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Sample records for synthetic lethality analysis

  1. Essential Plasticity and Redundancy of Metabolism Unveiled by Synthetic Lethality Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We unravel how functional plasticity and redundancy are essential mechanisms underlying the ability to survive of metabolic networks. We perform an exhaustive computational screening of synthetic lethal reaction pairs in Escherichia coli in a minimal medium and we find that synthetic lethal pairs divide in two different groups depending on whether the synthetic lethal interaction works as a backup or as a parallel use mechanism, the first corresponding to essential plasticity and the second to essential redundancy. In E. coli, the analysis of pathways entanglement through essential redundancy supports the view that synthetic lethality affects preferentially a single function or pathway. In contrast, essential plasticity, the dominant class, tends to be inter-pathway but strongly localized and unveils Cell Envelope Biosynthesis as an essential backup for Membrane Lipid Metabolism. When comparing E. coli and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, we find that the metabolic networks of the two organisms exhibit a large difference in the relative importance of plasticity and redundancy which is consistent with the conjecture that plasticity is a sophisticated mechanism that requires a complex organization. Finally, coessential reaction pairs are explored in different environmental conditions to uncover the interplay between the two mechanisms. We find that synthetic lethal interactions and their classification in plasticity and redundancy are basically insensitive to medium composition, and are highly conserved even when the environment is enriched with nonessential compounds or overconstrained to decrease maximum biomass formation. PMID:24854166

  2. Development of synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bingliang

    2014-10-09

    The concept of synthetic lethality (the creation of a lethal phenotype from the combined effects of mutations in two or more genes) has recently been exploited in various efforts to develop new genotype-selective anticancer therapeutics. These efforts include screening for novel anticancer agents, identifying novel therapeutic targets, characterizing mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy, and improving efficacies through the rational design of combination therapy. This review discusses recent developments in synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics, including poly ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitors for BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutant cancers, checkpoint inhibitors for p53 mutant cancers, and small molecule agents targeting RAS gene mutant cancers. Because cancers are caused by mutations in multiple genes and abnormalities in multiple signaling pathways, synthetic lethality for a specific tumor suppressor gene or oncogene is likely cell context-dependent. Delineation of the mechanisms underlying synthetic lethality and identification of treatment response biomarkers will be critical for the success of synthetic lethality anticancer therapy.

  3. PARP inhibitors: Synthetic lethality in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2017-03-17

    PARP inhibitors (PARPi), a cancer therapy targeting poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, are the first clinically approved drugs designed to exploit synthetic lethality, a genetic concept proposed nearly a century ago. Tumors arising in patients who carry germline mutations in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 are sensitive to PARPi because they have a specific type of DNA repair defect. PARPi also show promising activity in more common cancers that share this repair defect. However, as with other targeted therapies, resistance to PARPi arises in advanced disease. In addition, determining the optimal use of PARPi within drug combination approaches has been challenging. Nevertheless, the preclinical discovery of PARPi synthetic lethality and the route to clinical approval provide interesting lessons for the development of other therapies. Here, we discuss current knowledge of PARP inhibitors and potential ways to maximize their clinical effectiveness.

  4. Lethality and synthetic lethality in the genome-wide metabolic network of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ghim, Cheol-Min; Goh, Kwang-Il; Kahng, Byungnam

    2005-12-21

    Recent genomic analyses on the cellular metabolic network show that reaction flux across enzymes are diverse and exhibit power-law behavior in its distribution. While intuition might suggest that the reactions with larger fluxes are more likely to be lethal under the blockade of its catalysing gene products or gene knockouts, we find, by in silico flux analysis, that the lethality rarely has correlations with the flux level owing to the widespread backup pathways innate in the genome-wide metabolism of Escherichia coli. Lethal reactions, of which the deletion generates cascading failure of following reactions up to the biomass reaction, are identified in terms of the Boolean network scheme as well as the flux balance analysis. The avalanche size of a reaction, defined as the number of subsequently blocked reactions after its removal, turns out to be a useful measure of lethality. As a means to elucidate phenotypic robustness to a single deletion, we investigate synthetic lethality in reaction level, where simultaneous deletion of a pair of nonlethal reactions leads to the failure of the biomass reaction. Synthetic lethals identified via flux balance and Boolean scheme are consistently shown to act in parallel pathways, working in such a way that the backup machinery is compromised.

  5. Functional Analysis of Variants of Unknown Significance in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Using Complementation of a Synthetic Lethal Interaction with PARP Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Synthetic Lethal Interaction with PARP Inhibition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert L. Nussbaum, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of California...Significance in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Using Complementation of a Synthetic Lethal Interaction with PARP Inhibition 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...shRNA directed against the 3-UTR of BRCA2 for synthetic lethality with PARP inhibitors. Antibody staining with RAD51 and H2AX was used to look for

  6. Fast-SL: an efficient algorithm to identify synthetic lethal sets in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Pratapa, Aditya; Balachandran, Shankar; Raman, Karthik

    2015-10-15

    Synthetic lethal sets are sets of reactions/genes where only the simultaneous removal of all reactions/genes in the set abolishes growth of an organism. Previous approaches to identify synthetic lethal genes in genome-scale metabolic networks have built on the framework of flux balance analysis (FBA), extending it either to exhaustively analyze all possible combinations of genes or formulate the problem as a bi-level mixed integer linear programming (MILP) problem. We here propose an algorithm, Fast-SL, which surmounts the computational complexity of previous approaches by iteratively reducing the search space for synthetic lethals, resulting in a substantial reduction in running time, even for higher order synthetic lethals. We performed synthetic reaction and gene lethality analysis, using Fast-SL, for genome-scale metabolic networks of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Fast-SL also rigorously identifies synthetic lethal gene deletions, uncovering synthetic lethal triplets that were not reported previously. We confirm that the triple lethal gene sets obtained for the three organisms have a precise match with the results obtained through exhaustive enumeration of lethals performed on a computer cluster. We also parallelized our algorithm, enabling the identification of synthetic lethal gene quadruplets for all three organisms in under 6 h. Overall, Fast-SL enables an efficient enumeration of higher order synthetic lethals in metabolic networks, which may help uncover previously unknown genetic interactions and combinatorial drug targets. The MATLAB implementation of the algorithm, compatible with COBRA toolbox v2.0, is available at https://github.com/RamanLab/FastSL CONTACT: kraman@iitm.ac.in Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Establishing Genetic Interactions by a Synthetic Dosage Lethality Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, E. S.; Hyland, K. M.; Hieter, P.; Li, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have devised a genetic screen, termed synthetic dosage lethality, in which a cloned ``reference'' gene is inducibly overexpressed in a set of mutant strains carrying potential ``target'' mutations. To test the specificity of the method, two reference genes, CTF13, encoding a centromere binding protein, and ORC6, encoding a subunit of the origin of replication binding complex, were overexpressed in a large collection of mutants defective in either chromosome segregation or replication. CTF13 overexpression caused synthetic dosage lethality in combination with ctf14-42 (cbf2, ndc10), ctf17-61 (chl4), ctf19-58 and ctf19-26. ORC6 overexpression caused synthetic dosage lethality in combination with cdc2-1, cdc6-1, cdc14-1, cdc16-1 and cdc46-1. These relationships reflect specific interactions, as overexpression of CTF13 caused lethality in kinetochore mutants and overexpression of ORC6 caused lethality in replication mutants. In contrast, only one case of dosage suppression was observed. We suggest that synthetic dosage lethality identifies a broad spectrum of interacting mutations and is of general utility in detecting specific genetic interactions using a cloned wild-type gene as a starting point. Furthermore, synthetic dosage lethality is easily adapted to the study of cloned genes in other organisms. PMID:8722765

  8. A lethal combination for cancer cells: synthetic lethality screenings for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Elisa; Lucca, Chiara; Foiani, Marco

    2010-11-01

    In recent years, cancer drug discovery has faced the challenging task of integrating the huge amount of information coming from the genomic studies with the need of developing highly selective target-based strategies within the context of tumour cells that experience massive genome instability. The combination between genetic and genomic technologies has been extremely useful and has contributed to efficiently transfer certain approaches typical of basic science to drug discover projects. An example comes from the synthetic lethal approaches, very powerful procedures that employ the rational used by geneticists working on model organisms. Applying the synthetic lethality (SL) screenings to anticancer therapy allows exploiting the typical features of tumour cells, such as genome instability, without changing them, as opposed to the conventional anticancer strategies that aim at counteracting the oncogenic signalling pathways. Recent and very encouraging clinical studies clearly show that certain promising anticancer compounds work through a synthetic lethal mechanism by targeting pathways that are specifically essential for the viability of cancer cells but not of normal cells. Herein we describe the rationale of the synthetic lethality approaches and the potential applications for anticancer therapy.

  9. Synthetic lethality between PAXX and XLF in mammalian development

    PubMed Central

    Balmus, Gabriel; Barros, Ana C.; Wijnhoven, Paul W.G.; Lescale, Chloé; Hasse, Hélène Lenden; Boroviak, Katharina; le Sage, Carlos; Doe, Brendan; Speak, Anneliese O.; Galli, Antonella; Jacobsen, Matt; Deriano, Ludovic; Adams, David J.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    PAXX was identified recently as a novel nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair factor in human cells. To characterize its physiological roles, we generated Paxx-deficient mice. Like Xlf−/− mice, Paxx−/− mice are viable, grow normally, and are fertile but show mild radiosensitivity. Strikingly, while Paxx loss is epistatic with Ku80, Lig4, and Atm deficiency, Paxx/Xlf double-knockout mice display embryonic lethality associated with genomic instability, cell death in the central nervous system, and an almost complete block in lymphogenesis, phenotypes that closely resemble those of Xrcc4−/− and Lig4−/− mice. Thus, combined loss of Paxx and Xlf is synthetic-lethal in mammals. PMID:27798842

  10. Syn-Lethality: An Integrative Knowledge Base of Synthetic Lethality towards Discovery of Selective Anticancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-juan; Mishra, Shital K.; Wu, Min; Zhang, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a novel strategy for anticancer therapies, whereby mutations of two genes will kill a cell but mutation of a single gene will not. Therefore, a cancer-specific mutation combined with a drug-induced mutation, if they have SL interactions, will selectively kill cancer cells. While numerous SL interactions have been identified in yeast, only a few have been known in human. There is a pressing need to systematically discover and understand SL interactions specific to human cancer. In this paper, we present Syn-Lethality, the first integrative knowledge base of SL that is dedicated to human cancer. It integrates experimentally discovered and verified human SL gene pairs into a network, associated with annotations of gene function, pathway, and molecular mechanisms. It also includes yeast SL genes from high-throughput screenings which are mapped to orthologous human genes. Such an integrative knowledge base, organized as a relational database with user interface for searching and network visualization, will greatly expedite the discovery of novel anticancer drug targets based on synthetic lethality interactions. The database can be downloaded as a stand-alone Java application. PMID:24864230

  11. Synthetic lethal interactions for the development of cancer therapeutics: biological and methodological advancements.

    PubMed

    Mizuarai, Shinji; Kotani, Hidehito

    2010-12-01

    Synthetic lethal interaction is defined as a combination of two mutations that is lethal when present in the same cell; each individual mutation is non-lethal. Synthetic lethal interactions attract attention in cancer research fields since the discovery of synthetic lethal genes with either oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) provides novel cancer therapeutic targets. Due to the selective lethal effect on cancer cells harboring specific genetic alterations, it is expected that targeting synthetic lethal genes would provide wider therapeutic windows compared with cytotoxic chemotherapeutics. Here, we review the current status of the application of synthetic lethal screening in cancer research fields from biological and methodological viewpoints. Very recent studies seeking to identify synthetic lethal genes with K-RAS and p53, which are known to be the most frequently occurring oncogenes and TSGs, respectively, are introduced. Among the accumulating amount of research on synthetic lethal interactions, the synthetic lethality between BRCA1/2 and PARP1 inhibition has been clinically proven. Thus, both preclinical and clinical data showing a preferential anti-tumor effect on BRCA1/2 deficient tumors by a PARP1 inhibitor are the best examples of the synthetic lethal approach of cancer therapeutics. Finally, methodological progress regarding synthetic lethal screening, including barcode shRNA screening and in vivo synthetic lethal screening, is described. Given the fact that an increasing number of synthetic lethal genes for major cancerous genes have been validated in preclinical studies, this intriguing approach awaits clinical verification of preferential benefits for cancer patients with specific genetic alterations as a clear predictive factor for tumor response.

  12. The role of protein interactions in mediating essentiality and synthetic lethality.

    PubMed

    Talavera, David; Robertson, David L; Lovell, Simon C

    2013-01-01

    Genes are characterized as essential if their knockout is associated with a lethal phenotype, and these "essential genes" play a central role in biological function. In addition, some genes are only essential when deleted in pairs, a phenomenon known as synthetic lethality. Here we consider genes displaying synthetic lethality as "essential pairs" of genes, and analyze the properties of yeast essential genes and synthetic lethal pairs together. As gene duplication initially produces an identical pair or sets of genes, it is often invoked as an explanation for synthetic lethality. However, we find that duplication explains only a minority of cases of synthetic lethality. Similarly, disruption of metabolic pathways leads to relatively few examples of synthetic lethality. By contrast, the vast majority of synthetic lethal gene pairs code for proteins with related functions that share interaction partners. We also find that essential genes and synthetic lethal pairs cluster in the protein-protein interaction network. These results suggest that synthetic lethality is strongly dependent on the formation of protein-protein interactions. Compensation by duplicates does not usually occur mainly because the genes involved are recent duplicates, but is more commonly due to functional similarity that permits preservation of essential protein complexes. This unified view, combining genes that are individually essential with those that form essential pairs, suggests that essentiality is a feature of physical interactions between proteins protein-protein interactions, rather than being inherent in gene and protein products themselves.

  13. The 'Pushmi-Pullyu' of DNA REPAIR: Clinical Synthetic Lethality.

    PubMed

    Ivy, S Percy; de Bono, Johann; Kohn, Elise C

    2016-11-01

    Maintenance of genomic integrity is critical for adaptive survival in the face of endogenous and exogenous environmental stress. The loss of stability and fidelity in the genome caused by cancer and cancer treatment provides therapeutic opportunities to leverage the critical balance between DNA injury and repair. Blocking repair and pushing damaged DNA through the cell cycle using therapeutic inhibitors exemplify the 'pushmi-pullyu' effect of disrupted DNA repair. DNA repair inhibitors (DNARi) can be separated into five biofunctional categories: sensors, mediators, transducers, effectors, and collaborators that recognize DNA damage, propagate injury DNA messages, regulate cell cycle checkpoints, and alter the microenvironment. The result is cancer therapeutics that takes advantage of clinical synthetic lethality, resulting in selective tumor cell kill. Here, we review recent considerations related to DNA repair and new DNARi agents and organize those findings to address future directions and clinical opportunities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. PARP1 inhibitor olaparib (Lynparza) exerts synthetic lethal effect against ligase 4-deficient melanomas.

    PubMed

    Czyż, Małgorzata; Toma, Monika; Gajos-Michniewicz, Anna; Majchrzak, Kinga; Hoser, Grazyna; Szemraj, Janusz; Nieborowska-Skorska, Margaret; Cheng, Phil; Gritsyuk, Daniel; Levesque, Mitchell; Dummer, Reinhard; Sliwinski, Tomasz; Skorski, Tomasz

    2016-11-15

    Cancer including melanoma may be ''addicted" to double strand break (DSB) repair and targeting this process could sensitize them to the lethal effect of DNA damage. PARP1 exerts an important impact on DSB repair as it binds to both single- and double- strand breaks. PARP1 inhibitors might be highly effective drugs triggering synthetic lethality in patients whose tumors have germline or somatic defects in DNA repair genes. We hypothesized that PARP1-dependent synthetic lethality could be induced in melanoma cells displaying downregulation of DSB repair genes. We observed that PARP1 inhibitor olaparib sensitized melanomas with reduced expression of DNA ligase 4 (LIG4) to an alkylatimg agent dacarbazine (DTIC) treatment in vitro, while normal melanocytes remained intact. PARP1 inhibition caused accumulation of DSBs, which was associated with apoptosis in LIG4 deficient melanoma cells. Our hypothesis that olaparib is synthetic lethal with LIG4 deficiency in melanoma cells was supported by selective anti-tumor effects of olaparib used either alone or in combination with dacarbazine (DTIC) in LIG4 deficient, but not LIG4 proficient cells. In addition, olaparib combined with DTIC inhibited the growth of LIG4 deficient human melanoma xenografts. This work for the first time demonstrates the effectiveness of a combination of PARP1 inhibitor olaparib and alkylating agent DTIC for treating LIG4 deficient melanomas. In addition, analysis of the TCGA and transcriptome microarray databases revealed numerous individual melanoma samples potentially displaying specific defects in DSB repair pathways, which may predispose them to synthetic lethality triggered by PARP1 inhibitor combined with a cytotoxic drug.

  15. PARP1 inhibitor olaparib (Lynparza) exerts synthetic lethal effect against ligase 4-deficient melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Czyż, Małgorzata; Toma, Monika; Gajos-Michniewicz, Anna; Majchrzak, Kinga; Hoser, Grazyna; Szemraj, Janusz; Nieborowska-Skorska, Margaret; Cheng, Phil; Gritsyuk, Daniel; Levesque, Mitchell; Dummer, Reinhard; Sliwinski, Tomasz; Skorski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Cancer including melanoma may be “addicted” to double strand break (DSB) repair and targeting this process could sensitize them to the lethal effect of DNA damage. PARP1 exerts an important impact on DSB repair as it binds to both single- and double- strand breaks. PARP1 inhibitors might be highly effective drugs triggering synthetic lethality in patients whose tumors have germline or somatic defects in DNA repair genes. We hypothesized that PARP1-dependent synthetic lethality could be induced in melanoma cells displaying downregulation of DSB repair genes. We observed that PARP1 inhibitor olaparib sensitized melanomas with reduced expression of DNA ligase 4 (LIG4) to an alkylatimg agent dacarbazine (DTIC) treatment in vitro, while normal melanocytes remained intact. PARP1 inhibition caused accumulation of DSBs, which was associated with apoptosis in LIG4 deficient melanoma cells. Our hypothesis that olaparib is synthetic lethal with LIG4 deficiency in melanoma cells was supported by selective anti-tumor effects of olaparib used either alone or in combination with dacarbazine (DTIC) in LIG4 deficient, but not LIG4 proficient cells. In addition, olaparib combined with DTIC inhibited the growth of LIG4 deficient human melanoma xenografts. This work for the first time demonstrates the effectiveness of a combination of PARP1 inhibitor olaparib and alkylating agent DTIC for treating LIG4 deficient melanomas. In addition, analysis of the TCGA and transcriptome microarray databases revealed numerous individual melanoma samples potentially displaying specific defects in DSB repair pathways, which may predispose them to synthetic lethality triggered by PARP1 inhibitor combined with a cytotoxic drug. PMID:27705909

  16. Synthetic Lethality Screens Using RNAi in Combination with CRISPR-based Knockout in Drosophila Cells.

    PubMed

    Housden, Benjamin E; Nicholson, Hilary E; Perrimon, Norbert

    2017-02-05

    A synthetic lethal interaction is a type of genetic interaction where the disruption of either of two genes individually has little effect but their combined disruption is lethal. Knowledge of synthetic lethal interactions can allow for elucidation of network structure and identification of candidate drug targets for human diseases such as cancer. In Drosophila, combinatorial gene disruption has been achieved previously by combining multiple RNAi reagents. Here we describe a protocol for high-throughput combinatorial gene disruption by combining CRISPR and RNAi. This approach previously resulted in the identification of highly reproducible and conserved synthetic lethal interactions (Housden et al., 2015).

  17. Connectivity Homology Enables Inter-Species Network Models of Synthetic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Jacunski, Alexandra; Dixon, Scott J.; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic lethality is a genetic interaction wherein two otherwise nonessential genes cause cellular inviability when knocked out simultaneously. Drugs can mimic genetic knock-out effects; therefore, our understanding of promiscuous drugs, polypharmacology-related adverse drug reactions, and multi-drug therapies, especially cancer combination therapy, may be informed by a deeper understanding of synthetic lethality. However, the colossal experimental burden in humans necessitates in silico methods to guide the identification of synthetic lethal pairs. Here, we present SINaTRA (Species-INdependent TRAnslation), a network-based methodology that discovers genome-wide synthetic lethality in translation between species. SINaTRA uses connectivity homology, defined as biological connectivity patterns that persist across species, to identify synthetic lethal pairs. Importantly, our approach does not rely on genetic homology or structural and functional similarity, and it significantly outperforms models utilizing these data. We validate SINaTRA by predicting synthetic lethality in S. pombe using S. cerevisiae data, then identify over one million putative human synthetic lethal pairs to guide experimental approaches. We highlight the translational applications of our algorithm for drug discovery by identifying clusters of genes significantly enriched for single- and multi-drug cancer therapies. PMID:26451775

  18. Understanding and predicting synthetic lethal genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using domain genetic interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Synthetic lethal genetic interactions among proteins have been widely used to define functional relationships between proteins and pathways. However, the molecular mechanism of synthetic lethal genetic interactions is still unclear. Results In this study, we demonstrated that yeast synthetic lethal genetic interactions can be explained by the genetic interactions between domains of those proteins. The domain genetic interactions rarely overlap with the domain physical interactions from iPfam database and provide a complementary view about domain relationships. Moreover, we found that domains in multidomain yeast proteins contribute to their genetic interactions differently. The domain genetic interactions help more precisely define the function related to the synthetic lethal genetic interactions, and then help understand how domains contribute to different functionalities of multidomain proteins. Using the probabilities of domain genetic interactions, we were able to predict novel yeast synthetic lethal genetic interactions. Furthermore, we had also identified novel compensatory pathways from the predicted synthetic lethal genetic interactions. Conclusion The identification of domain genetic interactions helps the understanding of originality of functional relationship in SLGIs at domain level. Our study significantly improved the understanding of yeast mulitdomain proteins, the synthetic lethal genetic interactions and the functional relationships between proteins and pathways. PMID:21586150

  19. Malignancy of Cancers and Synthetic Lethal Interactions Associated With Mutations of Cancer Driver Genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Yue; Han, Ze-Guang; He, Kun-Yan

    2016-02-01

    The mutation status of cancer driver genes may correlate with different degrees of malignancy of cancers. The doubling time and multidrug resistance are 2 phenotypes that reflect the degree of malignancy of cancer cells. Because most of cancer driver genes are hard to target, identification of their synthetic lethal partners might be a viable approach to treatment of the cancers with the relevant mutations.The genome-wide screening for synthetic lethal partners is costly and labor intensive. Thus, a computational approach facilitating identification of candidate genes for a focus synthetic lethal RNAi screening will accelerate novel anticancer drug discovery.We used several publicly available cancer cell lines and tumor tissue genomic data in this study.We compared the doubling time and multidrug resistance between the NCI-60 cell lines with mutations in some cancer driver genes and those without the mutations. We identified some candidate synthetic lethal genes to the cancer driver genes APC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53 by comparison of their gene phenotype values in cancer cell lines with the relevant mutations and wild-type background. Further, we experimentally validated some of the synthetic lethal relationships we predicted.We reported that mutations in some cancer driver genes mutations in some cancer driver genes such as APC, KRAS, or PIK3CA might correlate with cancer proliferation or drug resistance. We identified 40, 21, 5, 43, and 18 potential synthetic lethal genes to APC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53, respectively. We found that some of the potential synthetic lethal genes show significantly higher expression in the cancers with mutations of their synthetic lethal partners and the wild-type counterparts. Further, our experiments confirmed several synthetic lethal relationships that are novel findings by our methods.We experimentally validated a part of the synthetic lethal relationships we predicted. We plan to perform further experiments to validate

  20. Malignancy of Cancers and Synthetic Lethal Interactions Associated With Mutations of Cancer Driver Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Yue; Han, Ze-Guang; He, Kun-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mutation status of cancer driver genes may correlate with different degrees of malignancy of cancers. The doubling time and multidrug resistance are 2 phenotypes that reflect the degree of malignancy of cancer cells. Because most of cancer driver genes are hard to target, identification of their synthetic lethal partners might be a viable approach to treatment of the cancers with the relevant mutations. The genome-wide screening for synthetic lethal partners is costly and labor intensive. Thus, a computational approach facilitating identification of candidate genes for a focus synthetic lethal RNAi screening will accelerate novel anticancer drug discovery. We used several publicly available cancer cell lines and tumor tissue genomic data in this study. We compared the doubling time and multidrug resistance between the NCI-60 cell lines with mutations in some cancer driver genes and those without the mutations. We identified some candidate synthetic lethal genes to the cancer driver genes APC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53 by comparison of their gene phenotype values in cancer cell lines with the relevant mutations and wild-type background. Further, we experimentally validated some of the synthetic lethal relationships we predicted. We reported that mutations in some cancer driver genes mutations in some cancer driver genes such as APC, KRAS, or PIK3CA might correlate with cancer proliferation or drug resistance. We identified 40, 21, 5, 43, and 18 potential synthetic lethal genes to APC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53, respectively. We found that some of the potential synthetic lethal genes show significantly higher expression in the cancers with mutations of their synthetic lethal partners and the wild-type counterparts. Further, our experiments confirmed several synthetic lethal relationships that are novel findings by our methods. We experimentally validated a part of the synthetic lethal relationships we predicted. We plan to perform further

  1. Ranking novel cancer driving synthetic lethal gene pairs using TCGA data

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Zhang, Xiuhua; Chen, Yunqin; Liu, Qi; Wei, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) has emerged as a promising approach to cancer therapy. In contrast to the costly and labour-intensive genome-wide siRNA or CRISPR-based human cell line screening approaches, computational approaches to prioritize potential synthetic lethality pairs for further experimental validation represent an attractive alternative. In this study, we propose an efficient and comprehensive in-silico pipeline to rank novel SL gene pairs by mining vast amounts of accumulated tumor high-throughput sequencing data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), coupled with other protein interaction networks and cell line information. Our pipeline integrates three significant features, including mutation coverage in TCGA, driver mutation probability and the quantified cancer network information centrality, into a ranking model for SL gene pair identification, which is presented as the first learning-based method for SL identification. As a result, 107 potential SL gene pairs were obtained from the top 10 results covering 11 cancers. Functional analysis of these genes indicated that several promising pathways were identified, including the DNA repair related Fanconi Anemia pathway and HIF-1 signaling pathway. In addition, 4 SL pairs, mTOR-TP53, VEGFR2-TP53, EGFR-TP53, ATM-PRKCA, were validated using drug sensitivity information in the cancer cell line databases CCLE or NCI60. Interestingly, significant differences in the cell growth of mTOR siRNA or EGFR siRNA knock-down were detected between cancer cells with wild type TP53 and mutant TP53. Our study indicates that the pre-screening of potential SL gene pairs based on the large genomics data repertoire of tumor tissues and cancer cell lines could substantially expedite the identification of synthetic lethal gene pairs for cancer therapy. PMID:27438146

  2. A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies DNA Repair Pathways that Sensitize Cancer Cells to Combined ATR Inhibition and Cisplatin Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Mohni, Kareem N.; Thompson, Petria S.; Luzwick, Jessica W.; Glick, Gloria G.; Pendleton, Christopher S.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.; Cortez, David

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response kinase ATR may be a useful cancer therapeutic target. ATR inhibition synergizes with loss of ERCC1, ATM, XRCC1 and DNA damaging chemotherapy agents. Clinical trials have begun using ATR inhibitors in combination with cisplatin. Here we report the first synthetic lethality screen with a combination treatment of an ATR inhibitor (ATRi) and cisplatin. Combination treatment with ATRi/cisplatin is synthetically lethal with loss of the TLS polymerase ζ and 53BP1. Other DNA repair pathways including homologous recombination and mismatch repair do not exhibit synthetic lethal interactions with ATRi/cisplatin, even though loss of some of these repair pathways sensitizes cells to cisplatin as a single-agent. We also report that ATRi strongly synergizes with PARP inhibition, even in homologous recombination-proficient backgrounds. Lastly, ATR inhibitors were able to resensitize cisplatin-resistant cell lines to cisplatin. These data provide a comprehensive analysis of DNA repair pathways that exhibit synthetic lethality with ATR inhibitors when combined with cisplatin chemotherapy, and will help guide patient selection strategies as ATR inhibitors progress into the cancer clinic. PMID:25965342

  3. Novel Synthetic Lethality Approaches for Drug Combinations and Early Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Ocana, Alberto; Pandiella, Atanasio

    2017-01-01

    Preclinical evaluation of drug combinations is challenging. In this mini-review we discuss the concept of synthetic lethality and how this can impact on the evaluation of drug combinations and its clinical development. We will also review novel combinations with immunologic agents and the concept of collateral lethality. We suggest that identification of synthetic lethality interactions including collateral lethality using novel drug combinations can speed up the drug development process. This approach may identify synergistic combinations in tumors with a specific molecular alteration, limiting toxicity to normal tissue. In addition, the combination of an immunotherapy with an agent targeting cancer cells have the potential for acting on different functions with no overlapping of toxicities. Here, we also discuss potential consequences of this approach in the design of early clinical studies.

  4. Gene expression and mutation-guided synthetic lethality eradicates proliferating and quiescent leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Nieborowska-Skorska, Margaret; Sullivan, Katherine; Dasgupta, Yashodhara; Podszywalow-Bartnicka, Paulina; Maifrede, Silvia; Di Marcantonio, Daniela; Bolton-Gillespie, Elisabeth; Cramer-Morales, Kimberly; Lee, Jaewong; Li, Min; Slupianek, Artur; Gritsyuk, Daniel; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Seferynska, Ilona; Bullinger, Lars; Gorbunova, Vera; Piwocka, Katarzyna; Valent, Peter; Civin, Curt I.; Muschen, Markus; Dick, John E.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Bhatia, Smita; Bhatia, Ravi; Eppert, Kolja; Minden, Mark D.; Sykes, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    Quiescent and proliferating leukemia cells accumulate highly lethal DNA double-strand breaks that are repaired by 2 major mechanisms: BRCA-dependent homologous recombination and DNA-dependent protein kinase–mediated (DNA-PK–mediated) nonhomologous end-joining, whereas DNA repair pathways mediated by poly(ADP)ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1) serve as backups. Here we have designed a personalized medicine approach called gene expression and mutation analysis (GEMA) to identify BRCA- and DNA-PK–deficient leukemias either directly, using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, microarrays, and flow cytometry, or indirectly, by the presence of oncogenes such as BCR-ABL1. DNA-PK–deficient quiescent leukemia cells and BRCA/DNA-PK–deficient proliferating leukemia cells were sensitive to PARP1 inhibitors that were administered alone or in combination with current antileukemic drugs. In conclusion, GEMA-guided targeting of PARP1 resulted in dual cellular synthetic lethality in quiescent and proliferating immature leukemia cells, and is thus a potential approach to eradicate leukemia stem and progenitor cells that are responsible for initiation and manifestation of the disease. Further, an analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas database indicated that this personalized medicine approach could also be applied to treat numerous solid tumors from individual patients. PMID:28481221

  5. Analysis of Synthetic Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Charles G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reviews techniques for the characterization and analysis of synthetic polymers, copolymers, and blends. Includes techniques for structure determination, separation, and quantitation of additives and residual monomers; determination of molecular weight; and the study of thermal properties including degradation mechanisms. (MVL)

  6. The population genetics of X-autosome synthetic lethals and steriles.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Joseph; Johnson, Norman A; True, John R

    2011-11-01

    Epistatic interactions are widespread, and many of these interactions involve combinations of alleles at different loci that are deleterious when present in the same individual. The average genetic environment of sex-linked genes differs from that of autosomal genes, suggesting that the population genetics of interacting X-linked and autosomal alleles may be complex. Using both analytical theory and computer simulations, we analyzed the evolutionary trajectories and mutation-selection balance conditions for X-autosome synthetic lethals and steriles. Allele frequencies follow a set of fundamental trajectories, and incompatible alleles are able to segregate at much higher frequencies than single-locus expectations. Equilibria exist, and they can involve fixation of either autosomal or X-linked alleles. The exact equilibrium depends on whether synthetic alleles are dominant or recessive and whether fitness effects are seen in males, females, or both sexes. When single-locus fitness effects and synthetic incompatibilities are both present, population dynamics depend on the dominance of alleles and historical contingency (i.e., whether X-linked or autosomal mutations occur first). Recessive synthetic lethality can result in high-frequency X-linked alleles, and dominant synthetic lethality can result in high-frequency autosomal alleles. Many X-autosome incompatibilities in natural populations may be cryptic, appearing to be single-locus effects because one locus is fixed. We also discuss the implications of these findings with respect to standing genetic variation and the origins of Haldane's rule.

  7. The Population Genetics of X–Autosome Synthetic Lethals and Steriles

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Joseph; Johnson, Norman A.; True, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Epistatic interactions are widespread, and many of these interactions involve combinations of alleles at different loci that are deleterious when present in the same individual. The average genetic environment of sex-linked genes differs from that of autosomal genes, suggesting that the population genetics of interacting X-linked and autosomal alleles may be complex. Using both analytical theory and computer simulations, we analyzed the evolutionary trajectories and mutation–selection balance conditions for X–autosome synthetic lethals and steriles. Allele frequencies follow a set of fundamental trajectories, and incompatible alleles are able to segregate at much higher frequencies than single-locus expectations. Equilibria exist, and they can involve fixation of either autosomal or X-linked alleles. The exact equilibrium depends on whether synthetic alleles are dominant or recessive and whether fitness effects are seen in males, females, or both sexes. When single-locus fitness effects and synthetic incompatibilities are both present, population dynamics depend on the dominance of alleles and historical contingency (i.e., whether X-linked or autosomal mutations occur first). Recessive synthetic lethality can result in high-frequency X-linked alleles, and dominant synthetic lethality can result in high-frequency autosomal alleles. Many X–autosome incompatibilities in natural populations may be cryptic, appearing to be single-locus effects because one locus is fixed. We also discuss the implications of these findings with respect to standing genetic variation and the origins of Haldane’s rule. PMID:21900269

  8. High throughput synthetic lethality screen reveals a tumorigenic role of adenylate cyclase in fumarate hydratase-deficient cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Synthetic lethality is an appealing technique for selectively targeting cancer cells which have acquired molecular changes that distinguish them from normal cells. High-throughput RNAi-based screens have been successfully used to identify synthetic lethal pathways with well-characterized tumor suppressors and oncogenes. The recent identification of metabolic tumor suppressors suggests that the concept of synthetic lethality can be applied to selectively target cancer metabolism as well. Results Here, we perform a high-throughput RNAi screen to identify synthetic lethal genes with fumarate hydratase (FH), a metabolic tumor suppressor whose loss-of-function has been associated with hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC). Our unbiased screen identified synthetic lethality between FH and several genes in heme metabolism, in accordance with recent findings. Furthermore, we identified an enrichment of synthetic lethality with adenylate cyclases. The effects were validated in an embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293T) and in HLRCC-patient derived cells (UOK262) via both genetic and pharmacological inhibition. The reliance on adenylate cyclases in FH-deficient cells is consistent with increased cyclic-AMP levels, which may act to regulate cellular energy metabolism. Conclusions The identified synthetic lethality of FH with adenylate cyclases suggests a new potential target for treating HLRCC patients. PMID:24568598

  9. High throughput synthetic lethality screen reveals a tumorigenic role of adenylate cyclase in fumarate hydratase-deficient cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Michael; Lawson, Andrew; Ladenburger, Viola; Fredebohm, Johannes; Wolf, Jonas; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Frezza, Christian; Shlomi, Tomer

    2014-02-25

    Synthetic lethality is an appealing technique for selectively targeting cancer cells which have acquired molecular changes that distinguish them from normal cells. High-throughput RNAi-based screens have been successfully used to identify synthetic lethal pathways with well-characterized tumor suppressors and oncogenes. The recent identification of metabolic tumor suppressors suggests that the concept of synthetic lethality can be applied to selectively target cancer metabolism as well. Here, we perform a high-throughput RNAi screen to identify synthetic lethal genes with fumarate hydratase (FH), a metabolic tumor suppressor whose loss-of-function has been associated with hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC). Our unbiased screen identified synthetic lethality between FH and several genes in heme metabolism, in accordance with recent findings. Furthermore, we identified an enrichment of synthetic lethality with adenylate cyclases. The effects were validated in an embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293T) and in HLRCC-patient derived cells (UOK262) via both genetic and pharmacological inhibition. The reliance on adenylate cyclases in FH-deficient cells is consistent with increased cyclic-AMP levels, which may act to regulate cellular energy metabolism. The identified synthetic lethality of FH with adenylate cyclases suggests a new potential target for treating HLRCC patients.

  10. MYC pathway activation in triple-negative breast cancer is synthetic lethal with CDK inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Dai; Kusdra, Leonard; Huskey, Noelle E.; Chandriani, Sanjay; Lenburg, Marc E.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Creasman, Katelyn J.; Bazarov, Alexey V.; Smyth, James W.; Davis, Sarah E.; Yaswen, Paul; Mills, Gordon B.; Esserman, Laura J.

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 receptor-negative triple-negative breast cancers encompass the most clinically challenging subtype for which targeted therapeutics are lacking. We find that triple-negative tumors exhibit elevated MYC expression, as well as altered expression of MYC regulatory genes, resulting in increased activity of the MYC pathway. In primary breast tumors, MYC signaling did not predict response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy but was associated with poor prognosis. We exploit the increased MYC expression found in triple-negative breast cancers by using a synthetic-lethal approach dependent on cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibition. CDK inhibition effectively induced tumor regression in triple-negative tumor xenografts. The proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BIM is up-regulated after CDK inhibition and contributes to this synthetic-lethal mechanism. These results indicate that aggressive breast tumors with elevated MYC are uniquely sensitive to CDK inhibitors. PMID:22430491

  11. ATR inhibitors as a synthetic lethal therapy for tumours deficient in ARID1A

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Chris T.; Miller, Rowan; Pemberton, Helen N.; Jones, Samuel E.; Campbell, James; Konde, Asha; Badham, Nicholas; Rafiq, Rumana; Brough, Rachel; Gulati, Aditi; Ryan, Colm J.; Francis, Jeff; Vermulen, Peter B.; Reynolds, Andrew R.; Reaper, Philip M.; Pollard, John R.; Ashworth, Alan; Lord, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genetic biomarkers of synthetic lethal drug sensitivity effects provides one approach to the development of targeted cancer therapies. Mutations in ARID1A represent one of the most common molecular alterations in human cancer, but therapeutic approaches that target these defects are not yet clinically available. We demonstrate that defects in ARID1A sensitize tumour cells to clinical inhibitors of the DNA damage checkpoint kinase, ATR, both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, ARID1A deficiency results in topoisomerase 2A and cell cycle defects, which cause an increased reliance on ATR checkpoint activity. In ARID1A mutant tumour cells, inhibition of ATR triggers premature mitotic entry, genomic instability and apoptosis. The data presented here provide the pre-clinical and mechanistic rationale for assessing ARID1A defects as a biomarker of single-agent ATR inhibitor response and represents a novel synthetic lethal approach to targeting tumour cells. PMID:27958275

  12. Synthetic Lethality in Breast Cancer Cells: Genes Required for Tumor Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    that the goals of this grant and that of the Innovator award are distinct. The innovator award is to develop high-throughput procedures to create a...revised report The original goal of this application was to develop strategies to permit synthetic lethal screens to be carried out in mammalian cells. In...parallel, one needed to develop systems in which such interactions could be effectively tested. When this application was initially submitted four

  13. Targeting SOD1 induces synthetic lethal killing in BLM- and CHEK2-deficient colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sajesh, Babu V; McManus, Kirk J

    2015-09-29

    Cancer is a major cause of death throughout the world, and there is a large need for better and more personalized approaches to combat the disease. Over the past decade, synthetic lethal approaches have been developed that are designed to exploit the aberrant molecular origins (i.e. defective genes) that underlie tumorigenesis. BLM and CHEK2 are two evolutionarily conserved genes that are somatically altered in a number of tumor types. Both proteins normally function in preserving genome stability through facilitating the accurate repair of DNA double strand breaks. Thus, uncovering synthetic lethal interactors of BLM and CHEK2 will identify novel candidate drug targets and lead chemical compounds. Here we identify an evolutionarily conserved synthetic lethal interaction between SOD1 and both BLM and CHEK2 in two distinct cell models. Using quantitative imaging microscopy, real-time cellular analyses, colony formation and tumor spheroid models we show that SOD1 silencing and inhibition (ATTM and LCS-1 treatments), or the induction of reactive oxygen species (2ME2 treatment) induces selective killing within BLM- and CHEK2-deficient cells relative to controls. We further show that increases in reactive oxygen species follow SOD1 silencing and inhibition that are associated with the persistence of DNA double strand breaks, and increases in apoptosis. Collectively, these data identify SOD1 as a novel candidate drug target in BLM and CHEK2 cancer contexts, and further suggest that 2ME2, ATTM and LCS-1 are lead therapeutic compounds warranting further pre-clinical study.

  14. CDK1 Is a Synthetic Lethal Target for KRAS Mutant Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Cabral, Sara; Brough, Rachel; Konde, Asha; Aarts, Marieke; Campbell, James; Marinari, Eliana; Riffell, Jenna; Bardelli, Alberto; Torrance, Christopher; Lord, Christopher J.; Ashworth, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Activating KRAS mutations are found in approximately 20% of human cancers but no RAS-directed therapies are currently available. Here we describe a novel, robust, KRAS synthetic lethal interaction with the cyclin dependent kinase, CDK1. This was discovered using parallel siRNA screens in KRAS mutant and wild type colorectal isogenic tumour cells and subsequently validated in a genetically diverse panel of 26 colorectal and pancreatic tumour cell models. This established that the KRAS/CDK1 synthetic lethality applies in tumour cells with either amino acid position 12 (p.G12V, pG12D, p.G12S) or amino acid position 13 (p.G13D) KRAS mutations and can also be replicated in vivo in a xenograft model using a small molecule CDK1 inhibitor. Mechanistically, CDK1 inhibition caused a reduction in the S-phase fraction of KRAS mutant cells, an effect also characterised by modulation of Rb, a master control of the G1/S checkpoint. Taken together, these observations suggest that the KRAS/CDK1 interaction is a robust synthetic lethal effect worthy of further investigation. PMID:26881434

  15. Hyperactivated Wnt signaling induces synthetic lethal interaction with Rb inactivation by elevating TORC1 activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyi; Liao, Yang; Hsu, Fu-Ning; Zhang, Robin; Searle, Jennifer S; Pei, Xun; Li, Xuan; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Du, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Inactivation of the Rb tumor suppressor can lead to increased cell proliferation or cell death depending on specific cellular context. Therefore, identification of the interacting pathways that modulate the effect of Rb loss will provide novel insights into the roles of Rb in cancer development and promote new therapeutic strategies. Here, we identify a novel synthetic lethal interaction between Rb inactivation and deregulated Wg/Wnt signaling through unbiased genetic screens. We show that a weak allele of axin, which deregulates Wg signaling and increases cell proliferation without obvious effects on cell fate specification, significantly alters metabolic gene expression, causes hypersensitivity to metabolic stress induced by fasting, and induces synergistic apoptosis with mutation of fly Rb ortholog, rbf. Furthermore, hyperactivation of Wg signaling by other components of the Wg pathway also induces synergistic apoptosis with rbf. We show that hyperactivated Wg signaling significantly increases TORC1 activity and induces excessive energy stress with rbf mutation. Inhibition of TORC1 activity significantly suppressed synergistic cell death induced by hyperactivated Wg signaling and rbf inactivation, which is correlated with decreased energy stress and decreased induction of apoptotic regulator expression. Finally the synthetic lethality between Rb and deregulated Wnt signaling is conserved in mammalian cells and that inactivation of Rb and APC induces synergistic cell death through a similar mechanism. These results suggest that elevated TORC1 activity and metabolic stress underpin the evolutionarily conserved synthetic lethal interaction between hyperactivated Wnt signaling and inactivated Rb tumor suppressor.

  16. Synthetic lethals in HIV: ways to avoid drug resistance : Running title: Preventing HIV resistance.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, Michel; Badel, Anne; Veitia, Reiner A; Vanet, Anne

    2015-04-17

    RNA viruses rapidly accumulate genetic variation, which can give rise to synthetic lethal (SL) and deleterious (SD) mutations. Synthetic lethal mutations (non-lethal when alone but lethal when combined in one genome) have been studied to develop cancer therapies. This principle can also be used against fast-evolving RNA-viruses. Indeed, targeting protein sites involved in SD + SL interactions with a drug would render any mutation of such sites, lethal. Here, we set up a strategy to detect intragenic pairs of SL and SD at the surface of the protein to predict less escapable drug target sites. For this, we detected SD + SL, studying HIV protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequence alignments from two groups of VIH(+) individuals: treated with drugs (T) or not (NT). Using a series of statistical approaches, we were able to propose bona fide SD + SL couples. When focusing on spatially close co-variant SD + SL couples at the surface of the protein, we found 5 SD + SL groups (2 in the protease and 3 in the reverse transcriptase), which could be good candidates to form pockets to accommodate potential drugs. Thus, designing drugs targeting these specific SD + SL groups would not allow the virus to mutate any residue involved in such groups without losing an essential function. Moreover, we also show that the selection pressure induced by the treatment leads to the appearance of new mutations, which change the mutational landscape of the protein. This drives the existence of differential SD + SL couples between the drug-treated and non-treated groups. Thus, new anti-viral drugs should be designed differently to target such groups.

  17. Targeting p300 Addiction in CBP-Deficient Cancers Causes Synthetic Lethality by Apoptotic Cell Death due to Abrogation of MYC Expression.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Hideaki; Sasaki, Mariko; Mitachi, Takafumi; Oike, Takahiro; Higuchi, Saito; Tominaga, Yuichi; Kohno, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the CBP/CREBBP gene, which encodes a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), are present in a variety of human tumors, including lung, bladder, gastric, and hematopoietic cancers. Consequently, development of a molecular targeting method capable of specifically killing CBP-deficient cancer cells would greatly improve cancer therapy. Functional screening of synthetic-lethal genes in CBP-deficient cancers identified the CBP paralog p300/EP300 Ablation of p300 in CBP-knockout and CBP-deficient cancer cells induced G1-S cell-cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis. Genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed that MYC is a major factor responsible for the synthetic lethality. Indeed, p300 ablation in CBP-deficient cells caused downregulation of MYC expression via reduction of histone acetylation in its promoter, and this lethality was rescued by exogenous MYC expression. The p300-HAT inhibitor C646 specifically suppressed the growth of CBP-deficient lung and hematopoietic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo; thus p300 is a promising therapeutic target for treatment of CBP-deficient cancers. Targeting synthetic-lethal partners of genes mutated in cancer holds great promise for treating patients without activating driver gene alterations. Here, we propose a "synthetic lethal-based therapeutic strategy" for CBP-deficient cancers by inhibition of the p300 HAT activity. Patients with CBP-deficient cancers could benefit from therapy using p300-HAT inhibitors. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. A synthetic lethal siRNA screen identifying genes mediating sensitivity to a PARP inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nicholas C; Lord, Christopher J; Iorns, Elizabeth; Brough, Rachel; Swift, Sally; Elliott, Richard; Rayter, Sydonia; Tutt, Andrew N; Ashworth, Alan

    2008-05-07

    Inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase-1 (PARP) are highly lethal to cells with deficiencies in BRCA1, BRCA2 or other components of the homologous recombination pathway. This has led to PARP inhibitors entering clinical trials as a potential therapy for cancer in carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. To discover new determinants of sensitivity to these drugs, we performed a PARP-inhibitor synthetic lethal short interfering RNA (siRNA) screen. We identified a number of kinases whose silencing strongly sensitised to PARP inhibitor, including cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), MAPK12, PLK3, PNKP, STK22c and STK36. How CDK5 silencing mediates sensitivity was investigated. Previously, CDK5 has been suggested to be active only in a neuronal context, but here we show that CDK5 is required in non-neuronal cells for the DNA-damage response and, in particular, intra-S and G(2)/M cell-cycle checkpoints. These results highlight the potential of synthetic lethal siRNA screens with chemical inhibitors to define new determinants of sensitivity and potential therapeutic targets.

  19. Synthetic lethal targeting of superoxide dismutase 1 selectively kills RAD54B-deficient colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sajesh, Babu V; Bailey, Melanie; Lichtensztejn, Zelda; Hieter, Philip; McManus, Kirk J

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic lethality is a rational approach to identify candidate drug targets for selective killing of cancer cells harboring somatic mutations that cause chromosome instability (CIN). To identify a set of the most highly connected synthetic lethal partner genes in yeast for subsequent testing in mammalian cells, we used the entire set of 692 yeast CIN genes to query the genome-wide synthetic lethal datasets. Hierarchical clustering revealed a highly connected set of synthetic lethal partners of yeast genes whose human orthologs are somatically mutated in colorectal cancer. Testing of a small matrix of synthetic lethal gene pairs in mammalian cells suggested that members of a pathway that remove reactive oxygen species that cause DNA damage would be excellent candidates for further testing. We show that the synthetic lethal interaction between budding yeast rad54 and sod1 is conserved within a human colorectal cancer context. Specifically, we demonstrate RAD54B-deficient cells are selectively killed relative to controls via siRNA-based silencing and chemical inhibition and further demonstrate that this interaction is conserved in an unrelated cell type. We further show that the DNA double strand breaks, resulting from increased reactive oxygen species following SOD1 inhibition, persist within the RAD54B-deficient cells and result in apoptosis. Collectively, these data identify SOD1 as a novel candidate cancer drug target and suggest that SOD1 inhibition may have broad-spectrum applicability in a variety of tumor types exhibiting RAD54B deficiencies.

  20. Synthetic lethality reveals mechanisms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to β-lactams.

    PubMed

    Lun, Shichun; Miranda, David; Kubler, Andre; Guo, Haidan; Maiga, Mariama C; Winglee, Kathryn; Pelly, Shaaretha; Bishai, William R

    2014-09-16

    Most β-lactam antibiotics are ineffective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis due to the microbe's innate resistance. The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains has prompted interest to repurpose this class of drugs. To identify the genetic determinants of innate β-lactam resistance, we carried out a synthetic lethality screen on a transposon mutant library for susceptibility to imipenem, a carbapenem β-lactam antibiotic. Mutations in 74 unique genes demonstrated synthetic lethality. The majority of mutations were in genes associated with cell wall biosynthesis. A second quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR)-based synthetic lethality screen of randomly selected mutants confirmed the role of cell wall biosynthesis in β-lactam resistance. The global transcriptional response of the bacterium to β-lactams was investigated, and changes in levels of expression of cell wall biosynthetic genes were identified. Finally, we validated these screens in vivo using the MT1616 transposon mutant, which lacks a functional acyl-transferase gene. Mice infected with the mutant responded to β-lactam treatment with a 100-fold decrease in bacillary lung burden over 4 weeks, while the numbers of organisms in the lungs of mice infected with wild-type bacilli proliferated. These findings reveal a road map of genes required for β-lactam resistance and validate synthetic lethality screening as a promising tool for repurposing existing classes of licensed, safe, well-characterized antimicrobials against tuberculosis. The global emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains has threatened public health worldwide, yet the pipeline of new tuberculosis drugs under development remains limited. One strategy to cope with the urgent need for new antituberculosis agents is to repurpose existing, approved antibiotics. The carbapenem class of β-lactam antibiotics has been proposed as one such class of drugs. Our

  1. New Targeted Agents in Gynecologic Cancers: Synthetic Lethality, Homologous Recombination Deficiency, and PARP Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fong W; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2016-03-01

    Inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) have emerged as a new class of anti-cancer drugs, specifically for malignancies bearing aberrations of the homologous recombination pathway, like those with mutations in the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 genes. Olaparib, a potent PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitor, has been shown to significantly increase progression-free survival (PFS) in women with recurrent ovarian cancer related to a germline BRCA mutation and is currently approved fourth-line treatment in these patients. PARP inhibitors (PARPi) target the genetic phenomenon known as synthetic lethality to exploit faulty DNA repair mechanisms. While ovarian cancer is enriched with a population of tumors with known homologous recombination defects, investigations are underway to help identify pathways in other gynecologic cancers that may demonstrate susceptibility to PARPi through synthetically lethal mechanisms. The ARIEL2 trial prospectively determined a predictive assay to identify patients with HRD. The future of cancer therapeutics will likely incorporate these HRD assays to determine the best treatment plan for patients. While the role of PARPi is less clear in non-ovarian gynecologic cancers, the discovery of a predictive assay for HRD may open the door for clinical trials in these other gynecologic cancers enriched with patients with HRD. Identification of patients with tumors deficient in homologous repair or have HRD-like behavior moves cancer treatment towards individualized therapies in order to maximize treatment effect and quality of life for women living with gynecologic cancers.

  2. Gene Essentiality Profiling Reveals Gene Networks and Synthetic Lethal Interactions with Oncogenic Ras.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tim; Yu, Haiyan; Hughes, Nicholas W; Liu, Bingxu; Kendirli, Arek; Klein, Klara; Chen, Walter W; Lander, Eric S; Sabatini, David M

    2017-02-23

    The genetic dependencies of human cancers widely vary. Here, we catalog this heterogeneity and use it to identify functional gene interactions and genotype-dependent liabilities in cancer. By using genome-wide CRISPR-based screens, we generate a gene essentiality dataset across 14 human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines. Sets of genes with correlated patterns of essentiality across the lines reveal new gene relationships, the essential substrates of enzymes, and the molecular functions of uncharacterized proteins. Comparisons of differentially essential genes between Ras-dependent and -independent lines uncover synthetic lethal partners of oncogenic Ras. Screens in both human AML and engineered mouse pro-B cells converge on a surprisingly small number of genes in the Ras processing and MAPK pathways and pinpoint PREX1 as an AML-specific activator of MAPK signaling. Our findings suggest general strategies for defining mammalian gene networks and synthetic lethal interactions by exploiting the natural genetic and epigenetic diversity of human cancer cells.

  3. Synthetic Lethal Targeting of ARID1A-Mutant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumors with Dasatinib.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rowan E; Brough, Rachel; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Williamson, Chris T; McDade, Simon; Campbell, James; Kigozi, Asha; Rafiq, Rumana; Pemberton, Helen; Natrajan, Rachel; Joel, Josephine; Astley, Holly; Mahoney, Claire; Moore, Jonathan D; Torrance, Chris; Gordan, John D; Webber, James T; Levin, Rebecca S; Shokat, Kevan M; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2016-07-01

    New targeted approaches to ovarian clear cell carcinomas (OCCC) are needed, given the limited treatment options in this disease and the poor response to standard chemotherapy. Using a series of high-throughput cell-based drug screens in OCCC tumor cell models, we have identified a synthetic lethal (SL) interaction between the kinase inhibitor dasatinib and a key driver in OCCC, ARID1A mutation. Imposing ARID1A deficiency upon a variety of human or mouse cells induced dasatinib sensitivity, both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that this is a robust synthetic lethal interaction. The sensitivity of ARID1A-deficient cells to dasatinib was associated with G1-S cell-cycle arrest and was dependent upon both p21 and Rb. Using focused siRNA screens and kinase profiling, we showed that ARID1A-mutant OCCC tumor cells are addicted to the dasatinib target YES1. This suggests that dasatinib merits investigation for the treatment of patients with ARID1A-mutant OCCC. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1472-84. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Synthetic lethal targeting of DNA double strand break repair deficient cells by human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Rebeka; McNeill, Daniel R.; Abbotts, Rachel; Mohammed, Mohammed Z.; Zdzienicka, Małgorzata Z.; Qutob, Haitham; Seedhouse, Claire; Laughton, Charles A.; Fischer, Peter M.; Patel, Poulam M.; Wilson, David M.; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    An apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is an obligatory cytotoxic intermediate in DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) that is processed by human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 is essential for BER and an emerging drug target in cancer. We have isolated novel small molecule inhibitors of APE1. In the current study we have investigated the ability of APE1 inhibitors to induce synthetic lethality in a panel of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair deficient and proficient cells; a) Chinese hamster (CH) cells: BRCA2 deficient (V-C8), ATM deficient (V-E5), wild type (V79) and BRCA2 revertant (V-C8(Rev1)). b) Human cancer cells: BRCA1 deficient (MDA-MB-436), BRCA1 proficient (MCF-7), BRCA2 deficient (CAPAN-1 and HeLa SilenciX cells), BRCA2 proficient (PANC1 and control SilenciX cells). We also tested synthetic lethality (SL) in CH ovary cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 (E8 cells) using ATM inhibitors and DNA-PKcs inhibitors (DSB inhibitors). APE1 inhibitors are synthetically lethal in BRCA and ATM deficient cells. APE1 inhibition resulted in accumulation of DNA DSBs and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Synthetic lethality was also demonstrated in CH cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 treated with ATM or DNA-PKcs inhibitors. We conclude that APE1 is a promising synthetic lethality target in cancer. PMID:22377908

  5. A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies a Role for Lin-44/Wnt in C. elegans Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hartin, Samantha N.; Hudson, Martin L.; Yingling, Curtis; Ackley, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The C. elegans proteins PTP-3/LAR-RPTP and SDN-1/Syndecan are conserved cell adhesion molecules. Loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in either ptp-3 or sdn-1 result in low penetrance embryonic developmental defects. Work from other systems has shown that syndecans can function as ligands for LAR receptors in vivo. We used double mutant analysis to test whether ptp-3 and sdn-1 function in a linear genetic pathway during C. elegans embryogenesis. Results We found animals with LOF in both sdn-1 and ptp-3 exhibited a highly penetrant synthetic lethality (SynLet), with only a small percentage of animals surviving to adulthood. Analysis of the survivors demonstrated that these animals had a synergistic increase in the penetrance of embryonic developmental defects. Together, these data strongly suggested PTP-3 and SDN-1 function in parallel during embryogenesis. We subsequently used RNAi to knockdown ~3,600 genes predicted to encode secreted and/or transmembrane molecules to identify genes that interacted with ptp-3 or sdn-1. We found that the Wnt ligand, lin-44, was SynLet with sdn-1, but not ptp-3. We used 4-dimensional time-lapse analysis to characterize the interaction between lin-44 and sdn-1. We found evidence that loss of lin-44 caused defects in the polarization and migration of endodermal precursors during gastrulation, a previously undescribed role for lin-44 that is strongly enhanced by the loss of sdn-1. Conclusions PTP-3 and SDN-1 function in compensatory pathways during C. elegans embryonic and larval development, as simultaneous loss of both genes has dire consequences for organismal survival. The Wnt ligand lin-44 contributes to the early stages of gastrulation in parallel to sdn-1, but in a genetic pathway with ptp-3. Overall, the SynLet phenotype provides a robust platform to identify ptp-3 and sdn-1 interacting genes, as well as other genes that function in development, yet might be missed in traditional forward genetic screens. PMID:25938228

  6. A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies a Role for Lin-44/Wnt in C. elegans Embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hartin, Samantha N; Hudson, Martin L; Yingling, Curtis; Ackley, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    The C. elegans proteins PTP-3/LAR-RPTP and SDN-1/Syndecan are conserved cell adhesion molecules. Loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in either ptp-3 or sdn-1 result in low penetrance embryonic developmental defects. Work from other systems has shown that syndecans can function as ligands for LAR receptors in vivo. We used double mutant analysis to test whether ptp-3 and sdn-1 function in a linear genetic pathway during C. elegans embryogenesis. We found animals with LOF in both sdn-1 and ptp-3 exhibited a highly penetrant synthetic lethality (SynLet), with only a small percentage of animals surviving to adulthood. Analysis of the survivors demonstrated that these animals had a synergistic increase in the penetrance of embryonic developmental defects. Together, these data strongly suggested PTP-3 and SDN-1 function in parallel during embryogenesis. We subsequently used RNAi to knockdown ~3,600 genes predicted to encode secreted and/or transmembrane molecules to identify genes that interacted with ptp-3 or sdn-1. We found that the Wnt ligand, lin-44, was SynLet with sdn-1, but not ptp-3. We used 4-dimensional time-lapse analysis to characterize the interaction between lin-44 and sdn-1. We found evidence that loss of lin-44 caused defects in the polarization and migration of endodermal precursors during gastrulation, a previously undescribed role for lin-44 that is strongly enhanced by the loss of sdn-1. PTP-3 and SDN-1 function in compensatory pathways during C. elegans embryonic and larval development, as simultaneous loss of both genes has dire consequences for organismal survival. The Wnt ligand lin-44 contributes to the early stages of gastrulation in parallel to sdn-1, but in a genetic pathway with ptp-3. Overall, the SynLet phenotype provides a robust platform to identify ptp-3 and sdn-1 interacting genes, as well as other genes that function in development, yet might be missed in traditional forward genetic screens.

  7. Predictors and Modulators of Synthetic Lethality: An Update on PARP Inhibitors and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Stephen; Zhang, Catherine; Finch, Nathan; Zhang, Kevin; Campo, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have proven to be successful agents in inducing synthetic lethality in several malignancies. Several PARP inhibitors have reached clinical trial testing for treatment in different cancers, and, recently, Olaparib (AZD2281) has gained both United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) and the European Commission (EC) approval for use in BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer treatment. The need to identify biomarkers, their interactions in DNA damage repair pathways, and their potential utility in identifying patients who are candidates for PARP inhibitor treatment is well recognized. In this review, we detail many of the biomarkers that have been investigated for their ability to predict both PARP inhibitor sensitivity and resistance in preclinical studies as well as the results of several clinical trials that have tested the safety and efficacy of different PARP inhibitor agents in BRCA and non-BRCA-mutated cancers. PMID:27642590

  8. Building high-resolution synthetic lethal networks: a 'Google map' of the cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Paul, James M; Templeton, Shaina D; Baharani, Akanksha; Freywald, Andrew; Vizeacoumar, Franco J

    2014-12-01

    The most commonly used therapies for cancer involve delivering high doses of radiation or toxic chemicals to the patient that also cause substantial damage to normal tissue. To overcome this, researchers have recently resorted to a basic biological concept called 'synthetic lethality' (SL) that takes advantage of interactions between gene pairs. The identification of SL interactions is of considerable therapeutic interest because if a particular gene is SL with a tumor-causing mutation, then the targeting that gene carries therapeutic advantages. Mapping these interactions in the context of human cancer cells could hold the key to effective, targeted cancer treatments. In this review, we cover the recent advances that aim to identify these SL interactions using unbiased genetic screens.

  9. Exploiting Synthetic Lethality for the Therapy of ABC Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yibin; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Emre, N.C. Tolga; Ceribelli, Michele; Zhang, Meili; Wright, George; Xiao, Wenming; Powell, John; Platig, John; Kohlhammer, Holger; Young, Ryan M.; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yandan; Xu, Weihong; Buggy, Joseph J.; Balasubramanian, Sriram; Mathews, Lesley A.; Shinn, Paul; Guha, Rajarshi; Ferrer, Marc; Thomas, Craig; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Knowledge of oncogenic mutations can inspire therapeutic strategies that are synthetically lethal, affecting cancer cells while sparing normal cells. Lenalidomide is an active agent in the activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but its mechanism of action is unknown. Lenalidomide kills ABC DLBCL cells by augmenting interferon β (IFNβ) production, owing to the oncogenic MYD88 mutations in these lymphomas. In a cereblon-dependent fashion, lenalidomide downregulates IRF4 and SPIB, transcription factors that together prevent IFNβ production by repressing IRF7 and also amplify pro-survival NF-κB signaling by transactivating CARD11. Blockade of B cell receptor (BCR) signaling using the BTK inhibitor ibrutinib also downregulates IRF4 and consequently synergizes with lenalidomide in killing ABC DLBCLs, suggesting attractive therapeutic strategies. PMID:22698399

  10. Potential Clinical Uses of CDK Inhibitors: Lessons from Synthetic Lethality Screens.

    PubMed

    Vymětalová, Ladislava; Kryštof, Vladimír

    2015-11-01

    Developments in genetic and genomic technology have produced vast quantities of data that are gradually yielding new insights into fundamental cellular and molecular processes. In particular, they have revealed some differences between normal and transformed cells that could potentially be exploited to develop targeted, personalized cancer therapies with unprecedented efficiencies. This review summarizes recent findings from synthetic lethality (SL) screens against cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) that can be targeted with small molecule kinase inhibitors. SL screens can be used to identify cancers sensitive to CDK inhibitors. Several SL partners of specific CDKs have been identified, including MYC, K-Ras, VHL, PI3K, and PARP, all of which are discussed in the review. CDK inhibitors have been in clinical trials for nearly 20 years and it has become clear that effective therapy using these compounds will require careful selection of patients with respect to the specific molecular phenotype of their disease.

  11. Predictors and Modulators of Synthetic Lethality: An Update on PARP Inhibitors and Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Murata, Stephen; Zhang, Catherine; Finch, Nathan; Zhang, Kevin; Campo, Loredana; Breuer, Eun-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have proven to be successful agents in inducing synthetic lethality in several malignancies. Several PARP inhibitors have reached clinical trial testing for treatment in different cancers, and, recently, Olaparib (AZD2281) has gained both United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) and the European Commission (EC) approval for use in BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer treatment. The need to identify biomarkers, their interactions in DNA damage repair pathways, and their potential utility in identifying patients who are candidates for PARP inhibitor treatment is well recognized. In this review, we detail many of the biomarkers that have been investigated for their ability to predict both PARP inhibitor sensitivity and resistance in preclinical studies as well as the results of several clinical trials that have tested the safety and efficacy of different PARP inhibitor agents in BRCA and non-BRCA-mutated cancers.

  12. Using Gene Essentiality and Synthetic Lethality Information to Correct Yeast and CHO Cell Genome-Scale Models

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Ratul; Chowdhury, Anupam; Maranas, Costas D.

    2015-01-01

    Essentiality (ES) and Synthetic Lethality (SL) information identify combination of genes whose deletion inhibits cell growth. This information is important for both identifying drug targets for tumor and pathogenic bacteria suppression and for flagging and avoiding gene deletions that are non-viable in biotechnology. In this study, we performed a comprehensive ES and SL analysis of two important eukaryotic models (S. cerevisiae and CHO cells) using a bilevel optimization approach introduced earlier. Information gleaned from this study is used to propose specific model changes to remedy inconsistent with data model predictions. Even for the highly curated Yeast 7.11 model we identified 50 changes (metabolic and GPR) leading to the correct prediction of an additional 28% of essential genes and 36% of synthetic lethals along with a 53% reduction in the erroneous identification of essential genes. Due to the paucity of mutant growth phenotype data only 12 changes were made for the CHO 1.2 model leading to an additional correctly predicted 11 essential and eight non-essential genes. Overall, we find that CHO 1.2 was 76% less accurate than the Yeast 7.11 metabolic model in predicting essential genes. Based on this analysis, 14 (single and double deletion) maximally informative experiments are suggested to improve the CHO cell model by using information from a mouse metabolic model. This analysis demonstrates the importance of single and multiple knockout phenotypes in assessing and improving model reconstructions. The advent of techniques such as CRISPR opens the door for the global assessment of eukaryotic models. PMID:26426067

  13. Defective sister chromatid cohesion is synthetically lethal with impaired APC/C function.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Job; Faramarz, Atiq; Oostra, Anneke B; de Menezes, Renee X; van der Meulen, Ida H; Rooimans, Martin A; Rockx, Davy A; Brakenhoff, Ruud H; van Beusechem, Victor W; King, Randall W; de Winter, Johan P; Wolthuis, Rob M F

    2015-10-01

    Warsaw breakage syndrome (WABS) is caused by defective DDX11, a DNA helicase that is essential for chromatid cohesion. Here, a paired genome-wide siRNA screen in patient-derived cell lines reveals that WABS cells do not tolerate partial depletion of individual APC/C subunits or the spindle checkpoint inhibitor p31(comet). A combination of reduced cohesion and impaired APC/C function also leads to fatal mitotic arrest in diploid RPE1 cells. Moreover, WABS cell lines, and several cancer cell lines with cohesion defects, display a highly increased response to a new cell-permeable APC/C inhibitor, apcin, but not to the spindle poison paclitaxel. Synthetic lethality of APC/C inhibition and cohesion defects strictly depends on a functional mitotic spindle checkpoint as well as on intact microtubule pulling forces. This indicates that the underlying mechanism involves cohesion fatigue in response to mitotic delay, leading to spindle checkpoint re-activation and lethal mitotic arrest. Our results point to APC/C inhibitors as promising therapeutic agents targeting cohesion-defective cancers.

  14. Cell line name recognition in support of the identification of synthetic lethality in cancer from text

    PubMed Central

    Kaewphan, Suwisa; Van Landeghem, Sofie; Ohta, Tomoko; Van de Peer, Yves; Ginter, Filip; Pyysalo, Sampo

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The recognition and normalization of cell line names in text is an important task in biomedical text mining research, facilitating for instance the identification of synthetically lethal genes from the literature. While several tools have previously been developed to address cell line recognition, it is unclear whether available systems can perform sufficiently well in realistic and broad-coverage applications such as extracting synthetically lethal genes from the cancer literature. In this study, we revisit the cell line name recognition task, evaluating both available systems and newly introduced methods on various resources to obtain a reliable tagger not tied to any specific subdomain. In support of this task, we introduce two text collections manually annotated for cell line names: the broad-coverage corpus Gellus and CLL, a focused target domain corpus. Results: We find that the best performance is achieved using NERsuite, a machine learning system based on Conditional Random Fields, trained on the Gellus corpus and supported with a dictionary of cell line names. The system achieves an F-score of 88.46% on the test set of Gellus and 85.98% on the independently annotated CLL corpus. It was further applied at large scale to 24 302 102 unannotated articles, resulting in the identification of 5 181 342 cell line mentions, normalized to 11 755 unique cell line database identifiers. Availability and implementation: The manually annotated datasets, the cell line dictionary, derived corpora, NERsuite models and the results of the large-scale run on unannotated texts are available under open licenses at http://turkunlp.github.io/Cell-line-recognition/. Contact: sukaew@utu.fi PMID:26428294

  15. Identification of synthetic lethality of PLK1 inhibition and microtubule-destabilizing drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hugle, M; Belz, K; Fulda, S

    2015-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is frequently overexpressed in cancer, which correlates with poor prognosis. Therefore, we investigated PLK1 as therapeutic target using rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) as a model. Here, we identify a novel synthetic lethal interaction of PLK1 inhibitors and microtubule-destabilizing drugs in preclinical RMS models and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of this synergism. PLK1 inhibitors (i.e., BI 2536 and BI 6727) synergistically induce apoptosis together with microtubule-destabilizing drugs (i.e., vincristine (VCR), vinblastine (VBL) and vinorelbine (VNR)) in several RMS cell lines (combination index <0.9) including a patient-derived primary RMS culture. Importantly, PLK1 inhibitors and VCR cooperate to significantly suppress RMS growth in two in vivo models, including a mouse xenograft model, without causing additive toxicity. In addition, no toxicity was observed in non-malignant fibroblast or myoblast cultures. Mechanistically, BI 2536/VCR co-treatment triggers mitotic arrest, which initiates mitochondrial apoptosis by inactivation of antiapoptotic BCL-2 family proteins, followed by BAX/BAK activation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of caspase-dependent or caspase-independent effector pathways. This conclusion is supported by data showing that BI 2536/VCR-induced apoptosis is significantly inhibited by preventing cells to enter mitosis, by overexpression of BCL-2 or a non-degradable MCL-1 mutant, by BAK knockdown, ROS scavengers, caspase inhibition or endonuclease G silencing. This identification of a novel synthetic lethality of PLK1 inhibitors and microtubule-destabilizing drugs has important implications for developing PLK1 inhibitor-based combination treatments. PMID:26024389

  16. Identification of synthetic lethality of PLK1 inhibition and microtubule-destabilizing drugs.

    PubMed

    Hugle, M; Belz, K; Fulda, S

    2015-12-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is frequently overexpressed in cancer, which correlates with poor prognosis. Therefore, we investigated PLK1 as therapeutic target using rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) as a model. Here, we identify a novel synthetic lethal interaction of PLK1 inhibitors and microtubule-destabilizing drugs in preclinical RMS models and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of this synergism. PLK1 inhibitors (i.e., BI 2536 and BI 6727) synergistically induce apoptosis together with microtubule-destabilizing drugs (i.e., vincristine (VCR), vinblastine (VBL) and vinorelbine (VNR)) in several RMS cell lines (combination index <0.9) including a patient-derived primary RMS culture. Importantly, PLK1 inhibitors and VCR cooperate to significantly suppress RMS growth in two in vivo models, including a mouse xenograft model, without causing additive toxicity. In addition, no toxicity was observed in non-malignant fibroblast or myoblast cultures. Mechanistically, BI 2536/VCR co-treatment triggers mitotic arrest, which initiates mitochondrial apoptosis by inactivation of antiapoptotic BCL-2 family proteins, followed by BAX/BAK activation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of caspase-dependent or caspase-independent effector pathways. This conclusion is supported by data showing that BI 2536/VCR-induced apoptosis is significantly inhibited by preventing cells to enter mitosis, by overexpression of BCL-2 or a non-degradable MCL-1 mutant, by BAK knockdown, ROS scavengers, caspase inhibition or endonuclease G silencing. This identification of a novel synthetic lethality of PLK1 inhibitors and microtubule-destabilizing drugs has important implications for developing PLK1 inhibitor-based combination treatments.

