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Sample records for syphilis

  1. Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... can I get more information? Sexually Transmitted Diseases http: / / www. cdc. gov/ std/ Syphilis http: / / www. cdc. gov/ std/ syphilis/ Syphilis and MSM Fact Sheet http: / / www. cdc. gov/ std/ syphilis/ STDFact- MSM- Syphilis. ...

  2. Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Syphilis Posted under Health Guides . Updated 6 September 2016. + ... early to avoid serious problems. How common is syphilis? According to the Centers for Disease Control and ...

  3. Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by bacteria. It infects the genital area, lips, mouth, or ... of both men and women. You usually get syphilis from sexual contact with someone who has it. ...

  4. Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... women who have sex with women get syphilis? Yes. It is possible to get syphilis, or any other STI, if you are a woman who ... sex and avoid sexual activity during an outbreak. Yes. It is possible to get syphilis, or any other STI, if you are a woman who ...

  5. Syphilis - primary

    MedlinePlus

    Primary syphilis; Secondary syphilis; Late syphilis; Tertiary syphilis ... Syphilis is a sexually transmitted, infectious disease caused by the spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum . This bacterium causes ...

  6. Congenital syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital lues; Fetal syphilis ... which is passed from mother to child during fetal development or at birth. Nearly half of all ... Saunders; 2014:chap 143. Duff P. Maternal and fetal infections. In: Creasy RK, Resnik R, Iams JD, ...

  7. Gastric syphilis - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Tais Ferreira; Novis, Camila Freitas Lobo; Bottino, Caroline Bertolini; D'Acri, Antonio Macedo; Lima, Ricardo Barbosa; Martins, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    Gastric syphilis is an uncommon extracutaneous manifestation of syphilis, occurring in less than 1% of patients, presenting nonspecific clinical manifestations. In general, it occurs on secondary stage. The critical point is the recognition of the syphilitic gastric involvement, without which there may be incorrect diagnosis of malignancy of the digestive tract. In this report, a case of secondary syphilis with gastric involvement that had complete remission with benzathine penicillin will be described.

  8. Syphilis in adults

    PubMed Central

    Goh, B

    2005-01-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease with protean manifestations resulting from infection by Treponema pallidum. It is systemic early from the outset, the primary pathology being vasculitis. Acquired syphilis can be divided into primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary stages. The infection can also be transmitted vertically resulting in congenital syphilis, and occasionally by blood transfusion and non-sexual contact. Diagnosis is mainly by dark field microscopy in early syphilis and by serological tests. The management in the tropics depends on the diagnostic facilities available: in resource poor countries, primary syphilis is managed syndromically as for anogenital ulcer. The introduction of rapid "desktop" serological tests may simplify and promote widespread screening for syphilis. The mainstay of treatment is with long acting penicillin. Syphilis promotes the transmission of HIV and both infections can simulate and interact with each other. Treponemes may persist despite effective treatment and may have a role in reactivation in immunosuppressed patients. Partner notification, health education, and screening in high risk populations and pregnant women to prevent congenital syphilis are essential aspects in controlling the infection. PMID:16326843

  9. Diagnostic tests for syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection caused by Treponema pallidum. A total of 13,106 cases of primary and secondary syphilis were reported in the United States in 2011 and the rate of infection has increased in subgroups, particularly men who have sex with men. The disease is mainly diagnosed through clinical findings and serologic testing. However, no single serologic test of syphilis is sufficient. Hence, the serologic diagnosis of syphilis requires the detection of 2 types of antibodies (nontreponemal antibodies and treponemal antibodies). The paradigm in syphilis testing has recently shifted in many centers to screen with a treponemal antibody test, reflexing to a nontreponemal test if the treponemal antibody test is positive. This reverse of the traditional algorithm may not be widely recognized among clinicians.

  10. [Syphilis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Charlier, Caroline; Benhaddou, Nadjet; Dupin, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease responsible for a congenital severe infection. Congenital syphilis is complicated by fetal loss/neonatal death (50%), prematurity (25%) and major long term sequelae in other surviving children (20%). Every woman delivering a stillborn after 20WG should be tested for syphilis. Early screening is the cornerstone of prevention, and should be repeated in women at higher risk of contamination. Maternal management relies on early benzathine penicillin administration. Neonatal management relies on early diagnosis and prompt adequate penicillin therapy.

  11. Syphilis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... large blood vessels, heart, bones, and central nervous system (called neurosyphilis). Symptoms of this late stage of syphilis can include memory loss, problems with mental function, walking, balance, bladder ...

  12. [Cardiovascular syphilis: diagnosis, treatment].

    PubMed

    Carrada-Bravo, Teodoro

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular tertiary syphilis may lead to aortitis, aortic aneurism, coronary stenosis, aortic insufficiency and, rarely, to myocarditis. The physician must be familiar with the clinical presentations of this process, including the asymptomatic variety and must be able to have an organized plan for the diagnosis and evaluation to establish or exclude the presence of cardiovascular pathology and the differential diagnosis with other entities. Once the etiologic and topographic diagnosis is established, the patient should be treated with penicillin, doxicycline and other antibiotics, and the consequences of the disorder, both actual and potential, should be considered before deciding weather to recommend surgical intervention. Although late syphilis can be prevented by appropriate therapy of early syphilis, this is a cardiovascular disease that most likely will continue to be diagnosed lately. Understanding of the pathology and pathophysiology of the disease, is most important for its prompt recognition and subsequent management. This paper reviews the natural history, diagnosis and therapy of cardiovascular syphilis. PMID:17469346

  13. Syphilis: an unusual manifestation?

    PubMed Central

    Bezalely, Shai; Jacob, Giris; Flusser, Gideon; Ablin, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Syphilis is a widely investigated infectious venereal disease with varied presentations frequently mimicking other diseases. It progresses in distinct, well-characterised stages: early (primary and secondary), latent, and late (tertiary), each stage having its own unique presentations. However, there has been increasing evidence of atypical presentations. We describe one such presentation of early syphilis in its secondary stage. A man in his late 20s presented with a rash (which is typical of the secondary stage) and with bone pain with multiple lytic lesions (which is rare in the secondary stage but more typical of the tertiary stage). The patient was successfully treated for secondary syphilis. On the basis of our case, and on analysis of other case reports and research of early-stage syphilitic bone involvement, we conclude that the true incidence of bone involvement in early-stage syphilis may be higher than has been previously appreciated, and thus may be under-recognised and underdiagnosed. PMID:25239989

  14. Pregnancy Complications: Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syphilis usually is treated with an antibiotic called penicillin. Antibiotics are medicines that kill infections caused by ... less than a year, a single shot of penicillin usually can cure the infection. But if you’ ...

  15. Treatment of primary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Elliott, W C

    1976-12-01

    Reports in the English language of the treatment of primary syphilis are reviewed. Except for benzathine penicillin, the efficacy of the currently recommended dosage schedules are documented only by Schroeter et al. Although these investigators reported generally acceptable failure rates, further study is necessary to determine: (1) if differences in efficacy exist among regimes; (2) if the current schedules are equally effective in both primary and secondary syphilis; and (3) if increased dosages reduce failure rates. PMID:1010777

  16. Brief History of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Tampa, M; Sarbu, I; Matei, C; Benea, V; Georgescu, SR

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Before the discovery of Treponema pallidum as the etiologic agent, the origins of syphilis have been the subject of several debates. Diverse therapeutic agents were employed in an attempt to cure the disease. Examining the milestones in the history of syphilis, the present article reviews the existing theories that tried to explain the origins of the disease, the approach in art, the cultural and the evolution of the treatments from the empiric means to the discovery of penicillin. PMID:24653750

  17. Endemic syphilis and yaws

    PubMed Central

    Grin, E. I.

    1956-01-01

    Endemic syphilis and similar conditions are compared in this paper with yaws. Both are non-venereal and endemic, and they have very similar epidemiological characteristics. There is also considerable similarity in the clinical manifestations at the various stages of yaws and endemic syphilis, the differences that do appear being mainly due to different environmental and living conditions. No antigenic or immunogenic differences between syphilis and yaws have yet been demonstrated, and the sensitivity of both to penicillin is the same. Control measures for both diseases may be based on similar principles. The author considers the treponematoses to be closely related infections, and stresses the “unitarian” view put forward by various writers. PMID:13404469

  18. Don't forget about syphilis.

    PubMed

    Chacon, Anna H

    2015-08-01

    Syphilis has extremely variable manifestations that produce an extremely broad differential diagnosis. Care must be taken to consider syphilis in dermatologic and other systemic disorders as is relevant.

  19. Oral Manifestations of Secondary Syphilis.

    PubMed

    de Paulo, Luiz Fernando Barbosa; Servato, João Paulo Silva; Oliveira, Maiolino Thomaz Fonseca; Durighetto, Antonio Francisco; Zanetta-Barbosa, Darceny

    2015-06-01

    Known as "the great imitator," secondary syphilis may clinically manifest itself in myriad ways, involving different organs including the oral mucosa, and mimicking, both clinically and histologically, several diseases, thereby making diagnosis a challenge for clinicians. We highlight the clinical aspects of oral manifestation in 7 patients with secondary syphilis. Clinicians should consider secondary syphilis in the differential diagnosis of ulcerative and/or white oral lesions.

  20. Oral Manifestations of Secondary Syphilis.

    PubMed

    de Paulo, Luiz Fernando Barbosa; Servato, João Paulo Silva; Oliveira, Maiolino Thomaz Fonseca; Durighetto, Antonio Francisco; Zanetta-Barbosa, Darceny

    2015-06-01

    Known as "the great imitator," secondary syphilis may clinically manifest itself in myriad ways, involving different organs including the oral mucosa, and mimicking, both clinically and histologically, several diseases, thereby making diagnosis a challenge for clinicians. We highlight the clinical aspects of oral manifestation in 7 patients with secondary syphilis. Clinicians should consider secondary syphilis in the differential diagnosis of ulcerative and/or white oral lesions. PMID:25892249

  1. Eponyms in syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Vashisht, Deepak; Baveja, Sukriti

    2015-01-01

    Eponym has originated from the Greek word “eponymos” meaning “giving name”. It is a tribute to the pioneers in the field who have significantly contributed towards present understanding of the subject. Syphilis has amazed and plagued mankind since eternity. This disease is a great masquerade and can humble best of physicians with its varied presentations. Keen and immaculate observations of these workers have eased our understanding of many signs and phenomenon associated with this disease. This has led to evolution of number of eponyms, perhaps no other disease has as many eponyms associated with it, as does syphilis. Eponyms such as Kassowitz's law, Clutton's joints, Higoumenaki sign, Argyll-Robertson pupil etc. help in providing easy milieu for remembering. Besides paying tributes to stalwarts in the field, who dedicated their lives for this cause, they also facilitated our current understanding of the great masquerade. PMID:26692628

  2. Syphilis: antibiotic treatment and resistance.

    PubMed

    Stamm, L V

    2015-06-01

    Syphilis is a chronic, multi-stage infectious disease that is usually transmitted sexually by contact with an active lesion of a partner or congenitally from an infected pregnant woman to her fetus. Although syphilis is still endemic in many developing countries, it has re-emerged in several developed countries. The resurgence of syphilis is a major concern to global public health, particularly since the lesions of early syphilis increase the risk of acquisition and transmission of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Because there is no vaccine to prevent syphilis, control is mainly dependent on the identification and treatment of infected individuals and their contacts with penicillin G, the first-line drug for all stages of syphilis. The emergence of clinically significant azithromycin resistance in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the syphilis agent, has resulted in treatment failures, thus precluding the routine use of this second-line drug. Information is presented here on the diagnosis and recommended antibiotic treatment of syphilis and the challenge of macrolide-resistant T. pallidum.

  3. Ocular Syphilis: a Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Woolston, Sophie L; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Marrazzo, Jeanne

    2016-11-01

    While ocular syphilis is not a new phenomenon, recent increased rates of new diagnoses, especially in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons and men who have sex with men, have sparked a new interest in an old disease. This article will review the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of ocular syphilis, and provide guidance on management. PMID:27686678

  4. Atypical Cutaneous Manifestations in Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Ivars Lleó, M; Clavo Escribano, P; Menéndez Prieto, B

    2016-05-01

    Although the diversity of the clinical manifestations of syphilis is well-known, atypical presentations can also occur. Such atypical presentations are associated with a high risk of transmission as a result of diagnostic confusion and treatment delays owing to the disease's ability to mimic other common skin diseases, deviate from classic clinical presentations, and adopt unique forms. Cases of atypical syphilis have been described most frequently in patients with concomitant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Because the incidence of syphilis has been growing over recent years -particularly in patients with HIV co-infection- dermatologists need to be familiar with the less well-known clinical presentations of this venereal disease.

  5. Maternal syphilis: pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Stuart M.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the long history of medical interest in syphilis and its effects on pregnancy outcome, many fundamental questions about the pathophysiology and treatment of syphilis during pregnancy remain unanswered. However, understanding has been advanced by recent scientific reports such as those which delineate the complete sequence of the genome of the syphilis spirochaete, provide a more precise description of fetal and neonate infection by use of rabbit infectivity tests and describe the gestational age distribution of fetal death secondary to syphilis. It appears that fetal syphilitic involvement progresses in a rather predictable fashion, and although there is disagreement about the optimal prenatal treatment regimen, programmatic efforts to prevent fetal death must provide seropositive pregnant women with a recommended treatment early in pregnancy, and certainly before the third trimester. PMID:15356936

  6. Considering syphilis in aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Sarup; Chadwick, David; Chawla, Girish

    2009-12-01

    Clinicians need to consider syphilis in the differential diagnosis of macular or papular rashes with neurological conditions, particularly aseptic meningitis, as early diagnosis and treatment lead to a better prognosis. PMID:20095316

  7. Malignant syphilis in an immunocompetent female patient*

    PubMed Central

    Requena, Camila Bueno; Orasmo, Cínthia Rosane; Ocanha, Juliana Polizel; Barraviera, Silvia Regina Catharino Sartore; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2014-01-01

    Malignant syphilis is an uncommon manifestation of secondary syphilis, in which necrotic lesions may be associated with systemic signs and symptoms. Generally it occurs in an immunosuppressed patient, mainly HIV-infected, but might be observed on those who have normal immune response. Since there is an exponential increase in the number of syphilis cases, more diagnoses of malignant syphilis must be expected. We report a case in an immunocompetent female patient. PMID:25387504

  8. Malignant syphilis in an immunocompetent female patient.

    PubMed

    Requena, Camila Bueno; Orasmo, Cínthia Rosane; Ocanha, Juliana Polizel; Barraviera, Silvia Regina Catharino Sartore; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2014-01-01

    Malignant syphilis is an uncommon manifestation of secondary syphilis, in which necrotic lesions may be associated with systemic signs and symptoms. Generally it occurs in an immunosuppressed patient, mainly HIV-infected, but might be observed on those who have normal immune response. Since there is an exponential increase in the number of syphilis cases, more diagnoses of malignant syphilis must be expected. We report a case in an immunocompetent female patient. PMID:25387504

  9. 42 CFR 493.923 - Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Syphilis serology. 493.923 Section 493.923 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.923 Syphilis serology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing in syphilis serology, a...

  10. 42 CFR 493.923 - Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Syphilis serology. 493.923 Section 493.923 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.923 Syphilis serology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing in syphilis serology, a...

  11. 42 CFR 493.923 - Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Syphilis serology. 493.923 Section 493.923 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.923 Syphilis serology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing in syphilis serology, a...

  12. 42 CFR 493.923 - Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Syphilis serology. 493.923 Section 493.923 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.923 Syphilis serology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing in syphilis serology, a...

  13. 42 CFR 493.923 - Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Syphilis serology. 493.923 Section 493.923 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.923 Syphilis serology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing in syphilis serology, a...

  14. Nodular tertiary syphilis in an immunocompetent patient*

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano; de Brito, Arival Cardoso; Nascimento, Bianca Angelina Macêdodo; Carvalho, Alessandra Haber; Drago, Marion Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Acquired syphilis can be divided into primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary stages. About 25% of patients with untreated primary syphilis will develop late signs that generally occur after three to five years, with involvement of several organs. The authors present an immunocompetent female who developed a tertiary stage syphilis presenting with long-standing nodular plaques. PMID:27579755

  15. Nodular tertiary syphilis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano; Brito, Arival Cardoso de; Nascimento, Bianca Angelina Macêdodo; Carvalho, Alessandra Haber; Drago, Marion Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Acquired syphilis can be divided into primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary stages. About 25% of patients with untreated primary syphilis will develop late signs that generally occur after three to five years, with involvement of several organs. The authors present an immunocompetent female who developed a tertiary stage syphilis presenting with long-standing nodular plaques. PMID:27579755

  16. Atypical Cutaneous Manifestations in Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Ivars Lleó, M; Clavo Escribano, P; Menéndez Prieto, B

    2016-05-01

    Although the diversity of the clinical manifestations of syphilis is well-known, atypical presentations can also occur. Such atypical presentations are associated with a high risk of transmission as a result of diagnostic confusion and treatment delays owing to the disease's ability to mimic other common skin diseases, deviate from classic clinical presentations, and adopt unique forms. Cases of atypical syphilis have been described most frequently in patients with concomitant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Because the incidence of syphilis has been growing over recent years -particularly in patients with HIV co-infection- dermatologists need to be familiar with the less well-known clinical presentations of this venereal disease. PMID:26708562

  17. Did Adolf Hitler have syphilis?

    PubMed

    Retief, F P; Wessels, A

    2005-10-01

    The evidence that Adolf Hitler might have suffered from incapacitating syphilis is reviewed. Rumors that he acquired syphilis from a prostitute at the age of 20 years, with possible re-infection during World War I, can no longer be verified. Evidence is that he was sexually rather inactive throughout his life. Suggestions that Hitler's cardiac lesion and complaints such as transitory blindness, tremor of his left arm and leg, recurring abdominal pain and a skin lesion of the leg were of syphilitic aetiology cannot be supported. Hitler's progressive mental and physical deterioration after 1942, his growing paranoia, fits of rage, grandiosity and symptoms of possible dementia would fit in neurosyphilis. There are, however, also other explanations for his terminal syndrome, and evidence that repeated clinical examinations did not show the characteristic signs of dementia paralytica or tabes dorsalis, swings the balance of probability away from tertiary syphilis. PMID:16341329

  18. Did Adolf Hitler have syphilis?

    PubMed

    Retief, F P; Wessels, A

    2005-10-01

    The evidence that Adolf Hitler might have suffered from incapacitating syphilis is reviewed. Rumors that he acquired syphilis from a prostitute at the age of 20 years, with possible re-infection during World War I, can no longer be verified. Evidence is that he was sexually rather inactive throughout his life. Suggestions that Hitler's cardiac lesion and complaints such as transitory blindness, tremor of his left arm and leg, recurring abdominal pain and a skin lesion of the leg were of syphilitic aetiology cannot be supported. Hitler's progressive mental and physical deterioration after 1942, his growing paranoia, fits of rage, grandiosity and symptoms of possible dementia would fit in neurosyphilis. There are, however, also other explanations for his terminal syndrome, and evidence that repeated clinical examinations did not show the characteristic signs of dementia paralytica or tabes dorsalis, swings the balance of probability away from tertiary syphilis.

  19. OCULAR SYPHILIS IN A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT.

    PubMed

    Romao, Elen A; Bolella, Valdes R; Nardin, Maria Estela P; Habib-Simao, Maria Lucia; Furtado, João Marcelo; Moyses-Neto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of ocular syphilis after a renal transplantation involving progressive vision loss without clinically identifiable ocular disease. Electroretinography showed signs of ischemia, especially in the internal retina. A serological test was positive for syphilis. Lumbar puncture revealed lymphocytic meningitis and a positive serologic test for syphilis in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was treated with penicillin, and had a quick vision improvement. In the case of transplant recipients, clinicians should always consider the diagnosis of ocular syphilis in cases with unexplained visual acuity decrement, as this condition may cause serious complications if not treated. PMID:27253748

  20. Alopecia as the Presenting Symptom of Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Ornelas, Jennifer; Agbai, Oma N; Kiuru, Maija; Sivamani, Raja K

    2015-07-15

    Alopecia can be one of the many symptoms of secondary syphilis and the clinical presentations include essential syphilitic alopecia or symptomatic syphilitic alopecia. In this report, we present a case of a patient with essential syphilitic alopecia whose sole presenting symptom of syphilis was alopecia. Despite an initial negative rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, he was ultimately found to have syphilis on scalp biopsy. His alopecia improved following treatment with benzathine penicillin. This presentation serves as a reminder to clinicians to be cognizant of alopecia as a presenting sign of syphilis. A review of the specificity and sensitivity of the typical tests used for the diagnosis is presented.

  1. OCULAR SYPHILIS IN A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT.

    PubMed

    Romao, Elen A; Bolella, Valdes R; Nardin, Maria Estela P; Habib-Simao, Maria Lucia; Furtado, João Marcelo; Moyses-Neto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of ocular syphilis after a renal transplantation involving progressive vision loss without clinically identifiable ocular disease. Electroretinography showed signs of ischemia, especially in the internal retina. A serological test was positive for syphilis. Lumbar puncture revealed lymphocytic meningitis and a positive serologic test for syphilis in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was treated with penicillin, and had a quick vision improvement. In the case of transplant recipients, clinicians should always consider the diagnosis of ocular syphilis in cases with unexplained visual acuity decrement, as this condition may cause serious complications if not treated.

  2. OCULAR SYPHILIS IN A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT

    PubMed Central

    ROMAO, Elen A.; BOLELLA, Valdes R.; NARDIN, Maria Estela P.; HABIB-SIMAO, Maria Lucia; FURTADO, João Marcelo; MOYSES-NETO, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of ocular syphilis after a renal transplantation involving progressive vision loss without clinically identifiable ocular disease. Electroretinography showed signs of ischemia, especially in the internal retina. A serological test was positive for syphilis. Lumbar puncture revealed lymphocytic meningitis and a positive serologic test for syphilis in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was treated with penicillin, and had a quick vision improvement. In the case of transplant recipients, clinicians should always consider the diagnosis of ocular syphilis in cases with unexplained visual acuity decrement, as this condition may cause serious complications if not treated. PMID:27253748

  3. The modern diagnosis of syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Olansky, Sidney; Price, I. N. Orpwood

    1956-01-01

    After briefly outlining the natural history of syphilitic infection, the authors review in detail the diagnosis of syphilis in the various stages of the disease and discuss the relative value at each stage of the commonly used serological tests and the Treponema pallidum immobilization (TPI) test. In their conclusions, they remark that the TPI test should be used with discretion and not as a matter of routine with all sera. Owing to its complexities and to the lengthy procedure involved, it is better suited for use with “problem” sera, for instance, sera from expectant mothers suspected of being acute non-treponemal reactors, or sera from persons with latent syphilis. PMID:13329849

  4. [Rheumatic expression of secondary syphilis].

    PubMed

    Roque, R; Vinagre, F; Cordeiro, I; Gonçalves, P; Bartolo, E; Canas da Silva, J; Santos, M J

    2012-01-01

    Syphilis is a disease caused by Treponema pallidum infection with protean clinical manifestations. Musculoskeletal complaints are however uncommon and most of the time mild. Occasionally they can dominate the clinical picture and simulate a variety of rheumatic diseases. The authors present the clinical case of a 33-year-old woman who developed a lupus-like syndrome in the postpartum, characterized by polyarthritis, elevated acute phase reactants and positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA). Physical examination revealed a macular non-pruriginous skin rash involving the trunk, upper limbs and palms. The Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) and Treponema Pallidum Hemaglutination (TPHA) tests gave a positive result and the patient was diagnosed as secondary syphilis and medicated with 2.4 MU of benzathine penicillin intramuscular weekly for 3 weeks, with complete resolution of clinical signs and ANA negativation. The association of rash and arthritis may occur in several rheumatic diseases but in the presence of palmoplantar involvement, the possibility of syphilis infection should not be overlooked. PMID:23149640

  5. Bone invasion in secondary syphilis: case reports.

    PubMed Central

    Ollé-Goig, J E; Barrio, J L; Gurgui, M; Mildvan, D

    1988-01-01

    The affinity of treponemes for bone tissue is well known, but the incidence of bone infection in the early stages of syphilis is uncertain. Although case reports of early bone invasion are few, reviews of large numbers of patients with early syphilis indicate that the incidence is probably greater than at present believed. Two case reports are presented. Images PMID:3410468

  6. Syphilis. A tale of twisted treponemes.

    PubMed Central

    Flores, J L

    1995-01-01

    Despite the widespread availability of effective treatment, the incidence of primary and secondary syphilis in the United States is on the rise. In addition, syphilis is occurring in a substantial number of patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), thus adding to the complexities of diagnosis and treatment. Primary syphilis represents a disseminated infection, often accompanied by abnormalities of the cerebrospinal fluid, that may pass unrecognized and progress to the myriad manifestations of secondary syphilis. The diagnosis of syphilis in patients with mucosal or skin lesions may be made by darkfield examination; once lesions have resolved, serologic tests are required. Patients with latent syphilis may have asymptomatic neurosyphilis and risk progression to tertiary disease. The diagnosis of asymptomatic neurosyphilis is necessary to determine the optimal treatment of patients with latent disease. The diagnosis of active neurosyphilis generally requires an inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid profile and a reactive cerebrospinal fluid VDRL test. Syphilis is common in HIV-infected patients, who may have an altered antibody response to infection and an apparent increased incidence of neurologic complications. The preferred treatment at all stages is penicillin, which is also the only recommended therapy for neurosyphilis. The optimal treatment of syphilis in HIV-infected patients is unknown. Images Figure 1. PMID:8553639

  7. Laboratory diagnosis of syphilis with automated immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Antonella; Moroni, Alessandra; Accardo, Silvia; Cevenini, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The serological detection of specific antibodies to Treponema pallidum is of particular importance in the diagnosis of syphilis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate diagnostic performances of automated immunoassays in comparison with T. pallidum hemagglutination test (TPHA) and Western Blot (WB). The retrospective study was performed with different panels of sera: 244 clinical and serological characterized syphilitic sera and 203 potentially interfering samples. All the sera were tested by Enzygnost Syphilis, ARCHITECT Syphilis TP, TPHA, and homemade WB. The diagnostic performances of the two assays were very similar: both Enzygnost Syphilis and ARCHITECT Syphilis TP performed with a sensitivity of 99.2%, whereas the specificity was 98.5 and 98.4%, respectively. Considering the suitability for automation, both immunoassays may represent a good choice as a screening test. However, the use of a confirmatory test, such as TPHA or WB, remains a must in order to avoid false-positive results.

  8. [Injury by skull osteolytic secundary syphilis].

    PubMed

    Alessandro, Lucas; Camporro, Julieta Piar; Arakaki, Naomi; Orellana, Nora; Mora, Claudia Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Bone involvement of syphilis can be observed in tertiary and congenital syphilis. It is infrequent during the secondary stage. The skull is the most affected bone in secondary syphilis, and its most frequent form of presentation is proliferative osteitis. If the skull is affected, headache is usual and can be as intense as in meningitis. Osteolyitic lesions may be seen in complimentary imaging studies, with a moth eaten aspect. These lesions raise concern over a number of differential diagnoses, among which are infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. The definitive diagnosis is made by bone biopsy of the compromised bone. Molecular techniques in the affected tissues increases diagnostic performance. There is no standardized treatment protocol for syphilis since there are no guidelines available. We report a case of a 19 year old female, presenting with a unique osteolytic lesion in the skull due to secondary syphilis. PMID:27315003

  9. Syphilis: An Old Disease With Present-Day Implications.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Candice J; Bachmann, Laura H

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis continues to be a burden on the public health system. While men who have sex with men and HIV-infected individuals are the most affected populations, syphilis rates have also increased in reproductive-aged women, resulting in concurrent increases in congenital syphilis. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are requisite components of syphilis control. PMID:27621352

  10. Syphilis: An Old Disease With Present-Day Implications.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Candice J; Bachmann, Laura H

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis continues to be a burden on the public health system. While men who have sex with men and HIV-infected individuals are the most affected populations, syphilis rates have also increased in reproductive-aged women, resulting in concurrent increases in congenital syphilis. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are requisite components of syphilis control.

  11. Syphilis surveillance in France, 2000-2003.

    PubMed

    Couturier, E; Michel, A; Janier, M; Dupin, N; Semaille, C

    2004-12-01

    This article describes syphilis trends, characteristics of patients from 2000 to 2003 in France and trends of the benzylpenicillin benzathine 2.4 million UI sales from 2001 to 2003. The ongoing surveillance system for syphilis case reporting since 2001 has been set up in volunteer settings, mostly public settings where STI treatment is offered. Clinical case reporting is complemented by sexual behavioural data based on a self-administered questionnaire. From 2000 to 2003, 1089 syphilis cases were reported in France, increasing from 37 cases in 2000 to 428 in 2003. Overall, 96% of syphilis cases were in men with a mean age of 36.5 years and 70% of whom were born in France. The proportion of syphilis cases with HIV co-infection decreased over time from 60% in 2000 to 33% in 2003. The most affected area by the syphilis epidemic is the Ile-de-France region, mainly the city of Paris. The greatest proportion of syphilis cases diagnosed in men who have sex with men (MSM) were in the Ile-de-France region, where they made up 87% of cases, compared with 75% in other regions. Among the patients who completed the self-administered questionnaire on sexual behaviour, 83% reported having casual sex partners in the 3 months prior to their syphilis diagnosis. Trends in the sales of benzylpenicillin benzathine 2.4 million UI in private pharmacies are similar to those observed in the surveillance system, and increased between 2001 and 2003. In conclusion, syphilis transmission is still ongoing in France in 2003 and the role of unprotected oral sex in the transmission of syphilis should be emphasised. PMID:15677855

  12. Prozone phenomenon in secondary syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Sidana, Ruchi; Mangala, H. C.; Murugesh, S. B.; Ravindra, K.

    2011-01-01

    Prozone phenomenon is a false negative response resulting from high antibody titer which interferes with formation of antigen- antibody lattice, necessary to visualize a positive flocculation test. We present a case of secondary syphilis who presented to us with features of contact irritant dermatitis. She initially tested non- reactive for VDRL testing but tested positive with higher dilution. The prozone phenomenon is attaining importance because of increasing prevalence of Acquired immune deficiency syndrome. So one needs to be familiar with the occurrence of prozone phenomenon. PMID:21799578

  13. Prozone phenomenon in secondary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Sidana, Ruchi; Mangala, H C; Murugesh, S B; Ravindra, K

    2011-01-01

    Prozone phenomenon is a false negative response resulting from high antibody titer which interferes with formation of antigen- antibody lattice, necessary to visualize a positive flocculation test. We present a case of secondary syphilis who presented to us with features of contact irritant dermatitis. She initially tested non- reactive for VDRL testing but tested positive with higher dilution. The prozone phenomenon is attaining importance because of increasing prevalence of Acquired immune deficiency syndrome. So one needs to be familiar with the occurrence of prozone phenomenon.

  14. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study and women's health.

    PubMed

    Gamble, V N

    1997-01-01

    In May 1997, President Bill Clinton apologized for the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. The President's action underscores that in the 25 years since its public revelation, the study has moved from a singular historical event to a powerful metaphor that symbolizes racism in medicine, misconduct in human research, the arrogance of physicians, and government abuse of black people. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study also has implications for women's health. Discussion of the study usually ignores its impact on the wives of the victims. In addition, African-American women may be more reluctant to participate in clinical trials because of the shadow cast by the syphilis study and other incidents of medical abuse. Finally, the Tuskegee Syphilis Study reminds us that the battle against racism must be an integral part of the campaign to improve women's health.

  15. Secondary Syphilis With Hepatitis and Nephrotic Syndrome: A Rare Concurrence

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Jasbir; Bajantri, Bharat; Nayudu, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis, a chronic multisystem disease, is caused by a spirochete, Treponema pallidum. Clinical presentation may expand to several stages including primary, secondary and latent syphilis, which may present as early or late syphilis. Nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis are well-known complications of secondary syphilis. To the best of our knowledge, secondary syphilis with coexisting renal and hepatic complications has rarely been reported. Here we present a rare case of concurrent nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis in a patient with secondary syphilis. PMID:27298666

  16. Secondary Syphilis With Hepatitis and Nephrotic Syndrome: A Rare Concurrence.

    PubMed

    Makker, Jasbir; Bajantri, Bharat; Nayudu, Suresh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Syphilis, a chronic multisystem disease, is caused by a spirochete, Treponema pallidum. Clinical presentation may expand to several stages including primary, secondary and latent syphilis, which may present as early or late syphilis. Nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis are well-known complications of secondary syphilis. To the best of our knowledge, secondary syphilis with coexisting renal and hepatic complications has rarely been reported. Here we present a rare case of concurrent nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis in a patient with secondary syphilis. PMID:27298666

  17. Syphilis in pregnancy and congenital syphilis in Amazonas State, Brazil: an evaluation using database linkage.

    PubMed

    Soeiro, Claudia Marques de Oliveira; Miranda, Angélica Espinosa; Saraceni, Valeria; Santos, Marcelo Cordeiro dos; Talhari, Sinesio; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos de Lima

    2014-04-01

    This study analyzes notification of syphilis in pregnancy and congenital syphilis in Amazo- nas State, Brazil, from 2007 to 2009 and verifies underreporting in databases in the National Information System on Diseases of Notification (SINAN) and the occurrence of perinatal deaths associated with congenital syphilis and not reported in the Mortality Information System (SIM). This was a cross-sectional study with probabilistic record linkage between the SINAN and SIM. There were 666 reports of syphilis in pregnant women, including 224 in 2007 (3.8/1,000), 244(4.5/1,000) in 2008, and 198(4.0/1,000) in 2009. The study found 486 cases of congenital syphilis, of which 153 in 2007 (2.1/1,000), 193 in 2008 (2.6/1,000), and 140 in 2009 (2.0/1,000). After linkage of the SINAN databases, 237 pregnant women (35.6%) had cases of congenital syphilis reported. The SIM recorded 4,905 perinatal deaths, of which 57.8% were stillbirths. Probabilistic record linkage between SIM and SINAN-Congenital Syphilis yielded 13 matched records. The use of SINAN and SIM may not reflect the total magnitude of syphilis, but provide the basis for monitoring and analyzing this health problem, with a view towards planning and management. PMID:24896047

  18. Syphilis

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  1. Neonatal hypoglycemia caused by hypopituitarism in infants with congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Daaboul, J J; Kartchner, W; Jones, K L

    1993-12-01

    Two infants with congenital syphilis and persistent hypoglycemia were found to have hypopituitarism. Hypopituitarism should be recognized as a potential complication of congenital syphilis; affected infants with persistent hypoglycemia should receive a prompt evaluation of pituitary function.

  2. Neuro syphilis: Portrayals by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, O

    2009-01-01

    The developments in neuro syphilis in the 19 th century are integral parts of the history of psychiatry. The delineation of various aspects of neuro syphilis by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in three of his stories is discussed in brief.

  3. Syphilis hospitalisations in Portugal over the last decade.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Pinto, B; Freitas, A; Lisboa, C

    2016-02-01

    Although several studies have reported an increase of syphilis incidence over the last decade in Western Europe, information concerning syphilis epidemiology in Portugal remains scarce. Therefore, we sought to characterise acquired syphilis-associated hospitalisations in Portugal according to demographic and clinical data. We used a database containing all hospitalisations that occurred in mainland Portugal public hospitals with discharges between 2000 and 2014. We analysed all hospitalisations associated with ICD-9-CM codes 091-097.x (corresponding to acquired syphilis diagnosis) concerning inpatients' gender, age and comorbidities. The median length of stay and in-hospital mortality rates were also studied. Between 2000 and 2014, there were a total of 8974 syphilis-related hospitalisations in mainland Portugal. The rate of acquired syphilis hospitalisations per 100,000 inhabitants increased by 33 % during the studied period. Syphilis hospitalisation rates increased by 70 % in males and 139 % among patients aged over 55 years. On the other hand, they declined by 10 % in females and 20 % among patients younger than 55 years old. The percentage of syphilis episodes presenting cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric comorbidities increased, while the percentage of syphilis episodes presenting HIV co-infection decreased by 69 %. A fatal outcome was reported in 5 % of episodes; 4.6 % of them had acquired syphilis as the main reason for hospitalisation. This study illustrates that, despite being a preventable infection, syphilis remains a public health problem. The analysis of hospitalisation and administrative data helps to understand syphilis epidemiology and provides a supplement to traditional case notifications.

  4. Syphilis intervention in pregnancy: Zambian demonstration project.

    PubMed Central

    Hira, S K; Bhat, G J; Chikamata, D M; Nkowane, B; Tembo, G; Perine, P L; Meheus, A

    1990-01-01

    Despite availability of simpler serologic tests for syphilis and near cure with penicillin, unacceptably high prevalence of infectious maternal syphilis exist in many developing countries, including Zambia. It is the foremost risk factor for mid-trimester abortions, stillbirths, prematurity and morbidity and mortality among infants born with congenital syphilis in Zambia. An intervention project was conducted in Lusaka aimed at demonstrating the effectiveness of new health education methods and prenatal screening for syphilis in reducing the adverse outcomes during pregnancy. During pre-intervention phase, approximately 150 consecutive pregnant women from each of the three study and the three control centres were recruited when they presented in labour at the University Teaching Hospital. The intervention phase lasted for one year at the three study centres during which new methods of health education were introduced to improve early attendances during pregnancy. Also, on-site syphilis screening was performed twice during pregnancy and seroreactive women, and in many cases their sexual partners, were treated by the existing prenatal clinic staff. During the post-intervention phase the steps of pre-intervention phase were repeated to evaluate the impact of intervention. Overall, 8.0% of women were confirmed seroreactive for syphilis; there was no difference between the study and the control centres (p greater than 0.05). Fifty seven percent (132/230) of syphilitic pregnancies ended with an adverse outcome, that is, abortion (RR 5.0), stillbirth (RR 3.6), prematurity (RR 2.6) and low birth weight (RR 7.8). The overall risk of adverse outcomes due to syphilis was 8.29 (95% confidence interval 6.53, 10.53). The new methods of health education were effective and the percentage of women who had their first prenatal visit under 16 weeks of gestation improved from 9.4 to 42.5. Although screening and treatment during intervention was suboptimal, the adverse outcomes

  5. Syphilis in pregnant women in Zambia.

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, A V; Din, S N; Hira, S K; Bhat, G J; Wacha, D S; Rukmini, A; Mulenga, R C

    1982-01-01

    Because of the high incidence of congenital syphilis at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia, the potential risks of congenital infection and fetal loss due to syphilis were assessed by screening 202 antenatal patients, 340 pregnant women admitted to the hospital whose pregnancies ended in either spontaneous abortion or stillbirth, and 469 consecutive babies delivered at the hospital. Primary serological screening was performed with the rapid plasma reagin test, and reactive sera were confirmed by the Treponema pallidum haemagglutination test. In all cases detailed histories were obtained and patients were examined for clinical signs of syphilis. The TPHA test result was reactive in 12.5% of antenatal patients and in 42% of women who aborted in the later half of pregnancy. Among 469 consecutive babies delivered at the hospital, 30 had reactive results to the TPHA test; of these two were stillborn and four had signs of congenital syphilis at birth. Thus, syphilis appears to affect adversely an appreciably high number of pregnant women in Zambia. For this reason a special campaign to screen adequately and treat pregnant women and neonates is needed. PMID:6756542

  6. Syphilis on the rise: A prolonged syphilis outbreak among HIV-infected patients in Northern Greece

    PubMed Central

    Tsachouridou, Olga; Skoura, Lemonia; Christaki, Eirini; Kollaras, Panagiotis; Sidiropoulou, Eleni; Zebekakis, Pantelis; Vakirlis, Efstratios; Margariti, Apostolia; Metallidis, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are a major public health issue in Europe. Numerous outbreaks of syphilis have been described recently and an increased prevalence of high-risk sexual practices has raised concern about the transmission of HIV and other STDs. Similarly, an increase in sexually transmitted infections has been recorded in Northern Greece. Methods This report describes a recent outbreak of syphilis in people living with HIV. The demographic, clinical, and serologic data of HIV patients diagnosed with syphilis were recorded and analyzed. Data on syphilis incidence from the general population was also compared to HIV patients’ data. Results Fifty-eight HIV-patients of the Infectious Diseases Unit of a tertiary hospital (5.2%) were diagnosed with syphilis during a three-year period (2008-2010). Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and coexistence of other STDs were independent predictors of syphilis (OR: 2.4, 95CI%: 1.26, 4.63, p=0.008; OR: 9.4, 95%CI: 4.49, 19.64, p<0.001, respectively). Origin from a country other than Greece (p=0.005), and homosexual contact (p=0.003), were separate risk factors for syphilis in the general population in the same area. Conclusion Diagnosis of a sexually transmitted disease in an HIV patient is a crucial clinical event that should trigger the clinician’s suspicion for high-risk sexual behavior. Sexual health assessments should be a routine process for HIV patients.

  7. Syphilis on the rise: A prolonged syphilis outbreak among HIV-infected patients in Northern Greece

    PubMed Central

    Tsachouridou, Olga; Skoura, Lemonia; Christaki, Eirini; Kollaras, Panagiotis; Sidiropoulou, Eleni; Zebekakis, Pantelis; Vakirlis, Efstratios; Margariti, Apostolia; Metallidis, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are a major public health issue in Europe. Numerous outbreaks of syphilis have been described recently and an increased prevalence of high-risk sexual practices has raised concern about the transmission of HIV and other STDs. Similarly, an increase in sexually transmitted infections has been recorded in Northern Greece. Methods This report describes a recent outbreak of syphilis in people living with HIV. The demographic, clinical, and serologic data of HIV patients diagnosed with syphilis were recorded and analyzed. Data on syphilis incidence from the general population was also compared to HIV patients’ data. Results Fifty-eight HIV-patients of the Infectious Diseases Unit of a tertiary hospital (5.2%) were diagnosed with syphilis during a three-year period (2008-2010). Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and coexistence of other STDs were independent predictors of syphilis (OR: 2.4, 95CI%: 1.26, 4.63, p=0.008; OR: 9.4, 95%CI: 4.49, 19.64, p<0.001, respectively). Origin from a country other than Greece (p=0.005), and homosexual contact (p=0.003), were separate risk factors for syphilis in the general population in the same area. Conclusion Diagnosis of a sexually transmitted disease in an HIV patient is a crucial clinical event that should trigger the clinician’s suspicion for high-risk sexual behavior. Sexual health assessments should be a routine process for HIV patients. PMID:27622160

  8. Cross-reactivity between Lyme and syphilis screening assays: Lyme disease does not cause false-positive syphilis screens.

    PubMed

    Patriquin, Glenn; LeBlanc, Jason; Heinstein, Charles; Roberts, Catherine; Lindsay, Robbin; Hatchette, Todd F

    2016-03-01

    Increased rates of Lyme disease and syphilis in the same geographic area prompted an assessment of screening test cross-reactivity. This study supports the previously described cross-reactivity of Lyme screening among syphilis-positive sera and reports evidence against the possibility of false-positive syphilis screening tests resulting from previous Borrelia burgdorferi infection.

  9. [Treatment of syphilis with malaria or heat].

    PubMed

    Verhave, Jan Peter

    2016-01-01

    Until the end of the Second World War, syphilis was a common sexually transmitted infection. This stigmatising infectious disease caused mental decline, paralysis and eventually death. The history of syphilis was given public attention because of 'malaria therapy', which had been applied from the First World War onwards in patients with paralytic dementia. In 1917, the Austrian physician Julius Wagner-Jauregg (1857-1940) induced fever in these patients by infecting them with malaria parasites; in 1927, he received the Nobel Prize for his discovery of the healing properties of malarial fever. One source, not cited anywhere, is an interview that the American bacteriologist and science writer/medical journalist Paul de Kruif conducted with Wagner-Jauregg in 1930. The reporting of this meeting, and De Kruif's later involvement in the mechanical heat treatment of patients with syphilis, form the inspiration for this article. When penicillin became available, both treatments became obsolete. PMID:27165455

  10. Malignant syphilis in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, T R; de Castro, I J; Dahia, M M B; de Azevedo, M C V M; da Silva, G A R; Motta, R N; da Cunha Pinto, J; de Almeida Ferry, F R

    2015-04-01

    Malignant syphilis is an uncommon, but not unknown, ulcerative variation of secondary syphilis. The lesions typically begin as papules, which quickly evolve to pustules and then to ulcers with elevated edges and central necrosis. It is usually, but not mandatory, found in patients with some level of immunosuppression, such as HIV patients, when the TCD4(+) cell count is >200 cells/mm(3). Despite the anxiety the lesions cause, this form of the disease has a good prognosis. The general symptoms disappear right after the beginning of treatment, and lesions disappear over a variable period. This study reports the case of a 27-year-old man who has been HIV positive for 6 years, uses antiretroviral therapy incorrectly, has a TCD4(+) cell count of 340 cells/mm(3), a VDRL of 1:128 and itchy disseminated hyperchromic maculopapular lesions with rupioid crusts compatible with malignant syphilis. PMID:25408098

  11. [Treatment of syphilis with malaria or heat].

    PubMed

    Verhave, Jan Peter

    2016-01-01

    Until the end of the Second World War, syphilis was a common sexually transmitted infection. This stigmatising infectious disease caused mental decline, paralysis and eventually death. The history of syphilis was given public attention because of 'malaria therapy', which had been applied from the First World War onwards in patients with paralytic dementia. In 1917, the Austrian physician Julius Wagner-Jauregg (1857-1940) induced fever in these patients by infecting them with malaria parasites; in 1927, he received the Nobel Prize for his discovery of the healing properties of malarial fever. One source, not cited anywhere, is an interview that the American bacteriologist and science writer/medical journalist Paul de Kruif conducted with Wagner-Jauregg in 1930. The reporting of this meeting, and De Kruif's later involvement in the mechanical heat treatment of patients with syphilis, form the inspiration for this article. When penicillin became available, both treatments became obsolete.

  12. Syphilis in the United States: on the rise?

    PubMed

    Peterman, Thomas A; Su, John; Bernstein, Kyle T; Weinstock, Hillard

    2015-02-01

    Syphilis rates and trends vary by population subgroup. Among men who have sex with men (MSM), rates of primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis are high throughout the USA (228.8 per 100,000 in 2013). P&S syphilis among women is much less common (0.9 per 100,000 in 2013) and occurs in isolated outbreaks plus in a few counties with persistent low levels of infection. Congenital syphilis trends closely follow P&S trends among women. These trends have implications for prevention. Routine screening among MSM can prevent tertiary syphilis, but despite interventions, rates of infection continue to rise among MSM and will soon approach those last seen in 1982 (estimate: 340.7 per 100,000). Control of syphilis among women is possible and important because it often leads to congenital syphilis. Outbreaks among heterosexuals can be halted by intensive screening, treatment and partner notification.

  13. Syphilis Infection during Pregnancy: Fetal Risks and Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Marco; De Luca, Carmen; Mappa, Ilenia; Spagnuolo, Terryann; Licameli, Angelo; Straface, Gianluca; Scambia, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Congenital syphilis is still a cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Untreated maternal infection leads to adverse pregnancy outcomes, including early fetal loss, stillbirth, prematurity, low birth weight, neonatal and infant death, and congenital disease among newborns. Clinical manifestations of congenital syphilis are influenced by gestational age, stage of maternal syphilis, maternal treatment, and immunological response of the fetus. It has been traditionally classified in early congenital syphilis and late congenital syphilis. Diagnosis of maternal infection is based on clinical findings, serological tests, and direct identification of treponemes in clinical specimens. Adequate treatment of maternal infection is effective for preventing maternal transmission to the fetus and for treating fetal infection. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital syphilis includes noninvasive and invasive diagnosis. Serological screening during pregnancy and during preconception period should be performed to reduce the incidence of congenital syphilis. PMID:22829747

  14. [Maternal syphilis and congenital syphilis in Latin America: big problem, simple solution].

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Julia; Zacarías, Fernando; Mazin, Rafael

    2004-09-01

    From the data submitted to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) by nationwide programs against sexually transmitted diseases (STD), HIV infection, and AIDS (2002), one can estimate the overall prevalence of syphilis among pregnant women to be 3.1% and to range from 1.00% in Peru to 6.21% in Paraguay. According to these data, the incidence of congenital syphilis ranges from 1.4 per 1000 live births in El Salvador to 12.0 per 1000 live births in Honduras. Among men who engage in sex with other men, who often classify themselves as heterosexual, as well as in female sex workers, the prevalence of syphilis ranged from 5% to 15%. Factors that determine the persistence of congenital syphilis as public health problem include a lack of awareness of the seriousness of the problem among politicians, health officials, and health care providers, difficult access to prenatal care, and screening services, a low demand for the test among users, and the stigma and discrimination that surround sexually transmitted diseases (STD). This paper seeks to focus the attention of health professionals on maternal and congenital syphilis so they will undertake actions, using an interprogrammatic approach, to eliminate congenital syphilis from Latin America and the Caribbean. Eliminating congenital syphilis will only become possible if interventions targeting vulnerable groups are also implemented. PAHO's role in eliminating congenital syphilis includes determining the baseline situation in the Region as a whole and in each country, developing communication and procurement strategies, supporting nationwide programs, promoting operational research, and facilitating interprogrammatic coordination. PMID:15507190

  15. Origin and evolution of syphilis: drifting myth.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Verma, Prashant; Chatterjee, Kingshuk; Chaudhuri, Anita; Chatterjee, Gautam; Rasool, Farhan

    2012-01-01

    The venereal form of treponematosis, caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum, plagued every major city in the preantibiotic era. "Civilization means syphilization," was an idea touted by Richard von Krafft-Ebing in the late 19th, and early 20th centuries that the effects of modern life make men more susceptible to syphilis and other diseases. Christopher Columbus was thought of as an importer of syphilis to Europe. Because his serendipitous voyages to the New World initiated the process of Spanish colonization, which foreshadowed general European colonization of the New World, it is difficult to rule out the cultural and political animosity created by Columbus and his men. These recent revelations are intriguing and may create dialogue that may subsequently challenge the age-old theory of "East to West" spread of venereal syphilis. This contribution warrants the continuation of study in this direction, taking into account skeletal studies that utilized radiocarbon dating technique and the phylogenetic analysis of the bacterial strains, offering a possible consensus on the origin and evolution of syphilis.

