Science.gov

Sample records for synuclein induced alterations

  1. Increased lipolysis and altered lipid homeostasis protect y-synuclein null mutant mice from diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synucleins are a family of homologous proteins principally known for their involvement in neurodegeneration. In neurons a-synuclein promotes assembly of SNARE complexes required for fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane during neurotransmitter release. Y-synuclein is highly expressed ...

  2. Chronic administration of cholesterol oximes in mice increases transcription of cytoprotective genes and improves transcriptome alterations induced by alpha-synuclein overexpression in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Franziska; Gao, Fuying; Medvedeva, Vera; Lee, Patrick; Bove, Nicholas; Fleming, Sheila M.; Michaud, Magali; Lemesre, Vincent; Patassini, Stefano; De La Rosa, Krystal; Mulligan, Caitlin K.; Sioshansi, Pedrom; Zhu, Chunni; Coppola, Giovanni; Bordet, Thierry; Pruss, Rebecca; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol-oximes TRO19622 and TRO40303 target outer mitochondrial membrane proteins and have beneficial effects in preclinical models of neurodegenerative diseases leading to their advancement to clinical trials. Dopaminergic neurons degenerate in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and are prone to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. In order to provide insights into the neuroprotective potential of TRO19622 and TRO40303 for dopaminergic neurons in vivo, we assessed their effects on gene expression in laser captured nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons of wildtype mice and of mice that over-express alpha-synuclein, a protein involved in both familial and sporadic forms of PD (Thy1-aSyn mice). Young mice were fed the drugs in food pellets or a control diet from 1 to 4 months of age, approximately 10 months before the appearance of striatal dopamine loss in this model. Unbiased weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) of transcriptional changes revealed effects of cholesterol oximes on transcripts related to mitochondria, cytoprotection and anti-oxidant response in wild-type and transgenic mice, including increased transcription of stress defense (e.g. Prdx1, Prdx2, Glrx2, Hspa9, Pink1, Drp1, Trak1) and dopamine-related (Th, Ddc, Gch1, Dat, Vmat2, Drd2, Chnr6a) genes. Even at this young age transgenic mice showed alterations in transcripts implicated in mitochondrial function and oxidative stress (e.g. Bcl-2, Bax, Casp3, Nos2), and both drugs normalized about 20% of these alterations. Young Thy1-aSyn mice exhibit motor deficits that differ from parkinsonism and are established before the onset of treatment; these deficits were not improved by cholesterol oximes. However, high doses of TRO40303 improved olfaction and produced the same effects as dopamine agonists on a challenging beam test, specifically an increase in footslips, an observation congruent with its effects on transcripts involved in dopamine synthesis. High doses of TRO19622 increased

  3. Rab7 induces clearance of α-synuclein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Dinter, Elisabeth; Saridaki, Theodora; Nippold, Markus; Plum, Sarah; Diederichs, Leonie; Komnig, Daniel; Fensky, Luisa; May, Caroline; Marcus, Katrin; Voigt, Aaron; Schulz, Jörg B; Falkenburger, Björn H

    2016-09-01

    Parkinson's disease can be caused by mutations in the α-synuclein gene and is characterized by aggregates of α-synuclein protein. Aggregates are degraded by the autophago-lysosomal pathway. Since Rab7 has been shown to regulate trafficking of late endosomes and autophagosomes, we hypothesized that over-expressing Rab7 might be beneficial in Parkinson's disease. To test this hypothesis, we expressed the pathogenic A53T mutant of α-synuclein in HEK293 cells and Drosophila melanogaster. In HEK293 cells, EGFP-Rab7-decorated vesicles contain α-synuclein. Rab7 over-expression reduced the percentage of cells with α-synuclein particles and the amount of α-synuclein protein. Time-lapse microscopy confirmed that particles frequently disappeared with Rab7 over-expression. Clearance of α-synuclein is explained by the increased occurrence of acidified α-synuclein vesicles with Rab7 over-expression, presumably representing autolysosomes. Rab7 over-expression reduced apoptosis and the percentage of dead cells in trypan blue staining. In the fly model, Rab7 rescued the locomotor deficit induced by neuronal expression of A53T-α-synuclein. These beneficial effects were not produced by Rab7 missense mutations causing Charcot Marie Tooth neuropathy, or by the related GTPases Rab5, Rab9, or Rab23. Using mass spectrometry, we identified Rab7 in neuromelanin granules purified from human substantia nigra, indicating that Rab7 might be involved in the biogenesis of these possibly protective, autophagosome-like organelles in dopaminergic neurons. Taken together, Rab7 increased the clearance of α-synuclein aggregates, reduced cell death, and rescued the phenotype in a fly model of Parkinson's disease. These findings indicate that Rab7 is rate-limiting for aggregate clearance, and that Rab7 activation may offer a therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's disease. Cells over-expressing aggregation-prone A53T alpha-synuclein develop cytoplasmic aggregates mimicking changes observed in

  4. Ca2+ is a key factor in α-synuclein-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Angelova, Plamena R.; Ludtmann, Marthe H. R.; Horrocks, Mathew H.; Negoda, Alexander; Cremades, Nunilo; Klenerman, David; Dobson, Christopher M.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Pavlov, Evgeny V.; Gandhi, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aggregation of α-synuclein leads to the formation of oligomeric intermediates that can interact with membranes to form pores. However, it is unknown how this leads to cell toxicity in Parkinson's disease. We investigated the species-specific effects of α-synuclein on Ca2+ signalling in primary neurons and astrocytes using live neuronal imaging and electrophysiology on artificial membranes. We demonstrate that α-synuclein induces an increase in basal intracellular Ca2+ in its unfolded monomeric state as well as in its oligomeric state. Electrophysiology of artificial membranes demonstrated that α-synuclein monomers induce irregular ionic currents, whereas α-synuclein oligomers induce rare discrete channel formation events. Despite the ability of monomeric α-synuclein to affect Ca2+ signalling, it is only the oligomeric form of α-synuclein that induces cell death. Oligomer-induced cell death was abolished by the exclusion of extracellular Ca2+, which prevented the α-synuclein-induced Ca2+ dysregulation. The findings of this study confirm that α-synuclein interacts with membranes to affect Ca2+ signalling in a structure-specific manner and the oligomeric β-sheet-rich α-synuclein species ultimately leads to Ca2+ dysregulation and Ca2+-dependent cell death. PMID:26989132

  5. Depressive-like phenotype induced by AAV-mediated overexpression of human α-synuclein in midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Caudal, D; Alvarsson, A; Björklund, A; Svenningsson, P

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and by the presence of aggregates containing α-synuclein called Lewy bodies. Viral vector-induced overexpression of α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons represents a model of PD which recapitulates disease progression better than commonly used neurotoxin models. Previous studies using this model have reported motor and cognitive impairments, whereas depression, mood and anxiety phenotypes are less described. To investigate these psychiatric phenotypes, Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral injections of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing human α-synuclein or GFP into the substantia nigra pars compacta. Behavior was assessed at two timepoints: 3 and 8 weeks post-injection. We report that nigral α-synuclein overexpression led to a pronounced nigral dopaminergic cell loss accompanied by a smaller cell loss in the ventral tegmental area, and to a decreased striatal density of dopaminergic fibers. The AAV-α-synuclein group exhibited modest, but significant motor impairments 8 weeks after vector administration. The AAV-α-synuclein group displayed depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test after 3 weeks, and reduced sucrose preference at week 8. At both timepoints, overexpression of α-synuclein was linked to a hyperactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation of corticosterone. The depressive-like phenotype was also correlated with decreased nigral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and spinophilin levels, and with decreased striatal levels of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein. This study demonstrates that AAV-mediated α-synuclein overexpression in dopamine neurons is not only useful to model motor impairments of PD, but also depression. This study also provides evidence that depression in experimental Parkinsonism is correlated to dysregulation of the HPA axis and to

  6. Alteration of dynein function affects α-synuclein degradation via the autophagosome-lysosome pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Da; Shi, Ji-Jun; Mao, Cheng-Jie; Liu, Sha; Wang, Jian-Da; Chen, Jing; Wang, Fen; Yang, Ya-Ping; Hu, Wei-Dong; Hu, Li-Fang; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2013-12-13

    Growing evidence suggests that dynein dysfunction may be implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. It plays a central role in aggresome formation, the delivery of autophagosome to lysosome for fusion and degradation, which is a pro-survival mechanism essential for the bulk degradation of misfolded proteins and damaged organells. Previous studies reported that dynein dysfuntion was associated with aberrant aggregation of α-synuclein, which is a major component of inclusion bodies in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, it remains unclear what roles dynein plays in α-synuclein degradation. Our study demonstrated a decrease of dynein expression in neurotoxin-induced PD models in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by an increase of α-synuclein protein level. Dynein down-regulation induced by siRNA resulted in a prolonged half-life of α-synuclein and its over-accumulation in A53T overexpressing PC12 cells. Dynein knockdown also prompted the increase of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3-II) and sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, p62) expression, and the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles. Moreover, dynein suppression impaired the autophagosome fusion with lysosome. In summary, our findings indicate that dynein is critical for the clearance of aberrant α-synuclein via autophagosome-lysosome pathway.

  7. Inhibition of Calpain Prevents Manganese-Induced Cell Injury and Alpha-Synuclein Oligomerization in Organotypic Brain Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Liu, Wei; Deng, Yu; Yang, Tian-Yao; Feng, Shu; Xu, Zhao-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Overexposure to manganese has been known to promote alpha-synuclein oligomerization and enhance cellular toxicity. However, the exact mechanism of Mn-induced alpha-synuclein oligomerization is unclear. To explore whether alpha-synuclein oligomerization was associated with the cleavage of alpha-synuclein by calpain, we made a rat brain slice model of manganism and pretreated slices with calpain inhibitor II, a cell-permeable peptide that restricts the activity of calpain. After slices were treated with 400 μM Mn for 24 h, there were significant increases in the percentage of apoptotic cells, lactate dehydrogenase release, intracellular [Ca2+]i, calpain activity, and the mRNA and protein expression of calpain 1 and alpha-synuclein. Moreover, the number of C- and N-terminal fragments of alpha-synuclein and the amount of alpha-synuclein oligomerization also increased. These results also showed that calpain inhibitor II pretreatment could reduce Mn-induced nerve cell injury and alpha-synuclein oligomerization. Additionally, there was a significant decrease in the number of C- and N-terminal fragments of alpha-synuclein in calpain inhibitor II-pretreated slices. These findings revealed that Mn induced the cleavage of alpha-synuclein protein via overactivation of calpain and subsequent alpha-synuclein oligomerization in cultured slices. Moreover, the cleavage of alpha-synuclein by calpain 1 is an important signaling event in Mn-induced alpha-synuclein oligomerization. PMID:25756858

  8. Overexpression of alpha-synuclein at non-toxic levels increases dopaminergic cell death induced by copper exposure via modulation of protein degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Bohovych, Iryna; Griggs, Amy M; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Reyes-Reyes, Elsa M; Seravalli, Javier; Stanciu, Lia A; Lee, Jaekwon; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Franco, Rodrigo

    2015-09-01

    Gene multiplications or point mutations in alpha (α)-synuclein are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). An increase in copper (Cu) levels has been reported in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of PD patients, while occupational exposure to Cu has been suggested to augment the risk to develop PD. We aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which α-synuclein and Cu regulate dopaminergic cell death. Short-term overexpression of wild type (WT) or mutant A53T α-synuclein had no toxic effect in human dopaminergic cells and primary midbrain cultures, but it exerted a synergistic effect on Cu-induced cell death. Cell death induced by Cu was potentiated by overexpression of the Cu transporter protein 1 (Ctr1) and depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) indicating that the toxic effects of Cu are linked to alterations in its intracellular homeostasis. Using the redox sensor roGFP, we demonstrated that Cu-induced oxidative stress was primarily localized in the cytosol and not in the mitochondria. However, α-synuclein overexpression had no effect on Cu-induced oxidative stress. WT or A53T α-synuclein overexpression exacerbated Cu toxicity in dopaminergic and yeast cells in the absence of α-synuclein aggregation. Cu increased autophagic flux and protein ubiquitination. Impairment of autophagy by overexpression of a dominant negative Atg5 form or inhibition of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) with MG132 enhanced Cu-induced cell death. However, only inhibition of the UPS stimulated the synergistic toxic effects of Cu and α-synuclein overexpression. Our results demonstrate that α-synuclein stimulates Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells independent from its aggregation via modulation of protein degradation pathways.

  9. Overexpression of alpha-synuclein at non-toxic levels increases dopaminergic cell death induced by copper exposure via modulation of protein degradation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Bohovych, Iryna; Griggs, Amy M.; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Reyes-Reyes, Elsa M.; Seravalli, Javier; Stanciu, Lia A.; Lee, Jaekwon; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Franco, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Gene multiplications or point mutations in alpha (α)-synuclein are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). An increase in copper (Cu) levels has been reported in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of PD patients, while occupational exposure to Cu has been suggested to augment the risk to develop PD. We aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which α-synuclein and Cu regulate dopaminergic cell death. Short-term overexpression of WT or A53T α-synuclein had no toxic effect in human dopaminergic cells and primary midbrain cultures, but it exerted a synergistic effect on Cu-induced cell death. Cell death induced by Cu was potentiated by overexpression of the Cu transporter protein 1 (Ctr1) and depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) indicating that the toxic effects of Cu are linked to alterations in its intracellular homeostasis. Using the redox sensor roGFP, we demonstrated that Cu-induced oxidative stress was primarily localized in the cytosol and not in the mitochondria. However, α-synuclein overexpression had no effect on Cu-induced oxidative stress. WT or A53T α-synuclein overexpression exacerbated Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells and yeast in the absence of α-synuclein aggregation. Cu increased autophagic flux and protein ubiquitination. Impairment of autophagy by overexpression of a dominant negative Atg5 form or inhibition of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) with MG132 enhanced Cu-induced cell death. However, only inhibition of the UPS stimulated the synergistic toxic effects of Cu and α-synuclein overexpression. Our results demonstrate that α-synuclein stimulates Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells independent from its aggregation via modulation of protein degradation pathways. PMID:25497688

  10. Bcl-2 homologue Debcl enhances α-synuclein-induced phenotypes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Parkinson disease (PD) is a debilitating movement disorder that afflicts 1–2% of the population over 50 years of age. The common hallmark for both sporadic and familial forms of PD is mitochondrial dysfunction. Mammals have at least twenty proapoptotic and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members, in contrast, only two Bcl-2 family genes have been identified in Drosophila melanogaster, the proapoptotic mitochondrial localized Debcl and the antiapoptotic Buffy. The expression of the human transgene α-synuclein, a gene that is strongly associated with inherited forms of PD, in dopaminergic neurons (DA) of Drosophila, results in loss of neurons and locomotor dysfunction to model PD in flies. The altered expression of Debcl in the DA neurons and neuron-rich eye and along with the expression of α-synuclein offers an opportunity to highlight the role of Debcl in mitochondrial-dependent neuronal degeneration and death. Results The directed overexpression of Debcl using the Ddc-Gal4 transgene in the DA of Drosophila resulted in flies with severely decreased survival and a premature age-dependent loss in climbing ability. The inhibition of Debcl resulted in enhanced survival and improved climbing ability whereas the overexpression of Debcl in the α-synuclein-induced Drosophila model of PD resulted in more severe phenotypes. In addition, the co-expression of Debcl along with Buffy partially counteracts the Debcl-induced phenotypes, to improve the lifespan and the associated loss of locomotor ability observed. In complementary experiments, the overexpression of Debcl along with the expression of α-synuclein in the eye, enhanced the eye ablation that results from the overexpression of Debcl. The co-expression of Buffy along with Debcl overexpression results in the rescue of the moderate developmental eye defects. The co-expression of Buffy along with inhibition of Debcl partially restores the eye to a roughened eye phenotype. Discussion The overexpression of Debcl

  11. Bcl-2 homologue Debcl enhances α-synuclein-induced phenotypes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Parkinson disease (PD) is a debilitating movement disorder that afflicts 1–2% of the population over 50 years of age. The common hallmark for both sporadic and familial forms of PD is mitochondrial dysfunction. Mammals have at least twenty proapoptotic and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members, in contrast, only two Bcl-2 family genes have been identified in Drosophila melanogaster, the proapoptotic mitochondrial localized Debcl and the antiapoptotic Buffy. The expression of the human transgene α-synuclein, a gene that is strongly associated with inherited forms of PD, in dopaminergic neurons (DA) of Drosophila, results in loss of neurons and locomotor dysfunction to model PD in flies. The altered expression of Debcl in the DA neurons and neuron-rich eye and along with the expression of α-synuclein offers an opportunity to highlight the role of Debcl in mitochondrial-dependent neuronal degeneration and death. Results The directed overexpression of Debcl using the Ddc-Gal4 transgene in the DA of Drosophila resulted in flies with severely decreased survival and a premature age-dependent loss in climbing ability. The inhibition of Debcl resulted in enhanced survival and improved climbing ability whereas the overexpression of Debcl in the α-synuclein-induced Drosophila model of PD resulted in more severe phenotypes. In addition, the co-expression of Debcl along with Buffy partially counteracts the Debcl-induced phenotypes, to improve the lifespan and the associated loss of locomotor ability observed. In complementary experiments, the overexpression of Debcl along with the expression of α-synuclein in the eye, enhanced the eye ablation that results from the overexpression of Debcl. The co-expression of Buffy along with Debcl overexpression results in the rescue of the moderate developmental eye defects. The co-expression of Buffy along with inhibition of Debcl partially restores the eye to a roughened eye phenotype. Discussion The overexpression of Debcl

  12. Exogenous Alpha-Synuclein Alters Pre- and Post-Synaptic Activity by Fragmenting Lipid Rafts.

    PubMed

    Emanuele, Marco; Esposito, Alessandro; Camerini, Serena; Antonucci, Flavia; Ferrara, Silvia; Seghezza, Silvia; Catelani, Tiziano; Crescenzi, Marco; Marotta, Roberto; Canale, Claudio; Matteoli, Michela; Menna, Elisabetta; Chieregatti, Evelina

    2016-05-01

    Alpha-synuclein (αSyn) interferes with multiple steps of synaptic activity at pre-and post-synaptic terminals, however the mechanism/s by which αSyn alters neurotransmitter release and synaptic potentiation is unclear. By atomic force microscopy we show that human αSyn, when incubated with reconstituted membrane bilayer, induces lipid rafts' fragmentation. As a consequence, ion channels and receptors are displaced from lipid rafts with consequent changes in their activity. The enhanced calcium entry leads to acute mobilization of synaptic vesicles, and exhaustion of neurotransmission at later stages. At the post-synaptic terminal, an acute increase in glutamatergic transmission, with increased density of PSD-95 puncta, is followed by disruption of the interaction between N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and PSD-95 with ensuing decrease of long term potentiation. While cholesterol loading prevents the acute effect of αSyn at the presynapse; inhibition of casein kinase 2, which appears activated by reduction of cholesterol, restores the correct localization and clustering of NMDARs.

  13. Combinational losses of synucleins reveal their differential requirements for compensating age-dependent alterations in motor behavior and dopamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Connor-Robson, Natalie; Peters, Owen M; Millership, Steven; Ninkina, Natalia; Buchman, Vladimir L

    2016-10-01

    Synucleins are involved in multiple steps of the neurotransmitter turnover, but the largely normal synaptic function in young adult animals completely lacking synucleins suggests their roles are dispensable for execution of these processes. Instead, they may be utilized for boosting the efficiency of certain molecular mechanisms in presynaptic terminals, with a deficiency of synuclein proteins sensitizing to or exacerbating synaptic malfunction caused by accumulation of mild alterations, which are commonly associated with aging. Although functional redundancy within the family has been reported, it is unclear whether the remaining synucleins can fully compensate for the deficiency of a lost family member or whether some functions are specific for a particular member. We assessed several structural and functional characteristics of the nigrostriatal system of mice lacking members of the synuclein family in every possible combination and demonstrated that stabilization of the striatal dopamine level depends on the presence of α-synuclein and cannot be compensated by other family members, whereas β-synuclein is required for efficient maintenance of animal's balance and coordination in old age. PMID:27614017

  14. Mutations associated with familial Parkinson’s disease alter the initiation and amplification steps of α-synuclein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Vendruscolo, Michele; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Buell, Alexander K.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a highly debilitating neurodegenerative condition whose pathological hallmark is the presence in nerve cells of proteinacious deposits, known as Lewy bodies, composed primarily of amyloid fibrils of α-synuclein. Several missense mutations in the gene encoding α-synuclein have been associated with familial variants of Parkinson’s disease and have been shown to affect the kinetics of the aggregation of the protein. Using a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches, we present a systematic in vitro study of the influence of disease-associated single-point mutations on the individual processes involved in α-synuclein aggregation into amyloid fibrils. We find that lipid-induced fibril production and surface catalyzed fibril amplification are the processes most strongly affected by these mutations and show that familial mutations can induce dramatic changes in the crucial processes thought to be associated with the initiation and spreading of the aggregation of α-synuclein. PMID:27573854

  15. Number and Brightness analysis of alpha-synuclein oligomerization and the associated mitochondrial morphology alterations in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Plotegher, N.; Gratton, E.; Bubacco, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alpha-synuclein oligomerization is associated to Parkinson's disease etiopathogenesis. The study of alpha-synuclein oligomerization properties in live cell and the definition of their effects on cellular viability are among fields expected to provide the knowledge required to unravel the mechanism(s) of toxicity that lead to the disease. Methods We used Number and Brightness method, which is a method based on fluorescence fluctuation analysis, to monitor alpha-synuclein tagged with EGFP aggregation in living SH-SY5Y cells. The presence of alpha-synuclein oligomers detected with this method was associated with intracellular structure conditions, evaluated by fluorescence confocal imaging. Results Cells overexpressing alpha-synuclein-EGFP present a heterogeneous ensemble of oligomers constituted by less than 10 monomers, when the protein approaches a threshold concentration value of about 90 nM in the cell cytoplasm. We show that the oligomeric species are partially sequestered by lysosomes and that the mitochondria morphology is altered in cells presenting oligomers, suggesting that these mitochondria may be dysfunctional. Conclusions We showed that alpha-synuclein overexpression in SH-SY5Y causes the formation of alpha-synuclein oligomeric species, whose presence is associated with mitochondrial fragmentation and autophagic-lysosomal pathway activation in live cells. General significance The unique capability provided by the Number and Brightness analysis to study alpha-synuclein oligomers distribution and properties, and the study their association to intracellular components in single live cells is important to forward our understanding of the molecular mechanisms Parkinson’s disease and it may be of general significance when applied to the study of other aggregating proteins in cellular models. PMID:24561157

  16. α-Synuclein-induced myelination deficit defines a novel interventional target for multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ettle, Benjamin; Kerman, Bilal E; Valera, Elvira; Gillmann, Clarissa; Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Reiprich, Simone; Büttner, Christian; Ekici, Arif B; Reis, André; Wegner, Michael; Bäuerle, Tobias; Riemenschneider, Markus J; Masliah, Eliezer; Gage, Fred H; Winkler, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare atypical parkinsonian disorder characterized by a rapidly progressing clinical course and at present without any efficient therapy. Neuropathologically, myelin loss and neurodegeneration are associated with α-synuclein accumulation in oligodendrocytes, but underlying pathomechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the impact of oligodendrocytic α-synuclein on the formation of myelin sheaths to define a potential interventional target for MSA. Post-mortem analyses of MSA patients and controls were performed to quantify myelin and oligodendrocyte numbers. As pre-clinical models, we used transgenic MSA mice, a myelinating stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte-neuron co-culture, and primary oligodendrocytes to determine functional consequences of oligodendrocytic α-synuclein overexpression on myelination. We detected myelin loss accompanied by preserved or even increased numbers of oligodendrocytes in post-mortem MSA brains or transgenic mouse forebrains, respectively, indicating an oligodendrocytic dysfunction in myelin formation. Corroborating this observation, overexpression of α-synuclein in primary and stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes severely impaired myelin formation, defining a novel α-synuclein-linked pathomechanism in MSA. We used the pro-myelinating activity of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist benztropine to analyze the reversibility of the myelination deficit. Transcriptome profiling of primary pre-myelinating oligodendrocytes demonstrated that benztropine readjusts myelination-related processes such as cholesterol and membrane biogenesis, being compromised by oligodendrocytic α-synuclein. Additionally, benztropine restored the α-synuclein-induced myelination deficit of stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes. Strikingly, benztropine also ameliorated the myelin deficit in transgenic MSA mice, resulting in a prevention of neuronal cell loss. In conclusion, this study defines the α-synuclein-induced

  17. Nascent histamine induces α-synuclein and caspase-3 on human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Caro-Astorga, Joaquín; Fajardo, Ignacio; Ruiz-Pérez, María Victoria; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Urdiales, José Luis

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Nascent histamine alters cyclin expression pattern. • Nascent histamine increases expression of α-synuclein. • Nascent histamine activates caspase-3. - Abstract: Histamine (Hia) is the most multifunctional biogenic amine. It is synthetized by histidine decarboxylase (HDC) in a reduced set of mammalian cell types. Mast cells and histaminergic neurons store Hia in specialized organelles until the amine is extruded by exocytosis; however, other immune and cancer cells are able to produce but not store Hia. The intracellular effects of Hia are still not well characterized, in spite of its physiopathological relevance. Multiple functional relationships exist among Hia metabolism/signaling elements and those of other biogenic amines, including growth-related polyamines. Previously, we obtained the first insights for an inhibitory effect of newly synthetized Hia on both growth-related polyamine biosynthesis and cell cycle progression of non-fully differentiated mammalian cells. In this work, we describe progress in this line. HEK293 cells were transfected to express active and inactive versions of GFP-human HDC fusion proteins and, after cell sorting by flow cytometry, the relative expression of a large number of proteins associated with cell signaling were measured using an antibody microarray. Experimental results were analyzed in terms of protein–protein and functional interaction networks. Expression of active HDC induced a cell cycle arrest through the alteration of the levels of several proteins such as cyclin D1, cdk6, cdk7 and cyclin A. Regulation of α-synuclein and caspase-3 was also observed. The analyses provide new clues on the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulatory effects of intracellular newly synthetized Hia on cell proliferation/survival, cell trafficking and protein turnover. This information is especially interesting for emergent and orphan immune and neuroinflammatory diseases.

  18. Network Analysis Implicates Alpha-Synuclein (Snca) in the Regulation of Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Gina; Mesner, Larry D.; Foley, Patricia L.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Farber, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    The postmenopausal period in women is associated with decreased circulating estrogen levels, which accelerate bone loss and increase the risk of fracture. Here, we gained novel insight into the molecular mechanisms mediating bone loss in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, a model of human menopause, using co-expression network analysis. Specifically, we generated a co-expression network consisting of 53 gene modules using expression profiles from intact and OVX mice from a panel of inbred strains. The expression of four modules was altered by OVX, including module 23 whose expression was decreased by OVX across all strains. Module 23 was enriched for genes involved in the response to oxidative stress, a process known to be involved in OVX-induced bone loss. Additionally, module 23 homologs were co-expressed in human bone marrow. Alpha synuclein (Snca) was one of the most highly connected “hub” genes in module 23. We characterized mice deficient in Snca and observed a 40% reduction in OVX-induced bone loss. Furthermore, protection was associated with the altered expression of specific network modules, including module 23. In summary, the results of this study suggest that Snca regulates bone network homeostasis and ovariectomy-induced bone loss. PMID:27378017

  19. The NACP/synuclein gene: Chromosomal assignment and screening for alterations in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, D.; Martin, C.; Charbonnier, F.

    1995-03-20

    The major component of the vascular and plaque amyloid deposits in Alzheimer disease is the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}). A second intrinsic component of amyloid, the NAC (non-A{beta} component of amyloid) peptide, has recently been identified, and its precursor protein was named NACP. A computer homology search allowed us to establish that the human NACP gene was homologous to the rat synuclein gene. We mapped the NACP/synuclein gene to chromosome 4 and cloned three alternatively spliced transcripts in lymphocytes derived from a normal subject. We analyzed by RT-PCR and direct sequencing the entire coding region of the NACP/synuclein gene in a group of patients with familial early onset Alzheimer disease. No mutation was found in 26 unrelated patients. Further studies are required to investigate the implication of the NACP/synuclein gene in Alzheimer disease. 21 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Direct Correlation Between Ligand-Induced α-Synuclein Oligomers and Amyloid-like Fibril Growth

    PubMed Central

    Nors Perdersen, Martin; Foderà, Vito; Horvath, Istvan; van Maarschalkerweerd, Andreas; Nørgaard Toft, Katrine; Weise, Christoph; Almqvist, Fredrik; Wolf-Watz, Magnus; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of proteins into amyloid deposits is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. The suggestion that intermediate oligomeric species may be cytotoxic has led to intensified investigations of pre-fibrillar oligomers, which are complicated by their transient nature and low population. Here we investigate alpha-synuclein oligomers, enriched by a 2-pyridone molecule (FN075), and the conversion of oligomers into fibrils. As probed by leakage assays, the FN075 induced oligomers potently disrupt vesicles in vitro, suggesting a potential link to disease related degenerative activity. Fibrils formed in the presence and absence of FN075 are indistinguishable on microscopic and macroscopic levels. Using small angle X-ray scattering, we reveal that FN075 induced oligomers are similar, but not identical, to oligomers previously observed during alpha-synuclein fibrillation. Since the levels of FN075 induced oligomers correlate with the amounts of fibrils among different FN075:protein ratios, the oligomers appear to be on-pathway and modeling supports an ‘oligomer stacking model’ for alpha-synuclein fibril elongation. PMID:26020724

  1. Chemical properties of lipids strongly affect the kinetics of the membrane-induced aggregation of α-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James W. P.; Ouberai, Myriam M.; Flagmeier, Patrick; Vendruscolo, Michele; Buell, Alexander K.; Sparr, Emma; Dobson, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular α-synuclein deposits, known as Lewy bodies, have been linked to a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson’s disease. α-Synuclein binds to synthetic and biological lipids, and this interaction has been shown to play a crucial role for both α-synuclein’s native function, including synaptic plasticity, and the initiation of its aggregation. Here, we describe the interplay between the lipid properties and the lipid binding and aggregation propensity of α-synuclein. In particular, we have observed that the binding of α-synuclein to model membranes is much stronger when the latter is in the fluid rather than the gel phase, and that this binding induces a segregation of the lipids into protein-poor and protein-rich populations. In addition, α-synuclein was found to aggregate at detectable rates only when interacting with membranes composed of the most soluble lipids investigated here. Overall, our results show that the chemical properties of lipids determine whether or not the lipids can trigger the aggregation of α-synuclein, thus affecting the balance between functional and aberrant behavior of the protein. PMID:27298346

  2. Alpha-synuclein overexpression induced mitochondrial damage by the generation of endogenous neurotoxins in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Ma, Hong; Xie, Bingjie; Han, Chao; Wang, Chen; Qing, Hong; Deng, Yulin

    2013-06-28

    Alpha-synuclein is one of the important components of Lewy body which involved in neuropathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). The relationship between α-synuclein and cell death is still unclear. In the study, PC12 cell, stably over expressing α-synuclein model was used, and we investigated the level of intracellular oxidative stress, dopamine and endogenous neurotoxin. The results showed that the level of oxidative stress and intracytoplasmic dopamine (DA) was increased in cells over expressing α-synuclein compared with normal PC12 cells. Simultaneously, additional generation of endogenous neurotoxins 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (salsolinol) and 1(R),2(N)-dimethyl-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolin (NM-salsolinol) was detected and this phenomenon was exacerbated after exposed to H₂O₂ for 24 h, but mitigated when treated with dopamine synthesis inhibitors. The presence of endogenous neurotoxins exacerbated α-synuclein induced mitochondrial damage. These results suggest that the endogenous neurotoxins may become a bridge between α-synuclein and cell death.

  3. Cyclosporine A and MnTMPyP Alleviate α-Synuclein Expression and Aggregation in Cypermethrin-Induced Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sonal; Dixit, Anubhuti; Singh, Ashish; Tripathi, Pratibha; Singh, Dhirendra; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Mahendra Pratap

    2015-12-01

    Cypermethrin induces the mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons leading to Parkinsonism in rats. Despite α-synuclein aggregation is reported to be critical in Parkinson's disease, its role and alliance with the mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage leading to cypermethrin-induced Parkinsonism have not yet been deciphered. The present study aimed to examine the effect of cypermethrin on the expression and aggregation of α-synuclein and its subsequent connection with oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction leading to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the presence or absence of a mitochondrial membrane transition pore opening inhibitor, cyclosporine A and a superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic, manganese (III) tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin pentachloride (MnTMPyP). The expression of α-synuclein, 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE)-modified proteins, mitochondrial dysfunction-dependent apoptotic proteins, nitrite content, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons were estimated in the substantia nigra and dopamine content in the striatum of control and treated rats employing standard procedures. Cypermethrin augmented the expression of α-synuclein, 3-NT, 4-HNE-modified proteins, caspase-3, mitochondrial Bax and cytosolic cytochrome-c along with nitrite and LPO and reduced the expression of cytosolic Bax, mitochondrial cytochrome-c, dopamine and number of TH-positive neurons. Cyclosporine A or MnTMPyP alleviated the expression and aggregation of α-synuclein along with indicators of the mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage and dopaminergic neurodegeneration. The results demonstrate that cypermethrin induces α-synuclein expression and aggregation while cyclosporine A or MnTMPyP rescues from α-synuclein over-expression and aggregation along with the mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage leading to

  4. The H50Q mutation induces a 10-fold decrease in the solubility of α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Porcari, Riccardo; Proukakis, Christos; Waudby, Christopher A; Bolognesi, Benedetta; Mangione, P Patrizia; Paton, Jack F S; Mullin, Stephen; Cabrita, Lisa D; Penco, Amanda; Relini, Annalisa; Verona, Guglielmo; Vendruscolo, Michele; Stoppini, Monica; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Camilloni, Carlo; Christodoulou, John; Schapira, Anthony H V; Bellotti, Vittorio

    2015-01-23

    The conversion of α-synuclein from its intrinsically disordered monomeric state into the fibrillar cross-β aggregates characteristically present in Lewy bodies is largely unknown. The investigation of α-synuclein variants causative of familial forms of Parkinson disease can provide unique insights into the conditions that promote or inhibit aggregate formation. It has been shown recently that a newly identified pathogenic mutation of α-synuclein, H50Q, aggregates faster than the wild-type. We investigate here its aggregation propensity by using a sequence-based prediction algorithm, NMR chemical shift analysis of secondary structure populations in the monomeric state, and determination of thermodynamic stability of the fibrils. Our data show that the H50Q mutation induces only a small increment in polyproline II structure around the site of the mutation and a slight increase in the overall aggregation propensity. We also find, however, that the H50Q mutation strongly stabilizes α-synuclein fibrils by 5.0 ± 1.0 kJ mol(-1), thus increasing the supersaturation of monomeric α-synuclein within the cell, and strongly favors its aggregation process. We further show that wild-type α-synuclein can decelerate the aggregation kinetics of the H50Q variant in a dose-dependent manner when coaggregating with it. These last findings suggest that the precise balance of α-synuclein synthesized from the wild-type and mutant alleles may influence the natural history and heterogeneous clinical phenotype of Parkinson disease. PMID:25505181

  5. The H50Q Mutation Induces a 10-fold Decrease in the Solubility of α-Synuclein*

    PubMed Central

    Porcari, Riccardo; Proukakis, Christos; Waudby, Christopher A.; Bolognesi, Benedetta; Mangione, P. Patrizia; Paton, Jack F. S.; Mullin, Stephen; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Penco, Amanda; Relini, Annalisa; Verona, Guglielmo; Vendruscolo, Michele; Stoppini, Monica; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Camilloni, Carlo; Christodoulou, John; Schapira, Anthony H. V.; Bellotti, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    The conversion of α-synuclein from its intrinsically disordered monomeric state into the fibrillar cross-β aggregates characteristically present in Lewy bodies is largely unknown. The investigation of α-synuclein variants causative of familial forms of Parkinson disease can provide unique insights into the conditions that promote or inhibit aggregate formation. It has been shown recently that a newly identified pathogenic mutation of α-synuclein, H50Q, aggregates faster than the wild-type. We investigate here its aggregation propensity by using a sequence-based prediction algorithm, NMR chemical shift analysis of secondary structure populations in the monomeric state, and determination of thermodynamic stability of the fibrils. Our data show that the H50Q mutation induces only a small increment in polyproline II structure around the site of the mutation and a slight increase in the overall aggregation propensity. We also find, however, that the H50Q mutation strongly stabilizes α-synuclein fibrils by 5.0 ± 1.0 kJ mol−1, thus increasing the supersaturation of monomeric α-synuclein within the cell, and strongly favors its aggregation process. We further show that wild-type α-synuclein can decelerate the aggregation kinetics of the H50Q variant in a dose-dependent manner when coaggregating with it. These last findings suggest that the precise balance of α-synuclein synthesized from the wild-type and mutant alleles may influence the natural history and heterogeneous clinical phenotype of Parkinson disease. PMID:25505181

  6. Structural Characterization of Heparin-induced Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase Protofibrils Preventing α-Synuclein Oligomeric Species Toxicity*

    PubMed Central

    Ávila, César L.; Torres-Bugeau, Clarisa M.; Barbosa, Leandro R. S.; Sales, Elisa Morandé; Ouidja, Mohand O.; Socías, Sergio B.; Celej, M. Soledad; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Papy-Garcia, Dulce; Itri, Rosangela; Chehín, Rosana N.

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a multifunctional enzyme that has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. GAPDH colocalizes with α-synuclein in amyloid aggregates in post-mortem tissue of patients with sporadic Parkinson disease and promotes the formation of Lewy body-like inclusions in cell culture. In a previous work, we showed that glycosaminoglycan-induced GAPDH prefibrillar species accelerate the conversion of α-synuclein to fibrils. However, it remains to be determined whether the interplay among glycosaminoglycans, GAPDH, and α-synuclein has a role in pathological states. Here, we demonstrate that the toxic effect exerted by α-synuclein oligomers in dopaminergic cell culture is abolished in the presence of GAPDH prefibrillar species. Structural analysis of prefibrillar GAPDH performed by small angle x-ray scattering showed a particle compatible with a protofibril. This protofibril is shaped as a cylinder 22 nm long and a cross-section diameter of 12 nm. Using biocomputational techniques, we obtained the first all-atom model of the GAPDH protofibril, which was validated by cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry experiments. Because GAPDH can be secreted outside the cell where glycosaminoglycans are present, it seems plausible that GAPDH protofibrils could be assembled in the extracellular space kidnapping α-synuclein toxic oligomers. Thus, the role of GAPDH protofibrils in neuronal proteostasis must be considered. The data reported here could open alternative ways in the development of therapeutic strategies against synucleinopathies like Parkinson disease. PMID:24671416

  7. Leucine-rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) Pharmacological Inhibition Abates α-Synuclein Gene-induced Neurodegeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Daher, João P. L.; Abdelmotilib, Hisham A.; Hu, Xianzhen; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A.; Moehle, Mark S.; Fraser, Kyle B.; Needle, Elie; Chen, Yi; Steyn, Stefanus J.; Galatsis, Paul; Hirst, Warren D.; West, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic approaches to slow or block the progression of Parkinson disease (PD) do not exist. Genetic and biochemical studies implicate α-synuclein and leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) in late-onset PD. LRRK2 kinase activity has been linked to neurodegenerative pathways. However, the therapeutic potential of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors is not clear because significant toxicities have been associated with one class of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors. Furthermore, LRRK2 kinase inhibitors have not been tested previously for efficacy in models of α-synuclein-induced neurodegeneration. To better understand the therapeutic potential of LRRK2 kinase inhibition in PD, we evaluated the tolerability and efficacy of a LRRK2 kinase inhibitor, PF-06447475, in preventing α-synuclein-induced neurodegeneration in rats. Both wild-type rats as well as transgenic G2019S-LRRK2 rats were injected intracranially with adeno-associated viral vectors expressing human α-synuclein in the substantia nigra. Rats were treated with PF-06447475 or a control compound for 4 weeks post-viral transduction. We found that rats expressing G2019S-LRRK2 have exacerbated dopaminergic neurodegeneration and inflammation in response to the overexpression of α-synuclein. Both neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation associated with G2019S-LRRK2 expression were mitigated by LRRK2 kinase inhibition. Furthermore, PF-06447475 provided neuroprotection in wild-type rats. We could not detect adverse pathological indications in the lung, kidney, or liver of rats treated with PF-06447475. These results demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of LRRK2 is well tolerated for a 4-week period of time in rats and can counteract dopaminergic neurodegeneration caused by acute α-synuclein overexpression. PMID:26078453

  8. α-Synuclein induced toxicity in brain stem serotonin neurons mediated by an AAV vector driven by the tryptophan hydroxylase promoter

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Oi Wan; Shin, Eunju; Mattsson, Bengt; Caudal, Dorian; Svenningsson, Per; Björklund, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We studied the impact of α-synuclein overexpression in brainstem serotonin neurons using a novel vector construct where the expression of human wildtype α-synuclein is driven by the tryptophan hydroxylase promoter, allowing expression of α-synuclein at elevated levels, and with high selectivity, in serotonergic neurons. α-Synuclein induced degenerative changes in axons and dendrites, displaying a distorted appearance, suggesting accumulation and aggregation of α-synuclein as a result of impaired axonal transport, accompanied by a 40% loss of terminals, as assessed in the hippocampus. Tissue levels of serotonin and its major metabolite 5-HIAA remained largely unaltered, and the performance of the α-synuclein overexpressing rats in tests of spatial learning (water maze), anxiety related behavior (elevated plus maze) and depressive-like behavior (forced swim test) was not different from control, suggesting that the impact of the developing axonal pathology on serotonin neurotransmission was relatively mild. Overexpression of α-synuclein in the raphe nuclei, combined with overexpression in basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, resulted in more pronounced axonal pathology and significant impairment in the elevated plus maze. We conclude that α-synuclein pathology in serotonergic or cholinergic neurons alone is not sufficient to impair non-motor behaviors, but that it is their simultaneous involvement that determines severity of such symptoms. PMID:27211987

  9. Thymoquinone protects cultured hippocampal and human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived neurons against α-synuclein-induced synapse damage.

    PubMed

    Alhebshi, A H; Odawara, A; Gotoh, M; Suzuki, I

    2014-06-01

    The seeds of Nigella sativa are used worldwide to treat various diseases and ailments. Thymoquinone (TQ) that is present in the essential oil of these seeds mediates most of the plant's diverse therapeutic effects. The present study aimed to determine whether TQ protects against α-synuclein (αSN)-induced synaptic toxicity in rat hippocampal and human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons. Here, we report that αSN decreased the level of synaptophysin, a protein used as an indicator of synaptic density, in cultured hippocampal and hiPSC-derived neurons. However, simultaneous treatment with αSN and TQ protected neurons against αSN-induced synapse damage, as revealed by immunostaining. Moreover, administration of TQ efficiently induced protection in these cells against αSN-induced inhibition of synaptic vesicle recycling in hippocampal and hiPSC-derived neurons as well as against mutated P123H β-synuclein (βSN) in hippocampal neurons, as revealed by experiments using the fluorescent dye FM1-43. Using a multielectrode array, we further demonstrated that the treatment of hiPSC-derived neurons with αSN induced a reduction in spontaneous firing activity, and cotreatment with αSN and TQ partially reversed this loss. These results suggest that TQ protects cultured rat primary hippocampal and hiPSC-derived neurons against αSN-induced synaptic toxicity and could be a promising therapeutic agent for patients with Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

  10. microRNA-155 Regulates Alpha-Synuclein-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Models of Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thome, Aaron D.; Harms, Ashley S.; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to inflammation as a chief mediator of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and widespread aggregates of the protein α-synuclein (α-syn). Recently, microRNAs, small, noncoding RNAs involved in regulating gene expression at the posttranscriptional level, have been recognized as important regulators of the inflammatory environment. Using an array approach, we found significant upregulation of microRNA-155 (miR-155) in an in vivo model of PD produced by adeno-associated-virus-mediated expression of α-syn. Using a mouse with a complete deletion of miR-155, we found that loss of miR-155 reduced proinflammatory responses to α-syn and blocked α-syn-induced neurodegeneration. In primary microglia from miR-155−/− mice, we observed a markedly reduced inflammatory response to α-syn fibrils, with attenuation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and proinflammatory inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. Treatment of these microglia with a synthetic mimic of miR-155 restored the inflammatory response to α-syn fibrils. Our results suggest that miR-155 has a central role in the inflammatory response to α-syn in the brain and in α-syn-related neurodegeneration. These effects are at least in part due to a direct role of miR-155 on the microglial response to α-syn. These data implicate miR-155 as a potential therapeutic target for regulating the inflammatory response in PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The main feature associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) is the accumulation of α-synuclein in the brain accompanied by signs of inflammation and immune activation. Our studies suggest that microRNA-155 is a key inflammation-initiating molecule that could be a viable target for PD therapeutics. PMID:26911687

  11. TOM40 Mediates Mitochondrial Dysfunction Induced by α-Synuclein Accumulation in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rockenstein, Edward; Adame, Anthony; Elstner, Matthias; Laub, Christoph; Mueller, Sarina; Koob, Andrew O.; Mante, Michael; Pham, Emily; Klopstock, Thomas; Masliah, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) accumulation/aggregation and mitochondrial dysfunction play prominent roles in the pathology of Parkinson’s disease. We have previously shown that postmortem human dopaminergic neurons from PD brains accumulate high levels of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. We now addressed the question, whether alterations in a component of the mitochondrial import machinery -TOM40- might contribute to the mitochondrial dysfunction and damage in PD. For this purpose, we studied levels of TOM40, mtDNA deletions, oxidative damage, energy production, and complexes of the respiratory chain in brain homogenates as well as in single neurons, using laser-capture-microdissection in transgenic mice overexpressing human wildtype α-Syn. Additionally, we used lentivirus-mediated stereotactic delivery of a component of this import machinery into mouse brain as a novel therapeutic strategy. We report here that TOM40 is significantly reduced in the brain of PD patients and in α-Syn transgenic mice. TOM40 deficits were associated with increased mtDNA deletions and oxidative DNA damage, and with decreased energy production and altered levels of complex I proteins in α-Syn transgenic mice. Lentiviral-mediated overexpression of Tom40 in α-Syn-transgenic mice brains ameliorated energy deficits as well as oxidative burden. Our results suggest that alterations in the mitochondrial protein transport machinery might contribute to mitochondrial impairment in α-Synucleinopathies. PMID:23626796

  12. Trifluoperazine rescues human dopaminergic cells from wild-type α-synuclein-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Höllerhage, Matthias; Goebel, Joachim N; de Andrade, Anderson; Hildebrandt, Tobias; Dolga, Amalia; Culmsee, Carsten; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Hengerer, Bastian; Höglinger, Günter U

    2014-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most frequent neurodegenerative movement disorder. Presently, there is no causal therapy available to slow down or halt disease progression. The presynaptic protein alpha-synuclein aggregates to form intraneuronal Lewy bodies in PD. It is generally believed that intermediates on the way from monomers to the large aggregates would mediate neurotoxicity, but the precise species and mechanism responsible for neuronal death are controversially debated. To study alpha-synuclein-mediated toxicity, we developed a new model in which moderate overexpression of wild-type alpha-synuclein led to gradual death of human postmitotic dopaminergic neurons. In accordance with findings in postmortem PD brains, small oligomeric species occurred and the autophagic flux was impaired in our model. The phenothiazine neuroleptic trifluoperazine, an activator of macroautophagy, selectively reduced one particular alpha-synuclein species and rescued cells. Inversely, blocking of autophagy led to an accumulation of this oligomeric species and increased cell death. These data show that activation of autophagy is a promising approach to protect against alpha-synuclein pathology and likely acts by targeting one specific alpha-synuclein species.

  13. Interplay between desolvation and secondary structure in mediating cosolvent and temperature induced alpha-synuclein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, V. L.; Webb, W. W.; Eliezer, D.

    2012-10-01

    Both increased temperature and moderate concentrations of fluorinated alcohols enhance aggregation of the Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein (αS). Here, we investigate the secondary structural rearrangements induced by heating and trifluoroethanol [TFE]. At low TFE concentrations, CD spectra feature a negative peak characteristic of disordered polypeptides near 200 nm and a slight shoulder around 220 nm suggesting some polyproline-II content. Upon heating, these peaks weaken, while a weak negative signal develops at 222 nm. At high TFE concentrations, the spectra show distinct minima at 208 and 222 nm, indicative of considerable α-helical structure, which diminish upon heating. We observe a crossover between the low-TFE and high-TFE behavior near 15% TFE, where we previously showed that a partially helical intermediate is populated. We postulate that the protein is well solvated by water at low TFE concentrations and by TFE at high TFE concentrations, but may become desolvated at the crossover point. We discuss the potential roles and interplay of desolvation and helical secondary structure in driving αS aggregation.

  14. Small heat shock proteins protect against {alpha}-synuclein-induced toxicity and aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Klucken, Jochen; Strathearn, Katherine E.; Liu Fang; Nguyen, Paul; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Hyman, Bradley T.; McLean, Pamela J. . E-mail: touteiro@partners.org

    2006-12-22

    Protein misfolding and inclusion formation are common events in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). {alpha}-Synuclein (aSyn) is the main protein component of inclusions called Lewy bodies (LB) which are pathognomic of PD, Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and other diseases collectively known as LB diseases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are one class of the cellular quality control system that mediate protein folding, remodeling, and even disaggregation. Here, we investigated the role of the small heat shock proteins Hsp27 and {alpha}B-crystallin, in LB diseases. We demonstrate, via quantitative PCR, that Hsp27 messenger RNA levels are {approx}2-3-fold higher in DLB cases compared to control. We also show a corresponding increase in Hsp27 protein levels. Furthermore, we found that Hsp27 reduces aSyn-induced toxicity by {approx}80% in a culture model while {alpha}B-crystallin reduces toxicity by {approx}20%. In addition, intracellular inclusions were immunopositive for endogenous Hsp27, and overexpression of this protein reduced aSyn aggregation in a cell culture model.

  15. Emotional memory impairments induced by AAV-mediated overexpression of human α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Alvarsson, A; Caudal, D; Björklund, A; Svenningsson, P

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with extensive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons originating in the substantia nigra pars compacta, but neuronal loss is also found in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The VTA projects to areas involved in cognitive and emotional processes, including hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex, and has thus been proposed to play a role in emotional memory impairments in PD. Since the formation of α-synuclein inclusions throughout the central nervous system is a pathological hallmark of PD, we studied the progressive effects of α-synuclein overexpression in the VTA on motor functions, emotional behaviour and emotional memory. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors encoding either human α-synuclein or green fluorescent protein (GFP) were injected stereotactically into the VTA, and behaviour was monitored 3 and 8 weeks following AAV injection. At week 8, there was a 22% reduction of TH+ neurons in the VTA. We demonstrate that α-synuclein overexpression in dopaminergic neurons of the VTA induced mild motor deficits that appeared 3 weeks following AAV-α-synuclein injection and were aggravated at week 8. No depressive- or anxiety-like behaviours were found. To address emotional memory, we used the passive avoidance test, a one-trial associative learning paradigm based on contextual conditioning which requires minimal training. Interestingly, emotional memory impairments were found in α-synuclein overexpressing animals at week 8. These findings indicate that α-synuclein overexpression induces progressive memory impairments likely caused by a loss of function of mesolimbic dopaminergic projections.

  16. microRNA-155 Regulates Alpha-Synuclein-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Models of Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Thome, Aaron D; Harms, Ashley S; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A; Standaert, David G

    2016-02-24

    Increasing evidence points to inflammation as a chief mediator of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and widespread aggregates of the protein α-synuclein (α-syn). Recently, microRNAs, small, noncoding RNAs involved in regulating gene expression at the posttranscriptional level, have been recognized as important regulators of the inflammatory environment. Using an array approach, we found significant upregulation of microRNA-155 (miR-155) in an in vivo model of PD produced by adeno-associated-virus-mediated expression of α-syn. Using a mouse with a complete deletion of miR-155, we found that loss of miR-155 reduced proinflammatory responses to α-syn and blocked α-syn-induced neurodegeneration. In primary microglia from miR-155(-/-) mice, we observed a markedly reduced inflammatory response to α-syn fibrils, with attenuation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and proinflammatory inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. Treatment of these microglia with a synthetic mimic of miR-155 restored the inflammatory response to α-syn fibrils. Our results suggest that miR-155 has a central role in the inflammatory response to α-syn in the brain and in α-syn-related neurodegeneration. These effects are at least in part due to a direct role of miR-155 on the microglial response to α-syn. These data implicate miR-155 as a potential therapeutic target for regulating the inflammatory response in PD.

  17. Ginsenoside Rg1 attenuates motor impairment and neuroinflammation in the MPTP-probenecid-induced parkinsonism mouse model by targeting α-synuclein abnormalities in the substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Heng, Yang; Zhang, Qiu-Shuang; Mu, Zheng; Hu, Jin-Feng; Yuan, Yu-He; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-01-22

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is pathologically characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the accumulation of aggregated α-synuclein in specific central nervous system (CNS) regions. Disease development is attributed to α-synuclein abnormalities, particularly aggregation and phosphorylation. The ginsenoside Rg1, an active component of ginseng, possesses neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate these activities of Rg1 in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)/probenecid (MPTP/p)-induced PD mouse model for the first time and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Oral treatment with Rg1 significantly attenuated the high MPTP-induced mortality, behavior defects, loss of dopamine neurons and abnormal ultrastructure changes in the SNpc. Other assays indicated that the protective effect of Rg1 may be mediated by its anti-neuroinflammatory properties. Rg1 regulated MPTP-induced reactive astrocytes and microglia and decreased the release of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the SNpc. Rg1 also alleviated the unusual MPTP-induced increase in oligomeric, phosphorylated and disease-related α-synuclein in the SNpc. In conclusion, Rg1 protects dopaminergic neurons, most likely by reducing aberrant α-synuclein-mediated neuroinflammation, and holds promise for PD therapeutics. PMID:26723869

  18. The effects of pdr1, djr1.1 and pink1 loss in manganese-induced toxicity and the role of α-synuclein in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Bornhorst, Julia; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Meyer, Sören; Lohren, Hanna; Brinkhaus, Sigrid Groβe; Knight, Adam L.; Caldwell, Kim A.; Caldwell, Guy A.; Karst, Uwe; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Bowman, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder characterized by selective dopaminergic (DAergic) cell loss that results in overt motor and cognitive deficits. Current treatment options exist to combat PD symptomatology, but are unable to directly target its pathogenesis due to a lack of knowledge concerning its etiology. Several genes have been linked to PD, including three genes associated with an early-onset familial form: parkin, pink1 and dj1. All three genes are implicated in regulating oxidative stress pathways. Another hallmark of PD pathophysiology is Lewy body deposition, associated with the gain-of-function genetic risk factor α-synuclein. The function of α-synuclein is poorly understood, as it shows both neurotoxic and neuroprotective activities in PD. Using the genetically tractable invertebrate Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) model system, the neurotoxic or neuroprotective role of α-synuclein upon acute Mn exposure in the background of mutated pdr1, pink1 or djr1.1 was examined. The pdr1 and djr1.1 mutants showed enhanced Mn accumulation and oxidative stress that was rescued by α-synuclein. Moreover, DAergic neurodegeneration, while unchanged with Mn exposure, returned to wild-type (WT) levels for pdr1, but not djr1.1 mutants expressing α-synuclein. Taken together, this study uncovers a novel, neuroprotective role for WT human α-synuclein in attenuating Mn-induced toxicity in the background of PD-associated genes, and further supports the role of extracellular dopamine in exacerbating Mn neurotoxicity. PMID:24452053

  19. Age- and brain region-dependent α-synuclein oligomerization is attributed to alterations in intrinsic enzymes regulating α-synuclein phosphorylation in aging monkey brains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Yang, Weiwei; Li, Xin; Li, Xuran; Wang, Peng; Yue, Feng; Yang, Hui; Chan, Piu; Yu, Shun

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that the levels of α-syn oligomers, which play pivotal pathogenic roles in age-related Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies, increase heterogeneously in the aging brain. Here, we show that exogenous α-syn incubated with brain extracts from older cynomolgus monkeys and in Lewy body pathology (LBP)-susceptible brain regions (striatum and hippocampus) forms higher amounts of phosphorylated and oligomeric α-syn than that in extracts from younger monkeys and LBP-insusceptible brain regions (cerebellum and occipital cortex). The increased α-syn phosphorylation and oligomerization in the brain extracts from older monkeys and in LBP-susceptible brain regions were associated with higher levels of polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2), an enzyme promoting α-syn phosphorylation, and lower activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), an enzyme inhibiting α-syn phosphorylation, in these brain extracts. Further, the extent of the age- and brain-dependent increase in α-syn phosphorylation and oligomerization was reduced by inhibition of PLK2 and activation of PP2A. Inversely, phosphorylated α-syn oligomers reduced the activity of PP2A and showed potent cytotoxicity. In addition, the activity of GCase and the levels of ceramide, a product of GCase shown to activate PP2A, were lower in brain extracts from older monkeys and in LBP-susceptible brain regions. Our results suggest a role for altered intrinsic metabolic enzymes in age- and brain region-dependent α-syn oligomerization in aging brains. PMID:27032368

  20. Melatonin attenuates MPTP-induced neurotoxicity via preventing CDK5-mediated autophagy and SNCA/α-synuclein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ling-Yan; Li, Hao; Lv, Li; Feng, Yue-Mei; Li, Guo-Dong; Luo, Rongcan; Zhou, He-Jiang; Lei, Xiao-Guang; Ma, Liang; Li, Jia-Li; Xu, Lin; Hu, Xin-Tian; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson disease (PD). However, little is known about the regulation of autophagy in neurodegenerative process. In this study, we characterized aberrant activation of autophagy induced by neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and demonstrated that melatonin has a protective effect on neurotoxicity. We found an excessive activation of autophagy in monkey brain tissues and C6 cells, induced by MPTP, which is mediated by CDK5 (cyclin-dependent kinase 5). MPTP treatment significantly reduced total dendritic length and dendritic complexity of cultured primary cortical neurons and melatonin could reverse this effect. Decreased TH (tyrosine hydroxylase)-positive cells and dendrites of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) were observed in MPTP-treated monkeys and mice. Along with decreased TH protein level, we observed an upregulation of CDK5 and enhanced autophagic activity in the striatum of mice with MPTP injection. These changes could be salvaged by melatonin treatment or knockdown of CDK5. Importantly, melatonin or knockdown of CDK5 reduced MPTP-induced SNCA/α-synuclein aggregation in mice, which is widely thought to trigger the pathogenesis of PD. Finally, melatonin or knockdown of CDK5 counteracted the PD phenotype in mice induced by MPTP. Our findings uncover a potent role of CDK5-mediated autophagy in the pathogenesis of PD, and suggest that control of autophagic pathways may provide an important clue for exploring potential target for novel therapeutics of PD. PMID:26292069

  1. Melatonin attenuates MPTP-induced neurotoxicity via preventing CDK5-mediated autophagy and SNCA/α-synuclein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Su, Ling-Yan; Li, Hao; Lv, Li; Feng, Yue-Mei; Li, Guo-Dong; Luo, Rongcan; Zhou, He-Jiang; Lei, Xiao-Guang; Ma, Liang; Li, Jia-Li; Xu, Lin; Hu, Xin-Tian; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson disease (PD). However, little is known about the regulation of autophagy in neurodegenerative process. In this study, we characterized aberrant activation of autophagy induced by neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and demonstrated that melatonin has a protective effect on neurotoxicity. We found an excessive activation of autophagy in monkey brain tissues and C6 cells, induced by MPTP, which is mediated by CDK5 (cyclin-dependent kinase 5). MPTP treatment significantly reduced total dendritic length and dendritic complexity of cultured primary cortical neurons and melatonin could reverse this effect. Decreased TH (tyrosine hydroxylase)-positive cells and dendrites of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) were observed in MPTP-treated monkeys and mice. Along with decreased TH protein level, we observed an upregulation of CDK5 and enhanced autophagic activity in the striatum of mice with MPTP injection. These changes could be salvaged by melatonin treatment or knockdown of CDK5. Importantly, melatonin or knockdown of CDK5 reduced MPTP-induced SNCA/α-synuclein aggregation in mice, which is widely thought to trigger the pathogenesis of PD. Finally, melatonin or knockdown of CDK5 counteracted the PD phenotype in mice induced by MPTP. Our findings uncover a potent role of CDK5-mediated autophagy in the pathogenesis of PD, and suggest that control of autophagic pathways may provide an important clue for exploring potential target for novel therapeutics of PD.

  2. Phosphorylation of α-Synuclein at Y125 and S129 alters its metal binding properties: implications for understanding the role of α-Synuclein in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu; Prudent, Michel; Fauvet, Bruno; Lashuel, Hilal A; Girault, Hubert H

    2011-11-16

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is a 140-amino acid protein that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and other synucleinopathies. However, the molecular determinants that are responsible for triggering and/or propagating α-syn aggregation and toxicity remain poorly understood. Several studies have suggested that there are direct interactions between different metals and α-syn, but the role of metal ions and α-syn in the pathogenesis of PD is not firmly established. Interestingly, the majority of disease-associated post-translational modifications (PTMs) (e.g., truncation, phosphorylation, and nitration) of α-syn occur at residues within the C-terminal region (Y125, S129, Y133, and Y136) and in very close proximity to the putative metal binding sites. Therefore, we hypothesized that phosphorylation within this domain could influence the α-syn-metal interactions. In this paper, we sought to map the interactions between the di- and trivalent cations, Cu(II), Pb(II), Fe(II), and Fe(III), and the C-terminal region of α-syn encompassing residues 107-140 and to determine how phosphorylation at S129 or Y125 alters the specificity and binding affinity of metals using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and fluorescence spectroscopy. We demonstrate that D115-M116 and P128-S129 act as additional Cu(II) binding sites and show for the first time that the residues P128-S129 and D119 are also involved in Pb(II) and Fe(II) coordination, although D119 is not essential for binding to Fe(II) and Pb(II). Furthermore, we demonstrate that phosphorylation at either Y125 or S129 increases the binding affinity of Cu(II), Pb(II), and Fe(II), but not Fe(III). Additionally, we also show that phosphorylations at these residues lead to a shift in the binding sites of metal ions from the N-terminus to the C-teminus. Together, our findings provide critical insight into and expand our understanding of the molecular and structural bases underlying the

  3. Phosphorylation of α-Synuclein at Y125 and S129 Alters Its Metal Binding Properties: Implications for Understanding the Role of α-Synuclein in the Pathogenesis of Parkinson’s Disease and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is a 140-amino acid protein that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other synucleinopathies. However, the molecular determinants that are responsible for triggering and/or propagating α-syn aggregation and toxicity remain poorly understood. Several studies have suggested that there are direct interactions between different metals and α-syn, but the role of metal ions and α-syn in the pathogenesis of PD is not firmly established. Interestingly, the majority of disease-associated post-translational modifications (PTMs) (e.g., truncation, phosphorylation, and nitration) of α-syn occur at residues within the C-terminal region (Y125, S129, Y133, and Y136) and in very close proximity to the putative metal binding sites. Therefore, we hypothesized that phosphorylation within this domain could influence the α-syn–metal interactions. In this paper, we sought to map the interactions between the di- and trivalent cations, Cu(II), Pb(II), Fe(II), and Fe(III), and the C-terminal region of α-syn encompassing residues 107–140 and to determine how phosphorylation at S129 or Y125 alters the specificity and binding affinity of metals using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and fluorescence spectroscopy. We demonstrate that D115-M116 and P128-S129 act as additional Cu(II) binding sites and show for the first time that the residues P128-S129 and D119 are also involved in Pb(II) and Fe(II) coordination, although D119 is not essential for binding to Fe(II) and Pb(II). Furthermore, we demonstrate that phosphorylation at either Y125 or S129 increases the binding affinity of Cu(II), Pb(II), and Fe(II), but not Fe(III). Additionally, we also show that phosphorylations at these residues lead to a shift in the binding sites of metal ions from the N-terminus to the C-teminus. Together, our findings provide critical insight into and expand our understanding of the molecular and structural bases underlying

  4. Photobiomodulation Suppresses Alpha-Synuclein-Induced Toxicity in an AAV-Based Rat Genetic Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oueslati, Abid; Lovisa, Blaise; Perrin, John; Wagnières, Georges; van den Bergh, Hubert; Tardy, Yanik; Lashuel, Hilal A.

    2015-01-01

    Converging lines of evidence indicate that near-infrared light treatment, also known as photobiomodulation (PBM), may exert beneficial effects and protect against cellular toxicity and degeneration in several animal models of human pathologies, including neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study, we report that chronic PMB treatment mitigates dopaminergic loss induced by unilateral overexpression of human α-synuclein (α-syn) in the substantia nigra of an AAV-based rat genetic model of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In this model, daily exposure of both sides of the rat’s head to 808-nm near-infrared light for 28 consecutive days alleviated α-syn-induced motor impairment, as assessed using the cylinder test. This treatment also significantly reduced dopaminergic neuronal loss in the injected substantia nigra and preserved dopaminergic fibers in the ipsilateral striatum. These beneficial effects were sustained for at least 6 weeks after discontinuing the treatment. Together, our data point to PBM as a possible therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PD and other related synucleinopathies. PMID:26484876

  5. Alpha-synuclein functions in the nucleus to protect against hydroxyurea-induced replication stress in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xianpeng; Lee, Yong Joo; Liou, Liang-Chun; Ren, Qun; Zhang, Zhaojie; Wang, Shaoxiao; Witt, Stephan N.

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxyurea (HU) inhibits ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), which catalyzes the rate-limiting synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides for DNA replication. HU is used to treat HIV, sickle-cell anemia and some cancers. We found that, compared with vector control cells, low levels of alpha-synuclein (α-syn) protect S. cerevisiae cells from the growth inhibition and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation induced by HU. Analysis of this effect using different α-syn mutants revealed that the α-syn protein functions in the nucleus and not the cytoplasm to modulate S-phase checkpoint responses: α-syn up-regulates histone acetylation and RNR levels, maintains helicase minichromosome maintenance protein complexes (Mcm2–7) on chromatin and inhibits HU-induced ROS accumulation. Strikingly, when residues 2–10 or 96–140 are deleted, this protective function of α-syn in the nucleus is abolished. Understanding the mechanism by which α-syn protects against HU could expand our knowledge of the normal function of this neuronal protein. PMID:21642386

  6. Alpha-Synuclein Oligomers Interact with Metal Ions to Induce Oxidative Stress and Neuronal Death in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deas, Emma; Cremades, Nunilo; Angelova, Plamena R.; Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Yao, Zhi; Chen, Serene; Horrocks, Mathew H.; Banushi, Blerida; Little, Daniel; Devine, Michael J.; Gissen, Paul; Klenerman, David; Dobson, Christopher M.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Protein aggregation and oxidative stress are both key pathogenic processes in Parkinson's disease, although the mechanism by which misfolded proteins induce oxidative stress and neuronal death remains unknown. In this study, we describe how aggregation of alpha-synuclein (α-S) from its monomeric form to its soluble oligomeric state results in aberrant free radical production and neuronal toxicity. Results: We first demonstrate excessive free radical production in a human induced pluripotent stem-derived α-S triplication model at basal levels and on application of picomolar doses of β-sheet-rich α-S oligomers. We probed the effects of different structural species of α-S in wild-type rat neuronal cultures and show that both oligomeric and fibrillar forms of α-S are capable of generating free radical production, but that only the oligomeric form results in reduction of endogenous glutathione and subsequent neuronal toxicity. We dissected the mechanism of oligomer-induced free radical production and found that it was interestingly independent of several known cellular enzymatic sources. Innovation: The oligomer-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was entirely dependent on the presence of free metal ions as addition of metal chelators was able to block oligomer-induced ROS production and prevent oligomer-induced neuronal death. Conclusion: Our findings further support the causative role of soluble amyloid oligomers in triggering neurodegeneration and shed light into the mechanisms by which these species cause neuronal damage, which, we show here, can be amenable to modulation through the use of metal chelation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 376–391. PMID:26564470

  7. Alpha-synuclein-induced aggregation of cytoplasmic vesicles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Soper, James H; Roy, Subhojit; Stieber, Anna; Lee, Eliza; Wilson, Robert B; Trojanowski, John Q; Burd, Christopher G; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2008-03-01

    Aggregated alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn) fibrils form Lewy bodies (LBs), the signature lesions of Parkinson's disease (PD) and related synucleinopathies, but the pathogenesis and neurodegenerative effects of LBs remain enigmatic. Recent studies have shown that when overexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alpha-syn localizes to plasma membranes and forms cytoplasmic accumulations similar to human alpha-syn inclusions. However, the exact nature, composition, temporal evolution, and underlying mechanisms of yeast alpha-syn accumulations and their relevance to human synucleinopathies are unknown. Here we provide ultrastructural evidence that alpha-syn accumulations are not comprised of LB-like fibrils, but are associated with clusters of vesicles. Live-cell imaging showed alpha-syn initially localized to the plasma membrane and subsequently formed accumulations in association with vesicles. Imaging of truncated and mutant forms of alpha-syn revealed the molecular determinants and vesicular trafficking pathways underlying this pathological process. Because vesicular clustering is also found in LB-containing neurons of PD brains, alpha-syn-mediated vesicular accumulation in yeast represents a model system to study specific aspects of neurodegeneration in PD and related synucleinopathies.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of α-Synuclein Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Waxman, Elisa A.; Giasson, Benoit I.

    2009-01-01

    α-Synuclein is an abundant highly charged protein that is normally predominantly localized around synaptic vesicles in presynatic terminals. Although the function of this protein is still ill-defined, genetic studies have demonstrated that point mutations or genetic alteration (duplications or triplications) that increase the number of copies of the α-synuclein (SCNA) gene can cause Parkinson’s disease or the related disorder dementia with Lewy bodies. α-Synuclein can aberrantly polymerize into fibrils with typical amyloid properties, and these fibrils are the major component of many types of pathological inclusions, including Lewy bodies, which are associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease. Genetic studies have clearly established that alteration in the α-synuclein gene can lead to neuronal demise. Although there is substantial evidence supporting the toxic nature of α-synuclein inclusions, other modes of toxicity such as oligomers have been proposed. In this review, some of the evidence for the different mechanisms of α-synuclein toxicity is presented and discussed. PMID:18955133

  9. Entacapone and Tolcapone, Two Catechol O-Methyltransferase Inhibitors, Block Fibril Formation of α-Synuclein and β-Amyloid and Protect against Amyloid-induced Toxicity*

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovanni, Saviana; Eleuteri, Simona; Paleologou, Katerina E.; Yin, Guowei; Zweckstetter, Markus; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Lashuel, Hilal A.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer disease (AD). There is considerable consensus that the increased production and/or aggregation of α-synuclein (α-syn) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of PD and related synucleinopathies. Current therapeutic strategies for treating PD offer mainly transient symptomatic relief and aim at the restitution of dopamine levels to counterbalance the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Therefore, the identification and development of drug-like molecules that block α-synuclein aggregation and prevent the loss of dopaminergic neurons are desperately needed to treat or slow the progression of PD. Here, we show that entacapone and tolcapone are potent inhibitors of α-syn and β-amyloid (Aβ) oligomerization and fibrillogenesis, and they also protect against extracellular toxicity induced by the aggregation of both proteins. Comparison of the anti-aggregation properties of entacapone and tolcapone with the effect of five other catechol-containing compounds, dopamine, pyrogallol, gallic acid, caffeic acid, and quercetin on the oligomerization and fibrillization of α-syn and Aβ, demonstrate that the catechol moiety is essential for the anti-amyloidogenic activity. Our findings present the first characterization of the anti-amyloidogenic properties of tolcapone and entacapone against both α-synuclein and Aβ42 and highlight the potential of this class of nitro-catechol compounds as anti-amyloidogenic agents. Their inhibitory properties, mode of action, and structural properties suggest that they constitute promising lead compounds for further optimization. PMID:20150427

  10. Entacapone and tolcapone, two catechol O-methyltransferase inhibitors, block fibril formation of alpha-synuclein and beta-amyloid and protect against amyloid-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Di Giovanni, Saviana; Eleuteri, Simona; Paleologou, Katerina E; Yin, Guowei; Zweckstetter, Markus; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Lashuel, Hilal A

    2010-05-14

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer disease (AD). There is considerable consensus that the increased production and/or aggregation of alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of PD and related synucleinopathies. Current therapeutic strategies for treating PD offer mainly transient symptomatic relief and aim at the restitution of dopamine levels to counterbalance the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Therefore, the identification and development of drug-like molecules that block alpha-synuclein aggregation and prevent the loss of dopaminergic neurons are desperately needed to treat or slow the progression of PD. Here, we show that entacapone and tolcapone are potent inhibitors of alpha-syn and beta-amyloid (Abeta) oligomerization and fibrillogenesis, and they also protect against extracellular toxicity induced by the aggregation of both proteins. Comparison of the anti-aggregation properties of entacapone and tolcapone with the effect of five other catechol-containing compounds, dopamine, pyrogallol, gallic acid, caffeic acid, and quercetin on the oligomerization and fibrillization of alpha-syn and Abeta, demonstrate that the catechol moiety is essential for the anti-amyloidogenic activity. Our findings present the first characterization of the anti-amyloidogenic properties of tolcapone and entacapone against both alpha-synuclein and Abeta42 and highlight the potential of this class of nitro-catechol compounds as anti-amyloidogenic agents. Their inhibitory properties, mode of action, and structural properties suggest that they constitute promising lead compounds for further optimization. PMID:20150427

  11. The Mitochondrial Chaperone Protein TRAP1 Mitigates α-Synuclein Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, A. Kathrin; Toegel, Jane P.; Gerhardt, Ellen; Karsten, Peter; Falkenburger, Björn; Reinartz, Andrea; Winklhofer, Konstanze F.; Schulz, Jörg B.