  17. Cell line name recognition in support of the identification of synthetic lethality in cancer from text.

    PubMed

    Kaewphan, Suwisa; Van Landeghem, Sofie; Ohta, Tomoko; Van de Peer, Yves; Ginter, Filip; Pyysalo, Sampo

    2016-01-15

    The recognition and normalization of cell line names in text is an important task in biomedical text mining research, facilitating for instance the identification of synthetically lethal genes from the literature. While several tools have previously been developed to address cell line recognition, it is unclear whether available systems can perform sufficiently well in realistic and broad-coverage applications such as extracting synthetically lethal genes from the cancer literature. In this study, we revisit the cell line name recognition task, evaluating both available systems and newly introduced methods on various resources to obtain a reliable tagger not tied to any specific subdomain. In support of this task, we introduce two text collections manually annotated for cell line names: the broad-coverage corpus Gellus and CLL, a focused target domain corpus. We find that the best performance is achieved using NERsuite, a machine learning system based on Conditional Random Fields, trained on the Gellus corpus and supported with a dictionary of cell line names. The system achieves an F-score of 88.46% on the test set of Gellus and 85.98% on the independently annotated CLL corpus. It was further applied at large scale to 24 302 102 unannotated articles, resulting in the identification of 5 181 342 cell line mentions, normalized to 11 755 unique cell line database identifiers. The manually annotated datasets, the cell line dictionary, derived corpora, NERsuite models and the results of the large-scale run on unannotated texts are available under open licenses at http://turkunlp.github.io/Cell-line-recognition/. sukaew@utu.fi. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Combatting synthetic designer opioids: active vaccination ablates lethal doses of fentanyl class drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bremer, Paul T.; Kimishima, Atsushi; Schlosburg, Joel E.; Zhou, Bin; Collins, Karen C.; Janda, Kim D.

    2016-01-01

    Fentanyl is an addictive prescription opioid that is over 80 times more potent than morphine. The synthetic nature of fentanyl has enabled the creation of dangerous ‘designer drug’ analogues that escape toxicology screening, yet display comparable potency to the parent drug. Alarmingly, a large number of fatalities have been linked to overdose of fentanyl derivatives. Herein, we report an effective immunotherapy for reducing the psychoactive effects of fentanyl class drugs. A single conjugate vaccine was created that elicited high levels of antibodies with cross-reactivity for a wide panel of fentanyl analogues. Moreover, vaccinated mice gained significant protection from lethal fentanyl doses. Lastly, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based technique was established enabling drug specificity profiling of antibodies derived directly from serum. Our newly developed fentanyl vaccine and analytical methods may assist in the battle against synthetic opioid abuse. Fentanyl is an effective synthetic opioid that is used legally as a schedule II prescription pain reliever. However, fentanyl presents a significant abuse liability due to the euphoric feeling it induces via activation of μ-opioid receptors (MOR) in the brain; the same pharmacological target as the illegal schedule I opioid, heroin.[1] Excessive activation of MOR results in respiratory depression which can be fatal.[2] Fentanyl exceeds the potency of heroin by >10-fold, and morphine by >80-fold posing a significant risk of overdose when it is consumed from unregulated sources.[3] Furthermore, the ease of fentanyl synthesis enables illegal production and the creation of designer drug analogues.[4] The fact that the pharmacology of these analogues has yet to be properly characterized makes them particularly dangerous, especially when certain modifications, even methyl additions, can increase potency, notably at the 3-position (Figure 1).[5] PMID:26879590

  19. Targeting synthetic lethality between the SRC kinase and the EPHB6 receptor may benefit cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bhanumathy, Kalpana Kalyanasundaram; Li, Yue; Gerger, Courtney; Zawily, Amr El; Freywald, Tanya; Anderson, Deborah H.; Mousseau, Darrell; Kanthan, Rani; Zhang, Zhaolei; Vizeacoumar, Franco J.; Freywald, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Application of tumor genome sequencing has identified numerous loss-of-function alterations in cancer cells. While these alterations are difficult to target using direct interventions, they may be attacked with the help of the synthetic lethality (SL) approach. In this approach, inhibition of one gene causes lethality only when another gene is also completely or partially inactivated. The EPHB6 receptor tyrosine kinase has been shown to have anti-malignant properties and to be downregulated in multiple cancers, which makes it a very attractive target for SL applications. In our work, we used a genome-wide SL screen combined with expression and interaction network analyses, and identified the SRC kinase as a SL partner of EPHB6 in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Our experiments also reveal that this SL interaction can be targeted by small molecule SRC inhibitors, SU6656 and KX2-391, and can be used to improve elimination of human TNBC tumors in a xenograft model. Our observations are of potential practical importance, since TNBC is an aggressive heterogeneous malignancy with a very high rate of patient mortality due to the lack of targeted therapies, and our work indicates that FDA-approved SRC inhibitors may potentially be used in a personalized manner for treating patients with EPHB6-deficient TNBC. Our findings are also of a general interest, as EPHB6 is downregulated in multiple malignancies and our data serve as a proof of principle that EPHB6 deficiency may be targeted by small molecule inhibitors in the SL approach. PMID:27418135

  20. High throughput RNAi screening identifies ID1 as a synthetic sick/lethal gene interacting with the common TP53 mutation R175H

    PubMed Central

    IMAI, HIROO; KATO, SHUNSUKE; SAKAMOTO, YASUHIRO; KAKUDO, YUICHI; SHIMODAIRA, HIDEKI; ISHIOKA, CHIKASHI

    2014-01-01

    The TP53 mutation (R175H) is one of the most common mutations in human cancer. It is a highly attractive strategy for cancer therapy to find the genes that lead the R175H-expressing cancer cells. The aim of this study was to identify the synthetic sick/lethal gene interacting with R175H. Using lentiviral bar-coded comprehensive shRNA library and a tetracycline-inducible R175H expressed in the SF126 human glioblastoma cell line (SF126-tet-R175H), we conducted high-throughput screening to identify the candidate genes that induce synthetic sickness/lethality in R175H-expressing cells. We identified 906 candidate gene suppressions that may lead to accelerated cell growth inhibition in the presence of R175H. Inhibitor of differentiation 1 (ID1) was one of the candidate genes, and its suppression by siRNA resulted in the acceleration of growth inhibition in cell lines both transiently and endogenously expressing R175H but not in TP53-null cell lines or other common p53 mutants (such as R273H). Flow cytometry analysis showed that ID1 suppression resulted in G1 arrest, and the arrest was accelerated by the expression of R175H. ID1 is a synthetic sick/lethal gene that interacts with R175H and is considered to be a novel molecular target for cancer therapy in R175H-expressing cells. PMID:24378760

  1. A screen for dynein synthetic lethals in Aspergillus nidulans identifies spindle assembly checkpoint genes and other genes involved in mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Efimov, V P; Morris, N R

    1998-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a ubiquitously expressed microtubule motor involved in vesicle transport, mitosis, nuclear migration, and spindle orientation. In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, inactivation of cytoplasmic dynein, although not lethal, severely impairs nuclear migration. The role of dynein in mitosis and vesicle transport in this organism is unclear. To investigate the complete range of dynein function in A. nidulans, we searched for synthetic lethal mutations that significantly reduced growth in the absence of dynein but had little effect on their own. We isolated 19 sld (synthetic lethality without dynein) mutations in nine different genes. Mutations in two genes exacerbate the nuclear migration defect seen in the absence of dynein. Mutations in six other genes, including sldA and sldB, show a strong synthetic lethal interaction with a mutation in the mitotic kinesin bimC and, thus, are likely to play a role in mitosis. Mutations in sldA and sldB also confer hypersensitivity to the microtubule-destabilizing drug benomyl. sldA and sldB were cloned by complementation of their mutant phenotypes using an A. nidulans autonomously replicating vector. Sequencing revealed homology to the spindle assembly checkpoint genes BUB1 and BUB3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic interaction between dynein and spindle assembly checkpoint genes, as well as other mitotic genes, indicates that A. nidulans dynein plays a role in mitosis. We suggest a model for dynein motor action in A. nidulans that can explain dynein involvement in both mitosis and nuclear distribution. PMID:9584089

  2. Synthetic lethality between androgen receptor signalling and the PARP pathway in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Asim, Mohammad; Tarish, Firas; Zecchini, Heather I; Sanjiv, Kumar; Gelali, Eleni; Massie, Charles E; Baridi, Ajoeb; Warren, Anne Y; Zhao, Wanfeng; Ogris, Christoph; McDuffus, Leigh-Anne; Mascalchi, Patrice; Shaw, Greg; Dev, Harveer; Wadhwa, Karan; Wijnhoven, Paul; Forment, Josep V; Lyons, Scott R; Lynch, Andy G; O'Neill, Cormac; Zecchini, Vincent R; Rennie, Paul S; Baniahmad, Aria; Tavaré, Simon; Mills, Ian G; Galanty, Yaron; Crosetto, Nicola; Schultz, Niklas; Neal, David; Helleday, Thomas

    2017-08-29

    Emerging data demonstrate homologous recombination (HR) defects in castration-resistant prostate cancers, rendering these tumours sensitive to PARP inhibition. Here we demonstrate a direct requirement for the androgen receptor (AR) to maintain HR gene expression and HR activity in prostate cancer. We show that PARP-mediated repair pathways are upregulated in prostate cancer following androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Furthermore, upregulation of PARP activity is essential for the survival of prostate cancer cells and we demonstrate a synthetic lethality between ADT and PARP inhibition in vivo. Our data suggest that ADT can functionally impair HR prior to the development of castration resistance and that, this potentially could be exploited therapeutically using PARP inhibitors in combination with androgen-deprivation therapy upfront in advanced or high-risk prostate cancer.Tumours with homologous recombination (HR) defects become sensitive to PARPi. Here, the authors show that androgen receptor (AR) regulates HR and AR inhibition activates the PARP pathway in vivo, thus inhibition of both AR and PARP is required for effective treatment of high risk prostate cancer.

  3. In Silico Screening Identifies a Novel Potential PARP1 Inhibitor Targeting Synthetic Lethality in Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Zhou, Nan; Cai, Peiling; Bao, Jinku

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality describes situations in which defects in two different genes or pathways together result in cell death. This concept has been applied to drug development for cancer treatment, as represented by Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARPs) inhibitors. In the current study, we performed a computational screening to discover new PARP inhibitors. Among the 11,247 compounds analyzed, one natural product, ZINC67913374, stood out by its superior performance in the simulation analyses. Compared with the FDA approved PARP1 inhibitor, olaparib, our results demonstrated that the ZINC67913374 compound achieved a better grid score (−86.8) and amber score (−51.42). Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the PARP1-ZINC67913374 complex was more stable than olaparib. The binding free energy for ZINC67913374 was −177.28 kJ/mol while that of olaparib was −159.16 kJ/mol. These results indicated ZINC67913374 bound to PARP1 with a higher affinity, which suggest ZINC67913374 has promising potential for cancer drug development. PMID:26907257

  4. ATM and MET kinases are synthetic lethal with non-genotoxic activation of p53

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelly D.; Padilla-Just, Nuria; Henry, Ryan E.; Porter, Christopher C.; Kim, Jihye; Tentler, John J.; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Tan, Aik Choon; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M.

    2012-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor orchestrates alternative stress responses including cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, but the mechanisms defining cell fate upon p53 activation are poorly understood. Several small molecule activators of p53 have been developed, including Nutlin-3, but their therapeutic potential is limited by the fact that they induce reversible cell cycle arrest in most cancer cell types. We report here the results of a ‘Synthetic Lethal with Nutlin-3’ genome-wide shRNA screen, which revealed that the ATM and MET kinases govern cell fate choice upon p53 activation. Genetic or pharmacological interference with ATM or MET activity converts the cellular response from cell cycle arrest into apoptosis in diverse cancer cell types without affecting expression of key p53 target genes. ATM and MET inhibitors enable Nutlin-3 to kill tumor spheroids. These results identify novel pathways controlling the cellular response to p53 activation and aid in the design of p53-based therapies. PMID:22660439

  5. A synthetic peptide induces long-term protection from lethal infection with herpes simplex virus 2

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Immunization against viral pathogens is generally directed toward the induction of virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) and the maintenance of the potential for a second-set (IgG) response. Indeed, an elevated level of specific antibody is considered a reliable clinical indicator that a state of immunity exists in the host. However, in the case of herpes simplex virus (HSV), the presence of circulating VNA does not necessarily correlate with protection. Thus, it has been found that secondary infections occur in individuals even with high neutralizing titers to HSV, suggesting that antibody to the virus may be useless or even deleterious. In consideration of these facts, we were interested in inducing a T cell response to HSV. We had already shown that synthetic peptides corresponding to the NH3-terminal region of the glycoprotein D (gD) molecule of HSV could induce a strong T cell response when injected into mice, but did not, by themselves, confer protection. In this report, we examined the ability of peptides, covalently coupled to palmitic acid and incorporated into liposomes, to induce virus-specific T cell responses that confer protection against a lethal challenge of HSV-2. We have demonstrated that long-term protective immunity is achieved with a single immunization in the absence of neutralizing antibody when antigen is presented in this form. Furthermore, T cells but not serum from such immune mice can adoptively transfer this protection. PMID:3029270

  6. Synthetic lethality between CCNE1 amplification and loss of BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Weir, Barbara A; Au-Yeung, George; Alsop, Kathryn; Mitchell, Gillian; George, Joshy; Davis, Sally; D'Andrea, Alan D; Simpson, Kaylene; Hahn, William C; Bowtell, David D L

    2013-11-26

    High-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSCs) are characterized by a high frequency of TP53 mutations, BRCA1/2 inactivation, homologous recombination dysfunction, and widespread copy number changes. Cyclin E1 (CCNE1) gene amplification has been reported to occur independently of BRCA1/2 mutation, and it is associated with primary treatment failure and reduced patient survival. Insensitivity of CCNE1-amplified tumors to platinum cross-linking agents may be partly because of an intact BRCA1/2 pathway. Both BRCA1/2 dysfunction and CCNE1 amplification are known to promote genomic instability and tumor progression. These events may be mutually exclusive, because either change provides a path to tumor development, with no selective advantage to having both mutations. Using data from a genome-wide shRNA synthetic lethal screen, we show that BRCA1 and members of the ubiquitin pathway are selectively required in cancers that harbor CCNE1 amplification. Furthermore, we show specific sensitivity of CCNE1-amplified tumor cells to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. These findings provide an explanation for the observed mutual exclusivity of CCNE1 amplification and BRCA1/2 loss in HGSC and suggest a unique therapeutic approach for treatment-resistant CCNE1-amplified tumors.

  7. Autophagy and cell death to target cancer cells: exploiting synthetic lethality as cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Reyjal, Julie; Cormier, Kevin; Turcotte, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Since 1940 chemotherapy has been one of the major therapies used to kill cancer cells. However, conventional standard cytotoxic agents have a low therapeutic index and often show toxicity in healthy cells. Over the past decade, progress in molecular biology and genomics has identified signaling pathways and mutations driving different types of cancer. Genetic and epigenetic alterations that characterize tumor cells have been used in the development of targeted therapy, a very active area of cancer research. Moreover, identification of synthetic lethal interactions between two altered genes in cancer cells shows much promise to target specifically tumor cells. For a long time, apoptosis was considered the principal mechanism by which cells die from chemotherapeutic agents. Autophagy, necroptosis (a programmed cell death mechanism of necrosis), and lysosomal-mediated cell death significantly improve our understanding of how malignancy can be targeted by anticancer treatments. Autophagy is a highly regulated process by which misfolded proteins and organelles reach lysosomes for their degradation. Alterations in this cellular process have been observed in several pathological conditions, including cancer. The role of autophagy in cancer raised a paradox wherein it can act as a tumor suppressor at early stage of tumor development but can also be used by cancer cells as cytoprotection to promote survival in established tumors. It is interesting that autophagy can be targeted by anticancer agents to provoke cancer cell death. This review focuses on the role of autophagy in cancer cells and its potential to therapeutically kill cancer cells.

  8. Synthetic lethal interactions suggest a role for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtf1 protein in transcription elongation.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, P J; Arndt, K M

    2000-01-01

    Strong evidence indicates that transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II (pol II) is a highly regulated process. Here we present genetic results that indicate a role for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtf1 protein in transcription elongation. A screen for synthetic lethal mutations was carried out with an rtf1 deletion mutation to identify factors that interact with Rtf1 or regulate the same process as Rtf1. The screen uncovered mutations in SRB5, CTK1, FCP1, and POB3. These genes encode an Srb/mediator component, a CTD kinase, a CTD phosphatase, and a protein involved in the regulation of transcription by chromatin structure, respectively. All of these gene products have been directly or indirectly implicated in transcription elongation, indicating that Rtf1 may also regulate this process. In support of this view, we show that RTF1 functionally interacts with genes that encode known elongation factors, including SPT4, SPT5, SPT16, and PPR2. We also show that a deletion of RTF1 causes sensitivity to 6-azauracil and mycophenolic acid, phenotypes correlated with a transcription elongation defect. Collectively, our results suggest that Rtf1 may function as a novel transcription elongation factor in yeast. PMID:11014804

  9. Systematic discovery of mutation-specific synthetic lethals by mining pan-cancer human primary tumor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Subarna; Thomas, Daniel; Chan, Steven; Gao, Yang; Brunen, Diede; Torabi, Damoun; Reinisch, Andreas; Hernandez, David; Chan, Andy; Rankin, Erinn B.; Bernards, Rene; Majeti, Ravindra; Dill, David L.

    2017-05-01

    Two genes are synthetically lethal (SL) when defects in both are lethal to a cell but a single defect is non-lethal. SL partners of cancer mutations are of great interest as pharmacological targets; however, identifying them by cell line-based methods is challenging. Here we develop MiSL (Mining Synthetic Lethals), an algorithm that mines pan-cancer human primary tumour data to identify mutation-specific SL partners for specific cancers. We apply MiSL to 12 different cancers and predict 145,891 SL partners for 3,120 mutations, including known mutation-specific SL partners. Comparisons with functional screens show that MiSL predictions are enriched for SLs in multiple cancers. We extensively validate a SL interaction identified by MiSL between the IDH1 mutation and ACACA in leukaemia using gene targeting and patient-derived xenografts. Furthermore, we apply MiSL to pinpoint genetic biomarkers for drug sensitivity. These results demonstrate that MiSL can accelerate precision oncology by identifying mutation-specific targets and biomarkers.

  10. Uncovering synthetic lethal interactions for therapeutic targets and predictive markers in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Che, Ting-Fang; Huang, Yi-Syuan; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Shieh, Grace S.; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2016-01-01

    Two genes are called synthetic lethal (SL) if their simultaneous mutation leads to cell death, but mutation of either individual does not. Targeting SL partners of mutated cancer genes can selectively kill cancer cells, but leave normal cells intact. We present an integrated approach to uncover SL gene pairs as novel therapeutic targets of lung adenocarcinoma (LADC). Of 24 predicted SL pairs, PARP1-TP53 was validated by RNAi knockdown to have synergistic toxicity in H1975 and invasive CL1-5 LADC cells; additionally FEN1-RAD54B, BRCA1-TP53, BRCA2-TP53 and RB1-TP53 were consistent with the literature. While metastasis remains a bottleneck in cancer treatment and inhibitors of PARP1 have been developed, this result may have therapeutic potential for LADC, in which TP53 is commonly mutated. We also demonstrated that silencing PARP1 enhanced the cell death induced by the platinum-based chemotherapy drug carboplatin in lung cancer cells (CL1-5 and H1975). IHC of RAD54B↑, BRCA1↓-RAD54B↑, FEN1(N)↑-RAD54B↑ and PARP1↑-RAD54B↑ were shown to be prognostic markers for 131 Asian LADC patients, and all markers except BRCA1↓-RAD54B↑ were further confirmed by three independent gene expression data sets (a total of 426 patients) including The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort of LADC. Importantly, we identified POLB-TP53 and POLB as predictive markers for the TCGA cohort (230 subjects), independent of age and stage. Thus, POLB and POLB-TP53 may be used to stratify future non-Asian LADC patients for therapeutic strategies. PMID:27655641

  11. A synthetic lethal screen identifies SLK1, a novel protein kinase homolog implicated in yeast cell morphogenesis and cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Costigan, C; Gehrung, S; Snyder, M

    1992-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SPA2 protein localizes at sites involved in polarized cell growth in budding cells and mating cells. spa2 mutants have defects in projection formation during mating but are healthy during vegetative growth. A synthetic lethal screen was devised to identify mutants that require the SPA2 gene for vegetative growth. One mutant, called slk-1 (for synthetic lethal kinase), has been characterized extensively. The SLK1 gene has been cloned, and sequence analysis predicts that the SLK1 protein is 1,478 amino acid residues in length. Approximately 300 amino acids at the carboxy terminus exhibit sequence similarity with the catalytic domains of protein kinases. Disruption mutations have been constructed in the SLK1 gene. slk1 null mutants cannot grow at 37 degrees C, but many cells can grow at 30, 24, and 17 degrees C. Dead slk1 mutant cells usually have aberrant cell morphologies, and many cells are very small, approximately one-half the diameter of wild-type cells. Surviving slk1 cells also exhibit morphogenic defects; these cells are impaired in their ability to form projections upon exposure to mating pheromones. During vegetative growth, a higher fraction of slk1 cells are unbudded compared with wild-type cells, and under nutrient limiting conditions, slk1 cells exhibit defects in cell cycle arrest. The different slk1 mutant defects are partially rescued by an extra copy of the SSD1/SRK1 gene. SSD1/SRK1 has been independently isolated as a suppressor of mutations in genes involved in growth control, sit4, pde2, bcy1, and ins1 (A. Sutton, D. Immanuel, and K.T. Arnat, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:2133-2148, 1991; R.B. Wilson, A.A. Brenner, T.B. White, M.J. Engler, J.P. Gaughran, and K. Tatchell, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:3369-3373, 1991). These data suggest that SLK1 plays a role in both cell morphogenesis and the control of cell growth. We speculate that SLK1 may be a regulatory link for these two cellular processes. Images PMID:1545797

  12. Synthetic lethal short hairpin RNA screening reveals that ring finger protein 183 confers resistance to trametinib in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Geng, Rong; Tan, Xin; Zuo, Zhixiang; Wu, Jiangxue; Pan, Zhizhong; Shi, Wei; Liu, Ranyi; Yao, Chen; Wang, Gaoyuan; Lin, Jiaxin; Qiu, Lin; Huang, Wenlin; Chen, Shuai

    2017-07-31

    The mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor trametinib has shown promising therapeutic effects on melanoma, but its efficacy on colorectal cancer (CRC) is limited. Synthetic lethality arises with a combination of two or more separate gene mutations that causes cell death, whereas individual mutations keep cells alive. This study aimed to identify the genes responsible for resistance to trametinib in CRC cells, using a synthetic lethal short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screening approach. We infected HT29 cells with a pooled lentiviral shRNA library and applied next-generation sequencing to identify shRNAs with reduced abundance after 8-day treatment of 20 nmol/L trametinib. HCT116 and HT29 cells were used in validation studies. Stable ring finger protein 183 (RNF183)-overexpressing cell lines were generated by pcDNA4-myc/his-RNF183 transfection. Stable RNF183-knockdown cell lines were generated by infection of lentiviruses that express RNF183 shRNA, and small interference RNA (siRNA) was used to knock down RNF183 transiently. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the mRNA expression. Western blotting, immunohistochemical analysis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to evaluate the protein abundance. MTT assay, colony formation assay, and subcutaneous xenograft tumor growth model were used to evaluate cell proliferation. In the primary screening, we found that the abundance of RNF183 shRNA was markedly reduced after treatment with trametinib. Trametinib induced the expression of RNF183, which conferred resistance to drug-induced cell growth repression and apoptotic and non-apoptotic cell deaths. Moreover, interleukin-8 (IL-8) was a downstream gene of RNF183 and was required for the function of RNF183 in facilitating cell growth. Additionally, elevated RNF183 expression partly reduced the inhibitory effect of trametinib on IL-8 expression. Finally, xenograft tumor model showed the synergism of RNF183

  13. Systematic screening of isogenic cancer cells identifies DUSP6 as context-specific synthetic lethal target in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Wittig-Blaich, Stephanie; Wittig, Rainer; Schmidt, Steffen; Lyer, Stefan; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Gronert-Sum, Sabine; Strobel-Freidekind, Olga; Müller, Carolin; List, Markus; Jaskot, Aleksandra; Christiansen, Helle; Hafner, Mathias; Schadendorf, Dirk; Block, Ines; Mollenhauer, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has dramatically increased genome-wide profiling options and conceptually initiates the possibility for personalized cancer therapy. State-of-the-art sequencing studies yield large candidate gene sets comprising dozens or hundreds of mutated genes. However, few technologies are available for the systematic downstream evaluation of these results to identify novel starting points of future cancer therapies. We improved and extended a site-specific recombination-based system for systematic analysis of the individual functions of a large number of candidate genes. This was facilitated by a novel system for the construction of isogenic constitutive and inducible gain- and loss-of-function cell lines. Additionally, we demonstrate the construction of isogenic cell lines with combinations of the traits for advanced functional in vitro analyses. In a proof-of-concept experiment, a library of 108 isogenic melanoma cell lines was constructed and 8 genes were identified that significantly reduced viability in a discovery screen and in an independent validation screen. Here, we demonstrate the broad applicability of this recombination-based method and we proved its potential to identify new drug targets via the identification of the tumor suppressor DUSP6 as potential synthetic lethal target in melanoma cell lines with BRAF V600E mutations and high DUSP6 expression. PMID:28423600

  14. Lethal high: acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) triggered by toxic effect of synthetic cannabinoid black mamba.

    PubMed

    Samra, Kiran; Boon, Ian S; Packer, Gregory; Jacob, Saiju

    2017-04-22

    A previously well 25-year-old man presented with agitation, double incontinence and left-sided incoordination. His symptoms started after smoking a synthetic cannabinoid (black mamba) 5 days earlier. Over 48 hours, he developed aphasia, generalised hypertonia, hyper-reflexia and dense left hemiparesis. This progressed to profuse diaphoresis, fever, tachycardia, hypertension and a possible seizure necessitating admission to the intensive care unit. CT head and cerebrospinal fluid analysis were unremarkable. MRI brain demonstrated asymmetric multifocal hyperintense lesions in white and grey matter, which raised suspicions of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). An electroencephalogram showed widespread brain wave slowing, indicating diffuse cerebral dysfunction. Cerebral angiogram was normal. Toxicology analysis of the substance confirmed a potent synthetic cannabinoid NM2201, technically legal at the time. The patient made a slow but significant recovery after a course of intravenous methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulins and oral steroids, and was later transferred to a rehabilitation bed. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Natural and glucosyl flavonoids inhibit poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity and induce synthetic lethality in BRCA mutant cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Junko; Roybal, Erica J; Brents, Colleen A; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Aizawa, Yasushi; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2014-02-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have been proven to represent superior clinical agents targeting DNA repair mechanisms in cancer therapy. We investigated PARP inhibitory effects of the natural and synthetic flavonoids (quercetin, rutin, monoglucosyl rutin and maltooligosyl rutin) and tested the synthetic lethality in BRCA2 mutated cells. In vitro ELISA assay suggested that the flavonoids have inhibitory effects on PARP activity, but glucosyl modifications reduced the inhibitory effect. Cytotoxicity tests of Chinese hamster cells defective in BRCA2 gene (V-C8) and its parental V79 cells showed BRCA2-dependent synthetic lethality when treated with the flavonoids. BRCA2 mutated cells were three times more sensitive to the flavonoids than the wild-type and gene complemented cells. Reduced toxicity was observed in a glucosyl modification-dependent manner. The present study provides support for the clinical use of new treatment drugs, and is the beginning of the potential application of flavonoids in cancer prevention and the periodic consumption of appropriate flavonoids to reduce cancer risk in individuals carrying a mutant allele of the BRCA2 gene.

  16. Sub-lethal activity of small molecules from natural sources and their synthetic derivatives against biofilm forming nosocomial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Villa, Federica; Villa, Stefania; Gelain, Arianna; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, the patient safety is seriously jeopardized by the emergence and spread of nosocomial pathogens in the form of biofilm that is resistant to traditional and affordable antimicrobials. Although advances in organic synthesis have extended the lifetime of classic antibiotics through synthetic modifications, the search of innovative antibiofilm compounds from natural sources can provide new templates, novel targets and unique mechanisms that should have advantages over known antimicrobial agents. Testing sub-lethal concentrations of crude extracts and/or isolated compounds from plants and microorganisms is critical to acting on mechanisms subtler than the killing activity, e.g. those influencing the multicellular behavior, offering an elegant way to develop novel antimicrobial-free antibiofilm strategies. Herein we discussed the search and biological activity of small molecules from natural sources and their synthetic derivatives able to modulate biofilm genesis of nosocomial pathogens through non-microbicidal mechanisms (sub-lethal concentrations). The present work offers an overview about the approaches applied to the discovery of lead small molecules including a) conventional drug design methods like screening of chemical compounds obtained from nature and b) computer- aided drug design approaches. Finally, a classification (not exhaustive but representative) based on the natural origin of small molecules and their synthetic derivatives was reported. The information presented in this review should be of interest to a broad range of disciplines and represents an effort to summarize experimental research and advances in this field.

  17. Synthetic lethal screening reveals FGFR as one of the combinatorial targets to overcome resistance to Met-targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, B; Wang, S; Lee, J M; Jeong, Y; Ahn, T; Son, D-S; Park, H W; Yoo, H-s; Song, Y-J; Lee, E; Oh, Y M; Lee, S B; Choi, J; Murray, J C; Zhou, Y; Song, P H; Kim, K-A; Weiner, L M

    2015-02-26

    Met is a receptor tyrosine kinase that promotes cancer progression. In addition, Met has been implicated in resistance of tumors to various targeted therapies such as epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors in lung cancers, and has been prioritized as a key molecular target for cancer therapy. However, the underlying mechanism of resistance to Met-targeting drugs is poorly understood. Here, we describe screening of 1310 genes to search for key regulators related to drug resistance to an anti-Met therapeutic antibody (SAIT301) by using a small interfering RNA-based synthetic lethal screening method. We found that knockdown of 69 genes in Met-amplified MKN45 cells sensitized the antitumor activity of SAIT301. Pathway analysis of these 69 genes implicated fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) as a key regulator for antiproliferative effects of Met-targeting drugs. Inhibition of FGFR3 increased target cell apoptosis through the suppression of Bcl-xL expression, followed by reduced cancer cell growth in the presence of Met-targeting drugs. Treatment of cells with the FGFR inhibitors substantially restored the efficacy of SAIT301 in SAIT301-resistant cells and enhanced the efficacy in SAIT301-sensitive cells. In addition to FGFR3, integrin β3 is another potential target for combination treatment with SAIT301. Suppression of integrin β3 decreased AKT phosphorylation in SAIT301-resistant cells and restored SAIT301 responsiveness in HCC1954 cells, which are resistant to SAIT301. Gene expression analysis using CCLE database shows that cancer cells with high levels of FGFR and integrin β3 are resistant to crizotinib treatment, suggesting that FGFR and integrin β3 could be used as predictive markers for Met-targeted therapy and provide a potential therapeutic option to overcome acquired and innate resistance for the Met-targeting drugs.

  18. Personalized synthetic lethality induced by targeting RAD52 in leukemias identified by gene mutation and expression profile

    PubMed Central

    Cramer-Morales, Kimberly; Nieborowska-Skorska, Margaret; Scheibner, Kara; Padget, Michelle; Irvine, David A.; Sliwinski, Tomasz; Haas, Kimberly; Lee, Jaewoong; Geng, Huimin; Roy, Darshan; Slupianek, Artur; Rassool, Feyruz V.; Wasik, Mariusz A.; Childers, Wayne; Copland, Mhairi; Müschen, Markus; Civin, Curt I.

    2013-01-01

    Homologous recombination repair (HRR) protects cells from the lethal effect of spontaneous and therapy-induced DNA double-stand breaks. HRR usually depends on BRCA1/2-RAD51, and RAD52-RAD51 serves as back-up. To target HRR in tumor cells, a phenomenon called “synthetic lethality” was applied, which relies on the addiction of cancer cells to a single DNA repair pathway, whereas normal cells operate 2 or more mechanisms. Using mutagenesis and a peptide aptamer approach, we pinpointed phenylalanine 79 in RAD52 DNA binding domain I (RAD52-phenylalanine 79 [F79]) as a valid target to induce synthetic lethality in BRCA1- and/or BRCA2-deficient leukemias and carcinomas without affecting normal cells and tissues. Targeting RAD52-F79 disrupts the RAD52–DNA interaction, resulting in the accumulation of toxic DNA double-stand breaks in malignant cells, but not in normal counterparts. In addition, abrogation of RAD52–DNA interaction enhanced the antileukemia effect of already-approved drugs. BRCA-deficient status predisposing to RAD52-dependent synthetic lethality could be predicted by genetic abnormalities such as oncogenes BCR-ABL1 and PML-RAR, mutations in BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 genes, and gene expression profiles identifying leukemias displaying low levels of BRCA1 and/or BRCA2. We believe this work may initiate a personalized therapeutic approach in numerous patients with tumors displaying encoded and functional BRCA deficiency. PMID:23836560

  19. Synthetic predator cues impair immune function and make the biological pesticide Bti more lethal for vector mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Op De Beeck, Lin; Janssens, Lizanne; Stoks, Robby

    2016-03-01

    The control of vector mosquitoes is one of the biggest challenges facing humankind with the use of chemical pesticides often leading to environmental impact and the evolution of resistance. Although to a lesser extent, this also holds for Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), the most widely used biological pesticide to control mosquito populations. This raises the need for the development of integrated pest management strategies that allow the reduction of Bti concentrations without loss of the mosquito control efficiency. To this end, we tested in a laboratory experiment the combined effects of larval exposure to a sublethal Bti concentration and predation risk cues on life history and physiology of larval and adult Culex pipiens mosquitoes. Besides natural predator kairomones and prey alarm cues, we also tested synthetic kairomones of Notonecta predators. Neither Bti nor predation risk cues affected mortality, yet when both stressors were combined mortality increased on average by 133% compared to the treatment with only predation risk cues. This synergistic interaction was also present when Bti was combined with synthetic kairomones. This was further reflected in changes of the composite index of population performance, which suggested lowered per capita growth rates in mosquitoes exposed to Bti but only when Bti was combined with synthetic kairomones. Furthermore, predation risk cues shortened larval development time, reduced mass at metamorphosis in males, and had an immunosuppressive effect in larval and adult mosquitoes which may affect the mosquito vector competence. We provide the first demonstration that synthetic kairomones may generate similar effects on prey as natural kairomones. The identified immunosuppressive effect of synthetic kairomones and the novel lethal synergism type between a biological pesticide and synthetic predator kairomones provide an important proof of principle illustrating the potential of this combination for integrated

  20. A synthetic lethal screen identifies ATR-inhibition as a novel therapeutic approach for POLD1-deficient cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hocke, Sandra; Guo, Yang; Job, Albert; Orth, Michael; Ziesch, Andreas; Lauber, Kirsten; De Toni, Enrico N; Gress, Thomas M.; Herbst, Andreas; Göke, Burkhard; Gallmeier, Eike

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinase ATR represents a central checkpoint regulator and mediator of DNA-repair. Its inhibition selectively eliminates certain subsets of cancer cells in various tumor types, but the underlying genetic determinants remain enigmatic. Here, we applied a synthetic lethal screen directed against 288 DNA-repair genes using the well-defined ATR knock-in model of DLD1 colorectal cancer cells to identify potential DNA-repair defects mediating these effects. We identified a set of DNA-repair proteins, whose knockdown selectively killed ATR-deficient cancer cells. From this set, we further investigated the profound synthetic lethal interaction between ATR and POLD1. ATR-dependent POLD1 knockdown-induced cell killing was reproducible pharmacologically in POLD1-depleted DLD1 cells and a panel of other colorectal cancer cell lines by using chemical inhibitors of ATR or its major effector kinase CHK1. Mechanistically, POLD1 depletion in ATR-deficient cells caused caspase-dependent apoptosis without preceding cell cycle arrest and increased DNA-damage along with impaired DNA-repair. Our data could have clinical implications regarding tumor genotype-based cancer therapy, as inactivating POLD1 mutations have recently been identified in small subsets of colorectal and endometrial cancers. POLD1 deficiency might thus represent a predictive marker for treatment response towards ATR- or CHK1-inhibitors that are currently tested in clinical trials. PMID:26755646

  1. Synthetic lethal screening in the mammalian central nervous system identifies Gpx6 as a modulator of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Shema, Reut; Kulicke, Ruth; Cowley, Glenn S; Stein, Rachael; Root, David E; Heiman, Myriam

    2015-01-06

    Huntington's disease, the most common inherited neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by a dramatic loss of deep-layer cortical and striatal neurons, as well as morbidity in midlife. Human genetic studies led to the identification of the causative gene, huntingtin. Recent genomic advances have also led to the identification of hundreds of potential interacting partners for huntingtin protein and many hypotheses as to the molecular mechanisms whereby mutant huntingtin leads to cellular dysfunction and death. However, the multitude of possible interacting partners and cellular pathways affected by mutant huntingtin has complicated efforts to understand the etiology of this disease, and to date no curative therapeutic exists. To address the general problem of identifying the disease-phenotype contributing genes from a large number of correlative studies, here we develop a synthetic lethal screening methodology for the mammalian central nervous system, called SLIC, for synthetic lethal in the central nervous system. Applying SLIC to the study of Huntington's disease, we identify the age-regulated glutathione peroxidase 6 (Gpx6) gene as a modulator of mutant huntingtin toxicity and show that overexpression of Gpx6 can dramatically alleviate both behavioral and molecular phenotypes associated with a mouse model of Huntington's disease. SLIC can, in principle, be used in the study of any neurodegenerative disease for which a mouse model exists, promising to reveal modulators of neurodegenerative disease in an unbiased fashion, akin to screens in simpler model organisms.

  2. Systems biology-guided identification of synthetic lethal gene pairs and its potential use to discover antibiotic combinations

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Ramy K.; Monk, Jonathan M.; Lewis, Robert M.; In Loh, Suh; Mishra, Arti; Abhay Nagle, Amrita; Satyanarayana, Chitkala; Dhakshinamoorthy, Saravanakumar; Luche, Michele; Kitchen, Douglas B.; Andrews, Kathleen A.; Fong, Nicole L.; Li, Howard J.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Charusanti, Pep

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models of metabolism from bacterial systems biology have proven their utility across multiple fields, for example metabolic engineering, growth phenotype simulation, and biological discovery. The usefulness of the models stems from their ability to compute a link between genotype and phenotype, but their ability to accurately simulate gene-gene interactions has not been investigated extensively. Here we assess how accurately a metabolic model for Escherichia coli computes one particular type of gene-gene interaction, synthetic lethality, and find that the accuracy rate is between 25% and 43%. The most common failure modes were incorrect computation of single gene essentiality and biological information that was missing from the model. Moreover, we performed virtual and biological screening against several synthetic lethal pairs to explore whether two-compound formulations could be found that inhibit the growth of Gram-negative bacteria. One set of molecules was identified that, depending on the concentrations, inhibits E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in an additive or antagonistic manner. These findings pinpoint specific ways in which to improve the predictive ability of metabolic models, and highlight one potential application of systems biology to drug discovery and translational medicine. PMID:26531810

  3. Genome-wide RNAi screen for synthetic lethal interactions with the C. elegans kinesin-5 homolog BMK-1

    PubMed Central

    Maia, André F.; Tanenbaum, Marvin E.; Galli, Matilde; Lelieveld, Daphne; Egan, David A.; Gassmann, Reto; Sunkel, Claudio E.; van den Heuvel, Sander; Medema, René H.

    2015-01-01

    Kinesins are a superfamily of microtubule-based molecular motors that perform various transport needs and have essential roles in cell division. Among these, the kinesin-5 family has been shown to play a major role in the formation and maintenance of the bipolar mitotic spindle. Moreover, recent work suggests that kinesin-5 motors may have additional roles. In contrast to most model organisms, the sole kinesin-5 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans, bmk-1, is not required for successful mitosis and animals lacking bmk-1 are viable and fertile. To gain insight into factors that may act redundantly with BMK-1 in spindle assembly and to identify possible additional cellular pathways involving BMK-1, we performed a synthetic lethal screen using the bmk-1 deletion allele ok391. We successfully knocked down 82% of the C. elegans genome using RNAi and assayed viability in bmk-1(ok391) and wild type strains using an automated high-throughput approach based on fluorescence microscopy. The dataset includes a final list of 37 synthetic lethal interactions whose further study is likely to provide insight into kinesin-5 function. PMID:25984351

  4. Sec3 Mutations Are Synthetically Lethal with Profilin Mutations and Cause Defects in Diploid-Specific Bud-Site Selection

    PubMed Central

    Haarer, B. K.; Corbett, A.; Kweon, Y.; Petzold, A. S.; Silver, P.; Brown, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    Replacement of the wild-type yeast profilin gene (PFY1) with a mutated form (pfy1-111) that has codon 72 changed to encode glutamate rather than arginine results in defects similar to, but less severe than, those that result from complete deletion of the profilin gene. We have used a colony color-sectoring assay to identify mutations that cause pfy1-111, but not wild-type, cells to be inviable. These profilin synthetic lethal (psl) mutations result in various degrees of abnormal growth, morphology, and temperature sensitivity in PFY1 cells. We have examined psl1 strains in the most detail. Interestingly, these strains display a diploid-specific defect in bud-site selection; haploid strains bud normally, while homozygous diploid strains show a dramatic increase in random budding. We discovered that PSL1 is the late secretory gene, SEC3, and have found that mutations in several other late secretory genes are also synthetically lethal with pfy1-111. Our results are likely to reflect an interdependence between the actin cytoskeleton and secretory processes in directing cell polarity and growth. Moreover, they indicate that the secretory pathway is especially crucial for maintaining budding polarity in diploids. PMID:8889515

  5. Changes in gene expression variability reveal a stable synthetic lethal interaction network in BRCA2- ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Raymund; Mar, Jessica C

    2017-07-25

    Synthetic lethal interactions (SLIs) are robust mechanisms that provide cells with the ability to remain viable despite having mutations in genes critical to the DNA damage response, a core cellular process. Studies in model organisms such as S. cerevisiae showed that thousands of genes important in maintaining DNA integrity cooperated in a SLI network. Two genes participate in a SLI when a mutation in one gene has no effect on the cell, but mutations in both interacting genes are lethal. Furthermore in C. elegans, a mutation in a critical gene that is important for development induced a change in expression variability in the synthetic lethal interactor. In cancer, targeting SLIs shows promise in selectively killing cancer cells. For example, targeting PARP1 is an effective treatment for BRCA1/2- breast and ovarian cancers. Although PARP1 is already identified as having a SLI with BRCA1/2-, computationally searching for other genes that cooperate in the SLI network could highlight genes that may have promise for being a cancer-specific drug target. Using RNA sequencing data for ovarian cancer patients with BRCA2 mutations and the R Bioconductor package pathVar, we showed that genes whose expression changes to an invariant, stable expression state are likely candidates for SLIs with BRCA2. Our results highlight the interactions between the genes with predicted SLIs and protein-coding genes that are functionally important in the DNA damage response. The method of analyzing expression variability to computationally identify genes with SLIs can be applied to query SLIs in other tumor types. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthetic Lethal Interactions Identify Phenotypic “Interologs” of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Components

    PubMed Central

    Tarailo, Maja; Tarailo, Sanja; Rose, Ann M.

    2007-01-01

    Here, we report genetic interactions with mdf-1(gk2)/MAD1 in Caenorhabditis elegans. Nine are evolutionarily conserved or phenotypic “interologs” and two are novel enhancers, hcp-1 and bub-3. We show that HCP-1 and HCP-2, the two CENP-F-related proteins, recently implicated in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) function, do not have identical functions, since hcp-1(RNAi), but not hcp-2(RNAi), enhances the lethality of the SAC mutants. PMID:18073444

  7. A combination therapy for KRAS-mutant lung cancer by targeting synthetic lethal partners of mutant KRAS.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiufeng; Liu, Mingyao

    2016-10-28

    The KRAS gene is frequently mutated in multiple cancer types, but it fell off the drug discovery radar for many years because of its inherent "undruggable" structure and undefined biological properties. As reported in the paper entitled "Suppression of KRas-mutant cancer through the combined inhibition of KRAS with PLK1 and ROCK" in Nature Communications, we performed a synthetic lethal screening with a combinatorial strategy on a panel of clinical drugs; we found that combined inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and RhoA/Rho kinase markedly suppressed tumor growth in mice. An increase in the expression of the tumor suppressor P21(WAF1/CIP1) contributed to the synergistic mechanism of the combination therapy. These findings open a novel avenue for the treatment of KRAS-mutant lung cancer.

  8. Therapeutic potential of a synthetic lethal interaction between the MYC proto-oncogene and inhibition of aurora-B kinase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dun; Liu, Hong; Goga, Andrei; Kim, Suwon; Yuneva, Mariia; Bishop, J Michael

    2010-08-03

    The Myc protein and proteins that participate in mitosis represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. However, their potential is presently compromised by the threat of side effects and by a lack of pharmacological inhibitors of Myc. Here we report that a circumscribed exposure to the aurora kinase inhibitor, VX-680, selectively kills cells that overexpress Myc. This synthetic lethal interaction is attributable to inhibition of aurora-B kinase, with consequent disabling of the chromosomal passenger protein complex (CPPC) and ensuing DNA replication in the absence of cell division; executed by sequential apoptosis and autophagy; not reliant on the tumor suppressor protein p53; and effective against mouse models for B-cell and T-cell lymphomas initiated by transgenes of MYC. Our findings cast light on how inhibitors of aurora-B kinase may kill tumor cells, implicate Myc in the induction of a lethal form of autophagy, indicate that expression of Myc be a useful biomarker for sensitivity of tumor cells to inhibition of the CPPC, dramatize the virtue of bimodal killing by a single therapeutic agent, and suggest a therapeutic strategy for killing tumor cells that overexpress Myc while sparing normal cells.

  9. Synthetic lethal interaction of cetuximab with MEK1/2 inhibition in NRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Massaguer, Anna; de Llorens, Rafael; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Brunet, Joan; Salazar, Ramon; Menendez, Javier A.

    2016-01-01

    KRAS mutations are an established predictor of lack of response to EGFR-targeted therapies in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, little is known about the role of the rarer NRAS mutations as a mechanism of primary resistance to the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab in wild-type KRAS mCRC. Using isogenic mCRC cells with a heterozygous knock-in of the NRAS activating mutation Q61K, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism(s) by which mutant NRAS blocks cetuximab from inhibiting mCRC growth. NRASQ61K/+ cells were refractory to cetuximab-induced growth inhibition. Pathway-oriented proteome profiling revealed that cetuximab-unresponsive ERK1/2 phosphorylation was the sole biomarker distinguishing cetuximab-refractory NRASQ61K/+ from cetuximab-sensitive NRAS+/+ cells. We therefore employed four representative MEK1/2 inhibitors (binimetinib, trametinib, selumetinib, and pimasertib) to evaluate the therapeutic value of MEK/ERK signaling in cetuximab-refractory NRAS mutation-induced mCRC. Co-treatment with an ineffective dose of cetuximab augmented, up to more than 1,300-fold, the cytotoxic effects of pimasertib against NRASQ61K/+ cells. Simultaneous combination of MEK1/2 inhibitors with cetuximab resulted in extremely high and dose-dependent synthetic lethal effects, which were executed, at least in part, by exacerbated apoptotic cell death. Dynamic monitoring of real-time cell growth rates confirmed that cetuximab synergistically sensitized NRASQ61K/+ cellsto MEK1/2 inhibition. Our discovery of a synthetic lethal interaction of cetuximab in combination with MEK1/2 inhibition for the NRAS mutant subgroup of mCRC underscores the importance of therapeutic intervention both in the MEK-ERK and EGFR pathways to achieve maximal therapeutic efficacy against NRAS-mutant mCRC tumors. PMID:27636997

  10. Synthetic Lethality with Conditional dbp6 Alleles Identifies Rsa1p, a Nucleoplasmic Protein Involved in the Assembly of 60S Ribosomal Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Kressler, Dieter; Doère, Monique; Rojo, Manuel; Linder, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Dbp6p is an essential putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase that is required for 60S-ribosomal-subunit assembly in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (D. Kressler, J. de la Cruz, M. Rojo, and P. Linder, Mol. Cell. Biol. 18:1855–1865, 1998). To identify factors that are functionally interacting with Dbp6p, we have performed a synthetic lethal screen with conditional dbp6 mutants. Here, we describe the cloning and the phenotypic analysis of the previously uncharacterized open reading frame YPL193W, which we renamed RSA1 (ribosome assembly 1). Rsa1p is not essential for cell viability; however, rsa1 null mutant strains display a slow-growth phenotype, which is exacerbated at elevated temperatures. The rsa1 null allele synthetically enhances the mild growth defect of weak dbp6 alleles and confers synthetic lethality when combined with stronger dbp6 alleles. Polysome profile analysis shows that the absence of Rsa1p results in the accumulation of half-mer polysomes. However, the pool of free 60S ribosomal subunits is only moderately decreased; this is reminiscent of polysome profiles from mutants defective in 60S-to-40S subunit joining. Pulse-chase labeling of pre-rRNA in the rsa1 null mutant strain indicates that formation of the mature 25S rRNA is decreased at the nonpermissive temperature. Interestingly, free 60S ribosomal subunits of a rsa1 null mutant strain that was grown for two generations at 37°C are practically devoid of the 60S-ribosomal-subunit protein Qsr1p/Rpl10p, which is required for joining of 60S and 40S subunits (D. P. Eisinger, F. A. Dick, and B. L. Trumpower, Mol. Cell. Biol. 17:5136–5145, 1997). Moreover, the combination of the Δrsa1 and qsr1-1 mutations leads to a strong synthetic growth inhibition. Finally, a hemagglutinin epitope-tagged Rsa1p localizes predominantly to the nucleoplasm. Together, these results point towards a function for Rsa1p in a late nucleoplasmic step of 60S-ribosomal-subunit assembly. PMID:10567587

  11. Synthetic lethal compound combinations reveal a fundamental connection between wall teichoic acid and peptidoglycan biosyntheses in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jennifer; Singh, Atul K.; Santa Maria, John P.; Kim, Younghoon; Brown, Stephanie; Swoboda, Jonathan G.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Wilkinson, Brian J.; Walker, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus depends on the production of mecA, which encodes penicillin-binding protein 2A (PBP2A), an acquired peptidoglycan transpeptidase (TP) with reduced susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics. PBP2A crosslinks nascent peptidoglycan when the native TPs are inhibited by beta-lactams. Although mecA expression is essential for beta-lactam resistance, it is not sufficient. Here we show that blocking the expression of wall teichoic acids (WTAs) by inhibiting the first enzyme in the pathway, TarO, sensitizes MRSA strains to beta-lactams even though the beta-lactam-resistant transpeptidase, PBP2A, is still expressed. The dramatic synergy between TarO inhibitors and beta-lactams is noteworthy not simply because strategies to overcome methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are desperately needed, but because neither TarO nor the activities of the native TPs are essential in MRSA strains. The “synthetic lethality” of inhibiting TarO and the native TPs suggests a functional connection between ongoing WTA expression and peptidoglycan assembly in S. aureus. Indeed, transmission electron microscopy shows that S. aureus cells blocked in WTA synthesis have extensive defects in septation and cell separation, indicating dysregulated cell wall assembly and degradation. Our studies imply that WTAs play a fundamental role in S. aureus cell division and raise the possibility that synthetic lethal compound combinations may have therapeutic utility for overcoming antibiotic resistant bacterial infections. PMID:20961110

  12. Alisertib added to rituximab and vincristine is synthetic lethal and potentially curative in mice with aggressive DLBCL co-overexpressing MYC and BCL2.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Daruka; Morales, Carla; Cooke, Laurence S; Manziello, Ann; Mount, David W; Persky, Daniel O; Fisher, Richard I; Miller, Thomas P; Qi, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    Pearson correlation coefficient for expression analysis of the Lymphoma/Leukemia Molecular Profiling Project (LLMPP) demonstrated Aurora A and B are highly correlated with MYC in DLBCL and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), while both Auroras correlate with BCL2 only in DLBCL. Auroras are up-regulated by MYC dysregulation with associated aneuploidy and resistance to microtubule targeted agents such as vincristine. Myc and Bcl2 are differentially expressed in U-2932, TMD-8, OCI-Ly10 and Granta-519, but only U-2932 cells over-express mutated p53. Alisertib [MLN8237 or M], a highly selective small molecule inhibitor of Aurora A kinase, was synergistic with vincristine [VCR] and rituximab [R] for inhibition of cell proliferation, abrogation of cell cycle checkpoints and enhanced apoptosis versus single agent or doublet therapy. A DLBCL (U-2932) mouse model showed tumor growth inhibition (TGI) of ∼ 10-20% (p = 0.001) for M, VCR and M-VCR respectively, while R alone showed ∼ 50% TGI (p = 0.001). M-R and VCR-R led to tumor regression [TR], but relapsed 10 days after discontinuing therapy. In contrast, M-VCR-R demonstrated TR with no relapse >40 days after stopping therapy with a Kaplan-Meier survival of 100%. Genes that are modulated by M-VCR-R (CENP-C, Auroras) play a role in centromere-kinetochore function in an attempt to maintain mitosis in the presence of synthetic lethality. Together, our data suggest that the interaction between alisertib plus VCR plus rituximab is synergistic and synthetic lethal in Myc and Bcl-2 co-expressing DLBCL. Alisertib plus vincristine plus rituximab [M-VCR-R] may represent a new strategy for DLBCL therapy.

  13. Alisertib Added to Rituximab and Vincristine Is Synthetic Lethal and Potentially Curative in Mice with Aggressive DLBCL Co-Overexpressing MYC and BCL2

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Daruka; Morales, Carla; Cooke, Laurence S.; Manziello, Ann; Mount, David W.; Persky, Daniel O.; Fisher, Richard I.; Miller, Thomas P.; Qi, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    Pearson correlation coefficient for expression analysis of the Lymphoma/Leukemia Molecular Profiling Project (LLMPP) demonstrated Aurora A and B are highly correlated with MYC in DLBCL and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), while both Auroras correlate with BCL2 only in DLBCL. Auroras are up-regulated by MYC dysregulation with associated aneuploidy and resistance to microtubule targeted agents such as vincristine. Myc and Bcl2 are differentially expressed in U-2932, TMD-8, OCI-Ly10 and Granta-519, but only U-2932 cells over-express mutated p53. Alisertib [MLN8237 or M], a highly selective small molecule inhibitor of Aurora A kinase, was synergistic with vincristine [VCR] and rituximab [R] for inhibition of cell proliferation, abrogation of cell cycle checkpoints and enhanced apoptosis versus single agent or doublet therapy. A DLBCL (U-2932) mouse model showed tumor growth inhibition (TGI) of ∼10–20% (p = 0.001) for M, VCR and M-VCR respectively, while R alone showed ∼50% TGI (p = 0.001). M-R and VCR-R led to tumor regression [TR], but relapsed 10 days after discontinuing therapy. In contrast, M-VCR-R demonstrated TR with no relapse >40 days after stopping therapy with a Kaplan-Meier survival of 100%. Genes that are modulated by M-VCR-R (CENP-C, Auroras) play a role in centromere-kinetochore function in an attempt to maintain mitosis in the presence of synthetic lethality. Together, our data suggest that the interaction between alisertib plus VCR plus rituximab is synergistic and synthetic lethal in Myc and Bcl-2 co-expressing DLBCL. Alisertib plus vincristine plus rituximab [M-VCR-R] may represent a new strategy for DLBCL therapy. PMID:24893165

  14. Equation of state and fragmentation issues in computational lethality analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.G.

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the status of computational analysis of hypervelocity impact lethality in relatively nontechnical terms from the perspective of the author. It is not intended to be a review of the technical literature on the problems of concern. The discussion is focused by concentrating on two phenomenology areas which are of particular concern in computational impact studies. First, the material`s equation of state, specifically the treatment of expanded states of metals undergoing shock vaporization, is discussed. Second, the process of dynamic fragmentation is addressed. In both cases, the context of the discussion deals with inaccuracies and difficulties associated with numerical hypervelocity impact simulations. Laboratory experimental capabilities in hypervelocity impact for impact velocities greater than 10.0 km/s are becoming increasingly viable. This paper also gives recommendations for experimental thrusts which utilize these capabilities that will help to resolve the uncertainties in the numerical lethality studies that are pointed out in the present report.

  15. Synthetic substrates for enzyme analysis

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, E.R.; Mitchell, A.R.; Pearson, K.W.; Smith, R.E.

    1983-06-14

    Synthetic substrates are provided which may be represented as A-D. The A moiety includes an amino acid, polypeptide, or derivative. The D moiety includes 7-amino coumarin derivatives having an electron withdrawing substituent group at the 3 position carbon or fused between the 3 and 4 position carbons. No Drawings

  16. Synthetic substrates for enzyme analysis

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, Eugene R.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; Pearson, Karen W.; Smith, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    Synthetic substrates are provided which may be represented as A-D. The A moiety thereof includes an amino acid, polypeptide, or derivative thereof. The D moiety thereof includes 7-amino coumarin derivatives having an electron withdrawing substituent group at the 3 position carbon or fused between the 3 and 4 position carbons.

  17. MAX inactivation in small cell lung cancer disrupts MYC-SWI/SNF programs and is synthetic lethal with BRG1.

    PubMed

    Romero, Octavio A; Torres-Diz, Manuel; Pros, Eva; Savola, Suvi; Gomez, Antonio; Moran, Sebastian; Saez, Carmen; Iwakawa, Reika; Villanueva, Alberto; Montuenga, Luis M; Kohno, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse

    2014-03-01

    Our knowledge of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) genetics is still very limited, amplification of L-MYC, N-MYC, and C-MYC being some of the well-established gene alterations. Here, we report our discovery of tumor-specific inactivation of the MYC-associated factor X gene, MAX, in SCLC. MAX inactivation is mutually exclusive with alterations of MYC and BRG1, the latter coding for an ATPase of the switch/sucrose nonfermentable (SWI/SNF) complex. We demonstrate that BRG1 regulates the expression of MAX through direct recruitment to the MAX promoter, and that depletion of BRG1 strongly hinders cell growth, specifically in MAX-deficient cells, heralding a synthetic lethal interaction. Furthermore, MAX requires BRG1 to activate neuroendocrine transcriptional programs and to upregulate MYC targets, such as glycolysis-related genes. Finally, inactivation of the MAX dimerization protein, MGA, was also observed in both non-small cell lung cancer and SCLC. Our results provide evidence that an aberrant SWI/SNF-MYC network is essential for lung cancer development.

  18. AZD6738, A Novel Oral Inhibitor of ATR, Induces Synthetic Lethality with ATM Deficiency in Gastric Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Ahrum; Im, Seock-Ah; Jang, Hyemin; Kim, Seongyeong; Lee, Miso; Kim, Debora Keunyoung; Yang, Yaewon; Kim, Hee-Jun; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Tae-Yong; Oh, Do-Youn; Brown, Jeff; Lau, Alan; O'Connor, Mark J; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2017-04-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) can be considered an attractive target for cancer treatment due to its deleterious effect on cancer cells harboring a homologous recombination defect. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential use of the ATR inhibitor, AZD6738, to treat gastric cancer.In SNU-601 cells with dysfunctional ATM, AZD6738 treatment led to an accumulation of DNA damage due to dysfunctional RAD51 foci formation, S phase arrest, and caspase 3-dependent apoptosis. In contrast, SNU-484 cells with functional ATM were not sensitive to AZD6738. Inhibition of ATM in SNU-484 cells enhanced AZD6738 sensitivity to a level comparable with that observed in SNU-601 cells, showing that activation of the ATM-Chk2 signaling pathway attenuates AZD6738 sensitivity. In addition, decreased HDAC1 expression was found to be associated with ATM inactivation in SNU-601 cells, demonstrating the interaction between HDAC1 and ATM can affect sensitivity to AZD6738. Furthermore, in an in vivo tumor xenograft mouse model, AZD6738 significantly suppressed tumor growth and increased apoptosis.These findings suggest synthetic lethality between ATR inhibition and ATM deficiency in gastric cancer cells. Further clinical studies on the interaction between AZD 6738 and ATM deficiency are warranted to develop novel treatment strategies for gastric cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(4); 566-77. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Identification of cetrimonium bromide and irinotecan as compounds with synthetic lethality against NDRG1 deficient prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wissing, Michel D; Mendonca, Janet; Kim, Eunice; Kim, Eugene; Shim, Joong S; Kaelber, Nadine S; Kant, Huub; Hammers, Hans; Commes, Therese; Van Diest, Paul J; Liu, Jun O; Kachhap, Sushant K

    2013-05-01

    The N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) has been identified as a metastasis-suppressor gene in prostate cancer (PCa). Compounds targeting PCa cells deficient in NDRG1 could potentially decrease invasion/metastasis of PCa. A cell based screening strategy was employed to identify small molecules that selectively target NDRG1 deficient PCa cells. DU-145 PCa cells rendered deficient in NDRG1 expression by a lentiviral shRNA-mediated knockdown strategy were used in the primary screen. Compounds filtered from the primary screen were further validated through proliferation and clonogenic survival assays in parental and NDRG1 knockdown PCa cells. Screening of 3360 compounds revealed irinotecan and cetrimonium bromide (CTAB) as compounds that exhibited synthetic lethality against NDRG1 deficient PCa cells. A three-dimensional (3-D) invasion assay was utilized to test the ability of CTAB to inhibit invasion of DU-145 cells. CTAB was found to remarkably decrease invasion of DU-145 cells in collagen matrix. Our results suggest that CTAB and irinotecan could be further explored for their potential clinical benefit in patients with NDRG1 deficient PCa.

  20. A synthetic lethal screen identifies the Vitamin D receptor as a novel gemcitabine sensitizer in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, V; Zhou, Y; Yen, TJ

    2014-01-01

    Overcoming chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer (PCa) cells should significantly extend patient survival. The current treatment modalities rely on a variety of DNA damaging agents including gemcitabine, FOLFIRINOX, and Abraxane that activate cell cycle checkpoints, which allows cells to survive these drug treaments. Indeed, these treatment regimens have only extended patient survival by a few months. The complex microenvironment of PCa tumors has been shown to complicate drug delivery thus decreasing the sensitivity of PCa tumors to chemotherapy. In this study, a genome-wide siRNA library was used to conduct a synthetic lethal screen of Panc1 cells that was treated with gemcitabine. A sublethal dose (50 nM) of the drug was used to model situations of limiting drug availability to PCa tumors in vivo. Twenty-seven validated sensitizer genes were identified from the screen including the Vitamin D receptor (VDR). Gemcitabine sensitivity was shown to be VDR dependent in multiple PCa cell lines in clonogenic survival assays. Sensitization was not achieved through checkpoint override but rather through disrupting DNA repair. VDR knockdown disrupted the cells’ ability to form phospho-γH2AX and Rad51 foci in response to gemcitabine treatment. Disruption of Rad51 foci formation, which compromises homologous recombination, was consistent with increased sensitivity of PCa cells to the PARP inhibitor Rucaparib. Thus inhibition of VDR in PCa cells provides a new way to enhance the efficacy of genotoxic drugs. PMID:25558828

  1. Synthetic cannabinoids: analysis and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Elsohly, Mahmoud A; Gul, Waseem; Wanas, Amira S; Radwan, Mohamed M

    2014-02-27

    Cannabimimetics (commonly referred to as synthetic cannabinoids), a group of compounds encompassing a wide range of chemical structures, have been developed by scientists with the hope of achieving selectivity toward one or the other of the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. The goal was to have compounds that could possess high therapeutic activity without many side effects. However, underground laboratories have used the information generated by the scientific community to develop these compounds for illicit use as marijuana substitutes. This chapter reviews the different classes of these "synthetic cannabinoids" with particular emphasis on the methods used for their identification in the herbal products with which they are mixed and identification of their metabolites in biological specimens.

  2. Seed-effect modeling improves the consistency of genome-wide loss-of-function screens and identifies synthetic lethal vulnerabilities in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Alok; Peddinti, Gopal; Akimov, Yevhen; Wennerberg, Krister; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Tang, Jing; Aittokallio, Tero

    2017-06-01

    Genome-wide loss-of-function profiling is widely used for systematic identification of genetic dependencies in cancer cells; however, the poor reproducibility of RNA interference (RNAi) screens has been a major concern due to frequent off-target effects. Currently, a detailed understanding of the key factors contributing to the sub-optimal consistency is still a lacking, especially on how to improve the reliability of future RNAi screens by controlling for factors that determine their off-target propensity. We performed a systematic, quantitative analysis of the consistency between two genome-wide shRNA screens conducted on a compendium of cancer cell lines, and also compared several gene summarization methods for inferring gene essentiality from shRNA level data. We then devised novel concepts of seed essentiality and shRNA family, based on seed region sequences of shRNAs, to study in-depth the contribution of seed-mediated off-target effects to the consistency of the two screens. We further investigated two seed-sequence properties, seed pairing stability, and target abundance in terms of their capability to minimize the off-target effects in post-screening data analysis. Finally, we applied this novel methodology to identify genetic interactions and synthetic lethal partners of cancer drivers, and confirmed differential essentiality phenotypes by detailed CRISPR/Cas9 experiments. Using the novel concepts of seed essentiality and shRNA family, we demonstrate how genome-wide loss-of-function profiling of a common set of cancer cell lines can be actually made fairly reproducible when considering seed-mediated off-target effects. Importantly, by excluding shRNAs having higher propensity for off-target effects, based on their seed-sequence properties, one can remove noise from the genome-wide shRNA datasets. As a translational application case, we demonstrate enhanced reproducibility of genetic interaction partners of common cancer drivers, as well as identify novel

  3. In vivo toxic and lethal cardiovascular effects of a synthetic polymeric 1,3-dodecylpyridinium salt in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Grandic, Marjana; Sepcic, Kristina; Turk, Tom; Juntes, Polona; Frangez, Robert

    2011-08-15

    APS12-2 is one in a series of synthetic analogs of the polymeric alkylpyridinium salts isolated from the marine sponge Reniera sarai. As it is a potential candidate for treating non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we have studied its possible toxic and lethal effects in vivo. The median lethal dose (LD{sub 50}) of APS12-2 in mice was determined to be 11.5 mg/kg. Electrocardiograms, arterial blood pressure and respiratory activity were recorded under general anesthesia in untreated, pharmacologically vagotomized and artificially ventilated rats injected with APS12-2. In one group, the in vivo effects of APS12-2 were studied on nerve-evoked muscle contraction. Administration of APS12-2 at a dose of 8 mg/kg caused a progressive reduction of arterial blood pressure to a mid-circulatory value, accompanied by bradycardia, myocardial ischemia, ventricular extrasystoles, and second degree atrio-ventricular block. Similar electrocardiogram and arterial blood pressure changes caused by APS12-2 (8 mg/kg) were observed in animals pretreated with atropine and in artificially ventilated animals, indicating that hypoxia and cholinergic effects do not play a crucial role in the toxicity of APS12-2. Application of APS12-2 at sublethal doses (4 and 5.5 mg/kg) caused a decrease of arterial blood pressure, followed by an increase slightly above control values. We found that APS12-2 causes lysis of rat erythrocytes in vitro, therefore it is reasonable to expect the same effect in vivo. Indeed, hyperkalemia was observed in the blood of experimental animals. Hyperkalemia probably plays an important role in APS12-2 cardiotoxicity since no evident changes in histopathology of the heart were found. However, acute lesions were observed in the pulmonary vessels of rats after application of 8 mg/kg APS12-2. Predominant effects were dilation of interalveolar blood vessels and lysis of aggregated erythrocytes within their lumina. - Highlights: > LD{sub 50} estimated in mice (11.5 mg/kg) revealed

  4. Targeting glutamine metabolism in multiple myeloma enhances BIM binding to BCL-2 eliciting synthetic lethality to venetoclax.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, R; Matulis, S M; Wei, C; Nooka, A K; Von Hollen, H E; Lonial, S; Boise, L H; Shanmugam, M

    2016-07-28

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy that is largely incurable due to development of resistance to therapy-elicited cell death. Nutrients are intricately connected to maintenance of cellular viability in part by inhibition of apoptosis. We were interested to determine if examination of metabolic regulation of BCL-2 proteins may provide insight on alternative routes to engage apoptosis. MM cells are reliant on glucose and glutamine and withdrawal of either nutrient is associated with varying levels of apoptosis. We and others have demonstrated that glucose maintains levels of key resistance-promoting BCL-2 family member, myeloid cell leukemic factor 1 (MCL-1). Cells continuing to survive in the absence of glucose or glutamine were found to maintain expression of MCL-1 but importantly induce pro-apoptotic BIM expression. One potential mechanism for continued survival despite induction of BIM could be due to binding and sequestration of BIM to alternate pro-survival BCL-2 members. Our investigation revealed that cells surviving glutamine withdrawal in particular, enhance expression and binding of BIM to BCL-2, consequently sensitizing these cells to the BH3 mimetic venetoclax. Glutamine deprivation-driven sensitization to venetoclax can be reversed by metabolic supplementation with TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate. Inhibition of glucose metabolism with the GLUT4 inhibitor ritonavir elicits variable cytotoxicity in MM that is marginally enhanced with venetoclax treatment, however, targeting glutamine metabolism with 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine uniformly sensitized MM cell lines and relapse/refractory patient samples to venetoclax. Our studies reveal a potent therapeutic strategy of metabolically driven synthetic lethality involving targeting glutamine metabolism for sensitization to venetoclax in MM.