  16. THE IMMUNOPATHOBIOLOGY OF SYPHILIS: THE MANIFESTATIONS AND COURSE OF SYPHILIS ARE DETERMINED BY THE LEVEL OF DELAYED-TYPE HYPERSENSITIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, J. Andrew; Dabiri, Ganary; Cribier, Bernard; Sell, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    Syphilis has plagued mankind for centuries and is currently resurgent in the Western hemisphere. While there has been a significant reduction of tertiary disease, and recognition of facilitative interactions with HIV infection, the natural history of syphilis has remained largely unchanged; thus, new strategies are required to more effectively combat this pathogen. The immunopathologic features of experimental syphilis in the rabbit; the course, stages, and pathology of human syphilis; and a comparison of human syphilis with leprosy suggest that the clinical course of syphilis and its tissue manifestations are determined by the balance between delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and humoral immunity to the causative agent, Treponema pallidum. A strong DTH response is associated with clearance of the infecting organisms in a well-developed chancre, whereas a cytotoxic T-cell response or strong humoral antibody response is associated with prolonged infection and progression to tertiary disease. Many of the protean symptoms/appearances of secondary and tertiary human syphilis are manifestations of immune reactions that fail to clear the organism, due to a lack of recruitment and more importantly, activation of macrophages by sensitized CD4 T-cells. The Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) vaccination can enhance DTH and has been shown to produce a low, but measurable beneficial effect in the prevention of leprosy, a disease that shows a disease spectrum with characteristics in common with syphilis. In the prevention of syphilis, a potential vaccine protective against syphilis should be designed to augment the DTH response. PMID:21694502

  17. Prevalence of syphilis in pregnancy and prenatal syphilis testing in Brazil: Birth in Brazil study

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira; Szwarcwald, Celia Landmann; Souza, Paulo Roberto Borges; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Determine the coverage rate of syphilis testing during prenatal care and the prevalence of syphilis in pregnant women in Brazil. METHODS This is a national hospital-based cohort study conducted in Brazil with 23,894 postpartum women between 2011 and 2012. Data were obtained using interviews with postpartum women, hospital records, and prenatal care cards. All postpartum women with a reactive serological test result recorded in the prenatal care card or syphilis diagnosis during hospitalization for childbirth were considered cases of syphilis in pregnancy. The Chi-square test was used for determining the disease prevalence and testing coverage rate by region of residence, self-reported skin color, maternal age, and type of prenatal and child delivery care units. RESULTS Prenatal care covered 98.7% postpartum women. Syphilis testing coverage rate was 89.1% (one test) and 41.2% (two tests), and syphilis prevalence in pregnancy was 1.02% (95%CI 0.84;1.25). A lower prenatal coverage rate was observed among women in the North region, indigenous women, those with less education, and those who received prenatal care in public health care units. A lower testing coverage rate was observed among residents in the North, Northeast, and Midwest regions, among younger and non-white skin-color women, among those with lower education, and those who received prenatal care in public health care units. An increased prevalence of syphilis was observed among women with < 8 years of education (1.74%), who self-reported as black (1.8%) or mixed (1.2%), those who did not receive prenatal care (2.5%), and those attending public (1.37%) or mixed (0.93%) health care units. CONCLUSIONS The estimated prevalence of syphilis in pregnancy was similar to that reported in the last sentinel surveillance study conducted in 2006. There was an improvement in prenatal care and testing coverage rate, and the goals suggested by the World Health Organization were achieved in two regions. Regional

  18. Syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection.

    PubMed Central

    Funnyé, Allen S.; Akhtar, Abbasi J.

    2003-01-01

    Co-infection of syphilis and AIDS has profound implications for the African American community. The purpose of this review is to: evaluate the historical background of HIV and syphilis and their similarities in pathogenesis; review the epidemiology of syphilis and HIV co-infection, and implications for continued prevention efforts; examine the effect of syphilis on HIV transmission and acquisition; and, to examine the effects of HIV infection on syphilis transmission, diagnostic and serologic changes, clinical course, and treatment. The prevalence of HIV is higher in those with syphilis; moreover, the prevalence of HIV and syphilis co-infection is highest in African Americans. There may be humoral and cellular immune similarities. HIV may affect the transmission of syphilis, alter its serologic diagnosis, and accelerate and change the clinical course and response to treatment. In conclusion, combined infection of HIV and syphilis may alter the clinical presentation and course of either disease. There are historical and immunologic similarities and the high prevalence in African Americans compared to other groups is of great importance for prevention efforts. PMID:12793793

  19. [Girolamo Fracastoro and the invention of syphilis].

    PubMed

    Iommi Echeverría, Virginia

    2010-12-01

    Girolamo Fracastoro wrote two works on syphilis: his famous poem, in which he gave a name to the disease, and a prose treatise. From the comparison of these works, in this paper we have identified the combination of several approaches as main characteristic of his description. On the one hand Fracastoro followed the classical medical explanation that emphasized the corruption of the air in order to explain the origins of the disease. On the other hand, when referring to the forms of contagion, he stated clearly that the disease is contracted by direct contact with an infected person. It is possible then to talk of the "invention" of syphilis by Fracastoro since he combined the information empirically collected, with the renaissance medical traditional perspective.

  20. Balanoposthitis and Penile Edema: Atypical Manifestations of Primary Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Rovira-López, Roger; García-Martínez, Pablo; Martín-Ezquerra, Gemma; Pujol, Ramon M; Aventín, Daniel López

    2015-09-01

    The typical finding in primary syphilis stage is a unique, painless chancre with indurated borders. We report a case of primary syphilis presenting as erosive and crusted balanoposthitis with an underlying chancre, penile edema, and bilateral inguinal lymphadenopathy in a heterosexual man.

  1. 42 CFR 493.835 - Standard; Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard; Syphilis serology. 493.835 Section 493.835 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.835 Standard; Syphilis serology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event...

  2. 42 CFR 493.835 - Standard; Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard; Syphilis serology. 493.835 Section 493.835 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.835 Standard; Syphilis serology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1207 - Condition: Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Syphilis serology. 493.1207 Section 493.1207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1207 Condition: Syphilis serology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1207 - Condition: Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Syphilis serology. 493.1207 Section 493.1207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1207 Condition: Syphilis serology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of...

  5. 42 CFR 493.835 - Standard; Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard; Syphilis serology. 493.835 Section 493.835 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.835 Standard; Syphilis serology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1207 - Condition: Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Syphilis serology. 493.1207 Section 493.1207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1207 Condition: Syphilis serology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of...

  7. 42 CFR 493.835 - Standard; Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard; Syphilis serology. 493.835 Section 493.835 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.835 Standard; Syphilis serology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1207 - Condition: Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Syphilis serology. 493.1207 Section 493.1207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1207 Condition: Syphilis serology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1207 - Condition: Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Syphilis serology. 493.1207 Section 493.1207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1207 Condition: Syphilis serology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of...

  10. 42 CFR 493.835 - Standard; Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Syphilis serology. 493.835 Section 493.835 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.835 Standard; Syphilis serology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event...

  11. Neuro syphilis: Portrayals by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, O.

    2009-01-01

    The developments in neuro syphilis in the 19th century are integral parts of the history of psychiatry. The delineation of various aspects of neuro syphilis by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in three of his stories is discussed in brief. PMID:19881059

  12. Comparative studies on serological tests for syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Keizo; Ishizaka, Kimishige

    1954-01-01

    A comparative study was undertaken by the authors to determine the most reliable of the serodiagnostic tests for syphilis in current use in Japan. The criteria for the selection of sera, the way in which the standard tests were chosen, and the statistical method used for evaluating the results are described, and some of the detailed results are given. Five tests—the VDRL test, the agglutination test, Ogata's test, the Kahn test (with cardiolipin antigen), and Browning's test modified by Taniguchi (with cardiolipin antigen)—were found to be comparable in reliability to the Kolmer (Lederle) and VDRL (Lederle) tests employed in the USA. PMID:14364183

  13. Syphilis in Drug Users in Low and Middle Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Coffin, Lara S.; Newberry, Ashley; Hagan, Holly; Cleland, Charles M.; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Perlman, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Genital ulcer disease (GUD), including syphilis, is an important cause of morbidity in low and middle income (LMI) countries and syphilis transmission is associated with HIV transmission. Methods We conducted a literature review to evaluate syphilis infection among drug users in LMI countries for the period 1995–2007. Countries were categorized using the World Bank Atlas method (The World Bank, 2007) according to 2006 gross national income per capita. Results Thirty-two studies were included (N=13,848 subjects), mostly from Southeast Asia with some from Latin America, Eastern Europe, Central and East Asia, North Africa and the Middle East but none from regions such as Sub-Saharan Africa. The median prevalence of overall lifetime syphilis (N=32 studies) was 11.1% (interquartile range: 6.3% to 15.3%) and of HIV (N=31 studies) was 1.1% (interquartile range: 0.22% to 5.50%). There was a modest relation (r=0.27) between HIV and syphilis prevalence. Median syphilis prevalence by gender was 4.0% (interquartile range: 3.4% to 6.6%) among males (N=11 studies) and 19.9% (interquartile range: 11.4% to 36.0%) among females (N=6 studies). There was a strong relation (r= 0.68) between syphilis prevalence and female gender that may be related to female sex work. Conclusion Drug users in LMI countries have a high prevalence of syphilis but data are limited and, in some regions, entirely lacking. Further data are needed, including studies targeting the risks of women. Interventions to promote safer sex, testing, counseling and education, as well as health care worker awareness, should be integrated in harm reduction programs and health care settings to prevent new syphilis infections and reduce HIV transmission among drug users and their partners in LMI countries. PMID:19361976

  14. Present status of serological tests for syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Ad; Olansky, Sidney

    1956-01-01

    The authors first discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the various serological tests now in common use, or coming into use, for the detection and management of syphilis and also compare the different antigens used in those tests. They lay stress on the difficulties caused by the “unit” system of recording results, whereby identical findings with two or more tests may be given different numerical values for each test, and suggest that results should instead be given in dilution reactivity end-points (dils). False positive reactions to serological tests and discrepancies in the results of different tests are then considered; it is pointed out that these discrepancies may be due to causes in the patient himself, in transit, or in the testing laboratory. Finally, the authors consider that in view of the growing number of serological tests for syphilis, and of modifications to those tests, there is now a need for selecting, in different areas of the world, a certain number of procedures which can be standardized for routine testing. Regional serological evaluation studies can be used to this end. A brief outline is given of the United States Public Health Service programme to assist State laboratories to maintain a high level of efficiency in serological testing and thus to exert an influence on other laboratories within each State. PMID:13329847

  15. UK national guidelines on the management of syphilis 2015.

    PubMed

    Kingston, M; French, P; Higgins, S; McQuillan, O; Sukthankar, A; Stott, C; McBrien, B; Tipple, C; Turner, A; Sullivan, A K; Radcliffe, Keith; Cousins, Darren; FitzGerald, Mark; Fisher, Martin; Grover, Deepa; Higgins, Stephen; Kingston, Margaret; Rayment, Michael; Sullivan, Ann

    2016-05-01

    These guidelines are an update for 2015 of the 2008 UK guidelines for the management of syphilis. The writing group have piloted the new BASHH guideline methodology, notably using the GRADE system for assessing evidence and making recommendations. We have made significant changes to the recommendations for screening infants born to mothers with positive syphilis serology and to facilitate accurate and timely communication between the teams caring for mother and baby we have developed a birth plan. Procaine penicillin is now an alternative, not preferred treatment, for all stages of syphilis except neurosyphilis, but the length of treatment for this is shortened. Other changes are summarised at the start of the guideline.

  16. The footprint of old syphilis: using a reverse screening algorithm for syphilis testing in a U.S. Geographic Information Systems-Based Community Outreach Program.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Neela D; Stout, Jason E; Miller, William C; Hecker, Emily J; Cox, Gary M; Norton, Brianna L; Sena, Arlene C

    2013-11-01

    The impact of syphilis reverse sequence screening has not been evaluated in community outreach. Using reverse sequence screening in neighborhoods identified with geographic information systems, we found that among 239 participants, 45 (19%) were seropositive. Of these, 3 (7%) had untreated syphilis, 33 (73%) had previously treated syphilis infection, and 9 (20%) had negative nontreponemal test results.

  17. Active syphilis in HIV infection: a multicentre retrospective survey. The German AIDS Study Group (GASG).

    PubMed Central

    Schöfer, H; Imhof, M; Thoma-Greber, E; Brockmeyer, N H; Hartmann, M; Gerken, G; Pees, H W; Rasokat, H; Hartmann, H; Sadri, I; Emminger, C; Stellbrink, H J; Baumgarten, R; Plettenberg, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study syphilis in HIV infection focusing on immunocompromised patients with an atypical or aggressive clinical course of syphilis, inappropriate serological reactions or an unreliable response to therapy. STUDY DESIGN: A multicentre retrospective chart review using a standardised questionnaire for all patients with active syphilis. SETTINGS: Thirteen dermatological and medical centres throughout Germany, all members of the German AIDS Study Group (GASG). PATIENTS: Clinical data of 11,368 HIV infected patients have been analysed for cases of active syphilis requiring treatment. Asymptotic patients with reactive serological parameters indicating latent syphilis without a need for treatment were excluded. RESULTS: Active syphilis was reported in 151 of 11,368 HIV infected patients (1.33%, range per centre 0.3%-5.1%). Most of the 151 syphilis patients were male (93%) and belonged to the homosexual or bisexual exposure category for HIV infection (79%); another 6% were iv drug users. Among the 151 syphilis patients primary syphilis was diagnosed in 17.2%, maculopapular secondary syphilis in 29.1%, ulcerating secondary syphilis in 7.3%, neurosyphilis in 16.6% and latent seropositive syphilis without clinical symptoms but serological abnormalities indicating active syphilis in 25.2%. A history of prior treatments for syphilis was reported in 50%. At the time of syphilis diagnosis 26.5% of the patients were in CDC stage II, 33.8% in stage III and 24.5% in stage IV of HIV disease (CDC classification 1987). CD4 cell count was lowest in those with ulcerating secondary syphilis (mean 307, SD 140/microliters) and neurosyphilis (351, SD 235/ microliters). The highest CD4 count was found in patients with early primary and early secondary syphilis (444, SD 163/microliters and 470, SD 355/microliters). Inappropriate serological response to syphilis infection was found in 81 of 151 patients (54%). Remarkable findings were false negative VDRL titres (11 patients with non

  18. Cannibalism and contagion: framing syphilis in counter-reformation Italy.

    PubMed

    Eamon, W

    1998-02-01

    The outbreak of syphilis in Europe elicited a variety of responses concerning the disease's origins and cure. In this essay, I examine the theory of the origins of syphilis advanced by the 16th-century Italian surgeon Leonardo Fioravanti. According to Fioravanti, syphilis was not new but had always existed, although it was unknown to the ancients. The syphilis epidemic, he argued, was caused by cannibalism among the French and Italian armies during the siege of Naples in 1494. Fioravanti's strange and novel theory is connected with his view of disease as corruption of the body caused by eating improper foods. His theory of bodily pollution, a metaphor for the corruption of society, coincided with Counter-Reformation concepts about sin and the social order. PMID:11620327

  19. Cannibalism and contagion: framing syphilis in counter-reformation Italy.

    PubMed

    Eamon, W

    1998-02-01

    The outbreak of syphilis in Europe elicited a variety of responses concerning the disease's origins and cure. In this essay, I examine the theory of the origins of syphilis advanced by the 16th-century Italian surgeon Leonardo Fioravanti. According to Fioravanti, syphilis was not new but had always existed, although it was unknown to the ancients. The syphilis epidemic, he argued, was caused by cannibalism among the French and Italian armies during the siege of Naples in 1494. Fioravanti's strange and novel theory is connected with his view of disease as corruption of the body caused by eating improper foods. His theory of bodily pollution, a metaphor for the corruption of society, coincided with Counter-Reformation concepts about sin and the social order.

  20. Fetal anemia as a signal of congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Macé, Guillaume; Castaigne, Vanina; Trabbia, Aurore; Guigue, Virginie; Cynober, Evelyne; Cortey, Anne; Lalande, Valérie; Carbonne, Bruno

    2014-09-01

    An upsurge in syphilis has been observed almost everywhere over the past decade. The mother's clinical presentation is often uninformative. The diagnosis of maternal syphilis infection is most often based on serologic tests that allow early Extencilline treatment. Syphilis ultrasound findings are non-specific, and delay before treatment can be decisive for prognosis. Fetal anemia is a physiological consequence of severe infection. We confirmed that syphilis can be suggested non-invasively by MCA-PSV measurements in a context of ascitis or atypical hydrops in the absence of usual causes. It is therefore important to perform maternal TPHA/VDRL serology if fetal anemia is suspected. In association with Extencilline treatment, intra uterine transfusion can limit consequences of infection. Reduced fetal movements and non-reactive fetal heart rate may prefigure acute perinatal complications or stillbirth.

  1. Oral Syphilis: A Reemerging Infection Prompting Clinicians' Alertness

    PubMed Central

    Dybeck Udd, Sebastian; Lund, Bodil

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is a rare but increasing disease. Due to changing sexual habits, presentation of oral manifestations may rise. Since syphilis may mimic other oral manifestations, diagnoses can be difficult. Clinicians need to be aware that ambiguous oral manifestations may in fact be caused by oral syphilis. Here, we present a case of extended diagnostic delay highlighting the importance of consulting an expert in infectious diseases in case of obscure oral lesions not responding to standard treatment. Despite seven visits to six different medical doctors, a patient who presented with oral syphilis was continuously misdiagnosed. After 6 months of increasing complaints and deteriorating severity of disease, the patient was referred to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon where the correct diagnosis was determined and proper treatment initiated. PMID:27293914

  2. Syphilis and MSM (Men Who Have Sex with Men)

    MedlinePlus

    ... its early stages. A single intramuscular injection of penicillin, an antibiotic, will cure a person who has ... a year. For people who are allergic to penicillin, other antibiotics are available to treat syphilis. There ...

  3. Oral Syphilis: A Reemerging Infection Prompting Clinicians' Alertness.

    PubMed

    Dybeck Udd, Sebastian; Lund, Bodil

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is a rare but increasing disease. Due to changing sexual habits, presentation of oral manifestations may rise. Since syphilis may mimic other oral manifestations, diagnoses can be difficult. Clinicians need to be aware that ambiguous oral manifestations may in fact be caused by oral syphilis. Here, we present a case of extended diagnostic delay highlighting the importance of consulting an expert in infectious diseases in case of obscure oral lesions not responding to standard treatment. Despite seven visits to six different medical doctors, a patient who presented with oral syphilis was continuously misdiagnosed. After 6 months of increasing complaints and deteriorating severity of disease, the patient was referred to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon where the correct diagnosis was determined and proper treatment initiated. PMID:27293914

  4. Ocular syphilis in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John P; Huang, Lynn L; Rosberger, Daniel F

    2015-06-01

    As Acquired Immunodeficiency Disease (AIDS) turns thirty-years old, much progress has been made. 56,000 new cases of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are expected in Americans this year. At least half or more will be in African Americans. Reports of the association between syphilis and HIV infection are well documented. We present a case of bilateral optic neuritis and panuveitis as the initial presentation in a previously undiagnosed patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis. PMID:27269502

  5. Secondary syphilis presenting with aortitis and coronary ostial occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, John A; MacNab, Anita; Sarma, Jaydeep; Ray, Simon; Kadir, Isaac; Muldoon, Eavan G

    2016-03-01

    Aortitis is an established manifestation of tertiary syphilis. We report a rare case of aortitis with ostial occlusion and left ventricular failure in secondary syphilis. Her management required a true multidisciplinary approach from multiple specialities due to complications of concomitant psychosis and a history of anaphylaxis to penicillin. This case illustrates the complexities of diagnosing and managing a rare presentation of this increasingly prevalent infection. PMID:26670911

  6. Secondary syphilis presenting with aortitis and coronary ostial occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, John A; MacNab, Anita; Sarma, Jaydeep; Ray, Simon; Kadir, Isaac; Muldoon, Eavan G

    2016-03-01

    Aortitis is an established manifestation of tertiary syphilis. We report a rare case of aortitis with ostial occlusion and left ventricular failure in secondary syphilis. Her management required a true multidisciplinary approach from multiple specialities due to complications of concomitant psychosis and a history of anaphylaxis to penicillin. This case illustrates the complexities of diagnosing and managing a rare presentation of this increasingly prevalent infection.

  7. Epidemiological surveillance of congenital syphilis in Spain, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Lopez, Natalia; Diez, Mercedes; Diaz, Oliva; Simon, Fernando; Diaz, Asuncion

    2012-09-01

    The characteristics of 67 confirmed congenital syphilis cases reported to the surveillance system in Spain (2000-2010) were analyzed. The incidence rates ranged from 0.00 to 2.23 per 100,000 live births. Median age at diagnosis was 4 days. Hepatosplenomegaly was the most common clinical finding, although almost 60% of the cases were asymptomatic. Missed opportunities for congenital syphilis prevention through antenatal care were identified.

  8. A report on syphilis control in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Sven

    1954-01-01

    This report presents the results of a six-month survey of the nature and extent of venereal diseases in Turkey which was undertaken by the author, on behalf of WHO, at the request of the Turkish Government. The first part of the report outlines the present venereal-disease-control system and includes descriptions of the work undertaken by public authorities, hospitals and dispensaries, mobile venereal-disease-control teams, and laboratories; in the second part, the author enumerates certain recommendations for the intensification of the current control programme. These recommendations are particularly concerned with the control of syphilis (since the incidence of other venereal diseases in Turkey is of very secondary importance), and with the expansion, standardization, and co-ordination of serodiagnostic facilities and services. It is suggested that there might be a gradual intensification and reorientation of the present programme. A proposed plan of operations for an eight-year period is described. PMID:13182590

  9. Towards the Elimination of Syphilis in a Small Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Mungrue, Kameel; Edwards, Jeffrey; Fyzul, Azizah; Boodhai, Billy; Narinesingh, Adita; Nanlal, Shasta

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To describe the current epidemiological features of syphilis and congenital syphilis in Trinidad, 2009–2012. Methods. All laboratory confirmed syphilis cases diagnosed through a vertical program in the Ministry of Health, between 1/1/2009 and 31/12/2012, were identified. All relevant data were collected including address which was geocoded and mapped using ArcGIS 10.0 (Esri). Both spatial techniques and standardized incidence ratios were used to determine hot spots. Results. The annual cumulative incidence rate for syphilis remains high varying from 39 per 100 000 population in 2009 to 29 per 100 000 in 2012. We identified 3 “hot spots,” in urban areas of Trinidad. Young men and particularly young women in childbearing age 15–35 living in urban high density populations were commonly infected groups. Conclusion. The incidence of syphilis continues to be very high in Trinidad. New initiatives will have to be formulated in order to attain the global initiative to eradicate syphilis by 2015. PMID:26316981

  10. Correlates of syphilis seropositivity and risk for syphilis-associated adverse pregnancy outcomes among women attending antenatal care clinics in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Melanie M; Ebrahim, Shahul; Abiola, Nadine; Kinkodi, Didine Kaba; Mpingulu, Minlangu; Kabuayi, Jean Pierre; Ekofo, Felly; Newman, Daniel R; Peterman, Thomas A; Kamb, Mary L; Sidibe, Kassim

    2014-09-01

    Screening and treatment for syphilis among pregnant women is the primary means of prevention of congenital syphilis. Sentinel surveillance for syphilis can inform these prevention efforts. We reviewed antenatal syphilis screening results to assess trends and to identify correlates of seropositivity among women attending antenatal care clinics in the Democratic Republic of Congo during 2011. Syphilis seropositivity among the 17,669 women attending the antenatal care clinics during 2011 was 4.2% (range 0.4%-16.9%). Syphilis seropositivity was significantly higher among women attending rural clinics (5.0%) as compared to urban clinics (3.0%) and those tested in antenatal care clinics in the provinces of Equateur (7.6%) and Orientale (7.7%) as compared to other provinces (p < 0.001). Based on the antenatal care syphilis seroprevalence and national pregnancy estimates, we estimate that approximately 128,591 pregnant women countrywide would have tested seropositive for syphilis during 2011. Over 85,000 adverse pregnancy outcomes would have resulted from these maternal infections, assuming prenatal syphilis diagnosis and treatment were not available. The prevalence of syphilis was highest in rural areas, but exceeded 1% in every area, indicating a need to assure screening and treatment throughout Democratic Republic of Congo. These sentinel surveillance estimates can be used to guide national congenital syphilis prevention efforts.

  11. Social determinants of syphilis in South China: the effect of sibling position on syphilis and sexual risk behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Joseph D; Young, Darwin; Yang, Ligang; Yang, Bin; Adimora, Adaora A

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the relationship between sibling position and sexual risk based on behavioural and syphilis infection data from sexually transmitted infection (STI) patients in South China. Design A cross-sectional study examining sexual behaviours and syphilis infection. Setting 4 STI clinics in the Pearl River Delta of South China. Participants 1792 Chinese men and women attending STI clinics. Primary outcome measures STI history, syphilis infection defined as positive non-treponemal and treponemal tests. Results Among all clinic patients, 824 (46.3%) were first-born, 354 (19.9%) were middle-born and 602 (33.8%) were final-born. Middle-born individuals had a higher percentage of reported STI history (44.7% compared to 34.7%, p<0.001) and syphilis infection (9.7% compared to 4.9%, p=0.01) among men (n=1163) compared to other sibling positions in bivariate analyses, but not in the final multivariate model. The relationship between sibling position and syphilis was independent of income and education level. There was no trend observed between middle-born position and female sexual risk behaviours (n=626). Higher education was significantly associated with syphilis among women and men in respective multivariate models. Conclusions This study suggests that middle-born men in China may have an increased sexual risk compared to other sibling positions. As Chinese family and social structures change, a more thorough understanding of how demographic factors influence sexual risk behaviours is needed. PMID:23793689

  12. Recent Trends in the Serologic Diagnosis of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ameeta E.

    2014-01-01

    Complexities in the diagnosis of syphilis continue to challenge clinicians. While direct tests (e.g., microscopy or PCR) are helpful in early syphilis, the mainstay of diagnosis remains serologic tests. The traditional algorithm using a nontreponemal test (NTT) followed by a treponemal test (TT) remains the standard in many parts of the world. More recently, the ability to automate the TT has led to the increasingly widespread use of reverse algorithms using treponemal enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). Rapid, point-of-care TTs are in widespread use in developing countries because of low cost, ease of use, and reasonable performance. However, none of the current diagnostic algorithms are able to distinguish current from previously treated infections. In addition, the reversal of traditional syphilis algorithms has led to uncertainty in the clinical management of patients. The interpretation of syphilis tests is further complicated by the lack of a reliable gold standard for syphilis diagnostics, and the newer tests can result in false-positive reactions similar to those seen with older tests. Little progress has been made in the area of serologic diagnostics for congenital syphilis, which requires assessment of maternal treatment and serologic response as well as clinical and laboratory investigation of the neonate for appropriate management. The diagnosis of neurosyphilis continues to require the collection of cerebrospinal fluid for a combination of NTT and TT, and, while newer treponemal EIAs look promising, more studies are needed to confirm their utility. This article reviews current tests and discusses current controversies in syphilis diagnosis, with a focus on serologic tests. PMID:25428245

  13. Recent trends in the serologic diagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Muhammad G; Singh, Ameeta E

    2015-02-01

    Complexities in the diagnosis of syphilis continue to challenge clinicians. While direct tests (e.g., microscopy or PCR) are helpful in early syphilis, the mainstay of diagnosis remains serologic tests. The traditional algorithm using a nontreponemal test (NTT) followed by a treponemal test (TT) remains the standard in many parts of the world. More recently, the ability to automate the TT has led to the increasingly widespread use of reverse algorithms using treponemal enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). Rapid, point-of-care TTs are in widespread use in developing countries because of low cost, ease of use, and reasonable performance. However, none of the current diagnostic algorithms are able to distinguish current from previously treated infections. In addition, the reversal of traditional syphilis algorithms has led to uncertainty in the clinical management of patients. The interpretation of syphilis tests is further complicated by the lack of a reliable gold standard for syphilis diagnostics, and the newer tests can result in false-positive reactions similar to those seen with older tests. Little progress has been made in the area of serologic diagnostics for congenital syphilis, which requires assessment of maternal treatment and serologic response as well as clinical and laboratory investigation of the neonate for appropriate management. The diagnosis of neurosyphilis continues to require the collection of cerebrospinal fluid for a combination of NTT and TT, and, while newer treponemal EIAs look promising, more studies are needed to confirm their utility. This article reviews current tests and discusses current controversies in syphilis diagnosis, with a focus on serologic tests.

  14. Syphilis at the Crossroad of Phylogenetics and Paleopathology

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Fernando Lucas; de Mello, Joana Carvalho Moreira; Fraga, Ana Maria; Nunes, Kelly; Eggers, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    The origin of syphilis is still controversial. Different research avenues explore its fascinating history. Here we employed a new integrative approach, where paleopathology and molecular analyses are combined. As an exercise to test the validity of this approach we examined different hypotheses on the origin of syphilis and other human diseases caused by treponemes (treponematoses). Initially, we constructed a worldwide map containing all accessible reports on palaeopathological evidences of treponematoses before Columbus's return to Europe. Then, we selected the oldest ones to calibrate the time of the most recent common ancestor of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, T. pallidum subsp. endemicum and T. pallidum subsp. pertenue in phylogenetic analyses with 21 genetic regions of different T. pallidum strains previously reported. Finally, we estimated the treponemes' evolutionary rate to test three scenarios: A) if treponematoses accompanied human evolution since Homo erectus; B) if venereal syphilis arose very recently from less virulent strains caught in the New World about 500 years ago, and C) if it emerged in the Americas between 16,500 and 5,000 years ago. Two of the resulting evolutionary rates were unlikely and do not explain the existent osseous evidence. Thus, treponematoses, as we know them today, did not emerge with H. erectus, nor did venereal syphilis appear only five centuries ago. However, considering 16,500 years before present (yBP) as the time of the first colonization of the Americas, and approximately 5,000 yBP as the oldest probable evidence of venereal syphilis in the world, we could not entirely reject hypothesis C. We confirm that syphilis seems to have emerged in this time span, since the resulting evolutionary rate is compatible with those observed in other bacteria. In contrast, if the claims of precolumbian venereal syphilis outside the Americas are taken into account, the place of origin remains unsolved. Finally, the endeavor of

  15. Management of syphilis in HIV-positive individuals.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, Fiona V; Fisher, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Since the turn of the millennium a sustained outbreak of syphilis among men who have sex with men continues, approximately 20-50% of whom have concurrent HIV infection. In this paper we aim to explore the controversies that exist around the management of syphilis in HIV-positive individuals. Not only do HIV-positive people have different clinical manifestations of syphilis they have higher rates of asymptomatic neurological involvement, slower serological response to treatment and higher serological failure than HIV-negative individuals in most studies. Whether long-term clinical outcomes are different or affected by the antibiotic regimen selected remains to be established. The optimal antimicrobial regimen to treat syphilis in HIV is unknown due to a dearth of randomised controlled trial data. International guidelines state that the antibiotic management of syphilis is the same regardless of HIV status, with early syphilis treated with a single dose of benzathine penicillin G 2.4mU intrmuscularly. In practice, however, the majority of surveyed clinicians do treat HIV-positive people with more intensive antibiotics suggesting a lack of faith in guidelines. Factors which appear to affect the likelihood of developing neurological disease include CD4(+) count of <350 cells/μL, absence of antiretroviral therapy, rapid plasma regain (RPR) or venereal diseases reference laboratory titre (VDRL) >1:32, late-latent disease or lack of response to standard antibiotic treatment. We recommend a low-threshold for offering antibiotic treatment effective against neurosyphilis in HIV-positive people with syphilis, especially if they exhibit any of the above factors.

  16. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE HUMAN TREPONEMATOSES (PINTA, YAWS, ENDEMIC SYPHILIS AND VENEREAL SYPHILIS).

    PubMed

    HACKETT, C J

    1963-01-01

    A close relationship between the four human treponematoses is suggested by their clinical and epidemiological characteristics and by such limited knowledge of the treponemes as there is at present. No treponeme of this group (except for that of the rabbit) is known other than in man, but the human treponemes probably arose long ago from an animal infection. The long period of infectiousness of pinta suggests that it may have been the earliest human treponematosis. It may have been spread throughout the world by about 15 000 B.C., being subsequently isolated in the Americas when the Bering Strait was flooded. About 10 000 B.C. in the Afro-Asian land mass environmental conditions might have favoured treponeme mutants leading to yaws; from these, about 7000 B.C., endemic syphilis perhaps developed, to give rise to venereal syphilis about 3000 B.C. in south-west Asia as big cities developed there. Towards the end of the fifteenth century A.D. a further mutation may have resulted in a more severe venereal syphilis in Europe which, with European exploration and geographical expansion, was subsequently carried throughout the then treponemally uncommitted world. These suggestions find some tentative support in climatic changes which might have influenced the selection of those treponemes which still survive in humid or arid climates. Venereal transmission would presumably remove the treponeme from the direct influence of climate. The author makes a plea for further investigation of many aspects of this subject while this is still possible. PMID:14043755

  17. Syphilis in composers and musicians--Mozart, Beethoven, Paganini, Schubert, Schumann, Smetana.

    PubMed

    Franzen, C

    2008-12-01

    In the pre-antibiotics era, syphilis was an extremely common disease. The first well-recorded European outbreak of what is now known as syphilis occurred in 1494, when it appeared among French troops besieging Naples. Thereafter, the disease spread all over Europe and, in the 18th and 19th centuries, many artists became victims of syphilis, among them poets, painters, philosophers, and musicians and composers. This review presents biographies of several musicians and composers that probably suffered from syphilis.

  18. Premature loss of primary teeth associated with congenital syphilis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Antonio, Andréa Gonçalves; Kelly, Alice; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2005-01-01

    Congenital syphilis is an infectious disease transmitted by an infected mother to her fetus. Several reports in the literature have focused on oral manifestations of congenital syphilis, mainly about Hutchinson's teeth and dysplastic molars, which are more common. However, this paper describes an unusual feature of congenital syphilis in a four-year-old child. A case of premature loss of primary teeth associated with congenital syphilis is reported.

  19. Necrotizing retinitis due to syphilis in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Shinha, Takashi; Weaver, Bree A

    2016-01-01

    The ocular manifestations of syphilis are varied. Ocular syphilis can occur during any stage of infection and involve virtually any part of the eye. In immunocompetent individuals, the most common etiologies include syphilitic uveitis. Although the clinical presentation of ocular syphilis in HIV-infected patients is also widespread, posterior segment involvement has been more commonly described particularly in patients with AIDS. The diagnosis of syphilitic retinitis is challenging since its clinical presentation mimics retinitis caused by other viral etiologies. In addition, HIV-infected individuals with syphilis are more likely to develop aberrant serologic responses. Recognition of syphilitic retinitis and prompt initiation of penicillin therapy is of critical importance since syphilitic retinitis generally responds well to treatment and loss of vision is reversible. In this report, we describe a 39-year-old female with advanced stages of AIDS who developed necrotizing retinitis due to syphilis. Prompt initiation of intravenous penicillin led to excellent visual outcome for this patient despite significantly decreased visual acuity on presentation. PMID:27635383

  20. [Syphilis. Part 1: Introduction, pathology and clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Gross, G; Flaig, B; Rode, S

    2013-10-01

    In Germany more than 3,500 people become infected with syphilis annually. As elsewhere in Western Europe there is a low level endemicity with a concentration among population subgroups with high rates of partner exchange, such as men who have sex with other men. In Germany after initially reduced numbers of cases, the incidence rate has increased after the turn of the millennium. In 2011 the incidence reached 4.5 cases per 100,000 inhabitants, which is the highest incidence since the introduction of the Infection Protection Act of 2001. Syphilis, like other sexually transmitted infections and diseases with its manifold clinical manifestations and complex diagnostics, is a large global problem for public health systems. The recent resurgence of syphilis presents a challenge for all physicians but particularly for dermatologists and venereologists because the skin and adjacent mucous membranes are initially affected. Rapid diagnosis, differential diagnosis, consequent treatment and monitoring can cure the disease. Prevention of misdiagnosis is essential otherwise severe, sometimes fatal cardiovascular complications, neurosyphilis and transfer to unborn and newborn children can occur. The synergy of syphilis and sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is of special importance. Syphilis together with genital herpes and other sexually transmitted genital and oral ulcers is an important pacemaker for HIV. PMID:24150827

  1. Histopathologic ear findings of syphilis: a temporal bone study.

    PubMed

    Hızlı, Ömer; Hızlı, Pelin; Kaya, Serdar; Monsanto, Rafael da Costa; Paparella, Michael M; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2016-09-01

    To the best of our knowledge, histopathologic studies of syphilitic ears have generally focused on hydropic changes; so far, no such studies have investigated peripheral vestibular otopathology using differential interference contrast microscopy, in patients with syphilis. For this study, we examined 13 human temporal bone samples from 8 patients with a history of syphilis. Using conventional light microscopy, we performed qualitative histopathologic assessment. In addition, using differential interference contrast microscopy, we performed type I and type II vestibular hair cell counts on each vestibular sense organ with minimal autolysis; in which the neuroepithelium was oriented perpendicular to the plane of section. We then compared vestibular hair cell densities (cells per 0.01 mm² surface area) in the syphilis group vs. the control group. In the syphilis group, we observed precipitate in the endolymphatic or perilymphatic spaces in 1 (7.7 %) of the samples and endolymphatic hydrops in eight (61.5 %) of the samples. Hydrops involved the cochlea (four samples) and/or saccule (four samples). In addition, the syphilis group experienced a significant loss of type II vestibular hair cells in the maculae of the utricle and saccule, and in the cristae of the lateral and posterior semicircular canals, as compared with the control group (P < 0.05). PMID:26573155

  2. An estimate of syphilis incidence in Eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Liam J.; Middleton, Stephen I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim Eastern Europe experienced epidemic levels of syphilis after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Presently data are less comprehensive outside the European Union (EU) and European Free Trade Association (EFTA). This review aims to identify published papers with suitable data to estimate a regional burden of disease for syphilis in the 19 member countries of Eastern Europe. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted to identify published data relating to syphilis incidence in Eastern Europe through Web of Knowledge, PubMed and Google Scholar databases in addition to the latest surveillance report from the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control. A total of 381 papers fitted our search criteria; 30 papers were subjected to full text analysis. Results Seven papers were included in this study and provided useable data for 13 out of 19 member countries. There was a high level of heterogeneity observed in the incidence rates from the member countries. Gross, population weighted and geographically subdivided incidence rate estimates were carried out but the comprehensiveness of some of the included data is doubtful. Conclusions Despite the limits of the data, the incidence of syphilis in Eastern Europe is still substantially larger than that observed in the EU15 countries. This indicates that efforts to control syphilis in Eastern Europe can be enhanced; however, such goals would require significant investment in infrastructure, technology and surveillance mechanisms. PMID:23198131

  3. Diagnostic approaches in unsuspected oral lesions of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, C S; Saturno, J L; de Sousa, S C O M; da Silveira, F R X

    2014-12-01

    Awareness of the increased prevalence of syphilis is essential for early diagnosis and treatment, and to prevent the spread of the disease. Although serological studies are the primary tool used to confirm the diagnosis of secondary syphilis, biopsy of unsuspected oral lesions is not uncommon in the routine oral pathology laboratory. In these cases, histopathological characteristics are likely to indicate the possibility of syphilis, and an immunohistochemical reaction can confirm it. The aim of the present study was to highlight the histological features and test the efficacy of immunohistochemistry in the detection of Treponema pallidum in oral lesions biopsied with the assumption of a non-syphilitic disease. Thirty-nine tissue samples from patients for whom the possibility of syphilis was suggested on the basis of histopathological findings, were retrieved from the surgical oral pathology service files and submitted to immunohistochemical staining for T. pallidum. The study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Eighteen of the tissue samples were positive for T. pallidum. Following this, the contributing clinicians were contacted to check whether they had asked for serological examinations when the diagnostic report was received; for all 18 positive cases, the clinicians confirmed that the patients had tested positive at that time. This study shows the importance of clinical-pathological correlation and the value of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of unsuspected syphilis. PMID:25305698

  4. Histopathologic ear findings of syphilis: a temporal bone study.

    PubMed

    Hızlı, Ömer; Hızlı, Pelin; Kaya, Serdar; Monsanto, Rafael da Costa; Paparella, Michael M; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2016-09-01

    To the best of our knowledge, histopathologic studies of syphilitic ears have generally focused on hydropic changes; so far, no such studies have investigated peripheral vestibular otopathology using differential interference contrast microscopy, in patients with syphilis. For this study, we examined 13 human temporal bone samples from 8 patients with a history of syphilis. Using conventional light microscopy, we performed qualitative histopathologic assessment. In addition, using differential interference contrast microscopy, we performed type I and type II vestibular hair cell counts on each vestibular sense organ with minimal autolysis; in which the neuroepithelium was oriented perpendicular to the plane of section. We then compared vestibular hair cell densities (cells per 0.01 mm² surface area) in the syphilis group vs. the control group. In the syphilis group, we observed precipitate in the endolymphatic or perilymphatic spaces in 1 (7.7 %) of the samples and endolymphatic hydrops in eight (61.5 %) of the samples. Hydrops involved the cochlea (four samples) and/or saccule (four samples). In addition, the syphilis group experienced a significant loss of type II vestibular hair cells in the maculae of the utricle and saccule, and in the cristae of the lateral and posterior semicircular canals, as compared with the control group (P < 0.05).

  5. Syphilis outbreak in Walsall, UK: lessons for control and prevention.

    PubMed

    Arumainayagam, J; Pallan, M J; Buckley, E; Pugh, R N; White, D G; Morrall, I A; Morris, C; Chandramani, S

    2007-01-01

    An assessment of risk-taking behaviour among men who have sex with men (MSM) attending a sauna venue was undertaken, using a standardized questionnaire, after which outreach screening was introduced targeting MSM. The epidemiology of the continuing outbreak of syphilis was reviewed to determine the factors driving the outbreak and assess the benefit of continuing outreach screening. Findings among the 163 respondents at the sauna included a high rate of casual sex and a tendency not to disclose HIV status. Over 12 months, 51 cases of early syphilis were recorded. Our review showed a decline in incidence in MSM after outreach screening, but an increase in heterosexual spread. Given the frequent anonymous nature of syphilis transmission, traditional contact tracing is ineffective. Outreach screening is required at gay venues and other community settings to target at-risk populations.

  6. Biologically false positive reactions to serological tests for syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Kostant, George H.

    1956-01-01

    The frequency of biologically false positive reactions to serological tests for syphilis depends on a number of factors, including the individual immunological response, the number and type of serological tests performed, and the stage of the disease producing such reactions; the relative importance of such factors is discussed. The author also considers in detail the diseases or conditions giving rise to acute or chronic biologically false positive reactions. A variety of verification tests exists for differentiating the true syphilitic reaction from the biologically false positive reaction, but none is so accurate as the Treponema pallidum immobilization and immune adherence tests, which the author considers should be used when others have proved inconclusive. In the final section of his paper, he indicates the steps to be followed in attempting to distinguish between latent syphilis and biologically false positive reactions in persons with positive serological tests but no anamnestic or clinical evidence of syphilis. PMID:13329848

  7. Syphilis and gonorrhea in Miami: similar clustering, different trends.

    PubMed

    Hamers, F F; Peterman, T A; Zaidi, A A; Ransom, R L; Wroten, J E; Witte, J J

    1995-08-01

    During the second half of the 1980s, Miami had a syphilis epidemic while gonorrhea rates decreased. To determine whether the direction of these trends truly differed within all population subgroups or whether they resulted from aggregating groups within which trends were similar, records from four sexually transmitted disease clinics from 1986 to 1990 and census data from 1990 were used to compare race-, sex-, age-, and zip code-specific groups. Syphilis and gonorrhea clustering was similar; 50% of cases occurred in the same zip codes, representing 10% of the population. In all groups, gonorrhea decreased (aggregate 48%) while syphilis first increased (aggregate 47%) and then decreased. Determining reasons for these different trends may facilitate controlling these diseases.

  8. The prevalence of syphilis at childbirth in Ireland: a six-year review.

    PubMed

    Lutomski, Jennifer E; Shiely, Frances; Molloy, Eleanor J

    2014-11-01

    Re-emerging syphilis outbreaks across Europe have led to increasing syphilis rates among women of child-bearing age. We, therefore, identified all forms of syphilis cases among women hospitalized for delivery in Ireland over a six-year period. Cases per annum ranged from 10 to 24 (13.8-32.9 per 100 000 maternities). Rates of syphilis in this universally screened cohort were four times higher than the general Irish population. Future studies examining the incidence of congenital syphilis as well as patterns in follow-up treatment for the sero-positive mother and her infant are needed to better guide clinical intervention.

  9. A review of recent advances in rapid point-of-care tests for syphilis.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Claire C; Larson, Elysia; Javanbakht, Marjan; Huang, Emily; Causer, Louise; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2015-04-01

    Syphilis is a curable disease, yet over 10million people worldwide are infected with syphilis each year. Syphilis case finding and subsequent treatment are key steps in syphilis control and prevention efforts. The advent of rapid point-of-care tests - which require minimal equipment, are easy to perform and are relatively low cost - have the potential to improve syphilis control by allowing for more widespread testing in clinical and non-clinical settings. However, strategies to maximise the potential public health impact of those tests are needed, and those include regulatory oversight, effective supply-chain management and quality assurance systems. PMID:25622292

  10. [The symbolic geopolitics of syphilis: an essay in historical anthropology].

    PubMed

    Carrara, S

    The article analyzes certain scientific ideas that Brazilian physicians, and particularly syphilologists, have held about this disease. During the 1920's especially, these specialists constructed a uniquely Brazilian version of the disease as they debated with foreign specialists on the origins, symptoms, and incidence of syphilis in Brazil. In their formulations, syphilis became a kind of natural symbol through which they expressed their desires to play a leading role within the international scientific community and put forth efforts to earn Brazil a new status in the world ranking of nations contesting the notion that Brazil was forever doomed to backwardness and barbarism because it was a tropical country with a racially mixed population.

  11. Syphilis: using modern approaches to understand an old disease

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Emily L.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2011-01-01

    Syphilis is a fascinating and perplexing infection, with protean clinical manifestations and both diagnostic and management ambiguities. Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the agent of syphilis, is challenging to study in part because it cannot be cultured or genetically manipulated. Here, we review recent progress in the application of modern molecular techniques to understanding the biological basis of this multistage disease and to the development of new tools for diagnosis, for predicting efficacy of treatment with alternative antibiotics, and for studying the transmission of infection through population networks. PMID:22133883

  12. Time Series Modelling of Syphilis Incidence in China from 2005 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingyu; Zhang, Tao; Pei, Jiao; Liu, Yuanyuan; Li, Xiaosong; Medrano-Gracia, Pau

    2016-01-01

    Background The infection rate of syphilis in China has increased dramatically in recent decades, becoming a serious public health concern. Early prediction of syphilis is therefore of great importance for heath planning and management. Methods In this paper, we analyzed surveillance time series data for primary, secondary, tertiary, congenital and latent syphilis in mainland China from 2005 to 2012. Seasonality and long-term trend were explored with decomposition methods. Autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) was used to fit a univariate time series model of syphilis incidence. A separate multi-variable time series for each syphilis type was also tested using an autoregressive integrated moving average model with exogenous variables (ARIMAX). Results The syphilis incidence rates have increased three-fold from 2005 to 2012. All syphilis time series showed strong seasonality and increasing long-term trend. Both ARIMA and ARIMAX models fitted and estimated syphilis incidence well. All univariate time series showed highest goodness-of-fit results with the ARIMA(0,0,1)×(0,1,1) model. Conclusion Time series analysis was an effective tool for modelling the historical and future incidence of syphilis in China. The ARIMAX model showed superior performance than the ARIMA model for the modelling of syphilis incidence. Time series correlations existed between the models for primary, secondary, tertiary, congenital and latent syphilis. PMID:26901682

  13. Modelling the cost‐effectiveness of introducing rapid syphilis tests into an antenatal syphilis screening programme in Mwanza, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Vickerman, P; Peeling, R W; Terris‐Prestholt, F; Changalucha, J; Mabey, D; Watson‐Jones, D; Watts, C

    2006-01-01

    Objectives A study found screening (with rapid plasma reagin (RPR)) pregnant women for maternal syphilis was cost‐effective in Mwanza, Tanzania. Recently, four rapid point‐of‐care (POC) syphilis tests were evaluated in Mwanza, and found to have reasonable sensitivity/specificity. This analysis estimates the relative cost‐effectiveness of using these POC tests in the Mwanza syphilis screening intervention. Methods Empirical cost and epidemiological data were used to model the potential benefit of using POC tests instead of RPR. Reductions in costs relating to training, supplies, and equipment were estimated, and any changes in impact due to test sensitivity were included. Additional modelling explored how the results vary with prevalence of past infection, misclassified RPR results, and if not all women return for treatment. Results The cost‐effectiveness of using POC tests is mainly dependent on their cost and sensitivity for high titre active syphilis (HTAS). Savings due to reductions in training and equipment are small. Current POC tests may save more disability‐adjusted life years (DALYs) than the RPR test in Mwanza, but the test cost needs to be syphilis, false RPR‐positives, and past infections. Discussion Although the price of most POC tests needs to be reduced to make them as cost‐effective as RPR, their simplicity and limited requirements for electricity/equipment suggest their use could improve the coverage of antenatal syphilis screening in developing countries. PMID:17215276

  14. The Impact of Syphilis Screening among Female Sex Workers in China: A Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Kate M.; Cox, Andrew P.; Mabey, David; Tucker, Joseph D.; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Vickerman, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background In China, female sex workers (FSWs) are at high risk of syphilis infection, but are hard to reach for interventions. Point-of-care testing introduces opportunities for expanding syphilis control measures. Modelling is used to estimate the impact of using rapid tests to screen FSWs for syphilis. In other settings, modelling has predicted large rebounds in infectious syphilis following screening, which may undermine any impact achieved. Methods A deterministic syphilis transmission model among FSWs and clients was fitted to data from Yunnan Province (FSW syphilis prevalence = 7.5%), and used to estimate the impact of rapid syphilis testing and treatment for FSWs. Impact projections were compared for different model structures that included risk heterogeneity amongst FSWs, incoming syphilis infections amongst new FSWs and clients and re-infection from FSWs' regular non-commercial partners. The rebound in syphilis prevalence after screening ceased was explored. Results All model structures suggest yearly syphilis screening could substantially reduce (by 72–88%) syphilis prevalence amongst FSWs in this setting over five years. However, incoming syphilis infections amongst new FSWs and clients or re-infections from regular non-commercial partners of FSWs can considerably reduce (>30%) the proportion of infections averted. Including heterogeneity in risk amongst FSWs had little effect upon the proportion of infections averted. In this setting, the rebound in syphilis prevalence after screening ceased is predicted to be slight, but it could be large in high prevalence settings. Conclusions Rapid test screening could dramatically reduce syphilis prevalence amongst hard-to-reach groups, but strategies to reduce re-infection from regular non-commercial partners are needed to maximise impact. PMID:23383249

  15. A decade of reorientation in the treatment of venereal syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Idsoe, O.; Guthe, T.; Christiansen, Sven; Krag, P.; Cutler, J. C.