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression or mutation of α-Synuclein is associated with protein aggregation and interferes with a number of cellular processes, including mitochondrial integrity and function. We used a whole-genome screen in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to search for novel genetic modifiers of human [A53T]α-Synuclein–induced neurotoxicity. Decreased expression of the mitochondrial chaperone protein tumor necrosis factor receptor associated protein-1 (TRAP1) was found to enhance age-dependent loss of fly head dopamine (DA) and DA neuron number resulting from [A53T]α-Synuclein expression. In addition, decreased TRAP1 expression in [A53T]α-Synuclein–expressing flies resulted in enhanced loss of climbing ability and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Overexpression of human TRAP1 was able to rescue these phenotypes. Similarly, human TRAP1 overexpression in rat primary cortical neurons rescued [A53T]α-Synuclein–induced sensitivity to rotenone treatment. In human (non)neuronal cell lines, small interfering RNA directed against TRAP1 enhanced [A53T]α-Synuclein–induced sensitivity to oxidative stress treatment. [A53T]α-Synuclein directly interfered with mitochondrial function, as its expression reduced Complex I activity in HEK293 cells. These effects were blocked by TRAP1 overexpression. Moreover, TRAP1 was able to prevent alteration in mitochondrial morphology caused by [A53T]α-Synuclein overexpression in human SH-SY5Y cells. These results indicate that [A53T]α-Synuclein toxicity is intimately connected to mitochondrial dysfunction and that toxicity reduction in fly and rat primary neurons and human cell lines can be achieved using overexpression of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1. Interestingly, TRAP1 has previously been shown to be phosphorylated by the serine/threonine kinase PINK1, thus providing a potential link of PINK1 via TRAP1 to α-Synuclein. PMID:22319455

  12. Strong interactions with polyethylenimine-coated human serum albumin nanoparticles (PEI-HSA NPs) alter α-synuclein conformation and aggregation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad-Beigi, Hossein; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Marvian, Amir Tayaranian; Pedersen, Jannik Nedergaard; Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Christiansen, Gunna; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Dong, Mingdong; Morshedi, Dina; Otzen, Daniel E.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between nanoparticles (NPs) and the small intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein (αSN), whose aggregation is central in the development of Parkinson's disease, is of great relevance in biomedical applications of NPs as drug carriers. Here we showed using a combination of different techniques that αSN interacts strongly with positively charged polyethylenimine-coated human serum albumin (PEI-HSA) NPs, leading to a significant alteration in the αSN secondary structure. In contrast, the weak interactions of αSN with HSA NPs allowed αSN to remain unfolded. These different levels of interactions had different effects on αSN aggregation. While the weakly interacting HSA NPs did not alter the aggregation kinetic parameters of αSN, the rate of primary nucleation increased in the presence of PEI-HSA NPs. The aggregation rate changed in a PEI-HSA NP-concentration dependent and size independent manner and led to fibrils which were covered with small aggregates. Furthermore, PEI-HSA NPs reduced the level of membrane-perturbing oligomers and reduced oligomer toxicity in cell assays, highlighting a potential role for NPs in reducing αSN pathogenicity in vivo. Collectively, our results highlight the fact that a simple modification of NPs can strongly modulate interactions with target proteins, which may have important and positive implications in NP safety.The interaction between nanoparticles (NPs) and the small intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein (αSN), whose aggregation is central in the development of Parkinson's disease, is of great relevance in biomedical applications of NPs as drug carriers. Here we showed using a combination of different techniques that αSN interacts strongly with positively charged polyethylenimine-coated human serum albumin (PEI-HSA) NPs, leading to a significant alteration in the αSN secondary structure. In contrast, the weak interactions of αSN with HSA NPs allowed αSN to remain unfolded. These different

  13. α-Synuclein is a Novel Microtubule Dynamase.

    PubMed

    Cartelli, Daniele; Aliverti, Alessandro; Barbiroli, Alberto; Santambrogio, Carlo; Ragg, Enzio M; Casagrande, Francesca V M; Cantele, Francesca; Beltramone, Silvia; Marangon, Jacopo; De Gregorio, Carmelita; Pandini, Vittorio; Emanuele, Marco; Chieregatti, Evelina; Pieraccini, Stefano; Holmqvist, Staffan; Bubacco, Luigi; Roybon, Laurent; Pezzoli, Gianni; Grandori, Rita; Arnal, Isabelle; Cappelletti, Graziella

    2016-01-01

    α-Synuclein is a presynaptic protein associated to Parkinson's disease, which is unstructured when free in the cytoplasm and adopts α helical conformation when bound to vesicles. After decades of intense studies, α-Synuclein physiology is still difficult to clear up due to its interaction with multiple partners and its involvement in a pletora of neuronal functions. Here, we looked at the remarkably neglected interplay between α-Synuclein and microtubules, which potentially impacts on synaptic functionality. In order to identify the mechanisms underlying these actions, we investigated the interaction between purified α-Synuclein and tubulin. We demonstrated that α-Synuclein binds to microtubules and tubulin α2β2 tetramer; the latter interaction inducing the formation of helical segment(s) in the α-Synuclein polypeptide. This structural change seems to enable α-Synuclein to promote microtubule nucleation and to enhance microtubule growth rate and catastrophe frequency, both in vitro and in cell. We also showed that Parkinson's disease-linked α-Synuclein variants do not undergo tubulin-induced folding and cause tubulin aggregation rather than polymerization. Our data enable us to propose α-Synuclein as a novel, foldable, microtubule-dynamase, which influences microtubule organisation through its binding to tubulin and its regulating effects on microtubule nucleation and dynamics. PMID:27628239

  14. α-Synuclein is a Novel Microtubule Dynamase

    PubMed Central

    Cartelli, Daniele; Aliverti, Alessandro; Barbiroli, Alberto; Santambrogio, Carlo; Ragg, Enzio M.; Casagrande, Francesca V.M.; Cantele, Francesca; Beltramone, Silvia; Marangon, Jacopo; De Gregorio, Carmelita; Pandini, Vittorio; Emanuele, Marco; Chieregatti, Evelina; Pieraccini, Stefano; Holmqvist, Staffan; Bubacco, Luigi; Roybon, Laurent; Pezzoli, Gianni; Grandori, Rita; Arnal, Isabelle; Cappelletti, Graziella

    2016-01-01

    α-Synuclein is a presynaptic protein associated to Parkinson’s disease, which is unstructured when free in the cytoplasm and adopts α helical conformation when bound to vesicles. After decades of intense studies, α-Synuclein physiology is still difficult to clear up due to its interaction with multiple partners and its involvement in a pletora of neuronal functions. Here, we looked at the remarkably neglected interplay between α-Synuclein and microtubules, which potentially impacts on synaptic functionality. In order to identify the mechanisms underlying these actions, we investigated the interaction between purified α-Synuclein and tubulin. We demonstrated that α-Synuclein binds to microtubules and tubulin α2β2 tetramer; the latter interaction inducing the formation of helical segment(s) in the α-Synuclein polypeptide. This structural change seems to enable α-Synuclein to promote microtubule nucleation and to enhance microtubule growth rate and catastrophe frequency, both in vitro and in cell. We also showed that Parkinson’s disease-linked α-Synuclein variants do not undergo tubulin-induced folding and cause tubulin aggregation rather than polymerization. Our data enable us to propose α-Synuclein as a novel, foldable, microtubule-dynamase, which influences microtubule organisation through its binding to tubulin and its regulating effects on microtubule nucleation and dynamics. PMID:27628239

  15. Brain propagation of transduced α-synuclein involves non-fibrillar protein species and is enhanced in α-synuclein null mice.

    PubMed

    Helwig, Michael; Klinkenberg, Michael; Rusconi, Raffaella; Musgrove, Ruth E; Majbour, Nour K; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Ulusoy, Ayse; Di Monte, Donato A

    2016-03-01

    Aggregation and neuron-to-neuron transmission are attributes of α-synuclein relevant to its pathogenetic role in human synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease. Intraparenchymal injections of fibrillar α-synuclein trigger widespread propagation of amyloidogenic protein species via mechanisms that require expression of endogenous α-synuclein and, possibly, its structural corruption by misfolded conformers acting as pathological seeds. Here we describe another paradigm of long-distance brain diffusion of α-synuclein that involves inter-neuronal transfer of monomeric and/or oligomeric species and is independent of recruitment of the endogenous protein. Targeted expression of human α-synuclein was induced in the mouse medulla oblongata through an injection of viral vectors into the vagus nerve. Enhanced levels of intra-neuronal α-synuclein were sufficient to initiate its caudo-rostral diffusion that likely involved at least one synaptic transfer and progressively reached specific brain regions such as the locus coeruleus, dorsal raphae and amygdala in the pons, midbrain and forebrain. Transfer of human α-synuclein was compared in two separate lines of α-synuclein-deficient mice versus their respective wild-type controls and, interestingly, lack of endogenous α-synuclein expression did not counteract diffusion but actually resulted in a more pronounced and advanced propagation of exogenous α-synuclein. Self-interaction of adjacent molecules of human α-synuclein was detected in both wild-type and mutant mice. In the former, interaction of human α-synuclein with mouse α-synuclein was also observed and might have contributed to differences in protein transmission. In wild-type and α-synuclein-deficient mice, accumulation of human α-synuclein within recipient axons in the pons, midbrain and forebrain caused morphological evidence of neuritic pathology. Tissue sections from the medulla oblongata and pons were stained with different antibodies recognizing

  16. Brain propagation of transduced α-synuclein involves non-fibrillar protein species and is enhanced in α-synuclein null mice.

    PubMed

    Helwig, Michael; Klinkenberg, Michael; Rusconi, Raffaella; Musgrove, Ruth E; Majbour, Nour K; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Ulusoy, Ayse; Di Monte, Donato A

    2016-03-01

    Aggregation and neuron-to-neuron transmission are attributes of α-synuclein relevant to its pathogenetic role in human synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease. Intraparenchymal injections of fibrillar α-synuclein trigger widespread propagation of amyloidogenic protein species via mechanisms that require expression of endogenous α-synuclein and, possibly, its structural corruption by misfolded conformers acting as pathological seeds. Here we describe another paradigm of long-distance brain diffusion of α-synuclein that involves inter-neuronal transfer of monomeric and/or oligomeric species and is independent of recruitment of the endogenous protein. Targeted expression of human α-synuclein was induced in the mouse medulla oblongata through an injection of viral vectors into the vagus nerve. Enhanced levels of intra-neuronal α-synuclein were sufficient to initiate its caudo-rostral diffusion that likely involved at least one synaptic transfer and progressively reached specific brain regions such as the locus coeruleus, dorsal raphae and amygdala in the pons, midbrain and forebrain. Transfer of human α-synuclein was compared in two separate lines of α-synuclein-deficient mice versus their respective wild-type controls and, interestingly, lack of endogenous α-synuclein expression did not counteract diffusion but actually resulted in a more pronounced and advanced propagation of exogenous α-synuclein. Self-interaction of adjacent molecules of human α-synuclein was detected in both wild-type and mutant mice. In the former, interaction of human α-synuclein with mouse α-synuclein was also observed and might have contributed to differences in protein transmission. In wild-type and α-synuclein-deficient mice, accumulation of human α-synuclein within recipient axons in the pons, midbrain and forebrain caused morphological evidence of neuritic pathology. Tissue sections from the medulla oblongata and pons were stained with different antibodies recognizing

  17. α-Synuclein Fibrils Exhibit Gain of Toxic Function, Promoting Tau Aggregation and Inhibiting Microtubule Assembly.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Takayuki; Nonaka, Takashi; Terada, Makoto; Tamaoka, Akira; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Hasegawa, Masato

    2016-07-15

    α-Synuclein is the major component of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in Parkinson disease and dementia with Lewy bodies and of glial cytoplasmic inclusions in multiple system atrophy. It has been suggested that α-synuclein fibrils or intermediate protofibrils in the process of fibril formation may have a toxic effect on neuronal cells. In this study, we investigated the ability of soluble monomeric α-synuclein to promote microtubule assembly and the effects of conformational changes of α-synuclein on Tau-promoted microtubule assembly. In marked contrast to previous findings, monomeric α-synuclein had no effect on microtubule polymerization. However, both α-synuclein fibrils and protofibrils inhibited Tau-promoted microtubule assembly. The inhibitory effect of α-synuclein fibrils was greater than that of the protofibrils. Dot blot overlay assay and spin-down techniques revealed that α-synuclein fibrils bind to Tau and inhibit microtubule assembly by depleting the Tau available for microtubule polymerization. Using various deletion mutants of α-synuclein and Tau, the acidic C-terminal region of α-synuclein and the basic central region of Tau were identified as regions involved in the binding. Furthermore, introduction of α-synuclein fibrils into cultured cells overexpressing Tau protein induced Tau aggregation. These results raise the possibility that α-synuclein fibrils interact with Tau, inhibit its function to stabilize microtubules, and also promote Tau aggregation, leading to dysfunction of neuronal cells.

  18. Endogenous catecholamine enhances the dysfunction of unfolded protein response and alpha-synuclein oligomerization in PC12 cells overexpressing human alpha-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Ito, Satoru; Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Imamura, Keiko; Takeshima, Takao; Nakashima, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies. alpha-Synuclein is a major component of Lewy bodies. Recently, many studies have focused on the interaction between alpha-synuclein and catecholamine in the pathogenesis of PD. However, no detailed relationship between cathecholamine and alpha-synuclein cytotoxicity has been elucidated. Therefore, this study established PC12 cell lines which overexpress human alpha-synuclein in a tetracycline-inducible manner. The overexpression of human alpha-synuclein increased the number of apoptotic cells in a long-term culture. Moreover, human alpha-synuclein expressing PC12 cells demonstrated an increased vulnerability to several stressors in a short culture period. Thapsigargin increased the SDS soluble oligomers of alpha-synuclein associated with catecholamine-quinone. The unfolded protein response (UPR) study showed that thapsigargin increased eIF2alpha phosphorylation and nuclear GADD153/CHOP induction under alpha-synuclein overexpressed conditions. The activities of the ATF6alpha and IRE1alpha pathways decreased. These findings suggest that an overexpression of alpha-synuclein partly inactivates the UPR. alpha-Methyltyrosine inhibited the dysfunction of the UPR caused by an overexpression of human alpha-synuclein. Therefore, these findings suggest that the coexistence of human alpha-synuclein with catecholamine enhances the endoplasmic reticulum stress-related toxicity in PD pathogenesis.

  19. Elevated α-synuclein caused by SNCA gene triplication impairs neuronal differentiation and maturation in Parkinson's patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, L M A; Falomir-Lockhart, L J; Botelho, M G; Lin, K-H; Wales, P; Koch, J C; Gerhardt, E; Taschenberger, H; Outeiro, T F; Lingor, P; Schüle, B; Arndt-Jovin, D J; Jovin, T M

    2015-01-01

    We have assessed the impact of α-synuclein overexpression on the differentiation potential and phenotypic signatures of two neural-committed induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from a Parkinson's disease patient with a triplication of the human SNCA genomic locus. In parallel, comparative studies were performed on two control lines derived from healthy individuals and lines generated from the patient iPS-derived neuroprogenitor lines infected with a lentivirus incorporating a small hairpin RNA to knock down the SNCA mRNA. The SNCA triplication lines exhibited a reduced capacity to differentiate into dopaminergic or GABAergic neurons and decreased neurite outgrowth and lower neuronal activity compared with control cultures. This delayed maturation phenotype was confirmed by gene expression profiling, which revealed a significant reduction in mRNA for genes implicated in neuronal differentiation such as delta-like homolog 1 (DLK1), gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptor subunit 2 (GABABR2), nuclear receptor related 1 protein (NURR1), G-protein-regulated inward-rectifier potassium channel 2 (GIRK-2) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). The differentiated patient cells also demonstrated increased autophagic flux when stressed with chloroquine. We conclude that a two-fold overexpression of α-synuclein caused by a triplication of the SNCA gene is sufficient to impair the differentiation of neuronal progenitor cells, a finding with implications for adult neurogenesis and Parkinson's disease progression, particularly in the context of bioenergetic dysfunction. PMID:26610207

  20. Neuroinvasion of α-Synuclein Prionoids after Intraperitoneal and Intraglossal Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Breid, Sara; Bernis, Maria E.; Babila, Julius T.; Garza, Maria C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT α-Synuclein is a soluble, cellular protein that in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy, forms pathological deposits of protein aggregates. Because misfolded α-synuclein has some characteristics that resemble those of prions, we investigated its potential to induce disease after intraperitoneal or intraglossal challenge injection into bigenic Tg(M83+/−:Gfap-luc+/−) mice, which express the A53T mutant of human α-synuclein and firefly luciferase. After a single intraperitoneal injection with α-synuclein fibrils, four of five mice developed paralysis and α-synuclein pathology in the central nervous system, with a median incubation time of 229 ± 17 days. Diseased mice accumulated aggregates of Sarkosyl-insoluble and phosphorylated α-synuclein in the brain and spinal cord, which colocalized with ubiquitin and p62 and were accompanied by gliosis. In contrast, only one of five mice developed α-synuclein pathology in the central nervous system after intraglossal injection with α-synuclein fibrils, after 285 days. These findings are novel and important because they show that, similar to prions, α-synuclein prionoids can neuroinvade the central nervous system after intraperitoneal or intraglossal injection and can cause neuropathology and disease. IMPORTANCE Synucleinopathies are neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by the pathological presence of aggregated α-synuclein in cells of the nervous system. Previous studies have shown that α-synuclein aggregates made of recombinant protein or derived from brains of patients can spread in the central nervous system in a spatiotemporal manner when inoculated into the brains of animals and can induce pathology and neurologic disease, suggesting that misfolded α-synuclein can behave similarly to prions. Here we show that α-synuclein inoculation into the peritoneal cavity or the tongue in mice overexpressing α-synuclein causes

  1. Induction of α-synuclein aggregate formation by CSF exosomes from patients with Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Stuendl, Anne; Kunadt, Marcel; Kruse, Niels; Bartels, Claudia; Moebius, Wiebke; Danzer, Karin M; Mollenhauer, Brit; Schneider, Anja

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular α-synuclein has been proposed as a crucial mechanism for induction of pathological aggregate formation in previously healthy cells. In vitro, extracellular α-synuclein is partially associated with exosomal vesicles. Recently, we have provided evidence that exosomal α-synuclein is present in the central nervous system in vivo. We hypothesized that exosomal α-synuclein species from patients with α-synuclein related neurodegeneration serve as carriers for interneuronal disease transmission. We isolated exosomes from cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, progressive supranuclear palsy as a non-α-synuclein related disorder that clinically overlaps with Parkinson's disease, and neurological controls. Cerebrospinal fluid exosome numbers, α-synuclein protein content of cerebrospinal fluid exosomes and their potential to induce oligomerization of α-synuclein were analysed. The quantification of cerebrospinal fluid exosomal α-synuclein showed distinct differences between patients with Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. In addition, exosomal α-synuclein levels correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment in cross-sectional samples from patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. Importantly, cerebrospinal fluid exosomes derived from Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies induce oligomerization of α-synuclein in a reporter cell line in a dose-dependent manner. Our data suggest that cerebrospinal fluid exosomes from patients with Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies contain a pathogenic species of α-synuclein, which could initiate oligomerization of soluble α-synuclein in target cells and confer disease pathology.

  2. Alpha-Synuclein Function and Dysfunction on Cellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Snead, David

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein is a small neuronal protein that is closely associated with the etiology of Parkinson's disease. Mutations in and alterations in expression levels of alpha-synuclein cause autosomal dominant early onset heredity forms of Parkinson's disease, and sporadic Parkinson's disease is defined in part by the presence of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites that are composed primarily of alpha-synuclein deposited in an aggregated amyloid fibril state. The normal function of alpha-synuclein is poorly understood, and the precise mechanisms by which it leads to toxicity and cell death are also unclear. Although alpha-synuclein is a highly soluble, cytoplasmic protein, it binds to a variety of cellular membranes of different properties and compositions. These interactions are considered critical for at least some normal functions of alpha-synuclein, and may well play critical roles in both the aggregation of the protein and its mechanisms of toxicity. Here we review the known features of alpha-synuclein membrane interactions in the context of both the putative functions of the protein and of its pathological roles in disease. PMID:25548530

  3. Small molecule-mediated stabilization of vesicle-associated helical α-synuclein inhibits pathogenic misfolding and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Ornelas, Luis; Eisbach, Sybille E; Paulat, Maria; Giller, Karin; Fernández, Claudio O; Outeiro, Tiago F; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2014-01-01

    α-synuclein is an abundant presynaptic protein that is important for regulation of synaptic vesicle trafficking, and whose misfolding plays a key role in Parkinson's disease. While α-synuclein is disordered in solution, it folds into a helical conformation when bound to synaptic vesicles. Stabilization of helical, folded α-synuclein might therefore interfere with α-synuclein-induced neurotoxicity. Here we show that several small molecules, which delay aggregation of α-synuclein in solution, including the Parkinson's disease drug selegiline, fail to interfere with misfolding of vesicle-bound α-synuclein. In contrast, the porphyrin phtalocyanine tetrasulfonate directly binds to vesicle-bound α-synuclein, stabilizes its helical conformation and thereby delays pathogenic misfolding and aggregation. Our study suggests that small-molecule-mediated stabilization of helical vesicle-bound α-synuclein opens new possibilities to target Parkinson's disease and related synucleinopathies. PMID:25524885

  4. Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging Detects Microstructural Alterations in Brain of α-Synuclein Overexpressing Transgenic Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Amit; Latta, Peter; Drazanova, Eva; Ruda-Kucerova, Jana; Szabó, Nikoletta; Arab, Anas; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Havas, Daniel; Windisch, Manfred; Sulcova, Alexandra; Starcuk, Zenon; Rektorova, Irena

    2015-11-01

    Evidence suggests that accumulation and aggregation of α-synuclein contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) will provide a sensitive tool for differentiating between α-synuclein-overexpressing transgenic mouse model of PD (TNWT-61) and wild-type (WT) littermates. This experiment was designed as a proof-of-concept study and forms a part of a complex protocol and ongoing translational research. Nine-month-old TNWT-61 mice and age-matched WT littermates underwent behavioral tests to monitor motor impairment and MRI scanning using 9.4 Tesla system in vivo. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and the DKI protocol were used to compare the whole brain white matter of TNWT-61 and WT mice. In addition, region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed in gray matter regions such as substantia nigra, striatum, hippocampus, sensorimotor cortex, and thalamus known to show higher accumulation of α-synuclein. For the ROI analysis, both DKI (6 b-values) protocol and conventional (2 b-values) diffusion tensor imaging (cDTI) protocol were used. TNWT-61 mice showed significant impairment of motor coordination. With the DKI protocol, mean, axial, and radial kurtosis were found to be significantly elevated, whereas mean and radial diffusivity were decreased in the TNWT-61 group compared to that in the WT controls with both TBSS and ROI analysis. With the cDTI protocol, the ROI analysis showed decrease in all diffusivity parameters in TNWT-61 mice. The current study provides evidence that DKI by providing both kurtosis and diffusivity parameters gives unique information that is complementary to cDTI for in vivo detection of pathological changes that underlie PD-like symptomatology in TNWT-61 mouse model of PD. This result is a crucial step in search for a candidate diagnostic biomarker with translational potential and relevance for human studies.

  5. A53T human α-synuclein overexpression in transgenic mice induces pervasive mitochondria macroautophagy defects preceding dopamine neuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linan; Xie, Zhiguo; Turkson, Susie; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2015-01-21

    In vitro evidence suggests that the inefficient removal of damaged mitochondria by macroautophagy contributes to Parkinson's disease (PD). Using a tissue-specific gene amplification strategy, we generated a transgenic mouse line with human α-synuclein A53T overexpression specifically in dopamine (DA) neurons. Transgenic mice showed profound early-onset mitochondria abnormalities, characterized by macroautophagy marker-positive cytoplasmic inclusions containing mainly mitochondrial remnants, which preceded the degeneration of DA neurons. Genetic deletion of either parkin or PINK1 in these transgenic mice significantly worsened mitochondrial pathologies, including drastically enlarged inclusions and loss of total mitochondria contents. These data suggest that mitochondria are the main targets of α-synuclein and their defective autophagic clearance plays a significant role during pathogenesis. Moreover, endogenous PINK1 or parkin is indispensable for the proper autophagic removal of damaged mitochondria. Our data for the first time establish an essential link between mitochondria macroautophagy impairments and DA neuron degeneration in an in vivo model based on known PD genetics. The model, its well-defined pathologies, and the demonstration of a main pathogenesis pathway in the present study have set the stage and direction of emphasis for future studies.

  6. α-Synuclein-induced synapse damage in cultured neurons is mediated by cholesterol-sensitive activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Williams, Alun

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of aggregated forms of the α-synuclein (αSN) is associated with the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Dementia with Lewy Bodies. The loss of synapses is an important event in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Here we show that aggregated recombinant human αSN, but not βSN, triggered synapse damage in cultured neurons as measured by the loss of synaptic proteins. Pre-treatment with the selective cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) inhibitors AACOCF3 and MAFP protected neurons against αSN-induced synapse damage. Synapse damage was associated with the αSN-induced activation of synaptic cPLA2 and the production of prostaglandin E2. The activation of cPLA2 is the first step in the generation of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and PAF receptor antagonists (ginkgolide B or Hexa-PAF) also protect neurons against αSN-induced synapse damage. αSN-induced synapse damage was also reduced in neurons pre-treated with the cholesterol synthesis inhibitor (squalestatin). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that αSN triggered synapse damage via hyperactivation of cPLA2. They also indicate that αSN-induced activation of cPLA2 is influenced by the cholesterol content of membranes. Inhibitors of this pathway that can cross the blood brain barrier may protect against the synapse damage seen during PD. PMID:25761116

  7. α-Synuclein: Experimental Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Masato; Nonaka, Takashi; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami

    2016-01-01

    α-Synuclein, which is present as a small, soluble, cytosolic protein in healthy subjects, is converted to amyloid-like fibrils in diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Bulk synthesis of purified α-synuclein has made it more convenient to study the nature of the normal protein and the mechanism of its conversion to an abnormal form in vitro and in vivo. Synthetic α-synuclein fibrils and pathological α-synuclein from diseased brains can act as triggers to convert normal α-synuclein to an abnormal form via prion-like mechanisms. In this article, we describe the experimental pathologies of α-synuclein both in vitro and in vivo in human and animal models. Prion-like spreading of abnormal α-synuclein from cell to cell can account for the progression of these α-synucleinopathies. PMID:27481772

  8. Recombinant expression and phenotypic screening of a bioactive cyclotide against α-synuclein-induced cytotoxicity in baker’s yeast

    PubMed Central

    Jagadish, Krishnappa; Gould, Andrew; Borra, Radhika; Majumder, Subhabrata; Mushtaq, Zahid; Shekhtman, Alexander; Camarero, Julio A.

    2015-01-01

    We report for the first time the recombinant expression of fully folded bioactive cyclotides inside live yeast cells by using intracellular protein trans-splicing in combination with a highly efficient split-intein. This approach was successfully used to produce the naturally occurring cyclotide MCoTI-I and the engineered bioactive cyclotide MCoCP4. Cyclotide MCoCP4 was shown reduce the toxicity of human α-synuclein in live yeast cells. Cyclotide MCoCP4 was selected by phenotypic screening from cells transformed with a mixture of plasmids encoding MCoCP4 and inactive cyclotide MCoTI-I in a ratio of 1 to 5×104. This demonstrates the potential for using yeast to perform phenotypic screening of genetically-encoded cyclotide-based libraries in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26096948

  9. Recombinant Expression and Phenotypic Screening of a Bioactive Cyclotide Against α-Synuclein-Induced Cytotoxicity in Baker's Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jagadish, Krishnappa; Gould, Andrew; Borra, Radhika; Majumder, Subhabrata; Mushtaq, Zahid; Shekhtman, Alexander; Camarero, Julio A

    2015-07-13

    We report for the first time the recombinant expression of fully folded bioactive cyclotides inside live yeast cells by using intracellular protein trans-splicing in combination with a highly efficient split-intein. This approach was successfully used to produce the naturally occurring cyclotide MCoTI-I and the engineered bioactive cyclotide MCoCP4. Cyclotide MCoCP4 was shown to reduce the toxicity of human α-synuclein in live yeast cells. Cyclotide MCoCP4 was selected by phenotypic screening from cells transformed with a mixture of plasmids encoding MCoCP4 and inactive cyclotide MCoTI-I in a ratio of 1:5×10(4). This demonstrates the potential for using yeast to perform phenotypic screening of genetically encoded cyclotide-based libraries in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26096948

  10. Extracellular alpha-synuclein induces calpain-dependent overactivation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Czapski, Grzegorz A; Gąssowska, Magdalena; Wilkaniec, Anna; Cieślik, Magdalena; Adamczyk, Agata

    2013-09-17

    Extracellular alpha-synuclein (ASN) could be involved in the pathomechanism of Parkinson's disease (PD) via disturbances of calcium homeostasis, activation of nitric oxide synthase and oxidative/nitrosative stress. In this study we analyzed the role of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in the molecular mechanism(s) of ASN toxicity. We found that exposure of PC12 cells to ASN increases Cdk5 activity via calpain-dependent p25 formation and by enhancement of Cdk5 phosphorylation at Tyr15. Cdk5 and calpain inhibitors prevented ASN-evoked cell death. Our findings, indicating the participation of Cdk5 in ASN toxicity, provide new insight into how extracellular ASN may trigger dopaminergic cell dysfunction in PD.

  11. Recombinant Expression and Phenotypic Screening of a Bioactive Cyclotide Against α-Synuclein-Induced Cytotoxicity in Baker's Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jagadish, Krishnappa; Gould, Andrew; Borra, Radhika; Majumder, Subhabrata; Mushtaq, Zahid; Shekhtman, Alexander; Camarero, Julio A

    2015-07-13

    We report for the first time the recombinant expression of fully folded bioactive cyclotides inside live yeast cells by using intracellular protein trans-splicing in combination with a highly efficient split-intein. This approach was successfully used to produce the naturally occurring cyclotide MCoTI-I and the engineered bioactive cyclotide MCoCP4. Cyclotide MCoCP4 was shown to reduce the toxicity of human α-synuclein in live yeast cells. Cyclotide MCoCP4 was selected by phenotypic screening from cells transformed with a mixture of plasmids encoding MCoCP4 and inactive cyclotide MCoTI-I in a ratio of 1:5×10(4). This demonstrates the potential for using yeast to perform phenotypic screening of genetically encoded cyclotide-based libraries in eukaryotic cells.

  12. Preconditioning of Microglia by α-Synuclein Strongly Affects the Response Induced by Toll-like Receptor (TLR) Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Rey, Elena; Lachaud, Christian C.; Guilliams, Tim; Fernandez-Montesinos, Rafael; Benitez-Rondan, Alicia; Robledo, Gema; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Delgado, Mario; Dobson, Christopher M.; Pozo, David

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become accepted that α-synuclein (αSyn) has a key role in the microglia-mediated neuroinflammation, which accompanies the development of Parkinson’s disease and other related disorders, such as Dementia with Lewy Bodies and Alzheimer’s disease. Nevertheless, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying its pathological actions, especially in the sporadic forms of the diseases, are not completely understood. Intriguingly, several epidemiological and animal model studies have revealed a link between certain microbial infections and the onset or progression of sporadic forms of these neurodegenerative disorders. In this work, we have characterized the effect of toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation on primary murine microglial cultures and analysed the impact of priming cells with extracellular wild-type (Wt) αSyn on the subsequent TLR stimulation of cells with a set of TLR ligands. By assaying key interleukins and chemokines we report that specific stimuli, in particular Pam3Csk4 (Pam3) and single-stranded RNA40 (ssRNA), can differentially affect the TLR2/1- and TLR7-mediated responses of microglia when pre-conditioned with αSyn by augmenting IL-6, MCP-1/CCL2 or IP-10/CXCL10 secretion levels. Furthermore, we report a skewing of αSyn-primed microglia stimulated with ssRNA (TLR7) or Pam3 (TLR2/1) towards intermediate but at the same time differential, M1/M2 phenotypes. Finally, we show that the levels and intracellular location of activated caspase-3 protein change significantly in αSyn-primed microglia after stimulation with these particular TLR agonists. Overall, we report a remarkable impact of non-aggregated αSyn pre-sensitization of microglia on TLR-mediated immunity, a phenomenon that could contribute to triggering the onset of sporadic α-synuclein-related neuropathologies. PMID:24236103

  13. Alpha-synuclein up-regulation and aggregation during MPP+-induced apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells: intermediacy of transferrin receptor iron and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Kalivendi, Shasi V; Cunningham, Sonya; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar; Joseph, Joy; Hillard, Cecilia J; Kalyanaraman, B

    2004-04-01

    1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) is a neurotoxin that causes Parkinson's disease in experimental animals and humans. Despite the fact that intracellular iron was shown to be crucial for MPP(+)-induced apoptotic cell death, the molecular mechanisms for the iron requirement remain unclear. We investigated the role of transferrin receptor (TfR) and iron in modulating the expression of alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn) in MPP(+)-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Results show that MPP(+) inhibits mitochondrial complex-1 and aconitase activities leading to enhanced H(2)O(2) generation, TfR expression and alpha-syn expression/aggregation. Pretreatment with cell-permeable iron chelators, TfR antibody (that inhibits TfR-mediated iron uptake), or transfection with glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) enzyme inhibits intracellular oxidant generation, alpha-syn expression/aggregation, and apoptotic signaling as measured by caspase-3 activation. Cells overexpressing alpha-syn exacerbated MPP(+) toxicity, whereas antisense alpha-syn treatment totally abrogated MPP(+)-induced apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells without affecting oxidant generation. The increased cytotoxic effects of alpha-syn in MPP(+)-treated cells were attributed to inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase and proteasomal function. We conclude that MPP(+)-induced iron signaling is responsible for intracellular oxidant generation, alpha-syn expression, proteasomal dysfunction, and apoptosis. Relevance to Parkinson's disease is discussed. PMID:14742448

  14. Protective role of olesoxime against wild-type α-synuclein-induced toxicity in human neuronally differentiated SHSY-5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Gouarné, C; Tracz, J; Paoli, M Giraudon; Deluca, V; Seimandi, M; Tardif, G; Xilouri, M; Stefanis, L; Bordet, T; Pruss, R M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Parkinson's disease (PD) is usually diagnosed clinically from classical motor symptoms, while definitive diagnosis is made postmortem, based on the presence of Lewy bodies and nigral neuron cell loss. α-Synuclein (ASYN), the main protein component of Lewy bodies, clearly plays a role in the neurodegeneration that characterizes PD. Additionally, mutation in the SNCA gene or copy number variations are associated with some forms of familial PD. Here, the objective of the study was to evaluate whether olesoxime, a promising neuroprotective drug can prevent ASYN-mediated neurotoxicity. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used here a novel, mechanistically approachable and attractive cellular model based on the inducible overexpression of human wild-type ASYN in neuronally differentiated human neuroblastoma (SHSY-5Y) cells. This model demonstrates gradual cellular degeneration, coinciding temporally with the appearance of soluble and membrane-bound ASYN oligomers and cell death combining both apoptotic and non-apoptotic pathways. KEY RESULTS Olesoxime fully protected differentiated SHSY-5Y cells from cell death, neurite retraction and cytoplasmic shrinkage induced by moderate ASYN overexpression. This protection was associated with a reduction in cytochrome c release from mitochondria and caspase-9 activation suggesting that olesoxime prevented ASYN toxicity by preserving mitochondrial integrity and function. In addition, olesoxime displayed neurotrophic effects on neuronally differentiated SHSY-5Y cells, independent of ASYN expression, by promoting their differentiation. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Because ASYN is a common underlying factor in many cases of PD, olesoxime could be a promising therapy to slow neurodegeneration in PD. PMID:25220617

  15. Extracellular α-synuclein--a possible initiator of inflammation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wen-qing; Tian, Zeng-min; Yin, Feng; Sun, Jun-zhao; Zhang, Jian-ning

    2016-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease involving the loss of dopamine-producing neurons of the substantia nigra and the presence of Lewy bodies which contain high levels of α-synuclein. Although the causative factors of PD remain unclear, the progression of PD is accompanied by a highly localized inflammatory response mediated by reactive microglia. Recently, attention has focused on the relationship between α-synuclein and microglial activation. This review examines the role of α-synuclein on microglia in PD pathogenesis and progression, we also discuss the way of α-synuclein induced microglial activation. PMID:27004367

  16. Biochemical alterations during swimming induced stress.

    PubMed

    Aruj, N; Sharafatullah, T; Najam, R; Ahmed, S P; Ahmad, S I

    1994-07-01

    Stress can be defined as any stimulus that creates an imbalance in the internal environment. Hypothalamus has sensors that detect changes produced in the body. Stress can cause diseases by altering immune system, cardiovascular System neurotransmitter and neuroendocrine functions. Present study is designed to evaluate the effect of stress on few biochemical parameters during swimming induced stress. Significant changes have been observed especially in lipid profile. Corticosterone was also evaluated as reliable stress marker.

  17. α-Synuclein-induced lysosomal dysfunction occurs through disruptions in protein trafficking in human midbrain synucleinopathy models.

    PubMed

    Mazzulli, Joseph R; Zunke, Friederike; Isacson, Ole; Studer, Lorenz; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-02-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of protein aggregates comprised of α-synuclein (α-syn). A major barrier in treatment discovery for PD is the lack of identifiable therapeutic pathways capable of reducing aggregates in human neuronal model systems. Mutations in key components of protein trafficking and cellular degradation machinery represent important risk factors for PD; however, their precise role in disease progression and interaction with α-syn remains unclear. Here, we find that α-syn accumulation reduced lysosomal degradation capacity in human midbrain dopamine models of synucleinopathies through disrupting hydrolase trafficking. Accumulation of α-syn at the cell body resulted in aberrant association with cis-Golgi-tethering factor GM130 and disrupted the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi localization of rab1a, a key mediator of vesicular transport. Overexpression of rab1a restored Golgi structure, improved hydrolase trafficking and activity, and reduced pathological α-syn in patient neurons. Our work suggests that enhancement of lysosomal hydrolase trafficking may prove beneficial in synucleinopathies and indicates that human midbrain disease models may be useful for identifying critical therapeutic pathways in PD and related disorders. PMID:26839413

  18. α-Synuclein-induced lysosomal dysfunction occurs through disruptions in protein trafficking in human midbrain synucleinopathy models.

    PubMed

    Mazzulli, Joseph R; Zunke, Friederike; Isacson, Ole; Studer, Lorenz; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-02-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of protein aggregates comprised of α-synuclein (α-syn). A major barrier in treatment discovery for PD is the lack of identifiable therapeutic pathways capable of reducing aggregates in human neuronal model systems. Mutations in key components of protein trafficking and cellular degradation machinery represent important risk factors for PD; however, their precise role in disease progression and interaction with α-syn remains unclear. Here, we find that α-syn accumulation reduced lysosomal degradation capacity in human midbrain dopamine models of synucleinopathies through disrupting hydrolase trafficking. Accumulation of α-syn at the cell body resulted in aberrant association with cis-Golgi-tethering factor GM130 and disrupted the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi localization of rab1a, a key mediator of vesicular transport. Overexpression of rab1a restored Golgi structure, improved hydrolase trafficking and activity, and reduced pathological α-syn in patient neurons. Our work suggests that enhancement of lysosomal hydrolase trafficking may prove beneficial in synucleinopathies and indicates that human midbrain disease models may be useful for identifying critical therapeutic pathways in PD and related disorders.

  19. Piceatannol and Other Wine Stilbenes: A Pool of Inhibitors against α-Synuclein Aggregation and Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Temsamani, Hamza; Krisa, Stéphanie; Decossas-Mendoza, Marion; Lambert, Olivier; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Richard, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    The aggregation of α-synuclein is one on the key pathogenic events in Parkinson’s disease. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory capacities of stilbenes against α-synuclein aggregation and toxicity. Thioflavin T fluorescence, transmission electronic microscopy, and SDS-PAGE analysis were performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of three stilbenes against α-synuclein aggregation: piceatannol, ampelopsin A, and isohopeaphenol. Lipid vesicle permeabilization assays were performed to screen stilbenes for protection against membrane damage induced by aggregated α-synuclein. The viability of PC12 cells was examined using an MTT assay to assess the preventive effects of stilbenes against α-synuclein-induced toxicity. Piceatannol inhibited the formation of α synuclein fibrils and was able to destabilize preformed filaments. It seems to induce the formation of small soluble complexes protecting membranes against α-synuclein-induced damage. Finally, piceatannol protected cells against α-synuclein-induced toxicity. The oligomers tested (ampelopsin A and hopeaphenol) were less active. PMID:27314384

  20. Hypergravity-induced altered behavior in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Wan, Judy; Marcu, Oana; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2012-07-01

    Microgravity and mechanical stress are important factors of the spaceflight environment, and affect astronaut health and behavior. Structural, functional, and behavioral mechanisms of all cells and organisms are adapted to Earth's gravitational force, 1G, while altered gravity can pose challenges to their adaptability to this new environment. On ground, hypergravity paradigms have been used to predict and complement studies on microgravity. Even small changes that take place at a molecular and genetic level during altered gravity may result in changes in phenotypic behavior. Drosophila provides a robust and simple, yet very reliable model system to understand the complexity of hypergravity-induced altered behavior, due to availability of a plethora of genetic tools. Locomotor behavior is a sensitive parameter that reflects the array of molecular adaptive mechanisms recruited during exposure to altered gravity. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of this behavior in a hypergravity environment could potentially extend our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in microgravity. In our laboratory we are trying to dissect out the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hypergravity-induced oxidative stress, and its potential consequences on behavioral alterations by using Drosophila as a model system. In the present study, we employed pan-neuronal and mushroom body specific knock-down adult flies by using Gal4/UAS system to express inverted repeat transgenes (RNAi) to monitor and quantify the hypergravity-induced behavior in Drosophila. We established that acute hypergravity (3G for 60 min) causes a significant and robust decrease in the locomotor behavior in adult Drosophila, and that this change is dependent on genes related to Parkinson's disease, such as DJ-1α , DJ-1β , and parkin. In addition, we also showed that anatomically the control of this behavior is significantly processed in the mushroom body region of the fly brain. This work links a molecular

  1. Non-Amyloid-β Component of Human α-Synuclein Oligomers Induces Formation of New Aβ Oligomers: Insight into the Mechanisms That Link Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Diseases.

    PubMed

    Atsmon-Raz, Yoav; Miller, Yifat

    2016-01-20

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the formation of Lewy bodies (LBs), of which their major component is the non-amyloid-β component (NAC) of α-synuclein (AS). Clinical studies have identified a link between PD and Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the question of why PD patients are at risk to develop various types of dementia, such as AD, is still elusive. In vivo studies have shown that Aβ can act as a seed for NAC/AS aggregation, promoting NAC/AS aggregation and thus contributing to the etiology of PD. However, the mechanisms by which NAC/AS oligomers interact with Aβ oligomers are still elusive. This work presents the interactions between NAC oligomers and Aβ oligomers at atomic resolution by applying extensive molecular dynamics simulations for an ensemble of cross-seeded NAC-Aβ(1-42) oligomers. The main conclusions of this study are as follows: first, the cross-seeded NAC-Aβ(1-42) oligomers represent polymorphic states, yet NAC oligomers prefer to interact with Aβ(1-42) oligomers to form double-layer over single-layer conformations due to electrostatic/hydrophobic interactions; second, among the single-layer conformations, the NAC oligomers induce formation of new β-strands in Aβ(1-42) oligomers, thus leading to new Aβ oligomer structures; and third, NAC oligomers stabilize the cross-β structure of Aβ oligomers, i.e., yielding compact Aβ fibril-like structures.

  2. alpha-Synuclein budding yeast model: toxicity enhanced by impaired proteasome and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nijee; Brandis, Katrina A; Herrera, Sara K; Johnson, Brandon E; Vaidya, Tulaza; Shrestha, Ruja; Debburman, Shubhik K

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that results from the selective loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Misfolding and aggregation of the protein alpha-synuclein, oxidative damage, and proteasomal impairment are all hypotheses for the molecular cause of this selective neurotoxicity. Here, we describe a Saccharomyces cerevisiae model to evaluate the misfolding, aggregation, and toxicity-inducing ability of wild-type alpha-synuclein and three mutants (A30P, A53T, and A30P/A53T), and we compare regulation of these properties by dysfunctional proteasomes and by oxidative stress. We found prominent localization of wild-type and A53T alpha-synuclein near the plasma membrane, supporting known in vitro lipid-binding ability. In contrast, A30P was mostly cytoplasmic, whereas A30P/A53T displayed both types of fluorescence. Surprisingly, alpha-synuclein was not toxic to several yeast strains tested. When yeast mutants for the proteasomal barrel (doa3-1) were evaluated, delayed alpha-synuclein synthesis and membrane association were observed; yeast mutant for the proteasomal cap (sen3-1) exhibited increased accumulation and aggregation of alpha-synuclein. Both sen3-1and doa3-1 mutants exhibited synthetic lethality with alpha-synuclein. When yeasts were challenged with an oxidant (hydrogen peroxide), alpha-synuclein was extremely lethal to cells that lacked manganese superoxide dismutase Mn-SOD (sod2Delta) but not to cells that lacked copper, zinc superoxide dismutase Cu,Zn-SOD (sod1Delta). Despite the toxicity, sod2Delta cells never displayed intracellular aggregates of alpha-synuclein. We suggest that the toxic alpha-synuclein species in yeast are smaller than the visible aggregates, and toxicity might involve alpha-synuclein membrane association. Thus, yeasts have emerged effective organisms for characterizing factors and mechanisms that regulate alpha-synuclein toxicity.

  3. Mutant and wild-type alpha-synuclein interact with mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase.

    PubMed

    Elkon, Hanock; Don, Jermy; Melamed, Eldad; Ziv, Ilan; Shirvan, Anat; Offen, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    Alpha-synuclein, a presynaptic protein, was found to be the major component in the Lewy bodies (LB) in both inherited and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). Furthermore, rare mutations of alpha-synuclein cause autosomal-dominant PD. However, it is unknown how alpha-synuclein is involved in the pathogenesis of nigral degeneration in PD. In this study, we examine the protein-protein interactions of wild-type and mutant (A53T) a-synuclein with adult human brain cDNA expression library using the yeast two-hybrid technique. We found that both normal and mutant alpha-synuclein specifically interact with the mitochondrial complex IV enzyme, cytochrome C oxidase (COX). Wild-type and mutant alpha-synuclein genes were further fused with c-Myc tag and translated in rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Using anti-c-Myc antibody, we demonstrated that both wild-type and mutant alpha-synuclein, coimmunoprecipitated with COX. We also showed that potassium cyanide, a selective COX inhibitor, synergistically enhanced the sensitivity of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to dopamine-induced cell death. In conclusion, we found specific protein-protein interactions of alpha-synuclein, a major LB protein, to COX, a key enzyme of the mithochondrial respiratory system. This interaction suggests that alpha-synuclein aggregation may contribute to enhance the mitochondrial dysfunction, which might be a key factor in the pathogenesis of PD.

  4. Defining the oligomerization state of γ-synuclein in solution and in cells.

    PubMed

    Golebiewska, Urszula; Zurawsky, Cassandra; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2014-01-21

    γ-Synuclein is expressed at high levels in neuronal cells and in multiple invasive cancers. Like its family member α-synuclein, γ-synuclein is thought to be natively unfolded but does not readily form fibrils. The function of γ-synuclein is unknown, but we have found that it interacts strongly with the enzyme phospholipase Cβ (PLCβ), altering its interaction with G proteins. As a first step in determining its role, we have characterized its oligomerization using fluorescence homotransfer, photon-counting histogram analysis, and native gel electrophoresis. We found that when its expressed in Escherichia coli and purified, γ-synuclein appears monomeric on chromatographs under denaturing conditions, but under native conditions, it appears as oligomers of varying sizes. We followed the monomer-to-tetramer association by labeling the protein with fluorescein and following the concentration-dependent loss in fluorescence anisotropy resulting from fluorescence homotransfer. We also performed photon-counting histogram analysis at increasing concentrations of fluorescein-labeled γ-synuclein and found concentration-dependent oligomerization. Addition of PLCβ2, a strong γ-synuclein binding partner whose cellular expression is correlated with γ-synuclein, results in disruption of γ-synuclein oligomers. Similarly, its binding to lipid membranes promotes the monomer form. When we exogenously express γ-synuclein or microinject purified protein into cells, the protein appears monomeric. Our studies show that even though purified γ-synuclein form oligomers, when binding partners are present, as in cells, it dissociates to a monomer to bind these partners, which in turn may modify protein function and integrity.

  5. DESIPRAMINE INDUCED CHANGES IN THE NOREPINEPRHINE TRANSPORTER, α- AND γ-SYNUCLEIN IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS, AMYGDALA AND STRIATUM

    PubMed Central

    Jeannotte, Alexis M.; McCarthy, John G.; Sidhu, Anita

    2009-01-01

    The high incidence of depression in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) has been well-documented in the clinic; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms of these overlapping pathologies remain elusive. Using a rodent model of depression, the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat, we previously demonstrated that in the frontal cortex the altered expression and protein interactions of alpha- and gamma-synculein (α-Syn, γ-Syn) were associated with dysregulated trafficking of the norepinephrine transporter (NET). Chronic treatment with Desipramine (DMI), a NET-selective antidepressant, caused a disappearance of depressive-like behavior that was accompanied by a change in α-Syn and γ-Syn expression and their trafficking of NET. Using this same model, we examined the expression of NET, α-Syn and γ-Syn in the hippocampus, amygdale, brainstem, and striatum, all regions implicated in the development or maintenance of depression or PD pathology. Following chronic treatment with DMI, we observed a significant decrease in NET in the hippocampus, amygdala, and brainstem; decrease in γ-Syn in the hippocampus and amygdala; and, increase in α-Syn in the hippocampus and amygdala. Unexpectedly, we observed a significant decrease in α-Syn expression in the striatum of the WKY following chronic DMI treatment. The altered expression of NET, α-Syn and γ-Syn in different brain suggest that DMI’s ability to improve depressive-like behavior in a rodent is associated with region-specific changes in the regulation of NET by α- and γ-Syn. PMID:19818834

  6. Enhanced ubiquitin-dependent degradation by Nedd4 protects against α-synuclein accumulation and toxicity in animal models of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sian E.; Hallett, Penelope J.; Moens, Thomas; Smith, Gaynor; Mangano, Emily; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Liu, Ji-Long; Isacson, Ole; Tofaris, George K.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by accumulation and misfolding of α-synuclein. Although the level of α-synuclein in neurons is fundamentally linked to the onset of neurodegeneration, multiple pathways have been implicated in its degradation, and it remains unclear which are the critical ubiquitination enzymes that protect against α-synuclein accumulation in vivo. The ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 targets α-synuclein to the endosomal–lysosomal pathway in cultured cells. Here we asked whether Nedd4-mediated degradation protects against α-synuclein-induced toxicity in the Drosophila and rodent models of Parkinson's disease. We show that overexpression of Nedd4 can rescue the degenerative phenotype from ectopic expression of α-synuclein in the Drosophila eye. Overexpressed Nedd4 in the Drosophila brain prevented the α-synuclein-induced locomotor defect whereas reduction in endogenous Nedd4 by RNAi led to worsening motor function and increased loss of dopaminergic neurons. Accordingly, AAV-mediated expression of wild-type but not the catalytically inactive Nedd4 decreased the α-synuclein-induced dopaminergic cell loss in the rat substantia nigra and reduced α-synuclein accumulation. Collectively, our data in two evolutionarily distant model organisms strongly suggest that Nedd4 is a modifier of α-synuclein pathobiology and thus a potential target for neuroprotective therapies. PMID:24388974

  7. New roles of glycosaminoglycans in α-synuclein aggregation in a cellular model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Lehri-Boufala, Sonia; Ouidja, Mohand-Ouidir; Barbier-Chassefière, Véronique; Hénault, Emilie; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Garrigue-Antar, Laure; Papy-Garcia, Dulce; Morin, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The causes of Parkinson disease (PD) remain mysterious, although some evidence supports mitochondrial dysfunctions and α-synuclein accumulation in Lewy bodies as major events. The abnormal accumulation of α-synuclein has been associated with a deficiency in the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. Cathepsin D (cathD), the major lysosomal protease responsible of α-synuclein degradation was described to be up-regulated in PD model. As glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) regulate cathD activity, and have been recently suggested to participate in PD physiopathology, we investigated their role in α-synuclein accumulation by their intracellular regulation of cathD activity. In a classical neuroblastoma cell model of PD induced by MPP+, the genetic expression of GAGs-biosynthetic enzymes was modified, leading to an increase of GAGs amounts whereas intracellular level of α-synuclein increased. The absence of sulfated GAGs increased intracellular cathD activity and limited α-synuclein accumulation. GAGs effects on cathD further suggested that specific sequences or sulfation patterns could be responsible for this regulation. The present study identifies, for the first time, GAGs as new regulators of the lysosome degradation pathway, regulating cathD activity and affecting two main biological processes, α-synuclein aggregation and apoptosis. Finally, this opens new insights into intracellular GAGs functions and new fields of investigation for glycobiological approaches in PD and neurobiology.

  8. α-Synuclein: The Long Distance Runner

    PubMed Central

    George, Sonia; Rey, Nolwen L; Reichenbach, Nicole; Steiner, Jennifer A; Brundin, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by α-synuclein pathology in the form of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Braak et al described the spatial and temporal spread of α-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that α-synuclein can transfer from cell to cell. In this review, we highlight the involvement of α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease and in Braak's staging of Parkinson's disease pathology. We discuss whether a prion-like mechanism of α-synuclein spread might contribute to Parkinson's disease pathology. We describe recent studies investigating cell-to-cell transfer of α-synuclein and focus our review on the long-distance axonal transport of α-synuclein along neurons. PMID:23587141

  9. Mannose 6-Phosphate Receptor Is Reduced in -Synuclein Overexpressing Models of Parkinsons Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, Carmela; Dzamko, Nicolas; Madsen, Peder; Nyegaard, Mette; Pohlmann, Regina; Søndergaard, Rikke V.; Lassen, Louise B.; Andresen, Thomas L.; Halliday, Glenda M.; Jensen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to defects in autophagy as a common denominator in most neurodegenerative conditions. Progressive functional decline in the autophagy-lysosomal pathway (ALP) occurs with age, and the consequent impairment in protein processing capacity has been associated with a higher risk of neurodegeneration. Defects in cathepsin D (CD) processing and α-synuclein degradation causing its accumulation in lysosomes are particularly relevant for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the mechanism by which alterations in CD maturation and α-synuclein degradation leads to autophagy defects in PD neurons is still uncertain. Here we demonstrate that MPR300 shuttling between endosomes and the trans Golgi network is altered in α-synuclein overexpressing neurons. Consequently, CD is not correctly trafficked to lysosomes and cannot be processed to generate its mature active form, leading to a reduced CD-mediated α-synuclein degradation and α-synuclein accumulation in neurons. MPR300 is downregulated in brain from α-synuclein overexpressing animal models and in PD patients with early diagnosis. These data indicate MPR300 as crucial player in the autophagy-lysosomal dysfunctions reported in PD and pinpoint MRP300 as a potential biomarker for PD. PMID:27509067

  10. Fish Synucleins: An Update.

    PubMed

    Toni, Mattia; Cioni, Carla

    2015-11-01

    Synucleins (syns) are a family of proteins involved in several human neurodegenerative diseases and tumors. Since the first syn discovery in the brain of the electric ray Torpedo californica, members of the same family have been identified in all vertebrates and comparative studies have indicated that syn proteins are evolutionary conserved. No counterparts of syns were found in invertebrates suggesting that they are vertebrate-specific proteins. Molecular studies showed that the number of syn members varies among vertebrates. Three genes encode for α-, β- and γ-syn in mammals and birds. However, a variable number of syn genes and encoded proteins is expressed or predicted in fish depending on the species. Among biologically verified sequences, four syn genes were identified in fugu, encoding for α, β and two γ (γ1 and γ2) isoforms, whereas only three genes are expressed in zebrafish, which lacks α-syn gene. The list of "non verified" sequences is much longer and is often found in sequence databases. In this review we provide an overview of published papers and known syn sequences in agnathans and fish that are likely to impact future studies in this field. Indeed, fish models may play a key role in elucidating some of the molecular mechanisms involved in physiological and pathological functions of syn proteins. PMID:26528989

  11. Fish Synucleins: An Update.

    PubMed

    Toni, Mattia; Cioni, Carla

    2015-11-01

    Synucleins (syns) are a family of proteins involved in several human neurodegenerative diseases and tumors. Since the first syn discovery in the brain of the electric ray Torpedo californica, members of the same family have been identified in all vertebrates and comparative studies have indicated that syn proteins are evolutionary conserved. No counterparts of syns were found in invertebrates suggesting that they are vertebrate-specific proteins. Molecular studies showed that the number of syn members varies among vertebrates. Three genes encode for α-, β- and γ-syn in mammals and birds. However, a variable number of syn genes and encoded proteins is expressed or predicted in fish depending on the species. Among biologically verified sequences, four syn genes were identified in fugu, encoding for α, β and two γ (γ1 and γ2) isoforms, whereas only three genes are expressed in zebrafish, which lacks α-syn gene. The list of "non verified" sequences is much longer and is often found in sequence databases. In this review we provide an overview of published papers and known syn sequences in agnathans and fish that are likely to impact future studies in this field. Indeed, fish models may play a key role in elucidating some of the molecular mechanisms involved in physiological and pathological functions of syn proteins.

  12. Induction of α-synuclein aggregate formation by CSF exosomes from patients with Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Stuendl, Anne; Kunadt, Marcel; Kruse, Niels; Bartels, Claudia; Moebius, Wiebke; Danzer, Karin M.; Mollenhauer, Brit

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular α-synuclein has been proposed as a crucial mechanism for induction of pathological aggregate formation in previously healthy cells. In vitro, extracellular α-synuclein is partially associated with exosomal vesicles. Recently, we have provided evidence that exosomal α-synuclein is present in the central nervous system in vivo. We hypothesized that exosomal α-synuclein species from patients with α-synuclein related neurodegeneration serve as carriers for interneuronal disease transmission. We isolated exosomes from cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, progressive supranuclear palsy as a non-α-synuclein related disorder that clinically overlaps with Parkinson’s disease, and neurological controls. Cerebrospinal fluid exosome numbers, α-synuclein protein content of cerebrospinal fluid exosomes and their potential to induce oligomerization of α-synuclein were analysed. The quantification of cerebrospinal fluid exosomal α-synuclein showed distinct differences between patients with Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. In addition, exosomal α-synuclein levels correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment in cross-sectional samples from patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. Importantly, cerebrospinal fluid exosomes derived from Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies induce oligomerization of α-synuclein in a reporter cell line in a dose-dependent manner. Our data suggest that cerebrospinal fluid exosomes from patients with Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies contain a pathogenic species of α-synuclein, which could initiate oligomerization of soluble α-synuclein in target cells and confer disease pathology. PMID:26647156

  13. Cell-Produced α-Synuclein Is Secreted in a Calcium-Dependent Manner by Exosomes and Impacts Neuronal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Emmanouilidou, Evangelia; Melachroinou, Katerina; Roumeliotis, Theodoros; Garbis, Spiros D.; Ntzouni, Maria; Margaritis, Lukas H.; Stefanis, Leonidas

    2010-01-01

    α-Synuclein is central in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis. Although initially α-synuclein was considered a purely intracellular protein, recent data suggest that it can be detected in the plasma and CSF of humans and in the culture media of neuronal cells. To address a role of secreted α-synuclein in neuronal homeostasis, we have generated wild-type α-synuclein and β-galactosidase inducible SH-SY5Y cells. Soluble oligomeric and monomeric species of α-synuclein are readily detected in the conditioned media (CM) of these cells at concentrations similar to those observed in human CSF. We have found that, in this model, α-synuclein is secreted by externalized vesicles in a calcium-dependent manner. Electron microscopy and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry proteomic analysis demonstrate that these vesicles have the characteristic hallmarks of exosomes, secreted intraluminar vesicles of multivesicular bodies. Application of CM containing secreted α-synuclein causes cell death of recipient neuronal cells, which can be reversed after α-synuclein immunodepletion from the CM. High- and low-molecular-weight α-synuclein species, isolated from this CM, significantly decrease cell viability. Importantly, treatment of the CM with oligomer-interfering compounds before application rescues the recipient neuronal cells from the observed toxicity. Our results show for the first time that cell-produced α-synuclein is secreted via an exosomal, calcium-dependent mechanism and suggest that α-synuclein secretion serves to amplify and propagate Parkinson's disease-related pathology. PMID:20484626

  14. Posttranslational Modifications and Clearing of α-Synuclein Aggregates in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Blagovesta; Kleinknecht, Alexandra; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an established model system to study the molecular mechanisms associated to neurodegenerative disorders. A key-feature of Parkinson’s disease is the formation of Lewy bodies, which are cytoplasmic protein inclusions. Misfolded α-synuclein is one of their main constituents. Expression of α-synuclein protein in yeast leads to protein aggregation and cellular toxicity, which is reminiscent to Lewy body containing human cells. The molecular mechanism involved in clearance of α-synuclein aggregates is a central question for elucidating the α-synuclein-related toxicity. Cellular clearance mechanisms include ubiquitin mediated 26S proteasome function as well as lysosome/vacuole associated degradative pathways as autophagy. Various modifications change α-synuclein posttranslationally and alter its inclusion formation, cytotoxicity and the distribution to different clearance pathways. Several of these modification sites are conserved from yeast to human. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the effect of phosphorylation and sumoylation of α-synuclein to the enhanced channeling to either the autophagy or the proteasome degradation pathway in yeast model of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25915624

  15. Lysosomes and α-synuclein form a dangerous duet leading to neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Bourdenx, Mathieu; Bezard, Erwan; Dehay, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are (i) characterized by a selective neuronal vulnerability to degeneration in specific brain regions; and (ii) likely to be caused by disease-specific protein misfolding. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by the presence of intraneuronal proteinacious cytoplasmic inclusions, called Lewy Bodies (LB). α-Synuclein, an aggregation prone protein, has been identified as a major protein component of LB and the causative for autosomal dominant PD. Lysosomes are responsible for the clearance of long-lived proteins, such as α-synuclein, and for the removal of old or damaged organelles, such as mitochondria. Interestingly, PD-linked α-synuclein mutants and dopamine-modified wild-type α-synuclein block its own degradation, which result in insufficient clearance, leading to its aggregation and cell toxicity. Moreover, both lysosomes and lysosomal proteases have been found to be involved in the activation of certain cell death pathways. Interestingly, lysosomal alterations are observed in the brains of patients suffering from sporadic PD and also in toxic and genetic rodent models of PD-related neurodegeneration. All these events have unraveled a causal link between lysosomal impairment, α-synuclein accumulation, and neurotoxicity. In this review, we emphasize the pathophysiological mechanisms connecting α-synuclein and lysosomal dysfunction in neuronal cell death. PMID:25177278

  16. Opioid induced hyperalgesia altered with propofol infusion.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Alan D; Chung, Keun Sam; Vadivelu, Nalini; Cantemir, Catalin; Urman, Richard D; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2014-01-01

    Propofol is a common induction agent that is utilized worldwide in the field of anesthesiology. In recent years, its potential therapeutic role in a variety of patient states has been demonstrated. Controversy exists regarding Propofol mediated analgesic and antihyperalgesic properties. Recent studies have suggested a variety of different mechanisms of action, including modulation of N-Methyl-D- Aspartate receptors and the endocannabinoid system. The N-Methyl-D- Aspartate receptor is part of a larger family of glutamate receptors and is an important mediator of excitatory neurotransmission. In the case presented, the pain experienced by the patient was not well-controlled, in spite of increasing doses of opioids, potentially due to superimposed opioid induced hyperalgesia. In the present case, we demonstrate a cycle of opioid induced hyperalgesia which was successfully affected with a Propofol infusion. Controversial reports exist in animal studies on the analgesic properties of Propofol. Randomized controlled studies in animal models studying the effect of Propofol on pain sensation have shown that Propofol possesses an analgesic effect. This clinical case demonstrates that Propofol could possibly have antihyperalgesic effects on opioid induced hyperalgesia caused by high-doses of chronic opioids and worsened by fentanyl. We postulate that a probable mechanism of complete pain relief after the procedure could be the inhibition of activity of the N-Methyl-D- Aspartate receptor by Propofol because it was the only agent the patient received during the procedure, causing a break of the cycle of opioid induced hyperalgesia. Additional research is required to clarify Propofol mediated or modulated analgesic properties in humans.

  17. Omeprazole induces altered bile acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, K; Machida, M; Fukumura, M; Koide, K; Yamazaki, R

    1998-01-01

    Background—It has been reported that the acidity of gastric contents could be an important factor in regulating jejunal flora. 
Aims—To investigate the effects of omeprazole induced changes in gastric pH on jejunal flora and bile acid metabolism. 
Methods—Twenty one patients with gastric ulcer and 19 healthy volunteers were studied. Deconjugation of bile acids was detected using a bile acid breath test. Jejunal fluid was aspirated using a double lumen tube with a rubber cover on the tip and deconjugation was examined using thin layer chromatography. Fat malabsorption was detected by a triolein breath test. 
Results—In the bile acid breath test, expired breath samples from all patients and healthy volunteers showed significantly greater 14CO2 specific activity after omeprazole treatment (20 mg/day) than before treatment. Bacterial overgrowth was found in the jejunal fluid and gastric juice of both ulcer patients and healthy volunteers after omeprazole treatment. The following species were identified: Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, enterococcus, Lactobacillus bifidus, Bacteroides vulgatus, B uniformis, Eubacterium lentum, Eu parvum, and Corynebacterium granulosum. All of these species, except E coli and C albicans, deconjugate bile acids. There was a significant correlation between 14CO2 activity and gastric pH, both before and after omeprazole treatment in both groups. The triolein breath test revealed impaired fat absorption in both groups after omeprazole treatment. 
Conclusions—Both patients with gastric ulcer and healthy volunteers exhibited increased deconjugation of bile acids caused by bacterial overgrowth in the jejunum and fat malabsorption after omeprazole treatment. The bacterial overgrowth consisted of both anaerobes and aerobes with deconjugation ability and was probably associated with an omeprazole induced shift to neutral pH in the gastric juice. 

 Keywords: omeprazole; bacterial overgrowth; deconjugation; bile acid breath

  18. Evidence for α-synuclein prions causing multiple system atrophy in humans with parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Prusiner, Stanley B.; Woerman, Amanda L.; Mordes, Daniel A.; Watts, Joel C.; Rampersaud, Ryan; Berry, David B.; Patel, Smita; Oehler, Abby; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Kravitz, Stephanie N.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Glidden, David V.; Halliday, Glenda M.; Middleton, Lefkos T.; Gentleman, Steve M.; Grinberg, Lea T.; Giles, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Prions are proteins that adopt alternative conformations that become self-propagating; the PrPSc prion causes the rare human disorder Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD). We report here that multiple system atrophy (MSA) is caused by a different human prion composed of the α-synuclein protein. MSA is a slowly evolving disorder characterized by progressive loss of autonomic nervous system function and often signs of parkinsonism; the neuropathological hallmark of MSA is glial cytoplasmic inclusions consisting of filaments of α-synuclein. To determine whether human α-synuclein forms prions, we examined 14 human brain homogenates for transmission to cultured human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells expressing full-length, mutant human α-synuclein fused to yellow fluorescent protein (α-syn140*A53T–YFP) and TgM83+/− mice expressing α-synuclein (A53T). The TgM83+/− mice that were hemizygous for the mutant transgene did not develop spontaneous illness; in contrast, the TgM83+/+ mice that were homozygous developed neurological dysfunction. Brain extracts from 14 MSA cases all transmitted neurodegeneration to TgM83+/− mice after incubation periods of ∼120 d, which was accompanied by deposition of α-synuclein within neuronal cell bodies and axons. All of the MSA extracts also induced aggregation of α-syn*A53T–YFP in cultured cells, whereas none of six Parkinson’s disease (PD) extracts or a control sample did so. Our findings argue that MSA is caused by a unique strain of α-synuclein prions, which is different from the putative prions causing PD and from those causing spontaneous neurodegeneration in TgM83+/+ mice. Remarkably, α-synuclein is the first new human prion to be identified, to our knowledge, since the discovery a half century ago that CJD was transmissible. PMID:26324905

  19. Evidence for α-synuclein prions causing multiple system atrophy in humans with parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Prusiner, Stanley B; Woerman, Amanda L; Mordes, Daniel A; Watts, Joel C; Rampersaud, Ryan; Berry, David B; Patel, Smita; Oehler, Abby; Lowe, Jennifer K; Kravitz, Stephanie N; Geschwind, Daniel H; Glidden, David V; Halliday, Glenda M; Middleton, Lefkos T; Gentleman, Steve M; Grinberg, Lea T; Giles, Kurt

    2015-09-22

    Prions are proteins that adopt alternative conformations that become self-propagating; the PrP(Sc) prion causes the rare human disorder Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). We report here that multiple system atrophy (MSA) is caused by a different human prion composed of the α-synuclein protein. MSA is a slowly evolving disorder characterized by progressive loss of autonomic nervous system function and often signs of parkinsonism; the neuropathological hallmark of MSA is glial cytoplasmic inclusions consisting of filaments of α-synuclein. To determine whether human α-synuclein forms prions, we examined 14 human brain homogenates for transmission to cultured human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells expressing full-length, mutant human α-synuclein fused to yellow fluorescent protein (α-syn140*A53T-YFP) and TgM83(+/-) mice expressing α-synuclein (A53T). The TgM83(+/-) mice that were hemizygous for the mutant transgene did not develop spontaneous illness; in contrast, the TgM83(+/+) mice that were homozygous developed neurological dysfunction. Brain extracts from 14 MSA cases all transmitted neurodegeneration to TgM83(+/-) mice after incubation periods of ∼120 d, which was accompanied by deposition of α-synuclein within neuronal cell bodies and axons. All of the MSA extracts also induced aggregation of α-syn*A53T-YFP in cultured cells, whereas none of six Parkinson's disease (PD) extracts or a control sample did so. Our findings argue that MSA is caused by a unique strain of α-synuclein prions, which is different from the putative prions causing PD and from those causing spontaneous neurodegeneration in TgM83(+/+) mice. Remarkably, α-synuclein is the first new human prion to be identified, to our knowledge, since the discovery a half century ago that CJD was transmissible. PMID:26324905

  20. Biophysics of Parkinson’s Disease: Structure and Aggregation of α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.; Eliezer, David

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a slowly progressive movement disorder that results from the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, a small area of cells in the mid-brain. PD is a multifactorial disorder with unknown etiology, in which both genetic and environmental factors play important roles. Substantial evidence links α-synuclein, a small highly conserved presynaptic protein with unknown function, to both familial and sporadic PD. Rare familial cases of PD are associated with missense point mutations in α-synuclein, or with the hyper-expression of the wild type protein due to its gene duplication/triplication. Furthermore, α-synuclein was identified as the major component of amyloid fibrils found in Lewy body and Lewy neurites, the characteristic proteinaceous deposits that are the diagnostic hallmarks of PD. α-Synuclein is abundant in various regions of the brain and has two closely related homologs, β-synuclein and γ-synuclein. When isolated in solution, the protein is intrinsically disordered, but in the presence of lipid surfaces α-synuclein adopts a highly helical structure that is believed to mediate its normal function(s). A number of different conformational states of α-synuclein have been observed. Besides the membrane-bound form, other critical conformations include a partially-folded state that is a key intermediate in aggregation and fibrillation, various oligomeric species, and fibrillar and amorphous aggregates. A number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that either accelerate or inhibit the rate of α-synuclein aggregation and fibrillation in vitro are known. There is a strong correlation between the conformation of α-synuclein (induced by various factors) and its rate of fibrillation. The aggregation process appears to be branched, with one pathway leading to fibrils and another to oligomeric intermediates that may ultimately form amorphous deposits. The molecular basis of Parkinson’s disease appears to be tightly

  1. Untangling the Manganese-α-Synuclein Web

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Tanara Vieira; Parmalee, Nancy L.; Martinez-Finley, Ebany J.; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases affect a significant portion of the aging population. Several lines of evidence suggest a positive association between environmental exposures, which are common and cumulative in a lifetime, and development of neurodegenerative diseases. Environmental or occupational exposure to manganese (Mn) has been implicated in neurodegeneration due to its ability to induce mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and α-synuclein (α-Syn) aggregation. The role of the α-Syn protein vis-a-vis Mn is controversial, as it seemingly plays a duplicitous role in neuroprotection and neurodegeneration. α-Syn has low affinity for Mn, however an indirect interaction cannot be ruled out. In this review we will examine the current knowledge surrounding the interaction of α-Syn and Mn in neurodegenerative process. PMID:27540354

  2. α-Synuclein and neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, Mark R

    2009-01-01

    α-Synuclein is a small protein that has special relevance for understanding Parkinson disease and related disorders. Not only is α-synuclein found in Lewy bodies characteristic of Parkinson disease, but also mutations in the gene for α-synuclein can cause an inherited form of Parkinson disease and expression of normal α-synuclein can increase the risk of developing Parkinson disease in sporadic, or non-familial, cases. Both sporadic and familial Parkinson disease are characterized by substantial loss of several groups of neurons, including the dopaminergic cells of the substantia nigra that are the target of most current symptomatic therapies. Therefore, it is predicted that α-synuclein, especially in its mutant forms or under conditions where its expression levels are increased, is a toxic protein in the sense that it is associated with an increased rate of neuronal cell death. This review will discuss the experimental contexts in which α-synuclein has been demonstrated to be toxic. I will also outline what is known about the mechanisms by which α-synuclein triggers neuronal damage, and identify some of the current gaps in our knowledge about this subject. Finally, the therapeutic implications of toxicity of α-synuclein will be discussed. PMID:19193223

  3. Selective Induced Altered Coccidians to Immunize and Prevent Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Microbiomic flora in digestive tract is pivotal to the state of our health and disease. Antibiotics affect GI, control composition of microbiome, and shift equilibrium from health into disease status. Coccidiosis causes gastrointestinal inflammation. Antibiotic additives contaminate animal products and enter food chain, consumed by humans with possible allergic, antibiotic resistance and enigmatic side effects. Purposed study induced nonpathogenic, immunogenic organisms to protect against disease and abolish antibiotics' use in food animals and side effects in man. Diverse species of Coccidia were used as model. Immature organisms were treated with serial purification procedure prior to developmental stages to obtain altered strains. Chicks received oral gavage immunized with serial low doses of normal or altered organisms or sham treatment and were challenged with high infective normal organisms to compare pathogenicity and immunogenicity. Mature induced altered forms of E. tenella and E. necatrix lacked developmental stage of “sporocysts” and contained free sporozoites. In contrast, E. maxima progressed to normal forms or did not mature at all. Animals that received altered forms were considerably protected with higher weight gain and antibody titers against challenge infection compared to those that received normal organisms (p < 0.05). This is the first report to induce selected protective altered organisms for possible preventive measures to minimize antibiotic use in food animals. PMID:27721824

  4. Synucleins regulate the kinetics of synaptic vesicle endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Karina J; Makani, Sachin; Davis, Taylor; Westphal, Christopher H; Castillo, Pablo E; Chandra, Sreeganga S

    2014-07-01

    Genetic and pathological studies link α-synuclein to the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the normal function of this presynaptic protein remains unknown. α-Synuclein, an acidic lipid binding protein, shares high sequence identity with β- and γ-synuclein. Previous studies have implicated synucleins in synaptic vesicle (SV) trafficking, although the precise site of synuclein action continues to be unclear. Here we show, using optical imaging, electron microscopy, and slice electrophysiology, that synucleins are required for the fast kinetics of SV endocytosis. Slowed endocytosis observed in synuclein null cultures can be rescued by individually expressing mouse α-, β-, or γ-synuclein, indicating they are functionally redundant. Through comparisons to dynamin knock-out synapses and biochemical experiments, we suggest that synucleins act at early steps of SV endocytosis. Our results categorize α-synuclein with other familial PD genes known to regulate SV endocytosis, implicating this pathway in PD.

  5. Higher vulnerability and stress sensitivity of neuronal precursor cells carrying an alpha-synuclein gene triplication.