  5. ATR inhibition induces synthetic lethality and overcomes chemoresistance in TP53- or ATM-defective chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Marwan; Davies, Nicholas; Agathanggelou, Angelo; Smith, Edward; Oldreive, Ceri; Petermann, Eva; Stewart, Grant; Brown, Jeff; Lau, Alan; Pratt, Guy; Parry, Helen; Taylor, Malcolm; Moss, Paul; Hillmen, Peter; Stankovic, Tatjana

    2016-02-04

    TP53 and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) defects are associated with genomic instability, clonal evolution, and chemoresistance in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Currently, therapies capable of providing durable remissions in relapsed/refractory TP53- or ATM-defective CLL are lacking. Ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) mediates response to replication stress, the absence of which leads to collapse of stalled replication forks into chromatid fragments that require resolution through the ATM/p53 pathway. Here, using AZD6738, a novel ATR kinase inhibitor, we investigated ATR inhibition as a synthetically lethal strategy to target CLL cells with TP53 or ATM defects. Irrespective of TP53 or ATM status, induction of CLL cell proliferation upregulated ATR protein, which then became activated in response to replication stress. In TP53- or ATM-defective CLL cells, inhibition of ATR signaling by AZD6738 led to an accumulation of unrepaired DNA damage, which was carried through into mitosis because of defective cell cycle checkpoints, resulting in cell death by mitotic catastrophe. Consequently, AZD6738 was selectively cytotoxic to both TP53- and ATM-defective CLL cell lines and primary cells. This was confirmed in vivo using primary xenograft models of TP53- or ATM-defective CLL, where treatment with AZD6738 resulted in decreased tumor load and reduction in the proportion of CLL cells with such defects. Moreover, AZD6738 sensitized TP53- or ATM-defective primary CLL cells to chemotherapy and ibrutinib. Our findings suggest that ATR is a promising therapeutic target for TP53- or ATM-defective CLL that warrants clinical investigation. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Functional epigenetics approach identifies BRM/SMARCA2 as a critical synthetic lethal target in BRG1-deficient cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Gregory R.; Rahal, Rami; Buxton, Frank; Xiang, Kay; McAllister, Gregory; Frias, Elizabeth; Bagdasarian, Linda; Huber, Janina; Lindeman, Alicia; Chen, Dongshu; Romero, Rodrigo; Ramadan, Nadire; Phadke, Tanushree; Haas, Kristy; Jaskelioff, Mariela; Wilson, Boris G.; Meyer, Matthew J.; Saenz-Vash, Veronica; Zhai, Huili; Myer, Vic E.; Porter, Jeffery A.; Keen, Nicholas; McLaughlin, Margaret E.; Mickanin, Craig; Roberts, Charles W. M.; Stegmeier, Frank; Jagani, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Defects in epigenetic regulation play a fundamental role in the development of cancer, and epigenetic regulators have recently emerged as promising therapeutic candidates. We therefore set out to systematically interrogate epigenetic cancer dependencies by screening an epigenome-focused deep-coverage design shRNA (DECODER) library across 58 cancer cell lines. This screen identified BRM/SMARCA2, a DNA-dependent ATPase of the mammalian SWI/SNF (mSWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complex, as being essential for the growth of tumor cells that harbor loss of function mutations in BRG1/SMARCA4. Depletion of BRM in BRG1-deficient cancer cells leads to a cell cycle arrest, induction of senescence, and increased levels of global H3K9me3. We further demonstrate the selective dependency of BRG1-mutant tumors on BRM in vivo. Genetic alterations of the mSWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes are the most frequent among chromatin regulators in cancers, with BRG1/SMARCA4 mutations occurring in ∼10–15% of lung adenocarcinomas. Our findings position BRM as an attractive therapeutic target for BRG1 mutated cancers. Because BRG1 and BRM function as mutually exclusive catalytic subunits of the mSWI/SNF complex, we propose that such synthetic lethality may be explained by paralog insufficiency, in which loss of one family member unveils critical dependence on paralogous subunits. This concept of “cancer-selective paralog dependency” may provide a more general strategy for targeting other tumor suppressor lesions/complexes with paralogous subunits. PMID:24520176

  7. Synthetic Lethality of a Novel Small Molecule Against Mutant KRAS-Expressing Cancer Cells Involves AKT-Dependent ROS Production.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Kartini; Rezlan, Majidah; Yadav, Sanjiv Kumar; Foo, Chuan Han Jonathan; Sethi, Gautam; Qiang, Yu; Bellot, Gregory L; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2016-05-10

    We recently reported the death-inducing activity of a small-molecule compound, C1, which triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent autophagy-associated apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cell lines. In this study, we examine the ability of the compound to specifically target cancer cells harboring mutant KRAS with minimal activity against wild-type (WT) RAS-expressing cells. HCT116 cells expressing mutated KRAS are susceptible, while the WT-expressing HT29 cells are resistant. Interestingly, C1 triggers activation of mutant RAS, which results in the downstream phosphorylation and activation of AKT/PKB. Gene knockdown of KRAS or AKT or their pharmacological inhibition resulted in the abrogation of C1-induced ROS production and rescued tumor colony-forming ability. We also made use of HCT116 mutant KRAS knockout (KO) cells, which express only a single WT KRAS allele. Exposure of KO cells to C1 failed to increase mitochondrial ROS and cell death, unlike the parental cells harboring mutant KRAS. Similarly, mutant KRAS-transformed prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1-RAS) were more sensitive to the ROS-producing and death-inducing effects of C1 than the vector only expressing RWPE-1 cells. An in vivo model of xenograft tumors generated with HCT116 KRAS(WT/MUT) or KRAS(WT/-) cells showed the efficacy of C1 treatment and its ability to affect the relative mitotic index in tumors harboring KRAS mutant. These data indicate a synthetic lethal effect against cells carrying mutant KRAS, which could have therapeutic implications given the paucity of KRAS-specific chemotherapeutic strategies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 781-794.

  8. Synthetic Lethal Therapy for KRAS Mutant Non-small-cell Lung Carcinoma with Nanoparticle-mediated CDK4 siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Cheng-Qiong; Xiong, Meng-Hua; Liu, Yang; Shen, Song; Du, Xiao-Jiao; Yang, Xian-Zhu; Dou, Shuang; Zhang, Pei-Zhuo; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The KRAS mutation is present in ~20% of lung cancers and has not yet been effectively targeted for therapy. This mutation is associated with a poor prognosis in non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) and confers resistance to standard anticancer treatment drugs, including epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In this study, we exploited a new therapeutic strategy based on the synthetic lethal interaction between cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) downregulation and the KRAS mutation to deliver micellar nanoparticles (MNPs) containing small interfering RNA targeting CDK4 (MNPsiCDK4) for treatment in NSCLCs harboring the oncogenic KRAS mutation. Following MNPsiCDK4 administration, CDK4 expression was decreased, accompanied by inhibited cell proliferation, specifically in KRAS mutant NSCLCs. However, this intervention was harmless to normal KRAS wild-type cells, confirming the proposed mechanism of synthetic lethality. Moreover, systemic delivery of MNPsiCDK4 significantly inhibited tumor growth in an A549 NSCLC xenograft murine model, with depressed expression of CDK4 and mutational KRAS status, suggesting the therapeutic promise of MNPsiCDK4 delivery in KRAS mutant NSCLCs via a synthetic lethal interaction between KRAS and CDK4. PMID:24496383

  9. Synthetic aperture interferometry: error analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Amiya; Coupland, Jeremy

    2010-07-10

    Synthetic aperture interferometry (SAI) is a novel way of testing aspherics and has a potential for in-process measurement of aspherics [Appl. Opt.42, 701 (2003)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.42.000701 A method to measure steep aspherics using the SAI technique has been previously reported [Appl. Opt.47, 1705 (2008)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.47.001705 Here we investigate the computation of surface form using the SAI technique in different configurations and discuss the computational errors. A two-pass measurement strategy is proposed to reduce the computational errors, and a detailed investigation is carried out to determine the effect of alignment errors on the measurement process.

  10. Synthetic lethal genetic interactions that decrease somatic cell proliferation in Caenorhabditis elegans identify the alternative RFC CTF18 as a candidate cancer drug target.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Jessica; O'Neil, Nigel; Tarailo, Sanja; Stoepel, Jan; Bryan, Jennifer; Rose, Ann; Hieter, Philip

    2009-12-01

    Somatic mutations causing chromosome instability (CIN) in tumors can be exploited for selective killing of cancer cells by knockdown of second-site genes causing synthetic lethality. We tested and statistically validated synthetic lethal (SL) interactions between mutations in six Saccharomyces cerevisiae CIN genes orthologous to genes mutated in colon tumors and five additional CIN genes. To identify which SL interactions are conserved in higher organisms and represent potential chemotherapeutic targets, we developed an assay system in Caenorhabditis elegans to test genetic interactions causing synthetic proliferation defects in somatic cells. We made use of postembryonic RNA interference and the vulval cell lineage of C. elegans as a readout for somatic cell proliferation defects. We identified SL interactions between members of the cohesin complex and CTF4, RAD27, and components of the alternative RFC(CTF18) complex. The genetic interactions tested are highly conserved between S. cerevisiae and C. elegans and suggest that the alternative RFC components DCC1, CTF8, and CTF18 are ideal therapeutic targets because of their mild phenotype when knocked down singly in C. elegans. Furthermore, the C. elegans assay system will contribute to our knowledge of genetic interactions in a multicellular animal and is a powerful approach to identify new cancer therapeutic targets.

  11. Deregulated G1-S control and energy stress contribute to the synthetic-lethal interactions between inactivation of RB and TSC1 or TSC2.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Gabriel M; Zhang, Tianyi; Zhao, Jiong; Du, Wei

    2013-05-01

    Synthetic lethality is a potential strategy for cancer treatment by specifically promoting the death of cancer cells with particular defects such as the loss of the RB (RB1) tumor suppressor. We previously showed that inactivation of both RB and TSC2 induces synergistic apoptosis during the development of Drosophila melanogaster and in cancer cells. However, the in vivo mechanism of this synthetic-lethal interaction is not clear. Here, we show that synergistic cell death in tissues that have lost the RB and TSC orthologs rbf and dtsc1/gig, respectively, or overexpress Rheb and dE2F1, are correlated with synergistic defects in G1-S control, which causes cells to accumulate DNA damage. Coexpression of the G1-S inhibitor Dap, but not the G2-M inhibitor dWee1, decreases DNA damage and reduces cell death. In addition, we show that rbf and dtsc1 mutant cells are under energy stress, are sensitive to decreased energy levels and depend on the cellular energy stress-response pathway for survival. Decreasing mitochondrial ATP synthesis by inactivating cova or abrogating the energy-stress response by removing the metabolic regulator LKB1 both enhance the elimination of cells lacking either rbf or dtsc1. These observations, in conjunction with the finding that deregulation of TORC1 induces activation of JNK, indicate that multiple cellular stresses are induced and contribute to the synthetic-lethal interactions between RB and TSC1/TSC2 inactivation. The insights gained from this study suggest new approaches for targeting RB-deficient cancers.

  12. RAD52 inactivation is synthetically lethal with deficiencies in BRCA1 and PALB2 in addition to BRCA2 through RAD51-mediated homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Lok, B H; Carley, A C; Tchang, B; Powell, S N

    2013-07-25

    Synthetic lethality is an approach to study selective cell killing based on genotype. Previous work in our laboratory has shown that loss of RAD52 is synthetically lethal with BRCA2 deficiency, while exhibiting no impact on cell growth and viability in BRCA2-proficient cells. We now show that this same synthetically lethal relationship is evident in cells with deficiencies in BRCA1 or PALB2, which implicates BRCA1, PALB2 and BRCA2 in an epistatic relationship with one another. When RAD52 was depleted in BRCA1- or PALB2-deficient cells, a severe reduction in plating efficiency was observed, with many abortive attempts at cell division apparent in the double-depleted background. In contrast, when RAD52 was depleted in a BRCA1- or PALB2-wildtype background, a negligible decrease in colony survival was observed. The frequency of ionizing radiation-induced RAD51 foci formation and double-strand break-induced homologous recombination (HR) was decreased by 3- and 10-fold, respectively, when RAD52 was knocked down in BRCA1- or PALB2-depleted cells, with minimal effect in BRCA1- or PALB2-proficient cells. RAD52 function was independent of BRCA1 status, as evidenced by the lack of any defect in RAD52 foci formation in BRCA1-depleted cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that RAD52 is an alternative repair pathway of RAD51-mediated HR, and a target for therapy in cells deficient in the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 repair pathway.

  13. Synthetic lethal screen of NAA20, a catalytic subunit gene of NatB N-terminal acetylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Eun; Ahn, Jun-Young; Kim, Jeong-Mok; Hwang, Cheol-Sang

    2014-10-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NatB N-terminal acetylase contains a catalytic subunit Naa20 and an auxiliary subunit Naa25. To elucidate the cellular functions of the NatB, we utilized the Synthetic Genetic Array to screen for genes that are essential for cell growth in the absence of NAA20. The genome-wide synthetic lethal screen of NAA20 identified genes encoding for serine/threonine protein kinase Vps15, 1,3-beta-glucanosyltransferase Gas5, and a catabolic repression regulator Mig3. The present study suggests that the catalytic activity of the NatB N-terminal aceytase is involved in vacuolar protein sorting and cell wall maintenance.

  14. Immunization with a synthetic robustoxin derivative lacking disulphide bridges protects against a potentially lethal challenge with funnel-web spider (Atrax robustus) venom.

    PubMed

    Comis, Alfio; Tyler, Margaret; Mylecharane, Ewan; Spence, Ian; Howden, Merlin

    2009-03-01

    The venom of male Atrax robustus spiders is potentially lethal to primates. These spiders have been responsible for a number of human deaths. Robustoxin is the lethal toxin in the venom. It is a highly cross-linked polypeptide that has 42 amino acid residues and four disulphide bridges. If these bridges are broken, the resulting polypeptide is non-toxic. Robustoxin was chemically synthesized with all of its eight cysteine residues protected with acetamidomethyl groups in order to avoid formation of disulphide bridges. The resulting derivative was co-polymerized with keyhole limpet haemocyanin. Two Macaca fascicularis monkeys were immunized with this conjugate. The monkeys were challenged,under anaesthesia,with a potentially lethal dose of male A.robustus crude venom. Both monkeys showed some minor symptoms of intoxication but recovered fully with no adverse after-effects. Immunization with the same immunogen, in the absence of keyhole limpet haemocyanin, did not protect a third monkey. The N-terminal 23 amino acid peptide derived from the sequence of robustoxin was synthesized and conjugated with ovalbumin. A fourth monkey was immunized with this conjugate. However,it was not protected against challenge.The implications of these results for the preparation of synthetic peptide vaccines are discussed.

  15. Hyper-active non-homologous end joining selects for synthetic lethality resistant and pathological Fanconi anemia hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Amarachintha, Surya; Wilson, Andrew F; Pang, Qishen

    2016-02-26

    The prominent role of Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins involves homologous recombination (HR) repair. Poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase1 (PARP1) functions in multiple cellular processes including DNA repair and PARP inhibition is an emerging targeted therapy for cancer patients deficient in HR. Here we show that PARP1 activation in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in response to genotoxic or oxidative stress attenuates HSPC exhaustion. Mechanistically, PARP1 controls the balance between HR and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) in double strand break (DSB) repair by preventing excessive NHEJ. Disruption of the FA core complex skews PARP1 function in DSB repair and led to hyper-active NHEJ in Fanca(-/-) or Fancc(-/-) HSPCs. Re-expression of PARP1 rescues the hyper-active NHEJ phenotype in Brca1(-/-)Parp1(-/-) but less effective in Fanca(-/-)Parp1(-/-) cells. Inhibition of NHEJ prevents myeloid/erythroid pathologies associated with synthetic lethality. Our results suggest that hyper-active NHEJ may select for "synthetic lethality" resistant and pathological HSPCs.

  16. Principal component analysis of synthetic galaxy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronen, Shai; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Lahav, Ofer

    1999-02-01

    We analyse synthetic galaxy spectra from the evolutionary models of Bruzual & Charlot and Fioc & Rocca-Volmerange using the method of principal component analysis (PCA). We explore synthetic spectra with different ages, star formation histories and metallicities, and identify the principal components (PCs) of variance in the spectra resulting from these different model parameters. The PCA provides a more objective and informative alternative to diagnostics by individual spectral lines. We discuss how the PCs can be used to estimate the input model parameters, and explore the impact of dust and noise in this inverse problem. We also discuss how changing the sampling of the ages and other model parameters affects the resulting PCs. Our first two synthetic PCs agree with a similar analysis on observed spectra obtained by Kennicutt and the 2dF redshift survey. We conclude that with a good enough signal-to-noise ratio (S/N> > 10) it is possible to derive age, star formation history and metallicity from observed galaxy spectra using PCA.

  17. Model-driven discovery of synergistic inhibitors against E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium targeting a novel synthetic lethal pair, aldA and prpC

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Ramy K.; Khaw, Valerie L.; Monk, Jonathan M.; Brunk, Elizabeth; Lewis, Robert; Loh, Suh I.; Mishra, Arti; Nagle, Amrita A.; Satyanarayana, Chitkala; Dhakshinamoorthy, Saravanakumar; Luche, Michele; Kitchen, Douglas B.; Andrews, Kathleen A.; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.; Charusanti, Pep

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models of biochemical networks form a cornerstone of bacterial systems biology. Inconsistencies between simulation output and experimental data point to gaps in knowledge about the fundamental biology of the organism. One such inconsistency centers on the gene aldA in Escherichia coli: it is essential in a computational model of E. coli metabolism, but experimentally it is not. Here, we reconcile this disparity by providing evidence that aldA and prpC form a synthetic lethal pair, as the double knockout could only be created through complementation with a plasmid-borne copy of aldA. Moreover, virtual and biological screening against the two proteins led to a set of compounds that inhibited the growth of E. coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium synergistically at 100–200 μM individual concentrations. These results highlight the power of metabolic models to drive basic biological discovery and their potential use to discover new combination antibiotics. PMID:26441892

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by a SH2 domain-targeting STAT3 inhibitor leads to metabolic synthetic lethality in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Genini, Davide; Brambilla, Lara; Laurini, Erik; Merulla, Jessica; Civenni, Gianluca; Pandit, Shusil; D'Antuono, Rocco; Perez, Laurent; Levy, David E; Pricl, Sabrina; Carbone, Giuseppina M; Catapano, Carlo V

    2017-06-20

    In addition to its canonical role in nuclear transcription, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is emerging as an important regulator of mitochondrial function. Here, we demonstrate that a novel inhibitor that binds with high affinity to the STAT3 SH2 domain triggers a complex cascade of events initiated by interference with mitochondrial STAT3 (mSTAT3). The mSTAT3-drug interaction leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of proteotoxic STAT3 aggregates, and cell death. The cytotoxic effects depend directly on the drug's ability to interfere with mSTAT3 and mitochondrial function, as demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis and use of STAT3 knockout and mitochondria-depleted cells. Importantly, the lethal consequences of mSTAT3 inhibition are enhanced by glucose starvation and by increased reliance of cancer cells and tumor-initiating cells on mitochondria, resulting in potent activity in cell cultures and tumor xenografts in mice. These findings can be exploited for eliciting synthetic lethality in metabolically stressed cancer cells using high-affinity STAT3 inhibitors. Thus, this study provides insights on the role of mSTAT3 in cancer cells and a conceptual framework for developing more effective cancer therapies.

  19. Dual inhibition of EGFR and MET induces synthetic lethality in triple-negative breast cancer cells through downregulation of ribosomal protein S6

    PubMed Central

    YI, YONG WEON; YOU, KYUSIC; BAE, EDWARD JEONG; KWAK, SAHNG-JUNE; SEONG, YEON-SUN; BAE, INSOO

    2015-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) exhibits innate resistance to the EGFR inhibition despite high level expression of EGFR. Recently, we found that the proliferation of basal-like (BL) subtype TNBC cells is synergistically inhibited by combination of EGFR and PI3K/AKT inhibitors. On the contrary, TNBC cells of mesenchymal stem-like (MSL) subtype are resistant to these combinations. To identify potential synthetic lethal interaction of compounds for treatment of MSL subtype TNBC cells, we performed MTT screening of MDA-MB-231 cells with a small library of receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKIs) in the presence of gefitinib, an EGFR inhibitor. We identified MET inhibitors as potent RTKIs that caused synthetic lethality in combination with gefitinib in MDA-MB-231 cells. We demonstrated that combination of a MET inhibitor SU11274 with various EGFR inhibitors resulted in synergistic suppression of cell viability (in MTT assay) and cell survival (in colony formation assay) of MSL subtype TNBC cells. We further demonstrated that SU11274 alone induced G2 arrest and gefitinib/SU11274 combination sustained the SU11274-induced G2 arrest in these cells. In addition, SU11274/gefitinib combination synergistically reduced the level of ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) in MSL subtype TNBC cells. In addition, knockdown of RPS6 itself, in both HS578T and MDA-MB-231, markedly reduced the proliferation of these cells. Taken together, our data suggest that dual targeting of EGFR and MET inhibits the proliferation of MSL subtype TNBC cells through down-regulation of RPS6. PMID:25955731

  20. Genome-wide profiling of genetic synthetic lethality identifies CDK12 as a novel determinant of PARP1/2 inhibitor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bajrami, Ilirjana; Frankum, Jessica R; Konde, Asha; Miller, Rowan E; Rehman, Farah L; Brough, Rachel; Campbell, James; Sims, David; Rafiq, Rumana; Hooper, Sean; Chen, Lina; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Assiotis, Ioannis; Fenwick, Kerry; Natrajan, Rachael; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of PARP1/2, such as olaparib, have been proposed to serve as a synthetic lethal therapy for cancers that harbor BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. Indeed, in clinical trials, PARP1/2 inhibitors elicit sustained antitumor responses in patients with germline BRCA gene mutations. In hypothesizing that additional genetic determinants might direct use of these drugs, we conducted a genome-wide synthetic lethal screen for candidate olaparib sensitivity genes. In support of this hypothesis, the set of identified genes included known determinants of olaparib sensitivity, such as BRCA1, RAD51, and Fanconi's anemia susceptibility genes. In addition, the set included genes implicated in established networks of DNA repair, DNA cohesion, and chromatin remodeling, none of which were known previously to confer sensitivity to PARP1/2 inhibition. Notably, integration of the list of candidate sensitivity genes with data from tumor DNA sequencing studies identified CDK12 deficiency as a clinically relevant biomarker of PARP1/2 inhibitor sensitivity. In models of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGS-OVCa), CDK12 attenuation was sufficient to confer sensitivity to PARP1/2 inhibition, suppression of DNA repair via homologous recombination, and reduced expression of BRCA1. As one of only nine genes known to be significantly mutated in HGS-OVCa, CDK12 has properties that should confirm interest in its use as a biomarker, particularly in ongoing clinical trials of PARP1/2 inhibitors and other agents that trigger replication fork arrest.

  1. Dual inhibition of EGFR and MET induces synthetic lethality in triple-negative breast cancer cells through downregulation of ribosomal protein S6.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yong Weon; You, Kyusic; Bae, Edward Jeong; Kwak, Sahng-June; Seong, Yeon-Sun; Bae, Insoo

    2015-07-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) exhibits innate resistance to the EGFR inhibition despite high level expression of EGFR. Recently, we found that the proliferation of basal-like (BL) subtype TNBC cells is synergistically inhibited by combination of EGFR and PI3K/AKT inhibitors. On the contrary, TNBC cells of mesenchymal stem-like (MSL) subtype are resistant to these combinations. To identify potential synthetic lethal interaction of compounds for treatment of MSL subtype TNBC cells, we performed MTT screening of MDA-MB‑231 cells with a small library of receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKIs) in the presence of gefitinib, an EGFR inhibitor. We identified MET inhibitors as potent RTKIs that caused synthetic lethality in combination with gefitinib in MDA-MB‑231 cells. We demonstrated that combination of a MET inhibitor SU11274 with various EGFR inhibitors resulted in synergistic suppression of cell viability (in MTT assay) and cell survival (in colony formation assay) of MSL subtype TNBC cells. We further demonstrated that SU11274 alone induced G2 arrest and gefitinib/SU11274 combination sustained the SU11274-induced G2 arrest in these cells. In addition, SU11274/gefitinib combination synergistically reduced the level of ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) in MSL subtype TNBC cells. In addition, knockdown of RPS6 itself, in both HS578T and MDA-MB‑231, markedly reduced the proliferation of these cells. Taken together, our data suggest that dual targeting of EGFR and MET inhibits the proliferation of MSL subtype TNBC cells through downregulation of RPS6.

  2. Genome-wide profiling of genetic synthetic lethality identifies CDK12 as a novel determinant of PARP1/2 inhibitor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Bajrami, Ilirjana; Frankum, Jessica R.; Konde, Asha; Miller, Rowan E.; Rehman, Farah L.; Brough, Rachel; Campbell, James; Sims, David; Rafiq, Rumana; Hooper, Sean; Chen, Lina; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Assiotis, Ioannis; Fenwick, Kerry; Natrajan, Rachael; Lord, Christopher J.; Ashworth, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of PARP1/2 such as olaparib have been proposed to serve as a synthetic lethal therapy for cancers that harbor BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. Indeed, in clinical trials PARP1/2 inhibitors elicit sustained anti-tumor responses in patients with germ-line BRCA gene mutations. In hypothesizing that additional genetic determinants might direct use of these drugs, we conducted a genome-wide synthetic lethal screen for candidate olaparib sensitivity genes. In support of this hypothesis, the set of identified genes included known determinants of olaparib sensitivity, such as BRCA1, RAD51 and Fanconi’s anemia susceptibility genes. Additionally, the set included genes implicated in established networks of DNA repair, DNA cohesion and chromatin remodelling, none of which were known previously to confer sensitivity to PARP1/2 inhibition. Notably, integration of the list of candidate sensitivity genes with data from tumor DNA sequencing studies identified CDK12 deficiency as a clinically relevant biomarker of PARP1/2 inhibitor sensitivity. In models of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGS-OVCa), CDK12 attenuation was sufficient to confer sensitivity to PARP1/2 inhibition, suppression of DNA repair via homologous recombination and reduced expression of BRCA1. As one of only nine genes known to be mutated in HGS-OVCa, CDK12 has properties that should confirm interest in its utility as a biomarker, particularly in ongoing clinical trials of PARP1/2 inhibitors and other agents that trigger replication fork arrest. PMID:24240700

  3. Synthetic Lethality Screen Identifies RPS6KA2 as Modifier of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Milosevic, Nada; Kühnemuth, Benjamin; Mühlberg, Leonie; Ripka, Stefanie; Griesmann, Heidi; Lölkes, Carolin; Buchholz, Malte; Aust, Daniela; Pilarsky, Christian; Krug, Sebastian; Gress, Thomas; Michl, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by a high degree of resistance to chemotherapy. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition using the small-molecule inhibitor erlotinib was shown to provide a small survival benefit in a subgroup of patients. To identify kinases whose inhibition acts synergistically with erlotinib, we employed a kinome-wide small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-based loss-of-function screen in the presence of erlotinib. Of 779 tested kinases, we identified several targets whose inhibition acted synergistically lethal with EGFR inhibition by erlotinib, among them the S6 kinase ribosomal protein S6 kinase 2 (RPS6KA2)/ribosomal S6 kinase 3. Activated RPS6KA2 was expressed in approximately 40% of 123 human pancreatic cancer tissues. RPS6KA2 was shown to act downstream of EGFR/RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling and was activated by EGF independently of the presence of KRAS mutations. Knockdown of RPS6KA2 by siRNA led to increased apoptosis only in the presence of erlotinib, whereas RPS6KA2 activation or overexpression rescued from erlotinib- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. This effect was at least in part mediated by downstream activation of ribosomal protein S6. Genetic as well as pharmacological inhibition of RPS6KA2 by the inhibitor BI-D1870 acted synergistically with erlotinib. By applying this synergistic lethality screen using a kinome-wide RNA interference-library approach, we identified RPS6KA2 as potential drug target whose inhibition synergistically enhanced the effect of erlotinib on tumor cell survival. This kinase therefore represents a promising drug candidate suitable for the development of novel inhibitors for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:24403857

  4. Non-lethal sampling of walleye for stable isotope analysis: a comparison of three tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, Steven R.; VanDeHey, J.A.; Fincel, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis of fishes is often performed using muscle or organ tissues that require sacrificing animals. Non-lethal sampling provides an alternative for evaluating isotopic composition for species of concern or individuals of exceptional value. Stable isotope values of white muscle (lethal) were compared with those from fins and scales (non-lethal) in walleye, Sander vitreus (Mitchill), from multiple systems, size classes and across a range of isotopic values. Isotopic variability was also compared among populations to determine the potential of non-lethal tissues for diet-variability analyses. Muscle-derived isotope values were enriched compared with fins and depleted relative to scales. A split-sample validation technique and linear regression found that isotopic composition of walleye fins and scales was significantly related to that in muscle tissue for both δ13C and δ15N (r2 = 0.79–0.93). However, isotopic variability was significantly different between tissue types in two of six populations for δ15N and three of six populations for δ13C. Although species and population specific, these findings indicate that isotopic measures obtained from non-lethal tissues are indicative of those obtained from muscle.

  5. A Synthetic Vision Preliminary Integrated Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemm, Robert; Houser, Scott

    2001-01-01

    This report documents efforts to analyze a sample of aviation safety programs, using the LMI-developed integrated safety analysis tool to determine the change in system risk resulting from Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) technology implementation. Specifically, we have worked to modify existing system safety tools to address the safety impact of synthetic vision (SV) technology. Safety metrics include reliability, availability, and resultant hazard. This analysis of SV technology is intended to be part of a larger effort to develop a model that is capable of "providing further support to the product design and development team as additional information becomes available". The reliability analysis portion of the effort is complete and is fully documented in this report. The simulation analysis is still underway; it will be documented in a subsequent report. The specific goal of this effort is to apply the integrated safety analysis to SV technology. This report also contains a brief discussion of data necessary to expand the human performance capability of the model, as well as a discussion of human behavior and its implications for system risk assessment in this modeling environment.

  6. Hyper-active non-homologous end joining selects for synthetic lethality resistant and pathological Fanconi anemia hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Amarachintha, Surya; Wilson, Andrew F.; Pang, Qishen

    2016-01-01

    The prominent role of Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins involves homologous recombination (HR) repair. Poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase1 (PARP1) functions in multiple cellular processes including DNA repair and PARP inhibition is an emerging targeted therapy for cancer patients deficient in HR. Here we show that PARP1 activation in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in response to genotoxic or oxidative stress attenuates HSPC exhaustion. Mechanistically, PARP1 controls the balance between HR and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) in double strand break (DSB) repair by preventing excessive NHEJ. Disruption of the FA core complex skews PARP1 function in DSB repair and led to hyper-active NHEJ in Fanca−/− or Fancc−/− HSPCs. Re-expression of PARP1 rescues the hyper-active NHEJ phenotype in Brca1−/−Parp1−/− but less effective in Fanca−/−Parp1−/− cells. Inhibition of NHEJ prevents myeloid/erythroid pathologies associated with synthetic lethality. Our results suggest that hyper-active NHEJ may select for “synthetic lethality” resistant and pathological HSPCs. PMID:26916217

  7. Novel synthetic plasmid and Doggybone™ DNA vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies and provide protection from lethal influenza challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Veronica L; Patel, Ami; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hensley, Scott E; Ragwan, Edwin; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Rothwell, Paul J; Extance, Jonathan P; Caproni, Lisa J; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based vaccines (NAVs) are a promising alternative to conventional influenza vaccines with the potential to increase influenza vaccine availability due to their simplicity in design and rapid speed of production. NAVs can also target multiple influenza antigens and control flu variants. Traditionally NAVs have been DNA plasmids however, we are continuing to explore new methods that may enhance vaccine efficacy. Recently new focus has been on RNA cassettes as NAVs. RNA vaccines combine conceptual advantages in that they focus on delivery of only the coding cassette. However, RNA vaccines have a short half-life and cause interferon-induced fevers. Here we describe a new NAV approach where we study delivery of a linear DNA cassette [Doggybone™ linear closed DNA [(dbDNA™)] produced by an enzymatic process that yields an antigen expression cassette comprising a promoter, DNA antigen, poly A tail, and telomeric ends. This focused approach has many of the advantages of plasmid DNA as well as a minimal cassette size similar to RNA strategies. For this study, we characterized the specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses and determined the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers induced by dbDNA™ and compared the responses with those of an optimized plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine encoding the same H1N1 influenza A/PR/8/34 HA gene. Immunizations with the constructs resulted in similar humoral and cellular immune responses. Both constructs induced high-titer HI antibodies and fully protected animals from lethal viral challenge. The data obtained from this study provides important validation for further development of novel vector approaches. PMID:26091432

  8. A Synthetic Dosage Lethal Genetic Interaction Between CKS1B and PLK1 Is Conserved in Yeast and Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Robert J. D.; Du, Xing; Sunjevaric, Ivana; Rayannavar, Vinayak; Dittmar, John; Bryant, Eric; Maurer, Matthew; Rothstein, Rodney

    2016-01-01

    The CKS1B gene located on chromosome 1q21 is frequently amplified in breast, lung, and liver cancers. CKS1B codes for a conserved regulatory subunit of cyclin–CDK complexes that function at multiple stages of cell cycle progression. We used a high throughput screening protocol to mimic cancer-related overexpression in a library of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants to identify genes whose functions become essential only when CKS1 is overexpressed, a synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) interaction. Mutations in multiple genes affecting mitotic entry and mitotic exit are highly enriched in the set of SDL interactions. The interactions between Cks1 and the mitotic entry checkpoint genes require the inhibitory activity of Swe1 on the yeast cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), Cdc28. In addition, the SDL interactions of overexpressed CKS1 with mutations in the mitotic exit network are suppressed by modulating expression of the CDK inhibitor Sic1. Mutation of the polo-like kinase Cdc5, which functions in both the mitotic entry and mitotic exit pathways, is lethal in combination with overexpressed CKS1. Therefore we investigated the effect of targeting the human Cdc5 ortholog, PLK1, in breast cancers with various expression levels of human CKS1B. Growth inhibition by PLK1 knockdown correlates with increased CKS1B expression in published tumor cell data sets, and this correlation was confirmed using shRNAs against PLK1 in tumor cell lines. In addition, we overexpressed CKS1B in multiple cell lines and found increased sensitivity to PLK1 knockdown and PLK1 drug inhibition. Finally, combined inhibition of WEE1 and PLK1 results in less apoptosis than predicted based on an additive model of the individual inhibitors, showing an epistatic interaction and confirming a prediction of the yeast data. Thus, identification of a yeast SDL interaction uncovers conserved genetic interactions that can affect human cancer cell viability. PMID:27558135

  9. The synthetic lethal killing of RAD54B-deficient colorectal cancer cells by PARP1 inhibition is enhanced with SOD1 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    McAndrew, Erin N.; Lepage, Chloe C.; McManus, Kirk J.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death throughout the world. Despite improved screening efforts, most CRCs are diagnosed at late stages when surgery alone is not curative. Moreover, the low 5-year survival rate (∼8-13%) for those living with stage IV CRC highlights the need for better treatment options. Many current chemotherapeutic approaches are non-specific and associated with side effects due to their tendency to target both normal and cancer cells. To address this issue, synthetic lethal (SL) approaches are now being explored in cancer and are defined as the lethal combination of two independently viable mutations/deletions. From a therapeutic perspective, SL interactors of genes mutated in cancer serve as candidate drug targets. The present study focuses on RAD54B, a gene that is aberrantly expressed in many cancer types, including CRC. We show that PARP1 silencing or inhibition (BMN673 or Olaparib) leads to selective killing within RAD54B-deficient cells relative to controls, and is accompanied by increases in γ-H2AX (a surrogate marker of DNA double strand breaks) and cleaved Caspase-3 (an apoptotic indicator). We further show that BMN673 synergizes with LCS-1 (an inhibitor of an established RAD54B SL interactor) to induce enhanced killing in RAD54B-deficient cells. Collectively, these data identify RAD54B and PARP1 as SL interactors, and thus reveal PARP1 as a novel candidate drug target in RAD54B-deficient CRCs. These findings further show that combinatorial chemotherapies involving multiple SL targets may promote synergistic killing within cancer cells, a strategy that may hold potential in many cancer contexts. PMID:27902462

  10. A Synthetic Dosage Lethal Genetic Interaction Between CKS1B and PLK1 Is Conserved in Yeast and Human Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Reid, Robert J D; Du, Xing; Sunjevaric, Ivana; Rayannavar, Vinayak; Dittmar, John; Bryant, Eric; Maurer, Matthew; Rothstein, Rodney

    2016-10-01

    The CKS1B gene located on chromosome 1q21 is frequently amplified in breast, lung, and liver cancers. CKS1B codes for a conserved regulatory subunit of cyclin-CDK complexes that function at multiple stages of cell cycle progression. We used a high throughput screening protocol to mimic cancer-related overexpression in a library of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants to identify genes whose functions become essential only when CKS1 is overexpressed, a synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) interaction. Mutations in multiple genes affecting mitotic entry and mitotic exit are highly enriched in the set of SDL interactions. The interactions between Cks1 and the mitotic entry checkpoint genes require the inhibitory activity of Swe1 on the yeast cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), Cdc28. In addition, the SDL interactions of overexpressed CKS1 with mutations in the mitotic exit network are suppressed by modulating expression of the CDK inhibitor Sic1. Mutation of the polo-like kinase Cdc5, which functions in both the mitotic entry and mitotic exit pathways, is lethal in combination with overexpressed CKS1 Therefore we investigated the effect of targeting the human Cdc5 ortholog, PLK1, in breast cancers with various expression levels of human CKS1B Growth inhibition by PLK1 knockdown correlates with increased CKS1B expression in published tumor cell data sets, and this correlation was confirmed using shRNAs against PLK1 in tumor cell lines. In addition, we overexpressed CKS1B in multiple cell lines and found increased sensitivity to PLK1 knockdown and PLK1 drug inhibition. Finally, combined inhibition of WEE1 and PLK1 results in less apoptosis than predicted based on an additive model of the individual inhibitors, showing an epistatic interaction and confirming a prediction of the yeast data. Thus, identification of a yeast SDL interaction uncovers conserved genetic interactions that can affect human cancer cell viability. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  11. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the brainstem following lethal sarin exposure.

    PubMed

    Meade, Mitchell L; Hoffmann, Andrea; Makley, Meghan K; Snider, Thomas H; Schlager, John J; Gearhart, Jeffery M

    2015-06-22

    The brainstem represents a major tissue area affected by sarin organophosphate poisoning due to its function in respiratory and cardiovascular control. While the acute toxic effects of sarin on brainstem-related responses are relatively unknown, other brain areas e.g., cortex or cerebellum, have been studied more extensively. The study objective was to analyze the guinea pig brainstem toxicology response following sarin (2×LD50) exposure by proteome pathway analysis to gain insight into the complex regulatory mechanisms that lead to impairment of respiratory and cardiovascular control. Guinea pig exposure to sarin resulted in the typical acute behavior/physiology outcomes with death between 15 and 25min. In addition, brain and blood acetylcholinesterase activity was significantly reduced in the presence of sarin to 95%, and 89%, respectively, of control values. Isobaric-tagged (iTRAQ) liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identified 198 total proteins of which 23% were upregulated, and 18% were downregulated following sarin exposure. Direct gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed a sarin-specific broad-spectrum proteomic profile including glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, calcium overload, energy depletion responses, and compensatory carbohydrate metabolism, increases in ROS defense, DNA damage and chromatin remodeling, HSP response, targeted protein degradation (ubiquitination) and cell death response. With regards to the sarin-dependent effect on respiration, our study supports the potential interference of sarin with CO2/H(+) sensitive chemoreceptor neurons of the brainstem retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) that send excitatory glutamergic projections to the respiratory centers. In conclusion, this study gives insight into the brainstem broad-spectrum proteome following acute sarin exposure and the gained information will assist in the development of novel countermeasures. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. [Maternal mortality in the IMSS: an analysis from the perspective of mortality and lethality].

    PubMed

    Velasco-Murillo, Vitelio; Navarrete-Hernández, Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    To assess the incidence of hospital maternal mortality in the population covered by the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) from 2000 to 2003, utilizing the rates of the main causes of morbidity and lethality, in order to gain a better understanding of this epidemiological picture. We collected information from 3,357,346 hospital deliveries and 832 maternal deaths that occurred in the medical units of the IMSS during the above-mentioned years. For the specific analysis of mortality, morbidity and lethality, deliveries and deaths with diagnoses of mild preeclampsia, severe preeclampsia, eclampsia, placenta previa, postpartum hemorrhage, chorioamnionitis and puerperal sepsis were selected, based on the criteria of International Diseases Classification, Tenth Revision. For statistical differences we used the chi(2). Maternal mortality registered a reduction of 25.1% (39 x 100,000 live births in 2000 and 29.2% in 2003). Morbidity increased by 6.6%. Morbidity and lethality caused by preeclampsia, obstetrical hemorrhages and puerperal sepsis (56.7% of the total deaths) showed a significant decrease in most cases. Specific morbidity showed no changes. We observed a decrease in the rate of hospital maternal mortality during the years of the study, linked to a reduction in lethality of these three main causes. This epidemiological picture may demonstrate the optimal quality in obstetrical care, because no reported changes in morbidity levels were registered.

  13. Combined STAT3 and BCR-ABL1 Inhibition Induces Synthetic Lethality in Therapy-Resistant Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Clinton C.; Vellore, Nadeem A.; Resetca, Diana; Zabriskie, Matthew S.; Zhang, Tian Y.; Khorashad, Jamshid S.; Engar, Alexander J.; Reynolds, Kimberly R.; Anderson, David J.; Senina, Anna; Pomicter, Anthony D.; Arpin, Carolynn C.; Ahmad, Shazia; Heaton, William L.; Tantravahi, Srinivas K.; Todic, Aleksandra; Moriggl, Richard; Wilson, Derek J.; Baron, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the BCR-ABL1 kinase domain are an established mechanism of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance in Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemia, but fail to explain many cases of clinical TKI failure. In contrast, it is largely unknown why some patients fail TKI therapy despite continued suppression of BCR-ABL1 kinase activity, a situation termed BCRABL1 kinase-independent TKI resistance. Here, we identified activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) by extrinsic or intrinsic mechanisms as an essential feature of BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent TKI resistance. By combining synthetic chemistry, in vitro reporter assays, and molecular dynamics-guided rational inhibitor design and high-throughput screening, we discovered BP-5-087, a potent and selective STAT3 SH2 domain inhibitor that reduces STAT3 phosphorylation and nuclear transactivation. Computational simulations, fluorescence polarization assays, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange assays establish direct engagement of STAT3 by BP-5-087 and provide a high-resolution view of the STAT3 SH2 domain/BP-5-087 interface. In primary cells from CML patients with BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent TKI resistance, BP-5-087 (1.0 μM) restored TKI sensitivity to therapy-resistant CML progenitor cells, including leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Our findings implicate STAT3 as a critical signaling node in BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent TKI resistance, and suggest that BP-5-087 has clinical utility for treating malignancies characterized by STAT3 activation. PMID:25134459

  14. Thermodynamic Analysis of Ionic Compounds: Synthetic Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Claude H.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how thermodynamic cycles can be used to understand trends in heats of formation and aqueous solubilities and, most importantly, how they may be used to choose synthetic routes to new ionic compounds. (JN)

  15. Thermodynamic Analysis of Ionic Compounds: Synthetic Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Claude H.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how thermodynamic cycles can be used to understand trends in heats of formation and aqueous solubilities and, most importantly, how they may be used to choose synthetic routes to new ionic compounds. (JN)

  16. Loss of ypk1 function causes rapamycin sensitivity, inhibition of translation initiation and synthetic lethality in 14-3-3-deficient yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Gelperin, Daniel; Horton, Lynn; DeChant, Anne; Hensold, Jack; Lemmon, Sandra K

    2002-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins bind to phosphorylated proteins and regulate a variety of cellular activities as effectors of serine/threonine phosphorylation. To define processes requiring 14-3-3 function in yeast, mutants with increased sensitivity to reduced 14-3-3 protein levels were identified by synthetic lethal screening. One mutation was found to be allelic to YPK1, which encodes a Ser/Thr protein kinase. Loss of Ypk function causes hypersensitivity to rapamycin, similar to 14-3-3 mutations and other mutations affecting the TOR signaling pathway in yeast. Similar to treatment with rapamycin, loss of Ypk function disrupted translation, at least in part by causing depletion of eIF4G, a central adaptor protein required for cap-dependent mRNA translation initiation. In addition, Ypk1 as well as eIF4G protein levels were rapidly depleted upon nitrogen starvation, but not during glucose starvation, even though both conditions inhibit translation initiation. These results suggest that Ypk regulates translation initiation in response to nutrient signals, either through the TOR pathway or in a functionally related pathway parallel to TOR. PMID:12196392

  17. A synthetic lethal screen reveals enhanced sensitivity to ATR inhibitor treatment in mantle cell lymphoma with ATM loss-of-function.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Daniel L; Holt, Jenny; Tang, Yan; Feng, Jiajia; Barsanti, Paul; Pan, Yue; Ghoddusi, Majid; Zhang, Wei; Thomas, George; Holash, Jocelyn; Lees, Emma; Taricani, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms to maintain genomic integrity are essential for cells to remain viable. Not surprisingly, disruption of key DNA damage response pathway factors, such as ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)/ataxia telangiectasia and RAD3-related (ATR) results in loss of genomic integrity. Here, a synthetic lethal siRNA-screening approach not only confirmed ATM but identified additional replication checkpoint proteins, when ablated, enhanced ATR inhibitor (ATRi) response in a high-content γ-H2AX assay. Cancers with inactivating ATM mutations exhibit impaired DNA double-stranded break (DSB) repair and rely on compensatory repair pathways for survival. Therefore, impairing ATR activity may selectively sensitize cancer cells to killing. ATR inhibition in an ATM-deficient context results in phosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunits (DNA-PKcs) and leads to induction of γ-H2AX. Using both in vitro and in vivo models, ATR inhibition enhanced efficacy in ATM loss-of-function mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) compared with ATM wild-type cancer cells. In summary, single-agent ATR inhibitors have therapeutic utility in the treatment of cancers, like MCL, in which ATM function has been lost. These data suggest that single-agent ATR inhibitors have therapeutic utility and that ATR uses a complex and coordinated set of proteins to maintain genomic stability that could be further exploited. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. A Genetic Screen for High Copy Number Suppressors of the Synthetic Lethality Between elg1Δ and srs2Δ in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gazy, Inbal; Liefshitz, Batia; Bronstein, Alex; Parnas, Oren; Atias, Nir; Sharan, Roded; Kupiec, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Elg1 and Srs2 are two proteins involved in maintaining genome stability in yeast. After DNA damage, the homotrimeric clamp PCNA, which provides stability and processivity to DNA polymerases and serves as a docking platform for DNA repair enzymes, undergoes modification by the ubiquitin-like molecule SUMO. PCNA SUMOylation helps recruit Srs2 and Elg1 to the replication fork. In the absence of Elg1, both SUMOylated PCNA and Srs2 accumulate at the chromatin fraction, indicating that Elg1 is required for removing SUMOylated PCNA and Srs2 from DNA. Despite this interaction, which suggests that the two proteins work together, double mutants elg1Δ srs2Δ have severely impaired growth as haploids and exhibit synergistic sensitivity to DNA damage and a synergistic increase in gene conversion. In addition, diploid elg1Δ srs2Δ double mutants are dead, which implies that an essential function in the cell requires at least one of the two gene products for survival. To gain information about this essential function, we have carried out a high copy number suppressor screen to search for genes that, when overexpressed, suppress the synthetic lethality between elg1Δ and srs2Δ. We report the identification of 36 such genes, which are enriched for functions related to DNA- and chromatin-binding, chromatin packaging and modification, and mRNA export from the nucleus. PMID:23704284

  19. Computational Modeling And Analysis Of Synthetic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittal, Rajat; Cattafesta, Lou

    2005-01-01

    In the last report we focused on the study of 3D synthetic jets of moderate jet aspect-ratio. Jets in quiescent and cross-flow cases were investigated. Since most of the synthetic jets in practical applications are found to be of large aspect ratio, the focus was shifted to studying synthetic jets of large aspect ratio. In the current year, further progress has been made by studying jets of aspect ratio 8 and infinity. Some other aspects of the jet, like the vorticity flux is looked into apart from analyzing the vortex dynamics, velocity profiles and the other dynamical characteristics of the jet which allows us to extract some insight into the effect of these modifications on the jet performance. Also, efforts were made to qualitatively validate the simulated results with the NASA Langley test cases at higher jet Reynolds number for the quiescent jet case.

  20. Aurora A inhibitor (MLN8237) plus Vincristine plus Rituximab is synthetic lethal and a potential curative therapy in aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Daruka; Stejskal, Amy; Cooke, Laurence S.; Manziello, Ann; Morales, Carla; Persky, Daniel O.; Fisher, Richard I.; Miller, Thomas P.; Qi, Wenqing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Aurora A and B are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that regulate mitosis. Over-expression of Auroras promotes resistance to microtubule targeted agents. We investigated mechanistic synergy by inhibiting the mitotic spindle apparatus in the presence of MLN8237 [M], an Aurora A inhibitor with either vincristine [MV] or docetaxel [MD] in aggressive B-NHL. The addition of rituximab [R] to MV or MD was evaluated for synthetic lethality. Experimental Design Aggressive B-NHL cell subtypes were evaluated in vitro and in vivo for target modulation and anti-NHL activity with single agents, doublets and triplets by analyzing cell proliferation, apoptosis, tumor growth, survival and mechanisms of response/relapse by gene expression profiling with protein validation. Results MV is synergistic while MD is additive for cell proliferation inhibition in B-NHL cell culture models. Addition of R to MV is superior to MD but both significantly induce apoptosis compared to doublet therapy. Mouse xenograft models of mantle cell lymphoma showed modest single agent activity for M, R, D and V with tumor growth inhibition (TGI) of ~10–15%. Of the doublets, MV caused tumor regression, while TGI was observed with MD (~55–60%) and MR (~25–50%) respectively. Although MV caused tumor regression, mice relapsed 20 days after stopping therapy. In contrast, MVR was curative, while MDR led to TGI of ~85%. PCNA, Aurora B, cyclin B1, cyclin D1 and Bcl-2 proteins of harvested tumors confirmed response and resistance to therapy. Conclusions Addition of R to MV is a novel therapeutic strategy for aggressive B-NHL and warrants clinical trial evaluation. PMID:22374334

  1. Aurora A inhibitor (MLN8237) plus vincristine plus rituximab is synthetic lethal and a potential curative therapy in aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Daruka; Stejskal, Amy; Cooke, Laurence S; Manziello, Ann; Morales, Carla; Persky, Daniel O; Fisher, Richard I; Miller, Thomas P; Qi, Wenqing

    2012-04-15

    Aurora A and B are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that regulate mitosis. Overexpression of Auroras promotes resistance to microtubule-targeted agents. We investigated mechanistic synergy by inhibiting the mitotic spindle apparatus in the presence of MLN8237 [M], an Aurora A inhibitor with either vincristine [MV] or docetaxel [MD] in aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). The addition of rituximab [R] to MV or MD was evaluated for synthetic lethality. Aggressive B-NHL cell subtypes were evaluated in vitro and in vivo for target modulation and anti-NHL activity with single agents, doublets, and triplets by analyzing cell proliferation, apoptosis, tumor growth, survival, and mechanisms of response/relapse by gene expression profiling with protein validation. MV is synergistic whereas MD is additive for cell proliferation inhibition in B-NHL cell culture models. Addition of rituximab to MV is superior to MD, but both significantly induce apoptosis compared with doublet therapy. Mouse xenograft models of mantle cell lymphoma showed modest single-agent activity for MLN8237, rituximab, docetaxel, and vincristine with tumor growth inhibition (TGI) of approximately 10% to 15%. Of the doublets, MV caused tumor regression, whereas TGI was observed with MD (approximately 55%-60%) and MR (approximately 25%-50%), respectively. Although MV caused tumor regression, mice relapsed 20 days after stopping therapy. In contrast, MVR was curative, whereas MDR led to TGI of approximately 85%. Proliferation cell nuclear antigen, Aurora B, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, and Bcl-2 proteins of harvested tumors confirmed response and resistance to therapy. Addition of rituximab to MV is a novel therapeutic strategy for aggressive B-NHL and warrants clinical trial evaluation. ©2012 AACR.

  2. Synthetic lethality screen identifies a novel yeast myosin I gene (MYO5): myosin I proteins are required for polarization of the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The organization of the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role in cell physiology in motile and nonmotile organisms. Nonetheless, the function of the actin based motor molecules, members of the myosin superfamily, is not well understood. Deletion of MYO3, a yeast gene encoding a "classic" myosin I, has no detectable phenotype. We used a synthetic lethality screen to uncover genes whose functions might overlap with those of MYO3 and identified a second yeast myosin 1 gene, MYO5. MYO5 shows 86 and 62% identity to MYO3 across the motor and non- motor regions. Both genes contain an amino terminal motor domain, a neck region containing two IQ motifs, and a tail domain consisting of a positively charged region, a proline-rich region containing sequences implicated in ATP-insensitive actin binding, and an SH3 domain. Although myo5 deletion mutants have no detectable phenotype, yeast strains deleted for both MYO3 and MYO5 have severe defects in growth and actin cytoskeletal organization. Double deletion mutants also display phenotypes associated with actin disorganization including accumulation of intracellular membranes and vesicles, cell rounding, random bud site selection, sensitivity to high osmotic strength, and low pH as well as defects in chitin and cell wall deposition, invertase secretion, and fluid phase endocytosis. Indirect immunofluorescence studies using epitope-tagged Myo5p indicate that Myo5p is localized at actin patches. These results indicate that MYO3 and MYO5 encode classical myosin I proteins with overlapping functions and suggest a role for Myo3p and Myo5p in organization of the actin cytoskeleton of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:8682864

  3. Enhanced non-homologous end joining contributes toward synthetic lethality of pathological RAD51C mutants with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase.

    PubMed

    Somyajit, Kumar; Mishra, Anup; Jameei, Aida; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitors are actively under clinical trials for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers that arise due to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. The RAD51 paralog RAD51C has been identified as a breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene. The pathological RAD51C mutants that were identified in cancer patients are hypomorphic with partial repair function. However, targeting cancer cells that express hypomorphic mutants of RAD51C is highly challenging. Here, we report that RAD51C-deficient cells can be targeted by a 'synthetic lethal' approach using PARP inhibitor and this sensitivity was attributed to accumulation of cells in the G2/M and chromosomal aberrations. In addition, spontaneous hyperactivation of PARP1 was evident in RAD51C-deficient cells. Interestingly, RAD51C-negative cells exhibited enhanced recruitment of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) proteins onto chromatin and this accumulation correlated with increased activity of error-prone NHEJ as well as genome instability leading to cell death. Notably, inhibition of DNA-PKcs or depletion of KU70 or Ligase IV rescued this phenotype. Strikingly, stimulation of NHEJ by low dose of ionizing radiation (IR) in the PARP inhibitor-treated RAD51C-deficient cells and cells expressing pathological RAD51C mutants induced enhanced toxicity 'synergistically'. These results demonstrate that cancer cells arising due to hypomorphic mutations in RAD51C can be specifically targeted by a 'synergistic approach' and imply that this strategy can be potentially applied to cancers with hypomorphic mutations in other homologous recombination pathway genes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The development of synthetic biology: a patent analysis.

    PubMed

    van Doren, Davy; Koenigstein, Stefan; Reiss, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    In the past decades, synthetic biology has gained interest regarding research and development efforts within the biotechnology domain. However, it is unclear to what extent synthetic biology has matured already into being commercially exploitable. By means of a patent analysis, this study shows that there is an increasing trend regarding synthetic biology related patent applications. The majority of retrieved patents relates to innovations facilitating the realisation of synthetic biology through improved understanding of biological systems. In addition, there is increased activity concerning the development of synthetic biology based applications. When looking at potential application areas, the majority of synthetic biology patents seems most relevant for the medical, energy and industrial sector. Furthermore, the analysis shows that most activity has been carried out by the USA, with Japan and a number of European countries considerably trailing behind. In addition, both universities and companies are major patent applicant actor types. The results presented here form a starting point for follow-up studies concerning the identification of drivers explaining the observed patent application trends in synthetic biology.

  5. A THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF HIGH ENERGY SYNTHETIC FOODS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    An analysis is presented of the possibilities of incorporating synthetic foods into the diets of personnel engaged in long duration, manned space...appropriate substitutes for the lower energy carbohydrates that normally make up approximately 50 percent of the diet . Various classes or organic...synthetic alpha-amino acids and their peptides of chain lengths in excess of that found in leucine. Methods of reducing possible ketogenic effects are discussed. (Author)

  6. Analysis of synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Some problems faced in applications of radar measurements in hydrology are: (1) adequate calibration of the radar systems and direct digital data will be required in order that repeatable data can be acquired for hydrologic applications; (2) quantitative hydrologic research on a large scale will be prohibitive with aircraft mounted synthetic aperture radar systems due to the system geometry; (3) spacecraft platforms appear to be the best platforms for radar systems when conducting research over watersheds larger than a few square kilometers; (4) experimental radar systems should be designed to avoid use of radomes; and (5) cross polarized X and L band data seem to discriminate between good and poor hydrologic cover better than like polarized data.

  7. Toward a Survivability/Lethality Analysis Directorate (SLAD) Methodology for Conducting System of Systems Analysis (SoSA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    for SLV analysis. ........26 List of Tables Table 1. Examples of each use case in terms of the problem we expect to address, the questions we...on the survivability, lethality, and vulnerability ( SLV ) technical area. Use case 2 focuses on science and technology rather than SLAD’s...foundational SoS context for our more traditional SLV analyses. Use cases 2 and 3 represent different classes of efforts to extend SoSA to early technology

  8. Anti-Cancer Drug Discovery Using Synthetic Lethal Chemogenetic (SLC) Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Scholarship ($1500), Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory...Yeast Genetics Course, Cold Spring Harbor , New York, July 22-Aug. 11, 2003 Keystone Symposia travel scholarship ($1000), New Advances in Drug Discovery...Chemotherapeutics, Geneva, Switzerland, Sept. 28-Oct. 1, 2004 Courses Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Yeast Genetics Course, Cold Spring Harbor , New

  9. Fatally flawed? A review and ethical analysis of lethal congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, D J C; Thiele, P; Watkins, A; De Crespigny, L

    2012-10-01

    Prenatally diagnosed abnormalities that are associated with death in the newborn period are often referred to as 'lethal malformations'. Yet, for many of the commonly described lethal malformations long-term survival is possible if supportive interventions are provided. In this paper we analyse and review fetal or congenital lethal abnormalities. The designation 'lethal' overlaps with the concept of 'medical futility'. The term is used for a heterogenous group of conditions, and hinders clear communication and counselling. We argue that the term should be avoided, and propose in its place a set of key questions that should be addressed by counselling.

  10. Synthesis Sheets: An Aid To Synthetic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Still, W. Clark

    1973-01-01

    Describes the development of a scheme which allows the production of a complete synthesis tree through the backward analysis of a target molecule into precursor and pathway catalogues. The logical organizing framework will find applications to teaching of multistep organic synthesis. (CC)

  11. Analysis of Features for Synthetic Aperture Radar Target Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    gradients HPC high performance computing LDA linear discriminant analysis PEC perfect electric conductor RVM relevance vector machine SAR synthetic...the polarization of the re-radiated field. When a linearly polarized electric field is incident on a flat perfect electric conductor (PEC), the

  12. Integrating ethical analysis "into the DNA" of synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Heavey, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Current ethical analysis tends to evaluate synthetic biology at an overview level. Synthetic biology, however, is an umbrella term that covers a variety of areas of research. These areas contain, in turn, a hierarchy of different research fields. This abstraction hierarchy-the term is borrowed from engineering-permits synthetic biologists to specialise to a very high degree. Though synthetic biology per se may create profound ethical challenges, much of the day-to-day research does not. Yet seemingly innocuous research could lead to ethically problematic results. For example, Dolly the sheep resulted from a long series of research steps, none of which presented any ethical problems. The atomic bomb was developed as a result of Einstein's uncontentions theoretical research that proved the equivalence of matter and energy. Therefore it would seem wise for ethicists to evaluate synbio research across its subfields and through its abstraction hierarchies, comparing and inter-relating the various areas of research. In addition, it would be useful if journals that publish synbio papers require an ethical statement from authors, as standard practice, so as to encourage scientists to constantly engage with ethical issues in their work. Also, this would allow an ethical snapshot of the state of the research at any given time to exist, allowing for accurate evaluation by scientists and ethicists, regulators and policymakers.

  13. Determinants of the lethality of climate-related disasters in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM): a cross-country analysis.

    PubMed

    Andrewin, Aisha N; Rodriguez-Llanes, Jose M; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2015-07-08

    Floods and storms are climate-related hazards posing high mortality risk to Caribbean Community (CARICOM) nations. However risk factors for their lethality remain untested. We conducted an ecological study investigating risk factors for flood and storm lethality in CARICOM nations for the period 1980-2012. Lethality--deaths versus no deaths per disaster event- was the outcome. We examined biophysical and social vulnerability proxies and a decadal effect as predictors. We developed our regression model via multivariate analysis using a generalized logistic regression model with quasi-binomial distribution; removal of multi-collinear variables and backward elimination. Robustness was checked through subset analysis. We found significant positive associations between lethality, percentage of total land dedicated to agriculture (odds ratio [OR] 1.032; 95% CI: 1.013-1.053) and percentage urban population (OR 1.029, 95% CI 1.003-1.057). Deaths were more likely in the 2000-2012 period versus 1980-1989 (OR 3.708, 95% CI 1.615-8.737). Robustness checks revealed similar coefficients and directions of association. Population health in CARICOM nations is being increasingly impacted by climate-related disasters connected to increasing urbanization and land use patterns. Our findings support the evidence base for setting sustainable development goals (SDG).

  14. Determinants of the lethality of climate-related disasters in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM): a cross-country analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrewin, Aisha N.; Rodriguez-Llanes, Jose M.; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2015-07-01

    Floods and storms are climate-related hazards posing high mortality risk to Caribbean Community (CARICOM) nations. However risk factors for their lethality remain untested. We conducted an ecological study investigating risk factors for flood and storm lethality in CARICOM nations for the period 1980-2012. Lethality - deaths versus no deaths per disaster event- was the outcome. We examined biophysical and social vulnerability proxies and a decadal effect as predictors. We developed our regression model via multivariate analysis using a generalized logistic regression model with quasi-binomial distribution; removal of multi-collinear variables and backward elimination. Robustness was checked through subset analysis. We found significant positive associations between lethality, percentage of total land dedicated to agriculture (odds ratio [OR] 1.032; 95% CI: 1.013-1.053) and percentage urban population (OR 1.029, 95% CI 1.003-1.057). Deaths were more likely in the 2000-2012 period versus 1980-1989 (OR 3.708, 95% CI 1.615-8.737). Robustness checks revealed similar coefficients and directions of association. Population health in CARICOM nations is being increasingly impacted by climate-related disasters connected to increasing urbanization and land use patterns. Our findings support the evidence base for setting sustainable development goals (SDG).

  15. Determinants of the lethality of climate-related disasters in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM): a cross-country analysis

    PubMed Central

    Andrewin, Aisha N.; Rodriguez-Llanes, Jose M.; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2015-01-01

    Floods and storms are climate-related hazards posing high mortality risk to Caribbean Community (CARICOM) nations. However risk factors for their lethality remain untested. We conducted an ecological study investigating risk factors for flood and storm lethality in CARICOM nations for the period 1980–2012. Lethality - deaths versus no deaths per disaster event- was the outcome. We examined biophysical and social vulnerability proxies and a decadal effect as predictors. We developed our regression model via multivariate analysis using a generalized logistic regression model with quasi-binomial distribution; removal of multi-collinear variables and backward elimination. Robustness was checked through subset analysis. We found significant positive associations between lethality, percentage of total land dedicated to agriculture (odds ratio [OR] 1.032; 95% CI: 1.013–1.053) and percentage urban population (OR 1.029, 95% CI 1.003–1.057). Deaths were more likely in the 2000–2012 period versus 1980–1989 (OR 3.708, 95% CI 1.615–8.737). Robustness checks revealed similar coefficients and directions of association. Population health in CARICOM nations is being increasingly impacted by climate-related disasters connected to increasing urbanization and land use patterns. Our findings support the evidence base for setting sustainable development goals (SDG). PMID:26153115

  16. Judged Lethality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    as automobile accidents and heart attacks . Approach In two experiments, estimates of lethality were elicited in four ways: (1) direct estimates of...31 6,813 2,500 Strokes 11,011 4,648 181 24,758 11,765 Heart Attacks 13,011 3,666 131 27,477 16,250 Cancer 10,889 10,475 160 21,749 37,500 Coefficient...Each Group Experiment 1 Rank of Statistical Cause of Death Lethality Rate Always Underestimated Cancer 20 Heart Attack 19 Stroke 18 Pregnancy 12

  17. Preliminary Integrated Safety Analysis of Synthetic Vision Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary S.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Aviation Safety Program is to develop and demonstrate technologies that could help reduce the aviation fatal accident rate by a factor of 5 by the year 2007 and by a factor of 10 by the year 2022. Integrated safety analysis of day-to-day operations and risks within those operations will provide an understanding of the Aviation Safety Program portfolio beyond what is now available. Synthetic vision is the first of the Aviation Safety Program technologies that has been analyzed by the Logistics Management Institute under a contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center. These synthetic vision analyses include both a reliability analysis and a computer simulation model.

  18. Non-lethal weapons technologies--the case for independent scientific analysis.

    PubMed

    Altmann, J

    2001-01-01

    Various technologies have been proposed for non-lethal weapons (NLW), some of them credible, or at least plausible, but strong claims were made for others without evidence or references. Five such technologies are examined. For the chemical and biological examples, detailed information is lacking but the diminishing number of such claims over time and general scientific knowledge suggest that fulfilment of the promises is improbable. For acoustic weapons, a detailed study found that many of the claims are plainly untrue. In this case, even wrong values for physiological thresholds were presented. Civil and military NLW programmes in the USA put their main emphasis on simple, short-term technologies rather than exotic ones. In order to avoid dangers arising from unrealistic promises, the concept of preventive arms control should be applied to NLW. Its first step is a scientific analysis, investigating the new weapons, the propagation of their effects and the effect on the targets. Such detailed studies are needed for each proposed NLW technology.

  19. Fine Mapping and Transcriptome Analysis Reveal Candidate Genes Associated with Hybrid Lethality in Cabbage (Brassica Oleracea).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiliang; Hu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xue, Yuqian; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhang, Yangyong; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Liu, Xing; Liu, Zezhou; Lv, Honghao; Zhuang, Mu

    2017-06-05

    Hybrid lethality is a deleterious phenotype that is vital to species evolution. We previously reported hybrid lethality in cabbage (Brassica oleracea) and performed preliminary mapping of related genes. In the present study, the fine mapping of hybrid lethal genes revealed that BoHL1 was located on chromosome C1 between BoHLTO124 and BoHLTO130, with an interval of 101 kb. BoHL2 was confirmed to be between insertion-deletion (InDels) markers HL234 and HL235 on C4, with a marker interval of 70 kb. Twenty-eight and nine annotated genes were found within the two intervals of BoHL1 and BoHL2, respectively. We also applied RNA-Seq to analyze hybrid lethality in cabbage. In the region of BoHL1, seven differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and five resistance (R)-related genes (two in common, i.e., Bo1g153320 and Bo1g153380) were found, whereas in the region of BoHL2, two DEGs and four R-related genes (two in common, i.e., Bo4g173780 and Bo4g173810) were found. Along with studies in which R genes were frequently involved in hybrid lethality in other plants, these interesting R-DEGs may be good candidates associated with hybrid lethality. We also used SNP/InDel analyses and quantitative real-time PCR to confirm the results. This work provides new insight into the mechanisms of hybrid lethality in cabbage.

  20. Finite element analysis and performance evaluation of synthetic jet actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Jeng-Jong; Wu, K. C.

    2002-11-01

    The primary objective of active flow control research is to develop a cost-effective technology that has the potential for revolutionary advances in aerodynamic performance and maneuvering compared to conventional approaches. The development of such systems have many implications for aerospace vehicles including: reducing mechanical complexity and hydraulic failure, reducing noise and weight, lowering energy and fuel consumption, lowering downtime and maintenance, enhancing maneuvering and agility with enhanced aerodynamic performance and safety. Interest in active flow control for aerospace applications has stimulated the recent development of innovative actuator designs that create localized disturbances in a flowfield. A novel class of devices, known as synthetic jet actuator, has been demonstrated to exhibit promising flow control capabilities including separation control and thrust vectoring. The basic components of a synthetic jet actuator are made of cavity and oscillating materials. The synthetic jet actuator developed at NASA LaRC has a small housing in which a cylindrical cavity is enclosed by two metal diaphragms, 50 mm in diameter, placed opposite each other. A circular piezoelectric wafer is attached to the center of the outside face of each metal diaphragm. The pair of piezoelectric metal diaphragms is operated with a 180° phase differential at the same sinusoidal voltage and frequency. With actuation, a synthetic jet issues from a 35.5mm long by 0.5mm wide slot on the top of the device. In this study, a finite element model of synthetic jet actuator developed at NASA LaRC is investigated. The developed finite element model can be utilized to design and determine the performance of synthetic jet actuator. The analysis includes the FE model of circular plate, FE model of piezoelectric actuator/circular plate, piezoelectric (electrical field)/circular plate (structural field)/cavity (flow field) coupled system and experimental validation. The phase

  1. Visualization and Analysis of Arena Data, Wound Ballistics Data, and Vulnerability/Lethality (V/L) Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    engineering simulation in mind. In fact, it was originally developed for Walt Disney . This engine was made open source in 2002 in order to collaborate...information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources , gathering and...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Visualization and Analysis of Arena Data, Wound Ballistics Data, and Vulnerability/Lethality (V/L) Data 5. FUNDING NUMBERS

  2. Genetic mutation of p53 and suppression of the miR-17∼92 cluster are synthetic lethal in non-small cell lung cancer due to upregulation of vitamin D Signaling.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Robert; Du, Liqin; Zhao, Zhenze; McMillan, Elizabeth; Kosti, Adam; Yang, Chin-Rang; Suraokar, Milind; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Gazdar, Adi F; Minna, John D; White, Michael A; Pertsemlidis, Alexander

    2015-02-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related fatalities. Recent success developing genotypically targeted therapies, with potency only in well-defined subpopulations of tumors, suggests a path to improving patient survival. We used a library of oligonucleotide inhibitors of microRNAs, a class of posttranscriptional gene regulators, to identify novel synthetic lethal interactions between miRNA inhibition and molecular mechanisms in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two inhibitors, those for miR-92a and miR-1226*, produced a toxicity distribution across a panel of 27 cell lines that correlated with loss of p53 protein expression. Notably, depletion of p53 was sufficient to confer sensitivity to otherwise resistant telomerase-immortalized bronchial epithelial cells. We found that both miR inhibitors cause sequence-specific downregulation of the miR-17∼92 polycistron, and this downregulation was toxic only in the context of p53 loss. Mechanistic studies indicated that the selective toxicity of miR-17∼92 polycistron inactivation was the consequence of derepression of vitamin D signaling via suppression of CYP24A1, a rate-limiting enzyme in the 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 metabolic pathway. Of note, high CYP24A1 expression significantly correlated with poor patient outcome in multiple lung cancer cohorts. Our results indicate that the screening approach used in this study can identify clinically relevant synthetic lethal interactions and that vitamin D receptor agonists may show enhanced efficacy in p53-negative lung cancer patients.