    1954-01-01

    As experience with penicillin in the treatment of venereal syphilis has grown over the last decade, this drug, used without adjuvants, has become increasingly widely accepted as being effective, convenient, non-toxic, and relatively inexpensive. Metal chemotherapy required the use of repeated subcurative doses over a long period of time and was essentially suppressive in character; penicillin can be given in the form of repository preparations which ensure a treponemacidal blood-level of long duration. These can be given in large single doses or in repeated smaller doses; the therapeutic results will not vary whichever of these procedures is used. In the first part of this paper, the authors discuss the effect of penicillin and the time factor, the choice of penicillin preparation, the mode of administration, and the reaction to infection with Treponema pallidum. In the second part, they consider the present status of penicillin therapy in venereal syphilis, dealing with the principles of follow-up and control; with the treatment of early, latent, late, and congenital syphilis; and with the treatment of incubating syphilis and contacts. PMID:13182586

  16. Eosinophil-rich syphilis: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Gabriela; Bennett, Dan; Piliang, Melissa P

    2015-08-01

    The differential diagnosis for eosinophil-rich skin lesions often includes a drug reaction, allergic contact dermatitis and rarely, response to a helminth infection. However, many unrelated entities, such as infections, neoplasms and inflammatory dermatoses, can have a prominent eosinophilic infiltrate. Syphilis is classically associated with plasma cells, but other patterns of inflammation have been reported, including ulcerative, granulomatous and eosinophil-rich. Classic teaching might indicate that the presence of eosinophils argues against a diagnosis of syphilis. We present four cases of secondary syphilis with increased eosinophils, ranging from 8 to >200 eosinophils per 10 high-power fields (×400 magnification). Patient 1 had lesions on the penis and scrotum, with greater than 200 eosinophils per 10 high-power fields. Patient 2 had lesions on the back, with 150 eosinophils per 10 high-power fields. Patient 3 had lesions on the bilateral arms, with 8 eosinophils per 10 high-power fields. Patient 4 had lesions involving the anus, with 17 eosinophils per 10 high-power fields. These cases highlight that the presence of an eosinophil-rich infiltrate on skin biopsy should not exclude syphilis from the differential diagnosis.

  17. The epidemiology of infectious syphilis in the Republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Cronin, M; Domegan, L; Thornton, L; Fitzgerald, M; Hopkins, S; O'Lorcain, P; Creamer, E; O'Flanagan, D

    2004-12-01

    In response to the increasing numbers of syphilis cases reported among men having sex with men (MSM) in Dublin, an Outbreak Control Team (OCT) was set up in late 2000. The outbreak peaked in 2001 and had largely ceased by late 2003. An enhanced syphilis surveillance system was introduced to capture data from January 2000. Between January 2000 and December 2003, 547 cases of infectious syphilis were notified in Ireland (415 were MSM). Four per cent of cases were diagnosed with HIV and 15.4% of cases were diagnosed with at least one other STI (excluding HIV) within the previous 3 months. The mean number of contacts reported by male cases in the 3 months prior to diagnosis was 4 (range 0-8) for bisexual contacts and 6 for homosexual contacts (range 1-90). Thirty one per cent of MSM reported having had recent unprotected oral sex and 15.9% of MSM reported having had recent unprotected anal sex. Sixteen per cent of cases reported having had sex abroad in the three months prior to diagnosis. The results suggest that risky sexual behaviour contributed to the onward transmission of infection in Dublin. The outbreak in Dublin could be seen as part of a European-wide outbreak of syphilis. The rates of co-infection with HIV and syphilis in Ireland are comparable with rates reported from other centres. There is a need to improve surveillance systems in order to allow real time evaluation of interventions and ongoing monitoring of infection trends. PMID:15677853

  18. Factors associated with syphilis infection: a comprehensive analysis based on a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Li, S-L; Lin, H-L; Lin, Z-F; Zhu, X-Z; Fan, J-Y; Gao, K; Zhang, H-L; Lin, L-R; Liu, L-L; Tong, M-L; Niu, J-J; Yang, T-C

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to comprehensively evaluate factors that influence the likelihood of syphilis infection from risk-taking behaviours and medical conditions. A retrospective case-control study was conducted by enrolling 664 syphilis inpatients (excluding 11 congenital syphilis patients) and 800 sex- and age-matched controls. Medical histories, clinical data and patient interview data were collected and subjected to logistic regression analyses. The prevalence of syphilis in the study population was 3·9% (675/17,304). By univariate analysis, syphilis infection was associated with migration between cities, marital status, smoking, reproductive history, hypertension, elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) (P < 0·05). A high rate of syphilis-HBV co-infection was observed in HIV-negative patients and further research revealed an association between syphilis and specific HBV serological reactivity. Syphilis was also associated with the frequency, duration and status of tobacco use. Multivariate analysis indicated that syphilis infection was independently associated with migration between cities [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1·368, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·048-1·785], current smoking (aOR 1·607, 95% CI 1·177-2·195), elevated BUN (aOR 1·782, 95% CI 1·188-2·673) and some serological patterns of HBV infection. To prevent the spread of infectious diseases, inpatients and blood donors should be tested for HIV, syphilis, HBV and HCV simultaneously.

  19. The Global Epidemiology of Syphilis in the Past Century – A Systematic Review Based on Antenatal Syphilis Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Chris Richard; Osbak, Kara; Tsoumanis, Achilleas

    2016-01-01

    Background How can we explain the uneven decline of syphilis around the world following the introduction of penicillin? In this paper we use antenatal syphilis prevalence (ASP) to investigate how syphilis prevalence varied worldwide in the past century, and what risk factors correlate with this variance. Methods 1) A systematic review using PubMed and Google Scholar was conducted to identify countries with published data relating to ASP estimates from before 1952 until the present. Eleven countries were identified (Canada, Denmark, Finland, India, Japan, Norway, Singapore, South Africa, United States of America (USA), United Kingdom (UK) and Zimbabwe). The ASP epidemic curve for each population was depicted graphically. In South Africa and the USA, results are reported separately for the black and white populations. 2) National antenatal syphilis prevalence estimates for 1990 to 1999 and 2008 were taken from an Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation database on the prevalence of syphilis in low risk populations compiled for the Global Burden of Diseases study and from a recent review paper respectively. National ASPs were depicted graphically and regional median ASPs were calculated for both time periods. 3) Linear regression was used to test for an association between ASP in 1990–1999 and 2008 and four risk factors (efficacy of syphilis screening/treatment, health expenditure, GDP per capita and circumcision prevalence). WHO world regions were included as potential explanatory variables. Results In most populations, ASP dropped to under 1% before 1960. In Zimbabwe and black South Africans, ASP was high in the pre-penicillin period, dropped in the post-penicillin period, but then plateaued at around 6% until the end of the 20th century when ASP dropped to just above 1%. In black Americans, ASP declined in the post penicillin period, but plateaued at 3–5% thereafter. ASP was statistically significantly higher in sub-Saharan Africa in 1990–1999 and 2008

  20. High prevalence of syphilis among demobilized child soldiers in Eastern Congo: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Syphilis, a known major public health issue for soldiers during periods of conflict, is exacerbated in the Democratic Republic of Congo due to widespread sexual violence. However, there has been no previous study to determine the extent of this problem. Therefore, we determined the prevalence of syphilis among young demobilized soldiers. Methods Screening of syphilis using the rapid plasma reagin test and the Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay was conducted in three transit sites of soldier reintegration in 2005. The Fisher Exact probability test was used to compare results. Results The prevalence of syphilis was found to be 3.4%, with almost equal distribution in respect to sex, location. Conclusion Syphilis continues to be highly prevalent in demobilized child soldiers in Eastern Congo. Syphilis screening tests are recommended. PMID:21896173

  1. [Ocular Syphilis Complicated with HIV Infection: A Report of 3 Cases].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kazuaki; Yanagisawa, Naoki; Sasaki, Shugo; Sekiya, Ryoko; Sekiya, Noritaka; Suganuma, Akihiko; Ajisawa, Atsushi; Imamura, Akifumi

    2016-05-01

    We present 3 cases of ocular syphilis in patients who had been newly diagnosed as having HIV. All the patients had only complained of ophthalmologic symptoms at the time of their initial visit. Treatment with penicillin was successful, resulting in no significant sequelae. Ocular syphilis may lead to reduced visual acuity or even blindness if left untreated. However, the diagnosis may be challenging, since patients may lack symptoms that are commonly observed in cases with primary and secondary syphilis. Considering the recent increase in the number of syphilis patients, clinicians should be aware of ocular syphilis and should have a high index of suspicion for syphilis in any patient at risk so as to ensure a prompt diagnosis.

  2. [Ocular Syphilis Complicated with HIV Infection: A Report of 3 Cases].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kazuaki; Yanagisawa, Naoki; Sasaki, Shugo; Sekiya, Ryoko; Sekiya, Noritaka; Suganuma, Akihiko; Ajisawa, Atsushi; Imamura, Akifumi

    2016-05-01

    We present 3 cases of ocular syphilis in patients who had been newly diagnosed as having HIV. All the patients had only complained of ophthalmologic symptoms at the time of their initial visit. Treatment with penicillin was successful, resulting in no significant sequelae. Ocular syphilis may lead to reduced visual acuity or even blindness if left untreated. However, the diagnosis may be challenging, since patients may lack symptoms that are commonly observed in cases with primary and secondary syphilis. Considering the recent increase in the number of syphilis patients, clinicians should be aware of ocular syphilis and should have a high index of suspicion for syphilis in any patient at risk so as to ensure a prompt diagnosis. PMID:27529966

  3. Tertiary Syphilis in the Cervical Spine: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Salem, K. M. I.; Majeed, H.; Bommireddy, R.; Klezl, Z.

    2012-01-01

    As the prevalence of syphilis rises, an increase in tertiary syphilis with spinal involvement is predicted. We report what we believe to be the first case of compressive cervical spine syphilitic gummata, with central cord compression signs. We also review the relevant literature to date. The diagnosis of syphilis in the spine relies on the physician to be aware of it as part of the differential diagnosis. Treponemal laboratory tests are an important aid in establishing a diagnosis. PMID:24436850

  4. Evaluation of Elecsys Syphilis Assay for Routine and Blood Screening and Detection of Early Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kremastinou, J.; Polymerou, V.; Lavranos, D.; Aranda Arrufat, A.; Harwood, J.; Martínez Lorenzo, M. J.; Ng, K. P.; Queiros, L.; Vereb, I.

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum infections can have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Screening and diagnosis of syphilis require assays with high specificity and sensitivity. The Elecsys Syphilis assay is an automated treponemal immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against T. pallidum. The performance of this assay was investigated previously in a multicenter study. The current study expands on that evaluation in a variety of diagnostic settings and patient populations, at seven independent laboratories. The samples included routine diagnostic samples, blood donation samples, samples from patients with confirmed HIV infections, samples from living organ or bone marrow donors, and banked samples, including samples previously confirmed as syphilis positive. This study also investigated the seroconversion sensitivity of the assay. With a total of 1,965 syphilis-negative routine diagnostic samples and 5,792 syphilis-negative samples collected from blood donations, the Elecsys Syphilis assay had specificity values of 99.85% and 99.86%, respectively. With 333 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 100% regardless of disease stage. The assay also showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with samples from 69 patients coinfected with HIV. The Elecsys Syphilis assay detected infection in the same bleed or earlier, compared with comparator assays, in a set of sequential samples from a patient with primary syphilis. In archived serial blood samples collected from 14 patients with direct diagnoses of primary syphilis, the Elecsys Syphilis assay detected T. pallidum antibodies for 3 patients for whom antibodies were not detected with the Architect Syphilis TP assay, indicating a trend for earlier detection of infection, which may have the potential to shorten the time between infection and reactive screening test results. PMID:27358468

  5. Evaluation of Elecsys Syphilis Assay for Routine and Blood Screening and Detection of Early Infection.

    PubMed

    Kremastinou, J; Polymerou, V; Lavranos, D; Aranda Arrufat, A; Harwood, J; Martínez Lorenzo, M J; Ng, K P; Queiros, L; Vereb, I; Cusini, M

    2016-09-01

    Treponema pallidum infections can have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Screening and diagnosis of syphilis require assays with high specificity and sensitivity. The Elecsys Syphilis assay is an automated treponemal immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against T. pallidum The performance of this assay was investigated previously in a multicenter study. The current study expands on that evaluation in a variety of diagnostic settings and patient populations, at seven independent laboratories. The samples included routine diagnostic samples, blood donation samples, samples from patients with confirmed HIV infections, samples from living organ or bone marrow donors, and banked samples, including samples previously confirmed as syphilis positive. This study also investigated the seroconversion sensitivity of the assay. With a total of 1,965 syphilis-negative routine diagnostic samples and 5,792 syphilis-negative samples collected from blood donations, the Elecsys Syphilis assay had specificity values of 99.85% and 99.86%, respectively. With 333 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 100% regardless of disease stage. The assay also showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with samples from 69 patients coinfected with HIV. The Elecsys Syphilis assay detected infection in the same bleed or earlier, compared with comparator assays, in a set of sequential samples from a patient with primary syphilis. In archived serial blood samples collected from 14 patients with direct diagnoses of primary syphilis, the Elecsys Syphilis assay detected T. pallidum antibodies for 3 patients for whom antibodies were not detected with the Architect Syphilis TP assay, indicating a trend for earlier detection of infection, which may have the potential to shorten the time between infection and reactive screening test results.

  6. Evaluation of Elecsys Syphilis Assay for Routine and Blood Screening and Detection of Early Infection.

    PubMed

    Kremastinou, J; Polymerou, V; Lavranos, D; Aranda Arrufat, A; Harwood, J; Martínez Lorenzo, M J; Ng, K P; Queiros, L; Vereb, I; Cusini, M

    2016-09-01

    Treponema pallidum infections can have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Screening and diagnosis of syphilis require assays with high specificity and sensitivity. The Elecsys Syphilis assay is an automated treponemal immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against T. pallidum The performance of this assay was investigated previously in a multicenter study. The current study expands on that evaluation in a variety of diagnostic settings and patient populations, at seven independent laboratories. The samples included routine diagnostic samples, blood donation samples, samples from patients with confirmed HIV infections, samples from living organ or bone marrow donors, and banked samples, including samples previously confirmed as syphilis positive. This study also investigated the seroconversion sensitivity of the assay. With a total of 1,965 syphilis-negative routine diagnostic samples and 5,792 syphilis-negative samples collected from blood donations, the Elecsys Syphilis assay had specificity values of 99.85% and 99.86%, respectively. With 333 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 100% regardless of disease stage. The assay also showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with samples from 69 patients coinfected with HIV. The Elecsys Syphilis assay detected infection in the same bleed or earlier, compared with comparator assays, in a set of sequential samples from a patient with primary syphilis. In archived serial blood samples collected from 14 patients with direct diagnoses of primary syphilis, the Elecsys Syphilis assay detected T. pallidum antibodies for 3 patients for whom antibodies were not detected with the Architect Syphilis TP assay, indicating a trend for earlier detection of infection, which may have the potential to shorten the time between infection and reactive screening test results. PMID:27358468

  7. Clinical Spectrum of Oral Secondary Syphilis in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Amador, Velia; Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Esquivel-Pedraza, Lilly; Saeb-Lima, Marcela; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background. Oral lesions may constitute the first clinical manifestation in secondary syphilis, but detailed descriptions in HIV-infected individuals are scarce. Objective. To describe the clinical characteristics of oral secondary syphilis in HIV-infected patients and its relevance in the early diagnosis of syphilis. Methods. Twenty HIV/AIDS adult subjects with oral secondary syphilis lesions presenting at two HIV/AIDS referral centers in Mexico City (2003–2011) are described. An oral examination was performed by specialists in oral pathology and medicine; when possible, a punch biopsy was done, and Warthin-Starry stain and immunohistochemistry were completed. Intraoral herpes virus infection and erythematous candidosis were ruled out by cytological analysis. Diagnosis of oral syphilis was confirmed with positive nontreponemal test (VDRL), and, if possible, fluorescent treponemal antibody test. Results. Twenty male patients (median age 31.5, 21–59 years) with oral secondary syphilis lesions were included. Oral lesions were the first clinical sign of syphilis in 16 (80%) cases. Mucous patch was the most common oral manifestation (17, 85.5%), followed by shallow ulcers (2, 10%) and macular lesions (1, 5%). Conclusions. Due to the recent rise in HIV-syphilis coinfection, dental and medical practitioners should consider secondary syphilis in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions, particularly in HIV-infected patients. PMID:26316966

  8. Prosthetic rehabilitation of palatal perforation in a patient with ‘syphilis: the great imitator’

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Varsha; Vaithilingam, Yuvraj; Livingstone, David; Pillai, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmissible disease caused by treponema palladium, a microaerophilic spirochete. Syphilis may progress from primary to tertiary stage if left unnoticed and untreated. Dentists should be vigilant and suspect sexually transmitted infections such as syphilis in the differential diagnosis of oral inflammatory or ulcerative lesions with palatal perforation. Moreover, it is imperative that dentists should have knowledge about its stages, characteristic features, oral presentation and prosthetic rehabilitation. This case report describes a case of tertiary syphilis with palatal perforation and the prosthetic rehabilitation of the defect with a prosthetic obturator. PMID:24891485

  9. Evolution of the syphilis epidemic among men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Marc M.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    Syphilis has existed for millenni, but its epidemiology was only recently linked to men who have sex with men (MSM) after the introduction of penicillin in the 1940s; the syphilis epidemic became concentrated within the MSM community in subsequent decades. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in the 1980s led to a surge of new syphilis cases and revealed the potentiation between HIV and syphilis, as evidenced by a shift in the natural history of neurosyphilis. In response, MSM revolutionised their sexual behaviour by implementing community-driven seroadaptive strategies to stem HIV transmission. The Centers for Disease Control in the US called for the elimination of syphilis in the late 1990s since the rates had fallen sharply but this effort was overtaken by a resurgence of global outbreaks among MSM in the 2000s, many of which were linked to methamphetamine use and sexual networking websites. Syphilis remains highly prevalent today, especially among MSM and individuals infected with HIV, and it continues to present a significant public health conundrum. Innovative syphilis prevention strategies are warranted. MSM engaging in high-risk behaviour such as condomless anal receptive intercourse, sex with multiple partners or recreational drug use should be routinely screened for syphilis infection; they should also be counselled about the limits of seroadaptive behaviours and HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis as they relate to syphilis transmission. PMID:25514173

  10. [Primary syphilis with initial lower-lip sclerosis--a case report].

    PubMed

    Omura, Go; Fukuoka, Osamu; Suzuki, Masami

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of primary syphilis with initial lower-lip sclerosis. 54-year-old man seen for a left lower-lip lesion was found in serological testing to have elevated syphilis-rapid plasma regain (STS-RPR) and treponema pallidum lipid antigen (TPLA), diagnosed as primary syphilis. Following four weeks of 1500 mg/day amoxicillin administration, the lesion had almost disappeared. Serological data had improved to within the negative range six months after antibiotic treatment started. This case underscores the need to recognize syphilis of the lip even in the outpatient setting. PMID:20954363

  11. Musculoskeletal involvement of syphilis – a forgotten lesson

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Jesus Vallejo; Molnar, Szabolcs Lajos; Val, Sami Mansour; Arnal, Rafael Gracia

    2012-01-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease with a myriad of presentation and called ‘the great impostor’ for the variety of the symptoms. As a venereal disease it is transmissible mainly by sexual contact with infectious lesions but can spread by blood contamination. Without treatment it progresses through early and late syphilis. Since the introduction of penicillin its prevalence has strongly dropped but was never eradicated entirely. As the frequency and the progression are largely controlled there are several symptoms which are not common and can be a difficult differential diagnostic problem nowadays. The authors present a case where decades passed between the primary event and the actual hospitalisation with fever of unknown origin and coexistent swollen joint deformities. The patient was not treated entirely from his primary event and later, psoriasis was settled as a diagnosis, which was the cause of neglecting the secondary phase’s skin lesions. PMID:22787187

  12. Lack of effectiveness of ofloxacin against experimental syphilis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Une, T; Nakajima, R; Otani, T; Katami, K; Osada, Y; Otani, M

    1987-09-01

    Ofloxacin, a new pyridone-carboxylic acid derivative, was evaluated in experimental syphilis in rabbits in comparison with penicillin G. Experimental syphilis was established by intradermal injection of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum Nichols. Ten days after infection, the dermal lesions were characterized by syphilitic papula accompanied with central necrosis. These animals were subsequently treated either with ofloxacin twice a day at an oral dose of 10 mg/kg or with penicillin G once a day at an intramuscular dose of 10,000 U/kg for 21 consecutive days. In penicillin G-treated animals, the dermal lesions became smaller as early as day 3 of treatment and almost disappeared during the therapy. In marked contrast to remarkable efficacy of penicillin G was further development of the lesions in ofloxacin-treated animals, showing no difference in pathological manifestations as compared to untreated animals. The results of nontreponemal serologic test correlated well with the response of animals to treatment.

  13. [The symbolic geopolitics of syphilis: an essay in historical anthropology].

    PubMed

    Carrara, S

    The article analyzes certain scientific ideas that Brazilian physicians, and particularly syphilologists, have held about this disease. During the 1920's especially, these specialists constructed a uniquely Brazilian version of the disease as they debated with foreign specialists on the origins, symptoms, and incidence of syphilis in Brazil. In their formulations, syphilis became a kind of natural symbol through which they expressed their desires to play a leading role within the international scientific community and put forth efforts to earn Brazil a new status in the world ranking of nations contesting the notion that Brazil was forever doomed to backwardness and barbarism because it was a tropical country with a racially mixed population. PMID:11625109

  14. Nodular mucinosis misdiagnosed as non-responsive secondary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Patrício, Catarina; Campos, Sara; João, Alexandre; Serrão, Vasco

    2015-08-26

    A previously healthy 24-year-old man presented with an erythematous, non-pruritic and painless papulonodular skin rash affecting the trunk, upper arms (excluding palms), neck, face, forehead and scalp. He had a penile ulcer for the past 2 weeks, almost healed at the time of observation. The patient tested positive for syphilis and HIV-1; he claimed being negative for HIV 6 months earlier. As the palms were not affected, we performed a skin biopsy for the differential diagnosis between secondary lues and acute HIV seroconversion reaction. Benzathine penicillin (2,400,000 units) was administrated and antiretroviral therapy started. Although the skin biopsy was compatible with secondary syphilis, there was no change in the skin rash 3 weeks after the first penicillin administration. Another 2 doses of penicillin were given but 4 weeks later the rash persisted. A second biopsy revealed a mucinous skin infiltration, compatible with nodular mucinosis.

  15. Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle and the case of congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Arthur M; Ruggere, Christine

    2006-01-01

    In 1894, Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle wrote "The Third Generation," a short story involving the transmission of congenital syphilis from generation to generation. Analysts of his writings have interpreted the pathogenetic mechanism involved in modern terms: infection of mother by father and then transplacental infection of the fetus. However, a review of the contemporary literature and the history of the concepts of congenital and "hereditary" syphilis demonstrates that the late 19th-century understanding of the process involved a Lamarckian transmission of paternal infection, via the sperm at the moment of conception. It was undoubtedly this concept that Doyle learned in medical school in the late 1870s and that provided the background to his story.

  16. Yellowish dots in the retina: a finding of ocular syphilis?

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Renan Albert Mendonça; Nascimento, Heloisa Moraes do; Muccioli, Cristina

    2014-10-01

    Here we report the occurrence of pale yellowish perivascular preretinal dots in 12 patients with ocular syphilis. A case series of these patients was examined between March and October 2012 at the Uveitis Sector of Universidade Federal de São Paulo. After diagnostic confirmation of syphilis, fundus photographs and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were performed to verify the localization of the dots, and patients were treated with IV crystalline penicillin for 14 days. The study comprised 11 men (91.6%), 19 eyes, median presentation age of 38.1 years, and panuveitis as the main clinical manifestation (seven patients, 58.3%), being bilateral in four. Ten patients were taking oral prednisone (83.3%). Serum panels performed by the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) showed positive results in eight patients (66.7%), whereas VDRL cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests were negative in seven of nine collected (77.8%). However, serum FTA-Abs was positive in 100% of patients, and eight patients (66.7%) had HIV infection. The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) presented after treatment improved in 10 eyes (55.6%), did not change in seven eyes (38.9%), and worsened in one eye (5.6%). Although not yet acknowledged in the literature as a typical manifestation of ocular syphilis, these are very common findings in clinical practice. We believe that preretinal dots are due to perivasculitis secondary to treponema infection. It is important recognize them and remember that syphilis can present in several forms, including the one presented in this study. PMID:25494381

  17. Curse on two generations: a history of congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Before the microbiologic era, venereal diseases were poorly distinguished. Congenital syphilis was believed to be transmitted during conception by the father's sperm, during delivery in the birth canal, or from infected milk or breasts. The most frequent maternofetal transmission was not considered because the mother's primary infection remained undiagnosed. The concept of treating infants with mercury transmitted by nurses' milk prompted the founding of a specialized infant hospital in Vaugirard in 1780: lactating syphilitic women received mercury orally and by rubbing it into the skin. Their own infant and a second infected infant from the foundling hospital were believed to be cured by their milk. Underwood described snuffles in 1789 and Bertin periosteal bone disease in 1810. Tardive congenital lues with keratitis, deafness, and notched upper incisors were described by Hutchinson in 1863. Feeding remained difficult, as wet nursing transmitted syphilis to the nurse and other infants. Specialized institutions tried goat or donkey milk. A debate between contagionists assuming exclusively maternal infection and hereditists assuming germinal transmission by the father's sperm continued throughout the 19th century. Schaudinn and Hoffmann identified Spirochaeta pallida in 1905. When Ehrlich discovered the efficacy of salvarsan in 1910, Noeggerath treated infants with the new drug, pioneering the injection into scalp veins. In 1943, Lentz and Ingraham established penicillin treatment for congenital syphilis. Whereas this drug effectively prevented maternofetal transmission, treating infants remained difficult due to the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction.

  18. Laboratory diagnosis and interpretation of tests for syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, S A; Steiner, B M; Rudolph, A H

    1995-01-01

    The lack of a method for demonstrating the presence of Treponema pallidum by growth necessitates the use of alternative methods. Traditionally, these methods are divided into direct detection methods (animal inoculation, dark-field microscopy, etc.) and serologic tests for the presence of patient antibody against T. pallidum. Serologic methods are further divided into two classes. One class, the nontreponemal tests, detects antibodies to lipoidal antigens present in either the host or T. pallidum; examples are the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory and rapid plasma reagin and tests. Reactivity in these tests generally indicates host tissue damage that may not be specific for syphilis. Because these tests are easy and inexpensive to perform, they are commonly used for screening, and with proper clinical signs they are suggestive of syphilis. The other class of test, the treponemal tests, uses specific treponemal antigens. Confirmation of infection requires a reactive treponemal test. Examples of the treponemal tests are the microhemagglutination assay for antibodies to T. pallidum and the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test. These tests are more expensive and complicated to perform than the nontreponemal tests. On the horizon are a number of direct antigen, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and PCR techniques. Several of these techniques have shown promise in clinical trials for the diagnosis of congenital syphilis and neurosyphilis that are presently difficult to diagnose. PMID:7704889

  19. A new enhanced antibiotic treatment for early and late syphilis.

    PubMed

    Drago, Francesco; Ciccarese, Giulia; Broccolo, Francesco; Sartoris, Giulia; Stura, Paola; Esposito, Susanna; Rebora, Alfredo; Parodi, Aurora

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an enhanced treatment regimen for syphilis with the addition of doxycycline and ceftriaxone to the conventional benzathine penicillin G (BPG) treatment. Sixty-nine syphilis patients were recruited and were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (38 patients) received standard therapy and group 2 (31 patients) received the enhanced therapy. All patients were followed-up for at least 12 months. Patients underwent physical examination and serology every 6 months as well as echocardiography and neurological examination every year. A three- to four-fold decline in the initial Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) titre within 6 months after therapy was considered as serological cure. At 12 months, 68% of patients in group 1 and 100% in group 2 were serologically cured (P=0.002). During follow-up, no patients in group 2 experienced complications related to syphilis. In contrast, one patient in group 1 developed neurosyphilis. In conclusion, the enhanced treatment is more effective than standard treatment and results in a higher and faster cure rate. Moreover, it provides treponemicidal antibiotic levels in the cerebrospinal fluid, thereby preventing possible late complications. PMID:27436469

  20. Maternal and congenital syphilis in Bolivia, 1996: prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed Central

    Southwick, K. L.; Blanco, S.; Santander, A.; Estenssoro, M.; Torrico, F.; Seoane, G.; Brady, W.; Fears, M.; Lewis, J.; Pope, V.; Guarner, J.; Levine, W. C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The present study was carried out in seven maternity hospitals to determine the prevalence of maternal syphilis at the time of delivery and the associated risk factors, to conduct a pilot project of rapid syphilis testing in hospital laboratories, to assure the quality of syphilis testing, and to determine the rate of congenital syphilis in infants born to women with syphilis at the time of delivery--all of which would provide baseline data for a national prevention programme in Bolivia. METHODS: All women delivering either live-born or stillborn infants in the seven participating hospitals in and around La Paz, El Alto, and Cochabamba between June and November 1996 were eligible for enrolment in the study. FINDINGS: A total of 61 out of 1428 mothers (4.3%) of live-born infants and 11 out of 43 mothers (26%) of stillborn infants were found to have syphilis at delivery. Multivariate analysis showed that women with live-born infants who had less than secondary-level education, who did not watch television during the week before delivery (this was used as an indicator of socioeconomic status), who had a previous history of syphilis, or who had more than one partner during the pregnancy were at increased risk of syphilis. While 76% of the study population had received prenatal care, only 17% had syphilis testing carried out during the pregnancy; 91% of serum samples that were reactive to rapid plasma reagin (RPR) tests were also reactive to fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption (FTA-ABS) testing. There was 96% agreement between the results from local hospital laboratories and national reference laboratories in their testing of RPR reactivity of serum samples. Congenital syphilis infection was confirmed by laboratory tests in 15% of 66 infants born to women with positive RPR and FTA-ABS testing. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that a congenital syphilis prevention programme in Bolivia could substantially reduce adverse infant outcomes due to this

  1. Acute periostitis in early acquired syphilis simulating shin splints in a jogger.

    PubMed

    Meier, J L; Mollet, E

    1986-01-01

    Acute periostitis affecting the long bones is a characteristic but uncommon manifestation of syphilis in the adult with an early acquired infection. This report describes the history of a jogger who developed acute localized periostitis of the shaft of both tibiae during the early stage of acquired syphilis. Symptomatology was initially attributed to the medial tibial stress syndrome.

  2. Epidemiology of Syphilis in regional blood transfusion centres in Burkina Faso, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bisseye, Cyrille; Sanou, Mahamoudou; Nagalo, Bolni Marius; Kiba, Alice; Compaoré, Tegwindé Rebeca; Tao, Issoufou; Simpore, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Syphilis remains a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa, including Burkina Faso. However, few published data are available on the prevalence of syphilis in the general population. This study had two main objectives: to determine the seroprevalence of syphilis in a cohort of 37,210 first time blood donors and to study socio-demographic factors associated with the risk of infection by Treponema pallidum. Methods Antibodies to Treponema pallidum were screened for, by using Reagin Rapid Test (RPR) and their presence was confirmed by treponema pallidum haemagglutination test (TPHA). Results The overall seroprevalence of syphilis was 1.5% among first time blood donors and was significantly different between centers (p <0.001). The infection was significantly higher in men than women among blood donors in Ouagadougou and Fada N′gourma (P = 0.001 and P = 0.034). The overall seroprevalence of syphilis among blood donors was not associated with either age group or HIV status. In contrast, a significantly high seroprevalence of syphilis was observed in blood donors with HBsAg (P = 0.014) and anti-HCV (P = 0.007) positive. Conclusion Our report shows a low seroprevalence of syphilis in the representative sample of the population of Burkina Faso. The seroprevalence of syphilis remains unequally distributed between urban and rural areas and was not associated with HIV infection. PMID:24711869

  3. Don’t Forget What You Can’t See: A Case of Ocular Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Monica I.; Lee, Annie W.C.; Sumsion, Sean M.; Gorchynski, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    This case describes an emergency department (ED) presentation of ocular syphilis in a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patient. This is an unusual presentation of syphilis and one that emergency physicians should be aware of. The prevalence of syphilis has reached epidemic proportions since 2001 with occurrences primarily among men who have sex with men (MSM). This is a case of a 24-year-old male who presented to our ED with bilateral painless vision loss. The patient’s history and ED workup were notable for MSM, positive rapid plasmin reagin (RPR) and HIV tests and fundus exam consistent with ocular syphilis, specifically uveitis. Ocular manifestations of syphilis can present at any stage of syphilis. The 2010 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines now recommend that ocular syphilis be treated as neurosyphilis regardless of the lumbar puncture results. There is a paucity of emergency medicine literature on ocular syphilis. For emergency physicians it is important to be aware of iritis, uveitis, or chorioretinitis as ocular manifestations of neurosyphilis especially in this high-risk population and to obtain RPR and HIV tests in the ED to facilitate early diagnosis, and treatment and to prevent irreversible vision loss. PMID:27429702

  4. Prevalence of syphilis among antenatal clinic attendees in Karachi: Imperative to begin universal screening in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shah, SA; Kristensen, S; Memon, MA; Usman, G; Ghazi, A; John, R; Sathiakumar, N; Vermund, SH

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Sexually transmitted infections are thought by some to be rare in socially conservative Muslim countries. Little is known about prevalence of syphilis in Pakistani women from the general population. We determined syphilis prevalence in a multi-center cross-sectional study of low risk pregnant women in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods We administered a structured questionnaire and obtained a blood sample for syphilis serology (rapid plasma reagin test with Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay confirmation) from all women giving informed consent over six weeks in 2007. Results The prevalence of confirmed syphilis was less than one percent (0.9%; 95%CI: 0.4, 1.8) in a sample size of 800 women recruited from three urban sites (≈1% refusal rate). Women who lived in an area where male drug use is prevalent (Ibrahim Hyderi Hospital) had 1% (1.5%) higher prevalence rates than women from the other two sites 0.5%. Conclusions We documented higher-than-expected syphilis seroprevalence rates in a low risk population of antenatal clinic attendees in Pakistan. Bridge populations for syphilis may include drug users, who are usually married, and Hijras or their clients. Hijras are transgender and/or transvestite men who may provide sex for money to men. In accordance with our results, the national policy for syphilis control in Pakistan should be modified to include universal syphilis screening in antenatal clinics with subsequent partner notification. PMID:22356034

  5. Unusual case of cervical syphilis with Piringer-Kuchinka-like lymphadenitis.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Sánchez, Manuel; González-García, Raúl; García, Carlos Moreno; Monje, Florencio

    2014-12-01

    Syphilis rarely presents with cervical lymphadenopathy. We describe a patient with a cervical mass associated with weight loss, asthenia, and night sweats. The mass was excised and histological examination suggested Piringer-Kuchinka lymphadenitis, which is usually present in cervical toxoplasmosis. To the best of our knowledge, Piringer-Kuchinka lymphadenitis has not previously been reported in cervical syphilis.

  6. The association of syphilis with cirrhosis: the role of alcohol and serum hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sadikali, F.

    1975-01-01

    The role of syphilis and alcohol was investigated in a prospective study of patients with cirrhosis of liver in Uganda, and results were correlated with the histological type of cirrhosis, and serological tests for hepatitis B antigen (HB Ag). Eighteen out of eighty (22·5%) patients with histologically-proven cirrhosis had positive serology for syphilis (VDRL and TPI). A high incidence of alcoholism (80%) and syphilis (60%) was found in patients with micronodular cirrhosis who were all negative for HB Ag. By contrast, HB Ag was detected in 37% of patients with macronodular cirrhosis who had a much smaller incidence of syphilis and alcoholism. Although chronic infection with hepatitis B virus related to HB Ag appears to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of cirrhosis in at least 30% of cases, infection acquired during past treatment for syphilis is not an important cause of the association of syphilis with cirrhosis in this population. Subdivision of patients with cirrhosis into those with and those without a history of severe alcohol abuse showed that the difference between the incidence of syphilis in the two groups is significant statistically. However, evidence of syphilis in association with non-alcoholic as well as alcoholic cirrhosis in this and other previously reported series suggests that the association between the two diseases cannot be entirely explained through the common factor of alcoholism, and other factors may also be responsible. PMID:1114150

  7. Don't Forget What You Can't See: A Case of Ocular Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Monica I; Lee, Annie W C; Sumsion, Sean M; Gorchynski, Julie A

    2016-07-01

    This case describes an emergency department (ED) presentation of ocular syphilis in a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patient. This is an unusual presentation of syphilis and one that emergency physicians should be aware of. The prevalence of syphilis has reached epidemic proportions since 2001 with occurrences primarily among men who have sex with men (MSM). This is a case of a 24-year-old male who presented to our ED with bilateral painless vision loss. The patient's history and ED workup were notable for MSM, positive rapid plasmin reagin (RPR) and HIV tests and fundus exam consistent with ocular syphilis, specifically uveitis. Ocular manifestations of syphilis can present at any stage of syphilis. The 2010 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines now recommend that ocular syphilis be treated as neurosyphilis regardless of the lumbar puncture results. There is a paucity of emergency medicine literature on ocular syphilis. For emergency physicians it is important to be aware of iritis, uveitis, or chorioretinitis as ocular manifestations of neurosyphilis especially in this high-risk population and to obtain RPR and HIV tests in the ED to facilitate early diagnosis, and treatment and to prevent irreversible vision loss. PMID:27429702

  8. Risk Factors Associated with Incident Syphilis in a Cohort of High-Risk Men in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Konda, Kelika A.; Roberts, Chelsea P.; Maguiña, Jorge L.; Leon, Segundo R.; Clark, Jesse L.; Coates, Thomas J.; Caceres, Carlos F.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Syphilis is concentrated among high-risk groups, but the epidemiology of syphilis reinfection is poorly understood. We characterized factors associated with syphilis incidence, including reinfection, in a high-risk cohort in Peru. Methods Participants in the NIMH CPOL trial were assessed at baseline and 2 annual visits with HIV/STI testing and behavioral surveys. Participants diagnosed with syphilis also attended 4- and 9-month visits. All participants underwent syphilis testing with RPR screening and TPPA confirmation. Antibiotic treatment was provided according to CDC guidelines. Reinfection was defined as a 4-fold titer increase or recurrence of seroreactivity after successful treatment with subsequent negative RPR titers. The longitudinal analysis used a Possion generalized estimating equations model with backward selection of variables in the final model (criteria P <0.02). Results Of 2,709 participants, 191 (7.05%) were RPR-reactive (median 1:8, range 1:1–1:1024) with TPPA confirmation. There were 119 total cases of incident syphilis, which included both reinfection and first-time incident cases. In the bivariate analysis, the oldest 2 quartiles of age (incidence ratio (IR) 3.84; P <0.001 and IR 8.15; P <0.001) and being MSM/TW (IR 6.48; P <0.001) were associated with higher risk of incident syphilis infection. Of the sexual risk behaviors, older age of sexual debut (IR 12.53; P <0.001), not being in a stable partnership (IR 1.56, P = 0.035), higher number of sex partners (IR 3.01; P <0.001), unprotected sex in the past 3 months (IR 0.56; P = 0.003), HIV infection at baseline (IR 3.98; P <0.001) and incident HIV infection during the study period (IR 6.26; P = 0.003) were all associated with incident syphilis. In the multivariable analysis, older age group (adjusted incidence ratio (aIR) 6.18; P <0.001), men reporting having sex with a man (aIR 4.63; P <0.001), and incident HIV infection (aIR 4.48; P = 0.008) were significantly associated

  9. Lumbar Puncture in HIV-Infected Patients with Syphilis and No Neurologic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Khalil G.; Moore, Richard D.; Rompalo, Anne M.; Erbelding, Emily J.; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; Gebo, Kelly A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The decision to perform lumbar puncture in patients with asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and syphilis is controversial. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend certain criteria that warrant lumbar puncture. Here, we assess the performance of these criteria for detecting asymptomatic neurosyphilis (ANS). Methods Eligible subjects consisted of all patients with concurrent HIV infection and syphilis in a prospective clinical cohort who had no neurologic symptoms at the time of lumbar puncture. We retrospectively applied different stratification criteria to calculate the performance of lumbar puncture in detecting ANS: (1) lumbar puncture in patients with late latent syphilis or syphilis of an unknown duration, regardless of the CD4 cell count or rapid plasma reagin titer; (2) lumbar puncture if the CD4 cell count was ≤350 cells/mL and/or the rapid plasma reagin titer was ≥1:32, regardless of the syphilis stage; and (3) lumbar puncture in the context of serologic nonresponse to syphilis therapy. Results Two hundred two of 231 patients with syphilis did not have neurologic symptoms. Immediate lumbar puncture was performed for 46 patients, and 10 cases (22%) of ANS were detected. With use of the first criterion, 2 (14%) of 10 cases of ANS in patients with early-stage syphilis would have been missed (sensitivity, 80% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 44%–97%]; specificity, 76% [95% CI, 60%–89%]). Criterion 2 would not have missed any cases of ANS (sensitivity, 100% [95% CI, 70%–100%]; specificity, 87% [95% CI, 72%–96%]) but would have required that a lumbar puncture be performed for 88% of patients. Performance of lumbar puncture performed in 13 cases based on serologic nonresponse to syphilis therapy yielded 4 cases (31%) of ANS. Conclusions In patients with concurrent HIV infection and syphilis, the use of criteria based on rapid plasma reagin titer and CD4 cell count, instead of stage-based criteria

  10. Social network investigation of a syphilis outbreak in Ottawa, Ontario

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo-Scott, H; Cutler, J; Friedman, D; Hendriks, A; Jolly, AM

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of syphilis in Ottawa, Ontario, has risen substantially since 2000 to six cases per 100,000 in 2003, again to nine cases per 100,000 in 2007, and recently rose to 11 cases per 100,000 in 2010. The number of cases reported in the first quarter of 2010 was more than double that in the first quarter of 2009. OBJECTIVE: In May 2010, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care requested the assistance of the Field Epidemiology Program to describe the increase in infectious syphilis rates and to identify social network sources and prevention messages. METHODS: Syphilis surveillance data were routinely collected from January 1, 2009 to July 15, 2010, and social networks were constructed from an enhanced social network questionnaire. Univariate comparisons between the enhanced surveillance group and the remaining cases from 2009 on non-normally distributed data were conducted using Kruskal-Wallis tests and χ2 tests. RESULTS: The outbreak cases were comprised of 89% men. Seventeen of the 19 most recent cases consented to answer the questionnaire, which revealed infrequent use of condoms, multiple sex partners and sex with a same-sex partner. Information regarding social venues where sex partners were met was plotted together with sexual partnerships, linking 18 cases and 40 contacts, representing 37% of the outbreak population and connecting many of the single individuals and dyads. CONCLUSION: Uncovering the places sex partners met was an effective proxy measure of high-risk activities shared with infected individuals and demonstrates the potential for focusing on interventions at one named bar and one Internet site to reach a high proportion of the population at risk. PMID:26600816

  11. Syphilis in art: an entertainment in four parts. Part 1.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R S

    1990-01-01

    It is widely recognised that the history of art reveals the contemporary attitudes of societies and artists to changing patterns of social and sexual behaviour. This collection of artistic creations shows that representations of syphilis in art, over more than five centuries, are consistent with this view. The first quarter century of the morbus gallicus in Europe, starting in 1493, coincided with the spread of Renaissance influence, including printing. A host of pamphlets with woodcut illustrations reflected public alarm at the epidemic proportions and severity of the new disease, with its disabling and sometimes deadly consequences. Also revealed in these early works are the astrological and theological beliefs of disease causation as well as identifiable and serious attempts at public education. These twinned themes of understanding and educational endeavour recur together throughout the centuries and take many forms as man attempts to outline and influence attitudes and so improve his medico-social health. Attitudes to causation changed with experience so that by the beginning of the 17th century the morbus gallicus is no longer a mere contagion but recognised socially and represented artistically, as a morbus venereus. Its clinical presentation had changed remarkably from the alarming early days; and so too had its prevalence--from epidemic to endemic proportions. We find that the artists of both the 16th and 17th centuries, while somewhat reticent about syphilis, are nonetheless at pains to suggest that sex is not without its serious side effects. Their artistic exhortations suggest women as the source of the disease, so that we find Venus shown as both ideal love and the source of contamination. Such attitudes contrast strikingly with what follows. The 18th century is characterised by the sophisticated elements of European societies taking an irreverent or satirical view of sex and syphilis. In England this is reflected in the works of Hogarth and other

  12. Endemic syphilis in the Bakwena Reserve of the Bechuanaland Protectorate

    PubMed Central

    Murray, J. F.; Merriweather, A. M.; Freedman, M. L.