    PubMed

    Flierl, Adrian; Oliveira, Luís M A; Falomir-Lockhart, Lisandro J; Mak, Sally K; Hesley, Jayne; Soldner, Frank; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Langston, J William; Jovin, Thomas M; Schüle, Birgitt

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a multi-factorial neurodegenerative disorder with loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and characteristic intracellular inclusions, called Lewy bodies. Genetic predisposition, such as point mutations and copy number variants of the SNCA gene locus can cause very similar PD-like neurodegeneration. The impact of altered α-synuclein protein expression on integrity and developmental potential of neuronal stem cells is largely unexplored, but may have wide ranging implications for PD manifestation and disease progression. Here, we investigated if induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal precursor cells (NPCs) from a patient with Parkinson's disease carrying a genomic triplication of the SNCA gene (SNCA-Tri). Our goal was to determine if these cells these neuronal precursor cells already display pathological changes and impaired cellular function that would likely predispose them when differentiated to neurodegeneration. To achieve this aim, we assessed viability and cellular physiology in human SNCA-Tri NPCs both under normal and environmentally stressed conditions to model in vitro gene-environment interactions which may play a role in the initiation and progression of PD. Human SNCA-Tri NPCs displayed overall normal cellular and mitochondrial morphology, but showed substantial changes in growth, viability, cellular energy metabolism and stress resistance especially when challenged by starvation or toxicant challenge. Knockdown of α-synuclein in the SNCA-Tri NPCs by stably expressed short hairpin RNA (shRNA) resulted in reversal of the observed phenotypic changes. These data show for the first time that genetic alterations such as the SNCA gene triplication set the stage for decreased developmental fitness, accelerated aging, and increased neuronal cell loss. The observation of this "stem cell pathology" could have a great impact on both quality and quantity of neuronal networks and could provide a powerful new tool for

  6. Higher Vulnerability and Stress Sensitivity of Neuronal Precursor Cells Carrying an Alpha-Synuclein Gene Triplication

    PubMed Central

    Flierl, Adrian; Oliveira, Luís M. A.; Falomir-Lockhart, Lisandro J.; Mak, Sally K.; Hesley, Jayne; Soldner, Frank; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Langston, J. William; Jovin, Thomas M.; Schüle, Birgitt

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a multi-factorial neurodegenerative disorder with loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and characteristic intracellular inclusions, called Lewy bodies. Genetic predisposition, such as point mutations and copy number variants of the SNCA gene locus can cause very similar PD-like neurodegeneration. The impact of altered α-synuclein protein expression on integrity and developmental potential of neuronal stem cells is largely unexplored, but may have wide ranging implications for PD manifestation and disease progression. Here, we investigated if induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal precursor cells (NPCs) from a patient with Parkinson’s disease carrying a genomic triplication of the SNCA gene (SNCA-Tri). Our goal was to determine if these cells these neuronal precursor cells already display pathological changes and impaired cellular function that would likely predispose them when differentiated to neurodegeneration. To achieve this aim, we assessed viability and cellular physiology in human SNCA-Tri NPCs both under normal and environmentally stressed conditions to model in vitro gene-environment interactions which may play a role in the initiation and progression of PD. Human SNCA-Tri NPCs displayed overall normal cellular and mitochondrial morphology, but showed substantial changes in growth, viability, cellular energy metabolism and stress resistance especially when challenged by starvation or toxicant challenge. Knockdown of α-synuclein in the SNCA-Tri NPCs by stably expressed short hairpin RNA (shRNA) resulted in reversal of the observed phenotypic changes. These data show for the first time that genetic alterations such as the SNCA gene triplication set the stage for decreased developmental fitness, accelerated aging, and increased neuronal cell loss. The observation of this “stem cell pathology” could have a great impact on both quality and quantity of neuronal networks and could provide a powerful new

  7. Parkinson Disease-linked Vps35 R524W Mutation Impairs the Endosomal Association of Retromer and Induces α-Synuclein Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Follett, Jordan; Bugarcic, Andrea; Yang, Zhe; Ariotti, Nicholas; Norwood, Suzanne J; Collins, Brett M; Parton, Robert G; Teasdale, Rohan D

    2016-08-26

    Endosomal sorting is a highly orchestrated cellular process. Retromer is a heterotrimeric complex that associates with endosomal membranes and facilitates the retrograde sorting of multiple receptors, including the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor for lysosomal enzymes. The cycling of retromer on and off the endosomal membrane is regulated by a network of retromer-interacting proteins. Here, we find that Parkinson disease-associated Vps35 variant, R524W, but not P316S, is a loss-of-function mutation as marked by a reduced association with this regulatory network and dysregulation of endosomal receptor sorting. Expression of Vps35 R524W-containing retromer results in the accumulation of intracellular α-synuclein-positive aggregates, a hallmark of Parkinson disease. Overall, the Vps35 R524W-containing retromer has a decreased endosomal association, which can be partially rescued by R55, a small molecule previously shown to stabilize the retromer complex, supporting the potential for future targeting of the retromer complex in the treatment of Parkinson disease.

  8. Effect of 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal Modification on Alpha-Synuclein Aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Z.; Hu, D.; Han, S.; Reaney, S.H.; Monte, D.A.Di; Fink, A.L.

    2007-07-12

    Several observations have implicated oxidative stress and aggregation of the presynaptic protein alpha-synuclein in the pathogenesis of PD. alpha-Synuclein has been shown to have affinity for unsaturated fatty acids and membranes enriched in PUFAs, which are especially sensitive to oxidation under conditions of oxidative stress. One of the most important products of lipid oxidation is 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), which has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Consequently we investigated the effects of the interaction of HNE with alpha-synuclein. Incubation of HNE with alpha-synuclein at pH 7.4, 37oC resulted in covalent modification of the protein, with up to six HNE molecules incorporated as Michael addition products. FTIR and CD spectra indicated that HNE modification of alpha-synuclein resulted in a major conformational change involving increased beta-sheet. HNE modification of alpha-synuclein led to inhibition of fibrillation in an HNE-concentration-dependent manner. This inhibition of fibrillation was shown to be due to the formation of soluble oligomers based on SEC HPLC and AFM data. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis indicated that the HNE-induced oligomers are compact and tightly packed. Treatment with guanidinium chloride (GuHCl) demonstrated that the HNE-induced oligomers were very stable with an extremely slow rate of dissociation. Addition of 5 uM HNE-modified oligomers to primary mesencephalic cultures caused marked neurotoxicity, since the integrity of dopaminergic and GABAergic neurons was reduced by 95% and 85%, respectively. Our observations indicate that HNE-modification of alpha-synuclein prevents fibrillation but may result in toxic oligomers which could therefore contribute to the demise of neurons subjected to oxidative damage.

  9. Direct and/or Indirect Roles for SUMO in Modulating Alpha-Synuclein Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumaran, Shamini; Wong, Mathew B.; Antony, Helma; Pountney, Dean L.

    2015-01-01

    α-Synuclein inclusion bodies are a pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, and contain aggregated α-synuclein and a variety of recruited factors, including protein chaperones, proteasome components, ubiquitin and the small ubiquitin-like modifier, SUMO-1. Cell culture and animal model studies suggest that misfolded, aggregated α-synuclein is actively translocated via the cytoskeletal system to a region of the cell where other factors that help to lessen the toxic effects can also be recruited. SUMO-1 covalently conjugates to various intracellular target proteins in a way analogous to ubiquitination to alter cellular distribution, function and metabolism and also plays an important role in a growing list of cellular pathways, including exosome secretion and apoptosis. Furthermore, SUMO-1 modified proteins have recently been linked to cell stress responses, such as oxidative stress response and heat shock response, with increased SUMOylation being neuroprotective in some cases. Several recent studies have linked SUMOylation to the ubiquitin-proteasome system, while other evidence implicates the lysosomal pathway. Other reports depict a direct mechanism whereby sumoylation reduced the aggregation tendency of α-synuclein, and reduced the toxicity. However, the precise role of SUMO-1 in neurodegeneration remains unclear. In this review, we explore the potential direct or indirect role(s) of SUMO-1 in the cellular response to misfolded α-synuclein in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26213981

  10. Redistribution of DAT/α-Synuclein Complexes Visualized by “In Situ” Proximity Ligation Assay in Transgenic Mice Modelling Early Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bellucci, Arianna; Navarria, Laura; Falarti, Elisa; Zaltieri, Michela; Bono, Federica; Collo, Ginetta; Grazia, Maria; Missale, Cristina; Spano, PierFranco

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein, the major component of Lewy bodies, is thought to play a central role in the onset of synaptic dysfunctions in Parkinson's disease (PD). In particular, α-synuclein may affect dopaminergic neuron function as it interacts with a key protein modulating dopamine (DA) content at the synapse: the DA transporter (DAT). Indeed, recent evidence from our “in vitro” studies showed that α-synuclein aggregation decreases the expression and membrane trafficking of the DAT as the DAT is retained into α-synuclein-immunopositive inclusions. This notwithstanding, “in vivo” studies on PD animal models investigating whether DAT distribution is altered by the pathological overexpression and aggregation of α-synuclein are missing. By using the proximity ligation assay, a technique which allows the “in situ” visualization of protein-protein interactions, we studied the occurrence of alterations in the distribution of DAT/α-synuclein complexes in the SYN120 transgenic mouse model, showing insoluble α-synuclein aggregates into dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal system, reduced striatal DA levels and an altered distribution of synaptic proteins in the striatum. We found that DAT/α-synuclein complexes were markedly redistributed in the striatum and substantia nigra of SYN120 mice. These alterations were accompanied by a significant increase of DAT striatal levels in transgenic animals when compared to wild type littermates. Our data indicate that, in the early pathogenesis of PD, α-synuclein acts as a fine modulator of the dopaminergic synapse by regulating the subcellular distribution of key proteins such as the DAT. PMID:22163275

  11. Bridging high-throughput genetic and transcriptional data reveals cellular responses to alpha-synuclein toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Riva, Laura; Su, Linhui Julie; Gitler, Aaron D; Cashikar, Anil G; King, Oliver D; Auluck, Pavan K; Geddie, Melissa L; Valastyan, Julie S; Karger, David R; Lindquist, Susan; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2009-03-01

    Cells respond to stimuli by changes in various processes, including signaling pathways and gene expression. Efforts to identify components of these responses increasingly depend on mRNA profiling and genetic library screens. By comparing the results of these two assays across various stimuli, we found that genetic screens tend to identify response regulators, whereas mRNA profiling frequently detects metabolic responses. We developed an integrative approach that bridges the gap between these data using known molecular interactions, thus highlighting major response pathways. We used this approach to reveal cellular pathways responding to the toxicity of alpha-synuclein, a protein implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease. For this we screened an established yeast model to identify genes that when overexpressed alter alpha-synuclein toxicity. Bridging these data and data from mRNA profiling provided functional explanations for many of these genes and identified previously unknown relations between alpha-synuclein toxicity and basic cellular pathways. PMID:19234470

  12. Gut Feelings About α‐Synuclein in Gastrointestinal Biopsies: Biomarker in the Making?

    PubMed Central

    Ruffmann, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent years, several studies have investigated the potential of immunohistochemical detection of α‐synuclein in the gastrointestinal tract to diagnose Parkinson's disease (PD). Although methodological heterogeneity has hindered comparability between studies, it has become increasingly apparent that the high sensitivity and specificity reported in preliminary studies has not been sustained in subsequent large‐scale studies. What constitutes pathological α‐synuclein in the alimentary canal that could distinguish between PD patients and controls and how this can be reliably detected represent key outstanding questions in the field. In this review, we will comment on and compare the variable technical aspects from previous studies, and by highlighting some advantages and shortcomings we hope to delineate a standardized approach to facilitate the consensus criteria urgently needed in the field. Furthermore, we will describe alternative detection techniques to conventional immunohistochemistry that have recently emerged and may facilitate ease of interpretation and reliability of gastrointestinal α‐synuclein detection. Such techniques have the potential to detect the presence of pathological α‐synuclein and include the paraffin‐embedded tissue blot, the proximity ligation assay, the protein misfolding cyclic amplification technique, and the real‐time quaking‐induced conversion assay. Finally, we will review 2 nonsynonymous theories that have driven enteric α‐synuclein research, namely, (1) that α‐synuclein propagates in a prion‐like fashion from the peripheral nervous system to the brain via vagal connections and (2) that gastrointestinal α‐synuclein deposition may be used as a clinically useful biomarker in PD. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26799450

  13. Arsenic-induced Histological Alterations in Various Organs of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Noman, Abu Shadat Mohammod; Dilruba, Sayada; Mohanto, Nayan Chandra; Rahman, Lutfur; Khatun, Zohora; Riad, Wahiduzzaman; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Alam, Shahnur; Aktar, Sharmin; Chowdhury, Srikanta; Saud, Zahangir Alam; Rahman, Zillur; Hossain, Khaled; Haque, Azizul

    2015-01-01

    Deposition of arsenic in mice through groundwater is well documented but little is known about the histological changes of organs by the metalloid. Present study was designed to evaluate arsenic-induced histological alterations in kidney, liver, thoracic artery and brain of mice which are not well documented yet. Swiss albino male mice were divided into 2 groups and treated as follows: Group 1: control, 2: arsenic (sodium arsenite at 10 mg/kg b.w. orally for 8 wks). Group 2 showed marked degenerative changes in kidney, liver, thoracic artery, and brain whereas Group 1 did not reveal any abnormalities on histopathology. We therefore concluded that arsenic induces histological alterations in the tested organs. PMID:26740907

  14. Marked alterations of neutrophil functions during sepsis-induced immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Demaret, Julie; Venet, Fabienne; Friggeri, Arnaud; Cazalis, Marie-Angélique; Plassais, Jonathan; Jallades, Laurent; Malcus, Christophe; Poitevin-Later, Françoise; Textoris, Julien; Lepape, Alain; Monneret, Guillaume

    2015-12-01

    Severe septic syndromes deeply impair innate and adaptive immunity and are responsible for sepsis-induced immunosuppression. Although neutrophils represent the first line of defense against infection, little is known about their phenotype and functions a few days after sepsis, when the immunosuppressive phase is maximal (i.e., between d 3 and 8). The objective of the present study was to perform, for the first time, a global evaluation of neutrophil alterations in immunosuppressed septic patients (at d 3-4 and d 6-8) using phenotypic and functional studies. In addition, the potential association of these parameters and deleterious outcomes was assessed. Peripheral blood was collected from 43 septic shock patients and compared with that of 23 healthy controls. In the septic patients, our results highlight a markedly altered neutrophil chemotaxis (functional and chemokine receptor expressions), oxidative burst, and lactoferrin content and an increased number of circulating immature granulocytes (i.e., CD10(dim)CD16(dim)). These aspects were associated with an increased risk of death after septic shock. In contrast, phagocytosis and activation capacities were conserved. To conclude, circulating neutrophils present with phenotypic, functional, and morphologic alterations a few days after sepsis onset. These dysfunctions might participate in the deleterious role of sepsis-induced immunosuppression. The present results open new perspectives in the mechanisms favoring nosocomial infections after septic shock. They deserve to be further investigated in a larger clinical study and in animal models recapitulating these alterations. PMID:26224052

  15. Histologic and temperature alterations induced by skin refrigerants.

    PubMed

    Dzubow, L M

    1985-05-01

    The histologic alterations induced by spray refrigerants independent of and in combination with dermabrasion were studied with the use of the domestic pig as a model. Tissue injury was found to be a function of spray duration and freeze intensity. Both preabrasion freezing and postabrasion refreezing could produce damage additive to that of mechanical planing. Skin surface and intradermal temperature variations during refrigeration were recorded. The possible implications of these findings as they pertain to clinical dermabrasion are discussed. PMID:4008684

  16. α-Synuclein amino terminus regulates mitochondrial membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiamei; Du, Tingting; Wang, Xue; Duan, Chunli; Gao, Ge; Zhang, Jianliang; Lu, Lingling; Yang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative movement disorder affecting an increasing number of elderly. Various studies have shown that mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal protein aggregation are two major contributors to the progression of PD. The N terminus of α-synuclein (α-Syn/N), which adopts an α-helical conformation upon lipid binding, is essential for membrane interaction; yet its role in mitochondria remains poorly defined. A functional characterization of the α-Syn N-terminal domain and investigation of its effect on mitochondrial membrane permeability were undertaken in this study. α-Syn/N and α-Syn/delN (amino acids 1-65 and 61-140, respectively) constructs were overexpressed in dopaminergic MN9D cells and primary cortical neurons. A decrease in cell viability was observed in cells transfected with α-Syn/N but not α-Syn/delN. In addition, an α-Syn/N-induced increase in the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species, alteration in mitochondrial morphology, and decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential were accompanied by the activation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores (mPTP). These changes were also associated with a decline in mitochondrial cardiolipin content and interaction with the voltage-dependent anion channel and adenine nucleotide translocator in the mitochondrial membrane. The activation of mPTPs and reduction in cell viability were partially reversed by bongkrekic acid, an inhibitor of adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), suggesting that the interaction between α-Syn and ANT promoted mPTP activation and was toxic to cells. BKA treatment reduced interaction of α-Syn/N with ANT and VDAC. These results suggest that the N terminus of α-Syn is essential for the regulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability and is a likely factor in the neurodegeneration associated with PD.

  17. Sepsis-induced alterations in sleep of rats.

    PubMed

    Baracchi, Francesca; Ingiosi, Ashley M; Raymond, Richard M; Opp, Mark R

    2011-11-01

    Sepsis is a systemic immune response to infection that may result in multiple organ failure and death. Polymicrobial infections remain a serious clinical problem, and in the hospital, sepsis is the number-one noncardiac killer. Although the central nervous system may be one of the first systems affected, relatively little effort has been made to determine the impact of sepsis on the brain. In this study, we used the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model to determine the extent to which sepsis alters sleep, the EEG, and brain temperature (Tbr) of rats. Sepsis increases the amount of time rats spend in non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) during the dark period, but not during the light period. Rapid eye movements sleep (REMS) of septic rats is suppressed for about 24 h following CLP surgery, after which REMS increases during dark periods for at least three nights. The EEG is dramatically altered shortly after sepsis induction, as evidenced by reductions in slow-frequency components. Furthermore, sleep is fragmented, indicating that the quality of sleep is diminished. Effects on sleep, the EEG, and Tbr persist for at least 84 h after sepsis induction, the duration of our recording period. Immunohistochemical assays focused on brain stem mechanisms responsible for alterations in REMS, as little information is available concerning infection-induced suppression of this sleep stage. Our immunohistochemical data suggest that REMS suppression after sepsis onset may be mediated, in part, by the brain stem GABAergic system. This study demonstrates for the first time that sleep and EEG patterns are altered during CLP-induced sepsis. These data suggest that the EEG may serve as a biomarker for sepsis onset. These data also contribute to our knowledge of potential mechanisms, whereby infections alter sleep and other central nervous system functions.

  18. Modulating the Amyloidogenesis of α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Sivanesam, Kalkena; Andersen, Niels H.

    2016-01-01

    Alphα-synuclein is found in the neuronal cells but its native function is not well known. While α-synuclein is an intrinsically disordered protein that adopts a helical conformation upon membrane binding, numerous studies have shown that oligomeric b-forms of this protein are cytotoxic. This response to misfolded species contributes to Parkinson’s Disease etiology and symptoms. The resulting amyloid fibrils are an established diagnostic in Parkinson’s Disease. In this review, we focus on strategies that have been used to inhibit the amyloidogenesis of α-synuclein either by stabilizing the native state, or by redirecting the pathway to less toxic aggregates. Small molecules such as polyphenols, peptides as well as large proteins have proven effective at protecting cells against the cytotoxicity of α-synuclein. These strategies may lead to the development of therapeutic agents that could prove useful in combating this disease. PMID:26517049

  19. Altered Gravity Induces Oxidative Stress in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Hosamani, Ravikumar

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity environments can induce increased oxidative stress in biological systems. Microarray data from our previous spaceflight experiment (FIT experiment on STS-121) indicated significant changes in the expression of oxidative stress genes in adult fruit flies after spaceflight. Currently, our lab is focused on elucidating the role of hypergravity-induced oxidative stress and its impact on the nervous system in Drosophila melanogaster. Biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches were combined to study this effect on the ground. Adult flies (2-3 days old) exposed to acute hypergravity (3g, for 1 hour and 2 hours) showed significantly elevated levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in fly brains compared to control samples. This data was supported by significant changes in mRNA expression of specific oxidative stress and antioxidant defense related genes. As anticipated, a stress-resistant mutant line, Indy302, was less vulnerable to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress compared to wild-type flies. Survival curves were generated to study the combined effect of hypergravity and pro-oxidant treatment. Interestingly, many of the oxidative stress changes that were measured in flies showed sex specific differences. Collectively, our data demonstrate that altered gravity significantly induces oxidative stress in Drosophila, and that one of the organs where this effect is evident is the brain.

  20. Alpha-Synuclein Expression Restricts RNA Viral Infections in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Beatman, Erica L.; Massey, Aaron; Shives, Katherine D.; Burrack, Kristina S.; Chamanian, Mastooreh; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have discovered that native, neuronal expression of alpha-synuclein (Asyn) inhibits viral infection, injury, and disease in the central nervous system (CNS). Enveloped RNA viruses, such as West Nile virus (WNV), invade the CNS and cause encephalitis, yet little is known about the innate neuron-specific inhibitors of viral infections in the CNS. Following WNV infection of primary neurons, we found that Asyn protein expression is increased. The infectious titer of WNV and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) TC83 in the brains of Asyn-knockout mice exhibited a mean increase of 104.5 infectious viral particles compared to the titers in wild-type and heterozygote littermates. Asyn-knockout mice also exhibited significantly increased virus-induced mortality compared to Asyn heterozygote or homozygote control mice. Virus-induced Asyn localized to perinuclear, neuronal regions expressing viral envelope protein and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated trafficking protein Rab1. In Asyn-knockout primary neuronal cultures, the levels of expression of ER signaling pathways, known to support WNV replication, were significantly elevated before and during viral infection compared to those in Asyn-expressing primary neuronal cultures. We propose a model in which virus-induced Asyn localizes to ER-derived membranes, modulates virus-induced ER stress signaling, and inhibits viral replication, growth, and injury in the CNS. These data provide a novel and important functional role for the expression of native alpha-synuclein, a protein that is closely associated with the development of Parkinson's disease. IMPORTANCE Neuroinvasive viruses such as West Nile virus are able to infect neurons and cause severe disease, such as encephalitis, or infection of brain tissue. Following viral infection in the central nervous system, only select neurons are infected, implying that neurons exhibit innate resistance to viral infections. We discovered that native neuronal

  1. Alpha-Synuclein Proteins Promote Pro-Inflammatory Cascades in Microglia: Stronger Effects of the A53T Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Hoenen, Claire; Gustin, Audrey; Birck, Cindy; Kirchmeyer, Mélanie; Beaume, Nicolas; Felten, Paul; Grandbarbe, Luc; Heuschling, Paul; Heurtaux, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is histologically described by the deposition of α-synuclein, whose accumulation in Lewy bodies causes dopaminergic neuronal death. Although most of PD cases are sporadic, point mutations of the gene encoding the α-synuclein protein cause inherited forms of PD. There are currently six known point mutations that result in familial PD. Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation have also been described as early events associated with dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in PD. Though it is known that microglia are activated by wild-type α-synuclein, little is known about its mutated forms and the signaling cascades responsible for this microglial activation. The present study was designed to investigate consequences of wild-type and mutant α-synuclein (A53T, A30P and E46K) exposure on microglial reactivity. Interestingly, we described that α-synuclein-induced microglial reactivity appeared to be peptide-dependent. Indeed, the A53T protein activated more strongly microglia than the wild-type α-synuclein and other mutants. This A53T-induced microglial reactivity mechanism was found to depend on phosphorylation mechanisms mediated by MAPKs and on successive NFkB/AP-1/Nrf2 pathways activation. These results suggest that the microgliosis intensity during PD might depend on the type of α-synuclein protein implicated. Indeed, mutated forms are more potent microglial stimulators than wild-type α-synuclein. Based on these data, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant therapeutic strategies may be valid in order to reduce microgliosis but also to subsequently slow down PD progression, especially in familial cases. PMID:27622765

  2. Alpha-Synuclein Proteins Promote Pro-Inflammatory Cascades in Microglia: Stronger Effects of the A53T Mutant.

    PubMed

    Hoenen, Claire; Gustin, Audrey; Birck, Cindy; Kirchmeyer, Mélanie; Beaume, Nicolas; Felten, Paul; Grandbarbe, Luc; Heuschling, Paul; Heurtaux, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is histologically described by the deposition of α-synuclein, whose accumulation in Lewy bodies causes dopaminergic neuronal death. Although most of PD cases are sporadic, point mutations of the gene encoding the α-synuclein protein cause inherited forms of PD. There are currently six known point mutations that result in familial PD. Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation have also been described as early events associated with dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in PD. Though it is known that microglia are activated by wild-type α-synuclein, little is known about its mutated forms and the signaling cascades responsible for this microglial activation. The present study was designed to investigate consequences of wild-type and mutant α-synuclein (A53T, A30P and E46K) exposure on microglial reactivity. Interestingly, we described that α-synuclein-induced microglial reactivity appeared to be peptide-dependent. Indeed, the A53T protein activated more strongly microglia than the wild-type α-synuclein and other mutants. This A53T-induced microglial reactivity mechanism was found to depend on phosphorylation mechanisms mediated by MAPKs and on successive NFkB/AP-1/Nrf2 pathways activation. These results suggest that the microgliosis intensity during PD might depend on the type of α-synuclein protein implicated. Indeed, mutated forms are more potent microglial stimulators than wild-type α-synuclein. Based on these data, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant therapeutic strategies may be valid in order to reduce microgliosis but also to subsequently slow down PD progression, especially in familial cases. PMID:27622765

  3. Hepatic histological alterations and biochemical changes induced by sildenafil overdoses.

    PubMed

    Jarrar, Bashir Mahmoud; Almansour, Mansour Ibrahim

    2015-11-01

    Sildenafil is used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and is helping millions of men around the world to achieve and maintain a long lasting erection. Fifty healthy male rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) were used in the present study and exposed daily to sildenafil (0, 1, 3, 6, 9 mg/kg) for 5 days per week for 7 weeks to investigate the biochemical changes and alterations in the hepatic tissues induced by this drug overdosing. In comparison with respective control rabbits, sildenafil overdoses elevated significantly (p-value<0.05, ANOVA test) alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), testosterone, follicular stimulating hormone and total protein, while creatinine and urea were lowered with no significant alteration was observed in uric acid and luteinizing hormone concentration. Also sildenafil provoked hepatocytes nuclear alterations, necrosis, hydropic degeneration, bile duct hyperplasia, Kupffer cells hyperplasia, inflammatory cells infiltration, hepatic vessels congestion and evident partial depletion of glycogen content. The results show that subchronic exposure to sildenafil overdoses exhibits significant biochemical and alterations in the hepatic tissues that might affect the functions of the liver and other vital organs. PMID:26639481

  4. Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zeevi, David; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Thaiss, Christoph A; Maza, Ori; Israeli, David; Zmora, Niv; Gilad, Shlomit; Weinberger, Adina; Kuperman, Yael; Harmelin, Alon; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Shapiro, Hagit; Halpern, Zamir; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2014-10-01

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are among the most widely used food additives worldwide, regularly consumed by lean and obese individuals alike. NAS consumption is considered safe and beneficial owing to their low caloric content, yet supporting scientific data remain sparse and controversial. Here we demonstrate that consumption of commonly used NAS formulations drives the development of glucose intolerance through induction of compositional and functional alterations to the intestinal microbiota. These NAS-mediated deleterious metabolic effects are abrogated by antibiotic treatment, and are fully transferrable to germ-free mice upon faecal transplantation of microbiota configurations from NAS-consuming mice, or of microbiota anaerobically incubated in the presence of NAS. We identify NAS-altered microbial metabolic pathways that are linked to host susceptibility to metabolic disease, and demonstrate similar NAS-induced dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in healthy human subjects. Collectively, our results link NAS consumption, dysbiosis and metabolic abnormalities, thereby calling for a reassessment of massive NAS usage.

  5. Alteration of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation Properties Induced by Particle Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Polen, M.; Beydoun, H.; Lawlis, E.; Ahern, A.; Jahn, L.; Hill, T. C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol particles that can serve as ice nuclei frequently experience rapid and extensive chemical aging during atmospheric transport. This is known to significantly alter some ice nucleation modes of the few types of ice nucleation particle systems where aging effects have been simulated, such as for mineral dust. Yet much of our understanding of atmospheric particle freezing properties is derived from measurements of fresh or unaged particles. We know almost nothing regarding how atmospheric aging might alter the freezing properties of biomass burning aerosol or biological particle nucleants. We have investigated the effects of simulated aging using a chamber reactor on the heterogeneous ice nucleation properties of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) and ice-active bacteria particles. Some types of aging were found to enhance the freezing ability of BBA, exhibited as a shift in a portion of the droplet freezing curve to warmer temperatures by a few °C. Ice-active bacteria were found to consistently loose their most ice-active nucleants after repeated aging cycles. The bacterial systems always retained significantly efficient ice active sites that still allowed them to induce freezing at mild/warm temperatures, despite this decrease in freezing ability. A comprehensive series of online single-particle mass spectrometry and offline spectromicroscopic analysis of individual particles was used to determine how the aging altered the aerosol's composition, and gain mechanistic insights into how this in turn altered the freezing properties. Our new ice nucleation framework that uses a continuous distribution of ice active site ability (contact angle) was used to interpret the droplet freezing spectra and understand how aging alters the internal and external variability, and rigidity, of the ice active sites.

  6. Light-induced voltage alteration for integrated circuit analysis

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Jr., Edward I.; Soden, Jerry M.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method are described for analyzing an integrated circuit (IC), The invention uses a focused light beam that is scanned over a surface of the IC to generate a light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) signal for analysis of the IC, The LIVA signal may be used to generate an image of the IC showing the location of any defects in the IC; and it may be further used to image and control the logic states of the IC. The invention has uses for IC failure analysis, for the development of ICs, for production-line inspection of ICs, and for qualification of ICs.

  7. Light-induced voltage alteration for integrated circuit analysis

    DOEpatents

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.

    1995-07-04

    An apparatus and method are described for analyzing an integrated circuit (IC). The invention uses a focused light beam that is scanned over a surface of the IC to generate a light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) signal for analysis of the IC. The LIVA signal may be used to generate an image of the IC showing the location of any defects in the IC; and it may be further used to image and control the logic states of the IC. The invention has uses for IC failure analysis, for the development of ICs, for production-line inspection of ICs, and for qualification of ICs. 18 figs.

  8. Structure of membrane-bound α-synuclein from site-directed spin labeling and computational refinement

    PubMed Central

    Jao, Christine C.; Hegde, Balachandra G.; Chen, Jeannie; Haworth, Ian S.; Langen, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    α-Synuclein is known to play a causative role in Parkinson disease. Although its physiological functions are not fully understood, α-synuclein has been shown to interact with synaptic vesicles and modulate neurotransmitter release. However, the structure of its physiologically relevant membrane-bound state remains unknown. Here we developed a site-directed spin labeling and EPR-based approach for determining the structure of α-synuclein bound to a lipid bilayer. Continuous-wave EPR was used to assign local secondary structure and to determine the membrane immersion depth of lipid-exposed residues, whereas pulsed EPR was used to map long-range distances. The structure of α-synuclein was built and refined by using simulated annealing molecular dynamics restrained by the immersion depths and distances. We found that α-synuclein forms an extended, curved α-helical structure that is over 90 aa in length. The monomeric helix has a superhelical twist similar to that of right-handed coiled-coils which, like α-synuclein, contain 11-aa repeats, but which are soluble, oligomeric proteins (rmsd = 0.82 Å). The α-synuclein helix extends parallel to the curved membrane in a manner that allows conserved Lys and Glu residues to interact with the zwitterionic headgroups, while uncharged residues penetrate into the acyl chain region. This structural arrangement is significantly different from that of α-synuclein in the presence of the commonly used membrane-mimetic detergent SDS, which induces the formation of two antiparallel helices. Our structural analysis emphasizes the importance of studying membrane protein structure in a bilayer environment. PMID:19066219

  9. Cardiac alterations induced by a fish-catching diving competition.

    PubMed

    Gargne, O; Joulia, F; Golé, Y; Coulange, M; Bessereau, J; Fontanari, P; Desruelle, A-V; Gavarry, O; Boussuges, A

    2012-06-01

    Cardiac changes induced by repeated breath-hold diving were investigated after a fish-catching diving competition. Eleven healthy subjects carried out repeated breath-hold dives at a mean maximal depth of 20 ± 2.7 msw (66 ± 9 fsw) during 5 h. One hour after the competition, the body mass loss was -1.7 ± 0.5 kg. Most of the breath-hold divers suffered from cold and although the core temperature remained normal, a decrease in cutaneous temperature was recorded in the extremities. Systolic blood pressure was reduced in both upper and lower limbs. Heart rate was unchanged, but left ventricular (LV) stroke volume was reduced leading to a decrease in cardiac output (-20%). Left atrial and LV diameters were significantly decreased. LV filling was assessed on a trans-mitral profile. An increase in the contribution of the atrial contraction to LV filling was observed. Right cavity diameters were increased. The cardiac autonomic alterations were in favor of sympathetic hyperactivity. After a fish-catching diving competition in cold water, alterations suggesting dehydration, contraction in plasma volume and sympathetic hyperactivity were observed. Furthermore, enlargements of right cavities were in favor of right ventricular strains. Repeated apnea and swimming in cold water may account for these alterations. PMID:20738824

  10. Intestinal microbiota are transiently altered during Salmonella-induced gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Deanna L; Vallance, Bruce A

    2008-08-01

    The mammalian GI tract contains a large and diverse ecosystem of microorganisms that play a profound role in our development and physiology. Interestingly, the microbial make-up within the intestine has been found to be altered in many clinically important diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, Types 1 and 2 diabetes, and obesity. Barman et al. used a Salmonella-induced murine model of gastroenteritis to show that the intestinal microbiota are transiently altered during the host inflammatory response to infection. These findings are of interest as understanding how the microbiota are altered during disease states may offer insight into which microbial populations are important in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Recently, probiotics have been shown to modulate the mucosal immune system and improve intestinal barrier function, validating their potential as therapeutics for gastrointestinal-associated diseases. As we begin to understand the benefits conferred to the intestine by microbiota, the use of probiotics to modify its composition is an attractive option to improve human health. PMID:19072400

  11. Prevention of shockwave induced functional and morphological alterations: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sarica, Kemal; Yencilek, Faruk

    2008-03-01

    Experimental as well as clinical findings reported in the literature suggest that treatment with shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) causes renal parenchymal damage mainly by generating free radicals through ischaemia/reperfusion injury mechanism. Although SWL-induced renal damage is well tolerated in the majority of healthy cases with no permanent functional and/or morphologic side effects, a subset of patients with certain risk factors requires close attention on this aspect among which the ones with pre-existing renal disorders, urinary tract infection, previous lithotripsy history and solitary kidneys could be mentioned. It is clear that in such patients lowering the number of shock waves (per session) could be beneficial and has been applied by the physicians as the first practical step of diminishing SWL induced parenchymal damage. On the other hand, taking the injurious effects of high energy shock wave (HESW) induced free radical formation on renal parenchyma and subsequent histopathologic alterations into account, physicians searched for some protective agents in an attempt to prevent or at least to limit the extent of the functional as well as the morphologic alterations. Among these agents calcium channel blocking agents (verapamil and nifedipine), antioxidant agents (allopurinol, vitamin E and selenium) and potassium citrate have been used to minimize these adverse effects. Additionally, therapeutic application of these agents on reducing stone recurrence particularly after SWL will gain more importance in the future in order to limit new stone formation in these cases. Lastly, as experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated, combination of anti-oxidants with free radical scavengers may provide superior renal protection against shock wave induced trauma. However, we believe that further investigations are certainly needed to determine the dose-response relationship between the damaging effects of SWL application and the protective role of these agents.

  12. Fibrinogen Induces Alterations of Endothelial Cell Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    PATIBANDLA, PHANI K.; TYAGI, NEETU; DEAN, WILLIAM L.; TYAGI, SURESH C.; ROBERTS, ANDREW M.; LOMINADZE, DAVID

    2009-01-01

    We previously showed that an elevated content of fibrinogen (Fg) increased formation of filamentous actin and enhanced endothelial layer permeability. In the present work we tested the hypothesis that Fg binding to endothelial cells (ECs) alters expression of actin-associated endothelial tight junction proteins (TJP). Rat cardiac microvascular ECs were grown in gold plated chambers of an electrical cell-substrate impedance system, 8-well chambered, or in 12-well plates. Confluent ECs were treated with Fg (2 or 4 mg/ml), Fg (4 mg/ml) with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) kinase inhibitors (PD98059 or U0126), Fg (4 mg/ml) with anti-ICAM-1 antibody or BQ788 (endothelin type B receptor blocker), endothelin-1, endothelin-1 with BQ788, or medium alone for 24 h. Fg induced a dose-dependent decrease in EC junction integrity as determined by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER). Western blot analysis and RT-PCR data showed that the higher dose of Fg decreased the contents of TJPs, occludin, zona occluden-1 (ZO-1), and zona occluden-2 (ZO-2) in ECs. Fg-induced decreases in contents of the TJPs were blocked by PD98059, U0126, or anti-ICAM-1 antibody. While BQ788 inhibited endothelin-1-induced decrease in TEER, it did not affect Fg-induced decrease in TEER. These data suggest that Fg increases EC layer permeability via the MEK kinase signaling pathway by affecting occludin, ZO-1, and ZO-2, TJPs, which are bound to actin filaments. Therefore, increased binding of Fg to its major EC receptor, ICAM-1, during cardiovascular diseases may increase microvascular permeability by altering the content and possibly subcellular localization of endothelial TJPs. PMID:19507189

  13. Targeting α-synuclein: Therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Dehay, Benjamin; Decressac, Mickael; Bourdenx, Mathieu; Guadagnino, Irene; Fernagut, Pierre-Olivier; Tamburrino, Anna; Bassil, Fares; Meissner, Wassilios G; Bezard, Erwan

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of the central role of α-synuclein (αSyn) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has powered, in the last decade, the emergence of novel relevant models of this condition based on viral vector-mediated expression of the disease-causing protein or inoculation of toxic species of αSyn. Although the development of these powerful tools and models has provided considerable insights into the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in PD, it has also been translated into the expansion of the landscape of preclinical therapeutic strategies. Much attention is now brought to the proteotoxic mechanisms induced by αSyn and how to block them using strategies inspired by intrinsic cellular pathways such as the enhancement of cellular clearance by the lysosomal-autophagic system, through proteasome-mediated degradation or through immunization. The important effort undertaken by several laboratories and consortia to tackle these issues and identify novel targets warrants great promise for the discovery not only of neuroprotective approaches but also of restorative strategies for PD and other synucleinopathies. In this viewpoint, we summarize the latest advances in this new area of PD research and will discuss promising approaches and ongoing challenges. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26926119

  14. Drug Targets from Genetics: Alpha-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Danzer, Karin M.; McLean, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the critical issues in Parkinson disease (PD) research is the identity of the specific toxic, pathogenic moiety. In PD, mutations in alpha-synuclein (αsyn) or multiplication of the SNCA gene encoding αsyn, result in a phenotype of cellular inclusions, cell death, and brain dysfunction. While the historical point of view has been that the macroscopic aggregates containing αsyn are the toxic species, in the last several years evidence has emerged that suggests instead that smaller soluble species - likely oligomers containing misfolded αsyn - are actually the toxic moiety and that the fibrillar inclusions may even be a cellular detoxification pathway and less harmful. If soluble misfolded species of αsyn are the toxic moieties, then cellular mechanisms that degrade misfolded αsyn would be neuroprotective and a rational target for drug development. In this review we will discuss the fundamental mechanisms underlying αsyn toxicity including oligomer formation, oxidative stress, and degradation pathways and consider rational therapeutic strategies that may have the potential to prevent or halt αsyn induced pathogenesis in PD. PMID:21838671

  15. Structural Characteristics of the Alpha-Synuclein Oligomers Stabilized By the Flavonoid Baicalein

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, D.-P.; Fink, A.L.; Uversky, V.N.

    2009-05-18

    The flavonoid baicalein inhibits fibrillation of alpha-synuclein, which is a major component of Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease. It has been known that baicalein induces the formation of alpha-synuclein oligomers and consequently prevents their fibrillation. In order to evaluate the structural properties of baicalein-stabilized oligomers, we purified oligomer species by HPLC and examined their stability and structure by CD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography HPLC, small-angle X-ray scattering, and atomic force microscopy. Baicalein-stabilized oligomers are beta-sheet-enriched according to CD and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses. They did not form fibrils even after very prolonged incubation. From small-angle X-ray scattering data and atomic force microscopy images, the oligomers were characterized as quite compact globular species. Oligomers were extremely stable, with a GdmCl C(m)=3.3 M. This high stability explains the previously observed inhibition properties of baicalein against alpha-synuclein fibrillation. These baicalein-stabilized oligomers, added to the solution of aggregating alpha-synuclein, were able to noticeably inhibit its fibrillation. After prolonged coincubation, short fibrils were formed, suggesting an effective interaction of oligomers with monomeric alpha-synuclein. Membrane permeability tests suggested that the baicalein-stabilized oligomers had a mild effect on the integrity of the membrane surface. This effect was rather similar to that of the monomeric protein, suggesting that targeted stabilization of certain alpha-synuclein oligomers might offer a potential strategy for the development of novel Parkinson's disease therapies.

  16. Salivary total α-synuclein, oligomeric α-synuclein and SNCA variants in Parkinson’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wenyan; Chen, Wei; Yang, Qiong; Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Linyuan; Wang, Xiaoying; Dong, Fangyi; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Shuai; Quinn, Thomas J.; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Shengdi; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The present study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of salivary total and oligomeric α-synuclein levels in PD. Furthermore, we sought to explore the relationship between salivary total α-synuclein and α-synuclein SNP variants levels. 201 PD patients and 67 controls were recruited, of which there also had the genetic information of two positive α-synuclein (SNCA) loci. Salivary total α-synuclein was assayed using a highly sensitive Luminex assay and oligomeric α-synuclein was quantified by the combination of Gel filtration chromatography and Western blot, respectively. From our analysis,No difference in salivary total α-synuclein levels was found between PD patients and healthy controls, it decreased with age in PD patients, and was closely associated with genotypic distribution of rs11931074 and rs894278 in PD, respectively. After controlled for age and genders, G allele of rs11931074 was correlated with lower salivary total α-synuclein levels, while G allele of rs894278 was also correlated with the higher levels. Simultaneously, the further study was shown that salivary oligomeric α-synuclein in PD patients significantly increased comparing to healthy controls. In conclusions,our study firstly demonstrated that salivary total α-synuclein levels could be manipulated by different α-synuclein SNPs and salivary oligomeric α-synuclein could be a potential diagnostic indicator of PD. PMID:27335051

  17. Structural alterations of erythrocyte membrane components induced by exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Brzeszczynska, Joanna; Pieniazek, Anna; Gwozdzinski, Lukasz; Gwozdzinski, Krzysztof; Jegier, Anna

    2008-12-01

    Physical exercise was used as a model of the physiological modulator of free radical production to examine the effects of exercise-induced oxidative modifications on the physico-biochemical properties of erythrocyte membrane. The aim of our work was to investigate conformational changes of erythrocyte membrane proteins, membrane fluidity, and membrane susceptibility to disintegration. Venous blood was taken before, immediately after, and 1 h after an exhaustive incremental cycling test (30 W.min-1 ramp), performed by 11 healthy untrained males on balanced diets (mean age, 22 +/- 2 years; mean body mass index, 25 +/- 4.5 kg.m-2). In response to this exercise, individual maximum heart rate was 195 +/- 12 beats.min-1 and maximum wattage was 292 +/- 27 W. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to investigate alterations in membrane proteins and membrane dynamics, and to measure production of radical species. The reducing potential of plasma (RPP) was measured using the reduction of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and the ferric-reducing ability of plasma. Exercise induced decreases in erythrocyte membrane fluidity in the polar region (p < 0.0001) and alterations in the conformational state of membrane proteins (p < 0.05). An increase in RPP was observed immediately after exercise (p < 0.001), with a further increase 1 h postexercise (p < 0.0001). Supporting measurements of lipid peroxidation showed an increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances immediately after exercise (p < 0.05) and at 1 h of recovery (p < 0.001); however, free radicals were not detected. Results indicate the existence of early postexercise mild oxidative stress after single-exercise performance, which induced structural changes in erythrocyte membrane components (protein aggregation) and in the membrane organization (lipids rigidization) that followed lipid peroxidation but did not lead to cellular hemolysis.

  18. Rab11 modulates α-synuclein-mediated defects in synaptic transmission and behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Breda, Carlo; Nugent, Marie L.; Estranero, Jasper G.; Kyriacou, Charalambos P.; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Steinert, Joern R.; Giorgini, Flaviano

    2015-01-01

    A central pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the presence of proteinaceous depositions known as Lewy bodies, which consist largely of the protein α-synuclein (aSyn). Mutations, multiplications and polymorphisms in the gene encoding aSyn are associated with familial forms of PD and susceptibility to idiopathic PD. Alterations in aSyn impair neuronal vesicle formation/transport, and likely contribute to PD pathogenesis by neuronal dysfunction and degeneration. aSyn is functionally associated with several Rab family GTPases, which perform various roles in vesicle trafficking. Here, we explore the role of the endosomal recycling factor Rab11 in the pathogenesis of PD using Drosophila models of aSyn toxicity. We find that aSyn induces synaptic potentiation at the larval neuromuscular junction by increasing synaptic vesicle (SV) size, and that these alterations are reversed by Rab11 overexpression. Furthermore, Rab11 decreases aSyn aggregation and ameliorates several aSyn-dependent phenotypes in both larvae and adult fruit flies, including locomotor activity, degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and shortened lifespan. This work emphasizes the importance of Rab11 in the modulation of SV size and consequent enhancement of synaptic function. Our results suggest that targeting Rab11 activity could have a therapeutic value in PD. PMID:25305083

  19. Treadmill exercise induces hippocampal astroglial alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Caren; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Nardin, Patrícia; Biasibetti, Regina; Costa, Ana Paula; Vizueti, Adriana Fernanda; Batassini, Cristiane; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Bobermin, Larissa; Sesterheim, Patrícia; Quincozes-Santos, André; de Souza, Jaqueline; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Physical exercise effects on brain health and cognitive performance have been described. Synaptic remodeling in hippocampus induced by physical exercise has been described in animal models, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Changes in astrocytes, the glial cells involved in synaptic remodeling, need more characterization. We investigated the effect of moderate treadmill exercise (20 min/day) for 4 weeks on some parameters of astrocytic activity in rat hippocampal slices, namely, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamate uptake and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities, glutathione content, and S100B protein content and secretion, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and glucose uptake activity in this tissue. Results show that moderate treadmill exercise was able to induce a decrease in GFAP content (evaluated by ELISA and immunohistochemistry) and an increase in GS activity. These changes could be mediated by corticosterone, whose levels were elevated in serum. BDNF, another putative mediator, was not altered in hippocampal tissue. Moreover, treadmill exercise caused a decrease in NO content. Our data indicate specific changes in astrocyte markers induced by physical exercise, the importance of studying astrocytes for understanding brain plasticity, as well as reinforce the relevance of physical exercise as a neuroprotective strategy. PMID:23401802

  20. Is the NACP/Synuclein gene involved in early-onset Alheimer`s disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, D.; Clerget-Darpoux, F.; Frebourg, T.

    1994-09-01

    The major component of senile plaques (SP), the most specific histologic lesion of Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is the A4 peptide, derived from a large precursor protein (APP). Recently, a second major component of SP has been isolated. This 35 AA peptide was named non-A4 component amyloid (NAC) and its precursor - a 140 AA protein - was named NACP. Computer homology search has allowed us to establish that the NACP gene is homologous to the rat synuclein gene which is expressed in neurons. Since APP mutations have been shown to cause early-onset Alzheimer`s disease (EOAD) in several families, we investigated whether the NACP/synuclein gene was also involved in familial early-onset Alzheimer`s disease (FEOAD). RT-PCR and direct sequencing of the entire NACP open reading frame did not reveal any alteration of the NACP coding sequence in lymphocytes of 26 unrelated FEOAD patients. We showed that the NACP/synuclein gene was alternatively spliced and that the different transcripts potentially encoded for distinct proteins all containing the NAC peptide. Accumulation of NAC in SP might result from a dysregulation of NACP/synuclein expression.

  1. Cytokine-induced alterations of gastrointestinal motility in gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Akiho, Hirotada; Ihara, Eikichi; Motomura, Yasuaki; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation and immune activation in the gut are usually accompanied by alteration of gastrointestinal (GI) motility. In infection, changes in motor function have been linked to host defense by enhancing the expulsion of the infectious agents. In this review, we describe the evidence for inflammation and immune activation in GI infection, inflammatory bowel disease, ileus, achalasia, eosinophilic esophagitis, microscopic colitis, celiac disease, pseudo-obstruction and functional GI disorders. We also describe the possible mechanisms by which inflammation and immune activation in the gut affect GI motility. GI motility disorder is a broad spectrum disturbance of GI physiology. Although several systems including central nerves, enteric nerves, interstitial cells of Cajal and smooth muscles contribute to a coordinated regulation of GI motility, smooth muscle probably plays the most important role. Thus, we focus on the relationship between activation of cytokines induced by adaptive immune response and alteration of GI smooth muscle contractility. Accumulated evidence has shown that Th1 and Th2 cytokines cause hypocontractility and hypercontractility of inflamed intestinal smooth muscle. Th1 cytokines downregulate CPI-17 and L-type Ca2+ channels and upregulate regulators of G protein signaling 4, which contributes to hypocontractility of inflamed intestinal smooth muscle. Conversely, Th2 cytokines cause hypercontractilty via signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 or mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Th1 and Th2 cytokines have opposing effects on intestinal smooth muscle contraction via 5-hydroxytryptamine signaling. Understanding the immunological basis of altered GI motor function could lead to new therapeutic strategies for GI functional and inflammatory disorders. PMID:22013552

  2. Thermally-induced voltage alteration for analysis of microelectromechanical devices

    DOEpatents

    Walraven, Jeremy A.; Cole, Jr., Edward I.

    2002-01-01

    A thermally-induced voltage alteration (TIVA) apparatus and method are disclosed for analyzing a microelectromechanical (MEM) device with or without on-board integrated circuitry. One embodiment of the TIVA apparatus uses constant-current biasing of the MEM device while scanning a focused laser beam over electrically-active members therein to produce localized heating which alters the power demand of the MEM device and thereby changes the voltage of the constant-current source. This changing voltage of the constant-current source can be measured and used in combination with the position of the focused and scanned laser beam to generate an image of any short-circuit defects in the MEM device (e.g. due to stiction or fabrication defects). In another embodiment of the TIVA apparatus, an image can be generated directly from a thermoelectric potential produced by localized laser heating at the location of any short-circuit defects in the MEM device, without any need for supplying power to the MEM device. The TIVA apparatus can be formed, in part, from a scanning optical microscope, and has applications for qualification testing or failure analysis of MEM devices.

  3. Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zeevi, David; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Thaiss, Christoph A; Maza, Ori; Israeli, David; Zmora, Niv; Gilad, Shlomit; Weinberger, Adina; Kuperman, Yael; Harmelin, Alon; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Shapiro, Hagit; Halpern, Zamir; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2014-10-01

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are among the most widely used food additives worldwide, regularly consumed by lean and obese individuals alike. NAS consumption is considered safe and beneficial owing to their low caloric content, yet supporting scientific data remain sparse and controversial. Here we demonstrate that consumption of commonly used NAS formulations drives the development of glucose intolerance through induction of compositional and functional alterations to the intestinal microbiota. These NAS-mediated deleterious metabolic effects are abrogated by antibiotic treatment, and are fully transferrable to germ-free mice upon faecal transplantation of microbiota configurations from NAS-consuming mice, or of microbiota anaerobically incubated in the presence of NAS. We identify NAS-altered microbial metabolic pathways that are linked to host susceptibility to metabolic disease, and demonstrate similar NAS-induced dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in healthy human subjects. Collectively, our results link NAS consumption, dysbiosis and metabolic abnormalities, thereby calling for a reassessment of massive NAS usage. PMID:25231862

  4. Thermally-induced voltage alteration for integrated circuit analysis

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Jr., Edward I.

    2000-01-01

    A thermally-induced voltage alteration (TIVA) apparatus and method are disclosed for analyzing an integrated circuit (IC) either from a device side of the IC or through the IC substrate to locate any open-circuit or short-circuit defects therein. The TIVA apparatus uses constant-current biasing of the IC while scanning a focused laser beam over electrical conductors (i.e. a patterned metallization) in the IC to produce localized heating of the conductors. This localized heating produces a thermoelectric potential due to the Seebeck effect in any conductors with open-circuit defects and a resistance change in any conductors with short-circuit defects, both of which alter the power demand by the IC and thereby change the voltage of a source or power supply providing the constant-current biasing. By measuring the change in the supply voltage and the position of the focused and scanned laser beam over time, any open-circuit or short-circuit defects in the IC can be located and imaged. The TIVA apparatus can be formed in part from a scanning optical microscope, and has applications for qualification testing or failure analysis of ICs.

  5. Epigenetic Alterations Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter in Mouse Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Miousse, Isabelle R.; Chalbot, Marie-Cécile G.; Aykin-Burns, Nükhet; Wang, Xiaoying; Basnakian, Alexei; Kavouras, Ilias G.; Koturbash, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory mortality and morbidity has been associated with exposure to particulate matter (PM). Experimental evidence suggests involvement of cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammation in the development of PM-associated pathological states; however, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. In the current study, we analyzed short-term epigenetic response to PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm) exposure in mouse ascitic RAW264.7 macrophages (BALB/C Abelson murine leukemia virus-induced tumor). Ambient PM10 was collected using a high volume sampler in Little Rock, AR. Analysis revealed that PM10 was composed mainly of Al and Fe, and the water soluble organic fraction was dominated by aliphatic and carbohydrate fragments and minor quantities of aromatic components. Exposure to PM10 compromised the cellular epigenome at concentrations 10–200 μg/ml. Specifically, epigenetic alterations were evident as changes in the methylation and expression of repetitive element-associated DNA and associated DNA methylation machinery. These results suggest that epigenetic alterations, in concert with cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammation, might contribute to the pathogenesis of PM-associated respiratory diseases. PMID:24535919

  6. Galantamine reverses scopolamine-induced behavioral alterations in Dugesia tigrina.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Latha; Amatya, Christina; DeSaer, Cassie J; Dalhoff, Zachary; Eggerichs, Michael R

    2014-09-01

    In planaria (Dugesia tigrina), scopolamine, a nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist, induced distinct behaviors of attenuated motility and C-like hyperactivity. Planarian locomotor velocity (pLMV) displayed a dose-dependent negative correlation with scopolamine concentrations from 0.001 to 1.0 mM, and a further increase in scopolamine concentration to 2.25 mM did not further decrease pLMV. Planarian hyperactivity counts was dose-dependently increased following pretreatment with scopolamine concentrations from 0.001 to 0.5 mM and then decreased for scopolamine concentrations ≥ 1 mM. Planarian learning and memory investigated using classical Pavlovian conditioning experiments demonstrated that scopolamine (1 mM) negatively influenced associative learning indicated by a significant decrease in % positive behaviors from 86 % (control) to 14 % (1 mM scopolamine) and similarly altered memory retention, which is indicated by a decrease in % positive behaviors from 69 % (control) to 27 % (1 mM scopolamine). Galantamine demonstrated a complex behavior in planarian motility experiments since co-application of low concentrations of galantamine (0.001 and 0.01 mM) protected planaria against 1 mM scopolamine-induced motility impairments; however, pLMV was significantly decreased when planaria were tested in the presence of 0.1 mM galantamine alone. Effects of co-treatment of scopolamine and galantamine on memory retention in planaria via classical Pavlovian conditioning experiments showed that galantamine (0.01 mM) partially reversed scopolamine (1 mM)-induced memory deficits in planaria as the % positive behaviors increased from 27 to 63 %. The results demonstrate, for the first time in planaria, scopolamine's effects in causing learning and memory impairments and galantamine's ability in reversing scopolamine-induced memory impairments.

  7. Fracture-aperture alteration induced by calcite precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation significantly alters the transport properties of fractured rock. Chemical solubility gradients that favor precipitation induce mineral growth, which decreases the local aperture and alters preferential flow paths. Understanding the resulting development of spatial heterogeneities is necessary to predict the evolution of transport properties in the subsurface. We present experimental results that quantify the relationship between mineral precipitation and aperture alteration in a transparent analog fracture, 7.62cm x 7.62cm, with a uniform aperture of ~200 μm. Prior to flow experiments, a pump circulated a super-saturated calcite solution over the bottom glass, coating the glass surface with calcite. This method of seeding resulted in clusters of calcite crystals with large reactive surface area and provided micro-scale variability in the aperture field. A continuous flow syringe pump injected a reactive fluid into the fracture at 0.5 ml/min. The fluid was a mixture of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3, 0.02M) and calcium chloride (CaCl2 0.0004M) with a saturation index, Ω, of 8.51 with respect to calcite. A strobed LED panel backlit the fracture and a high-resolution CCD camera monitored changes in transmitted light intensity. Light transmission techniques provided a quantitative measurement of fracture aperture over the flow field. Results from these preliminary experiments showed growth near the inlet of the fracture, with decreasing precipitation rates in the flow direction. Over a period of two weeks, the fracture aperture decreased by 17% within the first 4mm of the inlet. Newly precipitated calcite bridged individual crystal clusters and smoothed the reacting surface. This observation is an interesting contradiction to the expectation of surface roughening induced by mineral growth. Additionally, the aperture decreased uniformly across the width of the fracture due to the initial aperture distribution. Future experiments of precipitation

  8. Alterations in the rat electrocardiogram induced by stationary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffey, C.T.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    A field strength dependent increase in the amplitude of the T-wave signal in the rat electrocardiogram (ECG) was observed during exposure to homogeneous, stationary magnetic fields. For 24 adult Sprague-Dswley and Buffalo rats of both sexes, the T-wave amplitude was found to increase by an average of 408% in a 2.0 Tesla (1 Tesla = 10/sup 4/ Gauss) field. No significant magnetically induced changes were observed in other components of the ECG record, including the P wave and the QRS complex. The minimum field level at which augmentation of the T wave could be detected was 0.3 Tesla. The magnetically induced increase in T-wave amplitude occurred instantaneously, and was immediately reversible after exposure to fields as high as 2.0 Tesla. No abnormalities in any component of the ECG record, including the T wave, were noted during a period of 3 weeks following cessation of a continuous 5-h exposure of rats to a 1.5-Tesla field. The heart rate and breathing rate of adult rats were not altered during, or subsequent to, application of fields up to 2.0 Tesla. The effect of animal orientation within the field was tested using juvenile rats 3-14 days old. The maximum increase in T-wave amplitude was observed when subjects were placed with the long axis of the body perpendicular to the lines of magnetic induction. (JMT)

  9. Chaperone-like activities of {alpha}-synuclein: {alpha}-Synuclein assists enzyme activities of esterases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Misun; Kim, SeungBum; Kang, Mira; Ryu, Yeonwoo . E-mail: ywryu@ajou.ac.kr; Doohun Kim, T. . E-mail: doohunkim@ajou.ac.kr

    2006-08-11

    {alpha}-Synuclein, a major constituent of Lewy bodies (LBs), has been implicated to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), although the physiological function of {alpha}-synuclein has not yet been known. Here we have shown that {alpha}-synuclein, which has no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure, can protect the enzyme activity of microbial esterases against stress conditions such as heat, pH, and organic solvents. In particular, the flexibility of {alpha}-synuclein and its C-terminal region seems to be important for complex formation, but the structural integrity of the C-terminal region may not be required for stabilization of enzyme activity. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in vivo enzyme assays showed highly specific interactions of esterases with {alpha}-synuclein. Our results indicate that {alpha}-synuclein not only protects the enzyme activity of microbial esterases in vitro, but also can stabilize the active conformation of microbial esterases in vivo.

  10. Effects of different isoforms of apoE on aggregation of the α-synuclein protein implicated in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Emamzadeh, Fatemeh Nouri; Aojula, Harmesh; McHugh, Patrick C; Allsop, David

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease is a progressive brain disorder due to the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The accumulation of aggregated forms of α-synuclein protein into Lewy bodies is one of the characteristic features of this disease although the pathological role of any such protein deposits in causing neurodegeneration remains elusive. Here, the effects of different apolipoprotein E isoforms (apoE2, apoE3, apoE4) on the aggregation of α-synuclein in vitro were examined using thioflavin T assays and also an immunoassay to detect the formation of multimeric forms. Our results revealed that the aggregation of α-synuclein is influenced by apoE concentration. At low concentrations of apoE (<15nM), all of the isoforms were able to increase the aggregation of α-synuclein (50μM), with apoE4 showing the greatest stimulatory effect. This is in contrast to a higher concentration (>15nM) of these isoforms, where a decrease in the aggregation of α-synuclein was noted. The data show that exceptionally low levels of apoE may seed α-syn aggregation, which could potentially lead to the pathogenesis of α-synuclein-induced neurodegeneration. On the other hand, higher levels of apoE could potentially lower the degree of α-synuclein aggregation and confer protection. The differential effects noted with apoE4 could explain why this particular isoform results in an earlier age of onset for Parkinson's disease.

  11. Single-molecule FRET studies on alpha-synuclein oligomerization of Parkinson's disease genetically related mutants.

    PubMed

    Tosatto, Laura; Horrocks, Mathew H; Dear, Alexander J; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Cremades, Nunilo; Dobson, Christopher M; Klenerman, David

    2015-01-01

    Oligomers of alpha-synuclein are toxic to cells and have been proposed to play a key role in the etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. As certain missense mutations in the gene encoding for alpha-synuclein induce early-onset forms of the disease, it has been suggested that these variants might have an inherent tendency to produce high concentrations of oligomers during aggregation, although a direct experimental evidence for this is still missing. We used single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer to visualize directly the protein self-assembly process by wild-type alpha-synuclein and A53T, A30P and E46K mutants and to compare the structural properties of the ensemble of oligomers generated. We found that the kinetics of oligomer formation correlates with the natural tendency of each variant to acquire beta-sheet structure. Moreover, A53T and A30P showed significant differences in the averaged FRET efficiency of one of the two types of oligomers formed compared to the wild-type oligomers, indicating possible structural variety among the ensemble of species generated. Importantly, we found similar concentrations of oligomers during the lag-phase of the aggregation of wild-type and mutated alpha-synuclein, suggesting that the properties of the ensemble of oligomers generated during self-assembly might be more relevant than their absolute concentration for triggering neurodegeneration. PMID:26582456

  12. Macromolecular crowding in the Escherichia coli periplasm maintains alpha-synuclein disorder.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Brian C; Young, Gregory B; Pielak, Gary J

    2006-02-01

    The natively disordered protein alpha-synuclein is the primary component of Lewy bodies, the cellular hallmark of Parkinson's disease. Most studies of this protein are performed in dilute solution, but its biologically relevant role is performed in the crowded environment inside cells. We addressed the effects of macromolecular crowding on alpha-synuclein by combining NMR data acquired in living Escherichia coli with in vitro NMR data. The crowded environment in the E.coli periplasm prevents a conformational change that is detected at 35 degrees C in dilute solution. This change is associated with an increase in hydrodynamic radius and the formation of secondary structure in the N-terminal 100 amino acid residues. By preventing this temperature-induced conformational change, crowding in the E.coli periplasm stabilizes the disordered monomer. We obtain the same stabilization in vitro upon crowding alpha-synuclein with 300 g/l of bovine serum albumin, indicating that crowding alone is sufficient to stabilize the disordered, monomeric protein. Two disease-associated variants (A30P and A53T) behave in the same way in both dilute solution and in the E.coli periplasm. These data reveal the importance of approaching the effects of macromolecular crowding on a case-by-case basis. Additionally, our work shows that discrete structured protein conformations may not be achieved by alpha-synuclein inside cells, implicating the commonly overlooked aspect of macromolecular crowding as a possible factor in the etiology of Parkinson's disease.

  13. Intracellular Dynamics of Synucleins: "Here, There and Everywhere".

    PubMed

    Surguchov, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Synucleins are small, soluble proteins expressed primarily in neural tissue and in certain tumors. The synuclein family consists of three members: α-, β-, and γ-synucleins present only in vertebrates. Members of the synuclein family have high sequence identity, especially in the N-terminal regions. The synuclein gene family came into the spotlight, when one of its members, α-synuclein, was found to be associated with Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, whereas γ-synuclein was linked to several forms of cancer. There are a lot of controversy and exciting debates concerning members of the synuclein family, including their normal functions, toxicity, role in pathology, transmission between cells and intracellular localization. Important findings which remain undisputable for many years are synuclein localization in synapses and their role in the regulation of synaptic vesicle trafficking, whereas their presence and function in mitochondria and nucleus is a debated topic. In this review, we present the data on the localization of synucleins in two intracellular organelles: the nucleus and mitochondria. PMID:26614873

  14. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5-5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  15. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5–5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  16. Alterations in the rat electrocardiogram induced by stationary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffey, C.T.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    A field strength dependent increase in the amplitude of the T-wave signal in the rat electrocardiogram (ECG) was observed during exposure to homogeneous, stationary magnetic fields. For 24 adult Sprague-Dawley and Buffalo rats of both sexes, the T-wave amplitude was found to increase by an average of 408% in a 2.0 Tesla (1 Tesla - 10(4) Gauss) field. No significant magnetically induced changes were observed in other components of the ECG record, including the P wave and the QRS complex. The minimum field level at which augmentation of the T wave could be detected was 0.3 Tesla. The magnetically induced increase in T-wave amplitude occurred instantaneously, and was immediately reversible after exposure to fields as high as 2.0 Tesla. No abnormalities in any component of the ECG record, including the T wave, were noted during a period of 3 weeks following cessation of a continuous 5-h exposure of rats to a 1.5-Tesla field. The heart rate and breathing rate of adult rats were not altered during, or subsequent to, application of fields up to 2.0 Tesla. The effect of animal orientation within the field was tested using juvenile rats 3-14 days old. The maximum increase in T-wave amplitude was observed when subjects were placed with the long axis of the body perpendicular to the lines of magnetic induction. These experimental observations, as well as theoretical considerations, suggest that augmentation of the signal amplitude in the T-wave segment of the ECG may result from a superimposed electrical potential generated by aortic blood flow in the presence of a stationary magnetic field.

  17. Drought induces alterations in the stomatal development program in Populus.

    PubMed

    Hamanishi, Erin T; Thomas, Barb R; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2012-08-01

    Much is known about the physiological control of stomatal aperture as a means by which plants adjust to water availability. By contrast, the role played by the modulation of stomatal development to limit water loss has received much less attention. The control of stomatal development in response to water deprivation in the genus Populus is explored here. Drought induced declines in stomatal conductance as well as an alteration in stomatal development in two genotypes of Populus balsamifera. Leaves that developed under water-deficit conditions had lower stomatal indices than leaves that developed under well-watered conditions. Transcript abundance of genes that could hypothetically underpin drought-responsive changes in stomatal development was examined, in two genotypes, across six time points, under two conditions, well-watered and with water deficit. Populus homologues of STOMAGEN, ERECTA (ER), STOMATA DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION 1 (SDD1), and FAMA had variable transcript abundance patterns congruent with their role in the modulation of stomatal development in response to drought. Conversely, there was no significant variation in transcript abundance between genotypes or treatments for the Populus homologues of YODA (YDA) and TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM). The findings highlight the role that could be played by stomatal development during leaf expansion as a longer term means by which to limit water loss from leaves. Moreover, the results point to the key roles played by the regulation of the homologues of STOMAGEN, ER, SDD1, and FAMA in the control of this response in poplar.

  18. Low alpha-synuclein levels in the blood are associated with insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Araujo, Gerardo; Nakagami, Hironori; Takami, Yoichi; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Akasaka, Hiroshi; Saitoh, Shigeyuki; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Morishita, Ryuichi; Rakugi, Hiromi; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the protein alpha-synuclein (SNCA) have been linked to Parkinson’s disease. We recently reported that non-mutated SNCA enhanced glucose uptake through the Gab1-PI3 kinase-Akt pathway and elucidated its effects on glucose regulation. Here, we examined the association of SNCA with insulin resistance (IR), a condition that is characterized by decreased tissue glucose uptake. Our observations include those from a population study as well as a SNCA-deficient mouse model, which had not previously been characterized in an IR scenario. In 1,152 patients, we found that serum SNCA levels were inversely correlated with IR indicators—body mass index, homeostatic model assessment for IR (HOMA-IR) and immunoreactive insulin (IRI)—and, to a lesser extent, with blood pressure and age. Additionally, SNCA-deficient mice displayed alterations in glucose and insulin responses during diet-induced IR. Moreover, during euglycemic clamp assessments, SNCA knock-out mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) showed severe IR in adipose tissues and skeletal muscle. These findings provide new insights into IR and diabetes and point to SNCA as a potential candidate for further research. PMID:26159928

  19. AMPK over-activation leads to accumulation of α-synuclein oligomers and decrease of neurites

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peizhou; Gan, Ming; Ebrahim, Abdul Shukkur; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Dickson, Dennis W.; Yen, Shu-Hui C.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal inclusions of α-synuclein (α-syn), termed Lewy bodies, are a hallmark of Parkinson disease (PD). Increased α-syn levels can occur in brains of aging human and neurotoxin treated mice. Since previous studies have shown increased brain lactate levels in aging brains, in PD affected subjects when compared to age-matched controls, and in mice treated with MPTP, we tested the effects of lactate exposure on α-syn in a cell based-study. We demonstrated that (i) lactate treatment led to α-syn accumulation and oligomerization in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, (ii) such alterations were mediated via adenosine-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) and associated with increasing cytoplasmic phosphorylated AMPK levels, (iii) AMPK activation facilitated α-syn accumulation and phosphorylation, (iv) lactate treatment or overexpression of active form of AMPK decreased α-syn turnover and neurite outgrowth and (v) Lewy body-bearing neurons displayed abnormal cytoplasmic distribution of phosphorylated AMPK, which normally is located in nuclei. Together, our results suggest that chronic neuronal accumulation of α-syn induced by lactate-triggered AMPK activation in aging brains may be a novel mechanism underlying α-synucleionpathies in PD and related disorders. PMID:23200460

  20. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of α-synuclein ligands

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lihai; Cui, Jinquan; Padakanti, Prashanth K.; Engel, Laura; Bagchi, Devika P.; Kotzbauer, Paul T.; Tu, Zhude

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of misfolded α-synuclein in Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites is the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s Disease (PD). To identify ligands having high binding potency toward aggregated α-synuclein, we synthesized a series of phenothiazine derivatives and assessed their binding affinity to recombinant α-synuclein fibrils using a fluorescent thioflavin T competition assay. Among 16 new analogues, the in vitro data suggest that compound 11b has high affinity to α-synuclein fibrils (Ki = 32.10 ± 1.25 nM) and compounds 11d, 16a and 16b have moderate affinity to α-synuclein fibrils (Ki ≈ 50 to 100 nM). Further optimization of the structure of these analogues may yield compounds with high affinity and selectivity for aggregated α-synuclein. PMID:22789706

  1. Head-down posture induces PERG alterations in early glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Lori M.; Golubev, Iuri; Lee, William; Nose, Izuru; Parel, Jean-Marie; Feuer, William J.; Porciatti, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To probe susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) to physiological stressors associated with moderate head-down body tilt in patients with suspicion of glaucoma or early manifest glaucoma. Methods One hundred nine subjects with best corrected visual acuity ≥20/20 and no disease other than glaucoma (glaucoma suspects, GS= 79, early manifest glaucoma, EMG=14, normal controls, NC= 16) and comparable age range were tested. Non-contact IOP, pattern electroretinogram (PERG), and brachial blood pressure/heart rate measurements were performed in three consecutive (~8 minutes apart) conditions: seated (baseline), −10 deg whole body head-down (HDT), and seated again (recovery). PERG amplitude and latency, IOP, and systolic/diastolic blood pressures, heart rate, calculated mean central retinal artery pressure, ocular perfusion pressure, and systolic/diastolic perfusion pressures were evaluated. Results During HDT, IOP significantly (P<0.001) increased in all groups approximately to the same extent (~20%). PERG amplitude did not change in NC but decreased significantly (P<0.001) in patients (GS, −25%, EMG −23%). PERG phase become delayed in NC (− 1.6%, P=0.04) but more so in patients (GS, −2.7%, P<0.001; EMG, −6.0%, P<0.001). The proportion of patients with PERG alterations significantly (P<0.05) exceeding those occurring in age- and baseline-adjusted NC were, GS: amplitude 20%, phase 15%; EMG: amplitude 14%, phase 50%. All measures recovered baseline values after HDT. Conclusions Moderate HDT induces temporary worsening of RGC function in a subpopulation of GS and EMG patients. This non-invasive protocol may help disclose abnormal susceptibility of RGCs in a subset of the patients at risk of glaucoma. PMID:22138883

  2. Targeting the intrinsically disordered structural ensemble of α-synuclein by small molecules as a potential therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gergely; Gardai, Shyra J; Zago, Wagner; Bertoncini, Carlos W; Cremades, Nunilo; Roy, Susan L; Tambe, Mitali A; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Galvagnion, Celine; Skibinski, Gaia; Finkbeiner, Steven; Bova, Michael; Regnstrom, Karin; Chiou, San-San; Johnston, Jennifer; Callaway, Kari; Anderson, John P; Jobling, Michael F; Buell, Alexander K; Yednock, Ted A; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Vendruscolo, Michele; Christodoulou, John; Dobson, Christopher M; Schenk, Dale; McConlogue, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The misfolding of intrinsically disordered proteins such as α-synuclein, tau and the Aβ peptide has been associated with many highly debilitating neurodegenerative syndromes including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Therapeutic targeting of the monomeric state of such intrinsically disordered proteins by small molecules has, however, been a major challenge because of their heterogeneous conformational properties. We show here that a combination of computational and experimental techniques has led to the identification of a drug-like phenyl-sulfonamide compound (ELN484228), that targets α-synuclein, a key protein in Parkinson's disease. We found that this compound has substantial biological activity in cellular models of α-synuclein-mediated dysfunction, including rescue of α-synuclein-induced disruption of vesicle trafficking and dopaminergic neuronal loss and neurite retraction most likely by reducing the amount of α-synuclein targeted to sites of vesicle mobilization such as the synapse in neurons or the site of bead engulfment in microglial cells. These results indicate that targeting α-synuclein by small molecules represents a promising approach to the development of therapeutic treatments of Parkinson's disease and related conditions. PMID:24551051

  3. Propiconazole induces alterations in the hepatic metabolome of mice: relevance to propiconazole-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nesnow, Stephen; Padgett, William T; Moore, Tanya

    2011-04-01

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide and has been the subject of recent investigations into its carcinogenic mechanism of action. The goals of this study were (1) to identify metabolomic changes induced in the liver by increasing doses of propiconazole in mice, (2) to interpret these results with key previously reported biochemical, transcriptomic, and proteomic findings obtained from mouse liver under the same treatment conditions, and (3) to relate these alterations to those associated with the carcinogenesis process. Propiconazole was administered to male CD-1 mice in the feed for 4 days with six mice per feed level (500, 1250, and 2500 ppm). The 2500 ppm dose level had previously been shown to induce both adenocarcinomas and adenomas in mouse liver after a 2-year continuous feed regimen. Endogenous biochemicals were profiled using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods and 261 were detected. The most populous biochemical class detected was lipids, followed by amino acids and then carbohydrates. Nucleotides, cofactors and vitamins, energy, peptides, and xenobiotics were also represented. Of the biochemicals detected, 159 were significantly altered by at least one dose of propiconazole and many showed strong dose responses. Many alterations in the levels of biochemicals were found in the glycogen metabolism, glycolysis, lipolysis, carnitine, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle pathways Several groups of metabolomic responses were ascribed to the metabolism and clearance of propiconazole: glucuronate, glutathione, and cysteine pathways. Groups of metabolic responses supported previous hypotheses on key events that can lead to propiconazole-induced tumorigenesis: oxidative stress and increases in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Groups of metabolomic responses identified biomarkers associated with neoplasia: increases in glycolysis and increases in the levels of spermidine, sarcosine, and

  4. Adsorption of α-Synuclein on Lipid Bilayers: Modulating the Structure and Stability of Protein Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Farzin; Pandey, Anjan P.; Cambrea, Lee R.; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Hovis, Jennifer S.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of α-synuclein with phospholipid membranes has been examined using supported lipid bilayers and epi-fluorescence microscopy. The membranes contained phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidic acid (PA), which mix at physiological pH. Upon protein adsorption the lipids undergo fluid-fluid phase separation into PC-rich and PA-rich regions. The protein preferentially adsorbs to the PA-rich regions. The adsorption and subsequent aggregation of α-synuclein was probed by tuning several parameters: the charge on the lipids, the charge on the protein, and the screening environment. Conditions which promoted the greatest extent of adsorption resulted in structurally heterogeneous aggregates, while comparatively homogeneous aggregates were observed under conditions whereby adsorption did not occur as readily. Our observation that different alterations to the system lead to different degrees of aggregation and different aggregate structures poses a challenge for drug discovery. Namely, therapies aimed at neutralizing α-synuclein must target a broad range of potentially toxic, membrane-bound assemblies. PMID:20187615

  5. Exposure to bacterial endotoxin generates a distinct strain of α-synuclein fibril

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Changyoun; Lv, Guohua; Lee, Jun Sung; Jung, Byung Chul; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami; Hong, Chul-Suk; Valera, Elvira; Lee, He-Jin; Paik, Seung R.; Hasegawa, Masato; Masliah, Eliezer; Eliezer, David; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    A single amyloidogenic protein is implicated in multiple neurological diseases and capable of generating a number of aggregate “strains” with distinct structures. Among the amyloidogenic proteins, α-synuclein generates multiple patterns of proteinopathies in a group of diseases, such as Parkinson disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and multiple system atrophy (MSA). However, the link between specific conformations and distinct pathologies, the key concept of the strain hypothesis, remains elusive. Here we show that in the presence of bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), α-synuclein generated a self-renewable, structurally distinct fibril strain that consistently induced specific patterns of synucleinopathies in mice. These results suggest that amyloid fibrils with self-renewable structures cause distinct types of proteinopathies despite the identical primary structure and that exposure to exogenous pathogens may contribute to the diversity of synucleinopathies. PMID:27488222

  6. Exposure to bacterial endotoxin generates a distinct strain of α-synuclein fibril.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changyoun; Lv, Guohua; Lee, Jun Sung; Jung, Byung Chul; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami; Hong, Chul-Suk; Valera, Elvira; Lee, He-Jin; Paik, Seung R; Hasegawa, Masato; Masliah, Eliezer; Eliezer, David; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    A single amyloidogenic protein is implicated in multiple neurological diseases and capable of generating a number of aggregate "strains" with distinct structures. Among the amyloidogenic proteins, α-synuclein generates multiple patterns of proteinopathies in a group of diseases, such as Parkinson disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and multiple system atrophy (MSA). However, the link between specific conformations and distinct pathologies, the key concept of the strain hypothesis, remains elusive. Here we show that in the presence of bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), α-synuclein generated a self-renewable, structurally distinct fibril strain that consistently induced specific patterns of synucleinopathies in mice. These results suggest that amyloid fibrils with self-renewable structures cause distinct types of proteinopathies despite the identical primary structure and that exposure to exogenous pathogens may contribute to the diversity of synucleinopathies. PMID:27488222

  7. Paroxysmal Perceptual Alteration: Drug-Induced Phenomenon or Schizophrenic Psychopathology?

    PubMed

    Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Kongasseri, Sreejayan; Acharya, Mahima

    2016-01-01

    Brief and repetitive episodes of perceptual changes, termed paroxysmal perceptual alteration (PPA), have been described in association with antipsychotic treatment. We report a case of paranoid schizophrenia who had such perceptual changes akin to PPA for 15 years, which was not related to antipsychotic treatment. There was a rapid resolution of PPA after treatment with low-dose clonazepam. PMID:26954463

  8. Paroxysmal Perceptual Alteration: Drug-Induced Phenomenon or Schizophrenic Psychopathology?

    PubMed Central

    Praharaj, Samir Kumar; K., Sreejayan; Acharya, Mahima

    2012-01-01

    Brief and repetitive episodes of perceptual changes, termed paroxysmal perceptual alteration (PPA), have been described in association with antipsychotic treatment. We report a case of paranoid schizophrenia who had such perceptual changes akin to PPA for 15 years, that was not related to antipsychotic treatment. There was a rapid resolution of PPA following treatment with low dose clonazepam.