  3. Genetic mutation of p53 and suppression of the miR-17~92 cluster are synthetic lethal in non-small cell lung cancer due to upregulation of vitamin D signaling

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Robert; Du, Liqin; Zhao, Zhenze; McMillan, Elizabeth; Kosti, Adam; Yang, Chin-Rang; Suraokar, Milind; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Minna, John D.; White, Michael A.; Pertsemlidis, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related fatalities. Recent success developing genotypically-targeted therapies, with potency only in well-defined subpopulations of tumors, suggests a path to improving patient survival. We utilized a library of oligonucleotide inhibitors to microRNAs, a class of post-transcriptional gene regulators, to identify novel synthetic lethal interactions between miRNA inhibition and molecular mechanisms in NSCLC. Two inhibitors, those for miR-92a and miR-1226*, produced a toxicity distribution across a panel of 27 cell lines that correlated with loss of p53 protein expression. Notably, depletion of p53 was sufficient to confer sensitivity to otherwise resistant telomerase-immortalized bronchial epithelial cells. We found that both miR inhibitors cause sequence-specific down-regulation of the miR-17~92 polycistron, and this down-regulation was toxic only in the context of p53 loss. Mechanistic studies indicated the selective toxicity of miR-17~92 polycistron inactivation was the consequence of derepression of vitamin D signaling via suppression of CYP24A1; a rate limiting enzyme in the 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 metabolic pathway. Of note, high CYP24A1 expression significantly correlated with poor patient outcome in multiple lung cancer cohorts. Our results indicate that the screening approach utilized in this study can identify clinically relevant synthetic lethal interactions, and that vitamin D receptor agonists may show enhanced efficacy in p53-negative lung cancer patients. PMID:25519225

  4. Synthetic Lethality of the lytE cwlO Genotype in Bacillus subtilis Is Caused by Lack of d,l-Endopeptidase Activity at the Lateral Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Masayuki; Ooiwa, Seika

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial peptidoglycan acts as an exoskeleton to protect the bacterial cell. Although peptidoglycan biosynthesis by penicillin-binding proteins is well studied, few studies have described peptidoglycan disassembly, which is necessary for a dynamic structure that allows cell growth. In Bacillus subtilis, more than 35 genes encoding cell wall lytic enzymes have been identified; however, only two d,l-endopeptidases (lytE and cwlO) are involved in cell proliferation. In this study, we demonstrated that the d,l-endopeptidase activity at the lateral cell wall is essential for cell proliferation. Inactivation of LytE and CwlO by point mutation of the catalytic residues caused cell growth defects. However, the forced expression of LytF or CwlS, which are paralogs of LytE, did not suppress lytE cwlO synthetic lethality. Subcellular localization studies of these d,l-endopeptidases showed LytF and CwlS at the septa and poles, CwlO at the cylindrical part of the cell, and LytE at the septa and poles as well as the cylindrical part. Furthermore, construction of N-terminal and C-terminal domain-swapped enzymes of LytE, LytF, CwlS, and CwlO revealed that localization was dependent on the N-terminal domains. Only the chimeric proteins that were enzymatically active and localized to the sidewall were able to suppress the synthetic lethality, suggesting that the lack of d,l-endopeptidase activity at the cylindrical part of the cell leads to a growth defect. The functions of LytE and CwlO in cell morphogenesis were discussed. PMID:22139507

  5. Protection Against Lethal Sendai Virus Infection by in vivo Priming of Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes with a Free Synthetic Peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kast, W. Martin; Roux, Laurent; Curren, Joseph; Blom, Hendrika J. J.; Voordouw, Arie C.; Meloen, Rob H.; Kolakofsky, Daniel; Melief, Cornelis J. M.

    1991-03-01

    The only peptide of Sendai virus that is recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in B6 mice was found with (i) the use of recombinant vaccinia virus constructs containing separate genes of Sendai virus and (ii) a set of overlapping peptides completely spanning the identified nucleoprotein (NP) gene product. This immunodominant NP peptide is recognized by Sendai virus-specific CTL that are known to have therapeutic effects in vivo. By subcutaneous immunization, this peptide induced Sendai virus and NP peptide-specific CTL memory responses in vivo. Most importantly, mice that had been immunized with this peptide were protected against a lethal virus dose, indicating that viral peptides can be used as antiviral T-cell vaccines. The induction of T-cell memory by free peptide immunization potentially has wide applicability in biology and medicine, including protection against infectious disease.

  6. Protection against lethal Sendai virus infection by in vivo priming of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes with a free synthetic peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Kast, W M; Roux, L; Curren, J; Blom, H J; Voordouw, A C; Meloen, R H; Kolakofsky, D; Melief, C J

    1991-01-01

    The only peptide of Sendai virus that is recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in B6 mice was found with (i) the use of recombinant vaccinia virus constructs containing separate genes of Sendai virus and (ii) a set of overlapping peptides completely spanning the identified nucleoprotein (NP) gene product. This immunodominant NP peptide is recognized by Sendai virus-specific CTL that are known to have therapeutic effects in vivo. By subcutaneous immunization, this peptide induced Sendai virus and NP peptide-specific CTL memory responses in vivo. Most importantly, mice that had been immunized with this peptide were protected against a lethal virus dose, indicating that viral peptides can be used as antiviral T-cell vaccines. The induction of T-cell memory by free peptide immunization potentially has wide applicability in biology and medicine, including protection against infectious disease. PMID:1848698

  7. Metagenomic Analysis of Cucumber RNA from East Timor Reveals an Aphid lethal paralysis virus Genome

    PubMed Central

    Maina, Solomon; Edwards, Owain R.; de Almeida, Luis; Ximenes, Abel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present here the first complete genomic Aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV) sequence isolated from cucumber plant RNA from East Timor. We compare it with two complete ALPV genome sequences from China, and one each from Israel, South Africa, and the United States. It most closely resembled the Chinese isolate LGH genome. PMID:28082492

  8. Rain Attenuation Analysis using Synthetic Storm Technique in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lwas, A. K.; Islam, Md R.; Chebil, J.; Habaebi, M. H.; Ismail, A. F.; Zyoud, A.; Dao, H.

    2013-12-01

    Generated rain attenuation time series plays an important role for investigating the rain fade characteristics in the lack of real fade measurements. A suitable conversion technique can be applied to measured rain rate time series to produce rain attenuation data and be utilized to understand the rain fade characteristics. This paper focuses on applicability of synthetic storm technique (SST) to convert measured rain rate data to rain attenuation time series. Its performance is assessed for time series generation over a tropical location Kuala Lumpur, in Malaysia. From preliminary analysis, it is found that SST gives satisfactory results to estimate the rain attenuation time series from the rain rate measurements over this region.

  9. Standardized, mathematical model-based and validated in vitro analysis of anthrax lethal toxin neutralization.

    PubMed

    Li, Han; Soroka, Stephen D; Taylor, Thomas H; Stamey, Karen L; Stinson, Kelly Wallace; Freeman, Alison E; Abramson, Darbi R; Desai, Rita; Cronin, Li X; Oxford, J Wade; Caba, Joseph; Pleatman, Cynthia; Pathak, Sonal; Schmidt, Daniel S; Semenova, Vera A; Martin, Sandra K; Wilkins, Patricia P; Quinn, Conrad P

    2008-04-20

    Quantification of anthrax lethal toxin (LTx) neutralization activity (TNA) is pivotal in assessing protective antibody responses to anthrax vaccines and for evaluation of immunotherapies for anthrax. We have adapted and redesigned the TNA assay to establish a unifying, standardized, quantitative and validated technology platform for LTx neutralization in the J774A.1 murine cell line. Critical design features of this platform are 1) the application of a free-form or constrained 4 parameter logistic (4-PL) function to model neutralization responses within and between boundary limits of 100% cell survival and 95% cell lysis and 2) to exploit innovative assay curve recognition algorithms for interpretive endpoints. The assay was validated using human serum ED50 (dilution of serum effecting 50% neutralization) as the primary reportable value (RV). Intra-operator and intermediate precision, expressed as the coefficient of variation (%CV), were high at 10.5-15.5%CV and 13.5-14.5%CV respectively. TNA assay dilutional linearity was demonstrated for human sera using linear regression analysis of log(10) transformed data with slope=0.99, intercept=-0.03 and r(2)=0.985. Assay accuracy, inferred from the precision and linearity data and using a spike-recovery approach, was high with a percent error (%E) range of only 3.4-20.5%E. The lower limit of detection (LLOD) was ED50=12 and the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was ED50=36. The cell-based assay was robust, tolerating incubation temperatures from 35 to 39 degrees C, CO(2) concentrations from 3% to 7% and reporter substrate (MTT) concentrations of 2.5-7.5 mg/ml. Strict assay quality control parameters were met for up to 25 cell culture passages. The long term (50 month) assay stability, determined using human reference standards AVR414 and AVR801, indicated high precision, consistent accuracy and no detectable assay drift. A customized software program provided two additional assay metrics, Quantification Titer (QT) and

  10. Non-Lethal Chemical Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    AU/ACSC/1636/2003-04 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY Non- Lethal Chemical Weapons LESTER A. WEILACHER...Non- Lethal Chemical Weapons 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...of the United States government. ii EL 664 (AY03) Issue Analysis, “Non- Lethal Chemical Weapons” Submitted by Major JR Weilacher, 03-1636E, 11

  11. Is Birthweight Associated with Total and Aggressive/Lethal Prostate Cancer Risks? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cindy Ke; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Welsh, Judith; Mackinnon, Karen; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Cook, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that intrauterine exposures are important for subsequent prostate cancer risk. Prior epidemiological studies have used birthweight as a proxy of cumulative intrauterine exposures to test this hypothesis, but results have been inconsistent partly due to limited statistical power. Methods We investigated birthweight in relation to prostate cancer in the Medical Research Council (MRC) National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD) using Cox proportional hazards models. We then conducted a meta-analysis of birthweight in relation to total and aggressive/lethal prostate cancer risks, combining results from the NSHD analysis with 13 additional studies on this relationship identified from a systematic search in four major scientific literature databases through January 2015. Results Random-effects models found that each kg increase in birthweight was positively associated with total (OR=1.02, 95%CI=1.00, 1.05; I2=13%) and aggressive/lethal prostate cancer (OR=1.08, 95%CI=0.99, 1.19; I2=40%). Sensitivity analyses restricted to studies with birthweight extracted from medical records demonstrated stronger positive associations with total (OR=1.11, 95%CI=1.03, 1.19; I2=0%) and aggressive/lethal (OR=1.37, 95%CI=1.09, 1.74; I2=0%) prostate cancer. These studies heavily overlapped with those based in Nordic countries. Conclusion This study provides evidence that heavier birthweight may be associated with modest increased risks of total and aggressive/lethal prostate cancer, which supports the hypothesis that intrauterine exposures may be related to subsequent prostate cancer risks. PMID:26930450

  12. Functional analysis of molecular interactions in synthetic auxin response circuits

    PubMed Central

    Lanctot, Amy; Hageman, Amber; Nemhauser, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Auxin-regulated transcription pivots on the interaction between the AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (Aux/IAA) repressor proteins and the AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF) transcription factors. Recent structural analyses of ARFs and Aux/IAAs have raised questions about the functional complexes driving auxin transcriptional responses. To parse the nature and significance of ARF–DNA and ARF–Aux/IAA interactions, we analyzed structure-guided variants of synthetic auxin response circuits in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our analysis revealed that promoter architecture could specify ARF activity and that ARF19 required dimerization at two distinct domains for full transcriptional activation. In addition, monomeric Aux/IAAs were able to repress ARF activity in both yeast and plants. This systematic, quantitative structure-function analysis identified a minimal complex—comprising a single Aux/IAA repressing a pair of dimerized ARFs—sufficient for auxin-induced transcription. PMID:27647902

  13. Time-frequency analysis of synthetic aperture radar signals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Brooks

    1996-08-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has become an important tool for remote sensing of the environment. SAR is a set of digital signal processing algorithms that are used to focus the signal returned to the radar because radar systems in themselves cannot produce the high resolution images required in remote sensing applications. To reconstruct an image, several parameters must be estimated and the quality of output image depends on the degree of accuracy of these parameters. In this thesis, we derive the fundamental SAR algorithms and concentrate on the estimation of one of its critical parameters. We show that the common technique for estimating this particular parameter can sometimes lead to erroneous results and reduced quality images. We also employ time-frequency analysis techniques to examine variations in the radar signals caused by platform motion and show how these results can be used to improve output image quality.

  14. Economic Deprivation as a Predictor of the Direction of Lethal Violence: An Analysis of Italian Provinces.

    PubMed

    Stack, Steven; Laubepin, Frederique; Vichi, Monica; Minelli, Giada; Lester, David; Ferracuti, Stefano; Girardi, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio

    2016-07-02

    Research on suicide and homicide rates has neglected an integrated model seeking to explain social variation in the direction of lethal violence. The present investigation explores the association between measures of social deprivation on the relative incidence of suicide over homicide in Italian provinces. Data refer to official government sources on lethal violence rates and measures of social deprivation. The central dependent variable (SHR) is the tendency towards suicide measured as the suicide rate divided by the sum of the suicide and homicide rates. Data were available for 102 Italian provinces in the Census year 2001. The percentage of the population marked by two indicators of deprivation (low education, household population density) were negatively associated with the SHR. The results are largely consistent with a stream of previous research that connects deprivation with a relatively high probability for disadvantaged populations to direct aggression outwardly in the form of homicide rather than inwardly in the form of suicide. The present study specifies which elements of deprivation best predict the direction of violence and is the first study for the Italian context.

  15. Quantity, analysis, and lethality of European and Africanized honey bee venoms.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, M J; Schmidt, J O; Egen, N B; Lowry, J E

    1990-07-01

    Venom from Africanized honey bees (derived mainly from Apis mellifera scutellata) was compared with venom from domestic, European bees by study of lethality, immunological cross-reactivity, venom yield, isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns, and melittin titers. The LD50s of European and Africanized bee venom by iv injection in mice were similar. In venom neutralization experiments, Africanized bee venom was mixed with antibodies from a beekeeper exposed only to European bees and used to challenge mice. Survival times of mice given these mixtures were significantly prolonged, indicating that human serum antibodies to European bee venom neutralized the lethal effects of Africanized bee venom. Reservoirs from Africanized bees contained less venom than European bees (94 and 147 micrograms venom/bee, respectively) and Africanized bee venom had a lower melittin content. The IEF patterns of venom from individual European bees varied considerably, as did IEF patterns of individual Africanized bees. Pools of venom from 1,000 bees of each population of A. mellifera showed noticeable but less obvious electrophoretic differences. The findings suggest that multiple stinging, and not increased venom potency or delivery, is the cause of serious reactions from Africanized bee attacks.

  16. Synthetic biology in the analysis and engineering of signaling processes.

    PubMed

    Kämpf, Michael M; Weber, Wilfried

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic biology as the discipline of reconstructing natural and designing novel biological systems is gaining increasing impact in signaling science. This review article provides insight into synthetic approaches for analyzing and synthesizing signaling processes starting with strategies into how natural and pathological signaling pathways can be reconstructed in an evolutionary distant host to study their topology and function while avoiding interference with the original host background. In the second part we integrate synthetic strategies in the rewiring of signaling systems at the nucleic acid and protein level to reprogram cellular functions for biotechnological applications. The last part focuses on synthetic inter-cell and inter-species signaling devices and their integration into synthetic ecosystems to study fundamental mechanisms governing the co-existence of species. We finally address current bottlenecks in the (re-)design of signaling pathways and discuss future directions in signaling-related synthetic biology.

  17. Hypoxia Potentiates the Radiation-Sensitizing Effect of Olaparib in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Xenografts by Contextual Synthetic Lethality.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanyan; Verbiest, Tom; Devery, Aoife M; Bokobza, Sivan M; Weber, Anika M; Leszczynska, Katarzyna B; Hammond, Ester M; Ryan, Anderson J

    2016-06-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors potentiate radiation therapy in preclinical models of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and other types of cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying radiosensitization in vivo are incompletely understood. Herein, we investigated the impact of hypoxia on radiosensitization by the PARP inhibitor olaparib in human NSCLC xenograft models. NSCLC Calu-6 and Calu-3 cells were irradiated in the presence of olaparib or vehicle under normoxic (21% O2) or hypoxic (1% O2) conditions. In vitro radiosensitivity was assessed by clonogenic survival assay and γH2AX foci assay. Established Calu-6 and Calu-3 subcutaneous xenografts were treated with olaparib (50 mg/kg, daily for 3 days), radiation (10 Gy), or both. Tumors (n=3/group) were collected 24 or 72 hours after the first treatment. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase IX [CA9]), vessels (CD31), DNA double strand breaks (DSB) (γH2AX), and apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3 [CC3]). The remaining xenografts (n=6/group) were monitored for tumor growth. In vitro, olaparib showed a greater radiation-sensitizing effect in Calu-3 and Calu-6 cells in hypoxic conditions (1% O2). In vivo, Calu-3 tumors were well-oxygenated, whereas Calu-6 tumors had extensive regions of hypoxia associated with down-regulation of the homologous recombination protein RAD51. Olaparib treatment increased unrepaired DNA DSB (P<.001) and apoptosis (P<.001) in hypoxic cells of Calu-6 tumors following radiation, whereas it had no significant effect on radiation-induced DNA damage response in nonhypoxic cells of Calu-6 tumors or in the tumor cells of well-oxygenated Calu-3 tumors. Consequently, olaparib significantly increased radiation-induced growth inhibition in Calu-6 tumors (P<.001) but not in Calu-3 tumors. Our data suggest that hypoxia potentiates the radiation-sensitizing effects of olaparib by contextual synthetic killing, and that tumor hypoxia may be a

  18. Development of synthetic flood damage curve by explicit costs analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martina, Mario; Molinari, Daniela; Dottori, Francesco; Scorzini, Annarita

    2015-04-01

    Damage modelling is a key component in flood risk assessments. A conventional approach for estimating direct flood damages is the use of depth-damage functions. However, at present, there are few studies that describe in detail the parameters involved in the models and the hypotheses used for the development of these functions based on synthetic approaches and/or actual flood damage data. In this work a synthetic approach was adopted for the development of a damage model for residential buildings. The approach follows the loss assessment procedure usually applied by the insurance loss adjusters. Required information consisted of all those variables that are necessary to define hazard characteristics at building location, compute the exposure value of the building and the replacement costs of its components. In detail, the model requires four input tables. The hazard module includes the variables describing the features of the flood event at building location (e.g. water depth outside the building, water depth inside the basement, maximum velocity of the flood, duration of the event, contaminant and sediment load). The exposure module includes both extensive variables (e.g. foot print area, number of floors) and "vulnerability" variables, where the latter affect damage estimation in two different ways: by changing the replacement value/unit prices of the building and its components (e.g. the finishing level, building type) or by modifying the function(s) describing damage mechanisms (e.g. building structure, plant distribution). The replacement values table and the unit-price table include respectively the replacement value of the building and the unitary replacement costs of the different building components (e.g. doors and pavement replacement per square meter). The final output of the model is represented by different sets of damage functions describing all the building components (e.g. plasters, plants), depending on hazard, exposure and vulnerability

  19. Biophysical analysis of a lethal laminin alpha-1 mutation reveals altered self-interaction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Trushar R; Nikodemus, Denise; Besong, Tabot M D; Reuten, Raphael; Meier, Markus; Harding, Stephen E; Winzor, Donald J; Koch, Manuel; Stetefeld, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Laminins are key basement membrane molecules that influence several biological activities and are linked to a number of diseases. They are secreted as heterotrimeric proteins consisting of one α, one β, and one γ chain, followed by their assembly into a polymer-like sheet at the basement membrane. Using sedimentation velocity, dynamic light scattering, and surface plasmon resonance experiments, we studied self-association of three laminin (LM) N-terminal fragments α-1 (hLM α-1N), α-5 (hLM α-5N) and β-3 (hLM β-3N) originating from the short arms of the human laminin αβγ heterotrimer. Corresponding studies of the hLM α-1N C49S mutant, equivalent to the larval lethal C56S mutant in zebrafish, have shown that this mutation causes enhanced self-association behavior, an observation that provides a plausible explanation for the inability of laminin bearing this mutation to fulfill functional roles in vivo, and hence for the deleterious pathological consequences of the mutation on lens function.

  20. Analysis of lethal and sublethal impacts of environmental disasters on sperm whales using stochastic modeling.

    PubMed

    Ackleh, Azmy S; Chiquet, Ross A; Ma, Baoling; Tang, Tingting; Caswell, Hal; Veprauskas, Amy; Sidorovskaia, Natalia

    2017-08-01

    Mathematical models are essential for combining data from multiple sources to quantify population endpoints. This is especially true for species, such as marine mammals, for which data on vital rates are difficult to obtain. Since the effects of an environmental disaster are not fixed, we develop time-varying (nonautonomous) matrix population models that account for the eventual recovery of the environment to the pre-disaster state. We use these models to investigate how lethal and sublethal impacts (in the form of reductions in the survival and fecundity, respectively) affect the population's recovery process. We explore two scenarios of the environmental recovery process and include the effect of demographic stochasticity. Our results provide insights into the relationship between the magnitude of the disaster, the duration of the disaster, and the probability that the population recovers to pre-disaster levels or a biologically relevant threshold level. To illustrate this modeling methodology, we provide an application to a sperm whale population. This application was motivated by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico that has impacted a wide variety of species populations including oysters, fish, corals, and whales.

  1. Analysis of cyanogen bromide peptides of type I collagen from a patient with lethal osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, E; Glanville, R W; Krieg, T; Müller, P

    1983-01-01

    The CNBr peptides of type I collagen from bone of a patient with lethal osteogenesis imperfecta and age-matched controls were isolated by molecular-sieve chromatography and their amino acid compositions were determined. No differences were found between the compositions of the peptides from the patient and those from the controls, except for an increase in the degree of hydroxylation of lysine in all peptides from the patient. Type I collagen CNBr peptides from chick-embryo skin [Barnes, Constable Morton & Kodicek (1971) Biochem. J. 125, 925--928] and guinea-pig scar tissue [Shuttleworth, Forrest & Jackson (1975) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 379, 207--216] also have an increased degree of hydroxylation of lysine with an otherwise normal amino acid composition, and it was believed that this could be an embryonic form of collagen. As a similar collagen was present in the bones of the patient studied, it seems possible that the same 'embryonic' collagen is synthesized during development, in repair process and also in genetic disorders of collagen metabolism. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6411063

  2. Credible Set Estimation, Analysis, and Applications in Synthetic Aperture Radar Canonical Feature Extraction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    CREDIBLE SET ESTIMATION, ANALYSIS, AND APPLICATIONS IN SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR CANONICAL FEATURE EXTRACTION THESIS Andrew C. Rexford, 1st Lieutenant...AND APPLICATIONS IN SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR CANONICAL FEATURE EXTRACTION THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Electrical and Computer...APPLICATIONS IN SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR CANONICAL FEATURE EXTRACTION THESIS Andrew C. Rexford, B.S.E.E. 1st Lieutenant, USAF Committee Membership: Dr. Julie

  3. Inverse Synthetic Aperture LADAR for Geosynchronous Space Objects - Signal-to-Noise Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Inverse synthetic aperture LADAR for geosynchronous space objects – signal-to-noise analysis Casey J. Pellizzari Air Force Research Laboratory...NM 87117 Rao Gudimetla Air Force Research Laboratory (RDSMA) 535 Lipoa Parkway, Ste. 200, Kihei HI 96753 ABSTRACT Inverse synthetic ...return signal detected by a coherent ISAL system. Using tomographic techniques common to synthetic aperture radar (SAR), a model is developed for the

  4. Molecular Analysis of an Outbreak of Lethal Postpartum Sepsis Caused by Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Claire E.; Dryden, Matthew; Holden, Matthew T. G.; Davies, Frances J.; Lawrenson, Richard A.; Farzaneh, Leili; Bentley, Stephen D.; Efstratiou, Androulla

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is now the leading direct cause of maternal death in the United Kingdom, and Streptococcus pyogenes is the leading pathogen. We combined conventional and genomic analyses to define the duration and scale of a lethal outbreak. Two postpartum deaths caused by S. pyogenes occurred within 24 h; one was characterized by bacteremia and shock and the other by hemorrhagic pneumonia. The women gave birth within minutes of each other in the same maternity unit 2 days earlier. Seven additional infections in health care and household contacts were subsequently detected and treated. All cluster-associated S. pyogenes isolates were genotype emm1 and were initially indistinguishable from other United Kingdom emm1 isolates. Sequencing of the virulence gene sic revealed that all outbreak isolates had the same unique sic type. Genome sequencing confirmed that the cluster was caused by a unique S. pyogenes clone. Transmission between patients occurred on a single day and was associated with casual contact only. A single isolate from one patient demonstrated a sequence change in sic consistent with longer infection duration. Transmission to health care workers was traced to single clinical contacts with index cases. The last case was detected 18 days after the first case. Following enhanced surveillance, the outbreak isolate was not detected again. Mutations in bacterial regulatory genes played no detectable role in this outbreak, illustrating the intrinsic ability of emm1 S. pyogenes to spread while retaining virulence. This fast-moving outbreak highlights the potential of S. pyogenes to cause a range of diseases in the puerperium with rapid transmission, underlining the importance of immediate recognition and response by clinical infection and occupational health teams. PMID:23616448

  5. The VG/GA strain of Newcastle disease virus: mucosal immunity, protection against lethal challenge and molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Perozo, Francisco; Villegas, Pedro; Dolz, Roser; Afonso, Claudio L; Purvis, Linda B

    2008-06-01

    The Villegas-Glisson/University of Georgia (VG/GA) strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolated from the intestine of healthy turkeys has been proposed to replicate in the respiratory and intestinal tract of chickens. In the present study, the virus distribution, the mucosal and systemic immune response, the efficacy against lethal challenge and the full genome sequence of the VG/GA strain were compared with the La Sota strain of NDV. The VG/GA strain was detected at different time points in the respiratory and intestinal tract of chickens with a preferential tropism for the latter. Both the VG/GA and La Sota strains induced NDV-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) at the upper respiratory tract. IgA levels were higher in the trachea for the La Sota strain, while they were higher in the bile and intestine for the VG/GA strain. Positive correlation between virus distribution of the viruses and IgA production was observed. Despite the presence of the maternal antibodies in broilers, early vaccination with the VG/GA strain afforded 95% to 100% protection against lethal challenge, equivalent to the protection conferred by the La Sota strain. Full genome sequence analysis classified the VG/GA strain within class II, genotype II viruses, which also include most of the respirotropic vaccine strains. Differences with the La Sota strain at the nucleotide and amino acid levels that may explain the differential phenotype of the VG/GA were observed; however, verification of the significance of those changes is required. Taken together, these results validate field observations on the efficacy of VG/GA vaccination and demonstrated the unique characteristics of the strain.

  6. Improving the Analysis Capabilities of the Synthetic Theater Operations Research Model (STORM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    the Chief of Naval Operations, Capability Analysis and Assessment Division (OPNAV N81), along with other DOD organizations, utilizes the Synthetic...Capability Analysis and Assessment Division (OPNAV N81), along with other DOD organizations, utilizes the Synthetic Theater Operations Research Model...Navy’s Assessment Division, adopted STORM as its primary campaign analysis tool due to its stochastic nature, which provides analysts the ability to

  7. What Are Reasons for the Large Gender Differences in the Lethality of Suicidal Acts? An Epidemiological Analysis in Four European Countries

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs, Katherina; Székely, András; Tóth, Mónika Ditta; Coyne, James; Quintão, Sónia; Arensman, Ella; Coffey, Claire; Maxwell, Margaret; Värnik, Airi; van Audenhove, Chantal; McDaid, David; Sarchiapone, Marco; Schmidtke, Armin; Genz, Axel; Gusmão, Ricardo; Hegerl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Background In Europe, men have lower rates of attempted suicide compared to women and at the same time a higher rate of completed suicides, indicating major gender differences in lethality of suicidal behaviour. The aim of this study was to analyse the extent to which these gender differences in lethality can be explained by factors such as choice of more lethal methods or lethality differences within the same suicide method or age. In addition, we explored gender differences in the intentionality of suicide attempts. Methods and Findings Methods. Design: Epidemiological study using a combination of self-report and official data. Setting: Mental health care services in four European countries: Germany, Hungary, Ireland, and Portugal. Data basis: Completed suicides derived from official statistics for each country (767 acts, 74.4% male) and assessed suicide attempts excluding habitual intentional self-harm (8,175 acts, 43.2% male). Main Outcome Measures and Data Analysis. We collected data on suicidal acts in eight regions of four European countries participating in the EU-funded “OSPI-Europe”-project (www.ospi-europe.com). We calculated method-specific lethality using the number of completed suicides per method * 100 / (number of completed suicides per method + number of attempted suicides per method). We tested gender differences in the distribution of suicidal acts for significance by using the χ2-test for two-by-two tables. We assessed the effect sizes with phi coefficients (φ). We identified predictors of lethality with a binary logistic regression analysis. Poisson regression analysis examined the contribution of choice of methods and method-specific lethality to gender differences in the lethality of suicidal acts. Findings Main Results Suicidal acts (fatal and non-fatal) were 3.4 times more lethal in men than in women (lethality 13.91% (regarding 4106 suicidal acts) versus 4.05% (regarding 4836 suicidal acts)), the difference being significant for the

  8. Analysis of Parent Synthetic Cannabinoids in Blood and Urinary Metabolites by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Knittel, Jessica L.; Holler, Justin M.; Chmiel, Jeffrey D.; Vorce, Shawn P.; Magluilo, Joseph; Levine, Barry; Ramos, Gerardo; Bosy, Thomas Z.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids emerged on the designer drug market in recent years due to their ability to produce cannabis-like effects without the risk of detection by traditional drug testing techniques such as immunoassay and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. As government agencies work to schedule existing synthetic cannabinoids, new, unregulated and structurally diverse compounds continue to be developed and sold. Synthetic cannabinoids undergo extensive metabolic conversion. Consequently, both blood and urine specimens may play an important role in the forensic analysis of synthetic cannabinoids. It has been observed that structurally similar synthetic cannabinoids follow common metabolic pathways, which often produce metabolites with similar metabolic transformations. Presented are two validated quantitative methods for extracting and identifying 15 parent synthetic cannabinoids in blood, 17 synthetic cannabinoid metabolites in urine and the qualitative identification of 2 additional parent compounds. The linear range for most synthetic cannabinoid compounds monitored was 0.1–10 ng/mL with the limit of detection between 0.01 and 0.5 ng/mL. Selectivity, specificity, accuracy, precision, recovery and matrix effect were also examined and determined to be acceptable for each compound. The validated methods were used to analyze a compilation of synthetic cannabinoid investigative cases where both blood and urine specimens were submitted. The study suggests a strong correlation between the metabolites detected in urine and the parent compounds found in blood. PMID:26792810

  9. Analysis of Parent Synthetic Cannabinoids in Blood and Urinary Metabolites by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Jessica L; Holler, Justin M; Chmiel, Jeffrey D; Vorce, Shawn P; Magluilo, Joseph; Levine, Barry; Ramos, Gerardo; Bosy, Thomas Z

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids emerged on the designer drug market in recent years due to their ability to produce cannabis-like effects without the risk of detection by traditional drug testing techniques such as immunoassay and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As government agencies work to schedule existing synthetic cannabinoids, new, unregulated and structurally diverse compounds continue to be developed and sold. Synthetic cannabinoids undergo extensive metabolic conversion. Consequently, both blood and urine specimens may play an important role in the forensic analysis of synthetic cannabinoids. It has been observed that structurally similar synthetic cannabinoids follow common metabolic pathways, which often produce metabolites with similar metabolic transformations. Presented are two validated quantitative methods for extracting and identifying 15 parent synthetic cannabinoids in blood, 17 synthetic cannabinoid metabolites in urine and the qualitative identification of 2 additional parent compounds. The linear range for most synthetic cannabinoid compounds monitored was 0.1-10 ng/mL with the limit of detection between 0.01 and 0.5 ng/mL. Selectivity, specificity, accuracy, precision, recovery and matrix effect were also examined and determined to be acceptable for each compound. The validated methods were used to analyze a compilation of synthetic cannabinoid investigative cases where both blood and urine specimens were submitted. The study suggests a strong correlation between the metabolites detected in urine and the parent compounds found in blood. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Qualitative analysis of seized synthetic cannabinoids and synthetic cathinones by gas chromatography triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Seongshin; Arroyo-Mora, Luis E; Almirall, José R

    2015-02-01

    Designer drugs are analogues or derivatives of illicit drugs with a modification of their chemical structure in order to circumvent current legislation for controlled substances. Designer drugs of abuse have increased dramatically in popularity all over the world for the past couple of years. Currently, the qualitative seized-drug analysis is mainly performed by gas chromatography-electron ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS) in which most of these emerging designer drug derivatives are extensively fragmented not presenting a molecular ion in their mass spectra. The absence of molecular ion and/or similar fragmentation pattern among these derivatives may cause the equivocal identification of unknown seized-substances. In this study, the qualitative identification of 34 designer drugs, mainly synthetic cannabinoids and synthetic cathinones, were performed by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole-tandem mass spectrometry with two different ionization techniques, including electron ionization (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) only focusing on qualitative seized-drug analysis, not from the toxicological point of view. The implementation of CI source facilitates the determination of molecular mass and the identification of seized designer drugs. Developed multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode may increase sensitivity and selectivity in the analysis of seized designer drugs. In addition, CI mass spectra and MRM mass spectra of these designer drug derivatives can be used as a potential supplemental database along with EI mass spectral database. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Synthetic Cell Lineage Tracing Using Nuclease Barcoding.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stephanie Tzouanas; Zimmerman, Stephanie M; Wang, Jianbin; Kim, Stuart K; Quake, Stephen R

    2017-06-16

    Lineage tracing by the determination and mapping of progeny arising from single cells is an important approach enabling the elucidation of mechanisms underlying diverse biological processes ranging from development to disease. We developed a dynamic sequence-based barcode system for synthetic lineage tracing and have demonstrated its performance in C. elegans, a model organism whose lineage tree is well established. The strategy we use creates lineage trees based upon the introduction of synthetically controlled mutations into cells and the propagation of these mutations to daughter cells at each cell division. We analyzed this experimental proof of concept along with a corresponding simulation and analytical model to gain a deeper understanding of the coding capacity of the system. Our results provide specific bounds on the fidelity of lineage tracing using such approaches.

  12. Design and analysis of synthetic carbon fixation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Even, Arren; Noor, Elad; Lewis, Nathan E.; Milo, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Carbon fixation is the process by which CO2 is incorporated into organic compounds. In modern agriculture in which water, light, and nutrients can be abundant, carbon fixation could become a significant growth-limiting factor. Hence, increasing the fixation rate is of major importance in the road toward sustainability in food and energy production. There have been recent attempts to improve the rate and specificity of Rubisco, the carboxylating enzyme operating in the Calvin–Benson cycle; however, they have achieved only limited success. Nature employs several alternative carbon fixation pathways, which prompted us to ask whether more efficient novel synthetic cycles could be devised. Using the entire repertoire of approximately 5,000 metabolic enzymes known to occur in nature, we computationally identified alternative carbon fixation pathways that combine existing metabolic building blocks from various organisms. We compared the natural and synthetic pathways based on physicochemical criteria that include kinetics, energetics, and topology. Our study suggests that some of the proposed synthetic pathways could have significant quantitative advantages over their natural counterparts, such as the overall kinetic rate. One such cycle, which is predicted to be two to three times faster than the Calvin–Benson cycle, employs the most effective carboxylating enzyme, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, using the core of the naturally evolved C4 cycle. Although implementing such alternative cycles presents daunting challenges related to expression levels, activity, stability, localization, and regulation, we believe our findings suggest exciting avenues of exploration in the grand challenge of enhancing food and renewable fuel production via metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. PMID:20410460

  13. Analysis of jamming on inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhou-an; Pi, Yi-ming; Yang, Jian-yu

    2005-05-01

    Inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) is a powerful means in target identifying, especially the target in the air, which can image the moving target. There is little study on modeling and resistance technique according to ISAR in China. This paper establishes a model of ISAR system, and then studies on some valid jamming technique. This will provide us the valid technique support on ISAR resistance equipment later.

  14. Design and analysis of synthetic carbon fixation pathways.

    PubMed

    Bar-Even, Arren; Noor, Elad; Lewis, Nathan E; Milo, Ron

    2010-05-11

    Carbon fixation is the process by which CO(2) is incorporated into organic compounds. In modern agriculture in which water, light, and nutrients can be abundant, carbon fixation could become a significant growth-limiting factor. Hence, increasing the fixation rate is of major importance in the road toward sustainability in food and energy production. There have been recent attempts to improve the rate and specificity of Rubisco, the carboxylating enzyme operating in the Calvin-Benson cycle; however, they have achieved only limited success. Nature employs several alternative carbon fixation pathways, which prompted us to ask whether more efficient novel synthetic cycles could be devised. Using the entire repertoire of approximately 5,000 metabolic enzymes known to occur in nature, we computationally identified alternative carbon fixation pathways that combine existing metabolic building blocks from various organisms. We compared the natural and synthetic pathways based on physicochemical criteria that include kinetics, energetics, and topology. Our study suggests that some of the proposed synthetic pathways could have significant quantitative advantages over their natural counterparts, such as the overall kinetic rate. One such cycle, which is predicted to be two to three times faster than the Calvin-Benson cycle, employs the most effective carboxylating enzyme, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, using the core of the naturally evolved C4 cycle. Although implementing such alternative cycles presents daunting challenges related to expression levels, activity, stability, localization, and regulation, we believe our findings suggest exciting avenues of exploration in the grand challenge of enhancing food and renewable fuel production via metabolic engineering and synthetic biology.

  15. Quantitative proteomics analysis of zebrafish exposed to sub-lethal dosages of β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA)

    PubMed Central

    Frøyset, Ann Kristin; Khan, Essa Ahsan; Fladmark, Kari Espolin

    2016-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin present in microalgae and shown to accumulate in the food web. BMAA has been linked to the complex neurodegenerative disorder of Guam and to increased incidents sporadic ALS. Two main neurotoxic routes are suggested; an excitotoxic by acting as an agonist towards glutamate receptors and a metabolic by misincorporating into cellular proteins. We have used zebrafish, an increasingly used model for neurodegenerative diseases, to further identify signaling components involved in BMAA-induced toxicity. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to sub-lethal dosages of BMAA and a label-free proteomics analysis was conducted on larvae 4 days post fertilization. The exposed larvae showed no developmental abnormalities, but a reduced heart rate and increased expression of GSK3 isoforms. Search towards a reviewed database containing 2968 entries identified 480 proteins. Only 17 of these were regulated 2-fold or more in the exposed larvae. Seven of these proteins could be associated to glutamate receptor signaling and recycling. The remaining nine have all been linked to disturbance in protein homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) development or neuronal cell death. We also found that BMAA influenced the endocannabinoid system by up-regulation of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and that FAAH inhibitor URB597 reduced the BMAA effect on heart rate and GSK3 expression. PMID:27404450

  16. Quantitative proteomics analysis of zebrafish exposed to sub-lethal dosages of β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA).

    PubMed

    Frøyset, Ann Kristin; Khan, Essa Ahsan; Fladmark, Kari Espolin

    2016-07-12

    The non-protein amino acid β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin present in microalgae and shown to accumulate in the food web. BMAA has been linked to the complex neurodegenerative disorder of Guam and to increased incidents sporadic ALS. Two main neurotoxic routes are suggested; an excitotoxic by acting as an agonist towards glutamate receptors and a metabolic by misincorporating into cellular proteins. We have used zebrafish, an increasingly used model for neurodegenerative diseases, to further identify signaling components involved in BMAA-induced toxicity. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to sub-lethal dosages of BMAA and a label-free proteomics analysis was conducted on larvae 4 days post fertilization. The exposed larvae showed no developmental abnormalities, but a reduced heart rate and increased expression of GSK3 isoforms. Search towards a reviewed database containing 2968 entries identified 480 proteins. Only 17 of these were regulated 2-fold or more in the exposed larvae. Seven of these proteins could be associated to glutamate receptor signaling and recycling. The remaining nine have all been linked to disturbance in protein homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) development or neuronal cell death. We also found that BMAA influenced the endocannabinoid system by up-regulation of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and that FAAH inhibitor URB597 reduced the BMAA effect on heart rate and GSK3 expression.

  17. Combined high pressure and temperature induced lethal and sublethal injury of Lactococcus lactis--application of multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kilimann, K V; Hartmann, C; Delgado, A; Vogel, R F; Gänzle, M G

    2006-05-25

    It was the aim of this work to determine the combined effects of pressure, temperature, and co-solutes on Lactococcus lactis, and to detect correlations between culture-dependent and culture-independent methods for assessment of cellular viability and sublethal injury. Therefore, the pressure induced inactivation of L. lactis MG 1363 was investigated in buffer and in buffer with 1.5 M sucrose or 4 M NaCl at a pressure range of 0.1 to 500 MPa and a temperature range of 5 to 50 degrees C. The inactivation was characterised by viable cell counts, stress resistant cell counts, membrane integrity, metabolic activity, and the activity of the multi-drug-resistance transport enzyme LmrP. L. lactis was most resistant to pressure application at 20-30 degrees C. Sucrose protected towards inactivation at any temperature, NaCl provided protection at high temperatures only. By using Principal Component Analysis, correlations were detected between viable cell counts and metabolic activity as well as stress resistant cell counts and LmrP activity. In conclusion, the pressure-inactivation of L. lactis is strongly temperature dependent, baroprotection by sucrose occurs at any temperature but the baroprotective effects of NaCl is temperature dependent. Further on, a combination of two experimental methods fully describe lethal and sublethal injury of pressure treated cells. These simplification of data acquisition and model development facilitates the establishment of pressure processes in food technology.

  18. Integrated clinical, whole-genome, and transcriptome analysis of multisampled lethal metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bova, G. Steven; Kallio, Heini M.L.; Annala, Matti; Kivinummi, Kati; Högnäs, Gunilla; Häyrynen, Sergei; Rantapero, Tommi; Kivinen, Virpi; Isaacs, William B.; Tolonen, Teemu; Nykter, Matti; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    We report the first combined analysis of whole-genome sequence, detailed clinical history, and transcriptome sequence of multiple prostate cancer metastases in a single patient (A21). Whole-genome and transcriptome sequence was obtained from nine anatomically separate metastases, and targeted DNA sequencing was performed in cancerous and noncancerous foci within the primary tumor specimen removed 5 yr before death. Transcriptome analysis revealed increased expression of androgen receptor (AR)-regulated genes in liver metastases that harbored an AR p.L702H mutation, suggesting a dominant effect by the mutation despite being present in only one of an estimated 16 copies per cell. The metastases harbored several alterations to the PI3K/AKT pathway, including a clonal truncal mutation in PIK3CG and present in all metastatic sites studied. The list of truncal genomic alterations shared by all metastases included homozygous deletion of TP53, hemizygous deletion of RB1 and CHD1, and amplification of FGFR1. If the patient were treated today, given this knowledge, the use of second-generation androgen-directed therapies, cessation of glucocorticoid administration, and therapeutic inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway or FGFR1 receptor could provide personalized benefit. Three previously unreported truncal clonal missense mutations (ABCC4 p.R891L, ALDH9A1 p.W89R, and ASNA1 p.P75R) were expressed at the RNA level and assessed as druggable. The truncal status of mutations may be critical for effective actionability and merit further study. Our findings suggest that a large set of deeply analyzed cases could serve as a powerful guide to more effective prostate cancer basic science and personalized cancer medicine clinical trials. PMID:27148588

  19. Integrated clinical, whole-genome, and transcriptome analysis of multisampled lethal metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bova, G Steven; Kallio, Heini M L; Annala, Matti; Kivinummi, Kati; Högnäs, Gunilla; Häyrynen, Sergei; Rantapero, Tommi; Kivinen, Virpi; Isaacs, William B; Tolonen, Teemu; Nykter, Matti; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2016-05-01

    We report the first combined analysis of whole-genome sequence, detailed clinical history, and transcriptome sequence of multiple prostate cancer metastases in a single patient (A21). Whole-genome and transcriptome sequence was obtained from nine anatomically separate metastases, and targeted DNA sequencing was performed in cancerous and noncancerous foci within the primary tumor specimen removed 5 yr before death. Transcriptome analysis revealed increased expression of androgen receptor (AR)-regulated genes in liver metastases that harbored an AR p.L702H mutation, suggesting a dominant effect by the mutation despite being present in only one of an estimated 16 copies per cell. The metastases harbored several alterations to the PI3K/AKT pathway, including a clonal truncal mutation in PIK3CG and present in all metastatic sites studied. The list of truncal genomic alterations shared by all metastases included homozygous deletion of TP53, hemizygous deletion of RB1 and CHD1, and amplification of FGFR1. If the patient were treated today, given this knowledge, the use of second-generation androgen-directed therapies, cessation of glucocorticoid administration, and therapeutic inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway or FGFR1 receptor could provide personalized benefit. Three previously unreported truncal clonal missense mutations (ABCC4 p.R891L, ALDH9A1 p.W89R, and ASNA1 p.P75R) were expressed at the RNA level and assessed as druggable. The truncal status of mutations may be critical for effective actionability and merit further study. Our findings suggest that a large set of deeply analyzed cases could serve as a powerful guide to more effective prostate cancer basic science and personalized cancer medicine clinical trials.

  20. Synthetic plant defense elicitors.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Yasemin; Eulgem, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    To defend themselves against invading pathogens plants utilize a complex regulatory network that coordinates extensive transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming. Although many of the key players of this immunity-associated network are known, the details of its topology and dynamics are still poorly understood. As an alternative to forward and reverse genetic studies, chemical genetics-related approaches based on bioactive small molecules have gained substantial popularity in the analysis of biological pathways and networks. Use of such molecular probes can allow researchers to access biological space that was previously inaccessible to genetic analyses due to gene redundancy or lethality of mutations. Synthetic elicitors are small drug-like molecules that induce plant defense responses, but are distinct from known natural elicitors of plant immunity. While the discovery of some synthetic elicitors had already been reported in the 1970s, recent breakthroughs in combinatorial chemical synthesis now allow for inexpensive high-throughput screens for bioactive plant defense-inducing compounds. Along with powerful reverse genetics tools and resources available for model plants and crop systems, comprehensive collections of new synthetic elicitors will likely allow plant scientists to study the intricacies of plant defense signaling pathways and networks in an unparalleled fashion. As synthetic elicitors can protect crops from diseases, without the need to be directly toxic for pathogenic organisms, they may also serve as promising alternatives to conventional biocidal pesticides, which often are harmful for the environment, farmers and consumers. Here we are discussing various types of synthetic elicitors that have been used for studies on the plant immune system, their modes-of-action as well as their application in crop protection.

  1. Synthetic plant defense elicitors

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Yasemin; Eulgem, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To defend themselves against invading pathogens plants utilize a complex regulatory network that coordinates extensive transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming. Although many of the key players of this immunity-associated network are known, the details of its topology and dynamics are still poorly understood. As an alternative to forward and reverse genetic studies, chemical genetics-related approaches based on bioactive small molecules have gained substantial popularity in the analysis of biological pathways and networks. Use of such molecular probes can allow researchers to access biological space that was previously inaccessible to genetic analyses due to gene redundancy or lethality of mutations. Synthetic elicitors are small drug-like molecules that induce plant defense responses, but are distinct from known natural elicitors of plant immunity. While the discovery of some synthetic elicitors had already been reported in the 1970s, recent breakthroughs in combinatorial chemical synthesis now allow for inexpensive high-throughput screens for bioactive plant defense-inducing compounds. Along with powerful reverse genetics tools and resources available for model plants and crop systems, comprehensive collections of new synthetic elicitors will likely allow plant scientists to study the intricacies of plant defense signaling pathways and networks in an unparalleled fashion. As synthetic elicitors can protect crops from diseases, without the need to be directly toxic for pathogenic organisms, they may also serve as promising alternatives to conventional biocidal pesticides, which often are harmful for the environment, farmers and consumers. Here we are discussing various types of synthetic elicitors that have been used for studies on the plant immune system, their modes-of-action as well as their application in crop protection. PMID:25674095

  2. Perspective - synthetic DEMs: A vital underpinning for the quantitative future of landform analysis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, J. K.; Sofia, G.; Conway, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Physical processes, including anthropogenic feedbacks, sculpt planetary surfaces (e.g. Earth's). A fundamental tenet of geomorphology is that the shapes created, when combined with other measurements, can be used to understand those processes. Artificial or synthetic digital elevation models (DEMs) might be vital in progressing further with this endeavour in two ways. First, synthetic DEMs can be built (e.g. by directly using governing equations) to encapsulate the processes, making predictions from theory. A second, arguably underutilised, role is to perform checks on accuracy and robustness that we dub "synthetic tests". Specifically, synthetic DEMs can contain a priori known, idealised morphologies that numerical landscape evolution models, DEM-analysis algorithms, and even manual mapping can be assessed against. Some such tests, for instance examining inaccuracies caused by noise, are moderately commonly employed, whilst others are much less so. Derived morphological properties, including metrics and mapping (manual and automated), are required to establish whether or not conceptual models represent reality well, but at present their quality is typically weakly constrained (e.g. by mapper inter-comparison). Relatively rare examples illustrate how synthetic tests can make strong "absolute" statements about landform detection and quantification; for example, 84 % of valley heads in the real landscape are identified correctly. From our perspective, it is vital to verify such statistics quantifying the properties of landscapes as ultimately this is the link between physics-driven models of processes and morphological observations that allows quantitative hypotheses to be tested. As such the additional rigour possible with this second usage of synthetic DEMs feeds directly into a problem central to the validity of much of geomorphology. Thus, this note introduces synthetic tests and DEMs and then outlines a typology of synthetic DEMs along with their benefits

  3. HPLC analysis of synthetic polymers on short monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Maksimova, Elena; Vlakh, Evgenia; Sinitsyna, Ekaterina; Tennikova, Tatiana

    2013-12-01

    Ultrashort monolithic columns (disks) were thoroughly studied as efficient stationary phases for precipitation-dissolution chromatography of synthetic polymers. Gradient elution mode was applied in all chromatographic runs. The mixtures of different flexible chain homopolymers, such as polystyrenes, poly(methyl methacrylates), and poly(tert-butylmethacrylates) were separated according to their molecular weights on both commercial poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) disks (12 id × 3 mm and 5 × 5 mm) and lab-made monolithic columns (4.6 id × 50 mm) filled with supports of different hydrophobicity. The experimental conditions were optimized to reach fast and highly efficient separation. It was observed that, similar to the separation of monoliths of other classes of (macro)molecules (proteins, DNA, oligonucleotides), the length of column did not affect the peak resolution. A comparison of the retention properties of the poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) disk-shaped monoliths with those based on poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate), poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate), and poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) supports demonstrated the obvious effect of surface chemistry on the resolution factor. Additionally, the results of the discussed chromatographic mode on the fast determination of the molecular weights of homopolymers used in this study were compared to those established by SEC on columns packed with sorbent beads of a similar nature to the monoliths. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Lethal Airpower and Intervention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-01

    of similar proportions in Bosnia might have fatally undermined the NATO policy there, bringing an ignominious end to OPERATION DELIBERATE FORCE...Progress Lethality COG Amenable to Bombing Too Lethal at Low End of Conflict Spectrum Global Reacli—Global Power Tempo 105 For a more complete...element of a winning strategy at the high end of the intervention spectrum—war-fighting. Humanitarian Interests and Lethal Airpower. Humanitarian

  5. End-to-end automated microfluidic platform for synthetic biology: from design to functional analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Linshiz, Gregory; Jensen, Erik; Stawski, Nina; ...

    2016-02-02

    Synthetic biology aims to engineer biological systems for desired behaviors. The construction of these systems can be complex, often requiring genetic reprogramming, extensive de novo DNA synthesis, and functional screening. Here, we present a programmable, multipurpose microfluidic platform and associated software and apply the platform to major steps of the synthetic biology research cycle: design, construction, testing, and analysis. We show the platform’s capabilities for multiple automated DNA assembly methods, including a new method for Isothermal Hierarchical DNA Construction, and for Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae transformation. The platform enables the automated control of cellular growth, gene expression induction, andmore » proteogenic and metabolic output analysis. Finally, taken together, we demonstrate the microfluidic platform’s potential to provide end-to-end solutions for synthetic biology research, from design to functional analysis.« less

  6. End-to-end automated microfluidic platform for synthetic biology: from design to functional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Linshiz, Gregory; Jensen, Erik; Stawski, Nina; Bi, Changhao; Elsbree, Nick; Jiao, Hong; Kim, Jungkyu; Mathies, Richard; Keasling, Jay D.; Hillson, Nathan J.

    2016-02-02

    Synthetic biology aims to engineer biological systems for desired behaviors. The construction of these systems can be complex, often requiring genetic reprogramming, extensive de novo DNA synthesis, and functional screening. Here, we present a programmable, multipurpose microfluidic platform and associated software and apply the platform to major steps of the synthetic biology research cycle: design, construction, testing, and analysis. We show the platform’s capabilities for multiple automated DNA assembly methods, including a new method for Isothermal Hierarchical DNA Construction, and for Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae transformation. The platform enables the automated control of cellular growth, gene expression induction, and proteogenic and metabolic output analysis. Finally, taken together, we demonstrate the microfluidic platform’s potential to provide end-to-end solutions for synthetic biology research, from design to functional analysis.

  7. End-to-end automated microfluidic platform for synthetic biology: from design to functional analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Linshiz, Gregory; Jensen, Erik; Stawski, Nina; ...

    2016-02-02

    Synthetic biology aims to engineer biological systems for desired behaviors. The construction of these systems can be complex, often requiring genetic reprogramming, extensive de novo DNA synthesis, and functional screening. Here, we present a programmable, multipurpose microfluidic platform and associated software and apply the platform to major steps of the synthetic biology research cycle: design, construction, testing, and analysis. We show the platform’s capabilities for multiple automated DNA assembly methods, including a new method for Isothermal Hierarchical DNA Construction, and for Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae transformation. The platform enables the automated control of cellular growth, gene expression induction, andmore » proteogenic and metabolic output analysis. Finally, taken together, we demonstrate the microfluidic platform’s potential to provide end-to-end solutions for synthetic biology research, from design to functional analysis.« less

  8. End-to-end automated microfluidic platform for synthetic biology: from design to functional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Linshiz, Gregory; Jensen, Erik; Stawski, Nina; Bi, Changhao; Elsbree, Nick; Jiao, Hong; Kim, Jungkyu; Mathies, Richard; Keasling, Jay D.; Hillson, Nathan J.

    2016-02-02

    Synthetic biology aims to engineer biological systems for desired behaviors. The construction of these systems can be complex, often requiring genetic reprogramming, extensive de novo DNA synthesis, and functional screening. Here, we present a programmable, multipurpose microfluidic platform and associated software and apply the platform to major steps of the synthetic biology research cycle: design, construction, testing, and analysis. We show the platform’s capabilities for multiple automated DNA assembly methods, including a new method for Isothermal Hierarchical DNA Construction, and for Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae transformation. The platform enables the automated control of cellular growth, gene expression induction, and proteogenic and metabolic output analysis. Finally, taken together, we demonstrate the microfluidic platform’s potential to provide end-to-end solutions for synthetic biology research, from design to functional analysis.

  9. The VG/GA strain of Newcastle disease virus: Mucosal immunity, protection against lethal challenge and molecular analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The VG/GA strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolated from the intestine of healthy turkeys has been proposed to replicate in the respiratory and intestinal tract of chickens. In this study, the virus distribution, the mucosal and systemic immune response, the efficacy against lethal challenge...

  10. Perspective - synthetic DEMs: a vital underpinning for the quantitative future of landform analysis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, J. K.; Sofia, G.; Conway, S. J.

    2015-07-01

    Physical processes, including anthropogenic feedbacks, sculpt planetary surfaces (e.g., Earth's). A fundamental tenet of Geomorphology is that the shapes created, when combined with other measurements, can be used to understand those processes. Artificial or synthetic Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) might be vital in progressing further with this endeavour. Morphological data, including metrics and mapping (manual and automated) are a key resource, but at present their quality is typically weakly constrained (e.g., by mapper inter-comparison). In addition to examining inaccuracies caused by noise, relatively rare examples illustrate how synthetic DEMs containing a priori known, idealised morphologies can be used perform "synthetic tests" to make strong "absolute" statements about landform detection and quantification; e.g., 84 % of valley heads in the real landscape are identified correctly. From our perspective, it is vital to verify such statistics as ultimately they link physics-driven models of processes to morphological observations, allowing quantitative hypotheses to be formulated and tested. Synthetic DEMs built by directly using governing equations that encapsulate processes are another key part of forming this link. Thus, this note introduces synthetic tests and DEMs, then it outlines a typology of synthetic DEMs along with their benefits, challenges and future potential to provide constraints and insights. The aim is to discuss how we best proceed with uncertainty-aware landscape analysis to examine physical processes.

  11. Simultaneous analysis of synthetic cannabinoids in the materials seized during drug trafficking using GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeyoung; Heo, Sewoong; Choe, Sanggil; Yang, Wonkyung; Park, Yuran; Kim, Eunmi; Chung, Heesun; Lee, Jaesin

    2013-05-01

    A rapid and simple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and validated to identify and quantify synthetic cannabinoids in the materials seized during drug trafficking. Accuracy and reproducibility of the method were improved by using deuterated JWH-018 and JWH-073 as internal standards. Validation results of the GC-MS method showed that it was suitable for simultaneous qualitative and quantitative analyses of synthetic cannabinoids, and we analyzed synthetic cannabinoids in seized materials using the validated GC-MS method. As a result of the analysis, ten species of synthetic cannabinoids were identified in dried leaves (n = 40), bulk powders (n = 6), and tablets (n = 14) seized in Korea during 2009-2012, as a single ingredient or as a mixture with other active co-ingredients. JWH-018 and JWH-073 were the most frequently identified compounds in the seized materials. Synthetic cannabinoids in the dried leaves showed broad concentration ranges, which may cause unexpected toxicity to abusers. The bulk powders were considered as raw materials used to prepare legal highs, and they contained single ingredient of JWH-073, JWH-019, or JWH-250 with the purity over 70 %. In contrast, JWH-018 and JWH-073 contents in the tablets were 7.1-13.8 and 3.0-10.2 mg/g, respectively. Relatively low contents in the tablets suggest that the synthetic cannabinoids may have been added to the tablets as supplements to other active co-ingredients.

  12. Assessment of synthetic winds through spectral modelling, rainflow count analysis and statistics of increments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Hans Georg; Chougule, Abhijit

    2016-04-01

    While wind energy industry growing rapidly and siting of wind turbines onshore as well as offshore is increasing, many wind engineering model tools have been developed for the assessment of loads on wind turbines due to varying wind speeds. In order to have proper wind turbine design and performance analysis, it is important to have an accurate representation of the incoming wind field. To ease the analysis, tools for the generation of synthetic wind fields have been developed, e.g the widely used TurbSim procedure. We analyse respective synthetic data sets on one hand in view of the similarity of the spectral characteristics of measured and synthetic sets. In addition, second order characteristics with direct relevance to load assessment as given by the statistics of increments and rainflow count results are inspected.

  13. Integrated In Silico Analysis of Pathway Designs for Synthetic Photo-Electro-Autotrophy.

    PubMed

    Volpers, Michael; Claassens, Nico J; Noor, Elad; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M; Kengen, Servé W M; Martins Dos Santos, Vitor A P

    2016-01-01

    The strong advances in synthetic biology enable the engineering of novel functions and complex biological features in unprecedented ways, such as implementing synthetic autotrophic metabolism into heterotrophic hosts. A key challenge for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals entails the engineering of synthetic autotrophic organisms that can effectively and efficiently fix carbon dioxide by using sustainable energy sources. This challenge involves the integration of carbon fixation and energy uptake systems. A variety of carbon fixation pathways and several types of photosystems and other energy uptake systems can be chosen and, potentially, modularly combined to design synthetic autotrophic metabolism. Prior to implementation, these designs can be evaluated by the combination of several computational pathway analysis techniques. Here we present a systematic, integrated in silico analysis of photo-electro-autotrophic pathway designs, consisting of natural and synthetic carbon fixation pathways, a proton-pumping rhodopsin photosystem for ATP regeneration and an electron uptake pathway. We integrated Flux Balance Analysis of the heterotrophic chassis Escherichia coli with kinetic pathway analysis and thermodynamic pathway analysis (Max-min Driving Force). The photo-electro-autotrophic designs are predicted to have a limited potential for anaerobic, autotrophic growth of E. coli, given the relatively low ATP regenerating capacity of the proton pumping rhodopsin photosystems and the high ATP maintenance of E. coli. If these factors can be tackled, our analysis indicates the highest growth potential for the natural reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle and the synthetic pyruvate synthase-pyruvate carboxylate -glyoxylate bicycle. Both carbon fixation cycles are very ATP efficient, while maintaining fast kinetics, which also results in relatively low estimated protein costs for these pathways. Furthermore, the synthetic bicycles are highly thermodynamic favorable

  14. Integrated In Silico Analysis of Pathway Designs for Synthetic Photo-Electro-Autotrophy

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Elad; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M.; Kengen, Servé W. M.; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A. P.

    2016-01-01

    The strong advances in synthetic biology enable the engineering of novel functions and complex biological features in unprecedented ways, such as implementing synthetic autotrophic metabolism into heterotrophic hosts. A key challenge for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals entails the engineering of synthetic autotrophic organisms that can effectively and efficiently fix carbon dioxide by using sustainable energy sources. This challenge involves the integration of carbon fixation and energy uptake systems. A variety of carbon fixation pathways and several types of photosystems and other energy uptake systems can be chosen and, potentially, modularly combined to design synthetic autotrophic metabolism. Prior to implementation, these designs can be evaluated by the combination of several computational pathway analysis techniques. Here we present a systematic, integrated in silico analysis of photo-electro-autotrophic pathway designs, consisting of natural and synthetic carbon fixation pathways, a proton-pumping rhodopsin photosystem for ATP regeneration and an electron uptake pathway. We integrated Flux Balance Analysis of the heterotrophic chassis Escherichia coli with kinetic pathway analysis and thermodynamic pathway analysis (Max-min Driving Force). The photo-electro-autotrophic designs are predicted to have a limited potential for anaerobic, autotrophic growth of E. coli, given the relatively low ATP regenerating capacity of the proton pumping rhodopsin photosystems and the high ATP maintenance of E. coli. If these factors can be tackled, our analysis indicates the highest growth potential for the natural reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle and the synthetic pyruvate synthase–pyruvate carboxylate -glyoxylate bicycle. Both carbon fixation cycles are very ATP efficient, while maintaining fast kinetics, which also results in relatively low estimated protein costs for these pathways. Furthermore, the synthetic bicycles are highly thermodynamic

  15. Systemic Analysis of Atg5-Null Mice Rescued from Neonatal Lethality by Transgenic ATG5 Expression in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Saori R; Kuma, Akiko; Akashi, Takumi; Hara, Taichi; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kurikawa, Yoshitaka; Itakura, Eisuke; Tsukamoto, Satoshi; Shitara, Hiroshi; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Mizushima, Noboru

    2016-10-10

    Autophagy is a cytoplasmic degradation system that is important for starvation adaptation and cellular quality control. Previously, we reported that Atg5-null mice are neonatal lethal; however, the exact cause of their death remains unknown. Here, we show that restoration of ATG5 in the brain is sufficient to rescue Atg5-null mice from neonatal lethality. This suggests that neuronal dysfunction, including suckling failure, is the primary cause of the death of Atg5-null neonates, which would further be accelerated by nutrient insufficiency due to a systemic failure in autophagy. The rescued Atg5-null mouse model, as a resource, allows us to investigate the physiological roles of autophagy in the whole body after the neonatal period. These rescued mice demonstrate previously unappreciated abnormalities such as hypogonadism and iron-deficiency anemia. These observations provide new insights into the physiological roles of the autophagy factor ATG5.

  16. Overview of independent component analysis technique with an application to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery processing.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Simone

    2003-01-01

    We present an overview of independent component analysis, an emerging signal processing technique based on neural networks, with the aim to provide an up-to-date survey of the theoretical streams in this discipline and of the current applications in the engineering area. We also focus on a particular application, dealing with a remote sensing technique based on synthetic aperture radar imagery processing: we briefly review the features and main applications of synthetic aperture radar and show how blind signal processing by neural networks may be advantageously employed to enhance the quality of remote sensing data.

  17. Synthetical Reliability Analysis Model of CNC Software System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yue; Xia, Yinjie; Wan, Yi

    CNC technology is the core of advanced manufacturing technology, and CNC software system is the very important part of numerical control system. The entire CNC system will not work normally, once the potential failure makes the software invalid. As to the current study of CNC sysytem, in use of the FAULT glitch tree, established a glitch tree for the CNC system; find the minimum cut sets with Fussed method and then according to the probability of several common glitches, make quantitative analysis in the reliability of the CNC system so that scientific ways can be provided for the reliability design, maintenance and management of the CNC system.

  18. Performance analysis of improved methodology for incorporation of spatial/spectral variability in synthetic hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlan, Neil W.; Schott, John R.; Brown, Scott D.

    2004-01-01

    Synthetic imagery has traditionally been used to support sensor design by enabling design engineers to pre-evaluate image products during the design and development stages. Increasingly exploitation analysts are looking to synthetic imagery as a way to develop and test exploitation algorithms before image data are available from new sensors. Even when sensors are available, synthetic imagery can significantly aid in algorithm development by providing a wide range of "ground truthed" images with varying illumination, atmospheric, viewing and scene conditions. One limitation of synthetic data is that the background variability is often too bland. It does not exhibit the spatial and spectral variability present in real data. In this work, four fundamentally different texture modeling algorithms will first be implemented as necessary into the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model environment. Two of the models to be tested are variants of a statistical Z-Score selection model, while the remaining two involve a texture synthesis and a spectral end-member fractional abundance map approach, respectively. A detailed comparative performance analysis of each model will then be carried out on several texturally significant regions of the resultant synthetic hyperspectral imagery. The quantitative assessment of each model will utilize a set of three peformance metrics that have been derived from spatial Gray Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) analysis, hyperspectral Signal-to-Clutter Ratio (SCR) measures, and a new concept termed the Spectral Co-Occurrence Matrix (SCM) metric which permits the simultaneous measurement of spatial and spectral texture. Previous research efforts on the validation and performance analysis of texture characterization models have been largely qualitative in nature based on conducting visual inspections of synthetic textures in order to judge the degree of similarity to the original sample texture imagery. The quantitative

  19. Performance analysis of improved methodology for incorporation of spatial/spectral variability in synthetic hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlan, Neil W.; Schott, John R.; Brown, Scott D.

    2003-12-01

    Synthetic imagery has traditionally been used to support sensor design by enabling design engineers to pre-evaluate image products during the design and development stages. Increasingly exploitation analysts are looking to synthetic imagery as a way to develop and test exploitation algorithms before image data are available from new sensors. Even when sensors are available, synthetic imagery can significantly aid in algorithm development by providing a wide range of "ground truthed" images with varying illumination, atmospheric, viewing and scene conditions. One limitation of synthetic data is that the background variability is often too bland. It does not exhibit the spatial and spectral variability present in real data. In this work, four fundamentally different texture modeling algorithms will first be implemented as necessary into the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model environment. Two of the models to be tested are variants of a statistical Z-Score selection model, while the remaining two involve a texture synthesis and a spectral end-member fractional abundance map approach, respectively. A detailed comparative performance analysis of each model will then be carried out on several texturally significant regions of the resultant synthetic hyperspectral imagery. The quantitative assessment of each model will utilize a set of three peformance metrics that have been derived from spatial Gray Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) analysis, hyperspectral Signal-to-Clutter Ratio (SCR) measures, and a new concept termed the Spectral Co-Occurrence Matrix (SCM) metric which permits the simultaneous measurement of spatial and spectral texture. Previous research efforts on the validation and performance analysis of texture characterization models have been largely qualitative in nature based on conducting visual inspections of synthetic textures in order to judge the degree of similarity to the original sample texture imagery. The quantitative

  20. Synthetic microvascular networks for quantitative analysis of particle adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Pant, Kapil; Scott, Robert C.; Patillo, Christopher B.; Irimia, Daniel; Kiani, Mohammad F.; Sundaram, Shivshankar

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a methodology to study particle adhesion in the microvascular environment using microfluidic, image-derived microvascular networks on a chip accompanied by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of fluid flow and particle adhesion. Microfluidic networks, obtained from digitization of in vivo microvascular topology were prototyped using soft-lithography techniques to obtain semicircular cross sectional microvascular networks in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Dye perfusion studies indicated the presence of well-perfused as well as stagnant regions in a given network. Furthermore, microparticle adhesion to antibody coated networks was found to be spatially non-uniform as well. These findings were broadly corroborated in the CFD analyses. Detailed information on shear rates and particle fluxes in the entire network, obtained from the CFD models, were used to show global adhesion trends to be qualitatively consistent with current knowledge obtained using flow chambers. However, in comparison with a flow chamber, this method represents and incorporates elements of size and complex morphology of the microvasculature. Particle adhesion was found to be significantly localized near the bifurcations in comparison with the straight sections over the entire network, an effect not observable with flow chambers. In addition, the microvascular network chips are resource effective by providing data on particle adhesion over physiologically relevant shear range from even a single experiment. The microfluidic microvascular networks developed in this study can be readily used to gain fundamental insights into the processes leading to particle adhesion in the microvasculature. PMID:18327641

  1. Proteomic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cells in physiological condition and in pulmonary arterial hypertension: Toward contractile versus synthetic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Régent, Alexis; Ly, Kim Heang; Lofek, Sébastien; Clary, Guilhem; Tamby, Mathieu; Tamas, Nicolas; Federici, Christian; Broussard, Cédric; Chafey, Philippe; Liaudet-Coopman, Emmanuelle; Humbert, Marc; Perros, Frédéric; Mouthon, Luc

    2016-10-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are highly specialized cells that regulate vascular tone and participate in vessel remodeling in physiological and pathological conditions. It is unclear why certain vascular pathologies involve one type of vessel and spare others. Our objective was to compare the proteomes of normal human VSMC from aorta (human aortic smooth muscle cells, HAoSMC), umbilical artery (human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells, HUASMC), pulmonary artery (HPASMC), or pulmonary artery VSMC from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH-SMC). Proteomes of VSMC were compared by 2D DIGE and MS. Only 19 proteins were differentially expressed between HAoSMC and HPASMC while 132 and 124 were differentially expressed between HUASMC and HAoSMC or HPASMC, respectively (fold change 1.5≤ or -1.5≥, p < 0.05). As much as 336 proteins were differentially expressed between HPASMC and PAH-SMC (fold change 1.5≤ or -1.5≥, p < 0.05). HUASMC expressed increased amount of α-smooth muscle actin compared to either HPASMC or HAoSMC (although not statistically significant). In addition, PAH-SMC expressed decreased amount of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain and proliferation rate was increased compared to HPASMC thus supporting that PAH-SMC have a more synthetic phenotype. Analysis with Ingenuity identified paxillin and (embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, drosophila) like 1 (ELAVL1) as molecules linked with a lot of proteins differentially expressed between HPASMC and PAH-SMC. There was a trend toward reduced proliferation of PAH-SMC with paxillin-si-RNA and increased proliferation with ELAVL1-siRNA. Thus, VSMCs have very diverse protein content depending on their origin and this is in link with phenotypic differentiation. Paxillin targeting may be a promising treatment of PAH. ELAVL1 also participate in the regulation of PAH-SMC proliferation.

  2. 1H NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Sub-Lethal Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Exposure to the Earthworm, Eisenia fetida, in Soil.

    PubMed

    Lankadurai, Brian P; Furdui, Vasile I; Reiner, Eric J; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2013-08-27

    1H NMR-based metabolomics was used to measure the response of Eisenia fetida earthworms after exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in soil. Earthworms were exposed to a range of PFOS concentrations (five, 10, 25, 50, 100 or 150 mg/kg) for two, seven and fourteen days. Earthworm tissues were extracted and analyzed by 1H NMR. Multivariate statistical analysis of the metabolic response of E. fetida to PFOS exposure identified time-dependent responses that were comprised of two separate modes of action: a non-polar narcosis type mechanism after two days of exposure and increased fatty acid oxidation after seven and fourteen days of exposure. Univariate statistical analysis revealed that 2-hexyl-5-ethyl-3-furansulfonate (HEFS), betaine, leucine, arginine, glutamate, maltose and ATP are potential indicators of PFOS exposure, as the concentrations of these metabolites fluctuated significantly. Overall, NMR-based metabolomic analysis suggests elevated fatty acid oxidation, disruption in energy metabolism and biological membrane structure and a possible interruption of ATP synthesis. These conclusions obtained from analysis of the metabolic profile in response to sub-lethal PFOS exposure indicates that NMR-based metabolomics is an excellent discovery tool when the mode of action (MOA) of contaminants is not clearly defined.

  3. 1H NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Sub-Lethal Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Exposure to the Earthworm, Eisenia fetida, in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Lankadurai, Brian P.; Furdui, Vasile I.; Reiner, Eric J.; Simpson, André J.; Simpson, Myrna J.