    1956-01-01

    A form of endemic syphilis exists in the Bakwena Reserve of the Bechuanaland Protectorate known by the local name of “dichuchwa”. It is similar to bejel, njovera and the endemic syphilis reported elsewhere in the world. The Government of the Protectorate, with the assistance of WHO and UNICEF, began in November 1953 a mass campaign in the Reserve to control this disease and, at the same time, to study its epidemiological, clinical, social and therapeutic aspects. The seropositivity rate in the Reserve was found to be 37%. Dichuchwa is a childhood and family disease, usually spread non-venereally. The early lesions are similar to secondary lesions of sporadic venereal syphilis, and are often followed by tertiary lesions affecting mainly the skin, nasopharynx and long bones. Primary lesions are rare but may occur under certain epidemiological conditions if the inoculum is sufficiently large; thus a mother may develop primary sores on the nipples through suckling an infected infant. Lesions of the cardiovascular and central nervous systems and congenital syphilis are also rare. Superinfection of an already infected and allergic host is probably the chief reason for the frequency of the tertiary lesions. Treatment of the disease with penicillin is very effective, and the authors believe that mass treatment of cases and contacts combined with an improvement in the standards of hygiene could eradicate the disease. ImagesFig. 61Fig. 62Fig. 63Fig. 64Fig. 74Fig. 75Fig. 76Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 43Fig. 44Fig. 45Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 33Fig. 50Fig. 51Fig. 52Fig. 53Fig. 54Fig. 55Fig. 56Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 46Fig. 47Fig. 48Fig. 49Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 57Fig. 58Fig. 59Fig. 60Fig. 65Fig. 66Fig. 67Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 21Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 68Fig. 69Fig. 70Fig. 71Fig. 72Fig. 73Fig. 37Fig. 38Fig. 39Fig. 28Fig. 29Fig. 30Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 40Fig. 41Fig. 42 PMID:13404470

  13. Is antenatal syphilis screening still cost effective in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Terris-Prestholt, F; Watson-Jones, D; Mugeye, K; Kumaranayake, L; Ndeki, L; Weiss, H; Changalucha, J; Todd, J; Lisekie, F; Gumodoka, B; Mabey, D; Hayes, R

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the cost effectiveness of on-site antenatal syphilis screening and treatment in Mwanza, Tanzania. To compare this intervention with other antenatal and child health interventions, specifically the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). Methods: The economic costs of adding the intervention to routine antenatal care were assessed. Cost effectiveness (CE) ratios of the intervention were obtained for low birth weight (LBW) live births and stillbirths averted and cost per DALY saved. Cost per DALY saved was also estimated for previous CE studies of syphilis screening. The CE of the intervention at different syphilis prevalence rates was modelled. Results: The economic cost of the intervention is $1.44 per woman screened, $20 per woman treated, and $187 per adverse birth outcome averted. The cost per DALY saved is $110 with LBW as the only adverse outcome. When including stillbirth, this estimate improves 10-fold to $10.56 per DALY saved. The cost per DALY saved from all syphilis screening studies ranged from $3.97 to $18.73. Conclusions: Syphilis screening is shown to be at least as cost effective as PMTCT and more cost effective than many widely implemented interventions. There is urgent need for scaling up syphilis screening and treatment in high prevalence areas. The CE of screening interventions is highly dependent on disease prevalence. In combination, PMTCT and syphilis screening and treatment interventions may achieve economies of scope and thus improved efficiency. PMID:14573832

  14. Current Perspectives on Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to provide an update on the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis by drawing upon some important basic concepts and reviewing the most recent literature on the diagnosis and treatment of syphilis in pregnancy. New technologies, such as automated and point-of-care immunologic tests, are shifting some paradigms, which will certainly be further investigated in the forthcoming years. This is the time to carefully evaluate traditional as well as new strategies to prevent congenital syphilis. Adverse outcomes of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis can be prevented with antenatal screening and penicillin therapy, which proved to have an excellent cost-benefit ratio even in populations with a low prevalence of syphilis. However, syphilis epidemiology is influenced by socioeconomic and cultural factors, and major challenges are faced by poor and developing countries in which the severity of the problem is extremely alarming. On the other hand, the emergence of new technologies has raised doubts about the best algorithm to be used when proper laboratory resources are available. Conditions are quite heterogeneous across populations, and some procedures should not be generalized while there is no evidence that supports some changes and while in-depth studies about local conditions are not conducted. Official organizations need to be alert in order to avoid isolated decisions and ensure that evidence-based guidelines be used in the management of syphilis in pregnancy. PMID:27081586

  15. A novel response to an outbreak of infectious syphilis in Christchurch, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Edward; Young, Heather; Parkes, Catherine; Coshall, Maureen; Dickson, Nigel; Psutka, Rebecca; Saxton, Peter; Pink, Ramon; Adams, Katharine

    2015-04-01

    During 2012, Christchurch experienced a dramatic increase in cases of infectious syphilis among men who have sex with men. This was accompanied by some novel trends; notably, the acquisition of infection in a younger age group, with local sexual contacts, commonly via the use of social media. This study is a report on an approach to case identification and public health communication as a component of a multifaceted outbreak response. Enhanced syphilis surveillance data on public health responses to outbreaks of sexually transmissible infections was collated and reviewed, alongside clinical records and literature. Reported outbreak response methods were adapted for the Christchurch cohort. A Facebook page was created to raise awareness of infectious syphilis, the importance of screening and where to get tested. Twenty-six males were diagnosed with infectious syphilis in 2012, an increase from previous years, of which 22 reported only male sexual contact. High use of social media used to find potential sexual contacts was reported. Enhanced syphilis surveillance characterised in detail an infectious syphilis outbreak in Christchurch. Index cases were identified, contact tracing mapping was used to identify transmission networks and social media was also used to educate the risk group. There was a decrease in infectious syphilis presentations, with no cases in the last 3 months of 2012.

  16. Examination of amniotic fluid in diagnosing congenital syphilis with fetal death.

    PubMed

    Wendel, G D; Maberry, M C; Christmas, J T; Goldberg, M S; Norgard, M V

    1989-12-01

    The diagnosis of congenital syphilis is difficult, particularly in stillborn fetuses, who are often macerated and have undergone autolysis. These changes can obscure both syphilitic histologic findings and special stains for spirochetes in tissue specimens used to confirm the diagnosis of congenital syphilis. Five gravidas with untreated syphilis and fetal deaths underwent sonographic examination and amniocentesis. In all five cases, dark-field microscopic examination of the amniotic fluid showed spirochetes with morphology and motility characteristic of Treponema pallidum. Organisms were infrequent, but easily identified at 400x magnification and confirmed using an oil-immersion objective yielding a 900x magnification. After delivery, fetal-placental examination and autopsy showed clinical findings typical of congenital syphilis in all five cases. Histologic changes compatible with syphilis were found in all four autopsied fetuses. Silver impregnation stains were positive in two of five tissue specimens, and anti-treponemal monoclonal antibody immunofluorescence assays were positive in one of three amniotic fluid specimens examined retrospectively, further strengthening the specificity of the dark-field microscopic identification of spirochetes. This technique, which can make the diagnosis of congenital syphilis, is recommended for women with syphilis and a fetal death, especially if sonographic hydrops and/or edema is present or if an autopsy will not be performed.

  17. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the scientific concept of racial nervous resistance.

    PubMed

    Crenner, Christopher

    2012-04-01

    In 1932, the U.S. Public Health Service began a study of untreated syphilis among black men in Macon County, Alabama. This project, later known as the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, became one of the most notorious ventures of twentieth-century medicine. Much has been written on it. Historians have suggested that scientific racism strongly influenced the study. But specific links between earlier racial science and the scientific conduct of the study have remained unexplored. The examination in this paper of the concept of a racially determined resistance to syphilis in the nervous system establishes such a link. Discussion of nervous resistance to syphilis appeared in the medical literature in the early twentieth century as a conjecture about the natural inferiority of blacks. White physicians used the concept to interpret racial differences in neurosyphilis as evidence of the rudimentary development of the brain. A small community of African American physicians joined other national experts in syphilis who chose to explain apparent racial differences through alternate mechanisms. But the scientific advisors to the Tuskegee Syphilis Study favored the concept of a racial resistance to neurosyphilis and steered the early design of the study to help to elucidate it. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study was an examination of untreated syphilis, but it also became a demonstration of a putative racial characteristic of syphilis long considered evidence of the natural inferiority of blacks. An examination of the concept of racial nervous resistance and its influence on the research in Macon County helps to define the influence of scientific racism on this notorious medical study.

  18. The prevalence and correlates of syphilis and HIV among homosexual and bisexual men in Shijiazhuang, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Hui; Liu, Shu-Jun; Hu, Ling-Ling; Li, Jie-Fang; Liu, Li-Hua; Wei, Ning

    2016-02-01

    Bisexual men (men who have sex with men and women) are potential epidemiological bridges responsible for the spread of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections from men who have sex with men only to the heterosexual population. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of syphilis and HIV and the factors associated with syphilis infection among men who have sex with men and women and men who have sex with men only from Shijiazhuang, China. In 2011-2013, a cross-sectional cohort of 427 men who have sex with men was recruited by a snowball sampling method and tested for syphilis and HIV. Chi square and logistic regression were performed to identify syphilis risk factors. Among the 427 men who have sex with men, 71 (16.6%) cases were syphilis-positive and 16 cases (3.7%) were HIV-positive. The proportions of men who have sex with men and women and men who have sex with men only in the total sample were 31.4% and 68.6%, respectively. Men who have sex with men and women exhibited double the syphilis prevalence of men who have sex with men only and were more likely to practice insertive anal sex. Higher education level, being married, having more male partners, and both receptive and insertive anal sex roles were associated with syphilis among men who have sex with men and women. Residing in suburban areas, being married, being HIV positive, and an absence of desire to change sexual orientation were associated with syphilis among men who have sex with men only. Therefore, men who have sex with men and women represent an important sub-group in the syphilis epidemic and further interventions should be developed to reduce risk among different sub-sets of men who have sex with men.

  19. Utility of the Determine Syphilis TP rapid test in commercial sex venues in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Campos, P E; Buffardi, A L; Chiappe, M; Buendía, C; Garcia, P J; Carcamo, C P; Garnett, G; White, P

    2006-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to evaluate the utility of the Determine Syphilis TP test performed in Peruvian commercial sex venues for the detection of active syphilis; and determine the feasibility of integrating rapid syphilis testing for female sex workers (FSW) into existing health outreach services. Methods We tested 3586 female sex workers for syphilis by Determine in the field using whole blood fingerstick, and by rapid plasma reagin (RPR) and Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA) in a central laboratory in Lima using sera. Results 97.4% of the FSW offered rapid syphilis testing participated; and among those who tested positive, 87% visited the local health centre for treatment. More than twice as many specimens were RPR reactive using serum in Lima (5.7%) than tested positive by whole blood Determine in the field (2.8%), and although most were confirmed by TPHA, only a small proportion (0.7%) were RPR reactive at ⩾1:8 dilutions, and likely indicating active syphilis. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of the Determine Syphilis TP test in whole blood when compared to serum RPR reactivity at any dilution confirmed by TPHA as the gold standard were 39.3%, 99.2% and 71.4%, respectively. Sensitivity improved to 64.0% when using serum RPR ⩾1:8 confirmed by TPHA. Invalid tests were rare (0.3%). Conclusions Rapid syphilis testing in sex work venues proved feasible, but Determine using whole blood obtained by fingerstick was substantially less sensitive than reported in previous laboratory‐based studies using serum. Although easy to perform in outreach venues, the utility of this rapid syphilis test was relatively low in settings where a large proportion of the targeted population has been previously tested and treated. PMID:17116642

  20. Commercial sex venues, syphilis and methamphetamine use among female sex workers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dianming; Liao, Meizhen; Jiang, Zhenxia; Zhang, Xijiang; Mao, Wenwen; Zhang, Ning; Tao, Xiaorun; Huang, Tao; Bi, Zhenqiang; Aliyu, Muktar; Wu, Pingsheng; Jiang, Baofa; Jia, Yujiang

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the factors associated with methamphetamine (MA) use, syphilis, and unprotected sex among female sex workers from different type of venues in Qingdao City, Shandong Province of China. Three consecutive cross-sectional surveys provided information on demographics, sexual and drug use behaviors, and HIV-related services. Of 1187 participants, 3.0% were infected with syphilis; 30.2% ever used MA; 58.3% ever had unprotected commercial sex in the past month. The prevalence rates of syphilis and MA use were 2.5% and 33.0% for participants recruited from saunas, night clubs, bars or hotels; 2.7% and 28.3% for hair/beauty salon-based participants; and 4.5% and 15.8% for street-based participants. Street-based MA users were more likely to be single, non-Shandong residents, have first lifetime sex act at younger age, and recruited in 2008 (vs. 2006). Saunas, night clubs, bars, or hotels-based MA users were more likely to be younger, sex debut at younger age, have longer duration of sex work, have unprotected commercial sex, and be syphilis-infected. Hair/beauty salon-based MA users were more likely to be non-Shandong residents, younger, and to have unprotected commercial sex. Syphilis among the sauna-, night club-, bar-, or hotel-based participants was associated with MA use and ever receipt of HIV testing. Syphilis among the hair/beauty salon-based participants was associated with longer duration of sex work. MA users who frequent commercial sex venues are engaging in high-risk behaviors and are at risk for syphilis/other sexually transmitted diseases. Better-targeted intervention efforts to curtail the epidemics of MA use and HIV/syphilis should therefore take cognizance of the role of commercial sex venues as focal points of MA use and syphilis/sexually transmitted disease transmission.

  1. A probable case of congenital syphilis from pre-Columbian Austria.

    PubMed

    Gaul, Johanna Sophia; Grossschmidt, Karl; Gusenbauer, Christian; Kanz, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the skeletal remains of a subadult from an archeological site in Austria. Radiocarbon dating and archeological attribution indicate that this individual is of pre-Columbian origin. Most of the skeleton was recovered, and only the teeth and the orbital roofs show changes. Dental defects such as the mulberry molar and a tapered, fang-like canine suggest a diagnosis of congenital syphilis. This is the first probable case of congenital syphilis from pre-Columbian Central Europe. Our findings contribute to the pre-Columbian theory, offering counter evidence to the assumption that syphilis was carried from Columbus' crew from the New to the Old World.

  2. An outbreak of infectious syphilis among young heterosexuals in an English town.

    PubMed

    Welfare, W; Lacey, H; Lighton, L; Simms, I

    2011-09-01

    We describe a recent outbreak of syphilis in young heterosexuals in the north west of England. A cluster of 12 cases of syphilis (7 primary and 5 early latent) was identified in Rochdale in heterosexuals aged 20 or under. Nine were women. Five were asymptomatic at presentation. This outbreak occurred in a group not usually associated with syphilis transmission in the north west. Not all the identified cases could be linked, and so potentially this outbreak is a sentinel of a larger problem. PMID:21890550

  3. Syphilis associated with paretic neurosyphilis mimicking Reiter's syndrome in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Thales Costa; Maia, Daniela Cristina Caetano; Gomes, Nathália Matos; Menezes, Carla Kellen da Silva; Francesconi, Valeska; Francesconi, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    HIV/syphilis co-infection is common because both conditions affect similar risk groups. HIV interferes with the natural history of syphilis, which often has atypical clinical features and nervous system involvement in the early stage of disease. We report the case of an HIV-positive patient with secondary syphilis, scaling palmoplantar keratoderma, scrotal eczema, balanitis and urethritis mimicking Reiter's syndrome. Immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies against Treponema pallidum revealed the presence of spirochetes, associated with the paretic form of parenchymal neurosyphilis. The patient was given crystalline penicillin, with complete resolution of dermatological and neurological symptoms, and no sequelae. PMID:26312720

  4. Papulonodular secondary syphilis: a rare clinic presentation confirmed by serologic and histologic exams*

    PubMed Central

    Veasey, John Verrinder; Lellis, Rute Facchini; Boin, Maria Fernanda Feitosa de Camargo; Porto, Pedro Loureiro; Chen, Jessica Chia Sin

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum and divided into three stages according to the duration of the disease: primary, secondary and tertiary. Secondary syphilis has diverse clinical presentations, such as papular-nodular lesions. This presentation is rare, with 15 cases reported in the literature over the past 20 years. We report a case of secondary syphilis with papular-nodular lesions in a healthy 63-year-old patient, who has presented treponema in immunohistochemical examination of the skin lesions. PMID:27192520

  5. Papulonodular secondary syphilis: a rare clinic presentation confirmed by serologic and histologic exams.

    PubMed

    Veasey, John Verrinder; Lellis, Rute Facchini; Boin, Maria Fernanda Feitosa de Camargo; Porto, Pedro Loureiro; Chen, Jessica Chia Sin

    2016-04-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum and divided into three stages according to the duration of the disease: primary, secondary and tertiary. Secondary syphilis has diverse clinical presentations, such as papular-nodular lesions. This presentation is rare, with 15 cases reported in the literature over the past 20 years. We report a case of secondary syphilis with papular-nodular lesions in a healthy 63-year-old patient, who has presented treponema in immunohistochemical examination of the skin lesions. PMID:27192520

  6. [Nodular granuloma of the lip. An unusual manifestation of secondary syphilis].

    PubMed

    Müller-Wiefel, A-S; Reifenberger, J; Bruch-Gerharz, D; Helbig, D

    2013-10-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum which evolves through three overlapping stages. A 50-year-old woman presented with an expanding painless granulomatous nodule on her lower lip in combination with a maculo-papular exanthem. Both serologic studies and microscopic examination indicated an infection with Treponema pallidum. This case shows an unusual granulomatous nodular presentation of syphilis on the lower lip, emphasizing the variable clinical and histological manifestations syphilis, which shows an increasing number of new infections worldwide in recent years. PMID:23979072

  7. Syphilis Predicts HIV Incidence Among Men and Transgender Women Who Have Sex With Men in a Preexposure Prophylaxis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Marc M.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Glidden, David V.; Liu, Albert Y.; McMahan, Vanessa M.; Guanira, Juan V.; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Fernandez, Telmo; Grant, Robert M.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Buchbinder, Susan; Casapia, Martin; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Guanira, Juan; Kallas, Esper; Lama, Javier; Mayer, Kenneth; Montoya, Orlando; Schechter, Mauro; Veloso, Valdiléa

    2014-01-01

    Background. Syphilis infection may potentiate transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We sought to determine the extent to which HIV acquisition was associated with syphilis infection within an HIV preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trial and whether emtricitabine/tenofovir (FTC/TDF) modified that association. Methods. The Preexposure Prophylaxis Initiative (iPrEx) study randomly assigned 2499 HIV-seronegative men and transgender women who have sex with men (MSM) to receive oral daily FTC/TDF or placebo. Syphilis prevalence at screening and incidence during follow-up were measured. Hazard ratios for the effect of incident syphilis on HIV acquisition were calculated. The effect of FTC/TDF on incident syphilis and HIV acquisition was assessed. Results. Of 2499 individuals, 360 (14.4%) had a positive rapid plasma reagin test at screening; 333 (92.5%) had a positive confirmatory test, which did not differ between the arms (FTC/TDF vs placebo, P = .81). The overall syphilis incidence during the trial was 7.3 cases per 100 person-years. There was no difference in syphilis incidence between the study arms (7.8 cases per 100 person-years for FTC/TDF vs 6.8 cases per 100 person-years for placebo, P = .304). HIV incidence varied by incident syphilis (2.8 cases per 100 person-years for no syphilis vs 8.0 cases per 100 person-years for incident syphilis), reflecting a hazard ratio of 2.6 (95% confidence interval, 1.6–4.4; P < .001). There was no evidence for interaction between randomization to the FTC/TDF arm and incident syphilis on HIV incidence. Conclusions. In HIV-seronegative MSM, syphilis infection was associated with HIV acquisition in this PrEP trial; a syphilis diagnosis should prompt providers to offer PrEP unless otherwise contraindicated. PMID:24928295

  8. Pressure ulcer-like presacral gummata in a patient with tertiary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Koch, André; Abdel-Naser, Mohammed Badawy; Schönlebe, Jacqueline

    2005-03-01

    Pressure ulcers are common among elderly patients. Here, we describe a case of tertiary syphilis with ulcerated gummata, appearing as a possible pressure ulcer. In such a case, wound management has to be accompanied by specific antibiosis to achieve healing.

  9. Recurrent Fever, Anemia, Arthralgia, and Genu Varum as Late Manifestations of Congenital Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Quaresma, Liliana; Gonçalves, Juan; Estanqueiro, Paula; Salgado, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    We report an unusual case of recurrent fever, inflammatory knee pain, genu varum, persistent anemia, and high erythrocyte sedimentation rate in a 28-month-old boy as late manifestations of congenital syphilis (CS). Despite standard penicillin treatment at the end of the first month of life, it recurred later in life, more than once. In the first relapse, manifested by a likely gumma lesion, the prior penicillin treatment plus a negative venereal disease research laboratory result unduly led to exclusion of CS. A second treatment with penicillin led to complete clinical resolution. Although rare, bow legs, recurrent fever, anemia, and inflammatory arthralgias may be manifestations of late CS. Congenital syphilis should be considered throughout early childhood, especially if history of syphilis infection is present. A negative venereal disease research laboratory result does not exclude late syphilis, present in nearly 30% of these patients. The possibility of atypical symptoms of this "great masquerader" should always be borne in mind. PMID:26587855

  10. Value of serological diagnosis in congenital syphilis. Report of nine cases.

    PubMed Central

    Borobio, M V; Nogales, M C; Palomares, J C

    1980-01-01

    The diagnosis of congenital syphilis is difficult since it depends mainly on the results of serological tests. The results of five serological tests (three specific and two non-specific) in nine neonates with congenital syphilis are compared with those obtained in three with passively acquired antibodies. It appeared that the serological diagnosis of congenital syphilis must be based on the finding of specific neonatal antibodies in cord serum, which give positive results to the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test for immunoglobulin M, together with high titres of total IgM and negative results to latex tests. The non-specific tests are useful for confirming the efficacy of treatment. The mean number of cases of congenital syphilis in Seville is 0.81/1000 live births. PMID:7448581

  11. Emerging trends and persistent challenges in the management of adult syphilis.

    PubMed

    Tuddenham, Susan; Ghanem, Khalil G

    2015-08-19

    There are an estimated 10.6 million incident cases of syphilis worldwide each year. We highlight some persistent challenges and emerging trends in the clinical management of syphilis with a particular focus on therapy, serology, diagnostics, and prevention. Decades after the introduction of penicillin, the optimal management of early syphilis continues to be a controversial topic, particularly in the setting of HIV co-infection. Similarly, the need for routine lumbar puncture in HIV co-infected asymptomatic persons is an unanswered question. Despite advances in both automation and point-of-care diagnostics, we continue to rely on indirect measures of disease activity to manage this infection. As syphilis rates in some populations continue to rise, novel and effective prevention strategies are needed.

  12. Syphilis and HIV co-infection. Epidemiology, treatment and molecular typing of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2015-12-01

    The studies included in this PhD thesis examined the interactions of syphilis, which is caused by Treponema pallidum, and HIV. Syphilis reemerged worldwide in the late 1990s and hereafter increasing rates of early syphilis were also reported in Denmark. The proportion of patients with concurrent HIV has been substantial, ranging from one third to almost two thirds of patients diagnosed with syphilis some years. Given that syphilis facilitates transmission and acquisition of HIV the two sexually transmitted diseases are of major public health concern. Further, syphilis has a negative impact on HIV infection, resulting in increasing viral loads and decreasing CD4 cell counts during syphilis infection. Likewise, HIV has an impact on the clinical course of syphilis; patients with concurrent HIV are thought to be at increased risk of neurological complications and treatment failure. Almost ten per cent of Danish men with syphilis acquired HIV infection within five years after they were diagnosed with syphilis during an 11-year study period. Interestingly, the risk of HIV declined during the later part of the period. Moreover, HIV-infected men had a substantial increased risk of re-infection with syphilis compared to HIV-uninfected men. As one third of the HIV-infected patients had viral loads >1,000 copies/ml, our conclusion supported the initiation of cART in more HIV-infected MSM to reduce HIV transmission. During a five-year study period, including the majority of HIV-infected patients from the Copenhagen area, we observed that syphilis was diagnosed in the primary, secondary, early and late latent stage. These patients were treated with either doxycycline or penicillin and the rate of treatment failure was similar in the two groups, indicating that doxycycline can be used as a treatment alternative - at least in an HIV-infected population. During a four-year study period, the T. pallidum strain type distribution was investigated among patients diagnosed by PCR

  13. Predictors of lack of serological response to syphilis treatment in HIV-infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    Spagnuolo, Vincenzo; Poli, Andrea; Galli, Laura; Cernuschi, Massimo; Nozza, Silvia; Maillard, Myriam; Gianotti, Nicola; Hasson, Hamid; Bossolasco, Simona; Lazzarin, Adriano; Castagna, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with lack of serological response (LSR) to treatment of syphilis among HIV-infected subjects. Materials and Methods Retrospective, longitudinal study on HIV-infected subjects diagnosed and treated for syphilis and with an assessable serological response between 1 January 2004 and 15 September 2013. LSR was defined as a <4-fold decline of rapid plasma reagin (RPR) titer or a failed reversion to nonreactive (if RPR ≤1:4 at diagnosis) after one year since treatment. Diagnoses of syphilis were staged in early syphilis (primary, secondary and early latent) or late syphilis (tertiary and late latent) according to clinical examination and patient's history. Syphilis was classified in new infections [NI: positive RPR and TPHA (Treponema pallidum Haemagglutination assay) titers in subjects without previous history of syphilis] or re-infections [ReI: a ≥4-fold increase of RPR titer in subjects previously successfully treated for syphilis]. Syphilis treatment was prescribed according to CDC guidelines. The crude incidence rates (IRs) of LSR were calculated per 1000-person months of follow-up (PMFU) as the total number of LSR episodes divided by the cumulative time contributed by all subjects (interval time since each syphilis diagnosis and the date of ascertainment of response). Results are described as median (IQR) or frequency (%). Results 565 diagnoses of syphilis with an assessable serological response in 421 patients; 458 (81%) were early syphilis, 189 (33%) were NI, 376 (67%) were ReI. At first, diagnosis of syphilis median age was 41 (36–47) years, 419 (99.5%) males, 391 (93%) MSM, HIV-infected since 7.7 (3.5–12.9) years, 75 (18%) HCV or HBV co-infected, 56 (13%) with a previous AIDS diagnosis, 82 (19%) antiretroviral treatment naïve, 102 (24%) with HIV-RNA ≥50 cp/mL, CD4+=576 (437–749) cells/mm3, nadir CD4+=308 (194–406) cells/mm3. LSRs were observed in 70/565 (12.4%) treated

  14. Syphilis presenting as inflammatory tumors of the liver in HIV-positive homosexual men.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Catherine E; Kamionek, Michal; McKinsey, David S; Misdraji, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    Syphilis, a sexually transmitted infection caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum, has seen a resurgence since 2001, particularly in men who have sex with men. Syphilis can affect the liver during the secondary stage as syphilitic hepatitis and during the tertiary stage as gummas. We describe 3 cases of syphilis in human immunodeficiency virus-positive homosexual men that presented as hepatic mass lesions clinically suspected of being malignant tumors. Histologically, 2 of the 3 cases showed a plump spindle cell proliferation, mixed inflammatory infiltrate with numerous neutrophils, and abscesses, whereas the third case showed granulomas and pericholangitis/cholangitis. Immunohistochemical staining for T. pallidum showed innumerable organisms in 2 of the cases. Pathologists must be aware of the possibility of syphilis causing hepatic inflammatory masses in human immunodeficiency virus-positive men who have sex with men in order to avoid misdiagnosis or delayed treatment. PMID:24921640

  15. Syphilis and methamphetamine use among female sex workers in Shandong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Liao, Meizhen; Jiang, Zhenxia; Zhang, Xijiang; Kang, Dianming; Bi, Zhenqiang; Liu, Xuezhen; Fu, Jihua; Zhang, Ning; Mao, Wenwen; Jiang, Baofa; Jia, Yujiang

    2011-01-01

    A study of female sex workers in China, found alarmingly high prevalence of methamphetamine use. Methamphetamine users were more likely to be single, younger, inconsistent condom users, and have syphilis.

  16. Syphilis presenting as inflammatory tumors of the liver in HIV-positive homosexual men.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Catherine E; Kamionek, Michal; McKinsey, David S; Misdraji, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    Syphilis, a sexually transmitted infection caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum, has seen a resurgence since 2001, particularly in men who have sex with men. Syphilis can affect the liver during the secondary stage as syphilitic hepatitis and during the tertiary stage as gummas. We describe 3 cases of syphilis in human immunodeficiency virus-positive homosexual men that presented as hepatic mass lesions clinically suspected of being malignant tumors. Histologically, 2 of the 3 cases showed a plump spindle cell proliferation, mixed inflammatory infiltrate with numerous neutrophils, and abscesses, whereas the third case showed granulomas and pericholangitis/cholangitis. Immunohistochemical staining for T. pallidum showed innumerable organisms in 2 of the cases. Pathologists must be aware of the possibility of syphilis causing hepatic inflammatory masses in human immunodeficiency virus-positive men who have sex with men in order to avoid misdiagnosis or delayed treatment.

  17. Syphilis and HIV co-infection. Epidemiology, treatment and molecular typing of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2015-12-01

    The studies included in this PhD thesis examined the interactions of syphilis, which is caused by Treponema pallidum, and HIV. Syphilis reemerged worldwide in the late 1990s and hereafter increasing rates of early syphilis were also reported in Denmark. The proportion of patients with concurrent HIV has been substantial, ranging from one third to almost two thirds of patients diagnosed with syphilis some years. Given that syphilis facilitates transmission and acquisition of HIV the two sexually transmitted diseases are of major public health concern. Further, syphilis has a negative impact on HIV infection, resulting in increasing viral loads and decreasing CD4 cell counts during syphilis infection. Likewise, HIV has an impact on the clinical course of syphilis; patients with concurrent HIV are thought to be at increased risk of neurological complications and treatment failure. Almost ten per cent of Danish men with syphilis acquired HIV infection within five years after they were diagnosed with syphilis during an 11-year study period. Interestingly, the risk of HIV declined during the later part of the period. Moreover, HIV-infected men had a substantial increased risk of re-infection with syphilis compared to HIV-uninfected men. As one third of the HIV-infected patients had viral loads >1,000 copies/ml, our conclusion supported the initiation of cART in more HIV-infected MSM to reduce HIV transmission. During a five-year study period, including the majority of HIV-infected patients from the Copenhagen area, we observed that syphilis was diagnosed in the primary, secondary, early and late latent stage. These patients were treated with either doxycycline or penicillin and the rate of treatment failure was similar in the two groups, indicating that doxycycline can be used as a treatment alternative - at least in an HIV-infected population. During a four-year study period, the T. pallidum strain type distribution was investigated among patients diagnosed by PCR

  18. Syphilis Mimicking Other Dermatological Diseases: Reactive Arthritis and Mucha-Habermann Disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Carneiro, Sueli Coelho; Pirmez, Rodrigo; de Hollanda, Taciana Rocha; Cuzzi, Tullia; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    The authors present two cases of syphilis: one mimicking reactive arthritis and the other Mucha-Habermann disease. Both reports illustrate syphilis as ‘the great imitator’, a description given by Sir William Osler, and call attention to the strong need for awareness among physicians of all specialties, especially the younger ones, who are not used to seeing this increasingly prevalent disease, as it once was in the past. PMID:23467097

  19. Prenatal Transmission of Syphilis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Brazil: Achieving Regional Targets for Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Cerda, Rodrigo; Perez, Freddy; Domingues, Rosa Maria S.M.; Luz, Paula M.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Caffe, Sonja; Francke, Jordan A.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Ciaranello, Andrea L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Pan-American Health Organization has called for reducing (1) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) to ≤0.30 infections/1000 live births (LB), (2) HIV MTCT risk to ≤2.0%, and (3) congenital syphilis (CS) incidence to ≤0.50/1000 LB in the Americas by 2015. Methods. Using published Brazilian data in a mathematical model, we simulated a cohort of pregnant women from antenatal care (ANC) through birth. We investigated 2 scenarios: “current access” (89.1% receive one ANC syphilis test and 41.1% receive 2; 81.7% receive one ANC HIV test and 18.9% receive birth testing; if diagnosed, 81.0% are treated for syphilis and 87.5% are treated for HIV) and “ideal access” (95% of women undergo 2 HIV and syphilis screenings; 95% receive appropriate treatment). We conducted univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses on key inputs. Results. With current access, we projected 2.95 CS cases/1000 LB, 0.29 HIV infections/1000 LB, 7.1% HIV MTCT risk, and 11.11 intrauterine fetal demises (IUFD)/1000 pregnancies, with significant regional variation. With ideal access, we projected improved outcomes: 1.00 CS cases/1000 LB, 0.10 HIV infections/1000 LB, HIV MTCT risk of 2.4%, and 10.65 IUFD/1000 pregnancies. Increased testing drove the greatest improvements. Even with ideal access, only HIV infections/1000 LB met elimination goals. Achieving all targets required testing and treatment >95% and reductions in prevalence and incidence of HIV and syphilis. Conclusions. Increasing access to care and HIV and syphilis antenatal testing will substantially reduce HIV and syphilis MTCT in Brazil. In addition, regionally tailored interventions reducing syphilis incidence and prevalence and supporting HIV treatment adherence are necessary to completely meet elimination goals. PMID:26180825

  20. Prevalence of Syphilis among Blood and Stem Cell Donors in Saudi Arabia: An Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Elyamany, Ghaleb; Al amro, Mohamed; Pereira, Winston Costa; Alsuhaibani, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Syphilis is one of the known transfusion-transmissible infections and causes 100,000 deaths yearly, with around 90% of these deaths occurring in the developing world. Little data is available regarding the prevalence of syphilis among Saudi blood and stem cell donors. We conducted a survey on the incidence of syphilis among all blood and stem cell donors. Methods This study was conducted at the Prince Sultan Military Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in the 10 years period data during 2006–2015. Data were analyzed about full history, physical examination, age, sex, weight, profession, marital status, number of the donations, data of last donation, having a relation who received blood transfusion, as well as the screening test results of the donated blood. We determined the seroprevalence of infection and compared by sex and other variable through frequency analysis, Chi square, Fisher, and prevalence ratios. Results Approximately 240,000 blood donors were screened and studied in the period of study. Most of the blood donors were male (98.3%) and 89% of them were citizens of Saudi Arabia. According to our findings, we estimated that, in the last 10 years, approximately 0.044% of all the blood donors were syphilis positive cases. No cases were detected as positive for syphilis among stem cell donors. Only 60 blood donors tested positive for syphilis. In addition, we studied 202 stem cell transplant donors during the same period, of which 59% were male and none texted positive for syphilis. Conclusions A concerted effort between the government, health care providers, regulatory bodies and accreditation agencies have all contributed in eliminating the risk of spreading syphilis among blood donors. PMID:27757184

  1. Clinical Outcomes of In Vitro Fertilization among Chinese Infertile Couples Treated for Syphilis Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Xiaomiao; Yuan, Ping; Fang, Tingfeng; Ouyang, Nengyong; Li, Ruiqi; Ou, Songbang; Wang, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    To compare the clinical outcomes of infertile patients with and without syphilis after in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET), in this case-control study, 320 infertile couples were enrolled and divided into syphilis (n = 160) and control groups (n = 160). The primary IVF outcomes were the clinical pregnancy rate and the birth of a healthy baby. All syphilis patients received the standard anti-syphilis treatment before undergoing IVF/ICSI. Our results showed that the endometrial thickness of the syphilis group was greater than that of the control group following hCG injection (16.9±5.4 vs. 13.0±4.7 mm, P<0.001). The numbers of normally fertilized eggs and normally cleaved fertilized eggs and the implantation rate were 6.8±4.8, 6.3±4.7 and 24.2%, respectively, for the syphilis group and 8.3±4.6, 8.1±4.6 and 34.4%, respectively, for the control group, and these values were significantly different between the groups. The clinical pregnancy rate was lower in the syphilis group compared with that in the control group (43.8% vs. 55.6%, P = 0.03). Lower offspring birth weight was observed in the infected male group compared with those in the infected female (2.7±0.4 vs. 3.0±0.4 kg, P = 0.01) and infected couple groups (2.7±0.4 vs. 3.1±0.5 kg, P = 0.007). Therefore, syphilis infection reduces the clinical pregnancy rate after IVF/ICSI.

  2. Prenatal Transmission of Syphilis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Brazil: Achieving Regional Targets for Elimination.

    PubMed

    Cerda, Rodrigo; Perez, Freddy; Domingues, Rosa Maria S M; Luz, Paula M; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdilea G; Caffe, Sonja; Francke, Jordan A; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Ciaranello, Andrea L

    2015-04-01

    Background.  The Pan-American Health Organization has called for reducing (1) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) to ≤0.30 infections/1000 live births (LB), (2) HIV MTCT risk to ≤2.0%, and (3) congenital syphilis (CS) incidence to ≤0.50/1000 LB in the Americas by 2015. Methods.  Using published Brazilian data in a mathematical model, we simulated a cohort of pregnant women from antenatal care (ANC) through birth. We investigated 2 scenarios: "current access" (89.1% receive one ANC syphilis test and 41.1% receive 2; 81.7% receive one ANC HIV test and 18.9% receive birth testing; if diagnosed, 81.0% are treated for syphilis and 87.5% are treated for HIV) and "ideal access" (95% of women undergo 2 HIV and syphilis screenings; 95% receive appropriate treatment). We conducted univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses on key inputs. Results.  With current access, we projected 2.95 CS cases/1000 LB, 0.29 HIV infections/1000 LB, 7.1% HIV MTCT risk, and 11.11 intrauterine fetal demises (IUFD)/1000 pregnancies, with significant regional variation. With ideal access, we projected improved outcomes: 1.00 CS cases/1000 LB, 0.10 HIV infections/1000 LB, HIV MTCT risk of 2.4%, and 10.65 IUFD/1000 pregnancies. Increased testing drove the greatest improvements. Even with ideal access, only HIV infections/1000 LB met elimination goals. Achieving all targets required testing and treatment >95% and reductions in prevalence and incidence of HIV and syphilis. Conclusions.  Increasing access to care and HIV and syphilis antenatal testing will substantially reduce HIV and syphilis MTCT in Brazil. In addition, regionally tailored interventions reducing syphilis incidence and prevalence and supporting HIV treatment adherence are necessary to completely meet elimination goals. PMID:26180825

  3. Unusual presentations and pitfalls of secondary syphilis: osteitis, pneumonia and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Crouzy, Frederike; Alvarez, Veronica; Gex, Grégoire; Troillet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis can show unexpected clinical characteristics rendering its diagnosis difficult. We report on two cases of secondary syphilis presenting with atypical histories of knee or cervical pain and cough. Both had bone involvement and one, pulmonary involvement, documented by MRI, CT scan and PCR. Both responded well to therapy with intravenous aqueous penicillin G followed by intramuscular benzathine penicillin G, but a pulmonary adenocarcinoma was diagnosed during follow-up in one case. PMID:26504092

  4. Incident syphilis infection among people who inject drugs in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pines, Heather A; Rusch, Melanie L; Vera, Alicia; Rangel, Gudelia; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2015-12-01

    Given that syphilis is associated with HIV infection among people who inject drugs (PWID), we examined syphilis incidence among PWID in Tijuana, Mexico. From 2006 to 2007, 940 PWID (142 women and 798 men) were recruited via respondent-driven sampling and followed for 18 months. At semi-annual visits, participants were tested for syphilis and completed surveys, which collected information on socio-demographics, sexual behaviours, substance use and injection behaviours. Poisson regression was used to estimate syphilis incidence rates (IRs), incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Twenty-one participants acquired syphilis during follow-up (IR = 1.57 per 100 person-years, 95% CI: 1.02-2.41). In a multivariate analysis, syphilis incidence was higher among women (IRR = 3.90, 95% CI: 1.37-11.09), HIV-positive participants (IRR = 4.60, 95% CI: 1.58-13.39) and those who reported ever exchanging sex for drugs, money, or other goods (IRR = 2.74, 95% CI: 0.97-7.76), while syphilis incidence was lower among those living in Tijuana for a longer duration (IRR = 0.95 per year, 95% CI: 0.91-1.00) and those reporting at least daily injection drug use (past 6 months) (IRR = 0.22, 95% CI: 0.09-0.54). Our findings suggest interventions that address the destabilising conditions associated with migration and integrate sexual and drug-related risk reduction strategies may help reduce syphilis incidence among PWID along the Mexico-US border.

  5. [Tertiary syphilis of the pancreas and liver in 82-year-old patient: case study].

    PubMed

    Denisova, T L; Tiul'tiaeva, L A; Lipatova, T E; Bakulev, A L; Alipova, L N; Apanasevich, A V; Bezrodnaia, L A; Borisova, E A

    2013-01-01

    It has been described a clinical case of late diagnosis of syphilis of the pancreas and liver of elderly patients. Two years before that it was wrongly diagnosed with cancer of the pancreas with liver metastases, and the patient was operated on with the imposition of cholecystostomy. It was conducted appropriate therapy and reconstructive surgery after verification of the diagnosis of syphilis of the pancreas and liver. PMID:24772875

  6. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of ocular syphilis, co-infection, and therapy response

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ozlem; Ziaei, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical presentation of patients diagnosed with presumed latent ocular syphilis and congenital ocular syphilis at tertiary referral center in Turkey, and to compare the clinical findings with patients described in other studies, specifically focusing on demographics and co-infections. Methods This is a retrospective study reviewing the medical records of patients diagnosed with ocular inflammation between January 2012 and June 2014 at a tertiary referral center in Turkey. Ocular syphilis was diagnosed on the basis of non-treponemal and treponemal antibody tests, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. All the patients diagnosed with ocular syphilis were tested for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Toxoplasma gondii, rubella, cytomegalovirus, and herpes. Results A total of 1,115 patients were evaluated between January 2012 and June 2014, and 12 patients (1.07%) were diagnosed with ocular syphilis based on the inclusion criteria. None of the patients were seropositive for HIV. Two patients were seropositive for T. gondii-specific IgG. Clinical presentations include non-necrotizing anterior scleritis, non-necrotizing sclerokeratitis, anterior uveitis, intermediate uveitis, posterior uveitis, panuveitis, and optic neuritis. All of the patients showed clinical improvement in the level of ocular inflammation with intravenous penicillin 24 million U/day for 10 days. Three patients received additional oral methotrexate as an adjunctive therapy. Two cases received low-dose trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole. Conclusion Ocular syphilis is an uncommon cause of ocular inflammation in HIV-negative patients. Central retinochoroiditis is the most common ocular manifestation, and it is the most common cause of visual impairment. Ocular syphilis might present associated with co-infections such as T. gondii in developing countries. Oral methotrexate might be beneficial as an adjunctive therapy for ocular syphilis in resolving the residual intraocular inflammation

  7. The Distribution of Syphilis Among Inpatients in Wenzhou, China: A Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ke; Chi, Shengying; Chen, Bin; Chen, Lingzhi; Zheng, Dongyun

    2016-01-01

    Background The high prevalence of syphilis among inpatients is an important concern in clinical settings. Thus, a better understanding of the serological test would be valuable. Objectives We analyzed the serological test results for syphilis among the inpatients in Wenzhou central hospital, China, to estimate the distribution of syphilis this Chinese population. Patients and Methods The blood samples of 81946 inpatients at the hospital from January 2010 to December 2012 were collected and retrospectively analyzed. Syphilis testing was conducted using a Treponema pallidum enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TP-ELISA) and a TP particle agglutination (TPPA) assay. A toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST) was then used to determine the titer of TP antibody in the TP- ELISA-positive samples. Results In total, 1618 of the 81946 inpatients showed positive syphilis serology; the positive rates in 2010, 2011, and 2012 were 2.27%, 1.58%, and 2.11%, respectively. Males had a significantly higher positive rate when compared to females. Surprisingly, the highest positive rate was observed among patients older than 80 years, followed by patients younger than 19 years, while patients aged 20 - 39 years had the lowest positive rate. The TRUST titer of most TP-positive cases was less than 1:8. Patients aged 20 - 39 years showed the highest percentage of TRUST titer values ≥ 1:8, while patients older than 80 years showed the lowest percentage; the differences between these two groups were statistically significant. Conclusions The serological characteristics of syphilis varied with gender and age. Syphilis screening and control should be conducted for young patients and pregnant women, but special attention should also be paid to elderly inpatients. The TRUST assay is better used in syphilis screening and for judgment of curative effects, but the diagnosis needs specific methods, such as the TP-ELISA and the TPPA test. PMID:27800128

  8. Declining trends of Syphilis seroprevalance among antenatal clinic cases and STD clinic cases in a tertiary care centre: from January 2002 to December 2012.

    PubMed

    Chopra, S; Garg, A; Chopra, M; Ghosh, A; Sreenivas, V; Sood, S; Kapil, A; Das, B K

    2015-02-01

    Syphilis affects nearly 1.36 million pregnant women, majority of these cases being concentrated in the developing countries. We aimed at analysing the 11 years' trends in syphilis seroprevalence in antenatal clinics (ANC) and STD clinic cases. Laboratory data of syphilis cases from 2002-2012 were retrospectively analysed. Out of the total 73,642 cases, 393 (0.53%) tested positive for Syphilis. A statistically significant decline in syphilis prevalence was found in both ANC and STD clinic cases. The efforts of various interventional programs should continue to make the screening and treatment facilities readily accessible to continue the decline in syphilis seropositivity.

  9. Tertiary syphilis presenting as hepatic bull's eye lesions.

    PubMed

    Peeters, L; Van Vaerenbergh, W; Van der Perre, C; Lagrange, W; Verbeke, M

    2005-01-01

    We report a rare case of tertiary syphilis (hepatic gummata, asymptomatic neurosyphilis and iridocyclitis) in a 47 year old female patient. Our patient suffered from a troubled sight, pain in the right hypochondrium, one enlarged submandibular lymph node, an elevated sedimentation rate, disturbed liver tests and two hepatic lesions upon abdominal computed tomography. The diagnosis was based upon a liver biopsy and a positive Treponema Pallidum haemagglutination test. The patient was treated with doxycyclin. After treatment the sedimentation rate and liver tests normalised and the hepatic lesions disappeared leaving a small 'scar' on CT-scan; at the end she still complained of a decreased sight. We conclude that syphilitic gummata of the liver have a favourable prognosis when the diagnosis is made early. One has to differentiate with hepatic abscesses, primary tumours and metastases. PMID:16432997

  10. Secondary Syphilis in Cali, Colombia: New Concepts in Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Adriana R.; Pillay, Allan; Zuluaga, Ana V.; Ramirez, Lady G.; Duque, Jorge E.; Aristizabal, Gloria E.; Fiel-Gan, Mary D.; Jaramillo, Roberto; Trujillo, Rodolfo; Valencia, Carlos; Jagodzinski, Linda; Cox, David L.; Radolf, Justin D.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    Venereal syphilis is a multi-stage, sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochetal bacterium Treponema pallidum (Tp). Herein we describe a cohort of 57 patients (age 18–68 years) with secondary syphilis (SS) identified through a network of public sector primary health care providers in Cali, Colombia. To be eligible for participation, study subjects were required to have cutaneous lesions consistent with SS, a reactive Rapid Plasma Reagin test (RPR-titer ≥1∶4), and a confirmatory treponemal test (Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody Absorption test- FTA-ABS). Most subjects enrolled were women (64.9%), predominantly Afro-Colombian (38.6%) or mestizo (56.1%), and all were of low socio-economic status. Three (5.3%) subjects were newly diagnosed with HIV infection at study entry. The duration of signs and symptoms in most patients (53.6%) was less than 30 days; however, some patients reported being symptomatic for several months (range 5–240 days). The typical palmar and plantar exanthem of SS was the most common dermal manifestation (63%), followed by diffuse hypo- or hyperpigmented macules and papules on the trunk, abdomen and extremities. Three patients had patchy alopecia. Whole blood (WB) samples and punch biopsy material from a subset of SS patients were assayed for the presence of Tp DNA polymerase I gene (polA) target by real-time qualitative and quantitative PCR methods. Twelve (46%) of the 26 WB samples studied had quantifiable Tp DNA (ranging between 194.9 and 1954.2 Tp polA copies/ml blood) and seven (64%) were positive when WB DNA was extracted within 24 hours of collection. Tp DNA was also present in 8/12 (66%) skin biopsies available for testing. Strain typing analysis was attempted in all skin and WB samples with detectable Tp DNA. Using arp repeat size analysis and tpr RFLP patterns four different strain types were identified (14d, 16d, 13d and 22a). None of the WB samples had sufficient DNA for typing. The clinical and microbiologic

  11. Fibronectin tetrapeptide is target for syphilis spirochete cytadherence

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.D.; Baseman, J.B.; Alderete, J.F.

    1985-11-01

    The syphilis bacterium, Treponema pallidum, parasitizes host cells through recognition of fibronectin (Fn) on cell surfaces. The active site of the Fn molecule has been identified as a four-amino acid sequence, arg-gly-asp-ser (RGDS), located on each monomer of the cell-binding domain. The synthetic heptapeptide gly-arg-gly-asp-ser-pro-cys (GRGDSPC), with the active site sequence RGDS, specifically competed with SVI-labeled cell-binding domain acquisition by T. pallidum. Additionally, the same heptapeptide with the RGDS sequence diminished treponemal attachment to HEp-2 and HT1080 cell monolayers. Related heptapeptides altered in one key amino acid within the RGDS sequence failed to inhibit Fn cell-binding domain acquisition or parasitism of host cells by T. pallidum. The data support the view that T. pallidum cytadherence of host cells is through recognition of the RGDS sequence also important for eukaryotic cell-Fn binding.

  12. [Positive syphilis serodiagnositic tests in air transport workers].

    PubMed

    Castoro, G

    1980-07-14

    The present study was carried out by the Aeronautic Medicine Section of Alitalia at Fiumicino, where in the years 1976-1977 and in the first four months of 1978, 6700 samples of serum from ground and air personnel were analysed as part of a preventive medicine check-up. A high percentage of positivity (9 per thousand in 1976, 12 per thousand in 1977 and 11 per thousand in the first four months of 1978) was observed. The problems of continual travelling and staying in countries were syphilis presents a very high morbility rate are the reasons for the infection. Social, sanitary, deontological and human problems of department physicians delegated to treat the disease are discussed.

  13. Epidemiology of syphilis-related hospitalisations in Spain between 1997 and 2006: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ariza-Megía, M Carmen; González-Escalada, Alba; Álvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Gil-deMiguel, Ángel; Gil-Prieto, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Objective In order to illustrate the important public health impact of syphilis, which is a preventable infection, the epidemiology of syphilis-related hospitalisations in Spain was studied over a 10-year period. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using the National Epidemiological Surveillance System for Hospital Data (Minimum Data Set). All hospitalisations due to syphilis infection in any diagnostic position (ICD-9-CM 090–097) between 1997 and 2006 were analysed, according to the Spanish version of the International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision (ICD-9-CM). Results There were 9556 hospitalisations associated with syphilis in Spain. The hospitalisation rate was 2.33 per 100 000 population, the mortality rate was 0.07 per 100 000 population and the lethality was 3.17%. The hospitalisation rate increased significantly after 2000 and was higher in men. Conclusion Syphilis remains a major public health problem because of both potential complications and its close association with HIV infection. It is necessary to promote early diagnosis, ensure treatment in patients with syphilis and emphasise health promotion and prevention programmes. PMID:22080538

  14. Diverging gonorrhea and syphilis trends in the 1980s: are they real?

    PubMed Central

    Gershman, K A; Rolfs, R T

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the divergence in national trends of gonorrhea and syphilis from 1986 to 1989 in the United States was real and if overall trends masked a contemporaneous increase in both diseases in a core group. METHODS. We analyzed the following: (1) reported cases of gonorrhea and primary and secondary syphilis in the United States for the years 1981 to 1989, (2) gonorrhea screening results from six states for the years 1985 to 1989, and (3) reported cases of gonorrhea and primary and secondary syphilis by census tract for the years 1986 to 1989 in one city. RESULTS. The incidence of gonorrhea decreased 22% in the United States from 1986 to 1989 while the incidence of primary and secondary syphilis increased 59%. Among Blacks, syphilis incidence increased 100% and gonorrhea incidence decreased 13%; among Whites and Hispanics, the incidence of both diseases decreased. Results from gonorrhea screening among females in six states agree with gonorrhea incidence trends in those areas. Race-specific and census tract analyses of data from a number of metropolitan areas where overall rates diverged did not demonstrate a group in which the incidence of both diseases increased. CONCLUSIONS. We conclude that diverging trends of gonorrhea and syphilis from 1986 to 1989 are real and emphasize differences in the epidemiologic characteristics of these two sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:1928523

  15. Oral manifestations of secondary syphilis in the elderly - a timely reminder for dentists.

    PubMed

    Minicucci, E M; Vieira, R A; Oliveira, D T; Marques, S A

    2013-09-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum. Cases of syphilis have increased in frequency and are challenging when affecting the elderly. The main causes of increased prevalence of syphilis are sexual promiscuity, lack of knowledge about the disease and decreasing use of barrier protection. Clinically, the oral manifestation of syphilis may resemble other entities, which hampers the correct diagnosis. We report a case of a 79-year-old male with weight loss and feeding difficulties. In the oral cavity there were ulcerative lesions in the hard palate and bilaterally in the buccal mucosa. The incisional biopsy revealed only a non-specific ulceration of the oral mucosa. After 20 days, the patient was re-evaluated and presented maculopapular lesions in the palmar and plantar areas. Positive serological venereal disease reference laboratory (VDRL) tests confirmed the diagnosis of secondary syphilis. The patient was treated with Benzathine penicillin G. After two weeks of treatment the oral lesion disappeared and the patient returned to normal feeding and gained weight. This case report reinforces the need to alert physicians and dentists to include sexually transmitted infections such as syphilis in the differential diagnosis of oral ulcerative lesions in elderly sexually active patients.

