to a simplification in data processing because of the nature of the modulation performed on the radar pulse by the backscattering surface. -from Author

  7. Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR): Performance Analysis During the Eco-3D 2011 and Summer 2012 Flight Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Carter, Lynn; Ranson, K. Jon; Vega, Manuel; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Lee, SeungKuk; Sun, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    The Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture radar (DBSAR) is a state-of-the-art airborne radar developed at NASA/Goddard for the implementation, and testing of digital beamforming techniques applicable to Earth and planetary sciences. The DBSAR measurements have been employed to study: The estimation of vegetation biomass and structure - critical parameters in the study of the carbon cycle; The measurement of geological features - to explore its applicability to planetary science by measuring planetary analogue targets. The instrument flew two test campaigns over the East coast of the United States in 2011, and 2012. During the campaigns the instrument operated in full polarimetric mode collecting data from vegetation and topography features.

  8. Forest biomass, canopy structure, and species composition relationships with multipolarization L-band synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sader, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of forest biomass, canopy structure, and species composition on L-band synthetic aperature radar data at 44 southern Mississippi bottomland hardwood and pine-hardwood forest sites was investigated. Cross-polarization mean digital values for pine forests were significantly correlated with green weight biomass and stand structure. Multiple linear regression with five forest structure variables provided a better integrated measure of canopy roughness and produced highly significant correlation coefficients for hardwood forests using HV/VV ratio only. Differences in biomass levels and canopy structure, including branching patterns and vertical canopy stratification, were important sources of volume scatter affecting multipolarization radar data. Standardized correction techniques and calibration of aircraft data, in addition to development of canopy models, are recommended for future investigations of forest biomass and structure using synthetic aperture radar.

  9. Rapid, Repeat-sample Monitoring of Crustal Deformations and Environmental Phenomena with the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is a precision repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) mission being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Dryden Flight Research Center in support of NASA s Science Mission Directorate. UAVSAR's unique ability to fly a repeatable flight path, along with an electronically steerable array, allows interferometric data to be obtained with accuracies measured in millimeters. Deploying the radar on an airborne platform will also allow for radar images to be collected and compared with images from the same area taken hours or even years later - providing for long-term trending and near real-time notification of changes and deformations. UAVSAR s data processing algorithms will provide for near-real time data reduction providing disaster planning and response teams with highly accurate data to aid in the prediction of, and response to, natural phenomena. UAVSAR data can be applied to increasing our understanding of the processes behind solid earth, cryosphere, carbon cycle and other areas of interest in earth science. Technologies developed for UAVSAR may also be applicable to a future earth-orbiting InSAR mission and possibly for missions to the Moon or Mars. The UAVSAR is expected to fly on a Gulfstream III aircraft this winter, followed by a flight test program lasting until the second half of 2007. Following radar calibration and data reduction activities, the platform will be ready for science users in the summer of 2008.

  10. Fine Resolution Topographic Mapping of the Jovian Moons: A Ka-Band High Resolution Topographic Mapping Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, S. N.; Carsey, F. D.; Turtle, E. P.

    2003-01-01

    The topographic data set obtained by MOLA has provided an unprecedented level of information about Mars' geologic features. The proposed flight of JIMO provides an opportunity to accomplish a similar mapping of and comparable scientific discovery for the Jovian moons through use of an interferometric imaging radar analogous to the Shuttle radar that recently generated a new topographic map of Earth. A Ka-band single pass across-track synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometer can provide very high resolution surface elevation maps. The concept would use two antennas mounted at the ends of a deployable boom (similar to the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mapper) extended orthogonal to the direction of flight. Assuming an orbit altitude of approximately 100km and a ground velocity of approximately 1.5 km/sec, horizontal resolutions at the 10 meter level and vertical resolutions at the sub-meter level are possible.

  11. Fine resolution topographic mapping of the Jovian moons: a Ka-band high resolution topographic mapping interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Soren N.; Carsey, Frank D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2003-01-01

    The topographic data set obtained by MOLA has provided an unprecedented level of information about Mars' geologic features. The proposed flight of JIMO provides an opportunity to accomplish a similar mapping of and comparable scientific discovery for the Jovian moons through us of an interferometric imaging radar analogous to the Shuttle radar that recently generated a new topographic map of Earth. A Ka-band single pass across-track synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometer can provide very high resolution surface elevation maps. The concept would use two antennas mounted at the ends of a deployable boom (similar to the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mapper) extended orthogonal to the direction of flight. Assuming an orbit altitude of approximately 100 km and a ground velocity of approximately 1.5 km/sec, horizontal resolutions at the 10 meter level and vertical resolutions at the sub-meter level are possible.

  12. Performance of Scattering Matrix Decomposition and Color Spaces for Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzuoli, Andrew; Arriagada, Manuel; Saville, Michael

    Polarimetrc Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has been shown to be a powerful tool in re-mote sensing because uses up to four simultaneous measurements giving additional degrees of freedom for processing. Typically, polarization decomposition techniques are applied to the polarization-dependent data to form colorful imagery that is easy for operators systems to interpret. Yet, the presumption is that the SAR system operates with maximum bandwidth which requires extensive processing for near-or real-time application. In this research, color space selection is investigated when processing sparse polarimetric SAR data as in the case of the publicly available Volumetric SAR Data Set, Version 1:0". To improve information quality in resultant color imagery, three scattering matrix decompositions were investigated (linear, Pauli and Krogager) using two common color spaces (RGB, CMY) to deter-mine the best combination for accurate feature extraction. A mathematical model is presented for each de-composition technique and color space to the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) and quantify the performance bounds from an estimation perspective for given SAR system and processing parameters. After a deep literature review in color science, the mathematical model for color spaces was not able to be computed together with the mathematical model for decomposition techniques. The color spaces used for this research were functions of variables that are out of the scope of electrical engineering research and include factors such as the way humans sense color, envi-ronment inuences in the color stimulus and device technical characteristics used to display the SAR image. Hence, SAR imagery was computed for speci c combinations of decomposition technique and color space and allow the reader to gain an abstract view of the performance differences. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not reflect the official policy of the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Department of Defense

  13. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry Analysis of Ground Deformation within the Coso Geothermal Site, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brawner, Erik

    Earth's surface movement may cause as a potential hazard to infrastructure and people. Associated earthquake hazards pose a potential side effect of geothermal activity. Modern remote sensing techniques known as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) can measure surface change with a high degree of precision to mm scale movements. Previous work has identified a deformation anomaly within the Coso Geothermal site in eastern California. Surface changes have not been analyzed since the 1990s, allowing a decade of geothermal production impact to occur since previously assessed. In this study, InSAR data was acquired and analyzed between the years 2005 and 2010. Acquired by the ENVISAT satellite from both ascending and descending modes. This provides an independent dataset from previous work. Incorporating data generated from a new sensor covering a more modern temporal study period. Analysis of this time period revealed a subsidence anomaly in correlation with the extents of the geothermal production area under current operation. Maximum subsidence rates in the region reached approximately 3.8 cm/yr. A similar rate assessed from previous work throughout the 1990s. The correlation of subsidence patterns suggests a linear source of deformation from measurements spanning multiple decades. Regions of subsidence branch out from the main anomaly to the North-Northeast and to the South where additional significant peaks of subsidence occurring. The extents of the deformation anomaly directly correlate with the dispersal of geothermal production well site locations. Depressurization within the geothermal system provides a leading cause to surface subsidence from excessive extraction of hydrothermal fluids. As a result of minimal reinjection of production fluids.

  14. Observation of melt onset on multiyear Arctic sea ice using the ERS 1 synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebrenner, D. P.; Nelson, E. D.; Colony, R.; West, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    We present nearly coincident observations of backscattering from the Earth Remote-Sensing Satellite (ERS) 1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and of near-surface temperature from six drifting buoys in the Beaufort Sea, showing that the onset of melting in snow on multiyear sea ice is clearly detectable in the SAR data. Melt onset is marked by a clean, steep decrease in the backscattering cross section of multiyear ice at 5.3 GHz and VV polarization. We investigate the scattering physics responsible for the signature change and find that the cross section decrease is due solely to the appearance of liquid water in the snow cover overlying the ice. A thin layer of moist snow is sufficient to cause the observed decrease. We present a prototype algorithm to estimate the date of melt onset using the ERS 1 SAR and apply the algorithm first to the SAR data for which we have corresponding buoy temperatures. The melt onset dates estimated by the SAR algorithm agree with those obtained independently from the temperature data to within 4 days or less, with the exception of one case in which temperatures oscillated about 0 C for several weeks. Lastly, we apply the algorithm to the entire ERS 1 SAR data record acquired by the Alaska SAR Facility for the Beaufort Sea north of 73 deg N during the spring of 1992, to produce a map of the dates of melt onset over an area roughly 1000 km on a side. The progression of melt onset is primarily poleward but shows a weak meridional dependence at latitudes of approximately 76 deg-77 deg N. Melting begins in the southern part of the study region on June 13 and by June 20 has progressed to the northermost part of the region.

  15. Deep source model for Nevado del Ruiz Volcano, Colombia, constrained by interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, P.; Samsonov, S. V.; López, C. M.; Ordoñez, M.

    2015-12-01

    Nevado del Ruiz (NRV) is part of a large volcano complex in the northern Andes of Colombia with a large glacier that erupted in 1985, generating a lahar killing over 23,000 people in the city of Armero and 2,000 people in the town of Chinchina. NRV is the most active volcano in Colombia and since 2012 has generated small eruptions, with no casualties, and constant gas and ash emissions. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations from ascending and descending track RADARSAT-2 data show a large (>20 km) wide inflation pattern apparently starting in late 2011 to early 2012 and continuing to the time of this study in early 2015 at a LOS rate of over 3-4 cm/yr (Fig. 1). Volcano pressure volume models for both a point source (Mogi) and a spheroidal (Yang) source find solutions over 14 km beneath the surface, or 10 km below sea level, and centered 10 km to the SW of Nevado del Ruiz volcano. The spheroidal source has a roughly horizontal long axis oriented parallel to the Santa Isabel - Nevado del Ruiz volcanic line and perpendicular to the ambient compressive stress direction. Its solution provides a statistically significant improvement in fit compared to the point source, though consideration of spatially correlated noise sources may diminish this significance. Stress change computations do not favor one model over the other but show that propagating dikes would become trapped in sills, leading to a more complex pathway to the surface and possibly explaining the significant lateral distance between the modeled sources and Nevado del Ruiz volcano.

  16. Iceberg and ship detection and classification in single, dual and quad polarized synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Carl

    Iceberg and ship identification in satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data is an essential part of offering an operational iceberg surveillance program. Identification here refers to detection of ocean SAR targets and then classification of these targets as iceberg, ship, or unknown. Maximizing the detection and minimizing incorrect classification of iceberg and ship targets are required. Because coarser resolution satellite SAR data is at times not as intuitive as satellite optical data for manual human interpreted target classification, this process can be labor intensive, subjective, and error prone. Therefore, it is desired that an automated method for iceberg or ship identification be implemented. The methodology investigated here follows a well known standard in supervised pattern recognition, the maximum likelihood-quadratic discriminant function. The goal here in this thesis is to build class models from known iceberg and ship targets. Each class model is based on features that describe targets such as brightness, texture, and shape. Based on these descriptors as training input into the discriminant functions, future unknown targets can be compared with the class model for best fit. The best fit (or minimum distance) is used to assign class status for these unknown targets. One major consideration when using this type of pattern recognition approach is feature selection. Feature selection is based on the notion that some subset (subspace) of the descriptive metrics will lead to improved classification accuracy when comparing discriminant functions. Sequential forward selection and variants of exhaustive search algorithms are implemented and compared. RADARSAT-1, ENVSIAT AP (HH/HV), and EMISAR SAR iceberg and ship targets are used for algorithm training, feature selection, and performance estimation.

  17. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry coherence analysis over Katmai volcano group, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Freymueller, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring volcanic deformation or monitoring deformation of active volcanoes using space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry depends on the ability to maintain phase coherence over appropriate time intervals. Using ERS 1 C band (?? = 5.66 cm) SAR imagery, we studied the seasonal and temporal changes of the interferometric SAR coherence for fresh lava, weathered lava, tephra with weak water reworking, tephra with strong water reworking, and fluvial deposits representing the range of typical volcanic surface materials in the Katmai volcano group, Alaska. For interferograms based on two passes with 35 days separation taken during the same summer season, we found that coherence increases after early June, reaches a peak between the middle of July and the middle of September, and finally decreases until the middle of November when coherence is completely lost for all five sites. Fresh lava has the highest coherence, followed by either weathered lava or fluvial deposits. These surfaces maintain relatively high levels of coherence for periods up to the length of the summer season. Coherence degrades more rapidly with time for surfaces covered with tephra. For images taken in different summers, only the lavas maintained coherence well enough to provide useful interferometric images, but we found only a small reduction in coherence after the first year for surfaces with lava. Measurement of volcanic deformation is possible using summer images spaced a few years apart, as long as the surface is dominated by lavas. Our studies suggest that in order to make volcanic monitoring feasible along the Aleutian arc or other regions with similar climatic conditions, observation intervals of the satellite with C band SAR should be at least every month from July through September, every week during the late spring/early summer or late fall, and every 2-3 days during the winter. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Empirical assessment of multi-wavelength synthetic aperture radar for land cover and canopy height estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tighe, Mary Lorraine

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) and polarimetric InSAR (PoIInSAR) techniques have gained traction in the last decade as a viable technology for vegetation parameter estimation at local and regional scales, but large spatial extent methods and physical models are not yet available. This research presents an empirical methodology for use with airborne X-band InSAR and L-band Po1InSAR to classify vegetation type and estimate canopy height over diverse environments and large geographic extents common in North America. The methodology includes: 1) derivation of the scattering phase height centre (hspc) as an initial canopy height estimate by subtracting an InSAR derived digital terrain model from an InSAR digital surface model, 2) classification of vegetation type using InSAR data, 3) correction of h spc using empirically derived factors per vegetation type, and 4) refinement of height estimates at forest edges and gaps. The method yields a root mean square error (RMSE) of 1.00 -- 1.93 m over five vegetation types evaluated, which is a substantial improvement over the 5.4 -- 6.96 m RMSE for raw X- and L-band hspc. Relative height estimate error decreased with increasing canopy height and density; it was generally higher in shrub/wetlands vegetation and lower in dense conifer. Height estimate error also increased with increasing terrain slope, but effects of incidence angle were mixed. This research confirms that the proposed X-band InSAR and L-band PoIInSAR empirical methodology is well-suited to derive land cover and canopy height over large geographic areas and varied vegetation types, providing an alternative to costlier spaceborne InSAR and LiDAR.

  19. Fault Creep along the Southern San Andreas from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar, Permanent Scatterers, and Stacking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Suzanne; Sandwell, David

    2003-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) provides a practical means of mapping creep along major strike-slip faults. The small amplitude of the creep signal (less than 10 mm/yr), combined with its short wavelength, makes it difficult to extract from long time span interferograms, especially in agricultural or heavily vegetated areas. We utilize two approaches to extract the fault creep signal from 37 ERS SAR images along the southem San Andreas Fault. First, amplitude stacking is utilized to identify permanent scatterers, which are then used to weight the interferogram prior to spatial filtering. This weighting improves correlation and also provides a mask for poorly correlated areas. Second, the unwrapped phase is stacked to reduce tropospheric and other short-wavelength noise. This combined processing enables us to recover the near-field (approximately 200 m) slip signal across the fault due to shallow creep. Displacement maps fiom 60 interferograms reveal a diffuse secular strain buildup, punctuated by localized interseismic creep of 4-6 mm/yr line of sight (LOS, 12-18 mm/yr horizontal). With the exception of Durmid Hill, this entire segment of the southern San Andreas experienced right-lateral triggered slip of up to 10 cm during the 3.5-year period spanning the 1992 Landers earthquake. The deformation change following the 1999 Hector Mine earthquake was much smaller (4 cm) and broader than for the Landers event. Profiles across the fault during the interseismic phase show peak-to-trough amplitude ranging from 15 to 25 mm/yr (horizontal component) and the minimum misfit models show a range of creeping/locking depth values that fit the data.

  20. Vegetation profiles in tropical forests from multibaseline interferometric synthetic aperture radar, field, and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Chapman, B. D.; Dos Santos, J. R.; GonçAlves, F. G.; Dutra, L. V.; GraçA, P. M. L. A.; Drake, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    This paper addresses the estimation of vertical vegetation density profiles from multibaseline interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the AirSAR aircraft at C band over primary, secondary, and abandoned-pasture stands at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica in 2004. Profiles were also estimated from field data taken in 2006 and lidar data taken with the LVIS, 25 m spot instrument in 2005. After motivating the study of tropical forest profiles based on their role in the global carbon cycle, ecosystem state, and biodiversity, this paper describes the InSAR, field, and lidar data acquisitions and analyses. Beyond qualitative agreement between profiles from the 3 measurement techniques, results show that InSAR and lidar profile-averaged mean height have RMS scatters about field-measured means of 3.4 m and 3.2 m, 16% and 15% of the average mean height, respectively. InSAR and lidar standard deviations of the vegetation distribution have RMS scatters about the field standard deviations of 1.9 m and 1.5 m, or 27% and 21%, respectively. Dominant errors in the profile-averaged mean height for each measurement technique were modeled. InSAR inaccuracies, dominated by ambiguities in finding the ground altitude and coherence calibration, together account for about 3 m of InSAR error in the mean height. The dominant, modeled error for the field measurements was the inaccuracy in modeling the trees as uniformly filled volumes of leaf area, inducing field errors in mean height of about 3 m. The dominant, modeled lidar error, also due to finding the ground, was 2 m.

  1. Hierarchical ship detection and recognition with high-resolution polarimetric synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Haitao; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Ting; Zhao, Di; Meng, Junmin

    2014-01-01

    Ship surveillance by remote sensing technology has become a valuable tool for protecting marine environments. In recent years, the successful launch of advanced synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensors that have high resolution and multipolarimetric modes has enabled researchers to use SAR imagery for not only ship detection but also ship category recognition. A hierarchical ship detection and recognition scheme is proposed. The complementary information obtained from multipolarimetric modes is used to improve both the detection precision and the recognition accuracy. In the ship detection stage, a three-class fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm is used to calculate the segmenting threshold for prescreening ship candidates. To reduce the false alarm rate (FAR), we use a two-step discrimination strategy. In the first step, we fuse the detection results from multipolarimetric channels to reduce the speckle noise, ambiguities, sidelobes, and other sources of interference. In the second step, we use a binary classifier, which is trained with prior data collected on ships and nonships, to reduce the FAR even further. In the ship category recognition stage, we concatenate texture-based descriptors extracted from multiple polarmetric channels to construct a robust ship representation for category recognition. Furthermore, we construct and release a ship category database with real SAR data. We hope that it can be used to promote investigations of SAR ship recognition in the remote sensing and related academic communities. The proposed method is validated by a comprehensive experimental comparison to the state-of-the-art methods. The validation procedure showed that the proposed method outperforms all of the competing methods by about 5% and 15% in terms of ship detection and recognition, respectively.

  2. Estimation of the real aperture radar modulation transfer function directly from synthetic aperture radar ocean wave image spectra without a priori knowledge of the ocean wave height spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, S.; HøGda, K. A.

    1994-07-01

    The phase and amplitude of the real aperture radar (RAR) modulation transfer function (MTF) are, applying both simulated and real synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image spectra, shown to strongly influence the SAR ocean wave imaging of range- (or near-range) traveling wave systems. Conventionally, in situ measurement of the sea state has been used in connection with SAR estimation of the RAR MTF. In most cases, the SAR imaging has been simulated by varying the phase and amplitude of the transfer function until some criterium for best fit between the measured and simulated spectra is met. The main problem with this method is the need for in situ buoy measurements of the underlying ocean wave height spectrum. This paper proposes a new method for estimating the RAR MTF directly from the SAR ocean wave image spectrum. Hence the method differs from previously used methods in that it is independent of in situ measurements of the sea state. The only (weak) restriction is that the observed wave system is range- or near-range traveling. On the basis of three range-going profiles the RAR MTF phase and amplitude are estimated. Investigations using synthetic data reveal that the SAR image spectrum for realistic sea states is colored by the unknown transfer function to such an extent that the underlying wave spectral form is not critical. Experimentally, the phase and amplitude of the RAR modulation are computed using the Norwegian Continental Shelf Experiment 1988 data. It is shown that the phase is most important for the SAR spectral distribution. Typically, the phase is observed to be in the interval from 60° to 110° and the amplitude to be of the order of 10-18. Furthermore, it is shown from simulation studies that marked changes in real SAR image spectra crossing an atmospheric front are recreated when the measured MTF phase and amplitude are used. Eventually, the hydrodynamic modulation is also extracted from the RAR MTF data. Variations of the hydrodynamic MTF phase

  3. Monitoring flooding and vegetation on seasonally inundated floodplains with multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Laura Lorraine

    The ability of synthetic aperture radar to detect flooding and vegetation structure was evaluated for three seasonally inundated floodplain sites supporting a broad variety of wetland and upland vegetation types: two reaches of the Solimoes floodplain in the central Amazon, and the Magela Creek floodplain in Northern Territory, Australia. For each site, C- and L-band polarimetric Shuttle Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) data was obtained at both high- and low-water stages. Inundation status and vegetation structure were documented simultaneous with the SIR-C acquisitions using low-altitude videography and ground measurements. SIR-C images were classified into cover states defined by vegetation physiognomy and presence of standing water, using a decision-tree model with backscattering coefficients at HH, VV, and HV polarizations as input variables. Classification accuracy was assessed using user's accuracy, producer's accuracy, and kappa coefficient for a test population of pixels. At all sites, both C- and L-band were necessary to accurately classify cover types with two dates. HH polarization was most. useful for distinguishing flooded from non-flooded vegetation (C-HH for macrophyte versus pasture, L-HH for flooded versus non-flooded forest), and cross-polarized L-band data provided the best separation between woody and non-woody vegetation. Increases in L-HH backscattering due to flooding were on the order of 3--4 dB for closed-canopy varzea and igapo forest, and 4--7 dB, for open Melaleuca woodland. The broad range of physiognomies and stand structures found in both herbaceous and woody wetland communities, combined with the variation in the amount of emergent canopy caused by water level fluctuations and phenologic changes, resulted in a large range in backscattering characteristics of wetland communities both within and between sites. High accuracies cannot be achieved for these communities using single-date, single-band, single-polarization data, particularly in the

  4. Monitoring delta subsidence with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, S.; Overeem, I.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Can subsidence in river deltas be monitored in near real-time at the spatial and temporal resolution needed for informing critical management decisions? Interferometric Synthetic Radar Aperture (InSAR) is a satellite-based technique that can map ground deformation with millimeter-scale vertical resolution over thousands of square kilometers. InSAR has enormous potential to shed light on the dynamics of actively subsiding deltas, but the technique is not commonly applied outside of major cities due to the difficulty of performing InSAR in wet, vegetated settings. Given these limitations, how can InSAR best serve the global effort to monitor sinking deltas? Here, an overview of InSAR processing is provided that addresses delta-specific challenges, including frequent cloud-cover in tropical areas; noisy signals in wetlands and flooded fields; dense forests that interact unpredictably with different radar wavelengths; flat landscapes that hinder image stacking algorithms; rapid urban development that can render Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) inaccurate; and a lack of in situ GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers for InSAR calibration. InSAR has unique value for monitoring subsidence in deltas, and some natural and anthropogenic drivers of subsidence can be resolved by InSAR. High-resolution InSAR measurements from the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) are then presented and validated against GPS data. Surface motion is shown to reflect subsurface stratigraphy, and sediment compaction is shown to be the most important factor in this delta on short (non-tectonic) timescales. Average compaction rates throughout the eastern delta range from 0 to > 18 mm/y, varying by more than an order of magnitude depending on the ages and grain sizes of surface and subsurface sediment layers. Fastest subsidence is observed in Holocene organic-rich mud, and slowest subsidence is observed along the Meghna River and in areas with surface or subsurface sand deposits. Although groundwater

  5. Analysis of the Greenland Ice Sheet's surface hydrology using Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Katie; Benedek, Corinne; Tedesco, Marco; Willis, Ian

    2016-04-01

    The behaviour of surface water on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has recently received much attention due to its ponding to form supraglacial lakes. These can drain and impact ice sheet dynamics by facilitating increased basal sliding, thus leading to a more rapid transfer of ice to the oceans and contributing to rising sea levels. Research into supraglacial lakes has primarily used the optical and infrared wavelength bands of MODIS due to their high temporal resolution. However, this comes with an associated low spatial resolution, potentially resulting in smaller lakes being overlooked, and an inability to image through clouds or in darkness. Conversely, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), a satellite-borne active imaging method uses microwave wavelength bands which are unaffected by cloud or lack of illumination from the sun. SAR imagery often has a much higher spatial resolution than optical imagery without compromising temporal resolution, and radar systems have even detected lakes covered by ice/snow or buried at shallow depths [Koenig et al., 2015]. This gives SAR imagery the potential to significantly increase the size of the database of supraglacial lakes. The current Sentinel-1A mission comprises two polar-orbiting satellites performing C-band SAR imaging, and provides a novel method for investigating the surface hydrology of the GrIS. Here, we explore a year's worth of images since the launch of Sentinel-1A in April 2014. These images have a higher spatial (5 m x 20 m) and temporal (up to daily) resolution than any previously available imagery, so will revolutionise the amount of information that can be yielded about GrIS hydrology. We use these images in combination with other remotely sensed data, including Landsat-8 imagery, to elicit spatial and temporal variations in the water content of the GrIS's surface ice layers. Our primary focus is on the area upstream of Jakobshavn Isbræ, where preliminary analysis has indicated that liquid water may persist

  6. Tracking Changes in Coastal and Nearshore Morphology in the Southern Beaufort Sea Using Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. M.; Fraser, P.; Whalen, D.

    2007-12-01

    Nearshore morphology in the Mackenzie Delta region of the Beaufort Sea is poorly known because much of the region is very shallow (< 2 m) and the water is highly turbid. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has been used to map nearshore morphology of lakes in Alaska by taking advantage of the ability of radar waves to penetrate freshwater ice. This technique has been extended to the Mackenzie Delta nearshore region where winter ice forms from river water that is sufficiently fresh so as to be transparent at SAR frequencies. SAR allows the delineation of sea ice that freezes to the seabed (bottom-fast ice or BFI). A time series of imagery throughout a winter depicts the progressive growth of areas where BFI occurs and if sea ice thickness is known at the time of imaging, the delineation of BFI zones represents a proxy for bathymetry. Progressive development of BFI was mapped through the winters of 2003-07 and isolated images from other years are available. The nearshore morphology of the region as revealed by BFI mapping is characterized by extensive nearshore shoals that form at the mouths of active distributaries and are separated by wide, slightly deeper embayments. Narrow channels can be seen to transect the shoals both aligned with and orthogonal to the river outflow. Detailed images from thick ice years depict channels fanning out to feed distributary mouth bars. Comparison of images acquired over more than 10 years suggest that shoal migration can exceed 100 m per year and channel incision of the shoals to depths of >5 m has occurred. The BFI imagery suggests that there is sufficient room beneath the sea ice cover to permit river discharge to reach the shelf without requiring extensive networks of sub- ice channels. The distribution of bottomfast ice also constrains discharge during winter and spring. High inflows occurring during winter surges may lift the ice canopy or over flow onto the surface of the ice disrupting transportation networks. Negative surges in

  7. Earth Surface Change as Viewed by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C. X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) and shuttle Hand-Held Photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. L.; Stofan, E. R.; Jones, T. D.; Godwin, L.

    1994-01-01

    The Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C, X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) was launched on space shuttle Endeavour at 7:05 AM EDT, Saturday, April 9, 1994 as part of the Space Radar Lab (SRL-1). Soon after launch, the radars were activated and began arount the clock operations which lasted for the next 10 days.

  8. Advanced Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Imaging Radar (InSAR) for Dune Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havivi, Shiran; Amir, Doron; Schvartzman, Ilan; August, Yitzhak; Mamman, Shimrit; Rotman, Stanely R.; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2016-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available lose particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970s, remote sensing imagery, both optical and radar, have been used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two or more images. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR methods. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This work aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the coherence change detection method was used, in order to identify dune stability or instability and the dune activity level. The Nitzanim-Ashdod coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of

  9. Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry in monitoring large landslide (La Frasse, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michoud, C.; Rune Lauknes, T.; Pedrazzini, A.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Tapia, R.; Steinmann, G.