  9. Prenatal hyperandrogenism induces alterations that affect liver lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Abruzzese, Giselle Adriana; Heber, Maria Florencia; Ferreira, Silvana Rocio; Velez, Leandro Martin; Reynoso, Roxana; Pignataro, Omar Pedro; Motta, Alicia Beatriz

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal hyperandrogenism is hypothesized as one of the main factors contributing to the development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). PCOS patients have high risk of developing fatty liver and steatosis. This study aimed to evaluate the role of prenatal hyperandrogenism in liver lipid metabolism and fatty liver development. Pregnant rats were hyperandrogenized with testosterone. At pubertal age, the prenatally hyperandrogenized (PH) female offspring displayed both ovulatory (PHov) and anovulatory (PHanov) phenotypes that mimic human PCOS features. We evaluated hepatic transferases, liver lipid content, the balance between lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation pathway, oxidant/antioxidant balance and proinflammatory status. We also evaluated the general metabolic status through growth rate curve, basal glucose and insulin levels, glucose tolerance test, HOMA-IR index and serum lipid profile. Although neither PH group showed signs of liver lipid content, the lipogenesis and fatty oxidation pathways were altered. The PH groups also showed impaired oxidant/antioxidant balance, a decrease in the proinflammatory pathway (measured by prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygenase-2 levels), decreased glucose tolerance, imbalance of circulating lipids and increased risk of metabolic syndrome. We conclude that prenatal hyperandrogenism generates both PHov and PHanov phenotypes with signs of liver alterations, imbalance in lipid metabolism and increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The anovulatory phenotype showed more alterations in liver lipogenesis and a more impaired balance of insulin and glucose metabolism, being more susceptible to the development of steatosis.

  10. Alpha-Synuclein Regulates Neuronal Levels of Manganese and Calcium.

    PubMed

    Dučić, Tanja; Carboni, Eleonora; Lai, Barry; Chen, Si; Michalke, Bernhard; Lázaro, Diana F; Outeiro, Tiago F; Bähr, Mathias; Barski, Elisabeth; Lingor, Paul

    2015-10-21

    Manganese (Mn) may foster aggregation of alpha-synuclein (αSyn) contributing to the pathogenesis of PD. Here, we examined the influence of αSyn overexpression on distribution and oxidation states of Mn in frozen-hydrated primary midbrain neurons (PMNs) by synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES). Overexpression of αSyn increased intracellular Mn levels, whereas levels of Ca, Zn, K, P, and S were significantly decreased. Mn oxidation states were not altered. A strong correlation between Cu-/Mn-levels as well as Fe-/Mn-levels was observed in αSyn-overexpressing cells. Subcellular resolution revealed a punctate or filament-like perinuclear and neuritic distribution of Mn, which resembled the expression of DMT1 and MnSOD. While overexpression of αSyn did not significantly alter the expression patterns of the most-expressed Mn transport proteins (DMT1, VGCC, Fpn1), it attenuated the Mn release from Mn-treated neurons. Thus, these data suggest that αSyn may act as an intracellular Mn store. In total, neurotoxicity in PD could be mediated via regulation of transition metal levels and the metal-binding capacity of αSyn, which could represent a promising therapeutic target for this neurodegenerative disorder.

  11. Localization of pellicle-induced open contacts using Charge-Induced Voltage Alteration

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.

    1993-08-01

    The recently developed Charge-Induced Voltage Alteration (CIVA) technique for localizing open metal conductors was used successfully to identify transistors with electrically open metal-1 contacts to silicon. The transistors were in the I/O port circuitry of a failing microcontroller and were completely covered by a metal-2 power bus. The root cause of the open contacts was a subtle scratch in the pellicle over the contact reticle. The scratch prevented full exposure of the photoresist, resulting in incomplete removal of the interlevel oxide in several contact windows. In addition to this powerful new application of CIVA, a number of failure analysis techniques utilizing both the electrical and physical properties of the failing microcontrollers were employed to identify and confirm the open contacts. These techniques are reviewed and recommendations are given for improved pellicle/reticle inspection.

  12. Radiation-induced alterations of fracture healing biomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Pelker, R.R.; Friedlaender, G.E.; Panjabi, M.M.; Kapp, D.; Doganis, A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of irradiation on the normal temporal progression of the physical properties of healing fractures were studied in a rat model. Fractures were surgically produced in the femur, stabilized with an intramedullary pin, and irradiated. One group of rats was exposed to 2,500 rads in divided doses over 2 weeks, beginning 3 days after fracture, and compared to a control group with fractures which were not irradiated. Animals were sacrificed at periodic intervals and the bones were tested to failure in torsion. The torque, stiffness, and energy increased and the angle decreased for the nonirradiated specimens in the expected fashion. This progression was deleteriously altered in the irradiated femurs.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Alpha-synuclein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammalkorpi, Maria; Schreck, Carl; Nath, Abhinav; Dewitt, David; Rhoades, Elizabeth; O'Hern, Corey

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the conformational dynamics of single alpha-synuclein proteins, which have been implicated in amyloid diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, in solution using unconstrained and constrained all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. The constraints on inter-residue separations are obtained from our single-molecule FRET measurements of eleven FRET pairs that span the protein. By comparing the simulation data satisfying different combinations of FRET constraints, we are able to identify those constraints that are most important in determining the radius of gyration and key features of the contact map of the protein.

  14. Alterations in glucose kinetics induced by pentobarbital anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Bagby, G.J.; Spitzer, J.J.

    1986-03-05

    Pentobarbital is a common anesthetic agent used in animal research that is known to alter sympathetic function and may also affect carbohydrate metabolism. The in vivo effects of iv pentobarbital on glucose homeostasis were studied in chronically catheterized fasted rats. Whole body glucose kinetics, assessed by the constant iv infusion of (6-/sup 3/H)- and (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose, were determined in all rats in the conscious state. Thereafter, glucose metabolism was followed over the next 4 hr in 3 subgroups of rats; conscious, anesthetized with body temperature maintained, and anesthetized with body temperature not maintained. Hypothermia (a 5/sup 0/C decrease) developed spontaneously in anesthetized rats kept at ambient temperature (22/sup 0/C). No differences were seen in MABP and heart rate between conscious and normothermic anesthetized rats; however, hypothermic anesthetized rats showed a decrease in MABP (20%) and heart rate (35%). Likewise, plasma glucose and lactate concentrations, the rate of glucose appearance (Ra), recycling and metabolic clearance (MCR) did not differ between conscious and normothermic anesthetized animals. In contrast, hypothermic anesthetized rats showed a 50% reduction in plasma lactate, a 40% drop in glucose Ra, and a 30-40% decrease in glucose recycling and MCR. Thus, pentobarbital does not appear to alter in vivo glucose kinetics, compared to unanesthetized controls, provided that body temperature is maintained.

  15. Altered brain energetics induces mitochondrial fission arrest in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Trushin, Sergey; Christensen, Trace A; Bachmeier, Benjamin V; Gateno, Benjamin; Schroeder, Andreas; Yao, Jia; Itoh, Kie; Sesaki, Hiromi; Poon, Wayne W; Gylys, Karen H; Patterson, Emily R; Parisi, Joseph E; Diaz Brinton, Roberta; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Trushina, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Altered brain metabolism is associated with progression of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Mitochondria respond to bioenergetic changes by continuous fission and fusion. To account for three dimensional architecture of the brain tissue and organelles, we applied 3-dimensional electron microscopy (3D EM) reconstruction to visualize mitochondrial structure in the brain tissue from patients and mouse models of AD. We identified a previously unknown mitochondrial fission arrest phenotype that results in elongated interconnected organelles, "mitochondria-on-a-string" (MOAS). Our data suggest that MOAS formation may occur at the final stages of fission process and was not associated with altered translocation of activated dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria but with reduced GTPase activity. Since MOAS formation was also observed in the brain tissue of wild-type mice in response to hypoxia or during chronological aging, fission arrest may represent fundamental compensatory adaptation to bioenergetic stress providing protection against mitophagy that may preserve residual mitochondrial function. The discovery of novel mitochondrial phenotype that occurs in the brain tissue in response to energetic stress accurately detected only using 3D EM reconstruction argues for a major role of mitochondrial dynamics in regulating neuronal survival. PMID:26729583

  16. Protein-Induced Membrane Curvature Alters Local Membrane Tension

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, Padmini; Mandadap, Kranthi K.; Oster, George

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of proteins onto membranes can alter the local membrane curvature. This phenomenon has been observed in biological processes such as endocytosis, tubulation, and vesiculation. However, it is not clear how the local surface properties of the membrane, such as membrane tension, change in response to protein adsorption. In this article, we show that the partial differential equations arising from classical elastic model of lipid membranes, which account for simultaneous changes in shape and membrane tension due to protein adsorption in a local region, cannot be solved for nonaxisymmetric geometries using straightforward numerical techniques; instead, a viscous-elastic formulation is necessary to fully describe the system. Therefore, we develop a viscous-elastic model for inhomogeneous membranes of the Helfrich type. Using the newly available viscous-elastic model, we find that the lipids flow to accommodate changes in membrane curvature during protein adsorption. We show that, at the end of protein adsorption process, the system sustains a residual local tension to balance the difference between the actual mean curvature and the imposed spontaneous curvature. We also show that this change in membrane tension can have a functional impact such as altered response to pulling forces in the presence of proteins. PMID:25099814

  17. Alcohol Induced Alterations to the Human Fecal VOC Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Robin D.; Dailey, Allyson; Zaidi, Fatima; Navarro, Karl; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip A.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that excessive alcohol consumption impacts the intestinal microbiota composition, causing disruption of homeostasis (dysbiosis). However, this observed change is not indicative of the dysbiotic intestinal microbiota function that could result in the production of injurious and toxic products. Thus, knowledge of the effects of alcohol on the intestinal microbiota function and their metabolites is warranted, in order to better understand the role of the intestinal microbiota in alcohol associated organ failure. Here, we report the results of a differential metabolomic analysis comparing volatile organic compounds (VOC) detected in the stool of alcoholics and non-alcoholic healthy controls. We performed the analysis with fecal samples collected after passage as well as with samples collected directly from the sigmoid lumen. Regardless of the approach to fecal collection, we found a stool VOC metabolomic signature in alcoholics that is different from healthy controls. The most notable metabolite alterations in the alcoholic samples include: (1) an elevation in the oxidative stress biomarker tetradecane; (2) a decrease in five fatty alcohols with anti-oxidant property; (3) a decrease in the short chain fatty acids propionate and isobutyrate, important in maintaining intestinal epithelial cell health and barrier integrity; (4) a decrease in alcohol consumption natural suppressant caryophyllene; (5) a decrease in natural product and hepatic steatosis attenuator camphene; and (6) decreased dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide, microbial products of decomposition. Our results showed that intestinal microbiota function is altered in alcoholics which might promote alcohol associated pathologies. PMID:25751150

  18. Alcohol induced alterations to the human fecal VOC metabolome.

    PubMed

    Couch, Robin D; Dailey, Allyson; Zaidi, Fatima; Navarro, Karl; Forsyth, Christopher B; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip A; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that excessive alcohol consumption impacts the intestinal microbiota composition, causing disruption of homeostasis (dysbiosis). However, this observed change is not indicative of the dysbiotic intestinal microbiota function that could result in the production of injurious and toxic products. Thus, knowledge of the effects of alcohol on the intestinal microbiota function and their metabolites is warranted, in order to better understand the role of the intestinal microbiota in alcohol associated organ failure. Here, we report the results of a differential metabolomic analysis comparing volatile organic compounds (VOC) detected in the stool of alcoholics and non-alcoholic healthy controls. We performed the analysis with fecal samples collected after passage as well as with samples collected directly from the sigmoid lumen. Regardless of the approach to fecal collection, we found a stool VOC metabolomic signature in alcoholics that is different from healthy controls. The most notable metabolite alterations in the alcoholic samples include: (1) an elevation in the oxidative stress biomarker tetradecane; (2) a decrease in five fatty alcohols with anti-oxidant property; (3) a decrease in the short chain fatty acids propionate and isobutyrate, important in maintaining intestinal epithelial cell health and barrier integrity; (4) a decrease in alcohol consumption natural suppressant caryophyllene; (5) a decrease in natural product and hepatic steatosis attenuator camphene; and (6) decreased dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide, microbial products of decomposition. Our results showed that intestinal microbiota function is altered in alcoholics which might promote alcohol associated pathologies. PMID:25751150

  19. Glycocalyx and sepsis-induced alterations in vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Chelazzi, Cosimo; Villa, Gianluca; Mancinelli, Paola; De Gaudio, A Raffaele; Adembri, Chiara

    2015-01-28

    Endothelial cells line the inner portion of the heart, blood vessels, and lymphatic vessels; a basal membrane of extracellular matrix lines the extraluminal side of endothelial cells. The apical side of endothelial cells is the site for the glycocalyx, which is a complex network of macromolecules, including cell-bound proteoglycans and sialoproteins. Sepsis-associated alterations of this structure may compromise endothelial permeability with associated interstitial fluid shift and generalized edema. Indeed, in sepsis, the glycocalyx acts as a target for inflammatory mediators and leukocytes, and its ubiquitous nature explains the damage of tissues that occurs distant from the original site of infection. Inflammatory-mediated injury to glycocalyx can be responsible for a number of specific clinical effects of sepsis, including acute kidney injury, respiratory failure, and hepatic dysfunction. Moreover, some markers of glycocalyx degradation, such as circulating levels of syndecan or selectins, may be used as markers of endothelial dysfunction and sepsis severity. Although a great deal of experimental evidence shows that alteration of glycocalyx is widely involved in endothelial damage caused by sepsis, therapeutic strategies aiming at preserving its integrity did not significantly improve the outcome of these patients.

  20. Metronidazole-induced alterations in murine spermatozoa morphology.

    PubMed

    Mudry, Marta D; Palermo, Ana M; Merani, María S; Carballo, Marta A

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the effect of metronidazole (MTZ) on the stages of the seminiferous epithelial cycle and spermatozoa morphology when the drug is administered in human therapeutic doses to 60-day-old CFW male mice. The frequency of the stages was established by counting spermatocytes in pachytene and spermatids. Abnormalities in the flagellum or the head, lack of maturity and multiple malformations, were considered in the morphological analysis. Murine control strain was compared with MTZ treated group (v.ip 130 mg/kg/bw) both kept in standard captivity conditions. Cellular composition or number of stages in the seminiferous tubules were not altered in MTZ exposed animals, though the number of cells in stages I, V and XII was increased. The sperm cell morphology was severely affected by the treatment with potentially serious consequences on the normal fertilization process. Thus, the MTZ has to be considered as a conceivable thread regarding male fertility. PMID:17184970

  1. Alcohol-induced alterations in dopamine modulation of prefrontal activity.

    PubMed

    Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Chandler, L Judson

    2015-12-01

    Long-term alcohol use leads to persistent cognitive deficits that may be associated with maladaptive changes in the neurocircuitry that mediates executive functions. Impairments caused by these changes can persist well into abstinence and have a negative impact on quality of life and job performance, and can increase the probability of relapse. Many of the changes that affect cognitive function appear to involve dysregulation of the mesocortical dopamine system. This includes changes in dopamine release and alterations in dopamine receptor expression and function in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). This review summarizes the cellular effects of acute and chronic ethanol exposure on dopamine release and dopamine receptor function in the PFC with the goal of providing greater understanding of the effects of alcohol-use disorders on the dopamine system and how this relates to deficits in the executive function of the PFC. PMID:26558348

  2. Single-molecule FRET studies on alpha-synuclein oligomerization of Parkinson’s disease genetically related mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosatto, Laura; Horrocks, Mathew H.; Dear, Alexander J.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Cremades, Nunilo; Dobson, Christopher M.; Klenerman, David

    2015-11-01

    Oligomers of alpha-synuclein are toxic to cells and have been proposed to play a key role in the etiopathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. As certain missense mutations in the gene encoding for alpha-synuclein induce early-onset forms of the disease, it has been suggested that these variants might have an inherent tendency to produce high concentrations of oligomers during aggregation, although a direct experimental evidence for this is still missing. We used single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer to visualize directly the protein self-assembly process by wild-type alpha-synuclein and A53T, A30P and E46K mutants and to compare the structural properties of the ensemble of oligomers generated. We found that the kinetics of oligomer formation correlates with the natural tendency of each variant to acquire beta-sheet structure. Moreover, A53T and A30P showed significant differences in the averaged FRET efficiency of one of the two types of oligomers formed compared to the wild-type oligomers, indicating possible structural variety among the ensemble of species generated. Importantly, we found similar concentrations of oligomers during the lag-phase of the aggregation of wild-type and mutated alpha-synuclein, suggesting that the properties of the ensemble of oligomers generated during self-assembly might be more relevant than their absolute concentration for triggering neurodegeneration.

  3. Vanadium Exposure-Induced Neurobehavioral Alterations among Chinese Workers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Zhou, Dinglun; Zhang, Qin; Feng, Chengyong; Zheng, Wei; He, Keping; Lan, Yajia

    2014-01-01

    Vanadium-containing products are manufactured and widely used in the modern industry. Yet the neurobehavioral toxicity due to occupational exposure to vanadium remained elusive. This cross-sectional study was designed to examine the neurotoxic effects of occupational vanadium exposure. A total of 463 vanadium-exposed workers (exposed group) and 251 non-exposed workers (control group) were recruited from a Steel and Iron Group in Sichuan, China. A WHO-recommended neurobehavioral core test battery (NCTB) and event-related auditory evoked potentials test (P300) were used to assess the neurobehavioral functions of all study subjects. A general linear model was used to compare outcome scores between the two groups while controlling for possible confounders. The exposed group showed a statistically significant neurobehavioral alteration more than the control group in the NCTB tests. The exposed workers also exhibited an increased anger-hostility, depression-dejection and fatigue-inertia on the profile of mood states (p<0.05). Performances in the Simple Reaction Time, Digit Span, Benton Visual Retention and Pursuit Aiming were also poorer among exposed workers as compared to unexposed control workers(p<0.05). Some of these poor performances in tests were also significantly related to workers’ exposure duration. P300 latencies were longer in the exposed group than in the control (p<0.05). Longer mean reaction times and more counting errors were also found in the exposed workers (p<0.05). Given the findings of our study and the limitations of neurobehavioral workplace testing, we found evidence of altered neurobehavioral outcomes by occupational exposure to vanadium. PMID:23500660

  4. Alteration of sperm protein profile induced by cigarette smoking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohui; Xu, Wangjie; Miao, Maohua; Zhu, Zijue; Dai, Jingbo; Chen, Zhong; Fang, Peng; Wu, Junqing; Nie, Dongsheng; Wang, Lianyun; Wang, Zhaoxia; Qiao, Zhongdong; Shi, Huijuan

    2015-07-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with lower semen quality, but how cigarette smoking changes the semen quality remains unclear. The aim of this study was to screen the differentially expressed proteins in the sperm of mice with daily exposure to cigarette smoke. The 2D gel electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) analyses results showed that the mouse sperm protein profile was altered by cigarette smoking. And 22 of the most abundant proteins that correspond to differentially expressed spots in 2DE gels of the sperm samples were identified. These proteins were classified into different groups based on their functions, such as energy metabolism, reproduction, and structural molecules. Furthermore, the 2DE and MS results of five proteins (Aldoa, ATP5a1, Gpx4, Cs, and Spatc1) were validated by western blot analysis and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results showed that except Spatc1 the other four proteins showed statistically significant different protein levels between the smoking group and the control group (P < 0.05). The expressions of three genes (Aldoa, Gpx4, and Spatc1) were significantly different (P < 0.05) at transcription level between the smoking group and the control group. In addition, five proteins (Aldoa, ATP5a1, Spatc1, Cs, and Gpx4) in human sperm samples from 30 male smokers and 30 non-smokers were detected by western blot analysis. Two proteins (Aldoa and Cs) that are associated with energy production were found to be significantly altered, suggesting that these proteins may be potential diagnostic markers for evaluation of smoking risk in sperm. Further study of these proteins may provide insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying infertility in smoking persons.

  5. Mechanically induced alterations in cultured skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.; Hatfaludy, S.; Karlisch, P.; Shansky, J.

    1991-01-01

    Model systems are available for mechanically stimulating cultured skeletal muscle cells by passive tensile forces which simulate those found in vivo. When applied to embryonic muscle cells in vitro these forces induce tissue organogenesis, metabolic adaptations, and muscle cell growth. The mechanical stimulation of muscle cell growth correlates with stretch-induced increases in the efflux of prostaglandins PGE2 and PGF2(alpha) in a time and frequency dependent manner. These prostaglandins act as mechanical 'second messengers' regulating skeletal muscle protein turnover rates. Since they also effect bone remodelling in response to tissue loading and unloading, secreted prostaglandins may serve as paracrine growth factors, coordinating the growth rates of muscle and bone in response to external mechanical forces. Cell culture model systems will supplement other models in understanding mechanical transduction processes at the molecular level.

  6. Thermal blanketing: a case for aerosol-induced climatic alteration.

    PubMed

    Idso, S B

    1974-10-01

    Long-term temperature records at Phoenix, Arizona, indicate the existence of a post-1946 warming trend that may be attributed to the buildup of pollution in the lower layers of the atmosphere. The causative mechanism appears to be an enhancement of the so-called "greenhouse effect," induced by the inter-action of aerosol with long-wavelength thermal radiation in the lower atmosphere.

  7. Light-Induced Alterations in Striatal Neurochemical Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Much of our present knowledge regarding circadian rhythms and biological activity during space flight has been derived from those missions orbiting the Earth. During space missions, astronauts can become exposed to bright/dark cycles that vary considerably from those that entrain the mammalian biological timing system to the 24-hour cycle found on Earth. As a spacecraft orbits the Earth, the duration of the light/dark period experienced becomes a function of the time it takes to circumnavigate the planet which in turn depends upon the altitude of the craft. Orbiting the Earth at an altitude of 200-800 km provides a light/dark cycle lasting between 80 and 140 minutes, whereas a voyage to the moon or even another planet would provide a light condition of constant light. Currently, little is known regarding the effects of altered light/dark cycles on neurochemical levels within the central nervous system (CNS). Many biochemical, physiological and behavioral phenomena are under circadian control, governed primarily by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. As such, these phenomena are subject to influence by the environmental light/dark cycle. Circadian variations in locomotor and behavioral activities have been correlated to both the environmental light/dark cycle and to dopamine (DA) levels within the CNS. It has been postulated by Martin-Iverson et al. that DA's role in the control of motor activity is subject to modulation by circadian rhythms (CR), environmental lighting and excitatory amino acids (EAAs). In addition, DA and EAA receptor regulated pathways are involved in both the photic entrainment of CR and the control of motor activity. The cellular mechanisms by which DA and EAA-receptor ligands execute these functions, is still unclear. In order to help elucidate these mechanisms, we set out to determine the effects of altered environmental light/dark cycles on CNS neurotransmitter levels. In this study, we focused on the striatum, a region of the brain

  8. Reactivity of copper-α-synuclein peptide complexes relevant to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dell'Acqua, Simone; Pirota, Valentina; Anzani, Cecilia; Rocco, Michela M; Nicolis, Stefania; Valensin, Daniela; Monzani, Enrico; Casella, Luigi

    2015-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presence of abnormal α-synuclein (αSyn) deposits in the brain. Alterations in metal homeostasis and metal-induced oxidative stress may play a crucial role in the aggregation of αSyn and, consequently, in the pathogenesis of PD. We have therefore investigated the capability of copper-αSyn6 and copper-αSyn15 peptide complexes, with the 1-6 and 1-15 terminal fragments of the protein, to promote redox reactions that can be harmful to other cellular components. The pseudo-tyrosinase activity of copper-αSyn complexes against catecholic (di-tert-butylcatechol (DTBCH2), 4-methylcatechol (4-MC)) and phenolic (phenol) substrates is lower compared to that of free copper(II). In particular, the rates (kcat) of DTBCH2 catalytic oxidation are 0.030 s(-1) and 0.009 s(-1) for the reaction promoted by free copper(II) and [Cu(2+)-αSyn15], respectively. On the other hand, HPLC/ESI-MS analysis of solutions of αSyn15 incubated with copper(II) and 4-MC showed that αSyn is competitively oxidized with remarkable formation of sulfoxide at Met1 and Met5 residues. Moreover, the sulfoxidation of methionine residues, which is related to the aggregation of αSyn, also occurs on peptides not directly bound to copper, indicating that external αSyn can also be oxidized by copper. Therefore, this study strengthens the hypothesis that copper plays an important role in oxidative damage of αSyn which is proposed to be strongly related to the etiology of PD.

  9. Overexpression of α-synuclein simultaneously increases glutamate NMDA receptor phosphorylation and reduces glucocerebrosidase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junfeng; Hertz, Ellen; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Leinartaité, Lina; Lundius, Ebba Gregorsson; Li, Jie; Svenningsson, Per

    2016-01-12

    Progressive accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn)-containing protein aggregates throughout the nervous system is a pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). The mechanisms whereby α-syn exerts neurodegeneration remain to be fully understood. Here we show that overexpression of α-syn in transgenic mice leads to increased phosphorylation of glutamate NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunits NR1 and NR2B in substantia nigra and striatum as well as reduced glucocerebrosidase (GCase) levels. Similarly, molecular studies performed in mouse N2A cells stably overexpressing human α-syn ((α-syn)N2A) showed that phosphorylation states of the same NMDAR subunits were increased, whereas GCase levels and lysosomal GCase activity were reduced. (α-syn)N2A cells showed an increased sensitivity to neurotoxicity towards 6-hydroxydopamine and NMDA. However, wildtype N2A, but not (α-syn)N2A cells, showed a further reduction in viability when co-incubated with 6-hydroxydopamine and the lysosomal inhibitors NH4Cl and leupeptin, suggesting that α-syn per se perturbs lysosomal functions. NMDA treatment reduced lysosomal GCase activity to the same extent in (α-syn)N2A cells as in wildtype N2A cells, indicating that the α-syn-dependent difference in NMDA neurotoxicity is unrelated to an altered GCase activity. Nevertheless, these data provide molecular evidence that overexpression of α-syn simultaneously induces two potential neurotoxic hits by increasing glutamate NMDA receptor phosphorylation, consistent with increased NMDA receptors functionality, and reducing GCase activity. PMID:26610904

  10. Pavlovian conditioning of morphine-induced alterations of immune status: evidence for opioid receptor involvement.

    PubMed

    Coussons-Read, M E; Dykstra, L A; Lysle, D T

    1994-12-01

    Prior work in our laboratory has shown that morphine's immunomodulatory effects can become conditioned to environmental stimuli that predict drug administration. These immune alterations include conditioned changes in natural killer cell activity, interleukin-2 production, and mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation. The present study examined the involvement of opioid receptor activity in the establishment and expression of conditioned morphine-induced alterations of immune status. During the training phase of the experiment, Lewis rats received two conditioning sessions during which a subcutaneous injection of 15 mg/kg morphine sulfate was paired with exposure to a distinctive environment. On the test day, animals were re-exposed to the distinctive environment alone prior to sacrifice. Saline or naltrexone (0.3, 1.0, 3.0 or 10.0 mg/kg) was administered during either the training or the test session. Administration of naltrexone prior to training antagonized the development of all of the conditioned alterations of immune status including changes in the mitogenic responsiveness of splenocytes, suppression of natural killer cell activity, and interleukin-2 production by splenocytes. Naltrexone administration prior to testing also was effective in antagonizing the expression of a subset of morphine-induced conditioned alterations in immune status. Taken together, these studies indicate that opioid receptor activity is involved in the establishment of conditioned morphine-induced immune alterations, as well as in the expression of a subset of these conditioned alterations of immune status.

  11. Alterations in glucose kinetics induced by pentobarbital anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Bagby, G.J.; Hargrove, D.M.; Hyde, P.M.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1987-12-01

    Because pentobarbital is often used in investigations related to carbohydrate metabolism, the in vivo effect of this drug on glucose homeostasis was studied. Glucose kinetics assessed by the constant intravenous infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)- and (U-{sup 14}C)glucose, were determined in three groups of catheterized fasted rats: conscious, anesthetized and body temperature maintained, and anesthetized but body temperature not maintained. After induction of anesthesia, marked hypothermia developed in rats not provided with external heat. Anesthetized rats that developed hypothermia showed a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (25%) and heart rate (40%). Likewise, the plasma lactate concentration and the rates of glucose appearance, recycling, and metabolic clearance were reduced by 30-50% in the hypothermic anesthetized rats. Changes in whole-body carbohydrate metabolism were prevented when body temperature was maintained. Because plasma pentobarbital levels were similar between the euthermic and hypothermic rats during the first 2 h of the experiment, the rapid reduction in glucose metabolism in this latter group appears related to the decrease in body temperature. The continuous infusion of epinephrine produced alterations in glucose kinetics that were not different between conscious animals and anesthetized rats with body temperature maintained. Thus pentobarbital-anesthetized rats became hypothermic when kept at room temperature and exhibited marked decreases in glucose metabolism. Such changes were absent when body temperature was maintained during anesthesia.

  12. Optical spectrum evolution induced by altering input light wavelength spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minjie; Ma, Caiwen

    2016-11-01

    This study explored the optical spectrum evolution process using a pump-modulated light and a continuous-wave probe, launched simultaneously into a 1 km highly nonlinear fiber. A total of 70 optical spectra were obtained by each changing the wavelength spacing (0.4 nm) between the probe and pump lights. Simulation results indicated that wavelength spacing between the two beams caused a cyclical optical spectrum evolution process induced by cross-phase modulation. As input light wavelength spacing increased, the coupling between the two optical fields showed obvious attenuation in each neat, multi-peak cycle.

  13. Cerebellar morphological alterations in rats induced by prenatal ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Manzano, P; Paz, C

    1999-11-26

    The present study analyzes the morphological aspects of the cerebellum of rats with prenatal exposure to ozone. A double blind histological and planimetric analysis was performed studying sagittal sections of the anterior cerebellar lobe at postnatal days 0, 12 and 60. Ozone exposed rats showed cerebellar necrotic signs at age 0, diminished area of the molecular layer with Purkinje cells with pale nucleoli and perinucleolar bodies at age 12, and Purkinje cells showing nuclei with unusual clumps of chromatin in the periphery at age 60. We conclude that exposure to high concentrations of ozone during gestation induces permanent cerebellar damage in rats.

  14. Altered Acer Rubrum Fecundity Induced By Chemical Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, J. L.; Peters, A.

    2014-12-01

    Red maple (Acer rubrum L.) is becoming the most dominating tree in North American eastern deciduous forests. Concurrently, human activities have altered the chemical climate of terrestrial ecosystems via acidic deposition, which increases the available of nitrogen (N), while decreasing phosphorus (P) availability. Once a minor forest component prior to European settlement, the abundance of red maple may be a symptom of the modern age. The current paradigm explaining red maple's rise to prominence concerns fire suppression that excludes competitors. However, this still does not explain why red maple is unique compared to other functionally similar trees. The objective of this study was to investigate the interactive influence of acid rain mitigation on the fecundity of red maple. Objectives were achieved by measuring flowering, seed production, germination, and growth from red maple on plots that have been experimentally manipulated to increase soil pH, P, or both in three unglaciated eastern deciduous hardwood forests. At least 50% of the red maple population is seed bearing in our control soils, however the median percent of seed-bearing trees declined to zero when mitigating soils from acidic deposition. This can be explained by the curious fact that red maple is polygamodioecious, or has labile sex-expression, in which an individual tree can change its sex-expression in response to the environment. Furthermore, seed-bearing trees in the mitigated plots grew less, produced less seeds, and germinated at lower rates than their counterparts in control soils. Our results provide evidence that chemical climate change could be the primary contributing factor accelerating the dominance of red maple in eastern North American forests. Our observations can provide a boarder conceptual framework for understanding how nutrient limitations can be applied beyond plant productivity towards explaining distribution changes in vegetation.

  15. Methoxychlor induces atresia by altering Bcl2 factors and inducing caspase activity in mouse ovarian antral follicles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S; Karman, Bethany N; Wang, Wei; Gupta, Rupesh K; Flaws, Jodi A

    2012-12-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide widely used in many countries against various species of insects that attack crops and domestic animals. MXC reduces fertility by increasing atresia (death) of antral follicles in vivo. MXC also induces atresia of antral follicles after 96 h in vitro. The current work tested the hypothesis that MXC induces morphological atresia at early time points (24 and 48 h) by altering pro-apoptotic (Bax, Bok, Casp3, and caspase activity) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl2 and Bcl-xL) factors in the follicles. The results indicate that at 24 h, MXC increased Bcl-xL and Bax mRNA levels and increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl2. At 48-96 h, MXC induced morphological atresia. At 24-96 h, MXC increased caspase activities. These data suggest that MXC may induce atresia by altering Bcl2 factors and inducing caspase activities in antral follicles.

  16. Biophysical characterization of α-synuclein and its controversial structure

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, T Reid; Markley, John L

    2014-01-01

    α-synuclein, a presynaptic protein of poorly defined function, constitutes the main component of Parkinson disease-associated Lewy bodies. Extensive biophysical investigations have provided evidence that isolated α-synuclein is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) in vitro. Subsequently serving as a model IDP in numerous studies, α-synuclein has aided in the development of many technologies used to characterize IDPs and arguably represents the most thoroughly analyzed IDP to date. Recent reports, however, have challenged the disordered nature of α-synuclein inside cells and have instead proposed a physiologically relevant helical tetramer. Despite α-synuclein’s rich biophysical history, a single coherent picture has not yet emerged concerning its in vivo structure, dynamics, and physiological role(s). We present herein a review of the biophysical discoveries, developments, and models pertinent to the characterization of α-synuclein’s structure and analysis of the native tetramer controversy. PMID:24634806

  17. [Stress-induced alteration of the anticonflict effect of anxiolytics].

    PubMed

    Molodavkin, G M; Voronina, T A; Ramkhin, E Ia; Aldarmaa, Zh

    2002-01-01

    The influence of stress of various etiology (prolonged isolation, anavoidable electrostimulation, paradoxical sleep deprivation, transport stress) on the activity of anxiolytics (tranquilizers) in the conflict situation was studied in inbreed white male rats. It was established that the anticonflict effect of highly effective anxiolytics decreases under the action of stress, the activity of gidazepam remains unchanged, while the drugs of moderate efficacy loose their activity. The degree of changes and the rate of restoration of the initial activity depends on the efficacy of anxiolytics, the strength and duration of stress, and on the duration of drug administration after stress. The possible mechanism of this phenomenon can be the stress-induced activation of the endogenous system of anxiogenic ligands.

  18. Plasma-induced Escape and Alterations of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Tucker, O. J.; Ewrin, J.; Cassidy, T. A.; Leblanc, F.

    2009-12-01

    The atmospheres of planets and planetary satellites are typically imbedded in space plasmas. Depending on the interaction with the induced or intrinsic fields energetic ions can have access to the thermosphere and the corona affecting their composition and thermal structure and causing loss to space. These processes are often lumped together as ‘atmospheric sputtering’ (Johnson 1994). In this talk I will review the results of simulations of the plasma bombardment at a number of solar system bodies and use those data to describe the effect on the upper atmosphere and on escape. Of considerable recent interest is the modeling of escape from Titan. Prior to Cassini’s tour of the Saturnian system, plasma-induced escape was suggested to be the dominant loss process, but recent models of enhanced thermal escape, often referred to as ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape, have been suggested to lead to much larger Titan atmospheric loss rates (Strobel 2008; Cui et al. 2008). Such a process has been suggested to be active at some point in time on a number of solar system bodies. I will present hybrid fluid/ kinetic models of the upper atmosphere of certain bodies in order to test both the plasma-induced and thermal escape processes. Preliminary results suggest that the loss rates estimated using the ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape process can be orders of magnitude too large. The implications for Mars, Titan and Pluto will be discussed. Background for this talk is contained in the following papers (Johnson 2004; 2009; Chaufray et al. 2007; Johnson et al. 2008; 2009; Tucker and Johnson 2009). References: Chaufray, J.Y., R. Modolo, F. Leblanc, G. Chanteur, R.E. Johnson, and J.G. Luhmann, Mars Solar Wind interaction: formation of the Martian corona and atmosphric loss to space, JGR 112, E09009, doi:10.1029/2007JE002915 (2007) Cui, J., Yelle, R. V., Volk, K. Distribution and escape of molecular hydrogen in Titan's thermosphere and exosphere. J. Geophys. Res. 113, doi:10

  19. [Morphological alterations induced by preservatives in eye drops].

    PubMed

    Huber-van der Velden, K K; Thieme, H; Eichhorn, M

    2012-11-01

    A large number of experimental and clinical investigations carried out recently have confirmed that the chronic application of eye drops induces significant cytological and histological impairment in ocular tissues. It is also generally accepted that preservatives are the components responsible for the observed changes. The most commonly used preservative in ophthalmology is benzalkonium chloride (BAC), which has a relatively high toxicity. Possible consequences of preservatives on the eye are chronic inflammation and subsequent fibrosis of the subconjunctiva and cell loss and structural changes in the conjunctival epithelium as well as in the epithelial and endothelial layers of the cornea. Frequently, dry eye symptoms occur or deteriorate during therapy. During the last few years new preservatives have been developed which seem to have fewer side effects; however, relatively little data are available with regard to these new substances. To minimize impairments of the eye, preservative-free formulations should be considered for therapy.

  20. Light-Induced Alterations in Basil Ganglia Kynurenic Acid Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.; Orr, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolic synthesis, release and breakdown of several known CNS neurotransmitters have been shown to follow a circadian pattern entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle. The levels of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmitters such as glutamate, have been shown to vary with environmental lighting conditions. Kynurenic Acid (KA), an endogenous tryptophan metabolite and glutamate receptor antagonist, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects against EAA-induced excitotoxic cell damage. Changes in KA's activity within the mammalian basal ganglia has been proposed as being contributory to neurotoxicity in Huntington's Disease. It is not known whether CNS KA levels follow a circadian pattern or exhibit light-induced fluctuations. However, because the symptoms of certain degenerative motor disorders seem to fluctuate with daily 24 hour rhythm, we initiated studies to determine if basal ganglia KA were influenced by the daily light/dark cycle and could influence motor function. Therefore in this study, HPLC-EC was utilized to determine if basal ganglia KA levels in tissue extracts from adult male Long-Evans rats (200-250g) entrained to 24 and 48 hours constant light and dark conditions, respectively. Samples were taken one hour before the onset of the subjective day and one hour prior to the onset of the subjective night in order to detect possible phase differences in KA levels and to allow for accumulation of factors expressed in association with the light or dark phase. Data analysis revealed that KA levels in the basal ganglia vary with environmental lighting conditions; being elevated generally during the dark. Circadian phase differences in KA levels were also evident during the subjective night and subjective day, respectively. Results from these studies are discussed with respect to potential cyclic changes in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic damage during the daily 24 hour cycle and its possible relevance to future therapeutic approaches in

  1. Novel subcellular localization for α-synuclein: possible functional consequences

    PubMed Central

    Guardia-Laguarta, Cristina; Area-Gomez, Estela; Schon, Eric A.; Przedborski, Serge

    2015-01-01

    α-synuclein (α-syn) is one of the genes that when mutated or overexpressed causes Parkinson’s Disease (PD). Initially, it was described as a synaptic terminal protein and later was found to be localized at mitochondria. Mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM) have emerged as a central endoplasmic reticulum (ER) subcellular compartments where key functions of the cell occur. These domains, enriched in cholesterol and anionic phospholipids, are where calcium homeostasis, lipid transfer, and cholesterol metabolism are regulated. Some proteins, related to mitochondrial dynamics and function, are also localized to this area. Several neurodegenerative diseases have shown alterations in MAM functions and resident proteins, including Charcot Marie-Tooth and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We have recently reported that MAM function is downregulated in cell and mouse models of PD expressing pathogenic mutations of α-syn. This review focuses on the possible role of α-syn in these cellular domains and the early pathogenic features of PD that could be explained by α-syn-MAM disturbances. PMID:25755636

  2. Radiation-induced functional connectivity alterations in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiongmin; Wu, Donglin; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Hu, Dewen; Qiu, Shijun

    2016-07-01

    The study aims to investigate the radiation-induced brain functional alterations in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients who received radiotherapy (RT) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and statistic scale.The fMRI data of 35 NPC patients with RT and 24 demographically matched untreated NPC patients were acquired. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was also measured to evaluate their global cognition performance. Multivariate pattern analysis was performed to find the significantly altered functional connections between these 2 groups, while the linear correlation level was detected between the altered functional connections and the MoCA scores.Forty-five notably altered functional connections were found, which were mainly located between 3 brain networks, the cerebellum, sensorimotor, and cingulo-opercular. With strictly false discovery rate correction, 5 altered functional connections were shown to have significant linear correlations with the MoCA scores, that is, the connections between the vermis and hippocampus, cerebellum lobule VI and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, precuneus and dorsal frontal cortex, cuneus and middle occipital lobe, and insula and cuneus. Besides, the connectivity between the vermis and hippocampus was also significantly correlated with the attention score, 1 of the 7 subscores of the MoCA.The present study provides new insights into the radiation-induced functional connectivity impairments in NPC patients. The results showed that the RT may induce the cognitive impairments, especially the attention alterations. The 45 altered functional connections, especially the 5 altered functional connections that were significantly correlated to the MoCA scores, may serve as the potential biomarkers of the RT-induced brain functional impairments and provide valuable targets for further functional recovery treatment. PMID:27442663

  3. Studies on effect of stress preconditioning in restrain stress-induced behavioral alterations.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Rajneet; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal

    2010-02-01

    Stress preconditioning has been documented to confer on gastroprotective effects on stress-induced gastric ulcerations. However, the effects of prior exposure of stress preconditioning episodes on stress-induced behavioral changes have not been explored yet. Therefore the present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative effects of stress preconditioning in immobilization stress-induced behavioral alterations in rats. The rats were subjected to restrain stress by placing in restrainer (5.5 cm in diameter and 18 cm in length) for 3.5 h. Stress preconditioning was induced by subjecting the rats to two cycles of restraint and restrain-free periods of 15 min each. Furthermore, a similar type of stress preconditioning was induced using different time cycles of 30 and 45 min. The extent and severity of the stress-induced behavioral alterations were assessed using different behavioral tests such as hole-board test, social interaction test, open field test, and actophotometer. Restrain stress resulted in decrease in locomotor activity, frequency of head dips and rearing in hole board, line crossing and rearing in open field, and decreased following and increased avoidance in social interaction test. Stress preconditioning with two cycles of 15, 30 or 45 min respectively, did not attenuate stress-induced behavioral changes to any extent. It may be concluded that stress preconditioning does not seem to confer any protective effect in modulating restrain stress-induced behavioral alterations.

  4. Monomeric Alpha-Synuclein Exerts a Physiological Role on Brain ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Angelova, Plamena R.; Ninkina, Natalia N.; Gandhi, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded α-synuclein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, knowledge about a physiological role for the native, unfolded α-synuclein is limited. Using brains of mice lacking α-, β-, and γ-synuclein, we report that extracellular monomeric α-synuclein enters neurons and localizes to mitochondria, interacts with ATP synthase subunit α, and modulates ATP synthase function. Using a combination of biochemical, live-cell imaging and mitochondrial respiration analysis, we found that brain mitochondria of α-, β-, and γ-synuclein knock-out mice are uncoupled, as characterized by increased mitochondrial respiration and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, synuclein deficiency results in reduced ATP synthase efficiency and lower ATP levels. Exogenous application of low unfolded α-synuclein concentrations is able to increase the ATP synthase activity that rescues the mitochondrial phenotypes observed in synuclein deficiency. Overall, the data suggest that α-synuclein is a previously unrecognized physiological regulator of mitochondrial bioenergetics through its ability to interact with ATP synthase and increase its efficiency. This may be of particular importance in times of stress or PD mutations leading to energy depletion and neuronal cell toxicity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Misfolded α-synuclein aggregations in the form of Lewy bodies have been shown to be a pathological hallmark in histological staining of Parkinson's disease (PD) patient brains. It is known that misfolded α-synuclein is a key driver in PD pathogenesis, but the physiological role of unfolded monomeric α-synuclein remains unclear. Using neuronal cocultures and isolated brain mitochondria of α-, β-, and γ-synuclein knock-out mice and monomeric α-synuclein, this current study shows that α-synuclein in its unfolded monomeric form improves ATP synthase efficiency and mitochondrial function. The ability of monomeric α-synuclein to enhance

  5. Transmission of Soluble and Insoluble α-Synuclein to Mice.

    PubMed

    Jones, Daryl Rhys; Delenclos, Marion; Baine, AnnMarie T; DeTure, Michael; Murray, Melissa E; Dickson, Dennis W; McLean, Pamela J

    2015-12-01

    The neurodegenerative synucleinopathies, which include Parkinson disease, multiple-system atrophy, and Lewy body disease, are characterized by the presence of abundant neuronal inclusions called Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. These disorders remain incurable, and a greater understanding of the pathologic processes is needed for effective treatment strategies to be developed. Recent data suggest that pathogenic misfolding of the presynaptic protein, α-synuclein (α-syn), and subsequent aggregation and accumulation are fundamental to the disease process. It is hypothesized that the misfolded isoform is able to induce misfolding of normal endogenous α-syn, much like what occurs in the prion diseases. Recent work highlighting the seeding effect of pathogenic α-syn has largely focused on the detergent-insoluble species of the protein. In this study, we performed intracerebral inoculations of the sarkosyl-insoluble or sarkosyl-soluble fractions of human Lewy body disease brain homogenate and show that both fractions induce CNS pathology in mice at 4 months after injection. Disease-associated deposits accumulated both near and distal to the site of the injection, suggesting a cell-to-cell spread via recruitment of α-syn. These results provide further insight into the prion-like mechanisms of α-syn and suggest that disease-associated α-syn is not homogeneous within a single patient but might exist in both soluble and insoluble isoforms. PMID:26574670

  6. Alterations in enamel remineralization in vitro induced by blue light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, I. T.; Zezell, D. M.; Mendes, F. M.; Wetter, N. U.

    2010-06-01

    Blue light, especially from LED devices, is a very frequently used tool in dental procedures. However, the investigations of its effects on dental enamel are focused primarily on enamel demineralization and fluoride retention. Despite the fact that this spectral region can inhibit enamel demineralization, the effects of the irradiation on demineralized enamel are not known. For this reason, we evaluated the effects of blue LED on remineralization of dental enamel. Artificial lesions were formed in bovine dental enamel blocks by immersing the samples in undersaturated acetate buffer. The lesions were irradiated with blue LED (455 nm, 1.38 W/cm2, 13.75 J/cm2, and 10 s) and remineralization was induced by pH-cycling process. Cross-sectional hardness was used to asses mineral changes after remineralization. Non-irradiated enamel lesions presented higher mineral content than irradiated ones. Furthermore, the mineral content of irradiated group was not significantly different from the lesion samples that were not submitted to the remineralization process. Results obtained in the present study show that the blue light is not innocuous for the dental enamel and inhibition of its remineralization can occur.

  7. Endothelial Dysfunction and Amyloid-β-Induced Neurovascular Alterations.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kenzo; Wang, Gang; Park, Laibaik

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular diseases share common vascular risk factors that have disastrous effects on cerebrovascular regulation. Endothelial cells, lining inner walls of cerebral blood vessels, form a dynamic interface between the blood and the brain and are critical for the maintenance of neurovascular homeostasis. Accordingly, injury in endothelial cells is regarded as one of the earliest symptoms of impaired vasoregulatory mechanisms. Extracellular buildup of amyloid-β (Aβ) is a central pathogenic factor in AD. Aβ exerts potent detrimental effects on cerebral blood vessels and impairs endothelial structure and function. Recent evidence implicates vascular oxidative stress and activation of the non-selective cationic channel transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM)-2 on endothelial cells in the mechanisms of Aβ-induced neurovascular dysfunction. Thus, Aβ triggers opening of TRPM2 channels in endothelial cells leading to intracellular Ca(2+) overload and vasomotor dysfunction. The cerebrovascular dysfunction may contribute to AD pathogenesis by reducing the cerebral blood supply, leading to increased susceptibility to vascular insufficiency, and by promoting Aβ accumulation. The recent realization that vascular factors contribute to AD pathobiology suggests new targets for the prevention and treatment of this devastating disease. PMID:26328781

  8. Reducing synuclein accumulation improves neuronal survival after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Fogerson, Stephanie M; van Brummen, Alexandra J; Busch, David J; Allen, Scott R; Roychaudhuri, Robin; Banks, Susan M L; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Morgan, Jennifer R

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury causes neuronal death, limiting subsequent regeneration and recovery. Thus, there is a need to develop strategies for improving neuronal survival after injury. Relative to our understanding of axon regeneration, comparatively little is known about the mechanisms that promote the survival of damaged neurons. To address this, we took advantage of lamprey giant reticulospinal neurons whose large size permits detailed examination of post-injury molecular responses at the level of individual, identified cells. We report here that spinal cord injury caused a select subset of giant reticulospinal neurons to accumulate synuclein, a synaptic vesicle-associated protein best known for its atypical aggregation and causal role in neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and other diseases. Post-injury synuclein accumulation took the form of punctate aggregates throughout the somata and occurred selectively in dying neurons, but not in those that survived. In contrast, another synaptic vesicle protein, synaptotagmin, did not accumulate in response to injury. We further show that the post-injury synuclein accumulation was greatly attenuated after single dose application of either the "molecular tweezer" inhibitor, CLR01, or a translation-blocking synuclein morpholino. Consequently, reduction of synuclein accumulation not only improved neuronal survival, but also increased the number of axons in the spinal cord proximal and distal to the lesion. This study is the first to reveal that reducing synuclein accumulation is a novel strategy for improving neuronal survival after spinal cord injury.

  9. Chronic cola drinking induces metabolic and cardiac alterations in rats

    PubMed Central

    Milei, José; Losada, Matilde Otero; Llambí, Hernán Gómez; Grana, Daniel R; Suárez, Daniel; Azzato, Francisco; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of chronic drinking of cola beverages on metabolic and echocardiographic parameters in rats. METHODS: Forty-eight male Wistar rats were divided in 3 groups and allowed to drink regular cola (C), diet cola (L), or tap water (W) ad libitum during 6 mo. After this period, 50% of the animals in each group were euthanized. The remaining rats drank tap water ad libitum for an additional 6 mo and were then sacrificed. Rat weight, food, and beverage consumption were measured regularly. Biochemical, echocardiographic and systolic blood pressure data were obtained at baseline, and at 6 mo (treatment) and 12 mo (washout). A complete histopathology study was performed after sacrifice. RESULTS: After 6 mo, C rats had increased body weight (+7%, P < 0.01), increased liquid consumption (+69%, P < 0.001), and decreased food intake (-31%, P < 0.001). C rats showed mild hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia. Normoglycemia (+69%, P < 0.01) and sustained hypertriglyceridemia (+69%, P < 0.01) were observed in C after washout. Both cola beverages induced an increase in left ventricular diastolic diameter (C: +9%, L: +7%, P < 0.05 vs W) and volumes (diastolic C: +26%, L: +22%, P < 0.01 vs W; systolic C: +24%, L: +24%, P < 0.05 vs W) and reduction of relative posterior wall thickness (C: -8%, L: -10%, P < 0.05 vs W). Cardiac output tended to increase (C: +25%, P < 0.05 vs W; L: +17%, not significant vs W). Heart rate was not affected. Pathology findings were scarce, related to aging rather than treatment. CONCLUSION: This experimental model may prove useful to investigate the consequences of high consumption of soft drinks. PMID:21526048

  10. Cadmium induces alterations in the human spinal cord morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sarchielli, Erica; Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Marini, Mirca; Vannelli, Gabriella B; Gulisano, Massimo

    2012-02-01

    The effects of cadmium on the central nervous system are still relatively poorly understood and its role in neurodegenerative diseases has been debated. In our research, cultured explants from 25 human foetal spinal cords (10-11 weeks gestational age) were incubated with 10 and 100 μM cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)) for 24 h. After treatment, an immunohistochemical study [for Sglial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)], a Western blot analysis (for GFAP, β-Tubulin III, nerve growth factor receptor, Caspase 8 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase), and a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay (for detection of apoptotic bodies) were performed. The treatment with CdCl(2) induced a significant and dose-dependent change in the ratio motor neurons/glial cells in the ventral horns of human foetal spinal cord. The decrease of the choline acetyltransferase-positive cells (motor neurons) and the reduction of β Tubulin III indicate that CdCl(2) specifically affects motor neurons of the ventral horns. While the number of motor neurons decreased for the activation of apoptotic pathways (as shown by the increased expression of Caspase 8, nerve growth factor receptor, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase), glial cells, both in the subependymal zone and in the gray matter of the ventral horns, increased (as shown by the increase of GFAP expression). These results provide the evidence that during human spinal cord development, CdCl(2) may affect the fate of neural and glial cells thus, being potentially involved in the etiopathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Transcriptional mutagenesis by 8-oxodG in α-synuclein aggregation and the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sambuddha; Je, Goun; Kim, Yoon-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with selective loss of dopaminergic neurons. The characteristic hallmark of the disease is intracytoplasmic proteinacious inclusion bodies called Lewy bodies, primarily consisting of a presynaptic protein α-synuclein. Oxidative stress-mediated damage to macromolecules have been shown to occur frequently in PD. Oxidative damage to DNA in the form of oxidized guanine (8-oxodG) accumulates in both the mitochondrial and nuclear DNA of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra in PD. 8-oxodG-mediated transcriptional mutagenesis has been shown to have the potential to alter phenotype of cells through production of mutant pool of proteins. This review comprehensively summarizes the role of oxidative stress-mediated damage incurred during neurodegeneration, and highlights the scope of transcriptional mutagenesis event in leading to α-synuclein aggregation as seen in PD. PMID:26315598

  12. A hyperbranched dopamine-containing PEG-based polymer for the inhibition of α-synuclein fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Breydo, Leonid; Newland, Ben; Zhang, Hong; Rosser, Anne; Werner, Carsten; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Wang, Wenxin

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of α-synuclein is believed to play an important role in Parkinson's disease and in other neurodegenerative maladies. Small molecule inhibitors of this process are among the most promising drug candidates for neurodegenerative diseases. Dendrimers have also been studied for anti-fibrillation applications but they can be difficult and expensive to synthetize. Here we show that RAFT polymerization can be used to produce a hyperbranched polyethylene glycol structure via a one-pot reaction. This polymer included a dopamine moiety, a known inhibitor of α-synuclein fibril formation. Dopamine within the polymer structure was capable of aggregation inhibition, although not to the same degree as free dopamine. This result opens up new avenues for the use of controlled radical polymerizations as a means of preparing hyperbranched polymers for anti-fibrillation activity, but shows that the incorporation of functional groups from known small molecules within polymers may alter their biological activity. PMID:26707645

  13. Biophysics of α-Synuclein Membrane Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferkorn, Candace M.; Jiang, Zhiping; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins participate in nearly all cellular processes; however, because of experimental limitations, their characterization lags far behind that of soluble proteins. Peripheral membrane proteins are particularly challenging to study because of their inherent propensity to adopt multiple and/or transient conformations in solution and upon membrane association. In this review, we summarize useful biophysical techniques for the study of peripheral membrane proteins and their application in the characterization of the membrane interactions of the natively unfolded and Parkinson’s disease (PD) related protein, α-synuclein (α-syn). We give particular focus to studies that have led to the current understanding of membrane-bound α-syn structure and the elucidation of specific membrane properties that affect α-syn-membrane binding. Finally, we discuss biophysical evidence supporting a key role for membranes and α-syn in PD pathogenesis. PMID:21819966

  14. Biophysics of α-synuclein membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Pfefferkorn, Candace M; Jiang, Zhiping; Lee, Jennifer C

    2012-02-01

    Membrane proteins participate in nearly all cellular processes; however, because of experimental limitations, their characterization lags far behind that of soluble proteins. Peripheral membrane proteins are particularly challenging to study because of their inherent propensity to adopt multiple and/or transient conformations in solution and upon membrane association. In this review, we summarize useful biophysical techniques for the study of peripheral membrane proteins and their application in the characterization of the membrane interactions of the natively unfolded and Parkinson's disease (PD) related protein, α-synuclein (α-syn). We give particular focus to studies that have led to the current understanding of membrane-bound α-syn structure and the elucidation of specific membrane properties that affect α-syn-membrane binding. Finally, we discuss biophysical evidence supporting a key role for membranes and α-syn in PD pathogenesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane protein structure and function.

  15. Versatile Structures of α-Synuclein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuchu; Zhao, Chunyu; Li, Dan; Tian, Zhiqi; Lai, Ying; Diao, Jiajie; Liu, Cong

    2016-01-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is an intrinsically disordered protein abundantly distributed in presynaptic terminals. Aggregation of α-syn into Lewy bodies (LB) is a molecular hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). α-Syn features an extreme conformational diversity, which adapts to different conditions and fulfills versatile functions. However, the molecular mechanism of α-syn transformation and the relation between different structural species and their functional and pathogenic roles in neuronal activities and PD remain unknown. In this mini-review, we summarize the recent discoveries of α-syn structures in the membrane-bound state, in cytosol, and in the amyloid state under physiological and pathological conditions. From the current knowledge on different structural species of α-syn, we intend to find a clue about its function and toxicity in normal neurons and under disease conditions, which could shed light on the PD pathogenesis. PMID:27378848

  16. Versatile Structures of α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuchu; Zhao, Chunyu; Li, Dan; Tian, Zhiqi; Lai, Ying; Diao, Jiajie; Liu, Cong

    2016-01-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is an intrinsically disordered protein abundantly distributed in presynaptic terminals. Aggregation of α-syn into Lewy bodies (LB) is a molecular hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD). α-Syn features an extreme conformational diversity, which adapts to different conditions and fulfills versatile functions. However, the molecular mechanism of α-syn transformation and the relation between different structural species and their functional and pathogenic roles in neuronal activities and PD remain unknown. In this mini-review, we summarize the recent discoveries of α-syn structures in the membrane-bound state, in cytosol, and in the amyloid state under physiological and pathological conditions. From the current knowledge on different structural species of α-syn, we intend to find a clue about its function and toxicity in normal neurons and under disease conditions, which could shed light on the PD pathogenesis. PMID:27378848

  17. Local and systemic biochemical alterations induced by Bothrops atrox snake venom in mice.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Carlos At; Kayano, Anderson M; Setúbal, Sulamita S; Pontes, Adriana S; Furtado, Juliana L; Kwasniewski, Fábio H; Zaqueo, Kayena D; Soares, Andreimar M; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Zuliani, Juliana P

    2012-01-01

    The local and systemic alterations induced by Bothrops atrox snake venom (BaV) injection in mice were studied. BaV induced superoxide production by migrated neutrophils, mast cell degranulation and phagocytosis by macrophages. Moreover, BaV caused hemorrhage in dorsum of mice after 2hr post- injection. Three hours post-injection in gastrocnemius muscle, we also observed myonecrosis, which was assessed by the determination of serum and tissue CK besides the release of urea, but not creatinine and uric acid, indicating kidney alterations. BaV also induced the release of LDH and transaminases (ALT and AST) indicating tissue and liver abnormalities. In conclusion, the data indicate that BaV induces events of local and systemic importance. PMID:23487552

  18. Local and systemic biochemical alterations induced by Bothrops atrox snake venom in mice.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Carlos At; Kayano, Anderson M; Setúbal, Sulamita S; Pontes, Adriana S; Furtado, Juliana L; Kwasniewski, Fábio H; Zaqueo, Kayena D; Soares, Andreimar M; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Zuliani, Juliana P

    2012-01-01

    The local and systemic alterations induced by Bothrops atrox snake venom (BaV) injection in mice were studied. BaV induced superoxide production by migrated neutrophils, mast cell degranulation and phagocytosis by macrophages. Moreover, BaV caused hemorrhage in dorsum of mice after 2hr post- injection. Three hours post-injection in gastrocnemius muscle, we also observed myonecrosis, which was assessed by the determination of serum and tissue CK besides the release of urea, but not creatinine and uric acid, indicating kidney alterations. BaV also induced the release of LDH and transaminases (ALT and AST) indicating tissue and liver abnormalities. In conclusion, the data indicate that BaV induces events of local and systemic importance.

  19. Local and systemic biochemical alterations induced by Bothrops atrox snake venom in mice

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Carlos AT; Kayano, Anderson M; Setúbal, Sulamita S; Pontes, Adriana S; Furtado, Juliana L; Kwasniewski, Fábio H; Zaqueo, Kayena D; Soares, Andreimar M; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Zuliani, Juliana P

    2012-01-01

    The local and systemic alterations induced by Bothrops atrox snake venom (BaV) injection in mice were studied. BaV induced superoxide production by migrated neutrophils, mast cell degranulation and phagocytosis by macrophages. Moreover, BaV caused hemorrhage in dorsum of mice after 2hr post- injection. Three hours post-injection in gastrocnemius muscle, we also observed myonecrosis, which was assessed by the determination of serum and tissue CK besides the release of urea, but not creatinine and uric acid, indicating kidney alterations. BaV also induced the release of LDH and transaminases (ALT and AST) indicating tissue and liver abnormalities. In conclusion, the data indicate that BaV induces events of local and systemic importance. PMID:23487552

  20. Piroxicam attenuates 3-nitropropionic acid-induced brain oxidative stress and behavioral alteration in mice.

    PubMed

    C, Jadiswami; H M, Megha; Dhadde, Shivsharan B; Durg, Sharanbasappa; Potadar, Pandharinath P; B S, Thippeswamy; V P, Veerapur

    2014-12-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP) is a fungal toxin that produces Huntington's disease like symptoms in both animals and humans. Piroxicam, a non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, used as anti-inflammatory agent and also known to decrease free oxygen radical production. In this study, the effect of piroxicam was evaluated against 3-NP-induced brain oxidative stress and behavioral alteration in mice. Adult male Swiss albino mice were injected with vehicle/piroxicam (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before 3-NP challenge (15 mg/kg, i.p.) regularly for 14 days. Body weights of the mice were measured on alternative days of the experiment. At the end of the treatment schedule, mice were evaluated for behavioral alterations (movement analysis, locomotor test, beam walking test and hanging wire test) and brain homogenates were used for the estimation of oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and catalase). Administration of 3-NP significantly altered the behavioral activities and brain antioxidant status in mice. Piroxicam, at both the tested doses, caused a significant reversal of 3-NP-induced behavioral alterations and oxidative stress in mice. These findings suggest piroxicam protects the mice against 3-NP-induced brain oxidative stress and behavioral alteration. The antioxidant properties of piroxicam may be responsible for the observed beneficial actions. PMID:25191831

  1. Evaluation of the synuclein-y (SNCG) gene as a PPARy target in murine adipocytes, dorsal root ganglia somatosensory neurons, and human adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synuclein-gamma is highly expressed in both adipocytes and peripheral nervous system (PNS) somatosensory neurons. Its mRNA is induced during adipogenesis, increased in obese human white adipose tissue (WAT), may be coordinately regulated with leptin, and is decreased following treatment of murine 3T...

  2. Outcome of Children with Hyperventilation-Induced High-Amplitude Rhythmic Slow Activity with Altered Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Alexander; Ng, Joanne; Rittey, Christopher D. C.; Kandler, Rosalind H.; Mordekar, Santosh R.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperventilation-induced high-amplitude rhythmic slow activity with altered awareness (HIHARS) is increasingly being identified in children and is thought to be an age-related non-epileptic electrographic phenomenon. We retrospectively investigated the clinical outcome in 15 children (six males, nine females) with HIHARS (mean age 7y, SD 1y 11mo;…

  3. ALTERED RA SIGNALING IN THE GENESIS OF ETHANOL-INDUCED LIMB DEFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Altered RA Signaling in the Genesis of Ethanol-Induced Limb Defects

    Johnson CS(1), Sulik KK(1,2) Hunter, ES III(3)
    (1) Dept of Cell and Developmental Biology, UNC-Chapel Hill (2) Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies, UNC-CH (3) NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC

    Administr...

  4. Structural and functional properties of prefibrillar α-synuclein oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Pieri, Laura; Madiona, Karine; Melki, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The deposition of fibrillar alpha-synuclein (α-syn) within inclusions (Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites) in neurons and glial cells is a hallmark of synucleinopathies. α-syn populates a variety of assemblies ranging from prefibrillar oligomeric species to fibrils whose specific contribution to neurodegeneration is still unclear. Here, we compare the specific structural and biological properties of distinct soluble prefibrillar α-syn oligomers formed either spontaneously or in the presence of dopamine and glutaraldehyde. We show that both on-fibrillar assembly pathway and distinct dopamine-mediated and glutaraldehyde-cross-linked α-syn oligomers are only slightly effective in perturbing cell membrane integrity and inducing cytotoxicity, while mature fibrils exhibit the highest toxicity. In contrast to low-molecular weight and unstable oligomers, large stable α-syn oligomers seed the aggregation of soluble α-syn within reporter cells although to a lesser extent than mature α-syn fibrils. These oligomers appear elongated in shape. Our findings suggest that α-syn oligomers represent a continuum of species ranging from unstable low molecular weight particles to mature fibrils via stable elongated oligomers composed of more than 15 α-syn monomers that possess seeding capacity. PMID:27075649

  5. Severely impaired hippocampal neurogenesis associates with an early serotonergic deficit in a BAC α-synuclein transgenic rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Zacharias; Ben Abdallah, Nada; Vogelgsang, Jonathan; Tischer, Lucas; Deusser, Janina; Amato, Davide; Anderson, Scott; Müller, Christian P; Riess, Olaf; Masliah, Eliezer; Nuber, Silke; Winkler, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multisystem disorder, involving several monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems resulting in a broad range of motor and non-motor symptoms. Pathological hallmarks of PD are the loss of dopaminergic neurons and the accumulation of alpha-synuclein, however also being present in the serotonergic raphe nuclei early in the disease course. The dysfunction of the serotonergic system projecting to the hippocampus may contribute to early non-motor symptoms such as anxiety and depression. The adult hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), a unique niche of the forebrain continuously generating new neurons, may particularly present enhanced susceptibility towards accumulating alpha-synuclein levels. The underlying molecular mechanisms in the context of neuronal maturation and survival of new-born neurons are yet not well understood. To characterize the effects of overexpression of human full-length alpha-synuclein on hippocampal cellular and synaptic plasticity, we used a recently generated BAC alpha-synuclein transgenic rat model showing important features of PD such as widespread and progressive alpha-synuclein aggregation pathology, dopamine loss and age-dependent motor decline. At the age of four months, thus prior to the occurrence of the motor phenotype, we observed a profoundly impaired dendritogenesis of neuroblasts in the hippocampal DG resulting in severely reduced survival of adult new-born neurons. Diminished neurogenesis concurred with a serotonergic deficit in the hippocampus as defined by reduced levels of serotonin (5-HT) 1B receptor, decreased 5-HT neurotransmitter levels, and a loss of serotonergic nerve terminals innervating the DG/CA3 subfield, while the number of serotonergic neurons in the raphe nuclei remained unchanged. Moreover, alpha-synuclein overexpression reduced proteins involved in vesicle release, in particular synapsin-1 and Rab3 interacting molecule (RIM3), in conjunction with an altered ultrastructural architecture of

  6. Fiber diffraction of synthetic α-synuclein filaments shows amyloid-like cross-β conformation

    PubMed Central

    Serpell, Louise C.; Berriman, John; Jakes, Ross; Goedert, Michel; Crowther, R. Anthony

    2000-01-01

    Filamentous inclusions made of α-synuclein constitute the defining neuropathological characteristic of Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy. Rare familial cases of Parkinson's disease are associated with mutations A53T and A30P in α-synuclein. We report here the assembly properties and secondary structure characteristics of recombinant α-synuclein. Carboxy-terminally truncated human α-synuclein (1–87) and (1–120) showed the fastest rates of assembly, followed by human A53T α-synuclein, and rat and zebra finch α-synuclein. Wild-type human α-synuclein and the A30P mutant showed slower rates of assembly. Upon shaking, filaments formed within 48 h at 37°C. The related proteins β- and γ-synuclein only assembled after several weeks of incubation. Synthetic human α-synuclein filaments were decorated by an antibody directed against the carboxy-terminal 10 amino acids of α-synuclein, as were filaments extracted from dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy brains. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that α-synuclein undergoes a conformational change from random coil to β-sheet structure during assembly. X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction of the α-synuclein assemblies showed a cross-β conformation characteristic of amyloid. PMID:10781096

  7. Binding of Abeta to alpha- and beta-synucleins: identification of segments in alpha-synuclein/NAC precursor that bind Abeta and NAC.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, P H; Hojrup, P; Hager, H; Nielsen, M S; Jacobsen, L; Olesen, O F; Gliemann, J; Jakes, R

    1997-01-01

    NAC, a 35-residue peptide derived from the neuronal protein alpha-synuclein/NAC precursor, is tightly associated with Abeta fibrils in Alzheimer's disease amyloid, and alpha-synuclein has recently been shown to bind Abeta in vitro. We have studied the interaction between Abeta and synucleins, aiming at determining segments in alpha-synuclein that can account for the binding, as well as identifying a possible interaction between Abeta and the beta-type synuclein. We report that Abeta binds to native and recombinant alpha-synuclein, and to beta-synuclein in an SDS-sensitive interaction (IC50 approx. 20 microM), as determined by chemical cross-linking and solid-phase binding assays. alpha-Synuclein and beta-synuclein were found to stimulate Abeta-aggregation in vitro to the same extent. The synucleins also displayed Abeta-inhibitable binding of NAC and they were capable of forming dimers. Using proteolytic fragmentation of alpha-synuclein and cross-linking to 125I-Abeta, we identified two consecutive binding domains (residues 1-56 and 57-97) by Edman degradation and mass spectrometric analysis, and a synthetic peptide comprising residues 32-57 possessed Abeta-binding activity. To test further the possible significance in pathology, alpha-synuclein was biotinylated and shown to bind specifically to amyloid plaques in a brain with Alzheimer's disease. It is proposed that the multiple Abeta-binding sites in alpha-synuclein are involved in the development of amyloid plaques. PMID:9163350

  8. Epigenetic alteration to activate Bmp2-Smad signaling in Raf-induced senescence

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Mai; Mano, Yasunobu; Anai, Motonobu; Yamamoto, Shogo; Fukuyo, Masaki; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate epigenomic and gene expression alterations during cellular senescence induced by oncogenic Raf. METHODS: Cellular senescence was induced into mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) by infecting retrovirus to express oncogenic Raf (RafV600E). RNA was collected from RafV600E cells as well as MEFs without infection and MEFs with mock infection, and a genome-wide gene expression analysis was performed using microarray. The epigenomic status for active H3K4me3 and repressive H3K27me3 histone marks was analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing for RafV600E cells on day 7 and for MEFs without infection. These data for Raf-induced senescence were compared with data for Ras-induced senescence that were obtained in our previous study. Gene knockdown and overexpression were done by retrovirus infection. RESULTS: Although the expression of some genes including secreted factors was specifically altered in either Ras- or Raf-induced senescence, many genes showed similar alteration pattern in Raf- and Ras-induced senescence. A total of 841 commonly upregulated 841 genes and 573 commonly downregulated genes showed a significant enrichment of genes related to signal and secreted proteins, suggesting the importance of alterations in secreted factors. Bmp2, a secreted protein to activate Bmp2-Smad signaling, was highly upregulated with gain of H3K4me3 and loss of H3K27me3 during Raf-induced senescence, as previously detected in Ras-induced senescence, and the knockdown of Bmp2 by shRNA lead to escape from Raf-induced senescence. Bmp2-Smad inhibitor Smad6 was strongly repressed with H3K4me3 loss in Raf-induced senescence, as detected in Ras-induced senescence, and senescence was also bypassed by Smad6 induction in Raf-activated cells. Different from Ras-induced senescence, however, gain of H3K27me3 did not occur in the Smad6 promoter region during Raf-induced senescence. When comparing genome-wide alteration between Ras- and Raf-induced senescence, genes

  9. Utility of Dexrazoxane for the Attenuation of Epirubicin-Induced Genetic Alterations in Mouse Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sheikh F.; Ansaria, Mushtaq A.; Nadeem, Ahmed; Al-Shabanah, Othman A.; Al-Harbi, Mohammed M.; Bakheet, Saleh A.