  16. Evaluation of the HISCL Anti-Treponema pallidum Assay as a Screening Test for Syphilis.

    PubMed

    An, Jingna; Chen, Qixia; Liu, Qianqian; Rao, Chenli; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Tingting; Tao, Chuanmin; Wang, Lanlan

    2015-07-01

    The resurgence of syphilis in recent years has become a serious threat to public health worldwide, and the serological detection of specific antibodies against Treponema pallidum remains the most reliable method for laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. This study examined the performance of the recently launched HISCL anti-Treponema pallidum (anti-TP) assay as a screening test for syphilis in a high-volume laboratory. The HISCL anti-TP assay was tested in 300 preselected syphilis-positive samples, 704 fresh syphilis-negative samples, 48 preselected potentially interfering samples, and 30 "borderline" samples and was compared head to head with the commercially available Lumipulse G TP-N. In this study, the HISCL anti-TP assay was in perfect agreement with the applied testing algorithms with an overall agreement of 100%, comparable to that of Lumipulse G TP-N (99.63%). The sensitivity and specificity of the HISCL anti-TP assay were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 98.42% to 100%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.37% to 100%), respectively. Considering the excellent ease of use and automation, high throughput, and its favorable sensitivity and specificity, the HISCL anti-TP assay may represent a new choice for syphilis screening in high-volume laboratories.

  17. Community Reactions to a Syphilis Prevention Campaign for Gay and Bisexual Men in Los Angeles County

    PubMed Central

    Nanín, José E.; Bimbi, David S.; Grov, Christian; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2010-01-01

    “Stop the Sores” (STS), a humor-based syphilis prevention campaign, was implemented in response to increasing syphilis prevalence among gay and bisexual men in Los Angeles County. In 2004, 564 men completed surveys measuring exposure and reactions to the campaign and syphilis testing. Mean age was 39, and men of color comprised a significant proportion of the sample (46.8%). Most men reported being HIV-negative (79.3%). Overall, 7.8% of the sample reported ever having syphilis; HIV-positive men were six times more likely to report this. Over one half of the sample (58.5%) reported exposure to the campaign. Men reporting any recent unprotected anal sex were twice more likely (than those who did not) to see the campaign. Men of color were twice more likely than White men to report wanting to speak to their friends about it. Finally, 39.1% of men exposed to the campaign reported being tested for syphilis as a result. Factors related to higher likelihood to test for syphilis included HIV seropositive status, any recent unprotected anal insertive sex, recent use of methamphetamine, recent use of “poppers,” and recent use of erectile dysfunction drugs. Although STS was somewhat effective, outreach efforts to particular subgroups may need to increase. PMID:19291502

  18. Community reactions to a syphilis prevention campaign for gay and bisexual men in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Nanin, Jose E; Bimbi, David S; Grov, Christian; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2009-01-01

    "Stop the Sores" (STS), a humor-based syphilis prevention campaign, was implemented in response to increasing syphilis prevalence among gay and bisexual men in Los Angeles County. In 2004, 564 men completed surveys measuring exposure and reactions to the campaign and syphilis testing. Mean age was 39, and men of color comprised a significant proportion of the sample (46.8%). Most men reported being HIV-negative (79.3%). Overall, 7.8% of the sample reported ever having syphilis; HIV-positive men were six times more likely to report this. Over one half of the sample (58.5%) reported exposure to the campaign. Men reporting any recent unprotected anal sex were twice more likely (than those who did not) to see the campaign. Men of color were twice more likely than White men to report wanting to speak to their friends about it. Finally, 39.1% of men exposed to the campaign reported being tested for syphilis as a result. Factors related to higher likelihood to test for syphilis included HIV seropositive status, any recent unprotected anal insertive sex, recent use of methamphetamine, recent use of "poppers," and recent use of erectile dysfunction drugs. Although STS was somewhat effective, outreach efforts to particular subgroups may need to increase.

  19. Oral manifestations of secondary syphilis in the elderly - a timely reminder for dentists.

    PubMed

    Minicucci, E M; Vieira, R A; Oliveira, D T; Marques, S A

    2013-09-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum. Cases of syphilis have increased in frequency and are challenging when affecting the elderly. The main causes of increased prevalence of syphilis are sexual promiscuity, lack of knowledge about the disease and decreasing use of barrier protection. Clinically, the oral manifestation of syphilis may resemble other entities, which hampers the correct diagnosis. We report a case of a 79-year-old male with weight loss and feeding difficulties. In the oral cavity there were ulcerative lesions in the hard palate and bilaterally in the buccal mucosa. The incisional biopsy revealed only a non-specific ulceration of the oral mucosa. After 20 days, the patient was re-evaluated and presented maculopapular lesions in the palmar and plantar areas. Positive serological venereal disease reference laboratory (VDRL) tests confirmed the diagnosis of secondary syphilis. The patient was treated with Benzathine penicillin G. After two weeks of treatment the oral lesion disappeared and the patient returned to normal feeding and gained weight. This case report reinforces the need to alert physicians and dentists to include sexually transmitted infections such as syphilis in the differential diagnosis of oral ulcerative lesions in elderly sexually active patients. PMID:23981220

  20. Evaluation of the HISCL Anti-Treponema pallidum Assay as a Screening Test for Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    An, Jingna; Chen, Qixia; Liu, Qianqian; Rao, Chenli; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    The resurgence of syphilis in recent years has become a serious threat to public health worldwide, and the serological detection of specific antibodies against Treponema pallidum remains the most reliable method for laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. This study examined the performance of the recently launched HISCL anti-Treponema pallidum (anti-TP) assay as a screening test for syphilis in a high-volume laboratory. The HISCL anti-TP assay was tested in 300 preselected syphilis-positive samples, 704 fresh syphilis-negative samples, 48 preselected potentially interfering samples, and 30 “borderline” samples and was compared head to head with the commercially available Lumipulse G TP-N. In this study, the HISCL anti-TP assay was in perfect agreement with the applied testing algorithms with an overall agreement of 100%, comparable to that of Lumipulse G TP-N (99.63%). The sensitivity and specificity of the HISCL anti-TP assay were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 98.42% to 100%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.37% to 100%), respectively. Considering the excellent ease of use and automation, high throughput, and its favorable sensitivity and specificity, the HISCL anti-TP assay may represent a new choice for syphilis screening in high-volume laboratories. PMID:25972403

  1. Diagnostic tools for preventing and managing maternal and congenital syphilis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Peeling, Rosanna W; Ye, Htun

    2004-06-01

    Syphilis is a major cause of adverse outcomes in pregnancy in developing countries. Fetal death and morbidity due to congenital syphilis are preventable if infected mothers are identified and treated appropriately by the middle of the second trimester. Most pregnant women with syphilis are asymptomatic and can only be identified through serological screening. Non-treponemal tests, such as the rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, are sensitive, simple to perform, and inexpensive. However, they have often not been available at primary health-care settings because they required cold storage for reagents and electricity to operate a rotator. Additionally, as many as 28% of positive RPR results in pregnant women are biological false positives. Confirmatory assays are usually available only in reference laboratories. Technological advances have resulted in improved serodiagnostic tools for syphilis. New enzyme immunoassays are available for surveillance and for large-scale screening programmes. Decentralized antenatal screening with on-site confirmation is now possible since new RPR reagents that are stable at room temperature have become commercially available, as have solar-powered rotators and simple, rapid point-of-care treponemal tests that use whole blood and do not require electricity or equipment. These will be valuable tools for preventing or eliminating congenital syphilis. The development of a non-invasive rapid treponemal test that distinguishes between active and past infections remains a high priority in areas where syphilis is endemic.

  2. Estimating Benzathine Penicillin Need for the Treatment of Pregnant Women Diagnosed with Syphilis during Antenatal Care in High-Morbidity Countries

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Melanie M.; Nurse-Findlay, Stephen; Zhang, Xiulei; Hedman, Lisa; Kamb, Mary L.; Broutet, Nathalie; Kiarie, James

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital syphilis continues to be a preventable cause of global stillbirth and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Shortages of injectable penicillin, the only recommended treatment for pregnant women and infants with syphilis, have been reported by high-morbidity countries. We sought to estimate current and projected annual needs for benzathine penicillin in antenatal care settings for 30 high morbidity countries that account for approximately 33% of the global burden of congenital syphilis. Methods Proportions of antenatal care attendance, syphilis screening coverage in pregnancy, syphilis prevalence among pregnant women, and adverse pregnancy outcomes due to untreated maternal syphilis reported to WHO were applied to 2012 birth estimates for 30 high syphilis burden countries to estimate current and projected benzathine penicillin need for prevention of congenital syphilis. Results Using current antenatal care syphilis screening coverage and seroprevalence, we estimated the total number of women requiring treatment with at least one injection of 2.4 MU of benzathine penicillin in these 30 countries to be 351,016. Syphilis screening coverage at or above 95% for all 30 countries would increase the number of women requiring treatment with benzathine penicillin to 712,030. Based on WHO management guidelines, 351,016 doses of weight-based benzathine penicillin would also be needed for the live-born infants of mothers who test positive and are treated for syphilis in pregnancy. Assuming availability of penicillin and provision of treatment for all mothers diagnosed with syphilis, an estimated 95,938 adverse birth outcomes overall would be prevented including 37,822 stillbirths, 15,814 neonatal deaths, and 34,088 other congenital syphilis cases. Conclusion Penicillin need for maternal and infant syphilis treatment is high among this group of syphilis burdened countries. Initiatives to ensure a stable and adequate supply of benzathine penicillin for treatment

  3. Incidence of syphilis, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 1 January 2010 through 31 August 2015.

    PubMed

    Clark, Leslie L; Hunt, Devin J

    2015-09-01

    In 2014,the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported significant increases in cases of primary and secondary syphilis in the U.S.; among beneficiaries of the Military Health System, monthly surveillance reports tracking reportable medical events of syphilis have reflected similar increases. This analysis reports on incident cases and rates of syphilis among active component service members of the U.S. Armed Forces from 1 January 2010 through 31 August 2015. During the surveillance period, 2,976 cases of syphilis were diagnosed. Crude incidence rates increased from 30.9 cases per 100,000 person-years (p-yrs) in 2010 to 47.4 cases per 100,000 p-yrs in 2015. Males accounted for 88.7% of cases. Incidence rates of syphilis were highest among service members who were black, non-Hispanic or who were aged 20-29 years. About one-quarter of syphilis cases (24.4%; 727 cases) were diagnosed as HIV infected. Primary and secondary syphilis cases comprised 42% of all syphilis cases. Increasing rates of primary and secondary syphilis in active component service members reflect similar trends reported in the U.S. civilian population.

  4. The management of isolated positive syphilis enzyme immunoassay results in HIV-negative patients attending a sexual health clinic.

    PubMed

    Thorley, Nicola; Adebayo, Michael; Smit, Erasmus; Radcliffe, Keith

    2016-08-01

    An unconfirmed positive treponemal enzyme immunoassay (enzyme immunoassay positive, Treponema pallidum particle agglutination negative and rapid plasma reagin negative) presents a clinical challenge to distinguish early syphilis infection from false-positive results. These cases are referred for syphilis line assay (INNO-LIA) and recalled for repeat syphilis serology. We performed a retrospective audit to establish the proportion of HIV-negative cases with unconfirmed positive enzyme immunoassay results, the proportion of these cases that received an INNO-LIA test and repeat syphilis serology testing and reviewed the clinical outcomes; 0.35% (80/22687) cases had an unconfirmed positive treponemal enzyme immunoassay result. Repeat syphilis serology was performed in 80% (64/80) cases, but no additional cases of syphilis were identified. Eighty-eight per cent (70/80) received an INNO-LIA test; 14% (5/37) unconfirmed enzyme immunoassay-positive cases with no prior history of syphilis were confirmed on INNO-LIA assay, supporting a diagnosis of latent syphilis. As a confirmatory treponemal test, the INNO-LIA assay may be more useful than repeat syphilis serological testing. PMID:26637236

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus-positive secondary syphilis mimicking cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Michiko; Fujii, Yoshiyuki; Ozaki, Keiji; Urano, Yoshio; Iwasa, Masami; Nakamura, Shingen; Fujii, Shiro; Abe, Masahiro; Sato, Yasuharu; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Malignant syphilis or lues maligna is a severe form of secondary syphilis that was commonly reported in the pre-antibiotic era, and has now reemerged with the advent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. However, the characteristic histopathological findings of malignant syphilis remain controversial. The aim of this case report was to clarify the clinical and histopathological findings of HIV-positive malignant secondary syphilis. A Japanese man in his forties complained of fever, skin lesions, headache, and myalgia without lymphadenopathy during the previous 4 weeks. The skin lesions manifested as erythematous, nonhealing, ulcerated papules scattered on his trunk, extremities, palm, and face. Although the skin lesions were suspected to be cutaneous T-cell lymphomas on histological analyses, they lacked T-cell receptor Jγ rearrangement; moreover, immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the presence of spirochetes. The patient was administered antibiotics and anti-retroviral therapy, which dramatically improved the symptoms. On the basis of these observations of the skin lesions, we finally diagnosed the patient with HIV-associated secondary syphilis that mimicked cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The patient's systemic CD4+ lymphocyte count was very low, and the infiltrate was almost exclusively composed of CD8+ atypical lymphocytes; therefore, the condition was easily misdiagnosed as cutaneous lymphoma. Although the abundance of plasma cells is a good indicator of malignant syphilis on skin histological analyses, in some cases, the plasma cell count may be very low. Therefore, a diagnosis of malignant secondary syphilis should be considered before making a diagnosis of primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma or lymphoma associated with HIV infection. PMID:26449225

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus-positive secondary syphilis mimicking cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Michiko; Fujii, Yoshiyuki; Ozaki, Keiji; Urano, Yoshio; Iwasa, Masami; Nakamura, Shingen; Fujii, Shiro; Abe, Masahiro; Sato, Yasuharu; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2015-10-08

    Malignant syphilis or lues maligna is a severe form of secondary syphilis that was commonly reported in the pre-antibiotic era, and has now reemerged with the advent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. However, the characteristic histopathological findings of malignant syphilis remain controversial. The aim of this case report was to clarify the clinical and histopathological findings of HIV-positive malignant secondary syphilis. A Japanese man in his forties complained of fever, skin lesions, headache, and myalgia without lymphadenopathy during the previous 4 weeks. The skin lesions manifested as erythematous, nonhealing, ulcerated papules scattered on his trunk, extremities, palm, and face. Although the skin lesions were suspected to be cutaneous T-cell lymphomas on histological analyses, they lacked T-cell receptor Jγ rearrangement; moreover, immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the presence of spirochetes. The patient was administered antibiotics and anti-retroviral therapy, which dramatically improved the symptoms. On the basis of these observations of the skin lesions, we finally diagnosed the patient with HIV-associated secondary syphilis that mimicked cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The patient's systemic CD4+ lymphocyte count was very low, and the infiltrate was almost exclusively composed of CD8+ atypical lymphocytes; therefore, the condition was easily misdiagnosed as cutaneous lymphoma. Although the abundance of plasma cells is a good indicator of malignant syphilis on skin histological analyses, in some cases, the plasma cell count may be very low. Therefore, a diagnosis of malignant secondary syphilis should be considered before making a diagnosis of primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma or lymphoma associated with HIV infection.

  7. Screening for syphilis among men who have sex with men in various clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Debattista, J; Dwyer, J; Anderson, R; Rowling, D; Patten, J; Mortlock, M

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of syphilis infections among men who have sex with men (MSM) accessing the Brisbane Sexual Health Clinic during the period 1997 up to May 2003, data were collated through three clinical programmes conducted by the service—a large inner city mainstream sexual health clinic and two small outreach sessional clinics conducted on the site of male sex on premises venues (SOPV). Data analysis also provided the opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of the smaller outreach clinics to access populations of MSM less likely to attend or identify at the larger mainstream clinic, and therefore enhance the detection of previously undiagnosed sexually transmissible infections. Methods: Computerised records from 1997–2003 were collated for a statistical analysis of syphilis and other STI pathology results for all MSM accessing the mainstream clinic, and two outreach clinics. Results: A review of client charts showed that 16 new syphilis diagnoses were made over the previous 5 years, but only two of these infections (both through the mainstream clinic) were early syphilis and therefore transmissible. All other cases were latent infections. A higher proportion of bisexual men was identified with positive syphilis serology but this was just below significance (p = 0.06). Significantly, almost a third of syphilis diagnoses (all latent) were made at SOPV outreach clinics, despite the much lower proportion of clients seen overall through the SOPV clinics. For other sexually transmissible infections, the mainstream clinic demonstrated greater efficiency at case detection. Conclusion: Outreach clinics located in male saunas may serve an effective function in syphilis screening by facilitating access for a particular subpopulation of MSM (bisexual, married men). These outreach clinics may provide important outlets for education and opportunistic screening of asymptomatic MSM and foster a greater willingness for men to honestly self identify

  8. Prevalence, incidence, and determinants of syphilis in female commercial sex workers in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Uribe-Salas, F; Del Río-Chiriboga, C; Conde-Glez, C J; Juárez-Figueroa, L; Uribe-Zúñaga, P; Calderón-Jaimes, E; Hernández-Avila, M

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence and the incidence of serologic markers for syphilis and the characteristics associated with the risk of infection in female commercial sex workers (CSWs) in Mexico City. It also sought to identify female CSWs at greater risk of infection with syphilis. The authors performed a cross-sectional study of 3100 female CSWs who sought human immunodeficiency virus testing at a National Council on AIDS clinic between January 1992 and April 1993. The authors collected information about socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, history of sexually transmitted diseases, sexual practices, and preventive measures against such diseases. All of the women provided a blood sample for identification of infection markers, and in a subgroup of 1802 women repeat samples were obtained to estimate the rate of seroconversion to syphilis. Prevalence of syphilis was 8.2%, with an incidence of 2.4/100 person-years. A positive linear relation between age and time working in commercial sex and prevalence of infection markers was observed. Women with less education, born in states other than Mexico City, and who worked on the street had significantly greater risks of infection with syphilis. Frequency of infection by both estimators is relatively low in the women studied. Characteristics related to periods of exposure such as age and time working in commercial sex, as well as socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, such as place of birth, education, and type of work site, were significantly related to the frequency of infection.

  9. Prevalence of HIV, syphilis and genital chlamydial infection among women in north-west Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Aseffa, A; Ishak, A; Stevens, R; Fergussen, E; Giles, M; Yohannes, G; Kidan, K G

    1998-03-01

    The prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) among women visiting antenatal (ANC) and gynaecological clinics in Gondar, north-west Ethiopia, was investigated. Between April and August 1995, 728 women consented to enter the study. Prevalence rates were 5.9% (41/693) for chlamydial antigen in cervix, 18.8% (113/600) for syphilis (Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay [TPHA]) and 25.3% (150/593) for HIV. Active syphilis (RPR)+, TPHA+ was detected in 74% (44/597). HIV infection rate was higher among women with higher age of first marriage and low gravidity. It was significantly associated with young age, urban residence, and presence of genital ulcer (odds ratio [OR] = 6.3), and lymphadenopathy (OR = 2.8) on examination. Women seropositive for syphilis had married at an earlier age, were significantly older and had changed husbands. Low gravidity and age < 30 were independently significant risk factors for cervical chlamydial antigen positivity which was predominantly asymptomatic. Significant association was observed between HIV infection and syphilis (OR = 2.6). Active syphilis was associated with chlamydial (OR = 3.4) and HIV infection (OR = 4.1). The rate of 23.4% and 15.1% of HIV seropositivity among ANC attenders and rural women respectively is an indicator of the rapid progression of the HIV epidemic in the area. PMID:9593487

  10. Correlates of Syphilis Seroreactivity Among Pregnant Women: The HIVNET 024 Trial in Malawi, Tanzania, and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Dara; Goldenberg, Robert L.; Read, Jennifer S.; Wang, Jing; Hoffman, Irving F.; Saathoff, Elmar; Kafulafula, George; Aboud, Said; Martinson, Francis E. A.; Dahab, Maysoon; Vermund, Sten H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to determine correlates of syphilis seroprevalence among HIV-infected and -uninfected antenatal attendees in an African multisite clinical trial, and to improve strategies for maternal syphilis prevention. Results A total of 2270 (86%) women were HIV-infected and 366 (14%) were HIV-uninfected. One hundred seventy-five (6.6%) were syphilis-seropositive (7.3% among HIV-infected and 2.6% HIV-uninfected women). Statistically significant correlates included geographic site (odds ratio [OR] = 4.5, Blantyre; OR = 3.2, Lilongwe; OR = 9.0, Lusaka vs. Dar es Salaam referent); HIV infection (OR = 3.3); age 20 to 24 years (OR = 2.5); being divorced, widowed, or separated (OR = 2.9); genital ulcer treatment in the last year (OR = 2.9); history of stillbirth (OR = 2.8, one stillbirth; OR = 4.3, 2–5 stillbirths); and history of preterm delivery (OR = 2.7, one preterm delivery). Conclusion Many women without identified risk factors were syphilis-seropositive. Younger HIV-infected women were at highest risk. Universal integrated antenatal HIV and syphilis screening and treatment is essential in sub-Saharan African settings. PMID:16601659

  11. Azithromycin-Resistant Syphilis-Causing Strains in Sydney, Australia: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jeoffreys, Neisha; Tagg, Kaitlin; Guy, Rebecca J.; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.; Donovan, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Azithromycin has shown high efficacy in randomized trials when used for treating infectious syphilis in Africa. However, its use in clinical practice has been limited by the development of antimicrobial drug resistance. Resistance has not previously been reported from Australasia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for azithromycin-resistant syphilis-causing strains in Sydney, Australia. We evaluated 409 samples that were PCR positive for Treponema pallidum DNA collected between 2004 and 2011 for the presence of the A2058G mutation, which confers resistance to macrolide antibiotics such as azithromycin. Overall, 84% of samples harbored the mutation. The prevalence of the mutation increased during the study period (P trend, 0.003). We also collected clinical and demographic data on 220 patients from whom these samples had been collected to determine factors associated with the A2058G mutation; 97% were from men who have sex with men. Reporting sex in countries other than Australia was associated with less macrolide resistance (adjusted odds ratio, 0.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.09 to 0.66; P = 0.005), with other study factors showing no association (age, HIV status, recent macrolide use, stage of syphilis, or history of prior syphilis). Azithromycin cannot be recommended as an alternative treatment for syphilis in Sydney. PMID:24850356

  12. Variations in Clinical Presentation of Ocular Syphilis: Case Series Reported From a Growing Epidemic in the United States.

    PubMed

    Marx, Grace E; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Marrazzo, Jeanne M; Tuddenham, Susan A; Rompalo, Anne M; Leone, Peter A; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Rietmeijer, Cornelis A

    2016-08-01

    Ocular syphilis, a form of neurosyphilis, has been increasingly diagnosed in the United States. This case series summarizes the course of 6 patients recently diagnosed with ocular syphilis, emphasizing the varied sociodemographic factors and the wide range of symptoms and outcomes that are seen in patients with this disease. PMID:27419818

  13. Immune Evasion and Recognition of the Syphilis Spirochete in Blood and Skin of Secondary Syphilis Patients: Two Immunologically Distinct Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Adriana R.; Ramirez, Lady G.; Zuluaga, Ana V.; Pillay, Allan; Abreu, Christine; Valencia, Carlos A.; La Vake, Carson; Cervantes, Jorge L.; Dunham-Ems, Star; Cartun, Richard; Mavilio, Domenico; Radolf, Justin D.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical syndrome associated with secondary syphilis (SS) reflects the propensity of Treponema pallidum (Tp) to escape immune recognition while simultaneously inducing inflammation. Methods To better understand the duality of immune evasion and immune recognition in human syphilis, herein we used a combination of flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and transcriptional profiling to study the immune response in the blood and skin of 27 HIV(-) SS patients in relation to spirochetal burdens. Ex vivo opsonophagocytosis assays using human syphilitic sera (HSS) were performed to model spirochete-monocyte/macrophage interactions in vivo. Results Despite the presence of low-level spirochetemia, as well as immunophenotypic changes suggestive of monocyte activation, we did not detect systemic cytokine production. SS subjects had substantial decreases in circulating DCs and in IFNγ-producing and cytotoxic NK-cells, along with an emergent CD56−/CD16+ NK-cell subset in blood. Skin lesions, which had visible Tp by IHC and substantial amounts of Tp-DNA, had large numbers of macrophages (CD68+), a relative increase in CD8+ T-cells over CD4+ T-cells and were enriched for CD56+ NK-cells. Skin lesions contained transcripts for cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α), chemokines (CCL2, CXCL10), macrophage and DC activation markers (CD40, CD86), Fc-mediated phagocytosis receptors (FcγRI, FcγR3), IFN-β and effector molecules associated with CD8 and NK-cell cytotoxic responses. While HSS promoted uptake of Tp in conjunction with monocyte activation, most spirochetes were not internalized. Conclusions Our findings support the importance of macrophage driven opsonophagocytosis and cell mediated immunity in treponemal clearance, while suggesting that the balance between phagocytic uptake and evasion is influenced by the relative burdens of bacteria in blood and skin and the presence of Tp subpopulations with differential capacities for binding opsonic antibodies. They also

  14. Misrepresentations of the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    White, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    The Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis (TSUS) is the subject of medical research, healthcare, ethics, race relations and fictitious media portrayals (e.g., movie, play). Unraveling misrepresentations about the TSUS is important because prevailing views continue to contribute to alleged mistrust of the medical system by the black community and compromised doctor-patient and researcher-participant relationships. A comparative analysis of standard TSUS information was conducted and included evidenced-based alternative information in an effort to: (a) contextualize the TSUS with accurate medical, public health and historical information and (b) balance claims of racism, nontreatment and denial of treatment. An article in the Winter 2003 Radcliffe Quarterly misrepresented the images of two historical African-American health institutions, the John A. Andrew Memorial Hospital and the Tuskegee Veterans Administration Hospital. A critical analysis challenges these pictorial misrepresentations and documents, in part, a continuing and prevailing pattern of biased misrepresentations in discussions about the TSUS. The National Medical Association (NMA) and the Journal of the National Medical Association have a history of advocacy for African-American health, a record of combating racial discrimination and a quest for truth about the status of the black community. As past NMA historical notables have performed through their advancement, service and leadership, health professionals now have the opportunity, obligation and information to educate the American community about the TSUS with evidenced-based information. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 p581-a PMID:15868777

  15. [The significance of Karl Landsteiner's works for syphilis research].

    PubMed

    Luger, A

    1991-01-01

    On January 7th 1905, more than five months before the detection of T. pallidum, Karl Landsteiner began his work on syphilis research together with notable members of the Viennese School of Medicine, namely Ernest Finger, Rudolf Müller, Viktor Mucha, Otto Pötzl and others. Extensive animal experiments led to the formulation of the Finger-Landsteiner Law and provided the basic facts for the Jadasson-Lewandowsky Law. Attempts of active or passive immunization were unsuccessful and, indeed, were still a failure in 1990 after implementation of the latest tools of modern research, including gene technology. Dark-field microscopy was introduced for the detection of T. pallidum by Landsteiner and Mucha. These authors noted that serum of syphilitic patients inhibited the movements of T. pallidum and, thus, observed the basic principle underlying the T. pallidum immobilization test (= TPI = Nelson-Mayer test). Finally, Landsteiner, Müller and Pötzl discovered that it was not an antibody specific to T. pallidum that reacted in the Wassermann reaction, but "autotoxic" substances, which they called reagines. During the 1970's and 1980's it was discovered that these reagines are autoantibodies directed against parts of the inner envelope of the mitochondria.

  16. Misrepresentations of the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis.

    PubMed

    White, Robert M

    2005-04-01

    The Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis (TSUS) is the subject of medical research, healthcare, ethics, race relations and fictitious media portrayals (e.g., movie, play). Unraveling misrepresentations about the TSUS is important because prevailing views continue to contribute to alleged mistrust of the medical system by the black community and compromised doctor-patient and researcher-participant relationships. A comparative analysis of standard TSUS information was conducted and included evidenced-based alternative information in an effort to: (a) contextualize the TSUS with accurate medical, public health and historical information and (b) balance claims of racism, nontreatment and denial of treatment. An article in the Winter 2003 Radcliffe Quarterly misrepresented the images of two historical African-American health institutions, the John A. Andrew Memorial Hospital and the Tuskegee Veterans Administration Hospital. A critical analysis challenges these pictorial misrepresentations and documents, in part, a continuing and prevailing pattern of biased misrepresentations in discussions about the TSUS. The National Medical Association (NMA) and the Journal of the National Medical Association have a history of advocacy for African-American health, a record of combating racial discrimination and a quest for truth about the status of the black community. As past NMA historical notables have performed through their advancement, service and leadership, health professionals now have the opportunity, obligation and information to educate the American community about the TSUS with evidenced-based information.

  17. Syphilis, leprosy, and human immunodeficiency virus coinfection: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Claudia Fd; Bornhausen-Demarch, Eduardo; Prata, Aline G; de Andrade, Felipe C; Fernandes, Mariana P; Lopes, Marcia Ra; Nery, José Ac

    2013-08-01

    The association between syphilis, leprosy, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is not well documented, and the emergence of isolated cases raises the interest and indicates that this triple coinfection can occur. We report the case of a 42-year-old man from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, who presented with erythematous papules on the trunk, back, and upper and lower extremities; an erythematous plaque on the upper abdomen; and an erythematous violaceous plaque on the right thigh with altered sensitivity. Laboratory investigation showed a reagent VDRL test (1:512) and positive test results for Treponema pallidum hemagglutination. Treatment with benzathine penicillin (2,400,000 U intramuscularly) was started (2 doses 1 week apart). On follow-up 40 days later, the lesions showed partial improvement with persistence of the plaques on the right thigh and upper abdomen as well as a new similar plaque on the back. Further laboratory examinations showed negative bacilloscopy, positive HIV test, and histologic findings consistent with tuberculoid leprosy. The patient was started on multidrug therapy for paucibacillary leprosy with clinical improvement; the patient also was monitored by the HIV/AIDS department. We emphasize the importance of clinical suspicion for a coinfection case despite the polymorphism of these diseases as well as the precise interpretation of laboratory and histopathology examinations to correctly manage atypical cases. PMID:24087779

  18. [Issues of congenital syphilis in the past twenty years. I. Etiology, epidemiology and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Zákoucká, Hana; Kremenová, Sona; Kremen, Jaromír

    2006-04-01

    Since 1990 there is an upward trend in the incidence of both acquired and congenital syphilis in the Czech Republic. A similar situation exists in other European countries as well. Higher incidence of syphilis is clearly associated with urban agglomerates and sexual tourism destinations. The only way to reduce the number of cases is a consistent application of mandatory preventive and diagnostic measures. These important measures against the spreading of the infection include mandatory serological testing of pregnant women and newborns (from umbilical blood), antibiotic treatment and systematic follow-up of HIV-positive mothers and children. This paper describes the current epidemiological situation of syphilis in the Czech Republic and presents a review of available diagnostic tests and their significance for diagnosis.

  19. Facebook-Augmented Partner Notification in a Cluster of Syphilis Cases in Milwaukee

    PubMed Central

    Oyervides, Otilio; Grande, Katarina M.; Prater, Daphne; Vann, Vannessa; Reitl, Irmine; Biedrzycki, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Public health professionals face many challenges in infectious disease cluster case identification and partner notification (PN), especially in populations using social media as a primary communication venue. We present a method using Facebook and social network diagram illustration to identify, link, and notify individuals in a cluster of syphilis cases in young black men who have sex with men (MSM). Use of Facebook was crucial in identifying two of 55 individuals with syphilis, and the cooperation of socially connected individuals with traditional PN methods yielded a high number of contacts per case. Integration of PN services for HIV and sexually transmitted diseases, as well as collaboration between the city and state information systems, assisted in the cluster investigation. Given that rates of syphilis and HIV infection are increasing significantly in young African American MSM, the use of social media can provide an additional avenue to facilitate case identification and notification. PMID:24385648

  20. Detection of immunoglobulin M in cerebrospinal fluid from syphilis patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J B; Farshy, C E; Hunter, E F; Hambie, E A; Wobig, G H; Larsen, S A

    1986-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were evaluated in an immunoglobulin M enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IgM ELISA) for syphilis with sonic extracts of Treponema pallidum coated on polystyrene plates. The ELISA procedure was reproducible, and T. pallidum antigens were stable., A total of 15 CSF samples from patients with neurosyphilis, 18 CSF samples from patients with syphilis, 12 CSF samples from patients treated for syphilis, and 494 CSF samples from patients with neurologic or other systemic diseases were tested. The IgM ELISA gave reactive results in all of six symptomatic and congenital neurosyphilitic patients and none of nine asymptomatic neurosyphilitic patients. Of 524 CSF samples from nonneurosyphilitic individuals, 513 were nonreactive, resulting in 98% test specificity. The IgM ELISA in CSF should prove to be useful for confirmation of symptomatic neurosyphilis. PMID:3533984

  1. A rare case of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome presenting as secondary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Asma; Skalweit, Marion J

    2015-09-01

    Immune reconstitution syndrome has rarely been reported in the context of syphilis infection. We report a patient with AIDS (CD4 42 cells/mm(3), viral load 344,000 cp/ml), treated previously for secondary syphilis and started on an integrase inhibitor-based single-tablet antiretroviral treatment regimen. After four weeks of antiretroviral treatment, he presented with non-tender, non-blanching erythematous nodules on his chest, an elevated rapid plasma reagin (1:1024) and immune reconstitution (CD4 154 cells/mm(3), HIV-RNA 130 cp/ml). A detailed workup to exclude opportunistic infections including secondary and neurosyphilis was performed. The patient was continued on antiretroviral treatment and treated empirically for neurosyphilis given cerebrospinal lymphocytosis and dermatopathology suggesting treponemal antigen-driven B-cell hyperplasia. We favour a diagnosis of immune reconstitution in association with prior syphilis infection attributable to rapid and potent immune restoration afforded by integrase inhibitors.

  2. The Science behind Pre-Columbian Evidence of Syphilis in Europe: Research by Documentary

    PubMed Central

    Armelagos, George J.; Zuckerman, Molly K.; Harper, Kristin N.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the presentation of scientific finding via documentary and absent the process of peer-review. We use, as an example, PBS’s Syphilis Enigma, in which researchers presented novel evidence concerning the origin of syphilis that had never been reviewed by other scientists. These “findings” then entered the world of peer-reviewed literature through citations of the documentary itself or material associated with the documentary. Here, we demonstrate that the case for pre-Columbian syphilis in Europe that was made in the documentary does not withstand scientific scrutiny. We also situate this example from paleopathology within a larger trend of “science by documentary” or “science by press conference,” in which researchers seek to bypass the peer review process by presenting unvetted findings directly to the public. PMID:22499439

  3. The science behind pre-Columbian evidence of syphilis in Europe: research by documentary.

    PubMed

    Armelagos, George J; Zuckerman, Molly K; Harper, Kristin N

    2012-03-01

    This article discusses the presentation of scientific findings by documentary, without the process of peer review. We use, as an example, PBS's "The Syphilis Enigma," in which researchers presented novel evidence concerning the origin of syphilis that had never been reviewed by other scientists. These "findings" then entered the world of peer-reviewed literature through citations of the documentary itself or material associated with it. Here, we demonstrate that the case for pre-Columbian syphilis in Europe that was made in the documentary does not withstand scientific scrutiny. We also situate this example from paleopathology within a larger trend of "science by documentary" or "science by press conference," in which researchers seek to bypass the peer review process by presenting unvetted findings directly to the public.

  4. [Issues of congenital syphilis in the past twenty years. I. Etiology, epidemiology and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Zákoucká, Hana; Kremenová, Sona; Kremen, Jaromír

    2006-04-01

    Since 1990 there is an upward trend in the incidence of both acquired and congenital syphilis in the Czech Republic. A similar situation exists in other European countries as well. Higher incidence of syphilis is clearly associated with urban agglomerates and sexual tourism destinations. The only way to reduce the number of cases is a consistent application of mandatory preventive and diagnostic measures. These important measures against the spreading of the infection include mandatory serological testing of pregnant women and newborns (from umbilical blood), antibiotic treatment and systematic follow-up of HIV-positive mothers and children. This paper describes the current epidemiological situation of syphilis in the Czech Republic and presents a review of available diagnostic tests and their significance for diagnosis. PMID:16649150

  5. Facebook-augmented partner notification in a cluster of syphilis cases in Milwaukee.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Paul; Oyervides, Otilio; Grande, Katarina M; Prater, Daphne; Vann, Vannessa; Reitl, Irmine; Biedrzycki, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Public health professionals face many challenges in infectious disease cluster case identification and partner notification (PN), especially in populations using social media as a primary communication venue. We present a method using Facebook and social network diagram illustration to identify, link, and notify individuals in a cluster of syphilis cases in young black men who have sex with men (MSM). Use of Facebook was crucial in identifying two of 55 individuals with syphilis, and the cooperation of socially connected individuals with traditional PN methods yielded a high number of contacts per case. Integration of PN services for HIV and sexually transmitted diseases, as well as collaboration between the city and state information systems, assisted in the cluster investigation. Given that rates of syphilis and HIV infection are increasing significantly in young African American MSM, the use of social media can provide an additional avenue to facilitate case identification and notification.

  6. Prevalence of syphilis infection in different tiers of female sex workers in China: implications for surveillance and interventions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Syphilis has made a dramatic resurgence in China during the past two decades and become the third most prevalent notifiable infectious disease in China. Female sex workers (FSWs) have become one of key populations for the epidemic. In order to investigate syphilis infection among different tiers of FSWs, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 8 sites in China. Methods Serum specimens (n = 7,118) were collected to test for syphilis and questionnaire interviews were conducted to obtain socio-demographic and behavioral information among FSWs recruited from different types of venues. FSWs were categorized into three tiers (high-, middle- and low-tier FSWs) based on the venues where they solicited clients. Serum specimens were screened with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for treponemal antibody followed by confirmation with non-treponemal toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST) for positive ELISA specimens to determine syphilis infection. A logistic regression model was used to determine factors associated with syphilis infection. Results Overall syphilis prevalence was 5.0% (95%CI, 4.5-5.5%). Low-tier FSWs had the highest prevalence (9.7%; 95%CI, 8.3-11.1%), followed by middle-tier (4.3%; 95%CI, 3.6-5.0%, P < 0.001) and high-tier FSWs (2.2%; 95%CI, 1.6-2.9%, P < 0.001). Factors independently associated with syphilis infection included older age, lower education level, geographic location, lower tier of typology, and injection drug use. Conclusions This multi-site survey showed a high prevalence of syphilis infection among FSWs and substantial disparities in syphilis prevalence by the tier of FSWs. The difference in syphilis prevalence is substantial between different tiers of FSWs, with the highest rate among low-tier FSWs. Thus, current surveillance and intervention activities, which have low coverage in low-tier FSWs in China, should be further examined. PMID:22475187

  7. Prevalence, incidence, and correlates of syphilis seroreactivity in multiethnic San Francisco neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D; Larsen, S A; Golden, E; Morse, S; Fullilove, M T; Washington, A E

    1994-11-01

    To examine the extent of infection with syphilis in an inner-city community, we determined the prevalence, incidence, and correlates of syphilis seroreactivity in a representative sample of unmarried whites, African Americans, and Hispanics living in San Francisco during 1988 to 1989 and again 1 year later in 1989 to 1990. One thousand seven hundred seventy single men and women aged 20 to 44 were surveyed in a random household sample drawn from three neighborhoods of varying geographic and cultural characteristics. Syphilitic infection was determined by testing specimens with the microhemagglutination assay for antibodies to Treponema pallidum (MHA-TP). Of blood samples available from 1262 participants from the initial survey, 32 (2.5%) were MHA-TP reactive. After adjustment for age, a reactive syphilis serology was significantly predicted (P < 0.05) by African American race, homosexual activity (men), and less education. In homosexually active men, lifetime number of male sex partners and the presence of antibody to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) significantly predicted syphilis seroreactivity (P < 0.01). One year later, of 841 specimens available for testing, an additional 13 (1.5%) had become MHA-TP reactive. Eleven (85%) of the new cases were in heterosexual men and women. Although San Francisco citywide incidence data indicate that syphilis may be decreasing for the city as a whole, incidence data on a community level suggests that syphilitic infection is increasing in high-risk heterosexual communities. Thus, syphilis prevention programs should rely on serologic testing at the community level to plan effective intervention strategies. PMID:7804501

  8. HIV and Syphilis Infection among Men attending a Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinic in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Colón-López, Vivian; Ortiz, Ana P.; Banerjee, Geetanjoli; Gertz, Alida M.; García, Hermes

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the demographic, behavioral, and clinical factors associated with HIV and syphilis infection among a sample of men attending a sexually transmitted infection clinic during 2009 to 2010 in San Juan, Puerto Rico (PR). Methods A sample of 350 clinical records from men visiting the clinic for the first time during 2009 to 2010 was reviewed. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the study sample, and bivariate analyses were performed separately for HIV and syphilis to identify factors associated with these infectious diseases. Variables that were significantly associated (p<0.05) with HIV and syphilis in the bivariate analysis were considered for inclusion in the logistic regression models. Results Overall, 11.2% and 14.1% of the men were infected with HIV and syphilis, respectively, and 5.1% were coinfected with HIV and syphilis. In multivariate logistic regression models, ever injecting drugs (POR = 8.1; 95%Cl 3.0, 21.8) and being a man who has sex with men (MSM) (POR = 5.3; 95%CI 2.3, 11.9) were positively associated with HIV infection. Being a man older than 45 years (POR = 4.0; 95%CI: 1.9, 8.9) and being an MSM (POR = 2.5; 95%CI: 1.3, 4.9) were both significantly associated with syphilis infection. Conclusion These findings reinforce the need for greater education and prevention efforts for HIV and other STIs among men in PR, particularly those who are MSM. However, there is a need to make an a priori assessment of the level of health literacy in the members of this group so that a culturally sensitive intervention can be provided to the men who attend this STI clinic. PMID:23556260

  9. Three cases of ocular syphilis and the resurgence of the disease in Queensland

    PubMed Central

    Sara, Sergio A; McAllister, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The past few years has seen a resurgence of syphilis. It is predominantly associated within men who have sex with men and also within heterosexual Indigenous Australians. Possessing the ability to mimic a variety of ocular diseases, it typically manifests as uveitis, although it can affect any structure within the eye. Thus, a high degree of clinical suspicion by ophthalmologists is required to prevent disease progression and ocular morbidity. Patients require prolonged antibiotic treatment with intravenous benzylpenicillin and outpatient monitoring to successfully resolve the infection. We describe a case series of ocular syphilis presentations in Queensland, Australia. PMID:27672343

  10. Three cases of ocular syphilis and the resurgence of the disease in Queensland

    PubMed Central

    Sara, Sergio A; McAllister, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The past few years has seen a resurgence of syphilis. It is predominantly associated within men who have sex with men and also within heterosexual Indigenous Australians. Possessing the ability to mimic a variety of ocular diseases, it typically manifests as uveitis, although it can affect any structure within the eye. Thus, a high degree of clinical suspicion by ophthalmologists is required to prevent disease progression and ocular morbidity. Patients require prolonged antibiotic treatment with intravenous benzylpenicillin and outpatient monitoring to successfully resolve the infection. We describe a case series of ocular syphilis presentations in Queensland, Australia.

  11. Three cases of ocular syphilis and the resurgence of the disease in Queensland.

    PubMed

    Sara, Sergio A; McAllister, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The past few years has seen a resurgence of syphilis. It is predominantly associated within men who have sex with men and also within heterosexual Indigenous Australians. Possessing the ability to mimic a variety of ocular diseases, it typically manifests as uveitis, although it can affect any structure within the eye. Thus, a high degree of clinical suspicion by ophthalmologists is required to prevent disease progression and ocular morbidity. Patients require prolonged antibiotic treatment with intravenous benzylpenicillin and outpatient monitoring to successfully resolve the infection. We describe a case series of ocular syphilis presentations in Queensland, Australia. PMID:27672343

  12. A case of secondary syphilis with HIV, resembling borderline lepromatous leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Mohan Zachariah; Kanish, Bimal; Kwatra, Kanwardeep; Chaudhary, Paulina R.; Bhatia, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting an unusual case of secondary syphilis, in a homosexual male patient, which resembled borderline lepromatous leprosy, and in whom the diagnosis was considered on clinical grounds. The patient also had concomitant HIV infection, with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. His rapid plasma reagin test was reactive in 1:128 dilution. He improved with three standard, weekly injections of benzathine penicillin, along with 2 g of intravenous ceftriaxone daily for 15 days. This case is being reported to highlight the need for a high index of suspicion in diagnosing unusual cases of secondary syphilis, especially in those with concomitant HIV infection. PMID:26692613

  13. A case of secondary syphilis with HIV, resembling borderline lepromatous leprosy.

    PubMed

    Mani, Mohan Zachariah; Kanish, Bimal; Kwatra, Kanwardeep; Chaudhary, Paulina R; Bhatia, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting an unusual case of secondary syphilis, in a homosexual male patient, which resembled borderline lepromatous leprosy, and in whom the diagnosis was considered on clinical grounds. The patient also had concomitant HIV infection, with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. His rapid plasma reagin test was reactive in 1:128 dilution. He improved with three standard, weekly injections of benzathine penicillin, along with 2 g of intravenous ceftriaxone daily for 15 days. This case is being reported to highlight the need for a high index of suspicion in diagnosing unusual cases of secondary syphilis, especially in those with concomitant HIV infection. PMID:26692613

  14. Syphilis in the South: rural rates surpass urban rates in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J C; Kulik, A L; Schoenbach, V J

    1995-08-01

    We studied primary and secondary syphilis rates in North Carolina for 1985 through 1993 to elucidate demographic trends and the role of rurality in the state's high rates. Each of the state's 100 counties was classified by rural-urban character; and county-level rates, adjusted for gender, race, and age group, were compared. Syphilis rates rose dramatically during the 9-year period, with most of the increase occurring among women, non-Whites, and rural counties. The rural rates recently surpassed urban rates, with the greatest increase experienced by non-White rural women. The exchange of sex for drugs and characteristics of rural poverty may be fueling these trends.