    2013-01-01

    1H NMR-based metabolomics was used to measure the response of Eisenia fetida earthworms after exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in soil. Earthworms were exposed to a range of PFOS concentrations (five, 10, 25, 50, 100 or 150 mg/kg) for two, seven and fourteen days. Earthworm tissues were extracted and analyzed by 1H NMR. Multivariate statistical analysis of the metabolic response of E. fetida to PFOS exposure identified time-dependent responses that were comprised of two separate modes of action: a non-polar narcosis type mechanism after two days of exposure and increased fatty acid oxidation after seven and fourteen days of exposure. Univariate statistical analysis revealed that 2-hexyl-5-ethyl-3-furansulfonate (HEFS), betaine, leucine, arginine, glutamate, maltose and ATP are potential indicators of PFOS exposure, as the concentrations of these metabolites fluctuated significantly. Overall, NMR-based metabolomic analysis suggests elevated fatty acid oxidation, disruption in energy metabolism and biological membrane structure and a possible interruption of ATP synthesis. These conclusions obtained from analysis of the metabolic profile in response to sub-lethal PFOS exposure indicates that NMR-based metabolomics is an excellent discovery tool when the mode of action (MOA) of contaminants is not clearly defined. PMID:24958147

  4. Analysis of 62 synthetic cannabinoids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with photoionization.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Mamoru; Sugie, Ken-Ichi; Saito, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in electron ionization (EI) mode is one of the most commonly used techniques for analysis of synthetic cannabinoids, because the GC-EI-MS spectra contain characteristic fragment ions for identification of a compound; however, the information on its molecular ions is frequently lacking. To obtain such molecular ion information, GC-MS in chemical ionization (CI) mode is frequently used. However, GC-CI-MS requires a relatively tedious process using reagent gas such as methane or isobutane. In this study, we show that GC-MS in photoionization (PI) mode provided molecular ions in all spectra of 62 synthetic cannabinoids, and 35 of the 62 compounds showed only the molecular radical cations. Except for the 35 compounds, the PI spectra showed very simple patterns with the molecular peak plus only a few fragment peak(s). An advantage is that the ion source for GC-PI-MS can easily be used for GC-EI-MS as well. Therefore, GC-EI/PI-MS will be a useful tool for the identification of synthetic cannabinoids contained in a dubious product. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to use GC-PI-MS for analysis of synthetic cannabinoids.

  5. Structure-Based Systematic Isolation of Conditional-Lethal Mutations in the Single Yeast Calmodulin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohya, Y.; Botstein, D.

    1994-01-01

    Conditional-lethal mutations of the single calmodulin gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been very difficult to isolate by random and systematic methods, despite the fact that deletions cause recessive lethality. We report here the isolation of numerous conditional-lethal mutants that were recovered by systematically altering phenylalanine residues. The phenylalanine residues of calmodulin were implicated in function both by structural studies of calmodulin bound to target peptides and by their extraordinary conservation in evolution. Seven single and 26 multiple Phe -> Ala mutations were constructed. Mutant phenotypes were examined in a haploid cmd1 disrupted strain under three conditions: single copy, low copy, and overexpressed. Whereas all but one of the single mutations caused no obvious phenotype, most of the multiple mutations caused obvious growth phenotypes. Five were lethal, 6 were lethal only in synthetic medium, 13 were temperature-sensitive lethal and 2 had no discernible phenotypic consequences. Overexpression of some of the mutant genes restored the phenotype to nearly wild type. Several temperature-sensitive calmodulin mutations were suppressed by elevated concentration of CaCl(2) in the medium. Mutant calmodulin protein was detected at normal levels in extracts of most of the lethal mutant cells, suggesting that the deleterious phenotypes were due to loss of the calmodulin function and not protein instability. Analysis of diploid strains heterozygous for all combinations of cmd1-ts alleles revealed four intragenic complementation groups. The contributions of individual phe->ala changes to mutant phenotypes support the idea of internal functional redundancy in the symmetrical calmodulin protein molecule. These results suggest that the several phenylalanine residues in calmodulin are required to different extents in different combinations in order to carry out each of the several essential tasks. PMID:7896089

  6. Analysis of Sub-Lethal Toxicity of Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS) to Daphnia magna Using 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, Martha N.; Nagato, Edward G.; Lankadurai, Brian P.; Simpson, André J.; Simpson, Myrna J.

    2017-01-01

    1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics was used to characterize the response of Daphnia magna after sub-lethal exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), a commonly found environmental pollutant in freshwater ecosystems. Principal component analysis (PCA) scores plots showed significant separation in the exposed samples relative to the controls. Partial least squares (PLS) regression analysis revealed a strong linear correlation between the overall metabolic response and PFOS exposure concentration. More detailed analysis showed that the toxic mode of action is metabolite-specific with some metabolites exhibiting a non-monotonic response with higher PFOS exposure concentrations. Our study indicates that PFOS exposure disrupts various energy metabolism pathways and also enhances protein degradation. Overall, we identified several metabolites that are sensitive to PFOS exposure and may be used as bioindicators of D. magna health. In addition, this study also highlights the important utility of environmental metabolomic methods when attempting to elucidate acute and sub-lethal pollutant stressors on keystone organisms such as D. magna. PMID:28420092

  7. The effects of a synthetic curcuminoid analogue, 2,6-bis-(4-hydroxyl-3-methoxybenzylidine)cyclohexanone on proinflammatory signaling pathways and CLP-induced lethal sepsis in mice.

    PubMed

    Tham, Chau Ling; Lam, Kok Wai; Rajajendram, Revathee; Cheah, Yoke Kqueen; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan; Lajis, Nordin H; Kim, Min Kyu; Israf, Daud A

    2011-02-10

    We previously showed that 2,6-bis-(4-hydroxyl-3-methoxybenzylidine)cyclohexanone (BHMC), suppressed the synthesis of various proinflammatory mediators. In this study we explain the mechanism of action of BHMC in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced U937 monocytes and further show that BHMC prevents lethality of CLP-induced sepsis. BHMC showed dose-dependent inhibitory effects on p38, JNK and ERK 1/2 activity as determined by inhibition of phosphorylation of downstream transcription factors ATF-2, c-Jun and Elk-1 respectively. Inhibition of these transcription factors subsequently caused total abolishment of AP-1-DNA binding. BHMC inhibited p65 NF-κB nuclear translocation and DNA binding of p65 NF-κB only at the highest concentration used (12.5μM) but failed to alter phosphorylation of JNK, ERK1/2 and STAT-1. Since the inhibition of p38 activity was more pronounced we evaluated the possibility that BHMC may bind to p38. Molecular docking experiments confirmed that BHMC fits well in the highly conserved hydrophobic pocket of p38 MAP kinase. We also show that BHMC was able to improve survival from lethal sepsis in a murine caecal-ligation and puncture (CLP) model.

  8. Perspective - Synthetic DEMs: A vital underpinning for the quantitative future of landform analysis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, John K.; Sofia, Giulia; Conway, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Physical processes, including anthropogenic feedbacks, sculpt planetary surfaces (e.g., Earth's). A fundamental tenet of Geomorphology is that the shapes created, when combined with other measurements, can be used to understand those processes. Morphological data, including metrics and mapping (manual and automated), are a key resource in this endeavour. However, how good are these data that analyses rely on? Artificial or synthetic DEMs are widely used to examine the distortions of 'noise' (e.g., on topographic parameters), but only rarely to make strong 'absolute' statements about landform detection and quantification; e.g., 84% of the river channels in the real landscape are found, or 47% of all actual drumlins H > 3 m are mapped. In theory synthetic DEMs a priori containing known, idealised components can give such absolute conclusions regarding effectiveness if they can be constructed so as to represent well the actual landscapes. So, do we need good realistic synthetic DEMs, how can we best construct them, and what for? From our perspective, they are vital to verify the statistics that will link physics-driven models of processes to morphological observations, allowing quantitative hypotheses to be formulated and tested. We will outline current approaches, and some speculations about the future, but we are seeking a discussion on how best to construct realistic synthetic DEMs and proceed with uncertainty-aware landscape analysis to examine physical processes.

  9. Use of SPME-HS-GC–MS for the Analysis of Herbal Products Containing Synthetic Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Anderson O.; Daw, Richard C.; Mason, Michele D.; Grabenauer, Megan; Pande, Poonam G.; Davis, Kenneth H.; Wiley, Jenny L.; Stout, Peter R.; Thomas, Brian F.; Huffman, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence and use of herbal mixtures containing synthetic cannabinoids presents a growing public health concern and legal challenge for society. In contrast to the plant-derived cannabinoids in medical marijuana and other cannabinoid-based therapeutics, the commonly encountered synthetic cannabinoids in these mendaciously labeled products constitute a structurally diverse set of compounds of relatively unknown pharmacology and toxicology. Indeed, the use of these substances has been associated with an alarming number of hospitalizations and emergency room visits. Moreover, there are already several hundred known cannabinoid agonist compounds that could potentially be used for illicit purposes, posing an additional challenge for public health professionals and law enforcement efforts, which often require the detection and identification of the active ingredients for effective treatment or prosecution. A solid-phase microextraction headspace gas chromatography–mass spectrometry method is shown here to allow for rapid and reliable detection and structural identification of many of the synthetic cannabinoid compounds that are currently or could potentially be used in herbal smoking mixtures. This approach provides accelerated analysis and results that distinguish between structural analogs within several classes of cannabinoid compounds, including positional isomers. The analytical results confirm the continued manufacture and distribution of herbal materials with synthetic cannabinoids and provide insight into the manipulation of these products to avoid legal constraints and prosecution. PMID:22582264

  10. Clinical parameters, postmortem analysis and estimation of lethal dose in victims of a massive intoxication with diethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Luis A; Giannuzzi, Leda

    2005-10-04

    could be observed. The lethal dose for human beings estimated in this work ranged from 0.014 to 0.170 mg DEG/kg body weight. This is a lower lethal dose than reported in a separate incident in Haiti. These results may contribute to the understanding of DEG's metabolic pathway and provides data from lethal doses in humans.

  11. Deep functional analysis of synII, a 770 kb synthetic yeast chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Gong, Jianhui; Abramczyk, Dariusz; Walker, Roy; Zhao, Hongcui; Chen, Shihong; Liu, Wei; Luo, Yisha; Müller, Carolin A.; Paul-Dubois-Taine, Adrien; Alver, Bonnie; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Mitchell, Leslie A.; Luo, Zhouqing; Fan, Yanqun; Zhou, Baojin; Wen, Bo; Tan, Fengji; Wang, Yujia; Zi, Jin; Xie, Zexiong; Li, Bingzhi; Yang, Kun; Richardson, Sarah M.; Jiang, Hui; French, Christopher E.; Nieduszynski, Conrad A.; Koszul, Romain; Marston, Adele L.; Yuan, Yingjin; Wang, Jian; Bader, Joel S.; Dai, Junbiao; Boeke, Jef D.; Xu, Xun; Cai, Yizhi; Yang, Huanming

    2017-01-01

    Herein we report the successful design, construction and characterization of a 770 kb synthetic yeast chromosome II (synII). Our study incorporates characterization at multiple levels, including phenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, chromosome segregation and replication analysis to provide a thorough and comprehensive analysis of a synthetic chromosome. Our “Trans-Omics” analyses reveal a modest but potentially significant pervasive up-regulation of translational machinery observed in synII is mainly caused by the deletion of 13 tRNAs. By both complementation assays and SCRaMbLE, we targeted and debuged the origin of a growth defect at 37°C in glycerol medium, which is related to misregulation of the HOG response. Despite the subtle differences, the synII strain shows highly consistent biological processes comparable to the native strain. PMID:28280153

  12. 3D-QSAR Investigation of Synthetic Antioxidant Chromone Derivatives by Molecular Field Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Samee, Weerasak; Nunthanavanit, Patcharawee; Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn

    2008-01-01

    A series of 7-hydroxy, 8-hydroxy and 7,8-dihydroxy synthetic chromone derivatives was evaluated for their DPPH free radical scavenging activities. A training set of 30 synthetic chromone derivatives was subject to three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies using molecular field analysis (MFA). The substitutional requirements for favorable antioxidant activity were investigated and a predictive model that could be used for the design of novel antioxidants was derived. Regression analysis was carried out using genetic partial least squares (G/PLS) method. A highly predictive and statistically significant model was generated. The predictive ability of the developed model was assessed using a test set of 5 compounds (r2pred = 0.924). The analyzed MFA model demonstrated a good fit, having r2 value of 0.868 and cross-validated coefficient r2cv value of 0.771. PMID:19325746

  13. The Bioethicist Who Cried "Synthetic Biology": An Analysis of the Function of Bioterrorism Predictions in Bioethics.

    PubMed

    Holm, Søren

    2017-04-01

    This article analyzes a specter that has haunted bioethics almost since its inception, namely the specter of the misuse of biotechnology by maleficent agents bent on mass destruction, or the complete eradication of human kind and life as we know it. The article provides a general account of why bioethicists cry "catastrophic bioterrorism potential" when new biotechnologies emerge, and an analysis of the arguments that flow from the prediction, especially in relation to synthetic biology.

  14. Coal liquefaction processes and development requirements analysis for synthetic fuels production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Focus of the study is on: (1) developing a technical and programmatic data base on direct and indirect liquefaction processes which have potential for commercialization during the 1980's and beyond, and (2) performing analyses to assess technology readiness and development trends, development requirements, commercial plant costs, and projected synthetic fuel costs. Numerous data sources and references were used as the basis for the analysis results and information presented.

  15. Application of non-lethal stable isotope analysis to assess feeding patterns of juvenile pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus: a comparison of tissue types and sample preservation methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andvik, R.T.; VanDeHey, J.A.; Fincel, M.J.; French, William E.; Bertrand, K.N.; Chipps, Steven R.; Klumb, R.A.; Graeb, B.D.S.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional techniques for stable isotope analysis (SIA) generally require sacrificing animals to collect tissue samples; this can be problematic when studying diets of endangered species such as the pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus. Our objectives were to (i) determine if pectoral fin tissue (non-lethal) could be a substitute for muscle tissue (lethal) in SIA of juvenile pallid sturgeon, and (ii) evaluate the influence of preservation techniques on stable isotope values. In the laboratory, individual juvenile pallid sturgeon were held for up to 186 day and fed chironomids, fish, or a commercially available pellet diet. Significant, positive relationships (r² ≥ 0.8) were observed between fin and muscle tissues for both δ15N and δ13C; in all samples isotopes were enriched in fins compared to muscle tissue. Chironomid and fish based diets of juvenile pallid sturgeon were distinguishable for fast growing fish (0.3 mm day−1) using stable δ15N and δ13C isotopes. Frozen and preserved fin tissue δ15N isotopes were strongly related (r2 = 0.89) but δ13C isotopes were weakly related (r2 = 0.16). Therefore, freezing is recommended for preservation of fin clips to avoid the confounding effect of enrichment by ethanol. This study demonstrates the utility of a non-lethal technique to assess time integrated food habits of juvenile pallid sturgeon and should be applicable to other threatened or endangered species.

  16. Molecular analysis and developmental expression of the Sex-lethal gene of Sciara ocellaris (Diptera order, Nematocera suborder).

    PubMed

    Ruiz, M F; Goday, C; González, P; Sánchez, L

    2003-06-01

    This paper reports the cloning and characterization in Sciara ocellaris of the gene homologous to Sex-lethal (Sxl) of Drosophila melanogaster. This gene plays the key role controlling sex determination and dosage compensation in the latter species. The Sciara Sxl gene produces a single transcript encoding a single protein in both males and females. This protein, found inside the nucleus, is expressed in all tissues. Both Sciara and Drosophila Sxl proteins are highly conserved at their two RNA-binding domains. In both Sciara sexes, the Sxl protein co-localizes with transcription-active regions dependent on RNA polymerase II but not on RNA polymerase I. It would appear that in Sciara, Sxl does not appear to play the key discriminative role in controlling sex determination and dosage compensation that it plays in Drosophila.

  17. High-content analysis screening for cell cycle regulators using arrayed synthetic crRNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Strezoska, Žaklina; Perkett, Matthew R; Chou, Eldon T; Maksimova, Elena; Anderson, Emily M; McClelland, Shawn; Kelley, Melissa L; Vermeulen, Annaleen; Smith, Anja van Brabant

    2017-06-10

    The CRISPR-Cas9 system has been utilized for large-scale, loss-of-function screens mainly using lentiviral pooled formats and cell-survival phenotypic assays. Screening in an arrayed format expands the types of phenotypic readouts that can be used to now include high-content, morphology-based assays, and with the recent availability of synthetic crRNA libraries, new studies are emerging. Here, we use a cell cycle reporter cell line to perform an arrayed, synthetic crRNA:tracrRNA screen targeting 169 genes (>600 crRNAs) and used high content analysis (HCA) to identify genes that regulate the cell cycle. Seven parameters were used to classify cells into cell cycle categories and multiple parameters were combined using a new analysis technique to identify hits. Comprehensive hit follow-up experiments included target gene expression analysis, confirmation of DNA insertions/deletions, and validation with orthogonal reagents. Our results show that most hits had three or more independent crRNAs per gene that demonstrated a phenotype with consistent individual parameters, indicating that our screen produced high-confidence hits with low off-target effects and allowed us to identify hits with more subtle phenotypes. The results of our screen demonstrate the power of using arrayed, synthetic crRNAs for functional phenotypic screening using multiparameter HCA assays. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthetic fuels and the environment: an environmental and regulatory impacts analysis

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    Since July 1979 when DOE/EV-0044 report Environmental Analysis of Synthetic Liquid fuels was published the synthetic fuels program proposals of the Administration have undergone significant modifications. The program year for which the development goal of 1.5 million barrels per day is to be reached has been changed from 1990 to 1995. The program plan is now proposed to have two stages to ensure, among other things, better environmental protection: an initial stage emphasizing applied research and development (R and D), including environmental research, followed by a second stage that would accelerate deployment of those synthetic fuel technologies then judged most ready for rapid deployment and economic operation within the environmental protection requirements. These program changes have significantly expanded the scope of technologies to be considered in this environmental analysis and have increased the likelihood that accelerated environmental R and D efforts will be successful in solving principal environmental and worker safety concerns for most technologies prior to the initiation of the second stage of the accelerated deployment plan. Information is presented under the following section headings: summary; study description; the technologies and their environmental concerns (including, coal liquefaction and gasification, oil shale production, biomass and urban waste conversion); regulatory and institutional analyses; and environmental impacts analysis (including air and water quaility analyses, impacts of carbon dioxide and acid rain, water availability, solid and hazardous wastes, coal mining environmental impacts, transportation issues, community growth and change, and regional impacts). Additional information is presented in seventeen appendixes. (JGB)

  19. Estimation of the synthetic routes of seized methamphetamines using GC-MS and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Choe, Sanggil; Lee, Jaesin; Choi, Hyeyoung; Park, Yujin; Lee, Heesang; Jo, Jiyeong; Park, Yonghoon; Kim, Eunmi; Pyo, Jaesung; Lee, Hun Joo; Kim, Suncheun

    2016-02-01

    One hundred and twenty six seized methamphetamine (MA) samples were analyzed using GC-MS. All the peaks that appeared in the chromatograms were investigated and 61 impurities including n-octacosane (internal standard) were identified. Among them, 37 impurities were already known or newly identified by comparing with commercial library entries and 18 impurities were detected for the first time. To estimate the synthetic routes of MA samples, route specific impurities had to be selected for each method. Two naphthalenes, 1,3-dimethyl-2-phenylnaphthalene and 1-benzyl-3-methylnaphthalene were selected as Nagai route specific impurities and three diasteromers, UK-19.62(58_165_178) I, UK-19.95(58_165_178) II, UK-20.49(58_165_178) III were also selected not only for their high frequency detection only in Nagai samples but also for the high principal component analysis (PCA) correlation values. For the Emde route, N,N-dimethyl-3,4-diphenylhexane-2,5-diamine and N-methyl-1-{4-[2-(methylamino)propyl]phenyl}-1-phenylpropan-2-amine were selected as route specific impurities, and N,N-di(β-phenylisopropyl)amine I (DPIA I), N,N-di(β-phenylisopropyl)amine II (DPIA II), N,N-di(β-phenylisopropyl)methylamine I (DPIMA I) and N,N-di(β-phenylisopropyl)methylamine II (DPIMA II) were selected for the Leuckart route. With these route specific impurities, synthetic routes could be identified for 78 of the 126 samples. The 61 impurities were registered in AMDIS target component library and the GC-MS data were deconvoluted. After AMDIS deconvolution, a matrix file was composed and then multivariate analyses were performed to estimate the synthetic route for unknown samples. The unsupervised methods, hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) and PCA clustered the samples according to the closeness between samples. Two classification functions were obtained from discriminant analysis (DA) and the synthetic routes of the unknown samples were predicted using these two functions.

  20. Dried haematic microsamples and LC-MS/MS for the analysis of natural and synthetic cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Protti, Michele; Rudge, James; Sberna, Angelo Eliseo; Gerra, Gilberto; Mercolini, Laura

    2017-02-15

    Synthetic cannabinoids are new psychoactive substances (NPS) with similar effects when compared to natural ones found in Cannabis derivatives. They have rapidly integrated into the illicit market, often sold as alternatives under international control. The need to identify and quantify an unprecedented and growing number of new compounds represents a unique challenge for toxicological, forensic and anti-doping analysis. Dried blood spots have been used within the bioanalytical framework in place of plasma or serum, in order to reduce invasiveness, lower sample size, simplify handling, storage and shipping of samples and to facilitate home-based and on-field applications. However, DBS implementation has been limited mainly by concerns related to haematocrit effect on method accuracy. Volumetric absorptive microsampling (VAMS™), a second generation dried miniaturized sampling technology, has been developed just in order to eliminate haematocrit effect, thus providing accurate sampling but still granting feasible sample processing. An original LC-MS/MS method was herein developed and validated for the analysis of THC and its 2 main metabolites, together with 10 representative synthetic cannabinoids in both DBS and VAMS dried microsamples. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide highly innovative DBS and VAMS analytical protocols, whose performances were extensively optimized and compared, in order to provide effective and alternative tools that can be applied for natural and synthetic cannabinoid determination, in place of classical analytical strategies.

  1. Analysis of Eisenia fetida earthworm responses to sub-lethal C60 nanoparticle exposure using (1)H-NMR based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Lankadurai, Brian P; Nagato, Edward G; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2015-10-01

    The enhanced production and environmental release of Buckminsterfullerene (C60) nanoparticles will likely increase the exposure and risk to soil dwelling organisms. We used (1)H NMR-based metabolomics to investigate the response of Eisenia fetida earthworms to sub-lethal C60 nanoparticle exposure in both contact and soil tests. Principal component analysis of (1)H NMR data showed clear separation between controls and exposed earthworms after just 2 days of exposure, however as exposure time increased the separation decreased in soil but increased in contact tests suggesting potential adaptation during soil exposure. The amino acids leucine, valine, isoleucine and phenylalanine, the nucleoside inosine, and the sugars glucose and maltose emerged as potential bioindicators of exposure to C60 nanoparticles. The significant responses observed in earthworms using NMR-based metabolomics after exposure to very low concentrations of C60 nanoparticles suggests the need for further investigations to better understand and predict their sub-lethal toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Accuracy of imaging parameters in the prediction of lethal pulmonary hypoplasia secondary to mid-trimester prelabor rupture of fetal membranes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    van Teeffelen, A S P; Van Der Heijden, J; Oei, S G; Porath, M M; Willekes, C; Opmeer, B; Mol, B W J

    2012-05-01

    In women who have suffered mid-trimester prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM), prediction of pulmonary hypoplasia is important for optimal management. We performed a systematic review to assess the capacity of imaging parameters to predict pulmonary hypoplasia. We searched for published articles that reported on biometric parameters and allowed the construction of a 2 × 2 table, comparing at least one of these parameters with the occurrence of pulmonary hypoplasia. The selected studies were scored on methodological quality and we calculated sensitivity and specificity of the tests in the prediction of pulmonary hypoplasia and lethal pulmonary hypoplasia. Overall performance was assessed by summary receiver-operating characteristics (sROC) analyses that were performed with bivariate meta-analysis. We detected 13 studies that reported on the prediction of lethal pulmonary hypoplasia. The quality of the included studies was poor to mediocre. The estimated sROC curves for the chest circumference/abdominal circumference ratio and other parameters showed limited accuracy in the prediction of pulmonary hypoplasia. In women with mid-trimester PPROM, the available evidence indicates limited accuracy of biometric parameters in the prediction of pulmonary hypoplasia.

  3. Phenotypic analysis of pulmonary perivascular mononuclear infiltrates that occur as a direct result of acute lethal graft-versus-host disease describes the onset of interstitial pneumonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Workman, D. L.; Clancy, J.

    1995-01-01

    We recently determined that the sequential development of interstitial pneumonitis and lymphocytic bronchiolitis/bronchitis occurs as a direct result of acute lethal graft-versus-host disease. Interstitial pneumonitis develops before lymphocytic bronchiolitis/bronchitis primarily from the dissemination of perivascular mononuclear infiltrates. We have used the adult, nonirradiated (DA x LEW) F1 hybrid rat in the absence of chemotherapy, immunosuppression, or overt infection to determine the phenotype of infiltrating perivascular mononuclear cells throughout acute lethal graft-versus-host disease. F1 animals were intravenously injected with 1 x 10(6) DA parental lymphoid cells/g body weight, which produced 100% morbidity and mortality by day 21. Graft-versus-host disease animals were killed on days 3, 7, 10, 14, and 15 to 21 after injection. Whole left lung lobes were frozen, serially sectioned (4 microns), and incubated with a panel of mouse anti-rat monoclonal antibodies. Labeled antibody density was determined by computerized image analysis. Perivascular infiltration was observed first for ED1+, OX8+, and W3/25+ cells, and then OX41+, W3/13+ and OX19/25+ populations. OX6 was expressed in control tissues and at all time points tested. OX12+, OX39+ and MOM/3F12/F2+ cells were not quantifiable. The present study has determined that the process of perivascular infiltration was produced through a biphasic influx of OX6+, T-cell, and macrophage populations. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:7485398

  4. Analysis and optimization of a synthetic milkweed floral attractant for mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Otienoburu, Philip E; Ebrahimi, Babak; Phelan, P Larry; Foster, Woodbridge A

    2012-07-01

    A pentane extract of flowers of common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca (Asclepiadaceae), elicited significant orientation from both male and female Culex pipiens in a dual-port flight olfactometer. Analysis of the extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed six major constituents in order of relative abundance: benzaldehyde, (E)-β-ocimene, phenylacetaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, nonanal, and (E)-2-nonenal. Although not all were collected from the headspace profile of live flowers, a synthetic blend of these six compounds, when presented to mosquitoes in the same levels and proportions that occur in the extract, elicited a response comparable to the extract. Subtractive behavioral bioassays demonstrated that a three-component blend consisting of benzaldehyde, phenylacetaldehyde, and (E)-2-nonenal was as attractive as the full blend. These findings suggest the potential use of synthetic floral-odor blends for monitoring or control of both male and female disease-vectoring mosquitoes.

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of biogenic and synthetic polyamines conjugation with PAMAM-G4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chanphai, P; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-02-01

    We report the thermodynamic analysis of the bindings of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM-G4) nanoparticles with biogenic polyamines spermine (spm), spermidine (spmd) and synthetic polyamines 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane·4HCl (BE-333) in aqueous solution at physiological conditions. Multiple spectroscopic methods, thermodynamic parameters and molecular modelling were used to analyse polyamine bindings to PAMAM dendrimers. Thermodynamic parameters ΔS, ΔH and ΔG parameters showed that polyamines bind polymer through H-bonding and van der Waals contacts with biogenic polyamines form more stable conjugates than synthetic polyamines. Modelling showed that polyamines are located at the surface of PAMAM with the free binding energy of -3.56 (spermine), -3.88 (spermidine) and -3.13 kcal/mol (BE-333), indicating spontaneous polyamine-polymer interaction at room temperature.

  6. [Comparative analysis of ionizing radiation and xenobiotics influence on spermatogenic epithelium and dominant lethal mutations output in laboratory animals].

    PubMed

    Mamina, V P; Zhigal'skiĭ, O A

    2014-01-01

    The study covered state of spermatogenic epithelium and dominant lethal mutations output in mice of BALB/c and CBA lines, subjected to total gamma-irradiation and in Wistar rats after intraperitoneal injection of potassium bichromate (K2Cr2,O7) in small and sublethal doses. The BALB/c line mice under low irradiation dose (0.25 Gy) demonstrated stimulation effect on spermatogenic epithelium, but in the CBA line mice no such effect was seen. Both mice lines under irradiation of 0.25 Gy and 1.0 Gy demonstrated increase in pathologic sperm counts and in percentage ofpreimplantation embryonal death. In rats, injection of potassium bichromate in doses of 0.028 mg/kg and 2.8 mg/kg increased number of micronuclear spermatids, larger pathologic sperm counts and percentage of postimplantation deaths. Thus, lower general embryonal deaths under radiation exposure is due to preimplantation embryonal deaths, under exposure to 6-valent chromium--is due to postimplantation losses.

  7. Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Tulika; Noor, Nazia Nagori; Kural, Moolraj; Tripathi, Amita

    2016-01-01

    The multiple pterygium syndrome is consist of wide range of fetal malformations which have a genetic linkage. A defect in embryonic acetylcholine receptor which can be inherited as autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked fashion is the cause of this syndrome. We present a sporadic case of lethal multiple pterygium syndrome. PMID:27843868

  8. Lethal mutagenesis of viruses.

    PubMed

    Perales, Celia; Martín, Verónica; Domingo, Esteban

    2011-11-01

    Lethal mutagenesis aims at extinguishing viruses by increased mutagenesis prompted by virus-specific mutagenic agents, mainly nucleoside analogues. It is derived from the error threshold relationship of quasispecies theory, and it is slowly finding its way towards a clinical application. We summarize the current situation of research in this field of antiviral therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthetic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukes, George E.; Cain, Joel M.

    1996-02-01

    The Advanced Distributed Simulation (ADS) Synthetic Environments Program seeks to create robust virtual worlds from operational terrain and environmental data sources of sufficient fidelity and currency to interact with the real world. While some applications can be met by direct exploitation of standard digital terrain data, more demanding applications -- particularly those support operations 'close to the ground' -- are well-served by emerging capabilities for 'value-adding' by the user working with controlled imagery. For users to rigorously refine and exploit controlled imagery within functionally different workstations they must have a shared framework to allow interoperability within and between these environments in terms of passing image and object coordinates and other information using a variety of validated sensor models. The Synthetic Environments Program is now being expanded to address rapid construction of virtual worlds with research initiatives in digital mapping, softcopy workstations, and cartographic image understanding. The Synthetic Environments Program is also participating in a joint initiative for a sensor model applications programer's interface (API) to ensure that a common controlled imagery exploitation framework is available to all researchers, developers and users. This presentation provides an introduction to ADS and the associated requirements for synthetic environments to support synthetic theaters of war. It provides a technical rationale for exploring applications of image understanding technology to automated cartography in support of ADS and related programs benefitting from automated analysis of mapping, earth resources and reconnaissance imagery. And it provides an overview and status of the joint initiative for a sensor model API.

  10. A high-throughput pipeline for the production of synthetic antibodies for analysis of ribonucleoprotein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hong; Laver, John D.; Jeon, Jouhyun; Singh, Fateh; Ancevicius, Kristin; Fan, Yujie; Cao, Wen Xi; Nie, Kun; Yang, Zhenglin; Luo, Hua; Wang, Miranda; Rissland, Olivia; Westwood, J. Timothy; Kim, Philip M.; Smibert, Craig A.; Lipshitz, Howard D.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs plays an essential role in the control of gene expression. mRNAs are regulated in ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) along with associated protein and noncoding RNA (ncRNA) cofactors. A global understanding of post-transcriptional control in any cell type requires identification of the components of all of its RNP complexes. We have previously shown that these complexes can be purified by immunoprecipitation using anti-RBP synthetic antibodies produced by phage display. To develop the large number of synthetic antibodies required for a global analysis of RNP complex composition, we have established a pipeline that combines (i) a computationally aided strategy for design of antigens located outside of annotated domains, (ii) high-throughput antigen expression and purification in Escherichia coli, and (iii) high-throughput antibody selection and screening. Using this pipeline, we have produced 279 antibodies against 61 different protein components of Drosophila melanogaster RNPs. Together with those produced in our low-throughput efforts, we have a panel of 311 antibodies for 67 RNP complex proteins. Tests of a subset of our antibodies demonstrated that 89% immunoprecipitate their endogenous target from embryo lysate. This panel of antibodies will serve as a resource for global studies of RNP complexes in Drosophila. Furthermore, our high-throughput pipeline permits efficient production of synthetic antibodies against any large set of proteins. PMID:26847261

  11. Analysis of synthetic peptides by capillary zone electrophoresis in organic/aqueous buffers.

    PubMed

    Miller, C; Rivier, J

    1998-06-01

    Whereas synthetic peptides have been routinely analyzed for purity by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RPHPLC) for a number of years, it is only in the last decade that the use of capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) in aqueous buffers has been taken advantage of as an orthogonal method for the detection of impurities. However, we have found that hydrophobic amino acids and peptides often migrate as very broad, tailing absorbances or even precipitate in the aqueous buffers during CZE analysis. As a result, alternative buffer systems containing organic modifiers were sought. Varying concentrations of acetonitrile, methanol and isopropanol in sodium phosphate and triethylammonium phosphate buffers were used to study their effects on the electrophoretic migration of several synthetic peptides [gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and analogs] and an enantiomeric synthetic amino acid. The organic/aqueous buffers used to obtain the best conditions for separation of porcine gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and chicken II GnRH were then used to optimize a separation of nine native forms of GnRH decapeptides. Interestingly, several of these GnRHs have identical formal charges and yet could be separated. This suggests a mixed mechanism of separation that discriminates not only on the basis of peptide charge and structure but also of adsorptive properties (Van der Waals forces, dipole-dipole interactions and hydrogen bonding) of the capillaries.

  12. A high-throughput pipeline for the production of synthetic antibodies for analysis of ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Na, Hong; Laver, John D; Jeon, Jouhyun; Singh, Fateh; Ancevicius, Kristin; Fan, Yujie; Cao, Wen Xi; Nie, Kun; Yang, Zhenglin; Luo, Hua; Wang, Miranda; Rissland, Olivia; Westwood, J Timothy; Kim, Philip M; Smibert, Craig A; Lipshitz, Howard D; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2016-04-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs plays an essential role in the control of gene expression. mRNAs are regulated in ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) along with associated protein and noncoding RNA (ncRNA) cofactors. A global understanding of post-transcriptional control in any cell type requires identification of the components of all of its RNP complexes. We have previously shown that these complexes can be purified by immunoprecipitation using anti-RBP synthetic antibodies produced by phage display. To develop the large number of synthetic antibodies required for a global analysis of RNP complex composition, we have established a pipeline that combines (i) a computationally aided strategy for design of antigens located outside of annotated domains, (ii) high-throughput antigen expression and purification in Escherichia coli, and (iii) high-throughput antibody selection and screening. Using this pipeline, we have produced 279 antibodies against 61 different protein components of Drosophila melanogaster RNPs. Together with those produced in our low-throughput efforts, we have a panel of 311 antibodies for 67 RNP complex proteins. Tests of a subset of our antibodies demonstrated that 89% immunoprecipitate their endogenous target from embryo lysate. This panel of antibodies will serve as a resource for global studies of RNP complexes in Drosophila. Furthermore, our high-throughput pipeline permits efficient production of synthetic antibodies against any large set of proteins. © 2016 Na et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  13. Stability of Synthetic Cannabinoids in Biological Specimens: Analysis Through Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fort, Chelsea; Jourdan, Thomas; Jesse Kemp; Curtis, Byron

    2017-06-01

    The focus of this study was to determine the stability of four synthetic cannabinoids, XLR-11, UR-144, AB-Pinaca and AB-Fubinaca in biological specimens for the purpose of casework processing prioritization. The study used human whole blood spiked with the compounds of interest to mimic real forensic laboratory samples submitted for synthetic cannabinoid analysis. The spiked whole blood specimens were incubated under one of three temperature conditions: room or ambient (22°C), refrigerated (4°C) and frozen (-20°C) for a period of 12 weeks. Study specimens were then extracted using a forward alkaline extraction at pH 10.2 and analyzed using a liquid chromatograph tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS-MS). Under all incubation conditions results showed that AB-Fubinaca, AB-Pinaca and UR-144 were relatively stable while XLR-11 significantly degraded at ambient and refrigerated conditions. Frozen storage conditions were the only tested parameter able to preserve and stabilize all four compounds over the three month period. Therefore, it should be suggested that forensic blood evidence suspected of containing synthetic cannabinoid compounds should be stored in frozen conditions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Anthrax lethal factor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shoop, W L; Xiong, Y; Wiltsie, J; Woods, A; Guo, J; Pivnichny, J V; Felcetto, T; Michael, B F; Bansal, A; Cummings, R T; Cunningham, B R; Friedlander, A M; Douglas, C M; Patel, S B; Wisniewski, D; Scapin, G; Salowe, S P; Zaller, D M; Chapman, K T; Scolnick, E M; Schmatz, D M; Bartizal, K; MacCoss, M; Hermes, J D

    2005-05-31

    The primary virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis is a secreted zinc-dependent metalloprotease toxin known as lethal factor (LF) that is lethal to the host through disruption of signaling pathways, cell destruction, and circulatory shock. Inhibition of this proteolytic-based LF toxemia could be expected to provide therapeutic value in combination with an antibiotic during and immediately after an active anthrax infection. Herein is shown the crystal structure of an intimate complex between a hydroxamate, (2R)-2-[(4-fluoro-3-methylphenyl)sulfonylamino]-N-hydroxy-2-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)acetamide, and LF at the LF-active site. Most importantly, this molecular interaction between the hydroxamate and the LF active site resulted in (i) inhibited LF protease activity in an enzyme assay and protected macrophages against recombinant LF and protective antigen in a cell-based assay, (ii) 100% protection in a lethal mouse toxemia model against recombinant LF and protective antigen, (iii) approximately 50% survival advantage to mice given a lethal challenge of B. anthracis Sterne vegetative cells and to rabbits given a lethal challenge of B. anthracis Ames spores and doubled the mean time to death in those that died in both species, and (iv) 100% protection against B. anthracis spore challenge when used in combination therapy with ciprofloxacin in a rabbit "point of no return" model for which ciprofloxacin alone provided 50% protection. These results indicate that a small molecule, hydroxamate LF inhibitor, as revealed herein, can ameliorate the toxemia characteristic of an active B. anthracis infection and could be a vital adjunct to our ability to combat anthrax.

  15. The effectiveness of screening history, physical exam, and ECG to detect potentially lethal cardiac disorders in athletes: a systematic review/meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Kimberly G; Zigman, Monica; Drezner, Jonathan A

    2015-01-01

    The optimal cardiovascular preparticipation screen is debated. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review/meta-analysis of evidence comparing screening strategies. PRIMSA guidelines were followed. Electronic databases were searched from January 1996 to November 2014 for articles examining the efficacy of screening with history and physical exam (PE) based on the American Heart Association (AHA) or similar recommendations and electrocardiogram (ECG). Pooled data was analyzed for sensitivity, specificity, false positive rates and positive and negative likelihood ratios. Secondary outcomes included rate of potentially lethal cardiovascular conditions detected with screening and the etiology of pathology discovered. Fifteen articles reporting on 47,137 athletes were reviewed. After meta-analysis the sensitivity and specificity of ECG was 94%/93%, history 20%/94%, and PE 9%/97%. The overall false positive rate of ECG (6%) was less than that of history (8%), or physical exam (10%). Positive likelihood ratios were ECG 14.8, history 3.22 and PE 2.93 and negative likelihood ratios were ECG 0.055, history 0.85, and PE 0.93. There were a total of 160 potentially lethal cardiovascular conditions detected for a rate of 0.3% or 1 in 294. The most common pathology was Wolff-Parkinson-White (67, 42%), Long QT Syndrome (18, 11%), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (18, 11%), dilated cardiomyopathy (11, 7%), coronary artery disease or myocardial ischemia (9, 6%) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (4, 3%). The most effective strategy for screening for cardiovascular disease in athletes is ECG. It is 5 times more sensitive than history, 10 times more sensitive than physical exam, has higher positive likelihood ratio, lower negative likelihood ratio and a lower false positive rate. 12-lead ECG interpreted using modern criteria should be considered best practice in screening for cardiovascular disease in athletes while the use of history and physical alone as

  16. Efficient one-stationary bistatic synthetic aperture radar raw data generation based on Fourier analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yulin; Wu, Junjie; Li, Zhongyu; Yang, Haiguang; Yang, Jianyu

    2016-01-01

    Raw data generation for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is very powerful for designing systems and testing imaging algorithms. In this paper, a raw data generation method based on Fourier analysis for one-stationary bistatic SAR is presented. In this mode, two-dimensional (2-D) spatial variation is the major problem faced by the fast Fourier transform-based raw data generation. To deal with this problem, a 2-D linearization followed by a 2-D frequency transformation is employed in this method. This frequency transformation can reflect the 2-D spatial variation. Residual phase compensation is also discussed. Numerical simulation verifies the method.

  17. Analog-digital conversion signal-to-noise ratio analysis for synthetic aperture interferometric radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Zhiping; Zheng, Cheng; Yao, Xianxun; Yang, Baohua; Shang, Xiaozhou; Miao, Jungang

    2014-01-01

    A nontrivial analog-digital conversion (ADC) signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analysis for synthetic aperture interferometric radiometers for microwave remote sensing is presented. Correlation uncertainty is a key issue in the digital processing of radiometric signals. The ADC digitizes the analog intermediate frequency signal to perform digital correlations, hence the ADC noise is critical for radiometric performance, but this effect has lacked sufficient analysis. First, the ADC SNR requirement is drawn, and ADC SNR degradation is attributed to input noise, quantization noise, and sampling jitter. Second, it is proved that the input and the quantization noise have negligible effects on visibility uncertainty. Third, it is shown that the sampling jitter should be stringently controlled by Gaussian noise digitization SNR requirement. The sampling clock jitter is the dominant contributor in jitter caused SNR, and is evaluated by the long-term statistical time interval error jitter. Finally, the sampling jitter, the realized ADC SNR ratio and visibility uncertainties are tested on BHU-2D-U radiometer to verify the demonstrations. The analysis results can be used as a guideline in the digital correlation design of polarimetric or synthetic aperture radiometric systems.

  18. Time course analysis of apoptotic cell death during expression of hybrid lethality in hybrid tobacco cells (Nicotiana suaveolens x N. tabacum).

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yu; Yamada, Tetsuya; Marubashi, Wataru

    2003-04-01

    Hybrid cells from the cross Nicotiana suaveolens x N. tabacum expressed hybrid lethality at 28 degrees C in a thin layer cell culture system. Features characteristic of apoptosis, such as DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation, were detected during expression of hybrid lethality. Actinomycin D (ActD) or cycloheximide (CHX) added to the medium suppressed apoptotic cell death during hybrid lethality. This indicates that hybrid lethality requires de novo transcription and translation, and is thus under genetic control. To estimate the time course of apoptotic cell death during the expression of hybrid lethality, we determined when factors controlling hybrid lethality were expressed by observing the point of no return. When cells were exposed to 28 degrees C for 2 h or less in inhibitor-free medium before addition of ActD or CHX, the percentage of dead cells did not increase. However, when cells were exposed to 28 degrees C for 4 h before the addition of inhibitor, the percentage of dead cells increased. When cells were exposed to 28 degrees C for 3 h before the addition of inhibitor, the percentage of dead cells varied from experiment to experiment. These data indicate that the factors controlling hybrid lethality are expressed 3 h after induction of hybrid lethality. In addition, we found a time difference between the expression of cell death and nuclear fragmentation. This suggests that the factor controlling cell death is different from the one controlling nuclear fragmentation.

  19. Py-GC/MS applied to the analysis of synthetic organic pigments: characterization and identification in paint samples.

    PubMed

    Ghelardi, Elisa; Degano, Ilaria; Colombini, Maria Perla; Mazurek, Joy; Schilling, Michael; Learner, Tom

    2015-02-01

    A collection of 76 synthetic organic pigments was analysed using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). The purpose of this work was to expand the knowledge on synthetic pigments and to assess characteristic pyrolysis products that could help in the identification of these pigments in paint samples. We analysed several classes of synthetic pigments not previously reported as being analysed by this technique: some metal complexes, β-naphthol pigment lakes, BONA pigment lakes, disazopyrazolone, triarylcarbonium, dioxazine, anthraquinone, indanthrone, isoindoline and thioindigo classes. We also report for the first time the Py-GC/MS analysis of a number of naphthol AS, benzimidazolone, phthalocyanine and perylene pigments and other miscellaneous pigments including pigments with unpublished chemical structure. We successfully used the Py-GC/MS technique for the analysis of paints by artists Clyfford Still and Jackson Pollock to identify the synthetic organic pigments and the binding media.

  20. Synthetic spider silk sustainability verification by techno-economic and life cycle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edlund, Alan

    Major ampullate spider silk represents a promising biomaterial with diverse commercial potential ranging from textiles to medical devices due to the excellent physical and thermal properties from the protein structure. Recent advancements in synthetic biology have facilitated the development of recombinant spider silk proteins from Escherichia coli (E. coli), alfalfa, and goats. This study specifically investigates the economic feasibility and environmental impact of synthetic spider silk manufacturing. Pilot scale data was used to validate an engineering process model that includes all of the required sub-processing steps for synthetic fiber manufacture: production, harvesting, purification, drying, and spinning. Modeling was constructed modularly to support assessment of alternative protein production methods (alfalfa and goats) as well as alternative down-stream processing technologies. The techno-economic analysis indicates a minimum sale price from pioneer and optimized E. coli plants at 761 kg-1 and 23 kg-1 with greenhouse gas emissions of 572 kg CO2-eq. kg-1 and 55 kg CO2-eq. kg-1, respectively. Spider silk sale price estimates from goat pioneer and optimized results are 730 kg-1 and 54 kg-1, respectively, with pioneer and optimized alfalfa plants are 207 kg-1 and 9.22 kg-1 respectively. Elevated costs and emissions from the pioneer plant can be directly tied to the high material consumption and low protein yield. Decreased production costs associated with the optimized plants include improved protein yield, process optimization, and an Nth plant assumption. Discussion focuses on the commercial potential of spider silk, the production performance requirements for commercialization, and impact of alternative technologies on the sustainability of the system.

  1. Synthetic wind speed scenarios generation for probabilistic analysis of hybrid energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jun; Rabiti, Cristian

    2016-11-25

    Hybrid energy systems consisting of multiple energy inputs and multiple energy outputs have been proposed to be an effective element to enable ever increasing penetration of clean energy. In order to better understand the dynamic and probabilistic behavior of hybrid energy systems, this paper proposes a model combining Fourier series and autoregressive moving average (ARMA) to characterize historical weather measurements and to generate synthetic weather (e.g., wind speed) data. In particular, Fourier series is used to characterize the seasonal trend in historical data, while ARMA is applied to capture the autocorrelation in residue time series (e.g., measurements minus seasonal trends). The generated synthetic wind speed data is then utilized to perform probabilistic analysis of a particular hybrid energy system con guration, which consists of nuclear power plant, wind farm, battery storage, natural gas boiler, and chemical plant. As a result, requirements on component ramping rate, economic and environmental impacts of hybrid energy systems, and the effects of deploying different sizes of batteries in smoothing renewable variability, are all investigated.

  2. Performance evaluation and bacteria analysis of AFB-MFC enriched with high-strength synthetic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-sheng; Guo, Yong; Yang, Ping; Li, Chong-ming; Gao, Hui; Feng, Li; Zhang, Yun

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the performance and bacterial communities of an anaerobic fluidized bed microbial fuel cell (AFB-MFC) system, the 16S rDNA gene sequencing was applied, and high-strength synthetic wastewater was treated by the AFB-MFC system. The high-strength synthetic wastewater, in which the concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD), nitrite nitrogen, and nitrate nitrogen were above 19,000, 2,516-3,871 and 927-1,427 mg/L, was treated by the AFB-MFC system. The removal efficiency of COD, nitrite nitrogen, and nitrate nitrogen reached 70-89, 98 and 98%, while the maximum voltage was 394 mV. The bacteria analysis revealed the presence of Alistipes putredinis, Carnobacterium sp., Victivallis vadensis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Thauera sp., Parabacteroides merdae, Parvimonas micra, Parabacteroides sp., and Desulfomicrobium baculatum in the anode chamber. In addition, the Klebsiella pneumoniae was observed to have the capability of organic degradation and electricity generation, while the Thauera sp. has the capability of denitrification.

  3. Synthetic wind speed scenarios generation for probabilistic analysis of hybrid energy systems

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Jun; Rabiti, Cristian

    2016-11-25

    Hybrid energy systems consisting of multiple energy inputs and multiple energy outputs have been proposed to be an effective element to enable ever increasing penetration of clean energy. In order to better understand the dynamic and probabilistic behavior of hybrid energy systems, this paper proposes a model combining Fourier series and autoregressive moving average (ARMA) to characterize historical weather measurements and to generate synthetic weather (e.g., wind speed) data. In particular, Fourier series is used to characterize the seasonal trend in historical data, while ARMA is applied to capture the autocorrelation in residue time series (e.g., measurements minus seasonal trends).more » The generated synthetic wind speed data is then utilized to perform probabilistic analysis of a particular hybrid energy system con guration, which consists of nuclear power plant, wind farm, battery storage, natural gas boiler, and chemical plant. As a result, requirements on component ramping rate, economic and environmental impacts of hybrid energy systems, and the effects of deploying different sizes of batteries in smoothing renewable variability, are all investigated.« less

  4. The lethality test system

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.; Sims, J.R.; Parker, J.V.

    1986-11-01

    The Lethality Test System (LTS), presently under construction at Los Alamos, is an electromagnetic launcher facility designed to perform impact experiments at velocities up to 15 km/s. The launcher is a 25 mm round bore, plasma armature railgun extending 22 m in length. Preinjection is accomplished with a two-stage light gas gun capable of 7 km/s. The railgun power supply utilized traction motors, vacuum interrupters, and pulse transformers. The design of these traction motors, vacuum interrupters and pulse transformers are detailed.

  5. Nuclear Test Depth Determination with Synthetic Modelling: Global Analysis from PNEs to DPRK-2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkov, Mikhail; Stachnik, Joshua; Baker, Ben; Epiphansky, Alexey; Bobrov, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    Seismic event depth determination is critical for the event screening process at the International Data Center, CTBTO. A thorough determination of the event depth can be conducted mostly through additional special analysis because the IDC's Event Definition Criteria is based, in particular, on depth estimation uncertainties. This causes a large number of events in the Reviewed Event Bulletin to have depth constrained to the surface making the depth screening criterion not applicable. Further it may result in a heavier workload to manually distinguish between subsurface and deeper crustal events. Since the shape of the first few seconds of signal of very shallow events is very sensitive to the depth phases, cross correlation between observed and theoretic seismograms can provide a basis for the event depth estimation, and so an expansion to the screening process. We applied this approach mostly to events at teleseismic and partially regional distances. The approach was found efficient for the seismic event screening process, with certain caveats related mostly to poorly defined source and receiver crustal models which can shift the depth estimate. An adjustable teleseismic attenuation model (t*) for synthetics was used since this characteristic is not known for most of the rays we studied. We studied a wide set of historical records of nuclear explosions, including so called Peaceful Nuclear Explosions (PNE) with presumably known depths, and recent DPRK nuclear tests. The teleseismic synthetic approach is based on the stationary phase approximation with hudson96 program, and the regional modelling was done with the generalized ray technique by Vlastislav Cerveny modified to account for the complex source topography. The software prototype is designed to be used for the Expert Technical Analysis at the IDC. With this, the design effectively reuses the NDC-in-a-Box code and can be comfortably utilized by the NDC users. The package uses Geotool as a front-end for data

  6. Proteomic analysis of differentiating neuroblastoma cells treated with sub-lethal neurite inhibitory concentrations of diazinon: Identification of novel biomarkers of effect

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W.; Sachana, M.; Flaskos, J.; Hargreaves, A.J.

    2009-10-15

    In previous work we showed that sub-lethal levels of diazinon inhibited neurite outgrowth in differentiating N2a neuroblastoma cells. Western blotting analysis targeted at proteins involved in axon growth and stress responses, revealed that such exposure led to a reduction in the levels of neurofilament heavy chain, microtubule associated protein 1 B (MAP 1B) and HSP-70. The aim of this study was to apply the approach of 2 dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify novel biomarkers of effect. A number of proteins were found to be up-regulated compared to the control on silver-stained gels. These were classified in to 3 main groups of proteins: cytosolic factors, chaperones and the actin-binding protein cofilin, all of which are involved in cell differentiation, survival or metabolism. The changes observed for cofilin were further confirmed by quantitative Western blotting analysis with anti-actin and anti-cofilin antibodies. Indirect immunofluorescence staining with the same antibodies indicated that the microfilament network was disrupted in diazinon-treated cells. Our data suggest that microfilament organisation is disrupted by diazinon exposure, which may be related to increased cofilin expression.

  7. Analysis of Waveform Errors in Millimeter-Wave Lfmcw Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenqin

    2006-11-01

    In remote sensing applications, there is a special interest in the lightweight, cost effective, and high resolution imaging sensors. The combination of linearly frequency modulated continuous wave (LFMCW) technology and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technique can lead to such a sensor. This paper concentrates on the analysis of waveform errors in millimeter-wave (MMW) LFMCW SAR. The generating scheme of millimeter-wave LFMCW waveforms with phase locked loop (PLL) and direct digital synthesizer (DDS) combined frequency synthesizer is investigated. The impacts of quantization errors, spurs, and frequency nonlinearities are analyzed. Simulation results show that the quality of LFMCW waveforms has a direct influence on the SAR images. Hence a scheme of frequency synthesizer to achieve high performance MMW LFMCW waveform is proposed. This synthesizer driven by a DDS array can adaptive suppress the spurious level without degradation of excellent frequency linearity and fast switching speed.

  8. A Liquid Array Platform For the Multiplexed Analysis of Synthetic Molecule-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Doran, Todd M.; Kodadek, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic molecule microarrays, consisting of many different compounds spotted onto a planar surface such as modified glass or cellulose, have proven to be useful tools for the multiplexed analysis of small molecule- and peptide-protein interactions. However, these arrays are technically difficult to manufacture and use with high reproducibility and require specialized equipment. Here we report a more convenient alternative comprised of color-encoded beads that display a small molecule protein ligand on the surface. Quantitative, multiplexed assay of protein binding to up to 24 different ligands can be achieved using a common flow cytometer for the readout. This technology should be useful for evaluating hits from library screening efforts, the determination of structure activity relationships and for certain types of serological analyses. PMID:24245981

  9. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry for Digital Elevation Model of Kuwait Desert - Analysis of Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassar, H. K. Al; Rao, K. S.

    2012-07-01

    Using different combinations of 29 Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) images, 43 Digital Elevations Models (DEM) were generated adopting SAR Interferometry (InSAR) technique. Due to sand movement in desert terrain, there is a poor phase correlation between different SAR images. Therefore, suitable methodology for generating DEMs of Kuwait desert terrain using InSAR technique were worked out. Time series analysis was adopted to derive the best DEM out of 43 DEMs. The problems related to phase de-correlation over desert terrain are discussed. Various errors associated with the DEM generation are discussed which include atmospheric effects, penetration into soil medium, sand movement. The DEM of Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is used as a reference. The noise levels of DEM of SRTM are presented.

  10. Critical analysis on nanostructured CoFeB synthetic orthogonal ferrimagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. S.; Lin, J. G.; Cheng, Chih-Wei; Chern, G.

    2014-09-21

    Critical analysis on the magnetic properties of synthetic ferrimagnet (SyF), Ta/MgO/CoFeB/Ru/CoFeB/MgO/Ta, is demonstrated via both static and dynamic techniques. With the Ru thickness being 2.3 nm, the coupling between two CoFeB layers becomes orthogonal, which can be used for spin-transfer-torque nano-oscillator (STNO). The fitting of angular dependent ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) allows the precise determination of magnetic anisotropy of each CoFeB layer, the relative magnetizations and the exchange field near the frequency of STNO applications. In addition, the mechanism of resonance broadening at out-of-plane direction is identified to be magnetic inhomogeneity by fitting the angular dependent linewidth of FMR spectra, which provides indispensable information for the future design of STNO devices.

  11. Synthetic graph generation for data-intensive HPC benchmarking: Scalability, analysis and real-world application

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Sarah S.; Lothian, Joshua

    2014-12-01

    The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allows the emulation of a broad spectrum of application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report described the in-depth analysis of the generated synthetic graphs' properties at a variety of scales using different generator implementations and examines their applicability to replicating real world datasets.

  12. Adaptive multiparameter spectral feature analysis for synthetic aperture radar target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangrong; Jiao, Licheng; Zhou, Sisi; Zhou, Nan; Feng, Jie

    2012-08-01

    A feature extraction algorithm based on spectral clustering with adaptive multiparameters is proposed for synthetic aperture radar automatic target recognition (SAR-ATR). Spectral clustering has been widely applied in computer vision for its good performance. Meanwhile, the spectral mapping step in it has the property of feature space transformation. Spectral clustering based target feature extraction for SAR-ATR is constructed according to the framework of out-of-sample extensions in weighted kernel principal component analysis. To avoid the scaling parameter selection in spectral feature analysis (SFA) and eliminate the influence of scaling parameter on feature extraction performance as well, the multiple scaling parameters are calculated adaptively by local neighborhoods. Because the local statistics of the neighborhood of each point are taken into consideration, its performance is better than using only one fixed parameter. Based on the extracted features, target recognition is performed by the support vector machine for its good generalization capability. The experimental results show that the multiparameter SFA outperforms the principal component analysis, kernel principal component analysis and SFA with the selected scaling parameter for SAR target recognition in terms of recognition accuracy.

  13. Derivation of Human Lethal Doses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-19

    extrapolate to human lethal doses. In this effort, Ekwall et al. (1998) collected data on human lethal doses in acute poisonings from handbooks on...emergency medicine, pharmacology, forensic medicine, and industrial chemical toxicology, in addition to a poison information center. The authors presented...lethal doses would be dose-response data in people. Estimates of doses from case reports of fatal poisonings provide information on what doses can be

  14. Genomewide Clonal Analysis of Lethal Mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster Eye: Comparison of the X Chromosome and Autosomes

    PubMed Central

    Call, Gerald B.; Olson, John M.; Chen, Jiong; Villarasa, Nikki; Ngo, Kathy T.; Yabroff, Allison M.; Cokus, Shawn; Pellegrini, Matteo; Bibikova, Elena; Bui, Chris; Cespedes, Albert; Chan, Cheryl; Chan, Stacy; Cheema, Amrita K.; Chhabra, Akanksha; Chitsazzadeh, Vida; Do, Minh-Tu; Fang, Q. Angela; Folick, Andrew; Goodstein, Gelsey L.; Huang, Cheng R.; Hung, Tony; Kim, Eunha; Kim, William; Kim, Yulee; Kohan, Emil; Kuoy, Edward; Kwak, Robert; Lee, Eric; Lee, JiEun; Lin, Henry; Liu, H-C. Angela; Moroz, Tatiana; Prasad, Tharani; Prashad, Sacha L.; Patananan, Alexander N.; Rangel, Alma; Rosselli, Desiree; Sidhu, Sohrab; Sitz, Daniel; Taber, Chelsea E.; Tan, Jingwen; Topp, Kasey; Tran, PhuongThao; Tran, Quynh-Minh; Unkovic, Mary; Wells, Maggie; Wickland, Jessica; Yackle, Kevin; Yavari, Amir; Zaretsky, Jesse M.; Allen, Christopher M.; Alli, Latifat; An, Ju; Anwar, Abbas; Arevalo, Sonia; Ayoub, Danny; Badal, Shawn S.; Baghdanian, Armonde; Baghdanian, Arthur H.; Baumann, Sara A.; Becerra, Vivian N.; Chan, Hei J.; Chang, Aileen E.; Cheng, Xibin A.; Chin, Mabel; Chong, Fleurette; Crisostomo, Carlyn; Datta, Sanjit; Delosreyes, Angela; Diep, Francie; Ekanayake, Preethika; Engeln, Mark; Evers, Elizabeth; Farshidi, Farzin; Fischer, Katrina; Formanes, Arlene J.; Gong, Jun; Gupta, Riju; Haas, Blake E.; Hahm, Vicky; Hsieh, Michael; Hui, James Z.; Iao, Mei L.; Jin, Sophia D.; Kim, Angela Y.; Kim, Lydia S-H.; King, Megan; Knudsen-Robbins, Chloe; Kohanchi, David; Kovshilovskaya, Bogdana; Ku, Amy; Kung, Raymond W.; Landig, Mark E. L.; Latterman, Stephanie S.; Lauw, Stephanie S.; Lee, Daniel S.; Lee, Joann S.; Lei, Kai C.; Leung, Lesley L.; Lerner, Renata; Lin, Jian-ya; Lin, Kathleen; Lim, Bryon C.; Lui, Crystal P. Y.; Liu, Tiffany Q.; Luong, Vincent; Makshanoff, Jacob; Mei, An-Chi; Meza, Miguel; Mikhaeil, Yara A.; Moarefi, Majid; Nguyen, Long H.; Pai, Shekhar S.; Pandya, Manish; Patel, Aadit R.; Picard, Paul D.; Safaee, Michael M.; Salame, Carol; Sanchez, Christian; Sanchez, Nina; Seifert, Christina C.; Shah, Abhishek; Shilgevorkyan, Oganes H.; Singh, Inderroop; Soma, Vanessa; Song, Junia J.; Srivastava, Neetika; Sta.Ana, Jennifer L.; Sun, Christie; Tan, Diane; Teruya, Alison S.; Tikia, Robyn; Tran, Trinh; Travis, Emily G.; Trinh, Jennifer D.; Vo, Diane; Walsh, Thomas; Wong, Regan S.; Wu, Katherine; Wu, Ya-Whey; Yang, Nkau X. V.; Yeranosian, Michael; Yu, James S.; Zhou, Jennifer J.; Zhu, Ran X.; Abrams, Anna; Abramson, Amanda; Amado, Latiffe; Anderson, Jenny; Bashour, Keenan; Beyer, Elsa; Bookatz, Allen; Brewer, Sarah; Buu, Natalie; Calvillo, Stephanie; Cao, Joseph; Chan, Amy; Chan, Jenny; Chang, Aileen; Chang, Daniel; Chang, Yuli; Chen, YiBing; Choi, Joo; Chou, Jeyling; Dang, Peter; Datta, Sumit; Davarifar, Ardy; Deravanesian, Artemis; Desai, Poonam; Fabrikant, Jordan; Farnad, Shahbaz; Fu, Katherine; Garcia, Eddie; Garrone, Nick; Gasparyan, Srpouhi; Gayda, Phyllis; Go, Sherrylene; Goffstein, Chad; Gonzalez, Courtney; Guirguis, Mariam; Hassid, Ryan; Hermogeno, Brenda; Hong, Julie; Hong, Aria; Hovestreydt, Lindsay; Hu, Charles; Huff, Devon; Jamshidian, Farid; Jen, James; Kahen, Katrin; Kao, Linda; Kelley, Melissa; Kho, Thomas; Kim, Yein; Kim, Sarah; Kirkpatrick, Brian; Langenbacher, Adam; Laxamana, Santino; Lee, Janet; Lee, Chris; Lee, So-Youn; Lee, ToHang S.; Lee, Toni; Lewis, Gemma; Lezcano, Sheila; Lin, Peter; Luu, Thanh; Luu, Julie; Marrs, Will; Marsh, Erin; Marshall, Jamie; Min, Sarah; Minasian, Tanya; Minye, Helena; Misra, Amit; Morimoto, Miles; Moshfegh, Yasaman; Murray, Jessica; Nguyen, Kha; Nguyen, Cynthia; Nodado, Ernesto; O'Donahue, Amanda; Onugha, Ndidi; Orjiakor, Nneka; Padhiar, Bhavin; Paul, Eric; Pavel-Dinu, Mara; Pavlenko, Alex; Paz, Edwin; Phaklides, Sarah; Pham, Lephong; Poulose, Preethi; Powell, Russell; Pusic, Aya; Ramola, Divi; Regalia, Kirsten; Ribbens, Meghann; Rifai, Bassel; Saakyan, Manyak; Saarikoski, Pamela; Segura, Miriam; Shadpour, Farnaz; Shemmassian, Aram; Singh, Ramnik; Singh, Vivek; Skinner, Emily; Solomin, Daniel; Soneji, Kosha; Spivey, Kristin; Stageberg, Erika; Stavchanskiy, Marina; Tekchandani, Leena; Thai, Leo; Thiyanaratnam, Jayantha; Tong, Maurine; Toor, Aneet; Tovar, Steve; Trangsrud, Kelly; Tsang, Wah-Yung; Uemura, Marc; Vollmer, Emily; Weiss, Emily; Wood, Damien; Wu, Joy; Wu, Sophia; Wu, Winston; Xu, Qing; Yamauchi, Yuki; Yarosh, Will; Yee, Laura; Yen, George; Banerjee, Utpal

    2007-01-01

    Using a large consortium of undergraduate students in an organized program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), we have undertaken a functional genomic screen in the Drosophila eye. In addition to the educational value of discovery-based learning, this article presents the first comprehensive genomewide analysis of essential genes involved in eye development. The data reveal the surprising result that the X chromosome has almost twice the frequency of essential genes involved in eye development as that found on the autosomes. PMID:17720911

  15. Systemic endotoxin and gastric mucosal pH are the best parameters to predict lethal outcome in a porcine model of abdominal sepsis according to multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Strate, Tim; Schneider, Claus; Yekebas, Emre; Knoefel, Wolfram T; Bloechle, Christian; Izbicki, Jakob R

    2003-01-01

    This study was devised to identify sepsis-relevant parameters that early and reliably predict a lethal outcome in intra-abdominal sepsis. In 18 Duroc pigs, peritonitis was induced through standardized gastrotomy. Twelve hours later the defect was oversewn and the abdominal cavity lavaged thoroughly. Sepsis relevant parameters were measured before initiating therapy, and 30 min later animals were extubated and observed for a period of 6 days under adequate analgesia with free access to water and food. All parameters were correlated with survival postoperatively. In the treatment group, 7 out of 18 pigs (39%) died within the observation period. Endotoxin level at 30 min after initiation of therapy [17.9 EU/mL (+/- 12.1) vs. 110.9 EU/mL (+/- 21); p <.001] and Delta pHi [0.015 (+/- 0.011) vs. -0.039 (+/- 0.013); p =.016] were identified as the two parameters with highest predictive power regarding mortality in a multivariate analysis. In conclusion measurement of endotoxin and gastric tonometry should gain wider clinical application in septic patients.

  16. The Lethality Test System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, W. M.; Sims, J. R.; Parker, J. V.

    1986-11-01

    The Lethality Test System (LTS) under construction at Los Alamos is an electromagnetic launcher facility designed to perform impact experiments at velocities up to 15 km/sec. The launcher is a 25 mm round bore, plasma armature railgun 22 m in length. Preinjection is accomplished with a two-stage light gas gun capable of 7 km/sec. The railgun power supply utilizes traction motors, vacuum interrupters, and pulse transformers. An assembly of 28 traction motors, equipped with flywheels, stores approximately 80 MJ at 92 percent of full speed and energizes the primary windings of three pulse transformers at a current of 50 kA. At peak current an array of vacuum interrupters disconnects the transformer primary windings and forces the current to flow in the secondary windings. The secondary windings are connected to the railgun, and by staging the vacuum interrupter openings, a 1-1.3 MA ramped current waveform will be delivered to the railgun.

  17. Lethality test system

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.; Sims, J.R.; Parker, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    The Lethality Test System (LTS), presently under construction at Los Alamos, is an electromagnetic launcher facility designed to perform impact experiments at velocities up to 15 km/s. The launcher is a 25 mm round bore, plasma armature railgun extending 22 m in length. Preinjection is accomplished with a two-stage gas gun capable of 7 km/s. The railgun power supply utilizes traction motors, vacuum interrupters, and pulse transformers. An assembly of 28 traction motors, equipped with flywheels, stores approximately 80 MJ at 92% of full speed and energizes the primary windings of three pulse transformers at a current of 50 kA. At peak current an array of vacuum interrupters disconnects the transformer primary windings and forces the current to flow in the secondary windings. The secondary windings are connected to the railgun, and by staging the vacuum interrupter openings, a 1 MA to 1.3 MA ramped current waveform will be delivered to the railgun.

  18. Cell-to-Cell Communication Circuits: Quantitative Analysis of Synthetic Logic Gates.

    PubMed

    Hoffman-Sommer, Marta; Supady, Adriana; Klipp, Edda

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals in the field of synthetic biology is the construction of cellular computation devices that could function in a manner similar to electronic circuits. To this end, attempts are made to create biological systems that function as logic gates. In this work we present a theoretical quantitative analysis of a synthetic cellular logic-gates system, which has been implemented in cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Regot et al., 2011). It exploits endogenous MAP kinase signaling pathways. The novelty of the system lies in the compartmentalization of the circuit where all basic logic gates are implemented in independent single cells that can then be cultured together to perform complex logic functions. We have constructed kinetic models of the multicellular IDENTITY, NOT, OR, and IMPLIES logic gates, using both deterministic and stochastic frameworks. All necessary model parameters are taken from literature or estimated based on published kinetic data, in such a way that the resulting models correctly capture important dynamic features of the included mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. We analyze the models in terms of parameter sensitivity and we discuss possible ways of optimizing the system, e.g., by tuning the culture density. We apply a stochastic modeling approach, which simulates the behavior of whole populations of cells and allows us to investigate the noise generated in the system; we find that the gene expression units are the major sources of noise. Finally, the model is used for the design of system modifications: we show how the current system could be transformed to operate on three discrete values.

  19. Analysis of Synthetic Cannabinoids in Botanical Material: A Review of Analytical Methods and Findings.

    PubMed

    Presley, B C; Jansen-Varnum, S A; Logan, B K

    2013-03-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid analogs have gained a great deal of attention from the forensic community within the last four years. The compounds found to be of most interest to forensic practitioners include those of the following series: JWH, CP, HU, AM, WIN, RCS, and most recently, XLR and UR. Structurally the HU compounds are most similar in structure to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive component of marijuana. The novel compounds include cyclohexylphenols, naphthoylindoles, naphthylmethylindoles, naphthylmethylindenes, benzoylindoles, naphthoylpyrroles, phenylacetylindoles, adamantoylindoles, and tetramethylcyclopropylindoles. Many of these compounds are cannabinoid receptor agonists and were originally synthesized for medical research purposes but have recently been appropriated into the illicit drug market. Their psychoactive effects, mimicking those of marijuana, as well as their indeterminate legal status, have made them popular for recreational use. Solutions of the compounds dissolved in organic solvents are sprayed onto botanical material and sold as "herbal incense" products via the Internet, and in smoke shops, convenience stores, and gas stations around the world. Many of the products are labeled "Not for human consumption" in an attempt to circumvent legislation that bans the sale and manufacture of certain compounds and their analogs for human use. The compounds that were first detected following forensic analysis of botanical materials included JWH-018, JWH-073, and CP 47,497 (C7 and C8 homologs). However, in the four years since their appearance the number of compounds has grown, and additional diverse classes of compounds have been detected. Governments worldwide have taken action in an attempt to control those compounds that have become widespread in their regions. This article discusses the history of synthetic cannabinoids and how they have been detected in the illicit drug market. It also discusses the analytical methods and

  20. Constraining shallow seismic event depth via synthetic modeling for Expert Technical Analysis at the IDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachnik, J.; Rozhkov, M.; Baker, B.; Bobrov, D.; Friberg, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Depth of event is an important criterion of seismic event screening at the International Data Center, CTBTO. However, a thorough determination of the event depth can be conducted mostly through special analysis because the IDC's Event Definition Criteria is based, in particular, on depth estimation uncertainties. This causes a large number of events in the Reviewed Event Bulletin to have depth constrained to the surface. When the true origin depth is greater than that reasonable for a nuclear test (3 km based on existing observations), this may result in a heavier workload to manually distinguish between shallow and deep events. Also, IDC depth criterion is not applicable to the events with the small t(pP-P) travel time difference, which is the case of the nuclear test. Since the shape of the first few seconds of signal of very shallow events is very sensitive to the presence of the depth phase, cross correlation between observed and theoretic seismogram can provide an estimate for the depth of the event, and so provide an expansion to the screening process. We exercised this approach mostly with events at teleseismic and partially regional distances. We found that such approach can be very efficient for the seismic event screening process, with certain caveats related mostly to the poorly defined crustal models at source and receiver which can shift the depth estimate. We used adjustable t* teleseismic attenuation model for synthetics since this characteristic is not determined for most of the rays we studied. We studied a wide set of historical records of nuclear explosions, including so called Peaceful Nuclear Explosions (PNE) with presumably known depths, and recent DPRK nuclear tests. The teleseismic synthetic approach is based on the stationary phase approximation with Robert Herrmann's hudson96 program, and the regional modelling was done with the generalized ray technique by Vlastislav Cerveny modified to the complex source topography.