    2016-01-01

    Dexrazoxane has been approved to treat anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy and extravasation. However, the effect of dexrazoxane on epirubicin-induced genetic alterations in germ cells has not yet been reported. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether dexrazoxane modulates epirubicin-induced genetic damage in the germ cells of male mice. Our results show that dexrazoxane was not genotoxic at the tested doses. Furthermore, it protected mouse germ cells against epirubicin-induced genetic alterations as detected by the reduction in disomic and diploid sperm, spermatogonial chromosomal aberrations, and abnormal sperm heads. The attenuating effect of dexrazoxane was greater at higher dose, indicating a dose-dependent effect. Moreover, sperm motility and count were ameliorated by dexrazoxane pretreatment. Epirubicin induced marked biochemical changes characteristic of oxidative DNA damage including elevated 8-hydroxy-2ʹ-deoxyguanosine levels and reduction in reduced glutathione. Pretreatment of mice with dexrazoxane before epirubicin challenge restored these altered endpoints. We conclude that dexrazoxane may efficiently mitigate the epirubicin insult in male germ cells, and prevent the enhanced risk of abnormal reproductive outcomes and associated health risks. Thus, pretreating patients with dexrazoxane prior to epirubicin may efficiently preserve not only sperm quality but also prevent the transmission of genetic damage to future generations. PMID:27690233

  10. Altered magnesium transport in slices of kidney cortex from chemically-induced diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, B.

    1981-10-01

    The uptake of magnesium-28 was measured in slices of kidney cortex from rats with alloxan-diabetes and from rats with streptozotocin-diabetes of increasing durations. In both forms of chemically-induced diabetes, magnesium-28 uptake by kidney cortex slices was significantly increased over uptake measured in kidney cortex slices from control rats. Immediate institution of daily insulin therapy to the diabetic rats prevented the diabetes-induced elevated uptake of magnesium without controlling blood glucose levels. Late institution of daily insulin therapy was ineffective in restoring the magnesium uptake to control values. These alterations in magnesium uptake occurred prior to any evidence of nephropathy (via the classic indices of proteinuria and increased BUN levels). The implications of these findings, together with our earlier demonstrations of altered calcium transport by kidney cortex slices from chemically-induced diabetic rats, are discussed in terms of disordered divalent cation transport being at least part of the basic pathogenesis underlying diabetic nephropathy.

  11. Exposure to arsenic via drinking water induces 5-hydroxymethylcytosine alteration in rat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Mu, Xiaoli; Xu, Weipan; Martin, Francis L; Alamdar, Ambreen; Liu, Liangpo; Tian, Meiping; Huang, Qingyu; Shen, Heqing

    2014-11-01

    Arsenic exposure has been implicated to alter DNA methylation process in vitro and in vivo, but it remains obscure whether it disrupts DNA demethylation process, which is pivotal for epigenetic regulation. The objective of this descriptive study was to investigate the relationship between arsenic exposure and 5-methylcytosine (5mC), 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) alterations in various organs. In this study, we exposed male Sprague-Dawley rats to sodium arsenite (0.5, 2 or 10 ppm) via drinking water for 8 weeks. Spleen accumulated 2- to 3-fold higher arsenic levels than liver and heart. Lower arsenic levels were observed in the kidney, pancreas and lung. No significant arsenic-induced global 5mC alterations were observed in the majority of investigated organs. However, arsenic induced organ-specific alterations of 5hmC and/or 5hmC/5mC in some investigated organs, i.e. lung, heart, kidney, pancreas and spleen. Our observations suggest that 5hmC is a more sensitive biomarker of arsenic-induced impacts on epigenetic processes than 5mC. Moreover, demethylation via hydroxylation of 5mC appears to play a central role in the toxic mechanism of arsenic.

  12. Acceleration of α-Synuclein Aggregation by Exosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Marie; Dunning, Christopher J.; Gaspar, Ricardo; Grey, Carl; Brundin, Patrik; Sparr, Emma; Linse, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles released from cells into extracellular space. We have isolated exosomes from neuroblastoma cells and investigated their influence on the aggregation of α-synuclein, a protein associated with Parkinson disease pathology. Using cryo-transmission electron microscopy of exosomes, we found spherical unilamellar vesicles with a significant protein content, and Western blot analysis revealed that they contain, as expected, the proteins Flotillin-1 and Alix. Using thioflavin T fluorescence to monitor aggregation kinetics, we found that exosomes catalyze the process in a similar manner as a low concentration of preformed α-synuclein fibrils. The exosomes reduce the lag time indicating that they provide catalytic environments for nucleation. The catalytic effects of exosomes derived from naive cells and cells that overexpress α-synuclein do not differ. Vesicles prepared from extracted exosome lipids accelerate aggregation, suggesting that the lipids in exosomes are sufficient for the catalytic effect to arise. Using mass spectrometry, we found several phospholipid classes in the exosomes, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, and the gangliosides GM2 and GM3. Within each class, several species with different acyl chains were identified. We then prepared vesicles from corresponding pure lipids or defined mixtures, most of which were found to retard α-synuclein aggregation. As a striking exception, vesicles containing ganglioside lipids GM1 or GM3 accelerate the process. Understanding how α-synuclein interacts with biological membranes to promote neurological disease might lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25425650

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Fluctuating Conformational Dynamics of the Intrinsically Disordered Proteins α-Synuclein and τ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W.; Schreck, Carl; Nath, Abhinav; Rhoades, Elizabeth; O'Hern, Corey

    2013-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not possess well-defined three-dimensional structures in solution under physiological conditions. We develop united-atom and coarse-grained Langevin dynamics simulations for the IDPs α-synuclein and τ that include geometric,attractive hydrophobic, and screened electrostatic interactions and are calibrated to the inter-residue separations measured in recent smFRET experiments. We find that these IDPs have conformational statistics that are intermediate between random walk and collapsed globule behavior and demonstrate close resemblance to the known experimental data, with both electrostatics and hydrophobicity strongly influencing the dynamics. We investigate the propensity of α-synuclein to aggregate and form oligomers, and present preliminary results for the aggregation of τ and interactions between these IDPs and small molecules such as heparin and spermine which are known to induce aggregation.

  14. Mutant LRRK2 toxicity in neurons depends on LRRK2 levels and synuclein but not kinase activity or inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Skibinski, Gaia; Nakamura, Ken; Cookson, Mark R; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2014-01-01

    By combining experimental neuron models and mathematical tools, we developed a "systems" approach to deconvolve cellular mechanisms of neurodegeneration underlying the most common known cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2). Neurons ectopically expressing mutant LRRK2 formed inclusion bodies (IBs), retracted neurites, accumulated synuclein, and died prematurely, recapitulating key features of PD. Degeneration was predicted from the levels of diffuse mutant LRRK2 that each neuron contained, but IB formation was neither necessary nor sufficient for death. Genetic or pharmacological blockade of its kinase activity destabilized LRRK2 and lowered its levels enough to account for the moderate reduction in LRRK2 toxicity that ensued. By contrast, targeting synuclein, including neurons made from PD patient-derived induced pluripotent cells, dramatically reduced LRRK2-dependent neurodegeneration and LRRK2 levels. These findings suggest that LRRK2 levels are more important than kinase activity per se in predicting toxicity and implicate synuclein as a major mediator of LRRK2-induced neurodegeneration.

  15. Renal Oxidative Stress Induced by Long-Term Hyperuricemia Alters Mitochondrial Function and Maintains Systemic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cristóbal-García, Magdalena; García-Arroyo, Fernando E.; Arellano-Buendía, Abraham S.; Madero, Magdalena; Rodríguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Zazueta, Cecilia; Johnson, Richard J.; Sánchez Lozada, Laura-Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    We addressed if oxidative stress in the renal cortex plays a role in the induction of hypertension and mitochondrial alterations in hyperuricemia. A second objective was to evaluate whether the long-term treatment with the antioxidant Tempol prevents renal oxidative stress, mitochondrial alterations, and systemic hypertension in this model. Long-term (11-12 weeks) and short-term (3 weeks) effects of oxonic acid induced hyperuricemia were studied in rats (OA, 750 mg/kg BW), OA+Allopurinol (AP, 150 mg/L drinking water), OA+Tempol (T, 15 mg/kg BW), or vehicle. Systolic blood pressure, renal blood flow, and vascular resistance were measured. Tubular damage (urine N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase) and oxidative stress markers (lipid and protein oxidation) along with ATP levels were determined in kidney tissue. Oxygen consumption, aconitase activity, and uric acid were evaluated in isolated mitochondria from renal cortex. Short-term hyperuricemia resulted in hypertension without demonstrable renal oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction. Long-term hyperuricemia induced hypertension, renal vasoconstriction, tubular damage, renal cortex oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction and decreased ATP levels. Treatments with Tempol and allopurinol prevented these alterations. Renal oxidative stress induced by hyperuricemia promoted mitochondrial functional disturbances and decreased ATP content, which represent an additional pathogenic mechanism induced by chronic hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia-related hypertension occurs before these changes are evident. PMID:25918583

  16. Renal oxidative stress induced by long-term hyperuricemia alters mitochondrial function and maintains systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cristóbal-García, Magdalena; García-Arroyo, Fernando E; Tapia, Edilia; Osorio, Horacio; Arellano-Buendía, Abraham S; Madero, Magdalena; Rodríguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Correa, Francisco; Zazueta, Cecilia; Johnson, Richard J; Lozada, Laura-Gabriela Sánchez

    2015-01-01

    We addressed if oxidative stress in the renal cortex plays a role in the induction of hypertension and mitochondrial alterations in hyperuricemia. A second objective was to evaluate whether the long-term treatment with the antioxidant Tempol prevents renal oxidative stress, mitochondrial alterations, and systemic hypertension in this model. Long-term (11-12 weeks) and short-term (3 weeks) effects of oxonic acid induced hyperuricemia were studied in rats (OA, 750 mg/kg BW), OA+Allopurinol (AP, 150 mg/L drinking water), OA+Tempol (T, 15 mg/kg BW), or vehicle. Systolic blood pressure, renal blood flow, and vascular resistance were measured. Tubular damage (urine N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase) and oxidative stress markers (lipid and protein oxidation) along with ATP levels were determined in kidney tissue. Oxygen consumption, aconitase activity, and uric acid were evaluated in isolated mitochondria from renal cortex. Short-term hyperuricemia resulted in hypertension without demonstrable renal oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction. Long-term hyperuricemia induced hypertension, renal vasoconstriction, tubular damage, renal cortex oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction and decreased ATP levels. Treatments with Tempol and allopurinol prevented these alterations. Renal oxidative stress induced by hyperuricemia promoted mitochondrial functional disturbances and decreased ATP content, which represent an additional pathogenic mechanism induced by chronic hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia-related hypertension occurs before these changes are evident.

  17. Alteration of liver glycopatterns during cirrhosis and tumor progression induced by HBV.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yannan; Zhong, Yaogang; Ma, Tianran; Wu, Fei; Wu, Haoxiang; Yu, Hanjie; Huang, Chen; Li, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is closely correlated with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-induced liver cirrhosis. Structural changes in the glycans of serum and tissue proteins are reliable indicators of liver damage. However, little is known about the alteration of liver glycopatterns during cirrhosis and tumor progression induced by HBV infection. This study compared the differential expression of liver glycopatterns in 7 sets of normal pericarcinomatous tissues (PCTs), cirrhotic, and tumor tissues from patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC induced by HBV using lectin microarrays. Fluorescence-based lectin histochemistry and lectin blotting were further utilized to validate and assess the expression and distribution of certain glycans in 9 sets of corresponding liver tissue sections. Eight lectins (e.g., Jacalin and AAL) revealed significant difference in cirrhotic tissues versus PCTs. Eleven lectins (e.g., EEL and SJA) showed significant alteration during cirrhotic and tumor progression. The expression of Galα1-3(Fucα1-2)Gal (EEL) and fucosyltransferase 1 was mainly increasing in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes during PCTs-cirrhotic-tumor tissues progression, while the expression of T antigen (ACA and PNA) was decreased sharply in cytoplasm of tumor hepatocytes. Understanding the precision alteration of liver glycopatterns related to the development of hepatitis, cirrhosis, and tumor induced by HBV infection may help elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of chronic liver diseases and develop new antineoplastic therapeutic strategies. PMID:26833199

  18. Pioglitazone in adult rats reverses immediate postnatal overfeeding-induced metabolic, hormonal, and inflammatory alterations.

    PubMed

    Boullu-Ciocca, S; Tassistro, V; Dutour, A; Grino, M

    2015-12-01

    Immediate postnatal overfeeding in rats, obtained by reducing the litter size, results in early-onset obesity. Such experimental paradigm programs overweight, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, increased adipose glucocorticoid metabolism [up-regulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1)], and overexpression of proinflammatory cytokines in mesenteric adipose tissue (MAT) in adulthood. We studied the effects of pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, treatment on the above-mentioned overfeeding-induced alterations. Nine-month-old rats normofed or overfed during the immediate postnatal period were given pioglitazone (3 mg/kg/day) for 6 weeks. Pioglitazone stimulated weight gain and induced a redistribution of adipose tissue toward epididymal location with enhanced plasma adiponectin. Treatment normalized postnatal overfeeding-induced metabolic alterations (increased fasting insulinemia and free fatty acids) and mesenteric overexpression of GR, 11β-HSD11, CD 68, and proinflammatory cytokines mRNAs, including plasminogen-activator inhibitor type 1. Mesenteric GR mRNA levels correlated positively with mesenteric proinflammatory cytokines mRNA concentrations. In vitro incubation of MAT obtained from overfed rats demonstrated that pioglitazone induced a down-regulation of GR gene expression and normalized glucocorticoid-induced stimulation of 11β-HSD1 and plasminogen-activator inhibitor type 1 mRNAs. Our data show for the first time that the metabolic, endocrine, and inflammatory alterations induced by early-onset postnatal obesity can be reversed by pioglitazone at the adulthood. They demonstrate that pioglitazone, in addition to its well-established effect on adipose tissue redistribution and adiponectin secretion, reverses programing-induced adipose GR, 11β-HSD1, and proinflammatory cytokines overexpression, possibly through a GR-dependent mechanism. PMID:26084260

  19. Phenobarbital Induces Alterations in the Proteome of Hepatocytes and Mesenchymal Cells of Rat Livers

    PubMed Central

    Klepeisz, Philip; Sagmeister, Sandra; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Pichlbauer, Melanie; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Gerner, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Preceding studies on the mode of action of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGCs) have concentrated on alterations induced in hepatocytes (HCs). A potential role of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs) in NGC-driven hepatocarcinogenesis has been largely neglected so far. The aim of this study is to characterize NGC-induced alterations in the proteome profiles of HCs as well as NPCs. We chose the prototypic NGC phenobarbital (PB) which was applied to male rats for a period of 14 days. The livers of PB-treated rats were perfused by collagenase and the cell suspensions obtained were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to separate HCs from NPCs. In addition, HCs and NPC isolated from untreated animals were treated with PB in vitro. Proteome profiling was done by CHIP-HPLC and ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteome analyses of the in vivo experiments showed many of the PB effects previously described in HCs by other methods, e.g. induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolising enzymes. In NPCs proteins related to inflammation and immune regulation such as PAI-1 and S100-A10, ADP-ribosyl cyclase 1 and to cell migration such as kinesin-1 heavy chain, myosin regulatory light chain RLC-A and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 1 were found to be induced, indicating major PB effects on these cells. Remarkably, in vitro treatment of HCs and NPCs with PB hardly reproduced the proteome alterations observed in vivo, indicating differences of NGC induced responses of cells at culture conditions compared to the intact organism. To conclude, the present study clearly demonstrated that PB induces proteome alterations not only in HCs but also in NPCs. Thus, any profound molecular understanding on the mode of action of NGCs has to consider effects on cells of the hepatic mesenchyme. PMID:24204595

  20. Phenobarbital induces alterations in the proteome of hepatocytes and mesenchymal cells of rat livers.

    PubMed

    Klepeisz, Philip; Sagmeister, Sandra; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Pichlbauer, Melanie; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Gerner, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Preceding studies on the mode of action of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGCs) have concentrated on alterations induced in hepatocytes (HCs). A potential role of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs) in NGC-driven hepatocarcinogenesis has been largely neglected so far. The aim of this study is to characterize NGC-induced alterations in the proteome profiles of HCs as well as NPCs. We chose the prototypic NGC phenobarbital (PB) which was applied to male rats for a period of 14 days. The livers of PB-treated rats were perfused by collagenase and the cell suspensions obtained were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to separate HCs from NPCs. In addition, HCs and NPC isolated from untreated animals were treated with PB in vitro. Proteome profiling was done by CHIP-HPLC and ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteome analyses of the in vivo experiments showed many of the PB effects previously described in HCs by other methods, e.g. induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolising enzymes. In NPCs proteins related to inflammation and immune regulation such as PAI-1 and S100-A10, ADP-ribosyl cyclase 1 and to cell migration such as kinesin-1 heavy chain, myosin regulatory light chain RLC-A and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 1 were found to be induced, indicating major PB effects on these cells. Remarkably, in vitro treatment of HCs and NPCs with PB hardly reproduced the proteome alterations observed in vivo, indicating differences of NGC induced responses of cells at culture conditions compared to the intact organism. To conclude, the present study clearly demonstrated that PB induces proteome alterations not only in HCs but also in NPCs. Thus, any profound molecular understanding on the mode of action of NGCs has to consider effects on cells of the hepatic mesenchyme.

  1. Prenatal caffeine ingestion induces transgenerational neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in second generation rats

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Hanwen; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Lian; Shen, Lang; Kou, Hao; He, Zheng; Ping, Jie; Xu, Dan; Ma, Lu; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that prenatal caffeine ingestion induces an increased susceptibility to metabolic syndrome with alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic phenotypes in adult first generation (F1) of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rats, and the underlying mechanism is originated from a hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in utero. This study aims to investigate the transgenerational effects of this programming alteration in adult second generation (F2). Pregnant Wistar rats were administered with caffeine (120 mg/kg·d) from gestational day 11 until delivery. Four groups in F2 were set according to the cross-mating between control and caffeine-induced IUGR rats. F2 were subjected to a fortnight ice water swimming stimulus on postnatal month 4, and blood samples were collected before and after stress. Results showed that the majority of the activities of HPA axis and phenotypes of glucose and lipid metabolism were altered in F2. Particularly, comparing with the control group, caffeine groups had an enhanced corticosterone levels after chronic stress. Compared with before stress, the serum glucose levels were increased in some groups whereas the triglyceride levels were decreased. Furthermore, total cholesterol gain rates were enhanced but the high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol gain rates were decreased in most caffeine groups after stress. These transgenerational effects were characterized partially with gender and parental differences. Taken together, these results indicate that the reproductive and developmental toxicities and the neuroendocrine metabolic programming mechanism by prenatal caffeine ingestion have transgenerational effects in rats, which may help to explain the susceptibility to metabolic syndrome and associated diseases in F2. - Highlights: • Caffeine-induced neuroendocrine metabolic programming of HPA has hereditary effect. • Caffeine-induced

  2. Microcystin-LR and Cylindrospermopsin Induced Alterations in Chromatin Organization of Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Máthé, Csaba; M-Hamvas, Márta; Vasas, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce metabolites with diverse bioactivities, structures and pharmacological properties. The effects of microcystins (MCYs), a family of peptide type protein-phosphatase inhibitors and cylindrospermopsin (CYN), an alkaloid type of protein synthesis blocker will be discussed in this review. We are focusing mainly on cyanotoxin-induced changes of chromatin organization and their possible cellular mechanisms. The particularities of plant cells explain the importance of such studies. Preprophase bands (PPBs) are premitotic cytoskeletal structures important in the determination of plant cell division plane. Phragmoplasts are cytoskeletal structures involved in plant cytokinesis. Both cyanotoxins induce the formation of multipolar spindles and disrupted phragmoplasts, leading to abnormal sister chromatid segregation during mitosis. Thus, MCY and CYN are probably inducing alterations of chromosome number. MCY induces programmed cell death: chromatin condensation, nucleus fragmentation, necrosis, alterations of nuclease and protease enzyme activities and patterns. The above effects may be related to elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or disfunctioning of microtubule associated proteins. Specific effects: MCY-LR induces histone H3 hyperphosphorylation leading to incomplete chromatid segregation and the formation of micronuclei. CYN induces the formation of split or double PPB directly related to protein synthesis inhibition. Cyanotoxins are powerful tools in the study of plant cell organization. PMID:24084787

  3. Curcumin Attenuates Gentamicin-Induced Kidney Mitochondrial Alterations: Possible Role of a Mitochondrial Biogenesis Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Negrette-Guzmán, Mario; García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Tapia, Edilia; Zazueta, Cecilia; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Aparicio-Trejo, Omar Emiliano; Madero, Magdalena; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that curcumin (CUR), a polyphenol derived from Curcuma longa, exerts a protective effect against gentamicin- (GM-) induced nephrotoxicity in rats, associated with a preservation of the antioxidant status. Although mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark in the GM-induced renal injury, the role of CUR in mitochondrial protection has not been studied. In this work, LLC-PK1 cells were preincubated 24 h with CUR and then coincubated 48 h with CUR and 8 mM GM. Treatment with CUR attenuated GM-induced drop in cell viability and led to an increase in nuclear factor (erythroid-2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear accumulation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) cell expression attenuating GM-induced losses in these proteins. In vivo, Wistar rats were injected subcutaneously with GM (75 mg/Kg/12 h) during 7 days to develop kidney mitochondrial alterations. CUR (400 mg/Kg/day) was administered orally 5 days before and during the GM exposure. The GM-induced mitochondrial alterations in ultrastructure and bioenergetics as well as decrease in activities of respiratory complexes I and IV and induction of calcium-dependent permeability transition were mostly attenuated by CUR. Protection of CUR against GM-induced nephrotoxicity could be in part mediated by maintenance of mitochondrial functions and biogenesis with some participation of the nuclear factor Nrf2. PMID:26345660

  4. α-synuclein phosphorylation and truncation are normal events in the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Muntané, G; Ferrer, I; Martinez-Vicente, M

    2012-01-01

    α-synuclein is a key protein in Lewy body diseases (LBDs) and a major component of Lewy bodies and related aberrant cytoplasmic and neuritic inclusions. Regional differences in α-synuclein have been associated with selective neuronal vulnerability to Lewy pathology. Furthermore, phosphorylation at serine 129 (Ser129) and α-synuclein truncation have been considered crucial in the pathogenesis of Lewy inclusions. The present study shows consistent reduction in α-synuclein protein expression levels in the human substantia nigra and nucleus basalis of Meynert compared with other brain regions independently of age and pathology. Phosphorylated α-synuclein at Ser129 is naturally increased in these same regions, thus inversely related with the total amount of α-synuclein. In contrast, truncated α-synuclein is naturally observed in control and diseased brains and correlating with the total amount of α-synuclein. Several truncated variants have been identified where some of these variants are truncated at the C-terminal domain, whereas others are truncated at the N-terminal domain, and all are present in cases with and without Lewy pathology. Although accumulation of truncated α-synuclein variants and phosphorylated α-synuclein occurs in Lewy bodies, α-synuclein phosphorylation and truncation can be considered constitutive in control and diseased brains.

  5. Carbosilane dendrimers affect the fibrillation of α-synuclein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milowska, Katarzyna; Gomez-Ramirez, Rafael; de la Mata, Francisco Javier; Gabryelak, Teresa; Bryszewska, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Participation of α-synuclein (ASN) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease is undeniable. This protein is important for functioning of neurons. Conformational changes in ASN and its aggregation result in neurodegeneration. Therefore, the factors preventing aggregation need to be identified. The search for the potential agents preventing fibrillation of proteins in neurodegenerative diseases has also involved polymers such as dendrimers. The aim of this study was to examine the role of carbosilane dendrimers (CBS) in α-synuclein fibrillation process and to assess the structural changes in α-synuclein under the influence of dendrimers. ASN interactions with carbosilane dendrimers were examined by measuring the zeta potential. The fibrillation and structural changes were examined using CD spectroscopy. The results obtained in this study suggest that carbosilane dendrimers can be potential inhibitors of ASN fibril formation. The fact that dendrimers can prevent ASN fibrillation in suspension is important for further research because it may lead to the design of effective pharmacological strategies.

  6. Structural and functional characterization of two alpha-synuclein strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousset, Luc; Pieri, Laura; Ruiz-Arlandis, Gemma; Gath, Julia; Jensen, Poul Henning; Habenstein, Birgit; Madiona, Karine; Olieric, Vincent; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H.; Melki, Ronald

    2013-10-01

    α-synuclein aggregation is implicated in a variety of diseases including Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, pure autonomic failure and multiple system atrophy. The association of protein aggregates made of a single protein with a variety of clinical phenotypes has been explained for prion diseases by the existence of different strains that propagate through the infection pathway. Here we structurally and functionally characterize two polymorphs of α-synuclein. We present evidence that the two forms indeed fulfil the molecular criteria to be identified as two strains of α-synuclein. Specifically, we show that the two strains have different structures, levels of toxicity, and in vitro and in vivo seeding and propagation properties. Such strain differences may account for differences in disease progression in different individuals/cell types and/or types of synucleinopathies.

  7. DNA demethylation caused by 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine induces mitotic alterations and aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Lentini, Laura; Cilluffo, Danilo; Di Leonardo, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy, the unbalanced number of chromosomes in a cell, is considered a prevalent form of genetic instability and is largely acknowledged as a condition implicated in tumorigenesis. Epigenetic alterations like DNA hypomethylation have been correlated with cancer initiation/progression. Furthermore, a growing body of evidence suggests the involvement of epigenome-wide disruption as a cause of global DNA hypomethylation in aneuploidy generation. Here, we report that the DNA hypomethylating drug 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC), affects the correct ploidy of nearly diploid HCT-116 human cells by altering the methylation pattern of the chromosomes. Specifically, we show that a DAC-induced reduction of 5-Methyl Cytosine at the pericentromeric region of chromosomes correlates with aneuploidy and mitotic defects. Our results suggest that DNA hypomethylation leads to aneuploidy by altering the DNA methylation landscape at the centromere that is necessary to ensure proper chromosomes segregation by recruiting the proteins necessary to build up a functional kinetochore. PMID:26771138

  8. Activation of MyD88-dependent TLR1/2 signaling by misfolded α-synuclein, a protein linked to neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Daniele, Stefano G.; Béraud, Dawn; Davenport, Connor; Cheng, Kui; Yin, Hang; Maguire-Zeiss, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Synucleinopathies, such as Parkinson’s disease and diffuse Lewy body disease, are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by selective neuronal death, abnormal accumulation of misfolded α-synuclein, and sustained microglial activation. In addition to inducing neuronal toxicity, higher-ordered oligomeric α-synuclein causes proinflammatory responses in the brain parenchyma by triggering microglial activation, which may exacerbate pathogenic processes by establishing a chronic neuroinflammatory milieu. Here, we found that higher-ordered oligomeric α-synuclein induced a proinflammatory microglial phenotype by directly engaging the heterodimer TLR1/2 (Toll-like receptor 1 and 2) at the cell membrane, leading to the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) and the increased production of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β in a MyD88-dependent manner. Blocking signaling by the TLR1/2 heterodimer with the small molecule inhibitor, CU-CPT22, reduced the expression and secretion of these inflammatory cytokines from cultured primary mouse microglia. Candesartan cilexetil, a drug approved for treating hypertension and that inhibits the expression of TLR2, reversed the activated proinflammatory phenotype of primary microglia exposed to oligomeric α-synuclein, supporting the possibility of repurposing this drug for synucleinopathies. PMID:25969543

  9. Glucocerebrosidase depletion enhances cell-to-cell transmission of α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eun-Jin; Yang, Na-Young; Song, Miyoung; Lee, Cheol Soon; Lee, Jun Sung; Jung, Byung Chul; Lee, He-Jin; Kim, Seokjoong; Masliah, Eliezer; Sardi, Sergio Pablo; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2014-01-01

    Deposition of α-synuclein aggregates occurs widely in the central and peripheral nervous systems in Parkinson's disease (PD). Although recent evidence has suggested that cell-to-cell transmission of α-synuclein aggregates is associated with the progression of PD, the mechanism by which α-synuclein aggregates spread remains undefined. Here, we show that α-synuclein aggregates are transmitted from cell to cell through a cycle involving uptake of external aggregates, co-aggregation with endogenous α-synuclein and exocytosis of the co-aggregates. Moreover, we find that glucocerebrosidase depletion, which has previously been strongly associated with PD and increased cognitive impairment, promotes propagation of α-synuclein aggregates. These studies define how α-synuclein aggregates spread among neuronal cells and may provide an explanation for how glucocerebrosidase mutations increase the risk of developing PD and other synucleinopathies. PMID:25156829

  10. IL-4 Inhibits IL-1β-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior and Central Neurotransmitter Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Shim, Hyun-Soo; An, Kyungeh; Starkweather, Angela; Kim, Kyung Soo; Shim, Insop

    2015-01-01

    It has been known that activation of the central innate immune system or exposure to stress can disrupt balance of anti-/proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the modulation of depressive-like behaviors, the hormonal and neurotransmitter systems in rats. We investigated whether centrally administered IL-1β is associated with activation of CNS inflammatory pathways and behavioral changes and whether treatment with IL-4 could modulate IL-1β-induced depressive-like behaviors and central neurotransmitter systems. Infusion of IL-4 significantly decreased IL-1β-induced anhedonic responses and increased social exploration and total activity. Treatment with IL-4 markedly blocked IL-1β-induced increase in PGE2 and CORT levels. Also, IL-4 reduced IL-1β-induced 5-HT levels by inhibiting tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) mRNA and activating serotonin transporter (SERT) in the hippocampus, and levels of NE were increased by activating tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that IL-4 may locally contribute to the regulation of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurotransmission and may inhibit IL-1β-induced behavioral and immunological changes. The present results suggest that IL-4 modulates IL-1β-induced depressive behavior by inhibiting IL-1β-induced central glial activation and neurotransmitter alterations. IL-4 reduced central and systemic mediatory inflammatory activation, as well as reversing the IL-1β-induced alterations in neurotransmitter levels. The present findings contribute a biochemical pathway regulated by IL-4 that may have therapeutic utility for treatment of IL-1β-induced depressive behavior and neuroinflammation which warrants further study. PMID:26417153

  11. IL-4 Inhibits IL-1β-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior and Central Neurotransmitter Alterations.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Shim, Hyun-Soo; An, Kyungeh; Starkweather, Angela; Kim, Kyung Soo; Shim, Insop

    2015-01-01

    It has been known that activation of the central innate immune system or exposure to stress can disrupt balance of anti-/proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the modulation of depressive-like behaviors, the hormonal and neurotransmitter systems in rats. We investigated whether centrally administered IL-1β is associated with activation of CNS inflammatory pathways and behavioral changes and whether treatment with IL-4 could modulate IL-1β-induced depressive-like behaviors and central neurotransmitter systems. Infusion of IL-4 significantly decreased IL-1β-induced anhedonic responses and increased social exploration and total activity. Treatment with IL-4 markedly blocked IL-1β-induced increase in PGE2 and CORT levels. Also, IL-4 reduced IL-1β-induced 5-HT levels by inhibiting tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) mRNA and activating serotonin transporter (SERT) in the hippocampus, and levels of NE were increased by activating tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that IL-4 may locally contribute to the regulation of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurotransmission and may inhibit IL-1β-induced behavioral and immunological changes. The present results suggest that IL-4 modulates IL-1β-induced depressive behavior by inhibiting IL-1β-induced central glial activation and neurotransmitter alterations. IL-4 reduced central and systemic mediatory inflammatory activation, as well as reversing the IL-1β-induced alterations in neurotransmitter levels. The present findings contribute a biochemical pathway regulated by IL-4 that may have therapeutic utility for treatment of IL-1β-induced depressive behavior and neuroinflammation which warrants further study.

  12. [Multiple system atrophy - synuclein and neuronal degeneration].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mari

    2011-11-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a sporadic neurodegenerative disorder that encompasses olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), striatonigral degeneration (SND) and Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS). The histopathological hallmarks are α-synuclein (AS) positive glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) in oligodendroglias. AS aggregation is also found in glial nuclear inclusions (GNIs), neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs), neuronal nuclear inclusions (NNIs) and dystrophic neurties. Reviewing the pathological features of 102 MSA cases, OPCA-type was relatively more frequent and SND-type was less frequent in Japanese MSA cases, which suggested different phenotypic pattern of MSA might exist between races, compared to the relatively high frequency of SND-type in western countries. In early stage of MSA, NNIs, NCIs and diffuse homogenous stain of AS in neuronal nuclei and cytoplasm were observed in various vulnerable lesions including the pontine nuclei, putamen, substantia nigra, locus ceruleus, inferior olivary nucleus, intermediolateral column of thoracic cord, lower motor neurons and cortical pyramidal neurons, in additions to GCIs. These findings indicated that the primary nonfibrillar and fibrillar AS aggregation also occurred in neurons. Therefore both the direct involvement of neurons themselves and the oligodendroglia-myelin-axon mechanism may synergistically accelerate the degenerative process of MSA. PMID:22277386

  13. Synuclein expression in the lizard Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Toni, Mattia; Cioni, Carla; De Angelis, Federica; di Patti, Maria Carmela Bonaccorsi

    2016-08-01

    The synuclein (syn) family comprises three proteins: α-, β- and γ-syns. In humans, they are involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease and in tumors. Members of the syn family were sequenced in representative species of all vertebrates and the comparative analysis of amino acid sequences suggests that syns are evolutionarily conserved, but information about their expression in vertebrate lineages is still scarce and completely lacking in reptiles. In this study, the expression of genes coding for α-, β- and γ-syns was analyzed in the green lizard Anolis carolinensis by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Results demonstrate good expression levels of the three syns in the lizard nervous system, similarly to human syns. This, together with the high identity between lizard and human syns, suggests that these proteins fulfill evolutionarily conserved functions. However, differences between lizard and humans in the expression of syn variants (two different variants of γ-syn were detected in A. carolinensis) and differences in some amino acids in key positions for the regulation of protein conformation and affinity for lipid and metal ions also suggest that these proteins may have acquired different functional specializations in the two lineages. PMID:27393691

  14. Synuclein expression in the lizard Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Toni, Mattia; Cioni, Carla; De Angelis, Federica; di Patti, Maria Carmela Bonaccorsi

    2016-08-01

    The synuclein (syn) family comprises three proteins: α-, β- and γ-syns. In humans, they are involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease and in tumors. Members of the syn family were sequenced in representative species of all vertebrates and the comparative analysis of amino acid sequences suggests that syns are evolutionarily conserved, but information about their expression in vertebrate lineages is still scarce and completely lacking in reptiles. In this study, the expression of genes coding for α-, β- and γ-syns was analyzed in the green lizard Anolis carolinensis by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Results demonstrate good expression levels of the three syns in the lizard nervous system, similarly to human syns. This, together with the high identity between lizard and human syns, suggests that these proteins fulfill evolutionarily conserved functions. However, differences between lizard and humans in the expression of syn variants (two different variants of γ-syn were detected in A. carolinensis) and differences in some amino acids in key positions for the regulation of protein conformation and affinity for lipid and metal ions also suggest that these proteins may have acquired different functional specializations in the two lineages.

  15. Anethole prevents hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and collagen metabolism alterations in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Galicka, Anna; Krętowski, Rafał; Nazaruk, Jolanta; Cechowska-Pasko, Marzanna

    2014-09-01

    The collagen metabolism alterations triggered by reactive oxygen species are involved in the development of various connective tissue diseases and skin aging. This study was designed to examine whether (E)-anethole possesses a protective effect on H2O2-induced alterations in collagen metabolism as well as whether it can prevent apoptosis in human skin fibroblasts. In cells treated with 300 µM H₂O₂, a decrease in collagen biosynthesis of 54% was observed. Pretreatment of cells with 0.5 µM anethole for 1 h completely prevented this alteration. Changes at the protein level positively correlated with alterations of type I collagen mRNA expression. We have shown that H2O2 caused increase in the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 as well as that an increase in MMP-2 activity can contribute to the 8% decrease in the amount of collagen secreted into the medium. The most efficient suppression of these changes was observed in the presence of 0.5 µM of anethole. At 10 µM, in addition to suppression, an inhibitory effect of anethole on MMP-9 activity was documented. Additionally, the 60% H₂O₂-induced decrease in cell viability was suppressed by 1 µM of anethole and a 4-fold increase in cell apoptosis was suppressed by 0.5 µM of anethole. Our results suggest that anethole, which is a small lipophilic and non-toxic molecule with the ability to prevent H₂O₂-induced collagen metabolism alterations and apoptosis in human skin fibroblasts, would prove useful in the development of effective agents in pharmacotherapy of oxidative stress-related skin diseases.

  16. Anthropogenic habitat alteration induces rapid morphological divergence in a native stream fish

    PubMed Central

    Franssen, Nathan R

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic habitat alteration creates novel environments that can alter selection pressures. Construction of reservoirs worldwide has disturbed riverine ecosystems by altering biotic and abiotic environments of impounded streams. Changes to fish communities in impoundments are well documented, but effects of those changes on native species persisting in reservoirs, which are presumably subjected to novel selective pressures, are largely unexplored. I assessed body shape variation of a native stream fish in reservoir habitats and streams from seven reservoir basins in the Central Plains of the USA. Body shape significantly and consistently diverged in reservoirs compared with stream habitats within reservoir basins; individuals from reservoir populations were deeper-bodied and had smaller heads compared with stream populations. Individuals from reservoir habitats also exhibited lower overall shape variation compared with stream individuals. I assessed the contribution of genotypic divergence and predator-induced phenotypic plasticity on body shape variation by rearing offspring from a reservoir and a stream population with or without a piscivorous fish. Significant population-level differences in body shape persisted in offspring, and both populations demonstrated similar predator-induced phenotypic plasticity. My results suggest that, although components of body shape are plastic, anthropogenic habitat modification may drive trait divergence in native fish populations in reservoir-altered habitats. PMID:25568023

  17. Anthropogenic habitat alteration induces rapid morphological divergence in a native stream fish.

    PubMed

    Franssen, Nathan R

    2011-11-01

    Anthropogenic habitat alteration creates novel environments that can alter selection pressures. Construction of reservoirs worldwide has disturbed riverine ecosystems by altering biotic and abiotic environments of impounded streams. Changes to fish communities in impoundments are well documented, but effects of those changes on native species persisting in reservoirs, which are presumably subjected to novel selective pressures, are largely unexplored. I assessed body shape variation of a native stream fish in reservoir habitats and streams from seven reservoir basins in the Central Plains of the USA. Body shape significantly and consistently diverged in reservoirs compared with stream habitats within reservoir basins; individuals from reservoir populations were deeper-bodied and had smaller heads compared with stream populations. Individuals from reservoir habitats also exhibited lower overall shape variation compared with stream individuals. I assessed the contribution of genotypic divergence and predator-induced phenotypic plasticity on body shape variation by rearing offspring from a reservoir and a stream population with or without a piscivorous fish. Significant population-level differences in body shape persisted in offspring, and both populations demonstrated similar predator-induced phenotypic plasticity. My results suggest that, although components of body shape are plastic, anthropogenic habitat modification may drive trait divergence in native fish populations in reservoir-altered habitats.

  18. alpha-Synuclein fission yeast model: concentration-dependent aggregation without plasma membrane localization or toxicity.

    PubMed

    Brandis, Katrina A; Holmes, Isaac F; England, Samantha J; Sharma, Nijee; Kukreja, Lokesh; DebBurman, Shubhik K

    2006-01-01

    Despite fission yeast's history of modeling salient cellular processes, it has not yet been used to model human neurodegeneration-linked protein misfolding. Because alpha-synuclein misfolding and aggregation are linked to Parkinson's disease (PD), here, we report a fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) model that evaluates alpha-synuclein misfolding, aggregation, and toxicity and compare these properties with those recently characterized in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Wild-type alpha-synuclein and three mutants (A30P, A53T, and A30P/A53T) were expressed with thiamine-repressible promoters (using vectors of increasing promoter strength: pNMT81, pNMT41, and pNMT1) to test directly in living cells the nucleation polymerization hypothesis for alpha-synuclein misfolding and aggregation. In support of the hypothesis, wild-type and A53T alpha-synuclein formed prominent intracellular cytoplasmic inclusions within fission yeast cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, whereas A30P and A30P/A53T remained diffuse throughout the cytoplasm. A53T alpha-synuclein formed aggregates faster than wild-type alpha-synuclein and at a lower alpha-synuclein concentration. Unexpectedly, unlike in budding yeast, wild-type and A53T alpha-synuclein did not target to the plasma membrane in fission yeast, not even at low alpha-synuclein concentrations or as a precursor step to forming aggregates. Despite alpha-synuclein's extensive aggregation, it was surprisingly nontoxic to fission yeast. Future genetic dissection might yield molecular insight into this protection against toxicity. We speculate that alpha-synuclein toxicity might be linked to its membrane binding capacity. To conclude, S. pombe and S. cerevisiae model similar yet distinct aspects of alpha-synuclein biology, and both organisms shed insight into alpha-synuclein's role in PD pathogenesis.

  19. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-06-27

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C {r_arrow} A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C {r_arrow} T, two C {r_arrow} A, one C {r_arrow} G, and one A {r_arrow} T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Daytime melatonin infusions induce sleep in pigeons without altering subsequent amounts of nocturnal sleep.

    PubMed

    Mintz, E M; Phillips, N H; Berger, R J

    1998-12-18

    Daily infusions of melatonin restore sleep suppressed by continuous bright light in pigeons. To test whether melatonin could also induce sleep in pigeons on a 12:12 h light-dark cycle (LD), pigeons received 12-h intravenous melatonin infusions during the day. Melatonin induced sleep during the day, increased EEG slow wave activity, and decreased body temperature and locomotor activity. None of these variables were altered during the night following infusions. The induction of extended daytime sleep by melatonin infusions indicates that melatonin is a principal factor in the regulation of sleep in pigeons.

  1. Mannosylated lipoarabinomannan antagonizes Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis by altering Ca+2-dependent cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Rojas, M; García, L F; Nigou, J; Puzo, G; Olivier, M

    2000-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis can be inhibited by mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM), although it induces tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and NO production, which participate in apoptosis induction. ManLAM also modulates Ca(+2)-dependent intracellular events, and Ca(+2) participates in apoptosis in different systems. Ca(+2) was assessed for involvement in M. tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis and for modulation by ManLAM. The role of Ca(+2) was supported by the blockade of apoptosis by cAMP inhibitors and the Ca(+2) chelator, BAPTA/AM. These agents also inhibited caspase-1 activation and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein translocation without affecting TNF-alpha production. Infection of macrophages with M. tuberculosis induced an influx of Ca(+2) that was prevented by ManLAM. Similarly, M. tuberculosis infection-altered mitochondrial permeability transition was prevented by ManLAM and BAPTA/AM. Finally, ManLAM and BAPTA/AM reversed the effects of M. tuberculosis on p53 and Bcl-2 expression. ManLAM counteracts the alterations of calcium-dependent intracellular events that occur during M. tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis.

  2. Retinoic acid metabolism proteins are altered in trichoblastomas induced by mouse papillomavirus 1.

    PubMed

    Everts, Helen B; Suo, Liye; Ghim, Shinge; Bennett Jenson, A; Sundberg, John P

    2015-12-01

    Skin cancer burden is significant as treatment costs have skyrocketed to $8.1 million annually and some forms metastasize, such as cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) and melanoma. cSCC is caused by altered growth factor signaling induced by chemical carcinogens, ultraviolet light (UV) exposure, and infections with papillomaviruses (PVs). One of the few options for preventing cSCC in high-risk patients is oral retinoids. While much is understood about retinoid treatments and metabolism in mouse models of chemically and UV exposure induced cSCC, little is known about the role of retinoids in PV-induced cSCC. To better understand how retinoid metabolism is altered in cSCC, we examined the expression of this pathway in the newly discovered mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV1), which produces trichoblastomas in dorsal skin but not cSCC. We found significant increases in a rate-limiting enzyme involved in retinoic acid synthesis and retinoic acid binding proteins, suggestive of increased RA synthesis, in MmuPV1-induced tumors in B6.Cg-Foxn1(nu)/J mice. Similar increases in these proteins were seen after acute UVB exposure in Crl:SKH1-Hr(hr) mice and in regressing pre-cancerous lesions in a chemically-induced mouse model, suggesting a common mechanism in limiting the progression of papillomas to full blown cSCC. PMID:26416148

  3. Tumor-induced lymph node alterations detected by MRI lymphography using gadolinium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Partridge, S C; Kurland, B F; Liu, C-L; Ho, R J Y; Ruddell, A

    2015-10-26

    Contrast-enhanced MRI lymphography shows potential to identify alterations in lymph drainage through lymph nodes (LNs) in cancer and other diseases. MRI studies have typically used low molecular weight gadolinium contrast agents, however larger gadolinium-loaded nanoparticles possess characteristics that could improve the specificity and sensitivity of lymphography. The performance of three gadolinium contrast agents with different sizes and properties was compared by 3T MRI after subcutaneous injection. Mice bearing B16-F10 melanoma footpad tumors were imaged to assess tumor-induced alterations in lymph drainage through tumor-draining popliteal and inguinal LNs versus contralateral uninvolved drainage. Gadolinium lipid nanoparticles were able to identify tumor-induced alterations in contrast agent drainage into the popliteal LN, while lower molecular weight or albumin-binding gadolinium agents were less effective. All of the contrast agents distributed in foci around the cortex and medulla of tumor-draining popliteal LNs, while they were restricted to the cortex of non-draining LNs. Surprisingly, second-tier tumor-draining inguinal LNs exhibited reduced uptake, indicating that tumors can also divert LN drainage. These characteristics of tumor-induced lymph drainage could be useful for diagnosis of LN pathology in cancer and other diseases. The preferential uptake of nanoparticle contrasts into tumor-draining LNs could also allow selective targeting of therapies to tumor-draining LNs.

  4. Modification of mercury-induced biochemical alterations by Triticum Aestivum Linn in rats.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, B V S; Sudhakar, M; Nireesha, G

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation has been undertaken to evaluate role of Wheat grass extract in modifying mercury-induced biochemical alterations in albino rats. Mercuric chloride 5 mg/kg body weight i.p. was given on 11, 13 & 15th day of the experiment. Wheat grass extract (400 mg/kg) and Quercetin (10 mg/kg) were administered 10 days before mercuric chloride administration and continued up to 30 days after mercuric chloride administration. The animals were sacrificed on 1, 15 and 30 days, the activity of serum alkaline and acid phosphatase and the iron, calcium, BUN, creatinine, SGPT, SGOT, total bilirubin, total protein levels were measured. Tissue lipid peroxidation content, glutathione (GSH) level, anti-oxidant enzymes- CAT and GR were measured. Hematological indices were also estimated. Mercury intoxication causes significant increase (P < 0.001) in calcium level, acid phosphatase, BUN, creatinine, SGOT, SGPT, total bilirubin, lipid peroxidation content and significant decrease in iron level, alkaline phosphatase, total protein, and CAT, GR and glutathione level. Wheat grass extract pre- and post-treatment ameliorated mercury-induced alterations in terms of biochemical and hematological parameters. Concomitant treatment of Wheatgrass extract with Mercury showed prominent recovery and normal architecture with mild residual degeneration in the tissues. Thus from present investigation, it can be concluded that Wheat grass extract pre- and post-treatment with HgCl2 significantly modulate or modify mercury-induced biochemical alteration in albino rats. PMID:26215012

  5. Solid-State NMR Structure of a Pathogenic Fibril of Full-Length Human α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Marcus D.; Comellas, Gemma; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Covell, Dustin J.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Kloepper, Kathryn D.; Courtney, Joseph M.; Kim, Jae K.; Barclay, Alexander M.; Kendall, Amy; Wan, William; Stubbs, Gerald; Schwieters, Charles D.; Lee, Virginia M. Y.; George, Julia M.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded α-synuclein amyloid fibrils are the principal components of Lewy bodies and neurites, hallmarks of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Here we present a high-resolution structure of an α-synuclein fibril, in a form that induces robust pathology in primary neuronal culture, determined by solid-state NMR spectroscopy and validated by electron microscopy and X-ray fiber diffraction. Over 200 unique long-range distance restraints define a consensus structure with common amyloid features including parallel in-register β-sheets and hydrophobic core residues, but also substantial complexity, arising from diverse structural features: an intermolecular salt bridge, a glutamine ladder, close backbone interactions involving small residues, and several steric zippers stabilizing a novel, orthogonal Greek-key topology. These characteristics contribute to the robust propagation of this fibril form, as evidenced by structural similarity of early-onset PD mutants. The structure provides a framework for understanding the interactions of α-synuclein with other proteins and small molecules to diagnose and treat PD. PMID:27018801

  6. An Efficient Procedure for Removal and Inactivation of Alpha-Synuclein Assemblies from Laboratory Materials

    PubMed Central

    Bousset, Luc; Brundin, Patrik; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat; Melki, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Background: Preformed α-synuclein fibrils seed the aggregation of soluble α-synuclein in cultured cells and in vivo. This, and other findings, has kindled the idea that α-synuclein fibrils possess prion-like properties. Objective: As α-synuclein fibrils should not be considered as innocuous, there is a need for decontamination and inactivation procedures for laboratory benches and non-disposable laboratory material. Methods: We assessed the effectiveness of different procedures designed to disassemble α-synuclein fibrils and reduce their infectivity. We examined different commercially available detergents to remove α-synuclein assemblies adsorbed on materials that are not disposable and that are most found in laboratories (e.g. plastic, glass, aluminum or stainless steel surfaces). Results: We show that methods designed to decrease PrP prion infectivity neither effectively remove α-synuclein assemblies adsorbed to different materials commonly used in the laboratory nor disassemble the fibrillar form of the protein with efficiency. In contrast, both commercial detergents and SDS detached α-synuclein assemblies from contaminated surfaces and disassembled the fibrils. Conclusions: We describe three cleaning procedures that effectively remove and disassemble α-synuclein seeds. The methods rely on the use of detergents that are compatible with most non-disposable tools in a laboratory. The procedures are easy to implement and significantly decrease any potential risks associated to handling α-synuclein assemblies. PMID:26639448

  7. Cytoprotective effect of chlorogenic acid against α-synuclein-related toxicity in catecholaminergic PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Teraoka, Mari; Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Kusumoto, Chiaki; Katano, Satoshi; Tajima, Naoko; Yamashita, Atsushi; Zushi, Teppei; Ito, Satoru; Matsura, Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a major neurodegenerative disease involving the selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and α-synuclein containing Lewy bodies formation in the substantia nigra. Although α-synuclein is a key molecule for both dopaminergic neuron death and the formation of inclusion bodies, the mechanism of α-synuclein induction of Parkinson’s disease-related pathogenesis is not understood. In the present study, we found that the interaction between dopamine and α-synuclein requires the oxidation of dopamine. Furthermore, we examined the protective effect of chlorogenic acid, a major polyphenol contained in coffee, against α-syn and dopamine-related toxicity. Chlorogenic acid inhibits several DA/α-synuclein-related phenomenon, including the oxidation of dopamine, the interaction of oxidized dopamine with α-synuclein, and the oligomerization of α-synuclein under dopamine existing conditions in vitro. Finally, we showed that the cytoprotective effect against α-synuclein-related toxicity in PC12 cells that can be controlled by the Tet-Off system. Although the induction of α-synuclein in catecholaminergic PC12 cells causes a decrease in cell viability, chlorogenic acid rescued this cytotoxicity significantly in a dose dependent manner. These results suggest that the interaction of oxidized DA with α-synuclein may be a novel therapeutic target for Parkinson’s disease, and polyphenols, including chlorogenic acid, are candidates as protective and preventive agents for Parkinson’s disease onset. PMID:22962530

  8. Plasma exosomal α-synuclein is likely CNS-derived and increased in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Liu, Changqin; Cook, Travis J; Bullock, Kristin M; Zhao, Yanchun; Ginghina, Carmen; Li, Yanfei; Aro, Patrick; Dator, Romel; He, Chunmei; Hipp, Michael J; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Peskind, Elaine R; Hu, Shu-Ching; Quinn, Joseph F; Galasko, Douglas R; Banks, William A; Zhang, Jing

    2014-11-01

    Extracellular α-synuclein is important in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and also as a potential biomarker when tested in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The performance of blood plasma or serum α-synuclein as a biomarker has been found to be inconsistent and generally ineffective, largely due to the contribution of peripherally derived α-synuclein. In this study, we discovered, via an intracerebroventricular injection of radiolabeled α-synuclein into mouse brain, that CSF α-synuclein was readily transported to blood, with a small portion being contained in exosomes that are relatively specific to the central nervous system (CNS). Consequently, we developed a technique to evaluate the levels of α-synuclein in these exosomes in individual plasma samples. When applied to a large cohort of clinical samples (267 PD, 215 controls), we found that in contrast to CSF α-synuclein concentrations, which are consistently reported to be lower in PD patients compared to controls, the levels of plasma exosomal α-synuclein were substantially higher in PD patients, suggesting an increased efflux of the protein to the peripheral blood of these patients. Furthermore, although no association was observed between plasma exosomal and CSF α-synuclein, a significant correlation between plasma exosomal α-synuclein and disease severity (r = 0.176, p = 0.004) was observed, and the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity achieved by plasma exosomal α-synuclein were comparable to those determined by CSF α-synuclein. Further studies are clearly needed to elucidate the mechanism involved in the transport of CNS α-synuclein to the periphery, which may lead to a more convenient and robust assessment of PD clinically. PMID:24997849

  9. Cross-Species Analysis of Nicotine-Induced Proteomic Alterations in Pancreatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; Urrutia, Raul; Kadiyala, Vivek; Banks, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Toxic compounds in tobacco, such as nicotine, may have adversely affect pancreatic function. We aim to determine nicotine-induced protein alterations in pancreatic cells, which may reveal a link between nicotine exposure and pancreatic disease. Methods We compared the proteomic alterations induced by nicotine treatment in cultured pancreatic cells (mouse, rat and human stellate cells and human duct cells) using mass spectrometry-based techniques, specifically GeLC-MS/MS and spectral counting. Results We identified thousands of proteins in pancreatic cells, hundreds of which were identified exclusively or in higher abundance in either nicotine-treated or untreated cells. Inter-species comparisons of stellate cell proteins revealed several differentially-abundant proteins (in nicotine treated versus untreated cells) common among the 3 species. Proteins appearing in all nicotine-treated stellate cells include amyloid beta (A4), procollagen type VI alpha 1, integral membrane protein 2B,and Toll interacting protein. Conclusions Proteins which were differentially expressed upon nicotine treatment across cell lines, were enriched in certain pathways, including nAChR, cytokine, and integrin signaling. At this analytical depth, we conclude that similar pathways are affected by nicotine, but alterations at the protein level among stellate cells of different species vary. Further interrogation of such pathways will lead to insights into the potential effect of nicotine on pancreatic cells at the biomolecular level and the extension of this concept to the effect of nicotine on pancreatic disease. PMID:23456891

  10. Epilepsy-induced electrocardiographic alterations following cardiac ischemia and reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Tavares, J G P; Vasques, E R; Arida, R M; Cavalheiro, E A; Cabral, F R; Torres, L B; Menezes-Rodrigues, F S; Jurkiewicz, A; Caricati-Neto, A; Godoy, C M G; Gomes da Silva, S

    2015-02-01

    The present study evaluated electrocardiographic alterations in rats with epilepsy submitted to an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model induced by cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. Rats were randomly divided into two groups: control (n=12) and epilepsy (n=14). It was found that rats with epilepsy presented a significant reduction in atrioventricular block incidence following the ischemia and reperfusion procedure. In addition, significant alterations were observed in electrocardiogram intervals during the stabilization, ischemia, and reperfusion periods of rats with epilepsy compared to control rats. It was noted that rats with epilepsy presented a significant increase in the QRS interval during the stabilization period in relation to control rats (P<0.01). During the ischemia period, there was an increase in the QRS interval (P<0.05) and a reduction in the P wave and QT intervals (P<0.05 for both) in rats with epilepsy compared to control rats. During the reperfusion period, a significant reduction in the QT interval (P<0.01) was verified in the epilepsy group in relation to the control group. Our results indicate that rats submitted to an epilepsy model induced by pilocarpine presented electrical conductivity alterations of cardiac tissue, mainly during an AMI episode.

  11. Genetic and epigenetic alterations induced by different levels of rye genome integration in wheat recipient.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X L; Zhou, J P; Zang, L L; Tang, A T; Liu, D Q; Deng, K J; Zhang, Y

    2016-06-17

    The narrow genetic variation present in common wheat (Triticum aestivum) varieties has greatly restricted the improvement of crop yield in modern breeding systems. Alien addition lines have proven to be an effective means to broaden the genetic diversity of common wheat. Wheat-rye addition lines, which are the direct bridge materials for wheat improvement, have been wildly used to produce new wheat cultivars carrying alien rye germplasm. In this study, we investigated the genetic and epigenetic alterations in two sets of wheat-rye disomic addition lines (1R-7R) and the corresponding triticales. We used expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat, amplified fragment length polymorphism, and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analyses to analyze the effects of the introduction of alien chromosomes (either the entire genome or sub-genome) to wheat genetic background. We found obvious and diversiform variations in the genomic primary structure, as well as alterations in the extent and pattern of the genomic DNA methylation of the recipient. Meanwhile, these results also showed that introduction of different rye chromosomes could induce different genetic and epigenetic alterations in its recipient, and the genetic background of the parents is an important factor for genomic and epigenetic variation induced by alien chromosome addition.

  12. Epilepsy-induced electrocardiographic alterations following cardiac ischemia and reperfusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, J.G.P.; Vasques, E.R.; Arida, R.M.; Cavalheiro, E.A.; Cabral, F.R.; Torres, L.B.; Menezes-Rodrigues, F.S.; Jurkiewicz, A.; Caricati-Neto, A.; Godoy, C.M.G.; Gomes da Silva, S.

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated electrocardiographic alterations in rats with epilepsy submitted to an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model induced by cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. Rats were randomly divided into two groups: control (n=12) and epilepsy (n=14). It was found that rats with epilepsy presented a significant reduction in atrioventricular block incidence following the ischemia and reperfusion procedure. In addition, significant alterations were observed in electrocardiogram intervals during the stabilization, ischemia, and reperfusion periods of rats with epilepsy compared to control rats. It was noted that rats with epilepsy presented a significant increase in the QRS interval during the stabilization period in relation to control rats (P<0.01). During the ischemia period, there was an increase in the QRS interval (P<0.05) and a reduction in the P wave and QT intervals (P<0.05 for both) in rats with epilepsy compared to control rats. During the reperfusion period, a significant reduction in the QT interval (P<0.01) was verified in the epilepsy group in relation to the control group. Our results indicate that rats submitted to an epilepsy model induced by pilocarpine presented electrical conductivity alterations of cardiac tissue, mainly during an AMI episode. PMID:25590352

  13. Alterations in left ventricular diastolic function in conscious dogs with pacing-induced heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Komamura, K; Shannon, R P; Pasipoularides, A; Ihara, T; Lader, A S; Patrick, T A; Bishop, S P; Vatner, S F

    1992-01-01

    We investigated in conscious dogs (a) the effects of heart failure induced by chronic rapid ventricular pacing on the sequence of development of left ventricular (LV) diastolic versus systolic dysfunction and (b) whether the changes were load dependent or secondary to alterations in structure. LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction were evident within 24 h after initiation of pacing and occurred in parallel over 3 wk. LV systolic function was reduced at 3 wk, i.e., peak LV dP/dt fell by -1,327 +/- 105 mmHg/s and ejection fraction by -22 +/- 2%. LV diastolic dysfunction also progressed over 3 wk of pacing, i.e., tau increased by +14.0 +/- 2.8 ms and the myocardial stiffness constant by +6.5 +/- 1.4, whereas LV chamber stiffness did not change. These alterations were associated with increases in LV end-systolic (+28.6 +/- 5.7 g/cm2) and LV end-diastolic stresses (+40.4 +/- 5.3 g/cm2). When stresses and heart rate were matched at the same levels in the control and failure states, the increases in tau and myocardial stiffness were no longer observed, whereas LV systolic function remained depressed. There were no increases in connective tissue content in heart failure. Thus, pacing-induced heart failure in conscious dogs is characterized by major alterations in diastolic function which are reversible with normalization of increased loading condition. Images PMID:1601992

  14. Neuronal and microvascular alterations induced by the cholinergic toxin AF64A in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ramos, P; Galea, E; Estrada, C

    1990-06-18

    The choline analogue ethylcholine mustard aziridinium ion (AF64A) produces both neuronal and non-neuronal alterations in the rat retina. The possible involvement of the retinal capillaries in the origin of the apparently non-specific lesions has been investigated. Two hours after a single intraocular injection of 5 nmol AF64A, ultrastructural alterations were observed in neurons of the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer, where cholinergic cells are located. One week later, the number of cholinergic neurons, identified by choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry, was decreased to 65% of control, the neurons located in the inner nuclear layer being more sensitive than those in the ganglion cell layer. The same dose of AF64A also induced ultrastructural changes in retinal capillaries, which showed a significant increase in the number of pinocytotic vesicles and microvilli in the endothelial cells, 2-5 h after the toxin administration. One day later, arterioles and capillaries presented contracted profiles and the lumen was occasionally lost. The sensitivity of endothelial cells to the toxic effects of AF64A may be explained by the presence in the cerebral endothelium of a choline transport mechanism with an affinity close to that of cerebral synaptosomes. In vitro, both neuronal and endothelial choline uptake systems were equally sensitive to the toxin inhibitory effect. The early and severe vascular alterations induced in the retinal microvessels by AF64A may produce changes in blood perfusion and capillary permeability that could account for the apparently non-specific histological damage.

  15. Regional alterations of type I collagen in rat tibia induced by skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiiba, Masashi; Arnaud, Sara B.; Tanzawa, Hideki; Kitamura, Eiji; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of mineral density in weight-bearing bones that leads to inferior bone mechanical strength. This appears to be caused by a failure of bone formation; however, its mechanisms still are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize collagen, the predominant matrix protein in bone, in various regions of tibia of rats that were subjected to skeletal unloading by 4 weeks tail suspension. Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (4 months old) were divided into tail suspension and ambulatory controls (eight rats each). After the tail suspension, tibias from each animal were collected and divided into five regions and collagen was analyzed. The collagen cross-linking and the extent of lysine (Lys) hydroxylation in unloaded bones were significantly altered in proximal epiphysis, diaphysis, and, in particular, proximal metaphysis but not in distal regions. The pool of immature/nonmineralized collagen measured by its extractability with a chaotropic solvent was significantly increased in proximal metaphysis. These results suggest that skeletal unloading induced an accumulation of post-translationally altered nonmineralized collagen and that these changes are bone region specific. These alterations might be caused by impaired osteoblastic function/differentiation resulting in a mineralization defect.

  16. Alterations in left ventricular diastolic function in conscious dogs with pacing-induced heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komamura, K.; Shannon, R. P.; Pasipoularides, A.; Ihara, T.; Lader, A. S.; Patrick, T. A.; Bishop, S. P.; Vatner, S. F.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated in conscious dogs (a) the effects of heart failure induced by chronic rapid ventricular pacing on the sequence of development of left ventricular (LV) diastolic versus systolic dysfunction and (b) whether the changes were load dependent or secondary to alterations in structure. LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction were evident within 24 h after initiation of pacing and occurred in parallel over 3 wk. LV systolic function was reduced at 3 wk, i.e., peak LV dP/dt fell by -1,327 +/- 105 mmHg/s and ejection fraction by -22 +/- 2%. LV diastolic dysfunction also progressed over 3 wk of pacing, i.e., tau increased by +14.0 +/- 2.8 ms and the myocardial stiffness constant by +6.5 +/- 1.4, whereas LV chamber stiffness did not change. These alterations were associated with increases in LV end-systolic (+28.6 +/- 5.7 g/cm2) and LV end-diastolic stresses (+40.4 +/- 5.3 g/cm2). When stresses and heart rate were matched at the same levels in the control and failure states, the increases in tau and myocardial stiffness were no longer observed, whereas LV systolic function remained depressed. There were no increases in connective tissue content in heart failure. Thus, pacing-induced heart failure in conscious dogs is characterized by major alterations in diastolic function which are reversible with normalization of increased loading condition.

  17. Genetic and epigenetic alterations induced by different levels of rye genome integration in wheat recipient.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X L; Zhou, J P; Zang, L L; Tang, A T; Liu, D Q; Deng, K J; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    The narrow genetic variation present in common wheat (Triticum aestivum) varieties has greatly restricted the improvement of crop yield in modern breeding systems. Alien addition lines have proven to be an effective means to broaden the genetic diversity of common wheat. Wheat-rye addition lines, which are the direct bridge materials for wheat improvement, have been wildly used to produce new wheat cultivars carrying alien rye germplasm. In this study, we investigated the genetic and epigenetic alterations in two sets of wheat-rye disomic addition lines (1R-7R) and the corresponding triticales. We used expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat, amplified fragment length polymorphism, and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analyses to analyze the effects of the introduction of alien chromosomes (either the entire genome or sub-genome) to wheat genetic background. We found obvious and diversiform variations in the genomic primary structure, as well as alterations in the extent and pattern of the genomic DNA methylation of the recipient. Meanwhile, these results also showed that introduction of different rye chromosomes could induce different genetic and epigenetic alterations in its recipient, and the genetic background of the parents is an important factor for genomic and epigenetic variation induced by alien chromosome addition. PMID:27323191

  18. Role of neutrophilic inflammation in ozone-induced epithelial alterations in the nasal airways of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hye Youn

    Ozone is a principal oxidant air pollutant in photochemical smog. Epithelial cells lining the centriacinar region of lung and the proximal aspects of nasal passage are primary target sites for ozone-induced injury in laboratory animals. Acute exposure of rats to high ambient concentrations of ozone (e.g., 0.5 ppm) results in neutrophilic inflammation, epithelial hyperplasia and mucous cell metaplasia (MCM) in the nasal transitional epithelium (NTE) lining the proximal nasal airways. The principal purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of pre-metaplastic cellular responses, especially neutrophilic inflammation, in the pathogenesis of ozone-induced MCM in rat NTE. For this purpose, three specific hypotheses-based whole-animal inhalation studies were conducted. Male F344/N rats were exposed in whole-body inhalation chambers to 0 (filtered air) or 0.5 ppm ozone for 1-3 days (8 h/day). Histochemical, immunochemical, molecular and morphometric techniques were used to investigate the ozone-induced cellular and molecular events in the NTE. Two in vitro studies were also conducted to examine the effects of ozone-inducible cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-alpha; TNF- a, and interleukin-6; IL-6) on mucin gene (rMuc-5AC) expression. Ozone induced a rapid increase of rMuc-5AC mRNA in nasal tissues within hours after the start of exposure. It preceded the appearance of MCM, and persisted with MCM. Ozone-induced neutrophilic inflammation accompanied the mucin gene upregulation, but was resolved when MCM first appeared in the NTE. Antibody-mediated depletion of circulating neutrophils attenuated ozone-induced MCM, although it did not affect the ozone-induced epithelial hyperplasia and mucin mRNA upregulation. In another study, it was found that preexisting neutrophilic rhinitis induced by endotoxin augmented the ozone-induced MCM. However, pre-existing rhinitis did not alter the severity of ozone-induced epithelial hyperplasia and mucin gene upregulation

  19. Protective effect of Labisia pumila on stress-induced behavioral, biochemical, and immunological alterations.

    PubMed

    Kour, Kiranjeet; Sharma, Neelam; Chandan, Bal Krishan; Koul, Surrinder; Sangwan, Payare Lal; Bani, Sarang

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the antistress potential of LABISIA PUMILA aqueous extract (LPPM/A003) using a battery of tests widely employed in different stressful situations. Pretreatment of experimental animals with LPPM/A003 caused an increase in the swimming endurance and hypoxia time and also showed the recovery of physical stress-induced depletion of neuromuscular coordination and scopolamine induced memory deficit. LPPM/A003 at graded doses reversed the chronic restraint stress (RST), induced depletion of CD4 (+) and CD8 (+) T lymphocytes, NK cell population, and corresponding cytokines expression besides downregulating the stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone, a major stress hormone. In addition, LPPM/A003 reversed the chronic stress-induced increase in adrenal gland weight, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and hepatic lipid peroxidation (LP) levels and augmented the RST induced decrease in hepatic glutathione (GSH), thymus and spleen weight. Thus, we conclude that LPPM/A003 has the ability to reverse the alterations produced by various stressful stimuli and therefore restores homeostasis.

  20. Propiconazole induces alterations in the hepatic metabolome of mice: relevance to propiconazole-induced hepatocarcinogenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide and has been the subject of recent investigations into its carcinogenic mechanism of action. The goals of this study were: 1. To identify metabolomic changes induced in the liver by increasing doses of propiconazole in mice; 2...

  1. Propiconazole induces alterations in the hepatic metabolome of mice: relevance to propiconazole-induced hepatocarcinogenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide and has been the subject of recent mechanistic investigations on its carcinogenic mechanism of action. The goals of this study were: 1. To identify metabolomic changes induced in the liver by increasing doses of propiconazole i...

  2. DJ-1 Is a Redox-Dependent Molecular Chaperone That Inhibits α-Synuclein Aggregate Formation

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) pathology is characterized by the degeneration of midbrain dopamine neurons (DNs) ultimately leading to a progressive movement disorder in patients. The etiology of DN loss in sporadic PD is unknown, although it is hypothesized that aberrant protein aggregation and cellular oxidative stress may promote DN degeneration. Homozygous mutations in DJ-1 were recently described in two families with autosomal recessive inherited PD (Bonifati et al. 2003). In a companion article (Martinat et al. 2004), we show that mutations in DJ-1 alter the cellular response to oxidative stress and proteasomal inhibition. Here we show that DJ-1 functions as a redox-sensitive molecular chaperone that is activated in an oxidative cytoplasmic environment. We further demonstrate that DJ-1 chaperone activity in vivo extends to α-synuclein, a protein implicated in PD pathogenesis. PMID:15502874

  3. Unambiguous observation of blocked states reveals altered, blocker-induced, cardiac ryanodine receptor gating

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Thomas, N. Lowri; Williams, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    The flow of ions through membrane channels is precisely regulated by gates. The architecture and function of these elements have been studied extensively, shedding light on the mechanisms underlying gating. Recent investigations have focused on ion occupancy of the channel’s selectivity filter and its ability to alter gating, with most studies involving prokaryotic K+ channels. Some studies used large quaternary ammonium blocker molecules to examine the effects of altered ionic flux on gating. However, the absence of blocking events that are visibly distinct from closing events in K+ channels makes unambiguous interpretation of data from single channel recordings difficult. In this study, the large K+ conductance of the RyR2 channel permits direct observation of blocking events as distinct subconductance states and for the first time demonstrates the differential effects of blocker molecules on channel gating. This experimental platform provides valuable insights into mechanisms of blocker-induced modulation of ion channel gating. PMID:27703263

  4. Reduced progesterone and altered cotyledonary prostaglandin values induced by locoweed (Astragalus lentiginosus) in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, L.C.; James, L.F.; McMullen, R.W.; Panter, K.E.

    1985-09-01

    Feeding 300 or 400 g of dried spotted locoweed, Astragalus lentiginosus per day to 11 pregnant Columbia ewes from the 20th to the 50th days of their gestations resulted in dead and edematous fetuses. Aspartate aminotransferase values were increased, whereas serum progesterone values were significantly diminished in a dose-dependent manner by locoweed ingestion. Cotyledonary 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F1 alpha (400 g/day only) and PGF2 alpha (300 and 400 g/day) values were significantly increased, whereas PGE values were not affected by the treatment. Alterations in PG values in these sheep may be a mechanism for altering corpus luteum function and inducing fetal death, which would ultimately result in abortion.

  5. Multiple system atrophy: alpha-synuclein and neuronal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mari

    2007-10-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a sporadic neurodegenerative disorder that encompasses olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), striatonigral degeneration (SND) and Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS). The histopathological hallmark is the formation of alpha-synuclein-positive glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) in oligodendroglia. alpha-synuclein aggregation is also found in glial nuclear inclusions, neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs), neuronal nuclear inclusions (NNIs) and dystrophic neurites. We evaluated the pathological features of 102 MSA cases, and presented the pathological spectrum of MSA and initial features of alpha-synuclein accumulation. We found that 39% of the 102 cases showed equivalent SND and OPCA pathologies, 33% showed OPCA- and 22% showed SND-predominant pathology, whereas 6% showed extremely mild changes. Our pathological analysis indicated that OPCA-type was relatively more frequent and SND-type was less frequent in Japanese MSA cases, compared to the relatively high frequency of SND-type in Western countries, suggesting that different phenotypic patterns of MSA may exist between races. In the early stage, in addition to GCIs, NNIs and diffuse homogenous alpha-synuclein staining in neuronal nuclei and cytoplasm were observed in lesions in the pontine nuclei, putamen, substantia nigra, locus ceruleus, inferior olivary nucleus, intermediolateral column of thoracic spinal cord, lower motor neurons and cortical pyramidal neurons. A subgroup of MSA cases with severe temporal atrophy showed numerous NCIs, particularly in the limbic system. These findings suggest that primary non-fibrillar and fibrillar alpha-synuclein aggregation also occur in neurons. The oligo-myelin-axon-neuron complex mechanism, along with the direct involvement of neurons themselves, may synergistically accelerate the degenerative process of MSA. PMID:18018485

  6. Gene expression patterns underlying parasite-induced alterations in host behaviour and life history.

    PubMed

    Feldmeyer, Barbara; Mazur, Johanna; Beros, Sara; Lerp, Hannes; Binder, Harald; Foitzik, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Many parasites manipulate their hosts' phenotype. In particular, parasites with complex life cycles take control of their intermediate hosts' behaviour and life history to increase transmission to their definitive host. The proximate mechanisms underlying these parasite-induced alterations are poorly understood. The cestode Anomotaenia brevis affects the behaviour, life history and morphology of parasitized Temnothorax nylanderi ants and indirectly of their unparasitized nestmates. To gain insights on how parasites alter host phenotypes, we contrast brain gene expression patterns of T. nylanderi workers parasitized with the cestode, their unparasitized nestmates and unparasitized workers from unparasitized colonies. Over 400 differentially expressed genes between the three groups were identified, with most uniquely expressed genes detected in parasitized workers. Among these are genes that can be linked to the increased lifespan of parasitized workers. Furthermore, many muscle (functionality) genes are downregulated in these workers, potentially causing the observed muscular deformations and their inactive behaviour. Alterations in lifespan and activity could be adaptive for the parasite by increasing the likelihood that infected workers residing in acorns are eaten by their definitive host, a woodpecker. Our transcriptome analysis reveals numerous gene expression changes in parasitized workers and their uninfected nestmates and indicates possible routes of parasite manipulation. Although causality still needs to be established, parasite-induced alterations in lifespan and host behaviour appear to be partly explained by morphological muscle atrophy instead of central nervous system interference, which is often the core of behavioural regulation. Results of this study will shed light upon the molecular basis of antagonistic species interactions.