    2009-04-01

    Spaceborne Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) is able to detect quasi vertical movements covering very large areas in a continuous way; it can be considered as an efficient tool to detect and monitor slope instabilities. The La Frasse landslide is located in the Canton of Vaud (Switzerland). It has a length of 2 km, a width of 500 m and its sliding surface is located at a depth of 60 to 100 m. With high velocities (presently at 40 cm/y in the active lower part), La Frasse landslide is in highly hazardous area according to the Swiss legislation. According to Varnes classification, it is a complex slide composed of tertiary flysch material and flowing over on flysch and limestone bedrock. The landscape is occupied by forests, pastures, some habitations and two main roads to touristic areas. The foot of the landslide is continuously eroded by the river "Grande-Eau". First of all, two interferometric pairs are constructed with data provided by the satellite Alos. The big wavelength (24 cm) of ALOS' PALSAR sensor gives good results in the foot of the landslide, where the movements are highest. Afterwards, fifty-three interferometric pairs are constructed with twenty-two images acquired with the European satellite Envisat. With the shorter wavelength (5.6 cm) of the Envisat's ASAR sensor, but the higher number of interferograms, the analysis provides the mean velocities of landslide's scaterrers by using the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) methodology. The DInSAR results were compared to ground displacements measured every 2h by an optical total station (Robovec™ System). The results of this study are coherent with the amplitude of the deformations monitored by Robovec™. Moreover, the computation of the mean velocities shows that today, total displacements are measured in the active lower part of the landslide; the data complete Robovec™ results. But the accuracy of the measured displacements and the number of scatterers could be improved

  10. Detection of flooded urban areas in high resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar images using double scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, David; Giustarini, Laura; Garcia-Pintado, Javier; Cloke, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    compared to an un-flooded image of the same area acquired with the same radar parameters. The method proved successful in detecting double scattering due to flooding in the single-image case, for which flooded double scattering curves were detected with 100% classification accuracy (albeit using a small sample set) and un-flooded curves with 91% classification accuracy. The same measures of success were achieved using change detection between flooded and un-flooded images. Depending on the particular flooding situation, the method could lead to improved detection of flooding in urban areas. 1. Mason DC, Giustarini L, Garcia-Pintado J (2014). Detection of flooded urban areas in high resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar images using double scattering. Int. J. Applied Earth Observation and Geoscience, 28C (May 2014), 150-159.

  11. Oil Spill Detection and Tracking Using Lipschitz Regularity and Multiscale Techniques in Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajadi, O. A.; Meyer, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Automatic oil spill detection and tracking from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is a difficult task, due in large part to the inhomogeneous properties of the sea surface, the high level of speckle inherent in SAR data, the complexity and the highly non-Gaussian nature of amplitude information, and the low temporal sampling that is often achieved with SAR systems. This research presents a promising new oil spill detection and tracking method that is based on time series of SAR images. Through the combination of a number of advanced image processing techniques, the develop approach is able to mitigate some of these previously mentioned limitations of SAR-based oil-spill detection and enables fully automatic spill detection and tracking across a wide range of spatial scales. The method combines an initial automatic texture analysis with a consecutive change detection approach based on multi-scale image decomposition. The first step of the approach, a texture transformation of the original SAR images, is performed in order to normalize the ocean background and enhance the contrast between oil-covered and oil-free ocean surfaces. The Lipschitz regularity (LR), a local texture parameter, is used here due to its proven ability to normalize the reflectivity properties of ocean water and maximize the visibly of oil in water. To calculate LR, the images are decomposed using two-dimensional continuous wavelet transform (2D-CWT), and transformed into Holder space to measure LR. After texture transformation, the now normalized images are inserted into our multi-temporal change detection algorithm. The multi-temporal change detection approach is a two-step procedure including (1) data enhancement and filtering and (2) multi-scale automatic change detection. The performance of the developed approach is demonstrated by an application to oil spill areas in the Gulf of Mexico. In this example, areas affected by oil spills were identified from a series of ALOS PALSAR images

  12. Gulf Coast Subsidence: Integration of Geodesy, Geophysical Modeling, and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, R. G.; Chapman, B. D.; Deese, R.; Dokka, R. K.; Fielding, E. J.; Hawkins, B.; Hensley, S.; Ivins, E. R.; Jones, C. E.; Kent, J. D.; Liu, Z.; Lohman, R.; Zheng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The vulnerability of the US Gulf Coast has received increased attention in the years since hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Agencies responsible for the long-term protection of lives and infrastructure require precise estimates of future subsidence and sea level rise. A quantitative, geophysically based methodology can provide such estimates by incorporating geological data, geodetic measurements, geophysical models of non-elastic mechanical behavior at depth, and geographically comprehensive deformation monitoring made possible with measurements from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). To be effective, results must be available to user agencies in a format suitable for integration within existing decision-support processes. Work to date has included analysis of historical and continuing ground-based geodetic measurements. These reveal a surprising degree of complexity, including regions that are subsiding at rates faster than those considered for hurricane protection planning of New Orleans and other coastal communities (http://www.mvn.usace.army.mil/pdf/hps_verticalsettlement.pdf) as well as Louisiana's coastal restoration strategies (http://www.coast2050.gov/2050reports.htm) (Dokka, 2011, J. Geophys. Res., 116, B06403, doi:10.1029/2010JB008008). Traditional geodetic measurements provide precise information at single points, while InSAR observations provide geographically comprehensive measurements of surface deformation at lower vertical precision. Available InSAR data sources include X-, C- and L-band satellite, and NASA/JPL airborne UAVSAR L-band data. The Gulf Coast environment is very challenging for InSAR techniques, especially with systems not designed for interferometry. For example, the shorter wavelength C-band data decorrelates over short time periods requiring more elaborate time-series analysis techniques, with which we've had some success. Meanwhile, preliminary analysis of limited L-Band ALOS/PALSAR satellite data show promise

  13. The Synthetic Aperture Radar Science Data Processing Foundry Concept for Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hua, H.; Norton, C. D.; Little, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2008, NASA's Earth Science Technology Office and the Advanced Information Systems Technology Program have invested in two technology evolutions to meet the needs of the community of scientists exploiting the rapidly growing database of international synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. JPL, working with the science community, has developed the InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE), a next-generation interferometric SAR processing system that is designed to be flexible and extensible. ISCE currently supports many international space borne data sets but has been primarily focused on geodetic science and applications. A second evolutionary path, the Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) science data system, uses ISCE as its core science data processing engine and produces automated science and response products, quality assessments and metadata. The success of this two-front effort has been demonstrated in NASA's ability to respond to recent events with useful disaster support. JPL has enabled high-volume and low latency data production by the re-use of the hybrid cloud computing science data system (HySDS) that runs ARIA, leveraging on-premise cloud computing assets that are able to burst onto the Amazon Web Services (AWS) services as needed. Beyond geodetic applications, needs have emerged to process large volumes of time-series SAR data collected for estimation of biomass and its change, in such campaigns as the upcoming AfriSAR field campaign. ESTO is funding JPL to extend the ISCE-ARIA model to a "SAR Science Data Processing Foundry" to on-ramp new data sources and to produce new science data products to meet the needs of science teams and, in general, science community members. An extension of the ISCE-ARIA model to support on-demand processing will permit PIs to leverage this Foundry to produce data products from accepted data sources when they need them. This paper will describe each of the elements of the SAR SDP Foundry and describe their

  14. River Delta Subsidence Measured with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Stephanie

    This thesis addresses the need for high-resolution subsidence maps of major world river deltas. Driven by a combination of rising water, sediment compaction, and reduced sediment supply due to damming and flood control, many deltas are sinking relative to sea level. A lack of data constraining rates and patterns of subsidence has made it difficult to determine the relative contributions of each factor in any given delta, however, or to assess whether the primary drivers of land subsidence are natural or anthropogenic. In recent years, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has emerged as a satellite-based technique that can map ground deformation with mm-scale accuracy over thousands of square kilometers. These maps could provide critical insight into the drivers of subsidence in deltas, but InSAR is not typically applied to non-urban delta areas due to the difficulties of performing the technique in wet, vegetated settings. This thesis addresses those difficulties and achieves high-resolution measurements of ground deformation in rural deltaic areas. Chapter 1 introduces the processes that drive relative sea level rise in river deltas and investigates open questions in delta subsidence research. Chapter 2 assesses the performance of InSAR in delta settings and reviews interferogram generation in the context of delta analysis, presenting delta-specific processing details and guiding interpretation in these challenging areas. Chapter 3 applies Differential (D-) InSAR to the coast of the Yellow River Delta in China. Results show that subsidence rates are as high as 250 mm/y due to groundwater extraction at aquaculture facilities, a rate that exceeds local and global average sea level rise by nearly two orders of magnitude and suggests a significant hazard for Asian megadeltas. Chapter 4 applies interferometric stacking and Small Baseline Subset (SBAS)-InSAR to the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta, Bangladesh. Results show that stratigraphy controls subsidence in

  15. Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Wind Measurements to support Offshore Wind Parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneiderhan, T.; Lehner, S.; Horstmann, J.; Koch, W.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.

    2003-04-01

    In all countries with shallow coastal waters and a strong mean wind speed offshore wind parks are planned and built. The fast development of wind energy production in Europe led to an installation of more than 18 000 MW by the end of the year 2001. The installed offshore power up to date is about 100 MW. In the near future many projects for wind farms with an output of more than 5000 MW are planned. Some of these projects are already under construction. Offshore wind parks are showing a big potential for future energy production and solving ecological problems in reducing the CO^2 output. The construction and maintenance of offshore wind parks has to face the tough environmental conditions of the open sea resulting extensive maintenance and money. Therefore reliable forecast in particular of the wind and the ocean wave fields is essential. Space borne SAR data as acquired by the ERS satellites or the new ENVISAT satellite, launched in March 2002, provide two dimensional wind fields with a sub-kilometre resolution and a coverage of up to 500 by 500 km in the wide swath mode. They are thus ideally suited to investigate the spatial fine structure like e.g. turbulence in the wake of wind parks, which is an important factor in the optimal siting of wind farms. Due to their high coverage and resolution SAR data can provide information on the impact of the single turbines on the wind field experienced by the neighbouring turbines as well as the effect of the whole wind park on the local climate. This study shows the potential of two dimensional high resolution wind fields measured with space borne synthetic aperture radar to support the construction and operation of wind farms. The data can be used to minimize fatigue loading due to wind gusts as well as to provide short term power forecasts in order to optimise the power output. Examples of wind fields around the already existing offshore wind parks Utgrunden (South of Sweden) and Horns Rev (West of Denmark) and the

  16. Surface Ruptures and Building Damage of the 2003 Bam, Iran, Earthquake Mapped by Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometric Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielding, Eric J.; Talebian, M.; Rosen, P. A.; Nazari, H.; Jackson, J. A.; Ghorashi, M.; Walker, R.

    2005-01-01

    We use the interferometric correlation from Envisat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images to map the details of the surface ruptures related to the 26 December 2003 earthquake that devastated Bam, Iran. The main strike-slip fault rupture south of the city of Bam has a series of four segments with left steps shown by a narrow line of low correlation in the coseismic interferogram. This also has a clear expression in the field because of the net extension across the fault. Just south of the city limits, the surface strain becomes distributed over a width of about 500 m, probably because of a thicker layer of soft sedimentary material.

  17. The derivation of a sub-canopy digital terrain model of a flooded forest using synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc Lee; Gesch, Dean B.

    1990-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar data from the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B Mission were combined with the tide surface information to create a digital terrain model for a 70-km by 40-km section of the Mouths of the Ganges forests in southern Bangladesh. The dominance of the interaction phenomenon (canopy to surface or surface to canopy reflection) in flooded forests was exploited to create sub-canopy flood boundary maps for two different tide times. The boundary maps were digitally combined in x, y, z space with tide elevation models created from tide gauge data gridding the survey site and used as input to interpolation routines to create a terrain model. The end product represents a significant step in our ability to characterize the topography and hydrology of wetland ecosystems. The model derived here can be used for simulating tidal flow and nutrient transport from the forest to the marine habitat.

  18. Space based topographic mapping experiment using Seasat synthetic aperture radar and LANDSAT 3 return beam vidicon imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mader, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for producing topographic information is described which is based on same side/same time viewing using a dissimilar combination of radar imagery and photographic images. Common geographic areas viewed from similar space reference locations produce scene elevation displacements in opposite direction and proper use of this characteristic can yield the perspective information necessary for determination of base to height ratios. These base to height ratios can in turn be used to produce a topographic map. A test area covering the Harrisburg, Pennsylvania region was observed by synthetic aperture radar on the Seasat satellite and by return beam vidicon on by the LANDSAT - 3 satellite. The techniques developed for the scaling re-orientation and common registration of the two images are presented along with the topographic determination data. Topographic determination based exclusively on the images content is compared to the map information which is used as a performance calibration base.

  19. A-Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry analysis of a Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation occurring at Bisaccia (Italy).

    PubMed

    Di Martire, Diego; Novellino, Alessandro; Ramondini, Massimo; Calcaterra, Domenico

    2016-04-15

    This paper presents the results of an investigation on a Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation (DSGSD), previously only hypothesized by some authors, affecting Bisaccia, a small town located in Campania region, Italy. The study was conducted through the integration of conventional methods (geological-geomorphological field survey, air-photo interpretation) and an Advanced-Differential Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (A-DInSAR) technique. The DSGSD involves a brittle lithotype (conglomerates of the Ariano Irpino Supersynthem) resting over a Structurally Complex Formation (Varycoloured Clays of Calaggio Formation). At Bisaccia, probably as a consequence of post-cyclic recompression phenomena triggered by reiterated seismic actions, the rigid plate made up of conglomeratic sediments resulted to be split in five portions, showing different rates of displacements, whose deformations are in the order of some centimeter/year, thus inducing severe damage to the urban settlement. A-DInSAR techniques confirmed to be a reliable tool in monitoring slow-moving landslides. In this case 96 ENVIronmental SATellite-Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ENVISAT-ASAR) images, in ascending and descending orbits, have been processed using SUBSOFT software, developed by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSLab) group from the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC). The DInSAR results, coupled with field survey, supported the analysis of the instability mechanism and confirmed the historical record of the movements already available for the town.

  20. A-Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry analysis of a Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation occurring at Bisaccia (Italy).

    PubMed

    Di Martire, Diego; Novellino, Alessandro; Ramondini, Massimo; Calcaterra, Domenico

    2016-04-15

    This paper presents the results of an investigation on a Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation (DSGSD), previously only hypothesized by some authors, affecting Bisaccia, a small town located in Campania region, Italy. The study was conducted through the integration of conventional methods (geological-geomorphological field survey, air-photo interpretation) and an Advanced-Differential Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (A-DInSAR) technique. The DSGSD involves a brittle lithotype (conglomerates of the Ariano Irpino Supersynthem) resting over a Structurally Complex Formation (Varycoloured Clays of Calaggio Formation). At Bisaccia, probably as a consequence of post-cyclic recompression phenomena triggered by reiterated seismic actions, the rigid plate made up of conglomeratic sediments resulted to be split in five portions, showing different rates of displacements, whose deformations are in the order of some centimeter/year, thus inducing severe damage to the urban settlement. A-DInSAR techniques confirmed to be a reliable tool in monitoring slow-moving landslides. In this case 96 ENVIronmental SATellite-Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ENVISAT-ASAR) images, in ascending and descending orbits, have been processed using SUBSOFT software, developed by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSLab) group from the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC). The DInSAR results, coupled with field survey, supported the analysis of the instability mechanism and confirmed the historical record of the movements already available for the town. PMID:26849321

  1. Monitoring deformation at The Geysers geothermal field, California using C-band and X-band Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasco, D. W.; Rutqvist, J.; Dobson, P. F.; Oldenburg, C. M.; Ferretti, A.; Rucci, A.; Novali, F.; Garcia, J.; Walters, M.; Hartline, C.

    2012-12-01

    Using two distinct sets of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data and permanent scatterer analysis we are able to resolve deformation at The Geysers geothermal field. The first set of observations utilize archived European Space Agency (ESA) C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from 1992 through 1999 to image the long-term and large-scale subsidence in the geothermal field. The peak subsidence rate of 51.5 mm/year agrees with previous estimates from leveling and global positioning system observations. Data from a second set of measurements, acquired by a recently tasked TerraSar-X satellite, extend from May 2011 until April 2012 and overlap the C-band data spatially but not temporally. The higher frequency X-band data provides a much higher density of permanent scatters (1122 per square kilometer) than the lower frequency C-band data (12 per square kilometer) over the area surrounding an enhanced geothermal system (EGS) injection well. The EGS injection well is part of an EGS demonstration project in the northern portion of The Geysers field. The X-band InSAR observations are sensitive to some 1 to 2 cm of deformation induced by water injected into the EGS well starting in October 2011. The temporal variation of the deformation is compatible with the displacement history calculated using coupled numerical modeling of the water injection.

  2. Observation of wave refraction at an ice edge by synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Vachon, Paris W.; Peng, Chih Y.

    1991-01-01

    In this note the refraction of waves at the ice edge is studied by using aircraft synthesis aperture radar (SAR). Penetration of a dominant swell from open ocean into the ice cover was observed by SAR during the Labrador Ice Margin Experiment (LIMEX), conducted on the marginal ice zone (MIZ) off the east coast of Newfoundland, Canada, in March 1987. At an ice edge with a large curvature, the dominant swell component disappeared locally in the SAR imagery. Six subscenes of waves in the MIZ from the SAR image have been processed, revealing total reflection, refraction, and energy reduction of the ocean waves by the ice cover. The observed variations of wave spectra from SAR near the ice edge are consistent with the model prediction of wave refraction at the ice edge due to the change of wave dispersion relation in ice developed by Liu and Mollo-Christensen (1988).

  3. Science Results from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR): Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane L. (Editor); Plaut, Jeffrey (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is the most advanced imaging radar system to fly in Earth orbit. Carried in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Endeavour in April and October of 1994, SIR-C/X-SAR simultaneously recorded SAR data at three wavelengths (L-, C-, and X-bands; 23.5, 5.8, and 3.1 cm, respectively). The SIR-C/X-SAR Science Team consists of 53 investigator teams from more than a dozen countries. Science investigations were undertaken in the fields of ecology, hydrology, ecology, and oceanography. This report contains 44 investigator team reports and several additional reports from coinvestigators and other researchers.

  4. A comparison of spatial sampling techniques enabling first principles modeling of a synthetic aperture RADAR imaging platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartley, Michael; Goodenough, Adam; Brown, Scott; Kauffman, Russel P.

    2010-04-01

    Simulation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery may be approached in many different ways. One method treats a scene as a radar cross section (RCS) map and simply evaluates the radar equation, convolved with a system impulse response to generate simulated SAR imagery. Another approach treats a scene as a series of primitive geometric shapes, for which a closed form solution for the RCS exists (such as boxes, spheres and cylinders), and sums their contribution at the antenna level by again solving the radar equation. We present a ray-tracing approach to SAR image simulation that treats a scene as a series of arbitrarily shaped facetized objects, each facet potentially having a unique radio frequency optical property and time-varying location and orientation. A particle based approach, as compared to a wave based approach, presents a challenge for maintaining coherency of sampled scene points between pulses that allows the reconstruction of an exploitable image from the modeled complex phase history. We present a series of spatial sampling techniques and their relative success at producing accurate phase history data for simulations of spotlight, stripmap and SAR-GMTI collection scenarios.

  5. Two-beam-coupling correlator for synthetic aperture radar image recognition with power-law scattering centers preenhancement.

    PubMed

    Haji-Saeed, Bahareh; Woods, Charles L; Kierstead, John; Khoury, Jed

    2008-06-01

    Synthetic radar image recognition is an area of interest for military applications including automatic target recognition, air traffic control, and remote sensing. Here a dynamic range compression two-beam-coupling joint transform correlator for detecting synthetic aperture radar targets is utilized. The joint input image consists of a prepower-law, enhanced scattering center of the input image and a linearly synthesized power-law-enhanced scattering center template. Enhancing the scattering center of both the synthetic template and the input image furnishes the conditions for achieving dynamic range compression correlation in two-beam coupling. Dynamic range compression (a) enhances the signal-to-noise ratio, (b) enhances the high frequencies relative to low frequencies, and (c) converts the noise to high frequency components. This improves the correlation-peak intensity to the mean of the surrounding noise significantly. Dynamic range compression correlation has already been demonstrated to outperform many optimal correlation filters in detecting signals in severe noise environments. The performance is evaluated via established metrics such as peak-to-correlation energy, Horner efficiency, and correlation-peak intensity. The results showed significant improvement as the power increased.

  6. Status and future of laser scanning, synthetic aperture radar and hyperspectral remote sensing data for forest biomass assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Barbara

    2010-11-01

    This is a review of the latest developments in different fields of remote sensing for forest biomass mapping. The main fields of research within the last decade have focused on the use of small footprint airborne laser scanning systems, polarimetric synthetic radar interferometry and hyperspectral data. Parallel developments in the field of digital airborne camera systems, digital photogrammetry and very high resolution multispectral data have taken place and have also proven themselves suitable for forest mapping issues. Forest mapping is a wide field and a variety of forest parameters can be mapped or modelled based on remote sensing information alone or combined with field data. The most common information required about a forest is related to its wood production and environmental aspects. In this paper, we will focus on the potential of advanced remote sensing techniques to assess forest biomass. This information is especially required by the REDD (reducing of emission from avoided deforestation and degradation) process. For this reason, new types of remote sensing data such as fullwave laser scanning data, polarimetric radar interferometry (polarimetric systhetic aperture interferometry, PolInSAR) and hyperspectral data are the focus of the research. In recent times, a few state-of-the-art articles in the field of airborne laser scanning for forest applications have been published. The current paper will provide a state-of-the-art review of remote sensing with a particular focus on biomass estimation, including new findings with fullwave airborne laser scanning, hyperspectral and polarimetric synthetic aperture radar interferometry. A synthesis of the actual findings and an outline of future developments will be presented.

  7. Analysis of urban area land cover using SEASAT Synthetic Aperture Radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, F. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Digitally processed SEASAT synthetic aperture raar (SAR) imagery of the Denver, Colorado urban area was examined to explore the potential of SAR data for mapping urban land cover and the compatability of SAR derived land cover classes with the United States Geological Survey classification system. The imagery is examined at three different scales to determine the effect of image enlargement on accuracy and level of detail extractable. At each scale the value of employing a simplistic preprocessing smoothing algorithm to improve image interpretation is addressed. A visual interpretation approach and an automated machine/visual approach are employed to evaluate the feasibility of producing a semiautomated land cover classification from SAR data. Confusion matrices of omission and commission errors are employed to define classification accuracies for each interpretation approach and image scale.

  8. Inverse synthetic aperture radar processing using parametric time-frequency estimators Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V., LLNL

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes the work performed for the Office of the Chief of Naval Research (ONR) during the period of 1 September 1997 through 31 December 1997. The primary objective of this research was aimed at developing an alternative time-frequency approach which is recursive-in-time to be applied to the Inverse Synthethic Aperture Radar (ISAR) imaging problem discussed subsequently. Our short term (Phase I) goals were to: 1. Develop an ISAR stepped-frequency waveform (SFWF) radar simulator based on a point scatterer vehicular target model incorporating both translational and rotational motion; 2. Develop a parametric, recursive-in-time approach to the ISAR target imaging problem; 3. Apply the standard time-frequency short-term Fourier transform (STFT) estimator, initially to a synthesized data set; and 4. Initiate the development of the recursive algorithm. We have achieved all of these goals during the Phase I of the project and plan to complete the overall development, application and comparison of the parametric approach to other time-frequency estimators (STFT, etc.) on our synthesized vehicular data sets during the next phase of funding. It should also be noted that we developed a batch minimum variance translational motion compensation (TMC) algorithm to estimate the radial components of target motion (see Section IV). This algorithm is easily extended to recursive solution and will probably become part of the overall recursive processing approach to solve the ISAR imaging problem. Our goals for the continued effort are to: 1. Develop and extend a complex, recursive-in-time, time- frequency parameter estimator based on the recursive prediction error method (RPEM) using the underlying Gauss- Newton algorithms. 2. Apply the complex RPEM algorithm to synthesized ISAR data using the above simulator. 3. Compare the performance of the proposed algorithm to standard time-frequency estimators applied to the same data sets.

  9. Progress report on the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, Y.; Imel, D.; Chu, A.; Miller, T.; Moller, D.; Skotnicki, W.

    2001-01-01

    AIRSAR has served as a test-bed for both imaging radar techniques and radar technologies for over a decade. In fact, the polarimetric, cross-track interferometric, and along-track introferometric radar techniques were all developed using AIRSAR.

  10. Short-range verification experiment of a trial one-dimensional synthetic aperture infrared laser radar operated in the 10-microm band.

    PubMed

    Yoshikado, S; Aruga, T

    2000-03-20

    A trial one-dimensional (1-D) synthetic aperture infrared laser radar (SAILR) system for imaging static objects, with two CO(2) lasers as a transmitter and a local oscillator for heterodyne detection, was constructed. It has a single receiving aperture mounted on a linearly movable stage with a length of 1 m and a position accuracy of 1 microm. In an indoor short-range experiment to confirm the fundamental functions of the system and demonstrate its unique imaging process we succeeded in obtaining 1-D synthetic aperture images of close specular point targets with theoretically expected resolution.

  11. Investigating the backscatter contrast anomaly in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery of the dunes along the Israel-Egypt border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenstein, Offer; Siegal, Zehava; Blumberg, Dan G.; Adamowski, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The dune field intersected by the Israel-Egypt borderline has attracted many remote sensing studies over the years because it exhibits unique optical phenomena in several domains, from the visual to the thermal infrared. These phenomena are the result of land-use policies implemented by the two countries, which have differing effects on the two ecosystems. This study explores the surface properties that affect radar backscatter, namely the surface roughness and dielectric properties, in order to determine the cause for the variation across the border. The backscatter contrast was demonstrated for SIR-C, the first synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor to capture this phenomenon, as well as ASAR imagery that coincides with complementary ground observations. These field observations along the border, together with an aerial image from the same year as the SIR-C acquisition were used to analyze differences in vegetation patterns that can affect the surface roughness. The dielectric permittivity of two kinds of topsoil (sand, biocrust) was measured in the field and in the laboratory. The results suggest that the vegetation structure and spatial distribution differ between the two sides of the border in a manner that is consistent with the radar observations. The dielectric permittivity of sand and biocrust was found to be similar, although they are not constant across the radar spectral region (50 MHz-20 GHz). These findings support the hypothesis that changes to the vegetation, as a consequence of the different land-use practices in Israel and Egypt, are the cause for the radar backscatter contrast across the border.

  12. Three-dimensional subsurface imaging synthetic aperture radar (3D SISAR). Final report, September 22, 1993--September 22, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The concept developed under this applied research and development contract is a novel Ground Penetrating Radar system capable of remotely detecting, analyzing, and mapping buried waste containers from a mobile platform. From the testing and analysis performed to date, the 3-D SISAR has achieved the detection, accurate location, and three-dimensional imaging of buried test objects from a stand-off geometry. Tests have demonstrated that underground objects have been located to within 0.1 meter of their actual position. This work validates that the key elements of the approach are performing as anticipated. The stand-off synthetic aperture radar (SAR) methodology has been demonstrated to be a feasible approach as a remote sensing technique. The radar sensor constructed under this project is providing adequate quality data for imaging, and the matched filters have been demonstrated to provide enhanced target detection. Additional work is on-going in the area of underground propagation and scattering phenomena to provide enhanced depth performance, as the current imaging results have been limited to a few feet of depth underground.

  13. Continuous monitoring of biophysical Eucalyptus sp. parameters using interferometric synthetic aperture radar data in P and X bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gama, Fábio Furlan; dos Santos, João Roberto; Mura, José Claudio

    2016-04-01

    This work aims to verify the applicability of models obtained using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data for estimation of biophysical Eucalyptus saligna parameters [diameter of breast height (DBH), total height and volume], as a method of continuous forest inventory. In order to obtain different digital elevation models, and the interferometric height (Hint) to retrieve the tree heights, SAR surveying was carried out by an airborne interferometric SAR in two frequencies X and P bands. The study area, located in the Brazilian southeast region (S 22°53‧22″/W 45°26‧16″ and S 22°53‧22″/W 45°26‧16″), comprises 128.64 hectares of Eucalyptus saligna stands. The methodological procedures encompassed: forest inventory, topographic surveying, radar mapping, radar processing, and multivariable regression techniques to build Eucalyptus volume, DBH, and height models. The statistical regression pointed out Hint and interferometric coherence as the most important variables for the total height and DBH estimation; for the volume model, however, only the Hint variable was selected. The performance of the biophysical models from the second campaign, two years later (2006), were consistent and its results are very promising for updating annual inventories needed for managing Eucalyptus plantations.