  1. Heterogeneity of Lethals in a "Simple" Lethal Complementation Group

    PubMed Central

    Janca, Frank C.; Woloshyn, Effie P.; Nash, David

    1986-01-01

    Of 24 ethyl methanesulphonate-induced, recessive-lethal mutations in the region 9E1-9F13 of the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster , eight fall into a typically homogeneous lethal complementation group associated with the raspberry (ras) locus. Mutations in this group have previously been shown to be pleiotropic, affecting not only ras but also two other genetic entities, gua1 and pur1, which yield auxotrophic mutations.—The eight new mutations have been characterized phenotypically in double heterozygotes with gua1, pur1 and ras mutations. Despite their homogeneity in lethal complementation tests, the mutations prove quite diverse. For example, two mutations have little or no effect on eye color in double heterozygotes with ras2 . The differences between the lethals are allele-specific and cannot be explained as a trivial outcome of a hypomorphic series.—Taken alone, the lethal complementation studies mask the complexity of the locus and the diversity of its recessive lethal alleles. By extension, we argue that the general use of lethal saturation studies provides an unduly simplified image of genetic organization. We suggest that the reason why recessive lethal mutations rarely present complex complementation patterns is that complex loci tend to produce mutations that affect several subfunctions. PMID:3080355

  2. Passive Synthetic Aperture Hitchhiker Imaging of Ground Moving Targets - Part 2: Performance Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wacks, Steven; Yazici, Birsen

    2014-07-08

    In Part 1 of this work, we present a passive synthetic aperture imaging and velocity estimation method for ground moving targets using a network of passive receivers. The method involves inversion of a Radon transform type forward model via a novel filtered backprojection approach combined with entropy optimization. The method is applicable to noncooperative transmitters of opportunity where the transmitter locations and transmitted waveforms are unknown. Furthermore, it can image multiple targets moving at different velocities in arbitrary imaging geometries. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the performance of our method. First the resolution analysis in position and velocity spaces is presented. The analysis identifies several factors that contribute positively or negativity towards position and velocity resolution. Next, we present a novel theory to analyze and predict smearing artifacts in position images due to error in velocity estimation of moving targets. Specifically, we show that small errors in the velocity estimation result in small positioning errors. We present extensive numerical simulations to demonstrate the theoretical results. While our primary interest lies in radar, the theory, methods and algorithms introduced in our work are also applicable to passive acoustic, seismic, and microwave imaging.

  3. Synthetic Aperture Radar (sar) and Optical Imagery Data Fusion: Crop Yield Analysis in Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, S. M.

    2012-08-01

    With the expanding energy crisis and rising food prices, crop yield analysis in Southeast Asia is an increasingly important topic in this region. Rice is the most important food crop in Southeast Asia and the ability to accurately predict crop yields during a growing season is useful for decision-makers, aid providers, and commercial trade organizations. The use of optical satellite image data by itself is difficult due to the almost constant cloud in many parts of Southeast Asia. However, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), or SAR data, which can image the Earth's surface through cloud cover, is suitable for many agricultural purposes, such as the detection of rice fields, and the identification of different crop species. Crop yield analysis is difficult in this region due to many factors. Rice cropping systems are often characterized by the type of rice planted, the size of rice field, the sowing dates for different fields, different types of rice cropping systems from one area to another, as well as cultural practices such as sowing and transplanting. This paper will discuss the use of SAR data fused with optical imagery to improve the ability to perform crop yield analysis on rice crops in Southeast Asia.

  4. Novel pathway compendium analysis elucidates mechanism of pro-angiogenic synthetic small molecule

    PubMed Central

    Wieghaus, Kristen A.; Gianchandani, Erwin P.; Paige, Mikell A.; Brown, Milton L.; Botchwey, Edward A.; Papin, Jason A.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Computational techniques have been applied to experimental datasets to identify drug mode-of-action. A shortcoming of existing approaches is the requirement of large reference databases of compound expression profiles. Here, we developed a new pathway-based compendium analysis that couples multi-timepoint, controlled microarray data for a single compound with systems-based network analysis to elucidate drug mechanism more efficiently. Results: We applied this approach to a transcriptional regulatory footprint of phthalimide neovascular factor 1 (PNF1)—a novel synthetic small molecule that exhibits significant in vitro endothelial potency—spanning 1–48 h post-supplementation in human micro-vascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) to comprehensively interrogate PNF1 effects. We concluded that PNF1 first induces tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) signaling pathway function which in turn affects transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling. These results are consistent with our previous observations of PNF1-directed TGF-β signaling at 24 h, including differential regulation of TGF-β-induced matrix metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14/MT1-MMP) which is implicated in angiogenesis. Ultimately, we illustrate how our pathway-based compendium analysis more efficiently generates hypotheses for compound mechanism than existing techniques. Availability: The microarray data generated as part of this study are available in the Gene Expression Omnibus (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/). Contact: botchwey@virginia.edu; papin@virginia.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:18718940

  5. The 2008 Super Tuesday Tornado Outbreak: Synthetic Dual Doppler Analysis of Contrasting Tornadic Storm Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knupp, Kevin R.; Coleman, Timothy; Carey, Larry; Peterson, Walt; Elkins, Calvin

    2008-01-01

    During the Super Tuesday Tornado Outbreak on 5-6 February, a significant number of storms passed within about 40 km of WSR-88D radars. This distance, combined with the significant motion vector (from the southwest at 20-25 m per second) of relatively steady storms, is amenable to a synthetic dual Doppler analysis during the times when the storms passed the WSR-88D locations. Nine storms will be analyzed using the SDD technique. The following table provides their general characteristics and nearest approach to the 88D radars. For this data set, storm structure ranges from isolated supercell to QLCS. Each storm will be analyzed for a 40-60 min period during passage by the WSR-88D radar to determine general storm properties. Analysis of high-resolution single Doppler data around the time of passage (plus or minus 30 min), combined with 1-2 SDD analyses, will be used to examine the kinematic structure of low-level circulations (e.g., mesocyclone, downdraft) and the relation to the parent storm. This analysis may provide insights on the fundamental differences between cyclonic circulations in supercell storms and those within QCLS's.

  6. Co-lethality studied as an asset against viral drug escape: the HIV protease case.

    PubMed

    Brouillet, Sophie; Valere, Thomas; Ollivier, Emmanuelle; Marsan, Laurent; Vanet, Anne

    2010-06-17

    Co-lethality, or synthetic lethality is the documented genetic situation where two, separately non-lethal mutations, become lethal when combined in one genome. Each mutation is called a "synthetic lethal" (SL) or a co-lethal. Like invariant positions, SL sets (SL linked couples) are choice targets for drug design against fast-escaping RNA viruses: mutational viral escape by loss of affinity to the drug may induce (synthetic) lethality. From an amino acid sequence alignment of the HIV protease, we detected the potential SL couples, potential SL sets, and invariant positions. From the 3D structure of the same protein we focused on the ones that were close to each other and accessible on the protein surface, to possibly bind putative drugs. We aligned 24,155 HIV protease amino acid sequences and identified 290 potential SL couples and 25 invariant positions. After applying the distance and accessibility filter, three candidate drug design targets of respectively 7 (under the flap), 4 (in the cantilever) and 5 (in the fulcrum) amino acid positions were found. These three replication-critical targets, located outside of the active site, are key to our anti-escape strategy. Indeed, biological evidence shows that 2/3 of those target positions perform essential biological functions. Their mutational variations to escape antiviral medication could be lethal, thus limiting the apparition of drug-resistant strains. This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian, Shamil Sunyaev and Claus Wilke.

  7. Co-lethality studied as an asset against viral drug escape: the HIV protease case

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Co-lethality, or synthetic lethality is the documented genetic situation where two, separately non-lethal mutations, become lethal when combined in one genome. Each mutation is called a "synthetic lethal" (SL) or a co-lethal. Like invariant positions, SL sets (SL linked couples) are choice targets for drug design against fast-escaping RNA viruses: mutational viral escape by loss of affinity to the drug may induce (synthetic) lethality. Results From an amino acid sequence alignment of the HIV protease, we detected the potential SL couples, potential SL sets, and invariant positions. From the 3D structure of the same protein we focused on the ones that were close to each other and accessible on the protein surface, to possibly bind putative drugs. We aligned 24,155 HIV protease amino acid sequences and identified 290 potential SL couples and 25 invariant positions. After applying the distance and accessibility filter, three candidate drug design targets of respectively 7 (under the flap), 4 (in the cantilever) and 5 (in the fulcrum) amino acid positions were found. Conclusions These three replication-critical targets, located outside of the active site, are key to our anti-escape strategy. Indeed, biological evidence shows that 2/3 of those target positions perform essential biological functions. Their mutational variations to escape antiviral medication could be lethal, thus limiting the apparition of drug-resistant strains. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian, Shamil Sunyaev and Claus Wilke. PMID:20565756

  8. Genetic analysis of Enterobius vermicularis isolated from a chimpanzee with lethal hemorrhagic colitis and pathology of the associated lesions.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Yuji; Okabayashi, Sachi; Abe, Niichiro; Masatou, Haruhisa; Iida, Shinya; Teramoto, Isao; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Shibahara, Tomoyuki

    2014-11-01

    Human pinworms, Enterobius vermicularis, are normally recognized as minor pathogens. However, a fatal case of human pinworm infection has been reported in a nonhuman primate, a zoo reared chimpanzee. Here, we histopathologically examined the lesions in tissues from the deceased chimpanzee and genetically characterized the isolated worms to investigate the pathogenicity and determine the phylogeny. We identified ulcers deep in the submucosa where many parasites were found to have invaded the lamina propria mucosa or submucous tissue. An inflammatory reaction consisting mainly of neutrophils and lymphocytes but not eosinophils was observed around the parasites, and intense hemorrhage in the lamina propria was confirmed. The parasites were morphologically similar to E. vermicularis based on the shape of the copulatory spicules. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene products were amplified from worm DNA by PCR and were genetically identified as E. vermicularis based on >98.7% similarity of partial sequences. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the sequences clustered together with other chimpanzee E. vermicularis isolates in a group which has been referred to as type C and which differs from human isolates (type A). The samples were negative for bacterial pathogens and Entamoeba histolytica indicating that E. vermicularis could be pathogenic in chimpanzees. Phylogenetic clustering of the isolates indicated that the parasite may be host specific.

  9. 77 FR 6548 - Notice of Availability of Ballistic Survivability, Lethality and Vulnerability Analyses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Notice of Availability of Ballistic Survivability, Lethality and Vulnerability... Laboratory's (ARL's), Survivability, Lethality Analysis Directorate (SLAD) is a leader in ballistic...

  10. An analysis of lethal and sublethal interactions among type I and type II pyrethroid pesticide mixtures using standard Hyalella azteca water column toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Krista Callinan; Deanovic, Linda; Werner, Inge; Stillway, Marie; Fong, Stephanie; Teh, Swee

    2016-10-01

    A novel 2-tiered analytical approach was used to characterize and quantify interactions between type I and type II pyrethroids in Hyalella azteca using standardized water column toxicity tests. Bifenthrin, permethrin, cyfluthrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin were tested in all possible binary combinations across 6 experiments. All mixtures were analyzed for 4-d lethality, and 2 of the 6 mixtures (permethrin-bifenthrin and permethrin-cyfluthrin) were tested for subchronic 10-d lethality and sublethal effects on swimming motility and growth. Mixtures were initially analyzed for interactions using regression analyses, and subsequently compared with the additive models of concentration addition and independent action to further characterize mixture responses. Negative interactions (antagonistic) were significant in 2 of the 6 mixtures tested, including cyfluthrin-bifenthrin and cyfluthrin-permethrin, but only on the acute 4-d lethality endpoint. In both cases mixture responses fell between the additive models of concentration addition and independent action. All other mixtures were additive across 4-d lethality, and bifenthrin-permethrin and cyfluthrin-permethrin were also additive in terms of subchronic 10-d lethality and sublethal responses. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2542-2549. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  11. Multi-Resolution Clustering Analysis and Visualization of Around One Million Synthetic Earthquake Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, J. Y.; Yuen, D. A.; Dzwinel, W.; Boryszko, K.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Sevre, E. O.

    2002-12-01

    The study of seismic patterns with synthetic data is important for analyzing the seismic hazard of faults because one can precisely control the spatial and temporal domains. Using modern clustering analysis from statistics and a recently introduced visualization software, AMIRA, we have examined the multi-resolution nature of a total assemblage involving 922,672 earthquake events in 4 numerically simulated models, which have different constitutive parameters, with 2 disparately different time intervals in a 3D spatial domain. The evolution of stress and slip on the fault plane was simulated with the 3D elastic dislocation theory for a configuration representing the central San Andreas Fault (Ben-Zion, J. Geophys. Res., 101, 5677-5706, 1996). The 4 different models represent various levels of fault zone disorder and have the following brittle properties and names: uniform properties (model U), a Parkfield type Asperity (A), fractal properties (F), and multi-size-heterogeneities (model M). We employed the MNN (mutual nearest neighbor) clustering method and developed a C-program that calculates simultaneously a number of parameters related to the location of the earthquakes and their magnitude values .Visualization was then used to look at the geometrical locations of the hypocenters and the evolution of seismic patterns. We wrote an AmiraScript that allows us to pass the parameters in an interactive format. With data sets consisting of 150 year time intervals, we have unveiled the distinctly multi-resolutional nature in the spatial-temporal pattern of small and large earthquake correlations shown previously by Eneva and Ben-Zion (J. Geophys. Res., 102, 24513-24528, 1997). In order to search for clearer possible stationary patterns and substructures within the clusters, we have also carried out the same analysis for corresponding data sets with time extending to several thousand years. The larger data sets were studied with finer and finer time intervals and multi

  12. Computational Analysis of Some Aspects of a Synthetic Route to Ammonium Dinitramide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-27

    OF SOME ASPECTS OF A SYNTHETIC ROUTE TO AMMONIUM DINITRAMIDE by Tore Brinck and Peter Politzer D T IC ELECTES JAN1 119943 Department of Chemistry JAN...NO0014-91-J-4057 a Synthetic Route to Ammonium Dinitramide Dr. Richard S. Miller 6. AUTHOR(S) Tore Brinck and Peter Politzer R&T Code 4131D02 7

  13. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography for the analysis of synthetic and crude-derived jet fuels.

    PubMed

    van der Westhuizen, Rina; Ajam, Mariam; De Coning, Piet; Beens, Jan; de Villiers, André; Sandra, Pat

    2011-07-15

    Fully synthetic jet fuel (FSJF) produced via Fischer-Tropsch (FT) technology was recently approved by the international aviation fuel authorities. To receive approval, comparison of FSJF and crude-derived fuel and blends on their qualitative and quantitative hydrocarbon composition was of utmost importance. This was performed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) in the reversed phase mode. The hydrocarbon composition of synthetic and crude-derived jet fuels is very similar and all compounds detected in the synthetic product are also present in crude-derived fuels. Quantitatively, the synthetic fuel consists of a higher degree of aliphatic branching with less than half the aromatic content of the crude-derived fuel. GC×GC analyses also indicated the presence of trace levels of hetero-atomic impurities in the crude-derived product that were absent in the synthetic product. While clay-treatment removed some of the impurities and improved the fuel stability, the crude-derived product still contained traces of cyclic and aromatic S-containing compounds afterwards. Lower level of aromatics and the absence of sulphur are some of the factors that contribute to the better fuel stability and environmental properties of the synthetic fuel. GC×GC was further applied for the analysis of products during Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Testing (JFTOT), which measures deposit formation of a fuel under simulated engine conditions. JFTOT showed the synthetic fuel to be much more stable than the crude-derived fuel. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography analysis of synthetic polymers using fast size exclusion chromatography at high column temperature.

    PubMed

    Im, Kyuhyun; Park, Hae-Woong; Lee, Sekyung; Chang, Taihyun

    2009-05-22

    In recent years, two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) has been used increasingly for the analysis of synthetic polymers. A 2D-LC analysis provides richer information than a single chromatography analysis at the cost of longer analysis time. The time required for a comprehensive 2D-LC analysis is essentially proportional to the analysis time of the second dimension separation. Many of 2D-LC analyses of synthetic polymers have employed size exclusion chromatography (SEC) for the second-dimension analysis due to the relatively short analysis time in addition to the wide use in the polymer analysis. Nonetheless, short SEC columns are often used for 2D-LC analyses to reduce the separation time, which inevitably deteriorates the resolution. In this study, we demonstrated that high temperature SEC can be employed as an efficient second-LC in the 2D-LC separation of synthetic polymers. By virtue of high temperature operation (low solvent viscosity and high diffusivity of the polymer molecules), a normal length SEC column can be used at high flow rate with little loss in resolution.

  15. A differential array of metalated synthetic receptors for the analysis of tripeptide mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wright, Aaron T; Anslyn, Eric V; McDevitt, John T

    2005-12-14

    A novel library of resin-bound receptors within a cross-reactive differential array for the identification and discrimination of tripeptides and tripeptide mixtures is reported. Pattern recognition using principal component analysis showed complete discrimination of four similar tripeptides and three tripeptide mixtures. The library is comprised of a Cu(II)-centered core with two proximally appended tripeptide arms emanating outward. One tripeptide arm was prepared using combinatorial chemistry to generate the differential nature of the library. Thirty resin-bound receptors were randomly selected from the library and placed within a silicon microchip array that included integrated microfluidics elements, and an indicator-uptake assay was used for colorimetric signaling. The indicator Orange G yielded an accurate measure of the degree of association between receptors and analytes as determined by kinetic analysis of the indicator-uptake assays. Within this paper we detail the method used for differential sensing using a novel receptor library. This work further demonstrates the power and utility of a differential array of synthetic receptors for identification and discrimination of complex bioanalytes.

  16. INSYDE: a synthetic, probabilistic flood damage model based on explicit cost analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dottori, Francesco; Figueiredo, Rui; Martina, Mario L. V.; Molinari, Daniela; Scorzini, Anna Rita

    2016-12-01

    Methodologies to estimate economic flood damages are increasingly important for flood risk assessment and management. In this work, we present a new synthetic flood damage model based on a component-by-component analysis of physical damage to buildings. The damage functions are designed using an expert-based approach with the support of existing scientific and technical literature, loss adjustment studies, and damage surveys carried out for past flood events in Italy. The model structure is designed to be transparent and flexible, and therefore it can be applied in different geographical contexts and adapted to the actual knowledge of hazard and vulnerability variables. The model has been tested in a recent flood event in northern Italy. Validation results provided good estimates of post-event damages, with similar or superior performances when compared with other damage models available in the literature. In addition, a local sensitivity analysis was performed in order to identify the hazard variables that have more influence on damage assessment results.

  17. The genetics of the Dras3-Roughened-ecdysoneless chromosomal region (62B3-4 to 62D3-4) in Drosophila melanogaster: analysis of recessive lethal mutations.

    PubMed

    Sliter, T J; Henrich, V C; Tucker, R L; Gilbert, L I

    1989-10-01

    The genetic organization of interval 62B3-4 to 62D3-4 on the Drosophila third chromosome was investigated. The region (designated DRE) includes four known loci: Roughened (R; 3-1.4), defined by a dominant mutation disrupting eye morphology; the nonvital locus Aprt, structural gene for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase; Dras3, a homolog of the vertebrate ras oncogene; and 1(3)ecdysoneless (1(3)ecd), a gene that has been implicated in the regulation of larval molting hormone (ecdysteroid) synthesis. Overlapping chromosomal deletions of the region were generated by gamma-ray-induced reversion of the R mutation. Recessive lethal mutations were isolated based upon failure to complement the recessive lethality of Df(3L)RR2, a deletion of the DRE region that removes 16-18 polytene chromosome bands. A total of 117 mutations were isolated following ethyl methanesulfonate and gamma-ray mutagenesis. These and two additional define 13 lethal complementation groups. Mutations at two loci were recovered at disproportionately high rates. One of these loci is preferentially sensitive to radiation-induced mutational alterations. Additionally, an unusually low recovery rate for cytologically detectable rearrangement breakpoints within the gamma-ray-sensitive locus suggests that an interval of the DRE region closely linked to the R locus may be dominantly sensitive to position effects. Lethal phase analysis of mutant hemizygotes indicates that a high proportion of DRE-region loci (11 of 13) are necessary for larval development. Mutations in five loci cause predominantly first-instar larval lethality, while mutations in four other loci cause predominantly second-instar lethality. Mutations in two loci cause late-larval lethality associated with abnormal imaginal disc development. A temperature-sensitive allele of one newly identified complementation group blocks ecdysteroid-induced pupariation. This developmental block is overcome by dietary 20-hydroxyecdysone, suggesting that a

  18. [From synthetic biology to synthetic humankind].

    PubMed

    Nouvel, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an historical survey of the expression "synthetic biology" in order to identify its main philosophical components. The result of the analysis is then used to investigate the meaning of the notion of "synthetic man". It is shown that both notions share a common philosophical background that can be summed up by the short but meaningful assertion: "biology is technology". The analysis allows us to distinguish two notions that are often confused in transhumanist literature: the notion of synthetic man and the notion of renewed man. The consequences of this crucial distinction are discussed.

  19. Utilising E-on Vue and Unity 3D scenes to generate synthetic images and videos for visible signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Christopher S.; Richards, Noel J.; Culpepper, Joanne B.

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the ability to develop synthetic scenes in an image generation tool, E-on Vue, and a gaming engine, Unity 3D, which can be used to generate synthetic imagery of target objects across a variety of conditions in land environments. Developments within these tools and gaming engines have allowed the computer gaming industry to dramatically enhance the realism of the games they develop; however they utilise short cuts to ensure that the games run smoothly in real-time to create an immersive effect. Whilst these short cuts may have an impact upon the realism of the synthetic imagery, they do promise a much more time efficient method of developing imagery of different environmental conditions and to investigate the dynamic aspect of military operations that is currently not evaluated in signature analysis. The results presented investigate how some of the common image metrics used in target acquisition modelling, namely the Δμ1, Δμ2, Δμ3, RSS, and Doyle metrics, perform on the synthetic scenes generated by E-on Vue and Unity 3D compared to real imagery of similar scenes. An exploration of the time required to develop the various aspects of the scene to enhance its realism are included, along with an overview of the difficulties associated with trying to recreate specific locations as a virtual scene. This work is an important start towards utilising virtual worlds for visible signature evaluation, and evaluating how equivalent synthetic imagery is to real photographs.

  20. Characterization of the antibody response elicited by immunization with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) as recombinant protein or DNA vaccine and analysis of protection against an intranasal lethal challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Vadesilho, Cintia F M; Ferreira, Daniela M; Moreno, Adriana T; Chavez-Olortegui, Carlos; Machado de Avila, Ricardo A; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Ho, Paulo L; Miyaji, Eliane N

    2012-01-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) is an important candidate for a vaccine against pneumococcal infections. DNA vaccines expressing PspA were shown to protect mice against intraperitoneal and colonization challenge models in mice. We now show that a DNA vaccine expressing PspA from clade 4 (pSec-pspA4Pro) is also able to elicit protection against an intranasal lethal challenge model at levels similar to the recombinant protein PspA4Pro adjuvanted with alum. PspA4Pro + alum induced an IgG response characterized by a high IgG1/IgG2a ratio, leading to a lack of binding of anti-PspA IgG2a antibodies to intact pneumococci in vitro, which is in contrast to the response elicited by pSec-pspA4Pro. Epitopes recognized by the sera were mapped and antibodies induced by immunization with PspA4Pro + alum showed positive reaction with several synthetic peptides, mostly located in the first half of the protein. On the other hand, antibodies induced by the DNA vaccine showed reactivity with only two peptides. Though both strategies were protective against the intranasal lethal challenge model, the elicited humoral responses differ significantly, with the detection of important differences in the Fc (IgG1/IgG2a ratios) and Fab (recognized epitopes) regions of the induced antibodies.

  1. Human Health and Environmental Risks Posed by Synthetic Biology R&D for Energy Applications: A Literature Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Hewett, Joel P.; Wolfe, Amy K.; Bergmann, Rachael A.; ...

    2016-10-07

    What are the human health and environmental risks posed by synthetic biology research and development (R&D) for energy applications? In this study, we found it surprisingly difficult to answer this seemingly straightforward question in our review of the risk-related synthetic biology literature. To our knowledge, no entity to date has published a comprehensive review of this literature. Thus, this analysis aims to fill that void and, at a high level, answer the question that we pose. Risk-related synthetic biology literature addresses risk from different perspectives. Much of the literature that we reviewed treats the concept of risk in synthetic biologymore » R&D broadly, enumerating few specific risks. Nevertheless, after reviewing >200 documents, we identified 44 discrete risk issues; 18 of those related to human health and 26 to the environment. We clustered these risk issues into categories that reflect and summarize their content. We categorized human health risk issues as follows: allergies, antibiotic resistance, carcinogens, and pathogenicity or toxicity. Environmental risk issues were categorized as follows: change or depletion of the environment, competition with native species, horizontal gene transfer, and pathogenicity or toxicity. Our efforts to understand what the synthetic biology R&D-related risk issues are stemmed from a larger research project in which we used risk issues identified in the literature as a point of departure in interviews with biosafety professionals and scientists engaged in synthetic biology R&D. Finally, we wrote this article after multiple biosafety professionals told us that accessing our risk-related literature analysis would aid them in their work.« less

  2. Human Health and Environmental Risks Posed by Synthetic Biology R&D for Energy Applications: A Literature Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, Joel P.; Wolfe, Amy K.; Bergmann, Rachael A.; Stelling, Savannah C.; Davis, Kimberly L.

    2016-10-07

    What are the human health and environmental risks posed by synthetic biology research and development (R&D) for energy applications? In this study, we found it surprisingly difficult to answer this seemingly straightforward question in our review of the risk-related synthetic biology literature. To our knowledge, no entity to date has published a comprehensive review of this literature. Thus, this analysis aims to fill that void and, at a high level, answer the question that we pose. Risk-related synthetic biology literature addresses risk from different perspectives. Much of the literature that we reviewed treats the concept of risk in synthetic biology R&D broadly, enumerating few specific risks. Nevertheless, after reviewing >200 documents, we identified 44 discrete risk issues; 18 of those related to human health and 26 to the environment. We clustered these risk issues into categories that reflect and summarize their content. We categorized human health risk issues as follows: allergies, antibiotic resistance, carcinogens, and pathogenicity or toxicity. Environmental risk issues were categorized as follows: change or depletion of the environment, competition with native species, horizontal gene transfer, and pathogenicity or toxicity. Our efforts to understand what the synthetic biology R&D-related risk issues are stemmed from a larger research project in which we used risk issues identified in the literature as a point of departure in interviews with biosafety professionals and scientists engaged in synthetic biology R&D. Finally, we wrote this article after multiple biosafety professionals told us that accessing our risk-related literature analysis would aid them in their work.

  3. Rare earth element concentrations in geological and synthetic samples using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, J.R.; Chao, E.C.T.; Back, J.M.; Minkin, J.A.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Cygan, G.L.; Grossman, J.N.; Reed, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    The concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs) in specific mineral grains from the Bayan Obo ore deposit and synthetic high-silica glass samples have been measured by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) analysis using excitation of the REE K lines between 33 and 63 keV. Because SXRF, a nondestructive analytical technique, has much lower minimum detection limits (MDLs) for REEs, it is an important device that extends the in situ analytical capability of electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The distribution of trace amounts of REEs in common rock-forming minerals, as well as in REE minerals and minerals having minor quantities of REEs, can be analyzed with SXRF. Synchrotron radiation from a bending magnet and a wiggler source at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, was used to excite the REEs. MDLs of 6 ppm (La) to 26 ppm (Lu) for 3600 s in 60-??m-thick standard samples were obtained with a 25-??m diameter wiggler beam. The MDLs for the light REEs were a factor of 10-20 lower than the MDLs obtained with a bending magnet beam. The SXRF REE concentrations in mineral grains greater than 25 ??m compared favorably with measurements using EPMA. Because EPMA offered REE MDLs as low as several hundred ppm, the comparison was limited to the abundant light REEs (La, Ce, Pr, Nd). For trace values of medium and heavy REEs, the SXRF concentrations were in good agreement with measurements using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), a bulk analysis technique. ?? 1993.

  4. A synthetic perturbative hypothesis for multiscale analysis of convective wake instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordella, D.; Scarsoglio, S.; Belan, M.

    2006-05-01

    The paper presents a nonparallel stability analysis of the intermediate region of the two-dimensional wake behind a bluff body. In particular, it analyzes the convective instabilities using a Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin-Jeffreys method on a basic flow previously derived from intermediate asymptotics [D. Tordella and M. Belan, Phys. Fluids 15, 1897 (2003)]. The multiscaling is carried out to explicitly account for the effects associated to the lateral momentum dynamics at a given Reynolds number. These effects are an important feature of the base flow and are included in the perturbative equation as well as in the associated modulation equation. At the first order in the multiscaling, the disturbance is locally tuned to the property of the instability, as can be seen in the zero-order theory (near-parallel parametric Orr-Sommerfeld treatment). This leads to a synthetic analysis of the nonparallel correction of the instability characteristics. The system is, in fact, considered to be locally perturbed by waves with a wave number that varies along the intermediate wake and which is equal to the wave number of the dominant saddle point of the zero order dispersion relation, taken at different Reynolds numbers. In this study, the Reynolds number is thus the only parameter. It is shown that the corrections to the frequency, and to the temporal and spatial growth rates are remarkable in the first part of the intermediate wake and lead to absolute instability in regions that extend to about ten body scales. The correction increases with the Reynolds number and agrees with data from laboratory and numerical experiments in literature. An eigenfunction and eigenvalue asymptotic analysis for the far wake is included, which is in excellent agreement with the complete problem.

  5. Validation analysis of the thermal and radiometric integrity of RIT's synthetic image generation model, DIRSIG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, John E.; Schott, John R.; Rankin-Parobek, Donna

    1994-06-01

    The digital imaging and remote sensing laboratory's image generation model (DIRSIG) was validated in the long wave infrared (LWIR, 8 - 13.3 micrometers ) and midwife infrared (MWIR, 3 - 5 micrometers ) pass bands. Truth data was collected for all components of the thermal and radiometric submodels including a complete set of meteorological and radiometric data. Truth temperatures were collected using a bank of thermistors and truth radiance images were collected with calibrated InSb (MWIR) and HgCdTe (LWIR) detectors. Sensor spectral response functions were also included in the radiometric analysis. Relative error contributions to the total temperature/radiance digital count were investigated for each component in the multi-spectral model. Largest contributions were found to be wind speed, air temperature, visible emissivity, and fractional sky exposure for the thermal model and atmospheric transmission, temperature, and emissivity for the radiance model. An overall comparison of truth and synthetic images yields rms errors of as low as 1.8 degree(s)C actual temperature and 5 degree(s)C (LWIR) and 6 degree(s)C (MWIR) apparent temperature.

  6. Synthetic Lethality as a Targeted Approach to Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    1 00 % Treatment PKCd Kinase Assay Fig. 1: PKC activity, expressed as % inhibition. Compounds tested at the concentrations indicated (M...100 120 In hi bi tio n of 1 00 % Treatment PKCd Kinase Assay Fig. 2: PKC activity, expressed as % inhibition. Compounds tested at the...concentrations indicated (M). 6 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 In hi bi tio n of 1 00 % Treatment PKCd Kinase Assay Fig. 3: PKC

  7. Synthetic Lethality as a Targeted Approach to Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    for PKCθ, another member of the “novel” group of PKC enzymes, which is also inhibited by mallotoxin. LC-1 is a naturally- occurring product , with...Next, lithium acetylide addition to 3 provides 4, which was subsequently reduced to the E-olefin 5 in excellent yield. Manganese dioxide oxidation of...protein kinase C inhibitors (the natural product staurosporine), and incorporating protein structural data for “novel” class PKCs. We designed and

  8. Synthetic Lethality as a Targeted Approach to Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    target for therapy of prostate cancer , but approaches aimed at Ras itself, or its critical signaling pathways, which are required in normal tissues...Impact: Current therapies for prostate cancer are inadequate, and aberrant activation of Ras or Ras pathways are common. A novel therapeutic modality...to Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Douglas V. Faller, PhD, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Trustees of Boston University

  9. Synthetic Lethal Gene for PTEN as a Therapeutic Target

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Mississippi Medical Center REPORT DATE: September, 2014 TYPE OF REPORT...ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER University of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson MS 39216 9...our entire lab to University of Mississippi Medical Center, and we needed to re-establish our lab setting including personnel. However, we

  10. Synthetic Lethal Gene for PTEN as a Therapeutic Target

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    patients and prepare PTEN-deficient cells. We will then screen genes that play critical roles in the PTEN pathway using a technique called shRNA library ... screening , with or without radiation treatment of these cells. When we identify a gene, we will then test the effect of such gene in an animal model to

  11. ATLAS Versus NextGen Model Atmospheres: A Combined Analysis of Synthetic Spectral Energy Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Chávez, M.; Rodríguez-Merino, L. H.

    2004-08-01

    We carried out a critical appraisal of the two theoretical models, Kurucz' ATLAS9 and PHOENIX/NextGen, for stellar atmosphere synthesis. Our tests relied on the theoretical fit of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for a sample of 334 target stars along the whole spectral-type sequence, from the classical optical catalogs of Gunn & Stryker and Jacoby et al. The best-fitting physical parameters (Teff, logg) of stars allowed an independent calibration of the temperature and bolometric scale versus empirical classification parameters (i.e., spectral type and MK luminosity class); in addition, the comparison of the synthetic templates from the ATLAS and NextGen grids allowed us to probe the capability of the models to match spectrophotometric properties of real stars and assess the impact of the different input physics. We can sketch the following main conclusions of our analysis: (1) Fitting accuracy of both theoretical libraries drastically degrades at low Teff at which both ATLAS and NextGen models still fail to properly account for the contribution of molecular features in the observed SED of K-M stars. (2) Compared with empirical calibrations, both ATLAS and NextGen fits tend, on average, to predict slightly warmer (by 4%-8%) Teff for both giant and dwarf stars of fixed spectral type, but ATLAS provides, in general, a sensibly better fit (a factor of 2 lower σ of flux residuals) than NextGen. (3) There is a striking tendency of NextGen to label target stars with an effective temperature and surface gravity higher than that of ATLAS. The effect is especially evident for MK I-III objects for which about one in four stars is clearly misclassified by NextGen in logg. This is a consequence of some ``degeneracy'' in the solution space, partly induced by the different input physics and geometry constraints in the computation of the integrated emerging flux (ATLAS model atmospheres assume standard plane-parallel layers, while NextGen adopts, for low-gravity stars, a

  12. Analysis of synthetic seismograms for the detection of voids using the surface-wave backscatter-analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenk, J.; Miller, R. D.; Ivanov, J.; Peterie, S.; Sloan, S.

    2012-12-01

    We use the surface-wave backscatter-analysis technique to optimize the location of a void within a low-velocity-layer earth model. The synthetic seismograms are a product of previous research that sought to match Vp and Vs characteristics of a site located on the Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), Arizona. The YPG site utilizes an emplaced tunnel to further tunnel-detection research. Source offset, spread length, and frequency bandwidth were the primary processing parameters analyzed for optimization of the method. The superpositioning of forward-propagating and backscattered wavefields, along with the presence of higher-mode contamination, make interpretation and processing non-trivial. The translation of this research to real-world data sets may aid the detection of voids and tunnels in environmental, engineering, and defense applications.

  13. A kinematic analysis of the spine during rugby scrummaging on natural and synthetic turfs

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Ramesh; Williams, Jonathan M.; Jones, Michael D.; Theobald, Peter S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Artificial surfaces are now an established alternative to grass (natural) surfaces in rugby union. Little is known, however, about their potential to reduce injury. This study characterises the spinal kinematics of rugby union hookers during scrummaging on third-generation synthetic (3G) and natural pitches. The spine was sectioned into five segments, with inertial sensors providing three-dimensional kinematic data sampled at 40 Hz/sensor. Twenty-two adult, male community club and university-level hookers were recruited. An equal number were analysed whilst scrummaging on natural or synthetic turf. Players scrummaging on synthetic turf demonstrated less angular velocity in the lower thoracic spine for right and left lateral bending and right rotation. The general reduction in the range of motion and velocities, extrapolated over a prolonged playing career, may mean that the synthetic turf could result in fewer degenerative injuries. It should be noted, however, that this conclusion considers only the scrummaging scenario. PMID:26375051

  14. A kinematic analysis of the spine during rugby scrummaging on natural and synthetic turfs.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Ramesh; Williams, Jonathan M; Jones, Michael D; Theobald, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Artificial surfaces are now an established alternative to grass (natural) surfaces in rugby union. Little is known, however, about their potential to reduce injury. This study characterises the spinal kinematics of rugby union hookers during scrummaging on third-generation synthetic (3G) and natural pitches. The spine was sectioned into five segments, with inertial sensors providing three-dimensional kinematic data sampled at 40 Hz/sensor. Twenty-two adult, male community club and university-level hookers were recruited. An equal number were analysed whilst scrummaging on natural or synthetic turf. Players scrummaging on synthetic turf demonstrated less angular velocity in the lower thoracic spine for right and left lateral bending and right rotation. The general reduction in the range of motion and velocities, extrapolated over a prolonged playing career, may mean that the synthetic turf could result in fewer degenerative injuries. It should be noted, however, that this conclusion considers only the scrummaging scenario.

  15. dSLAM analysis of genome-wide genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuewen; Yuan, Daniel S.; Ooi, Siew-Loon; Wang, Xiaoling; Sookhai-Mahadeo, Sharon; Meluh, Pamela; Boeke, Jef D.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of genetic interactions has been extensively exploited to study gene functions and to dissect pathway structures. One such genetic interaction is synthetic lethality, in which the combination of two non-lethal mutations leads to loss of organism viability. We have developed a dSLAM (heterozygote diploid-based synthetic lethality analysis with microarrays) technology that effectively studies synthetic lethality interactions on a genome-wide scale in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Typically, a query mutation is introduced en masse into a population of ~6,000 haploid-convertible heterozygote diploid Yeast Knockout (YKO) mutants via integrative transformation. Haploid pools of single and double mutants are freshly generated from the resultant heterozygote diploid double mutant pool after meiosis and haploid selection and studied for potential growth defects of each double mutant combination by microarray analysis of the “molecular barcodes” representing each YKO. This technology has been effectively adapted to study other types of genome-wide genetic interactions including gene-compound synthetic lethality, secondary mutation suppression, dosage-dependent synthetic lethality and suppression. PMID:17189863

  16. A Fast and Comprehensive Analysis of 32 Synthetic Cannabinoids Using Agilent Triple Quadrupole LC-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Borg, Damon; Tverdovsky, Anna; Stripp, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids are a group of psychoactive compounds that mimic the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the primary psychoactive constituent of marijuana (Cannabis sativa L). The Drug Enforcement Administration has classified many of the most common cannabinoids as Schedule 1 controlled substances. As a result, several novel synthetic cannabinoid series have emerged in the illicit drug market, including PINACA, FUBINACA, PB-22, AKB-48 and multiple derivatives of these compounds. Our laboratory developed and validated an analytical method for the analysis 32 synthetic cannabinoid metabolites in urine samples. Included in this method are metabolites that are constituents of the new generation of synthetic cannabinoids. Following enzymatic hydrolysis, target analytes were recovered by liquid-liquid extraction utilizing 1-chlorobutane:isopropyl alcohol (70:30) as the organic ratio. Chromatographic separation and detection was achieved using an Agilent Technologies 1290 liquid chromatograph coupled to a 6460-triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with a Jetstream electrospray source. Linearity for all analytes was established along the range of 0.5-200 ng/mL. Both intraday and interday accuracy and precision data were all within acceptable limits, ±20% error and ±15% relative standard deviation, respectively. Recovery ranged from 48% to 104%. This method has shown to be selective and specific, providing no evidence of interference or carryover concerns. Finally, 11 distinct synthetic cannabinoids were detected in 23 of 25 donor samples analyzed with the method. The data presented here represents a validated liquid chromatography  tandem mass spectrometry method to accurately identify and quantitate synthetic cannabinoid metabolites in urine samples, incorporating new generation derivatives. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Coal conversion processes and analysis methodologies for synthetic fuels production. [technology assessment and economic analysis of reactor design for coal gasification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Information to identify viable coal gasification and utilization technologies is presented. Analysis capabilities required to support design and implementation of coal based synthetic fuels complexes are identified. The potential market in the Southeast United States for coal based synthetic fuels is investigated. A requirements analysis to identify the types of modeling and analysis capabilities required to conduct and monitor coal gasification project designs is discussed. Models and methodologies to satisfy these requirements are identified and evaluated, and recommendations are developed. Requirements for development of technology and data needed to improve gasification feasibility and economies are examined.

  18. ANALYSIS OF EARTHWORM SUB-LETHAL TOXIC RESPONSES TO ATRAZINE EXPOSURE USING (1) H NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE (NMR)-BASED METABOLOMICS.

    PubMed

    Dani, Vivek D; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2017-09-09

    Atrazine toxicity to earthworms is still not fully understood, particularly at sub-lethal concentrations. Because of the ubiquity of atrazine in the environment, it is imperative to understand the impacts of atrazine presence on soil-dwelling organisms. To examine this in detail, we used (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics to elucidate earthworm (Eisenia fetida) responses after a 48 h of atrazine exposure in contact tests. Earthworms were exposed to four sub-lethal concentrations of 362.4 ng/cm(2) , 181.2 ng/cm(2) , 90.6 ng/cm(2) and 45.3 ng/cm(2) , which correspond to 1/8(th) , 1/16(th) , 1/32(nd) and 1/64(th) of the LC50 value respectively. After exposure, polar metabolites were isolated from earthworm tissues and analyzed using (1) H NMR spectroscopy. Sub-lethal atrazine exposure induced a non-monotonic response with respect to exposure concentration and caused an overall suppression in earthworm metabolism. Maltose, fumarate, malate, threonine/lactate, adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), betaine, scyllo-inositol, glutamate, arginine and glutamine were the metabolites identified as most sensitive to atrazine exposure. These observed fluctuations in the metabolic profile suggest that atrazine reduced ATP synthesis and negatively impacted the health of earthworms with acute sub-lethal exposure. Our study also demonstrates the utility of NMR-based metabolomics for the basic assessment of sub-lethal toxicity which can then be used for more targeted approaches with other molecular techniques. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. 2005 Non-Lethal Defense VI Symposium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-16

    Untitled Document 2005 Non Lethal Defense VI Symposium.html[8/22/2016 9:24:13 AM] Non- Lethal Defense "VI" Symposium “Non- Lethal Weapon Options in...Current and Desired Capabilities Forum Army Non- Lethal Requirements, Brigadier General Coker, USA, TRADOC Successful Non- Lethal Illegal Alien...Interdiction Case, Rear Admiral Kunkle, USCG, Non Lethal IPT Member Luncheon Keynote Speaker, by Lieutenant General Jan Huly, USMC, Deputy Commandant for Plans

  20. A Systems Biology Approach to Link Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation with Lethal Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    independent data sets for association with lethal disease; ii) inform and increase power for identification of new SNPs in GWAS datasets associated with...for association with lethal disease; ii) inform and increase power for identification of new SNPs in GWAS datasets associated with lethal outcome...low risk/non-lethal prostate cancer cohort. We initially planned to use EDRN samples, but due to the samples being committed to a GWAS analysis, it

  1. Mass spectrometric analysis of chemical warfare agents and their degradation products in soil and synthetic samples.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Paul A; Hancock, James R; Chenier, Claude L

    2003-01-01

    A packed capillary liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) method was developed for the identification of chemical warfare agents, their degradation products and related compounds in synthetic tabun samples and in soil samples collected from a former mustard storage site. A number of organophosphorus and organosulfur compounds that had not been previously characterized were identified, based on acquired high-resolution ESI-MS data. At lower sampling cone voltages, the ESI mass spectra were dominated by protonated, sodiated and protonated acetonitrile adducts and/or their dimers that could be used to confirm the molecular mass of each compound. Structural information was obtained by inducing product ion formation in the ESI interface at higher sampling cone voltages. Representative ESI-MS mass spectra for previously uncharacterized compounds were incorporated into a database as part of an on-going effort in chemical warfare agent detection and identification. The same samples were also analyzed by capillary column gas chromatography (GC)-MS in order to compare an established method with LC-ESI-MS for chemical warfare agent identification. Analysis times and full-scanning sensitivities were similar for both methods, with differences being associated with sample matrix, ease of ionization and compound volatility. GC-MS would be preferred for organic extracts and must be used for the determination of mustard and relatively non-polar organosulfur degradation products, including 1,4- thioxane and 1,4-dithiane, as these compounds do not ionize during ESI-MS. Diols, formed following hydrolysis of mustard and longer-chain sulfur vesicants, may be analyzed using both methods with LC-ESI-MS providing improved chromatographic peak shape. Aqueous samples and extracts would, typically, be analyzed by LC-ESI-MS, since these analyses may be conducted directly without the need for additional sample handling and/or derivatization associated with

  2. Lethality and entropy of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Manke, Thomas; Demetrius, Lloyd; Vingron, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We characterize protein interaction networks in terms of network entropy. This approach suggests a ranking principle, which strongly correlates with elements of functional importance, such as lethal proteins. Our combined analysis of protein interaction networks and functional profiles in single cellular yeast and multi-cellular worm shows that proteins with large contribution to network entropy are preferentially lethal. While entropy is inherently a dynamical concept, the present analysis incorporates only structural information. Our result therefore highlights the importance of topological features, which appear as correlates of an underlying dynamical property, and which in turn determine functional traits. We argue that network entropy is a natural extension of previously studied observables, such as pathway multiplicity and centrality. It is also applicable to networks in which the processes can be quantified and therefore serves as a link to study questions of structural and dynamical robustness in a unified way.

  3. Lethal post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Windfuhr, Jochen P

    2003-12-01

    Post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage (PTH) seems to be a rare but unavoidable complication. Due to the frequency of performed tonsillectomies, it can be estimated that a certain amount may result in a lethal outcome. This study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical features of these rare cases. Retrospective case series of five patients with lethal post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage are reported after they had undergone tonsillectomy by four different surgeons. The relevant literature was reviewed. The youngest patient was 42 months and the oldest almost 13 years old. All patients were male. Three patients had left the hospital against surgeon's recommendation 5 days following tonsillectomy. Preceding episodes of bleeding prior to the lethal bleeding occurred in two patients. Lethal PTH occurred in four patients within 5-9 days, the latest bleeding 39 days after surgery. In the literature, lethal PTH was described for eight patients since 1958. The youngest patient was 4 years, the oldest 18 years old (mean: 8.6 years; median: 6.5 years). In three patients, lethal PTH occurred on the day of surgery and the latest bleeding 54 days after surgery. Due to the paucity of reports, little reliable information can be obtained from the literature. It remains unclear, whether or not this reflects the true incidence of this complication. The experience with the five reported cases suggests, that immediate surgical treatment may have avoided lethal outcome in most cases. Therefore, a close postoperative follow-up is advisable to detect any episode of bleeding as soon as possible which should be referred to a specialist. Certainly, the collected data do not suffice to establish general guidelines, indicating that further collection of cases is required to assess characteristics of lethal PTH.

  4. Gonadosomatic mosaicism for lethal mutations in Drosophila lethal mutations disturbing larval development

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A.I.; Sakharova, N.Yu.

    1988-11-01

    Phenogenetic analysis of autonomous lethal mutations obtained by the method of gonadosomatic mosaicism which manifested during larval stages, established that the nuclei of hypodermal cells, salivary glands suprapharyngeal ganglion, pharynx, esophagus, gizzard, and hindgut are the derivatives of the same nucleus (from the first two nuclei of cleavage) as the nuclei of the cells of the imaginal-somatic tissues.

  5. A rapid quantitative method for the analysis of synthetic cannabinoids by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Freijo, Tom D; Harris, Steve E; Kala, Subbarao V

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids represent an emerging drug problem in the USA, as these compounds are constantly being modified and rapidly sold as soon as they become available. Laboratories around the world are constantly improving the analytical methods to detect and identify these newly available designer drugs. This study used a simple approach to detect and quantify a variety of synthetic cannabinoids (14 parent compounds and 15 metabolites including series XLR, AM, JWH, UR, RCS, PB, HU and AB-FUBINACA) using LC-MS-MS. Drug-free urine samples spiked with various synthetic cannabinoids and their metabolites were separated on a C18-Hypersil Gold column using an Agilent 1290 ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and detected by an AB Sciex API 4000 tandem mass spectrometer. Studies were carried out to determine limit of detection, limit of quantitation, upper limit of linearity, ion suppression, interference, precision and accuracy to validate the method. Urine samples from patients and known users were hydrolyzed with β-glucuronidase prior to the analysis by LC-MS-MS, and the data are presented. The method described here is rapid, highly sensitive and specific for the identification of a variety of synthetic cannabinoids. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Synthetic spectral analysis of a kinetic model for slow-magnetosonic waves in solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, Wenzhi; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Lei; Vocks, Christian; Marsch, Eckart; Peter, Hardi

    2016-03-25

    We propose a kinetic model of slow-magnetosonic waves to explain various observational features associated with the propagating intensity disturbances (PIDs) occurring in the solar corona. The characteristics of slow mode waves, e.g, inphase oscillations of density, velocity, and thermal speed, are reproduced in this kinetic model. Moreover, the red-blue (R-B) asymmetry of the velocity distribution as self-consistently generated in the model is found to be contributed from the beam component, as a result of the competition between Landau resonance and Coulomb collisions. Furthermore, we synthesize the spectral lines and make the spectral analysis, based on the kinetic simulation data of the flux tube plasmas and the hypothesis of the surrounding background plasmas. It is found that the fluctuations of parameters of the synthetic spectral lines are basically consistent with the observations: (1) the line intensity, Doppler shift, and line width are fluctuating in phase; (2) the R-B asymmetry usually oscillate out of phase with the former three parameters; (3) the blueward asymmetry is more evident than the redward asymmetry in the R-B fluctuations. The oscillations of line parameters become weakened for the case with denser surrounding background plasmas. Similar to the observations, there is no doubled-frequency oscillation of the line width for the case with flux-tube plasmas flowing bulkly upward among the static background plasmas. Therefore, we suggest that the “wave + beam flow” kinetic model may be a viable interpretation for the PIDs observed in the solar corona.

  7. Multi-directional mechanical analysis of synthetic scaffolds for hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Est, Savannah; Roen, Madeleine; Chi, Tingying; Simien, Adrian; Castile, Ryan M; Thompson, Dominic M; Blatnik, Jeffrey A; Deeken, Corey R; Lake, Spencer P

    2017-02-09

    Hernias remain one of the most common ailments to affect men and women worldwide. Surgical mesh materials were first used to reinforce hernia defects during surgery in the late 1950s (Laker, n.d.). Today, there are well over 50 prosthetic meshes available for hernia repair (Brown and Finch, 2010; Bryan et al., 2014; Hope and El-hayek, 2014). With the multitude of available options, surgeons are faced with the challenging task of optimizing mesh selection for each patient. If the mechanics of the mesh are not compatible with the surrounding tissue, mismatch can occur, which can lead to complications such as mesh failure and/or hernia recurrence. Unfortunately, many aspects of synthetic mesh mechanics remain poorly described. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to provide a more complete mechanical analysis of a variety of commercially available prosthetic meshes for hernia repair, including evaluation of meshes in a variety of orientations. Twenty different meshes were subjected to biaxial tensile tests at both 90° and 45° orientations, and results were analyzed for relative strength, strain behavior, and anisotropy. Peak tension and strain values varied dramatically across all mesh types for all directions, ranging between 4.08 and 25.74N/cm and -5% to 10% strain. Anisotropy ratios for the evaluated meshes ranged from 0.33 to 1.89, demonstrating a wide range in relative direction-dependence of mesh mechanics. While further study of prosthetic meshes and better characterization of properties of the human abdominal wall are needed, results of this study provide valuable data that may aid clinicians in optimizing mesh selection for specific patients and repair conditions.

  8. Haemorrhagic toxin and lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii strain vpi9048: molecular characterization and comparative analysis of substrate specificity of the large clostridial glucosylating toxins.

    PubMed

    Genth, Harald; Pauillac, Serge; Schelle, Ilona; Bouvet, Philippe; Bouchier, Christiane; Varela-Chavez, Carolina; Just, Ingo; Popoff, Michel R

    2014-11-01

    Large clostridial glucosylating toxins (LCGTs) are produced by toxigenic strains of Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium sordellii. While most C. sordellii strains solely produce lethal toxin (TcsL), C. sordellii strain VPI9048 co-produces both hemorrhagic toxin (TcsH) and TcsL. Here, the sequences of TcsH-9048 and TcsL-9048 are provided, showing that both toxins retain conserved LCGT features and that TcsL and TcsH are highly related to Toxin A (TcdA) and Toxin B (TcdB) from C. difficile strain VPI10463. The substrate profile of the toxins was investigated with recombinant LCGT transferase domains (rN) and a wide panel of small GTPases. rN-TcsH-9048 and rN-TcdA-10463 glucosylated preferably Rho-GTPases but also Ras-GTPases to some extent. In this respect, rN-TcsH-9048 and rN-TcdA-10463 differ from the respective full-length TcsH-9048 and TcdA-10463, which exclusively glucosylate Rho-GTPases. rN-TcsL-9048 and full length TcsL-9048 glucosylate both Rho- and Ras-GTPases, whereas rN-TcdB-10463 and full length TcdB-10463 exclusively glucosylate Rho-GTPases. Vero cells treated with full length TcsH-9048 or TcdA-10463 also showed glucosylation of Ras, albeit to a lower extent than of Rho-GTPases. Thus, in vitro analysis of substrate spectra using recombinant transferase domains corresponding to the auto-proteolytically cleaved domains, predicts more precisely the in vivo substrates than the full length toxins. Except for TcdB-1470, all LCGTs evoked increased expression of the small GTPase RhoB, which exhibited cytoprotective activity in cells treated with TcsL isoforms, but pro-apoptotic activity in cells treated with TcdA, TcdB, and TcsH. All LCGTs induced a rapid dephosphorylation of pY118-paxillin and of pS144/141-PAK1/2 prior to actin filament depolymerization indicating that disassembly of focal adhesions is an early event leading to the disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Improvement of synthetic aperture techniques by means of the coarray analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Arguedas, C. J.; Martínez-Graullera, O.; Romero-Laorden, D.; Pérez-López, M.; Gómez-Ullate, L.

    2012-05-01

    In the field of ultrasonic imaging, the synthetic aperture techniques are well known due to their ability for obtain images using fewer resources. Initially, these techniques were developed to reduce the cost and complexity of phased array instrumentation. Although these drawbacks have already been overcome, the interest on the synthetic aperture systems has not decayed. The reasons of that are the high image quality achieved with these techniques (images dynamically focused both in emission and reception), and the fact that they are an excellent solution for the design of new high performance instrumentation with a low volume and power consumption, easily integrable in autonomous and embedded systems. Using the coarray as a model of the pulse-echo systems, the present work analyzes experimentally the main synthetic aperture strategies appeared until now, introducing two new proposals (2R-SAFT and nR-SAFT) that allow to improve the quality of the images without increase the hardware complexity of the system.

  10. Analysis of synthetic motor oils for additive elements by ICP-AES

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.C.; Salmon, S.G.

    1995-12-31

    Standard motor oils are made by blending paraffinic or naphthenic mineral oil base stocks with additive packages containing anti-wear agents, dispersants, corrosion inhibitors, and viscosity index improvers. The blender can monitor the correct addition of the additives by determining the additive elements in samples dissolved in a solvent by ICP-AES. Internal standardization is required to control sample transport interferences due to differences in viscosity between samples and standards. Synthetic motor oils, made with poly-alpha-olefins and trimethylol propane esters, instead of mineral oils, pose an additional challenge since these compounds affect the plasma as well as having sample transport interference considerations. The synthetic lubricant base stocks add significant oxygen to the sample matrix, which makes the samples behave differently than standards prepared in mineral oil. Determination of additive elements in synthetic motor oils will be discussed.

  11. Analysis of the structure of synthetic and natural melanins by solid-phase

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, G.A.; Roberts, J.E.; Foster, N.

    1988-09-06

    The structures of one synthetic and two natural melanins are examined by solid-state NMR using cross polarization, magic angle sample spinning, and high-power proton decoupling. The structural features of synthetic dopa malanin are compared to those of melanin from malignant melanoma cells grown in culture and sepia melanin from squid ink. Natural abundance /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N spectra show resonances consistent with known pyrrolic and indolic structures within the heterogeneous biopolymer; /sup 13/C spectra indicate the presence of aliphatic residues in all three materials. These solid-phase experiments illustrate the promise of solid-phase NMR for elucidating structural from insoluble biomaterials.

  12. Hair analysis as a tool to evaluate the prevalence of synthetic cannabinoids in different populations of drug consumers.

    PubMed

    Salomone, A; Luciano, C; Di Corcia, D; Gerace, E; Vincenti, M

    2014-01-01

    Among the new psychoactive products, herbal mixtures containing synthetic cannabimimetics are likely the most abused worldwide. In this study, a specific ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the detection of 23 synthetic cannabinoids in hair samples was developed in order to (1) expand the number of screened compounds, coherent with new substances emerging in the European territory, (2) evaluate their consumption on a large period of examination, and (3) evaluate the diffusion of cannabimimetics among different populations of drug consumers. The method employs digestion of hair sample with NaOH followed by extraction with n-hexane/ethylacetate, and injection into the UHPLC-MS/MS system. After validation, the method was applied to the analysis of 344 hair samples previously tested in our laboratory for the most common drugs. Overall, 15 samples were found positive for at least one synthetic cannabinoid. Coherent with previously published results, the present data show that young males, former or still active Cannabis consumers, represent the population most often involved in synthetic cannabimimetics consumption. Several cases of poly-abuse were also determined. The drug most frequently detected was JWH-073 (11 samples) generally at low concentration (mean 7.69 ± 14.4 pg/mg, median 1.9 pg/mg, range 1.6-50.5 pg/mg), followed by JWH-122 (8 samples, mean concentration: 544 ± 968 pg/mg, median 28.4 pg/mg, range 7.4-2800 pg/mg). Other detected drugs included JWH-250, JWH-081, JWH-018, JWH-210, JWH-019, and AM-1220. For several positive samples, the synthetic cannabinoid concentration was lower than 50 pg/mg, underlining the need for established cut-off values for discrimination between chronic consumption and occasional use (or external contamination).

  13. Evaluation of experimental and finite element models of synthetic and cadaveric femora for pre-clinical design-analysis.

    PubMed

    McNamara, B P; Cristofolini, L; Toni, A; Taylor, D

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the validity with which the finite element method could model synthetic bone and thereby determine the appropriateness of such femur analogues for application in pre-clinical tests. The performance of these synthetic femora was compared with cadaveric bone when employing the same geometric and material definition protocols. A four-point bend loading configuration was selected for this analysis. Four synthetic femurs and an embalmed cadaveric bone were tested experimentally to determine the structural bending stiffness (k) for the diaphysis of these bones. A finite element (FE) model was generated and an analysis performed for each bone type to estimate the Young's modulus (E) required to obtain a model stiffness equivalent to that obtained experimentally. The estimated material elastic modulus in the FE model for the synthetic femur was found to be very similar to available data for this bone analogue. The estimated cadaveric bone modulus however was found to differ significantly from documented values for cortical bone. A theoretical analysis demonstrated the great sensitivity of the estimated modulus value to the accuracy of the geometric definition. The very low variability found in the experimental test on the synthetic bones together with their more regular geometry and the possibility of achieving greater accuracy in geometric definition was shown to enable the production of a valid FE model of this bone for an isotropic homogeneous material description. Conversely, the greater irregularity of geometry, together with the less obvious differentiation between the cortical and cancellous bone in the cadaveric specimen makes accurate geometric description of this bone very difficult. This fact, together with the uncertainty concerning the quality of the cadaveric bone and its viscoelastic response during mechanical testing, makes reproduction of its behaviour in a FE model a much more demanding task. It is suggested that

  14. An Assessment of Social Welfare in Spain: Territorial Analysis Using a Synthetic Welfare Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espina, Pilar Zarzosa; Arechavala, Noelia Somarriba

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is measure social welfare in Spanish provinces. To achieve this, we use the distance method P[subscript 2] to compose a synthetic indicator of welfare for 2007, the last year for which data are available. The index comprises information on different social indicators from various life domains and enables a classification of…

  15. Analysis of the synthetic house-tree-person drawing test for developmental disorder.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Chikako; Okada, Ayumi; Akagi, Tomoko; Shigeyasu, Yoshie; Shimauchi, Aya; Hosogi, Mizuho; Munemori, Eriko; Ocho, Keiko; Morishima, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    Some patients cannot draw three subjects on the same page during the synthetic house-tree-person drawing test (S-HTP). We call this phenomenon "no synthetic sign". The aim of this study was to clarify the pathological meaning of no synthetic sign and investigate its use for the early detection of developmental disorders at a pediatric primary care center. We administered the S-HTP to 283 people who consulted the child psychosomatic medical clinic of Okayama University Hospital in 2007-2012. We diagnosed developmental disability based on DSM-IV-TR criteria and compared findings between the different diagnostic groups. A total of 241 patients completed the S-HTP (S-HTP group) and 22 patients were not able to complete the S-HTP, but did complete the HTP (an original version of the S-HTP) or tree test (HTP group). Significantly more people in the HTP group had autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared with the S-HTP group. Full-scale intelligence quotient was significantly lower in the HTP group compared with the S-HTP group. There were two types of patients with no synthetic sign. The first involved patients with a suspected mental age younger than 5 years 11 months. The second type consisted of patients with ASD. Although drawing ability reflects multiple domains, it may help in early identification of children with developmental problems and facilitate earlier initiation of interventions. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  16. Analysis of synthetic and biological microparticles on several flow cytometric platforms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microparticles (MPs) are membrane vesicles (0.1 to 1 urn) released from cells upon activation. The limit of detection ofmost standard flow cytometers is just below 1 urn. Recent advances enable detection of particles lower than 0.5 urn, Synthetic. beads are used to define size ra...

  17. An Assessment of Social Welfare in Spain: Territorial Analysis Using a Synthetic Welfare Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espina, Pilar Zarzosa; Arechavala, Noelia Somarriba

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is measure social welfare in Spanish provinces. To achieve this, we use the distance method P[subscript 2] to compose a synthetic indicator of welfare for 2007, the last year for which data are available. The index comprises information on different social indicators from various life domains and enables a classification of…

  18. Analysis of synthetic and biological microparticles on several flow cytometric platforms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microparticles (MPs) are membrane vesicles (0.1 to 1 urn) released from cells upon activation. The limit of detection ofmost standard flow cytometers is just below 1 urn. Recent advances enable detection of particles lower than 0.5 urn, Synthetic. beads are used to define size ra...

  19. Retrospective analysis of synthetic cannabinoids in serum samples--epidemiology and consumption patterns.

    PubMed

    Jaenicke, Nathalie J; Pogoda, Werner; Paulke, Alexander; Wunder, Cora; Toennes, Stefan W

    2014-09-01

    Herbal mixtures contain synthetic cannabinoids, which can cause severe intoxications. Due to the great variety and the changing spectrum of substances on the drug market, prevalence data are limited, and data on prevalence rates of synthetic cannabinoids in forensic cases are not available. The present study was performed to survey the prevalence of synthetic cannabinoids in cases of traffic and criminal offences in the German state Hesse in 2010. The applied analytical method covered all synthetic cannabinoids on the drug market at that time, and with 20% of the blood samples (422 out of 2201) a representative number was reanalyzed. In twelve samples synthetic cannabinoids were identified and a prevalence of 2.8% was estimated. Consumption patterns showed predominantly cases of multi-drug consumption (10 cases); the combination with cannabis or alcohol was frequent (four cases each). The observed deficits were moderate with the exception of aggravation of paranoia in one case. The symptoms were either compatible with the effects of cannabinoid agonists or attributable to alcohol or other drugs found in the blood samples. Our current analytical strategy is to perform such analyses only in cases where use is suspected or where symptoms are not explained by routine toxicological analyses. Hence, the positive rate is rather low highlighting the need to keep up with the developments on the drug market and to establish sensitive screening methods covering a broad range of substances that can be updated fast, e.g., relying on collections of mass spectrometric reference data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genome-wide association for grain morphology in synthetic hexaploid wheats using digital imaging analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Grain size and shape greatly influence grain weight which ultimately enhances grain yield in wheat. Digital imaging (DI) based phenomic characterization can capture the three dimensional variation in grain size and shape than has hitherto been possible. In this study, we report the results from using digital imaging of grain size and shape to understand the relationship among different components of this trait, their contribution to enhance grain weight, and to identify genomic regions (QTLs) controlling grain morphology using genome wide association mapping with high density diversity array technology (DArT) and allele-specific markers. Results Significant positive correlations were observed between grain weight and grain size measurements such as grain length (r = 0.43), width, thickness (r = 0.64) and factor from density (FFD) (r = 0.69). A total of 231 synthetic hexaploid wheats (SHWs) were grouped into five different sub-clusters by Bayesian structure analysis using unlinked DArT markers. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay was observed among DArT loci > 10 cM distance and approximately 28% marker pairs were in significant LD. In total, 197 loci over 60 chromosomal regions and 79 loci over 31 chromosomal regions were associated with grain morphology by genome wide analysis using general linear model (GLM) and mixed linear model (MLM) approaches, respectively. They were mainly distributed on homoeologous group 2, 3, 6 and 7 chromosomes. Twenty eight marker-trait associations (MTAs) on the D genome chromosomes 2D, 3D and 6D may carry novel alleles with potential to enhance grain weight due to the use of untapped wild accessions of Aegilops tauschii. Statistical simulations showed that favorable alleles for thousand kernel weight (TKW), grain length, width and thickness have additive genetic effects. Allelic variations for known genes controlling grain size and weight, viz. TaCwi-2A, TaSus-2B, TaCKX6-3D and TaGw2-6A, were also associated

  1. Molecular analysis of genetic fidelity in Cannabis sativa L. plants grown from synthetic (encapsulated) seeds following in vitro storage.

    PubMed

    Lata, Hemant; Chandra, Suman; Techen, Natascha; Khan, Ikhlas A; ElSohly, Mahmoud A

    2011-12-01

    The increasing utilization of synthetic (encapsulated) seeds for germplasm conservation and propagation necessitates the assessment of genetic stability of conserved propagules following their plantlet conversion. We have assessed the genetic stability of synthetic seeds of Cannabis sativa L. during in vitro multiplication and storage for 6 months at different growth conditions using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) DNA fingerprinting. Molecular analysis of randomly selected plants from each batch was conducted using 14 ISSR markers. Of the 14 primers tested, nine produced 40 distinct and reproducible bands. All the ISSR profiles from in vitro stored plants were monomorphic and comparable to the mother plant which confirms the genetic stability among the clones. GC analysis of six major cannabinoids [Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, tetrahydrocannabivarin, cannabidiol, cannabichromene, cannabigerol and cannabinol] showed homogeneity in the re-grown clones and the mother plant with insignificant differences in cannabinoids content, thereby confirming the stability of plants derived from synthetic seeds following 6 months storage. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  2. Genomic and neural analysis of the estradiol-synthetic pathway in the zebra finch

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Steroids are small molecule hormones derived from cholesterol. Steroids affect many tissues, including the brain. In the zebra finch, estrogenic steroids are particularly interesting because they masculinize the neural circuit that controls singing and their synthesis in the brain is modulated by experience. Here, we analyzed the zebra finch genome assembly to assess the content, conservation, and organization of genes that code for components of the estrogen-synthetic pathway and steroid nuclear receptors. Based on these analyses, we also investigated neural expression of a cholesterol transport protein gene in the context of song neurobiology. Results We present sequence-based analysis of twenty steroid-related genes using the genome assembly and other resources. Generally, zebra finch genes showed high homology to genes in other species. The diversity of steroidogenic enzymes and receptors may be lower in songbirds than in mammals; we were unable to identify all known mammalian isoforms of the 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase families in the zebra finch genome assembly, and not all splice sites described in mammals were identified in the corresponding zebra finch genes. We did identify two factors, Nobox and NR1H2-RXR, that may be important for coordinated transcription of multiple steroid-related genes. We found very little qualitative overlap in predicted transcription factor binding sites in the genes for two cholesterol transport proteins, the 18 kDa cholesterol transport protein (TSPO) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). We therefore performed in situ hybridization for TSPO and found that its mRNA was not always detected in brain regions where StAR and steroidogenic enzymes were previously shown to be expressed. Also, transcription of TSPO, but not StAR, may be regulated by the experience of hearing song. Conclusions The genes required for estradiol synthesis and action are represented in the

  3. Analysis of the Greenland Ice Sheet's surface hydrology using Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Katie; Benedek, Corinne; Tedesco, Marco; Willis, Ian

    2016-04-01

    The behaviour of surface water on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has recently received much attention due to its ponding to form supraglacial lakes. These can drain and impact ice sheet dynamics by facilitating increased basal sliding, thus leading to a more rapid transfer of ice to the oceans and contributing to rising sea levels. Research into supraglacial lakes has primarily used the optical and infrared wavelength bands of MODIS due to their high temporal resolution. However, this comes with an associated low spatial resolution, potentially resulting in smaller lakes being overlooked, and an inability to image through clouds or in darkness. Conversely, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), a satellite-borne active imaging method uses microwave wavelength bands which are unaffected by cloud or lack of illumination from the sun. SAR imagery often has a much higher spatial resolution than optical imagery without compromising temporal resolution, and radar systems have even detected lakes covered by ice/snow or buried at shallow depths [Koenig et al., 2015]. This gives SAR imagery the potential to significantly increase the size of the database of supraglacial lakes. The current Sentinel-1A mission comprises two polar-orbiting satellites performing C-band SAR imaging, and provides a novel method for investigating the surface hydrology of the GrIS. Here, we explore a year's worth of images since the launch of Sentinel-1A in April 2014. These images have a higher spatial (5 m x 20 m) and temporal (up to daily) resolution than any previously available imagery, so will revolutionise the amount of information that can be yielded about GrIS hydrology. We use these images in combination with other remotely sensed data, including Landsat-8 imagery, to elicit spatial and temporal variations in the water content of the GrIS's surface ice layers. Our primary focus is on the area upstream of Jakobshavn Isbræ, where preliminary analysis has indicated that liquid water may persist

  4. Female pelvic synthetic CT generation based on joint intensity and shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lianli; Jolly, Shruti; Cao, Yue; Vineberg, Karen; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Balter, James M.