  7. Prenatal caffeine ingestion induces transgenerational neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in second generation rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hanwen; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Lian; Shen, Lang; Kou, Hao; He, Zheng; Ping, Jie; Xu, Dan; Ma, Lu; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that prenatal caffeine ingestion induces an increased susceptibility to metabolic syndrome with alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic phenotypes in adult first generation (F1) of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rats, and the underlying mechanism is originated from a hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in utero. This study aims to investigate the transgenerational effects of this programming alteration in adult second generation (F2). Pregnant Wistar rats were administered with caffeine (120mg/kg·d) from gestational day 11 until delivery. Four groups in F2 were set according to the cross-mating between control and caffeine-induced IUGR rats. F2 were subjected to a fortnight ice water swimming stimulus on postnatal month 4, and blood samples were collected before and after stress. Results showed that the majority of the activities of HPA axis and phenotypes of glucose and lipid metabolism were altered in F2. Particularly, comparing with the control group, caffeine groups had an enhanced corticosterone levels after chronic stress. Compared with before stress, the serum glucose levels were increased in some groups whereas the triglyceride levels were decreased. Furthermore, total cholesterol gain rates were enhanced but the high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol gain rates were decreased in most caffeine groups after stress. These transgenerational effects were characterized partially with gender and parental differences. Taken together, these results indicate that the reproductive and developmental toxicities and the neuroendocrine metabolic programming mechanism by prenatal caffeine ingestion have transgenerational effects in rats, which may help to explain the susceptibility to metabolic syndrome and associated diseases in F2.

  8. Gene expression patterns underlying parasite-induced alterations in host behaviour and life history.

    PubMed

    Feldmeyer, Barbara; Mazur, Johanna; Beros, Sara; Lerp, Hannes; Binder, Harald; Foitzik, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Many parasites manipulate their hosts' phenotype. In particular, parasites with complex life cycles take control of their intermediate hosts' behaviour and life history to increase transmission to their definitive host. The proximate mechanisms underlying these parasite-induced alterations are poorly understood. The cestode Anomotaenia brevis affects the behaviour, life history and morphology of parasitized Temnothorax nylanderi ants and indirectly of their unparasitized nestmates. To gain insights on how parasites alter host phenotypes, we contrast brain gene expression patterns of T. nylanderi workers parasitized with the cestode, their unparasitized nestmates and unparasitized workers from unparasitized colonies. Over 400 differentially expressed genes between the three groups were identified, with most uniquely expressed genes detected in parasitized workers. Among these are genes that can be linked to the increased lifespan of parasitized workers. Furthermore, many muscle (functionality) genes are downregulated in these workers, potentially causing the observed muscular deformations and their inactive behaviour. Alterations in lifespan and activity could be adaptive for the parasite by increasing the likelihood that infected workers residing in acorns are eaten by their definitive host, a woodpecker. Our transcriptome analysis reveals numerous gene expression changes in parasitized workers and their uninfected nestmates and indicates possible routes of parasite manipulation. Although causality still needs to be established, parasite-induced alterations in lifespan and host behaviour appear to be partly explained by morphological muscle atrophy instead of central nervous system interference, which is often the core of behavioural regulation. Results of this study will shed light upon the molecular basis of antagonistic species interactions. PMID:26615010

  9. Prenatal caffeine ingestion induces transgenerational neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in second generation rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hanwen; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Lian; Shen, Lang; Kou, Hao; He, Zheng; Ping, Jie; Xu, Dan; Ma, Lu; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that prenatal caffeine ingestion induces an increased susceptibility to metabolic syndrome with alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic phenotypes in adult first generation (F1) of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rats, and the underlying mechanism is originated from a hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in utero. This study aims to investigate the transgenerational effects of this programming alteration in adult second generation (F2). Pregnant Wistar rats were administered with caffeine (120mg/kg·d) from gestational day 11 until delivery. Four groups in F2 were set according to the cross-mating between control and caffeine-induced IUGR rats. F2 were subjected to a fortnight ice water swimming stimulus on postnatal month 4, and blood samples were collected before and after stress. Results showed that the majority of the activities of HPA axis and phenotypes of glucose and lipid metabolism were altered in F2. Particularly, comparing with the control group, caffeine groups had an enhanced corticosterone levels after chronic stress. Compared with before stress, the serum glucose levels were increased in some groups whereas the triglyceride levels were decreased. Furthermore, total cholesterol gain rates were enhanced but the high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol gain rates were decreased in most caffeine groups after stress. These transgenerational effects were characterized partially with gender and parental differences. Taken together, these results indicate that the reproductive and developmental toxicities and the neuroendocrine metabolic programming mechanism by prenatal caffeine ingestion have transgenerational effects in rats, which may help to explain the susceptibility to metabolic syndrome and associated diseases in F2. PMID:24321341

  10. Cytosine Methylation Alteration in Natural Populations of Leymus chinensis Induced by Multiple Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yingjie; Yang, Xuejiao; Wang, Huaying; Shi, Fengxue; Liu, Ying; Liu, Jushan; Li, Linfeng; Wang, Deli; Liu, Bao

    2013-01-01

    Background Human activity has a profound effect on the global environment and caused frequent occurrence of climatic fluctuations. To survive, plants need to adapt to the changing environmental conditions through altering their morphological and physiological traits. One known mechanism for phenotypic innovation to be achieved is environment-induced rapid yet inheritable epigenetic changes. Therefore, the use of molecular techniques to address the epigenetic mechanisms underpinning stress adaptation in plants is an important and challenging topic in biological research. In this study, we investigated the impact of warming, nitrogen (N) addition, and warming+nitrogen (N) addition stresses on the cytosine methylation status of Leymus chinensis Tzvel. at the population level by using the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) and retrotransposon based sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (SSAP) techniques. Methodology/Principal Findings Our results showed that, although the percentages of cytosine methylation changes in SSAP are significantly higher than those in MSAP, all the treatment groups showed similar alteration patterns of hypermethylation and hypomethylation. It meant that the abiotic stresses have induced the alterations in cytosine methylation patterns, and the levels of cytosine methylation changes around the transposable element are higher than the other genomic regions. In addition, the identification and analysis of differentially methylated loci (DML) indicated that the abiotic stresses have also caused targeted methylation changes at specific loci and these DML might have contributed to the capability of plants in adaptation to the abiotic stresses. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrated that abiotic stresses related to global warming and nitrogen deposition readily evoke alterations of cytosine methylation, and which may provide a molecular basis for rapid adaptation by

  11. In vitro - in vivo correlation of gene expression alterations induced by liver carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Heise, T; Schug, M; Storm, D; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, H; Ahr, H J; Hellwig, B; Rahnenfuhrer, J; Ghallab, A; Guenther, G; Sisnaiske, J; Reif, R; Godoy, P; Mielke, H; Gundert-Remy, U; Lampen, A; Oberemm, A; Hengstler, J G

    2012-01-01

    Although cultivated hepatocytes are widely used in the studies of drug metabolism, their application in toxicogenomics is considered as problematic, because previous studies have reported only little overlap between chemically induced gene expression alterations in liver in vivo and in cultivated hepatocytes. Here, we identified 22 genes that were altered in livers of rats after oral administration of the liver carcinogens aflatoxin B1 (AB1), 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF), methapyrilene (MP) or piperonyl-butoxide (PBO). The functions of the 22 genes have been classified into two groups. Genes related to stress response, DNA repair or metabolism and genes associated with cell proliferation, respectively. Next, rat hepatocyte sandwich cultures were exposed to AB1, 2-NF, MP or PBO for 24h and expression of the above mentioned genes was determined by RT-qPCR. Significant correlations between the degree of gene expression alterations in vivo and in vitro were obtained for the stress, DNA repair and metabolism associated genes at concentrations covering a range from cytotoxic concentrations to non-toxic/in vivo relevant concentrations. In contrast to the stress associated genes, no significant in vivo/in vitro correlation was obtained for the genes associated with cell proliferation. To understand the reason of this discrepancy, we compared replacement proliferation in vivo and in vitro. While hepatocytes in vivo, killed after administration of hepatotoxic compounds, are rapidly replaced by proliferating surviving cells, in vitro no replacement proliferation as evidenced by BrdU incorporation was observed after washing out hepatotoxic concentrations of MP. In conclusion, there is a good correlation between gene expression alterations induced by liver carcinogens in vivo and in cultivated hepatocytes. However, it should be considered that cultivated primary hepatocytes do not show replacement proliferation explaining the in vivo/in vitro discrepancy concerning proliferation

  12. Ethanol alters vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced steroid release from immature rat ovaries in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, W.L.; Hiney, J.K.; Fuentes, F.; Forrest, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the acute effects of ethanol (ETOH) on basal and VIP-induced release of testosterone (T) and estradiol (E{sub 2}) from immature ovaries in vitro. Ovaries were collected from anestrus (A) and both naturally occurring and pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG)-induced early proestrus (EP) animals. The ovaries were incubated in wither media alone, media plus 1 {mu}M VIP, media plus ETOH in doses ranging from 25 to 100 mM, or media plus each dose of ETOH containing VIP. The present results demonstrate that ETOH did not affect either basal or VIP-induced steroid release from ovaries collected from A animals. Likewise, the ETOH did not alter basal steroid secretion from EP animals; however, the drug significantly reduced the VIP-stimulated release of both T and E, from EP ovaries. Thus, these data demonstrate for the first time that ETOH is capable of altering prepubertal ovarian responsiveness to VIP, a peptide known to be involved in the developmental regulation of ovarian function.

  13. Maternal diet-induced obesity alters mitochondrial activity and redox status in mouse oocytes and zygotes.

    PubMed

    Igosheva, Natalia; Abramov, Andrey Y; Poston, Lucilla; Eckert, Judith J; Fleming, Tom P; Duchen, Michael R; McConnell, Josie

    2010-01-01

    The negative impact of obesity on reproductive success is well documented but the stages at which development of the conceptus is compromised and the mechanisms responsible for the developmental failure still remain unclear. Recent findings suggest that mitochondria may be a contributing factor. However to date no studies have directly addressed the consequences of maternal obesity on mitochondria in early embryogenesis.Using an established murine model of maternal diet induced obesity and a live cell dynamic fluorescence imaging techniques coupled with molecular biology we have investigated the underlying mechanisms of obesity-induced reduced fertility. Our study is the first to show that maternal obesity prior to conception is associated with altered mitochondria in mouse oocytes and zygotes. Specifically, maternal diet-induced obesity in mice led to an increase in mitochondrial potential, mitochondrial DNA content and biogenesis. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was raised while glutathione was depleted and the redox state became more oxidised, suggestive of oxidative stress. These altered mitochondrial properties were associated with significant developmental impairment as shown by the increased number of obese mothers who failed to support blastocyst formation compared to lean dams. We propose that compromised oocyte and early embryo mitochondrial metabolism, resulting from excessive nutrient exposure prior to and during conception, may underlie poor reproductive outcomes frequently reported in obese women.

  14. GLUCOCORTICOID-INDUCED ALTERATION OF THE SURFACE MEMBRANE OF CULTURED HEPATOMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Philip L.; Tomkins, Gordon M.

    1970-01-01

    Glucocorticoids induce an alteration of the surface of hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells as expressed by changes in cell electrophoretic, antigenic, and adhesive properties. The alteration is assayed by the increased adhesiveness of induced cells for a glass surface. The induction process has a lag period of about 3 hr and attains a plateau level after 24–30 hr when 50–80% of the steroid-treated cells are firmly adhered. Less than 10% of untreated cells adhere under the same conditions. Induction is inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, demonstrates both pH and temperature dependence, and responds to changes in steroid concentration and structure. By contrast, the attachment per se of preinduced cells is not affected by inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis, fluctuations of temperature and pH, and the presence or absence of the hormone. When the induction process is reversed by removal of steroid or addition of actinomycin D, preinduced adhesiveness is lost with a half-life of 13–24 hr, but in the presence of cycloheximide the loss is accelerated (t1/2 3–5.5 hr). These results suggest that glucocorticoids induce the biosynthesis of a protein which either modifies the cell surface (an enzyme) or is incorporated into surface structures (structural protein). PMID:4327515

  15. Neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate induces morphological alterations in suprachiasmatic nucleus of adult rat.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Castañeda, Julio César; Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Chávez-Saldaña, Margarita; Rojas, Patricia; Gutiérrez-Pérez, Oscar; Rojas, Carolina; Arteaga-Silva, Marcela

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate (MSG) induces circadian disorders in several physiological and behavioural processes regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of neonatal exposure to MSG on locomotor activity, and on morphology, cellular density and expression of proteins, as evaluated by optical density (OD), of vasopressin (VP)-, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)- and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive cells in the SCN. Male Wistar rats were used: the MSG group was subcutaneously treated from 3 to 10 days of age with 3.5 mg/g/day. Locomotor activity was evaluated at 90 days of age using 'open-field' test, and the brains were processed for immunohistochemical studies. MSG exposure induced a significant decrease in locomotor activity. VP- and VIP-immunoreactive neuronal densities showed a significant decrease, while the somatic OD showed an increase. Major axes and somatic area were significantly increased in VIP neurons. The cellular and optical densities of GFAP-immunoreactive sections of SCN were significantly increased. These results demonstrated that newborn exposure to MSG induced morphological alterations in SCN cells, an alteration that could be the basis for behavioural disorders observed in the animals.

  16. Protective effect of methionine supplementation on arsenic-induced alteration of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sudipta; Chatterjee, Ajay K

    2004-05-01

    Short term exposure of arsenic produces carbohydrate depletion and hypoglycemia. Dietary deficiency of methionine causes impaired biotransformation of arsenic which has been attributed to the pathogenesis of different diseases induced by arsenic. Accordingly, the effects of methionine supplementation on the altered glucose homeostasis induced by arsenic were studied. Arsenic (as sodium arsenite) treatment (i.p) of male Wistar rats (weighing 80-100 g) at a dose of 5.55 mg kg(-1) body weight (equivalent to 35% LD50) per day for a period of 21 days caused a significant diminution in blood glucose level and fall in liver glycogen and pyruvic acid contents. The free amino acid nitrogen content of liver was elevated while that of kidney was decreased after arsenic treatment. Transaminase activities in liver and kidney were not significantly altered except that glutamate-pyruvate transaminase activity of kidney decreased significantly after arsenic treatment. Methionine supplementation reversed the above changes except decreased liver glycogen due to arsenic treatment. It may be suggested that hypoglycemia with associated decreased glycolytic activity induced by arsenic treatment at the present dose and duration can be partially counteracted by dietary methionine supplementation.

  17. OMP gene deletion results in an alteration in odorant-induced mucosal activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Youngentob, S L; Kent, P F; Margolis, F L

    2003-12-01

    Previous behavioral work, using a complex five-odorant identification task, demonstrated that olfactory marker protein (OMP) is critically involved in odor processing to the extent that its loss results in an alteration in odorant quality perception. Exactly how the lack of OMP exerts its influence on the perception of odorant quality is unknown. However, there is considerable neurophysiological evidence that different odorants produce different spatiotemporal patterns of neural activity at the level of the mucosa and that these patterns predict the psychophysically determined perceptual relationship among odorants. In this respect, OMP gene deletion is known to result in a constellation of physiologic defects (i.e., marked reduction in the electroolfactogram (EOG) and altered response and recovery kinetics) that would be expected to alter the odorant-induced spatiotemporal activity patterns that are characteristic of different odorants. This, in turn, would be expected to alter the spatiotemporal patterning of information that results from the mucosal projection onto the bulb, thereby changing odorant quality perception. To test the hypothesis that odorant-induced mucosal activity patterns are altered in mice lacking the gene for OMP, we optically recorded the fluorescent changes in response to odorant stimulation from both the septum and turbinates of both OMP-null and control mice using a voltage-sensitive dye (di-4-ANEPPS Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR) and a Dalsa 120 x 120, 12-bit CCD camera. To maintain continuity with the previous behavioral work, the odorants 2-propanol, citral, carvone, ethylacetoacetate, and propyl acetate were again used. Each odorant was randomly presented to each mucosal surface in a Latin-Square design. The results of this study demonstrated that, for both mouse strains, there do indeed exist different spatiotemporal activity patterns for different odorants. More importantly, however, these patterns significantly differed between OMP

  18. Carotid Body Ablation Abrogates Hypertension and Autonomic Alterations Induced by Intermittent Hypoxia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Rodrigo; Andrade, David C; Lucero, Claudia; Arias, Paulina; Iturriaga, Rodrigo

    2016-08-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the main feature of obstructive sleep apnea, enhances carotid body (CB) chemosensory responses to hypoxia and produces autonomic dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, and hypertension. We tested whether autonomic alterations, arrhythmogenesis, and the progression of hypertension induced by CIH depend on the enhanced CB chemosensory drive, by ablation of the CB chemoreceptors. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to control (Sham) conditions for 7 days and then to CIH (5% O2, 12/h 8 h/d) for a total of 28 days. At 21 days of CIH exposure, rats underwent bilateral CB ablation and then exposed to CIH for 7 additional days. Arterial blood pressure and ventilatory chemoreflex response to hypoxia were measured in conscious rats. In addition, cardiac autonomic imbalance, cardiac baroreflex gain, and arrhythmia score were assessed during the length of the experiments. In separate experimental series, we measured extracellular matrix remodeling content in cardiac atrial tissue and systemic oxidative stress. CIH induced hypertension, enhanced ventilatory response to hypoxia, induced autonomic imbalance toward sympathetic preponderance, reduced baroreflex gain, and increased arrhythmias and atrial fibrosis. CB ablation normalized blood pressure, reduced ventilatory response to hypoxia, and restored cardiac autonomic and baroreflex function. In addition, CB ablation reduced the number of arrhythmias, but not extracellular matrix remodeling or systemic oxidative stress, suggesting that reductions in arrhythmia incidence during CIH were related to normalization of cardiac autonomic balance. Present results show that autonomic alterations induced by CIH are critically dependent on the CB and support a main role for the CB in the CIH-induced hypertension. PMID:27381902

  19. Antibiotics induce redox-related physiological alterations as part of their lethality.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Daniel J; Belenky, Peter A; Yang, Jason H; MacDonald, I Cody; Martell, Jeffrey D; Takahashi, Noriko; Chan, Clement T Y; Lobritz, Michael A; Braff, Dana; Schwarz, Eric G; Ye, Jonathan D; Pati, Mekhala; Vercruysse, Maarten; Ralifo, Paul S; Allison, Kyle R; Khalil, Ahmad S; Ting, Alice Y; Walker, Graham C; Collins, James J

    2014-05-20

    Deeper understanding of antibiotic-induced physiological responses is critical to identifying means for enhancing our current antibiotic arsenal. Bactericidal antibiotics with diverse targets have been hypothesized to kill bacteria, in part by inducing production of damaging reactive species. This notion has been supported by many groups but has been challenged recently. Here we robustly test the hypothesis using biochemical, enzymatic, and biophysical assays along with genetic and phenotypic experiments. We first used a novel intracellular H2O2 sensor, together with a chemically diverse panel of fluorescent dyes sensitive to an array of reactive species to demonstrate that antibiotics broadly induce redox stress. Subsequent gene-expression analyses reveal that complex antibiotic-induced oxidative stress responses are distinct from canonical responses generated by supraphysiological levels of H2O2. We next developed a method to quantify cellular respiration dynamically and found that bactericidal antibiotics elevate oxygen consumption, indicating significant alterations to bacterial redox physiology. We further show that overexpression of catalase or DNA mismatch repair enzyme, MutS, and antioxidant pretreatment limit antibiotic lethality, indicating that reactive oxygen species causatively contribute to antibiotic killing. Critically, the killing efficacy of antibiotics was diminished under strict anaerobic conditions but could be enhanced by exposure to molecular oxygen or by the addition of alternative electron acceptors, indicating that environmental factors play a role in killing cells physiologically primed for death. This work provides direct evidence that, downstream of their target-specific interactions, bactericidal antibiotics induce complex redox alterations that contribute to cellular damage and death, thus supporting an evolving, expanded model of antibiotic lethality.

  20. Subtoxic Alterations in Hepatocyte-Derived Exosomes: An Early Step in Drug-Induced Liver Injury?

    PubMed

    Holman, Natalie S; Mosedale, Merrie; Wolf, Kristina K; LeCluyse, Edward L; Watkins, Paul B

    2016-06-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant clinical and economic problem in the United States, yet the mechanisms that underlie DILI remain poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests that signaling molecules released by stressed hepatocytes can trigger immune responses that may be common across DILI mechanisms. Extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes, principally hepatocyte-derived exosomes (HDEs), may constitute one such signal. To examine HDE alterations as a function of drug-induced stress, this work utilized prototypical hepatotoxicant acetaminophen (APAP) in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, SD rat hepatocytes, and primary human hepatocytes. HDE were isolated using ExoQuick precipitation reagent and analyzed by quantification of the liver-specific RNAs albumin and microRNA-122 (miR-122). In vivo, significant elevations in circulating exosomal albumin mRNA were observed at subtoxic APAP exposures. Significant increases in exosomal albumin mRNA were also observed in primary rat hepatocytes at subtoxic APAP concentrations. In primary human hepatocytes, APAP elicited increases in both exosomal albumin mRNA and exosomal miR-122 without overt cytotoxicity. However, the number of HDE produced in vitro in response to APAP did not increase with exosomal RNA quantity. We conclude that significant drug-induced alterations in the liver-specific RNA content of HDE occur at subtoxic APAP exposures in vivo and in vitro, and that these changes appear to reflect selective packaging rather than changes in exosome number. The current findings demonstrate that translationally relevant HDE alterations occur in the absence of overt hepatocellular toxicity, and support the hypothesis that HDE released by stressed hepatocytes may mediate early immune responses in DILI. PMID:26962055

  1. Multiscale alterations in bone matrix quality increased fragility in steroid induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Karunaratne, A; Xi, L; Bentley, L; Sykes, D; Boyde, A; Esapa, C T; Terrill, N J; Brown, S D M; Cox, R D; Thakker, R V; Gupta, H S

    2016-03-01

    A serious adverse clinical effect of glucocorticoid steroid treatment is secondary osteoporosis, enhancing fracture risk in bone. This rapid increase in bone fracture risk is largely independent of bone loss (quantity), and must therefore arise from degradation of the quality of the bone matrix at the micro- and nanoscale. However, we lack an understanding of both the specific alterations in bone quality n steroid-induced osteoporosis as well as the mechanistic effects of these changes. Here we demonstrate alterations in the nanostructural parameters of the mineralized fibrillar collagen matrix, which affect bone quality, and develop a model linking these to increased fracture risk in glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis. Using a mouse model with an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced corticotrophin releasing hormone promoter mutation (Crh(-120/+)) that developed hypercorticosteronaemia and osteoporosis, we utilized in situ mechanical testing with small angle X-ray diffraction, synchrotron micro-computed tomography and quantitative backscattered electron imaging to link altered nano- and microscale deformation mechanisms in the bone matrix to abnormal macroscopic mechanics. We measure the deformation of the mineralized collagen fibrils, and the nano-mechanical parameters including effective fibril modulus and fibril to tissue strain ratio. A significant reduction (51%) of fibril modulus was found in Crh(-120/+) mice. We also find a much larger fibril strain/tissue strain ratio in Crh(-120/+) mice (~1.5) compared to the wild-type mice (~0.5), indicative of a lowered mechanical competence at the nanoscale. Synchrotron microCT show a disruption of intracortical architecture, possibly linked to osteocytic osteolysis. These findings provide a clear quantitative demonstration of how bone quality changes increase macroscopic fragility in secondary osteoporosis. PMID:26657825

  2. Light-Induced Indeterminacy Alters Shade-Avoiding Tomato Leaf Morphology1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chitwood, Daniel H.; Kumar, Ravi; Ranjan, Aashish; Pelletier, Julie M.; Townsley, Brad T.; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Martinez, Ciera C.; Zumstein, Kristina; Harada, John J.; Maloof, Julin N.; Sinha, Neelima R.

    2015-01-01

    Plants sense the foliar shade of competitors and alter their developmental programs through the shade-avoidance response. Internode and petiole elongation, and changes in overall leaf area and leaf mass per area, are the stereotypical architectural responses to foliar shade in the shoot. However, changes in leaf shape and complexity in response to shade remain incompletely, and qualitatively, described. Using a meta-analysis of more than 18,000 previously published leaflet outlines, we demonstrate that shade avoidance alters leaf shape in domesticated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and wild relatives. The effects of shade avoidance on leaf shape are subtle with respect to individual traits but are combinatorially strong. We then seek to describe the developmental origins of shade-induced changes in leaf shape by swapping plants between light treatments. Leaf size is light responsive late into development, but patterning events, such as stomatal index, are irrevocably specified earlier. Observing that shade induces increases in shoot apical meristem size, we then describe gene expression changes in early leaf primordia and the meristem using laser microdissection. We find that in leaf primordia, shade avoidance is not mediated through canonical pathways described in mature organs but rather through the expression of KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX and other indeterminacy genes, altering known developmental pathways responsible for patterning leaf shape. We also demonstrate that shade-induced changes in leaf primordium gene expression largely do not overlap with those found in successively initiated leaf primordia, providing evidence against classic hypotheses that shaded leaf morphology results from the prolonged production of juvenile leaf types. PMID:26381315

  3. Multiscale alterations in bone matrix quality increased fragility in steroid induced osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Karunaratne, A.; Xi, L.; Bentley, L.; Sykes, D.; Boyde, A.; Esapa, C.T.; Terrill, N.J.; Brown, S.D.M.; Cox, R.D.; Thakker, R.V.; Gupta, H.S.

    2016-01-01

    A serious adverse clinical effect of glucocorticoid steroid treatment is secondary osteoporosis, enhancing fracture risk in bone. This rapid increase in bone fracture risk is largely independent of bone loss (quantity), and must therefore arise from degradation of the quality of the bone matrix at the micro- and nanoscale. However, we lack an understanding of both the specific alterations in bone quality n steroid-induced osteoporosis as well as the mechanistic effects of these changes. Here we demonstrate alterations in the nanostructural parameters of the mineralized fibrillar collagen matrix, which affect bone quality, and develop a model linking these to increased fracture risk in glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis. Using a mouse model with an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced corticotrophin releasing hormone promoter mutation (Crh− 120/+) that developed hypercorticosteronaemia and osteoporosis, we utilized in situ mechanical testing with small angle X-ray diffraction, synchrotron micro-computed tomography and quantitative backscattered electron imaging to link altered nano- and microscale deformation mechanisms in the bone matrix to abnormal macroscopic mechanics. We measure the deformation of the mineralized collagen fibrils, and the nano-mechanical parameters including effective fibril modulus and fibril to tissue strain ratio. A significant reduction (51%) of fibril modulus was found in Crh− 120/+ mice. We also find a much larger fibril strain/tissue strain ratio in Crh− 120/+ mice (~ 1.5) compared to the wild-type mice (~ 0.5), indicative of a lowered mechanical competence at the nanoscale. Synchrotron microCT show a disruption of intracortical architecture, possibly linked to osteocytic osteolysis. These findings provide a clear quantitative demonstration of how bone quality changes increase macroscopic fragility in secondary osteoporosis. PMID:26657825

  4. Genetic and histopathological alterations induced by cypermethrin in rat kidney and liver: Protection by sesame oil.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Mohamed Mohamed; Attia, Hossam F; El-Ella, Ghada A Abou

    2015-12-01

    Pesticides are widespread synthesized substances used for public health protection and agricultural programs. However, they cause environmental pollution and health hazards. This study aimed to examine the protective effects of sesame oil (SO) on the genetic alterations induced by cypermethrin (CYP) in the liver and kidney of Wistar rats. Male rats were divided into four groups, each containing 10 rats: the control group received vehicle, SO group (5 mL/kg b.w), CYP group (12 mg/kg b.w), and protective group received SO (5 mL/kg b.w) plus CYP (12 mg/kg b.w). Biochemical analysis showed an increase in albumin, urea, creatinine, GPT, GOT, and lipid profiles in the CYP group. Co-administration of SO with CYP normalized such biochemical changes. CYP administration decreased both the activity and mRNA expression of the examined antioxidants. SO co-administration recovered CYP, downregulating the expression of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase, and superoxide dismutase. Additionally, SO co-administration with CYP counteracted the CYP- altering the expression of renal interleukins (IL-1 and IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), anigotensinogen (AGT), AGT receptors (AT1), and genes of hepatic glucose and fatty acids metabolism. CYP induced degenerative changes in the kidney and liver histology which are ameliorated by SO. In conclusion, SO has a protective effect against alterations and pathological changes induced by CYP in the liver and kidney at genetic and histological levels.

  5. Multiscale alterations in bone matrix quality increased fragility in steroid induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Karunaratne, A; Xi, L; Bentley, L; Sykes, D; Boyde, A; Esapa, C T; Terrill, N J; Brown, S D M; Cox, R D; Thakker, R V; Gupta, H S

    2016-03-01

    A serious adverse clinical effect of glucocorticoid steroid treatment is secondary osteoporosis, enhancing fracture risk in bone. This rapid increase in bone fracture risk is largely independent of bone loss (quantity), and must therefore arise from degradation of the quality of the bone matrix at the micro- and nanoscale. However, we lack an understanding of both the specific alterations in bone quality n steroid-induced osteoporosis as well as the mechanistic effects of these changes. Here we demonstrate alterations in the nanostructural parameters of the mineralized fibrillar collagen matrix, which affect bone quality, and develop a model linking these to increased fracture risk in glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis. Using a mouse model with an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced corticotrophin releasing hormone promoter mutation (Crh(-120/+)) that developed hypercorticosteronaemia and osteoporosis, we utilized in situ mechanical testing with small angle X-ray diffraction, synchrotron micro-computed tomography and quantitative backscattered electron imaging to link altered nano- and microscale deformation mechanisms in the bone matrix to abnormal macroscopic mechanics. We measure the deformation of the mineralized collagen fibrils, and the nano-mechanical parameters including effective fibril modulus and fibril to tissue strain ratio. A significant reduction (51%) of fibril modulus was found in Crh(-120/+) mice. We also find a much larger fibril strain/tissue strain ratio in Crh(-120/+) mice (~1.5) compared to the wild-type mice (~0.5), indicative of a lowered mechanical competence at the nanoscale. Synchrotron microCT show a disruption of intracortical architecture, possibly linked to osteocytic osteolysis. These findings provide a clear quantitative demonstration of how bone quality changes increase macroscopic fragility in secondary osteoporosis.

  6. Surfactant-induced Marangoni eddies alter the coffee-rings of evaporating colloidal drops.

    PubMed

    Still, Tim; Yunker, Peter J; Yodh, Arjun G

    2012-03-20

    The influence of the small ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the evaporation of drying colloidal droplets is quantitatively investigated. The addition of SDS leads to a significantly more uniform deposition of colloidal particles after evaporation (i.e., the so-called "coffee-ring effect" is dramatically altered). We understand this phenomenon in the context of circulating radial Marangoni flows induced by the variation of SDS concentration along the air-water interface. Video microscopy permits the direct visualization of the colloidal particles involved in these flows, revealing a surprisingly stable "Marangoni eddy" that prevents particle deposition at the drop perimeter. PMID:22369657

  7. Immunotherapy in Parkinson’s Disease: Micromanaging Alpha-Synuclein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    George, Sonia; Brundin, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Currently, several α-synuclein immunotherapies are being tested in experimental Parkinson’s disease models and in clinical trials. Recent research has revealed that α-synuclein is not just an intracellular synaptic protein but also exists extracellularly. Moreover, the transfer of misfolded α-synuclein between cells might be a crucial step in the process leading to a progressive increase in deposition of α-synuclein aggregates throughout the Parkinson’s disease brain. The revelation that α-synuclein is present outside cells has increased the interest in antibody-based therapies and opens up for the notion that microglia might play a key role in retarding Parkinson’s disease progression. The objectives of this review are to describe and contrast the use of active and passive immunotherapy in treating α-synucleinopathies and highlight the likely important role of microglia in clearing misfolded α-synuclein from the extracellular space. PMID:26406122

  8. Activation of tyrosine kinase c-Abl contributes to α-synuclein–induced neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Hyun; Kim, Donghoon; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S.; Kumar, Manoj; Mao, Xiaobo; Shin, Joo Ho; Lee, Yunjong; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Ko, Han Seok

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of α-synuclein contributes to the formation of Lewy bodies and neurites, the pathologic hallmarks of Parkinson disease (PD) and α-synucleinopathies. Although a number of human mutations have been identified in familial PD, the mechanisms that promote α-synuclein accumulation and toxicity are poorly understood. Here, we report that hyperactivity of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl critically regulates α-synuclein–induced neuropathology. In mice expressing a human α-synucleinopathy–associated mutation (hA53Tα-syn mice), deletion of the gene encoding c-Abl reduced α-synuclein aggregation, neuropathology, and neurobehavioral deficits. Conversely, overexpression of constitutively active c-Abl in hA53Tα-syn mice accelerated α-synuclein aggregation, neuropathology, and neurobehavioral deficits. Moreover, c-Abl activation led to an age-dependent increase in phosphotyrosine 39 α-synuclein. In human postmortem samples, there was an accumulation of phosphotyrosine 39 α-synuclein in brain tissues and Lewy bodies of PD patients compared with age-matched controls. Furthermore, in vitro studies show that c-Abl phosphorylation of α-synuclein at tyrosine 39 enhances α-synuclein aggregation. Taken together, this work establishes a critical role for c-Abl in α-synuclein–induced neurodegeneration and demonstrates that selective inhibition of c-Abl may be neuroprotective. This study further indicates that phosphotyrosine 39 α-synuclein is a potential disease indicator for PD and related α-synucleinopathies. PMID:27348587

  9. CO2-induced ocean acidification increases anxiety in Rockfish via alteration of GABAA receptor functioning

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Trevor James; Holcombe, Adam; Tresguerres, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The average surface pH of the ocean is dropping at a rapid rate due to the dissolution of anthropogenic CO2, raising concerns for marine life. Additionally, some coastal areas periodically experience upwelling of CO2-enriched water with reduced pH. Previous research has demonstrated ocean acidification (OA)-induced changes in behavioural and sensory systems including olfaction, which is due to altered function of neural gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. Here, we used a camera-based tracking software system to examine whether OA-dependent changes in GABAA receptors affect anxiety in juvenile Californian rockfish (Sebastes diploproa). Anxiety was estimated using behavioural tests that measure light/dark preference (scototaxis) and proximity to an object. After one week in OA conditions projected for the next century in the California shore (1125 ± 100 µatm, pH 7.75), anxiety was significantly increased relative to controls (483 ± 40 µatm CO2, pH 8.1). The GABAA-receptor agonist muscimol, but not the antagonist gabazine, caused a significant increase in anxiety consistent with altered Cl− flux in OA-exposed fish. OA-exposed fish remained more anxious even after 7 days back in control seawater; however, they resumed their normal behaviour by day 12. These results show that OA could severely alter rockfish behaviour; however, this effect is reversible. PMID:24285203

  10. Chronic hypoxia-induced alterations in mitochondrial energy metabolism are not reversible in rat heart ventricles.

    PubMed

    Nouette-Gaulain, Karine; Biais, Matthieu; Savineau, Jean-Pierre; Marthan, Roger; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Letellier, Thierry; Sztark, François

    2011-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia alters mitochondrial energy metabolism. In the heart, oxidative capacity of both ventricles is decreased after 3 weeks of chronic hypoxia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reversal of these metabolic changes upon normoxia recovery. Rats were exposed to a hypobaric environment for 3 weeks and then subjected to a normoxic environment for 3 weeks (normoxia-recovery group) and compared with rats maintained in a normoxic environment (control group). Mitochondrial energy metabolism was differentially examined in both left and right ventricles. Oxidative capacity (oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis) was measured in saponin-skinned fibers. Activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and antioxidant enzymes were measured on ventricle homogenates. Morphometric analysis of mitochondria was performed on electron micrographs. In normoxia-recovery rats, oxidative capacities of right ventricles were decreased in the presence of glutamate or palmitoyl carnitine as substrates. In contrast, oxidation of palmitoyl carnitine was maintained in the left ventricle. Enzyme activities of complexes III and IV were significantly decreased in both ventricles. These functional alterations were associated with a decrease in numerical density and an increase in size of mitochondria. Finally, in the normoxia-recovery group, the antioxidant enzyme activities (catalase and glutathione peroxidase) increased. In conclusion, alterations of mitochondrial energy metabolism induced by chronic hypoxia are not totally reversible. Reactive oxygen species could be involved and should be investigated under such conditions, since they may represent a therapeutic target.

  11. Alterations in lenticular proteins during ageing and selenite-induced cataractogenesis in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Sakthivel, Muniyan; Elanchezhian, Rajan; Thomas, Philip A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine putative alterations in the major lenticular proteins in Wistar rats of different ages and to compare these alterations with those occurring in rats with selenite-induced cataract. Methods Lenticular transparency was determined by morphological examination using slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Alterations in lenticular protein were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE (SDS–PAGE) and confirmed immunologically by western blot. Results Morphological examination did not reveal observable opacities in the lenses of the rats of different age groups; however, dense nuclear opacities were noted in lenses of rats in the selenite-cataract group. Western blot assays revealed age-related changes in soluble and urea-soluble lenticular proteins. Decreased αA- and βB1-crystallins in the soluble fraction and aggregation of αA-crystallin, in addition to the degraded fragment of βB1-crystallin, in the urea-soluble fraction appeared to occur in relation to increasing age of the rats from which the lenses were taken; similarly, cytoskeletal proteins appeared to decline with increasing age. The lenses from rats in the selenite-cataract group exhibited similar changes, except that there was also high molecular weight aggregation of αA-crystallin. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that there is loss, as well as aggregation, of αA-crystallin in the aging rat lens, although there is no accompanying loss of lenticular transparency. PMID:20300567

  12. Alterations in the Rat Serum Proteome Induced by Prepubertal Exposure to Bisphenol A and Genistein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Humans are exposed to an array of chemicals via the food, drink and air, including a significant number that can mimic endogenous hormones. One such chemical is Bisphenol A (BPA), a synthetic chemical that has been shown to cause developmental alterations and to predispose for mammary cancer in rodent models. In contrast, the phytochemical genistein has been reported to suppress chemically induced mammary cancer in rodents, and Asians ingesting a diet high in soy containing genistein have lower incidence of breast and prostate cancers. In this study, we sought to: (1) identify protein biomarkers of susceptibility from blood sera of rats exposed prepubertally to BPA or genistein using Isobaric Tandem Mass Tags quantitative mass spectrometry (TMT-MS) combined with MudPIT technology and, (2) explore the relevance of these proteins to carcinogenesis. Prepubertal exposures to BPA and genistein resulted in altered expression of 63 and 28 proteins in rat sera at postnatal day (PND) 21, and of 9 and 18 proteins in sera at PND35, respectively. This study demonstrates the value of using quantitative proteomic techniques to explore the effect of chemical exposure on the rat serum proteome and its potential for unraveling cellular targets altered by BPA and genistein involved in carcinogenesis. PMID:24552547

  13. Air pollution induced alterations in assimilate partitioning in Anagallis arvensis L

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, F.A.; Iqbal, M.; Ahmad, Z.; Saquib, M.; Ghouse, A.K.M. )

    1989-04-01

    The Thermal Power Plant Complex of Kasimpur (Aligarh, UP, India) emits enormous amounts of oxides of sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon as well as particulate matters on consuming 3192 MT of coal/day. These effluents induce significant alterations in carbon allocation in Anagallis arvensis populations. Monthly samples of 10 plants each were collected on random basis at seedling to mature stage from 0.5, 2, 6, 12 and 20 km leeward from the power plant. In oven dried samples, assimilate partitioning was noted to be more severely altered by the air pollutants in the seedling stage. In 2 and 3 months old populations, photosynthate allocation to root and shoot was not altered noticeably. Considerable changes in carbon allocation were noted in 4 mo old mature stage. The carbon allocation to fruit was 3 fold and to seed was about 4 fold greater in the population thriving 20 km away from the source than in those growing in the vicinity of the source. Assimilate partitioning was linearly related to the distance from power plant and the productivity of the populations.

  14. Glomerular alterations in uranyl acetate-induced acute renal failure in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, S.; Nagase, M.; Honda, N.; Hishida, A.

    1984-12-01

    The study was performed to elucidate the progression and regression of superficial and inner glomerular alterations in uranyl acetate-induced renal failure in rabbits. Fifteen hours after the drug injection, creatinine clearance (CCr) decreased to 55% of controls with slightly elevated plasma creatinine concentration (initiation stage). After 5 days, urine flow and CCr decreased to approximately zero, with severe azotemia (maintenance stage). Scanning electron microscopic observations in these stages revealed a flattening and spreading of podocyte cell bodies associated with loss of epithelial foot processes, and reduction in the density of endothelial fenestrae. These changes were more advanced in the maintenance stage. Glomerular and fenestral diameters did not significantly change in the initiation stage but increased in the maintenance stage. There was no significant difference in these morphologic alterations, however, between the superficial and inner glomeruli. Glomerular alterations reverted to normal within 14 days, with good recovery of glomerular function. The findings show no significant difference in the progression or regression of the glomerular changes between the superficial and deep cortex. These morphologic changes may play a role in the reduction of CCr observed in this model.

  15. Alterations in the hippocampal endocannabinoid system in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Massa, Federico; Mancini, Giacomo; Schmidt, Helmut; Steindel, Frauke; Mackie, Ken; Angioni, Carlo; Oliet, Stéphane H.R.; Geisslinger, Gerd; Lutz, Beat

    2010-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system plays central roles in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure. Its alteration in activity contributes to the development and maintenance of obesity. Stimulation of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) increases feeding, enhances reward aspects of eating and promotes lipogenesis, while its blockade decreases appetite, sustains weight loss, increases insulin sensitivity, and alleviates dysregulation of lipid metabolism. The hypothesis has been put forward that the eCB system is over-active in obesity. Hippocampal circuits are not directly involved in the neuronal control of food intake and appetite, but they play important roles in hedonic aspects of eating. We investigated the possibility whether or not diet-induced obesity (DIO) alters the functioning of the hippocampal eCB system. We found that levels of the two eCBs, 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) and anandamide, were increased in the hippocampus from DIO mice, with a concomitant increase of the 2-AG synthesizing enzyme diacylglycerol lipase-α and increased CB1 receptor immunoreactivity in CA1 and CA3 regions, while CB1 receptor agonist-induced GTPγS binding was unchanged. eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity was changed in the CA1 region, as depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI) and long-term depression of inhibitory synapses (I-LTD) were enhanced. Functionality of CB1 receptors in GABAergic neurons was furthermore revealed, as mice specifically lacking CB1 receptors on this neuronal population were partly resistant to DIO. Our results showed that DIO-induced changes in the eCB system does not affect only tissues directly involved in the metabolic regulation, but also brain regions mediating hedonic aspects of eating and influencing cognitive processes. PMID:20445053

  16. Ethanol induced impairment of glucose metabolism involves alterations of GABAergic signaling in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuanglian; Luo, Yan; Feng, Allen; Li, Tao; Yang, Xupeng; Nofech-Mozes, Roy; Yu, Meng; Wang, Changhui; Li, Ziwei; Yi, Fan; Liu, Chuanyong; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2014-12-01

    Alcohol overindulgence is a risk factor of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the mechanisms by which alcohol overindulgence damages glucose metabolism remain unclear. Pancreatic islet β-cells are endowed with type-A γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAAR) mediated autocrine signaling mechanism, which regulates insulin secretion and fine-tunes glucose metabolism. In neurons GABAAR is one of the major targets for alcohol. This study investigated whether ethanol alters glucose metabolism by affecting GABAAR signaling in pancreatic β-cells. Blood glucose level of test mice was measured using a blood glucose meter. Insulin secretion by the pancreatic β-cell line INS-1 cells was examined using a specific insulin ELISA kit. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to evaluate GABA-elicited current in INS-1 cells. Western blot and immunostaining were used to measure the expression of GABAAR subunits in mouse pancreatic tissues or in INS-1 cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of ethanol (3.0g/kg body weight) to mice altered glucose metabolism, which was associated with decreased expression of GABAAR α1- and δ- subunits on the surface of pancreatic β-cells. Acute treatment of cultured INS-1cells with ethanol (60mM) decreased the GABA-induced current and reduced insulin secretion. In contrast, treating INS-1 cells with GABA (100μM) largely prevented the ethanol-induced reduction of insulin release. Importantly, pre-treating mice with GABA (i.p., 1.5mg/kg body weight) partially reversed ethanol-induced impairment of glucose homeostasis in mice. Our data suggest a novel role of pancreatic GABA signaling in protecting pancreatic islet β-cells from ethanol-induced dysfunction.

  17. β-asarone increases MEF2D and TH levels and reduces α-synuclein level in 6-OHDA-induced rats via regulating the HSP70/MAPK/MEF2D/Beclin-1 pathway: Chaperone-mediated autophagy activation, macroautophagy inhibition and HSP70 up-expression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Deng, Minzhen; He, Yuping; Lu, Shiyao; Liu, Shu; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-10-15

    Inactive myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) and alpha-synuclein (α-syn) aggregation will cause neuronal death. MEF2D or α-syn degradation is also associated with macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70). We found that β-asarone had positive effects on treating 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rats, but mechanisms of β-asarone affecting on MEF2D and α-syn via regulating the HSP70/MAPK/MEF2D/Beclin-1 pathway remain unclear. Unilateral 6-OHDA injection into the medial forebrain bundle was used to create PD rats, which were divided into four groups and administered for 30days: 6-OHDA model group, MEF2D inhibitor-treated group (SB203580, 0.5mg/kg, i.p.), MEF2D activator-treated group (LiCl, 100mg/kg, i.p.), β-asarone-treated group (15mg/kg, p.o.). Expressions of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), α-syn, heat-shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70), lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2a (LAMP-2A), MEF2D, HSP70, Beclin-1, light chain 3B (LC3B) and p62 in the mesencephalon were measured after 30-day administration. α-syn, Beclin-1 and LC3B levels were higher in the 6-OHDA model group, while TH, MEF2D, HSC70, LAMP-2A, p62 levels were lower compared to the sham-operated group. Our results also showed thatβ-asarone treatment reduced protein and mRNA levels of α-syn, Beclin-1 and LC3B, but increased HSP70, TH, MEF2D, HSC70, LAMP-2A and p62 levels compared to the 6-OHDA model group. Additionally, certain correlations among α-syn, TH, Beclin-1, LC3B, p62, HSP70, LAMP-2A and MEF2D were also discovered in this study. These findings suggested that β-asarone treatment could increase MEF2D and TH as well as reduce α-syn to protect against 6-OHDA induced damage in PD rat mesencephalon via modulating the HSP70/MAPK/MEF2D/Beclin-1 pathway.

  18. Chemically-induced alteration of UDP-glucuronic acid concentration in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Watkins, J B; Klaassen, C D

    1983-01-01

    Since many xenobiotics alter hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity, their effect on UDPGA concentration was determined. Rats were pretreated with: 1) microsomal enzyme inducers (7,8-benzoflavone, benzo(a)pyrene, butylated hydroxyanisole, isosafrole, 3-methylcholanthrene, phenobarbital, pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, trans-stilbene oxide); 2) inhibitors of microsomal enzymes (cobaltous chloride, piperonyl butoxide, SKF 525-A, borneol, galactosamine); 3) hepatotoxins (allyl alcohol, aflatoxin B1, alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate, bromobenzene, cadmium chloride, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1-dichloroethylene), and 4) commonly used anesthetics (pentobarbital, urethane, diethyl ether, halothane, enflurane, methoxyflurane). Rats were decapitated before removal of the liver. All inducers except PCN and isosafrole increased UDPGA 36-85% above control. Mixed-function oxidase inhibitors had no effect whereas borneol and galactosamine reduced UDPGA 85-90%. Aflatoxin B1 and cadmium produced decreases of 59 and 25%, respectively. Hepatic UDPGA content was diminished 70-95% after exposure to the inhalation anesthetics, whereas the other anesthetics reduced UDPGA about 25%. Thus, numerous xenobiotics alter the concentration of UDPGA in rat liver, which may influence the rate of glucoronidation.

  19. Altered Energy Homeostasis and Resistance to Diet-Induced Obesity in KRAP-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Miyasaka, Kyoko; Koyanagi, Midori; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Baba, Iwai; Doi, Keiko; Ohta, Minoru; Kato, Norihiro; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2009-01-01

    Obesity and related metabolic disorders have become leading causes of adult morbidity and mortality. KRAP (Ki-ras-induced actin-interacting protein) is a cytoskeleton-associated protein and a ubiquitous protein among tissues, originally identified as a cancer-related molecule, however, its physiological roles remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that KRAP-deficient (KRAP−/−) mice show enhanced metabolic rate, decreased adiposity, improved glucose tolerance, hypoinsulinemia and hypoleptinemia. KRAP−/− mice are also protected against high-fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance despite of hyperphagia. Notably, glucose uptake in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) in KRAP−/− mice is enhanced in an insulin-independent manner, suggesting that BAT is involved in altered energy homeostasis in KRAP−/− mice, although UCP (Uncoupling protein) expressions are not altered. Of interest is the down-regulation of fatty acid metabolism-related molecules, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC)-1, ACC-2 and fatty acid synthase in the liver of KRAP−/− mice, which could in part account for the metabolic phenotype in KRAP−/− mice. Thus, KRAP is a novel regulator in whole-body energy homeostasis and may be a therapeutic target in obesity and related diseases. PMID:19156225

  20. Altered 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine thyroxine ratio in experimentally induced kwashiorkor and obesity in rats.

    PubMed

    Makawiti, D W; Lomo, P O; Konji, V N; Oloowokere, J O

    1995-01-01

    The plasma triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) ratios have been evaluated in kwashiorkor and diet-induced obese weaned rats. The concentrations of T3 and T4 were determined in plasma by radio-immunoassay. A significant decrease in T3 level in the order kwashiorkor < obese < control was observed. However T4 concentration was more elevated (P < 0.01) in the obese than the normal controls, while more significantly depressed (P < 0.001) in the kwashiorkor than in control animals. The T3/T4 ratio decreased in the order obese < kwashiorkor < control. It was concluded from these studies that kwashiorkor and diet-induced obesity not only interfere with the absolute concentration of the thyroid hormones but also alter the T3/T4 ratio. The altered T3 and T4 ratio perhaps contributes to the maintenance of the isoenergetic state rather than to the promotion of negative or positive energy balance in kwashiorkor and obese subjects respectively.

  1. Alterations induced by chronic lead exposure on the cells of circadian pacemaker of developing rats

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Castañeda, Julio César; Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Rojas, Patricia; Chávez-Saldaña, Margarita; Pérez, Oscar Gutiérrez; Montes, Sergio; Ríos, Camilo

    2011-01-01

    Lead (Pb) exposure alters the temporal organization of several physiological and behavioural processes in which the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus plays a fundamental role. In this study, we evaluated the effects of chronic early Pb exposure (CePbe) on the morphology, cellular density and relative optical density (OD) in the cells of the SCN of male rats. Female Wistar rats were exposed during gestation and lactation to a Pb solution containing 320 ppm of Pb acetate through drinking water. After weaning, the pups were maintained with the same drinking water until sacrificed at 90 days of age. Pb levels in the blood, hypothalamus, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were significantly increased in the experimental group. Chronic early Pb exposure induced a significant increase in the minor and major axes and somatic area of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)- and vasopressin (VP)-immunoreactive neurons. The density of VIP-, VP- and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive cells showed a significant decrease in the experimental group. OD analysis showed a significant increase in VIP neurons of the experimental group. The results showed that CePbe induced alterations in the cells of the SCN, as evidenced by modifications in soma morphology, cellular density and OD in circadian pacemaker cells. These findings provide a morphological and cellular basis for deficits in circadian rhythms documented in Pb-exposed animals. PMID:21324006

  2. Licofelone attenuates quinolinic acid induced Huntington like symptoms: possible behavioral, biochemical and cellular alterations.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-03-30

    Cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes are involved in arachidonic acid metabolism. Emerging evidence indicates that cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors prevent neurodegenerative processes and related complications. Therefore, the present study has been designed to explore the neuroprotective potential of licofelone (dual COX-2/5-LOX inhibitor) against quinolinic acid induced Huntington like symptom in rats. Intrastriatal administration of quinolinic acid significantly caused reduction in body weight and motor function (locomotor activity, rotarod performance and beam walk test), oxidative defense (as evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration and decreased endogenous antioxidant enzymes), alteration in mitochondrial enzyme complex (I, II and IV) activities, raised TNF-α level and striatal lesion volume as compared to sham treated animals. Licofelone (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) treatment significantly improved body weight, locomotor activity, rotarod performance, balance beam walk performance, oxidative defense, mitochondrial enzyme complex activities and attenuated TNF-α level and striatal lesion as compared to control (quinolinic acid). The present study highlights that licofelone attenuates behavioral, biochemical and cellular alterations against quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity and this could be an important therapeutic avenue to ameliorate the Huntington like symptoms. PMID:21237233

  3. Molecular alterations in tumorigenic human bronchial and breast epithelial cells induced by high let radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, T. K.; Zhao, Y. L.; Roy, D.; Piao, C. Q.; Calaf, G.; Hall, E. J.

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process with sequence of genetic events governing the phenotypic expression of a series of transformation steps leading to the development of metastatic cancer. In the present study, immortalized human bronchial (BEP2D) and breast (MCF-10F) cells were irradiated with graded doses of either 150 keV/μm alpha particles or 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming tumorigenic in nude mice. Cell fusion studies indicated that radiation-induced tumorigenic phenotype in BEP2D cells could be completely suppressed by fusion with non-tumorigenic BEP2D cells. The differential expressions of known genes between tumorigenic bronchial and breast cells induced by alpha particles and their respective control cultures were compared using cDNA expression array. Among the 11 genes identified to be differentially expressed in BEP2D cells, three ( DCC, DNA-PK and p21 CIPI) were shown to be consistently down-regulated by 2 to 4 fold in all the 5 tumor cell lines examined. In contrast, their expressions in the fusion cell lines were comparable to control BEP2D cells. Similarly, expression levels of a series of genes were found to be altered in a step-wise manner among tumorigenic MCF-10F cells. The results are highly suggestive that functional alterations of these genes may be causally related to the carcinogenic process.

  4. Glomerular lesions induced in the rabbit by physicochemically altered homologous IgG.

    PubMed Central

    Cavalot, F.; Miyata, M.; Vladutiu, A.; Terranova, V.; Dubiski, S.; Burlingame, R.; Tan, E.; Brentjens, J.; Milgrom, F.; Andres, G.

    1992-01-01

    Immunization of rabbits with physicochemically altered homologous or even autologous IgG induces formation of antibodies combining with IgG of rabbit and of foreign species. Cardiac but not renal lesions were reported in such animals. This study examined the nephritogenic potential of the immune response to cationized or heat-aggregated homologous IgG of b9 or b4 allotype in rabbits of the b4 allotype. Rabbits injected with either b9 or b4 cationized IgG produced antibodies reactive with rabbit and human IgG and with histones; they also developed abnormal glomerular deposits of IgG b4 and C3 corresponding to alterations of the glomerular basement membranes (GBM). Rabbits injected with either b9 or b4 aggregated IgG developed antibodies reactive with rabbit and human IgG and abnormal glomerular deposits of IgG b4 and C3 in the GBM and in the mesangium with subendothelial and mesangial electron-dense deposits. Some rabbits in both groups had proliferative and exudative glomerulonephritis and proteinuria. The results showed that immunization of rabbits with physicochemically altered homologous IgG induces an immune response to rabbit and human IgG and to histones as well as glomerular deposits of autologous IgG and C3 and other glomerular lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 30 PMID:1546743

  5. Epigenetic alterations induced by genotoxic occupational and environmental human chemical carcinogens: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Grace; Pogribny, Igor P; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that epigenetic alterations play an important role in chemically-induced carcinogenesis. Although the epigenome and genome may be equally important in carcinogenicity, the genotoxicity of chemical agents and exposure-related transcriptomic responses have been more thoroughly studied and characterized. To better understand the evidence for epigenetic alterations of human carcinogens, and the potential association with genotoxic endpoints, we conducted a systematic review of published studies of genotoxic carcinogens that reported epigenetic endpoints. Specifically, we searched for publications reporting epigenetic effects for the 28 agents and occupations included in Monograph Volume 100F of the International Agency for the Research on Cancer (IARC) that were classified as "carcinogenic to humans" (Group 1) with strong evidence of genotoxic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. We identified a total of 158 studies that evaluated epigenetic alterations for 12 of these 28 carcinogenic agents and occupations (1,3-butadiene, 4-aminobiphenyl, aflatoxins, benzene, benzidine, benzo[a]pyrene, coke production, formaldehyde, occupational exposure as a painter, sulfur mustard, and vinyl chloride). Aberrant DNA methylation was most commonly studied, followed by altered expression of non-coding RNAs and histone changes (totaling 85, 59 and 25 studies, respectively). For 3 carcinogens (aflatoxins, benzene and benzo[a]pyrene), 10 or more studies reported epigenetic effects. However, epigenetic studies were sparse for the remaining 9 carcinogens; for 4 agents, only 1 or 2 published reports were identified. While further research is needed to better identify carcinogenesis-associated epigenetic perturbations for many potential carcinogens, published reports on specific epigenetic endpoints can be systematically identified and increasingly incorporated in cancer hazard assessments. PMID:27234561

  6. Kalpaamruthaa ameliorates mitochondrial and metabolic alterations in diabetes mellitus induced cardiovascular damage.

    PubMed

    Latha, Raja; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanadham

    2014-12-01

    Efficacy of Kalpaamruthaa on the activities of lipid and carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, electron transport chain complexes and mitochondrial ATPases were studied in heart and liver of experimental rats. Cardiovascular damage (CVD) was developed in 8 weeks after type 2 diabetes mellitus induction with high fat diet (2 weeks) and low dose of streptozotocin (2 × 35 mg/kg b.w. i.p. in 24 hr interval). In CVD-induced rats, the activities of total lipase, cholesterol ester hydrolase and cholesterol ester synthetase were increased, while lipoprotein lipase and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activities were decreased. The activities of lipid-metabolizing enzymes were altered by Kalpaamruthaa in CVD-induced rats towards normal. Kalpaamruthaa modulated the activities of glycolytic enzymes (hexokinase, phosphogluco-isomerase, aldolase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), gluconeogenic enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase) and glycogenolytic enzyme (glycogen phosphorylase) along with increased glycogen content in the liver of CVD-induced rats. The activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, Complexes and ATPases (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase) were decreased in CVD-induced rats, which were ameliorated by the treatment with Kalpaamruthaa. This study ascertained the efficacy of Kalpaamruthaa for the treatment of CVD in diabetes through the modulation of metabolizing enzymes and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:24552274

  7. Cypermethrin-induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration alters the mitochondrial function: a proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sonal; Singh, Ashish; Tripathi, Pratibha; Mishra, Manisha; Singh, Pradhyumna Kumar; Singh, Mahendra Pratap

    2015-04-01

    Cypermethrin induces the slow and progressive degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in rats. Postnatal preexposure with low doses of cypermethrin is known to enhance the susceptibility of animals upon adulthood reexposure. The study was undertaken to delineate the role of mitochondria in cypermethrin-induced neurodegeneration. Indexes of dopaminergic neurodegeneration, microglial activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction and its proteome profile were assessed in controls and cypermethrin-treated rats. Cypermethrin increased nigral dopaminergic neurodegeneration and microglial activation while reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and complex I activity. Cypermethrin attenuated striatal dopamine content and differentially regulated the expressions of the nine striatal and ten nigral proteins. Western blot analyses showed that cypermethrin also increased c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), caspase-3, tumor suppressor protein (p53), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expressions and reduced B cell lymphoma-2 protein (Bcl-2) expression. Syndopa and minocycline rescued from cypermethrin induced augmentation in microglial activation and reductions in mitochondrial membrane potential and complex I activity, striatal dopamine content, and degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons. Syndopa and minocycline, respectively, modulated the expressions of four and six striatal and four and seven nigral proteins. Furthermore, they reinstated the expressions of JNK, caspase-3, Bcl-2, p53, p38 MAPK, TNF-α, and HO-1. The study demonstrates that cypermethrin induces mitochondrial dysfunction and alters mitochondrial proteome leading to oxidative stress and apoptosis, which regulate the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

  8. Thyrostimulin deficiency does not alter peripheral responses to acute inflammation-induced nonthyroidal illness.

    PubMed

    van Zeijl, Clementine J J; Surovtseva, Olga V; Kwakkel, Joan; van Beeren, Hermina C; Bassett, J H Duncan; Duncan Bassett, J H; Williams, Graham R; Wiersinga, Wilmar M; Fliers, Eric; Boelen, Anita

    2014-09-15

    Thyrostimulin, a putative glycoprotein hormone, comprises the subunits GPA2 and GPB5 and activates the TSH receptor (TSHR). The observation that proinflammatory cytokines stimulate GPB5 transcription suggested a role for thyrostimulin in the pathogenesis of nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). In the present study, we induced acute inflammation by LPS administration to GPB5(-/-) and WT mice to evaluate the role of thyrostimulin in peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism during NTIS. In addition to serum thyroid hormone concentrations, we studied mRNA expression and activity of deiodinase types I, II, and III (D1, D2, and D3) in peripheral T3 target tissues, including liver, muscle, and white and brown adipose tissue (WAT and BAT), of which the latter three express the TSHR. LPS decreased serum free (f)T4 and fT3 indexes to a similar extent in GPB5(-/-) and WT mice. Serum reverse (r)T3 did not change following LPS administration. LPS also induced significant alterations in tissue D1, D2, and D3 mRNA and activity levels, but only the LPS-induced increase in WAT D2 mRNA expression differed between GPB5(-/-) and WT mice. In conclusion, lacking GPB5 during acute illness does not affect the LPS-induced decrease of serum thyroid hormones while resulting in subtle changes in tissue D2 expression that are unlikely to be mediated via the TSHR. PMID:25117405

  9. Caloric Restriction Normalizes Obesity-Induced Alterations on Regulators of Skeletal Muscle Growth Signaling.

    PubMed

    Dungan, Cory M; Li, Ji; Williamson, David L

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the impact of caloric restriction on high fat diet-induced alterations on regulators of skeletal muscle growth. We hypothesized that caloric restriction would reverse the negative effects of high fat diet-induced obesity on REDD1 and mTOR-related signaling. Following an initial 8 week period of HF diet-induced obesity, caloric restriction (CR ~30 %) was employed while mice continued to consume either a low (LF) or high fat (HF) diet for 8 weeks. Western analysis of skeletal muscle showed that CR reduced (p < 0.05) the obesity-related effects on the lipogenic protein, SREBP1. Likewise, CR reduced (p < 0.05) the obesity-related effects on the hyperactivation of mTORC1 and ERK1/2 signaling to levels comparable to the LF mice. CR also reduced (p < 0.05) obesity-induced expression of negative regulators of growth, REDD1 and cleaved caspase 3. These findings have implications for on the reversibility of dysregulated growth signaling in obese skeletal muscle, using short-term caloric restriction. PMID:27289530

  10. Kalpaamruthaa ameliorates mitochondrial and metabolic alterations in diabetes mellitus induced cardiovascular damage.

    PubMed

    Latha, Raja; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanadham

    2014-12-01

    Efficacy of Kalpaamruthaa on the activities of lipid and carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, electron transport chain complexes and mitochondrial ATPases were studied in heart and liver of experimental rats. Cardiovascular damage (CVD) was developed in 8 weeks after type 2 diabetes mellitus induction with high fat diet (2 weeks) and low dose of streptozotocin (2 × 35 mg/kg b.w. i.p. in 24 hr interval). In CVD-induced rats, the activities of total lipase, cholesterol ester hydrolase and cholesterol ester synthetase were increased, while lipoprotein lipase and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activities were decreased. The activities of lipid-metabolizing enzymes were altered by Kalpaamruthaa in CVD-induced rats towards normal. Kalpaamruthaa modulated the activities of glycolytic enzymes (hexokinase, phosphogluco-isomerase, aldolase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), gluconeogenic enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase) and glycogenolytic enzyme (glycogen phosphorylase) along with increased glycogen content in the liver of CVD-induced rats. The activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, Complexes and ATPases (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase) were decreased in CVD-induced rats, which were ameliorated by the treatment with Kalpaamruthaa. This study ascertained the efficacy of Kalpaamruthaa for the treatment of CVD in diabetes through the modulation of metabolizing enzymes and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  11. Thyrostimulin deficiency does not alter peripheral responses to acute inflammation-induced nonthyroidal illness.

    PubMed

    van Zeijl, Clementine J J; Surovtseva, Olga V; Kwakkel, Joan; van Beeren, Hermina C; Bassett, J H Duncan; Duncan Bassett, J H; Williams, Graham R; Wiersinga, Wilmar M; Fliers, Eric; Boelen, Anita

    2014-09-15

    Thyrostimulin, a putative glycoprotein hormone, comprises the subunits GPA2 and GPB5 and activates the TSH receptor (TSHR). The observation that proinflammatory cytokines stimulate GPB5 transcription suggested a role for thyrostimulin in the pathogenesis of nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). In the present study, we induced acute inflammation by LPS administration to GPB5(-/-) and WT mice to evaluate the role of thyrostimulin in peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism during NTIS. In addition to serum thyroid hormone concentrations, we studied mRNA expression and activity of deiodinase types I, II, and III (D1, D2, and D3) in peripheral T3 target tissues, including liver, muscle, and white and brown adipose tissue (WAT and BAT), of which the latter three express the TSHR. LPS decreased serum free (f)T4 and fT3 indexes to a similar extent in GPB5(-/-) and WT mice. Serum reverse (r)T3 did not change following LPS administration. LPS also induced significant alterations in tissue D1, D2, and D3 mRNA and activity levels, but only the LPS-induced increase in WAT D2 mRNA expression differed between GPB5(-/-) and WT mice. In conclusion, lacking GPB5 during acute illness does not affect the LPS-induced decrease of serum thyroid hormones while resulting in subtle changes in tissue D2 expression that are unlikely to be mediated via the TSHR.

  12. Testosterone differentially alters cocaine-induced ambulatory and rearing behavioral responses in adult and adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Minerly, AnaChristina E.; Wu, Hui Bing K.; Weierstall, Karen M.; Niyomchai, Tipyamol; Kemen, Lynne; Jenab, Shirzad; Quinones-Jenab, Vanya

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the physiological and behavioral effects of testosterone when co-administered with cocaine during adolescence. The present study aimed to determine whether exogenous testosterone administration differentially alters psychomotor responses to cocaine in adolescent and adult male rats. To this end, intact adolescent (30-days-old) and adult (60-day-old) male Fisher rats were pretreated with vehicle (sesame oil) or testosterone (5 or 10 mg/kg) 45 minutes prior to saline or cocaine (20 mg/kg) administration. Behavioral responses were monitored 1 hour after drug treatment, and serum testosterone levels were determined. Serum testosterone levels were affected by age: saline- and cocaine-treated adults in the vehicle groups had higher serum testosterone levels than adolescents rats, but after co-administration of testosterone the adolescent rats had higher serum testosterone levels than the adults. Pretreatment with testosterone affected baseline activity in adolescent rats: 5 mg/kg of testosterone increased both rearing and ambulatory behaviors in saline-treated adolescent rats. After normalizing data to % saline, an interaction between hormone administration and cocaine-induced behavioral responses was observed; 5 mg/kg of testosterone decreased both ambulatory and rearing behaviors among adolescents whereas 10 mg/kg of testosterone decreased only rearing behaviors. Testosterone pretreatment did not alter cocaine-induced behavioral responses in adult rats. These findings suggest that adolescents are more sensitive than adults to an interaction between testosterone and cocaine, and, indirectly, suggest that androgen abuse may lessen cocaine-induced behavioral responses in younger cocaine users. PMID:19822170

  13. Exposure to nicotine during periadolescence or early adulthood alters aversive and physiological effects induced by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Jennifer A; Hutchison, Mary Anne; Chen, Scott A; Thorsell, Annika; Heilig, Markus; Riley, Anthony L

    2011-07-01

    The majority of smokers begin their habit during adolescence, which often precedes experimentation with alcohol. Interestingly, very little preclinical work has been done examining how exposure to nicotine during periadolescence impacts the affective properties of alcohol in adulthood. Understanding how periadolescent nicotine exposure influences the aversive effects of alcohol might help to explain why it becomes more acceptable to this preexposed population. Thus, Experiment 1 exposed male Sprague Dawley rats to either saline or nicotine (0.4mg/kg, IP) from postnatal days 34 to 43 (periadolescence) and then examined changes in the aversive effects of alcohol (0, 0.56, 1.0 and 1.8g/kg, IP) in adulthood using the conditioned taste aversion (CTA) design. Changes in blood alcohol concentration (BAC) as well as alcohol-induced hypothermia and locomotor suppression were also assessed. To determine if changes seen were specific to nicotine exposure during periadolescence, the procedures were replicated in adults (Experiment 2). Preexposure to nicotine during periadolescence attenuated the acquisition of the alcohol-induced CTAs (at 1.0g/kg) and the hypothermic effects of alcohol (1.0g/kg). Adult nicotine preexposure produced similar attenuation in alcohol's aversive (at 1.8g/kg) and hypothermic (1.8g/kg) effects. Neither adolescent nor adult nicotine preexposure altered BACs or alcohol-induced locomotor suppression. These results suggest that nicotine may alter the aversive and physiological effects of alcohol, regardless of the age at which exposure occurs, possibly increasing its overall reinforcing value and making it more likely to be consumed.

  14. Ketamine treatment reverses behavioral and physiological alterations induced by chronic mild stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lêda S B; Comim, Clarissa M; Valvassori, Samira S; Réus, Gislaine Z; Stertz, Laura; Kapczinski, Flávio; Gavioli, Elaine C; Quevedo, João

    2009-04-30

    Several studies have supported the idea that ionotropic glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) is an important player in the etiology of psychopathologies, such as anxiety disorders and major depression. Additionally, studies have shown that ketamine induces antidepressant effects in humans as well as in rodents subjected to animal models of depression. In this context, the present study was aimed to evaluate behavioral and physiological effects of acute and chronic administration of ketamine, a NMDA receptor antagonist, in rats exposed to chronic mild stress (CMS). After 40 days of CMS, rats were treated with ketamine (15 mg/kg) and sweet food consumption, body and adrenal gland weight, corticosterone and adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) hormone levels, and hippocampal BDNF protein levels were assessed. Our findings demonstrated that CMS evoked anhedonia, induced hypertrophy of adrenal gland, impaired gain of body weight and increased corticosterone and ACTH circulating levels in rats. Acute and chronic treatment with ketamine reversed the increase in adrenal gland weight, promoted regain of body weight, and normalized corticosterone and ACTH circulating levels. Repeated, but not acute, administration of ketamine reversed anhedonia-like behavior, although the treatment with ketamine per se increased sweet food consumption in non-stressed rats. Finally, acute and chronic ketamine treatment did not alter hippocampal BDNF protein levels in stressed rats. In conclusion, these findings support the idea of a putative role of NMDA receptors in mood-related symptoms, and rapid and robust effects of ketamine in reverting mainly physiological alterations induced by chronic mild stressful situations in rats.

  15. Leishmania donovani Infection Induces Anemia in Hamsters by Differentially Altering Erythropoiesis in Bone Marrow and Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Lafuse, William P.; Story, Ryan; Mahylis, Jocelyn; Gupta, Gaurav; Varikuti, Sanjay; Steinkamp, Heidi; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R.

    2013-01-01

    Leishmania donovani is a parasite that causes visceral leishmaniasis by infecting and replicating in macrophages of the bone marrow, spleen, and liver. Severe anemia and leucopenia is associated with the disease. Although immune defense mechanisms against the parasite have been studied, we have a limited understanding of how L. donovani alters hematopoiesis. In this study, we used Syrian golden hamsters to investigate effects of L. donovani infection on erythropoiesis. Infection resulted in severe anemia and leucopenia by 8 weeks post-infection. Anemia was associated with increased levels of serum erythropoietin, which indicates the hamsters respond to the anemia by producing erythropoietin. We found that infection also increased numbers of BFU-E and CFU-E progenitor populations in the spleen and bone marrow and differentially altered erythroid gene expression in these organs. In the bone marrow, the mRNA expression of erythroid differentiation genes (α-globin, β-globin, ALAS2) were inhibited by 50%, but mRNA levels of erythroid receptor (c-kit, EpoR) and transcription factors (GATA1, GATA2, FOG1) were not affected by the infection. This suggests that infection has a negative effect on differentiation of erythroblasts. In the spleen, erythroid gene expression was enhanced by infection, indicating that the anemia activates a stress erythropoiesis response in the spleen. Analysis of cytokine mRNA levels in spleen and bone marrow found that IFN-γ mRNA is highly increased by L. donovani infection. Expression of the IFN-γ inducible cytokine, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), was also up-regulated. Since TRAIL induces erythroblasts apoptosis, apoptosis of bone marrow erythroblasts from infected hamsters was examined by flow cytometry. Percentage of erythroblasts that were apoptotic was significantly increased by L. donovani infection. Together, our results suggest that L. donovani infection inhibits erythropoiesis in the bone marrow by cytokine

  16. Radiation-Induced Epigenetic Alterations after Low and High LET Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2011-02-01

    Epigenetics, including DNA methylation and microRNA (miRNA) expression, could be the missing link in understanding the delayed, non-targeted effects of radiation including radiationinduced genomic instability (RIGI). This study tests the hypothesis that irradiation induces epigenetic aberrations, which could eventually lead to RIGI, and that the epigenetic aberrations induced by low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation are different than those induced by high LET irradiations. GM10115 cells were irradiated with low LET x-rays and high LET iron (Fe) ions and evaluated for DNA damage, cell survival and chromosomal instability. The cells were also evaluated for specific locus methylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB), tumor suppressor in lung cancer 1 (TSLC1) and cadherin 1 (CDH1) gene promoter regions, long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1) and Alu repeat element methylation, CpG and non-CpG global methylation and miRNA expression levels. Irradiated cells showed increased micronucleus induction and cell killing immediately following exposure, but were chromosomally stable at delayed times post-irradiation. At this same delayed time, alterations in repeat element and global DNA methylation and miRNA expression were observed. Analyses of DNA methylation predominantly showed hypomethylation, however hypermethylation was also observed. MiRNA shown to be altered in expression level after x-ray irradiation are involved in chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation. Different and higher incidence of epigenetic changes were observed after exposure to low LET x-rays than high LET Fe ions even though Fe ions elicited more chromosomal damage and cell killing. This study also shows that the irradiated cells acquire epigenetic changes even though they are chromosomally stable suggesting that epigenetic aberrations may arise in the cell without initiating RIGI.