  14. The evolution of convective storms from their footprints on the sea as viewed by synthetic aperture radar from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, David; Black, Peter G.

    1994-01-01

    SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) echoes from the sea have previously been shown to be the result of rain and winds produced by convective stroms; rain damps the surface waves and causes ech-free holes, while the diverging winds associated with downdraft generate waves and associated echoes surrounding the holes. Gust fronts are also evident. Such a snapshot from 8 July 1978 has been examined in conjunction with ground-based radar. This leads to the conclusion that the SAR storm footprints resulted from storm processes that occurred up to an hour or more prior to the snapshot. A sequence of events is discerned from the SAR imagery in which new cell growth is triggered in between the converging outflows of two preexisting cells. In turn, the new cell generates a mini-squall line along its expanding gust front. While such phenomena are well known over land, the spaceborne SAR now allows important inferences to be made about the nature and frequency of convective storms over the oceans. The storm effects on the sea have significant implications for spaceborne wind scatterometry and rainfall measurements. Some of the findings herein remain speculative because of the great distance to the Miami weather radar-the only source of corroborative data.

  15. Linear Dispersion Relation and Depth Sensitivity to Swell Parameters: Application to Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging and Bathymetry

    PubMed Central

    Boccia, Valentina; Renga, Alfredo; Rufino, Giancarlo; D'Errico, Marco; Moccia, Antonio; Aragno, Cesare; Zoffoli, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Long gravity waves or swell dominating the sea surface is known to be very useful to estimate seabed morphology in coastal areas. The paper reviews the main phenomena related to swell waves propagation that allow seabed morphology to be sensed. The linear dispersion is analysed and an error budget model is developed to assess the achievable depth accuracy when Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data are used. The relevant issues and potentials of swell-based bathymetry by SAR are identified and discussed. This technique is of particular interest for characteristic regions of the Mediterranean Sea, such as in gulfs and relatively close areas, where traditional SAR-based bathymetric techniques, relying on strong tidal currents, are of limited practical utility. PMID:25789333

  16. Automatic Synthetic Aperture Radar based oil spill detection and performance estimation via a semi-automatic operational service benchmark.

    PubMed

    Singha, Suman; Vespe, Michele; Trieschmann, Olaf

    2013-08-15

    Today the health of ocean is in danger as it was never before mainly due to man-made pollutions. Operational activities show regular occurrence of accidental and deliberate oil spill in European waters. Since the areas covered by oil spills are usually large, satellite remote sensing particularly Synthetic Aperture Radar represents an effective option for operational oil spill detection. This paper describes the development of a fully automated approach for oil spill detection from SAR. Total of 41 feature parameters extracted from each segmented dark spot for oil spill and 'look-alike' classification and ranked according to their importance. The classification algorithm is based on a two-stage processing that combines classification tree analysis and fuzzy logic. An initial evaluation of this methodology on a large dataset has been carried out and degree of agreement between results from proposed algorithm and human analyst was estimated between 85% and 93% respectively for ENVISAT and RADARSAT.

  17. Magma flux at Okmok Volcano, Alaska, from a joint inversion of continuous GPS, campaign GPS, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, Juliet; Lu, Zhong; Fournier, Tom; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.

    2010-12-01

    Volcano deformation is usually measured using satellite geodetic techniques including interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), campaign GPS, and continuous GPS. Differences in the spatial and temporal sampling of each system mean that most appropriate inversion scheme to determine the source parameters from each data set is different. Most studies either compare results from independent inversions or subsample the data sets to the lowest common factor. It is unclear whether differences in the solution reflect differences in source behavior, differences in measurement bias, or differences in inversion technique. Here we develop a single inversion procedure that captures the benefits of each system, especially the daily sampling of continuous GPS and the high spatial resolution of InSAR. Okmok Volcano, Alaska, is an ideal target for such a test because a long series (<15 years) of InSAR and continuous GPS measurement exists and the source is almost continuously active and in a stable location.

  18. Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sourcesof production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermalfield

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall, B.; Vasco, D.W.

    2006-07-01

    We used synthetic aperture radar interferograms to imageground subsidence that occurred over the Dixie Valley geothermal fieldduring different time intervals between 1992 and 1997. Linear elasticinversion of the subsidence that occurred between April, 1996 and March,1997 revealed that the dominant sources of deformation during this timeperiod were large changes in fluid volumes at shallow depths within thevalley fill above the reservoir. The distributions of subsidence andsubsurface volume change support a model in which reduction in pressureand volume of hot water discharging into the valley fill from localizedupflow along the Stillwater range frontal fault is caused by drawdownwithin the upflow zone resulting from geothermal production. Our resultsalso suggest that an additional source of fluid volume reduction in theshallow valley fill might be similar drawdown within piedmont faultzones. Shallow groundwater flow in the vicinity of the field appears tobe controlled on the NW by a mapped fault and to the SW by a lineament ofas yet unknown origin.

  19. Automatic target classification of man-made objects in synthetic aperture radar images using Gabor wavelet and neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasuki, Perumal; Roomi, S. Mohamed Mansoor

    2013-01-01

    Processing of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images has led to the development of automatic target classification approaches. These approaches help to classify individual and mass military ground vehicles. This work aims to develop an automatic target classification technique to classify military targets like truck/tank/armored car/cannon/bulldozer. The proposed method consists of three stages via preprocessing, feature extraction, and neural network (NN). The first stage removes speckle noise in a SAR image by the identified frost filter and enhances the image by histogram equalization. The second stage uses a Gabor wavelet to extract the image features. The third stage classifies the target by an NN classifier using image features. The proposed work performs better than its counterparts, like K-nearest neighbor (KNN). The proposed work performs better on databases like moving and stationary target acquisition and recognition against the earlier methods by KNN.

  20. Intercomparison of synthetic- and real-aperture radar observations of Arctic sea ice during winter MIZEX '87

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuchmann, R. A.; Onstott, R. G.; Sutherland, L. L.; Wackerman, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    Active microwave measurements were made of various sea ice forms in March and April 1987 during the Marginal Ice Zone Experiment, at 1, 5, 10, 18, and 35 GHz using a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and helicopter and ship-based scatterometers. The X-band (9.8 GHz) SAR data were compared to the scatterometer data and it was determined that for 5 GHz and higher frequencies both the SAR and scatterometers can differentiate open water, new ice (5 to 30 cm), first-year ice with rubble (0.60 -1.5 m), and multiyear ice. The analysis further confirmed that the C-band (5 GHz) SAR's flying on ESA ERS-1 and Radarsat will differentiate the mentioned ice types.

  1. Imaging method for downward-looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar based on reweighted atomic norm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Qian; Han, Kuoye; Lin, Yun; Zhang, Bingchen; Liu, Jianguo; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    We propose an imaging algorithm for downward-looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) in the circumstance of cross-track sparse and nonuniform array configuration. Considering the off-grid effect and the resolution improvement, the algorithm combines pseudo-polar formatting algorithm, reweighed atomic norm minimization (RANM), and a parametric relaxation-based cyclic approach (RELAX) to improve the imaging performance with a reduced number of array antennas. RANM is employed in the cross-track imaging after pseudo-polar formatting the DLSLA 3-D SAR echo signal, then the reconstructed results are refined by RELAX. By taking advantage of the reweighted scheme, RANM can improve the resolution of the atomic norm minimization, and outperforms discretized compressive sensing schemes that suffer from off-grid effect. The simulated and real data experiments of DLSLA 3-D SAR verify the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  2. a Fuzzy Logic-Based Approach for the Detection of Flooded Vegetation by Means of Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganskaya, V.; Martinis, S.; Twele, A.; Cao, W.; Schmitt, A.; Marzahn, P.; Ludwig, R.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper an algorithm designed to map flooded vegetation from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery is introduced. The approach is based on fuzzy logic which enables to deal with the ambiguity of SAR data and to integrate multiple ancillary data containing topographical information, simple hydraulic considerations and land cover information. This allows the exclusion of image elements with a backscatter value similar to flooded vegetation, to significantly reduce misclassification errors. The flooded vegetation mapping procedure is tested on a flood event that occurred in Germany over parts of the Saale catchment on January 2011 using a time series of high resolution TerraSAR-X data covering the time interval from 2009 to 2015. The results show that the analysis of multi-temporal X-band data combined with ancillary data using a fuzzy logic-based approach permits the detection of flooded vegetation areas.

  3. Linear dispersion relation and depth sensitivity to swell parameters: application to synthetic aperture radar imaging and bathymetry.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Valentina; Renga, Alfredo; Rufino, Giancarlo; D'Errico, Marco; Moccia, Antonio; Aragno, Cesare; Zoffoli, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Long gravity waves or swell dominating the sea surface is known to be very useful to estimate seabed morphology in coastal areas. The paper reviews the main phenomena related to swell waves propagation that allow seabed morphology to be sensed. The linear dispersion is analysed and an error budget model is developed to assess the achievable depth accuracy when Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data are used. The relevant issues and potentials of swell-based bathymetry by SAR are identified and discussed. This technique is of particular interest for characteristic regions of the Mediterranean Sea, such as in gulfs and relatively close areas, where traditional SAR-based bathymetric techniques, relying on strong tidal currents, are of limited practical utility. PMID:25789333

  4. Reservoir monitoring and characterization using satellite geodetic data: Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar observations from the Krechba field, Algeria

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    Deformation in the material overlying an active reservoir is used to monitor pressure change at depth. A sequence of pressure field estimates, eleven in all, allow us to construct a measure of diffusive travel time throughout the reservoir. The dense distribution of travel time values means that we can construct an exactly linear inverse problem for reservoir flow properties. Application to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data gathered over a CO{sub 2} injection in Algeria reveals pressure propagation along two northwest trending corridors. An inversion of the travel times indicates the existence of two northwest-trending high permeability zones. The high permeability features trend in the same direction as the regional fault and fracture zones. Model parameter resolution estimates indicate that the features are well resolved.

  5. Linear dispersion relation and depth sensitivity to swell parameters: application to synthetic aperture radar imaging and bathymetry.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Valentina; Renga, Alfredo; Rufino, Giancarlo; D'Errico, Marco; Moccia, Antonio; Aragno, Cesare; Zoffoli, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Long gravity waves or swell dominating the sea surface is known to be very useful to estimate seabed morphology in coastal areas. The paper reviews the main phenomena related to swell waves propagation that allow seabed morphology to be sensed. The linear dispersion is analysed and an error budget model is developed to assess the achievable depth accuracy when Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data are used. The relevant issues and potentials of swell-based bathymetry by SAR are identified and discussed. This technique is of particular interest for characteristic regions of the Mediterranean Sea, such as in gulfs and relatively close areas, where traditional SAR-based bathymetric techniques, relying on strong tidal currents, are of limited practical utility.

  6. Validation of a synthetic aperture radar ocean wave imaging theory by the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B Experiment over the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüning, Claus; Alpers, Werner; Zambresky, Liana F.; Tilley, David G.

    1988-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image intensity spectra measured during the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) mission on October 6 and 8, 1984, over the North Sea are compared with ocean wave spectra obtained from a wave prediction model. The relationship between both spectra is discussed in the light of a previously proposed SAR imaging theory of ocean waves. Most of the measured SAR image spectra of October 6 show double peaks, while the hindcast ocean wave spectra have only single peaks. It is shown that the double peaks are generated by the SAR imaging mechanism. They occur only when velocity bunching is sufficiently strong near the range direction and when enough spectral energy density is present in this spectral region. Double peaks are generated when the SAR modulation transfer function (MTF) consisting of the sum of the complex real aperture radar (RAR) MTF and the velocity bunching MTF has a strong minimum near the range direction by which the wave spectrum is cut into two, in general unequal, pieces. The azimuth angle at which this minimum occurs depends strongly on the phase of the RAR MTF. In general, the two peaks are not located symmetrically with respect to the range direction, nor do they have equal heights. We interpret the reasonably good agreement between simulated and measured SAR image spectra during the SIR-B mission over the North Sea as further experimental evidence in support of the validity of the previously proposed SAR imaging theory of ocean waves.

  7. Retrieval and Evaluation of Wind Vectors and Advective Surface Velocities from Synthetic Aperture Radar and Infrared Radiometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, Gisela; Eriksson, Leif E. B.

    Analysis of ocean surface dynamics has been proven to be of vital importance in many areas (e.g. shipping, fishing). Two important parameters to describe the ocean dynamics are the wind velocity (speed and direction) and advective surface velocities (ocean current velocity). These parameters are currently provided operationally by forecast models, surface sensors (e.g. buoys, coastal radar) and satellite sensors. However, coverage limitations, low resolution and limited temporal availability impose a need for implementation and evaluation of new data sources and techniques for estimation of these parameters. In this paper we implement and evaluate known techniques for determination of wind and ocean current velocity from satellite data. Wind is determined from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data by applying two algo-rithms. First, the Local Gradient method is implemented to extract wind direction from the SAR data, and then the CMOD-5 Geophysical Model Function of the backscatter is inverted to obtain the wind speed as a function of the wind direction and the incidence angle. Current propagation is estimated by analyzing the Sea Surface Temperature propagation in two consec-utive infrared images of the same area from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The evaluation shows a good agreement between estimated wind vectors from SAR and scat-terometer data. Comparison with merged ocean current estimates is addressed. The methods will be implemented in the maritime security service provided by the SECTRONIC project funded by the EU 7th framework program.

  8. Road-Aided Ground Slowly Moving Target 2D Motion Estimation for Single-Channel Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhirui; Xu, Jia; Huang, Zuzhen; Zhang, Xudong; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Long, Teng; Bao, Qian

    2016-03-16

    To detect and estimate ground slowly moving targets in airborne single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR), a road-aided ground moving target indication (GMTI) algorithm is proposed in this paper. First, the road area is extracted from a focused SAR image based on radar vision. Second, after stationary clutter suppression in the range-Doppler domain, a moving target is detected and located in the image domain via the watershed method. The target's position on the road as well as its radial velocity can be determined according to the target's offset distance and traffic rules. Furthermore, the target's azimuth velocity is estimated based on the road slope obtained via polynomial fitting. Compared with the traditional algorithms, the proposed method can effectively cope with slowly moving targets partly submerged in a stationary clutter spectrum. In addition, the proposed method can be easily extended to a multi-channel system to further improve the performance of clutter suppression and motion estimation. Finally, the results of numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  9. Joint use of multiple Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery for the detection of bivalve beds and morphological changes on intertidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade, Martin; Melchionna, Sabrina

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed a large amount of high-resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of dry-fallen intertidal flats on the German North Sea coast with respect to the imaging of sediments, macrophytes, and mussels. TerraSAR-X and Radarsat-2 images of four test areas acquired from 2008 to 2013 form the basis for the present investigation and are used to demonstrate that pairs of SAR images, if combined through basic algebraic operations, can already provide indicators for morphological changes and for bivalve (oyster and mussel) beds. Multi-temporal analyses of series of SAR images allow detecting bivalve beds, since the radar backscattering from those beds is generally high, whereas that from sediments may vary with imaging geometry and environmental conditions. Our results further show evidence that also single-acquisition, dual-polarization SAR imagery can be used in this respect. The polarization coefficient (i.e., the ratio of the difference and the sum of both co-polarizations) can be used to infer indicators for oyster and blue-mussel beds.

  10. Road-Aided Ground Slowly Moving Target 2D Motion Estimation for Single-Channel Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhirui; Xu, Jia; Huang, Zuzhen; Zhang, Xudong; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Long, Teng; Bao, Qian

    2016-01-01

    To detect and estimate ground slowly moving targets in airborne single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR), a road-aided ground moving target indication (GMTI) algorithm is proposed in this paper. First, the road area is extracted from a focused SAR image based on radar vision. Second, after stationary clutter suppression in the range-Doppler domain, a moving target is detected and located in the image domain via the watershed method. The target's position on the road as well as its radial velocity can be determined according to the target's offset distance and traffic rules. Furthermore, the target's azimuth velocity is estimated based on the road slope obtained via polynomial fitting. Compared with the traditional algorithms, the proposed method can effectively cope with slowly moving targets partly submerged in a stationary clutter spectrum. In addition, the proposed method can be easily extended to a multi-channel system to further improve the performance of clutter suppression and motion estimation. Finally, the results of numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26999140

  11. Detection of aquifer system compaction and land subsidence using interferometric synthetic aperture radar, Antelope Valley, Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, D.L.; Hudnut, K.W.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Phillips, S.P.; Peltzer, G.; Rogez, F.; Rosen, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has great potential to detect and quantify land subsidence caused by aquifer system compaction. InSAR maps with high spatial detail and resolution of range displacement (??10 mm in change of land surface elevation) were developed for a groundwater basin (~103 km2) in Antelope Valley, California, using radar data collected from the ERS-1 satellite. These data allow comprehensive comparison between recent (1993-1995) subsidence patterns and those detected historically (1926-1992) by more traditional methods. The changed subsidence patterns are generally compatible with recent shifts in land and water use. The InSAR-detected patterns are generally consistent with predictions based on a coupled model of groundwater flow and aquifer system compaction. The minor inconsistencies may reflect our imperfect knowledge of the distribution and properties of compressible sediments. When used in conjunction with coincident measurements of groundwater levels and other geologic information, InSAR data may be useful for constraining parameter estimates in simulations of aquifer system compaction.

  12. Road-Aided Ground Slowly Moving Target 2D Motion Estimation for Single-Channel Synthetic Aperture Radar

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhirui; Xu, Jia; Huang, Zuzhen; Zhang, Xudong; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Long, Teng; Bao, Qian

    2016-01-01

    To detect and estimate ground slowly moving targets in airborne single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR), a road-aided ground moving target indication (GMTI) algorithm is proposed in this paper. First, the road area is extracted from a focused SAR image based on radar vision. Second, after stationary clutter suppression in the range-Doppler domain, a moving target is detected and located in the image domain via the watershed method. The target’s position on the road as well as its radial velocity can be determined according to the target’s offset distance and traffic rules. Furthermore, the target’s azimuth velocity is estimated based on the road slope obtained via polynomial fitting. Compared with the traditional algorithms, the proposed method can effectively cope with slowly moving targets partly submerged in a stationary clutter spectrum. In addition, the proposed method can be easily extended to a multi-channel system to further improve the performance of clutter suppression and motion estimation. Finally, the results of numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26999140

  13. Tracking lava flow emplacement on the east rift zone of Kilauea, Hawai’i with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) coherence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dietterich, Hannah R.; Poland, Michael P.; Schmidt, David; Cashman, Katharine V.; Sherrod, David R.; Espinosa, Arkin Tapia

    2012-01-01

    Lava flow mapping is both an essential component of volcano monitoring and a valuable tool for investigating lava flow behavior. Although maps are traditionally created through field surveys, remote sensing allows an extraordinary view of active lava flows while avoiding the difficulties of mapping on location. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, in particular, can detect changes in a flow field by comparing two images collected at different times with SAR coherence. New lava flows radically alter the scattering properties of the surface, making the radar signal decorrelated in SAR coherence images. We describe a new technique, SAR Coherence Mapping (SCM), to map lava flows automatically from coherence images independent of look angle or satellite path. We use this approach to map lava flow emplacement during the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō-Kupaianaha eruption at Kīlauea, Hawai‘i. The resulting flow maps correspond well with field mapping and better resolve the internal structure of surface flows, as well as the locations of active flow paths. However, the SCM technique is only moderately successful at mapping flows that enter vegetation, which is also often decorrelated between successive SAR images. Along with measurements of planform morphology, we are able to show that the length of time a flow stays decorrelated after initial emplacement is linearly related to the flow thickness. Finally, we use interferograms obtained after flow surfaces become correlated to show that persistent decorrelation is caused by post-emplacement flow subsidence.

  14. Directional ocean wave spectrum estimation based on the joint measurement from synthetic aperture radar and wave spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lin; Pan, Delu; Hao, Zengzhou; Mao, Zhihua; He, Xianqiang

    2011-11-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can measure directional wave spectrum based on the closed nonlinear SAR-ocean mapping mechanism. The according wave spectrum retrieval algorithm has been developing for decades, but some limitations remain, like high wave number cut off in azimuthal direction and the need for the first guess spectrum. Wave spectrometer is a kind of new satellite-based real aperture radar (RAR) operating at low incidence, which has a narrow beam and scans complete 360° by antenna rotation. It derives wave spectrum by the simple linear relation between the wave spectrum and the modulation spectrum from the wave spectrometer. The linear coefficient can be estimated by the nadir beam or external wind speed information. This paper proposes a method on the wave spectrum estimation based on the joint measurement from synchronous SAR and wave spectrometer. Firstly, the modulation spectrum is derived from the signal spectrum of the wave spectrometer, from which the relative wave spectrum can be constructed. Then the relative wave spectrum is seen as the first guess spectrum for the wave spectrum retrieval of SAR image. Because the relative wave spectrum has the same pattern with the real wave spectrum but has different absolute energy, we can retrieve the directional wave spectrum by the iteration way based on the relative wave spectrum from the SAR image. This paper makes use of simulation technology to validate the joint measurement. The simulation compares the input spectrum and the retrieved one in terms of peak direction, peak wavelength and significant wave height, which has a deviation of 6°, 4m and 0.3m, respectively. Simulation results show the joint measurement has the feasibility for the retrieval of directional ocean wave spectrum.

  15. Detecting Faults in Southern California using Computer-Vision Techniques and Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba, M.; Rains, C.; von Dassow, W.; Parker, J. W.; Glasscoe, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    Knowing the location and behavior of active faults is essential for earthquake hazard assessment and disaster response. In Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) images, faults are revealed as linear discontinuities. Currently, interferograms are manually inspected to locate faults. During the summer of 2013, the NASA-JPL DEVELOP California Disasters team contributed to the development of a method to expedite fault detection in California using remote-sensing technology. The team utilized InSAR images created from polarimetric L-band data from NASA's Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) project. A computer-vision technique known as 'edge-detection' was used to automate the fault-identification process. We tested and refined an edge-detection algorithm under development through NASA's Earthquake Data Enhanced Cyber-Infrastructure for Disaster Evaluation and Response (E-DECIDER) project. To optimize the algorithm we used both UAVSAR interferograms and synthetic interferograms generated through Disloc, a web-based modeling program available through NASA's QuakeSim project. The edge-detection algorithm detected seismic, aseismic, and co-seismic slip along faults that were identified and compared with databases of known fault systems. Our optimization process was the first step toward integration of the edge-detection code into E-DECIDER to provide decision support for earthquake preparation and disaster management. E-DECIDER partners that will use the edge-detection code include the California Earthquake Clearinghouse and the US Department of Homeland Security through delivery of products using the Unified Incident Command and Decision Support (UICDS) service. Through these partnerships, researchers, earthquake disaster response teams, and policy-makers will be able to use this new methodology to examine the details of ground and fault motions for moderate to large earthquakes. Following an earthquake, the newly discovered faults can

  16. Differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry for landslide monitoring: a priori GIS based assessment of feasibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, S.; Singer, J.; Minet, Ch.; Thuro, K.

    2012-04-01

    In the last two decades differential radar interferometry (D-InSAR) has proven to be a powerful remote sensing technique for detection and deformation monitoring of landslides with an accuracy of a few millimeters. However, due to the inclined imaging geometry, areas with a topographic relief (where landslides usually occur) appear heavily distorted in the radar image. Thereby slopes inclined towards the radar sensor appear shortened (foreshortening) and in extreme even can cause an overlapping of different radar signals (layover effect); slopes oriented away from the radar seem stretched (elongation) or even can be shadowed by a steep mountain (shadowing). These effects limit or even prohibit the use of a radar image for interferometric applications. Besides these geometric distortions, the land cover has great influence on the applicability of differential radar interferometry. For example vegetation-free areas such as buildings and rocks show high coherence values over a long time period (high stability of their backscattering properties), whereas areas covered by vegetation, especially forests, have varying backscattering properties at different times (e.g. due to wind; temporal decorrelation). Areas with high coherence values in the radar interferogram are better suited for D-InSAR applications. To date prior to an investigation using D-InSAR these limiting effects usually are only roughly estimated, sometimes leading to disappointing results when the actual radar images are analyzed. Therefore we present a GIS routine, which based on freely available digital elevation model (DEM) data (SRTM) not only accurately predicts the areas in which layover and shadowing will occur, but also determines the percentage of measurability of the movement of a landslide (portion oriented in radar line of sight) for a given radar acquisition geometry. Additionally land cover classification data (e.g. CORINE) is used to evaluate the influence of the landslide's land cover on D

  17. Development of NASA's Next Generation L-Band Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Lee, Seung-Kuk; Ranson, K. Jon; Marrero, Victor; Yeary, Mark

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Next generation Digital Beamforming SAR (DBSAR-2) is a state-of-the-art airborne L-band radar developed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The instrument builds upon the advanced architectures in NASA's DBSAR-1 and EcoSAR instruments. The new instrument employs a 16-channel radar architecture characterized by multi-mode operation, software defined waveform generation, digital beamforming, and configurable radar parameters. The instrument has been design to support several disciplines in Earth and Planetary sciences. The instrument was recently completed, and tested and calibrated in a anechoic chamber.

  18. A Reduced Power Digital Electronics System for a Digital Beamforming Space Exploration Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, L. M.; Rincon, R. F.; Novak, M.

    2016-10-01

    We will discuss design of an orbital P-band (70 cm wavelength) digital beamforming radar system that is modular and can be used for imaging polarimetry of Earth and rocky planets and moons, as well as asteroids and comets.

  19. Spotlight-Mode Synthetic Aperture Radar Processing for High-Resolution Lunar Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harcke, Leif; Weintraub, Lawrence; Yun, Sang-Ho; Dickinson, Richard; Gurrola, Eric; Hensley, Scott; Marechal, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    During the 2008-2009 year, the Goldstone Solar System Radar was upgraded to support radar mapping of the lunar poles at 4 m resolution. The finer resolution of the new system and the accompanying migration through resolution cells called for spotlight, rather than delay-Doppler, imaging techniques. A new pre-processing system supports fast-time Doppler removal and motion compensation to a point. Two spotlight imaging techniques which compensate for phase errors due to i) out of focus-plane motion of the radar and ii) local topography, have been implemented and tested. One is based on the polar format algorithm followed by a unique autofocus technique, the other is a full bistatic time-domain backprojection technique. The processing system yields imagery of the specified resolution. Products enabled by this new system include topographic mapping through radar interferometry, and change detection techniques (amplitude and coherent change) for geolocation of the NASA LCROSS mission impact site.

  20. Partially Adaptive Phased Array Fed Cylindrical Reflector Technique for High Performance Synthetic Aperture Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussein, Z.; Hilland, J.

    2001-01-01

    Spaceborne microwave radar instruments demand a high-performance antenna with a large aperature to address key science themes such as climate variations and predictions and global water and energy cycles.

  1. Automatic position calculating imaging radar with low-cost synthetic aperture sensor for imaging layered media

    DOEpatents

    Mast, Jeffrey E.

    1998-01-01

    An imaging system for analyzing structures comprises a radar transmitter and receiver connected to a timing mechanism that allows a radar echo sample to be taken at a variety of delay times for each radar pulse transmission. The radar transmitter and receiver are coupled to a position determining system that provides the x,y position on a surface for each group of samples measured for a volume from the surface. The radar transmitter and receiver are moved about the surface to collect such groups of measurements from a variety of x,y positions. Return signal amplitudes represent the relative reflectivity of objects within the volume and the delay in receiving each signal echo represents the depth at which the object lays in the volume and the propagation speeds of the intervening material layers. Successively deeper z-planes are backward propagated from one layer to the next with an adjustment for variations in the expected propagation velocities of the material layers that lie between adjacent z-planes.

  2. Automatic position calculating imaging radar with low-cost synthetic aperture sensor for imaging layered media

    DOEpatents

    Mast, J.E.

    1998-08-18

    An imaging system for analyzing structures comprises a radar transmitter and receiver connected to a timing mechanism that allows a radar echo sample to be taken at a variety of delay times for each radar pulse transmission. The radar transmitter and receiver are coupled to a position determining system that provides the x,y position on a surface for each group of samples measured for a volume from the surface. The radar transmitter and receiver are moved about the surface to collect such groups of measurements from a variety of x,y positions. Return signal amplitudes represent the relative reflectivity of objects within the volume and the delay in receiving each signal echo represents the depth at which the object lays in the volume and the propagation speeds of the intervening material layers. Successively deeper z-planes are backward propagated from one layer to the next with an adjustment for variations in the expected propagation velocities of the material layers that lie between adjacent z-planes. 10 figs.