    2017-04-01

    Using MRI for radiotherapy treatment planning and image guidance is appealing as it provides superior soft tissue information over CT scans and avoids possible systematic errors introduced by aligning MR to CT images. This study presents a method that generates Synthetic CT (MRCT) volumes by performing probabilistic tissue classification of voxels from MRI data using a single imaging sequence (T1 Dixon). The intensity overlap between different tissues on MR images, a major challenge for voxel-based MRCT generation methods, is addressed by adding bone shape information to an intensity-based classification scheme. A simple pelvic bone shape model, built from principal component analysis of pelvis shape from 30 CT image volumes, is fitted to the MR volumes. The shape model generates a rough bone mask that excludes air and covers bone along with some surrounding soft tissues. Air regions are identified and masked out from the tissue classification process by intensity thresholding outside the bone mask. A regularization term is added to the fuzzy c-means classification scheme that constrains voxels outside the bone mask from being assigned memberships in the bone class. MRCT image volumes are generated by multiplying the probability of each voxel being represented in each class with assigned attenuation values of the corresponding class and summing the result across all classes. The MRCT images presented intensity distributions similar to CT images with a mean absolute error of 13.7 HU for muscle, 15.9 HU for fat, 49.1 HU for intra-pelvic soft tissues, 129.1 HU for marrow and 274.4 HU for bony tissues across 9 patients. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were optimized using MRCT-derived electron densities, and doses were recalculated using corresponding CT-derived density grids. Dose differences to planning target volumes were small with mean/standard deviation of 0.21/0.42 Gy for D0.5cc and 0.29/0.33 Gy for D99%. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the

  5. Analysis of ligand binding to the synthetic dodecapeptide 185-196 of the acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Fridkin, M; Fuchs, S

    1986-01-01

    A synthetic dodecapeptide corresponding to residues 185-196 of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit, which contains the adjacent cysteine residues at positions 192 and 193, was recently shown by us to contain the essential elements for alpha-bungarotoxin binding. In the present study, we have used Sepharose-linked peptides for quantitative analysis of the cholinergic binding properties of this and other synthetic peptides. Sepharose-linked peptides corresponding to residues 1-20, 126-143, 143-158, 169-181, 185-196, 193-210, and 394-409 of the alpha subunit of Torpedo acetylcholine receptor, as well as a peptide corresponding to residues 185-196 of the alpha subunit of human acetylcholine receptor, were tested for their toxin-binding capacity. Of these immobilized peptides, only peptide 185-196 of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor bound toxin significantly, thus verifying that this synthetic peptide contains essential components of the receptor toxin-binding site. Analysis of toxin binding to the peptide yielded a dissociation constant of 3.5 X 10(-5) M. This binding was inhibited by various cholinergic ligands. The inhibition potency obtained was alpha-bungarotoxin greater than Naja naja siamensis toxin greater than d-tubocurarine greater than decamethonium greater than acetylcholine greater than carbamoylcholine. This pharmacological profile resembles that of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and therefore suggests that the synthetic dodecapeptide also includes the neurotransmitter binding site. Reduction and carboxymethylation of the cysteine residues on peptide 185-196 inhibit its capacity to bind toxin, demonstrating that an intact disulfide is required for toxin binding. A decrease in toxin binding was also obtained following chemical modification of the tryptophan residue at position 187, thus implying its possible involvement in toxin binding. The failure to detect binding of toxin to the corresponding human sequence 185-196, in which the

  6. Analysis of ligand binding to the synthetic dodecapeptide 185-196 of the acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Fridkin, M; Fuchs, S

    1986-12-01

    A synthetic dodecapeptide corresponding to residues 185-196 of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit, which contains the adjacent cysteine residues at positions 192 and 193, was recently shown by us to contain the essential elements for alpha-bungarotoxin binding. In the present study, we have used Sepharose-linked peptides for quantitative analysis of the cholinergic binding properties of this and other synthetic peptides. Sepharose-linked peptides corresponding to residues 1-20, 126-143, 143-158, 169-181, 185-196, 193-210, and 394-409 of the alpha subunit of Torpedo acetylcholine receptor, as well as a peptide corresponding to residues 185-196 of the alpha subunit of human acetylcholine receptor, were tested for their toxin-binding capacity. Of these immobilized peptides, only peptide 185-196 of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor bound toxin significantly, thus verifying that this synthetic peptide contains essential components of the receptor toxin-binding site. Analysis of toxin binding to the peptide yielded a dissociation constant of 3.5 X 10(-5) M. This binding was inhibited by various cholinergic ligands. The inhibition potency obtained was alpha-bungarotoxin greater than Naja naja siamensis toxin greater than d-tubocurarine greater than decamethonium greater than acetylcholine greater than carbamoylcholine. This pharmacological profile resembles that of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and therefore suggests that the synthetic dodecapeptide also includes the neurotransmitter binding site. Reduction and carboxymethylation of the cysteine residues on peptide 185-196 inhibit its capacity to bind toxin, demonstrating that an intact disulfide is required for toxin binding. A decrease in toxin binding was also obtained following chemical modification of the tryptophan residue at position 187, thus implying its possible involvement in toxin binding. The failure to detect binding of toxin to the corresponding human sequence 185-196, in which the

  7. Evaluating Atmospheric pressure Solids Analysis Probe (ASAP) mass spectrometry for the analysis of low molecular weight synthetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael J P; Cameron, Neil R; Mosely, Jackie A

    2012-10-07

    Atmospheric pressure Solids Analysis Probe (ASAP) mass spectrometry has facilitated the ionisation of oligomers from low molecular weight synthetic polymers, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG: M(n) = 1430) and poly(styrene) (PS: M(n) = 1770), directly from solids, providing a fast and efficient method of identification. Ion source conditions were evaluated and it was found that the key instrument parameter was the ion source desolvation temperature which, when set to 600 °C was sufficient to vapourise the heavier oligomers for ionisation. PS, a non-polar polymer that is very challenging to analyse by MALDI or ESI without the aid of metal salts to promote cationisation, was ionised promptly by ASAP resulting in the production of radical cations. A small degree of in-source dissociation could be eliminated by control of the instrument ion source voltages. The fragmentation observed through in-source dissociation could be duplicated in a controlled manner through Collision-Induced Dissociation (CID) of the radical cations. PEG, which preferentially ionises through adduction with alkali metal cations in MALDI and ESI, was observed as a protonated molecular ion by ASAP. In-source dissociation could not be eliminated entirely and the fragmentation observed resulted from cleavage of the C-C and C-O backbone bonds, as opposed to only C-O bond cleavage observed from tandem mass spectrometry.

  8. Lethal Amanita species in China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qing; Cui, Yang-Yang; Yang, Zhu L

    2016-09-01

    Lethal amanitas (Amanita sect. Phalloideae) cause many casualties worldwide. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies revealed diverse lethal Amanita spp. in China. Here a 5-gene phylogeny (nuc rDNA region encompassing the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 with the 5.8S rDNA, the D1-D3 domains of nuc 28S rDNA, and partial RNA polymerase II second largest subunit, translation elongation factor 1-α and β-tubulin genes) is used to investigate the phylogenetic lineages and species delimitation in this section. Thirteen species are recognized, including four new species, namely A. griseorosea, A. molliuscula, A. parviexitialis, and A. subfuliginea They are documented with morphological, multigene phylogenetic, and ecological evidence, line drawings, and photographs and compared with similar species. A key to the Chinese lethal Amanita species is provided.

  9. Complement component 5 promotes lethal thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Tomohiro; Yoshioka, Kengo; Mizuno, Masashi; Shimizu, Mie; Nagano, Fumihiko; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Tsuboi, Naotake; Maruyama, Shoichi; Nagamatsu, Tadashi; Imai, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular histones promote platelet aggregation and thrombosis; this is followed by induction of coagulation disorder, which results in exhaustion of coagulation factors. Complement component 5 (C5) is known to be associated with platelet aggregation and coagulation system activation. To date, the pathological mechanism underlying liver injury has remained unclear. Here, we investigated whether C5 promotes liver injury associated with histone-induced lethal thrombosis. C5-sufficient and C5-deficient mice received single tail vein injections of purified, unfractionated histones obtained from calf thymus (45–75 μg/g). Subsequently, the mice were monitored for survival for up to 72 h. Based on the survival data, the 45 μg/g dose was used for analysis of blood cell count, liver function, blood coagulation ability, and promotion of platelet aggregation and platelet/leukocyte aggregate (PLA) production by extracellular histones. C5-deficient mice were protected from lethal thrombosis and had milder thrombocytopenia, consumptive coagulopathy, and liver injury with embolism and lower PLA production than C5-sufficient mice. These results indicate that C5 is associated with coagulation disorders, PLA production, and embolism-induced liver injury. In conclusion, C5 promotes liver injury associated with histone-induced lethal thrombosis. PMID:28205538

  10. Determination of PCQs by HPLC and its application to the analysis of Yusho patient blood and toxic rice oil and to the distribution of synthetic PCQs in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mochiike, A.; Matsuo, T.; Kanamori, H.; Hoshita, N.; Sakamoto, I.

    1986-01-01

    An excellent separation of six PCQ skeletal isomers was achieved by HPLC. This method was applied to the analysis of Yusho patient blood, toxic rice oil causing Yusho and various tissues and feces of mice dosed with synthetic PCQs.

  11. Analysis of Matched Filter Mismatch for Focusing Moving Targets in Multi-channel Synthetic Aperture Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) systems after clutter cancellation has been performed. The Displaced Phase Centre Antenna (DPCA) is utilized to achieve...the clutter cancellation in a two channel SAR system. After deriving the matched filter, the tolerance of the filter is then analyzed for mismatches...against errors in the moving target’s position and velocity components. The tolerances are quantified for two exemplar SAR systems; an X-band airborne

  12. Analysis of Microbe-Associated Molecular Pattern-Responsive Synthetic Promoters with the Parsley Protoplast System.

    PubMed

    Kanofsky, Konstantin; Lehmeyer, Mona; Schulze, Jutta; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Plants recognize pathogens by microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) and subsequently induce an immune response. The regulation of gene expression during the immune response depends largely on cis-sequences conserved in promoters of MAMP-responsive genes. These cis-sequences can be analyzed by constructing synthetic promoters linked to a reporter gene and by testing these constructs in transient expression systems. Here, the use of the parsley (Petroselinum crispum) protoplast system for analyzing MAMP-responsive synthetic promoters is described. The synthetic promoter consists of four copies of a potential MAMP-responsive cis-sequence cloned upstream of a minimal promoter and the uidA reporter gene. The reporter plasmid contains a second reporter gene, which is constitutively expressed and hence eliminates the requirement of a second plasmid used as a transformation control. The reporter plasmid is transformed into parsley protoplasts that are elicited by the MAMP Pep25. The MAMP responsiveness is validated by comparing the reporter gene activity from MAMP-treated and untreated cells and by normalizing reporter gene activity using the constitutively expressed reporter gene.

  13. Comparison and analysis of point target reference spectrum of FMCW synthetic aperture imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yue; Deng, Yun-Kai; Wang, Robert; Jia, Xiao-Xue; Han, Xiao-Dong

    2012-12-01

    Frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) synthetic aperture imaging sensor (SAIS) combines FMCW technology and SAIS techniques which makes a lightweight, high-resolution, and cost-effective imaging sensor. FMCW SAIS systems are going to play an important role in airborne and spaceborne earth observation fields. However, the stop-and-go approximation used in conventional pulsed SAIR (e.g., synthetic aperture radar—SAR) is no longer valid due to the long signal duration time or low wave propagation speed. To exploit the potentialities of an accurate signal model under FMCW SAIS circumstances, this article presents the relationship and remarkable differences between the analytical FMCW SAIS point target reference spectrum model and the traditional ones in pulsed SAR and Synthetic Aperture Acoustic imaging system, and validates the significance of the additional range-azimuth coupling term and range walk term in FMCW SAIS spectrum introduced by the variation of slant range during the long pulse durations, and highlight the limitations of other two spectra. Finally, the simulation experiments are carried out to compare the performance of the aforementioned spectrum formulations.

  14. Atomic force microscopy analysis of synthetic membranes applied in release studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejnik, Anna; Nowak, Izabela

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic membranes are commonly used in drug release studies and are applied mostly in quality control. They contain pores through which the drug can be diffused directly into the receptor fluid. Investigation of synthetic membranes permits determination of their structure and characterization of their properties. We suggest that the preliminary characterization of the membranes can be relevant to the interpretation of the release results. The aim of this study was to compare eight synthetic membranes by using atomic force microscopy in order to predict and understand their behavior in the release experiments. The results proved that polytetrafluoroethylene membrane was not suitable for the release study of tetrapeptide due to its hydrophobic nature, thickness and the specific structure with high trapezoid shaped blocks. The additional substructures in pores of mixed cellulose esters and nylon membranes detected by AFM influenced the diffusion rate of the active compound. These findings indicate that the selection of the membrane for the release studies should be performed cautiously by taking into consideration the membrane properties and by analyzing them prior the experiment.

  15. [The "lethal white foal" syndrome].

    PubMed

    Blendinger, C; Müller, G; Bostedt, H

    1994-06-01

    The lethal white foal syndrome (congenital intestinal aganglionosis) was diagnosed by history, clinical signs and pathological findings in a female foal, born in March 1992, that was an offspring of two overo-spotted paint horses. The syndrome is a congenital innervation defect of the gastrointestinal tract. A literature review of this condition, relatively unknown in Germany, is given.

  16. Theoretical design and analysis of the layered synthetic microstructure optic for the dual path X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, D. L.; Chao, S.

    1984-01-01

    A ray tracing analysis was performed for several configurations for the inner channel of the dual path X-ray telescope, which is proposed to use the second mirror of the Stanford/MSFC Wolter-Schwarzchild telescope and a normal incident layered synthetic microstructure (LSM) mirror to form a secondary image near the front of the telescope. The LSM mirror shapes considered were spherical, ellipsoid, hyperboloid, and constant optical path length (OPL) aspheric. Only the constant OPL case gave good axial resolution. All cases had poor off axis resolution as judged by the RMS blur circle radius.

  17. Rapid method for hydrocarbon-type analysis of heavy oils and synthetic fuels by pyrolysis thin layer chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.A.; George, A.E.

    1982-09-01

    This work describes a rapid method for hydrocargon-type analysis applying thin layer chromatography (TLC) to the pentane-soluble fraction *malthenes) of the petroleum and synthetic fuels boiling above 200/sup 0/C. The principal component types encountered in this paper are saturates (SA), aromatics (AR), (mono and di together) polynuclear aromatics (PNA) and polar material (PO). The method uses a Iatroscan TLC pyrolyzer which combines the resolution capabilities of TLC with the possibility of quantification by using a flame-ionization detector (FID). Comparison of the results with those obtained by the API-60 procedure is presented.

  18. Synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Adam G; McClintock, Maria K

    2010-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology has made rapid progress in a number of areas including method development, novel applications and community building. In seeking to make biology “engineerable,” synthetic biology is increasing the accessibility of biological research to researchers of all experience levels and backgrounds. One of the underlying strengths of synthetic biology is that it may establish the framework for a rigorous bottom-up approach to studying biology starting at the DNA level. Building upon the existing framework established largely by the Registry of Standard Biological Parts, careful consideration of future goals may lead to integrated multi- scale approaches to biology. Here we describe some of the current challenges that need to be addressed or considered in detail to continue the development of synthetic biology. Specifically, discussion on the areas of elucidating biological principles, computational methods and experimental construction methodologies are presented. PMID:21326830

  19. SYNTHETIC OIL,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The patent concerns a dicarboxylate-base synthetic oil with antiwear and antioxidation additives. The oil is prepared from the esterification of 2- or 3-methylcyclohexanol and 2-ethylhexanol with adipic acid. (Author)

  20. In-situ study of ferric iron distribution in synthetic spinels by electron microprobe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Alexey; Olga, Sinelshikova; Rustam, Lukmanov

    2017-04-01

    The iron oxidation state in mantle minerals is a key value in oxygen fugacity calculation and the most widely used analytical approach for Fe3+/ΣFe determination is Mössbauer spectroscopy, which is a bulk method and there is a lack of information on Fe3+/ΣFe zonation in individual mineral grains and Fe3+/ΣFe in inclusions. Here we present application of the flank method using the electron microprobe by analysing the FeLα and FeLβ X-ray emission spectra to a suite of 20 synthetic MgAl2O2-Cr2O3-Fe2O3(FeO) spinels. Materials were done with 5 - 25 FeO wt.%, and 2-70 Cr2O3 wt.% and Fe3+/ΣFe = 0.10 to 0.80, where Fe3+/ΣFe was determined independently using Mössbauer spectroscopy on the same grains used for the flank method measurements. Synthesis of the samples produced using a pyrolysis method of organic salt compositions in MgAl2O2-Cr2O3-Fe2O3(FeO) system with following heating in corundum crucibles at 1300 ° C for 5 -10 hours under controlled oxygen fugacity. All synthetic materials were investigated by X-ray and Mössbauer spectroscopy to examine a phase and iron oxidation state features. In terms of chemical composition and Fe3+/ΣFe resulting synthetic material covers a whole range of spinels derived in mantle peridotites and pyroxenites. These synthetic products were used as a standard sample to investigate co-variations of ratios of intensities measured on the flanks of FeLα and Lβ peaks and Fe3+/ΣFe, FeO content and Cr#. The obtained correlations can be used to perform in-situ studies of ferric iron distribution in natural mantle spinels. The presented approach will allow investigating the difference in mantle spinel Fe3+/ΣFe at a microscale from core to rim in individual grain, inclusion, melting pocket and in intergrows with other mantle mineral assemblage. The reported study was funded by RFBR according to the research project № 16-35-60076 mol_a_dk.

  1. Direct spectrophotometric method for analysis of food supplements containing synthetic polyhydroquinones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilevsky, A. M.; Konoplev, G. A.; Stepanova, O. S.; Toropov, D. K.; Zagorsky, A. L.

    2016-04-01

    A novel direct spectrophotometric method for quantitative determination of Oxiphore® drug substance (synthetic polyhydroquinone complex) in food supplements is developed. Absorption spectra of Oxiphore® water solutions in the ultraviolet region are presented. Samples preparation procedures and mathematical methods of spectra post-analytical procession are discussed. Basic characteristics of the automatic CCD-based UV spectrophotometer and special software implementing the developed method are described. The results of the trials of the developed method and software are analyzed: the error of determination for Oxiphore® concentration in water solutions of the isolated substance and singlecomponent food supplements did not exceed 15% (average error was 7…10%).

  2. Numerical analysis of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetization reversal in synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.; Shi, M.; Tanaka, T. Matsuyama, K.

    2015-05-07

    The spin transfer torque magnetization reversal of synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers under pulsed temperature rise was numerically studied by solving the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation, taking into account the stochastic random fields, the temperature dependence of magnetic parameters, and the spin torque terms. The anti-parallel magnetization configuration was retained at the elevated temperature, due to interlayer dipole coupling. A significant thermal assistance effect, resulting in a 40% reduction in the switching current, was demonstrated during a nanosecond pulsed temperature rise up to 77% of the Curie temperature.

  3. Further Analysis of Real Beam Line Optics From A Synthetic Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan Bodenstein, Michael Tiefenback, Yves Roblin

    2012-07-01

    Standard closed-orbit techniques for Twiss parameter measurement are not applicable to the open-ended Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab. The evolution of selected sets of real orbits in the accelerator models the behavior of a 'synthetic' beam. This process will be validated against beam profile-based Twiss parameter measurements and should provide the distributed optical information needed to optimize beamline tuning for an open-ended system. This work will discuss the current and future states of this technique, as well as an example of its use in the CEBAF machine.

  4. SYNTHETIC LUBRICANTS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    azelaic , and sebacic acids are the most readily available dibasic acids suitable for ester lubricant production, while the petroleum derived Oxo alcohols...of synthetic lubricants for use at low and high temperatures. The diesters of straight-chain dibasic acids lead the field of esters mutable as...dibasic acid esters in all the characteristics studied so far, and this type of ester therefore represents a promising source of synthetic oil. Mono

  5. Synthetic oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Synthetic lubricants are discussed by chemical class and their general strengths and weaknesses in terms of lubrication properties are analyzed. Comparative ratings are given for 14 chemical classes and are used as a guide for lubricant selection. The effects of chemical structure on the properties of the lubricant are described with special emphasis on thermal stability. The diversity of synthetic lubricants which is provided by the wide range of properties permits many applications, some of which are reported.

  6. Synthetic oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Synthetic lubricants are discussed by chemical class and their general strengths and weaknesses in terms of lubrication properties are analyzed. Comparative ratings are given for 14 chemical classes and are used as a guide for lubricant selection. The effects of chemical structure on the properties of the lubricant are described with special emphasis on thermal stability. The diversity of synthetic lubricants which is provided by the wide range of properties permits many applications, some of which are reported.

  7. Robustness Analysis of Regional Water Supply Portfolios using Synthetic Inflow Scenarios with Variable Drought Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, J. D.; Zeff, H. B.; Lamontagne, J. R.; Reed, P. M.; Characklis, G. W.

    2015-12-01

    Robustness analyses of water supply systems have moved toward exploratory simulation to discover scenarios in which existing or planned policies may fail to meet stakeholder objectives. Such assessments rely heavily on the choice of plausible future scenarios, which, in the case of drought management, requires sampling or generating a broad ensemble of reservoir inflows which do not necessarily reflect the historical record. Here we adapt a widely used synthetic streamflow generation method to adjust the frequency of low-flow periods, which can be related to impactful historical events from the perspective of decision makers. Specifically, the modified generation procedure allows the user to specify parameters n, p such that events with observed weekly non-exceedance frequency p appear in the synthetic scenario with approximate frequency np (i.e., the pth percentile flow occurs n times more frequently). Additionally, the generator preserves the historical autocorrelation of streamflow and its seasonality, as well as approximate multi-site correlation. Using model simulations from recent work in multi-objective urban drought portfolio planning in North Carolina, a region whose water supply faces both climate and population pressures, we illustrate the decision-relevant consequences caused by raising the frequency of low flows associated with the 2007-2008 drought. This method explores system performance under extreme events of increasing frequency prior to reconciling these findings with climate model projections, and thus can be used to support bottom-up robustness methods in water systems planning.

  8. Structure-function analysis of synthetic and recombinant derivatives of transforming growth factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Defeo-Jones, D; Tai, J Y; Wegrzyn, R J; Vuocolo, G A; Baker, A E; Payne, L S; Garsky, V M; Oliff, A; Riemen, M W

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) is a 50-amino-acid peptide that stimulates cell proliferation via binding to cell surface receptors. To identify the structural features of TGF-alpha that govern receptor-ligand interactions, we prepared synthetic peptide fragments and recombinant mutant proteins of TGF-alpha. These TGF-alpha derivatives were tested in receptor binding and mitogenesis assays. Synthetic peptides representing the N terminus, the C terminus, or the individual disulfide constrained rings of TGF-alpha did not exhibit receptor-binding or mitogenic activity. Replacement of the cysteines with alanines at positions 8 and 21, 16 and 32, and 34 and 43 or at positions 8 and 21 and 34 and 43 yielded inactive mutant proteins. However, mutant proteins containing substitutions or deletions in the N-terminal region retained significant biologic activity. Conservative amino acid changes at residue 29 or 38 or both and a nonconservative amino acid change at residue 12 had little effect on binding or mitogenesis. However, nonconservative amino acid changes at residues 15, 38, and 47 produced dramatic decreases in receptor binding (23- to 71-fold) and mitogenic activity (38- to 125-fold). These studies indicate that at least three distinct regions of TGF-alpha contribute to biologic activity. PMID:2850475

  9. Metabolism and toxicological analysis of synthetic cannabinoids in biological fluids and tissues.

    PubMed

    Presley, B C; Gurney, S M R; Scott, K S; Kacinko, S L; Logan, B K

    2016-07-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids, which began proliferating in the United States in 2009, have gone through numerous iterations of modification to their chemical structures. More recent generations of compounds have been associated with significant adverse outcomes following use, including cognitive and psychomotor impairment, seizures, psychosis, tissue injury and death. These effects increase the urgency for forensic and public health laboratories to develop methods for the detection and identification of novel substances, and apply these to the determination of their metabolism and disposition in biological samples. This comprehensive review describes the history of the appearance of the drugs in the United States, discusses the naming conventions emerging to designate new structures, and describes the most prominent new compounds linked to the adverse effects now associated with their use. We review in depth the metabolic pathways that have been elucidated for the major members of each of the prevalent synthetic cannabinoid drug subclasses, the enzyme systems responsible for their metabolism, and the use of in silico approaches to assist in predicting and identifying the metabolites of novel compounds and drug subclasses that will continue to appear. Finally, we review and critique analytical methods applied to the detection of the drugs and their metabolites, including immunoassay screening, and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry confirmatory techniques applied to urine, serum, whole blood, oral fluid, hair, and tissues. Copyright © 2016 Central Police University.

  10. Collateral Lethality: A new therapeutic strategy in oncology.

    PubMed

    Muller, Florian L; Aquilanti, Elisa A; DePinho, Ronald A

    2015-11-01

    Genomic deletion of tumor suppressor genes (TSG) is a rite of passage for virtually all human cancers. The synthetic lethal paradigm has provided a framework for the development of molecular targeted therapeutics that are functionally linked to the loss of specific TSG functions. In the course of genomic events that delete TSGs, a large number of genes with no apparent direct role in tumor promotion also sustain deletion as a result of chromosomal proximity to the target TSG. In this perspective, we review the novel concept of "collateral lethality", which has served to identify cancer-specific therapeutic vulnerabilities resulting from co-deletion of passenger genes neighboring TSG. The large number of collaterally deleted genes, playing diverse functions in cell homeostasis, offers a rich repertoire of pharmacologically targetable vulnerabilities presenting novel opportunities for the development of personalized anti-neoplastic therapies.

  11. Development of synthetic velocity - depth damage curves using a Weighted Monte Carlo method and Logistic Regression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozinaki, Anthi Eirini K.; Karatzas, George P.; Sibetheros, Ioannis A.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2014-05-01

    Damage curves are the most significant component of the flood loss estimation models. Their development is quite complex. Two types of damage curves exist, historical and synthetic curves. Historical curves are developed from historical loss data from actual flood events. However, due to the scarcity of historical data, synthetic damage curves can be alternatively developed. Synthetic curves rely on the analysis of expected damage under certain hypothetical flooding conditions. A synthetic approach was developed and presented in this work for the development of damage curves, which are subsequently used as the basic input to a flood loss estimation model. A questionnaire-based survey took place among practicing and research agronomists, in order to generate rural loss data based on the responders' loss estimates, for several flood condition scenarios. In addition, a similar questionnaire-based survey took place among building experts, i.e. civil engineers and architects, in order to generate loss data for the urban sector. By answering the questionnaire, the experts were in essence expressing their opinion on how damage to various crop types or building types is related to a range of values of flood inundation parameters, such as floodwater depth and velocity. However, the loss data compiled from the completed questionnaires were not sufficient for the construction of workable damage curves; to overcome this problem, a Weighted Monte Carlo method was implemented, in order to generate extra synthetic datasets with statistical properties identical to those of the questionnaire-based data. The data generated by the Weighted Monte Carlo method were processed via Logistic Regression techniques in order to develop accurate logistic damage curves for the rural and the urban sectors. A Python-based code was developed, which combines the Weighted Monte Carlo method and the Logistic Regression analysis into a single code (WMCLR Python code). Each WMCLR code execution

  12. Analysis of Natural Graphite, Synthetic Graphite, and Thermosetting Resin Candidates for Use in Fuel Compact Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Trammell, Michael P; Pappano, Peter J

    2011-09-01

    The AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacting process involved overcoating TRISO particles and compacting them in a steel die. The overcoating step is the process of applying matrix to the OPyC layer of TRISO particles in a rotating drum in order to build up an overcoat layer of desired thickness. The matrix used in overcoating is a mixture of natural graphite, synthetic graphite, and thermosetting resin in the ratio, by weight, of 64:16:20. A wet mixing process was used for AGR-1 and AGR-2, in that the graphites and resin were mixed in the presence of ethyl alcohol. The goal of the wet mixing process was to 'resinate' the graphite particles, or coat each individual graphite particle with a thin layer of resin. This matrix production process was similar to the German, Chinese, Japanese, and South African methods, which also use various amount of solvent during mixing. See Appendix 1 for information on these countries matrix production techniques. The resin used for AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by Hexion, specifically Hexion grade Durite SC1008. Durite SC1008 is a solvated (liquid) resole phenolic resin. A resole resin does not typically have a hardening agent added. The major constituent of SC1008 is phenol, with minor amounts of formaldehyde. Durite SC1008 is high viscosity, so additional ethyl alcohol was added during matrix production in order to reduce its viscosity and enhance graphite particle resination. The current compacting scale up plan departs from a wet mixing process. The matrix production method specified in the scale up plan is a co-grinding jet mill process where powdered phenolic resin and graphite are all fed into a jet mill at the same time. Because of the change in matrix production style, SC1008 cannot be used in the jet milling process because it is a liquid. The jet milling/mixing process requires that a suite of solid or powdered resins be investigated. The synthetic graphite used in AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by SGL Carbon, grade KRB2000. KRB2000 is a

  13. Analysis of urban area land cover using SEASAT Synthetic Aperture Radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, F. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Digitally processed SEASAT synthetic aperture raar (SAR) imagery of the Denver, Colorado urban area was examined to explore the potential of SAR data for mapping urban land cover and the compatability of SAR derived land cover classes with the United States Geological Survey classification system. The imagery is examined at three different scales to determine the effect of image enlargement on accuracy and level of detail extractable. At each scale the value of employing a simplistic preprocessing smoothing algorithm to improve image interpretation is addressed. A visual interpretation approach and an automated machine/visual approach are employed to evaluate the feasibility of producing a semiautomated land cover classification from SAR data. Confusion matrices of omission and commission errors are employed to define classification accuracies for each interpretation approach and image scale.

  14. Boron analysis by electron microprobe using MoB4C layered synthetic crystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, J.J.; Slack, J.F.; Herrington, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary electron microprobe studies of B distribution in minerals have been carried out using MoB4C-layered synthetic crystals to improve analytical sensitivity for B. Any microprobe measurements of the B contents of minerals using this crystal must include analyses for Cl to assess and correct for the interference of Cl X-rays on the BK?? peak. Microprobe analyses for B can be made routinely in tourmaline and other B-rich minerals, and minor B contents also can be determined in common rock-forming minerals. Incorporation of unusually high B contents in minerals other than borosilicates has been discovered in prograde and retrograde minerals in tourmalinites from the Broken Hill district, Australia, and may reflect high B activities produced during the metamorphism of tourmaline-rich rocks. -from Authors

  15. Using Videos Derived from Simulations to Support the Analysis of Spatial Awareness in Synthetic Vision Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boton, Matthew L.; Bass, Ellen J.; Comstock, James R., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The evaluation of human-centered systems can be performed using a variety of different methodologies. This paper describes a human-centered systems evaluation methodology where participants watch 5-second non-interactive videos of a system in operation before supplying judgments and subjective measures based on the information conveyed in the videos. This methodology was used to evaluate the ability of different textures and fields of view to convey spatial awareness in synthetic vision systems (SVS) displays. It produced significant results for both judgment based and subjective measures. This method is compared to other methods commonly used to evaluate SVS displays based on cost, the amount of experimental time required, experimental flexibility, and the type of data provided.

  16. Design of a Synthetic Integral Feedback Circuit: Dynamic Analysis and DNA Implementation.

    PubMed

    Briat, Corentin; Zechner, Christoph; Khammash, Mustafa

    2016-10-21

    The design and implementation of regulation motifs ensuring robust perfect adaptation are challenging problems in synthetic biology. Indeed, the design of high-yield robust metabolic pathways producing, for instance, drug precursors and biofuels, could be easily imagined to rely on such a control strategy in order to optimize production levels and reduce production costs, despite the presence of environmental disturbance and model uncertainty. We propose here a motif that ensures tracking and robust perfect adaptation for the controlled reaction network through integral feedback. Its metabolic load on the host is fully tunable and can be made arbitrarily close to the constitutive limit, the universal minimal metabolic load of all possible controllers. A DNA implementation of the controller network is finally provided. Computer simulations using realistic parameters demonstrate the good agreement between the DNA implementation and the ideal controller dynamics.

  17. Statistical analysis of partial discharges evolved during aging of synthetic nanofilled polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basappa, Prathap; Taylor, Charles M.; Watson, Antwarn E.; Dhara, Rohitha

    2015-08-01

    Introduction of nanofillers into polypropylene matrix has shown to improve the partial discharge resistance and breakdown strength. This work details the various statistical techniques that can be used to effectively analyze and forecast PD data obtained. PP samples made of base polymer and loaded with 1%, 2%, 4% and 8% synthetic nanofillers were aged under surface partial discharges. The acquired partial discharge pulse amplitude spectra were quantified in terms of Weibull scale (α) and shape (β) parameters. The sequential observations of these parameters collected at regular intervals of time constituted the two time series which are used here to analyze the PD data. The theoretical framework for analyzing & forecasting time series of Weibull shape and scale parameters of partial discharge pulse amplitude spectra using the auto & cross correlations to arrive at parsimonious models that can be used to analyze and forecast the data are presented.

  18. Analysis of spatially mismatched imagery for synthetic aperture radar ATR classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, Chad T.; Halversen, Shawn D.; Montagnino, Lee J.; Hebert, Christina L.; Young, Matthew T.; Cassabaum, Mary L.; Ku, Neilson

    2008-04-01

    Template-based classification algorithms used with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) automatic target recognition (ATR) degrade in performance when used with spatially mismatched imagery. The degradation, caused by a spatial mismatch between the template and image, is analyzed to show acceptable tolerances for SAR systems. The mismatch between the image and template is achieved by resampling the test imagery to different pixel spacings. A consistent SAR dataset is used to examine pixel spacings between 0.1069 and 0.2539 meters with a nominal spacing of 0.2021 meters. Performance degradation is observed as the pixel spacing is adjusted, Small amounts of variation in the pixel spacing cause little change in performance and allow design engineers to set reliable tolerances. Alternatively, the results show that using templates and images collected from slightly different sensor platforms is a very real possibility with the ability to predict the classification performance.

  19. Induction by lipopolysaccharide of intracellular and extracellular interleukin 1 production: analysis with synthetic models.

    PubMed

    Lasfargues, A; Ledur, A; Charon, D; Szabo, L; Chaby, R

    1987-07-15

    An attempt was made to identify the molecular structures that are present in bacterial LPS and induce the production of intracellular and extracellular pools of IL 1 by peritoneal macrophages of the mouse and by human monocytes. Activities of glycolipids and carbohydrates prepared by synthesis, and structurally related to the hydrophobic (Lipid A) and to the polysaccharide (PS) regions of LPS were compared with those induced by Bordetella pertussis endotoxin and by fragments derived therefrom. Both isolated regions of this LPS (PS and Lipid A) were able to induce IL 1 synthesis by monocytes and macrophages. Among the synthetic glycolipids employed, propyl-2-deoxy-2-[(3R)-3-hydroxytetrade-canamido]-4-O-pho sph ono-6-O-tetradecanoyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (glycolipid M9) induced IL 1 secretion more efficiently than Lipid A and LPS, whereas the amounts of intracellular IL 1 produced upon induction by these three substances were comparable. Macrophages from C3H/HeJ mice were unresponsive to Lipid A and to glycolipid M9, but produced IL 1 when incubated with PS or with a hydrophilic fragment isolated after methanolysis of the endotoxin. However, all synthetic derivatives of 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid (KDO) used in this study failed to induce IL 1 production by both mouse macrophages and human monocytes. The implications of these findings for a more precise comprehension of the molecular mechanism of LPS-induced activation of macrophages, and the relations between the molecular structures required for the induction of IL 1 production vs cytostatic activity in macrophages, are discussed.

  20. Mapping geoelectric fields during magnetic storms: Synthetic analysis of empirical United States impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedrosian, Paul A.; Love, Jeffrey J.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical impedance tensors obtained from EarthScope magnetotelluric data at sites distributed across the midwestern United States are used to examine the feasibility of mapping magnetic storm induction of geoelectric fields. With these tensors, in order to isolate the effects of Earth conductivity structure, we perform a synthetic analysis—calculating geoelectric field variations induced by a geomagnetic field that is geographically uniform but varying sinusoidally with a chosen set of oscillation frequencies that are characteristic of magnetic storm variations. For north-south oriented geomagnetic oscillations at a period of T0=100 s, induced geoelectric field vectors show substantial geographically distributed differences in amplitude (approximately a factor of 100), direction (up to 130∘), and phase (over a quarter wavelength). These differences are the result of three-dimensional Earth conductivity structure, and they highlight a shortcoming of one-dimensional conductivity models (and other synthetic models not derived from direct geophysical measurement) that are used in the evaluation of storm time geoelectric hazards for the electric power grid industry. A hypothetical extremely intense magnetic storm having 500 nT amplitude at T0=100 s would induce geoelectric fields with an average amplitude across the midwestern United States of about 2.71 V/km, but with a representative site-to-site range of 0.15 V/km to 16.77 V/km. Significant improvement in the evaluation of such hazards will require detailed knowledge of the Earth's interior three-dimensional conductivity structure.

  1. Selection of resistance at lethal and non-lethal antibiotic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Diarmaid; Andersson, Dan I

    2012-10-01

    Much of what we currently know about the genetics and evolution of antibiotic-resistance is based on selections with lethal drug concentrations that allow the detection of rare mutants with strong phenotypes. These data may be misleading with regard to the evolution of antibiotic resistance in natural environments, because bacteria are frequently exposed to concentration gradients of antibiotics. A significant part of antibiotic-resistance evolution may occur when bacteria are exposed to non-lethal concentrations of drug. High-resolution competition assays show that resistance mutations are rapidly enriched, and selected de novo, at very low antibiotic concentrations. Genomic analysis is providing a better understanding of how frequent and small-effect mutations selected at very low antibiotic concentrations contribute to the step-wise development of antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthetic foldamers.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Gilles; Huc, Ivan

    2011-06-07

    Foldamers are artificial folded molecular architectures inspired by the structures and functions of biopolymers. This highlight focuses on important developments concerning foldamers produced by chemical synthesis and on the perspectives that these new self-organized molecular scaffolds offer. Progress in the field has led to synthetic objects that resemble small proteins in terms of size and complexity yet that may not contain any α-amino acids. Foldamers have introduced new tools and concepts to develop biologically active substances, synthetic receptors and novel materials.

  3. A-Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry analysis of a Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation occurring at Bisaccia (Italy).

    PubMed

    Di Martire, Diego; Novellino, Alessandro; Ramondini, Massimo; Calcaterra, Domenico

    2016-04-15

    This paper presents the results of an investigation on a Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation (DSGSD), previously only hypothesized by some authors, affecting Bisaccia, a small town located in Campania region, Italy. The study was conducted through the integration of conventional methods (geological-geomorphological field survey, air-photo interpretation) and an Advanced-Differential Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (A-DInSAR) technique. The DSGSD involves a brittle lithotype (conglomerates of the Ariano Irpino Supersynthem) resting over a Structurally Complex Formation (Varycoloured Clays of Calaggio Formation). At Bisaccia, probably as a consequence of post-cyclic recompression phenomena triggered by reiterated seismic actions, the rigid plate made up of conglomeratic sediments resulted to be split in five portions, showing different rates of displacements, whose deformations are in the order of some centimeter/year, thus inducing severe damage to the urban settlement. A-DInSAR techniques confirmed to be a reliable tool in monitoring slow-moving landslides. In this case 96 ENVIronmental SATellite-Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ENVISAT-ASAR) images, in ascending and descending orbits, have been processed using SUBSOFT software, developed by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSLab) group from the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC). The DInSAR results, coupled with field survey, supported the analysis of the instability mechanism and confirmed the historical record of the movements already available for the town. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Purification and analysis of synthetic, triple-helical "minicollagens" by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fields, C G; Grab, B; Lauer, J L; Fields, G B

    1995-10-10

    To better study collagen-mediated cellular and enzymatic activities, a generally applicable solid-phase methodology has been developed by which aligned triple-helical peptides (designated THPs or "minicollagens") ranging from 79 to 124 residues can be assembled. Reversed-phase HPLC is typically the purification method of choice following chemical synthesis of small proteins of this size, as well as one of the analytical techniques used to verify product purity. We have thus compared the effects of different stationary phases (C18, C4, or diphenyl), organic modifiers (acetonitrile or isopropanol), support pore sizes (120 angstroms, 300 angstroms, or nonporous), and counterions for the reversed-phase HPLC analysis of THPs. Large pore C18 or C4 reversed-phase HPLC gave broad peaks, resulting in poor resolution of the desired THP from synthetic impurities. Broad peaks were presumably due to conformational instability of THPs to reversed-phase conditions and subsequent slow cis-trans isomerization of the peptide bonds. Peak sharpness was improved greatly by use large-pore diphenyl reversed-phase HPCL. We found that THPs can be best resolved from synthetic impurities by diphenyl or non-porous C18 reversed-phase HPLC using water-acetonitrile gradients. These results most likely reflect conditions which maintain the native conformation of collagen-like triple-helices.

  5. Analysis of the interaction of phytoestrogens and synthetic chemicals: an in vitro/in vivo comparison.

    PubMed

    Charles, Grantley D; Gennings, Chris; Tornesi, Belen; Kan, H Lynn; Zacharewski, Timothy R; Bhaskar Gollapudi, B; Carney, Edward W

    2007-02-01

    In the evaluation of chemical mixture toxicity, it is desirable to develop an evaluation paradigm which incorporates some critical attributes of real world exposures, particularly low dose levels, larger numbers of chemicals, and chemicals from synthetic and natural sources. This study evaluated the impact of low level exposure to a mixture of six synthetic chemicals (SC) under conditions of co-exposure to various levels of plant-derived phytoestrogen (PE) compounds. Estrogenic activity was evaluated using an in vitro human estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional activation assay and an in vivo immature rat uterotrophic assay. Initially, dose-response curves were characterized for each of the six SCs (methoxyclor, o,p-DDT, octylphenol, bisphenol A, beta-hexachlorocyclohexane, 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile) in each of the assays. The six SCs were then combined at equipotent ratios and tested at 5-6 dose levels spanning from very low, sub-threshold levels, to a dose in which every chemical in the mixture was at its individual estrogenic response threshold. The SC mixtures also were tested in the absence or presence of 5-6 different levels of PEs, for a total of 36 (in vitro) or 25 (in vivo) treatment groups. Both in vitro and in vivo, low concentrations of the SC mixture failed to increase estrogenic responses relative to those induced by PEs alone. However, significant increases in response occurred when each chemical in the SC mixture was near or above its individual response threshold. In vitro, interactions between high-doses of SCs and PEs were greater than additive, whereas mixtures of SCs in the absence of PEs interacted in a less than additive fashion. In vivo, the SC and PE mixture responses were consistent with additivity. These data illustrate a novel approach for incorporating key attributes of real world exposures in chemical mixture toxicity assessments, and suggest that chemical mixture toxicity is likely to be of concern only when the mixture

  6. Effect of democratic reforms on child mortality: a synthetic control analysis.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Hannah; Curzi, Daniele; Olper, Alessandro; Swinnen, Johan

    2016-09-01

    The effects of political regimes on health are unclear because empirical evidence is neither strong nor robust. Traditional econometric tools do not allow the direction of causality to be established clearly. We used a new method to investigate whether political transition into democracy affected child mortality. We used a synthetic control method to assess the effects of democratisation on child mortality as a proxy of health in countries that underwent transition from autocracy to democracy that lasted for at least 10 years between 1960 and 2010. Democracy was indicated by a score greater than 0 in the Polity2 index. We constructed synthetic controls (counterfactuals) based on weighted averages for factors such as child mortality, economic development, openess to trade, conflict, rural population, and female education from a pool of countries that remained autocracies during the study period. Of 60 countries that underwent democratic transition in the study period, 33 met our inclusion criteria. We were able to construct good counterfactuals for 24 of these. On average, democratisation reduced child mortality, and the effect increased over time. Significant reductions in child mortality were seen in nine (38%) countries, with the average reduction 10 years after democratisation being 13%. In the other 15 countries the effects were not significant. At the country level yhe effects were heterogeneous, but the differences did not correlate with geographic, economic, or political indicators. The effect of democratisation, however, was stronger in countries with above average child mortality before transition than in countries with below average child mortality. Our results are consistent with the interpretation that democratic reforms have the greatest effects when child mortality is a direct concern for a large part of the population. Future research could focus on identifying the precise mechanism through which the effects emerge. European Union 7th Framework

  7. Kinetic analysis of the cleavage of natural and synthetic substrates by the Serratia nuclease.

    PubMed

    Friedhoff, P; Meiss, G; Kolmes, B; Pieper, U; Gimadutdinow, O; Urbanke, C; Pingoud, A

    1996-10-15

    The extracellular nuclease from Serratia marcescens is a non-specific endonuclease that hydrolyzes double-stranded and single-stranded DNA and RNA with high specific activity. Steady-state and presteady-state kinetic cleavage experiments were performed with natural and synthetic DNA and RNA substrates to understand the mechanism of action of the Serratia nuclease. Most of the natural substrates are cleaved with similar Kcat and K(m) values, the Kcat/K(m) ratios being comparable to that of staphylococcal nuclease. Substrates with extreme structural features, like poly(dA).poly(dT) or poly(dG).poly(dC), are cleaved by the Serratia nuclease with a 50 times higher or 10 times lower K(m), respectively, as salmon testis DNA. Neither with natural DNA or RNA nor synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide substrates did we observe substrate inhibition for the Serratia nuclease as reported recently. Experiments with short oligodeoxynucleotides confirmed previous results that for moderately good cleavage activity the substrate should contain at least five phosphate residues. Shorter substrates are still cleaved by the Serratia nuclease, albeit at a rate reduced by a factor of more than 100. Cleavage experiments with oligodeoxynucleotides substituted by a single phosphorothioate group showed that the negative charge of the pro-Rp-oxygen of the phosphate group 3' adjacent to the scissile phosphodiester bond is essential for cleavage, as only the Rp-phosphorothioate supports cleavage at the 5' adjacent phosphodiester bond. Furthermore, the modified bond itself is only cleaved in the Rp-diastereomer, albeit 1000 times more slowly than the corresponding unmodified phosphodiester bond, which offers the possibility to determine the stereochemical outcome of cleavage. Pre-steady-state cleavage experiments demonstrate that it is not dissociation of products but association of enzyme and substrate or the cleavage of the phosphodiester bond that is the rate-limiting step of the reaction. Finally

  8. Analysis of the interaction of phytoestrogens and synthetic chemicals: An in vitro/in vivo comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, Grantley D. . E-mail: charles_grantley@allergan.com; Gennings, Chris; Tornesi, Belen; Kan, H. Lynn; Zacharewski, Timothy R.; Bhaskar Gollapudi, B.; Carney, Edward W.

    2007-02-01

    In the evaluation of chemical mixture toxicity, it is desirable to develop an evaluation paradigm which incorporates some critical attributes of real world exposures, particularly low dose levels, larger numbers of chemicals, and chemicals from synthetic and natural sources. This study evaluated the impact of low level exposure to a mixture of six synthetic chemicals (SC) under conditions of co-exposure to various levels of plant-derived phytoestrogen (PE) compounds. Estrogenic activity was evaluated using an in vitro human estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional activation assay and an in vivo immature rat uterotrophic assay. Initially, dose-response curves were characterized for each of the six SCs (methoxyclor, o,p-DDT, octylphenol, bisphenol A, {beta}-hexachlorocyclohexane, 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile) in each of the assays. The six SCs were then combined at equipotent ratios and tested at 5-6 dose levels spanning from very low, sub-threshold levels, to a dose in which every chemical in the mixture was at its individual estrogenic response threshold. The SC mixtures also were tested in the absence or presence of 5-6 different levels of PEs, for a total of 36 (in vitro) or 25 (in vivo) treatment groups. Both in vitro and in vivo, low concentrations of the SC mixture failed to increase estrogenic responses relative to those induced by PEs alone. However, significant increases in response occurred when each chemical in the SC mixture was near or above its individual response threshold. In vitro, interactions between high-doses of SCs and PEs were greater than additive, whereas mixtures of SCs in the absence of PEs interacted in a less than additive fashion. In vivo, the SC and PE mixture responses were consistent with additivity. These data illustrate a novel approach for incorporating key attributes of real world exposures in chemical mixture toxicity assessments, and suggest that chemical mixture toxicity is likely to be of concern only when the

  9. Improving Lethal Action: Learning and Adapting in U.S. Counterterrorism Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    September 2014 Dr. Jeffrey Miers Vice President Director Operations Tactic Analysis i Executive Summary The United States uses lethal...The United States uses lethal force to kill individuals it believes pose an imminent terrorist threat to its citizens and interests, as well as those...Need for Lethal Action Thirteen years ago this month, Al Qaeda struck down thousands of innocent civilians on American soil. The United States

  10. Synthetic Glycolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Raul F

    2010-09-20

    Recently, two groups separately reported what amounts to a synthetic version of glycolysis. The sum of these two reactions is equivalent to what is accomplished in living organisms by glycolysis in terms of the redistribution of oxidation states of the carbon, and is an important step in reproducing using chemical routes that living organisms accomplish daily.

  11. Synthetic Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  12. Synthetic Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. And what about the limits for life? Can we create organisms that expand the envelope for life? In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  13. Synthetic hardware performance analysis in virtualized cloud environment for healthcare organization.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chee-Heng; Teh, Ying-Wah

    2013-08-01

    The main obstacles in mass adoption of cloud computing for database operations in healthcare organization are the data security and privacy issues. In this paper, it is shown that IT services particularly in hardware performance evaluation in virtual machine can be accomplished effectively without IT personnel gaining access to actual data for diagnostic and remediation purposes. The proposed mechanisms utilized the hypothetical data from TPC-H benchmark, to achieve 2 objectives. First, the underlying hardware performance and consistency is monitored via a control system, which is constructed using TPC-H queries. Second, the mechanism to construct stress-testing scenario is envisaged in the host, using a single or combination of TPC-H queries, so that the resource threshold point can be verified, if the virtual machine is still capable of serving critical transactions at this constraining juncture. This threshold point uses server run queue size as input parameter, and it serves 2 purposes: It provides the boundary threshold to the control system, so that periodic learning of the synthetic data sets for performance evaluation does not reach the host's constraint level. Secondly, when the host undergoes hardware change, stress-testing scenarios are simulated in the host by loading up to this resource threshold level, for subsequent response time verification from real and critical transactions.

  14. Analysis of data acquired by synthetic aperture radar over Dade County, Florida, and Acadia Parish, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    Results of digital processing of airborne X-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data acquired over Dade County, Florida, and Acadia Parish, Louisiana are presented. The goal was to investigate the utility of SAR data for land cover mapping and area estimation under the AgRISTARS Domestic Crops and Land Cover Project. In the case of the Acadia Paris study area, LANDSAT multispectral scanner (MSS) data were also used to form a combined SAR and MSS data set. The results of accuracy evaluation for the SAR, MSS, and SAR/MSS data using supervised classification show that the combined SAR/MSS data set results in an improved classification accuracy of the five land cover classes as compared with SAR-only and MSS-only data sets. In the case of the Dade County study area, the results indicate that both HH and VV polarization data are highly responsive to the row orientation of the row crop but not to the specific vegetation which forms the row structure. On the other hand, the HV polarization data are relatively insensitive to the orientation of row crop. Therefore, the HV polarization data may be used to discriminate the specific vegetation that forms the row structure.

  15. Development and Analysis of Synthetic Composite Materials Emulating Patient AAA Wall Material Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margossian, Christa M.

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) rupture accounts for 14,000 deaths a year in the United States. Since the number of ruptures has not decreased significantly in recent years despite improvements in imaging and surgical procedures, there is a need for an accurate, noninvasive technique capable of establishing rupture risk for specific patients and discriminating lesions at high risk. In this project, synthetic composite materials replicating patient-specific wall stiffness and strength were developed and their material properties evaluated. Composites utilizing various fibers were developed to give a range of stiffness from 1825.75 kPa up through 8187.64 kPa with one base material, Sylgard 170. A range of strength from 631.12 kPa to 1083 kPa with the same base material was also found. By evaluating various base materials and various reinforcing fibers, a catalogue of stiffnesses and strengths was started to allow for adaptation to specific patient properties. Three specific patient properties were well-matched with two composites fabricated: silk thread-reinforced Sylgard 170 and silk thread-reinforced Dragon Skin 20. The composites showed similar stiffnesses to the specific patients while reaching target stresses at particular strains. Not all patients were matched with composites as of yet, but recommendations for future matches are able to be determined. These composites will allow for the future evaluation of flow-induced wall stresses in models replicating patient material properties and geometries.

  16. Observation of sea-ice dynamics using synthetic aperture radar images: Automated analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, John F.; Samadani, Ramin; Smith, Martha P.; Daida, Jason M.; Bracewell, Ronald N.

    1988-01-01

    The European Space Agency's ERS-1 satellite, as well as others planned to follow, is expected to carry synthetic-aperture radars (SARs) over the polar regions beginning in 1989. A key component in utilization of these SAR data is an automated scheme for extracting the sea-ice velocity field from a time sequence of SAR images of the same geographical region. Two techniques for automated sea-ice tracking, image pyramid area correlation (hierarchical correlation) and feature tracking, are described. Each technique is applied to a pair of Seasat SAR sea-ice images. The results compare well with each other and with manually tracked estimates of the ice velocity. The advantages and disadvantages of these automated methods are pointed out. Using these ice velocity field estimates it is possible to construct one sea-ice image from the other member of the pair. Comparing the reconstructed image with the observed image, errors in the estimated velocity field can be recognized and a useful probable error display created automatically to accompany ice velocity estimates. It is suggested that this error display may be useful in segmenting the sea ice observed into regions that move as rigid plates of significant ice velocity shear and distortion.

  17. Functional analysis of synthetic DELLA domain peptides and bioactive gibberellin assay using surface plasmon resonance technology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhuoya; Xing, Zenan; Zhou, Min; Chen, Yi; Li, Chenzhong; Wang, Ruozhong; Xu, Wenzhong; Ma, Mi

    2015-11-01

    DELLA proteins and phytohormone gibberellin act together to control convergence point of plant development. A gibberellin-bound nuclear receptor that interacts with the N-terminal domain of DELLA proteins is required for gibberellin induced degradation of DELLA proteins. N-terminal DELLA domain includes two conserved motifs: DELLA and VHYNP. However, their respective functions remain unclear. Meanwhile, the identification and detection of several bioactive gibberellins from the more than 100 gibberellin metabolites are overwhelmingly difficult for their similar structures. Using in vitro biochemical approach, our work demonstrates for the first time that the synthetic GAI N-terminal DELLA domain peptides have similar bioactive function as the expressed protein to interact with AtGID1a receptor. Furthermore, our results reveal that DELLA motif is vitally important region and DELLA segment is essentially required region to recognize AtGID1a receptor. Finally, based on bioactive GA-dependent of the interaction between AtGID1a and DELLA protein, we generated a new method that could identify and detect bioactive GAs accurately and rapidly with surface plasmon resonance assays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis Of Atmoshperic Effects On X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar Observations And Precipitations Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, S.; Pulvirenti, L.; Marzano, F. S.; Pierdicca, N.

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes a new methodology for the detection and quantitative estimation of intense atmospheric precipitations on images acquired by Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs) operating at X-Band wavelengths. The proposed methodology consists of two successive steps. The first one allows detecting and distinguishing areas subjected to intense precipitation events, permanent water surfaces, flood areas and snow coverage. The second step derives an estimation of the precipitation rate using the event attenuation estimated at the previous step. This methodology is applied on two COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) satellite case studies. The first one is relative to a severe precipitation weather event, occurred in northwestern Italy (close to Liguria region) on November 3-8, 2011. The second one is relative to Hurricane “Irene” event, occurred in Eastern United States (close to Delaware) on late August 2011. In both cases X-SAR echoes and estimated rain rate is compared with corresponding products derived by available ground Weather Radars (WRs). The correlation of the precipitating cloud fields between CSK X-SAR and WR images is significant in all case studies.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA integration: fine structure target analysis using synthetic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, T; Murphy, E; Groarke, J; Drlica, K

    1993-01-01

    The target specificity of DNA strand transfer mediated by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase was examined in vitro with synthetic oligonucleotides. Although insertion occurred at most locations in the target, some sites were preferred over others by at least 15-fold. Changing the nucleotide sequence of the target changed the distribution of preferred sites in complex ways, some of which included changes in target preference distant from the sequence alteration. Alignment of target sequences revealed that adenosine is preferred adjacent to the insertion site. Strand transfer occurred to within 2 nucleotides of the 3' end and to within 3 nucleotides of the 5' end of the target. This suggests that only 2 or 3 nucleotides flanking the target site are required for integration; such restricted contact with target DNA would allow integrase to insert the two ends of viral DNA into two closely spaced sites in host DNA, consistent with the concerted in vivo integration reaction that generates a 5-bp target duplication. Images PMID:8419642

  20. Performance analysis of weak target detection via ground-based synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong-sheng; Zhou, Mei; Tang, Ling-li; Li, Chuan-rong

    2011-10-01

    Polarimetric Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (Pol-InSAR) is an emerging technique that combines interferometric SAR and polarimetric SAR techniques and has shown its effectiveness in the detection of buried weak targets. The detection performance is affected by the SAR parameters as well as the covering characteristics. In this paper, the effects of covering characteristics on the detection performance were emphasized and experimentally investigated by a ground-based Pol-InSAR system. Firstly, the detection principle for buried weak target by Pol-InSAR technique was presented, which is based on the use of interferometric coherence variation with polarization. Then the ground-based two dimensional rail (TDR) SAR used for investigation was introduced. Furthermore, the experiment target scene was designed and the effects of different covering type, different covering moisture, and different covering depth on the detection performance of weak targets were shown and analyzed. Preliminary results confirmed the effectiveness of Pol-InSAR technique used for weak target detection and it would be helpful for the further investigation of this technique.

  1. Observation of sea-ice dynamics using synthetic aperture radar images: Automated analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, John F.; Samadani, Ramin; Smith, Martha P.; Daida, Jason M.; Bracewell, Ronald N.

    1988-01-01

    The European Space Agency's ERS-1 satellite, as well as others planned to follow, is expected to carry synthetic-aperture radars (SARs) over the polar regions beginning in 1989. A key component in utilization of these SAR data is an automated scheme for extracting the sea-ice velocity field from a time sequence of SAR images of the same geographical region. Two techniques for automated sea-ice tracking, image pyramid area correlation (hierarchical correlation) and feature tracking, are described. Each technique is applied to a pair of Seasat SAR sea-ice images. The results compare well with each other and with manually tracked estimates of the ice velocity. The advantages and disadvantages of these automated methods are pointed out. Using these ice velocity field estimates it is possible to construct one sea-ice image from the other member of the pair. Comparing the reconstructed image with the observed image, errors in the estimated velocity field can be recognized and a useful probable error display created automatically to accompany ice velocity estimates. It is suggested that this error display may be useful in segmenting the sea ice observed into regions that move as rigid plates of significant ice velocity shear and distortion.

  2. The Analysis of Moonborne Cross Track Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry for Global Environment Change Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yixing, Ding; Huadong, Guo; Guang, Liu; Daowei, Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Faced to the earth observation requirement of large scale global environment change, a SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) antenna system is proposed to set on Moon's surface for interferometry in this paper. With several advantages superior to low earth obit SAR, such as high space resolution, large range swath and short revisit interval, the moonborne SAR could be a potential data resource of global changes monitoring and environment change research. Due to the high stability and ease of maintenance, the novel system is competent for offering a long and continuous time series of remote sensing imagery. The Moonborne SAR system performance is discussed at the beginning. Then, the peculiarity of interferometry is analyzed in both repeat pass and single pass cases. The chief distinguishing feature which is worth to research the potentiality of repeat pass interferometry is that the revisit interval is reduced to one day in most cases, and in worst case one month. Decorrelation deriving from geometry variety is discussed in detail. It turns out that the feasibility of moonborne SAR repeat pass interferometry depends on the declination of Moon. The severity of shift effects in radar echoes increased as Moon approaches to the equatorial plane. Moreover, referring to the single pass interferometry, two antennas are assumed to set on different latitude of Moon. There is enough space on Moon to form a long baseline, which is highly related to the interferogram precision.

  3. Radiative transfer with POLARIS. I. Analysis of magnetic fields through synthetic dust continuum polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reissl, S.; Wolf, S.; Brauer, R.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: We present POLARIS (POLArized RadIation Simulator), a newly developed three-dimensional Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code. POLARIS was designed to calculate dust temperature, polarization maps, and spectral energy distributions. It is optimized to handle data that results from sophisticated magneto-hydrodynamic simulations. The main purpose of the code is to prepare and analyze multi-wavelength continuum polarization measurements in the context of magnetic field studies in the interstellar medium. An exemplary application is the investigation of the role of magnetic fields in star formation processes. Methods: We combine currently discussed state-of-the-art grain alignment theories with existing dust heating and polarization algorithms. We test the POLARIS code on multiple scales in complex astrophysical systems that are associated with different stages of star formation. POLARIS uses the full spectrum of dust polarization mechanisms to trace the underlying magnetic field morphology. Results: Resulting temperature distributions are consistent with the density and position of radiation sources resulting from magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) - collapse simulations. The calculated layers of aligned dust grains in the considered cirumstellar disk models are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Finally, we compute unique patterns in synthetic multi-wavelength polarization maps that are dependent on applied dust-model and grain-alignment theory in analytical cloud models.

  4. Analysis of different synthetic homopolymers by the use of a new calculation software for tandem mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Baumgaertel, Anja; Scheubert, Kerstin; Pietsch, Bernhard; Kempe, Kristian; Crecelius, Anna C; Böcker, Sebastian; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2011-06-30

    The manual interpretation of tandem mass spectra of synthetic polymers is very time-consuming. Therefore, a new software tool was developed to accelerate the interpretation of spectra obtained without requiring any further knowledge about the polymer class or the fragmentation behavior under high-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) conditions. The software only requires an alphabetical list of elements and a peak list of the measured substance as an xml file for the evaluation of the chosen mass spectrum. Tandem mass spectra of different homopolymers, like poly(2-oxazoline)s, poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(styrene), were interpreted by the new software tool. This contribution describes a fast and automated software tool for the rapid analysis of homopolymers. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of synthetic polymers and peptides.

    PubMed

    Hyzak, Lukas; Moos, Rebecca; von Rath, Friederike; Wulf, Volker; Wirtz, Michaela; Melchior, David; Kling, Hans-Willi; Köhler, Michael; Gäb, Siegmar; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2011-12-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) is a very powerful and widely used mass spectrometric technique to ionize high molecular weight compounds. The most commonly used dried droplet (DD) technique can lead to a concentration distribution of the analyte on the target and is therefore often not suitable for reproducible analyses. We developed a new solvent-free deposition technique, called compressed sample (CS), to prevent the distribution of the analytes caused by the crystallization of the compounds. The CS technique presented in this work allows the quantitative analysis of synthetic polymers such as derivatized maltosides with correlation coefficients of 0.999 and peptides up to 3500 Da with correlation coefficients of at least 0.982 without the use of stable-isotope-labeled standards.

  6. The benefits of using time-frequency analysis with synthetic aperture focusing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, Austin E-mail: claytonda@ornl.gov; Clayton, Dwight E-mail: claytonda@ornl.gov

    2015-03-31

    Improvements in detection and resolution are always desired and needed. There are various instruments available for the inspection of concrete structures that can be used with confidence for detecting different defects. However, more often than not that confidence is heavily dependent on the experience of the operator rather than the clear, objective discernibility of the output of the instrument. The challenge of objective discernment is amplified when the concrete structures contain multiple layers of reinforcement, are of significant thickness, or both, such as concrete structures in nuclear power plants. We seek to improve and extend the usefulness of results produced using the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) on data collected from thick, complex concrete structures. A secondary goal is to improve existing SAFT results, with regards to repeatedly and objectively identifying defects and/or internal structure of concrete structures. Towards these goals, we are applying the time-frequency technique of wavelet packet decomposition and reconstruction using a mother wavelet that possesses the exact reconstruction property. However, instead of analyzing the coefficients of each decomposition node, we select and reconstruct specific nodes based on the frequency band it contains to produce a frequency band specific time-series representation. SAFT is then applied to these frequency specific reconstructions allowing SAFT to be used to visualize the reflectivity of a frequency band and that band's interaction with the contents of the concrete structure. We apply our technique to data sets collected using a commercial, ultrasonic linear array (MIRA) from two 1.5m × 2m × 25cm concrete test specimens. One specimen contains multiple layers of rebar. The other contains honeycomb, crack, and rebar bonding defect analogs. This approach opens up a multitude of possibilities for improved detection, readability, and overall improved objectivity. We will focus on

  7. Numerical Analysis of Synthetic Jet Flow Control on a Vertical Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jeff

    Airflow over a stabilizer-rudder assembly is simulated on an unstructured grid using a stream-line upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) weighted residual finite element formulation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These studies seek to determine the effectiveness of synthetic jet flow control in increasing side force over the vertical tail. The two models under investigation are the Beta model, with 12 jets aligned along the span of the stabilizer, and a Beta model scaled up by a factor of 1.969, with 24 jets aligned along the span of the stabilizer. These two models have Reynolds numbers of 3.6x10 5 and 7.1x105, respectively, where both are based on the mean aerodynamic chord. The flow solver, Phasta, is used to run these simulations. URANS simulations on the Beta model with a 5° sideslip angle and 20° rudder deflection angle show that unsteady blowing with a blowing ratio of 1.0 increases the total side force coefficient by 14% with respect to the baseline. The Cp data obtained as a function of percent chord showed improvement in Cp from unsteady blowing in the outboard region, but negligible change in the inboard region. This data is in agreement with experimental values. Speed isosurface data was obtained for the Beta model with a 0° sideslip angle and 30° rudder deflection angle, with steady blowing. It was found that these isosurfaces create ridges and valleys along the span, suggesting interference between the jets. The same result was found for the scaled-up Beta model with a 0° sideslip angle and 30° rudder deflection angle, with steady blowing.

  8. The Benefits of Using Time-Frequency Analysis with Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, Austin P; Clayton, Dwight A

    2015-01-01

    Improvements in detection and resolution are always desired and needed. There are various instruments available for the inspection of concrete structures that can be used with confidence for detecting different defects. However, more often than not that confidence is heavily dependent on the experience of the operator rather than the clear, objective discernibility of the output of the instrument. The challenge of objective discernment is amplified when the concrete structures contain multiple layers of reinforcement, are of significant thickness, or both, such as concrete structures in nuclear power plants. We seek to improve and extend the usefulness of results produced using the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) on data collected from thick, complex concrete structures. A secondary goal is to improve existing SAFT results, with regards to repeatedly and objectively identifying defects and/or internal structure of concrete structures. Towards these goals, we are applying the time-frequency technique of wavelet packet decomposition and reconstruction using a mother wavelet that possesses the exact reconstruction property. However, instead of analyzing the coefficients of each decomposition node, we select and reconstruct specific nodes based on the frequency band it contains to produce a frequency band specific time-series representation. SAFT is then applied to these frequency specific reconstructions allowing SAFT to be used to visualize the reflectivity of a frequency band and that band s interaction with the contents of the concrete structure. We apply our technique to data sets collected using a commercial, ultrasonic linear array (MIRA) from two 1.5m x 2m x 25cm concrete test specimens. One specimen contains multiple layers of rebar. The other contains honeycomb, crack, and rebar bonding defect analogs. This approach opens up a multitude of possibilities for improved detection, readability, and overall improved objectivity. We will focus on

  9. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry coherence analysis over Katmai volcano group, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Freymueller, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring volcanic deformation or monitoring deformation of active volcanoes using space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry depends on the ability to maintain phase coherence over appropriate time intervals. Using ERS 1 C band (?? = 5.66 cm) SAR imagery, we studied the seasonal and temporal changes of the interferometric SAR coherence for fresh lava, weathered lava, tephra with weak water reworking, tephra with strong water reworking, and fluvial deposits representing the range of typical volcanic surface materials in the Katmai volcano group, Alaska. For interferograms based on two passes with 35 days separation taken during the same summer season, we found that coherence increases after early June, reaches a peak between the middle of July and the middle of September, and finally decreases until the middle of November when coherence is completely lost for all five sites. Fresh lava has the highest coherence, followed by either weathered lava or fluvial deposits. These surfaces maintain relatively high levels of coherence for periods up to the length of the summer season. Coherence degrades more rapidly with time for surfaces covered with tephra. For images taken in different summers, only the lavas maintained coherence well enough to provide useful interferometric images, but we found only a small reduction in coherence after the first year for surfaces with lava. Measurement of volcanic deformation is possible using summer images spaced a few years apart, as long as the surface is dominated by lavas. Our studies suggest that in order to make volcanic monitoring feasible along the Aleutian arc or other regions with similar climatic conditions, observation intervals of the satellite with C band SAR should be at least every month from July through September, every week during the late spring/early summer or late fall, and every 2-3 days during the winter. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Kinetic analysis of T7 RNA polymerase-promoter interactions with small synthetic promoters.

    PubMed

    Martin, C T; Coleman, J E

    1987-05-19

    Specific interactions between T7 RNA polymerase and its promoter have been studied by a simple steady-state kinetic assay using synthetic oligonucleotide promoters that produce a short five-base message. A series of promoters with upstream lengths extending to promoter positions -19, -17, -14, and -12 show that promoters extending to -19 and -17 produce very specific transcripts with initiation rate constant Kcat = 50 min-1 and a Michaelis constant Km = 0.02 microM, indicating that the consensus sequence to position -17 is sufficient for maximum promoter usage. Shortening the upstream region of the promoter to -14 substantially increases Km (0.3 microM) but does not significantly reduce the maximum velocity (kcat = 30 min-1). Finally, truncation of the promoter at position -12 results in extremely low levels of specific transcription. The coding and noncoding strands appear to make different contributions to promoter recognition. Although the double-stranded promoter of upstream length -12 is very poor as a transcription template, extension of only the noncoding strand to -17 very significantly improves both Kcat and Km. In contrast, extension of only the coding strand results in no significant improvement. Substitution of an AT base pair at position -10 by CG (as found in T3 RNA polymerase promoters) produces a 10-fold increase in Km, with little effect on Kcat. Comparison of two promoters containing a base pair mismatch at this site (AG or CT) demonstrates that promoter recognition is very sensitive to the nature of the base on the noncoding strand and is only slightly affected by the presence of a mismatch created by a wrong base in the coding strands.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. The benefits of using time-frequency analysis with synthetic aperture focusing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, Austin; Clayton, Dwight

    2015-03-01

    Improvements in detection and resolution are always desired and needed. There are various instruments available for the inspection of concrete structures that can be used with confidence for detecting different defects. However, more often than not that confidence is heavily dependent on the experience of the operator rather than the clear, objective discernibility of the output of the instrument. The challenge of objective discernment is amplified when the concrete structures contain multiple layers of reinforcement, are of significant thickness, or both, such as concrete structures in nuclear power plants. We seek to improve and extend the usefulness of results produced using the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) on data collected from thick, complex concrete structures. A secondary goal is to improve existing SAFT results, with regards to repeatedly and objectively identifying defects and/or internal structure of concrete structures. Towards these goals, we are applying the time-frequency technique of wavelet packet decomposition and reconstruction using a mother wavelet that possesses the exact reconstruction property. However, instead of analyzing the coefficients of each decomposition node, we select and reconstruct specific nodes based on the frequency band it contains to produce a frequency band specific time-series representation. SAFT is then applied to these frequency specific reconstructions allowing SAFT to be used to visualize the reflectivity of a frequency band and that band's interaction with the contents of the concrete structure. We apply our technique to data sets collected using a commercial, ultrasonic linear array (MIRA) from two 1.5m × 2m × 25cm concrete test specimens. One specimen contains multiple layers of rebar. The other contains honeycomb, crack, and rebar bonding defect analogs. This approach opens up a multitude of possibilities for improved detection, readability, and overall improved objectivity. We will focus on

  12. Phase-locked flow field analysis in a synthetic human larynx model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodermeyer, Alexander; Becker, Stefan; Döllinger, Michael; Kniesburges, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The fluid flow within a human larynx plays an essential role in the fluid-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. This study addresses the flow field downstream of aerodynamically driven, synthetic vocal folds. In order to quantitatively investigate the supraglottal formation of the flow field within one oscillation cycle of the vocal folds, a phase-locked PIV technique is introduced. The pseudo-time-resolved measurement results were averaged for each phase angle. When including a supraglottal channel, the jet was deflected from the centerline of the supraglottal channel and changed the direction of deflection in different cycles. The result is a bistable flow field. Therefore, a sorting method based on the mean cyclic supraglottal pressure difference was introduced. For both states of the flow field, a recirculation area was detected, interacting with the arising glottal jet in every oscillation cycle. This interaction could be identified as the major cause for supraglottal jet deflection, and the sense of rotation of the recirculation area defined the direction of deflection. The asymmetric structure of the flow field was caused by the geometric boundary condition, i.e., due to the present supraglottal channel. An additional key factor was found to be the contact between the two vocal folds in each oscillation cycle which interrupted the jet flow periodically. Removing the supraglottal channel resulted in a symmetric jet location. When avoiding vocal fold contact, the bistable behavior vanished and the jet was steadily deflected to one lateral side. In the present study, it cannot be confirmed that the Coanda effect is responsible for the deflection.