  15. Antenatal Syphilis Screening Using Point-of-Care Testing in Sub-Saharan African Countries: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuznik, Andreas; Lamorde, Mohammed; Nyabigambo, Agnes; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Untreated syphilis in pregnancy is associated with adverse clinical outcomes for the infant. Most syphilis infections occur in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where coverage of antenatal screening for syphilis is inadequate. Recently introduced point-of-care syphilis tests have high accuracy and demonstrate potential to increase coverage of antenatal screening. However, country-specific cost-effectiveness data for these tests are limited. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of antenatal syphilis screening for 43 countries in SSA and estimate the impact of universal screening on stillbirths, neonatal deaths, congenital syphilis, and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted. Methods and Findings The decision analytic model reflected the perspective of the national health care system and was based on the sensitivity (86%) and specificity (99%) reported for the immunochromatographic strip (ICS) test. Clinical outcomes of infants born to syphilis-infected mothers on the end points of stillbirth, neonatal death, and congenital syphilis were obtained from published sources. Treatment was assumed to consist of three injections of benzathine penicillin. Country-specific inputs included the antenatal prevalence of syphilis, annual number of live births, proportion of women with at least one antenatal care visit, per capita gross national income, and estimated hourly nurse wages. In all 43 sub-Saharan African countries analyzed, syphilis screening is highly cost-effective, with an average cost/DALY averted of US$11 (range: US$2–US$48). Screening remains highly cost-effective even if the average prevalence falls from the current rate of 3.1% (range: 0.6%–14.0%) to 0.038% (range: 0.002%–0.113%). Universal antenatal screening of pregnant women in clinics may reduce the annual number of stillbirths by up to 64,000, neonatal deaths by up to 25,000, and annual incidence of congenital syphilis by up to 32,000, and

  16. Syphilis Trends among Men Who Have Sex with Men in the United States and Western Europe: A Systematic Review of Trend Studies Published between 2004 and 2015

    PubMed Central

    Abara, Winston E.; Hess, Kristen L.; Neblett Fanfair, Robyn; Bernstein, Kyle T.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Globally, men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately burdened with syphilis. This review describes the published literature on trends in syphilis infections among MSM in the US and Western Europe from 1998, the period with the fewest syphilis infections in both geographical areas, onwards. We also describe disparities in syphilis trends among various sub-populations of MSM. We searched electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Global Health, PsychInfo, CAB Abstracts, CINAHL, Sociological Abstracts, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and LILACS) for peer-reviewed journal articles that were published between January 2004 and June 2015 and reported on syphilis cases among MSM at multiple time points from 1998 onwards. Ten articles (12 syphilis trend studies/reports) from the US and eight articles (12 syphilis trend studies/reports) from Western Europe were identified and included in this review. Taken together, our findings indicate an increase in the numbers and rates (per 100,000) of syphilis infections among MSM in the US and Western Europe since 1998. Disparities in the syphilis trends among MSM were also noted, with greater increases observed among HIV-positive MSM than HIV-negative MSM in both the US and Western Europe. In the US, racial minority MSM and MSM between 20 and 29 years accounted for the greatest increases in syphilis infections over time whereas White MSM accounted for most syphilis infections over time in Western Europe. Multiple strategies, including strengthening and targeting current syphilis screening and testing programs, and the prompt treatment of syphilis cases are warranted to address the increase in syphilis infections among all MSM in the US and Western Europe, but particularly among HIV-infected MSM, racial minority MSM, and young MSM in the US. PMID:27447943

  17. Syphilis Trends among Men Who Have Sex with Men in the United States and Western Europe: A Systematic Review of Trend Studies Published between 2004 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Abara, Winston E; Hess, Kristen L; Neblett Fanfair, Robyn; Bernstein, Kyle T; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Globally, men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately burdened with syphilis. This review describes the published literature on trends in syphilis infections among MSM in the US and Western Europe from 1998, the period with the fewest syphilis infections in both geographical areas, onwards. We also describe disparities in syphilis trends among various sub-populations of MSM. We searched electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Global Health, PsychInfo, CAB Abstracts, CINAHL, Sociological Abstracts, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and LILACS) for peer-reviewed journal articles that were published between January 2004 and June 2015 and reported on syphilis cases among MSM at multiple time points from 1998 onwards. Ten articles (12 syphilis trend studies/reports) from the US and eight articles (12 syphilis trend studies/reports) from Western Europe were identified and included in this review. Taken together, our findings indicate an increase in the numbers and rates (per 100,000) of syphilis infections among MSM in the US and Western Europe since 1998. Disparities in the syphilis trends among MSM were also noted, with greater increases observed among HIV-positive MSM than HIV-negative MSM in both the US and Western Europe. In the US, racial minority MSM and MSM between 20 and 29 years accounted for the greatest increases in syphilis infections over time whereas White MSM accounted for most syphilis infections over time in Western Europe. Multiple strategies, including strengthening and targeting current syphilis screening and testing programs, and the prompt treatment of syphilis cases are warranted to address the increase in syphilis infections among all MSM in the US and Western Europe, but particularly among HIV-infected MSM, racial minority MSM, and young MSM in the US. PMID:27447943

  18. Serum TRSUT Titer ≥1: 16 Is a Predictor for Neurosyphilis Among HIV-Infected Patients With Concurrent Syphilis and No Neurological Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian-Jun; Wang, Zhen-Yan; Shen, Jia-Yin; Shen, Yin-Zhong; Liu, Li; Wang, Jiang-Rong; Zhang, Ren-Fang; Lu, Hong-Zhou

    2015-11-01

    Investigating the predictors for lumbar puncture to diagnose the asymptomatic neurosyphilis among HIV and syphilis co-infected patients in Shanghai, China. Respectively, screening the medical records from August 1, 2009 to June 30, 2015. Those HIV-infected patients with concurrent syphilis who had received lumbar puncture were selected and their clinical and demographic data were recorded. Participants comprised symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. The latter ones could be further divided into 3 groups: late syphilis, early syphilis with anti-syphilis treatment failure, and early syphilis with serum toludine red unheated serum test (TRUST) ≥1:32. Both syphilis stage and anti-syphilis treatment effect were defined by common criteria, and syphilis of unknown duration was considered as late syphilis. Asymptomatic neurosyphilis was defined as neurosyphilis without neurological symptoms such as headache, cognitive dysfunction, motor deficits, auditory or ophthalmic abnormalities, and stroke. Neurosyphilis was defined as reactive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) TRUST and/or CSF white blood cell >20 cells/μL without other reasons. Mann-Whitney test and Fisher's exact test were used for analyzing the difference between neurosyphilis and non-neurosyphilis group. Logistic regression test was performed to analyze the risk factors for neurosyphilis. In total, 170 participants were collected, and the rate of neurosyphilis was 32.35%. Among all the 105 participants without neurological symptoms, 80 patients were with late syphilis and 25 were with early syphilis. Among the early syphilis patients, 23 had a TRUST ≥1:32 and the other 2 experienced an anti-syphilis treatment failure. The differences of clinical and demographic variables between neurosyphilis and non-neurosyphilis group were not statistically significant except the serum TRUST titer (P < 0.01). From HIV/syphilis co-infected patients with or without neurological symptom, those who had neurological symptoms, CD

  19. Epidemiology of syphilis infection among drug users at methadone maintenance treatment clinics in China: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing-xiang; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yu-jie; Yan, Jun-wei; Wan, Ya-nan; Peng, Wen-jia; Wang, Jing

    2014-07-01

    Illicit drug trade has re-emerged in China since 1979 and the number of drug addicts had increased. Syphilis is mainly spread through sexual contact and blood. The incidence of syphilis is high among drug users. Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) clinics have been implemented in China since 2004. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and risk factors of syphilis among drug users at MMT clinics in China between 2004 and 2013. Chinese and English databases (CBM, CNKI, Weipu, Pubmed) of literature were searched for studies reporting syphilis among drug users in MMT clinics from 2004 to 2013. The prevalence estimates and risk factors were summarized through a systematic review and meta-analysis of published literatures. In all, 29 eligible articles with a total of 8899 drug users, were selected in this review. The pooled prevalence of syphilis infection was 7.78% (95%CI: 5.83%-9.99%). The meta-analyses demonstrated significant differences in syphilis infection rates between men and women (OR = 0.34 [95%CI: 0.26-0.45]) but not between drug users and non-intravenous drug users (OR = 0.82 [95%CI: 0.51-1.32]). Enhanced detection of syphilis and health promotion is warranted in MMT clinics in China.

  20. [Incidence of congenital syphilis and factors associated with vertical transmission: data from the Birth in Brazil study].

    PubMed

    Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2016-06-20

    The objectives were to estimate incidence of congenital syphilis and verify factors associated with vertical transmission. A national hospital-based study was performed in 2011-2012 with 23,894 postpartum women using an in-hospital interview and data from patient charts and prenatal cards. Univariate logistic regression was performed to verify factors associated with congenital syphilis. Estimated incidence of congenital syphilis was 3.51 per 1,000 live births (95%CI: 2.29-5.37) and vertical transmission rate was 34.3% (95%CI: 24.7-45.4). Congenital syphilis was associated with lower maternal schooling, black skin color, higher rate of risk factors for prematurity, late initiation of prenatal care, fewer prenatal visits, and lower rate of prenatal serological testing. Fetal mortality was six times higher in congenital syphilis, and newborns with congenital syphilis showed higher hospital admission rates. Congenital syphilis is a persistent public health problem in Brazil and is associated with greater social vulnerability and gaps in prenatal care. PMID:27333146

  1. Finding a Needle in the Haystack: The Costs and Cost-Effectiveness of Syphilis Diagnosis and Treatment during Pregnancy to Prevent Congenital Syphilis in Kalomo District of Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Bruce A.; Lembela-Bwalya, Deophine; Bonawitz, Rachael; Hammond, Emily E.; Thea, Donald M.; Herlihy, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Background In March 2012, The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation trained maternal and child health workers in Southern Province of Zambia to use a new rapid syphilis test (RST) during routine antenatal care. A recent study by Bonawitz et al. (2014) evaluated the impact of this roll out in Kalomo District. This paper estimates the costs and cost-effectiveness from the provider's perspective under the actual conditions observed during the first year of the RST roll out. Methods Information on materials used and costs were extracted from program records. A decision-analytic model was used to evaluate the costs (2012 USD) and cost-effectiveness. Basic parameters needed for the model were based on the results from the evaluation study. Results During the evaluation study, 62% of patients received a RST, and 2.8% of patients tested were positive (and 10.4% of these were treated). Even with very high RST sensitivity and specificity (98%), true prevalence of active syphilis would be substantially less (estimated at <0.7%). For 1,000 new ANC patients, costs of screening and treatment were estimated at $2,136, and the cost per avoided disability-adjusted-life year lost (DALY) was estimated at $628. Costs change little if all positives are treated (because prevalence is low and treatment costs are small), but the cost-per-DALY avoided falls to just $66. With full adherence to guidelines, costs increase to $3,174 per 1,000 patients and the cost-per-DALY avoided falls to $60. Conclusions Screening for syphilis is only useful for reducing adverse birth outcomes if patients testing positive are actually treated. Even with very low prevalence of syphilis (a needle in the haystack), cost effectiveness improves dramatically if those found positive are treated; additional treatment costs little but DALYs avoided are substantial. Without treatment, the needle is essentially found and thrown back into the haystack. PMID:25478877

  2. Perceptions, attitude and uptake of rapid syphilis testing services in antenatal clinics in North-Western Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Nnko, Soori; Changalucha, John; Mosha, Jacklin; Bunga, Catherine; Wamoyi, Joyce; Peeling, Rosanna; Mabey, David

    2016-06-01

    Infection with syphilis during pregnancy could cause spontaneous abortion, low birth weight and stillbirth. To prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes caused by syphilis, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends syphilis screening and treatment of all pregnant women attending antenatal care (ANC) services. Rapid syphilis testing (RST) demonstration project was introduced at ANC clinics in Tanzania in 2009, to assess the feasibility, acceptability and its impact on uptake of syphilis screening service. Data collection was composed of in-depth interviews with health workers and pregnant women attending ANC. Additionally, from the health facility registers we extracted information on the uptake of antenatal care services, including number of pregnant women screened and treated for syphilis. Introduction of RST at health facilities was appreciated by pregnant women attending ANC and health workers. Following the introduction of RST services at ANC clinics, we observed a significant increase of the uptake of syphilis screening. Pregnant women appreciated RST service since it reduced the frequency of their visits to the health facilities and shortened the duration that they spent at the clinics. Moreover, the provision of same-day screening and treatment services helped women to save money that they would have to spend on transportation for the follow up visits. Health workers felt that RST simplified procedures to diagnose syphilis, and enabled the health workers to test and treat large numbers of clients in a shorter period of time. Our study demonstrates that, it is feasible to introduce RST service in antenatal clinics. The RST was appreciated by health workers and pregnant women, since it simplifies syphilis screening procedures, saves the time that pregnant women used to waste to wait for the results, and saves the cost that women would have to spend on transportation to come back for treatment. PMID:26685146

  3. The ocular manifestations of syphilis in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected host.

    PubMed

    McLeish, W M; Pulido, J S; Holland, S; Culbertson, W W; Winward, K

    1990-02-01

    Nine patients with active ocular or optic nerve involvement by syphilis who also had concurrent human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection are described. The ocular manifestations of syphilis led to the discovery of HIV-1 seropositivity in four of nine cases. Fifteen eyes were affected. Ocular manifestations were: iridocyclitis in three eyes, vitreitis in one eye, retinitis or neuroretinitis in five eyes, papillitis in two eyes, optic perineuritis in two eyes, and retrobulbar optic neuritis in two eyes. Three patients diagnosed with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) had the worst initial visual acuities. Six of nine patients had evidence of concomitant central nervous syndrome (CNS) involvement with syphilis. Benzathine penicillin was administered intramuscularly to three patients. All three had relapses. Seven of nine patients treated intravenously with high-dose penicillin had dramatic responses to therapy with improvement in vision and serologies and no evidence of relapse. Regimens accepted for the treatment of neurosyphilis appear to be adequate for the treatment of ocular syphilis in HIV-1-infected patients though further long-term follow-up will be required. PMID:2326008

  4. Use of Treponema pallidum PCR in Testing of Ulcers for Diagnosis of Primary Syphilis1

    PubMed Central

    Sednaoui, Patrice; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ferry, Tristan; Toutous-Trellu, Laurence; Cavassini, Matthias; Yassir, Fatima; Martinez de Tejada, Begoña; Emonet, Stéphane; Combescure, Christophe; Schrenzel, Jacques; Perneger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) has been noted as a valid method for diagnosing syphilis. We compared Tp-PCR to a combination of darkfield microscopy (DFM), the reference method, and serologic testing in a cohort of 273 patients from France and Switzerland and found the diagnostic accuracy of Tp-PCR was higher than that for DFM. PMID:25531672

  5. Use of Treponema pallidum PCR in testing of ulcers for diagnosis of primary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Sednaoui, Patrice; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ferry, Tristan; Toutous-Trellu, Laurence; Cavassini, Matthias; Yassir, Fatima; Martinez de Tejada, Begoña; Emonet, Stéphane; Combescure, Christophe; Schrenzel, Jacques; Perneger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) has been noted as a valid method for diagnosing syphilis. We compared Tp-PCR to a combination of darkfield microscopy (DFM), the reference method, and serologic testing in a cohort of 273 patients from France and Switzerland and found the diagnostic accuracy of Tp-PCR was higher than that for DFM. PMID:25531672

  6. Sexually transmitted diseases and native Americans: trends in reported gonorrhea and syphilis morbidity, 1984-88.

    PubMed Central

    Toomey, K E; Oberschelp, A G; Greenspan, J R

    1989-01-01

    Native Americans experienced higher reported gonorrhea and syphilis morbidity than did non-Native Americans from 1984 through 1988 in 13 States with large Native American populations. Gonorrhea rates among American Indians and Alaska Natives were approximately twice the rates for non-Indians. The highest gonorrhea rate was reported among Alaska Natives, with a 5-year average of 1,470 cases per 100,000, more than five times the average non-Native rate in Alaska. The average primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis rate from 1984 through 1988 was more than two times higher among Native Americans, largely due to high syphilis morbidity in Arizona and New Mexico. In Arizona the average American Indian P&S syphilis case rate was seven times higher than the non-Indian rate. True rates for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) among Native Americans may be higher than those reported due to racial misclassification of Native American cases, particularly in nonreservation areas. Improved recognition and reporting of STD cases among Native Americans are needed to target STD prevention and education more effectively. PMID:2511589

  7. Detailed Knowledge of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: Who Knows What? A Framework for Health Promotion Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, B. Lee; Li, Lin; Morris, J. Fontain; Gluzman, Rima; Davis, Jenna L.; Wang, Min Qi; Katz, Ralph V.

    2011-01-01

    This report explores the level of detailed knowledge about the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (TSS) among 848 Blacks and Whites in three U.S. cities across an array of demographic variables. The Tuskegee Legacy Project (TLP) Questionnaire was used, which was designed to explore the willingness of minorities to participate in biomedical studies. A…

  8. A Novel Quantum Dots-Based Point of Care Test for Syphilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Li, Ding; He, Rong; Guo, Qin; Wang, Kan; Zhang, Xueqing; Huang, Peng; Cui, Daxiang

    2010-05-01

    One-step lateral flow test is recommended as the first line screening of syphilis for primary healthcare settings in developing countries. However, it generally shows low sensitivity. We describe here the development of a novel fluorescent POC (Point Of Care) test method to be used for screening for syphilis. The method was designed to combine the rapidness of lateral flow test and sensitiveness of fluorescent method. 50 syphilis-positive specimens and 50 healthy specimens conformed by Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) were tested with Quantum Dot-labeled and colloidal gold-labeled lateral flow test strips, respectively. The results showed that both sensitivity and specificity of the quantum dots-based method reached up to 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91-100%), while those of the colloidal gold-based method were 82% (95% CI, 68-91%) and 100% (95% CI, 91-100%), respectively. In addition, the naked-eye detection limit of quantum dot-based method could achieve 2 ng/ml of anti-TP47 polyclonal antibodies purified by affinity chromatography with TP47 antigen, which was tenfold higher than that of colloidal gold-based method. In conclusion, the quantum dots were found to be suitable for labels of lateral flow test strip. Its ease of use, sensitiveness and low cost make it well-suited for population-based on-the-site syphilis screening.

  9. Syphilis as a Sole Indicator of Sexual Abuse: Two Cases with No Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Susan; Chadwick, David L.

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of suspected sexual abuse of five-year-old children with syphilis are reported. Lack of confirmation of abuse by either child or in parental interviews led to closing of the cases by Child Protection Services and continued residence by the children in their original homes. (DB)

  10. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus, syphilis, hepatitis B and C in blood donations in Namibia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transfusion Transmissible Infections (TTIs) such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), syphilis, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are infections which are common in some communities in Southern Africa. It is important to screen blood donations for these infections. Methods This is a retrospective study which involved reviewing of previous blood donation records for the year 2012 in Namibia. The records were analyzed to determine the prevalence of HIV, syphilis, Hepatitis B and C among blood donations with regard to gender, age and geographical region of the donors. Results The findings indicated a significantly low prevalence of HIV, syphilis, HBsAg and anti-Hepatitis C among the blood donations. A low infection rate of 1.3% by any of the four tested TTIs was found among the blood donations given by the donor population in Namibia in 2012. Conclusion The blood donations given by the donor population in Namibia has a low infection rate with the HIV, syphilis, HBsAg and anti-HCV. A strict screening regime must continue to be used as the infections are still present albeit in small numbers. PMID:24884633

  11. Evaluation of a rapid strip and a particle agglutination tests for syphilis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Figueroa, Luis; Uribe-Salas, Felipe; García-Cisneros, Santa; Olamendi-Portugal, María; Conde-Glez, Carlos J

    2007-10-01

    The availability of new diagnostic approaches, which are easier and faster to perform than conventional tests, offers the opportunity to improve the attention given to public health problems as syphilis. This study aimed to evaluate a rapid immunochromatographic strip test (Determine TP; Abbott Laboratories, Chicago, IL) and a nonequipment demanding particle microagglutination test (Serodia TP-PA; Fujirebio, Japan) for qualitative detection of treponemic antibodies. Sera from 548 women belonging to 3 population groups were tested; one of them showing low syphilis seroprevalence (1.5%) and the other 2 showing higher seroprevalences (>15%). By comparison with the gold standard (Venereal Disease Research Laboratories plus fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption), sensitivity and specificity values for both diagnostic tests were calculated. Sensitivity values of both tests evaluated were higher than 95% for 2 groups of 3 addressed; in one of the high syphilis prevalence groups, Serodia TP-PA showed 88.6% sensitivity. Specificity values were above 95% for all 3 groups. The use of simple/rapid treponemic tests as those included here may prove to be a suitable replacement for the traditional syphilis serology diagnosis approach, particularly at primary care settings.

  12. The impact of syphilis mass treatment one year later: self-reported behaviour change among participants.

    PubMed

    Rekart, Michael L; Wong, Thomas; Wong, Elsie; Hutchinson, Kylie; Ogilvie, Gina

    2005-08-01

    In 2000, syphilis mass treatment using oral azithromycin was delivered to at-risk British Columbians during a sex trade-related outbreak. The initiative included education, counselling and referral. This cross-sectional, observational study examines knowledge, attitudes and self-reported behaviour after one year among mass treatment participants compared with eligible non-participants. Participants self-reported positive changes: reduction in sexual partners overall (P=0.001) and for sex workers (P<0.01), decrease in unprotected oral sex (P=0.03), knowledge of asymptomatic syphilis (P=0.02), positive attitudes to mass treatment (P=0.02) and to the street nurses (P=0.01). Increased awareness was associated with increased condom use for vaginal sex overall (P=0.02) and for sex workers (P=0.03) and increased condom use for oral sex (P=0.05). There was no difference in syphilis incidence. Syphilis outbreak interventions that include education, support and referral can result in long-term positive behaviour changes. PMID:16105193

  13. Italian national survey of blood donors: external quality assessment (EQA) of syphilis testing.

    PubMed

    Vulcano, Francesca; Milazzo, Luisa; Volpi, Sabrina; Battista, Mara Maria; Barca, Alessandra; Hassan, Hamisa Jane; Pimpinelli, Fulvia; Giampaolo, Adele

    2010-03-01

    The detection of syphilis among blood donors may reveal high-risk sexual behavior, which can go unreported at the time of donor selection and compromise the safety of the donated blood. In Italy, blood is collected, tested, and distributed by transfusion services (TSs), which also perform outpatient transfusions. Although the TSs must screen for syphilis by law, there are no indications of the specific type of method to be used, generating discrepancies in the results obtained by the different TSs. To determine the proficiency of the TSs in screening for syphilis, we performed an external quality assessment (EQA). The EQA was based on two shipments of serum panels; 133 and 118 of the 326 existing TSs participated in the first and second shipments, respectively. Each panel consisted of both positive and negative serum samples. The results confirmed that the use of a single nontreponemal test (the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory [VDRL] and the rapid plasma reagin [RPR] tests) is the least sensitive means of identifying samples that are positive for syphilis antibodies. We also found that the interpretation of the results of manual techniques, such as the RPR test, the VDRL test, the Treponema pallidum hemagglutination (TPHA) assay, and the T. pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay, can vary greatly among different TSs and operators. Total Ig enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) are the most sensitive. However, the determination of syphilis on the basis of the results of a single test is not sufficient for an accurate screening; and all blood units should thus be assessed by two distinct treponemal tests, that is, a total Ig EIA and the TPHA or the TPPA assay. PMID:20042617

  14. Genital Cytomegalovirus Replication Predicts Syphilis Acquisition among HIV-1 Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Gianella, Sara; Smith, Davey M.; Daar, Eric S.; Dube, Michael P.; Lisco, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid; Haubrich, Richard H.; Morris, Sheldon R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Sexually transmitted infections (STI) are common among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). While behavioral factors are important in STI acquisition, other biological factors such as immune modulation due to chronic viral infection may further predispose to STI acquisition. Design Post Hoc analysis including data collected over 12 months of follow-up from 131 HIV-infected MSM receiving antiretroviral therapy and screened for incident bacterial STI every 3 months. Methods Genital secretions collected at baseline were used to measure herpesvirus replication and inflammatory cytokines. Baseline predictors of STI were determined using survival analysis of time to incident STI. Results All participants were seropositive for cytomegalovirus (CMV), and 52% had detectable genital CMV at baseline. Thirty-five individuals acquired STI during follow-up, sometimes with multiple pathogen (17 syphilis, 21 gonorrhea, 14 chlamydia). Syphilis acquisition was associated with genital CMV replication at baseline (19.1% CMV-shedders versus 4.8% non-shedders, p=0.03) and younger age (p=0.02). Lower seminal MCP-1 was associated with higher seminal CMV levels and with syphilis acquisition (p<0.01). For syphilis acquisition, in multivariable Cox-Proportional Hazard model adjusted hazard rates were 3.56 (95%CI:1.00–12.73) for baseline CMV replication and 2.50 (0.92–6.77) for younger age. Conclusions This post hoc analysis suggest that CMV-associated decrease in seminal MCP-1 levels might predispose HIV-infected MSM to syphilis acquisition, but not other STI. Future studies should determine underlying mechanisms and if a causal association exists. PMID:26061824

  15. Duration of syphilis symptoms at presentations in men who have sex with men in Australia: are current public health campaigns effective?

    PubMed

    Chow, E P F; Dutt, K; Fehler, G; Denham, I; Chen, M Y; Batrouney, C; Peel, J; Read, T R H; Bradshaw, C S; Fairley, C K

    2016-01-01

    The rapid rise in syphilis cases has prompted a number of public health campaigns to assist men who have sex with men (MSM) recognize and present early with symptoms. This study aimed to investigate the temporal trend of the duration of self-report symptoms and titre of rapid plasma reagin (RPR) in MSM with infectious syphilis. Seven hundred and sixty-one syphilis cases in MSM diagnosed at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC) from 2007-2013 were reviewed. Median duration of symptoms and RPR titres in each year were calculated. The median durations of symptoms with primary and secondary syphilis were 9 [interquartile range (IQR) 6-14] days and 14 (IQR 7-30) days, respectively. The overall median titre of RPR in secondary syphilis (median 128, IQR 64-256) was higher than in primary syphilis (median 4, IQR 1-32) and in early latent syphilis (median 32, IQR 4-64). The median duration of symptoms for primary syphilis, secondary syphilis and titre of RPR level did not change over time. Public health campaigns were not associated with a significant shorter time from onset of symptoms to treatment. Alternative strategies such as more frequent testing of MSM should be promoted to control the syphilis epidemic in Australia.

  16. What is the role of a full physical examination in the management of asymptomatic patients with late syphilis?

    PubMed

    Dabis, R; Radcliffe, K

    2012-12-01

    According to the British Association for Sexual Health and HIV guidelines, a full physical examination is recommended in patients with possible late syphilis. The aim of this audit was to review all cases of late syphilis diagnosed at our centre since 1994 to see if a full cardiovascular and neurological examination was documented and also to see what a full examination contributed to the management of asymptomatic patients. Of the 480 medical notes audited, 295 patients were asymptomatic of whom 288 (98%) had normal physical examinations; the rest were either not documented, declined or defaulted follow-up. Seven asymptomatic patients had positive clinical findings but these did not lead to a diagnosis of cardiovascular or neurological syphilis. This audit has shown that performing a physical examination in asymptomatic patients added no benefit in diagnosing complications of late syphilis; it would appear that the physical examination did not alter the management.

  17. Syphilis and human experimentation from World War II to the present: a historical perspective and reflections on ethics.

    PubMed

    Cuerda-Galindo, E; Sierra-Valenti, X; González-López, E; López-Muñoz, F

    2014-11-01

    Even after the Nuremberg code was published, research on syphilis often continued to fall far short of ethical standards. We review post-World War II research on this disease, focusing on the work carried out in Guatemala and Tuskegee. Over a thousand adults were deliberately inoculated with infectious material for syphilis, chancroid, and gonorrhea between 1946 and 1948 in Guatemala, and thousands of serologies were performed in individuals belonging to indigenous populations or sheltered in orphanages. The Tuskegee syphilis study, conducted by the US Public Health Service, took place between 1932 and 1972 with the aim of following the natural history of the disease when left untreated. The subjects belonged to a rural black population and the study was not halted when effective treatment for syphilis became available in 1945. PMID:24461955

  18. Syphilis and human experimentation from World War II to the present: a historical perspective and reflections on ethics.

    PubMed

    Cuerda-Galindo, E; Sierra-Valenti, X; González-López, E; López-Muñoz, F

    2014-11-01

    Even after the Nuremberg code was published, research on syphilis often continued to fall far short of ethical standards. We review post-World War II research on this disease, focusing on the work carried out in Guatemala and Tuskegee. Over a thousand adults were deliberately inoculated with infectious material for syphilis, chancroid, and gonorrhea between 1946 and 1948 in Guatemala, and thousands of serologies were performed in individuals belonging to indigenous populations or sheltered in orphanages. The Tuskegee syphilis study, conducted by the US Public Health Service, took place between 1932 and 1972 with the aim of following the natural history of the disease when left untreated. The subjects belonged to a rural black population and the study was not halted when effective treatment for syphilis became available in 1945.

  19. Awareness and knowledge of the U.S. Public Health Service syphilis study at Tuskegee: implications for biomedical research.

    PubMed

    McCallum, Jan M; Arekere, Dhananjaya M; Green, B Lee; Katz, Ralph V; Rivers, Brian M

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this review was to collect and interpret the findings of all published qualitative or quantitative research that assessed African Americans' 1) general awareness and/or specific knowledge of the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) Syphilis Study at Tuskegee, and 2) attitudes towards and/or willingness to participate in biomedical research. An exhaustive review of the literature produced eight articles that fit the aforementioned selection criteria. All articles that assessed both awareness and knowledge found that familiarity with the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee did not necessarily ensure accurate knowledge of it. Four studies also found that awareness of the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee did not relate to willingness to participate in biomedical research. In addition to awareness and knowledge of the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee, published studies suggest that a broad array of structural and sociocultural factors influence minorities' willingness to participate in biomedical studies.

  20. The Cost-Effectiveness of Syphilis Screening Among Men Who Have Sex With Men: An Exploratory Modeling Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chesson, Harrell W; Kidd, Sarah; Bernstein, Kyle T; Fanfair, Robyn Neblett; Gift, Thomas L

    2016-07-01

    We adapted a published model to estimate the costs and benefits of screening men who have sex with men for syphilis, including the benefits of preventing syphilis-attributable human immunodeficiency virus. The cost per quality-adjusted life year gained by screening was

  1. Factors associated with HIV and syphilis co-infection among men who have sex with men in seven Chinese cities.

    PubMed

    Das, Aritra; Li, Jianjun; Zhong, Fei; Ouyang, Lin; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Tang, Weiming; Fu, Gengfeng; Zhao, Jinkou; Detels, Roger

    2015-03-01

    HIV-syphilis co-infection is often cited as a major reason behind recent resurgence in syphilis prevalence among men who have sex with men in China. Most published literatures explore factors associated with either HIV or syphilis, but not their co-infection. We analysed data from a cross-sectional survey on men who have sex with men in seven Chinese cities. Snowball sampling was used to recruit participants for the survey. Socio-demographic and behavioural predictors for HIV-syphilis mono/co-infection were examined using ordinal logistic regression. Factor scores were used to summarise (1) HIV-related knowledge and (2) access to HIV preventive services. Prevalence of HIV, syphilis, and their co-infection, among 2936 self-identified men who have sex with men, were 7.7%, 14.3%, and 2.6%, respectively. In the adjusted analysis, the significant positive correlates of poorer diagnoses (co-infection vs mono- and no infection or co- and mono-infection vs no infection) were: 30 to 39 years and ≥40 years age, education up to senior high school, unprotected anal intercourse, recent sexually transmitted infection symptoms, incorrect knowledge about routes of transmission, and access to preventive or counselling/testing services for HIV. For effective control of this dual epidemic, integrated HIV and syphilis surveillance and targeted intervention strategies for Chinese men who have sex with men are needed urgently.

  2. The Effect of a Structural Intervention for Syphilis Control Among 3597 Female Sex Workers: A Demonstration Study in South China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoxi; Wang, Qian-Qiu; Yin, Yue-Ping; Liang, Guo-Jun; Jiang, Ning; Gong, Xiang-Dong; Yang, Bin; Zhou, Yue-Jiao; Liu, Qiao; Huan, Xi-Ping; Yang, Li-Gang; Tan, Guang-Jie; Pei, Dong-Nu; Tucker, Joseph D.; Chen, Xiang-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Background. Syphilis has made a rapid resurgence in China, especially among high-risk groups including female sex workers (FSWs). Methods. Two cities in each of 3 provinces in South China were chosen and allocated to intervention or control arms. The intervention consisted of enhancing community-based syphilis screening outreach intervention with comprehensive sexually transmitted infection services at designated clinics while the control maintained routine intervention activities. Generalized linear modeling was used to examine effect of the intervention on incident syphilis infection. Results. A total of 8275 women were eligible, and 3597 women enrolled (n = 2011 in control arm, n = 1586 in intervention arm) in the study. The median follow-up duration was 375 days (interquartile range, 267–475). Syphilis incidence density in the intervention group was reduced by 70% (95% confidence interval, 53%–81%) compared with the incidence in the control arm. The syphilis prevention intervention benefits were robust among FSWs at low-tier venues, individuals with less than high school education, migrants, and women who did not report condom use during the last episode of sex. Conclusions. Integrated sexually transmitted infection and human immunodeficiency virus prevention strategies substantially reduce syphilis incidence among FSWs, especially among those at low-tier venues. This intervention suggests the need for scaling up comprehensive FSW programs in China. PMID:22807520

  3. The Prevalence of Syphilis Infection and Its Associated Factors in the General Population of Rwanda: A National Household-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Mutagoma, Mwumvaneza; Remera, Eric; Sebuhoro, Dieudonné; Kanters, Steve; Riedel, David J.; Nsanzimana, Sabin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of syphilis among HIV-infected people is a public health concern, but there is limited literature to describe the true burden of syphilis in resource-limited settings. We conducted this survey in 2013 to estimate the prevalence of syphilis. Methods. A cross-sectional survey. Participants were tested for syphilis and HIV. Factors associated with syphilis infection were identified. Results. The prevalence of syphilis was 0.9% (95% CI: 0.7–1.1). This prevalence was higher in the 25–49-year-old age (1.1% [95% CI: 0.8–1.3]) than in the 15–24-year-old age (0.6% (95% CI: 0.4–0.9)). Women with lower education had a higher prevalence of syphilis (1.2% (95% CI: 0.9–1.5)) compared to others (0.4% (95% CI: 0.2–0.8)). This prevalence among HIV-infected people was six times higher: 4.8% (95% CI: 2.9–7.9) compared to HIV-negative people (0.8% (95% CI: 0.6–1.0)). The prevalence of syphilis among HIV-infected females was 5.9% (95% CI: 3.4–10.0). HIV-infected or concurrent sexual partners was associated with increased syphilis prevalence with aOR = 4.2 (95% CI: 2.5–7.2) and aOR = 4.2 (95% CI: 2.8–6.5), respectively. Conclusions. The prevalence of syphilis was significantly higher among HIV-infected patients. HIV infection and concurrent sexual partners are associated with an increased prevalence of syphilis. Preventing HIV might help in preventing syphilis. PMID:27123356

  4. Secondary syphilis in the oral cavity and the role of the dental surgeon in STD prevention, diagnosis and treatment: a case series study.

    PubMed

    Seibt, Creta Elisa; Munerato, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. Syphilis has three clinical stages and may present various oral manifestations, mainly at the secondary stage. The disease mimics other more common oral mucosa lesions, going undiagnosed and with no proper treatment. Despite the advancements in medicine toward prevention, diagnosis, and treatment syphilis remains a public health problem worldwide. In this sense, dental surgeons should be able to identify the most common manifestations of the disease in the oral cavity, pointing to the role of this professional in prevention and diagnosis. This study describes a case series of seven patients with secondary syphilis presenting different oral manifestations. PMID:27208390

  5. Incidence of syphilis seroconversion among HIV-infected persons in Asia: results from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin Young; Boettiger, David; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Huy, Bui Vu; Wong, Wing Wai; Ditangco, Rossana; Lee, Man Po; Oka, Shinichi; Durier, Nicolas; Choi, Jun Yong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Outbreaks of syphilis have been described among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) in Western communities, whereas reports in Asian countries are limited. We aimed to characterize the incidence and temporal trends of syphilis among HIV-infected MSM compared with HIV-infected non-MSM in Asian countries. Methods Patients enrolled in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database cohort and with a negative non-treponemal test since enrolment were analyzed. Incidence of syphilis seroconversion, defined as a positive non-treponemal test after previously testing negative, was evaluated among patients at sites performing non-treponemal tests at least annually. Factors associated with syphilis seroconversion were investigated at sites doing non-treponemal testing in all new patients and subsequently testing routinely or when patients were suspected of having syphilis. Results We included 1010 patients from five sites that performed non-treponemal tests in all new patients; those included had negative non-treponemal test results during enrolment and subsequent follow-ups. Among them, 657 patients were from three sites conducting regular non-treponemal testing. The incidence of syphilis seroconversion was 5.38/100 person-years (PY). Incidence was higher in MSM than non-MSM (7.64/100 PY vs. 2.44/100 PY, p<0.001). Among MSM, the incidence rate ratio (IRR) for every additional year from 2009 was 1.19 (p=0.051). MSM status (IRR 3.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.88–6.47), past syphilis diagnosis (IRR 5.15, 95% CI 3.69–7.17) and younger age (IRR 0.84 for every additional 10 years, 95% CI 0.706–0.997) were significantly associated with syphilis seroconversion. Conclusions We observed a higher incidence of syphilis seroconversion among HIV-infected MSM and a trend to increasing annual incidence. Regular screening for syphilis and targeted interventions to limit transmission are needed in this population. PMID:27774955

  6. Brief communication: a case of congenital syphilis during the colonial period in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Mansilla, J; Pijoan, C M

    1995-06-01

    Congenital syphilis has been diagnosed very seldom in ancient populations. The case that we examined comes from San Jeronimo's Church (17th and 18th centuries AD; Mexico City). Coffin 43 contained an incomplete skeleton of an approximately 2-year-old infant. The pathological lesions of this skeleton include bilateral osteochondritis, diaphyseal osteomyelitis, and osteitis and/or periostitis on the long bones. The radiographic appearance depicts symmetrical osteomyelitic foci, particularly at the proximal extremity of both tibiae (Wimberger's sign). The skull exhibits hydrocephaly and periosteal changes on the vault, and the unerupted upper incisors evince dental hypoplasia and other pathological alterations reminiscent of Hutchinson's incisors. All these features strongly suggest a case of early congenital syphilis.

  7. Syphilis in the South: rural rates surpass urban rates in North Carolina.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J C; Kulik, A L; Schoenbach, V J

    1995-01-01

    We studied primary and secondary syphilis rates in North Carolina for 1985 through 1993 to elucidate demographic trends and the role of rurality in the state's high rates. Each of the state's 100 counties was classified by rural-urban character; and county-level rates, adjusted for gender, race, and age group, were compared. Syphilis rates rose dramatically during the 9-year period, with most of the increase occurring among women, non-Whites, and rural counties. The rural rates recently surpassed urban rates, with the greatest increase experienced by non-White rural women. The exchange of sex for drugs and characteristics of rural poverty may be fueling these trends. PMID:7625508

  8. [Substantial increase in gonorrhea and syphilis among clients of Amsterdam Sexually Transmitted Diseases Clinic].

    PubMed

    Fennema, J S; Cairo, I; Coutinho, R A

    2000-03-25

    In the Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) clinic of the Amsterdam Municipal Health Service standardized data are collected about all visitors, which makes it possible to gain insight into the STD trends. In 1999, 706 new cases of gonorrhoea and 76 new cases of infectious syphilis were diagnosed, increases of 46% and 111% respectively compared with 1998. The largest increase was seen among men who had sex with men. In this group the number of diagnosed cases of anorectal gonorrhoea in 1999 was twice as high as in 1998 (186 versus 94) and the number of infectious syphilis cases four times as high (40 versus 9). These data indicate an increase in unsafe sexual behaviour, possibly because of a change in attitudes about AIDS, now that effective antiretroviral treatment is available.

  9. [Low seroprevalence of syphilis and HIV in refugees and asylum seekers in Germany in 2015].

    PubMed

    Jablonka, A; Solbach, P; Nothdorft, S; Hampel, A; Schmidt, R E; Behrens, G M N

    2016-07-01

    Background | Currently only estimates exist of seroprevalence of syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in refugees arriving in Germany during the current refugee crisis. Objectives | To assess the prevalence of syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in refugees arriving in northern Germany in 2015. Materials and methods | In a cross-sectional study in 790 patients from all age groups tests for serological markers of treponema pallidum and in 789 patients for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were performed in August 2015 in reception centers in northern Germany. Results | The overall prevalence of treponema pallidum antibodies was 0.13 % (1/790; [95 % CI: 0 - 0.4]). HIV antibodies were positive in two refugees from sub-Saharan Africa (2/789; 0.25 %, [95 % CI: 0 - 0.6]). Conclusions | This study showed a low prevalence of treponema pallidum antibodies and human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) in a German refugee cohort, not significantly different from German controls. PMID:27404938

  10. What's new in sexually transmitted infections in the HIV care setting: focus on syphilis and gonorrhea.

    PubMed

    Marrazzo, Jeanne M

    Sexually transmitted infections are a resurgent problem in HIV disease. The number of new cases of syphilis among men who have sex with men has continued to increase, requiring renewed vigilance in screening, diagnosis, and treatment. Drug-resistant gonorrhea has prompted changes in treatment regimens and warrants continued monitoring. This article summarizes an IAS-USA continuing education webinar presented by Jeanne M. Marrazzo, MD, MPH, in January 2014.

  11. A WHO study of treatment schedules for early syphilis in use throughout the world

    PubMed Central

    Willcox, R. R.

    1954-01-01

    Ten years have elapsed since penicillin was introduced in the treatment of syphilis. In order to appraise recent trends in syphilotherapy in the world, WHO carried out a detailed study of treatment practices in early syphilis. A questionnaire was circulated to leading venereologists and clinics in the world, and 277 replies were received from 55 countries giving particulars of 294 schedules. A total of 65.3% of the participants used penicillin alone and 28.9% used it in combination with other drugs. In North America all clinics relied solely on penicillin as against 52.2% in Europe; and procaine penicillin G in oil with aluminium monostearate (PAM) was used in 91% of clinics in the Americas and Asia and in 60.6% of European clinics. The most common dosage of penicillin in all stages of early syphilis was 4.8-6.0 million units; but appreciably larger doses were used in Europe than elsewhere, some 39.4% of schedules using 10.8 million units or more. There were single instances of 36 million units being given. Consolidation treatment was given in none of the North American clinics; seldom in Asia; by about one-third of the participants in Central and South America; and, for secondary syphilis, in 59% of European schedules. This study shows that with intensive treatment with PAM the saving in drug cost to clinics over the classical courses of arsenic and bismuth may be as much as £4 per case, but the overhead expenses are, of course, not reduced. PMID:13182588

  12. Hepatitis B, HIV, and Syphilis Seroprevalence in Pregnant Women and Blood Donors in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Mbah, Rahel; Rembert, Nicole J.; Tancho, Samuel; Halle-Ekane, Gregory E.; Enah, Comfort; Welty, Thomas K.; Tih, Pius M.; Tita, Alan T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated seroprevalence and correlates of selected infections in pregnant women and blood donors in a resource-limited setting. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of laboratory seroprevalence data from pregnant women and voluntary blood donors from facilities in Cameroon in 2014. Rapid tests were performed to detect hepatitis B surface antigen, syphilis treponemal antibodies, and HIV-1/2 antibodies. Blood donations were also tested for hepatitis C and malaria. Results. The seroprevalence rates and ranges among 7069 pregnant women were hepatitis B 4.4% (1.1–9.6%), HIV 6% (3.0–10.2%), and syphilis 1.7% (1.3–3.8%) with significant variability among the sites. Correlates of infection in pregnancy in adjusted regression models included urban residence for hepatitis B (aOR 2.9, CI 1.6–5.4) and HIV (aOR 3.5, CI 1.9–6.7). Blood donor seroprevalence rates and ranges were hepatitis B 6.8% (5.0–8.8%), HIV 2.2% (1.4–2.8%), syphilis 4% (3.3–4.5%), malaria 1.9%, and hepatitis C 1.7% (0.5–2.5%). Conclusions. Hepatitis B, HIV, and syphilis infections are common among pregnant women and blood donors in Cameroon with higher rates in urban areas. Future interventions to reduce vertical transmission should include universal screening for these infections early in pregnancy and provision of effective prevention tools including the birth dose of univalent hepatitis B vaccine. PMID:27578957

  13. [Screening of syphilis in the subsaharan African blood donor: which strategy?].

    PubMed

    Tagny, C T

    2009-01-01

    In a context of high prevalence of syphilis in blood donor and of resources-limited settings, this review aims to describe biological elements which are available for the screening of the disease and the essentials considerations which participate to choose a screening test in subsaharan Africa. Treponemics, non treponemics, immunochromatographics or nucleic, the type of the chosen screening test must contribute to the blood transfusion safety as well as be affordable. PMID:19695921

  14. The origin of syphilis. Clinical and epidemiologic considerations on the Columbian theory.

    PubMed

    Luger, A

    1993-01-01

    It is an unpleasant vogue of our day to soil the image of outstanding personalities. Christopher Columbus is blamed for the crimes and cruelties that were committed in the New World after his landing in San Salvador as well as for the import of syphilis from West India to Europe. Attempts to trace the origin of the pandemic of syphilis at the verge of the fifteenth century concluded with the myth that the disease was contracted in Haiti by members of Columbus' crew who later joined the army of Charles VIII of France and participated in the siege of Naples. The surrender of the town on February 22, 1495, at 4 pm (natal hour of syphilis) was followed by orgies, which led to infection of all participants, particularly of all soldiers, who then spread the disease on their journey back to France. This story is refuted on the ground of epidemiologic and clinical facts. Most of the crew of Columbus' first trip joined the admiral in his second expedition, too, left Europe on February 24, 1494, and did not return before June 11, 1496 (87 days, or 12.4 weeks). With not more than approximately 10 persons arriving in Naples for such a short stay, an endemic of syphilis of such grave proportions could not have occurred. The disease has an incubation period of 4 weeks and a contagiosity rate of approximately 30%. In addition, 2 years and 47 days had passed between the departure from Haiti and the arrival in Naples.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Clinical Evaluation of 2 Point-of-Care Lateral Flow Tests for the Diagnosis of Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Nakku-Joloba, Edith; Kiragga, Agnes; Mbazira, Joshua Kimeze; Kambugu, Fred; Jett-Goheen, Mary; Ratanshi, Rosalind Parkes; Gaydos, Charlotte; Manabe, Yukari C

    2016-10-01

    A diagnostic performance study comparing the only Food and Drug Administration-approved, point-of-care (POC) treponemal test (Syphilis Health Check) and the World Health Organization pre-qualified SD Bioline POC treponemal test against a treponemal hemagglutination test (TPHA) and a sequential algorithm of nontreponemal rapid plasma reagin and TPHA found both POC tests had >85% sensitivity compared with the TPHA and >85% sensitivity and >95% specificity compared with the rapid plasma reagin and TPHA standards. PMID:27631356

  16. Evaluation of the recombinant protein TpF1 of Treponema pallidum for serodiagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuanhao; Zhao, Feijun; Xiao, Jinhong; Zeng, Tiebing; Yu, Jian; Ma, Xiaohua; Wu, Haiying; Wu, Yimou

    2013-10-01

    Syphilis is a chronic infection caused by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, and diagnosis with sensitive and specific methods is a challenging process that is important for its prevention and treatment. In the present study, we established a recombinant protein TpF1-based indirect immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a Western blot assay for human and rabbit sera. The 20-kDa recombinant protein TpF1 was detected by Western blotting performed with sera from rabbits immunized with recombinant TpF1 and infected with the T. pallidum Nichols strain and T. pallidum clinical isolates but was not detected by Western blotting with sera from uninfected rabbits. The sensitivity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from individuals with primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis (n = 82). The specificity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from uninfected controls (n = 30) and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections, including Lyme disease (n = 30) and leptospirosis (n = 5). The sensitivities of TpF1-based ELISAs were 93.3%, 100%, 100%, and 100% for primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis, respectively, and the specificities were all 100% for sera from uninfected controls and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections. In Western blot assays, the sensitivities and specificities of TpF1 for human sera were all 100%. The reactivities of TpF1 with syphilitic sera were proportional to the titers of the T. pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay. These data indicate that the recombinant protein TpF1 is a highly immunogenic protein in human and rabbit infections and a promising marker for the screening of syphilis. PMID:23945159

  17. Oral syphilis: report of three cases and characterization of the inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Strieder, Luciana Rocha; León, Jorge Esquiche; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Kaminagakura, Estela

    2015-04-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum. This study reports 3 cases of syphilis and highlights the importance of identifying oral lesions for its final diagnosis. Case 1: a 48-year-old male patient presented with a bleeding ulcer in the lower lip. Overall clinical examination revealed patchy alopecia and skin target lesions. Case 2: a 61-year-old male patient presented with white spots on the lateral tongue and nodules on the dorsum of the tongue. Overall clinical examination showed erythematous target lesions on the abdomen, forearm, palms of the hand, and soles of the feet. Case 3: a 17-year-old male patient presented with an ulcerated lesion on the tongue and lymph node involvement. The following serologic tests were requested: Venereal Disease Research Laboratory, fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption, anti-HIV-1 and anti-HIV-2, and anti-hepatitis C virus. An incisional biopsy revealed epithelial hyperplasia associated with intense and diffuse mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltration consisting mainly of plasma cells, in a perivascular and perineural distribution. The final diagnosis in the 3 patients was syphilis. Treatment consisted of 1 weekly dose of penicillin (2.4 million units, intramuscular) for 2 or 3 weeks. Immunohistochemical reactions for XIIIa, CD3, CD20, CD68, CD163, S100, CD1a, CD11c, CD83, CD138, and CD208 were performed. Clinicians should be familiarized with oral syphilis lesions in order to be able to diagnose this emerging infectious disease of variable clinical presentation. PMID:25736987

  18. Hepatitis B, HIV, and Syphilis Seroprevalence in Pregnant Women and Blood Donors in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Dionne-Odom, Jodie; Mbah, Rahel; Rembert, Nicole J; Tancho, Samuel; Halle-Ekane, Gregory E; Enah, Comfort; Welty, Thomas K; Tih, Pius M; Tita, Alan T N

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated seroprevalence and correlates of selected infections in pregnant women and blood donors in a resource-limited setting. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of laboratory seroprevalence data from pregnant women and voluntary blood donors from facilities in Cameroon in 2014. Rapid tests were performed to detect hepatitis B surface antigen, syphilis treponemal antibodies, and HIV-1/2 antibodies. Blood donations were also tested for hepatitis C and malaria. Results. The seroprevalence rates and ranges among 7069 pregnant women were hepatitis B 4.4% (1.1-9.6%), HIV 6% (3.0-10.2%), and syphilis 1.7% (1.3-3.8%) with significant variability among the sites. Correlates of infection in pregnancy in adjusted regression models included urban residence for hepatitis B (aOR 2.9, CI 1.6-5.4) and HIV (aOR 3.5, CI 1.9-6.7). Blood donor seroprevalence rates and ranges were hepatitis B 6.8% (5.0-8.8%), HIV 2.2% (1.4-2.8%), syphilis 4% (3.3-4.5%), malaria 1.9%, and hepatitis C 1.7% (0.5-2.5%). Conclusions. Hepatitis B, HIV, and syphilis infections are common among pregnant women and blood donors in Cameroon with higher rates in urban areas. Future interventions to reduce vertical transmission should include universal screening for these infections early in pregnancy and provision of effective prevention tools including the birth dose of univalent hepatitis B vaccine. PMID:27578957

  19. Seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis in blood donors in Southern Haryana.

    PubMed

    Arora, Dimple; Arora, Bharti; Khetarpal, Anshul

    2010-01-01

    Blood transfusion is an important mode of transmission of infections to recipients. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of transfusion-transmissible infections among blood donors. For this, a 3.5-year retrospective study, from October 2002 to April 2006 was conducted at the blood transfusion centre of Maharaja Agrasen Medical College, Agroha (Hisar) Haryana. Donors were screened for seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis. A total of 5849 donors were tested, out of which 4010 (68.6%) were replacement donors and 1839 (31.4%) were voluntary donors. The seroprevalence of HIV was 0.3% in the donors. No voluntary donor was found to be positive for HIV. The low sero-positivity among donors is attributed to pre-donation counseling in donor selection. The seroprevalence of HBV, HCV and syphilis was 1.7%, 1.0% and 0.9% respectively in total donors. The seroprevalence of hepatitis and syphilis was more in replacement donors as compared to voluntary donors. PMID:20551540

  20. [Clinical and therapeutic differences in neuro-ophthalmological involvement secondary to syphilis].