  3. SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar). Earth observing system. Volume 2F: Instrument panel report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The scientific and engineering requirements for the Earth Observing System (EOS) imaging radar are provided. The radar is based on Shuttle Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C), and would include three frequencies: 1.25 GHz, 5.3 GHz, and 9.6 GHz; selectable polarizations for both transmit and receive channels; and selectable incidence angles from 15 to 55 deg. There would be three main viewing modes: a local high-resolution mode with typically 25 m resolution and 50 km swath width; a regional mapping mode with 100 m resolution and up to 200 km swath width; and a global mapping mode with typically 500 m resolution and up to 700 km swath width. The last mode allows global coverage in three days. The EOS SAR will be the first orbital imaging radar to provide multifrequency, multipolarization, multiple incidence angle observations of the entire Earth. Combined with Canadian and Japanese satellites, continuous radar observation capability will be possible. Major applications in the areas of glaciology, hydrology, vegetation science, oceanography, geology, and data and information systems are described.

  4. Integration of differential global positioning system with ultrawideband synthetic aperture radar for forward imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, David C.; Bui, Khang; Nguyen, Lam H.; Smith, Gregory; Ton, Tuan T.

    2003-09-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), as part of a customer and mission-funded exploratory development program, has been evaluating low-frequency, ultra-wideband (UWB) imaging radar for forward imaging to support the Army's vision for increased mobility and survivability of unmanned ground vehicle missions. As part of the program to improve the radar system and imaging capability, ARL has incorporated a differential global positioning system (DGPS) for motion compensation into the radar system. The use of DGPS can greatly increase positional accuracy, thereby allowing us to improve our ability to focus better images for the detection of small targets such as plastic mines and other concealed objects buried underground. The ability of UWB radar technology to detect concealed objects could provide an important obstacle avoidance capability for robotic vehicles, which would improve the speed and maneuverability of these vehicles and consequently increase the survivability of the U.S. forces. This paper details the integration and discusses the significance of integrating a DGPS into the radar system for forward imaging. It also compares the difference between DGPS and the motion compensation data collected by the use of the original theodolite-based system.

  5. Inverse synthetic aperture radar imagery of a man with a rocket propelled grenade launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Chi N.; Innocenti, Roberto; Kirose, Getachew; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Smith, Gregory

    2004-08-01

    As the Army moves toward more lightly armored Future Combat System (FCS) vehicles, enemy personnel will present an increasing threat to U.S. soldiers. In particular, they face a very real threat from adversaries using shoulder-launched, rocket propelled grenade (RPG). The Army Research Laboratory has utilized its Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) turntable facility to collect very high resolution, fully polarimetric Ka band radar data at low depression angles of a man holding an RPG. In this paper, we examine the resulting low resolution and high resolution range profiles; and based on the observed radar cross section (RCS) value, we attempt to determine the utility of Ka band radar for detecting enemy personnel carrying RPG launchers.

  6. Synthetic-aperture-radar data processing: the challenge and opportunity posed by orbiting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L.L.

    1983-03-11

    The computer-centered synthesis of a radar antenna many kilometers in effective size has been demonstrated in many (unclassified) instances, but in no more spectacular scale than in the NASA/JPL SEASAT-A satellite-borne experiment for ocean-surface imaging conducted in 1978. This essay briefly reviews the data-processing aspects of the SEASAT-A experiment, and the implications of existing and near-term radar and data processing technologies for enhancing the resolution and area coverage rates of this surveillance technology.

  7. Orbital Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) for Mars Post Sample Return Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Plaut, J. J.; Arvidson, R. E.; Paillou, P.

    2000-01-01

    A Mars orbital radar mission would use two frequencies to map the planet at 50 m resolution, penetrating 5-10 m. Some areas will be imaged at 5-m resolution. A 50-m resolution topographic map will be acquired, and surface changes detected.

  8. Point source localization from de-ramped phase history bound on interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Matthew; Hayat, Majeed M.

    2013-05-01

    The almost unique ability of azimuth deramping to preserve a smooth phase function in azimuth is exploited here to link two disparate spatial processing methods, Direction of Arrival (DOA) localization and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) and explore the achievable accuracy inherent in their common measurement scenario. Deramping in range quickly provides a first component for point source localization. Deramping in azimuth is phase preserving and provides an approximate localization in azimuth that is more accurate over narrower apertures and can be corrected in scenarios involving range migration and for its point source, azimuth location dependence. In cross-track IFSAR two antenna measurements azimuth/elevation DOAs can be calculated from their smooth azimuth functions at each range with a 1 D parametric estimate (exponential model) of point sources. Joint frequency estimates (both antennae) provide the azimuth DOA while the phase di¤erence between antenna amplitude estimates provides the elevation DOA. The cross track antenna measurements can also be processed via the IFSAR methodology producing two SAR images and the phase di¤erence between the two (an interferogram). This provides two images coordinates and a height for each pixel. The connection between the phase history DOA localization and the IFSAR is used to attain accuracy bounds for IFSAR. Extrapolation of the bounds is provided from two spatially un-aliased antennas to IFSAR scenarios with large baseline separations of the antennas. In addition imaging from the azimuth-elevation-range localization data and its ability to minimize layover (building tops imaged closer than their bases) is explored.

  9. Array error calibration methods in downward-looking linear-array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Weixian; Huang, Pingping; Han, Kuoye; Liu, Qi; Peng, Xueming

    2016-04-01

    In order to achieve high-precision three-dimensional (3-D) imaging with an airborne downward-looking linear-array 3-D synthetic aperture radar (LA-3D-SAR), a uniform virtual antenna array can be obtained by aperture synthesis of the cross-track sparse multiple-input-multiple-output array. However, the actual 3-D imaging quality is unavoidably degraded by array errors such as the multichannel amplitude-phase errors due to the nonideal antenna characteristics, and the virtual element position errors due to vibrations and motion measurement deviations. We investigate the effects of these errors on the forms and the degrees of image quality degradation and consider the use of corresponding calibration methods to eliminate the effects of errors. For the multichannel amplitude-phase errors, the target response is subject to an integrated sidelobe level increase introduced by the phase error, which can be calibrated based on external (parallel or point target) calibrators, as proposed in the paper. For the virtual element position errors, they mainly the result of contrast degradation and noise in the image along the cross-track direction and have little impact on the range and along-track directions. The imaging performance is more sensitive to the error component in the height direction as compared to other components, the precision requirement of which should be established as the calibration reference. A calibration method based on time-divided active calibrators is proposed to estimate and correct the virtual element position errors. Both numerical simulations and real data experiments have shown the validity of the analyses as well as the effectiveness of the proposed calibration methods.

  10. Surface deformation measured with interferometric synthetic aperture radar: Case studies of basin and range and Garlock-San Andreas fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Fernando

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) is widely used to detect ground deformation from varieties of geophysical origins. However, most studies lack the spatial and temporal resolutions to better characterize such observations. The purpose of this research is to use multi-track satellite radar imagery to generate time series to study and monitor vertical ground deformation over large regions such as the Nevada portion of the Basin and Range Province and the western end of the Mojave Desert. We developed an innovative method to remove horizontal movements from InSAR line-of-sight (LOS) observations using a GPS velocity field and subsequently combine the multi-track imagery resulting in one single high spatial resolution map of observed vertical crustal and surface movements. By implementing this technique we detect vertical deformation signals with short and intermediate wavelength signals associated to tectonic processes such as interseismic and postseismic deformation. In Central Nevada Seismic Belt we detect in three independent orbits a broad area of uplift that confirms results of previous studies that associate the origin of this signal to post-seimic deformation of the historic earthquakes at this region. In south-central Nevada we detect several valleys that show a gradual eastward tilt of the valley floors due to deep geodynamical processes. The valleys located at the eastern side of Ruby Mountains show a range decrease that could indicate uplift related to magma intrusion or post-seismic deformation due to older, unrecognized earthquakes. In the Big Bend segment in southern California we detect vertical uplift as expected by mechanical models of interseismic deformation. Additionaly all our velocity maps reveal small wavelength deformation signals of anthropogenic origin.

  11. Delineation of inundated area and vegetation along the Amazon floodplain with the SIR-C synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, L.L.; Melack, J.M.; Filoso, S.; Wang, Y. |

    1995-07-01

    Floodplain inundation and vegetation along the Negro and Amazon rivers near Manaus, Brazil were accurately delineated using multi-frequency, polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from the April and October 1994 SIR-C missions. A decision-tree model was used to formulate rules for a supervised classification into five categories: water, clearing (pasture), aquatic macrophyte (floating meadow), nonflooded forest, and flooded forest. Classified images were produced and tested within three days of SIR-C data acquisition. Both C-band (5.7 cm) and L-band (24 cm) wavelengths were necessary to distinguish the cover types. HH polarization was most useful for distinguishing flooded from nonflooded vegetation (C-HH for macrophyte versus pasture, and L-HH for flooded versus nonflooded forest), and cross-polarized L-band data provided the best separation between woody and nonwoody vegetation. Between the April and October missions, the Amazon River level fell about 3.6 m and the portion of the study area covered by flooded forest decreased from 23% to 12%. This study demonstrates the ability of multifrequency SAR to quantify in near realtime the extent of inundation on forested floodplains, and its potential application for timely monitoring of flood events.

  12. On the retrieval of significant wave heights from spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar using the Max-Planck Institut algorithm.

    PubMed

    Violante-Carvalho, Nelson

    2005-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) onboard satellites is the only source of directional wave spectra with continuous and global coverage. Millions of SAR Wave Mode (SWM) imagettes have been acquired since the launch in the early 1990's of the first European Remote Sensing Satellite ERS-1 and its successors ERS-2 and ENVISAT, which has opened up many possibilities specially for wave data assimilation purposes. The main aim of data assimilation is to improve the forecasting introducing available observations into the modeling procedures in order to minimize the differences between model estimates and measurements. However there are limitations in the retrieval of the directional spectrum from SAR images due to nonlinearities in the mapping mechanism. The Max-Planck Institut (MPI) scheme, the first proposed and most widely used algorithm to retrieve directional wave spectra from SAR images, is employed to compare significant wave heights retrieved from ERS-1 SAR against buoy measurements and against the WAM wave model. It is shown that for periods shorter than 12 seconds the WAM model performs better than the MPI, despite the fact that the model is used as first guess to the MPI method, that is the retrieval is deteriorating the first guess. For periods longer than 12 seconds, the part of the spectrum that is directly measured by SAR, the performance of the MPI scheme is at least as good as the WAM model.

  13. Millimeter-wave Ground-based Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging for Foreign Object Debris Detection: Experimental Studies at Short Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yigit, Enes; Demirci, Sevket; Unal, Atilla; Ozdemir, Caner; Vertiy, Alexey

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, millimeter-wave imaging of foreign object debris (FOD)-type objects on the ground is studied with the help of ground-based synthetic aperture radar (GB-SAR) technique. To test the feasibility of detecting runway FODs with this technique, some preliminary experiments are conducted within short antenna-to-target ranges of small imaging patches. An automated stripmap GB-SAR system with stepped-frequency transmission is constructed together with a quasi-monostatic data collection operation. The imaging experiments for various braces and screws are then carried out by using 32- 36 GHz and 90- 95 GHz frequency bands of the millimeter-wave. Images reconstructed by a matched-filter based algorithm are analyzed to determine the proper system parameters for an efficient imaging and to comprehend the factors against a successful detection. Results demonstrate the capability of GB-SAR imaging in accurately locating these FOD-like targets under near-range operating conditions.

  14. Off-line processing of ERS-1 synthetic aperture radar data with high precision and high throughput

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gredel, J.; Markwitz, W.; Noack, W.; Schreier, G.

    1986-01-01

    The first European remote sensing satellite ERS-1 will be launched by the European Space Agency (ESA) in 1989. The expected lifetime is two to three years. The spacecraft sensors will primarily support ocean investigations and to a limited extent also land applications. Prime sensor is the Active Microwave Instrumentation (AMI) operating in C-Band either as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) or as Wave-Scatterometer and simultaneously as Wind-Scatterometer. In Europe there will be two distinct types of processing for ERS-1 SAR data, Fast Delivery Processing and Precision Processing. Fast Delivery Proceessing will be carried out at the ground stations and up to three Fast Delivery products per pass will be delivered to end users via satellite within three hours after data acquisition. Precision Processing will be carried out in delayed time and products will not be generated until several days or weeks after data acquisition. However, a wide range of products will be generated by several Processing and Archiving Facilities (PAF) in a joint effort coordinated by ESA. The German Remote Sensing Data Center (Deutsches Fernerkundungsdatenzentrum DFD) will develop and operate one of these facilities. The related activities include the acquisition, processing and evaluation of such data for scientific, public and commercial users. Based on this experience the German Remote Sensing Data Center is presently performing a Phase-B study regarding the development of a SAR processor for ERS-1. The conceptual design of this processing facility is briefly outlined.

  15. Inversion of Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferograms for Sources of Production-Related Subsidence at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall, W; Vasco, D

    2003-02-07

    We used synthetic aperture radar interferograms to image ground subsidence that occurred over the Dixie Valley geothermal field during different time intervals between 1992 and 1997. Linear elastic inversion of the subsidence that occurred between April, 1996 and March, 1997 revealed that the dominant sources of deformation during this time period were large changes in fluid volumes at shallow depths within the valley fill above the reservoir. The distributions of subsidence and subsurface volume change support a model in which reduction in pressure and volume of hot water discharging into the valley fill from localized upflow along the Stillwater range frontal fault is caused by drawdown within the upflow zone resulting from geothermal production. Our results also suggest that an additional source of fluid volume reduction in the shallow valley fill might be similar drawdown within piedmont fault zones. Shallow groundwater flow in the vicinity of the field appears to be controlled on the NW by a mapped fault and to the SW by a lineament of as yet unknown origin.

  16. Synthetic aperture radar imagery of airports and surrounding areas: Study of clutter at grazing angles and their polarimetric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Robert G.; Gineris, Denise J.; Clinthorne, James T.

    1991-01-01

    The statistical description of ground clutter at an airport and in the surrounding area is addressed. These data are being utilized in a program to detect microbursts. Synthetic aperture radar data were collected at the Denver Stapleton Airport. Mountain terrain data were examined to determine if they may potentially contribute to range ambiguity problems and degrade microburst detection. Results suggest that mountain clutter may not present a special problem source. The examination of clutter at small grazing angles was continued by examining data collected at especially low altitudes. Cultural objects such as buildings produce strong sources of backscatter at angles of about 85 deg, with responses of 30 dB to 60 dB above the background. Otherwise there are a few sources which produce significant scatter. The polarization properties of hydrospheres and clutter were examined with the intent of determining the optimum polarization. This polarization was determined to be dependent upon the ratio of VV and HH polarizations of both rain and ground clutter.

  17. Extended nonlinear chirp scaling algorithm for highly squinted missile-borne synthetic aperture radar with diving acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rengli; Wang, Yanfei

    2016-04-01

    An extended nonlinear chirp scaling (NLCS) algorithm is proposed to process data of highly squinted, high-resolution, missile-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) diving with a constant acceleration. Due to the complex diving movement, the traditional signal model and focusing algorithm are no longer suited for missile-borne SAR signal processing. Therefore, an accurate range equation is presented, named as the equivalent hyperbolic range model (EHRM), which is more accurate and concise compared with the conventional fourth-order polynomial range equation. Based on the EHRM, a two-dimensional point target reference spectrum is derived, and an extended NLCS algorithm for missile-borne SAR image formation is developed. In the algorithm, a linear range walk correction is used to significantly remove the range-azimuth cross coupling, and an azimuth NLCS processing is adopted to solve the azimuth space variant focusing problem. Moreover, the operations of the proposed algorithm are carried out without any interpolation, thus having small computational loads. Finally, the simulation results and real-data processing results validate the proposed focusing algorithm.

  18. Analysis of ERS 1 synthetic aperture radar data of frozen lakes in northern Montana and implications for climate studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Fagre, Daniel B.; Klasner, Fritz; Linebaugh, Gregg; Liston, Glen E.

    1994-01-01

    Lakes that freeze each winter are good indicators of regional climate change if key parameters, such as freeze-up and breakup date and maximum ice thickness, are measured over a decade-scale time frame. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite data have proven to be especially useful for measurement of climatologically significant parameters characteristic of frozen lakes. In this paper, five lakes in Glacier National Park, Montana, have been studied both in the field and using Earth Remote-Sensing Satellite (ERS) 1 SAR data during the 1992-1993 winter. The lakes are characterized by clear ice, sometimes with tubular or rounded bubbles, and often with a layer of snow ice on top of the clear ice. They are also often snow covered. Freeze-up is detected quite easily using ERS 1 SAR data as soon as a thin layer of ice forms. The effect of snow ice on the backscatter is thought to be significant but is, as yet, undetermined. On the five lakes studied, relative backscatter was found to increase with ice thickness until a maximum was reached in February. Breakup, an often ill-defined occurrence, is difficult to detect because surface water causes the SAR signal to be absorbed, thus masking the ice below. Comparison of the bubble structure of thaw lakes in northern Alaska with lakes in northern Montana has shown that the ice structure is quite different, and this difference may contribute to differential SAR signature evolution in the lakes of the two areas.

  19. Using Regional GPS Network Atmospheric Models for Mitigating Errors in Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuveni, Y.; Bock, Y.; Tong, X.; Moore, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements provide valuable information for obtaining Earth surface deformation and topography at high spatial resolution for crustal deformation studies. Similar to Global Positioning System (GPS), InSAR phase measurements are affected by the Earth's ionospheric and tropospheric layers as the electromagnetic signals significantly refract while propagating through the different layers. While electromagnetic signals propagating through the neutral atmosphere are affected primarily by the pressure, temperature, and water vapor content of atmospheric gases, the propagation through the ionosphere is mainly affected by the number of free electrons along the signal path. Here, we present the use of dense regional GPS networks for extracting tropospheric zenith delays and ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) maps in order to reduce the noise levels in the phase measurement of the InSAR images. The results show significant reduction in the RMS values when simultaneously combining the two corrections, both at short time periods where no surface deformation is expected, and at longer periods, where imaging of crustal deformation, such as the ground subsidence and aseismic fault creep, is enhanced.

  20. Focusing vibrating targets in frequency-modulation continuous-wave-synthetic aperture radar with Doppler keystone transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuxin; Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Jinping; Lei, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Vibrating targets generally induce sinusoidal micro-Doppler modulation in high resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR). They could cause defocused and ghost results by conventional imaging algorithms. This paper proposes a method on vibrating target imaging in frequency-modulation continuous-wave (FMCW) SAR systems. The continuous motion of sensor platform during pulse time is considered in the signal model. Based on Bessel series expansion of the signal in the azimuth direction, the influence of platform motion on the azimuth frequency is eliminated after dechirp and deskew. In addition, the range walk is compensated in the two-dimensional frequency domain by Doppler keystone transform. Next, using range cell migration correction, the azimuth quadratic phase compensation and the range curvature correction are made in range-Doppler domain for the focus of paired echoes. The residual video phase of paired echoes is eliminated, and vibration parameters are estimated to compensate in the sinusoidal modulation phase. Then the deghosted image of vibrating targets can be obtained. The proposed method is applicable to multiple targets with various vibrating states due to no need of a priori knowledge of targets. Finally, simulations are carried out to validate the effectiveness of the method in FMCW-SAR imaging of vibrating targets.

  1. Design and implementation of a Synthetic Aperture Radar for Open Skies (SAROS) aboard a C-135 aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, D.W.; Murphy, M.; Rimmel, G.

    1994-08-01

    NATO and former Warsaw Pact nations have agreed to allow overflights of their countries in the interest of easing world tension. The United States has decided to implement two C-135 aircraft with a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) that has a 3-meter resolution. This work is being sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) and will be operational in Fall 1995. Since the SAR equipment must be exportable to foreign nations, a 20-year-old UPD-8 analog SAR system was selected as the front-end and refurbished for this application by Loral Defense Systems. Data processing is being upgraded to a currently exportable digital design by Sandia National Laboratories. Amplitude and phase histories will be collected during these overflights and digitized on VHS cassettes. Ground stations will use reduction algorithms to process the data and convert it to magnitude-detected images for member nations. System Planning Corporation is presently developing a portable ground station for use on the demonstration flights. Aircraft integration into the C-135 aircraft is being done by the Air Force at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio.

  2. Wave-current interaction study in the Gulf of Alaska for detection of eddies by synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Peng, Chich Y.; Schumacher, James D.

    1994-01-01

    High resolution Esa Remote Sensing Satellite-1 (ERS-1) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images are used to detect a mesoscale eddy. Such features limit dispersal of pollock larvae and therefore likely influence recruitment of fish in the Gulf of Alaska. During high sea states and high winds, the direct surface signature of the eddy was not clearly visible, but the wave refraction in the eddy area was observed. The rays of the wave field are traced out directly from the SAR image. The ray pattern gives information on the refraction pattern and on the relative variation of the wave energy along a ray through wave current interaction. These observations are simulated by a ray-tracing model which incorporates a surface current field associated with the eddy. The numerical results of the model show that the waves are refracted and diverge in the eddy field with energy density decreasing. The model-data comparison for each ray shows the model predictions are in good agreement with the SAR data.

  3. Coastal flood inundation monitoring with Satellite C-band and L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, Amina; Bannister, Terri

    2013-01-01

    Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) was evaluated as a method to operationally monitor the occurrence and distribution of storm- and tidal-related flooding of spatially extensive coastal marshes within the north-central Gulf of Mexico. Maps representing the occurrence of marsh surface inundation were created from available Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-Band SAR (PALSAR) (L-band) (21 scenes with HH polarizations in Wide Beam [100 m]) data and Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT) Advanced SAR (ASAR) (C-band) data (24 scenes with VV and HH polarizations in Wide Swath [150 m]) during 2006-2009 covering 500 km of the Louisiana coastal zone. Mapping was primarily based on a decrease in backscatter between reference and target scenes, and as an extension of previous studies, the flood inundation mapping performance was assessed by the degree of correspondence between inundation mapping and inland water levels. Both PALSAR- and ASAR-based mapping at times were based on suboptimal reference scenes; however, ASAR performance seemed more sensitive to reference-scene quality and other types of scene variability. Related to water depth, PALSAR and ASAR mapping accuracies tended to be lower when water depths were shallow and increased as water levels decreased below or increased above the ground surface, but this pattern was more pronounced with ASAR. Overall, PALSAR-based inundation accuracies averaged 84% (n = 160), while ASAR-based mapping accuracies averaged 62% (n = 245).

  4. Monitoring cyanobacteria-dominant algal blooms in eutrophicated Taihu Lake in China with synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ganlin; Li, Junsheng; Zhang, Bing; Shen, Qian; Zhang, Fangfang

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring algal blooms by optical remote sensing is limited by cloud cover. In this study, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) was deployed with the aim of monitoring cyanobacteria-dominant algal blooms in Taihu Lake in cloudy weather. The study shows that dark regions in the SAR images caused by cyanobacterial blooms damped the microwave backscatter of the lake surface and were consistent with the regions of algal blooms in quasi-synchronous optical images, confirming the applicability of SAR for detection of surface blooms. Low backscatter may also be associated with other factors such as low wind speeds, resulting in interference when monitoring algal blooms using SAR data alone. After feature extraction and selection, the dark regions were classified by the support vector machine method with an overall accuracy of 67.74%. SAR can provide a reference point for monitoring cyanobacterial blooms in the lake, particularly when weather is not suitable for optical remote sensing. Multi-polarization and multi-band SAR can be considered for use in the future to obtain more accurate information regarding algal blooms from SAR data.

  5. Millimeter wave and synthetic aperture radar; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 27, 28, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddleston, G. K.; Tanenhaus, Martin; Williams, Brian P.

    The present conference on mm-wave and SAR architectures and algorithms for both signal processing/calibration and image processing/exploitation discusses the use of the chirp z-transform for radar image formation, digital interpolations for polar-format processing, polarimetric calibrations using distributed clutter, imaging in multidimensions and monopulse processing and practice, vector quantization for SAR data-rate reduction, and digital filter design for radar image formation. Also discussed are a shadow-tracking algorithm for moving-target detection, Doppler-rate filtering for the detection of moving targets with SAR, mm-wave planar integrated waveguide transceivers, an advanced microwave precipitation radiometer, and a Kelvin-wake image artifact for SAR.

  6. 3D Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging of the Interior of the Cometary Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Y.; Heggy, E.; Arumugam, D.; Wu, X.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2014-12-01

    A capability of constructing the primitive body's interior structure such as the cometary nucleus is the key to the successful realization of a future three-dimensional (3D) mapping mission using a long-wavelength (20-60 meters) penetrating radar system. Discontinuities in the material density and/or composition at the surface and deep interior reflect a small amount of incoming electro-magnetic waves back to the orbiting radar system that records amplitudes and travel times (or phases). By coherently processing the phase information collected from different viewing angles at different times, we would like to show that we could build 3D internal structural and compositional images, and thereby provide crucial information about the origin and evolution of the cometary nucleus. Here, we will report our efforts on the high-fidelity electromagnetic (E&M) forward modeling, comet modeling related to Rosetta experiments, and validation of a radar reflection tomographic imaging technique. We have developed innovative techniques to reduce numerical errors in the E&M modeling, allowing us to simulate data collection in a realistic environment while significantly reducing spurious effects caused by numerical errors or imperfect matching layers surrounding the simulation scene. For comet modeling, we have used models developed for radar sounding experiments on Rosetta comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. These models are driven from various scientific hypothesis and lab measurements of cometary materials. For an imaging algorithm, we have used a proven SAR technique after taking into account the slowness of light inside the comet and refraction (ray-bending) at the comet surface. We have successfully imaged 2D cross-sectional images of various comet models and will pursuit 3D simulation and imaging reconstruction in the near future.

  7. Mobile Mapping by Fmcw Synthetic Aperture Radar Operating at 300 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, S.; Sommer, R.; Hommes, A.; Pohl, N.; Stilla, U.

    2016-06-01

    While optical cameras or laser systems are widely used for mobile mapping low attention was payed for radar systems. Due to new semiconductor technologies, compact and leight weight SAR systems based on the Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) principle in the millimeter wave domain can serve for mobile radar mapping on cars. For mapping of long stripes along roads in close range a special strategy for focusing of SAR images was developed. Hereby local adapted planes for processing are used considering the IMU data of the sensor. An experimental system was designed for high resolution radar mapping of urban scenes in close range geometry. This small and leight weighted system has a bandwidth of 30 GHz (5 mm resolution) and operates with 300 GHz in the lower terahertz domain. Experiments with a van in an urban scenario were carried out for proof of applicability of an operating SAR system resolving objects in the subcentimeter domain. The results show that narrow cracks in the asphalt of the road are visible and the measuring of small metallic objects placed in the scene is possible. Based on this mobile mapping techniques a first result from an acquisition of vertical facade structure is shown.

  8. On the nonlinear mapping of an ocean wave spectrum into a synthetic aperture radar image spectrum and its inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselmann, Klaus; Hasselmann, Susanne

    1991-06-01

    A new, closed nonlinear integral transformation relation is derived describing the mapping of a two-dimensional ocean wave spectrum into a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image spectrum. The general integral relation is expanded in a power series with respect to orders of nonlinearity and velocity bunching. The individual terms of the series can be readily computed using fast Fourier transforms. The convergence of the series is rapid. The series expansion is also useful in identifying the different contributions to the net imaging process, consisting of the real aperture radar (RAR) cross-section modulation, the nonlinear motion (velocity bunching) effects, and their various interaction products. The lowest term of the expansion with respect to nonlinearity order yields a simple quasi-linear approximate mapping relation consisting of the standard linear SAR modulation expression multiplied by an additional nonlinear Gaussian azimuthal cutoff factor. The cutoff scale is given by the rms azimuthal (velocity bunching) displacement. The same cutoff factor applies to all terms of the power series expansion. The nonlinear mapping relation is inverted using a standard first-guess wave spectrum as regularization term. This is needed to overcome the basic 180° mapping ambiguity and the loss of information beyond the azimuthal cutoff. The inversion is solved numerically using an iteration technique based on the successive application of the explicit solution for the quasi-linear mapping approximation, with interposed corrections invoking the full nonlinear mapping expression. A straightforward application of this technique, however, generally yields unrealistic discontinuities of the best fit wave spectrum in the transition region separating the low azimuthal wave number domain, in which useful SAR information is available and the wave spectrum is modified, from the high azimuthal wave number region beyond the azimuthal cutoff, where the first-guess wave spectrum is retained

  9. Phase noise from aircraft motion: Compensation and effect on synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, Andrew K.; Goldstein, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    Image degradation of airborne SAR imagery caused by phase errors introduced in the received signal by aircraft motion is discussed. Mechanical motion has a small bandwidth and does not affect the range signal, where the total echo time is typically 60 microsec. However, since the aperture length can be several seconds, the synthesized azimuth signal can have significant errors of which phase noise is the most important. An inertial navigation system can be used to compensate for these errors when processing the images. Calculations to evaluate how much improvement results from compensation are outlined.