  13. Measuring Deformation in Jakarta through Long Term Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustan; Sulaiman, Albertus; Ito, Takeo

    2016-11-01

    Jakarta as a home for more than 10 millions habitant facing complex environmental problems due to physical development that cause physical deformation. Physical deformation issues such as decreasing environmental carrying capacity, land cover changes and land subsidence have occurred. Recent studies shows that the long of shoreline changes in a span of 13 years from 2002 to 2015 around 14 km due to land reclamation in Jakarta bay. Previous studies also concluded that Jakarta suffer a sinking phenomena due to its rapid subsidence rate, approximately 260 mm/year in northern part of Jakarta. During the 2007 to 2011, the land subsidence phenomena in Jakarta was observed by InSAR based on ALOS-PALSAR data and found that the subsided areas only occurred in certain areas, mainly in Pluit and Cengkareng regions, with a subsidence of approximately 70 cm for 4 years. Land subsidence is generally related to geological subsidence i.e. sediment consolidation due to its own weight and tectonic movements; or related to human activities such as withdrawal of ground water and geothermal fluid, oil and gas extraction from underground reservoirs, and collapse of underground mines. The amount of subsidence or uplift can be estimated from the number of concentric fringes that appear in the interferogram. This research utilizes Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data observed from ALOS-2 (L-band) and Sentinel-1 (C-band) satellites. By interfering two single look complex (SLC) images from different observation epoch, it is found that the subsided area that has been identified before continues to subside. This occurs especially in Pluit region and has been revealed by interfering ALOS-2 data up to year 2016. The deformation in this area is approximately 12 cm from November 2015 to September 2016. The process of land reclamation also clearly identified by Sentinel-1 image by series data processing in Sentinels Application Platform (SNAP) software.

  14. Analysis of Novel Synthetic Opioids U-47700, U-50488 and Furanyl Fentanyl by LC-MS/MS in Postmortem Casework.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Amanda L A; Friscia, Melissa; Papsun, Donna; Kacinko, Sherri L; Buzby, David; Logan, Barry K

    2016-11-01

    Following series of synthetic cannabinoid and synthetic cathinone derivatives, the illicit drug market has begun to see increased incidence of synthetic opioids including fentanyl and its derivatives, and other chemically unrelated opioid agonists including AH-7921 and MT-45. Among the most frequently encountered compounds in postmortem casework have been furanyl fentanyl (N-(1-(2-phenylethyl)-4-piperidinyl)-N-phenylfuran-2-carboxamide, Fu-F) and U-47700 (trans-3,4-dichloro-N-(2-(dimethylamino)cyclohexyl)-N-methylbenzamide). Both drugs have been reported to be present in the heroin supply and to be gaining popularity among recreational opioid users, but were initially developed by pharmaceutical companies in the 1970s as candidates for development as potential analgesic therapeutic agents. A method was developed and validated for the analysis of U-47700, U-50488 and furanyl fentanyl in blood specimens. A total of 20 postmortem cases, initially believed to be heroin or other opioid-related drug overdoses, were submitted for quantitative analysis. The analytical range for U-47770 and U-50488 was 1-500 and 1-100 ng/mL for furanyl fentanyl. The limit of detection was 0.5 ng/mL for all compounds. Within the scope of the method, U-47700 was the only confirmed drug in 11 of the cases, 5 cases were confirmed for both U-47700 and furanyl fentanyl, and 3 cases were confirmed only for furanyl fentanyl. The mean and median blood concentrations for U-47700 were 253 ng/mL (±150) and 247 ng/mL, respectively, range 17-490 ng/mL. The mean and median blood concentrations for furanyl fentanyl were 26 ng/mL (±28) and 12.9 ng/mL, respectively, range 2.5-76 ng/mL. Given the widespread geographical distribution and increase in prevalence in postmortem casework, toxicology testing should be expanded to include testing for "designer opioids" in cases with histories consistent with opioid overdose but with no traditional opioids present or insufficient quantities to account for death.

  15. Single-Institution Financial Analysis of Biologic Versus Synthetic Mesh Hernia Repair: A Retrospective Analysis of Patients Readmitted for Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Otake, Leo R; Satterwhite, Thomas; Echo, Anthony; Chiou, Grace; Lee, Gordon K

    2013-07-11

    The advent and proliferation of commercially available biologic mesh material has expanded the repertoire of hernia repair materials available to the surgeon. Given the higher initial cost of these mesh materials relative to synthetic materials such as polypropylene, there has been debate regarding the purported benefit of the use of biologic mesh. This study is a single-institution review of complex hernia repairs using both biologic and synthetic mesh materials. The patients included in the analyses were admitted to the institution at least twice for management of hernia; this permitted specific evaluation of a given diagnosis, hernia, in the same patient, but at different points in time. In a subset of patients, hernia repair was performed upon the second admission with conversion from biologic or synthetic mesh, which had been placed at the initial repair. The objective of this study was to evaluate the financial implications of mesh choice. Specific parameters reviewed included type of mesh used, total costs of hospitalization, direct cost associated with the hernia repair, total collections, and percentage of collections relative to total charges. Through such analysis, our aim was to determine whether there were any variances in revenue and costs associated with the application of either mesh material or the associated clinical scenarios.

  16. Synthetic certified DNA reference material for analysis of human erythropoietin transgene and transcript in gene doping and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Baoutina, A; Bhat, S; Zheng, M; Partis, L; Dobeson, M; Alexander, I E; Emslie, K R

    2016-10-01

    There is a recognised need for standardisation of protocols for vector genome analysis used in vector manufacturing, to establish dosage, in biodistribution studies and to detect gene doping in sport. Analysis of vector genomes and transgene expression is typically performed by qPCR using plasmid-based calibrants incorporating transgenic sequences. These often undergo limited characterisation and differ between manufacturers, potentially leading to inaccurate quantification, inconsistent inter-laboratory results and affecting clinical outcomes. Contamination of negative samples with such calibrants could cause false positive results. We developed a design strategy for synthetic reference materials (RMs) with modified transgenic sequences to prevent false positives due to cross-contamination. When such RM is amplified in transgene-specific assays, the amplicons are distinguishable from transgene's amplicons based on size and sequence. Using human erythropoietin as a model, we produced certified RM according to this strategy and following ISO Guide 35. Using non-viral and viral vectors, we validated the effectiveness of this RM in vector genome analysis in blood in vitro. The developed design strategy could be applied to production of RMs for other transgenes, genes or transcripts. Together with validated PCR assays, such RMs form a measurement tool that facilitates standardised, accurate and reliable genetic analysis in various applications.

  17. Empirical complexities in the genetic foundations of lethal mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Bull, James J; Joyce, Paul; Gladstone, Eric; Molineux, Ian J

    2013-10-01

    From population genetics theory, elevating the mutation rate of a large population should progressively reduce average fitness. If the fitness decline is large enough, the population will go extinct in a process known as lethal mutagenesis. Lethal mutagenesis has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach to viral treatment, and several in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. Yet only one empirical study has tested the genetic models underlying lethal mutagenesis, and the theory failed on even a qualitative level. Here we provide a new level of analysis of lethal mutagenesis by developing and evaluating models specifically tailored to empirical systems that may be used to test the theory. We first quantify a bias in the estimation of a critical parameter and consider whether that bias underlies the previously observed lack of concordance between theory and experiment. We then consider a seemingly ideal protocol that avoids this bias-mutagenesis of virions-but find that it is hampered by other problems. Finally, results that reveal difficulties in the mere interpretation of mutations assayed from double-strand genomes are derived. Our analyses expose unanticipated complexities in testing the theory. Nevertheless, the previous failure of the theory to predict experimental outcomes appears to reside in evolutionary mechanisms neglected by the theory (e.g., beneficial mutations) rather than from a mismatch between the empirical setup and model assumptions. This interpretation raises the specter that naive attempts at lethal mutagenesis may augment adaptation rather than retard it.

  18. The Rorschach Suicide Constellation: assessing various degrees of lethality.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J C; Piers, C; Hilsenroth, M J; Holdwick, D J; Padawer, J R

    2001-04-01

    In this article we examine the relation between the Rorschach Comprehensive System's Suicide Constellation (S-CON; Exner, 1993; Exner & Wiley, 1977) and lethality of suicide attempts during the course of patients' hospitalization at the Austen Riggs Center (Stockbridge, MA). Patient records were rated as nonsuicidal (n = 37), parasuicidal (n = 37), or near-lethal (n = 30) based on the presence and lethality of self-destructive acts. Diagnostic efficiency statistics utilizing a cutoff score of 7 or more positive indicators successfully predicted which patients would engage in near-lethal suicidal activity relative to parasuicidal patients (overall correct classification rate [OCC] = .79), nonsuicidal inpatients (OCC = .79), and college students (OCC = .89). Although these predictions were influenced by relatively high base rates in the hospital population (14.5%), base rate estimates were calculated for other hypothetical populations revealing different prediction estimates that should be considered when judging the relative efficacy of the S-CON. Logistic regression analysis revealed that an S-CON score of 7 or more was the sole predictor of near-lethal suicide attempts among 9 psychiatric and demographic variables.

  19. Synthetic multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Maharbiz, Michel M

    2012-12-01

    The ability to synthesize biological constructs on the scale of the organisms we observe unaided is probably one of the more outlandish, yet recurring, dreams humans have had since they began to modify genes. This review brings together recent developments in synthetic biology, cell and developmental biology, computation, and technological development to provide context and direction for the engineering of rudimentary, autonomous multicellular ensembles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Two-stream Instabilities within the Front of Supercritical Quasi-perpendicular Shocks: a Synthetic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschietti, L.; Lembege, B.

    2015-12-01

    toward upstream for the oblique whistlers, as expected. We present a synthetic view of wave emissions of two-stream origin and connect our results with the low-frequency whistlers of Hellinger and Mangeney [JGR 102, 1997], the MTSI-1 and 2 of Matsukyio and Scholer [JGR 111, 2006], and the Bernstein waves of Muschietti and Lembege [JGR 118, 2013].

  1. Microarray Analysis of Antibodies Induced with Synthetic Antitumor Vaccines: Specificity against Diverse Mucin Core Structures.

    PubMed

    Pett, Christian; Cai, Hui; Liu, Jia; Palitzsch, Björn; Schorlemer, Manuel; Hartmann, Sebastian; Stergiou, Natascha; Lu, Mengji; Kunz, Horst; Schmitt, Edgar; Westerlind, Ulrika

    2017-03-17

    Glycoprotein research is pivotal for vaccine development and biomarker discovery. Many successful methodologies for reliably increasing the antigenicity toward tumor-associated glycopeptide structures have been reported. Deeper insights into the quality and specificity of the raised polyclonal, humoral reactions are often not addressed, despite the fact that an immunological memory, which produces antibodies with cross-reactivity to epitopes exposed on healthy cells, may cause autoimmune diseases. In the current work, three MUC1 antitumor vaccine candidates conjugated with different immune stimulants are evaluated immunologically. For assessment of the influence of the immune stimulant on antibody recognition, a comprehensive library of mucin 1 glycopeptides (>100 entries) is synthesized and employed in antibody microarray profiling; these range from small tumor-associated glycans (TN , STN , and T-antigen structures) to heavily extended O-glycan core structures (type-1 and type-2 elongated core 1-3 tri-, tetra-, and hexasaccharides) glycosylated in variable density at the five different sites of the MUC1 tandem repeat. This is one of the most extensive glycopeptide libraries ever made through total synthesis. On tumor cells, the core 2 β-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-1 (C2GlcNAcT-1) is down-regulated, resulting in lower amounts of the branched core 2 structures, which favor formation of linear core 1 or core 3 structures, and in particular, truncated tumor-associated antigen structures. The core 2 structures are commonly found on healthy cells and the elucidation of antibody cross-reactivity to such epitopes may predict the tumor-selectivity and safety of synthetic vaccines. With the extended mucin core structures in hand, antibody cross-reactivity toward the branched core 2 glycopeptide epitopes is explored. It is observed that the induced antibodies recognize MUC1 peptides with very high glycosylation site specificity. The nature of the

  2. Electroshock weapons can be lethal!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2008-03-01

    Electroshock weapons (EWs)-stun guns, tasers, riot shields-are electroconductive devices designed to safely incapacitate healthy men neuromuscularly, so they are called nonlethal or less-lethal. EW firms seeking large nonmilitary markets targeted law enforcement and corrections personnel, who began using EWs in prisons/jails and on public patrol in 1980 in the USA. This shifted the EW-shocked population from healthy soldiers to a heterogeneous mix of both sexes, ages 6-92, in a wide variety of health conditions! An EW operates by disrupting normal physiological processes, producing transient effects in healthy people. But if a person's health is sufficiently compromised, the margin of safety can be lost, resulting in death or permanent health problems. 325 people have died after EW shock since 1980. Did the EW cause these deaths? Evidence indicates that EWs do play a causal role in most such deaths. EWs can be lethal for people in diabetic shock^1 (hypoglycemia), which may be why Robert Dziekanski-a Polish immigrant to Canada-died so quickly after he was tasered at Vancouver Airport: not having eaten for over 10 hours, he likely was severely hypoglycemic. The EW death rate in North America is 30 times higher than need be, because EW users have not been properly trained to use EWs on a heterogeneous population safely! ^1J. Clinical Engineering 30(3):111(2005).

  3. Critical body residues, Michaelis-Menten analysis of bioaccumulation, lethality and behaviour as endpoints of waterborne Ni toxicity in two teleosts.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Erin M; Marentette, Julie R; Balshine, Sigal; Wood, Chris M

    2014-03-01

    Traditionally, water quality guidelines/criteria are based on lethality tests where results are expressed as a function of waterborne concentrations (e.g. LC50). However, there is growing interest in the use of uptake and binding relationships, such as biotic ligand models (BLM), and in bioaccumulation parameters, such as critical body residue values (e.g. CBR50), to predict metal toxicity in aquatic organisms. Nevertheless, all these approaches only protect species against physiological death (e.g. mortality, failed recruitment), and do not consider ecological death which can occur at much lower concentrations when the animal cannot perform normal behaviours essential for survival. Therefore, we investigated acute (96 h) Ni toxicity in two freshwater fish species, the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and compared LC, BLM, and CBR parameters for various organs, as well as behavioural responses (spontaneous activity). In general, round goby were more sensitive. Ni bioaccumulation displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in most tissues, and round goby gills had lower Kd (higher binding affinity) but similar Bmax (binding site density) values relative to rainbow trout gills. Round goby also accumulated more Ni than did trout in most tissues at a given exposure concentration. Organ-specific 96 h acute CBR values tended to be higher in round goby but 96 h acute CBR50 and CBR10 values in the gills were very similar in the two species. In contrast, LC50 and LC10 values were significantly higher in rainbow trout. With respect to BLM parameters, gill log KNiBL values for bioaccumulation were higher by 0.4-0.8 log units than the log KNiBL values for toxicity in both species, and both values were higher in goby (more sensitive). Round goby were also more sensitive with respect to the behavioural response, exhibiting a significant decline of 63-75 % in movements per minute at Ni concentrations at and above only 8 % of the LC50 value

  4. Parametric analysis of synthetic aperture radar data for the study of forest stand characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Shih-Tseng

    1988-01-01

    A parametric analysis of a Gulf Coast forest stand was performed using multipolarization, multipath airborne SAR data, and forest plot properties. Allometric equations were used to compute the biomass and basal area for the test plots. A multiple regression analysis with stepwise selection of independent variables was performed. It is found that forest stand characteristics such as biomass, basal area, and average tree height are correlated with SAR data.

  5. Identification of CCR4 and other essential thyroid hormone receptor co-activators by modified yeast synthetic genetic array analysis

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, Manjapra; Meng, Xianwang; Denis, Clyde L.; Webb, Paul; Baxter, John D.; Walfish, Paul G.

    2009-01-01

    Identification of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) co-regulators has enhanced our understanding of thyroid hormone (TH) action. However, it is likely that many other co-regulators remained unidentified, and unbiased methods are required to discover these proteins. We have previously demonstrated that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent system in which to study TR action, and that defined TR signaling complexes in a eukaryotic background devoid of complicating influences of mammalian cell co-regulators can be constructed and analyzed for endogenous yeast genes, many of which are conserved in mammals. Here, a modified synthetic genetic array analysis was performed by crossing a yeast strain that expressed TRβ1 and the co-activator GRIP1/SRC2 with 384 yeast strains bearing deletions of known genes. Eight genes essential for TH action were isolated, of which 4 are conserved in mammals. Examination of one, the yeast CCR4 and its human homolog CCR4/NOT6 (hCCR4), confirmed that (i) transfected CCR4 potentiates a TH response in cultured cells more efficiently than established TR co-activators and (ii) knockdown of CCR4 expression strongly inhibited a TH response (>80%). TH treatment promoted rapid and sustained hCCR4 recruitment to the TH-responsive deiodinase 1 promoter and TR co-localizes with hCCR4 in the nucleus and interacts with hCCR4 in 2-hybrid and pull-down assays. These findings indicate that a modified yeast synthetic genetic array strategy is a feasible method for unbiased identification of conserved genes essential for TR and other nuclear receptor hormone functions in mammals. PMID:19903885

  6. Qualitative Analysis and Detection of the Pyrolytic Products of JWH-018 and 11 Additional Synthetic Cannabinoids in the Presence of Common Herbal Smoking Substrates.

    PubMed

    Raso, Stephen; Bell, Suzanne

    2017-07-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids have become a ubiquitous challenge in forensic toxicology and seized drug analysis. Thermal degradation products have yet to be identified and evaluated for toxicity in comparison to parent and metabolic compounds. An investigation into these pyrolytic products, as the major route of ingestion is inhalation, may produce additional insight to understand the toxicity of synthetic cannabinoids. The pyrolysis of JWH-018 and 11 additional synthetic cannabinoids and six herbal plant substrates were conducted using an in-house constructed smoking simulator. After pyrolysis of herbal material alone, the plant substrate was spiked with the drug compounds to 2-5% w/w concentrations. Samples were collected, filtered, evaporated under nitrogen gas, reconstituted in methanol, and analyzed via gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Pyrolysis of the plant material alone produced 10 consistently observed compounds between the six plant species. The pyrolysis of the synthetic cannabinoids produced a total of 52 pyrolytic compounds, where 32 were unique to a particular parent compound and the remaining 20 were common products between multiple cannabinoids. The thermal degradation followed three major pathways that are outlined to assist in producing a predictive model for new synthetic cannabinoids that may arise in case samples. The observed pyrolytic products are also viable options for analysis in post mortem samples and the evaluation of toxicity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Analysis of 30 synthetic cannabinoids in serum by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry after liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Kneisel, Stefan; Auwärter, Volker

    2012-07-01

    The analysis of synthetic cannabinoids in human matrices is of particular importance in the fields of forensic and clinical toxicology since cannabis users partly shift to the consumption of 'herbal mixtures' as a legal alternative to cannabis products in order to circumvent drug testing. However, comprehensive methods covering the majority of synthetic cannabinoids already identified on the drug market are still lacking. In this article, we present a fully validated method for the analysis of 30 synthetic cannabinoids in human serum utilizing liquid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The method proved to be suitable for the quantification of 27 substances. The limits of detection ranged from 0.01 to 2.0 ng/mL, whereas the lower limits of quantification were in the range from 0.1 to 2.0 ng/mL. The presented method was successfully applied to 833 authentic serum samples during routine analysis between August 2011 and January 2012. A total of 227 (27%) samples was tested positive for at least one of the following synthetic cannabinoids: JWH-018, JWH-019, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-200, JWH-203, JWH-210, JWH-307, AM-2201 and RCS-4. The most prevalent compounds in positive samples were JWH-210 (80%), JWH-122 (63%) as well as AM-2201 (29%). Median serum concentrations were all below 1.0 ng/mL. These findings demonstrate a significant shift of the market of synthetic cannabinoids towards substances featuring a higher CB(1) binding affinity and clearly emphasize that the analysis of synthetic cannabinoids in serum or blood samples requires highly sensitive analytical methods covering a wide spectrum of substances. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The Pursuit of Non-Lethal Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    at the upper end of the spectrum. Without non- lethal options, a Marine would potentially have to resort to deadly force or face further risk by...Technologies with a potential for generating non- lethal military capabilities cover a very broad spectrum. At the low end of this spectrum are...systems, these modifications must not in any way reduce the capability of those systems to fire lethal munitions.” This stance incurred much debate

  9. Characterization of Factors Affecting Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis Results With Synthetic and Protein Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Aaron B; Carnell, Pauline; Carpenter, John F

    2016-04-01

    In many manufacturing and research areas, the ability to accurately monitor and characterize nanoparticles is becoming increasingly important. Nanoparticle tracking analysis is rapidly becoming a standard method for this characterization, yet several key factors in data acquisition and analysis may affect results. Nanoparticle tracking analysis is prone to user input and bias on account of a high number of parameters available, contains a limited analysis volume, and individual sample characteristics such as polydispersity or complex protein solutions may affect analysis results. This study systematically addressed these key issues. The integrated syringe pump was used to increase the sample volume analyzed. It was observed that measurements recorded under flow caused a reduction in total particle counts for both polystyrene and protein particles compared to those collected under static conditions. In addition, data for polydisperse samples tended to lose peak resolution at higher flow rates, masking distinct particle populations. Furthermore, in a bimodal particle population, a bias was seen toward the larger species within the sample. The impacts of filtration on an agitated intravenous immunoglobulin sample and operating parameters including "MINexps" and "blur" were investigated to optimize the method. Taken together, this study provides recommendations on instrument settings and sample preparations to properly characterize complex samples.

  10. Hemoglobin Pasadena: identification of the gene mutant by DNA analysis using synthetic DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Rahbar, S; Rosen, R; Nozari, G; Lee, T D; Asmerom, Y; Wallace, R B

    1988-03-01

    Hemoglobin Pasadena [beta 75(E19)Leu----Arg] was found in a boy who had an acute episode of anemia and rapid splenic enlargement. His father was the only other member of a large family with this hemoglobinopathy. We have used gene mapping techniques for direct identification of the beta-globin gene mutation. To correlate the DNA findings with the structural identification of this variant, we have also performed globin chain separation and analysis of the tryptic peptides using high performance liquid chromatography and secondary ion mass spectral analysis.

  11. Examining the Impact of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Comorbidity on the Medical Lethality of Adolescent "Suicide Attempts"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Manama O'Brien, Kimberly H.; Berzin, Stephanie C.

    2012-01-01

    Specific psychiatric diagnoses and comorbidity patterns were examined to determine if they were related to the medical lethality of "suicide attempts" among adolescents presenting to an urban general hospital (N = 375). Bivariate analysis showed that attempters with substance abuse disorders had higher levels of lethality than attempters without…

  12. Examining the Impact of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Comorbidity on the Medical Lethality of Adolescent "Suicide Attempts"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Manama O'Brien, Kimberly H.; Berzin, Stephanie C.

    2012-01-01

    Specific psychiatric diagnoses and comorbidity patterns were examined to determine if they were related to the medical lethality of "suicide attempts" among adolescents presenting to an urban general hospital (N = 375). Bivariate analysis showed that attempters with substance abuse disorders had higher levels of lethality than attempters without…

  13. We want what’s best for our baby: Prenatal Parenting of Babies with Lethal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Côté-Arsenault, Denise; Krowchuk, Heidi; Hall, Wendasha Jenkins; Denney-Koelsch, Erin

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on qualitative research into the experience of couples who chose to continue their pregnancies after receiving a lethal fetal diagnosis, and to embrace the parenting of their baby in the shortened time they have. This analysis of interview data is part of a larger research project describing parents’ experiences of continuing pregnancy with a known lethal fetal diagnosis (LFD). PMID:26594107

  14. The Danger Assessment: Validation of a Lethality Risk Assessment Instrument for Intimate Partner Femicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; Webster, Daniel W.; Glass, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    The Danger Assessment (DA) is an instrument designed to assess the likelihood of lethality or near lethality occurring in a case of intimate partner violence. This article describes the development, psychometric validation, and suggestions for use of the DA. An 11-city study of intimate partner femicide used multivariate analysis to test the…

  15. The Danger Assessment: Validation of a Lethality Risk Assessment Instrument for Intimate Partner Femicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; Webster, Daniel W.; Glass, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    The Danger Assessment (DA) is an instrument designed to assess the likelihood of lethality or near lethality occurring in a case of intimate partner violence. This article describes the development, psychometric validation, and suggestions for use of the DA. An 11-city study of intimate partner femicide used multivariate analysis to test the…

  16. The Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource in Epitope Discovery and Synthetic Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Fleri, Ward; Paul, Sinu; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Mahajan, Swapnil; Xu, Xiaojun; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    The task of epitope discovery and vaccine design is increasingly reliant on bioinformatics analytic tools and access to depositories of curated data relevant to immune reactions and specific pathogens. The Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB) was indeed created to assist biomedical researchers in the development of new vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The Analysis Resource is freely available to all researchers and provides access to a variety of epitope analysis and prediction tools. The tools include validated and benchmarked methods to predict MHC class I and class II binding. The predictions from these tools can be combined with tools predicting antigen processing, TCR recognition, and B cell epitope prediction. In addition, the resource contains a variety of secondary analysis tools that allow the researcher to calculate epitope conservation, population coverage, and other relevant analytic variables. The researcher involved in vaccine design and epitope discovery will also be interested in accessing experimental published data, relevant to the specific indication of interest. The database component of the IEDB contains a vast amount of experimentally derived epitope data that can be queried through a flexible user interface. The IEDB is linked to other pathogen-specific and immunological database resources. PMID:28352270

  17. The Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource in Epitope Discovery and Synthetic Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Fleri, Ward; Paul, Sinu; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Mahajan, Swapnil; Xu, Xiaojun; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    The task of epitope discovery and vaccine design is increasingly reliant on bioinformatics analytic tools and access to depositories of curated data relevant to immune reactions and specific pathogens. The Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB) was indeed created to assist biomedical researchers in the development of new vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The Analysis Resource is freely available to all researchers and provides access to a variety of epitope analysis and prediction tools. The tools include validated and benchmarked methods to predict MHC class I and class II binding. The predictions from these tools can be combined with tools predicting antigen processing, TCR recognition, and B cell epitope prediction. In addition, the resource contains a variety of secondary analysis tools that allow the researcher to calculate epitope conservation, population coverage, and other relevant analytic variables. The researcher involved in vaccine design and epitope discovery will also be interested in accessing experimental published data, relevant to the specific indication of interest. The database component of the IEDB contains a vast amount of experimentally derived epitope data that can be queried through a flexible user interface. The IEDB is linked to other pathogen-specific and immunological database resources.

  18. Statistical tests for recessive lethal-carriers.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, M A; Haseman, J K

    1979-08-01

    This paper presents a statistical method for testing whether a male mouse is a recessive lethal-carrier. The analysis is based on a back-cross experiment in which the male mouse is mated with some of his daughters. The numbers of total implantations and intrauterine deaths in each litter are recorded. It is assumed that, conditional on the number of total implantations, the number of intrauterine deaths follows a binomial distribution. Using computer-simulated experimentation it is shown that the proposed statistical method, which is sensitive to the pattern of intrauterine death rates, is more powerful than a test based only on the total number of implant deaths. The proposed test requires relatively simple calculations and can be used for a wide range of values of total implantations and background implant mortality rates. For computer-simulated experiments, there was no practical difference between the empirical error rate and the nominal error rate.

  19. Synthetic Cathinones ("Bath Salts")

    MedlinePlus

    ... still unknown about how synthetic cathinones affect the human brain. Researchers do know that synthetic cathinones are chemically ... of the chemicals in synthetic cathinones affect the human brain. Synthetic cathinones can cause: nosebleeds paranoia increased sociability ...

  20. Synthetic wisdom.

    PubMed

    Kitcher, Philip

    2016-11-01

    Wisdom is a special kind of virtue. It is not to be identified with any outstanding cognitive ability-like having a prodigious memory or knowing a lot. Rather it consists in seeing what is most important and most valuable, either within a particular domain or in life as a whole. In the life of a wise person, that insight should be accompanied by traits of character, enabling the person to pursue what is seen as valuable. Viewing wisdom as a capacity for synthetic understanding, I argue for the need for philosophy, even at a time when all of us have much to learn from the sciences.

  1. Synthetic Genetic Targeting of Genome Instability in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sajesh, Babu V.; Guppy, Brent J.; McManus, Kirk J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death throughout the World. A limitation of many current chemotherapeutic approaches is that their cytotoxic effects are not restricted to cancer cells, and adverse side effects can occur within normal tissues. Consequently, novel strategies are urgently needed to better target cancer cells. As we approach the era of personalized medicine, targeting the specific molecular defect(s) within a given patient’s tumor will become a more effective treatment strategy than traditional approaches that often target a given cancer type or sub-type. Synthetic genetic interactions are now being examined for their therapeutic potential and are designed to target the specific genetic and epigenetic phenomena associated with tumor formation, and thus are predicted to be highly selective. In general, two complementary approaches have been employed, including synthetic lethality and synthetic dosage lethality, to target aberrant expression and/or function associated with tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, respectively. Here we discuss the concepts of synthetic lethality and synthetic dosage lethality, and explain three general experimental approaches designed to identify novel genetic interactors. We present examples and discuss the merits and caveats of each approach. Finally, we provide insight into the subsequent pre-clinical work required to validate novel candidate drug targets. PMID:24202319

  2. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis using synthetic long-read sequencing reveals molecular co-association of distant splicing events

    PubMed Central

    Tilgner, Hagen; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Blauwkamp, Tim; Moshrefi, Ali; Jaeger, Erich; Chen, Feng; Harel, Itamar; Bustamante, Carlos D; Rasmussen, Morten; Snyder, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing shapes mammalian transcriptomes, with many RNA molecules undergoing multiple distant alternative splicing events. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis, including analysis of exon co-association in the same molecule, requires deep, long-read sequencing. Here we introduce an RNA sequencing method, synthetic long-read RNA sequencing (SLR-RNA-seq), in which small pools (≤1,000 molecules/pool, ≤1 molecule/gene for most genes) of full-length cDNAs are amplified, fragmented and short-read-sequenced. We demonstrate that these RNA sequences reconstructed from the short reads from each of the pools are mostly close to full length and contain few insertion and deletion errors. We report many previously undescribed isoforms (human brain: ∼13,800 affected genes, 14.5% of molecules; mouse brain ∼8,600 genes, 18% of molecules) and up to 165 human distant molecularly associated exon pairs (dMAPs) and distant molecularly and mutually exclusive pairs (dMEPs). Of 16 associated pairs detected in the mouse brain, 9 are conserved in human. Our results indicate conserved mechanisms that can produce distant but phased features on transcript and proteome isoforms. PMID:25985263

  3. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis using synthetic long-read sequencing reveals molecular co-association of distant splicing events.

    PubMed

    Tilgner, Hagen; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Blauwkamp, Tim; Moshrefi, Ali; Jaeger, Erich; Chen, Feng; Harel, Itamar; Bustamante, Carlos D; Rasmussen, Morten; Snyder, Michael P

    2015-07-01

    Alternative splicing shapes mammalian transcriptomes, with many RNA molecules undergoing multiple distant alternative splicing events. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis, including analysis of exon co-association in the same molecule, requires deep, long-read sequencing. Here we introduce an RNA sequencing method, synthetic long-read RNA sequencing (SLR-RNA-seq), in which small pools (≤1,000 molecules/pool, ≤1 molecule/gene for most genes) of full-length cDNAs are amplified, fragmented and short-read-sequenced. We demonstrate that these RNA sequences reconstructed from the short reads from each of the pools are mostly close to full length and contain few insertion and deletion errors. We report many previously undescribed isoforms (human brain: ∼13,800 affected genes, 14.5% of molecules; mouse brain ∼8,600 genes, 18% of molecules) and up to 165 human distant molecularly associated exon pairs (dMAPs) and distant molecularly and mutually exclusive pairs (dMEPs). Of 16 associated pairs detected in the mouse brain, 9 are conserved in human. Our results indicate conserved mechanisms that can produce distant but phased features on transcript and proteome isoforms.

  4. Somatic Mosaicism for a Lethal TRPV4 Mutation Results in Non-Lethal Metatropic Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Michael M.; Kang, Taekyu; Lachman, Ralph S.; Bamshad, Michael; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Dominant mutations in TRPV4, which encodes the Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Subfamily V Member 4 calcium channel, result in a series of musculoskeletal disorders that include a set of peripheral neuropathies and a broad phenotypic spectrum of skeletal dysplasias. The skeletal pheno-types range from brachyolmia, in which there is scoliosis with mild short stature, through perinatal lethal metatropic dysplasia. We describe a case with phenotypic findings consistent with metatropic dysplasia, but in whom no TRPV4 mutation was detected by Sanger sequence analysis. Exome sequence analysis identified a known lethal metatropic dysplasia mutation, TRPV4L618P, which was present at lower frequency than would be expected for a heterozygous change. The affected individual was shown to be a somatic mosaic for the mutation, providing an explanation for the milder than expected phenotype. The data illustrate that high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA can facilitate detection of mosaicism with higher sensitivity than Sanger sequence analysis and identify a new genetic mechanism for metatropic dysplasia. PMID:27530454

  5. Synthetic chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, M.

    1980-06-01

    The principal function of the chloroplast is to capture solar quanta and to store them in some stable form. We are in the process of trying to construct a totally synthetic system that would simulate some of the reactions of the two photosystems which occur in natural chloroplasts. Toward this end, we have demonstrated a number of the reactions required in separated systems. We have shown that it is possible to transfer electrons across an insulating membrane barrier with a surfactant photosensitizer. Others have shown, and we have confirmed, that it is possible to collect the two electrons necessary for the generation of molecular hydrogen on a heterogeneous catalyst suspended in water and similarly to collect the four holes on another heterogeneous catalyst suspended in water for the generation of molecular oxygen. A synthesis of some of these molecular catalysts for both these purposes is underway, with some partial success. When these partial reactions are assembled in a system, the resulting synthetic chloroplasts will not resemble the natural entity in detailed construction as they will contain no protein.

  6. Man-Made Synthetic Receptors for Capture and Analysis of Ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Baggiani, Claudio; Giovannoli, Cristina; Anfossi, Laura

    2015-10-10

    Contemporary analytical methods have the sensitivity required for Ochratoxin A detection and quantification, but direct application of these methods on real samples can be rarely performed because of matrix complexity. Thus, efficient sample pre-treatment methods are needed. Recent years have seen the increasing use of artificial recognition systems as a viable alternative to natural receptors, because these materials seem to be particularly suitable for applications where selectivity for Ochratoxin A is essential. In this review, molecularly imprinted polymers, aptamers and tailor-made peptides for Ochratoxin A capture and analysis with particular attention to solid phase extraction applications will be discussed.

  7. Morphological Analysis of Biocompatibility of Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells with Synthetic Polyethylene Terephthalate Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Gilevich, I V; Polyakov, I S; Porkhanov, V A; Chekhonin, V P

    2017-07-01

    We studied the properties of a tissue-engineered trachea consisting of a polyethylene terephthalate scaffold populated with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells. The tissue-engineered constructs were obtained before surgery, during the postoperative period, and during autopsy. Cytomorphological analysis during the postoperative period showed the presence of mesenchymal stem cells on the inner surface of the implant on day 3 after surgery and cells of the respiratory epithelium on day 10-14. In autopsy samples, single epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and basal cells were found. Biocompatibility of the tissue-engineered trachea with autologous mononuclear cells of the patient was demonstrated.

  8. Morphology of synthetic chrysoberyl and alexandrite crystals: Analysis of experimental data and theoretical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromalova, N. A.; Eremin, N. N.; Dorokhova, G. I.; Urusov, V. S.

    2012-07-01

    A morphological analysis of chrysoberyl and alexandrite crystals obtained by flux crystallization has been performed. Seven morphological types of crystals are selected. The surface energies of the faces of chrysoberyl and alexandrite crystals and their isostructural analogs, BeCr2O4 and BeFe2O4, have been calculated by atomistic computer modeling using the Metadise program. A "combined" approach is proposed which takes into account both the structural geometry and the surface energy of the faces and thus provides better agreement between the theoretical and experimentally observed faceting of chrysoberyl and alexandrite crystals.

  9. Man-Made Synthetic Receptors for Capture and Analysis of Ochratoxin A

    PubMed Central

    Baggiani, Claudio; Giovannoli, Cristina; Anfossi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary analytical methods have the sensitivity required for Ochratoxin A detection and quantification, but direct application of these methods on real samples can be rarely performed because of matrix complexity. Thus, efficient sample pre-treatment methods are needed. Recent years have seen the increasing use of artificial recognition systems as a viable alternative to natural receptors, because these materials seem to be particularly suitable for applications where selectivity for Ochratoxin A is essential. In this review, molecularly imprinted polymers, aptamers and tailor-made peptides for Ochratoxin A capture and analysis with particular attention to solid phase extraction applications will be discussed. PMID:26473924

  10. Identification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genes Whose Deletion Causes Synthetic Effects in Cells with Reduced Levels of the Nuclear Pif1 DNA Helicase.

    PubMed

    Stundon, Jennifer L; Zakian, Virginia A

    2015-10-19

    The multifunctional Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pif1 DNA helicase affects the maintenance of telomeric, ribosomal, and mitochondrial DNAs, suppresses DNA damage at G-quadruplex motifs, influences the processing of Okazaki fragments, and promotes breakage induced replication. All of these functions require the ATPase/helicase activity of the protein. Owing to Pif1's critical role in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA, pif1Δ strains quickly generate respiratory deficient cells and hence grow very slowly. This slow growth makes it difficult to carry out genome-wide synthetic genetic analysis in this background. Here, we used a partial loss of function allele of PIF1, pif1-m2, which is mitochondrial proficient but has reduced abundance of nuclear Pif1. Although pif1-m2 is not a null allele, pif1-m2 cells exhibit defects in telomere maintenance, reduced suppression of damage at G-quadruplex motifs and defects in breakage induced replication. We performed a synthetic screen to identify nonessential genes with a synthetic sick or lethal relationship in cells with low abundance of nuclear Pif1. This study identified eleven genes that were synthetic lethal (APM1, ARG80, CDH1, GCR1, GTO3, PRK1, RAD10, SKT5, SOP4, UMP1, and YCK1) and three genes that were synthetic sick (DEF1, YIP4, and HOM3) with pif1-m2.

  11. Analysis of apoptosis signaling pathway in human cancer cells by codeinone, a synthetic derivative of codeine.

    PubMed

    Hitosugi, Naoko; Nagasaka, Hiroshi; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Isao; Kawase, Masami

    2003-01-01

    We have recently found that codeinone, an oxidation metabolite of codeine, induced apoptosis, characterized by internucleosomal DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial cytochrome c release in HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemic cell lines, most effectively among 10 opioids. These findings prompted us to investigate whether codeinone induces apoptosis in other human cancer cells and possible changes in mitochondrial enzyme. FACS analysis demonstrated that codeinone induced the production of ANNEXIN-positive apoptotic cells in three different human cancer cells (HL-60, MCF7, A549). The apoptotic cells were visualized by microscopical observation after staining with Hoechst (H)-33342. Fluorometric assay showed that codeinone time-dependently activated caspase 3 and caspase 9, but not caspase 8, suggesting the activation of intrinsic apoptotic signaling pathway via mitochondria. Western blot analysis demonstrated that codeinone enhanced the Pro-apoptotic Bax protein expression, but reduced the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein expression. Codeinone did not significantly change the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity nor its mRNA expression. This apoptosis-inducing activity, in conjunction with antinociceptive activity, further substantiated the antitumor potential of codeinone.

  12. Data Processing and Analysis Tools Based on Ground-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosetto, M.; Monserrat, O.; Luzi, G.; Devanthéry, N.; Cuevas-González, M.; Barra, A.

    2017-09-01

    The Ground-Based SAR (GBSAR) is a terrestrial remote sensing technique used to measure and monitor deformation. In this paper we describe two complementary approaches to derive deformation measurements using GBSAR data. The first approach is based on radar interferometry, while the second one exploits the GBSAR amplitude. In this paper we consider the so-called discontinuous GBSAR acquisition mode. The interferometric process is not always straightforward: it requires appropriate data processing and analysis tools. One of the main critical steps is phase unwrapping, which can critically affect the deformation measurements. In this paper we describe the procedure used at the CTTC to process and analyse discontinuous GBSAR data. In the second part of the paper we describe the approach based on GBSAR amplitude images and an image-matching method.

  13. Parametric analysis of synthetic aperture radar data for characterization of deciduous forest stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Shih-Tseng

    1987-01-01

    The SAR sensor parameters that affect the estimation of deciduous forest stand characteristics were examined using data sets for the Gulf Coastal Plain region, acquired by the NASA/JPL multipolarization airborne SAR. In the regression analysis, the mean digital-number values of the three polarization data are used as the independent variables to estimate the average tree height (HT), basal area (BA), and total-tree biomass (TBM). The following results were obtained: (1) in the case of simple regression and using 28 plots, vertical-vertical (VV) polarization yielded the largest correlation coefficients (r) in estimating HT, BA, and TBM; (2) in the case of multiple regression, the horizontal-horizontal (HH) and VV polarization combination yielded the largest r value in estimating HT, while the VH and HH polarization combination yielded the largest r values in estimating BA and TBM. With the addition of a third polarization, the increase in r values is insignificant.

  14. Alcohol Consumption and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Kenneth E.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Swann, Alan C.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Lee, Roberta K.; Bayer, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a case-control study of the association between nearly lethal suicide attempts and facets of alcohol consumption; namely, drinking frequency, drinking quantity, binge drinking, alcoholism, drinking within 3 hours of suicide attempt, and age began drinking. In bivariate analyses, all measures were associated with nearly lethal suicide…

  15. Alcohol Consumption and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Kenneth E.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Swann, Alan C.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Lee, Roberta K.; Bayer, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a case-control study of the association between nearly lethal suicide attempts and facets of alcohol consumption; namely, drinking frequency, drinking quantity, binge drinking, alcoholism, drinking within 3 hours of suicide attempt, and age began drinking. In bivariate analyses, all measures were associated with nearly lethal suicide…

  16. Public health, populations, and lethal ingestion.

    PubMed

    Allison, Kirk C

    2010-01-01

    In 2008 the American Public Health Association endorsed lethal ingestion as a public health policy as part of "Patients' Rights to Self-Determination at the End of Life." Although rhetoric framing physician-assisted suicide (PAS) invokes individual autonomy, public health's focus is populations. Even regarding treatment refusal, its logic and coercive power (e.g., quarantine) subordinate autonomy to population interests. Research indicates health practitioners and disciplines that are closer to persons with terminal conditions oppose more PAS than those having little contact: specifically, public health associations are more willing to authorize life-ending means than disciplines directly caring for the dying. Why is that the case and with what consequences for populations and public health? Contextual analysis of semantics; policy submissions; standards; statutory and regulatory documents; related economic, equity, and demographic discourses is employed; and, finally, scenarios offered of the future. Notwithstanding rhetoric invoking autonomy, public health's population orientation is reflected in population health measures (e.g., aggregated DALYs, QALYs) that intimate why public health might endorse availing life-ending means. Current associated statutes, regulations, terminology, and data practices compromise public health and semantic integrity (e.g., the falsification of death certificates) and inadequately address population vulnerabilities. In recent policy processes, evidence of patient and system vulnerabilities has not been given due weight while future-oriented scenarios suggest autonomy-based rationales will increasingly yield to population-driven rationales, increasing risk of private and public forms of domination and vulnerabilities at life's end. Public health should address institutionalized violations of data integrity and patient vulnerabilities, while rescinding policy supporting the institutionalization of lethal means. Copyright © 2010

  17. Comparative analysis of synthetic DNA promoters for high-level gene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Dipak Kumar; Sarkar, Shayan; Raha, Sumita; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2014-10-01

    We have designed two near- constitutive and stress-inducible promoters (CmYLCV9.11 and CmYLCV4); those are highly efficient in both dicot and monocot plants and have prospective to substitute the CaMV 35S promoter. We performed structural and functional studies of the full-length transcript promoter from Cestrum yellow leaf curling virus (CmYLCV) employing promoter/leader deletion and activating cis-sequence analysis. We designed a 465-bp long CmYLCV9.11 promoter fragment (-329 to +137 from transcription start site) that showed enhanced promoter activity and was highly responsive to both biotic and abiotic stresses. The CmYLCV9.11 promoter was about 28-fold stronger than the CaMV35S promoter in transient and stable transgenic assays using β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The CmYLCV9.11 promoter also demonstrated stronger activity than the previously reported CmYLCV promoter fragments, CmpC (-341 to +5) and CmpS (-349 to +59) in transient systems like maize protoplasts and onion epidermal cells as well as transgenic systems. A good correlation between CmYLCV9.11 promoter-driven GUS-accumulation/enzymatic activities with corresponding uidA-mRNA level in transgenic tobacco plants was shown. Histochemical (X-Gluc) staining of transgenic seedlings, root and floral parts expressing the GUS under the control of CmYLCV9.11, CaMV35S, CmpC and CmpS promoters also support the above findings. The CmYLCV9.11 promoter is a constitutive promoter and the expression level in tissues of transgenic tobacco plants was in the following order: root > leaf > stem. The tobacco transcription factor TGA1a was found to bind strongly to the CmYLCV9.11 promoter region, as shown by Gel-shift assay and South-Western blot analysis. In addition, the CmYLCV9.11 promoter was regulated by a number of abiotic and biotic stresses as studied in transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. The newly derived CmYLCV9.11 promoter is an efficient tool for biotechnological applications.

  18. Sample entropy applied to the analysis of synthetic time series and tachograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Diosdado, A.; Gálvez-Coyt, G. G.; Solís-Montufar, E.

    2017-01-01

    Entropy is a method of non-linear analysis that allows an estimate of the irregularity of a system, however, there are different types of computational entropy that were considered and tested in order to obtain one that would give an index of signals complexity taking into account the data number of the analysed time series, the computational resources demanded by the method, and the accuracy of the calculation. An algorithm for the generation of fractal time-series with a certain value of β was used for the characterization of the different entropy algorithms. We obtained a significant variation for most of the algorithms in terms of the series size, which could result counterproductive for the study of real signals of different lengths. The chosen method was sample entropy, which shows great independence of the series size. With this method, time series of heart interbeat intervals or tachograms of healthy subjects and patients with congestive heart failure were analysed. The calculation of sample entropy was carried out for 24-hour tachograms and time subseries of 6-hours for sleepiness and wakefulness. The comparison between the two populations shows a significant difference that is accentuated when the patient is sleeping.

  19. Surface chemical analysis and electrokinetic properties of synthetic spherical mixed zinc-cadmium sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, J.D.G.; Guindo, M.C.; Delgado, A.V.; Gonzalez-Caballero, F.

    1997-09-15

    In this work, the authors analyze the surface and bulk chemical composition, as well as the crystal structure, of colloidal spherical particles of Zn-Cd mixed sulfides of different Zn/Cd ratios. Transmission electron microscopy of the particles show that their average diameter ranges from 50--60 nm (when the synthesis is carried out at 50 C) up to 150--200 nm (for a temperature of 70 C). Atomic absorption analysis of the twelve samples obtained indicated that the bulk Zn/Cd ratio increases with aging temperature; the same behavior is found when the concentration of Cd(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} used in the synthesis is decreased. The particles are more oxidized the larger the amount of cadmium on their surface. This is confirmed by electric conductivity determinations in aqueous suspensions of the samples, both in the presence of natural light and in the dark, as a function of time. These data, together with crystal structure determinations by XRD, suggest that, when the growth temperature is 50--60 C, the particles contain a ZnS (sphalerite) nucleus covered by a layer of mixed, hexagonal Zn-CdS and a surface layer of cubic ZnS. When the aging temperature is 70 C, the ZnS core is surrounded by a shell containing cubic ZnS and amorphous CdS. The surface electrical properties of the particles in aqueous suspensions were analyzed by electrophoresis.

  20. Analysis of synthetic diamond single crystals by X-ray topography and double-crystal diffractometry

    SciTech Connect

    Prokhorov, I. A.; Ralchenko, V. G.; Bolshakov, A. P.; Polskiy, A. V.; Vlasov, A. V.; Subbotin, I. A.; Podurets, K. M.; Pashaev, E. M.; Sozontov, E. A.

    2013-12-15

    Structural features of diamond single crystals synthesized under high pressure and homoepitaxial films grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been analyzed by double-crystal X-ray diffractometry and topography. The conditions of a diffraction analysis of diamond crystals using Ge monochromators have been optimized. The main structural defects (dislocations, stacking faults, growth striations, second-phase inclusions, etc.) formed during crystal growth have been revealed. The nitrogen concentration in high-pressure/high-temperature (HPHT) diamond substrates is estimated based on X-ray diffraction data. The formation of dislocation bundles at the film-substrate interface in the epitaxial structures has been revealed by plane-wave topography; these dislocations are likely due to the relaxation of elastic macroscopic stresses caused by the lattice mismatch between the substrate and film. The critical thicknesses of plastic relaxation onset in CVD diamond films are calculated. The experimental techniques for studying the real diamond structure in optimizing crystal-growth technology are proven to be highly efficient.

  1. Synthetic Botany.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Christian R; Pollak, Bernardo; Purswani, Nuri; Patron, Nicola; Haseloff, Jim

    2017-07-05

    Plants are attractive platforms for synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. Plants' modular and plastic body plans, capacity for photosynthesis, extensive secondary metabolism, and agronomic systems for large-scale production make them ideal targets for genetic reprogramming. However, efforts in this area have been constrained by slow growth, long life cycles, the requirement for specialized facilities, a paucity of efficient tools for genetic manipulation, and the complexity of multicellularity. There is a need for better experimental and theoretical frameworks to understand the way genetic networks, cellular populations, and tissue-wide physical processes interact at different scales. We highlight new approaches to the DNA-based manipulation of plants and the use of advanced quantitative imaging techniques in simple plant models such as Marchantia polymorpha. These offer the prospects of improved understanding of plant dynamics and new approaches to rational engineering of plant traits. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  2. Performance comparison of independent component analysis algorithms for fetal cardiac signal reconstruction: a study on synthetic fMCG data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantini, D.; Hild, K. E., II; Alleva, G.; Comani, S.

    2006-02-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms have been successfully used for signal extraction tasks in the field of biomedical signal processing. We studied the performances of six algorithms (FastICA, CubICA, JADE, Infomax, TDSEP and MRMI-SIG) for fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Synthetic datasets were used to check the quality of the separated components against the original traces. Real fMCG recordings were simulated with linear combinations of typical fMCG source signals: maternal and fetal cardiac activity, ambient noise, maternal respiration, sensor spikes and thermal noise. Clusters of different dimensions (19, 36 and 55 sensors) were prepared to represent different MCG systems. Two types of signal-to-interference ratios (SIR) were measured. The first involves averaging over all estimated components and the second is based solely on the fetal trace. The computation time to reach a minimum of 20 dB SIR was measured for all six algorithms. No significant dependency on gestational age or cluster dimension was observed. Infomax performed poorly when a sub-Gaussian source was included; TDSEP and MRMI-SIG were sensitive to additive noise, whereas FastICA, CubICA and JADE showed the best performances. Of all six methods considered, FastICA had the best overall performance in terms of both separation quality and computation times.

  3. Time-series analysis of surface deformation at Brady Hot Springs geothermal field (Nevada) using interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S. T.; Akerley, J.; Baluyut, E. C.; Cardiff, M.; Davatzes, N. C.; Feigl, K. L.; Foxall, W.; Fratta, D.; Mellors, R. J.; Spielman, P.; Wang, H. F.; Zemach, E.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data acquired between 2004 and 2014, by the ERS-2, Envisat, ALOS and TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X satellite missions to measure and characterize time-dependent deformation at the Brady Hot Springs geothermal field in western Nevada due to extraction of fluids. The long axis of the ~4 km by ~1.5 km elliptical subsiding area coincides with the strike of the dominant normal fault system at Brady. Within this bowl of subsidence, the interference pattern shows several smaller features with length scales of the order of ~1 km. This signature occurs consistently in all of the well-correlated interferometric pairs spanning several months. Results from inverse modeling suggest that the deformation is a result of volumetric contraction in shallow units, no deeper than 600 m, likely associated with damaged regions where fault segments mechanically interact. Such damaged zones are expected to extend downward along steeply dipping fault planes, providing a high permeability conduit to the production wells. Using time series analysis, we test the hypothesis that geothermal production drives the observed deformation. We find a good correlation between the observed deformation rate and the rate of production in the shallow wells. We also explore mechanisms that could potentially cause the observed deformation, including thermal contraction of rock, decline in pore pressure and dissolution of minerals over time.

  4. An analysis of dielectric properties of synthetic ballast water at frequencies ranging from 300 to 3000 MHz.

    PubMed

    Boldor, Dorin; Ortego, Jeffrey; Rusch, Kelly A

    2008-01-01

    Ballast water presents an important vector for introduction of aquatic invasive species in the coastal waters around the world. Currently there are no established technologies proven to completely eliminate this problem due to the particularities of the ballasting and de-ballasting operations (extremely large volumes of water, efficiency at destroying macro and micro organisms, environmental issues associated with chemical treatments). Continuous microwave heating presents a potential solution to this problem, but the design of suitable applicators depends on the dielectric properties of the ballast water to be processed. The study presented in this paper is focused on the dielectric properties (dielectric constant--epsilon'; dielectric loss--epsilon") of synthetic ballast water inoculated with four organisms at seven different temperatures in the frequency range of 300 to 3000 MHz. The dielectric properties of the mixtures were determined using a network analyzer and a dielectric probe kit using the open-ended coaxial probe method. Numerical analysis was performed on data collected across all frequencies involved with an emphasis placed on F.C.C. allotted frequencies of 433, 915 and 2450 MHz. The dielectric constant was relatively independent of frequency and the organism used, but it showed a remarkable decrease with temperature. The dielectric loss showed an extreme decrease with increasing frequency, marked differences between the different organisms and between different growth stages of the same organism, and a large relatively linear increase with increasing temperature.

  5. Terahertz Wide-Angle Imaging and Analysis on Plane-wave Criteria Based on Inverse Synthetic Aperture Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jing Kun; Qin, Yu Liang; Deng, Bin; Wang, Hong Qiang; Li, Jin; Li, Xiang

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents two parts of work around terahertz imaging applications. The first part aims at solving the problems occurred with the increasing of the rotation angle. To compensate for the nonlinearity of terahertz radar systems, a calibration signal acquired from a bright target is always used. Generally, this compensation inserts an extra linear phase term in the intermediate frequency (IF) echo signal which is not expected in large-rotation angle imaging applications. We carried out a detailed theoretical analysis on this problem, and a minimum entropy criterion was employed to estimate and compensate for the linear-phase errors. In the second part, the effects of spherical wave on terahertz inverse synthetic aperture imaging are analyzed. Analytic criteria of plane-wave approximation were derived in the cases of different rotation angles. Experimental results of corner reflectors and an aircraft model based on a 330-GHz linear frequency-modulated continuous wave (LFMCW) radar system validated the necessity and effectiveness of the proposed compensation. By comparing the experimental images obtained under plane-wave assumption and spherical-wave correction, it also showed to be highly consistent with the analytic criteria we derived.

  6. Targeted analysis with benchtop quadrupole-orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer: application to determination of synthetic hormones in animal urine.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Rúbies, Antoni; Centrich, Francesc; Granados, Mercè; Cortés-Francisco, Nuria; Caixach, Josep; Companyó, Ramon

    2013-05-30

    Sensitive and unequivocal determination of analytes/contaminants in complex matrices is a challenge in the field of food safety control. In this study, various acquisition modes (Full MS/AIF, Full MS+tMS/MS, Full MS/dd MS/MS and tSIM/ddMS/MS) and parameters of a quadrupole-orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer (Q Exactive) were studied in detail. One of the main conclusions has been that, reducing the scan range for Full MS (using the quadrupole) and targeted modes give higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios and thereby better detection limits for analytes in matrix. The use of Q Exactive in a complex case, for the confirmatory analysis of hormones in animal urine is presented. A targeted SIM data dependent MS/MS (tSIM/ddMS/MS) acquisition method for determination of eight synthetic hormones (trenbolone, 17α ethinylestradiol, zeranol, stanozolol, dienestrol, diethylstilbestrol, hexestrol, taleranol) and a naturally occurring hormone (zearalenone) in animal urine were optimized to have sensitive precursors from targeted SIM mode and trigger MS/MS scans over the entire chromatograph peak. The method was validated according to EC/657/2002. CCα (decision limit) for the analytes ranged between 0.11 μg L(-1) and 0.69 μg L(-1) and CCβ (detection capability) ranged between 0.29 μg L(-1) and 0.90 μg L(-1).

  7. Performance comparison of independent component analysis algorithms for fetal cardiac signal reconstruction: a study on synthetic fMCG data.

    PubMed

    Mantini, D; Hild, K E; Alleva, G; Comani, S

    2006-02-21

    Independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms have been successfully used for signal extraction tasks in the field of biomedical signal processing. We studied the performances of six algorithms (FastICA, CubICA, JADE, Infomax, TDSEP and MRMI-SIG) for fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Synthetic datasets were used to check the quality of the separated components against the original traces. Real fMCG recordings were simulated with linear combinations of typical fMCG source signals: maternal and fetal cardiac activity, ambient noise, maternal respiration, sensor spikes and thermal noise. Clusters of different dimensions (19, 36 and 55 sensors) were prepared to represent different MCG systems. Two types of signal-to-interference ratios (SIR) were measured. The first involves averaging over all estimated components and the second is based solely on the fetal trace. The computation time to reach a minimum of 20 dB SIR was measured for all six algorithms. No significant dependency on gestational age or cluster dimension was observed. Infomax performed poorly when a sub-Gaussian source was included; TDSEP and MRMI-SIG were sensitive to additive noise, whereas FastICA, CubICA and JADE showed the best performances. Of all six methods considered, FastICA had the best overall performance in terms of both separation quality and computation times.

  8. Polarimetric analysis of radar backscatter from ground-based scatterometers and wheat biomass monitoring with advanced synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lei; Tong, Ling; Li, Yuxia; Chen, Yan; Tan, Longfei; Guo, Caizheng

    2016-04-01

    This article presents an analysis of the scattering measurements for an entire wheat growth cycle by ground-based scatterometers at a frequency of 5.3 GHz. Since wheat ears are related to wheat growth and yield, the radar backscatter of wheat was analyzed at two different periods, i.e., with and without wheat ears. Simultaneously, parameters such as wheat and soil characteristics as well as volume scattering and soil scattering were analyzed for the two periods during the entire growth cycle. Wheat ears have been demonstrated to have a great influence on radar backscatter; therefore, a modified version of water-cloud model used for retrieving biomass should consider the effect of wheat ears. This work presents two retrieval models based on the water-cloud model and adopts the advanced integral equation model to simulate the soil backscatter before the heading stage and the backscatter from the layer under wheat ears after the heading stage. The research results showed that the biomass retrieved from the advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) images to agree well with the data measured in situ after setting the modified water-cloud model for the growth stages with ears. Furthermore, it was concluded that wheat ears should form an essential component of theoretical modeling as they influence the final yield.

  9. Simultaneous kinetic spectrophotometric analysis of five synthetic food colorants with the aid of chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yongnian; Wang, Yong; Kokot, Serge

    2009-04-30

    This paper describes a simple and sensitive kinetic spectrophotometric method for the simultaneous determination of Amaranth, Ponceau 4R, Sunset Yellow, Tartrazine and Brilliant Blue in mixtures with the aid of chemometrics. The method involved two coupled reactions, viz. the reduction of iron(III) by the analytes to iron(II) in sodium acetate/hydrochloric acid solution (pH 1.71) and the chromogenic reaction between iron(II) and hexacyanoferrate(III) ions to yield a Prussian blue peak at 760 nm. The spectral data were recorded over the 500-1000 nm wavelength range every 2s for 600 s. The kinetic data were collected at 760 nm and 600 s, and linear calibration models were satisfactorily constructed for each of the dyes with detection limits in the range of 0.04-0.50 mg L(-1). Multivariate calibration models for kinetic data were established and verified for methods such as the Iterative target transform factor analysis (ITTFA), principal component regression (PCR), partial least squares (PLS), and principal component-radial basis function-artificial neural network (PC-RBF-ANN) with and without wavelet packet transform (WPT) pre-treatment. The PC-RBF-ANN with WPT calibration performed somewhat better than others on the basis of the %RPE(T) (approximately 9) and %Recovery parameters (approximately 108), although the effect of the WPT pre-treatment was marginal (approximately 0.5% RPE(T)). The proposed method was applied for the simultaneous determination of the five colorants in foodstuff samples, and the results were comparable with those from a reference HPLC method.

  10. Synthetic Analysis for Extracting Information on Soil Salinity Using Remote Sensing and GIS: A Case Study of Yanggao Basin in China

    PubMed

    Peng

    1998-01-01

    / This paper reports the experience of extracting information on the salinity of soil and offers a method of synthetic analysis. The experimental areas for analysis are located in Yanggao Basin, Shanxi Province, China. The types of soil are mainly meadow soil and salinized meadow soil. The method of synthetic analysis of salinity uses a geographic information system (GIS) as a tool, building a basic saltwater analysis model of saline soil and adjusting the result with expert experience after computer processing. The method of feature extraction has been used for remotely sensed data. An optimum combination of features has been determined and, after comparing several combinations in the Yanggao region, an improved result has been obtained after Kauth-Thomas (K-T) transformation. For precise quantitative analysis of the salinization, not only Thematic Mapper (TM) remote sensing data, but also two forms of non-remote-sensing data are needed: depth of groundwater and mineralization rate of groundwater according to the theory of genesis of soil. For the analysis of synthetic compounded multisources, a generalized Bayes classification is used after overlay, matching, and related coefficients have been determined. On the premise that various information sources are independent, global membership functions with probability are used to combine various pieces of information in order to apply them directly to the pixels and classifications of soil salinity. The experiment indicates that this analytical method is sound because of the increased speed of processing and its simplicity and improved precision of classification of salinity. Finally, it is necessary to examine and adjust the factors using expert intelligence. The experiment shows that synthetic analysis using the geographic information system can raise the precision of quantitative analysis of salinity, which has advantages for environmental monitoring and management.KEY WORDS: Salinity; Remote sensing; Thematic

  11. Habitat mapping of the Brazilian Pantanal using synthetic aperture radar imagery and object based image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Teresa Lynne

    for both fine and medium resolution classifications related to issues of 1) scale of habitats, for instance, capoes, cordilheiras, and lakes, in relation to spatial resolution of the imagery, and 2) issues relating to variable flooding patterns in the subregion, and 3) arbitrary class membership rules. The 50 m spatial resolution classification of the entire Pantanal wetland resulted in an overall accuracy of 80%, and defined ten land cover classes. Given the analysis of the comparison of fine and relatively medium spatial resolution classifications of the Lower Nhecolândia subregion, I conclude that significant improvements in accuracy can be achieved with the finer spatial resolution dataset, particularly in subregions with high spatial heterogeneity in land cover. The produced habitat spatial distribution maps will provide vital information for determining refuge zones for terrestrial species, connectivity of aquatic habitats during the dry season, and crucial baseline data to aid in monitoring changes in the region, as well as to help define conservation strategies for habitat in this critically important wetland.

  12. Lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millson, Charles E.; Wilson, Michael; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Thurrell, Wendy; Mlkvy, Peter; Davies, Claire; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is associated with a large number of gastroduodenal disorders. Clearance of the bacteria has been shown to benefit patients with duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers, and certain rare types of gastric tumors. Broad-spectrum antibiotics are the mainstay of current treatment strategies but side-effects, poor compliance, and drug resistance limit their usefulness. We sensitized H. pylori with toluidine blue, haematoporphyrin derivative, aluminum disulphonated phthalocyanine, methylene blue or protoporphyrin IX prior to exposure to low-power laser light from either a gallium aluminum arsenide laser or a helium neon gas laser. All 5 sensitizers caused reductions of greater than 1000-fold in the number of viable bacteria. Light alone had no effect and only HpD caused a significant decrease in bacterial numbers without laser light. Next, we sensitized H. mustelae on explanted ferret gastric mucosa (ex vivo) with the same sensitizers and exposed them to light from a copper vapor pumped dye laser tuned appropriately. MB caused significant reductions in bacterial counts. Successful lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter pylori both in vitro and ex vivo raises the possibility of a local method for eradicating the bacteria, especially as the bacteria are only found in those parts of the upper gastrointestinal tract that are accessible to the endoscope.

  13. Lethal entanglement in baleen whales.

    PubMed

    Cassoff, Rachel M; Moore, Kathleen M; McLellan, William A; Barco, Susan G; Rotsteins, David S; Moore, Michael J

    2011-10-06

    Understanding the scenarios whereby fishing gear entanglement of large whales induces mortality is important for the development of mitigation strategies. Here we present a series of 21 cases involving 4 species of baleen whales in the NW Atlantic, describing the available sighting history, necropsy observations, and subsequent data analyses that enabled the compilation of the manners in which entanglement can be lethal. The single acute cause of entanglement mortality identified was drowning from entanglement involving multiple body parts, with the animal's inability to surface. More protracted causes of death included impaired foraging during entanglement, resulting in starvation after many months; systemic infection arising from open, unresolved entanglement wounds; and hemorrhage or debilitation due to severe gear-related damage to tissues. Serious gear-induced injury can include laceration of large vessels, occlusion of the nares, embedding of line in growing bone, and massive periosteal proliferation of new bone in an attempt to wall off constricting, encircling lines. These data show that baleen whale entanglement is not only a major issue for the conservation of some baleen whale populations, but is also a major concern for the welfare of each affected individual.

  14. Comprehensive Proteomic Analysis of Spider Dragline Silk from Black Widows: A Recipe to Build Synthetic Silk Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Larracas, Camille; Hekman, Ryan; Dyrness, Simmone; Arata, Alisa; Williams, Caroline; Crawford, Taylor; Vierra, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    The outstanding material properties of spider dragline silk fibers have been attributed to two spidroins, major ampullate spidroins 1 and 2 (MaSp1 and MaSp2). Although dragline silk fibers have been treated with different chemical solvents to elucidate the relationship between protein structure and fiber mechanics, there has not been a comprehensive proteomic analysis of the major ampullate (MA) gland, its spinning dope, and dragline silk using a wide range of chaotropic agents, inorganic salts, and fluorinated alcohols to elucidate their complete molecular constituents. In these studies, we perform in-solution tryptic digestions of solubilized MA glands, spinning dope and dragline silk fibers using five different solvents, followed by nano liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis with an Orbitrap Fusion™ Tribrid™. To improve protein identification, we employed three different tryptic peptide fragmentation modes, which included collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and high energy collision dissociation (HCD) to discover proteins involved in the silk assembly pathway and silk fiber. In addition to MaSp1 and MaSp2, we confirmed the presence of a third spidroin, aciniform spidroin 1 (AcSp1), widely recognized as the major constituent of wrapping silk, as a product of dragline silk. Our findings also reveal that MA glands, spinning dope, and dragline silk contain at least seven common proteins: three members of the Cysteine-Rich Protein Family (CRP1, CRP2 and CRP4), cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP3), fasciclin and two uncharacterized proteins. In summary, this study provides a proteomic blueprint to construct synthetic silk fibers that most closely mimic natural fibers. PMID:27649139

  15. Comprehensive Proteomic Analysis of Spider Dragline Silk from Black Widows: A Recipe to Build Synthetic Silk Fibers.

    PubMed

    Larracas, Camille; Hekman, Ryan; Dyrness, Simmone; Arata, Alisa; Williams, Caroline; Crawford, Taylor; Vierra, Craig A

    2016-09-13

    The outstanding material properties of spider dragline silk fibers have been attributed to two spidroins, major ampullate spidroins 1 and 2 (MaSp1 and MaSp2). Although dragline silk fibers have been treated with different chemical solvents to elucidate the relationship between protein structure and fiber mechanics, there has not been a comprehensive proteomic analysis of the major ampullate (MA) gland, its spinning dope, and dragline silk using a wide range of chaotropic agents, inorganic salts, and fluorinated alcohols to elucidate their complete molecular constituents. In these studies, we perform in-solution tryptic digestions of solubilized MA glands, spinning dope and dragline silk fibers using five different solvents, followed by nano liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis with an Orbitrap Fusion™ Tribrid™. To improve protein identification, we employed three different tryptic peptide fragmentation modes, which included collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and high energy collision dissociation (HCD) to discover proteins involved in the silk assembly pathway and silk fiber. In addition to MaSp1 and MaSp2, we confirmed the presence of a third spidroin, aciniform spidroin 1 (AcSp1), widely recognized as the major constituent of wrapping silk, as a product of dragline silk. Our findings also reveal that MA glands, spinning dope, and dragline silk contain at least seven common proteins: three members of the Cysteine-Rich Protein Family (CRP1, CRP2 and CRP4), cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP3), fasciclin and two uncharacterized proteins. In summary, this study provides a proteomic blueprint to construct synthetic silk fibers that most closely mimic natural fibers.

  16. In situ X-ray pair distribution function analysis of accelerated carbonation of a synthetic calcium-silicate-hydrate gel

    SciTech Connect

    Morandeau, Antoine E.; White, Claire E.

    2015-04-21

    Calcium–silicate–hydrate (C–S–H) gel is the main binder component in hydrated ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste, and is known to play a crucial role in the carbonation of cementitious materials, especially for more sustainable alternatives containing supplementary cementitious materials. However, the exact atomic structural changes that occur during carbonation of C–S–H gel remain unknown. Here, we investigate the local atomic structural changes that occur during carbonation of a synthetic calcium–silicate–hydrate gel exposed to pure CO₂ vapour, using in situ X-ray total scattering measurements and subsequent pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. By analysing both the reciprocal and real-space scattering data as the C–S–H carbonation reaction progresses, all phases present during the reaction (crystalline and non-crystalline) have been identified and quantified, with the results revealing the emergence of several polymorphs of crystalline calcium carbonate (vaterite and calcite) in addition to the decalcified C–S–H gel. Furthermore, the results point toward residual calcium being present in the amorphous decalcified gel, potentially in the form of an amorphous calcium carbonate phase. As a result of the quantification process, the reaction kinetics for the evolution of the individual phases have been obtained, revealing new information on the rate of growth/dissolution for each phase associated with C–S–H gel carbonation. Moreover, the investigation reveals that the use of real space diffraction data in the form of PDFs enables more accurate determination of the phases that develop during complex reaction processes such as C–S–H gel carbonation in comparison to the conventional reciprocal space Rietveld analysis approach.

  17. Capabilities and limitations of direct analysis in real time orbitrap mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of synthetic and natural polymers.

    PubMed

    Bridoux, Maxime C; Machuron-Mandard, Xavier

    2013-09-30

    Despite the widespread use of direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS), its capabilities in terms of accessible mass range and the types of polymers that can be analysed are not well known. The goal of this work was to evaluate the capabilities and limitations of this ionization technique combined with orbitrap mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry, for the characterization (structural and polydispersity metrics) of various synthetic and natural polymers. The capabilities and limitations of DART-MS (and -MS(2)), using an orbitrap mass spectrometer, for polymer