  17. Minimal changes in hypothalamic temperature accompany microwave-induced alteration of thermoregulatory behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.; Adams, B.W.; Akel, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    This study probed the mechanisms underlying microwave-induced alterations of thermoregulatory behavior. Adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus), trained to regulate the temperature of their immediate environment (Ta) behaviorally, were chronically implanted with Teflon reentrant tubes in the medical preoptic/anterior hypothalamic area (PO/AH), the brainstem region considered to control normal thermoregulatory processes. A Vitek temperature probe inserted into the tube measured PO/AH temperature continuously while changes in thermoregulatory behavior were induced by either brief (10-min) or prolonged (2.5-h) unilateral exposures to planewave 2,450-MHz continuous wave (CW) microwaves (E polarization). Power densities explored ranged from 4 to 20 mW/cm2 (rate of energy absorption (SAR) . 0.05 (W/kg)/cm2)). Rectal temperature and four representative skin temperatures were also monitored, as was the Ta selected by the animal. When the power density was high enough to induce a monkey to select a cooler Ta (8 mW/cm2 and above), PO/AH temperature rose approximately 0.3 degrees C but seldom more. Lower power densities usually produced smaller increases in PO/AH temperature and no reliable change in thermoregulatory behavior. Rectal temperature remained constant while PO/AH temperature rose only 0.2-0.3 degrees C during 2.5-h exposures at 20 mW/cm2 because the Ta selected was 2-3 degrees C cooler than normally preferred. Sometimes PO/AH temperature increments greater than 0.3 degrees C were recorded, but they always accompanied inadequate thermoregulatory behavior. Thus, a PO/AH temperature rise of 0.2-0.3 degrees C, accompanying microwave exposure, appears to be necessary and sufficient to alter thermoregulatory behavior, which ensures in turn that no greater temperature excursions occur in this hypothalamic thermoregulatory center.

  18. Moderate Hyperbilirubinemia Alters Neonatal Cardiorespiratory Control and Induces Inflammation in the Nucleus Tractus Solitarius

    PubMed Central

    Specq, Marie-Laure; Bourgoin-Heck, Mélisande; Samson, Nathalie; Corbin, François; Gestreau, Christian; Richer, Maxime; Kadhim, Hazim; Praud, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbilirubinemia (HB) occurs in 90% of preterm newborns. Moderate HB can induce acute neurological disorders while severe HB has been linked to a higher incidence of apneas of prematurity. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that even moderate HB disrupts cardiorespiratory control in preterm lambs. Two groups of preterm lambs (born 14 days prior to term), namely control (n = 6) and HB (n = 5), were studied. At day 5 of life, moderate HB (150–250 μmol/L) was induced during 17 h in the HB group after which cardiorespiratory control as well as laryngeal and pulmonary chemoreflexes were assessed during baseline recordings and during hypoxia. Recordings were repeated 72 h after HB induction, just before euthanasia. In addition, neuropathological studies were performed to investigate for cerebral bilirubin deposition as well as for signs of glial reactivity in brainstem structures involved in cardiorespiratory control. Results revealed that sustained and moderate HB: (i) decreased baseline respiratory rate and increased the time spent in apnea; (ii) blunted the cardiorespiratory inhibition normally observed during both laryngeal and pulmonary chemoreflexes; and (iii) increased heart rate in response to acute hypoxia. These acute physiological changes were concurrent with an activation of Alzheimer type II astrocytes throughout the brain, including the brainstem. Concomitantly, bilirubin deposits were observed in the leptomeninges, but not in brain parenchyma. While most cardiorespiratory alterations returned to normal 72 h after HB normalization, the expression of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) was still increased within the nucleus tractus solitarius. In conclusion, moderate and sustained HB in preterm lambs induced cardiorespiratory alterations, the latter of which were associated with neurohistopathological changes. These changes are indicative of an inflammatory response in the brainstem

  19. Aβ-Induced Synaptic Alterations Require the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Nedd4-1

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Elizabeth M.; Scudder, Samantha L.; Goo, Marisa S.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease in which patients experience progressive cognitive decline. A wealth of evidence suggests that this cognitive impairment results from synaptic dysfunction in affected brain regions caused by cleavage of amyloid precursor protein into the pathogenic peptide amyloid-β (Aβ). Specifically, it has been shown that Aβ decreases surface AMPARs, dendritic spine density, and synaptic strength, and also alters synaptic plasticity. The precise molecular mechanisms by which this occurs remain unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for ubiquitination in Aβ-induced synaptic dysfunction in cultured rat neurons. We find that Aβ promotes the ubiquitination of AMPARs, as well as the redistribution and recruitment of Nedd4-1, a HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase we previously demonstrated to target AMPARs for ubiquitination and degradation. Strikingly, we show that Nedd4-1 is required for Aβ-induced reductions in surface AMPARs, synaptic strength, and dendritic spine density. Our findings, therefore, indicate an important role for Nedd4-1 and ubiquitin in the synaptic alterations induced by Aβ. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Synaptic changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) include surface AMPAR loss, which can weaken synapses. In a cell culture model of AD, we found that AMPAR loss correlates with increased AMPAR ubiquitination. In addition, the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-1, known to ubiquitinate AMPARs, is recruited to synapses in response to Aβ. Strikingly, reducing Nedd4-1 levels in this model prevented surface AMPAR loss and synaptic weakening. These findings suggest that, in AD, Nedd4-1 may ubiquitinate AMPARs to promote their internalization and weaken synaptic strength, similar to what occurs in Nedd4-1's established role in homeostatic synaptic scaling. This is the first demonstration of Aβ-mediated control of a ubiquitin ligase to regulate surface AMPAR expression. PMID:26843640

  20. Metabolic alterations induced by chronic heat exposure in the rat: the involvement of thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Rousset, B; Cure, M; Jordan, D; Kervran, A; Bornet, H; Mornex, R

    1984-05-01

    The effects of chronic exposure to high environmental temperature (34 degrees C) on T4 production rate, food-intake, growth-rate and resting metabolic rate were investigated in adult male rats. This study was designed to examine the extent of variations and possible relationships between these parameters. As compared to control rats of the same body weight kept at 25 degrees C, rats exposed to 34 degrees C for 3-4 weeks exhibited a retarded growth-rate: 2.3 vs 4.0 g/day, a reduced food-intake: 15.2 vs 23.2 g/day, a decreased T4 production-rate: 1.8 vs 2.7 micrograms/day and a decreased oxygen consumption: 4.0 vs 5.4 ml/min. Heat-exposure altered the 4 parameters to a similar extent. T4 supplementation (3 micrograms/day) which induced a decrease in plasma TSH concentration, did not restore a normal growth-rate in heat-exposed rats. The decreased food-intake of the heat-exposed rats was not associated with any significant changes in the daily pattern of variations of liver glycogen content, or in the mean daily levels of blood glucose or insulin. The ratio T3 to rT3 in plasma was not altered by chronic heat exposure. When rats which had been chronically exposed to heat (25 days at 34 degrees C) were exposed to 25 degrees C, growth-rate, food-intake and oxygen consumption rapidly increased to control values whereas the rate of T4 production remained low. It is concluded that (1) a decrease in thyroid hormone economy is not directly involved in the alterations of growth and energy expenditure in rats chronically exposed to heat, (2) heat exposure does not lead to the establishment of a fasted state resulting from a large reduction in voluntary food intake, (3) metabolic alterations induced by heat exposure are rapidly and completely reversible upon decreasing the environmental temperature.

  1. Sepsis induces albuminuria and alterations in the glomerular filtration barrier: a morphofunctional study in the rat

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Increased vascular permeability represents one of the hallmarks of sepsis. In the kidney, vascular permeability is strictly regulated by the 'glomerular filtration barrier' (GFB), which is comprised of glomerular endothelium, podocytes, their interposed basement membranes and the associated glycocalyx. Although it is likely that the GFB and its glycocalyx are altered during sepsis, no study has specifically addressed this issue. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether albuminuria -- the hallmark of GFB perm-selectivity -- occurs in the initial stage of sepsis and whether it is associated with morphological and biochemical changes of the GFB. Methods Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used to induce sepsis in the rat. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels in plasma and growth of microorganisms in the peritoneal fluid were evaluated at 0, 3 and 7 hours after CLP or sham-operation. At the same times, kidney specimens were collected and structural and ultrastructural alterations in the GFB were assessed. In addition, several components of GFB-associated glycocalyx, syndecan-1, hyluronan (HA) and sialic acids were evaluated by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and lectin histochemistry techniques. Serum creatinine and creatinine clearance were measured to assess kidney function and albuminuria for changes in GFB permeability. Analysis of variance followed by Tukey's multiple comparison test was used. Results Septic rats showed increased TNF-alpha levels and growth of microorganisms in the peritoneal fluid. Only a few renal corpuscles had major ultrastructural and structural alterations and no change in serum creatinine or creatinine clearance was observed. Contrarily, urinary albumin significantly increased after CLP and was associated with diffuse alteration in the glycocalyx of the GFB, which consisted in a decrease in syndecan-1 expression and in HA and sialic acids contents. Sialic acids were also changed in their structure

  2. Synphilin suppresses α-synuclein neurotoxicity in a Parkinson's disease Drosophila model.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vargas, René; Fonseca-Ornelas, Luis; López-González, Ignacio; Riesgo-Escovar, Juan; Zurita, Mario; Reynaud, Enrique

    2011-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder in humans. It affects 1% of the population over 65-years old. Its causes are environmental and genetic. As the world population ages, there is an urgent need for better and more detailed animal models for this kind of disease. In this work we show that the use of transgenic Drosophila is comparable to more complicated and costly animal models such as mice. The Drosophila model behaves very similar to the equivalent transgenic mice model. We show that both Synphilin-1 and α-synuclein are toxic by themselves, but when co-expressed, they suppress their toxicity reciprocally. Importantly, the symptoms induced in the fly can be treated and partially reverted using standard PD pharmacological treatments. This work showcases Drosophila as a detailed and multifaceted model for Parkinson's disease, providing a convenient platform in which to study and find new genetic modifiers of PD. genesis 49:392-402, 2011.

  3. Neuroinflammation in Multiple System Atrophy: Response to and Cause of α-Synuclein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Bruno Di Marco; Radford, Rowan A.; Chung, Roger S.; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Pountney, Dean L.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease presenting with combinations of autonomic dysfunction, parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia and/or pyramidal signs. Oligodendroglial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) rich in α-synuclein (α-syn) constitute the disease hallmark, accompanied by neuronal loss and activation of glial cells which indicate neuroinflammation. Recent studies demonstrate that α-syn may be released from degenerating neurons to mediate formation of abnormal inclusion bodies and to induce neuroinflammation which, interestingly, might also favor the formation of intracellular α-syn aggregates as a consequence of cytokine release and the shift to a pro-inflammatory environment. Here, we critically review the relationships between α-syn and astrocytic and microglial activation in MSA to explore the potential of therapeutics which target neuroinflammation. PMID:26778958

  4. Alterations in Perivascular Sympathetic and Nitrergic Innervation Function Induced by Late Pregnancy in Rat Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Caracuel, Laura; Callejo, María; Balfagón, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated whether pregnancy was associated with changed function in components of perivascular mesenteric innervation and the mechanism/s involved. Experimental Approach We used superior mesenteric arteries from female Sprague-Dawley rats divided into two groups: control rats (in oestrous phase) and pregnant rats (20 days of pregnancy). Modifications in the vasoconstrictor response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were analysed in the presence/absence of phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) or L-NAME (nitric oxide synthase-NOS- non-specific inhibitor). Vasomotor responses to noradrenaline (NA), and to NO donor DEA-NO were studied, NA and NO release measured and neuronal NOS (nNOS) expression/activation analysed. Key Results EFS induced a lower frequency-dependent contraction in pregnant than in control rats. Phentolamine decreased EFS-induced vasoconstriction in segments from both experimental groups, but to a greater extent in control rats. EFS-induced vasoconstriction was increased by L-NAME in arteries from both experimental groups. This increase was greater in segments from pregnant rats. Pregnancy decreased NA release while increasing NO release. nNOS expression was not modified but nNOS activation was increased by pregnancy. Pregnancy decreased NA-induced vasoconstriction response and did not modify DEA-NO-induced vasodilation response. Conclusions and Implications Neural control of mesenteric vasomotor tone was altered by pregnancy. Diminished sympathetic and enhanced nitrergic components both contributed to the decreased vasoconstriction response to EFS during pregnancy. All these changes indicate the selective participation of sympathetic and nitrergic innervations in vascular adaptations produced during pregnancy. PMID:25951331

  5. Ras-mediated cell cycle arrest is altered by nuclear oncogenes to induce Schwann cell transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, A J; Paterson, H F; Noble, M; Land, H

    1988-01-01

    The cellular responses to ras and nuclear oncogenes were investigated in purified populations of rat Schwann cells. v-Ha-ras and SV40 large T cooperate to transform Schwann cells, inducing growth in soft agar and allowing proliferation in the absence of added mitogens. Expression of large T alone reduces their growth factor requirements but is insufficient to induce full transformation. In contrast, expression of v-Ha-ras leads to proliferation arrest in Schwann cells expressing a temperature-sensitive mutant of large T at the restrictive temperature. Cells arrest in either the G1 or G2/M phases of the cell cycle, and can re-enter cell division at the permissive temperature even after prolonged periods at the restrictive conditions. Oncogenic ras proteins also inhibit DNA synthesis when microinjected into Schwann cells. Adenovirus E1a and c-myc oncogenes behave similarly to SV40 large T. They cooperate with Ha-ras oncogenes to transform Schwann cells, and prevent ras-induced growth arrest. Thus nuclear oncogenes fundamentally alter the response of Schwann cells to a ras oncogene from cell cycle arrest to transformation. Images PMID:3049071

  6. Pregnancy-induced hypertension is associated with altered anatomical patterns of Hyrtl's anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Bhutia, Karma Lakhi; Sengupta, Ratnabali; Upreti, Benoy; Tamang, Binod K

    2014-05-01

    Umbilical arteries carry the blood from the fetus to the placenta and are typically connected by Hyrtl's anastomosis, a connection that is located near where the umbilical cord meets the placenta. The investigation of the anastomosis in pathological conditions, including pregnancy-induced hypertension is limited. Hence, 200 placenta and umbilical cords, 100 from normotensive and 100 from pregnancy-induced hypertensive subjects, were dissected and measurements were recorded. A single anastomosis between the umbilical arteries was observed in 167 specimens. In 16 cases, the two umbilical arteries were fused, in 15 cases there was no anastomosis, and in two cases there was a single umbilical artery. In one specimen from a normotensive case, a double anastomosis was observed. To our knowledge this is only the second report of this rare anatomical variant. When an anastomosis is present, the connecting vessel can be transverse to or form an oblique angle with the umbilical arteries. We observed a striking increase in the number of artery pairs connected by a transverse vessel in specimens from hypertensive subjects relative to those from normotensive subjects. Moreover, placentas from hypertensive donors were small if the umbilical arteries were connected by an oblique anastomosis. In addition, the length of the anastomosis and its distance from the cord insertion was shorter in specimens from hypertensive compared to normotensive subjects. We conclude that pregnancy-induced hypertension alters the anatomy of Hyrtl's anastomosis, and in some circumstances, the placenta.

  7. Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Altered Intestinal Permeability Induced by Combat Training Are Associated with Distinct Metabotypic Changes.

    PubMed

    Phua, Lee Cheng; Wilder-Smith, Clive H; Tan, Yee Min; Gopalakrishnan, Theebarina; Wong, Reuben K; Li, Xinhua; Kan, Mary E; Lu, Jia; Keshavarzian, Ali; Chan, Eric Chun Yong

    2015-11-01

    Physical and psychological stress have been shown to modulate multiple aspects of gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, but its molecular basis remains elusive. We therefore characterized the stress-induced metabolic phenotype (metabotype) in soldiers during high-intensity combat training and correlated the metabotype with changes in GI symptoms and permeability. In a prospective, longitudinal study, urinary metabotyping was conducted on 38 male healthy soldiers during combat training and a rest period using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The urinary metabotype during combat training was clearly distinct from the rest period (partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) Q(2) = 0.581), confirming the presence of a unique stress-induced metabotype. Differential metabolites related to combat stress were further uncovered, including elevated pyroglutamate and fructose, and reduced gut microbial metabolites, namely, hippurate and m-hydroxyphenylacetate (p < 0.05). The extent of pyroglutamate upregulation exhibited a positive correlation with an increase in IBS-SSS in soldiers during combat training (r = 0.5, p < 0.05). Additionally, the rise in fructose levels was positively correlated with an increase in intestinal permeability (r = 0.6, p < 0.005). In summary, protracted and mixed psychological and physical combat-training stress yielded unique metabolic changes that corresponded with the incidence and severity of GI symptoms and alteration in intestinal permeability. Our study provided novel molecular insights into stress-induced GI perturbations, which could be exploited for future biomarker research or development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:26506213

  8. Altered gastric emptying and prevention of radiation-induced vomiting in dogs. [Cobalt 60 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Jacobus, J.P.; Grissom, M.P.; Eng, R.R.; Conklin, J.J.

    1984-03-01

    The relation between radiation-induced vomiting and gastric emptying is unclear and the treatment of this condition is not established. We explored, therefore, (a) the effect of cobalt 60 irradiation on gastric emptying of solids and liquids and (b) the possibility of preventing radiation-induced vomiting with the dopamine antagonist, domperidone. Twenty dogs were studied on two separate days, blindly and in random order, after i.v. injection of either a placebo or 0.06 mg/kg domperidone. On a third day, they received 8 Gy (800 rads) whole body irradiation with cobalt 60 gamma-rays after either placebo (n . 10) or domperidone (n . 10). Before each study, each dog was fed chicken liver tagged in vivo with 99mTc-sulfur colloid (solid marker), and water containing 111In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (liquid marker). Dogs were placed in a Pavlov stand for the subsequent 3 h and radionuclide imaging was performed at 10-min intervals. Irradiation produced vomiting in 9 of 10 dogs given placebo but only in 1 of 10 dogs pretreated with domperidone (p less than 0.01). Gastric emptying of liquids and solids was significantly suppressed by irradiation (p less than 0.01) after both placebo and domperidone. These results demonstrate that radiation-induced vomiting is accompanied by suppression of gastric emptying. Furthermore, domperidone prevents vomiting produced by ionizing radiation but does not alter the accompanying delay of gastric emptying.

  9. Aluminum Toxicity-Induced Alterations of Leaf Proteome in Two Citrus Species Differing in Aluminum Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Guo, Peng; Lu, Yi-Bin; Chen, Li-Song

    2016-07-21

    Seedlings of aluminum-tolerant 'Xuegan' (Citrus sinensis) and Al-intolerant 'sour pummelo' (Citrus grandis) were fertigated for 18 weeks with nutrient solution containing 0 and 1.2 mM AlCl₃·6H₂O. Al toxicity-induced inhibition of photosynthesis and the decrease of total soluble protein only occurred in C. grandis leaves, demonstrating that C. sinensis had higher Al tolerance than C. grandis. Using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ), we obtained more Al toxicity-responsive proteins from C. sinensis than from C. grandis leaves, which might be responsible for the higher Al tolerance of C. sinensis. The following aspects might contribute to the Al tolerance of C. sinensis: (a) better maintenance of photosynthesis and energy balance via inducing photosynthesis and energy-related proteins; (b) less increased requirement for the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and other toxic compounds, such as aldehydes, and great improvement of the total ability of detoxification; and (c) upregulation of low-phosphorus-responsive proteins. Al toxicity-responsive proteins related to RNA regulation, protein metabolism, cellular transport and signal transduction might also play key roles in the higher Al tolerance of C. sinensis. We present the global picture of Al toxicity-induced alterations of protein profiles in citrus leaves, and identify some new Al toxicity-responsive proteins related to various biological processes. Our results provide some novel clues about plant Al tolerance.

  10. New insights into structural alteration of enamel apatite induced by citric acid and sodium fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojie; Klocke, Arndt; Mihailova, Boriana; Tosheva, Lubomira; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2008-07-24

    Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and complementary scanning electron microscopy were applied to analyze the surface structure of enamel apatite exposed to citric acid and to investigate the protective potential of fluorine-containing reagents against citric acid-induced erosion. Enamel and, for comparison, geological hydroxylapatite samples were treated with aqueous solutions of citric acid and sodium fluoride of different concentrations, ranging from 0.01 to 0.5 mol/L for citric acid solutions and from 0.5 to 2.0% for fluoride solutions. The two solutions were applied either simultaneously or consecutively. The citric acid-induced structural modification of apatite increases with the increase in the citric acid concentration and the number of treatments. The application of sodium fluoride alone does not suppress the atomic level changes in apatite exposed to acidic agents. The addition of sodium fluoride to citric acid solutions leads to formation of surface CaF2 and considerably reduces the changes in the apatite P-O-Ca framework. However, the CaF2 globules deposited on the enamel surface seem to be insufficient to prevent the alteration of the apatite structure upon further exposure to acidic agents. No evidence for fluorine-induced recovery of the apatite structure was found.

  11. Aluminum Toxicity-Induced Alterations of Leaf Proteome in Two Citrus Species Differing in Aluminum Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huan; Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Guo, Peng; Lu, Yi-Bin; Chen, Li-Song

    2016-01-01

    Seedlings of aluminum-tolerant ‘Xuegan’ (Citrus sinensis) and Al-intolerant ‘sour pummelo’ (Citrus grandis) were fertigated for 18 weeks with nutrient solution containing 0 and 1.2 mM AlCl3·6H2O. Al toxicity-induced inhibition of photosynthesis and the decrease of total soluble protein only occurred in C. grandis leaves, demonstrating that C. sinensis had higher Al tolerance than C. grandis. Using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ), we obtained more Al toxicity-responsive proteins from C. sinensis than from C. grandis leaves, which might be responsible for the higher Al tolerance of C. sinensis. The following aspects might contribute to the Al tolerance of C. sinensis: (a) better maintenance of photosynthesis and energy balance via inducing photosynthesis and energy-related proteins; (b) less increased requirement for the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and other toxic compounds, such as aldehydes, and great improvement of the total ability of detoxification; and (c) upregulation of low-phosphorus-responsive proteins. Al toxicity-responsive proteins related to RNA regulation, protein metabolism, cellular transport and signal transduction might also play key roles in the higher Al tolerance of C. sinensis. We present the global picture of Al toxicity-induced alterations of protein profiles in citrus leaves, and identify some new Al toxicity-responsive proteins related to various biological processes. Our results provide some novel clues about plant Al tolerance. PMID:27455238

  12. Stress-induced alterations of left-right electrodermal activity coupling indexed by pointwise transinformation.

    PubMed

    Světlák, M; Bob, P; Roman, R; Ježek, S; Damborská, A; Chládek, J; Shaw, D J; Kukleta, M

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that experimental stress induces a specific change of left-right electrodermal activity (EDA) coupling pattern, as indexed by pointwise transinformation (PTI). Further, we hypothesized that this change is associated with scores on psychometric measures of the chronic stress-related psychopathology. Ninety-nine university students underwent bilateral measurement of EDA during rest and stress-inducing Stroop test and completed a battery of self-report measures of chronic stress-related psychopathology. A significant decrease in the mean PTI value was the prevalent response to the stress conditions. No association between chronic stress and PTI was found. Raw scores of psychometric measures of stress-related psychopathology had no effect on either the resting levels of PTI or the amount of stress-induced PTI change. In summary, acute stress alters the level of coupling pattern of cortico-autonomic influences on the left and right sympathetic pathways to the palmar sweat glands. Different results obtained using the PTI, EDA laterality coefficient, and skin conductance level also show that the PTI algorithm represents a new analytical approach to EDA asymmetry description. PMID:24359433

  13. Aluminum Toxicity-Induced Alterations of Leaf Proteome in Two Citrus Species Differing in Aluminum Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Guo, Peng; Lu, Yi-Bin; Chen, Li-Song

    2016-01-01

    Seedlings of aluminum-tolerant 'Xuegan' (Citrus sinensis) and Al-intolerant 'sour pummelo' (Citrus grandis) were fertigated for 18 weeks with nutrient solution containing 0 and 1.2 mM AlCl₃·6H₂O. Al toxicity-induced inhibition of photosynthesis and the decrease of total soluble protein only occurred in C. grandis leaves, demonstrating that C. sinensis had higher Al tolerance than C. grandis. Using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ), we obtained more Al toxicity-responsive proteins from C. sinensis than from C. grandis leaves, which might be responsible for the higher Al tolerance of C. sinensis. The following aspects might contribute to the Al tolerance of C. sinensis: (a) better maintenance of photosynthesis and energy balance via inducing photosynthesis and energy-related proteins; (b) less increased requirement for the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and other toxic compounds, such as aldehydes, and great improvement of the total ability of detoxification; and (c) upregulation of low-phosphorus-responsive proteins. Al toxicity-responsive proteins related to RNA regulation, protein metabolism, cellular transport and signal transduction might also play key roles in the higher Al tolerance of C. sinensis. We present the global picture of Al toxicity-induced alterations of protein profiles in citrus leaves, and identify some new Al toxicity-responsive proteins related to various biological processes. Our results provide some novel clues about plant Al tolerance. PMID:27455238

  14. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R. . E-mail: nerurkar@pbrc.hawaii.edu

    2006-02-20

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML.

  15. Potential mechanisms responsible for chlorotriazine-induced alterations in catecholamines in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Parikshit C; McElroy, William K; Cooper, Ralph L

    2003-10-31

    Chlorotriazines interact with undifferentiated PC12 cells in vitro to modulate catecholamine synthesis and release, but the mechanism(s) responsible for this effect had not been determined. In this study we evaluated the effect of atrazine, simazine and cyanazine on the protein expression of the enzymes responsible for the synthesis of dopamine [tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)] and norepinephrine [dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DbetaH)]. We also examined the possible intracellular pathway associated with chlorotriazine-induced changes in catecholamine synthesis and release. Incubating PC12 cells in the presence of 100 microM atrazine and simazine decreased intracellular dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) concentration and NE release, and the protein expression of TH (approximately 20%) and DbetaH (approximately 50 and 25%, respectively) after 12-24 h exposure. In contrast, cyanazine (100 microM) stimulated intracellular and released NE concentration, and the protein expression of TH (approximately 20%) and DbetaH (approximately 225%) after 12-36 h exposure. Simultaneous exposure to the essential TH co-factors (iron and tetrahydrobiopterine) was ineffective in altering cellular DA. Agents known to enhance TH and DbetaH transcription, phosphorylation or activity (e.g., 8-bromo cAMP, forskolin or dexamethasone) reversed the inhibitory effects of atrazine and simazine on the NE. Again, in contrast to atrazine and simazine, cyanazine attenuated catecholamine-depleting effect of alpha-Methyl-p-tyrosine (alphaMpT) on NE. Both DA and NE synthesis can be altered by the chlorotriazines and suggest these occur via an alteration of the synthetic enzymes TH and DbetaH.

  16. Antagonist of prostaglandin E2 receptor 4 induces metabolic alterations in liver of mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Zhang, Limin; An, Yanpeng; Zhang, Lulu; Song, Yipeng; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2015-03-01

    Prostaglandin E2 receptor 4 (EP4) is one of the receptors for prostaglandin E2 and plays important roles in various biological functions. EP4 antagonists have been used as anti-inflammatory drugs. To investigate the effects of an EP4 antagonist (L-161982) on the endogenous metabolism in a holistic manner, we employed a mouse model, and obtained metabolic and transcriptomic profiles of multiple biological matrixes, including serum, liver, and urine of mice with and without EP4 antagonist (L-161982) exposure. We found that this EP4 antagonist caused significant changes in fatty acid metabolism, choline metabolism, and nucleotide metabolism. EP4 antagonist exposure also induced oxidative stress to mice. Our research is the first of its kind to report information on the alteration of metabolism associated with an EP4 antagonist. This information could further our understanding of current and new biological functions of EP4.

  17. The Gut Microbiome Is Altered in a Letrozole-Induced Mouse Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Scott T; Skarra, Danalea V; Rivera, Alissa J; Thackray, Varykina G

    2016-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have reproductive and metabolic abnormalities that result in an increased risk of infertility, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The large intestine contains a complex community of microorganisms (the gut microbiome) that is dysregulated in humans with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a letrozole-induced PCOS mouse model, we demonstrated significant diet-independent changes in the gut microbial community, suggesting that gut microbiome dysbiosis may also occur in PCOS women. Letrozole treatment was associated with a time-dependent shift in the gut microbiome and a substantial reduction in overall species and phylogenetic richness. Letrozole treatment also correlated with significant changes in the abundance of specific Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes previously implicated in other mouse models of metabolic disease in a time-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the hyperandrogenemia observed in PCOS may significantly alter the gut microbiome independently of diet. PMID:26731268

  18. Platinum recycling going green via induced surface potential alteration enabling fast and efficient dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Hodnik, Nejc; Baldizzone, Claudio; Polymeros, George; Geiger, Simon; Grote, Jan-Philipp; Cherevko, Serhiy; Mingers, Andrea; Zeradjanin, Aleksandar; Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.

    2016-01-01

    The recycling of precious metals, for example, platinum, is an essential aspect of sustainability for the modern industry and energy sectors. However, due to its resistance to corrosion, platinum-leaching techniques rely on high reagent consumption and hazardous processes, for example, boiling aqua regia; a mixture of concentrated nitric and hydrochloric acid. Here we demonstrate that complete dissolution of metallic platinum can be achieved by induced surface potential alteration, an ‘electrode-less' process utilizing alternatively oxidative and reductive gases. This concept for platinum recycling exploits the so-called transient dissolution mechanism, triggered by a repetitive change in platinum surface oxidation state, without using any external electric current or electrodes. The effective performance in non-toxic low-concentrated acid and at room temperature is a strong benefit of this approach, potentially rendering recycling of industrial catalysts, including but not limited to platinum-based systems, more sustainable. PMID:27767178

  19. Integrated circuit failure analysis by low-energy charge-induced voltage alteration

    DOEpatents

    Cole, E.I. Jr.

    1996-06-04

    A scanning electron microscope apparatus and method are described for detecting and imaging open-circuit defects in an integrated circuit (IC). The invention uses a low-energy high-current focused electron beam that is scanned over a device surface of the IC to generate a charge-induced voltage alteration (CIVA) signal at the location of any open-circuit defects. The low-energy CIVA signal may be used to generate an image of the IC showing the location of any open-circuit defects. A low electron beam energy is used to prevent electrical breakdown in any passivation layers in the IC and to minimize radiation damage to the IC. The invention has uses for IC failure analysis, for production-line inspection of ICs, and for qualification of ICs. 5 figs.

  20. Alteration of time-resolved autofluorescence properties of rat aorta, induced by diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uherek, M.; Uličná, O.; Vančová, O.; Muchová, J.; Ďuračková, Z.; Šikurová, L.; Chorvát, D.

    2016-10-01

    Changes in autofluorescence properties of isolated rat aorta, induced by diabetes mellitus, were detected using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy with pulsed ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation. We demonstrated that time-resolved spectroscopy was able to detect changes in aorta tissues related to diabetes and unambiguously discriminate diabetic (τ 1 0.63  ±  0.05 ns, τ 2 3.66  ±  0.10 ns) samples from the control (τ 1 0.76  ±  0.03 ns, τ 2 4.48  ±  0.15 ns) group. We also report changes in the ratio of relative amplitudes of the two lifetime component in aorta tissue during diabetes, most likely related to the pseudohypoxic state with altered NADH homeostasis.

  1. [Role of immune alterations induced by papillomavirus in development of cervical cancer ].

    PubMed

    Delvenne, P

    2011-01-01

    Squamous cell cancer of the uterine cervix is associated with a high morbidity and mortality worldwide and in Belgium. The link between cervical cancer and HPV has generated, in recent years, a great interest for studies aiming to better understand the role of the immune system in the control of these infections and for the development of prophylactic anti-HPV vaccines. The purpose of this work was to analyse the immune co-factors implicated in the promotion of the neoplastic process. We have shown that both virus-induced immune alterations and squamous metaplasia in the transformation zone of the uterine cervix play a role to create an immunotolerogenic microenvironment during the cervical carcinogenesis.

  2. Integrated circuit failure analysis by low-energy charge-induced voltage alteration

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Jr., Edward I.

    1996-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope apparatus and method are described for detecting and imaging open-circuit defects in an integrated circuit (IC). The invention uses a low-energy high-current focused electron beam that is scanned over a device surface of the IC to generate a charge-induced voltage alteration (CIVA) signal at the location of any open-circuit defects. The low-energy CIVA signal may be used to generate an image of the IC showing the location of any open-circuit defects. A low electron beam energy is used to prevent electrical breakdown in any passivation layers in the IC and to minimize radiation damage to the IC. The invention has uses for IC failure analysis, for production-line inspection of ICs, and for qualification of ICs.

  3. The Gut Microbiome Is Altered in a Letrozole-Induced Mouse Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Scott T; Skarra, Danalea V; Rivera, Alissa J; Thackray, Varykina G

    2016-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have reproductive and metabolic abnormalities that result in an increased risk of infertility, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The large intestine contains a complex community of microorganisms (the gut microbiome) that is dysregulated in humans with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a letrozole-induced PCOS mouse model, we demonstrated significant diet-independent changes in the gut microbial community, suggesting that gut microbiome dysbiosis may also occur in PCOS women. Letrozole treatment was associated with a time-dependent shift in the gut microbiome and a substantial reduction in overall species and phylogenetic richness. Letrozole treatment also correlated with significant changes in the abundance of specific Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes previously implicated in other mouse models of metabolic disease in a time-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the hyperandrogenemia observed in PCOS may significantly alter the gut microbiome independently of diet.

  4. The Gut Microbiome Is Altered in a Letrozole-Induced Mouse Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Scott T.; Skarra, Danalea V.; Rivera, Alissa J.; Thackray, Varykina G.

    2016-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have reproductive and metabolic abnormalities that result in an increased risk of infertility, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The large intestine contains a complex community of microorganisms (the gut microbiome) that is dysregulated in humans with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a letrozole-induced PCOS mouse model, we demonstrated significant diet-independent changes in the gut microbial community, suggesting that gut microbiome dysbiosis may also occur in PCOS women. Letrozole treatment was associated with a time-dependent shift in the gut microbiome and a substantial reduction in overall species and phylogenetic richness. Letrozole treatment also correlated with significant changes in the abundance of specific Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes previously implicated in other mouse models of metabolic disease in a time-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the hyperandrogenemia observed in PCOS may significantly alter the gut microbiome independently of diet. PMID:26731268

  5. MicroRNA and DNA methylation alterations mediating retinoic acid induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Raymond L; Foley, Niamh H; Bray, Isabella M; Das, Sudipto; Buckley, Patrick G

    2011-10-01

    Many neuroblastoma cell lines can be induced to differentiate into a mature neuronal cell type with retinoic acid and other compounds, providing an important model system for elucidating signalling pathways involved in this highly complex process. Recently, it has become apparent that miRNAs, which act as regulators of gene expression at a post-transcriptional level, are differentially expressed in differentiating cells and play important roles governing many aspects of this process. This includes the down-regulation of DNA methyltransferases that cause the de-methylation and transcriptional activation of numerous protein coding gene sequences. The purpose of this article is to review involvement of miRNAs and DNA methylation alterations in the process of neuroblastoma cell differentiation. A thorough understanding of miRNA and genetic pathways regulating neuroblastoma cell differentiation potentially could lead to targeted therapies for this disease.

  6. Running Induces Widespread Structural Alterations in the Hippocampus and Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Stranahan, Alexis M.; Khalil, David; Gould, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity enhances hippocampal function but its effects on neuronal structure remain relatively unexplored outside of the dentate gyrus. Using Golgi impregnation and the lipophilic tracer DiI, we show that long-term voluntary running increases the density of dendritic spines in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus of adult rats. Exercise was associated with increased dendritic spine density not only in granule neurons of the dentate gyrus, but also in CA1 pyramidal neurons, and in layer III pyramidal neurons of the entorhinal cortex. In the CA1 region, changes in dendritic spine density are accompanied by changes in dendritic arborization and alterations in the morphology of individual spines. These findings suggest that physical activity exerts pervasive effects on neuronal morphology in the hippocampus and one of its afferent populations. These structural changes may contribute to running-induced changes in cognitive function. PMID:17636549

  7. Altered oxygen metabolism associated to neurogenesis of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a schizophrenic patient.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Bruna da Silveira; de Moraes Maciel, Renata; Galina, Antonio; Souza da Silveira, Mariana; dos Santos Souza, Cleide; Drummond, Hannah; Nascimento Pozzatto, Ernesto; Silva, Hamilton; Chicaybam, Leonardo; Massuda, Raffael; Setti-Perdigão, Pedro; Bonamino, Martin; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo Silva; Castro, Newton Gonçalves; Brentani, Helena; Rehen, Stevens Kastrup

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been defined as a neurodevelopmental disease that causes changes in the process of thoughts, perceptions, and emotions, usually leading to a mental deterioration and affective blunting. Studies have shown altered cell respiration and oxidative stress response in schizophrenia; however, most of the knowledge has been acquired from postmortem brain analyses or from nonneural cells. Here we describe that neural cells, derived from induced pluripotent stem cells generated from skin fibroblasts of a schizophrenic patient, presented a twofold increase in extramitochondrial oxygen consumption as well as elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), when compared to controls. This difference in ROS levels was reverted by the mood stabilizer valproic acid. Our model shows evidence that metabolic changes occurring during neurogenesis are associated with schizophrenia, contributing to a better understanding of the development of the disease and highlighting potential targets for treatment and drug screening.

  8. p97 Disease Mutations Modulate Nucleotide-Induced Conformation to Alter Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bulfer, Stacie L; Chou, Tsui-Fen; Arkin, Michelle R

    2016-08-19

    The AAA+ ATPase p97/VCP adopts at least three conformations that depend on the binding of ADP and ATP and alter the orientation of the N-terminal protein-protein interaction (PPI) domain into "up" and "down" conformations. Point mutations that cause multisystem proteinopathy 1 (MSP1) are found at the interface of the N domain and D1-ATPase domain and potentially alter the conformational preferences of p97. Additionally, binding of "adaptor" proteins to the N-domain regulates p97's catalytic activity. We propose that p97/adaptor PPIs are coupled to p97 conformational states. We evaluated the binding of nucleotides and the adaptor proteins p37 and p47 to wild-type p97 and MSP1 mutants. Notably, p47 and p37 bind 8-fold more weakly to the ADP-bound conformation of wild-type p97 compared to the ATP-bound conformation. However, MSP1 mutants lose this nucleotide-induced conformational coupling because they destabilize the ADP-bound, "down" conformation of the N-domain. Loss in conformation coupling to PPIs could contribute to the mechanism of MSP1. PMID:27267671

  9. Biochemical and physiological alterations induced in Diopatra neapolitana after a long-term exposure to Arsenic.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Francesca; Pires, Adília; Velez, Cátia; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Pereira, Eduarda; Figueira, Etelvina; Freitas, Rosa

    2016-11-01

    Several authors identified polychaetes as a group of marine invertebrates that respond rapidly to anthropogenic stressors. Furthermore, several studies have demonstrated that environmental pollution lead to the impoverishment of benthic communities with species replacement and biodiversity loss, but very few studies have investigated biochemical and physiological alterations that species undergo in response to Arsenic (As) exposure. Therefore, the present study assessed the toxicity induced in the polychaete Diopatra neapolitana after a long-term (28days) exposure to different As concentrations (0.0, 0.05, 0.25 and 1.25mg/L). For this biochemical and physiological alterations were evaluated. Biochemical analysis included the measurement of different biomarkers such as glutathione S-transferase (GST), lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were assessed in order to evaluate oxidative stress. Physiological analyzes included the observation of polychaetes regenerative capacity and the quantification of organisms total protein (PROT) and glycogen (GLY) content. The results obtained allowed to confirm the suitability of these biomarkers to identify the toxicity caused by As and moreover revealed that D. neapolitana is a good bioindicator of As pollution. PMID:27349727

  10. Long-term alterations in neural and endocrine processes induced by motherhood in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Parental Care". The reproductive experience of pregnancy, lactation and motherhood can significantly remodel the female's biological state, affecting endocrine, neuroendocrine, neural, and immunological processes. The brain, pituitary gland, liver, thymus, and mammary tissue are among the structures that are modified by reproductive experience. The present review that focuses on rodent research, but also includes pertinent studies in sheep and other species, identifies specific changes in these processes brought about by the biological states of pregnancy, parturition, and lactation and how the components of reproductive experience contribute to the remodeling of the maternal brain and organ systems. Findings indicate that prior parity alters key circulating hormone levels and neural receptor gene expression. Moreover, reproductive experience results in modifications in neural processes and glial support. The possible role of pregnancy-induced neurogenesis is considered in the context of neuroplasticity and behavior, and the effects of reproductive experience on maternal memory, i.e. the retention of maternal behavior, together with anxiety and learning are presented. Together, these sets of findings support the concept that the neural and biological state of the adult female is significantly and dramatically altered on a long-term basis by the experiences of parity and motherhood. Remodeling of the maternal brain and other biological systems is posited to help facilitate adaptations to environmental/ecological challenges as the female raises young and ages.

  11. Structural and functional alterations of catalase induced by acriflavine, a compound causing apoptosis and necrosis.

    PubMed

    Attar, Farnoosh; Khavari-Nejad, Sarah; Keyhani, Jacqueline; Keyhani, Ezzatollah

    2009-08-01

    Acriflavine is an antiseptic agent causing both apoptosis and necrosis in yeast. In this work, its effect on the structure and function of catalase, a vital enzyme actively involved in protection against oxidative stress, was investigated. In vitro kinetic studies showed that acriflavine inhibited the enzymatic activity in a competitive manner. The residual activity detectable after preincubation of catalase (1.5 nmol/L) with various concentrations of acriflavine went from 50% to 20% of the control value as the acriflavine concentration increased from 30 to 90 micromol/L. Correlatively with the decrease in activity, alterations in the enzyme's conformation were observed as indicated by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and electronic absorption spectroscopy. The enzyme's intrinsic fluorescence obtained upon excitation at either 297 nm (tryptophan residues) or 280 nm (tyrosine and tryptophan residues) decreased as a function of acriflavine concentration. Circular dichroism studies showed alterations of the protein structure by acriflavine with up to 13% decrease in alpha helix, 16% increase in beta-sheet content, 17% increase in random coil, and 4% increase in beta turns. Spectrophotometric studies showed a blueshift and modifications in the chromicity of catalase at 405 nm, corresponding to an absorbance band due to the enzyme's prosthetic group. Thus, acriflavine induced in vitro a profound change in the structure of catalase so that the enzyme could no longer function. Our results showed that acriflavine, a compound producing apoptosis and necrosis, can have a direct effect on vital functions in cells by disabling key enzymes.

  12. Feminization and alteration of Drosophila taste neurons induce reciprocal effects on male avoidance behavior.

    PubMed

    Lacaille, Fabien; Everaerts, Claude; Ferveur, Jean-François

    2009-09-01

    Taste perception allows most animals to find edible food, potential mates, and avoid ingesting toxic molecules. Intriguingly, a small group of Drosophila taste neurones (expressing Gr66a-Gal4) involved in the perception of bitter substances is also used to detect 7-tricosene (7-T), a male cuticular pheromone. Male flies tend to be inhibited by 7-T whereas females are stimulated by this pheromone. To better understand their role on male courtship, Gr66a-Gal4 neurons were genetically feminized or altered with various transgenes, and the response of transgenic males was measured toward live targets carrying various amounts of 7-T, or of bitter molecules (caffeine, quinine and berberine). Surprisingly, tester males with feminized taste neurons showed an increased dose-dependent avoidance toward targets with high level of any of these substances, compared to other tester males. Conversely, males with altered neurons showed no, or very little avoidance. Moreover, the surgical ablation of the sensory appendages carrying these taste neurons differently affected the behavioral response of the various tester males. The fact that this manipulation did not affect the courtship toward control females nor the locomotor activity of tester males suggests that Gr66a-Gal4 neurons are involved in the sex-specific perception of molecules inducing male avoidance behavior.

  13. Cardiorespiratory alterations induced by low-intensity exercise performed in water or on land.

    PubMed

    Ayme, Karine; Rossi, Pascal; Gavarry, Olivier; Chaumet, Guillaume; Boussuges, Alain

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the cardiorespiratory alterations induced by a low-intensity exercise performed on land or in water. Sixteen healthy subjects were investigated. The exercise consisted of a 1-h period of ergocycling at 35%-40% of peak oxygen uptake. Investigations were performed at rest and 45 min after the beginning of the exercises. Hemodynamic changes were studied by Doppler-echocardiography. Gas exchanges were continuously monitored by an oxygen gas analyzer. Blood samples were taken successively at baseline, within the last minutes of the exercise bout, and during recovery to measure total protein concentration and natriuretic peptides. Cardiovascular parameters were not significantly different during exercise performed on land or in water. As a result of an accelerated breathing frequency, ventilation output was significantly greater in water. Biological changes included a decrease in total protein concentration and an increase in natriuretic peptides in water. During low-intensity exercise, ventilatory alterations favoured increasing the work of breathing while in the water when compared with the same exercise performed on land. Hemodynamic changes were similar in the 2 conditions. Furthermore, biological findings suggest that the fluid transfer from intravascular sector toward interstitial sector could be facilitated in water.

  14. The role of psychoneuroendocrine factors on spaceflight-induced immunological alterations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, R.; Whitson, P.; Sams, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes previous in-flight infections and novel conditions of spaceflight that may suppress immune function. Granulocytosis, monocytosis, and lymphopenia are routinely observed following short duration orbital flights. Subtle changes within the monocyte and T cell populations can also be noted by flow cytometric analysis. The similarity between the immunological changes observed after spaceflight and other diverse environmental stressors suggest that most of these alterations may be neuroendocrine-mediated. Available data support the hypothesis that spaceflight and other environmental stressors modulate normal immune regulation via stress hormones, other than exclusively glucocorticoids. It will be essential to simultaneously collect in-flight endocrine, immunologic, and infectious illness data to determine the clinical significance of these results. Additional research that delineates the neuroendocrine mechanisms of stress-induced changes in normal immune regulation will allow clinicians in the future to initiate prophylactic immunomodulator therapy to restore immune competence altered by the stress of long-duration spaceflight and therefore reduce morbidity from infectious illness, autoimmune disease, or malignancy.

  15. Long-term alterations in neural and endocrine processes induced by motherhood in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Parental Care". The reproductive experience of pregnancy, lactation and motherhood can significantly remodel the female's biological state, affecting endocrine, neuroendocrine, neural, and immunological processes. The brain, pituitary gland, liver, thymus, and mammary tissue are among the structures that are modified by reproductive experience. The present review that focuses on rodent research, but also includes pertinent studies in sheep and other species, identifies specific changes in these processes brought about by the biological states of pregnancy, parturition, and lactation and how the components of reproductive experience contribute to the remodeling of the maternal brain and organ systems. Findings indicate that prior parity alters key circulating hormone levels and neural receptor gene expression. Moreover, reproductive experience results in modifications in neural processes and glial support. The possible role of pregnancy-induced neurogenesis is considered in the context of neuroplasticity and behavior, and the effects of reproductive experience on maternal memory, i.e. the retention of maternal behavior, together with anxiety and learning are presented. Together, these sets of findings support the concept that the neural and biological state of the adult female is significantly and dramatically altered on a long-term basis by the experiences of parity and motherhood. Remodeling of the maternal brain and other biological systems is posited to help facilitate adaptations to environmental/ecological challenges as the female raises young and ages. PMID:26388065

  16. Gestational protein restriction induces alterations in placental morphology and mitochondrial function in rats during late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rebelato, Hércules Jonas; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marreto; Moraes, Camila; Amaral, Maria Esmeria Corezola; Catisti, Rosana

    2013-12-01

    The placenta acts a regulator of nutrient composition and supply from mother to fetus and is the source of hormonal signals that affect maternal and fetal metabolism. Thus, appropriate development of the placenta is crucial for normal fetal development. We investigated the effect of gestational protein restriction (GPR) on placental morphology and mitochondrial function on day 19 of gestation. Pregnant dams were divided into two groups: normal (NP 17 % casein) or low-protein diet (LP 6 % casein). The placentas were processed for biochemical, histomorphometric and ultrastructural analysis. The integrity of rat placental mitochondria (RPM) isolated by conventional differential centrifugation was measured by oxygen uptake (Clark-type electrode). LP animals presented an increase in adipose tissue and triacylglycerol and a decrease in serum insulin levels. No alterations were observed in body, liver, fetus, or placenta weight. There was also no change in serum glucose, total protein, or lipid content. Gestational protein restriction had tissue-specific respiratory effects, with the observation of a small change in liver respiration (~13 %) and considerable respiratory inhibition in placenta samples (~37 %). The higher oxygen uptake by RPM in the LP groups suggests uncoupling between respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, ultrastructural analysis of junctional zone giant cells from LP placenta showed a disorganized cytoplasm, with loss of integrity of most organelles and intense vacuolization. The present results led us to hypothesize that GPR alters placental structure and morphology, induces sensitivity to insulin, mitochondrial abnormalities and suggests premature aging of the placenta. Further studies are needed to test this hypothesis.

  17. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhong, Wei; Li, Houkai; Li, Qiong; Qiu, Yunping; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Huiyuan; Zhao, Xueqing; Zhang, Shucha; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zeisel, Steven H.; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the bile acid metabolism is limited by the fact that previous analyses have primarily focused on a selected few circulating bile acids; the bile acid profiles of the liver and gastrointestinal tract pools are rarely investigated. Here, we determined how chronic ethanol consumption altered the bile acids in multiple body compartments (liver, gastrointestinal tract, and serum) of rats. Rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet with 38% of calories as ethanol (the amount equivalent of 4–5 drinks in humans). While conjugated bile acids predominated in the liver (98.3%), duodenum (97.8%), and ileum (89.7%), unconjugated bile acids comprised the largest proportion of measured bile acids in serum (81.2%), the cecum (97.7%), and the rectum (97.5%). In particular, taurine-conjugated bile acids were significantly decreased in the liver and gastrointestinal tract of ethanol-treated rats, while unconjugated and glycine-conjugated species increased. Ethanol consumption caused increased expression of genes involved in bile acid biosynthesis, efflux transport, and reduced expression of genes regulating bile acid influx transport in the liver. These results provide an improved understanding of the systemic modulations of bile acid metabolism in mammals through the gut-liver axis.—Xie, G., Zhong, W., Li, H., Li, Q., Qiu, Y., Zheng, X., Chen, H., Zhao, X., Zhang, S., Zhou, Z., Zeisel, S. H., Jia, W. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption. PMID:23709616

  18. Stress-induced alterations in interferon production and class II histocompatibility antigen expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Cunnick, J. E.; Armfield, A. V.; Wood, P. G.; Rabin, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    Mild electric foot-shock has been shown to be a stressor that can alter immune responses. Male Lewis rats were exposed to one session of 16 5.0-s 1.6-mA foot-shocks. Production of interferon-gamma by splenocytes in response to concanavalin-A was decreased in spleens from the shocked rats compared to control spleens. Spleen cells from rats treated with nadolol, a peripherally acting beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, and then shocked, showed dose-dependent attenuation of the suppression of interferon-gamma production. This suggests that catecholamines mediate shock-induced suppression of interferon-gamma production. The percentage of splenic mononuclear cells expressing class II histocompatibility (Ia) antigens on their surfaces from spleens of shocked rats was determined by flow cytometry. Significantly decreased class II positive mononuclear cells were present in the spleens of shocked rats in comparison to the spleens of control rats. This may reflect an alteration of cell trafficking or decreased production of class II antigens.

  19. The role of psychoneuroendocrine factors on spaceflight-induced immunological alterations.

    PubMed

    Meehan, R; Whitson, P; Sams, C

    1993-09-01

    This paper summarizes previous in-flight infections and novel conditions of spaceflight that may suppress immune function. Granulocytosis, monocytosis, and lymphopenia are routinely observed following short duration orbital flights. Subtle changes within the monocyte and T cell populations can also be noted by flow cytometric analysis. The similarity between the immunological changes observed after spaceflight and other diverse environmental stressors suggest that most of these alterations may be neuroendocrine-mediated. Available data support the hypothesis that spaceflight and other environmental stressors modulate normal immune regulation via stress hormones, other than exclusively glucocorticoids. It will be essential to simultaneously collect in-flight endocrine, immunologic, and infectious illness data to determine the clinical significance of these results. Additional research that delineates the neuroendocrine mechanisms of stress-induced changes in normal immune regulation will allow clinicians in the future to initiate prophylactic immunomodulator therapy to restore immune competence altered by the stress of long-duration spaceflight and therefore reduce morbidity from infectious illness, autoimmune disease, or malignancy. PMID:8371053

  20. Effects of Chemotherapy-Induced Alterations in Cell Mechanical Properties on Cancer Metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prathivadhi, Sruti; Ekpenyong, Andrew; Nichols, Michael; Taylor, Carolyn; Ning, Jianhao

    Biological cells can modulate their mechanical properties to suit their functions and in response to changes in their environment. Thus, mechanical phenotyping of cells has been employed for tracking stem cell differentiation, bacterial infection, cell death, etc. Malignant transformation of cells also involves changes in mechanical properties. However, the extent to which mechanical properties of cancer cells contribute to metastasis is not well understood. Yet, more than 90% of all cancer deaths are directly related to metastasis. Transit of cells through the microcirculation is one of the key features of metastasis. We hypothesize that cancer treatment regimens do inadvertently alter cell mechanical properties in ways that might promote cancer metastasis. We use a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic (MMM) platform which mimics the capillary constrictions of the pulmonary and peripheral microcirculation to determine if in-vivo-like mechanical stimuli can evoke different responses from cells subjected to various cancer drugs. In particular, we show that cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic drugs such as daunorubicin, become more deformable at short timescales (0.1 s) and transit faster through the device. Our results are first steps in evaluating the pro- or anti-metastatic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs based on their induced alterations in cell mechanical properties.

  1. Chromosomal and Nuclear Alterations in Root Tip Cells of Allium Cepa L. Induced by Alprazolam

    PubMed Central

    Nefic, Hilada; Musanovic, Jasmin; Metovic, Azra; Kurteshi, Kemajl

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Alprazolam is a triazolobenzodiazepine used in panic disorders and other anxiety states. Target organ of Alprazolam is CNS, causing depression of respiration and consciousness. Aim: This study aimed to estimate the genotoxic potential of Alprazolam using Allium cepa test. Methods: Allium cepa is one of the most suitable plants for detecting different types of xenobiotics. The test enables the assessment of different genetic endpoints making possible damage to the DNA of humans to be predicted. Results: Alprazolam induced chromosomal (anaphase bridges, breaks, lagging and stickiness, abnormal spiralisation, multipolarity and polyploidy) and cytological aberrations, especially nuclear alterations (nuclear buds, fragmented nucleus and apoptotic bodies, cells without nucleus, binucleated and micronucleated cells), morphological alterations in shape and size of cells, spindle disturbance and polar deviation in root tip meristem cells of Allium cepa at all tested concentrations. Alprazolam also caused significant inhibition of mitotic index in these cells. Conclusion: These changes in cells are indicators of genotoxic potential of Alprazolam suggesting a need for further in vitro studies on animal and human lymphocytes as well as in vivo studies. PMID:25568504

  2. Intranasal NAP (davunetide) decreases tau hyperphosphorylation and moderately improves behavioral deficits in mice overexpressing α-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Iddo; Ostritsky, Regina; Richter, Franziska; Zhu, Chunni; Fleming, Sheila M; Lemesre, Vincent; Stewart, Alistair J; Morimoto, Bruce H; Gozes, Illana; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified strong associations between the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD) and polymorphisms in the genes encoding α-synuclein and the microtubule-associated protein tau. However, the contribution of tau and its phosphorylated form (p-tau) to α-synuclein-induced pathology and neuronal dysfunction remains controversial. We have assessed the effects of NAP (davunetide), an eight-amino acid peptide that decreases tau hyperphosphorylation, in mice overexpressing wild-type human α-synuclein (Thy1-aSyn mice), a model that recapitulates aspects of PD. We found that the p-tau/tau level increased in a subcortical tissue block that includes the striatum and brain stem, and in the cerebellum of the Thy1-aSyn mice compared to nontransgenic controls. Intermittent intranasal NAP administration at 2 μg/mouse per day, 5 days a week, for 24 weeks, starting at 4 weeks of age, significantly decreased the ratio of p-tau/tau levels in the subcortical region while a higher dose of 15 μg/mouse per day induced a decrease in p-tau/tau levels in the cerebellum. Both NAP doses reduced hyperactivity, improved habituation to a novel environment, and reduced olfactory deficits in the Thy1-aSyn mice, but neither dose improved the severe deficits of motor coordination observed on the challenging beam and pole, contrasting with previous data obtained with continuous daily administration of the drug. The data reveal novel effects of NAP on brain p-tau/tau and behavioral outcomes in this model of synucleinopathy and suggest that sustained exposure to NAP may be necessary for maximal benefits. PMID:25505609

  3. Tissue culture-induced genetic and epigenetic alterations in rice pure-lines, F1 hybrids and polyploids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic and epigenetic alterations can be invoked by plant tissue culture, which may result in heritable changes in phenotypes, a phenomenon collectively termed somaclonal variation. Although extensive studies have been conducted on the molecular nature and spectrum of tissue culture-induced genomic alterations, the issue of whether and to what extent distinct plant genotypes, e.g., pure-lines, hybrids and polyploids, may respond differentially to the tissue culture condition remains poorly understood. Results We investigated tissue culture-induced genetic and epigenetic alterations in a set of rice genotypes including two pure-lines (different subspecies), a pair of reciprocal F1 hybrids parented by the two pure-lines, and a pair of reciprocal tetraploids resulted from the hybrids. Using two molecular markers, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP), both genetic and DNA methylation alterations were detected in calli and regenerants from all six genotypes, but genetic alteration is more prominent than epigenetic alteration. While significant genotypic difference was observed in frequencies of both types of alterations, only genetic alteration showed distinctive features among the three types of genomes, with one hybrid (N/9) being exceptionally labile. Surprisingly, difference in genetic alteration frequencies between the pair of reciprocal F1 hybrids is much greater than that between the two pure-line subspecies. Difference also exists in the pair of reciprocal tetraploids, but is to a less extent than that between the hybrids. The steady-state transcript abundance of genes involved in DNA repair and DNA methylation was significantly altered in both calli and regenerants, and some of which were correlated with the genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. Conclusions Our results, based on molecular marker analysis of ca. 1,000 genomic loci, document that genetic alteration is the major cause of

  4. Chronic Intake of Japanese Sake Mediates Radiation-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tetsuo; Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Sake is a traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage that is gaining popularity worldwide. Although sake is reported to have beneficial health effects, it is not known whether chronic sake consumption modulates health risks due to radiation exposure or other factors. Here, the effects of chronic administration of sake on radiation-induced metabolic alterations in the livers of mice were evaluated. Sake (junmai-shu) was administered daily to female mice (C3H/He) for one month, and the mice were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy/day) for the last four days of the sake administration period. For comparative analysis, a group of mice were administered 15% (v/v) ethanol in water instead of sake. Metabolites in the liver were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry one day following the last exposure to radiation. The metabolite profiles of mice chronically administered sake in combination with radiation showed marked changes in purine, pyrimidine, and glutathione (GSH) metabolism, which were only partially altered by radiation or sake administration alone. Notably, the changes in GSH metabolism were not observed in mice treated with radiation following chronic administration of 15% ethanol in water. Changes in several metabolites, including methionine and valine, were induced by radiation alone, but were not detected in the livers of mice who received chronic administration of sake. In addition, the chronic administration of sake increased the level of serum triglycerides, although radiation exposure suppressed this increase. Taken together, the present findings suggest that chronic sake consumption promotes GSH metabolism and anti-oxidative activities in the liver, and thereby may contribute to minimizing the adverse effects associated with radiation. PMID:26752639

  5. Dracaena arborea alleviates ultra-structural spermatogenic alterations in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infertility is a common complication in diabetic men and experimental animals, mainly due to loss of germ cells by apoptotic cell death. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aqueous and ethanol extracts of Dracaena arborea in streptozotocin-induced ultra-structural spermatogenic alterations in Wistar rats. Methods Diabetic animals were orally treated with Millipore water (10 ml/kg), sildenafil citrate (1.44 mg/kg) or Dracaena arborea aqueous (500 mg/kg) and ethanol (100 mg/kg) extracts for three weeks. A group of non diabetic rats received Millipore water (10 ml/kg) and served as healthy control group. Blood glucose was monitored at the beginning and the end of the study. One day after the last treatment, animals were sacrificed and the testes immediately removed were morphologically observed and prepared for electron microscopy analysis of spermatogenesis. Results Our results showed that Dracaena arborea was devoid of any anti-hyperglycemic activity. In the untreated diabetic rats, hyperglycemia severely damaged the testes morphology as well as the spermatogenic process as evidenced by the: thickness of basement membrane of the seminiferous tubule; mitochondria alteration; abnormal spermatocyte cells displaying polymorphous nuclei, cytoplasmic vacuolization and necrosis; and disorganization and degeneration of sperm germ cells. Administration of sildenafil citrate and Dracaena arborea extracts to the diabetic rats improved testes morphology and reversed, although not completely, the impairment of spermatogenesis; this alleviating effect was more pronounced in animals treated with the aqueous extract (500 mg/kg) of Dracaena arborea. Conclusion Dracaena arborea improves testes morphology and restores spermatogenesis in type 1 diabetic rats, without having major anti-hyperglycemic properties. These effects could be attributed to saponins, flavonoids, phenols and sterols revealed in this plant, which could be a useful component

  6. DNA survival and physical and histological properties of heat-induced alterations in burnt bones.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, K; Taniguchi, K; Ogawa, Y

    2014-05-01

    During forensic casework, it is vital to be able to obtain valuable information from burnt bone fragments to ascertain the identity of the victim. Here, we report the findings of an experimental study on burnt bovine compact bone segments. Compact bones were cut to size and heated in an electric furnace at a temperature range of 100–1,100 °C with 100 °C increments. Heat-induced alterations to the bone color,weight, volume, and density were monitored using gross morphology and micro-focus X-ray computed tomography.We found that the increase in temperature caused the color of the compact bones to change in order of yellow, brown, gray,and white. In contrast to the weight reduction that occurred immediately after burning, we measured no significant reduction in volume even at 600 °C; however, volume reduced drastically once the temperature reached 700 °C. Light microscopic histological observations of burnt bone revealed heat induced alterations such as cracking and separation of the osteons at higher temperatures. In addition to these findings,we sought to examine the survival of DNA in the burnt bones using polymerase chain reaction of mitochondrial DNA. No amplification was found in the specimens burnt at 250 °C or higher, indicating the likely difficulty in testing the DNA of burnt bones from forensic casework. The results of this study will enable an estimation of the burning temperatures of burnt bones found in forensic cases and will provide an important framework with which to interpret data obtained during anthropological testing and DNA typing. PMID:24658641

  7. Gestational exposure to yellow fever vaccine at different developmental stages induces behavioral alterations in the progeny.

    PubMed

    Marianno, P; Salles, M J S; Sonego, A B; Costa, G A; Galvão, T C; Lima, G Z; Moreira, E G

    2013-01-01

    The most effective method to prevent yellow fever and control the disease is a vaccine made with attenuated live virus. Due to the neurological tropism of the virus, preventive vaccination is not recommended for infants under 6 months and for pregnant women. However there is a paucity of data regarding the safety for pregnant women and there are no experimental studies investigating adverse effects to the offspring after maternal exposure to the vaccine. This study aimed to investigate, in mice, the effects of maternal exposure to the yellow fever vaccine at three different gestational ages on the physical and behavioral development of the offspring. Pregnant Swiss mice received a single subcutaneous injection of water for injection (control groups) or 2 log Plaque Forming Units (vaccine-treated groups) of the yellow fever vaccine on gestational days (GD) 5, 10 or 15. Neither maternal signs of toxicity nor alterations in physical development and reflex ontogeny of the offspring were observed in any of the groups. Data from behavioral evaluation indicated that yellow fever vaccine exposure induced motor hypoactivity in 22-day-old females independent of the day of exposure; and in 60-day-old male and female pups exposed at GD 10. Moreover, 22-day-old females also presented with a deficit in habituation memory. Altogether, these results indicate that in utero exposure to the yellow fever vaccine may induce behavioral alterations in the pups that may persist to adulthood in the absence of observed maternal toxicity or disruption of physical development milestones or reflex ontogeny.

  8. Increased Klk9 Urinary Excretion Is Associated to Hypertension-Induced Cardiovascular Damage and Renal Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Blázquez-Medela, Ana M.; García-Sánchez, Omar; Quirós, Yaremi; Blanco-Gozalo, Victor; Prieto-García, Laura; Sancho-Martínez, Sandra M.; Romero, Miguel; Duarte, Juan M.; López-Hernández, Francisco J.; López-Novoa, José M.; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Early detection of hypertensive end-organ damage and secondary diseases are key determinants of cardiovascular prognosis in patients suffering from arterial hypertension. Presently, there are no biomarkers for the detection of hypertensive target organ damage, most outstandingly including blood vessels, the heart, and the kidneys. We aimed to validate the usefulness of the urinary excretion of the serine protease kallikrein-related peptidase 9 (KLK9) as a biomarker of hypertension-induced target organ damage. Urinary, plasma, and renal tissue levels of KLK9 were measured by the Western blot in different rat models of hypertension, including angiotensin-II infusion, DOCA-salt, L-NAME administration, and spontaneous hypertension. Urinary levels were associated to cardiovascular and renal injury, assessed by histopathology. The origin of urinary KLK9 was investigated through in situ renal perfusion experiments. The urinary excretion of KLK9 is increased in different experimental models of hypertension in rats. The ACE inhibitor trandolapril significantly reduced arterial pressure and the urinary level of KLK9. Hypertension did not increase kidney, heart, liver, lung, or plasma KLK9 levels. Hypertension-induced increased urinary excretion of KLK9 results from specific alterations in its tubular reabsorption, even in the absence of overt nephropathy. KLK9 urinary excretion strongly correlates with cardiac hypertrophy and aortic wall thickening. KLK9 appears in the urine in the presence of hypertension as a result of subtle renal handling alterations. Urinary KLK9 might be potentially used as an indicator of hypertensive cardiac and vascular damage. PMID:26469898

  9. Chronic Intake of Japanese Sake Mediates Radiation-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tetsuo; Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Sake is a traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage that is gaining popularity worldwide. Although sake is reported to have beneficial health effects, it is not known whether chronic sake consumption modulates health risks due to radiation exposure or other factors. Here, the effects of chronic administration of sake on radiation-induced metabolic alterations in the livers of mice were evaluated. Sake (junmai-shu) was administered daily to female mice (C3H/He) for one month, and the mice were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy/day) for the last four days of the sake administration period. For comparative analysis, a group of mice were administered 15% (v/v) ethanol in water instead of sake. Metabolites in the liver were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry one day following the last exposure to radiation. The metabolite profiles of mice chronically administered sake in combination with radiation showed marked changes in purine, pyrimidine, and glutathione (GSH) metabolism, which were only partially altered by radiation or sake administration alone. Notably, the changes in GSH metabolism were not observed in mice treated with radiation following chronic administration of 15% ethanol in water. Changes in several metabolites, including methionine and valine, were induced by radiation alone, but were not detected in the livers of mice who received chronic administration of sake. In addition, the chronic administration of sake increased the level of serum triglycerides, although radiation exposure suppressed this increase. Taken together, the present findings suggest that chronic sake consumption promotes GSH metabolism and anti-oxidative activities in the liver, and thereby may contribute to minimizing the adverse effects associated with radiation. PMID:26752639

  10. Modulation of cadmium induced alterations in murine thymocytes by piperine: oxidative stress, apoptosis, phenotyping and blastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Neelima; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2006-08-14

    Piperine, a main component of Piper longum Linn. and Piper nigrum Linn., is a plant alkaloid with a long history of medicinal use in Indian medicine. It is known to exhibit a variety of biological activities which include anti-pyretic, anti-inflammatory, anti-depressant, hepatoprotective and antitumor. Its immunomodulatory role has so far been limited to humoral response. The influence of piperine on murine thymocytes, immunocompromised by cadmium has been reported by us in this investigation. The various biochemical parameters such as oxidative stress markers (ROS and GSH), Bcl-2 protein expression, mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 activity, DNA damage, blastogenesis and T lymphocyte phenotypes were determined. Cadmium (25 microM) induced apoptosis earliest at 6 h. Alterations in ROS and GSH preceded mitochondrial membrane depolarization and caspase-3 activation followed by apoptosis. The phenotypic changes occurred at 18 h and blastogenesis at 72 h. Various conc. of piperine (1, 10 and 50 microg/ml) when added along with Cd (25 microM) from 1.5 to 72 h, caused a dose and time dependent amelioration in all the cellular events mentioned above. Modulation of oxidative stress has earlier been reported to reduce Cd induced apoptosis in murine lymphocytes. Inhibition of the ROS production and replenishment of GSH by piperine, may in part be responsible for the suppression of downstream cascade of events, i.e. apoptosis, blastogenesis and T lymphocyte phenotyping. The study clearly demonstrated the anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic, and restorative ability against cell proliferative mitogenic response and phenotypic alterations by piperine, suggesting its therapeutic usefulness in immunocompromised conditions. PMID:16780805

  11. Brain injury induces specific changes in the caecal microbiota of mice via altered autonomic activity and mucoprotein production.

    PubMed

    Houlden, A; Goldrick, M; Brough, D; Vizi, E S; Lénárt, N; Martinecz, B; Roberts, I S; Denes, A

    2016-10-01

    Intestinal microbiota are critical for health with changes associated with diverse human diseases. Research suggests that altered intestinal microbiota can profoundly affect brain function. However, whether altering brain function directly affects the microbiota is unknown. Since it is currently unclear how brain injury induces clinical complications such as infections or paralytic ileus, key contributors to prolonged hospitalization and death post-stroke, we tested in mice the hypothesis that brain damage induced changes in the intestinal microbiota. Experimental stroke altered the composition of caecal microbiota, with specific changes in Peptococcaceae and Prevotellaceae correlating with the extent of injury. These effects are mediated by noradrenaline release from the autonomic nervous system with altered caecal mucoprotein production and goblet cell numbers. Traumatic brain injury also caused changes in the gut microbiota, confirming brain injury effects gut microbiota. Changes in intestinal microbiota after brain injury may affect recovery and treatment of patients should appreciate such changes.

  12. Profiling of Altered Metabolomic States in Nicotiana tabacum Cells Induced by Priming Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mhlongo, Msizi I.; Steenkamp, Paul A.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Madala, Ntakadzeni E.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics has developed into a valuable tool for advancing our understanding of plant metabolism. Plant innate immune defenses can be activated and enhanced so that, subsequent to being pre-sensitized, plants are able to launch a stronger and faster defense response upon exposure to pathogenic microorganisms, a phenomenon known as priming. Here, three contrasting chemical activators, namely acibenzolar-S-methyl, azelaic acid and riboflavin, were used to induce a primed state in Nicotiana tabacum cells. Identified biomarkers were then compared to responses induced by three phytohormones—abscisic acid, methyljasmonate, and salicylic acid. Altered metabolomes were studied using a metabolite fingerprinting approach based on liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Multivariate data models indicated that these inducers cause time-dependent metabolic perturbations in the cultured cells and revealed biomarkers of which the levels are affected by these agents. A total of 34 metabolites were annotated from the mass spectral data and online databases. Venn diagrams were used to identify common biomarkers as well as those unique to a specific agent. Results implicate 20 cinnamic acid derivatives conjugated to (i) quinic acid (chlorogenic acids), (ii) tyramine, (iii) polyamines, or (iv) glucose as discriminatory biomarkers of priming in tobacco cells. Functional roles for most of these metabolites in plant defense responses could thus be proposed. Metabolites induced by the activators belong to the early phenylpropanoid pathway, which indicates that different stimuli can activate similar pathways but with different metabolite fingerprints. Possible linkages to phytohormone-dependent pathways at a metabolomic level were indicated in the case of cells treated with salicylic acid and methyljasmonate. The results contribute to a better understanding of the priming phenomenon and advance our knowledge of cinnamic acid derivatives as versatile defense metabolites. PMID

  13. Pretreatment with memantine prevents Alzheimer-like alterations induced by intrahippocampal okadaic acid administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Eduardo Rigon; Kalinine, Eduardo; Haas, Clarissa Branco; Torrez, Vitor Rocco; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Muller, Alexandre Pastoris; Portela, Luis Valmor

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral okadaic acid (OA) administration induces Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like phenotype in rats. Alterations in glutamate levels associated with hyperactivation of cyclin dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) signaling pathway downstream Tau phosphorylation may participate in the genesis of this pathological phenotype. Here, we examined the efficacy of memantine (MN) pretreatment on reducing OA-induced AD-like phenotypes in rats. Wistar rats were given daily intraperitoneal injections of MN for 3 days and then given an intrahippocampal infusion of OA. Animals were divided into four groups: control (CO), MN, OA and MN/OA. Spontaneous locomotion and spatial memory performance were assessed by open field and Morris water maze respectively. Additionally, we measured glutamate levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the immunocontent of Cdk5, p35, p25 and phosphorylated Tau (pTauSer199/202) in the hippocampus. Spontaneous locomotion did not differ between groups. The OA group showed a significant decrease in spatial memory performance compared to all groups. The OA infusion also increased CSF glutamate levels and the immunocontents of Cdk5, p25 and pTauSer199/202 in the hippocampus. Conversely, pretreatment with MN prevented OA-induced spatial memory deficits and the increment of CSF glutamate level; which paralleled with normal immunocontents of Cdk5, p25 and pTau- Ser199/202 proteins. There were positive correlations between spatial memory performance and the neurochemical parameters. In summary, pretreatment with MN prevents spatial memory deficits induced by intrahippocampal OA administration in rats. The prevention of increase CSF glutamate levels, along with the reduced hippocampal phosphorylation of TauSer199/202 by Cdk5/p25 signaling pathway, are the mechanisms proposed to participate in the prophylactic effects of MN in this AD-like model.