  10. Maximum a posteriori classification of multifrequency, multilook, synthetic aperture radar intensity data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, E.; Chellappa, R.

    1993-01-01

    We present a maximum a posteriori (MAP) classifier for classifying multifrequency, multilook, single polarization SAR intensity data into regions or ensembles of pixels of homogeneous and similar radar backscatter characteristics. A model for the prior joint distribution of the multifrequency SAR intensity data is combined with a Markov random field for representing the interactions between region labels to obtain an expression for the posterior distribution of the region labels given the multifrequency SAR observations. The maximization of the posterior distribution yields Bayes's optimum region labeling or classification of the SAR data or its MAP estimate. The performance of the MAP classifier is evaluated by using computer-simulated multilook SAR intensity data as a function of the parameters in the classification process. Multilook SAR intensity data are shown to yield higher classification accuracies than one-look SAR complex amplitude data. The MAP classifier is extended to the case in which the radar backscatter from the remotely sensed surface varies within the SAR image because of incidence angle effects. The results obtained illustrate the practicality of the method for combining SAR intensity observations acquired at two different frequencies and for improving classification accuracy of SAR data.

  11. Application of Lipschitz Regularity and Multiscale Techniques for the Automatic Detection of Oil Spills in Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajadi, O. A.; Meyer, F. J.; Tello, M.

    2015-12-01

    This research presents a promising new method for the detection and tracking of oil spills from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. The method presented here combines a number of advanced image processing techniques in order to overcome some common performance limitations of SAR-based oil spill detection. Principal among these limitations are: (1) the radar cross section of the ocean surface strongly depends on wind and wave activities and is therefore highly variable; (2) the radar cross section of oil covered waters is often indistinguishable from other dark ocean features such as low wind areas or oil lookalikes, leading to ambiguities in oil spill detection. In this paper, we introduce two novel image analysis techniques to largely mitigate the aforementioned performance limitations, namely Lipschitz regularity (LR) and Wavelet transforms. We used LR, an image texture parameter akin to the slope of the local power spectrum, in our approach to mitigate these limitations. We show that the LR parameter is much less sensitive to variations of wind and waves than the original image amplitude, lending itself well for normalizing image content. Beyond its benefit for image normalization, we also show that the LR transform enhances the contrast between oil-covered and oil-free ocean surfaces and therefore improves overall spill detection performance. To calculate LR, the SAR images are decomposed using two-dimensional continuous wavelet transform (2D-CWT), which are furthermore transformed into Holder space to measure LR. Finally, we demonstrate that the implementation of wavelet transforms provide additional benefits related to the adaptive reduction of speckle noise. We show how LR and CWT are integrated into our image analysis workflow for application to oil spill detection. To describe the performance of this approach under controlled conditions, we applied our method to simulated SAR data of wind driven oceans containing oil spills of various properties. We also

  12. Parametric analysis of synthetic aperture radar data acquired over truck garden vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    An airborne X-band SAR acquired multipolarization and multiflight pass SAR images over a truck garden vegetation area. Based on a variety of land cover and row crop direction variations, the vertical (VV) polarization data contain the highest contrast, while cross polarization contains the least. When the radar flight path is parallel to the row direction, both horizontal (HH) and VV polarization data contain very high return which masks out the specific land cover that forms the row structure. Cross polarization data are not that sensitive to row orientation. The inclusion of like and cross polarization data help delineate special surface features (e.g., row crop against non-row-oriented land cover, very-rough-surface against highly row-oriented surface).

  13. S-band synthetic aperture radar on-board NISAR satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Tapan; Bhan, Rakesh; Putrevu, Deepak; Mehrotra, Priyanka; Chakrabarty, Soumyabrata

    2016-05-01

    provide single, dual, compact and quasi-quad polarization imaging modes. Centre frequency for S-band SAR is 3200MHz with highest bandwidth of 75MHz. S-Band SAR utilizes 24 transmit receive modules (T/R Modules) to illuminate >240kms swath during transmit event and digital beam forming (DBF) on receive to reduce data rate by combining 24 receive channels and enhance SNR of the system. This paper provides details of S-band SAR system design, configuration and realization which is a challenging task since both L-band and S-band radars need to operate at same PRF and clock reference during simultaneous imaging operation. Further to this, SweepSAR technique demands PRF dithering (changing) to avoid dead gaps in the swath due to receive echo conflicting with transmit event.

  14. Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array Type L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) mosaic for the Kahiltna terrane, Alaska, 2007-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, Christopher J.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Graham, Garth E.

    2015-01-01

    The USGS has compiled a continuous, cloud-free 12.5-meter resolution radar mosaic of SAR data of approximately 212,000 square kilometers to examine the suitability of this technology for geologic mapping. This mosaic was created from Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data collected from 2007 to 2010 spanning the Kahiltna terrane and the surrounding area. Interpretation of these data may help geologists understand past geologic processes and identify areas with potential for near-surface mineral resources for further ground-based geological and geochemical investigations.

  15. Reconstructing 2-D/3-D Building Shapes from Spaceborne Tomographic Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, M.; Zhu, X. X.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we present an approach that allows automatic (parametric) reconstruction of building shapes in 2-D/3-D using TomoSAR point clouds. These point clouds are generated by processing radar image stacks via advanced interferometric technique, called SAR tomography. The proposed approach reconstructs the building outline by exploiting both the available roof and façade information. Roof points are extracted out by employing a surface normals based region growing procedure via selected seed points while the extraction of façade points is based on thresholding the point scatterer density SD estimated by robust M-estimator. Spatial clustering is then applied to the extracted roof points in a way such that each roof cluster represents an individual building. Extracted façade points are reconstructed and afterwards incorporated to the segmented roof cluster to reconstruct the complete building shape. Initial building footprints are derived by employing alpha shapes method that are later regularized. Finally, rectilinear constraints are added to yield better geometrically looking building shapes. The proposed approach is illustrated and validated by examples using TomoSAR point clouds generated from a stack of TerraSAR-X high-resolution spotlight images from ascending orbit only covering two different test areas with one containing relatively smaller buildings in densely populated regions and the other containing moderate sized buildings in the city of Las Vegas.

  16. Strain Partitioning and Localization within Dobe Graben Using Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (D-INSAR) and Shuttle Radar Terrain Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Z. S.; Abdelsalam, M. G.; Byrnes, J. M.; Bridges, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Dobe graben is a northwestern trending, Quaternary continental rift found within the east-central block of the Afar Depression (AD), Ethiopia. The AD is one of only few places where three active tectonic rift arms meet on land. Extensional rifting is ongoing in the Dobe graben as evident by the 1989 swarm of intermediate magnitude (5.7 < Ms < 6.3) earthquakes. Dobe graben extension occurs on steeply dipping faults, where the maximum displacement, fault length, heave and spacing spans in three orders of magnitude. Crustal deformation within the graben was measured through ascending and descending interferograms using the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR), C- Band (l = 5.6 cm) of the ENVISAT satellite. Results from the Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (D-INSAR) over a period of four years (05/20/2005 to 03/05/2010) suggests that the vertical component of deformation is distributed along a 50 km long NW trending zone in the Dobe graben. The vertical component of deformation is -0.5 to -0.3 cm along the graben axial rift floor likely representing subsidence due to riftingand +0.6 cm to 0.9 cm at the middle of the Dobe relay zone due to uplifting along the border escarpment faults. An estimate for the extension rate has been calculated from twelve traverses across the Dobe graben using Shuttle Rader Terrain Model (SRTM). Results show a deformation elongation (e) value ranging from 0.225 to 0.348. A fractal dimension of 0.03 from the graben floor was obtained for the measured population of fault throws (n= 162) in 12 traverses totaling 172 km. This value is interpreted to represent the dominant contribution to extension from faults with large throw. Moreover, frequency distribution of a natural fault population along the graben floor revealed a negative exponential law distribution indicating a strong strain partitioning within the active axial graben floor. A fractal dimension of 0.01 from the graben shoulder escarpment was obtained for

  17. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar study of Okmok volcano, Alaska, 1992-2003: Magma supply dynamics and postemplacement lava flow deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Masterlark, Timothy; Dzurisin, D.

    2005-01-01

    Okmok volcano, located in the central Aleutian arc, Alaska, is a dominantly basaltic complex topped with a 10-km-wide caldera that formed circa 2.05 ka. Okmok erupted several times during the 20th century, most recently in 1997; eruptions in 1945, 1958, and 1997 produced lava flows within the caldera. We used 80 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images (interferograms) to study transient deformation of the volcano before, during, and after the 1997 eruption. Point source models suggest that a magma reservoir at a depth of 3.2 km below sea level, located beneath the center of the caldera and about 5 km northeast of the 1997 vent, is responsible for observed volcano-wide deformation. The preeruption uplift rate decreased from about 10 cm yr-1 during 1992-1993 to 2 ??? 3 cm yr-1 during 1993-1995 and then to about -1 ??? -2 cm yr-1 during 1995-1996. The posteruption inflation rate generally decreased with time during 1997-2001, but increased significantly during 2001-2003. By the summer of 2003, 30 ??? 60% of the magma volume lost from the reservoir in the 1997 eruption had been replenished. Interferograms for periods before the 1997 eruption indicate consistent subsidence of the surface of the 1958 lava flows, most likely due to thermal contraction. Interferograms for periods after the eruption suggest at least four distinct deformation processes: (1) volcano-wide inflation due to replenishment of the shallow magma reservoir, (2) subsidence of the 1997 lava flows, most likely due to thermal contraction, (3) deformation of the 1958 lava flows due to loading by the 1997 flows, and (4) continuing subsidence of 1958 lava flows buried beneath 1997 flows. Our results provide insights into the postemplacement behavior of lava flows and have cautionary implications for the interpretation of inflation patterns at active volcanoes.

  18. Climate Change Indicator for Hazard Identification of Indian North West Coast Marine Environment Using Synthetic Aperture Radar (sar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambheer, Phani Raj

    2012-07-01

    Stormwater runoff, Petroleum Hydrocarbon plumes are found abundantly near coastal cities, coastal population settlements especially in developing nations as more than half the world's human population. Ever increasing coastal populations and development in coastal areas have led to increased loading of toxic substances, nutrients and pathogens. These hazards cause deleterious effects on the population in many ways directly or indirectly which lead to algal blooms, hypoxia, beach closures, and damage to coastal fisheries. Hence these pollution hazards are important and the coastal administrations and people need to be aware of such a danger lurking very close to them. These hazards due to their small size, dynamic and episodic in nature are difficult to be visualized or to sample using in-situ traditional scientific methods. Natural obstructions like cloud cover and complex coastal circulations can hinder to detect and monitor such occurrences in the selected areas chosen for observations. This study takes recourse to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery because the pollution hazards are easily detectable as surfactants are deposited on the sea surface, along with nutrients and pathogens, smoothing capillary and small gravity waves to produce areas of reduced backscatter compared with surrounding ocean. These black spots can be termed as `Ecologic Indicator' and formed probably due to stronger thermal stratification, a deepening event of thermocline. SAR imagery that delivers useful data better than others regardless of darkness or cloud cover, should be made as an important observational tool for assessment and monitoring marine pollution hazards in the areas close to coastal regions. Till now the effects of climate change, sea level rise and global warming seems to have not affected the coastal populace of India in intrusions of sea water but it takes significance to the human health as the tides dominate these latitudes with bringing these polluted waters. KEY

  19. Can C-band synthetic aperture radar be used to estimate soil organic carbon storage in tundra?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, Annett; Widhalm, Barbara; Kuhry, Peter; Hugelius, Gustaf; Palmtag, Juri; Siewert, Matthias Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    A new approach for the estimation of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools north of the tree line has been developed based on synthetic aperture radar (SAR; ENVISAT Advanced SAR Global Monitoring mode) data. SOC values are directly determined from backscatter values instead of upscaling using land cover or soil classes. The multi-mode capability of SAR allows application across scales. It can be shown that measurements in C band under frozen conditions represent vegetation and surface structure properties which relate to soil properties, specifically SOC. It is estimated that at least 29 Pg C is stored in the upper 30 cm of soils north of the tree line. This is approximately 25 % less than stocks derived from the soil-map-based Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD). The total stored carbon is underestimated since the established empirical relationship is not valid for peatlands or strongly cryoturbated soils. The approach does, however, provide the first spatially consistent account of soil organic carbon across the Arctic. Furthermore, it could be shown that values obtained from 1 km resolution SAR correspond to accounts based on a high spatial resolution (2 m) land cover map over a study area of about 7 × 7 km in NE Siberia. The approach can be also potentially transferred to medium-resolution C-band SAR data such as ENVISAT ASAR Wide Swath with ˜ 120 m resolution but it is in general limited to regions without woody vegetation. Global Monitoring-mode-derived SOC increases with unfrozen period length. This indicates the importance of this parameter for modelling of the spatial distribution of soil organic carbon storage.

  20. Coastal Monitoring Using L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Image Data - Some Case Studies in Asian Delta Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, A.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal geomorphology is highly variable as it is affected by sea-level changes and other naturally- and human-induced fluctuations. To effectively assess and monitor geomorphological changes in various time scales is thus critical for coastal management. Asian mega deltas are vulnerable to a sea-level rise due to its low-lying delta plain, and are dynamic region given a large amount of sediment supply. However, limited data availability and accessibility in the deltas have prevented establishment of systematic coastal monitoring. A variety of remote sensing systems can be used to monitor geomorphological changes in coastal areas as it has wide spatial coverage and high temporal repeatability. Especially, analysis using SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) data not affected by the cloud conditions offer potential for monitoring in the monsoon Asia region. We will present some case studies of Asian coastal regions using L-band SAR data, ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite) PALSAR (Phased Array type L-band SAR) and JERS-1 (Japanese Earth Resource Satellite-1) SAR data. One example is that time-series of radar amplitude images can be used to delineate changes quantitatively of the areal extent of river-mouth bars in distributaries of the Mekong River delta. It shows that the estimated areas of river mouthbars gradually increase on an annual time scale, and seasonal variations of areas were also recognized. Another example is that differential SAR interferometry is applied to the coast of the Yellow River delta in China. It shows very high subsidence rates, likely due to groundwater pumping. A further example is that we apply a SAR interferometry time series analysis to monitor ground deformations in the lower Chao Phraya delta plain, Thailand. A single reference time series interferogram from the stacking of unwrapped phases were applied. The subsidence and uplift pattern observed using the SAR interferometry time series analysis highlights the spatial complexity

  1. The absolute amplitude calibration of the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar - An intercomparison with other L-band radar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Held, D.; Werner, C.; Wall, S.

    1983-01-01

    The absolute amplitude calibration of the spaceborne Seasat SAR data set is presented based on previous relative calibration studies. A scale factor making it possible to express the perceived radar brightness of a scene in units of sigma-zero is established. The system components are analyzed for error contribution, and the calibration techniques are introduced for each stage. These include: A/D converter saturation tests; prevention of clipping in the processing step; and converting the digital image into the units of received power. Experimental verification was performed by screening and processing the data of the lava flow surrounding the Pisgah Crater in Southern California, for which previous C-130 airborne scatterometer data were available. The average backscatter difference between the two data sets is estimated to be 2 dB in the brighter, and 4 dB in the dimmer regions. For the SAR a calculated uncertainty of 3 dB is expected.

  2. Gulf of Mexico Ecological Forecasting - Atlantic Bluefin Tuna Population Assessment and Management using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laygo, K.; Jones, I.; Huerta, J.; Holt, B.

    2010-12-01

    Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus) is one of the largest vertebrates in the world and is in high demand in sushi markets. It is a highly political species and is managed internationally by the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tuna. The Gulf of Mexico and the Mediterranean Sea are the only two known spawning sites in the world. However, there is a large variance in estimates of adult Atlantic Tuna spawning. This research focuses on extending Earth science research results to existing decision-making systems, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)for population assessment and management of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna. The research team is a multi-sector and multi-disciplinary team composed of government (NOAA_NMFS), academic (University of South Florida Institute for Marine Remote Sensing) and commercial (Roffer’s Ocean Fishing Forecasting Service, Inc.) institutions. Their goal is to reduce the variance in the estimates of adult Bluefin Tuna spawning stock abundance in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Therefore, this paper will be derived from the innovative use of several earth orbiting satellites focusing on the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data to identify Sargassum, which is a floating marine algae that may be relevant to the presence of Bluefin Tuna aggregations. The SAR imagery will be examined in combination with MODIS and MERIS Chlorophyll-a products to detect fine-scale surface current shear, eddy and frontal features, as well as biological slicks due to the presence of Sargassum. In addition, wind records from NOAA buoy data will be studied to analyze wind patterns in the Gulf of Mexico. The fine-resolution, all-weather capabilities of SAR provide a valuable complement to optical/IR sensors, which are often impacted by cloud cover. This study will provide an assessment of whether or not SAR can contribute to decision support efforts relevant to commercial fisheries

  3. Automatic change detection in time series of Synthetic Aperture Radar data using a scale-driven approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajadi, O. A.; Meyer, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    Automatic change detection and change classification from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is a difficult task mostly due to the high level of speckle noise inherent to SAR data and the highly non-Gaussian nature of the SAR amplitude information. Several approaches were developed in recent years to deal with SAR specific change detection problems from image pairs and time series of images. Despite these considerable efforts, no satisfying solution to this problem has been found so far. In this paper we present a promising new algorithm for change detection from SAR that is based on a multi-scale analysis of a times series of SAR images. Our approach is composed of three steps, including (1) data enhancement and filtering, (2) multi-scale change detection, and (3) time-series analysis of change detection maps. In the data enhancement and filtering step, we first form time-series of ratio images by dividing all SAR images by a reference acquisition to suppress stationary image information and enhance change signatures. Several methods for reference image selection will be discussed in the paper. The generated ratio images are further log-transformed to create near-Gaussian data and to convert the originally multiplicative noise into additive noise. A subsequent fast non-local mean filter is applied to reduce image noise whilst preserving most of the image details. The filtered log-ratio images are then inserted into a multi-scale change detection algorithm that is composed of: (1) a multi-scale decomposition of the input images using a two-dimensional discrete stationary wavelet transform (2D-SWT); (2) a multi-resolution classification into 'change' and 'no-change' areas; and (3) a scale-driven fusion of the classification results. In a final time-series analysis step the multi-temporal change detection maps are analyzed to identify seasonal, gradual, and abrupt changes. The performance of the developed approach will be demonstrated by application to the

  4. Compounding in synthetic aperture imaging.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-09-01

    A method for obtaining compound images using synthetic aperture data is investigated using a convex array transducer. The new approach allows spatial compounding to be performed for any number of angles without reducing the frame rate or temporal resolution. This important feature is an intrinsic property of how the compound images are constructed using synthetic aperture data and an improvement compared with how spatial compounding is obtained using conventional methods. The synthetic aperture compound images are created by exploiting the linearity of delay-and-sum beamformation for data collected from multiple spherical emissions to synthesize multiple transmit and receive apertures, corresponding to imaging the tissue from multiple directions. The many images are added incoherently, to produce a single compound image. Using a 192-element, 3.5-MHz, λ-pitch transducer, it is demonstrated from tissue-phantom measurements that the speckle is reduced and the contrast resolution improved when applying synthetic aperture compound imaging. At a depth of 4 cm, the size of the synthesized apertures is optimized for lesion detection based on the speckle information density. This is a performance measure for tissue contrast resolution which quantifies the tradeoff between resolution loss and speckle reduction. The speckle information density is improved by 25% when comparing synthetic aperture compounding to a similar setup for compounding using dynamic receive focusing. The cystic resolution and clutter levels are measured using a wire phantom setup and compared with conventional application of the array, as well as to synthetic aperture imaging without compounding. If the full aperture is used for synthetic aperture compounding, the cystic resolution is improved by 41% compared with conventional imaging, and is at least as good as what can be obtained using synthetic aperture imaging without compounding. PMID:23007781

  5. Savannah woody structure modelling and mapping using multi-frequency (X-, C- and L-band) Synthetic Aperture Radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidoo, Laven; Mathieu, Renaud; Main, Russell; Kleynhans, Waldo; Wessels, Konrad; Asner, Gregory; Leblon, Brigitte

    2015-07-01

    Structural parameters of the woody component in African savannahs provide estimates of carbon stocks that are vital to the understanding of fuelwood reserves, which is the primary source of energy for 90% of households in South Africa (80% in Sub-Saharan Africa) and are at risk of over utilisation. The woody component can be characterised by various quantifiable woody structural parameters, such as tree cover, tree height, above ground biomass (AGB) or canopy volume, each been useful for different purposes. In contrast to the limited spatial coverage of ground-based approaches, remote sensing has the ability to sense the high spatio-temporal variability of e.g. woody canopy height, cover and biomass, as well as species diversity and phenological status - a defining but challenging set of characteristics typical of African savannahs. Active remote sensing systems (e.g. Light Detection and Ranging - LiDAR; Synthetic Aperture Radar - SAR), on the other hand, may be more effective in quantifying the savannah woody component because of their ability to sense within-canopy properties of the vegetation and its insensitivity to atmosphere and clouds and shadows. Additionally, the various components of a particular target's structure can be sensed differently with SAR depending on the frequency or wavelength of the sensor being utilised. This study sought to test and compare the accuracy of modelling, in a Random Forest machine learning environment, woody above ground biomass (AGB), canopy cover (CC) and total canopy volume (TCV) in South African savannahs using a combination of X-band (TerraSAR-X), C-band (RADARSAT-2) and L-band (ALOS PALSAR) radar datasets. Training and validation data were derived from airborne LiDAR data to evaluate the SAR modelling accuracies. It was concluded that the L-band SAR frequency was more effective in the modelling of the CC (coefficient of determination or R2 of 0.77), TCV (R2 of 0.79) and AGB (R2 of 0.78) metrics in Southern African

  6. Development of a GPS-aided motion measurement, pointing, and stabilization system for a Synthetic Aperture Radar. [Global Positioning System (GPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Fellerhoff, J.R.; Kohler, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    An advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Motion Compensation System has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The system includes a miniaturized high accuracy ring laser gyro inertial measurement unit, a three axis gimbal pointing and stabilization assembly, a differential Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation aiding system, and a pilot guidance system. The system provides several improvements over previous SNL motion compensation systems and is capable of antenna stabilization to less than 0.01 degrees RMS and absolute position measurement to less than 5.0 meters RMS. These accuracies have been demonstrated in recent flight testing aboard a DHC-6-300 Twin Otter'' aircraft.

  7. Comparing range data across the slow-time dimension to correct motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Heard, Freddie E.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    2010-08-17

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  8. Estimating lava volume by precision combination of multiple baseline spaceborne and airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar: The 1997 eruption of Okmok Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Fielding, E.; Patrick, M.R.; Trautwein, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques are used to calculate the volume of extrusion at Okmok volcano, Alaska by constructing precise digital elevation models (DEMs) that represent volcano topography before and after the 1997 eruption. The posteruption DEM is generated using airborne topographic synthetic aperture radar (TOPSAR) data where a three-dimensional affine transformation is used to account for the misalignments between different DEM patches. The preeruption DEM is produced using repeat-pass European Remote Sensing satellite data; multiple interferograms are combined to reduce errors due to atmospheric variations, and deformation rates are estimated independently and removed from the interferograms used for DEM generation. The extrusive flow volume associated with the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano is 0.154 ?? 0.025 km3. The thickest portion is approximately 50 m, although field measurements of the flow margin's height do not exceed 20 m. The in situ measurements at lava edges are not representative of the total thickness, and precise DEM data are absolutely essential to calculate eruption volume based on lava thickness estimations. This study is an example that demonstrates how InSAR will play a significant role in studying volcanoes in remote areas.

  9. Deformation estimation of an earth dam and its relation with local earthquakes, by exploiting multitemporal synthetic aperture radar interferometry: Mornos dam case (Central Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neokosmidis, Spiros; Elias, Panagiotis; Parcharidis, Issaak; Briole, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring dam performance is a critical parameter in maintaining a safe dam. Safety concerns include seepage, internal erosion, and seismic issues in the case that the dam is located in high seismic hazard areas. Seismic considerations for dam safety among others includes the expected dam's performance during seismic events. The scope of this research work concerns the capability to record potential deformation on the Mornos earth dam (central Greece) induced by major earthquake events that occurred in the broader area. For this purpose, a hybrid interferometry synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) method was applied using elements of conventional differential InSAR, short baseline interferometry approaches, and persistent scatterers interferometry. A time series of ascending and descending acquisitions of active microwave instrument/ERS-1 and 2 and advanced synthetic aperture radar/ENVISAT scenes covering the period from 1993 to 2010 were interferometrically combined. Five very strong seismic events with epicenters close to the dam, at the same period, were considered as potential sources of deformation. The lake's water surface elevation was also considered as an additional factor of induced deformation. Results show a maximum deformation rate of ˜10 cm along the line of sight for the whole period. Although the observed deformation appears to be due to changes in water level following a particular pattern, this is interrupted over time, and these interruptions coincide in time with specific seismic events.

  10. Study on spatial variation of land subsidence over Minagish-Umm Gudair oil fields of Kuwait using synthetic aperture radar interferometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Kota S.; Al Jassar, Hala K.; Kodiyan, Nevil J.; Daniel, Viju P.

    2016-01-01

    Land subsidence can be a major problem where there are large-scale underground activities such as oil extraction. This paper addresses the spatial variability of land subsidence over Minagish and Umm Gudair oil fields of Kuwait. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) with multiple reference scenes using a persistent scatterer InSAR toolchain was employed in this study. Twenty-nine scenes of advanced synthetic aperture radar data (for the period January 2005 to August 2009) were used to make 20 pairs of interferograms (with high coherence and low noise) of stable point-like reflectors. The output of this study is the land subsidence maps of Minagish and Umm Gudair oil fields with a spatial resolution of 40 m. The results indicate that there is land subsidence of 29.9 mm/year in the southern part of the oil field (Umm Gudair). This is the first detailed assessment of land subsidence in the Minagish-Umm Gudair oil fields; therefore, no ground-truth data are available to compare the subsidence results. The results were consistent, indicating their validity.

  11. Imaging of ocean waves on both sides of an atmospheric front by the SIR-C/X-SAR multifrequency synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melsheimer, Christian; Bao, Mingquan; Alpers, Werner

    1998-08-01

    Radar images of an ocean scene containing an atmospheric front and almost range-propagating ocean waves which were acquired by the multifrequency/multipolarization synthetic aperture radar (SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour during the spaceborne imaging radar-C/X-band synthetic aperture radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) mission over the North Atlantic in 1994 are analyzed. The L-band SAR image spectra calculated from two areas located on opposite sides of the atmospheric front are quite similar, whereas the corresponding X- and C-band SAR image spectra differ significantly. It is shown that this is a consequence of the SAR imaging mechanism; at L band the SAR imaging mechanism depends weakly on the local wind field, and at X and C band it depends strongly on the local wind field. This is in agreement with earlier results obtained from the analysis of airborne multifrequency/multipolarization SAR images acquired over the North Sea during the SAR and X-Band Ocean Nonlinearities - Forschungsplattform Nordsee (SAXON-FPN) experiment. In this investigation it was found that at X and C band the phase of the real aperture radar modulation transfer function (RAR MTF) changes by almost 90°, when in the reference system moving with the group velocity of the dominant wave, the component of the wind velocity in the direction of the wave propagation changes sign. However, at L band such a change in local wind direction affects the phase of the RAR MTF only slightly. Using this phase behavior of the RAR MTF in simulations of the SIR-C/X-SAR image spectra, we show that the observed differences of the X- and C-band SAR image spectra measured on both sides of the atmospheric front are consistent with a change in wind speed and direction across the front. From this we conclude that for inverting X- or C-band SAR image spectra into ocean wave spectra that contain ocean waves propagating near the range direction, it is quite important to have a good knowledge of the local wind field, whereas

  12. Small-scale loess landslide monitoring with small baseline subsets interferometric synthetic aperture radar technique-case study of Xingyuan landslide, Shaanxi, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chaoying; Zhang, Qin; He, Yang; Peng, Jianbing; Yang, Chengsheng; Kang, Ya

    2016-04-01

    Small baseline subsets interferometric synthetic aperture radar technique is analyzed to detect and monitor the loess landslide in the southern bank of the Jinghe River, Shaanxi province, China. Aiming to achieve the accurate preslide time-series deformation results over small spatial scale and abrupt temporal deformation loess landslide, digital elevation model error, coherence threshold for phase unwrapping, and quality of unwrapping interferograms must be carefully checked in advance. In this experience, land subsidence accompanying a landslide with the distance <1 km is obtained, which gives a sound precursor for small-scale loess landslide detection. Moreover, the longer and continuous land subsidence has been monitored while deformation starting point for the landslide is successfully inverted, which is key to monitoring the similar loess landslide. In addition, the accelerated landslide deformation from one to two months before the landslide can provide a critical clue to early warning of this kind of landslide.