    PubMed

    Crespo-Burillo, J A; Gil-Perez, D; Alarcia-Alejos, R; Hernando-Quintana, N; Garcia-Rubio, S; Martin-Martinez, J

    2014-09-16

    INTRODUCTION. There are many forms of neuro-ophthalmological involvement secondary to syphilis, and not all of them are well known. Our aim is to determine the clinical and therapeutic differences in these patients. CASE REPORTS. Our sample included eight patients diagnosed with an ocular and neuro-ophthalmological disorder due to syphilis over the years 2012 and 2013. Five of them presented uveitis, pan-eveitis being the most frequent, with three cases. Two cases presented papilloedema and another displayed retrobulbar optic neuropathy. A total of 62.5% were diagnosed with neurosyphilis, the presence of which was related with compromise of the optic nerve (p = 0.035). None of them gave positive for VDRL in cerebrospinal fluid and they were diagnosed by the presence of FTA antibodies together with high protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid, lymphocytic pleocytosis or intrathecal synthesis of antibodies. In the absence of uveitis, diagnosis was delayed by a mean time of 2.6 months (p = 0.047). All the patients, except one who required a vitrectomy, progressed favourably with intravenous antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSIONS. In cases of neuro-ophthalmological compromise, whether inflammatory or non-inflammatory, the physician must bear syphilis in mind as a potential causation in order to avoid delays in the diagnosis, since early well-tailored treatment can prevent permanent loss of sight.

  1. On the illness of Politian (Agnolo Ambrogini, 1454-1494): syphilis at its identification in Europe.

    PubMed

    Tagarelli, Antonio; Piro, Anna

    2014-08-01

    The authors investigated the life, the works and the illness of the humanist and poet Agnolo Ambrogini, better known as Politian, and the cause of his death, shedding evidence on the ambiguous meaning of the term scabies that is included in the titles of two works ascribed to Politian, namely 'Sylva in scabiem' and 'De scabie'. These two works tell us the illness that will kill Politian who describes them in detail as a new illness that does appear in other important works dated between the end of the 15th century and the beginning of the 16th. This new illness will be called 'syphilis'. Syphilis was virulent in Europe soon after it appeared and it killed Politian within one year. He seems to have been the first famous European who was not a physician who described his own syphilis. Others include the poet Niccolò Campani (1478-1523), the writer and humanist Ulrich Von Hutten (1488-1523), the sculptor and writer Benvenuto Cellini (1500-1571) and Joseph Grunpeck (1473-1532), and secretary to Emperor Maximilian I (1459-1519). The origins of this serious condition have been ascribed to the crew who accompanied Christopher Columbus (1451-1506).

  2. Tertiary syphilis and Kaposi sarcoma mistaken for systemic sarcoidosis in an HIV-negative patient.

    PubMed

    Anyasodor, M C; Bewley, A

    2015-12-01

    We describe a case of an HIV-negative man who was mistakenly diagnosed as having systemic sarcoidosis, which led to a delay in diagnosing tertiary syphilis and Kaposi sarcoma (KS). The patient presented initially with scrotal swelling and leg oedema. Initial blood tests were unremarkable and HIV testing was negative. The patient then developed unilateral limb weakness. Computed tomography showed lung lesions and hilar lymphadenopathy, while magnetic resonance imaging showed an increased signal in the cervical cord. Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme was raised, and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made and the patient started on steroids. Subsequently, his clinical symptoms and radiological abnormalities improved. However, he then developed progressive neurological deficits over several weeks, together with uveitis and cutaneous lesions. A uveitis screen showed a raised venereal disease research laboratory test titre and the cause of his multisystemic symptoms was revisited. He was diagnosed with tertiary syphilis and treated with antibiotics. Dermatologists reviewed the skin lesions and diagnosed KS, which was confirmed with biopsies. The patient's neurological deficit remains. Syphilis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient presenting with neurological problems, skin lesions or symptoms affecting multiple systems. Co-existing KS presented an extra therapeutic challenge in this case.

  3. The syphilis epidemics in Hungary 1985-2004, before entering the European Union.

    PubMed

    Talha, Elyas; Nagy, Károly; Horváth, Attila

    2013-09-01

    In the decade prior to the turn of the millennium, great interest was raised, and rightly so, by the STD (syphilis and HIV/AIDS) epidemic that developed in the Eastern-Central European Region. Its coincidence with the far-reaching political and economic changes that took place at that time suggested a link between the two events.Hungary, where these infections had had low incidence before the period investigated, also experienced an increase in STD incidence. The trend in syphilis infection during the 20 years between 1985-2004, that preceded the turn of the millennium and when finally Hungary joined the European Union, have been analyzed. Due to the nature of venereological epidemiological surveillance in Hungary, syphilis prevalence data are appropriate for further analysis from socio-demographic aspects. Behavioural changes underlying the specific features of the epidemics in Hungary had developed several years earlier and cannot be linked to the political and economic changes that started in the early 90s. The only exception is the phenomenon of growing migration that appeared simultaneously with the political changes and had a decisive impact on the spread and level of infection in some areas in the country. As shown by our data, trends seen in specific demographic groups (females, rural population) preceded the suddenly occurring political changes by about 15 years.

  4. Syphilis and prostitution in the socio-medical geographies of Turkey's early republican provinces.

    PubMed

    Evered, Kyle T; Evered, Emine Ö

    2012-05-01

    During and after the Ottoman Empire's collapse, Turkey's fledgling public health and social services ministry sought to deal with the increasing prevalence of syphilis-especially in its rural communities. This article examines the emergence of state-led information collection in Turkey during the 1920s and early 1930s and the anti-syphilis campaigns that resulted, and thus explores how the state created a new medical and moral order surrounding its citizens' sexualities that came to focus its gaze upon prostitution. Utilizing information from official primary sources, we analyze this transformation as part of a broader process of medicalization and state expansion that made syphilis a subject for state regulation. Within this context, moral pronouncements regarding the disease, traditional medicine, and prostitution and the potential benefits of regulated brothels were reframed, represented, and dispersed as directives for public health policy. Through this research, we assess how field-based surveys contributed ultimately to republican regimes of regulating sex work that still persist.

  5. Syphilis among middle-aged female sex workers in China: a three-site cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongjie; Dumenci, Levent; Morisky, Donald E; Xu, Yongfang; Li, Xiaojing; Jiang, Baofa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study addresses the lack of empirical studies about the epidemic of syphilis among middle-aged female sex workers (FSWs). The objectives of this study were to investigate prevalence of syphilis, and its potential risk factors among middle-aged FSWs in China. Design A cross-sectional study with respondent-driven sampling (RDS). Setting A multisite study conducted at three Chinese cites (Nanning, Hefei, and Qingdao) with different levels of sexually transmitted diseases in 2014. Participants 1245 middle-aged female sex workers who were over 35 years old (about 400 per study site). Main outcome measures Unprotected commercial sex, and syphilis and HIV infection were biologically tested and measured. Results The RDS-adjusted prevalence of active syphilis was 17.3% in Hefei, 9.9% in Qingdao, and 5.4% in Nanning. The RDS-adjusted prevalence of prevalent syphilis was between 6.8% and 33.6% in the three cities. The proportion of unprotected sex in the past 48 h verified by the prostate-specific antigen test (PSA) was between 27.8% and 42.4%. Multiple log-binomial regression analyses indicate that middle-aged FSWs who had 5 or more clients in the past week prior to interviews and engaged in unprotected sex were more likely to be active syphilitic cases. Middle-aged FSWs who had rural residency were less likely to be active syphilitic cases. Conclusions In contrast with previous studies that reported low prevalence of syphilis and high prevalence of protected sex among FSWs in China, both the prevalence of syphilis and unprotected sex were high among middle-aged FSWs. Evidence-based intervention programmes should be developed and evaluated among this vulnerable population in China and other countries with similar settings. PMID:27165644

  6. Evaluation of a new serological test for syphilis based on chemiluminescence assay in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Aseem K.; Pandey, Prashant K.; Dara, Ravi C.; Rawat, Ganesh S.; Raina, Vimarsh; Bhargava, Richa

    2015-01-01

    Context: Syphilis is a transfusion transmissible infections and it is mandatory to do serological test for syphilis (STS) on all donor blood samples. STS is usually based on detection of antibodies against the cardiolipin-lecithin antigen or against the Treponema-specific antigen. STS with good sensitivity and specificity helps enhance blood safety and consolidation of STS along with other transfusion transmittable infections such as human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis-C virus, and hepatitis-B virus helps in reducing the errors and enhances efficiency. Aims: This study was designed to evaluate the performance of newly introduced VITROS® syphilis Treponema pallidum agglutination (TPA) assay based on enhanced chemiluminescence principle for its analytical performance for use as a STS on donor blood samples at a tertiary care health center in National Capital Region, India. Materials and Methods: A total of 108 random blood units collected from the donors (both voluntary and replacement donors) and 28 known syphilis sero-reactive samples stored at −20°C, were used to evaluate the performance of VITROS® syphilis TPA assay based on enhanced chemiluminescence assay on VITROS® ECiQ immunodiagnostics system along with its analytical performance in terms of its sensitivity, precision, cross-reactivity and interference studies. Results: VITROS® syphilis TPA showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with precision (20 days study) of <10% co-efficient of variation. There was no cross-reactivity with other viral and auto-immune antibodies. No interference was observed from endogenous interfering substances like free hemoglobin or fats. Conclusions: Performance of the VITROS® syphilis TPA assay meets the requirements for its use as STS in blood bank, thus allowing consolidation with other transfusion transmittable infections screening assay on chemiluminescence platform, which is highly valuable for optimizing workflow and efficiency. PMID:25722576

  7. Sexual Behaviors and HIV/Syphilis Testing Among Transgender Individuals in China: Implications for Expanding HIV Testing Services

    PubMed Central

    Best, John; Tang, Weiming; Zhang, Ye; Han, Larry; Liu, Fengying; Huang, Shujie; Yang, Bin; Wei, Chongyi; Tucker, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV and syphilis are disproportionately common among transgender individuals globally, yet few studies have investigated transgender HIV/syphilis risk and testing in low and middle-income nations. We conducted an online survey of men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender individuals to examine sexual behaviors, and HIV/syphilis testing in China. Methods We recruited MSM and transgender individuals from two-major Chinese lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) web platforms. Chi-square and logistic regression were used to compare risk behaviors, HIV and syphilis testing history, and prevalence between transgender individuals and other MSM. Results Among the 1320 participants, 52 (3·9%) self-identified as transgender. Demographics, including education, employment, and marital status were similar between both groups, while transgender individuals were older. Condomless anal intercourse rate was comparable between the groups. Transgender individuals were less likely to report ever testing for HIV (34·6% VS 62·0%) and syphilis (15·7% VS 31·2%) with adjusted ORs of 0·36 (95% CI 0·20–0·65) and 0·42 (95% CI 0·20–0·91), respectively. We found a trend towards higher HIV prevalence among transgender individuals (11·1% VS5·7%, P=0·12). Conclusion Transgender individuals have suboptimal HIV and syphilis testing rates in China. Given the substantial risk behaviors and burden of HIV/STI in the general Chinese MSM population and lack of knowledge about transgender individuals, enhanced HIV/syphilis testing programs for transgender individuals in China are needed. PMID:25868142

  8. BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON SO-CALLED SYPHILIS ANTIGEN.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-01-01

    Noguchi has repeatedly done before) that the antigen should be selected from the aceton-insoluble fractions. Iodine Value in Relation to Antigenic Value.-Speaking generally of the aceton-insoluble fraction, a high antigenic value is associated with a high iodine value of lipoids obtained from the liver and heart. This rule does not, however, apply to the corresponding fraction from the brain. Standard Antigen.-The preparation of a standard antigen for Noguchi's method for the diagnosis of syphilis is given just before the summary. The directions will enable one to make a stock solution, from which, at any time, a suitable antigenic emulsion may be obtained.

  9. Early Syphilis Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in the US Pacific Northwest, 2008–2013: Clinical Management and Implications for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Petrosky, Emiko; Fanfair, Robyn Neblett; Toevs, Kim; DeSilva, Malini; Schafer, Sean; Hedberg, Katrina; Braxton, Jim; Walters, Jaime; Markowitz, Lauri; Hariri, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Substantial increases in syphilis during 2008–2013 were reported in the US Pacific Northwest state of Oregon, especially among men who have sex with men (MSM). The authors aimed to characterize the ongoing epidemic and identify possible gaps in clinical management of early syphilis (primary, secondary, and latent syphilis ≤1 year) among MSM in Multnomah County, Oregon to inform public health efforts. Administrative databases were used to examine trends in case characteristics during 2008–2013. Medical records were abstracted for cases occurring in 2013 to assess diagnosis, treatment, and screening practices. Early syphilis among MSM increased from 21 cases in 2008 to 229 in 2013. The majority of cases occurred in HIV-infected patients (range: 55.6%–69.2%) diagnosed with secondary syphilis (range: 36.2%–52.4%). In 2013, 119 (51.9%) cases were diagnosed in public sector medical settings and 110 (48.0%) in private sector settings. Over 80% of HIV-infected patients with syphilis were in HIV care. Although treatment was adequate and timely among all providers, management differed by provider type. Among HIV-infected patients, a larger proportion diagnosed by public HIV providers than private providers were tested for syphilis at least once in the previous 12 months (89.6% vs. 40.0%; p < 0.001). The characteristics of MSM diagnosed with early syphilis in Multnomah County remained largely unchanged during 2008–2013. Syphilis control measures were well established, but early syphilis among MSM continued to increase. The results suggest a need to improve syphilis screening among private clinics, but few gaps in clinical management were identified. PMID:27308806

  10. Management of Adult Syphilis: Key Questions to Inform the 2015 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Khalil G

    2015-12-15

    A panel of experts generated 8 "key questions" in the management of adult syphilis. A systematic literature review was conducted and tables of evidence were constructed to answer these important questions. Penicillin is the drug of choice to treat syphilis. Doxycycline to treat early and late latent syphilis is an acceptable alternate option if penicillin cannot be used. There is no added benefit to enhanced antimicrobial therapy when treating human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons with syphilis. If a patient misses a dose of penicillin in a course of weekly therapy for late syphilis, clinical experience suggests that an interval of 10-14 days between doses might be acceptable before restarting the sequence of injections. Pharmacologic considerations suggest that an interval of 7-9 days between doses, if feasible, may be more optimal. Missed doses are not acceptable for pregnant women. A cerebrospinal fluid examination to diagnose neurosyphilis is recommended in persons diagnosed with tertiary syphilis (eg, cardiovascular syphilis or late benign syphilis), persons with neurological signs or symptoms consistent with neurosyphilis, and asymptomatic persons whose serological titers do not decline appropriately following recommended therapy and in whom reinfection is ruled out. Infection and reinfection rates, particularly among men who have sex with men, are high. Frequent serological screening of this population appears to be the most cost-efficient intervention. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continues to recommend the use of the traditional rapid plasma reagin-based screening algorithm. The positive predictive value for syphilis associated with an isolated unconfirmed reactive treponemal chemiluminescence assay or enzyme immunoassay is low if the epidemiological risk and clinical probability for syphilis are low. Among pregnant women with serodiscordant serologies (positive treponemal tests and a negative nontreponemal test), the risk of

  11. Management of Adult Syphilis: Key Questions to Inform the 2015 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Khalil G

    2015-12-15

    A panel of experts generated 8 "key questions" in the management of adult syphilis. A systematic literature review was conducted and tables of evidence were constructed to answer these important questions. Penicillin is the drug of choice to treat syphilis. Doxycycline to treat early and late latent syphilis is an acceptable alternate option if penicillin cannot be used. There is no added benefit to enhanced antimicrobial therapy when treating human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons with syphilis. If a patient misses a dose of penicillin in a course of weekly therapy for late syphilis, clinical experience suggests that an interval of 10-14 days between doses might be acceptable before restarting the sequence of injections. Pharmacologic considerations suggest that an interval of 7-9 days between doses, if feasible, may be more optimal. Missed doses are not acceptable for pregnant women. A cerebrospinal fluid examination to diagnose neurosyphilis is recommended in persons diagnosed with tertiary syphilis (eg, cardiovascular syphilis or late benign syphilis), persons with neurological signs or symptoms consistent with neurosyphilis, and asymptomatic persons whose serological titers do not decline appropriately following recommended therapy and in whom reinfection is ruled out. Infection and reinfection rates, particularly among men who have sex with men, are high. Frequent serological screening of this population appears to be the most cost-efficient intervention. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continues to recommend the use of the traditional rapid plasma reagin-based screening algorithm. The positive predictive value for syphilis associated with an isolated unconfirmed reactive treponemal chemiluminescence assay or enzyme immunoassay is low if the epidemiological risk and clinical probability for syphilis are low. Among pregnant women with serodiscordant serologies (positive treponemal tests and a negative nontreponemal test), the risk of

  12. Early Syphilis Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in the US Pacific Northwest, 2008-2013: Clinical Management and Implications for Prevention.

    PubMed

    Petrosky, Emiko; Neblett Fanfair, Robyn; Toevs, Kim; DeSilva, Malini; Schafer, Sean; Hedberg, Katrina; Braxton, Jim; Walters, Jaime; Markowitz, Lauri; Hariri, Susan

    2016-03-01

    Substantial increases in syphilis during 2008-2013 were reported in the US Pacific Northwest state of Oregon, especially among men who have sex with men (MSM). The authors aimed to characterize the ongoing epidemic and identify possible gaps in clinical management of early syphilis (primary, secondary, and latent syphilis ≤1 year) among MSM in Multnomah County, Oregon to inform public health efforts. Administrative databases were used to examine trends in case characteristics during 2008-2013. Medical records were abstracted for cases occurring in 2013 to assess diagnosis, treatment, and screening practices. Early syphilis among MSM increased from 21 cases in 2008 to 229 in 2013. The majority of cases occurred in HIV-infected patients (range: 55.6%-69.2%) diagnosed with secondary syphilis (range: 36.2%-52.4%). In 2013, 119 (51.9%) cases were diagnosed in public sector medical settings and 110 (48.0%) in private sector settings. Over 80% of HIV-infected patients with syphilis were in HIV care. Although treatment was adequate and timely among all providers, management differed by provider type. Among HIV-infected patients, a larger proportion diagnosed by public HIV providers than private providers were tested for syphilis at least once in the previous 12 months (89.6% vs. 40.0%; p < 0.001). The characteristics of MSM diagnosed with early syphilis in Multnomah County remained largely unchanged during 2008-2013. Syphilis control measures were well established, but early syphilis among MSM continued to increase. The results suggest a need to improve syphilis screening among private clinics, but few gaps in clinical management were identified. PMID:27308806

  13. Population and dyadic-based seroincidence of herpes simplex virus-2 and syphilis in southern India

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, Chad H; Schneider, John A; Dandona, Rakhi; Lakshmi, Vemu; Kumar, G Anil; Sudha, Talasila; Akbar, Mohammed; Ahmed, G Md Mushtaq; Ramgopal, Sri P; Armbruster, Benjamin; Alary, Michel; Dandona, Lalit

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) and syphilis are associated with increased risk of HIV, highlighting the importance of understanding their transmission dynamics. In India, most studies of HSV-2 and syphilis incidence are in high-risk populations and may not accurately reflect infectious activity. In this study, we aim to define HSV-2/syphilis incidence and risk factors in a population sample. Methods We conducted a longitudinal population-based survey in Andhra Pradesh, India, in two rounds: 2004–2005 and 2010–2011. Sociodemographic and behavioural data were collected, and dried blood spots tested for HSV-2 and Treponema pallidum IgG. After calculating sexually transmitted infection (STI) incidence, associated factors were assessed using modified Poisson regression and within-couple transmission rates modelled using seroconcordance/discordance data. Results 12 617 adults participated at baseline with 8494 at follow-up. Incidence of HSV-2 and syphilis per 1000 person-years was 25.6 (95% CI 24.1 to 27.2) and 3.00 (95% CI 2.52 to 3.54). Incidence of HSV-2 was higher in women vs men (31.1 vs 20.2) and in rural vs urban residents (31.1 vs 19.0) (p<0.05 for both). STI seroincidence increased in a step-wise fashion with age and was associated with spousal seropositivity for both sexes (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 2.59 to 6.78). Within couples the rate of transmission per 1000 couple-years from men to women vs women to men was higher for HSV-2 (193.3 vs 119.0) compared with syphilis (27.6 vs 198.8), p<0.05 for both. Conclusions HSV-2 has higher incidence among subpopulations such as women, rural residents and older-aged individuals, suggesting a need for more generalised STI prevention approaches among populations traditionally considered low risk. PMID:25605970

  14. Prevalence and factors associated with syphilis in parturient women in Northeast, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital syphilis is a major public health concern, even after the implementation of intervention protocols in several countries. This study aimed to analyze the prevalence and socio-demographic, behavioral and institutional factors associated with syphilis in parturient women attending public maternity hospitals in Northeast, Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from June to September 2010 with a proportionate stratified sampling of 222 parturient women using a structured questionnaire. The study analyzed socio-demographic, behavioral and institutional variables. The structured questionnaire was conducted with parturient women and complementary information was obtained through hospitals records, admission forms and prenatal cards. Data were stored using the Statistical Package SPSS version 18. A descriptive statistical analysis was performed using frequency distribution, central tendency and measures of spread for the variables. A bivariate analysis was done using chi square test and Fisher’s exact test, with a significance level of 5% and a 95% confidence interval, in order to analyze the relation between the variables and risk factors for syphilis. The multivariate logistic regression analysis was done in the statistical package STATA, version 11.0. Results The prevalence of syphilis in parturient women was 7.7%. The bivariate analyses showed that the rate was higher among women who: were from Fortaleza (p = 0.019), studied for less than nine years (p = 0.044), had more than one sexual partner in life (p = 0.021), did not live with partner (p = 0.022), used illegal drugs (p < 0.0001), whose partner used illegal drugs and had diagnosis of syphilis (p = 0.001 and p < 0.0001 respectively). The non-adjusted analysis found significant positive association between syphilis and the following variable: being from Fortaleza (OR = 7.26; CI 95% = 1.49-100.20), having studied for less than nine years (OR

  15. Declining Inconsistent Condom Use but Increasing HIV and Syphilis Prevalence Among Older Male Clients of Female Sex Workers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Abraham Bussell, Scottie; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhenzhu; Lan, Guanghua; Zhu, Qiuying; Liu, Wei; Tang, Shuai; Li, Rongjian; Huang, Wenbo; Huang, Yuman; Liang, Fuxiong; Wang, Lu; Shao, Yiming; Ruan, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clients of female sex workers (CFSWs) are a bridge population for the spread of HIV and syphilis to low or average risk heterosexuals. Most studies have examined the point prevalence of these infections in CFSWs. Limited evidence suggests that older age CFSWs are at a higher risk of acquiring sexually transmitted diseases compared with younger clients. Thus, we sought to describe long-term trends in HIV, syphilis, and hepatitis C (HCV) to better understand how these infections differ by sex worker classification and client age. We also examined trends in HIV, syphilis, and HCV among categories of female sex workers (FSWs). We conducted serial cross-sectional studies from 2010 to 2015 in Guangxi autonomous region, China. We collected demographic and behavior variables. FSWs and their clients were tested for HIV, syphilis, and HCV antibodies. Positive HIV and syphilis serologies were confirmed by Western blot and rapid plasma regain, respectively. Clients were categorized as middle age (40–49 years) and older clients (≥50 years). FSWs were categorized as high-tier, middle-tier, or low-tier based on the payment amount charged for sex and their work venue. Chi-square test for trends was used for testing changes in prevalence over time. By 2015, low-tier FSWs (LTFSWs) accounted for almost half of all FSWs; and they had the highest HIV prevalence at 1.4%. HIV prevalence declined significantly for FSWs (high-tier FSW, P = 0.003; middle-tier FSWs; P = 0.021; LTFSWs, P < 0.001). Syphilis infections significantly declined for FSWs (P < 0.001) but only to 7.3% for LTFSWs. HCV and intravenous drug use were uncommon in FSWs. HIV prevalence increased for older age clients (1.3%–2.0%, P = 0.159) while syphilis prevalence remained stable. HCV infections were halved among older clients in 3 years (1.7%–0.8%, P < 0.001). Condom use during the last sexual encounter increased for FSWs and CFSWs. Few clients reported sex with men or intravenous

  16. HIV and syphilis infection among men who have sex with men--Bangkok, Thailand, 2005-2011.

    PubMed

    2013-06-28

    Although efforts to control the heterosexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic in Thailand had shown success by the late 1990s, HIV continued to spread in other risk groups, including men who have sex with men (MSM). In 2003, the Thailand Ministry of Public Health-U.S. CDC Collaboration (TUC) started surveillance among MSM in Bangkok, finding an HIV prevalence of 17.3%. By 2005, HIV prevalence in this group had risen to 28.3% and has since stabilized at around 30%. To obtain additional information about HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevalence and incidence in a clinic-based population of MSM, TUC, in collaboration with the Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Center, analyzed data collected at the Silom Community Clinic (SCC), an HIV and STI testing center targeting MSM. This report describes trends in HIV and syphilis prevalence and incidence seen among SCC MSM clients during 2005-2011. At first clinic visit, the prevalence of HIV infection among 4,762 clients was 28.3% and of syphilis (all stages) was 9.8%. Among those returning for HIV or syphilis testing before the end of 2011, the incidence of HIV infection was 6.3 per 100 person-years (PY) and 3.6 per 100 PY for syphilis. These results show ongoing epidemics of HIV and syphilis infection in MSM in Bangkok, underscoring the urgent need for preventive interventions to reduce the spread of HIV and STI in this population.

  17. Syphilis and HIV co-infection in patients who attend an AIDS outpatient clinic in Vitoria, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Callegari, Fabiola Mesquita; Pinto-Neto, Lauro Ferreira da Silva; Medeiros, Charlla Jezus; Scopel, Camila Binsi; Page, Kimberly; Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Our goal was to determine the prevalence of, and risk factors associated with, syphilis in HIV-infected patients who attend an AIDS outpatient clinic in Vitoria, Brazil. We conducted a cross-sectional study—including interviews for demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics—and blood collection (venipuncture and fingerstick) for VDRL and treponemal tests (rapid test) in a total of 438 patients. The mean age was 43.0 years (SD = 11), and mean years of school was 8.1 (SD = 4.2). The prevalence of syphilis was 5.3% (95% CI, 3.3%–7.3%). The treponemal test was positive in 18.9% of participants. In multivariate analysis, prevalent syphilis infection was independently associated with male gender (AOR 4.6, 95% CI, 1.1–20.0), a history of male-male sex (AOR 1.8, 95% CI, 1.6–4.1), current use of antiretroviral therapy (AOR 5.5, 95% CI, 1.7–16.7), and history of treated syphilis infection (AOR 5.5, 95% CI, 2.0–15.8). Syphilis prevalence was high in patients living with HIV/AIDS who attend an AIDS clinic; therefore, routine STI counseling and screening should be included in their care. PMID:23732958

  18. Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Human immunodeficiency virus and syphilis frequency among blood donors: A single center study.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Sule Menziletoglu; Candevir, Aslihan; Kibar, Filiz; Karaboga, Gulser; Turhan, Ferda Tekin; Kis, Cem; Dincer, Suleyman; Guvenc, Birol

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to provide updated results for seroprevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C viruses while presenting first data for human immunodeficiency virus and syphilis seropositivity amongst blood donors in Adana, Turkey. Screening and confirmatory test results of 62,461 donors were evaluated. HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV1/2 and syphilis seropositivity was 1.92%, 0.48%, 0.20%, 0.18% respectively, based on screening tests, and 1.66%, 0.05%, 0.003%, 0.10% respectively, according to confirmatory tests. Transfusion-transmitted infections (TTI) was more prevalent in low-educated donors. HBsAg and syphilis seropositivity rates were higher in married subjects. We found that the prevalence of HBV and HCV was significantly decreased in the last two decades in Adana. Importantly, this study provides first data in HIV and syphilis seropositivity rates among blood donors in our region and both HIV and syphilis seroprevalences were found to be low compared to many regions of Turkey. However, considering the fact that increasing number of immigrants may change prevalences and trends of TTI both in Adana and in Turkey, strict monitorization and yearly reporting of TTI rates seem necessary to be able to take proactive measures.

  19. The Legacy of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: Assessing its Impact on Willingness to Participate in Biomedical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Ralph V.; Green, B. Lee; Kressin, Nancy R.; Kegeles, S. Stephen; Wang, Min Qi; James, Sherman A.; Russell, Stefanie L.; Claudio, Cristina; McCallum, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    The phrase, legacy of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, is sometimes used to denote the belief that Blacks are more reluctant than Whites to participate in biomedical research studies because of the infamous study of syphilis in men run by the U.S. Public Health Service from 1932-72. This paper is the first to attempt to assess directly the accuracy of this belief within a multi-city, multi-racial, large-scale, detailed random survey. We administered the Tuskegee Legacy Project (TLP) Questionnaire to 826 Blacks and non-Hispanic White adults in three U.S. cities. While Blacks had higher levels of general awareness of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, there was no association between either awareness or detailed knowledge of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and willingness to participate in biomedical research, either for Blacks or Whites observed in our survey. While this study refutes the notion that there is a direct connection between detailed knowledge of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and willingness to participate in biomedical research, it does not assess the broader question of whether and how historical events influence people's willingness to participate in research. Future studies should explore this. PMID:19029744

  20. Rapid-Testing Technology and Systems Improvement for the Elimination of Congenital Syphilis in Haiti: Overcoming the “Technology to Systems Gap”

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Daphne; Zhou, Xi K.; Pape, Jean W.; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.; Mate, Kedar S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Despite the availability of rapid diagnostic tests and inexpensive treatment for pregnant women, maternal-child syphilis transmission remains a leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In Haiti, more than 3000 babies are born with congenital syphilis annually. Methods and Findings. From 2007 to 2011, we used a sequential time series, multi-intervention study design in fourteen clinics throughout Haiti to improve syphilis testing and treatment in pregnancy. The two primary interventions were the introduction of a rapid point-of-care syphilis test and systems strengthening based on quality improvement (QI) methods. Syphilis testing increased from 91.5% prediagnostic test to 95.9% after (P < 0.001) and further increased to 96.8% (P < 0.001) after the QI intervention. Despite high rates of testing across all time periods, syphilis treatment lagged behind and only increased from 70.3% to 74.7% after the introduction of rapid tests (P = 0.27), but it improved significantly from 70.2% to 84.3% (P < 0.001) after the systems strengthening QI intervention. Conclusion. Both point-of-care diagnostic testing and health systems-based quality improvement interventions can improve the delivery of specific evidence-based healthcare interventions to prevent congenital syphilis at scale in Haiti. Improved treatment rates for syphilis were seen only after the use of systems-based quality improvement approaches. PMID:26316955

  1. Trends in Syphilis Partner Notification Among Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men who Have Sex With Men in British Columbia, 2010 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Deonarine, Andrew; Ogilvie, Gina; Montgomery, Carolyn; Makaroff, Sylvia; Holgerson, Natalie; Grennan, Troy; Gilbert, Mark; Wong, Jason

    2016-08-01

    Chart reviews of 350 randomly sampled syphilis cases of men who had sex with men in British Columbia from 2010 to 2013 revealed no change in the median number of partners per case, and an increasing proportion of partners notified by cases but fewer partners were known to be tested for syphilis. PMID:27414679

  2. Infection by hepatitis B and C virus in female and transsexual Greek prostitutes with serological evidence of active syphilis.

    PubMed

    Tsakris, A; Kyriakis, K P; Chryssou, S; Papoutsakis, G

    1997-11-01

    Two hundred and thirty female and 43 male-to-female transsexual Greek prostitutes were screened for serological evidence of active syphilis as judged by positivity in both rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test and treponemal (FTA-ABS and TPHA) tests. The rate of active syphilis was 20.9% in the male-to-female transsexual prostitutes and 4.3% in the female ones (P < 0.001, odds ratio = 5.82). In the former group 65.1% had evidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, and 4.7% of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection while the respective rates among the latter group were 50.4% and 3.9%. There was no correlation of viral hepatitis marker prevalence with positive syphilis serology.

  3. Rapid Treponema pallidum clearance from blood and ulcer samples following single dose benzathine penicillin treatment of early syphilis.

    PubMed

    Tipple, Craig; Jones, Rachael; McClure, Myra; Taylor, Graham

    2015-02-01

    Currently, the efficacy of syphilis treatment is measured with anti-lipid antibody tests. These can take months to indicate cure and, as a result, syphilis treatment trials require long periods of follow-up. The causative organism, Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum), is detectable in the infectious lesions of early syphilis using DNA amplification. Bacteraemia can likewise be identified, typically in more active disease. We hypothesise that bacterial clearance from blood and ulcers will predict early the standard serology-measured treatment response and have developed a qPCR assay that could monitor this clearance directly in patients with infectious syphilis. Patients with early syphilis were given an intramuscular dose of benzathine penicillin. To investigate the appropriate sampling timeframe samples of blood and ulcer exudate were collected intensively for T. pallidum DNA (tpp047 gene) and RNA (16S rRNA) quantification. Sampling ended when two consecutive PCRs were negative. Four males were recruited. The mean peak level of T. pallidum DNA was 1626 copies/ml whole blood and the mean clearance half-life was 5.7 hours (std. dev. 0.53). The mean peak of 16S rRNA was 8879 copies/ml whole blood with a clearance half-life of 3.9 hours (std. dev. 0.84). From an ulcer, pre-treatment, 67,400 T. pallidum DNA copies and 7.08 x 107 16S rRNA copies were detected per absorbance strip and the clearance half-lives were 3.2 and 4.1 hours, respectively. Overall, T. pallidum nucleic acids were not detected in any sample collected more than 56 hours (range 20-56) after treatment. All patients achieved serologic cure. In patients with active early syphilis, measuring T. pallidum levels in blood and ulcer exudate may be a useful measure of treatment success in therapeutic trials. These laboratory findings need confirmation on a larger scale and in patients receiving different therapies.

  4. [Syphilis epidemic and an increase of the number of HIV infections among homosexual men attending the Amsterdam venereal disease clinic].

    PubMed

    Fennema, J S A; Cairo, I; Spaargaren, J; Dukers, N H T M; Coutinho, R A

    2002-03-30

    The registered number of cases of early infectious syphilis and of (ano)genital gonorrhoea among the attendees of the outpatient clinic for sexually transmitted diseases of the Amsterdam municipal health service shows a strong increase for both diagnoses in the period 1990-2001, notably in the last few years. Nearly all of this increase is accounted for by homosexual men. Syphilis increased mostly among men aged 35 years and over, gonorrhoea mostly among younger men. The population of older men also showed a distinct increase since 1997 in HIV incidence.

  5. Bilateral internal carotid artery dissection associated with prior syphilis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Marangi, Antonio; Moretto, Giuseppe; Cappellari, Manuel; Micheletti, Nicola; Tomelleri, Giampaolo; Bovi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral internal carotid artery dissection is a rare entity, and its presentation may include cerebral ischemia. We describe the case of a 69-year-old man with ischemic stroke and radiological evidence of intimal flap of both internal carotid arteries suggestive for dissection. During the hospitalization, our patient was found positive for a previous syphilis infection. We conducted a review of the literature, with evidence of a few cases of ischemic stroke presumably related to a prior syphilis. The absence of major cardiovascular risk factors in our patient leads us to believe that an etiopathogenetic link may exist between these two conditions. PMID:27354805

  6. Bilateral internal carotid artery dissection associated with prior syphilis: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Marangi, Antonio; Moretto, Giuseppe; Cappellari, Manuel; Micheletti, Nicola; Tomelleri, Giampaolo; Bovi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral internal carotid artery dissection is a rare entity, and its presentation may include cerebral ischemia. We describe the case of a 69-year-old man with ischemic stroke and radiological evidence of intimal flap of both internal carotid arteries suggestive for dissection. During the hospitalization, our patient was found positive for a previous syphilis infection. We conducted a review of the literature, with evidence of a few cases of ischemic stroke presumably related to a prior syphilis. The absence of major cardiovascular risk factors in our patient leads us to believe that an etiopathogenetic link may exist between these two conditions. PMID:27354805

  7. Treponema-specific tests for serodiagnosis of syphilis: comparative evaluation of seven assays.

    PubMed

    Binnicker, M J; Jespersen, D J; Rollins, L O

    2011-04-01

    The diagnosis of syphilis is challenging and often relies on serologic tests to detect treponemal or nontreponemal antibodies. Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association of Public Health Laboratories proposed an update to the syphilis serology testing algorithm, in which serum samples are first tested using a treponema-specific test and positive samples are analyzed with a nontreponemal assay. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of seven treponemal assays (BioPlex 2200 syphilis IgG [Bio-Rad, Hercules, CA], fluorescent treponemal antibody [FTA] assay [Zeus Scientific, Raritan, NJ], Treponema pallidum particle agglutination [TP-PA; Fujirebio Diagnostics, Malvern, PA], Trep-Sure enzyme immunoassay [EIA; Phoenix Biotech, Oakville, Ontario, Canada], Trep-Chek EIA [Phoenix Biotech], Trep-ID EIA [Phoenix Biotech], and Treponema ViraBlot IgG [Viramed Biotech AG, Planegg, Germany]) using serum samples (n = 303) submitted to our reference laboratory. In addition to testing with these 7 assays, all samples were tested by a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) assay and a treponemal IgM Western blot assay (Viramed ViraBlot). Compared to the FTA assay as the gold standard, the evaluated treponemal tests demonstrated comparable levels of performance, with percent agreement ranging from 95.4% (95% confidence interval, 92.3 to 97.3) for the Trep-Sure EIA to 98.4% (96.1 to 99.4) for the Trep-ID EIA. Compared to a "consensus of the test panel" (defined as at least 4 of 7 treponemal tests being in agreement), the percent agreement ranged from 95.7% (92.7 to 97.5) for Trep-Sure to 99.3% (97.5 to 99.9) for Trep-ID. These data may assist clinical laboratories that are considering implementing a treponemal test for screening or confirmatory purposes.

  8. Evaluation of a Treponema pallidum western immunoblot assay as a confirmatory test for syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, R E; Laska, S; Bell, M; Larson, D; Phillips, J; Todd, J

    1992-01-01

    Tests for the detection of antibodies to Treponema pallidum are recommended for the confirmation of reactive nontreponemal test results and the accurate diagnosis of syphilis. The present-day use of Western blot (immunoblot) technology for the diagnosis of retroviruses prompted the development and evaluation of a Western blot assay with whole-cell T. pallidum as the antigen. The assay detected antibodies in syphilitic serum or plasma from dilutions of specimens incubated overnight with test strips. A test was considered positive when at least three of four major antigens having molecular masses of 15.5, 17, 44.5, and 47 kDa were detected. The Western blot assay had 93.8% sensitivity and 100% specificity for clinically defined samples. The Western blot assay was compared with double-staining fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption [FTA-ABS (DS)], which had a sensitivity and a specificity of 91.7 and 92.0%, respectively. Dilution series studies of syphilis-positive specimens indicated that the Western blot assay has an endpoint of reactivity at least 3 to 4 serial dilutions greater than that for FTA-ABS (DS). Overall, the greater than 95% agreement between the Western blot assay and FTA-ABS (DS) for clinically defined specimens indicates that the sensitivity of the Western blot assay is equal to or greater than that of FTA-ABS (DS). The Western blot assay demonstrated no false-positive or equivocal reactivities for nonsyphilitic specimens, including normal specimens (both plasma and serum), biological false-positives, and specimens with elevated gamma globulin or antinuclear antibody. We conclude that the high sensitivity and specificity of the T. pallidum Western blot assay, together with its simplicity and objectivity, make it a good confirmatory test for syphilis. Images PMID:1734042

  9. Drug use and syphilis. Co-factors for HIV transmission among commercial sex workers in Guyana.

    PubMed

    Persaud, N E; Klaskala, W; Tewari, T; Shultz, J; Baum, M

    1999-06-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 124 street- and brothel-based female commercial sex workers (CSWs) in Georgetown in January and February 1997 to determine the seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and describe the sexual practices and drug use patterns. Their median age was 30 years (range 17 to 52 years). 119 (88%) reported regular alcohol consumption while looking for clients, 27 (22%) said they smoked cocaine and 51 (42%) reported use of marijuana. Street-based CSWs were significantly more likely to report marijuana use (p = 0.033). 72% reported that they never used condoms with regular sex partners and 35% reported that they never used condoms with clients. Brothel-based women were significantly more likely to report consistent condom use with their clients (p = 0.05). 46% (54/118) tested HIV positive and 28% (33/118) had a positive serological test for syphilis. Factors that were significantly associated with HIV infection included a positive serological test for syphilis (OR = 7.56; 95% CI = 2.7-21.97; p < 0.01) and a history of having received treatment for syphilis (OR = 2.93; 95% CI = 1.12-7.8). Weak associations were also found between HIV infection and a history of cocaine use (OR = 2.57; 95% CI = 0.95-7.11; p = 0.039); having more than four clients per night (OR = 5.14; 95% CI = 1.65-16.74; p = 0.04); and a history of receiving treatment for salpingitis (OR = 2.31; 95% CI = .93-5.75; p = 0.0035). No statistically significant association was found between HIV infection and marijuana use nor any sociodemographic variables (age, place of work, and duration of sex work). There is an urgent need for a community based behavioural intervention programme targetting this high risk population.

  10. The syphilis care cascade: tracking the course of care after screening positive among men and transgender women who have sex with men in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Eric C; Segura, Eddy R; Clark, Jesse L; Sanchez, Jorge; Lama, Javier R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Syphilis is endemic among men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women in Latin America. The objective of this study was to assess if those who screen positive for syphilis are receiving appropriate care and treatment. Methods We use data from the 2011 Peruvian National HIV Sentinel Surveillance to describe the syphilis care cascade among high-risk MSM and transgender women. Medical records from participants who had a positive syphilis screening test at two of the enrolment sites in Lima were reviewed to determine their subsequent course of care. Results We identified a cohort of 314 syphilis seropositive participants (median age: 30, 33.7% self-identified as transgender). Only 284/314 (90.4%) participants saw a physician for evaluation within 28 days of their positive test. Of these, 72/284 (25.4%) were asked to return for confirmatory results before deciding whether or not to start treatment; however, 45/72 (62.5%) of these participants did not follow up within 28 days. Of the people prescribed three weekly doses of penicillin, 34/63 (54%) received all three doses on time. Conclusions Many MSM and transgender women with a positive syphilis screening test are lost at various steps along the syphilis care cascade and may have persistent infection. Interventions in this population are needed to increase testing, link seropositive patients into care and ensure that they receive appropriate and timely treatment. PMID:26384725

  11. A Quality Improvement Project to Increase Early Detection of Syphilis Infection or Re-infection in HIV-infected Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    PubMed

    Cheeks, Miyesha A; Fransua, Mesfin; Stringer, Harold G; Silva, Susan; Relf, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Our quality improvement project evaluated whether testing for syphilis every 3 to 6 months with routine HIV laboratory monitoring had an effect on early detection of asymptomatic syphilis infection/re-infection in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. Retrospective analysis of syphilis testing and infections in a sample of this population (N = 245) was conducted after establishing a change-of-practice quality improvement initiative in a not-for-profit, community-based, grant-funded clinic. We compared the clinic's annual rates of syphilis before and after intervention implementation. The detection rate was 6.6% in the preintervention practice change group and 15.5% in the postintervention group. Increased testing identified 27 syphilis cases that would not otherwise have been identified until the annual comprehensive examination. Increased testing frequency led to earlier detection of syphilis, which was clinically significant, showing a potential to decrease the number of new syphilis and HIV infections and to decrease health care expenditures.

  12. Seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections among blood donors at Gondar University Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia: declining trends over a period of five years

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Transfusion-transmissible infectious agents such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis are among the greatest threats to blood safety for the recipient. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence, risk factors and trends of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections among blood donors over a period of five years at Gondar University Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods A retrospective analysis of consecutive blood donors' records covering the period between January 2003 and December 2007 was conducted. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine risk factors associated with HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections. Results From the total of 6361 consecutive blood donors, 607 (9.5%) had serological evidence of infection with at least one pathogen and 50 (0.8%) had multiple infections. The overall seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis was 3.8%, 4.7%, 0.7%, and 1.3% respectively. Among those with multiple infections, the most common combinations were HIV - syphilis 19 (38%) and HIV - HBV 17 (34%). The seropositivity of HIV was significantly increased among female blood donors, first time donors, housewives, merchants, soldiers, drivers and construction workers. Significantly increased HBV seropositivity was observed among farmers, first time donors and age groups of 26 - 35 and 36 - 45 years. Similarly, the seroprevalence of syphilis was significantly increased among daily labourers and construction workers. Statistically significant association was observed between syphilis and HIV infections, and HCV and HIV infections. Moreover, significantly declining trends of HIV, HCV and syphilis seropositivity were observed over the study period. Conclusions A substantial percentage of the blood donors harbour HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections. Strict selection of blood donors and comprehensive screening of donors' blood using standard methods are highly recommended to ensure

  13. Unexpectedly high prevalence of Treponema pallidum infection in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with early syphilis who had engaged in unprotected sex practices.

    PubMed

    Yang, C-J; Chang, S-Y; Wu, B-R; Yang, S-P; Liu, W-C; Wu, P-Y; Zhang, J-Y; Luo, Y-Z; Hung, C-C; Chang, S-C

    2015-08-01

    Between 2010 and 2014, we obtained swab specimens to detect Treponema pallidum, with PCR assays, from the oral cavities of 240 patients with 267 episodes of syphilis who reported engaging in unprotected sex practices. The detected treponemal DNA was subjected to genotyping. All of the syphilis cases occurred in men who have sex with men (MSM), and 242 (90.6%) occurred in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. The stages of syphilis included 38 cases (14.2%) of primary syphilis of the genital region, 76 (28.5%) of secondary syphilis, 21 (7.9%) of primary and secondary syphilis, 125 (46.8%) of early latent syphilis, and seven (2.6%) others. Concurrent oral ulcers were identified in 22 cases (8.2%). Treponemal DNA was identified from the swabs of 113 patients (42.2%), including 15 (68.2%) with oral ulcers. The most common genotype of T. pallidum was 14f/f. The presence of oral ulcers was associated with identification of T. pallidum in the swab specimens (15/22 (68.2%) vs. 98/245 (40.0%)) (p = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, secondary syphilis (adjusted OR 6.79; 95% CI 1.97-23.28) and rapid plasma reagin (RPR) titres of ≥1: 32 (adjusted OR 2.23; 95% CI 1.02-4.89) were independently associated with the presence of treponemal DNA in patients without oral ulcers. We conclude that detection of treponemal DNA in the oral cavity with PCR assays is not uncommon in MSM, most of whom reported having unprotected oral sex. Although the presence of oral ulcers is significantly associated with detection of treponemal DNA, treponemal DNA is more likely to be identified in patients without oral ulcers who present with secondary syphilis and RPR titres of ≥1: 32.

  14. Sex and the capital city: the political framing of syphilis and prostitution in early republican Ankara.

    PubMed

    Evered, Emine Ö; Evered, Kyle T

    2013-04-01

    In its initial years, the nascent Turkish republic established the Ministry of Health and Social Assistance in order to promote public health. Beyond simply facilitating its modernizing agenda for the emergent nation-state as it sought to define itself against an Ottoman past, this institution was also geared toward remedying a self-defined population crisis by prioritizing and confronting particular diseases and health conditions. One of the maladies of utmost concern was syphilis. Based upon an analysis of official primary sources, this article engages with how the developing republic distinguished and consequently politically constructed-or framed-the syphilis problem from the vantage of its new forward capital, Ankara. Integral to this project of confronting this sexually transmitted disease, public health officials projected upon both this ailment and their understanding of the suitable means for its treatment their own views of what constituted appropriate sexual practices and relations. In doing so, certain subgroups of the population, especially prostitutes, were particularized as targets for surveillance and policing through regimes of licensing and compulsory medical examinations. Stemming from the state's framing of the disease-and its definition of appropriate sexual practices-this article also examines the subsequent legislative and public health education projects that followed.

  15. Hepatitis C Screening in People With Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Lessons Learned From Syphilis Screening.