  14. Dopamine-Mediated Oxidation of Methionine 127 in α-Synuclein Causes Cytotoxicity and Oligomerization of α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Tajima, Naoko; Ito, Satoru; Teraoka, Mari; Yamashita, Atsushi; Horikoshi, Yosuke; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Mochida, Shinsuke; Nakashima, Kenji; Matsura, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies. Many recent studies focused on the interaction between α-synuclein (α-syn) and dopamine in the pathogenesis of PD, and fluorescent anisotropy suggested that the C-terminal region of α-syn may be a target for modification by dopamine. However, it is not well understood why PD-related pathogenesis occurs selectively in dopaminergic neurons. We investigated the interaction between dopamine and α-syn with regard to cytotoxicity. A soluble oligomer was formed by co-incubating α-syn and dopamine in vitro. To clarify the effect of dopamine on α-syn in cells, we generated PC12 cells expressing human α-syn, as well as the α-syn mutants, M116A, Y125D, M127A, S129A, and M116A/M127A, in a tetracycline-inducible manner (PC12-TetOFF-α-syn). Overexpression of wildtype α-syn in catecholaminergic PC12 cells decreased cell viability in long-term cultures, while a competitive inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase blocked this vulnerability, suggesting that α-syn-related cytotoxicity is associated with dopamine metabolism. The vulnerabilities of all mutant cell lines were lower than that of wildtype α-syn-expressing cells. Moreover, α-syn containing dopamine-mediated oxidized methionine (Met(O)) was detected in PC12-TetOFF-α-syn. Met(O) was lower in methionine mutant cells, especially in the M127A or M116A/M127A mutants, but also in the Y125D and S129A mutants. Co-incubation of dopamine and the 125YEMPS129 peptide enhanced the production of H2O2, which may oxidize methionine residues and convert them to Met(O). Y125- or S129-lacking peptides did not enhance the dopamine-related production of H2O2. Our results suggest that M127 is the major target for oxidative modification by dopamine, and that Y125 and S129 may act as enhancers of this modification. These results may describe a mechanism of dopaminergic neuron

  15. Insulin-degrading enzyme prevents α-synuclein fibril formation in a nonproteolytical manner

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sandeep K.; Chorell, Erik; Steneberg, Pär; Vernersson-Lindahl, Emma; Edlund, Helena; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2015-01-01

    The insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) degrades amyloidogenic proteins such as Amyloid β (Αβ) and Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP), i.e. peptides associated with Alzheimer’s disease and type 2 diabetes, respectively. In addition to the protease activity normally associated with IDE function an additional activity involving the formation of stable, irreversible complexes with both Αβ and α-synuclein, an amyloidogenic protein involved in Parkinson’s disease, was recently proposed. Here, we have investigated the functional consequences of IDE-α-synuclein interactions in vitro. We demonstrate that IDE in a nonproteolytic manner and at sub-stoichiometric ratios efficiently inhibits α-synuclein fibril formation by binding to α-synuclein oligomers making them inert to amyloid formation. Moreover, we show that, within a defined range of α-synuclein concentrations, interaction with α-synuclein oligomers increases IDE’s proteolytic activity on a fluorogenic substrate. We propose that the outcomes of IDE-α-synuclein interactions, i.e. protection against α-synuclein amyloid formation and stimulated IDE protease activity, may be protective in vivo. PMID:26228656

  16. Tau and α-Synuclein Pathology in Amygdala of Parkinsonism-Dementia Complex Patients of Guam

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Mark S.; Schmidt, M. Luise; Kasturi, Sanjay; Perl, Daniel P.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2002-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of Chamorro residents of Guam and the Mariana Islands, characterized by abundant neuron loss and tau neurofibrillary pathology similar to that observed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A variety of neurodegenerative diseases with tau pathology including ALS/PDC also have α-synuclein positive pathology, primarily in the amygdala. We further characterized the tau and α-synuclein pathology in the amygdala of a large series of 30 Chamorros using immunohistochemical and biochemical techniques. Tau pathology was readily detected in both affected and unaffected Chamorros. In contrast, α-synuclein pathology was detected in 37% of patients with PDC but not detected in Chamorros without PDC or AD. The α-synuclein aggregates often co-localized within neurons harboring neurofibrillary tangles suggesting a possible interaction between the two proteins. Tau and α-synuclein pathology within the amygdala is biochemically similar to that observed in AD and synucleinopathies, respectively. Thus, the amygdala may be selectively vulnerable to developing both tau and α-synuclein pathology or tau pathology may predispose it to synuclein aggregation. Furthermore, in PDC, tau and α-synuclein pathology occurs independent of β-amyloid deposition in amygdala thereby implicating the aggregation of these molecules in the severe neurodegeneration frequently observed in this location. PMID:12000724

  17. Insulin-degrading enzyme prevents α-synuclein fibril formation in a nonproteolytical manner.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep K; Chorell, Erik; Steneberg, Pär; Vernersson-Lindahl, Emma; Edlund, Helena; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2015-07-31

    The insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) degrades amyloidogenic proteins such as Amyloid β (Αβ) and Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP), i.e. peptides associated with Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes, respectively. In addition to the protease activity normally associated with IDE function an additional activity involving the formation of stable, irreversible complexes with both Αβ and α-synuclein, an amyloidogenic protein involved in Parkinson's disease, was recently proposed. Here, we have investigated the functional consequences of IDE-α-synuclein interactions in vitro. We demonstrate that IDE in a nonproteolytic manner and at sub-stoichiometric ratios efficiently inhibits α-synuclein fibril formation by binding to α-synuclein oligomers making them inert to amyloid formation. Moreover, we show that, within a defined range of α-synuclein concentrations, interaction with α-synuclein oligomers increases IDE's proteolytic activity on a fluorogenic substrate. We propose that the outcomes of IDE-α-synuclein interactions, i.e. protection against α-synuclein amyloid formation and stimulated IDE protease activity, may be protective in vivo.

  18. Alpha-Synuclein Levels in Blood Plasma Decline with Healthy Aging

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Niklas K. U.; Stransky, Elke; Meyer, Mirjam; Gaertner, Susanne; Shing, Mona; Schnaidt, Martina; Celej, Maria S.; Jovin, Thomas M.; Leyhe, Thomas; Laske, Christoph; Batra, Anil; Buchkremer, Gerhard; Fallgatter, Andreas J.; Wernet, Dorothee; Richartz-Salzburger, Elke

    2015-01-01

    There is unequivocal evidence that alpha-synuclein plays a pivotal pathophysiological role in neurodegenerative diseases, and in particular in synucleinopathies. These disorders present with a variable extent of cognitive impairment and alpha-synuclein is being explored as a biomarker in CSF, blood serum and plasma. Considering key events of aging that include proteostasis, alpha-synuclein may not only be useful as a marker for differential diagnosis but also for aging per se. To explore this hypothesis, we developed a highly specific ELISA to measure alpha-synuclein. In healthy males plasma alpha-synuclein levels correlated strongly with age, revealing much lower concentrations in older (avg. 58.1 years) compared to younger (avg. 27.6 years) individuals. This difference between the age groups was enhanced after acidification of the plasmas (p<0.0001), possibly reflecting a decrease of alpha-synuclein-antibody complexes or chaperone activity in older individuals. Our results support the concept that alpha-synuclein homeostasis may be impaired early on, possibly due to disturbance of the proteostasis network, a key component of healthy aging. Thus, alpha-synuclein may be a novel biomarker of aging, a factor that should be considered when analyzing its presence in biological specimens. PMID:25844871

  19. α-Synuclein aggregation, seeding and inhibition by scyllo-inositol.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tarek; McLaurin, JoAnne

    2016-01-15

    Recent literature demonstrates the accelerated aggregation of α-synuclein, a protein implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), by the presence of preformed fibrillar conformers in vitro. Furthermore, these preformed fibrillar seeds are suggested to accelerate pathological induction in vivo when injected into the brains of mice. Variation in the results of in vivo studies is proposed to be caused by α-synuclein conformational variants. To investigate the impact of amino acid sequence on seeding efficiency, human and mouse α-synuclein seeds, which vary at 7 amino acid residues, were generated and cross-seeding kinetics studied. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we confirmed that mouse α-synuclein aggregated more rapidly than human α-synuclein. Subsequently, we determined that seeding of human and mouse α-synuclein was more rapid in the presence of seeds generated from the same species. In addition, an established amyloid inhibitor, scyllo-inositol, was examined for potential inhibitory effects on α-synuclein aggregation. TEM analysis of protein:inhibitor assays demonstrated that scyllo-inositol inhibits the aggregation of α-synuclein, suggesting the therapeutic potential of the small molecule in PD.

  20. Diabetic retinopathy alters light-induced clock gene expression and dopamine levels in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Lahouaoui, Hasna; Coutanson, Christine; Cooper, Howard M.; Bennis, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common consequences of diabetes that affects millions of working-age adults worldwide and leads to progressive degeneration of the retina, visual loss, and blindness. Diabetes is associated with circadian disruption of the central and peripheral circadian clocks, but the mechanisms responsible for such alterations are unknown. Using a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of diabetes, we investigated whether diabetes alters 1) the circadian regulation of clock genes in the retina and in the central clocks, 2) the light response of clock genes in the retina, and/or 3) light-driven retinal dopamine (DA), a major output marker of the retinal clock. Methods To quantify circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled genes, retinas and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) from the same animals were collected every 4 h in circadian conditions, 12 weeks post-diabetes. Induction of Per1, Per2, and c-fos mRNAs was quantified in the retina after the administration of a pulse of monochromatic light (480 nm, 1.17×1014 photons/cm2/s, 15 min) at circadian time 16. Gene expression was assessed with real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT–PCR). Pooled retinas from the control and STZ-diabetic mice were collected 2 h after light ON and light OFF (Zeitgeber time (ZT)2 and ZT14), and DA and its metabolite were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results We found variable effects of diabetes on the expression of clock genes in the retina and only slight differences in phase and/or amplitude in the SCN. c-fos and Per1 induction by a 480 nm light pulse was abolished in diabetic animals at 12 weeks post-induction of diabetes in comparison with the control mice, suggesting a deficit in light-induced neuronal activation of the retinal clock. Finally, we quantified a 56% reduction in the total number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunopositive cells, associated with a decrease in DA levels during the subjective day (ZT2

  1. Enhanced zinc consumption prevents cadmium-induced alterations in lipid metabolism in male rats.

    PubMed

    Rogalska, Joanna; Brzóska, Małgorzata M; Roszczenko, Alicja; Moniuszko-Jakoniuk, Janina

    2009-01-27

    It has been investigated, based on a rat model of human exposure to cadmium (Cd), whether zinc (Zn) supplementation may prevent Cd-induced alterations in lipid metabolism. For this purpose, the concentrations of free fatty acids (FFA), phospholipids (PL), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TCh), and high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL and LDL, respectively) as well as the concentrations of chosen indices of lipid peroxidation such as lipid peroxides (LPO), F2-isoprostane (F2-IsoP) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL) were estimated in the serum of male Wistar rats administered Cd (5 or 50mg/l) or/and Zn (30 or 60mg/l) in drinking water for 6 months. The exposure to 5 and 50mg Cd/l resulted in marked alterations in the lipid status reflected in increased concentrations of FFA, TCh, LDL, LPO, F2-IsoP and oxLDL, and decreased concentrations of PL and HDL in the serum. The concentrations of LDL, LPO, F2-IsoP and oxLDL were more markedly enhanced at the higher Cd dosage. The supplementation with Zn during the exposure to 5 and 50mg Cd/l entirely prevented all the Cd-induced changes in the serum concentrations of the estimated lipid compounds and indices of lipid peroxidation, except for the F2-IsoP for which Zn provided only partial protection. Based on the results it can be concluded that Zn supplementation during exposure to Cd may have a protective effect on lipid metabolism consisting in its ability to prevent hyperlipidemia, including especially hypercholesterolemia, and to protect from lipid peroxidation. The findings seem to suggest that enhanced dietary Zn intake during Cd exposure, via preventing alterations in the body status of lipids may, at least partly, protect against some effects of Cd toxicity, including oxidative damage to the cellular membranes and atherogenic action. The paper is the first report suggesting protective impact of Zn against proatherogenic Cd action on experimental model of chronic moderate and relatively high human exposure to

  2. Baclofen alters gustatory discrimination capabilities and induces a conditioned taste aversion (CTA)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies intending to measure drug-induced changes in learning and memory are challenged to parse out the effects of drugs on sensory, motor, and associative systems in the brain. In the context of conditioned taste aversion (CTA), drugs that alter the sensorium of subjects and affect their ability to taste and/or feel malaise may limit the ability of investigators to make conclusions about associative effects of these substances. Since the GABAergic system is implicated in inhibition, the authors were hopeful to use the GABA agonist, baclofen (BAC), to enhance extinction of a CTA, but first a preliminary evaluation of BAC's peripheral effects on animals' sensorium had to be completed due to a lack of published literature in this area. Findings Our first experiment aimed to evaluate the extent to which the GABAB agonist, BAC, altered the ability of rats to differentiate between 0.3% and 0.6% saccharin (SAC) in a two bottle preference test. Here we report that 2 or 3 mg/kg (i.p.) BAC, but not 1 mg/kg BAC, impaired animals' gustatory discrimination abilities in this task. Furthermore, when SAC consumption was preceded by 2 or 3 mg/kg (i.p.) BAC, rats depressed their subsequent SAC drinking. A second experiment evaluated if the suppression of SAC and water drinking (revealed in Experiment 1) was mediated by amnesiac effects of BAC or whether BAC possessed US properties in the context of the CTA paradigm. The time necessary to reach an asymptotic level of CTA extinction was not significantly different in those animals that received the 3 mg/kg dose of BAC compared to more conventionally SAC + lithium chloride (LiCl, 81 mg/kg) conditioned animals. Conclusions Our findings were not consistent with a simple amnesia-of-neophobia explanation. Instead, results indicated that 2 and 3 mg/kg (i.p.) BAC were capable of inducing a CTA, which was extinguishable via repeated presentations of SAC only. Our data indicate that, depending on the dose, BAC can alter SAC taste

  3. Spaceflight induces both transient and heritable alterations in DNA methylation and gene expression in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Ou, Xiufang; Long, Likun; Zhang, Yunhong; Xue, Yiqun; Liu, Jingchun; Lin, Xiuyun; Liu, Bao

    2009-03-01

    Spaceflight represents a complex environmental condition in which several interacting factors such as cosmic radiation, microgravity and space magnetic fields are involved, which may provoke stress responses and jeopardize genome integrity. Given the inherent property of epigenetic modifications to respond to intrinsic as well as external perturbations, it is conceivable that epigenetic markers like DNA methylation may undergo alterations in response to spaceflight. We report here that extensive alteration in both DNA methylation and gene expression occurred in rice plants subjected to a spaceflight, as revealed by a set of characterized sequences including 6 transposable elements (TEs) and 11 cellular genes. We found that several features characterize the alterations: (1) All detected alterations are hypermethylation events; (2) whereas alteration in both CG and CNG methylation occurred in the TEs, only alteration in CNG methylation occurred in the cellular genes; (3) alteration in expression includes both up- and down-regulations, which did not show a general correlation with alteration in methylation; (4) altered methylation patterns in both TEs and cellular genes are heritable to progenies at variable frequencies; however, stochastic reversion to wild-type patterns and further de novo changes in progenies are also apparent; and (5) the altered expression states in both TEs and cellular genes are also heritable to selfed progenies but with markedly lower transmission frequencies than altered DNA methylation states. Furthermore, we found that a set of genes encoding for the various putative DNA methyltransferases, 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases, the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeller (DDM1) and siRNA-related proteins are extremely sensitive to perturbation by spaceflight, which might be an underlying cause for the altered methylation patterns in the space-flown plants. We discuss implications of spaceflight-induced epigenetic variations with regard to health safety

  4. Effect of quercetin against lindane induced alterations in the serum and hepatic tissue lipids in wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Lalitha, Gurusamy; Shirony, Nicholson Puthanveedu; Baskaran, Rathinasamy

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of quercetin (flavonoid) against lindane induced alterations in lipid profile of wistar rats. Methods Rats were administered orally with lindane (100 mg/kg body weight) and quercetin (10 mg/kg body weight) for 30 days. After the end of treatment period lipid profile was estimated in serum and tissue. Results Elevated levels of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein (LDL), very Low Density Lipoprotein (VLDL) and tissue triglycerides, cholesterol with concomitant decrease in serum HDL and tissue phospholipids were decreased in lindane treated rats were found to be significantly decreased in the quercetin and lindane co-treated rats. Conclusions Our study suggests that quercetin has hypolipidemic effect and offers protection against lindane induced toxicity in liver by restoring the altered levels of lipids. The quercetin cotreatment along with lindane for 30 days reversed these biochemical alterations in lipids induced by lindane. PMID:23569870

  5. ER Stress and Autophagic Perturbations Lead to Elevated Extracellular α-Synuclein in GBA-N370S Parkinson's iPSC-Derived Dopamine Neurons.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Hugo J R; Hartfield, Elizabeth M; Christian, Helen C; Emmanoulidou, Evangelia; Zheng, Ying; Booth, Heather; Bogetofte, Helle; Lang, Charmaine; Ryan, Brent J; Sardi, S Pablo; Badger, Jennifer; Vowles, Jane; Evetts, Samuel; Tofaris, George K; Vekrellis, Kostas; Talbot, Kevin; Hu, Michele T; James, William; Cowley, Sally A; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) represent the strongest common genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this association are still poorly understood. Here, we have analyzed ten independent induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from three controls and three unrelated PD patients heterozygous for the GBA-N370S mutation, and identified relevant disease mechanisms. After differentiation into dopaminergic neurons, we observed misprocessing of mutant glucocerebrosidase protein in the ER, associated with activation of ER stress and abnormal cellular lipid profiles. Furthermore, we observed autophagic perturbations and an enlargement of the lysosomal compartment specifically in dopamine neurons. Finally, we found increased extracellular α-synuclein in patient-derived neuronal culture medium, which was not associated with exosomes. Overall, ER stress, autophagic/lysosomal perturbations, and elevated extracellular α-synuclein likely represent critical early cellular phenotypes of PD, which might offer multiple therapeutic targets. PMID:26905200

  6. Agmatine attenuates chronic unpredictable mild stress induced behavioral alteration in mice.

    PubMed

    Taksande, Brijesh G; Faldu, Dharmesh S; Dixit, Madhura P; Sakaria, Jay N; Aglawe, Manish M; Umekar, Milind J; Kotagale, Nandkishor R

    2013-11-15

    Chronic stress exposure and resulting dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis develops susceptibility to variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Agmatine, a putative neurotransmitter has been reported to be released in response to various stressful stimuli to maintain the homeostasis. Present study investigated the role of agmatine on chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) induced behavioral and biochemical alteration in mice. Exposure of mice to CUMS protocol for 28 days resulted in diminished performance in sucrose preference test, splash test, forced swim test and marked elevation in plasma corticosterone levels. Chronic agmatine (5 and 10 mg/kg, ip, once daily) treatment started on day-15 and continued till the end of the CUMS protocol significantly increased sucrose preference, improved self-care and motivational behavior in the splash test and decreased duration of immobility in the forced swim test. Agmatine treatment also normalized the elevated corticosterone levels and prevented the body weight changes in chronically stressed animals. The pharmacological effect of agmatine was comparable to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (10mg/kg, ip). Results of present study clearly demonstrated the anti-depressant like effect of agmatine in chronic unpredictable mild stress induced depression in mice. Thus the development of drugs based on brain agmatinergic modulation may represent a new potential approach for the treatment of stress related mood disorders like depression.

  7. Altered systemic bioavailability and organ distribution of azathioprine in methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Karbelkar, Sadaf A.; Majumdar, Anuradha S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Intestinal mucositis is a significant problem haunting clinicians for decades. One of the major reasons for its occurrence is high-dose chemotherapy. The study is aimed at investigating effect of intestinal mucositis on pharmacokinetics, organ distribution, and bioavailability of azathioprine (AZA) (6-mercaptopurine). Materials and Methods: Intestinal mucositis was induced with methotrexate (MTX) (2.5 mg/kg). The oral absorption of AZA and 6-mercaptopurine (metabolite) levels were determined in control and MTX-treated rats: ex vivo (noneverted sac technique) and in vivo (pharmacokinetics and organ-distribution) using high-performance liquid chromatography. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to evaluate peptide transporter expression on luminal membrane of small intestine. Results: Intestinal permeation of AZA into systemic circulation of rats was lower after MTX administration, widely found in intestinal segments of mucositis-induced rats leading to decline in systemic bioavailability of AZA. Immunohistochemistry findings indicated diminution of peptide transporter expression representing hampered absorption of drugs absorbed via this transporter. Conclusion: Study outcome has thrown light on altered fate of AZA when administered to individuals with mucositis which suggests modified drug therapy. These findings can further be investigated in different drug classes which might be administered concomitantly in mucositis and study outcome can be further confirmed in mucositis patients in clinical practice also. PMID:27298491

  8. Proteomic Alterations in B Lymphocytes of Sensitized Mice in a Model of Chemical-Induced Asthma

    PubMed Central

    De Vooght, Vanessa; Schoofs, Liliane; Nemery, Benoit; Clynen, Elke; Hoet, Peter H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aim The role of B-lymphocytes in chemical-induced asthma is largely unknown. Recent work demonstrated that transferring B lymphocytes from toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-sensitized mice into naïve mice, B cell KO mice and SCID mice, triggered an asthma-like response in these mice after a subsequent TDI-challenge. We applied two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) to describe the “sensitized signature” of B lymphocytes comparing TDI-sensitized mice with control mice. Results Sixteen proteins were identified that were significantly up- or down-regulated in B lymphocytes of sensitized mice. Particularly differences in the expression of cyclophilin A, cofilin 1 and zinc finger containing CCHC domain protein 11 could be correlated to the function of B lymphocytes as initiators of T lymphocyte independent asthma-like responses. Conclusion This study revealed important alterations in the proteome of sensitized B cells in a mouse model of chemical-induced asthma, which will have an important impact on the B cell function. PMID:26398101

  9. Meditation may predispose to epilepsy: an insight into the alteration in brain environment induced by meditation.

    PubMed

    Jaseja, Harinder

    2005-01-01

    Stress-induced diseases in modern life are on an alarming rise not only in developed countries but also in developing ones. To alleviate stress, one practice that is being commonly and increasingly adapted to is meditation. Limited studies on meditation have reported occurrence of mental calmness along with apparently favorable changes in certain autonomic functional parameters like heart rate, blood pressure, respiration and skin resistance. Recently, meditation is also being practiced and advised for alleviation of epilepsy; however, very little work is available to comprehend effect and utility of meditation on epilepsy. Neuro-imaging and in-depth studies during the course and attainment of meditational state have revealed alteration in neuro-chemistry and neuro-physiology of brain environment that could favor epileptogenesis. The rise in brain glutamate and serotonin along with development of 'hypersynchrony' of EEG activity (which occur during the course and attainment of meditational state) are well documented to form the underlying basis of epilepsy. Each of the above-mentioned factors is individually capable of inducing susceptibility and decreasing threshold to epilepsy. Based on these changes in brain, this paper raises a grave possibility and risk of meditation in developing epilepsy or increasing the severity and frequency of attacks in an already epileptic state, contrary to the popular belief of its remedial role in alleviating epilepsy.

  10. Aspirin-mediated acetylation induces structural alteration and aggregation of bovine pancreatic insulin.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Reza; Taheri, Behnaz; Alavi, Parnian; Shahsavani, Mohammad Bagher; Asadi, Zahra; Ghahramani, Maryam; Niazi, Ali; Alavianmehr, Mohammad Mehdi; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    The simple aggregation of insulin under various chemical and physical stresses is still an important challenge for both pharmaceutical production and clinical formulation. In the storage form, this protein is subjected to various chemical modifications which alter its physicochemical and aggregation properties. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) which is the most widely used medicine worldwide has been indicated to acetylate a large number of proteins both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, as insulin treated with aspirin at 37°C, a significant level of acetylation was observed by flourescamine and o-phthalaldehyde assay. Also, different spectroscopic techniques, gel electrophoresis, and microscopic assessment were applied to compare the structural variation and aggregation/fibrillation propensity among acetylated and non-acetylated insulin samples. The results of spectroscopic assessments elucidate that acetylation induces insulin unfolding which is accompanied with the exposure of protein hydrophobic patches, a transition from alpha-helix to beta-sheet and increased propensity of the protein for aggregation. The kinetic studies propose that acetylation increases aggregation rate of insulin under both thermal and chemical stresses. Also, gel electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering experiments suggest that acetylation induces insulin oligomerization. Additionally, the results of Thioflavin T fluorescence study, Congo red absorption assessment, and microscopic analysis suggest that acetylation with aspirin enhances the process of insulin fibrillation. Overall, the increased susceptibility of acetylated insulin for aggregation may reflect the fact that this type of modification has significant structural destabilizing effect which finally makes the protein more vulnerable for pathogenic aggregation/fibrillation.

  11. Gene alterations in radiation-induced F344 rat lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, G.; Hahn, F.F.

    1994-11-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is frequently altered in all major histopathologic types of human lung tumors. Reported p53 mutations include base substitutions, allelic loss, rearrangements, and deletions. Point mutations resulting in base substitutions are clustered within a highly conserved region of the gene encoding exons 508, and mutations in this region substantially extend the half-life of the p53 protein. In addition to its prominent importance in lung carcinogenesis, the p53 gene plays a critical role in the cellular response to genetic damage caused by radiation. Specifically, the protein product of p53 induces a pause or block at the G{sub 1} to S boundary of the cell cycle following radiation-caused DNA damage. This G{sub 1} block may allow the cell time to repair the damaged DNA prior to replication. Cells lacking a functional p53 protein fail to pause for repair and consequently accumulate mutations in the genome at an accelerated rate. p53 has also been implicated as a controlling factor in apoptosis or in programmed cell death induced by DNA-damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation. The p53 gene is mutated in approximately 50% of squamous cell carcinomas from uranium miners who inhaled high doses of radon daughters. The purpose of the present study was to determine if a similar percentage of squamous cell carcinomas with p53 mutations developed in the lungs of rats exposed to aerosols of {sup 239}PuO{sub 2}.

  12. Cyclooxygenase-2 Mediates Dialysate-Induced Alterations of the Peritoneal Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Aroeira, Luiz S.; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Loureiro, Jesús; Aguilera, Abelardo; Ramírez-Huesca, Marta; González-Mateo, Guadalupe; Pérez-Lozano, M. Luisa; Albar-Vizcaíno, Patricia; Bajo, M-Auxiliadora; del Peso, Gloria; Sánchez-Tomero, José Antonio; Jiménez-Heffernan, José Antonio; Selgas, Rafael; López-Cabrera, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), exposure of the peritoneal membrane to nonphysiologic solutions causes inflammation, ultimately leading to altered structure and function. Myofibroblasts, one of the cell types that contribute to dysfunction of the peritoneal membrane, can originate from mesothelial cells (MCs) by epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process that has been associated with an increased rate of peritoneal transport. Because cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is induced by inflammation, we studied the role of COX-2 in the deterioration of the peritoneal membrane. We observed that nonepithelioid MCs found in peritoneal effluent expressed higher levels of COX-2 than epithelioid MCs. The mass transfer coefficient for creatinine correlated with MC phenotype and with COX-2 levels. Although COX-2 was upregulated during EMT of MCs in vitro, COX-2 inhibition did not prevent EMT. In a mouse model of PD, however, COX-2 inhibition with Celecoxib resulted in reduced fibrosis and in partial recovery of ultrafiltration, outcomes that were associated with a reduction of inflammatory cells. Furthermore, PD fluid with a low content of glucose degradation products did not induce EMT or COX-2; the peritoneal membranes of mice treated with this fluid showed less worsening than mice exposed to standard fluid. In conclusion, upregulation of COX-2 during EMT may mediate peritoneal inflammation, suggesting COX-2 inhibition as a potential strategy to ameliorate peritoneal deterioration in PD patients. PMID:19158357

  13. Enhanced carotid body chemosensory activity and the cardiovascular alterations induced by intermittent hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Andrade, David C.; Del Rio, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) plays a main role in the maintenance of the oxygen homeostasis. The hypoxic stimulation of the CB increases the chemosensory discharge, which in turn elicits reflex sympathetic, cardiovascular, and ventilatory adjustments. An exacerbate carotid chemosensory activity has been associated with human sympathetic-mediated diseases such as hypertension, insulin resistance, heart failure, and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Indeed, the CB chemosensory discharge becomes tonically hypereactive in experimental models of OSA and heart failure. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a main feature of OSA, enhances CB chemosensory baseline discharges in normoxia and in response to hypoxia, inducing sympathetic overactivity and hypertension. Oxidative stress, increased levels of ET-1, Angiotensin II and pro-inflammatory cytokines, along with a reduced production of NO in the CB, have been associated with the enhanced carotid chemosensory activity. In this review, we will discuss new evidence supporting a main role for the CB chemoreceptor in the autonomic and cardiorespiratory alterations induced by intermittent hypoxia, as well as the molecular mechanisms involved in the CB chemosensory potentiation. PMID:25520668

  14. Melatonin Alters the Mechanical and Thermal Hyperalgesia Induced by Orofacial Pain Model in Rats.

    PubMed

    Scarabelot, Vanessa Leal; Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; de Oliveira, Carla; Adachi, Lauren Naomi Spezia; de Macedo, Isabel Cristina; Cioato, Stefania Giotti; de Freitas, Joice S; de Souza, Andressa; Quevedo, Alexandre; Caumo, Wolnei; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva

    2016-10-01

    Melatonin is a neuroendocrine hormone that presents a wide range of physiological functions including regulating circadian rhythms and sleep, enhancing immune function, sleep improvement, and antioxidant effects. In addition, melatonin has received special attention in pain treatment since it is effective and presents few adverse effects. In this study, we evaluated the effect of acute dose of melatonin upon hyperalgesia induced by complete Freund's adjuvant in a chronic orofacial pain model in Sprague-Dawley rats. Nociceptive behavior was assessed by facial Von Frey and the hot plate tests at baseline and thereafter 30, 60, and 120 min, 24 h, and 7 days after melatonin treatment. We demonstrated that acute melatonin administration alters mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia induced by an orofacial pain model (TMD), highlighting that the melatonin effect upon mechanical hyperalgesia remained until 7 days after its administration. Besides, we observed specific tissue profiles of neuroimmunomodulators linked to pain conditions and/or melatonin effect (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, and interleukins 6 and 10) in the brainstem levels, and its effects were state-dependent of the baseline of these animals. PMID:27378529

  15. Emersion Induces Nitrogen Release and Alteration of Nitrogen Metabolism in the Intertidal Genus Porphyra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jang K.; Kraemer, George P.; Yarish, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We investigated emersion-induced nitrogen (N) release from Porphyra umbilicalis Kütz. Thallus N concentration decreased during 4 h of emersion. Tissue N and soluble protein contents of P. umbilicalis were positively correlated and decreased during emersion. Growth of P. umbilicalis did not simply dilute the pre-emersion tissue N concentration. Rather, N was lost from tissues during emersion. We hypothesize that emersion-induced N release occurs when proteins are catabolized. While the δ15N value of tissues exposed to emersion was higher than that of continuously submerged tissues, further discrimination of stable N isotopes did not occur during the 4 h emersion. We conclude that N release from Porphyra during emersion did not result from bacterial denitrification, but possibly as a consequence of photorespiration. The release of N by P. umbilicalis into the environment during emersion suggests a novel role of intertidal seaweeds in the global N cycle. Emersion also altered the physiological function (nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase activity, growth rate) of P. umbilicalis and the co-occurring upper intertidal species P. linearis Grev., though in a seasonally influenced manner. Individuals of the year round perennial species P. umbilicalis were more tolerant of emersion than ephemeral, cold temperate P. linearis in early winter. However, the mid-winter populations of both P. linearis and P. umbilicalis, had similar temporal physiological patterns during emersion. PMID:23922872

  16. Combination of exercise training and erythropoietin prevents cancer-induced muscle alterations.

    PubMed

    Pin, Fabrizio; Busquets, Silvia; Toledo, Miriam; Camperi, Andrea; Lopez-Soriano, Francisco J; Costelli, Paola; Argilés, Josep M; Penna, Fabio

    2015-12-22

    Cancer cachexia is a syndrome characterized by loss of skeletal muscle mass, inflammation, anorexia and anemia, contributing to patient fatigue and reduced quality of life. In addition to nutritional approaches, exercise training (EX) has been proposed as a suitable tool to manage cachexia. In the present work the effect of mild exercise training, coupled to erythropoietin (EPO) administration to prevent anemia, has been tested in tumor-bearing mice. In the C26 hosts, acute exercise does not prevent and even worsens muscle wasting. Such pattern is prevented by EPO co-administration or by the adoption of a chronic exercise protocol. EX and EPO co-treatment spares oxidative myofibers from atrophy and counteracts the oxidative to glycolytic shift, inducing PGC-1α. LLC hosts are responsive to exercise and their treatment with the EX-EPO combination prevents the loss of muscle strength and the onset of mitochondrial ultrastructural alterations, while increases muscle oxidative capacity and intracellular ATP content, likely depending on PGC-1α induction and mitophagy promotion. Consistently, muscle-specific PGC-1α overexpression prevents LLC-induced muscle atrophy and Atrogin-1 hyperexpression. Overall, the present data suggest that low intensisty exercise can be an effective tool to be included in combined therapeutic approaches against cancer cachexia, provided that anemia is coincidently treated in order to enhance the beneficial action of exercise.

  17. Metabolic and histopathological alterations in the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis induced by chronic exposure to acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Larguinho, Miguel; Cordeiro, Ana; Diniz, Mário S; Costa, Pedro M; Baptista, Pedro V

    2014-11-01

    Although the neurotoxic and genotoxic potential of acrylamide has been established in freshwater fish, the full breadth of the toxicological consequences induced by this xenobiotic has not yet been disclosed, particularly in aquatic invertebrates. To assess the effects of acrylamide on a bivalve model, the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), two different setups were accomplished: 1) acute exposure to several concentrations of waterborne acrylamide to determine lethality thresholds of the substance and 2) chronic exposure to more reduced acrylamide concentrations to survey phases I and II metabolic endpoints and to perform a whole-body screening for histopathological alterations. Acute toxicity was low (LC50≈400mg/L). However, mussels were responsive to prolonged exposure to chronic concentrations of waterborne acrylamide (1-10mg/L), yielding a significant increase in lipid peroxidation plus EROD and GST activities. Still, total anti-oxidant capacity was not exceeded. In addition, no neurotoxic effects could be determined through acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. The findings suggest aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr)-dependent responses in mussels exposed to acrylamide, although reduced comparatively to vertebrates. No significant histological damage was found in digestive gland or gills but female gonads endured severe necrosis and oocyte atresia. Altogether, the results indicate that acrylamide may induce gonadotoxicity in mussels, although the subject should benefit from further research. Altogether, the findings suggest that the risk of acrylamide to aquatic animals, especially molluscs, may be underestimated.

  18. α-Synuclein in Extracellular Vesicles: Functional Implications and Diagnostic Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Lööv, Camilla; Scherzer, Clemens R; Hyman, Bradley T; Breakefield, Xandra O; Ingelsson, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Fibrillar inclusions of intraneuronal α-synuclein can be detected in certain brain areas from patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and other disorders with Lewy body pathology. These insoluble protein aggregates do not themselves appear to have a prominent neurotoxic effect, whereas various α-synuclein oligomers appear harmful. Although it is incompletely known how the prefibrillar species may be pathogenic, they have been detected both within and on the outside of exosomes and other extracellular vesicles (EVs), suggesting that such structures may mediate toxic α-synuclein propagation between neurons. Vesicular transfer of α-synuclein may thereby contribute to the hierarchical spreading of pathology seen in the PD brain. Although the regulation of α-synuclein release via EVs is not understood, data suggest that it may involve other PD-related molecules, such as LRRK2 and ATP13A2. Moreover, new evidence indicates that CNS-derived EVs in plasma have the potential to serve as biomarkers for diagnostic purposes. In a recent study, levels of α-synuclein were found to be increased in L1CAM-positive vesicles isolated from plasma of PD patients compared to healthy controls, and follow-up studies will reveal whether α-synuclein in EVs could be developed as a future disease biomarker. Preferentially, toxic prefibrillar α-synuclein oligomers should then be targeted as a biomarker-as evidence suggests that they reflect the disease process more closely than total α-synuclein content. In such studies, it will be essential to adopt stringent EV isolation protocols in order to avoid contamination from the abundant pool of free plasma α-synuclein in different aggregational states. PMID:26993503

  19. Transglutaminase 2 exacerbates α-synuclein toxicity in mice and yeast

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Hilary; Woo, Jong-Min; Lee, Kang-Woo; Im, Joo-Young; Masliah, Eliezer; Junn, Eunsung; Mouradian, M. Maral

    2014-01-01

    α-Synuclein is a key pathogenic protein that aggregates in hallmark lesions in Parkinson's disease and other α-synucleinopathies. Prior in vitro studies demonstrated that it is a substrate for cross-linking by transglutaminase 2 (TG2) into higher-order species. Here we investigated whether this increased aggregation occurs in vivo and whether TG2 exacerbates α-synuclein toxicity in Mus musculus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Compared with α-synuclein transgenic (SynTg) mice, animals double transgenic for human α-synuclein and TG2 (TG2Tg/SynTg) manifested greater high-molecular-weight insoluble species of α-synuclein in brain lysates and developed α-synuclein aggregates in the synaptic vesicle fraction. In addition, larger proteinase K-resistant aggregates developed, along with increased thioflavin-S-positive amyloid fibrils. This correlated with an exaggerated neuroinflammatory response, as seen with more astrocytes and microglia. Further neuronal damage was suggested by greater morphological disruption of nerve fibers and a trend toward decreased c-Fos immunoreactive neurons. Finally, the performance of TG2Tg/SynTg animals on motor behavioral tasks was worse relative to SynTg mice. Greater toxicity of α-synuclein was also demonstrated in yeast cells coexpressing TG2. Our findings demonstrate that TG2 promotes the aggregation of α-synuclein in vivo and that this is associated with aggravated toxicity of α-synuclein and its downstream neuropathologic consequences.—Grosso, H., Woo, J.-M., Lee, K.-W., Im, J.-Y., Masliah, E., Junn, E., Mouradian, M. M. Transglutaminase 2 exacerbates α-synuclein toxicity in mice and yeast. PMID:24970392

  20. Alteration of hepatic structure and oxidative stress induced by intravenous nanoceria

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Michael T.; Lu, Xiaoqin; Duan, Xiaoxian; Hardas, Sarita S.; Sultana, Rukhsana; Wu, Peng; Unrine, Jason M.; Graham, Uschi; Butterfield, D. Allan; Grulke, Eric A.; Yokel, Robert A.

    2012-04-15

    Beyond the traditional use of ceria as an abrasive, the scope of nanoceria applications now extends into fuel cell manufacturing, diesel fuel additives, and for therapeutic intervention as a putative antioxidant. However, the biological effects of nanoceria exposure have yet to be fully defined, which gave us the impetus to examine its systemic biodistribution and biological responses. An extensively characterized nanoceria (5 nm) dispersion was vascularly infused into rats, which were terminated 1 h, 20 h or 30 days later. Light and electron microscopic tissue characterization was conducted and hepatic oxidative stress parameters determined. We observed acute ceria nanoparticle sequestration by Kupffer cells with subsequent bioretention in parenchymal cells as well. The internalized ceria nanoparticles appeared as spherical agglomerates of varying dimension without specific organelle penetration. In hepatocytes, the agglomerated nanoceria frequently localized to the plasma membrane facing bile canaliculi. Hepatic stellate cells also sequestered nanoceria. Within the sinusoids, sustained nanoceria bioretention was associated with granuloma formations comprised of Kupffer cells and intermingling CD3{sup +} T cells. A statistically significant elevation of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) level was seen at 1 and 20 h, but subsided by 30 days after ceria administration. Further, elevated apoptosis was observed on day 30. These findings, together with increased hepatic protein carbonyl levels on day 30, indicate ceria-induced hepatic injury and oxidative stress, respectively. Such observations suggest a single vascular infusion of nanoceria can lead to persistent hepatic retention of particles with possible implications for occupational and therapeutic exposures. -- Highlights: ► Time course study on nanoceria induced hepatic alterations in rats. ► Serum AST elevation indicated acute hepatotoxicity. ► Ceria is retained for up to 30 days in Kupffer cells

  1. Prenatal Hyperandrogenization Induces Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations Which Depend on the Levels of Testosterone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Amalfi, Sabrina; Velez, Leandro Martín; Heber, María Florencia; Vighi, Susana; Ferreira, Silvana Rocío; Orozco, Adriana Vega; Pignataro, Omar; Motta, Alicia Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal hyperandrogenism is able to induce polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in rats. The aim of the present study was to establish if the levels of prenatal testosterone may determine the extent of metabolic and endocrine alterations during the adult life. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were prenatally injected with either 2 or 5 mg free testosterone (groups T2 and T5 respectively) from day 16 to day 19 day of gestation. Female offspring from T2 and T5 displayed different phenotype of PCOS during adult life. Offspring from T2 showed hyperandrogenism, ovarian cysts and ovulatory cycles whereas those from T5 displayed hyperandrogenism, ovarian cysts and anovulatory cycles. Both group showed increased circulating glucose levels after the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT; an evaluation of insulin resistance). IPGTT was higher in T5 rats and directly correlated with body weight at prepubertal age. However, the decrease in the body weight at prepubertal age was compensated during adult life. Although both groups showed enhanced ovarian steroidogenesis, it appears that the molecular mechanisms involved were different. The higher dose of testosterone enhanced the expression of both the protein that regulates cholesterol availability (the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)) and the protein expression of the transcriptional factor: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma). Prenatal hyperandrogenization induced an anti-oxidant response that prevented a possible pro-oxidant status. The higher dose of testosterone induced a pro-inflammatory state in ovarian tissue mediated by increased levels of prostaglandin E (PG) and the protein expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2, the limiting enzyme of PGs synthesis). In summary, our data show that the levels of testosterone prenatally injected modulate the uterine environment and that this, in turn, would be responsible for the endocrine and metabolic abnormalities and the phenotype of PCOS

  2. Alterations in ethanol-induced accumbal transmission after acute and long-term zinc depletion.

    PubMed

    Morud, Julia; Adermark, Louise; Ericson, Mia; Söderpalm, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholism is subject to extensive research, but the role of changes in metabolism caused by alcohol consumption has been poorly investigated. Zinc (Zn(2+) ) deficiency is a common metabolic aberration among alcoholics and Zn(2+) influences the function of ligand-gated ion channels, known pharmacological targets of ethanol (EtOH). Here, we investigate whether manipulation of extracellular levels of Zn(2+) modulates EtOH-induced increases of dopamine (DA) output, as measured by in vivo microdialysis in the rat, and whether voluntary EtOH consumption is altered by Zn(2+) deficiency. Our findings show that the Zn(2+) -chelating agent tricine slowly raises DA levels when perfused in the nucleus accumbens (nAc), whereas the more potent Zn(2+) chelator TPEN reduces DA levels. We also show that pre-treatment with either tricine or TPEN blocks the EtOH-induced DA elevation. Chronic Zn(2+) deficiency induced by a Zn(2+) -free diet did not affect EtOH consumption, but excitatory transmission, assessed by striatal field-potential recordings in the nAc shell, was significantly modulated both by Zn(2+) -free diet and by EtOH consumption, as compared with the EtOH naïve controls. The present study indicates that Zn(2+) influences EtOH's interaction with the brain reward system, possibly by interfering with glycine receptor and GABAA receptor function. This also implies that Zn(2+) deficiency among alcoholics may be important to correct in order to normalize important aspects of brain function.

  3. Fructooligosaccharide raftilose reduces the mycophenolate mofetil-induced complications: Hematological and biochemical alterations

    PubMed Central

    Cheraghi, Hadi; Khaki, Zohreh; Malekinejad, Hassan; Sasani, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a selective inhibitor of Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase. Gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances in immature ones are reported for MMF-induced compilations, which in the case of occurrence dose reduction is required. Thus, in the present study, the fructooligosaccharide raftilose® (RFT) was co-administrated with MMF to estimate the protective effect of RFT against MMF-induced GI complications. Thirty six immature male Wistar rats were divided into six groups including: Control (normal saline), RFT-treated (100 mg kg-1), MMF-treated (20 mg kg-1), MMF + LRFT (50 mg kg-1), MMF + MRFT (100 mg kg-1) and MMF + HRFT (200 mg kg-1) groups. The hematocrit (Hct), lymphocyte/total WBC, feces water content and pH were analyzed. Moreover, the hepatic functional tests, kidney-related biomarkers, lipid and protein profiles, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) contents were assessed. Co-administration of RFT stabilized the MMF-reduced body weight. The MMF significantly diminished Hct and lymph/total WBC (p < 0.05). Only MRFT enhanced the lymphocyte/total WBC. Increased water content, no changes in feces pH, increased serum ALT and AST, no alteration in urea and mild enhancement in creatinine were demonstrated in MMF-received animals. However, RFT at low dose ameliorated the feces parameters and reduced ALT. No significant changes were demonstrated for serum lipid and protein profiles in MMF- and RFT + MMF-treated groups. The RFT enhanced the serum TAC, reduced MDA and NO contents. In conclusion, our data suggested that RFT could be considered as an effective agent to subsidize the MMF-induced clinical, hematological and biochemical disorders. PMID:26973768

  4. Aluminum induces inflammatory and proteolytic alterations in human monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Ligi, D; Santi, M; Croce, L; Mannello, F

    2015-11-01

    The increasing exposure to aluminum has been linked with the development of different human pathologies (e.g., breast cancer, myofasciitis, neurodegenerative diseases), probably due to the consistent presence of aluminum salts in widely diffused cosmetic products and vaccines. However, the mechanisms underlying immunologic and proliferative alterations still remain unknown. In the present study we investigated the ability of different aluminum compounds (i.e., aluminum chloride vs Imject® Alum, a mixture of aluminum and magnesium hydroxide) to trigger both inflammatory and proteolytic responses in U-937 human monocytic cell line. We demonstrated, by multiplex immunoassay analyses, that monocytic cells treated with both Imject Alum and aluminum chloride showed different and peculiar expression profiles of 27 inflammatory mediators and 5 matrix metalloproteinases, with respect to untreated control cells. In particular, we found dose-dependent significantly increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and chemoattractant chemokines; whereas among metalloproteinases, only collagenolytic protease showed a significant dose-dependent increase in Imject-treated cells with respect to controls and Al-chloride treated cells. Noteworthy, we found only in Imject Alum-treated cells the significant positive correlations among collagenolytic metalloproteinase and increased expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, suggesting a possible involvement of aluminum in regulating the acute inflammatory responses. In agreement to emerging evidences, for the first time we demonstrated that the treatment of monocyte cells with aluminum-based adjuvant is able to induce an inflammatory status and a proteolytic cascade activation. In fact, the cell treatment with Imject Alum induced increased levels of several cytokines and proteinases, suggesting these monocyte mediators as possible biomarkers for aluminum-linked diseases. The identification of the biochemical pathways

  5. Fructooligosaccharide raftilose reduces the mycophenolate mofetil-induced complications: Hematological and biochemical alterations.

    PubMed

    Cheraghi, Hadi; Khaki, Zohreh; Malekinejad, Hassan; Sasani, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a selective inhibitor of Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase. Gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances in immature ones are reported for MMF-induced compilations, which in the case of occurrence dose reduction is required. Thus, in the present study, the fructooligosaccharide raftilose(®) (RFT) was co-administrated with MMF to estimate the protective effect of RFT against MMF-induced GI complications. Thirty six immature male Wistar rats were divided into six groups including: Control (normal saline), RFT-treated (100 mg kg(-1)), MMF-treated (20 mg kg(-1)), MMF + LRFT (50 mg kg(-1)), MMF + MRFT (100 mg kg(-1)) and MMF + HRFT (200 mg kg(-1)) groups. The hematocrit (Hct), lymphocyte/total WBC, feces water content and pH were analyzed. Moreover, the hepatic functional tests, kidney-related biomarkers, lipid and protein profiles, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) contents were assessed. Co-administration of RFT stabilized the MMF-reduced body weight. The MMF significantly diminished Hct and lymph/total WBC (p < 0.05). Only MRFT enhanced the lymphocyte/total WBC. Increased water content, no changes in feces pH, increased serum ALT and AST, no alteration in urea and mild enhancement in creatinine were demonstrated in MMF-received animals. However, RFT at low dose ameliorated the feces parameters and reduced ALT. No significant changes were demonstrated for serum lipid and protein profiles in MMF- and RFT + MMF-treated groups. The RFT enhanced the serum TAC, reduced MDA and NO contents. In conclusion, our data suggested that RFT could be considered as an effective agent to subsidize the MMF-induced clinical, hematological and biochemical disorders.

  6. Dopaminergic Toxin 1-Methyl-4-Phenylpyridinium, Proteins α-Synuclein and Glia Maturation Factor Activate Mast Cells and Release Inflammatory Mediators.

    PubMed

    Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Thangavel, Ramasamy; Yang, Evert; Pattani, Sagar; Zaheer, Smita; Santillan, Donna A; Santillan, Mark K; Zaheer, Asgar

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), a metabolite of neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and Lewy body component α-synuclein activates glia in PD pathogenesis. Mast cells and glia maturation factor (GMF) are implicated in neuroinflammatory conditions including Multiple Sclerosis. However, the role of mast cells in PD is not yet known. We have analyzed the effect of recombinant GMF, MPP+, α-synuclein and interleukin-33 (IL-33) on mouse bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMMCs), human umbilical cord blood-derived cultured mast cells (hCBMCs) and mouse brain-derived cultured astrocytes by quantifying cytokines/chemokines released using ELISA or by detecting the expression of co-stimulatory molecules CD40 and CD40L by flow cytometry. GMF significantly released chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) from BMMCs but its release was reduced in BMMCs from GMF knockout mice. GMF, α-synuclein and MPP+ released IL-1β, β-hexosaminidase from BMMCs, and IL-8 from hCBMCs. GMF released CCL5, and IL-33- induced the expression of GMF from hCBMCs. Novel GMF expression was detected in hCBMCs and BMMCs by immunocytochemistry. GMF released tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) from mouse astrocytes, and this release was greater in BMMC- astrocyte coculture than in individual cultures. Flow cytometry results showed increased IL-33 expression by GMF and MPP+, and GMF-induced CD40 expression in astrocytes. Proinflammatory mediator release by GMF, MPP+ and α-synuclein, as well as GMF expression by mast cells indicate a potential therapeutic target for neurodegenerative diseases including PD. PMID:26275153

  7. Altered cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization in adult mice exposed to cocaine in utero.

    PubMed

    Crozatier, Claire; Guerriero, Rejean M; Mathieu, Flavie; Giros, Bruno; Nosten-Bertrand, Marika; Kosofsky, Barry E

    2003-12-30

    Behavioral sensitization induced by psychostimulants is characterized by increased locomotion and stereotypy and may reflect aspects of neuronal adaptations underlying drug addiction in humans. To study the developmental contributions to addictive behaviors, we measured behavioral responses in adult offspring to a cocaine sensitization paradigm following prenatal cocaine exposure. Pregnant Swiss-Webster (SW) mice were injected twice daily from embryonic days 8 to 17 (E8-E17, inclusive) with cocaine (20 or 40 mg/kg/day; COC20 and COC40, respectively), or saline vehicle (SAL and SPF40) subcutaneously (s.c.). A nutritional control group of dams were 'pair-fed' with COC40 dams (SPF40). P120 male offspring from each prenatal treatment group were assigned to a behavioral sensitization group and injected with cocaine (15 mg/kg) or saline intraperitoneally (i.p.) every other day for seven doses. Locomotor activity and stereotypy were measured during habituation, cocaine initiation, and following a cocaine challenge 21 days after the last initiation injection. As expected, animals demonstrated significantly more locomotion and stereotypic behavior following acute and recurrent injection of cocaine compared to saline-injected animals. However, for each prenatal treatment group, cocaine-sensitized animals showed unique temporal profiles for the increase in locomotor sensitization and stereotypy over the course of the sensitization protocol. Two features that distinguished the altered behavioral progression of prenatally cocaine-exposed animals (COC40) from control (SAL) animals included blunted augmentation of locomotion and enhanced patterns of stereotypic behavior. These findings provide evidence that the behavioral activating effects of cocaine in adult animals are altered following exposure to cocaine in utero.

  8. Modulatory effects of lipoic acid and selenium against cadmium-induced biochemical alterations in testicular steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    El-Maraghy, Shohda A; Nassar, Noha N

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to toxic metals including cadmium has become an increasingly recognized source of illness worldwide. Cadmium (Cd(2+) ) is one of the environmental pollutants affecting various tissues and organs including testis. The protective effect of lipoic acid and selenium on Cd(2+) -induced testicular damage was investigated. Accordingly, male Wistar rats were allocated into four groups (n = 8; each). Gp I: (control), whereas the other 3 groups received CdCl(2) (2 mg/kg, i.p. for 28 days) alone or in combination with either (i) lipoic acid (35 mg/kg, p.o) or (ii) selenium (0.35 mg/kg, p.o) throughout the experiment. Serum testosterone, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone levels significantly decreased in the Cd(2+) -exposed rats. The activities of testicular key androgenic enzymes, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17 β-HSD significantly decreased in Cd(2) exposed rats compared to the control counterparts. In addition, the activities of testicular marker enzymes were significantly altered in cadmium-treated animals. Significant reductions in body and testicular weight as well as antioxidant status were also observed in Cd(2+) -exposed rats. Moreover, some testicular metal levels were altered. Lipoic acid and selenium significantly increased serum testosterone level and restored testicular activity of 3β-HSD and 17 β-HSD and were effective in modulation of most of the measured biochemical parameters. The biochemical parameters were further confirmed with histopathological findings. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated the beneficial influences of lipoic acid and selenium in reducing harmful effects of Cd(2+) in rats' testes. PMID:20957662

  9. Ceftriaxone reverses ketamine-induced lasting EEG and astrocyte alterations in juvenile mice

    PubMed Central

    Dodman, K.; Featherstone, R.E.; Bang, J.; Liang, Y.; Siegel, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine, an N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, is used as a pediatric anesthetic because of its favorable safety profile. It is also being investigated as an antidepressant. Unfortunately, ketamine causes adverse reactions including hallucinations and is associated with a high prevalence of abuse among adolescents. Although chronic ketamine use has been shown to produce cognitive impairments even years following cessation, little is known about its long-term consequences on adolescents. The beta-lactam ceftriaxone has been shown to attenuate alcohol withdrawal, and alleviate early brain injury and memory impairments following subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, its ability to reverse the effects of adolescent ketamine exposure is not known. Previous data indicate that ketamine causes a reduction in the number of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter Type 2 (EAAT2)-containing astrocytes. Additionally, the beta lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone increased expression of EAAT2. As EAAT2 is a principal mechanism of glutamate clearance from the synapse, the current study tests the hypothesis that ceftriaxone may reverse functional consequences of ketamine exposure. Methods We examined the effects of chronic ketamine in juvenile mice as well as reversal by ceftriaxone using electroencephalography (EEG). Subsequently, we assessed the effects of these treatments on markers of astrocyte proliferation, using Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), and function, as evidenced by EAAT2. Results Juvenile mice exposed to chronic ketamine showed lasting alterations in EEG measurements as well as markers of astrocyte number and function. These alterations were reversed by ceftriaxone. Conclusions Data suggest that ceftriaxone may be able to ameliorate ketamine-induced long-term disturbances in adolescent brains. PMID:26442907

  10. Process-induced extracellular matrix alterations affect the mechanisms of soft tissue repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Sandor, Maryellen; Lombardi, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrices derived from animal tissues for human tissue repairs are processed by various methods of physical, chemical, or enzymatic decellularization, viral inactivation, and terminal sterilization. The mechanisms of action in tissue repair vary among bioscaffolds and are suggested to be associated with process-induced extracellular matrix modifications. We compared three non-cross-linked, commercially available extracellular matrix scaffolds (Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix), and correlated extracellular matrix alterations to in vivo biological responses upon implantation in non-human primates. Structural evaluation showed significant differences in retaining native tissue extracellular matrix histology and ultrastructural features among bioscaffolds. Tissue processing may cause both the condensation of collagen fibers and fragmentation or separation of collagen bundles. Calorimetric analysis showed significant differences in the stability of bioscaffolds. The intrinsic denaturation temperature was measured to be 51°C, 38°C, and 44°C for Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix, respectively, demonstrating more extracellular matrix modifications in the Veritas and XenMatrix scaffolds. Consequently, the susceptibility to collagenase degradation was increased in Veritas and XenMatrix when compared to their respective source tissues. Using a non-human primate model, three bioscaffolds were found to elicit different biological responses, have distinct mechanisms of action, and yield various outcomes of tissue repair. Strattice permitted cell repopulation and was remodeled over 6 months. Veritas was unstable at body temperature, resulting in rapid absorption with moderate inflammation. XenMatrix caused severe inflammation and sustained immune reactions. This study demonstrates that extracellular matrix alterations significantly affect biological responses in soft tissue repair and regeneration. The data offer useful insights into the rational design of

  11. Expression of FSHD-related DUX4-FL alters proteostasis and induces TDP-43 aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Sachiko; Beermann, Mary Lou; Boyce, Frederick M; Miller, Jeffrey Boone

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pathogenesis in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) appears to be due to aberrant expression, particularly in skeletal muscle nuclei, of the full-length isoform of DUX4 (DUX4-FL). Expression of DUX4-FL is known to alter gene expression and to be cytotoxic, but cell responses to DUX4-FL are not fully understood. Our study was designed to identify cellular mechanisms of pathogenesis caused by DUX4-FL expression. Methods We used human myogenic cell cultures to analyze the effects of DUX4-FL when it was expressed either from its endogenous promoter in FSHD cells or by exogenous expression using BacMam vectors. We focused on determining the effects of DUX4-FL on protein ubiquitination and turnover and on aggregation of TDP-43. Results Human FSHD myotubes with endogenous DUX4-FL expression showed both altered nuclear and cytoplasmic distributions of ubiquitinated proteins and aggregation of TDP-43 in DUX4-FL-expressing nuclei. Similar changes were found upon exogenous expression of DUX4-FL, but were not seen upon expression of the non-toxic short isoform DUX4-S. DUX4-FL expression also inhibited protein turnover in a model system and increased the amounts of insoluble ubiquitinated proteins and insoluble TDP-43. Finally, inhibition of the ubiquitin–proteasome system with MG132 produced TDP-43 aggregation similar to DUX4-FL expression. Interpretations Our results identify DUX4-FL-induced inhibition of protein turnover and aggregation of TDP-43, which are pathological changes also found in diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and inclusion body myopathy, as potential pathological mechanisms in FSHD. PMID:25750920

  12. Nutrition-induced ketosis alters metabolic and signaling gene networks in liver of periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Loor, Juan J; Everts, Robin E; Bionaz, Massimo; Dann, Heather M; Morin, Dawn E; Oliveira, Rosane; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Drackley, James K; Lewin, Harris A

    2007-12-19

    Dairy cows are highly susceptible after parturition to developing liver lipidosis and ketosis, which are costly diseases to farmers. A bovine microarray platform consisting of 13,257-annotated oligonucleotides was used to study hepatic gene networks underlying nutrition-induced ketosis. On day 5 postpartum, 14 Holstein cows were randomly assigned to ketosis-induction (n = 7) or control (n = 7) groups. Cows in the ketosis-induction group were fed at 50% of day 4 intake until they developed signs of clinical ketosis, and cows in the control group were fed ad libitum throughout the treatment period. Liver was biopsied at 10-14 (ketosis) or 14 days postpartum (controls). Feed restriction increased blood concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids and beta-hydroxybutyrate, but decreased glucose. Liver triacylglycerol concentration also increased. A total of 2,415 genes were altered by ketosis (false discovery rate = 0.05). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed downregulation of genes associated with oxidative phosphorylation, protein ubiquitination, and ubiquinone biosynthesis with ketosis. Other molecular adaptations included upregulation of genes and nuclear receptors associated with cytokine signaling, fatty acid uptake/transport, and fatty acid oxidation. Genes downregulated during ketosis included several associated with cholesterol metabolism, growth hormone signaling, proton transport, and fatty acid desaturation. Feed restriction and ketosis resulted in previously unrecognized alterations in gene network expression underlying key cellular functions and discrete metabolic events. These responses might help explain well-documented physiological adaptations to reduced feed intake in early postpartum cows and, thus, provide molecular targets that might be useful in prevention and treatment of liver lipidosis and ketosis.

  13. Toxicity of drinking water disinfection byproducts: cell cycle alterations induced by the monohaloacetonitriles.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Yukako; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    Haloacetonitriles (HANs) are a chemical class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that form from reactions between disinfectants and nitrogen-containing precursors, the latter more prevalent in water sources impacted by algae bloom and municipal wastewater effluent discharge. HANs, previously demonstrated to be genotoxic, were investigated for their effects on the mammalian cell cycle. Treating Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with monoHANs followed by the release from the chemical treatment resulted in the accumulation of abnormally high DNA content in cells over time (hyperploid). The potency for the cell cycle alteration followed the order: iodoacetonitrile (IAN) > bromoacetonitrile (BAN) ≫ chloroacetonitrile (CAN). Exposure to 6 μM IAN, 12 μM BAN and 900 μM CAN after 26 h post-treatment incubation resulted in DNA repair; however, subsequent cell cycle alteration effects were observed. Cell proliferation of HAN-treated cells was suppressed for as long as 43 to 52 h. Enlarged cell size was observed after 52 h post-treatment incubation without the induction of cytotoxicity. The HAN-mediated cell cycle alteration was mitosis- and proliferation-dependent, which suggests that HAN treatment induced mitosis override, and that HAN-treated cells proceeded into S phase and directly into the next cell cycle. Cells with multiples genomes would result in aneuploidy (state of abnormal chromosome number and DNA content) at the next mitosis since extra centrosomes could compromise the assembly of bipolar spindles. There is accumulating evidence of a transient tetraploid state proceeding to aneuploidy in cancer progression. Biological self-defense systems to ensure genomic stability and to eliminate tetraploid cells exist in eukaryotic cells. A key tumor suppressor gene, p53, is oftentimes mutated in various types of human cancer. It is possible that HAN disruption of the normal cell cycle and the generation of aberrant cells with an abnormal number of

  14. SNCA triplication Parkinson's patient's iPSC-derived DA neurons accumulate α-synuclein and are susceptible to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Byers, Blake; Cord, Branden; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Schüle, Birgitt; Fenno, Lief; Lee, Patrick C; Deisseroth, Karl; Langston, J William; Pera, Renee Reijo; Palmer, Theo D

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an incurable age-related neurodegenerative disorder affecting both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Although common, the etiology of PD remains poorly understood. Genetic studies infer that the disease results from a complex interaction between genetics and environment and there is growing evidence that PD may represent a constellation of diseases with overlapping yet distinct underlying mechanisms. Novel clinical approaches will require a better understanding of the mechanisms at work within an individual as well as methods to identify the specific array of mechanisms that have contributed to the disease. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) strategies provide an opportunity to directly study the affected neuronal subtypes in a given patient. Here we report the generation of iPSC-derived midbrain dopaminergic neurons from a patient with a triplication in the α-synuclein gene (SNCA). We observed that the iPSCs readily differentiated into functional neurons. Importantly, the PD-affected line exhibited disease-related phenotypes in culture: accumulation of α-synuclein, inherent overexpression of markers of oxidative stress, and sensitivity to peroxide induced oxidative stress. These findings show that the dominantly-acting PD mutation is intrinsically capable of perturbing normal cell function in culture and confirm that these features reflect, at least in part, a cell autonomous disease process that is independent of exposure to the entire complexity of the diseased brain.

  15. SNCA Triplication Parkinson's Patient's iPSC-derived DA Neurons Accumulate α-Synuclein and Are Susceptible to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Schüle, Birgitt; Fenno, Lief; Lee, Patrick C.; Deisseroth, Karl; Langston, J. William; Pera, Renee Reijo; Palmer, Theo D.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an incurable age-related neurodegenerative disorder affecting both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Although common, the etiology of PD remains poorly understood. Genetic studies infer that the disease results from a complex interaction between genetics and environment and there is growing evidence that PD may represent a constellation of diseases with overlapping yet distinct underlying mechanisms. Novel clinical approaches will require a better understanding of the mechanisms at work within an individual as well as methods to identify the specific array of mechanisms that have contributed to the disease. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) strategies provide an opportunity to directly study the affected neuronal subtypes in a given patient. Here we report the generation of iPSC-derived midbrain dopaminergic neurons from a patient with a triplication in the α-synuclein gene (SNCA). We observed that the iPSCs readily differentiated into functional neurons. Importantly, the PD-affected line exhibited disease-related phenotypes in culture: accumulation of α-synuclein, inherent overexpression of markers of oxidative stress, and sensitivity to peroxide induced oxidative stress. These findings show that the dominantly-acting PD mutation is intrinsically capable of perturbing normal cell function in culture and confirm that these features reflect, at least in part, a cell autonomous disease process that is independent of exposure to the entire complexity of the diseased brain. PMID:22110584

  16. SNCA triplication Parkinson's patient's iPSC-derived DA neurons accumulate α-synuclein and are susceptible to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Byers, Blake; Cord, Branden; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Schüle, Birgitt; Fenno, Lief; Lee, Patrick C; Deisseroth, Karl; Langston, J William; Pera, Renee Reijo; Palmer, Theo D

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an incurable age-related neurodegenerative disorder affecting both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Although common, the etiology of PD remains poorly understood. Genetic studies infer that the disease results from a complex interaction between genetics and environment and there is growing evidence that PD may represent a constellation of diseases with overlapping yet distinct underlying mechanisms. Novel clinical approaches will require a better understanding of the mechanisms at work within an individual as well as methods to identify the specific array of mechanisms that have contributed to the disease. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) strategies provide an opportunity to directly study the affected neuronal subtypes in a given patient. Here we report the generation of iPSC-derived midbrain dopaminergic neurons from a patient with a triplication in the α-synuclein gene (SNCA). We observed that the iPSCs readily differentiated into functional neurons. Importantly, the PD-affected line exhibited disease-related phenotypes in culture: accumulation of α-synuclein, inherent overexpression of markers of oxidative stress, and sensitivity to peroxide induced oxidative stress. These findings show that the dominantly-acting PD mutation is intrinsically capable of perturbing normal cell function in culture and confirm that these features reflect, at least in part, a cell autonomous disease process that is independent of exposure to the entire complexity of the diseased brain. PMID:22110584

  17. Effects of ozone and endotoxin coexposure on rat airway epithelium: potentiation of toxicant-induced alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, J G; Hotchkiss, J A; Harkema, J R

    2001-01-01

    of these results indicates that epithelial and inflammatory responses to coexposure of these two pollutants are greater than those elicited by either agent alone. Interestingly, each toxicant enhances the epithelial alterations induced by the other. Furthermore, the synergistic effects elicited by coexposure to ozone and endotoxin are mediated partly by neutrophils. These studies provided some new insights into how inhaled co-pollutants interact to initiate and promote alterations of airway epithelium. Further studies with these and other air pollutants will help define their true risk to human health. PMID:11544169

  18. Effects of ozone and endotoxin coexposure on rat airway epithelium: potentiation of toxicant-induced alterations.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J G; Hotchkiss, J A; Harkema, J R

    2001-08-01

    of these results indicates that epithelial and inflammatory responses to coexposure of these two pollutants are greater than those elicited by either agent alone. Interestingly, each toxicant enhances the epithelial alterations induced by the other. Furthermore, the synergistic effects elicited by coexposure to ozone and endotoxin are mediated partly by neutrophils. These studies provided some new insights into how inhaled co-pollutants interact to initiate and promote alterations of airway epithelium. Further studies with these and other air pollutants will help define their true risk to human health. PMID:11544169

  19. Protective effect of alpha-tocopheral on biochemical and histological alterations induced by cadmium in rat testes.

    PubMed

    Rajendar, B; Bharavi, K; Rao, G S; Kishore, P V S; Kumar, P Ravi; Kumar, C S V Satish; Kumar, D Srinivas

    2011-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a potential environmental pollutant and causes severe damage to reproductive organs in adults including ovary and testes. Of all antioxidants alpha-tocopheral is considered to be most potent chain breaking antioxidant. Our aim was to study the effect of alpha-tocopheral on biochemical and histological alterations induced by Cd in testes of rats. Group 1 served as control, while groups 2 and 3 received subcutaneous injections of CdCl2 (3 mg/kg b.wt) once a week for four weeks. Group 3 in addition received alpha-tocopheral (75 mg/kg b.wt.) orally, daily for six weeks. Cadmium caused testicular tissue biochemical alterations such as significant increase in MDA, a peroxidation marker, decrease in antioxidant markers viz SOD, CAT and GSH and functional markers viz ALP and LDH. Histological alteration induced by Cd consisted of desquamation of basal lamina, shrunken tubules, generalized germ cell depletion with multinucleated gaint cells, degenerating Leydig cells, vascular congestion, interstitial edema and significant reduction in spermatodynamic count. Alpha-tocopheral significantly reversed all the Cd induced alterations. These results indicate that alpha-tocopheral has a protective effect against Cd indeed biochemical and histological alterations in rat testes. PMID:22471227

  20. Heme stabilization of α-Synuclein oligomers during amyloid fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Eric Y.; Kaur, Prerna; Williams, Thomas L.; Matsui, Hiroshi; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-Synuclein (αSyn), which forms amyloid fibrils, is linked to the neuronal pathology of Parkinson’s disease, as it is the major fibrillar component of Lewy bodies, the inclusions that are characteristic of the disease. Oligomeric structures, common to many neurodegenerative disease-related proteins, may in fact be the primary toxic species, while the amyloid fibrils exist as either a less toxic dead-end species, or even as a beneficial mechanism to clear damaged proteins. In order to alter the progression of the aggregation and gain insights into the pre-fibrillar structures, the effect of heme on αSyn oligomerization was determined by several different techniques including native (non-denaturing) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, thioflavin T fluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism and membrane permeation using a calcein release assay. During aggregation, heme is able to bind the αSyn in a specific fashion, stabilizing distinct oligomeric conformations and promoting the formation of αSyn into annular structures, thereby delaying and/or inhibiting the fibrillation process. These results indicate that heme may play a regulatory role in the progression of Parkinson’s disease; in addition, they provide insights of how the aggregation process may be altered, which may be applicable to the understanding of many neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26161848

  1. Altered Landscapes and Groundwater Sustainability — Exploring Impacts with Induced Polarization, DC Resistivity, and Thermal Tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy-Miller, C.; Caldwell, R.; Wheeler, J.; McCarthy, P.; Binley, A. M.; Constantz, J. E.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Anthropogenically impacted landscapes constitute rising proportions of the Earth’s surface that are characterized by generally elevated nutrient and sediment loadings concurrent with increased consumptive water withdrawals. In recent years a growing number of hydraulically engineered riparian habitat restoration projects have attempted to ameliorate negative impacts of land use on groundwater-surface water systems resulting, e.g., from agricultural practices and urban development. Often the nature of groundwater-surface water interactions in pre- and minimally altered systems is poorly known, making it difficult to assess the impacts of land use and restoration projects on groundwater sustainability. Traditional assessments of surface water parameters (flow, temperature, dissolved oxygen, biotic composition, etc.) can be complemented by hydraulic and thermal measurements to better understand the important role played by groundwater-surface water interactions. Hydraulic and thermal measurements are usually limited to point samples, however, making non-invasive and spatially extensive geophysical characterizations an attractive additional tool. Groundwater-surface water interactions along the Smith River, a tributary to the Missouri River in Montana, and Fish Creek and Flat Creek, tributaries to the Snake River in Wyoming, are being examined using a combination of hydraulic measurements, thermal tracing, and electrical-property imaging. Ninety-two direct-current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization cross sections were obtained at stream transects covering a wide variety of hydrogeologic settings ranging from shallow bedrock to thick alluvial sequences, nature of groundwater-surface water interactions (always gaining, always losing, or seasonally varying) and anthropogenic impacts (minimal low-intensity agriculture to major landscape engineering, including channel reconstruction). DC resistivity and induced polarization delineated mutually distinct features

  2. Cd2+-Induced Alteration of the Global Proteome of Human Skin Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a toxic heavy metal and a well-known human carcinogen. The toxic effects of Cd2+ on biological systems are diverse and thought to be exerted through a complex array of mechanisms. Despite the large number of studies aimed to elucidate the toxic mechanisms of action of Cd2+, few have been targeted toward investigating the ability of Cd2+ to disrupt multiple cellular pathways simultaneously and the overall cellular responses toward Cd2+ exposure. In this study, we employed a quantitative proteomic method, relying on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and LC–MS/MS, to assess the Cd2+-induced simultaneous alterations of multiple cellular pathways in cultured human skin fibroblast cells. By using this approach, we were able to quantify 2931 proteins, and 400 of them displayed significantly changed expression following Cd2+ exposure. Our results unveiled that Cd2+ treatment led to the marked upregulation of several antioxidant enzymes (e.g., metallothionein-1G, superoxide dismutase, pyridoxal kinase, etc.), enzymes associated with glutathione biosynthesis and homeostasis (e.g., glutathione S-transferases, glutathione synthetase, glutathione peroxidase, etc.), and proteins involved in cellular energy metabolism (e.g., glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and the citric acid cycle). Additionally, we found that Cd2+ treatment resulted in the elevated expression of two isoforms of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH I and II), enzymes known to play a key role in regulating nitric oxide biosynthesis. Consistent with these findings, we observed elevated formation of nitric oxide in human skin (GM00637) and lung (IMR-90) fibroblast cells following Cd2+ exposure. The upregulation of DDAH I and II suggests a role of nitric oxide synthesis in Cd2+-induced toxicity in human cells. PMID:24527689

  3. Methamphetamine Preconditioning Alters Midbrain Transcriptional Responses to Methamphetamine-Induced Injury in the Rat Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Cadet, Jean Lud; McCoy, Michael T.; Cai, Ning Sheng; Krasnova, Irina N.; Ladenheim, Bruce; Beauvais, Genevieve; Wilson, Natascha; Wood, William; Becker, Kevin G.; Hodges, Amber B.

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an illicit drug which is neurotoxic to the mammalian brain. Numerous studies have revealed significant decreases in dopamine and serotonin levels in the brains of animals exposed to moderate-to-large METH doses given within short intervals of time. In contrast, repeated injections of small nontoxic doses of the drug followed by a challenge with toxic METH doses afford significant protection against monoamine depletion. The present study was undertaken to test the possibility that repeated injections of the drug might be accompanied by transcriptional changes involved in rendering the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system refractory to METH toxicity. Our results confirm that METH preconditioning can provide significant protection against METH-induced striatal dopamine depletion. In addition, the presence and absence of METH preconditioning were associated with substantial differences in the identity of the genes whose expression was affected by a toxic METH challenge. Quantitative PCR confirmed METH-induced changes in genes of interest and identified additional genes that were differentially impacted by the toxic METH challenge in the presence of METH preconditioning. These genes include small heat shock 27 kD 27 protein 2 (HspB2), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), c-fos, and some encoding antioxidant proteins including CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1, and heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox-1). These observations are consistent, in part, with the transcriptional alterations reported in models of lethal ischemic injuries which are preceded by ischemic or pharmacological preconditioning. Our findings suggest that multiple molecular pathways might work in tandem to protect the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway against the deleterious effects of the toxic psychostimulant. Further analysis of the molecular and cellular pathways regulated by these genes should help to provide some

  4. Repeated stress-induced stimulation of catecholamine response is not followed by altered immune cell redistribution.

    PubMed

    Imrich, Richard; Tibenska, Elena; Koska, Juraj; Ksinantova, Lucia; Kvetnansky, Richard; Bergendiova-Sedlackova, Katarina; Blazicek, Pavol; Vigas, Milan

    2004-06-01

    Stress response is considered an important factor in the modulation of immune function. Neuroendocrine hormones, including catecholamines, affect the process of immune cell redistribution, important for cell-mediated immunity. This longitudinal investigation was aimed at evaluating the effect of repeated stress-induced elevation of catecholamines on immune cell redistribution and expression of adhesive molecules. We assessed the responses of epinephrine (EPI), norepinephrine (NE), cortisol, changes in lymphocytes subpopulations, and percentages of CD11a+, CD11b+, and CD62L+ lymphocytes to a 20-min treadmill exercise of an intensity equal to 80% of the individual's Vo(2)max. The exercise was performed before and after 6 weeks of endurance training consisting of a 1-h run 4 times a week (ET) and after 5 days of bed rest (HDBR) in 10 healthy males. We did not observe any significant changes in the basal levels of EPI, NE, and cortisol in the plasma, nor in the immune parameters after ET and HDBR. The exercise test led to a significant (P <.001) elevation of EPI and NE levels after both ET and HDBR, a significant elevation (P <.01) of cortisol after HDBR, an increase in the absolute numbers of leukocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, CD19+ lymphocytes, percentage of CD11a+ and CD11b+ lymphocytes, and to a decrease of CD62L1 before, after ET, and after HDBR. We found comparable changes in all measured immune parameters after ET and HDBR. In conclusion, repeated stress-induced elevation of EPI and NE was not associated with an alteration in immune cell redistribution found in response to the single bout of exercise. PMID:15240377