  13. Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar: Current status and future directions. A report to the Committee on Earth Sciences, Space Studies Board, National Research Council

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. L. (Editor); Apel, J.; Arvidson, R.; Bindschadler, R.; Carsey, F.; Dozier, J.; Jezek, K.; Kasischke, E.; Li, F.; Melack, J.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides a context in which questions put forth by NASA's Office of Mission to Planet Earth (OMPTE) regarding the next steps in spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) science and technology can be addressed. It summarizes the state-of-the-art in theory, experimental design, technology, data analysis, and utilization of SAR data for studies of the Earth, and describes potential new applications. The report is divided into five science chapters and a technology assessment. The chapters summarize the value of existing SAR data and currently planned SAR systems, and identify gaps in observational capabilities needing to be filled to address the scientific questions. Cases where SAR provides complementary data to other (non-SAR) measurement techniques are also described. The chapter on technology assessment outlines SAR technology development which is critical not only to NASA's providing societally relevant geophysical parameters but to maintaining competitiveness in SAR technology, and promoting economic development.

  14. Synthetic-aperture-radar imaging of the ocean surface using the slightly-rough facet model and a full surface-wave spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, James C.; Moore, Richard K.; Holtzman, Julian C.

    1990-01-01

    A new model of synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) imaging of ocean waves is described. The model is based on mapping individual, slightly-rough surface facets through the SAR processor into the image and responses of the facets in the image domain are added together coherently to give the composite image. A windowing technique allows both the orbital motion and the phase velocity of the long waves to be included. It is determined that the azimuthal cut-off is due to a smearing of the response of the facets in the image induced by the random orbital motion of the intermediate large-scale waves and that the focus adjustment that gives the greatest image contrast is half the phase velocity of the dominant long wave. The optimal processing technique, however, may consist of spatially offsetting the multiple looks on the image domain to compensate the propagation of long waves during the integration time of the SAR.

  15. Application of SEASAT-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data to enhance and detect geological lineaments and to assist LANDSAT landcover classification mapping. [Appalachian Region, West Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekhon, R.

    1981-01-01

    Digital SEASAT-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data were used to enhance linear features to extract geologically significant lineaments in the Appalachian region. Comparison of Lineaments thus mapped with an existing lineament map based on LANDSAT MSS images shows that appropriately processed SEASAT-1 SAR data can significantly improve the detection of lineaments. Merge MSS and SAR data sets were more useful fo lineament detection and landcover classification than LANDSAT or SEASAT data alone. About 20 percent of the lineaments plotted from the SEASAT SAR image did not appear on the LANDSAT image. About 6 percent of minor lineaments or parts of lineaments present in the LANDSAT map were missing from the SEASAT map. Improvement in the landcover classification (acreage and spatial estimation accuracy) was attained by using MSS-SAR merged data. The aerial estimation of residential/built-up and forest categories was improved. Accuracy in estimating the agricultural and water categories was slightly reduced.

  16. Multitemporal L- and C-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar To Highlight Differences in Water Status Among Boreal Forest and Wetland Systems in the Yukon Flats, Interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balser, Andrew W.; Wylie, Bruce K.

    2010-01-01

    Tracking landscape-scale water status in high-latitude boreal systems is indispensible to understanding the fate of stored and sequestered carbon in a climate change scenario. Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery provides critical information for water and moisture status in Alaskan boreal environments at the landscape scale. When combined with results from optical sensor analyses, a complementary picture of vegetation, biomass, and water status emerges. Whereas L-band SAR showed better inherent capacity to map water status, C-band had much more temporal coverage in this study. Analysis through the use of L- and C-band SARs combined with Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) enables landscape stratification by vegetation and by seasonal and interannual hydrology. Resultant classifications are highly relevant to biogeochemistry at the landscape scale. These results enhance our understanding of ecosystem processes relevant to carbon balance and may be scaled up to inform regional carbon flux estimates and better parameterize general circulation models (GCMs).

  17. Rupture parameters of the 2003 Zemmouri (Mw 6.8), Algeria, earthquake from joint inversion of interferometric synthetic aperture radar, coastal uplift, and GPS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belabbes, S.; Wicks, C.; Cakir, Z.; Meghraoui, M.

    2009-01-01

    We study the surface deformation associated with the 21 May 2003 (M w = 6.8) Zemmouri (Algeria) earthquake, the strongest seismic event felt in the Algiers region since 1716. The thrust earthquake mechanism and related surface deformation revealed an average 0.50 m coastal uplift along ??55-km-long coastline. We obtain coseismic interferograms using Envisat advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) (IS2) and RADARSAT standard beam (ST4) data from both the ascending and descending orbits of Envisat satellite, whereas the RADARSAT data proved useful only in the descending mode. While the two RADARSAT interferograms cover the earthquake area, Envisat data cover only the western half of the rupture zone. Although the interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) coherence in the epicenter area is poor, deformation fringes are observed along the coast in different patches. In the Boumerdes area, the maximum coseismic deformation is indicated by the high gradient of fringes visible in all interferograms in agreement with field measurements (tape, differential GPS, leveling, and GPS). To constrain the earthquake rupture parameters, we model the interferograms and uplift measurements using elastic dislocations on triangular fault patches in an elastic and homogeneous half-space. We invert the coseismic slip using first, a planar surface and second, a curved fault, both constructed from triangular elements using Poly3Dinv program that uses a damped least square minimization. The best fit of InSAR, coastal uplift, and GPS data corresponds to a 65-km-long fault rupture dipping 40?? to 50?? SE, located at 8 to 13 km offshore with a change in strike west of Boumerdes from N60??-65?? to N95??-105??. The inferred rupture geometry at depth correlates well with the seismological results and may have critical implications for the seismic hazard assessment of the Algiers region. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Gold Mineral Prospecting Using Phased Array Type L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (palsar) Satellite Remote Sensing Data, Central Gold Belt, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiranvand Pour, Amin; Hashim, Mazlan

    2016-06-01

    The Bentong-Raub Suture Zone (BRSZ) of Peninsular Malaysia is one of the significant structural zones in Sundaland, Southeast Asia. It forms the boundary between the Gondwana-derived Sibumasu terrane in the west and Sukhothai arc in the east. The BRSZ is also genetically related to the sediment-hosted/orogenic gold deposits associated with the major lineaments and form-lines in the central gold belt Central Gold Belt of Peninsular Malaysia. In tropical environments, heavy tropical rainforest and intense weathering makes it impossible to map geological structures over long distances. Advances in remote sensing technology allow the application of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data in geological structural analysis for tropical environments. In this investigation, the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) satellite remote sensing data were used to analyse major geological structures in Peninsular Malaysia and provide detailed characterization of lineaments and form-lines in the BRSZ, as well as its implication for sediment-hosted/orogenic gold exploration in tropical environments. The major geological structure directions of the BRSZ are N-S, NNE-SSW, NE-SW and NW-SE, which derived from directional filtering analysis to PALSAR data. The pervasive array of N-S faults in the study area and surrounding terrain is mainly linked to the N-S trending of the Suture Zone. N-S striking lineaments are often cut by younger NE-SW and NW-SE-trending lineaments. Gold mineralized trends lineaments are associated with the intersection of N-S, NE-SW, NNW-SSE and ESE-WNW faults and curvilinear features in shearing and alteration zones. Lineament analysis on PALSAR satellite remote sensing data is a useful tool for detecting the boundary between the Gondwana-derived terranes and major geological features associated with suture zone especially for large inaccessible regions in tropical environments.

  19. Application of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery to volcano mapping in the humid tropics: a case study in East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carn, Simon A.

    Volcanoes in humid tropical environments are frequently cloud covered, typically densely vegetated and rapidly eroded. These factors complicate field and laboratory studies and even the basic identification of potentially active volcanoes. Numerous previous studies have highlighted the potential value of radar remote sensing for volcanology in equatorial regions. Here, cloud- and vegetation-penetrating LHH-band (λ 24cm) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite (JERS-1) are used to investigate persistently active volcanoes and prehistoric calderas in East Java, Indonesia. The LHH-band JERS-1 SAR produces high-spatial-resolution (18m) imagery with relatively high incidence angle that highlights structures and topographic variations at or greater than the wavelength scale while minimising geometrical distortions such as layover and foreshortening. These images, along with Internet browse data derived from the Canadian RADARSAT mission, provide new evidence relating regional tectonics to volcanism throughout East Java. Volcanic events, such as caldera collapse at the Tengger caldera, appear to have been partly controlled by northwest-aligned faults related to intra-arc sedimentary basins. Similar regional controls appear important at historically active Lamongan volcano, which is encircled by numerous flank maars and cinder cones. A previously undocumented pyroclastic sheet and debris avalanche deposit from the Jambangan caldera complex is also manifested in the synoptic radar images. At the currently active Semeru volcano these data permit identification of recent pyroclastic flow and lahar deposits. Radar data therefore offer a valuable tool for mapping and hazard assessment at late Quaternary volcanoes. The criteria developed in the analysis here could be applied to other regions in the humid tropics.

  20. Rapid Damage Mapping for the 2015 M7.8 Gorkha Earthquake using Synthetic Aperture Radar Data from COSMO-SkyMed and ALOS-2 Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S. H.; Hudnut, K. W.; Owen, S. E.; Webb, F.; Simons, M.; Macdonald, A.; Sacco, P.; Gurrola, E. M.; Manipon, G.; Liang, C.; Fielding, E. J.; Milillo, P.; Hua, H.; Coletta, A.

    2015-12-01

    The April 25, 2015 M7.8 Gorkha earthquake caused more than 8,000 fatalities and widespread building damage in central Nepal. Four days after the earthquake, the Italian Space Agency's (ASI's) COSMO-SkyMed Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite acquired data over Kathmandu area. Nine days after the earthquake, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA's) ALOS-2 SAR satellite covered larger area. Using these radar observations, we rapidly produced damage proxy maps derived from temporal changes in Interferometric SAR (InSAR) coherence. These maps were qualitatively validated through comparison with independent damage analyses by National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) and the UNITAR's (United Nations Institute for Training and Research's) Operational Satellite Applications Programme (UNOSAT), and based on our own visual inspection of DigitalGlobe's WorldView optical pre- vs. post-event imagery. Our maps were quickly released to responding agencies and the public, and used for damage assessment, determining inspection/imaging priorities, and reconnaissance fieldwork.

  1. Rapid damage mapping for the 2015 M7.8 Gorkha earthquake using synthetic aperture radar data from COSMO-SkyMed and ALOS-2 satellites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yun, Sang-Ho; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Owen, Susan; Webb, Frank; Simons, Mark; Sacco, Patrizia; Gurrola, Eric; Manipon, Gerald; Liang, Cunren; Fielding, Eric; Milillo, Pietro; Hua, Hook; Coletta, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The 25 April 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake caused more than 8000 fatalities and widespread building damage in central Nepal. The Italian Space Agency’s COSMO–SkyMed Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite acquired data over Kathmandu area four days after the earthquake and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 SAR satellite for larger area nine days after the mainshock. We used these radar observations and rapidly produced damage proxy maps (DPMs) derived from temporal changes in Interferometric SAR coherence. Our DPMs were qualitatively validated through comparison with independent damage analyses by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and the United Nations Institute for Training and Research’s United Nations Operational Satellite Applications Programme, and based on our own visual inspection of DigitalGlobe’s WorldView optical pre- versus postevent imagery. Our maps were quickly released to responding agencies and the public, and used for damage assessment, determining inspection/imaging priorities, and reconnaissance fieldwork.

  2. Integrating the probability integral method for subsidence prediction and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry for monitoring mining subsidence in Fengfeng, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Xinpeng; Wu, Kan; Zhou, Dawei; Li, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (D-InSAR) is characterized mainly by high spatial resolution and high accuracy over a wide coverage range. Because of its unique advantages, the technology is widely used for monitoring ground surface deformations. However, in coal mining areas, the ground surface can suffer large-scale collapses in short periods of time, leading to inaccuracies in D-InSAR results and limiting its use for monitoring mining subsidence. We propose a data-processing method that overcomes these disadvantages by combining D-InSAR with the probability integral method used for predicting mining subsidence. Five RadarSat-2 images over Fengfeng coal mine, China, were used to demonstrate the proposed method and assess its effectiveness. Using this method, surface deformation could be monitored over an area of thousands of square kilometers, and more than 50 regions affected by subsidence were identified. For Jiulong mine, nonlinear subsidence cumulative results were obtained for a time period from January 2011 to April 2011, and the maximum subsidence value reached up to 299 mm. Finally, the efficiency and applicability of the proposed method were verified by comparing with data from leveling surveying.

  3. Crop monitoring & yield forecasting system based on Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and process-based crop growth model: Development and validation in South and South East Asian Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiyono, T. D.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate and timely information on rice crop growth and yield helps governments and other stakeholders adapting their economic policies and enables relief organizations to better anticipate and coordinate relief efforts in the wake of a natural catastrophe. Such delivery of rice growth and yield information is made possible by regular earth observation using space-born Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology combined with crop modeling approach to estimate yield. Radar-based remote sensing is capable of observing rice vegetation growth irrespective of cloud coverage, an important feature given that in incidences of flooding the sky is often cloud-covered. The system allows rapid damage assessment over the area of interest. Rice yield monitoring is based on a crop growth simulation and SAR-derived key information, particularly start of season and leaf growth rate. Results from pilot study sites in South and South East Asian countries suggest that incorporation of SAR data into crop model improves yield estimation for actual yields. Remote-sensing data assimilation into crop model effectively capture responses of rice crops to environmental conditions over large spatial coverage, which otherwise is practically impossible to achieve. Such improvement of actual yield estimates offers practical application such as in a crop insurance program. Process-based crop simulation model is used in the system to ensure climate information is adequately captured and to enable mid-season yield forecast.

  4. Modeling Collapse Chimney and Spall Zone Settlement as a Source of Post-Shot Subsidence Detected by Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Foxwall, W.

    2000-07-24

    Ground surface subsidence resulting from the March 1992 JUNCTION underground nuclear test at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) imaged by satellite synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) wholly occurred during a period of several months after the shot (Vincent et al., 1999) and after the main cavity collapse event. A significant portion of the subsidence associated with the small (less than 20 kt) GALENA and DIVIDER tests probably also occurred after the shots, although the deformation detected in these cases contains additional contributions from coseismic processes, since the radar scenes used to construct the deformation interferogram bracketed these two later events, The dimensions of the seas of subsidence resulting from all three events are too large to be solely accounted for by processes confined to the damage zone in the vicinity of the shot point or the collapse chimney. Rather, the subsidence closely corresponds to the span dimensions predicted by Patton's (1990) empirical relationship between spall radius and yield. This suggests that gravitational settlement of damaged rock within the spall zone is an important source of post-shot subsidence, in addition to settlement of the rubble within the collapse chimney. These observations illustrate the potential power of InSAR as a tool for Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring and on-site inspection in that the relatively broad ({approx} 100 m to 1 km) subsidence signatures resulting from small shots detonated at normal depths of burial (or even significantly overburied) are readily detectable within large geographical areas (100 km x 100 km) under favorable observing conditions. Furthermore, the present results demonstrate the flexibility of the technique in that the two routinely gathered satellite radar images used to construct the interferogram need not necessarily capture the event itself, but can cover a time period up to several months following the shot.

  5. Terahertz interferometric synthetic aperture tomography for confocal imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Heimbeck, M S; Marks, D L; Brady, D; Everitt, H O

    2012-04-15

    Terahertz (THz) interferometric synthetic aperture tomography (TISAT) for confocal imaging within extended objects is demonstrated by combining attributes of synthetic aperture radar and optical coherence tomography. Algorithms recently devised for interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy are adapted to account for the diffraction-and defocusing-induced spatially varying THz beam width characteristic of narrow depth of focus, high-resolution confocal imaging. A frequency-swept two-dimensional TISAT confocal imaging instrument rapidly achieves in-focus, diffraction-limited resolution over a depth 12 times larger than the instrument's depth of focus in a manner that may be easily extended to three dimensions and greater depths.

  6. Synthetic aperture integration (SAI) algorithm for SAR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Chambers, David H; Mast, Jeffrey E; Paglieroni, David W; Beer, N. Reginald

    2013-07-09

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  7. High Altitude Synthetic Aperture Imaging of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Richard; Stiles, B.; Anderson, Y.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Johnson, W. T.; Kelleher, K.; Wye, L.; Zebker, H.

    2006-09-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has been conducting observations of Titan since July 2004 . Currently, 6 close flyby's have collected synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data giving image resolutions down to 300 - 500 m. About 14 additional close radar imaging passes are planned. To improve radar coverage and increase the synergy with other Cassini imaging instruments such as VIMS and ISS, the radar team has started experimenting with very high altitude SAR imaging where conditions permit. This presentation will examine the performance trade-offs, special processing issues, and science potential of these high altitude SAR observations. These data collections are distinct from the normal Titan SAR images because the range will be much larger (around 20,000 km). To acquire enough signal in these circumstances, the radar operates in the lowest bandwidth scatterometer mode while spacecraft pointing control is used to slowly pan the central beam across a small swath. Due to a lower signal to noise ratio these high altitude images are designed to average together 150-200 independent looks to see features that may lie below the noise floor. So far, three high altitude images have been acquired during Titan flyby's T12, T13, and T15. In T12 imaging was attempted from 37000 km with an effective resolution around 5 km. In T13 the Huygens Probe landing site was imaged from 11000 km with effective resolution of 1 - 2 km. In T15 the Tsegehi area was imaged from 20000 km with effective resolution of 2 - 3 km.

  8. Synthetic Aperture Radar Technology Conference, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, N. Mex., March 8-10, 1978, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The following aspects of SAR development are discussed: calibration techniques, image simulation and interpretability, antennas, data processing, and system design. Papers are presented on such topics as a postlaunch calibration experiment for the Seasat-A SAR, computer simulation of an orbital SAR system, definition study of the Shuttle Imaging Radar, custom LSI circuits for spaceborne SAR processors, and random sampling adaptively focusing SAR.

  9. Structural and stratigraphic features and ERS 1 synthetic aperture radar backscatter characteristics of ice growing on shallow lakes in NW Alaska, winter 1991-1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, M. O.; Morris, K.; Weeks, W. F.; Wakabayashi, H.

    1994-11-01

    Changes in ERS 1 C band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) backscatter intensity (σ°) from ice growing on shallow tundra lakes at three locations in NW Alaska are described. Ice core analysis shows that at all lakes on the coast at Barrow the ice, whether floating or frozen to the bottom, includes an inclusion-free layer overlying a layer of ice with tubular bubbles oriented parallel to the direction of growth. The clear ice may also be overlain by a discontinuous layer of bubbly snow ice. Backscatter is low (-16 to -22 dB) at the time of initial ice formation, probably due to the specular nature of the upper and lower ice surfaces causing the radar pulse to be reflected away from the radar. As the ice thickens during the autumn, backscatter rises steadily. Once the ice freezes to the lake bottom, regardless of the presence of forward scattering tubular bubbles, low backscatter values of-17 to -18 dB are caused by absorption of the radar signal in the lake bed. For ice that remains afloat all winter the ice-water interface and the tubular bubbles combine, presumably via an incoherent double-bounce mechanism, to cause maximum backscatter values of the order of -6 to -7 dB. The σ° saturates at -6 to -7 dB before maximum ice thickness and tubular bubble content are attained. A simple ice growth model suggests that the layer of ice with tubular bubbles need be only a few centimeters thick midway through the growth season to cause maximum backscatter from floating ice. During the spring thaw a previously unreported backscatter reversal is observed on the floating and grounded portions of the coastal lakes but not on the lakes farther inland. This reversal may be related to the ice surface topography and wetness plus the effects of a longer, cooler melt period by the coast. Time series of backscatter variations from shallow tundra lakes are a record of (1) the development of tubular bubbles in the ice and, by association, changes in the gas content of the underlying

  10. Structural and stratigraphic features and ERS 1 synthetic aperture radar backscatter characteristics of ice growing on shallow lakes in NW Alaska, winter 1991-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffries, M. O.; Morris, K.; Weeks, W. F.; Wakabayashi, H.

    1994-01-01

    Changes in Earth Remote-Sensing Satellite (ERS) 1 C band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) backscatter intensity (sigma(exp 0)) from ice growing on shallow tundra lakes at three locations in NW Alaska are described. Ice core analysis shows that all lakes on the coast at Barrow the ice, whether floating or frozen to the bottom, includes an inclusion-free layer overlying a layer of ice with tubular bubbles oriented parallel to the direction of growth. The clear ice may also be overlain by a discontinuous layer of bubbly snow ice. Backscatter is low (-16 to -22 dB) at the time of initial ice formation, probably due to the specular nature of the upper and lower ice surfaces causing the radar pulse to be reflected away from the radar. As the ice thickens during the autumn, backscatter rises steadily. Once the ice freezes to the lake bottom, regardless of the presence of foward scattering tubular bubbles, low backscatter values of -17 to -18 dB are caused by absorption of the radar signal in the lake bed. For ice that remains afloat all winter the ice-water interface and the tubular bubbles combine, presumably via an incoherent double-bounce mechanism, to cause maximum backscatter values of the order of -6 to -7 dB. The sigma(exp 0) saturates at -6 to -7 dB before maximum ice thickness and tubular bubble content are attained. A simple ice growth model suggests that the layer of ice with tubular bubbles need be only a few centimeters thick midway through the growth season to cause maximum backscatter from floating ice. During the spring thaw a previously unreported backscatter reversal is observed on the floating and grounded portions of the coastal lakes but not on the lakes farther inland. This reversal may be related to the ice surface topography and wetness plus the effects of a longer, cooler melt period by the coast. Time series of backscatter variations from shallow tundra lakes are a record of (1) the development of tubular bubbles in the ice and, by association

  11. Arizona Department of Water Resources use of ALOS Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data to Identify Areas of Land Subsidence in Southeastern Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, B. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR) has been collecting, processing, and analyzing Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data since 2005. The Alaska Satellite Facility's Americas ALOS Data Node (AADN) has provided ADWR's InSAR program with the necessary data to identify new land subsidence features in Southeastern Arizona within Cochise County. ADWR has used the ALOS InSAR data in conjunction with ADWR groundwater level data to better understand the groundwater conditions in relation to the current land subsidence data and attempt to better understand the complex basin hydrology of the area. ADWR and the Arizona Geological Survey (AZGS) have used the ALOS InSAR data to also identify areas where conditions may exist for earth fissure formation. Further ground investigations by the AZGS have revealed unmapped earth fissures in potential earth fissure risk areas identified by ALOS InSAR data. Previously mapped earth fissures by the AZGS also fall within some of these earth fissure risk areas.

  12. Flood disaster monitoring in Thailand by using a airborne L-band SAR: Polarimetric and interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar with L-band(Pi-SAR-L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, N.; Sobue, S.; Shimada, M.; Ohyoshi, K.

    2012-04-01

    It was heavy rainfall around the northern region of Thailand from July to September 2011, which caused flood disaster to quite wide region of Thailand, it finally reached to the Bangkok central in the end of October 2011. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) conducted an emergency observation by using a airborne L-band SAR: Polarimetric and interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar with L-band(Pi-SAR-L) from 5th to 27th November to monitor flood area. Pi-SAR-L has a center frequency of 1271.5 MHz, a band width of 50 MHz, a slant range resolution of 3 m, and an acquisition swath of 15 km on the ground. Pi-SAR-L is boarded on an aircraft of the Gulfstream-II operated by the Diamond Air Service(DAS), Japan, and the Gulfstream-II was ferried to the Chieng-Mai airport in the North Thailand, from Japan. In our presentation, we will show flood area around Bangkok and its variations detected by Pi-SAR-L

  13. Ground displacements caused by aquifer-system water-level variations observed using interferometric synthetic aperture radar near Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heywood, Charles E.; Galloway, Devin L.; Stork, Sylvia V.

    2002-01-01

    Six synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images were processed to form five unwrapped interferometric (InSAR) images of the greater metropolitan area in the Albuquerque Basin. Most interference patterns in the images were caused by range displacements resulting from changes in land-surface elevation. Loci of land- surface elevation changes correlate with changes in aquifer-system water levels and largely result from the elastic response of the aquifer-system skeletal material to changes in pore-fluid pressure. The magnitude of the observed land-surface subsidence and rebound suggests that aquifer-system deformation resulting from ground-water withdrawals in the Albuquerque area has probably remained in the elastic (recoverable) range from July 1993 through September 1999. Evidence of inelastic (permanent) land subsidence in the Rio Rancho area exists, but its relation to compaction of the aquifer system is inconclusive because of insufficient water-level data. Patterns of elastic deformation in both Albuquerque and Rio Rancho suggest that intrabasin faults impede ground- water-pressure diffusion at seasonal time scales and that these faults are probably important in controlling patterns of regional ground-water flow.

  14. Multi-input multi-output frequency-modulated continuous wave synthetic aperture radar system using beat-frequency division waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Chen, Long-yong; Liang, Xing-dong; Ding, Chi-biao; Hong, Wen; Zhou, Liang-jiang; Dong, Yong-wei; Li, Kun

    2013-07-01

    Attention has been paid to lightweight, cost-effective frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in recent years. Though FMCW SAR can operate at high altitude, it is still impracticable for wide swath or high Doppler bandwidth remote sensing because of the dramatic losses of range resolution and processing gain. Moreover, the system sampling rate is too high for real-time processing. All these restrictions caused by the bandwidth loss of the dechirp operation can be relieved by expanding the system sweep cycle. However, the broadening of the sweep cycle decreases the system pulse repetition frequency with azimuth ambiguity, which can be suppressed by exploiting the spatial diversity of multi-input multi-output (MIMO) systems. This paper reports a MIMO-FMCW SAR system using beat-frequency division waveforms. There is a small frequency interval and a large overlap (in frequency) between the orthogonal waveforms. As the frequency interval is much smaller than the signal bandwidth, the echoes that come from different transmitters can be separated by bandpass filtering with little intrapulse interference. Consequently, the applications of FMCW SAR systems can be extended for wider swath or higher Doppler bandwidth remote sensing. Theoretical analysis and simulation results illustrate the feasibility of this system.

  15. Time series synthetic aperture radar interferometry over the multispan cable-stayed Rio-Antirio Bridge (central Greece): achievements and constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcharidis, Issaak; Foumelis, Michael; Benekos, George; Kourkouli, Penelope; Stamatopoulos, Constantine; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to monitor by means of multitemporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry the stability of the fully suspended cable-stayed Rio-Antirio Bridge (RAB) as well as the ground deformation of its surrounding area. The bridge is located in a region characterized by high hazard susceptibility, therefore, the monitoring of its behavior is of significant interest to mitigate potential risks. Envisat ASAR descending and TerraSAR-X ascending acquisitions were exploited using the persistent scatterer interferometry technique covering the periods 2002 to 2010 and 2010 to 2012, respectively. For both periods, ground displacement rates ranging from -12 to +12 mm/year indicate the absence of a significant deformation source acting during the period of investigation. Of interest is the differential motion pattern between Rio and Antirio for both SAR geometries, signifying the contribution of horizontal motion components, meanwhile allowing the quantification of the relative vertical displacement rates of these regions. For the RAB infrastructure, displacement histories were obtained from TerraSAR-X data analysis only for the stable part of the bridge, namely the viaducts and the four pylons, possibly due to the oscillation of its suspended part and the uncertainty of phase measurements over the pavement. The common behavior of the pylons was confirmed with an overall subsidence between -2 and -3 mm/year. The highest rates were observed for pylons established on specific soil types and were attributed to sediment consolidation.

  16. Root mass ratio: index derived by assimilation of synthetic aperture radar and the improved World Food Study model for heavy metal stress monitoring in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Liu, Xiangnan; Liu, Meiling; Liu, Feng; Jin, Ming; Wu, Ling

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic assessment of heavy metal contamination in crops is essential for food security and the farmland ecological environment. A new index for monitoring heavy metal stress based on the assimilation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data and the crop growth model is performed. The improved World Food Study (WOFOST) model was used in this study, which is embedded with two stress factors to improve the accuracy of assimilation. Biomass (BM) values retrieved by SAR data were assimilated into the improved WOFOST model to simulate dry weight of rice roots (WRT), and the root mass ratio (RMR, WRT/BM) was calculated as an index for monitoring heavy metal stress. SAR shows enormous potential for monitoring crop growth status in cloudy area. Compared with other physiological indices, RMR could weaken the weight change of rice caused by other background factors. In the temporal scale, RMR showed a faster significant decrease when the stress was greater. The spatial distribution of RMR and the stress factors exhibited good consistency. These results suggest that RMR derived from the assimilation method based on SAR data and the improved WOFOST model is effective for dynamically monitoring the rice growth status in cloudy regions under heavy metal stress.

  17. Analysis of data acquired by synthetic aperture radar and LANDSAT Multispectral Scanner over Kershaw County, South Carolina, during the summer season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    Data acquired by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and LANDSAT multispectral scanner (MSS) were processed and analyzed to derive forest-related resources inventory information. The SAR data were acquired by using the NASA aircraft X-band SAR with linear (HH, VV) and cross (HV, VH) polarizations and the SEASAT L-band SAR. After data processing and data quality examination, the three polarization (HH, HV, and VV) data from the aircraft X-band SAR were used in conjunction with LANDSAT MSS for multisensor data classification. The results of accuracy evaluation for the SAR, MSS and SAR/MSS data using supervised classification show that the SAR-only data set contains low classification accuracy for several land cover classes. However, the SAR/MSS data show that significant improvement in classification accuracy is obtained for all eight land cover classes. These results suggest the usefulness of using combined SAR/MSS data for forest-related cover mapping. The SAR data also detect several small special surface features that are not detectable by MSS data.

  18. A study of P-band synthetic aperture radar applicability and performance for Mars exploration: Imaging subsurface geology and detecting shallow moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paillou, Philippe; Lasne, Yannick; Heggy, Essam; Malézieux, Jean-Marie; Ruffié, Gilles

    2006-04-01

    Over the past decade, orbital images of the Martian surface revealed key evidence about the history of the planet environment (craters, faults, paleo-lakes, and rivers), partially hidden under a widespread layer of aeolian deposits. Furthermore, several recent observations and studies support the hypothesis that water could be found in the shallow subsurface of Mars. Low-frequency synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has demonstrated its subsurface imaging capabilities on Earth, especially in arid regions. While SAR potentials for Mars exploration have already been widely discussed, we present here results of a theoretical and parametric study, based on the experience we gained from terrestrial surveys on Mars analog test sites, which evaluates the capabilities of a P-band (430 MHz) SAR for Mars exploration for both shallow subsurface geology mapping and moisture detection. We suggest that a P-band polarimetric SAR can probe the first meters of the Martian subsurface to reveal the dust-covered geology and to monitor moisture changes over large scales.

  19. Geometric ortho-rectification and generation of sigma(0) image products from multiple incidence synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, James; Leberl, Franz; Kruse, Fred

    1992-01-01

    The results of the first phase of a cooperative effort in geometric orthorectification and generation of sigma(0) images of multiple incidence SAR images are presented. The geometric accuracy of the final image products is approximately 18 m or 1.5 pixels. A method for registering radar imagery collected from an airborne platform to an existing digital elevation model despite the effects of unmodeled variations in the flight path of the platform is demonstrated. The results indicate the requirements for a more detailed digital elevation model.

  20. Relationships between autofocus methods for SAR and self-survey techniques for SONAR. [Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, D.E.; Jakowatz, C.V. Jr.; Ghiglia, D.C.; Eichel, P.H.

    1991-01-01

    Autofocus methods in SAR and self-survey techniques in SONAR have a common mathematical basis in that they both involve estimation and correction of phase errors introduced by sensor position uncertainties. Time delay estimation and correlation methods have been shown to be effective in solving the self-survey problem for towed SONAR arrays. Since it can be shown that platform motion errors introduce similar time-delay estimation problems in SAR imaging, the question arises as to whether such techniques could be effectively employed for autofocus of SAR imagery. With a simple mathematical model for motion errors in SAR, we will show why such correlation/time-delay techniques are not nearly as effective as established SAR autofocus algorithms such as phase gradient autofocus or sub-aperture based methods. This analysis forms an important bridge between signal processing methodologies for SAR and SONAR. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  1. System and method for measuring ocean surface currents at locations remote from land masses using synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Lawrence E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A system for measuring ocean surface currents from an airborne platform is disclosed. A radar system having two spaced antennas wherein one antenna is driven and return signals from the ocean surface are detected by both antennas is employed to get raw ocean current data which are saved for later processing. There are a pair of global positioning system (GPS) systems including a first antenna carried by the platform at a first location and a second antenna carried by the platform at a second location displaced from the first antenna for determining the position of the antennas from signals from orbiting GPS navigational satellites. Data are also saved for later processing. The saved data are subsequently processed by a ground-based computer system to determine the position, orientation, and velocity of the platform as well as to derive measurements of currents on the ocean surface.

  2. Studies of the dependence of L-band backscatter on sea surface winds using the synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Brown, W. E., Jr.; Thompson, T. W.; Gonzalez, F. I.; Jones, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    Airborne and Seasat-1 SAR measurements of over-ocean winds through the use of L-band frequencies is described. A consistent dependence has been found between the wind speeds and the microwave backscattering coefficient. Measurements were obtained for cells a few kilometers across and at an incidence angle of 20 deg from nadir. Surface measurements were included in the analyses whenever possible, including data for surface temperatures and current variations, such as in the Gulf Stream. Higher radar cross-sections have been observed from the Gulf Stream than in nearby continental shelf waters. The eye-wall of Hurricane Gloria in Sept. 1976 displayed the largest backscatter of the storm. Wind speed backscatter exponents of 0.5 for winds below 18 m/sec, and 0.58 for winds above 20 m/sec have been determined for the Seasat L-band backscatter. The same wind speeds hold true for 0.05 and 0.50, respectively, for the wind direction component.

  3. Applications of Radarsat-1 synthetic aperture radar imagery to assess hurricane-related flooding of coastal Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiage, L.M.; Walker, N.D.; Balasubramanian, S.; Babin, A.; Barras, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Louisiana coast is subjected to hurricane impacts including flooding of human settlements, river channels and coastal marshes, and salt water intrusion. Information on the extent of flooding is often required quickly for emergency relief, repairs of infrastructure, and production of flood risk maps. This study investigates the feasibility of using Radarsat-1 SAR imagery to detect flooded areas in coastal Louisiana after Hurricane Lili, October 2002. Arithmetic differencing and multi-temporal enhancement techniques were employed to detect flooding and to investigate relationships between backscatter and water level changes. Strong positive correlations (R2=0.7-0.94) were observed between water level and SAR backscatter within marsh areas proximate to Atchafalaya Bay. Although variations in elevation and vegetation type did influence and complicate the radar signature at individual sites, multi-date differences in backscatter largely reflected the patterns of flooding within large marsh areas. Preliminary analyses show that SAR imagery was not useful in mapping urban flooding in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina's landfall on 29 August 2005. ?? 2005 Taylor & Francis.

  4. Detection of above-ground and subsurface unexploded ordnance using ultrawideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and electromagnetic modeling tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Anders J.; Damarla, Thyagaraju; Geng, Norbert; Dong, Yanting; Carin, Lawrence

    2000-08-01

    Recent development of wideband, high-resolution SAR technology has shown that detecting buried targets over large open areas may be possible. Ground clutter and soil type are tow limiting factor influencing the practicality of using wideband SAR for wide-area target detection. In particular, the presence of strong ground clutter because of the unevenness, roughness or inconsistency of the soil itself may limit the radar's capability to resolve the target from the clutter. Likewise, the soil material properties can also play a major tole. The incident wave may experience significant attenuation as the wave penetrates lossy soil. In an attempt to more fully characterize this problem, fully polarimetric ultra-wideband measurements have been taken by the US Army Research Laboratory's SAR at test sites in Yuma, Arizona, and Elgin Air Force Base, Florida. SAR images have been generated for above-ground and subsurface unexploded ordnance targets, including 155-mm shells. Additionally, a full-wave method of moments (MoM) model has been developed for the electromagnetic scattering from these same targets, accounting for the lossy nature and frequency dependency of the various soils. An approximate model based on phys9cal optics (PO) has also been developed. The efficacy of using PO in lieu of the MoM to generate the electromagnetic scattering data is examined. We compare SAR images from the measured data with images produced by the MoM and PO simulations by using a standard back-projection technique.

  5. Automatic selection of flood water levels from high resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar images for assimilation into hydraulic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, D. C.; Schumann, G. J.-P.; Neal, J. C.; Garcia-Pintado, J.; Bates, P. D.

    2012-04-01

    Flood extents caused by fluvial floods in urban and rural areas may be predicted by hydraulic models. Assimilation may be used to correct the model state and improve the estimates of the model parameters or external forcing. One common observation assimilated is the water level at various points along the modelled reach. Distributed water levels may be estimated indirectly along the flood extents in SAR images by intersecting the extents with the floodplain DEM. It is necessary to select a subset of levels because adjacent levels along the flood extent will be strongly correlated and add little new information, while a large number of levels will increase the computational cost of the assimilation unnecessarily. The subset of points selected should be at positions at which the water level can be accurately determined, with the points distributed uniformly over the flood extent sufficiently sparsely that adjacent water levels are spatially uncorrelated. Although models run in hindcasting mode can provide useful information for predicting the effects of future floods, the ultimate goal must be to use SAR water levels in a forecasting model, which means that they have to be estimated in near real-time. A method for selecting such a subset automatically and in near real-time is described. The input to the method is a flood extent in both urban and rural areas extracted from a high resolution SAR image using an automatic near real-time algorithm based on object segmentation and classification, which takes into account, for example, object heights as well as their SAR backscatter, and the presence of radar shadow and layover in urban areas. The method of subset selection uses this flood extent to first select candidate waterline points in flooded rural areas having low slope, so that levels may be calculated accurately. The waterline levels and positions are corrected for the effects of double reflections between the water surface and emergent vegetation at the flood

  6. Forest above ground biomass estimation and forest/non-forest classification for Odisha, India, using L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, M.; Kiran Chand, T. R.; Fararoda, R.; Jha, C. S.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Tropical forests contribute to approximately 40 % of the total carbon found in terrestrial biomass. In this context, forest/non-forest classification and estimation of forest above ground biomass over tropical regions are very important and relevant in understanding the contribution of tropical forests in global biogeochemical cycles, especially in terms of carbon pools and fluxes. Information on the spatio-temporal biomass distribution acts as a key input to Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation Plus (REDD+) action plans. This necessitates precise and reliable methods to estimate forest biomass and to reduce uncertainties in existing biomass quantification scenarios. The use of backscatter information from a host of allweather capable Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems during the recent past has demonstrated the potential of SAR data in forest above ground biomass estimation and forest / nonforest classification. In the present study, Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) / Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data along with field inventory data have been used in forest above ground biomass estimation and forest / non-forest classification over Odisha state, India. The ALOSPALSAR 50 m spatial resolution orthorectified and radiometrically corrected HH/HV dual polarization data (digital numbers) for the year 2010 were converted to backscattering coefficient images (Schimada et al., 2009). The tree level measurements collected during field inventory (2009-'10) on Girth at Breast Height (GBH at 1.3 m above ground) and height of all individual trees at plot (plot size 0.1 ha) level were converted to biomass density using species specific allometric equations and wood densities. The field inventory based biomass estimations were empirically integrated with ALOS-PALSAR backscatter coefficients to derive spatial forest above ground biomass estimates for the study area. Further, The Support Vector Machines (SVM) based Radial

  7. Synthetic aperture interferometry: error analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Amiya; Coupland, Jeremy

    2010-07-10

    Synthetic aperture interferometry (SAI) is a novel way of testing aspherics and has a potential for in-process measurement of aspherics [Appl. Opt.42, 701 (2003)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.42.000701 A method to measure steep aspherics using the SAI technique has been previously reported [Appl. Opt.47, 1705 (2008)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.47.001705 Here we investigate the computation of surface form using the SAI technique in different configurations and discuss the computational errors. A two-pass measurement strategy is proposed to reduce the computational errors, and a detailed investigation is carried out to determine the effect of alignment errors on the measurement process.

  8. Southern San Andreas-San Jacinto fault system slip rates estimated from earthquake cycle models constrained by GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Paul; Hetland, Eric A.; Liu, Zhen; Fielding, Eric J.

    2009-02-01

    We use ground geodetic and interferometric synthetic aperture radar satellite observations across the southern San Andreas (SAF)-San Jacinto (SJF) fault systems to constrain their slip rates and the viscosity structure of the lower crust and upper mantle on the basis of periodic earthquake cycle, Maxwell viscoelastic, finite element models. Key questions for this system are the SAF and SJF slip rates, the slip partitioning between the two main branches of the SJF, and the dip of the SAF. The best-fitting models generally have a high-viscosity lower crust (η = 1021 Pa s) overlying a lower-viscosity upper mantle (η = 1019 Pa s). We find considerable trade-offs between the relative time into the current earthquake cycle of the San Jacinto fault and the upper mantle viscosity. With reasonable assumptions for the relative time in the earthquake cycle, the partition of slip is fairly robust at around 24-26 mm/a for the San Jacinto fault system and 16-18 mm/a for the San Andreas fault. Models for two subprofiles across the SAF-SJF systems suggest that slip may transfer from the western (Coyote Creek) branch to the eastern (Clark-Superstition hills) branch of the SJF from NW to SE. Across the entire system our best-fitting model gives slip rates of 2 ± 3, 12 ± 9, 12 ± 9, and 17 ± 3 mm/a for the Elsinore, Coyote Creek, Clark, and San Andreas faults, respectively, where the large uncertainties in the slip rates for the SJF branches reflect the large uncertainty in the slip rate partitioning within the SJF system.

  9. Graph theory for analyzing pair-wise data: application to geophysical model parameters estimated from interferometric synthetic aperture radar data at Okmok volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, Elena C.; Cardiff, Michael; Feigl, Kurt L.

    2016-07-01

    Graph theory is useful for analyzing time-dependent model parameters estimated from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data in the temporal domain. Plotting acquisition dates (epochs) as vertices and pair-wise interferometric combinations as edges defines an incidence graph. The edge-vertex incidence matrix and the normalized edge Laplacian matrix are factors in the covariance matrix for the pair-wise data. Using empirical measures of residual scatter in the pair-wise observations, we estimate the relative variance at each epoch by inverting the covariance of the pair-wise data. We evaluate the rank deficiency of the corresponding least-squares problem via the edge-vertex incidence matrix. We implement our method in a MATLAB software package called GraphTreeTA available on GitHub (https://github.com/feigl/gipht). We apply temporal adjustment to the data set described in Lu et al. (Geophys Res Solid Earth 110, 2005) at Okmok volcano, Alaska, which erupted most recently in 1997 and 2008. The data set contains 44 differential volumetric changes and uncertainties estimated from interferograms between 1997 and 2004. Estimates show that approximately half of the magma volume lost during the 1997 eruption was recovered by the summer of 2003. Between June 2002 and September 2003, the estimated rate of volumetric increase is (6.2 ± 0.6) × 10^6~m^3/year . Our preferred model provides a reasonable fit that is compatible with viscoelastic relaxation in the five years following the 1997 eruption. Although we demonstrate the approach using volumetric rates of change, our formulation in terms of incidence graphs applies to any quantity derived from pair-wise differences, such as range change, range gradient, or atmospheric delay.

  10. Sinking Coastlines: Land Subsidence at Aquaculture Facilities in the Yellow River Delta, China, measured with Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar (D-InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, S.; Overeem, I.; Tanaka, A.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Land subsidence in river deltas is a global problem. It heightens storm surges, salinates groundwater, intensifies river flooding, destabilizes infrastructure and accelerates shoreline retreat. Measurements of delta subsidence typically rely on point measures such as GPS devices, tide gauges or extensometers, but spatial coverage is needed to fully assess risk across river deltas. Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (D-InSAR) is a satellite-based technique that can provide maps of ground deformation with mm to cm-scale vertical resolution. We apply D-InSAR to the coast of the Yellow River Delta in China, which is dominated by aquaculture facilities and has experienced severe coastal erosion in the last twenty years. We extract deformation patterns from dry land adjacent to aquaculture facilities along the coast, allowing the first measurements of subsidence at a non-urban delta shoreline. Results show classic cones-of-depression surrounding aquaculture facilities, likely due to groundwater pumping. Subsidence rates are as high as 250 mm/y at the largest facility on the delta. These rates exceed local and global average sea level rise by nearly two orders of magnitude. If these rates continue, large aquaculture facilities in the area could induce more than a meter of relative sea level rise every five years. Given the global explosion in fish farming in recent years, these results also suggest that similar subsidence and associated relative sea level rise may present a significant hazard for other Asian megadeltas. False-color MODIS image of the Yellow River delta in September 2012. Water appears dark blue, highlighting the abundance of aquaculture facilities along the coast. Green land is primarily agricultural; brown is urban. Red boxes indicate locations of aquaculture facilities examined in this study. Figure from Higgins, S., Overeem, I., Tanaka, A., & Syvitski, J.P.M., (2013), Land Subsidence at Aquaculture Facilities in the Yellow River

  11. Time-Dependent Deformation at Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Field (Nevada) Measured With Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar and Modeled with Multiple Working Hypotheses of Coupled Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigl, K. L.; Ali, S. T.; Akerley, J.; Baluyut, E.; Cardiff, M. A.; Davatzes, N. C.; Foxall, W.; Fratta, D.; Kreemer, C.; Mellors, R. J.; Lopeman, J.; Spielman, P.; Wang, H. F.

    2015-12-01

    To measure time-dependent deformation at the Brady Hot Springs geothermal field in western Nevada, we analyze interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data acquired between 2004 and 2014 by five satellite missions, including: ERS-2, Envisat, ALOS, TerraSAR-X, and TanDEM-X. The resulting maps of deformation show an elliptical subsiding area that is ~4 km by ~1.5 km. Its long axis coincides with the strike of the dominant normal-fault system at Brady. Within this bowl of subsidence, the interference pattern shows several smaller features with length scales of the order of ~1 km. This signature occurs consistently in all of the well-correlated interferometric pairs spanning several months. Results from inverse modeling suggest that the deformation is a result of volumetric contraction in shallow units, no deeper than 600 m, that are probably associated with damaged regions where faults interact via thermal (T), hydrological (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes. Such damaged zones are expected to extend downward along steeply dipping fault planes, providing high-permeability conduits to the production wells. Using time series analysis, we test the hypothesis that geothermal production drives the observed deformation. We find a good correlation between the observed deformation rate and the rate of production in the shallow wells. We explore first-order models to calculate the time-dependent deformation fields produced by coupled processes, including: thermal contraction of rock (T-M coupling), decline in pore pressure (H-M coupling), and dissolution of minerals over time (H-C-M coupling). These processes are related to the heterogeneity of hydro-geological and material properties at the site. This work is part of a project entitled "Poroelastic Tomography by Adjoint Inverse Modeling of Data from Seismology, Geodesy, and Hydrology" (PoroTomo) http://geoscience.wisc.edu/feigl/porotomo.

  12. Object-oriented fusion of RADARSAT-2 polarimetric synthetic aperture radar and HJ-1A multispectral data for land-cover classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yan; Jiang, Qigang; Wang, Bin; Li, Yuanhua; Liu, Shu; Cui, Can

    2016-04-01

    The contribution of the integration of optical and polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) data to accurate land-cover classification was investigated. For this purpose, an object-oriented classification methodology that consisted of polarimetric decomposition, hybrid feature selection, and a support vector machine (SVM) was proposed. A RADARSAT-2 Fine Quad-Pol image and an HJ-1A CCD2 multispectral image were used as data sources. First, polarimetric decomposition was implemented for the RADARSAT-2 image. Sixty-one polarimetric parameters were extracted using different polarimetric decomposition methods and then merged with the main diagonal elements (T11, T22, T33) of the coherency matrix to form a multichannel image with 64 layers. Second, the HJ-1A and the multichannel images were divided into numerous image objects by implementing multiresolution segmentation. Third, 1104 features were extracted from the HJ-1A and the multichannel images for each image object. Fourth, the hybrid feature selection method that combined the ReliefF filter approach and the genetic algorithm (GA) wrapper approach (ReliefF-GA) was used. Finally, land-cover classification was performed by an SVM classifier on the basis of the selected features. Five other classification methodologies were conducted for comparison to verify the contribution of optical and PolSAR data integration and to test the superiority of the proposed object-oriented classification methodology. Comparison results show that HJ-1A data, RADARSAT-2 data, polarimetric decomposition, ReliefF-GA, and SVM have a significant contribution by improving land-cover classification accuracy.

  13. L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery performs better than optical datasets at retrieving woody fractional cover in deciduous, dry savannahs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidoo, Laven; Mathieu, Renaud; Main, Russell; Wessels, Konrad; Asner, Gregory P.

    2016-10-01

    Woody canopy cover (CC) is the simplest two dimensional metric for assessing the presence of the woody component in savannahs, but detailed validated maps are not currently available in southern African savannahs. A number of international EO programs (including in savannah landscapes) advocate and use optical LandSAT imagery for regional to country-wide mapping of woody canopy cover. However, previous research has shown that L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provides good performance at retrieving woody canopy cover in southern African savannahs. This study's objective was to evaluate, compare and use in combination L-band ALOS PALSAR and LandSAT-5 TM, in a Random Forest environment, to assess the benefits of using LandSAT compared to ALOS PALSAR. Additional objectives saw the testing of LandSAT-5 image seasonality, spectral vegetation indices and image textures for improved CC modelling. Results showed that LandSAT-5 imagery acquired in the summer and autumn seasons yielded the highest single season modelling accuracies (R2 between 0.47 and 0.65), depending on the year but the combination of multi-seasonal images yielded higher accuracies (R2 between 0.57 and 0.72). The derivation of spectral vegetation indices and image textures and their combinations with optical reflectance bands provided minimal improvement with no optical-only result exceeding the winter SAR L-band backscatter alone results (R2 of ∼0.8). The integration of seasonally appropriate LandSAT-5 image reflectance and L-band HH and HV backscatter data does provide a significant improvement for CC modelling at the higher end of the model performance (R2 between 0.83 and 0.88), but we conclude that L-band only based CC modelling be recommended for South African regions.

  14. The potential of flood forecasting using a variable-resolution global Digital Terrain Model and flood extents from Synthetic Aperture Radar images.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, David; Garcia-Pintado, Javier; Cloke, Hannah; Dance, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    A basic data requirement of a river flood inundation model is a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of the reach being studied. The scale at which modeling is required determines the accuracy required of the DTM. For modeling floods in urban areas, a high resolution DTM such as that produced by airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) is most useful, and large parts of many developed countries have now been mapped using LiDAR. In remoter areas, it is possible to model flooding on a larger scale using a lower resolution DTM, and in the near future the DTM of choice is likely to be that derived from the TanDEM-X Digital Elevation Model (DEM). A variable-resolution global DTM obtained by combining existing high and low resolution data sets would be useful for modeling flood water dynamics globally, at high resolution wherever possible and at lower resolution over larger rivers in remote areas. A further important data resource used in flood modeling is the flood extent, commonly derived from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. Flood extents become more useful if they are intersected with the DTM, when water level observations (WLOs) at the flood boundary can be estimated at various points along the river reach. To illustrate the utility of such a global DTM, two examples of recent research involving WLOs at opposite ends of the spatial scale are discussed. The first requires high resolution spatial data, and involves the assimilation of WLOs from a real sequence of high resolution SAR images into a flood model to update the model state with observations over time, and to estimate river discharge and model parameters, including river bathymetry and friction. The results indicate the feasibility of such an Earth Observation-based flood forecasting system. The second example is at a larger scale, and uses SAR-derived WLOs to improve the lower-resolution TanDEM-X DEM in the area covered by the flood extents. The resulting reduction in random height error is significant.

  15. Detection and measurement of land subsidence using interferometric synthetic aperture radar and Global Positioning System, San Bernardino County, Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Ikehara, Marti E.; Stork, Sylvia V.; Amelung, Falk; Galloway, Devin L.

    2003-01-01

    Land subsidence associated with ground-water-level declines has been recognized as a potential problem in parts of the Mojave Desert, California. Ground water has been the primary source of domestic, agricultural, and municipal water supplies in the desert since the early 1900s. Pumping of ground water from the Mojave River and Morongo ground-water basins in the southwestern Mojave Desert resulted in water-level declines of more than 30 meters (100 feet) between the 1950s and the 1990s. A Global Positioning System (GPS) survey of a geodetic network was used to determine the location, extent, and magnitude of vertical land-surface changes in Lucerne Valley in the Morongo ground-water basin. The GPS survey was conducted in 1998 to estimate historical elevation changes by comparing GPS-derived elevations with historical elevations (which were available for some of the monuments in the network as early as 1944) and to establish baseline values that can be used for comparisons with future GPS surveys. The GPS measurements indicated that about 600 millimeters (2 feet) [plus or minus 1,500 millimeters (5 feet)] of subsidence occurred at three of the monuments between 1969 and 1998 but that very little to no vertical change in position occurred at seven other monuments in the network. Water levels in the area of subsidence in Lucerne Valley declined about 15 meters (50 feet) during 1970-98. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) methods were used to characterize vertical land-surface changes in the Mojave River and Morongo ground-water basins during various intervals of time between 1992 and 1999. Interferograms, InSAR-generated displacement maps, show that subsidence ranging from 45 to 90 mm (0.15 to 0.3 ft) occurred in four areas of these two ground-water basins--the El Mirage, Lockhart-Harper Lake (dry), Newberry Springs, and Lucerne Valley areas. Some of the InSAR measurements were affected by the earthquakes at Landers and Hector Mine, California, and by

  16. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar observation of vertical land displacement in the vicinity of the All-American Canal at the United States and Mexico border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Joo-Yup

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) provided a synoptic view of the status of groundwater levels in the vicinity of the All-American Canal (AAC) by measuring vertical land displacements. The European Remote Sensing satellite SAR images were used to produce surface deformation maps. The full time period (1992-2000) was divided to two shorter periods (early and late) (1992-97 and 1996-2000). For low coherence areas such as agricultural fields in the Mexicali Valley, Persistent Scatterers InSAR (PSInSAR) was used to detect any deformation signals. The surface deformation maps from InSAR indicated that there were insignificant vertical land displacements in the vicinity of the AAC. However, the surrounding areas of the East Mesa Geothermal Field (EMGF) were subsiding over the full observation period (-38 mm/year). The maximum subsidence rate at the EMGF was reduced by 21% between the early (-43 mm/year) and late (-34 mm/year) periods. The AAC was within the edges of the spatial extent of the EMGF subsidence, especially during the early period, which was associated with a high averaged net geothermal production. The maximum subsidence on the East Highline Canal was -9.5 +/- 0.5 cm and -2.4 +/- 0.8 cm for the early and late periods, respectively. Results from PSInSAR in Mexicali City and the Mexicali Valley showed insignificant displacements. This lack of deformation indicated that there was no measurable surface deformation in the areas, but validation data were not available. The most interesting phenomenon is the high density of persistent scatterers in the areas between the Andrade Mesa and the Mexicali Valley, and the Sand Hills dunes. Forward modeling was conducted to characterize the reservoir zone of the EMGF based on the InSAR displacement over the full time period. Inputs to the model were the maximum subsidence (-3.8 cm) and depth of the reservoir, the radius of the reservoir and Poisson's ratio. An interactive approach was conducted to find the

  17. Feasibility of sea ice typing with synthetic aperture radar (SAR): Merging of Landsat thematic mapper and ERS 1 SAR satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Konrad; Heinrichs, John

    1994-01-01

    Earth Remote-Sensing Satellite (ERS) 1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and Landsat thematic mapper (TM) images were acquired for the same area in the Beaufort Sea, April 16 and 18, 1992. The two image pairs were colocated to the same grid (25-m resolution), and a supervised ice type classification was performed on the TM images in order to classify ice free, nilas, gray ice, gray-white ice, thin first-year ice, medium and thick first-year ice, and old ice. Comparison of the collocated SAR pixels showed that ice-free areas can only be classified under calm wind conditions (less than 3 m/s) and for surface winds greater than 10 m/s based on the backscattering coefficient alone. This is true for pack ice regions during the cold months of the year where ice-free areas are spatially limited and where the capillary waves that cause SAR backscatter are dampened by entrained ice crystals. For nilas, two distinct backscatter classes were found at -17 dB and at -10 dB. The higher backscattering coefficient is attributed to the presence of frost flowers on light nilas. Gray and gray-white ice have a backscatter signature similar to first-year ice and therefore cannot be distinguished by SAR alone. First-year and old ice can be clearly separated based on their backscattering coefficient. The performance of the Geophysical Processor System ice classifier was tested against the Landsat derived ice products. It was found that smooth first-year ice and rough first-year ice were not significantly different in the backscatter domain. Ice concentration estimates based on ERS 1 C band SAR showed an error range of 5 to 8% for high ice concentration regions, mainly due to misclassified ice-free and smooth first-year ice areas. This error is expected to increase for areas of lower ice concentration. The combination of C band SAR and TM channels 2, 4, and 6 resulted in ice typing performance with an estimated accuracy of 90% for all seven ice classes.

  18. Inverse-synthetic-aperture imaging of trees over a ground plane

    SciTech Connect

    Zittel, D.H.; Brock, B.C.; Littlejohn, J.H.; Patitz, W.E.

    1995-11-01

    Recent data collections with the Sandia VHF-UHF synthetic-aperture radar have yielded surprising results; trees appear brighter in the images than expected! In an effort to understand this phenomenon, various small trees have been measured on the Sandia folded compact range with the inverse-synthetic-aperture imaging system. A compilation of these measurements is contained in this report.

  19. The Use of Coincident Synthetic Aperture Radar and Visible Imagery to Aid in the Analysis of Photon-Counting Lidar Data Sets Over Complex Ice/Snow Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Kimberly H.

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of multi-sensor data is becoming increasingly useful as a method of improving our understanding of complex environments, and can be an effective tool in the arsenal to help climate scientists to predict sea level rise due to change in the mass balance of large glaciers in the Arctic and Antarctic. A novel approach to remote sensing of the continuously changing polar environment involves the use of coincident RADARSAT-2 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery and Landsat 7 visible/near-infrared imagery, combined with digital elevation models (DEM) developed from Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL) data sets. MABEL is a scaled down model of the lidar altimeter that will eventually be flown on ICESat-2, and provides dense along-track and moderate slope (cross-track) elevation data over narrow (~198 m) aircraft transects. Because glacial terrain consists of steep slopes, crevices, glacial lakes, and outflow into the sea, accurate slope information is critical to our understanding of any changes that may be happening in the ice sheets. RADARSAT-2 operates in the C-band, at a wavelength of 5.55 cm, and was chosen partly for its ability to image the Earth under all atmospheric conditions, including clouds. The SAR images not only provide spatial context for the elevation data found using the lidar, but also offer key insights into the consistency of the snow and ice making up the glacier, giving us some idea of mean temperature and surface conditions on the ice sheet. Finally, Landsat 7 images provide us with information on the extent of the glacier, and additional understanding of the state of the glacial surface. To aid in the analysis of the three data sets, proper preparation of each data set must first be performed. For the lidar data, this required the development of a new data reduction technique, based on statistical analysis, to reduce the number of received photons to those representing only the surface return

  20. Detection and Measurement of Land Subsidence Using Global Positioning System and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar, Coachella Valley, California, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Stork, Sylvia V.; Ikehara, Marti E.

    2002-01-01

    Land subsidence associated with ground-water-level declines has been recognized as a potential problem in Coachella Valley, California. Since the early 1920s, ground water has been a major source of agricultural, municipal, and domestic supply in the valley. Pumping of ground water resulted in water-level declines as large as 15 meters (50 feet) through the late 1940s. In 1949, the importation of Colorado River water to the lower Coachella Valley began, resulting in a reduction in ground-water pumping and a recovery of water levels during the 1950s through the 1970s. Since the late 1970s, demand for water in the valley has exceeded deliveries of imported surface water, resulting in increased pumping and associated ground-water-level declines and, consequently, an increase in the potential for land subsidence caused by aquifer-system compaction. The location, extent, and magnitude of the vertical land-surface changes in Coachella Valley between 1998 and 2000 were determined using Global Positioning System (GPS) and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) methods. GPS measurements made at 15 geodetic monuments in the lower Coachella Valley indicate that -34 to +60 millimeters ? 45 millimeters (-0.11 to +0.20 foot ? 0.15 foot) of vertical change in the land surface occurred during the 2-year period. Changes at three of the monuments exceeded the maximum uncertainty of ? 45 millimeters (? 0.15 foot) at the 95-percent confidence level, which indicates that small amounts of uplift occurred at these monuments between October 1998 and August 2000. Water-level measurements made at wells near the three uplifted monuments during this 2-year period indicate that the water levels fluctuate seasonally; water-level measurements made at these wells in September 1998 and September 2000 indicate that the water levels rose slightly near two monuments and declined slightly near the third. The relation between the seasonally fluctuating, but fairly stable, water levels between

  1. Natural and Unnatural Oil Layers on the Surface of the Gulf of Mexico Detected and Quantified in Synthetic Aperture RADAR Images with Texture Classifying Neural Network Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.; Morey, S. L.; Huffer, F.

    2011-12-01

    Effervescent hydrocarbons rise naturally from hydrocarbon seeps in the Gulf of Mexico and reach the ocean surface. This oil forms thin (~0.1 μm) layers that enhance specular reflectivity and have been widely used to quantify the abundance and distribution of natural seeps using synthetic aperture radar (SAR). An analogous process occurred at a vastly greater scale for oil and gas discharged from BP's Macondo well blowout. SAR data allow direct comparison of the areas of the ocean surface covered by oil from natural sources and the discharge. We used a texture classifying neural network algorithm to quantify the areas of naturally occurring oil-covered water in 176 SAR image collections from the Gulf of Mexico obtained between May 1997 and November 2007, prior to the blowout. Separately we also analyzed 36 SAR images collections obtained between 26 April and 30 July, 2010 while the discharged oil was visible in the Gulf of Mexico. For the naturally occurring oil, we removed pollution events and transient oceanographic effects by including only the reflectance anomalies that that recurred in the same locality over multiple images. We measured the area of oil layers in a grid of 10x10 km cells covering the entire Gulf of Mexico. Floating oil layers were observed in only a fraction of the total Gulf area amounting to 1.22x10^5 km^2. In a bootstrap sample of 2000 replications, the combined average area of these layers was 7.80x10^2 km^2 (sd 86.03). For a regional comparison, we divided the Gulf of Mexico into four quadrates along 90° W longitude, and 25° N latitude. The NE quadrate, where the BP discharge occurred, received on average 7.0% of the total natural seepage in the Gulf of Mexico (5.24 x10^2 km^2, sd 21.99); the NW quadrate received on average 68.0% of this total (5.30 x10^2 km^2, sd 69.67). The BP blowout occurred in the NE quadrate of the Gulf of Mexico; discharged oil that reached the surface drifted over a large area north of 25° N. Performing a

  2. A synthetic aperture acoustic prototype system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, Robert H.; Bishop, Steven S.; Chan, Aaron M.; Gugino, Peter M.; Donzelli, Thomas P.; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2015-05-01

    A novel quasi-monostatic system operating in a side-scan synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) imaging mode is presented. This research project's objectives are to explore the military utility of outdoor continuous sound imaging of roadside foliage and target detection. The acoustic imaging method has several military relevant advantages such as being immune to RF jamming, superior spatial resolution as compared to 0.8-2.4 GHz ground penetrating radar (GPR), capable of standoff side and forward-looking scanning, and relatively low cost, weight and size when compared to GPR technologies. The prototype system's broadband 2-17 kHz LFM chirp transceiver is mounted on a manned all-terrain vehicle. Targets are positioned within the acoustic main beam at slant ranges of two to seven meters and on surfaces such as dirt, grass, gravel and weathered asphalt and with an intervening metallic chain link fence. Acoustic image reconstructions and signature plots result in means for literal interpretation and quantifiable analyses.

  3. Axial superresolution by synthetic aperture generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micó, V.; García, J.; Zalevsky, Z.

    2008-12-01

    The use of tilted illumination onto the input object in combination with time multiplexing is a useful technique to overcome the Abbe diffraction limit in imaging systems. It is based on the generation of an expanded synthetic aperture that improves the cutoff frequency (and thus the resolution limit) of the imaging system. In this paper we present an experimental validation of the fact that the generation of a synthetic aperture improves not only the lateral resolution but also the axial one. Thus, it is possible to achieve higher optical sectioning of three-dimensional (3D) objects than that defined by the theoretical resolution limit imposed by diffraction. Experimental results are provided for two different cases: a synthetic object (micrometer slide) imaged by a 0.14 numerical aperture (NA) microscope lens, and a biosample (swine sperm cells) imaged by a 0.42 NA objective.

  4. Detection and Measurement of Land Subsidence Using Global Positioning System Surveying and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar, Coachella Valley, California, 1996-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Brandt, Justin T.

    2007-01-01

    Land subsidence associated with ground-water-level declines has been investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey in the Coachella Valley, California, since 1996. Ground water has been a major source of agricultural, municipal, and domestic supply in the valley since the early 1920s. Pumping of ground water resulted in water-level declines as large as 15 meters (50 feet) through the late 1940s. In 1949, the importation of Colorado River water to the southern Coachella Valley began, resulting in a reduction in ground-water pumping and a recovery of water levels during the 1950s through the 1970s. Since the late 1970s, demand for water in the valley has exceeded deliveries of imported surface water, resulting in increased pumping and associated ground-water-level declines and, consequently, an increase in the potential for land subsidence caused by aquifer-system compaction. Global Positioning System (GPS) surveying and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) methods were used to determine the location, extent, and magnitude of the vertical land-surface changes in the southern Coachella Valley. GPS measurements made at 13 geodetic monuments in 1996 and in 2005 in the southern Coachella Valley indicate that the elevation of the land surface had a net decline of 333 to 22 millimeters ?58 millimeters (1.1 to 0.07 foot ?0.19 foot) during the 9-year period. Changes at 10 of the 13 monuments exceeded the maximum uncertainty of ?58 millimeters (?0.19 foot) at the 95-percent confidence level, indicating that subsidence occurred at these monuments between June 1996 and August 2005. GPS measurements made at 20 geodetic monuments in 2000 and in 2005 indicate that the elevation of the land surface changed -312 to +25 millimeters ?42 millimeters (-1.0 to +0.08 foot ?0.14 foot) during the 5-year period. Changes at 14 of the 20 monuments exceeded the maximum uncertainty of ?42 millimeters (?0.14 foot) at the 95-percent confidence level, indicating that subsidence occurred at

  5. Detection and measurement of land subsidence using Global Positioning System and interferometric synthetic aperture radar, Coachella Valley, California, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Ikehara, Marti E.; Galloway, D.L.; Amelung, Falk

    2001-01-01

    Land subsidence associated with ground-water-level declines has been recognized as a potential problem in Coachella Valley, California. Since the early 1920s, ground water has been a major source of agricultural, municipal, and domestic supply in the valley, resulting in water-level declines as large as 15 meters (50 feet) through the late 1940s. In 1949, the importation of Colorado River water to the lower Coachella Valley began, resulting in a reduction in ground-water pumping and a recovery of water levels from the 1950s through the 1970s. Since the late 1970s, the demand for water in the valley has exceeded the deliveries of imported surface water, again resulting in increased pumping and ground-water-level declines. The magnitude and temporal occurrence of land subsidence in the lower Coachella Valley are not well known; data are sparse and accuracy varies. Also, the area is tectonically active and has subsided during the past several million years, which further complicates interpretations of the data. Land-surface-elevation data have been collected by many agencies using various methods and different geographic scales; because of this, the -150 millimeters (-0.5 foot) of subsidence determined for the southern parts of the valley for 1930-96 may have a possible error of plus or minus (?)90 millimeters (?0.3 foot). The location, extent, and magnitude of vertical land-surface changes from 1996 to 1998 were determined using Global Positioning System (GPS) and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) methods. GPS measurements for 14 monuments in the lower Coachella Valley indicate that the vertical land-surface changes from 1996 to 1998 ranged from -13 to -67 millimeters ? 40 millimeters (-0.04 to -0.22 foot ?0.13 foot). Changes at seven of the monuments exceeded the measurement error of ?40 millimeters (?0.13 foot), which indicates that small amounts of land subsidence occurred at these monuments between 1996 and 1998. Some of the water levels measured

  6. Synthetic-Aperture Coherent Imaging From A Circular Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Michael Y.

    1995-01-01

    Imaging algorithms based on exact point-target responses. Developed for use in reconstructing image of target from data gathered by radar, sonar, or other transmitting/receiving coherent-signal sensory apparatus following circular observation path around target. Potential applications include: Wide-beam synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) from aboard spacecraft in circular orbit around target planet; SAR from aboard airplane flying circular course at constant elevation around central ground point, toward which spotlight radar beam pointed; Ultrasonic reflection tomography in medical setting, using one transducer moving in circle around patient or else multiple transducers at fixed positions on circle around patient; and Sonar imaging of sea floor to high resolution, without need for large sensory apparatus.

  7. Reconstruction in interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy: comparison with optical coherence tomography and digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Colin J R; Kou, Shan Shan; Depeursinge, Christian

    2012-03-01

    It is shown that the spatial frequencies recorded in interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy do not correspond to exact backscattering [as they do in unistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR)] and that the reconstruction process based on SAR is therefore based on an approximation. The spatial frequency response is developed based on the three-dimensional coherent transfer function approach and compared with that in optical coherence tomography and digital holographic microscopy.

  8. An implementation of synthetic aperture focusing technique in frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2007-07-01

    A new implementation of a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) based on concepts used in synthetic aperture radar and sonar is presented in the paper. The algorithm, based on the convolution model of the imaging system developed in frequency domain, accounts for the beam pattern of the finite-sized transducer used in the synthetic aperture. The 2D fast Fourier transform (FFT) is used for the calculation of a 2D spectrum of the ultrasonic data. The spectrum is then interpolated to convert the polar coordinate system used for the acquisition of ultrasonic signals to the rectangular coordinates used for the presentation of imaging results. After compensating the transducer lobe amplitude profile using a Wiener filter, the transformed spectrum is subjected to the 2D inverse Fourier transform to get the time-domain image again. The algorithm is computationally attractive due to the use of 2D FFT. The performance of the proposed frequency-domain algorithm and the classical time-domain SAFT are compared in the paper using simulated and real ultrasonic data.

  9. (abstract) Characterization of Tree Water Status and Dielectric Constant Changes of North American Boreal Forests in Combination with Synthetic Aperture Radar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, K. C.; Zimmerman, R.; Way, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The occurrence and magnitude of temporal and spatial tree water status changes in the boreal environment were studied in a floodplain forest in Alaska and in four forest types of Central Canada. Under limited water supply conditions from the rooted soil zone in early spring (freeze/thaw transition) and during summer, trees show declining water potentials. Coincidental change in tree water potential, tree transpiration and tree dielectric constant had been observed in previous studies performed in Mediterranean ecotones. If radar is sensitive to chances in tree water status as reflected through changes in dielectric constant, then radar remote sensing could be used to monitor the water status of forests. The SAR imagery is examined to determine the response of the radar backscatter to the ground based observations of the water status of forest canopies. Comparisons are made between stands and also along the large North-South gradient between sites. Data from SAR are used to examine the radar response to canopy physiological state as related to vegetation freeze/thaw and growing season length.

  10. Use of the SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) P band for detection of the Moche and Lambayeque canal networks in the Apurlec region, Perù

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilaria Pannaccione Apa, Maria; Santovito, Maria Rosaria; Pica, Giulia; Catapano, Ilaria; Fornaro, Gianfranco; Lanari, Riccardo; Soldovieri, Francesco; Wester La Torre, Carlos; Fernandez Manayalle, Marco Antonio; Longo, Francesco; Facchinetti, Claudia; Formaro, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, research attention has been devoted to the development of a new class of airborne radar systems using low frequency bands ranging from VHF/UHF to P and L ones. In this frame, the Italian Space Agency (ASI) has promoted the development of a new multi-mode and multi-band airborne radar system, which can be considered even a "proof-of-concept" for the next space-borne missions. In particular, in agreement with the ASI, the research consortium CO.RI.S.T.A. has in charge the design, development and flight validation of such a kind of system, which is the first airborne radar entirely built in Italy. The aim was to design and realize a radar system able to work in different modalities as: nadir-looking sounder at VHF band (163 MHz); side-looking imager (SAR) at P band with two channels at 450 MHz and 900 MHz. The P-band is a penetration radar. Exploiting penetration features of low frequency electromagnetic waves, dielectric discontinuities of observed scene due to inhomogeneous materials rise up and can be detected on the resulting image. Therefore buried objects or targets placed under vegetation may be detected. Penetration capabilities essentially depend on microwave frequency. Typically, penetration distance is inversely proportional to microwave frequency. The higher the frequency, the lower the penetration depth. Terrain characteristics affect penetration capabilities. Humidity acts as a shield to microwave penetration. Hence terrain with high water content are not good targets for P-band applicability. Science community, governments and space agencies have increased their interest about low frequency radar for their useful applicability in climatology, ecosystem monitoring, glaciology, archaeology. The combination of low frequency and high relative bandwidth of such a systems has a large applicability in both military and civilian applications, ranging from forestry applications, biomass measuring, archaeological and geological exploration

  11. Constraining the slip distribution and fault geometry of the Mw 7.9, 3 November 2002, Denali fault earthquake with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar and Global Positioning System data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Tim J.; Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C.

    2004-01-01

    The Mw 7.9, Denali fault earthquake (DFE) is the largest continental strike-slip earthquake to occur since the development of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). We use five interferograms, constructed using radar images from the Canadian Radarsat-1 satellite, to map the surface deformation at the western end of the fault rupture. Additional geodetic data are provided by displacements observed at 40 campaign and continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) sites. We use the data to determine the geometry of the Susitna Glacier fault, thrusting on which initiated the DFE, and to determine a slip model for the entire event that is consistent with both the InSAR and GPS data. We find there was an average of 7.3 ± 0.4 m slip on the Susitna Glacier fault, between 1 and 9.5 km depth on a 29 km long fault that dips north at 41 ± 0.7° and has a surface projection close to the mapped rupture. On the Denali fault, a simple model with large slip patches finds a maximum of 8.7 ± 0.7 m of slip between the surface and 14.3 ± 0.2 km depth. A more complex distributed slip model finds a peak of 12.5 ± 0.8 m in the upper 4 km, significantly higher than the observed surface slip. We estimate a geodetic moment of 670 ± 10 × 1018 N m (Mw 7.9), consistent with seismic estimates. Lack of preseismic data resulted in an absence of InSAR coverage for the eastern half of the DFE rupture. A dedicated geodetic InSAR mission could obviate coverage problems in the future.

  12. Two-Dimensional Synthetic-Aperture Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.

    2010-01-01

    A two-dimensional synthetic-aperture radiometer, now undergoing development, serves as a test bed for demonstrating the potential of aperture synthesis for remote sensing of the Earth, particularly for measuring spatial distributions of soil moisture and ocean-surface salinity. The goal is to use the technology for remote sensing aboard a spacecraft in orbit, but the basic principles of design and operation are applicable to remote sensing from aboard an aircraft, and the prototype of the system under development is designed for operation aboard an aircraft. In aperture synthesis, one utilizes several small antennas in combination with a signal processing in order to obtain resolution that otherwise would require the use of an antenna with a larger aperture (and, hence, potentially more difficult to deploy in space). The principle upon which this system is based is similar to that of Earth-rotation aperture synthesis employed in radio astronomy. In this technology the coherent products (correlations) of signals from pairs of antennas are obtained at different antenna-pair spacings (baselines). The correlation for each baseline yields a sample point in a Fourier transform of the brightness-temperature map of the scene. An image of the scene itself is then reconstructed by inverting the sampled transform. The predecessor of the present two-dimensional synthetic-aperture radiometer is a one-dimensional one, named the Electrically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR). Operating in the L band, the ESTAR employs aperture synthesis in the cross-track dimension only, while using a conventional antenna for resolution in the along-track dimension. The two-dimensional instrument also operates in the L band to be precise, at a frequency of 1.413 GHz in the frequency band restricted for passive use (no transmission) only. The L band was chosen because (1) the L band represents the long-wavelength end of the remote- sensing spectrum, where the problem of achieving adequate

  13. Optimization of synthetic aperture image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Jensen, Jonas; Villagomez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Stuart, Matthias B.; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic Aperture (SA) imaging produces high-quality images and velocity estimates of both slow and fast flow at high frame rates. However, grating lobe artifacts can appear both in transmission and reception. These affect the image quality and the frame rate. Therefore optimization of parameters effecting the image quality of SA is of great importance, and this paper proposes an advanced procedure for optimizing the parameters essential for acquiring an optimal image quality, while generating high resolution SA images. Optimization of the image quality is mainly performed based on measures such as F-number, number of emissions and the aperture size. They are considered to be the most contributing acquisition factors in the quality of the high resolution images in SA. Therefore, the performance of image quality is quantified in terms of full-width at half maximum (FWHM) and the cystic resolution (CTR). The results of the study showed that SA imaging with only 32 emissions and maximum sweep angle of 22 degrees yields a very good image quality compared with using 256 emissions and the full aperture size. Therefore the number of emissions and the maximum sweep angle in the SA can be optimized to reach a reasonably good performance, and to increase the frame rate by lowering the required number of emissions. All the measurements are performed using the experimental SARUS scanner connected to a λ/2-pitch transducer. A wire phantom and a tissue mimicking phantom containing anechoic cysts are scanned using the optimized parameters for the transducer. Measurements coincide with simulations.

  14. Automated change detection for synthetic aperture sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G-Michael, Tesfaye; Marchand, Bradley; Tucker, J. D.; Sternlicht, Daniel D.; Marston, Timothy M.; Azimi-Sadjadi, Mahmood R.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, an automated change detection technique is presented that compares new and historical seafloor images created with sidescan synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) for changes occurring over time. The method consists of a four stage process: a coarse navigational alignment; fine-scale co-registration using the scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm to match features between overlapping images; sub-pixel co-registration to improves phase coherence; and finally, change detection utilizing canonical correlation analysis (CCA). The method was tested using data collected with a high-frequency SAS in a sandy shallow-water environment. By using precise co-registration tools and change detection algorithms, it is shown that the coherent nature of the SAS data can be exploited and utilized in this environment over time scales ranging from hours through several days.

  15. Limitations of synthetic aperture laser optical feedback imaging.

    PubMed

    Glastre, Wilfried; Jacquin, Olivier; Hugon, Olivier; Guillet de Chatellus, Hugues; Lacot, Eric

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we study the origin and the effect of amplitude and phase noise on laser optical feedback imaging associated with a synthetic aperture (SA) imaging system. Amplitude noise corresponds to photon noise and acts as an additive noise; it can be reduced by increasing the global measurement time. Phase noise can be divided in three families: random, sinusoidal, and drift phase noise; we show that it acts as a multiplicative noise. We explain how we can reduce phase noise by making oversampling or multiple measurements depending on its type. This work can easily be extended to all SA systems (radar, laser, or terahertz), especially when raw holograms are acquired point by point.

  16. Use of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to Identify and Characterize Overwintering Areas of Fish in Ice-Covered Arctic RIvers: A Demonstration with Broad Whitefish and their Habitats in the Sagavanirktok River, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard S.; Duguay, Claude R.; Mueller, Robert P.; Moulton, Larry; Doucette, Peter J.; Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-12-01

    In northern climates, locating overwintering fish can be very challenging due to thick ice cover. Areas near the coast of the Beaufort Sea provide valuable overwintering habitat for both resident and anadromous fish species; identifying and understanding their use of overwintering areas is of special interest. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery from two spaceborne satellites was examined as an alternative to radiotelemetry for identifying anadromous fish overwintering. The presence of water and ice were sampled at 162 sites and fish were sampled at 16 of these sites. From SAR imagery alone, we successfully identified large pools inhabited by overwintering fish in the ice-covered Sagavanirktok River. In addition, the imagery was able to identify all of the larger pools (mean minimum length of 138m (range 15-470 m; SD=131)) of water located by field sampling. The effectiveness of SAR to identify these pools varied from 31% to 100%, depending on imagery polarization, the incidence angle range, and the orbit. Horizontal transmit–vertical receive (HV) polarization appeared best. The accuracy of SAR was also assessed at a finer pixel-by-pixel (30-m x30-m) scale. The best correspondence at this finer scale was obtained with an image having HV polarization. The levels of agreement ranged from 54% to 69%. The presence of broad whitefish (the only anadromous species present) was associated with salinity and pool size (estimated with SAR imagery); fish were more likely to be found in larger pools with low salinity. This research illustrates that SAR imaging has great potential for identifying under-ice overwintering areas of riverine fish. These techniques should allow managers to identify critical overwintering areas with relatively more ease and lower cost than traditional techniques.

  17. Tissue harmonic synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Rasmussen, Joachim Hee; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) and tissue harmonic imaging (THI) are combined to improve the image quality of medical ultrasound imaging. The technique is evaluated in a comparative study against dynamic receive focusing (DRF). The objective is to investigate if SASB combined with THI improves the image quality compared to DRF-THI. The major benefit of SASB is a reduced bandwidth between the probe and processing unit. A BK Medical 2202 Ultraview ultrasound scanner was used to acquire beamformed RF data for offline evaluation. The acquisition was made interleaved between methods, and data were recorded with and without pulse inversion for tissue harmonic imaging. Data were acquired using a Sound Technology 192 element convex array transducer from both a wire phantom and a tissue mimicking phantom to investigate spatial resolution and penetration. In vivo scans were also performed for a visual comparison. The spatial resolution for SASB-THI is on average 19% better than DRI-THI, and the investigation of penetration showed equally good signal-to-noise ratio. In vivo B-mode scans were made and compared. The comparison showed that SASB-THI reduces the artifact and noise interference and improves image contrast and spatial resolution.

  18. Synthetic aperture elastography: a GPU based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Prashant; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2014-03-01

    Synthetic aperture (SA) ultrasound imaging system produces highly accurate axial and lateral displacement estimates; however, low frame rates and large data volumes can hamper its clinical use. This paper describes a real-time SA imaging based ultrasound elastography system that we have recently developed to overcome this limitation. In this system, we implemented both beamforming and 2D cross-correlation echo tracking on Nvidia GTX 480 graphics processing unit (GPU). We used one thread per pixel for beamforming; whereas, one block per pixel was used for echo tracking. We compared the quality of elastograms computed with our real-time system relative to those computed using our standard single threaded elastographic imaging methodology. In all studies, we used conventional measures of image quality such as elastographic signal to noise ratio (SNRe). Specifically, SNRe of axial and lateral strain elastograms computed with real-time system were 36 dB and 23 dB, respectively, which was numerically equal to those computed with our standard approach. We achieved a frame rate of 6 frames per second using our GPU based approach for 16 transmits and kernel size of 60 × 60 pixels, which is 400 times faster than that achieved using our standard protocol.

  19. Motion compensation on synthetic aperture sonar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heremans, R.; Acheroy, M.; Dupont, Y.

    2006-09-01

    High resolution sonars are required to detect and classify mines on the sea-bed. Synthetic aperture sonar increases the sonar cross range resolution by several orders of magnitudes while maintaining or increasing the area search rate. The resolution is however strongly dependent on the precision with which the motion errors of the platform can be estimated. The term micro-navigation is used to describe this very special requirement for sub-wavelength relative positioning of the platform. Therefore algorithms were designed to estimate those motion errors and to correct for them during the (ω, k)-reconstruction phase. To validate the quality of the motion estimation algorithms a single transmitter/multiple receiver simulator was build, allowing to generate multiple point targets with or without surge and/or sway and/or yaw motion errors. The surge motion estimation is shown on real data, which were taken during a sea trial in November of 2003 with the low frequency (12 kHz) side scan sonar (LFSS) moving on a rail positioned on the sea-bed near Marciana Marina on the Elba Island, Italy.

  20. Detection of breast microcalcifications using synthetic-aperture ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lianjie; Labyed, Yassin; Lin, Youzuo; Zhang, Zhigang; Pohl, Jennifer; Sandoval, Daniel; Williamson, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Ultrasound could be an attractive imaging modality for detecting breast microcalcifications, but it requires significant improvement in image resolution and quality. Recently, we have used tissue-equivalent phantoms to demonstrate that synthetic-aperture ultrasound has the potential to detect small targets. In this paper, we study the in vivo imaging capability of a real-time synthetic-aperture ultrasound system for detecting breast microcalcifications. This LANL's (Los Alamos National Laboratory's) custom built synthetic-aperture ultrasound system has a maximum frame rate of 25 Hz, and is one of the very first medical devices capable of acquiring synthetic-aperture ultrasound data and forming ultrasound images in real time, making the synthetic-aperture ultrasound feasible for clinical applications. We recruit patients whose screening mammograms show breast microcalcifications, and use LANL's synthetic-aperture ultrasound system to scan the regions with microcalcifications. Our preliminary in vivo patient imaging results demonstrate that synthetic-aperture ultrasound is a promising imaging modality for detecting breast microcalcifications.