    PubMed

    Wurcel, Alysse G; Chen, Daniel D; Fitzpatrick, Rosemary E; Grasberger, Paula E; Kirshner, Caleb H; Anderson, Jordan E; Chui, Kenneth K H; Knox, Tamsin A

    2016-01-01

    Background.  The incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is increasing in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). New guidelines recommend annual screening for HCV, similar to recommendations for syphilis screening with rapid plasma reagin (RPR). Methods.  This study compares the frequency of repeat HCV antibody (Ab) testing to repeat RPR testing in a retrospective chart review of 359 HCVAb-negative people living with HIV (PLWH) observed in an Infectious Diseases clinic. Patients were classified into risk groups based on sexual risk factors. Results.  Although 85% of PLWH had repeat syphilis screening, less than two thirds had repeat HCVAb screening. The MSM status was associated with increased HCVAb and RPR testing (adjusted odds ratio, 2.6 and 5.9, respectively). Seven persons had incident HCV infection: 3 were MSM, and 4 had symptoms or abnormal laboratory results to prompt testing. Conclusions.  Failure to find incident HCV infection in PLWH represents missed opportunities to cure HCV infection and prevent progressive liver disease. Further quality improvement studies are necessary to develop physician-focused interventions to increase HCV screening rates in PLWH.

  16. Hepatitis C Screening in People With Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Lessons Learned From Syphilis Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wurcel, Alysse G.; Chen, Daniel D.; Fitzpatrick, Rosemary E.; Grasberger, Paula E.; Kirshner, Caleb H.; Anderson, Jordan E.; Chui, Kenneth K. H.; Knox, Tamsin A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is increasing in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). New guidelines recommend annual screening for HCV, similar to recommendations for syphilis screening with rapid plasma reagin (RPR). Methods. This study compares the frequency of repeat HCV antibody (Ab) testing to repeat RPR testing in a retrospective chart review of 359 HCVAb-negative people living with HIV (PLWH) observed in an Infectious Diseases clinic. Patients were classified into risk groups based on sexual risk factors. Results. Although 85% of PLWH had repeat syphilis screening, less than two thirds had repeat HCVAb screening. The MSM status was associated with increased HCVAb and RPR testing (adjusted odds ratio, 2.6 and 5.9, respectively). Seven persons had incident HCV infection: 3 were MSM, and 4 had symptoms or abnormal laboratory results to prompt testing. Conclusions. Failure to find incident HCV infection in PLWH represents missed opportunities to cure HCV infection and prevent progressive liver disease. Further quality improvement studies are necessary to develop physician-focused interventions to increase HCV screening rates in PLWH. PMID:26885544

  17. Eugenics, medical education, and the Public Health Service: Another perspective on the Tuskegee syphilis experiment.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Paul A; Dorr, Gregory M

    2006-01-01

    The Public Health Service (PHS) Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Male Negro (1932-72) is the most infamous American example of medical research abuse. Commentary on the study has often focused on the reasons for its initiation and for its long duration. Racism, bureaucratic inertia, and the personal motivations of study personnel have been suggested as possible explanations. We develop another explanation by examining the educational and professional linkages shared by three key physicians who launched and directed the study. PHS surgeon general Hugh Cumming initiated Tuskegee, and assistant surgeons general Taliaferro Clark and Raymond A. Vonderlehr presided over the study during its first decade. All three had graduated from the medical school at the University of Virginia, a center of eugenics teaching, where students were trained to think about race as a key factor in both the etiology and the natural history of syphilis. Along with other senior officers in the PHS, they were publicly aligned with the eugenics movement. Tuskegee provided a vehicle for testing a eugenic hypothesis: that racial groups were differentially susceptible to infectious diseases.

  18. Meta-analysis of ceftriaxone compared with penicillin for the treatment of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhen; Chen, Ya-Ping; Yang, Chun-Sheng; Guo, Wen; Jiang, Xiao-Xiao; Xu, Xi-Feng; Feng, Shou-Xin; Liu, Yan-Qun; Jiang, Guan

    2016-01-01

    Penicillin is the gold standard for treating syphilis. However, allergic reactions, poor drug tolerance and limited efficacy in patients remain a challenging problem. The objective of this meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy of ceftriaxone and penicillin based on data obtained from published randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The Cochrane Library, Medline, EBSCO, EMBASE and Ovid databases were searched for RCTs of ceftriaxone vs. penicillin for the treatment of syphilis. Estimated risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to investigate the following outcome measures: 3-month response rate; 6-month response rate; 12-month response rate; relapse rate; serofast rate; and failure rate. Seven RCTs involving 281 participants (159 patients who received ceftriaxone and 122 patients who received penicillin) were included in the meta-analysis. There were no significant differences in 3-month response rate (RR=1.12, 95% CI 0.89-1.42), 6-month response rate (RR=1.02, 95% CI 0.75-1.38), 12-month response rate (RR=1.04, 95% CI 0.82-1.32), relapse rate (RR=0.91, 95% CI 0.45-1.84), serofast rate (RR=0.69, 95% CI 0.22-2.12) or failure rate (RR=0.66, 95% CI 0.03-15.76) in patients treated with ceftriaxone compared with those treated with penicillin. In conclusion, there is no evidence in the literature that ceftriaxone is less efficient than penicillin.

  19. Medical and Social Aspects of Syphilis in the Balkans from the mid-19th Century to the Interwar.

    PubMed

    Tsiamis, Costas; Vrioni, Georgia; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie; Gennimata, Vasiliki; Murdjeva, Mariana А; Tsakris, Athanasios

    2016-03-01

    The current study presents some aspects of syphilis in the Balkan Peninsula from the 19th century until the Interwar. Ever since the birth of modern Balkan States (Greece, Bulgaria, Turkey and Serbia), urbanization, poverty and the frequent wars have been considered the major factors conducive to the spread of syphilis. The measures against sex work and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) were taken in two aspects, one medical and the other legislative. In this period, numerous hospitals for venereal diseases were established in the Balkan countries. In line with the international diagnostic approach and therapeutic standards, laboratory examinations in these Balkan hospitals included spirochete examination, Wassermann reaction, precipitation reaction and cerebrospinal fluid examination. Despite the strict legislation and the adoption of relevant laws against illegal sex work, public health services were unable to curb the spread of syphilis. Medical and social factors such as poverty, citizen's ignorance of STDs, misguided medical perceptions, lack of sanitary control of prostitution and epidemiological studies, are highlighted in this study. These factors were the major causes that helped syphilis spread in the Balkan countries during the 19th and early 20th century. The value of these aspects as a historic paradigm is diachronic. Failure to comply with the laws and the dysfunction of public services during periods of war or socioeconomic crises are both factors facilitating the spread of STDs. PMID:27383872

  20. [Scabies and syphilis--aspects of treatments of skin- and venereal diseases at Copenhagen Kommunehospital 1863 - 92].

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jeanne G; Henrik, Permin

    2007-01-01

    Scabies and syphilis was very common but social unaccepted diseases in the later part of the 19th century. In 1892, 1,210 patients with syphilis and 106 children suffering from scabies were treated at the Kommunehospital in Copenhagen. Case records from patients admitted March 19th and September 19th, form the study basis of different aspects of scabies and syphilis treatment in the period. In the mid 19th century different soap treatments were the common cure for scabies. In the 1880s the cure became napthollinement, powdering with flour followed by rapping the patient in a sheet. Throughout the whole period experiments with medicine and thereby the patients was the norm. The treatment of syphilis consisted of different forms of mercury cures combined with bathes. Admission time was long and the patient was rarely cured. Progress in the treatments of both diseases was made in the daily work with patients. Access to knowledge, economy, the effort of the physician and the relationship between the different professions and groups in the hospital influenced and formed the process.

  1. Sexually transmitted diseases and native Americans: trends in reported gonorrhea and syphilis morbidity, 1984-88.

    PubMed Central

    Toomey, K E; Oberschelp, A G; Greenspan, J R

    1989-01-01

    Native Americans experienced higher reported gonorrhea and syphilis morbidity than did non-Native Americans from 1984 through 1988 in 13 States with large Native American populations. Gonorrhea rates among American Indians and Alaska Natives were approximately twice the rates for non-Indians. The highest gonorrhea rate was reported among Alaska Natives, with a 5-year average of 1,470 cases per 100,000, more than five times the average non-Native rate in Alaska. The average primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis rate from 1984 through 1988 was more than two times higher among Native Americans, largely due to high syphilis morbidity in Arizona and New Mexico. In Arizona the average American Indian P&S syphilis case rate was seven times higher than the non-Indian rate. True rates for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) among Native Americans may be higher than those reported due to racial misclassification of Native American cases, particularly in nonreservation areas. Improved recognition and reporting of STD cases among Native Americans are needed to target STD prevention and education more effectively. PMID:2511589

  2. Medical, demographical and social aspects of syphilis: the case of infected sex workers in Greece during Interwar.

    PubMed

    Pagratis, N; Tsiamis, C; Mandyla, M; Bampounis, C; Anoyatis-Pele, D

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this research is to present syphilis among women described as "indecent" according to the records of the Venereal Diseases Hospital "Andreas Syggros", which is located in Athens, during the period 1931-1935. In impoverished Greece of the Interwar period, factors such as criminal ignorance, or lack of information on sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) along with inadequate health controls of sex workers, resulted in a dramatic spread of syphilis, whereas "Andreas Syggros" hospital accommodated thousands of patients. The inflow of 1.300.000 Greek refugees from Asia Minor, after the Greek defeat by the Turkish army in the war of 1922, resulted in a notable change in the demographics of the country, while the combination of miserable living conditions, unemployment, economic crisis of the Interwar period, political instability and dysfunction of the State led to an increased number of illegal sex workers and syphilis outbreaks. Despite the introduction of an ad hoc Act to control STDs since 1923, the State was unable to limit the transmissibility of syphilis and to control prostitution. Unfortunately, the value of this historical paradigm is borne out by a contemporary example, i.e. the scandal of HIV seropositive sex workers in -beset by economic crisis- Greece in May 2012. It turns out that ignorance, failure to comply with the law, change in the mentality of the citizens in an economically ruined society, and most notably dysfunction of public services during periods of crisis, are all risk factors for the spread of serious infectious diseases. PMID:25068236

  3. Rapid Syphilis Testing Is Cost-Effective Even in Low-Prevalence Settings: The CISNE-PERU Experience.

    PubMed

    Mallma, Patricia; Garcia, Patricia; Carcamo, Cesar; Torres-Rueda, Sergio; Peeling, Rosanna; Mabey, David; Terris-Prestholt, Fern

    2016-01-01

    Studies have addressed cost-effectiveness of syphilis testing of pregnant women in high-prevalence settings. This study compares costs of rapid syphilis testing (RST) with laboratory-based rapid plasma reagin (RPR) tests in low-prevalence settings in Peru. The RST was introduced in a tertiary-level maternity hospital and in the Ventanilla Network of primary health centers, where syphilis prevalence is approximately 1%. The costs per woman tested and treated with RST at the hospital were $2.70 and $369 respectively compared with $3.60 and $740 for RPR. For the Ventanilla Network the costs per woman tested and treated with RST were $3.19 and $295 respectively compared with $5.55 and $1454 for RPR. The cost per DALY averted using RST was $46 vs. $109 for RPR. RST showed lower costs compared to the WHO standard costs per DALY ($64). Findings suggest syphilis screening with RST is cost-effective in low-prevalence settings.

  4. Rapid Syphilis Testing Is Cost-Effective Even in Low-Prevalence Settings: The CISNE-PERU Experience.

    PubMed

    Mallma, Patricia; Garcia, Patricia; Carcamo, Cesar; Torres-Rueda, Sergio; Peeling, Rosanna; Mabey, David; Terris-Prestholt, Fern

    2016-01-01

    Studies have addressed cost-effectiveness of syphilis testing of pregnant women in high-prevalence settings. This study compares costs of rapid syphilis testing (RST) with laboratory-based rapid plasma reagin (RPR) tests in low-prevalence settings in Peru. The RST was introduced in a tertiary-level maternity hospital and in the Ventanilla Network of primary health centers, where syphilis prevalence is approximately 1%. The costs per woman tested and treated with RST at the hospital were $2.70 and $369 respectively compared with $3.60 and $740 for RPR. For the Ventanilla Network the costs per woman tested and treated with RST were $3.19 and $295 respectively compared with $5.55 and $1454 for RPR. The cost per DALY averted using RST was $46 vs. $109 for RPR. RST showed lower costs compared to the WHO standard costs per DALY ($64). Findings suggest syphilis screening with RST is cost-effective in low-prevalence settings. PMID:26949941

  5. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study, 1932 to 1972: Implications for HIV Education and AIDS Risk Education Programs in the Black Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Stephen B.; Quinn, Sandra Crouse

    1991-01-01

    The Tuskegee study of untreated syphilis in black males caused distrust by blacks of the public health system that has implications for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) studies. AIDS prevention among blacks may require openness about the Tuskegee study to allay fears of repetition. (SLD)

  6. Rapid Syphilis Testing Is Cost-Effective Even in Low-Prevalence Settings: The CISNE-PERU Experience

    PubMed Central

    Mallma, Patricia; Garcia, Patricia; Carcamo, Cesar; Torres-Rueda, Sergio; Peeling, Rosanna; Mabey, David; Terris-Prestholt, Fern

    2016-01-01

    Studies have addressed cost-effectiveness of syphilis testing of pregnant women in high-prevalence settings. This study compares costs of rapid syphilis testing (RST) with laboratory-based rapid plasma reagin (RPR) tests in low-prevalence settings in Peru. The RST was introduced in a tertiary-level maternity hospital and in the Ventanilla Network of primary health centers, where syphilis prevalence is approximately 1%. The costs per woman tested and treated with RST at the hospital were $2.70 and $369 respectively compared with $3.60 and $740 for RPR. For the Ventanilla Network the costs per woman tested and treated with RST were $3.19 and $295 respectively compared with $5.55 and $1454 for RPR. The cost per DALY averted using RST was $46 vs. $109 for RPR. RST showed lower costs compared to the WHO standard costs per DALY ($64). Findings suggest syphilis screening with RST is cost-effective in low-prevalence settings. PMID:26949941

  7. Syphilis and hepatitis B Co-infection among HIV-infected, sex-trafficked women and girls, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Jay G; Decke, Michele R; Gupta, Jhumka; Dharmadhikari, Ashwin; Seage, George R; Raj, Anita

    2008-06-01

    Sex trafficking may play a major role in spread of HIV across South Asia. We investigated co-infection with HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases among 246 sex-trafficked women and girls from Nepal. Those who were HIV positive were more likely than those who were HIV negative to be infected with syphilis and/or hepatitis B. PMID:18507905

  8. Metaanalysis of the Performance of a Combined Treponemal and Nontreponemal Rapid Diagnostic Test for Syphilis and Yaws

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Yin, Yue-Ping; Chen, Xiang-Sheng; Castro, Arnold; Causer, Louise; Guy, Rebecca; Wangnapi, Regina; Mitjà, Oriol; Aziz, Abdul; Castro, Rita; da Luz Martins Pereira, Filomena; Taleo, Fasihah; Guinard, Jérôme; Bélec, Laurent; Tun, Ye; Bottomley, Christian; Ballard, Ronald C.; Mabey, David C.W.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The human treponematoses are important causes of disease. Mother-to-child transmission of syphilis remains a major cause of stillbirth and neonatal death. There are also almost 100 000 cases of endemic treponemal disease reported annually, predominantly yaws. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) would improve access to screening for these diseases. Most RDTs cannot distinguish current and previous infection. The Dual Path Platform (DPP) Syphilis Screen & Confirm test includes both a treponemal (T1) and nontreponemal (T2) component and may improve the accuracy of diagnosis. Methods. We conducted a metaanalysis of published and unpublished evaluations of the DPP-RDT for the diagnosis of syphilis and yaws. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, and overall agreement of the test compared with reference laboratory tests. Results. Nine evaluations, including 7267 tests, were included. Sensitivity was higher in patients with higher titer rapid plasma reagin (≥1:16) for both the T1 (98.2% vs 90.1%, P < .0001) and the T2 component (98.2% vs 80.6%, P < .0001). Overall agreement between the DPP test and reference serology was 85.2% (84.4%–86.1%). Agreement was highest for high-titer active infection and lowest for past infection. Conclusions. The RDT has good sensitivity and specificity of the treponemal and nontreponemal components both in cases of suspected syphilis and yaws, although the sensitivity is decreased at lower antibody titers. PMID:27217216

  9. Spirochetemia due to Treponema pallidum using polymerase-chain-reaction assays in patients with early syphilis: prevalence, associated factors and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Wu, B-R; Tsai, M-S; Yang, C-J; Sun, H-Y; Liu, W-C; Yang, S-P; Wu, P-Y; Su, Y-C; Chang, S-Y; Hung, C-C

    2014-08-01

    Between 2009 and 2013, polymerase-chain-reaction assay was used to detect Treponema pallidum in the blood samples collected from 296 patients with early syphilis (241 being HIV infected) and 102 patients (34.5%) had spirochetemia. The presence of spirochetemia was associated with lower CD4 counts (per 10-cell/mm(3) decrease, adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 1.020; 95% CI, 1.006-1.036) and secondary syphilis (AOR, 4.967; 95% CI, 2.016-12.238). Patients with early latent syphilis were less likely to achieve serological response compared with those with primary or secondary syphilis (AOR, 0.317; 95% CI, 0.142-0.708). However, serological response was not affected by presence of spirochetemia or antibiotic regimens.

  10. Prevalence of Treponema pallidum DNA among blood donors with two different serologic tests profiles for syphilis in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, S C; de Almeida-Neto, C; Nishiya, A S; Di-Lorenzo-Oliveira, C; Ferreira, J E; Alencar, C S; Levi, J E; Salles, N A; Mendrone-Junior, A; Sabino, E C

    2014-05-01

    The presence of Treponema pallidum DNA was assessed by real-time PCR in samples of blood donors with reactive serologic tests for syphilis. Treponema pallidum DNA was detected in two (1·02%) of 197 samples of VDRL>8, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+ donors, and in no sample from 80 VDRL−, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+ donors. Donors VDRL−, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+ lack demonstrable T. pallidum DNA in their blood and are unlike to transmit syphilis. Donors VDRL>8, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+ carry the risk of syphilis infectivity even in concomitance to antibodies detection. Serologic screening for syphilis may still play a role to prevent its transfusion transmission. PMID:24877236

  11. Antenatal Syphilis Screening Using Point-Of-Care Testing in Low- and Middle-Income Countries in Asia and Latin America: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuznik, Andreas; Muhumuza, Christine; Komakech, Henry; Marques, Elsa M. R.; Lamorde, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background Untreated syphilis in pregnancy is associated with adverse clinical outcomes to the infant. In low- and middle-income countries in Asia and Latin America, 20%-30% of women are not tested for syphilis during pregnancy. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of increasing the coverage for antenatal syphilis screening in 11 Asian and 20 Latin American countries, using a point-of-care immunochromatographic strip (ICS) test. Methods The decision analytical cost-effectiveness models reported incremental costs per disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted from the perspectives of the national health care payer. Clinical outcomes were stillbirths, neonatal deaths, and congenital syphilis. DALYs were computed using WHO disability weights. Costs included the ICS test, three injections of benzathine penicillin, and nurse wages. Country-specific inputs included the antenatal prevalence of syphilis and the proportion of women in the antenatal care setting that are screened for syphilis infection as reported in the 2014 WHO baseline report on global sexually transmitted infection surveillance. Country-specific data on the annual number of live births, proportion of women with at least one antenatal care visit, and per capita gross national income were also included in the model. Results The incremental cost/DALY averted of syphilis screening is US$53 (range: US$10-US$332; Prob<1*per capita GDP=99.71%) in Asia and US$60 (range: US$5-US$225; Prob<1*per capita GDP=99.77%) in Latin America. Universal screening may reduce the annual number of stillbirths by 20,344 and 4,270, neonatal deaths by 8,201 and 1,721, cases of congenital syphilis by 10,952 and 2,298, and avert 925,039 and 197,454 DALYs in the aggregate Asian and Latin American panel, respectively. Conclusion Antenatal syphilis screening is highly cost-effective in all the 11 Asian and 20 Latin American countries assessed. Our findings support the decision to expand syphilis screening in countries with currently

  12. Incidence of Co-Infections of HIV, Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 and Syphilis in a Large Cohort of Men Who Have Sex with Men in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Zixin; Qi, Xiao; Ruan, Yuhua; Zhou, Yunhua; Li, Chunrong; Luo, Fengji; Lau, Joseph T. F.

    2016-01-01

    Background The HIV-epidemic among MSM in China has worsened. In this key population, prevalence of HSV-2 and syphilis infection and co-infection with HIV is high. Methods A longitudinal study was conducted (n = 962) in Beijing, China, with three overlapping cohorts (n = 857, 757 and 760) consisting of MSM that were free from pairs of infections of concern (i.e. HIV-HSV-2, HIV-syphilis, HSV-2-syphilis) at baseline to estimate incidence of HIV, HSV-2, syphilis, and those of co-infection. Results The incidence of HIV, HSV-2 and syphilis in the overall cohort was 3.90 (95% CI = 2.37, 5.43), 7.87 (95% CI = 5.74, 10.00) and 6.06 (95% CI = 4.18, 7.94) cases per 100 person-years (PYs), respectively. The incidence of HIV-HSV-2, HIV-Syphilis and HSV-2-Syphilis co-infections was 0.30 (95% CI = 0.29, 0.88), 1.02 (95% CI = 0.13, 2.17) and 1.41 (95% CI: 0.04, 2.78) cases per 100 PYs, respectively, in the three sub-cohorts constructed for this study. Conclusions The incidence of HIV, HSV-2 and syphilis was very high and those of their co-infections were relatively high. Such co-infections have negative impacts on the HIV/STI epidemics. Prevention practices need to take such co-infections into account. PMID:26820145

  13. Audit of antenatal screening for syphilis and HIV in migrant and refugee women on the Thai-Myanmar border: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    McGready, Rose; Kang, Joy; Watts, Isabella; Tyrosvoutis, Mary Ellen G; Torchinsky, Miriam B.; Htut, Aung Myo; Tun, Nay Win; Keereecharoen, Lily; Wangsing, Chirapat; Hanboonkunupakarn, Borimas; Nosten, François H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The antenatal prevalence of syphilis and HIV/AIDS in migrants and refugees is poorly documented. The aim of this study was to audit the first year of routine syphilis screening in the same population and reassess the trends in HIV rates. Methods: From August 2012 to July 2013, 3600 pregnant women were screened for HIV (ELISA) and syphilis (VDRL with TPHA confirmation) at clinics along the Thai-Myanmar border. Results: Seroprevalence for HIV 0.47% (95% CI 0.30-0.76) (17/3,599), and syphilis 0.39% (95% CI 0.23-0.65) (14/3,592), were low. Syphilis was significantly lower in refugees (0.07% 95% CI 0.01-0.38) (1/1,469), than in migrants (0.61% 95% CI 0.36-1.04) (13/2,123). The three active (VDRL≥1:8 and TPHA reactive) syphilis cases with VDRL titres of 1:32 were easy to counsel and treat. Women with low VDRL titres (>75% were < 1:8) and TPHA reactive results, in the absence of symptoms and both the woman and her husband having only one sexual partner in their lifetime, and the inability to determine the true cause of the positive results presented ethical difficulties for counsellors. Conclusion: As HIV and syphilis testing becomes available in more and more settings, the potential impact of false positive results should be considered, especially in populations with low prevalence for these diseases. This uncertainty must be considered in order to counsel patients and partners accurately and safely about the results of these tests, without exposing women to increased risk for abuse or abandonment. Our findings highlight the complexities of counselling patients about these tests and the global need for more conclusive syphilis testing strategies. PMID:26664698

  14. The Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis and public perceptions of biomedical research: a focus group study.

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Benjamin R.; Harris, Tina M.

    2004-01-01

    African Americans are less likely than European Americans to participate in biomedical research. Researchers often attribute nonparticipation to the "Tuskegee effect." Using critical qualitative analysis of focus group data, we examined the public's use of the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis (TSUS) to discuss biomedical research. Our participants articulated three primary themes in relation to TSUS: 1) that TSUS made them suspicious about biomedical research; 2) that other values had to weigh against concerns about TSUS; and 3) that African Americans could take steps to resolve their concerns about TSUS. African Americans were more likely to discuss TSUS than were European Americans. African Americans did not use TSUS to express simple fear. African Americans suggested issues other than TSUS that influence the decision to participate in research. African Americans indicated specific reforms that would increase participation in research. We discuss how a better understanding of African Americans' use of TSUS can enhance research participation and allay concerns about "another Tuskegee." PMID:15303410

  15. Evaluation of three serological tests manufactured in Belarus for the diagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Shimanskaya, Iryna; Zhurauskaya, Larisa; Pankratov, Oleg; Unemo, Magnus; Ballard, Ronald C; Domeika, Marius

    2011-05-01

    The performance of three serological tests manufactured in Belarus for the diagnosis of syphilis, i.e. a microprecipitation reaction (MPR) and two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were compared with internationally recognized assays, namely the rapid plasma reagin test and the Treponema pallidum passive particle agglutination assay (TPPA). Sera from 392 consecutive patients attending Brest (Belarus) regional dermatovenereological dispensaries were tested. The sensitivity of the MPR test was low (77.3%) compared with the rapid plasma reagin test, while the specificity was high (100%). In contrast, both Belarusian ELISAs performed well when compared with the TPPA (sensitivities of 99.2% and 100%, specificities of 98.7% and 99.0%, respectively). There is a clear need to improve the sensitivity of the existing Belarusian MPR test or to use a more sensitive screening test in order to improve diagnosis of the disease in Belarus.

  16. Syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, molecular epidemiological strain typing and determination of macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum in 2013-2014 in Tuva Republic, Russia.

    PubMed

    Khairullin, Rafil; Vorobyev, Denis; Obukhov, Andrey; Kuular, Ural-Herel; Kubanova, Anna; Kubanov, Alexey; Unemo, Magnus

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of syphilis in the Tuva Republic (geographical centre of Asia), Russia has been exceedingly high historically. No detailed examinations and no molecular investigations of Treponema pallidum strains transmitted in the Tuva Republic, or in general, in Russia, were published internationally. We examined the syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, and the molecular epidemiology and macrolide resistance in T. pallidum strains in 2013-2014 in the Tuva Republic. Among 95 mainly primary or secondary syphilis patients, the arp, tpr, tp0548 and 23S rRNA genes in 85 polA gene-positive genital ulcer specimens were characterized. The syphilis incidence in Tuva Republic peaked in 1998 (1562), however declined to 177 in 2013. Among the 70 (82%) completely genotyped specimens, six molecular strain types were found. Strain type 14d/f accounted for 91%, but also 14c/f, 14d/g, 14b/f, 14i/f, 9d/f, and 4d/f were identified. Two (2.4%) specimens contained the 23S rRNA A2058G macrolide resistance mutation. This is the first internationally published typing study regarding T. pallidum in Russia, performed in the Tuva Republic with the highest syphilis incidence in Russia. The two molecular strain types 4d/f and 9d/f have previously been described only in Eastern and Northern China and for the first time, macrolide-resistant syphilis was described in Russia.

  17. Syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, molecular epidemiological strain typing and determination of macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum in 2013-2014 in Tuva Republic, Russia.

    PubMed

    Khairullin, Rafil; Vorobyev, Denis; Obukhov, Andrey; Kuular, Ural-Herel; Kubanova, Anna; Kubanov, Alexey; Unemo, Magnus

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of syphilis in the Tuva Republic (geographical centre of Asia), Russia has been exceedingly high historically. No detailed examinations and no molecular investigations of Treponema pallidum strains transmitted in the Tuva Republic, or in general, in Russia, were published internationally. We examined the syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, and the molecular epidemiology and macrolide resistance in T. pallidum strains in 2013-2014 in the Tuva Republic. Among 95 mainly primary or secondary syphilis patients, the arp, tpr, tp0548 and 23S rRNA genes in 85 polA gene-positive genital ulcer specimens were characterized. The syphilis incidence in Tuva Republic peaked in 1998 (1562), however declined to 177 in 2013. Among the 70 (82%) completely genotyped specimens, six molecular strain types were found. Strain type 14d/f accounted for 91%, but also 14c/f, 14d/g, 14b/f, 14i/f, 9d/f, and 4d/f were identified. Two (2.4%) specimens contained the 23S rRNA A2058G macrolide resistance mutation. This is the first internationally published typing study regarding T. pallidum in Russia, performed in the Tuva Republic with the highest syphilis incidence in Russia. The two molecular strain types 4d/f and 9d/f have previously been described only in Eastern and Northern China and for the first time, macrolide-resistant syphilis was described in Russia. PMID:27102715

  18. Syphilis serology in pregnancy: an eight-year study (2005-2012) in a large teaching maternity hospital in Dublin, Ireland.

    PubMed

    McGettrick, Padraig; Ferguson, Wendy; Jackson, Valerie; Eogan, Maeve; Lawless, Mairead; Ciprike, Vaneta; Varughese, Alan; Coulter-Smith, Sam; Lambert, John S

    2016-03-01

    All cases of positive syphilis serology detected in antenatal and peripartum screening in a large teaching maternity hospital in inner city Dublin, Ireland over an eight-year period (2005-2012 inclusive) were reviewed and included in our study. Demographic, antenatal registration, laboratory (including co-infections), partner serology, treatment and delivery data were recorded in our database. Infant follow-up, treatment and outcome data were also collected. During this period, 194 women had positive syphilis serology, of which 182 completed their pregnancies at the institution. This accounts for 0.28% of the total number of women completing their pregnancies during this time (N = 66038); 79 had no previous diagnosis of infection. There was one case of re-infection during pregnancy. Thirty-two women were co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. There was one case suggestive of congenital syphilis infection. Our study is a comprehensive analysis of the diagnosis, management and clinical outcomes of women testing positive for syphilis infection in pregnancy. It reveals the relatively high prevalence of syphilis infection in the population utilising the maternity services in north inner-city Dublin. It re-enforces the importance of continued active surveillance to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with maternal syphilis infection. It also highlights the importance of strategies such as re-testing high-risk groups and definitive screening of spouse serology.

  19. Republication: Two Premature Neonates of Congenital Syphilis with Severe Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Akahira-Azuma, Moe; Kubota, Mai; Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kaneshige, Masao; Yasuda, Noriko; Sato, Noriko; Matsushita, Takeji

    2015-01-01

    Congenital syphilis (CS) is a public health burden in both developing and developed countries. We report two cases of CS in premature neonates with severe clinical manifestations; Patient 1 (gestational age 31 weeks, birth weight 1423 g) had disseminated idiopathic coagulation (DIC) while Patient 2 (gestational age 34 weeks and 6 days, birth weight 2299 g) had refractory syphilitic meningitis. Their mothers were single and had neither received antenatal care nor undergone syphilis screening. Both neonates were delivered via an emergency cesarean section and had birth asphyxia and transient tachypnea of newborn. Physical examination revealed massive hepatosplenomegaly. Laboratory testing of maternal and neonatal blood showed increased rapid plasma reagin (RPR) titer and positive Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay. Diagnosis of CS was further supported by a positive IgM fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test and large amounts of T. pallidum spirochetes detected in the placenta. Each neonate was initially treated with ampicillin and cefotaxime for early bacterial sepsis/meningitis that coexisted with CS. Patient 1 received fresh frozen plasma and antithrombin III to treat DIC. Patient 2 experienced a relapse of CS during initial antibiotic treatment, necessitating parenteral penicillin G. Treatment was effective in both neonates, as shown by reductions in RPR. Monitoring of growth and neurological development through to age 4 showed no evidence of apparent delay or complications. Without adequate antenatal care and maternal screening tests for infection, CS is difficult for non-specialists to diagnose at birth, because the clinical manifestations are similar to those of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. Ampicillin was insufficient for treating CS and penicillin G was necessary. PMID:26543391

  20. Correlates of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections among prison inmates and officers in Ghana: A national multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Adjei, Andrew A; Armah, Henry B; Gbagbo, Foster; Ampofo, William K; Boamah, Isaac; Adu-Gyamfi, Clement; Asare, Isaac; Hesse, Ian FA; Mensah, George

    2008-01-01

    Background Prisons are known to be high-risk environments for the spread of bloodborne and sexually transmitted infections. Prison officers are considered to have an intermittent exposure potential to bloodborne infectious diseases on the job, however there has been no studies on the prevalence of these infections in prison officers in Ghana. Methods A national multicenter cross-sectional study was undertaken on correlates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and syphilis infections in sample of prison inmates and officers from eight of ten regional central prisons in Ghana. A total of 1366 inmates and 445 officers were enrolled between May 2004 and December 2005. Subjects completed personal risk-factor questionnaire and provided blood specimens for unlinked anonymous testing for presence of antibodies to HIV, HCV and Treponema pallidum; and surface antigen of HBV (HBsAg). These data were analyzed using both univariate and multivariate techniques. Results Almost 18% (1336) of 7652 eligible inmates and 21% (445) of 2139 eligible officers in eight study prisons took part. Median ages of inmates and officers were 36.5 years (range 16–84) and 38.1 years (range 25–59), respectively. Among inmates, HIV seroprevalence was 5.9%, syphilis seroprevalence was 16.5%, and 25.5% had HBsAg. Among officers tested, HIV seroprevalence was 4.9%, HCV seroprevalence was 18.7%, syphilis seroprevalence was 7.9%, and 11.7% had HBsAg. Independent determinants for HIV, HBV and syphilis infections among inmates were age between 17–46, being unmarried, being illiterate, female gender, being incarcerated for longer than median time served of 36 months, history of homosexuality, history of intravenous drug use, history of sharing syringes and drug paraphernalia, history of participation in paid sexual activity, and history of sexually transmitted diseases. Independent determinants for HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections among officers

  1. Syphilis Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... highly sensitive but, since they are non-specific, false-positive results can be caused by, for example, ... it is more specific and there are fewer false positives. MHA-TP (Microhemagglutination assay)--another confirmatory method; ...

  2. Primary Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2006-2013 Logical Images, Inc. All rights reserved. Advertising Notice This Site and third parties who place ... would like to obtain more information about these advertising practices and to make choices about online behavioral ...

  3. Yaws, syphilis, sexuality, and the circulation of medical knowledge in the British Caribbean and the Atlantic world.

    PubMed

    Paugh, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    This history of the disease categories "yaws" and "syphilis" explores the interplay between European and African medical cultures in the early modern Atlantic world. The assertion made by both early modern and modern medical authorities, that yaws and syphilis are the same disease, prompts a case study of the history of disease that reflects on a variety of issues in the history of medicine: the use of ideas about contagion to demarcate racial and sexual difference at sites around the British Empire; the contrast between persistently holistic ideas about disease causation in the Black Atlantic and the growth of ontological theories of disease among Europeans and Euro-Americans; and the controversy over the African practice of yaws inoculation, which may once have been an effective treatment but was stamped out by plantation owners who viewed it as a waste of their enslaved laborers' valuable time.

  4. Yaws, syphilis, sexuality, and the circulation of medical knowledge in the British Caribbean and the Atlantic world.

    PubMed

    Paugh, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    This history of the disease categories "yaws" and "syphilis" explores the interplay between European and African medical cultures in the early modern Atlantic world. The assertion made by both early modern and modern medical authorities, that yaws and syphilis are the same disease, prompts a case study of the history of disease that reflects on a variety of issues in the history of medicine: the use of ideas about contagion to demarcate racial and sexual difference at sites around the British Empire; the contrast between persistently holistic ideas about disease causation in the Black Atlantic and the growth of ontological theories of disease among Europeans and Euro-Americans; and the controversy over the African practice of yaws inoculation, which may once have been an effective treatment but was stamped out by plantation owners who viewed it as a waste of their enslaved laborers' valuable time. PMID:24976161

  5. Changing trend of HIV, Syphilis and Hepatitis C among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Qianqian; Tang, Weiming; Ge, Lin; Li, Dongmin; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Wang, Liyan; Guo, Wei; Cui, Yan; Sun, Jiangping

    2016-01-01

    Dearth of information regarding the trend and correlates of HIV, syphilis and Hepatitis C (HCV) in a country-wide sample of understudied though high-risk Chinese men who have sex with men (MSM) called for a comprehensive serial cross-sectional study. Using a multistage mixed-method strategy, 171,311 MSM from 107 selected cities/counties in 30 provinces of mainland China, were interviewed and tested. Descriptive, bivariate, multivariate and Cochran-Armitage trend analyses were conducted using SAS 9.2. During 2009-13, recent (71.5% to 78.6%, p < 0.001) and consistent (40.4% to 48.8%, p < 0.001) condom use as well as condom use during commercial anal sex (46.5% to 55.0%, p < 0.001) were increasing. In contrast, commercial anal sex with male (11.9% to 7.1%, p < 0.001) and drug use (1.9% to 0.8%, p < 0.001) were decreasing over time. HIV prevalence increased gradually (5.5% to 7.3%, p < 0.001), while syphilis (9.0% to 6.3%, p < 0.001) and HCV prevalence (1.5% to 0.7%, p < 0.001) decreased over time. A positive correlation was observed between HIV and syphilis prevalence (r = 0.38). HIV infection was associated with HIV-related knowledge, services and injecting drug use. An increasing trend of HIV prevalence was observed during 2009–13 among MSM in China. While gradual reduction of risk behaviors along with syphilis and HCV prevalence supported expansion of testing and prevention services, increasing HIV burden called for deeper thematic investigations. PMID:27535092

  6. Ethical issues evolving from patients’ perspectives on compulsory screening for syphilis and voluntary screening for cervical cancer in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Public health aims to provide universal safety and progressive opportunities to populations to realise their highest level of health through prevention of disease, its progression or transmission. Screening asymptomatic individuals to detect early unapparent conditions is an important public health intervention strategy. It may be designed to be compulsory or voluntary depending on the epidemiological characteristics of the disease. Integrated screening, including for both syphilis and cancer of the cervix, is a core component of the national reproductive health program in Kenya. Screening for syphilis is compulsory while it is voluntary for cervical cancer. Participants’ perspectives of either form of screening approach provide the necessary contextual information that clarifies mundane community concerns. Methods Focus group discussions with female clients screened for syphilis and cancer of the cervix were conducted to elicit their perspectives of compulsory and voluntary screening. The discussions were audiotaped, transcribed and thematic content analysis performed manually to explore emerging ethics issues. Results The results indicate that real ethical challenges exist in either of the approaches. Also, participants were more concerned about the benefits of the procedure and whether their dignity is respected than the compulsoriness of screening per se. The implication is for the policy makers to clarify in the guidelines how to manage ethical challenges, while at the operational level, providers need to be judicious to minimize potential harms participants and families when screening for disease in women. Conclusions The context for mounting screening as a public health intervention and attendant ethical issues may be more complex than hitherto perceived. Interpreting emerging ethics issues in screening requires more nuanced considerations of individuals’ contextual experiences since these may be contradictory to the policy position. In

  7. Changing trend of HIV, Syphilis and Hepatitis C among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qianqian; Tang, Weiming; Ge, Lin; Li, Dongmin; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Wang, Liyan; Guo, Wei; Cui, Yan; Sun, Jiangping

    2016-01-01

    Dearth of information regarding the trend and correlates of HIV, syphilis and Hepatitis C (HCV) in a country-wide sample of understudied though high-risk Chinese men who have sex with men (MSM) called for a comprehensive serial cross-sectional study. Using a multistage mixed-method strategy, 171,311 MSM from 107 selected cities/counties in 30 provinces of mainland China, were interviewed and tested. Descriptive, bivariate, multivariate and Cochran-Armitage trend analyses were conducted using SAS 9.2. During 2009-13, recent (71.5% to 78.6%, p < 0.001) and consistent (40.4% to 48.8%, p < 0.001) condom use as well as condom use during commercial anal sex (46.5% to 55.0%, p < 0.001) were increasing. In contrast, commercial anal sex with male (11.9% to 7.1%, p < 0.001) and drug use (1.9% to 0.8%, p < 0.001) were decreasing over time. HIV prevalence increased gradually (5.5% to 7.3%, p < 0.001), while syphilis (9.0% to 6.3%, p < 0.001) and HCV prevalence (1.5% to 0.7%, p < 0.001) decreased over time. A positive correlation was observed between HIV and syphilis prevalence (r = 0.38). HIV infection was associated with HIV-related knowledge, services and injecting drug use. An increasing trend of HIV prevalence was observed during 2009-13 among MSM in China. While gradual reduction of risk behaviors along with syphilis and HCV prevalence supported expansion of testing and prevention services, increasing HIV burden called for deeper thematic investigations. PMID:27535092

  8. Seroepidemiology of HIV, syphilis and hepatitis B and C viruses among blood donors in Bangui, Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    Nambei, W S; Rawago-Mandjiza, D; Gbangbangai, E

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of HIV, the hepatitis B and C viruses, and syphilis as well the risk factors for these diseases among blood donors in Bangui, Central Africa Republic. This cross-sectional study examined samples from donors giving blood in August and September, 2013. HIV1/2 antibodies was screened with the Determine and Unigold HIV tests. Hepatitis B surface antigens were detected by sandwich immunochromatographic methods (DIAspot HBsAg test), and antibodies to HCV by the DIAspot test strip. Syphilis was diagnosed with the VDRL and TPHA methods (Omega Diagnostic, UK). The Chi(2) test was used for statistical analysis. The study included samples from 551 individuals, 350 (63.52%) of whom were frequent volunteer donors. In all, 132 (23.95%) were infected with at least one pathogen. The overall seroprevalence rate was 8.89% for HBV, 4.72% for HCV, 4.36% for syphilis, and 5.98% for HIV. Eight patients had two concomitant infections, with HIV-HBV the most common combination. Compared to long-term volunteers, first-time donors were more often infected by at least one of the pathogens we screened for, most especially HVB (OR = 5.06; 95% CI = 4.22-7.11) and syphilis (OR = 2.05; 95% CI = 2.02-7.44). Our findings indicate the high seroprevalence of transfusion-transmitted infections in blood donated in Bangui. The most common combined infections were HIV-HBV. The most common risk factor was a family history of HBV infection, and especially, mother-child transmission. PMID:27412978

  9. Uptake of Testing for HIV and Syphilis Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Baltimore, Maryland: 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Said, Maria A; German, Danielle; Flynn, Colin; Linton, Sabriya L; Blythe, David; Cooley, Laura A; Balaji, Alexandra B; Oster, Alexandra M

    2015-11-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) in Baltimore are at disproportionately high risk for HIV and syphilis infection. Testing and diagnosis are important first steps in receiving treatment and reducing transmission. We analyzed cross-sectional data collected in 2004-2005, 2008, and 2011 among MSM not reporting a previous positive HIV test (n = 1268) in Baltimore, Maryland as part of the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System to determine the proportion of men tested for HIV and/or syphilis within the previous 12 months and examine the extent to which opportunities for testing were being missed in health care settings. Within the previous 12 months, 54 % of men had received an HIV test; 31 % had received a syphilis test; and only 23 % of men had received testing for both. Among 979 men who did not receive both tests, 72 % had seen a health care provider in the past year, suggesting missed testing opportunities.

  10. [Seroprevalence and factors associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis in inmates in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil].

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque, Ana Cecília Cavalcanti; da Silva, Débora Maria; Rabelo, Deyse Caroline Cabral; de Lucena, Waldenia Agny Torres; de Lima, Paloma Cássia Silva; Coelho, Maria Rosângela Cunha Duarte; Tiago, Guilherme Gustavo de Brito

    2014-07-01

    Prison inmates are more vulnerable to HIV and other Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) due to risk factors such as needle sharing and unprotected sex with homosexuals. The aim of this work was to determine the seroprevalence and risk factors associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1/2) and syphilis among male inmates in Caruaru, State of Pernambuco, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was performed between May and July 2011, when 1,097 inmates at a prison in Caruaru were assessed by means of interviews and blood sample collection for performing the respective tests. The prevalence was 1.19% for HIV infection and 3.92% for syphilis. HIV infection showed a statistically significant association (p <0.05), with injected drug use, homosexuality and blood transfusions. With respect to HIV status and syphilis, factors related to sex life were statistically significant (p <0.05). The prison population is a high risk group for the diseases investigated. The prevalence rates identified indicate the need to implement prevention programs, helping to contain such diseases in this particular population group. PMID:25014292

  11. The cost-effectiveness of 10 antenatal syphilis screening and treatment approaches in Peru, Tanzania, and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Vickerman, Peter; Torres-Rueda, Sergio; Santesso, Nancy; Sweeney, Sedona; Mallma, Patricia; Shelley, Katharine D.; Garcia, Patricia J.; Bronzan, Rachel; Gill, Michelle M.; Broutet, Nathalie; Wi, Teodora; Watts, Charlotte; Mabey, David; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Newman, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Objective Rapid plasma reagin (RPR) is frequently used to test women for maternal syphilis. Rapid syphilis immunochromatographic strip tests detecting only Treponema pallidum antibodies (single RSTs) or both treponemal and non-treponemal antibodies (dual RSTs) are now available. This study assessed the cost-effectiveness of algorithms using these tests to screen pregnant women. Methods Observed costs of maternal syphilis screening and treatment using clinic-based RPR and single RSTs in 20 clinics across Peru, Tanzania, and Zambia were used to model the cost-effectiveness of algorithms using combinations of RPR, single, and dual RSTs, and no and mass treatment. Sensitivity analyses determined drivers of key results. Results Although this analysis found screening using RPR to be relatively cheap, most (> 70%) true cases went untreated. Algorithms using single RSTs were the most cost-effective in all observed settings, followed by dual RSTs, which became the most cost-effective if dual RST costs were halved. Single test algorithms dominated most sequential testing algorithms, although sequential algorithms reduced overtreatment. Mass treatment was relatively cheap and effective in the absence of screening supplies, though treated many uninfected women. Conclusion This analysis highlights the advantages of introducing RSTs in three diverse settings. The results should be applicable to other similar settings. PMID:25963907

  12. Sex, Drugs (Methamphetamines), and the Internet: Increasing Syphilis Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in California, 2004–2008

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Michael C.; Lo, Terrence; Bernstein, Kyle T.; Aynalem, Getahun; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Bolan, Gail

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined primary and secondary syphilis cases among men who have sex with men (MSM) in California, and the association of methamphetamine use and Internet use to meet sex partners (Internet use) with number of sex partners. Methods. We analyzed California surveillance data for MSM who were diagnosed with syphilis between 2004 and 2008, to assess differences in the mean number of sex partners by methamphetamine use and mutually exclusive groups of patients reporting Internet use (Internet users). Results. Large proportions of patients reported methamphetamine use (19.2%) and Internet use (36.4%). From 2006 through 2008, Adam4Adam was the most frequently reported Web site statewide, despite temporal and regional differences in Web site usage. Methamphetamine users reported more sex partners (mean = 11.7) than nonmethamphetamine users (mean = 5.6; P < .001). Internet users reported more sex partners (mean = 9.8) than non-Internet users (mean = 5.0; P < .001). Multivariable analysis of variance confirmed an independent association of methamphetamine and Internet use with increased numbers of sex partners. Conclusions. Higher numbers of partners among MSM syphilis patients were associated with methamphetamine and Internet use. Collaboration between currently stand-alone interventions targeting methamphetamine users and Internet users may offer potential advances in sexually transmitted disease control efforts. PMID:23153138

  13. A study on usefulness of a set of known risk factors in predicting maternal syphilis infections in three districts of Western Province, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Sakala, Jacob; Chizuni, Nellisiwe; Nzala, Selestine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite roll-out of cost-effective point-of-care tests, less than half antenatal attendees in rural western Zambia are screened for syphilis. This study formulated a clinical, risk-based assessment criteria and evaluated its usefulness as a non-biomedical alternative for identifying high-risk prenatal cases. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of antenatal clinic attendees in Kaoma, Luampa and Nkeyema districts to collect data on exposure to nine pre-selected syphilis risk factors. These factors were classified into major and minor factors based on their observed pre-study association strengths to maternal syphilis. Clinical disease was defined as exposure to either two major factors, one major with two minor factors or three minor factors. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the clinical protocol were then calculated in comparison to rapid plasmin reagin results. Results The observed syphilis prevalence was 9.3% (95% CI: 7.4 - 11.6%) and the overall sensitivity of the study criteria was 62.3% with positive predictive value of 72.9%. Sensitivities of individual case-defining categories were even lower; from 17.4% to 33.3%. Results confirmed that abortion history, still birth, multiple sexual partners, previous maternal syphilis infection, partner history of sexually transmitted infection and maternal co-morbid conditions of HIV and genital ulcer disease were significantly associated to maternal syphilis in study population as well. Conclusion The criteria was not as effective as biomedical tests in identifying maternal syphilis. However, it could be a useful adjunct/alternative in antenatal clinics when biomedical tests are either inadequate or unavailable.

  14. Syphilis and Its Correlates among Heterosexual Males Attending Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinics – Observation from a Multicity Cohort in Jiangsu Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Yan; Hao, Chao; Jiang, Hui; Sun, Lin; Zhou, Jian-Bo; Yin, Yue-Ping; Tang, Weiming; Jiang, Ning; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Mahapatra, Sanchita; Chen, Xiang-Sheng; Yang, Hai-Tao; Fu, Geng-Feng; Huan, Xi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of HIV and syphilis, incidence of syphilis and to identify the correlates of syphilis infection among heterosexual male attendees of sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinics (MSC). Methods A cohort study of one-year duration was conducted in Yangzhou and Changzhou cities in Jiangsu province of China. The baseline survey commenced in June 2009, recruited 1225 consenting adult MSCs (609 in Yangzhou and 617 in Changzhou) through STI-clinic based convenience sampling. Results Baseline HIV and syphilis prevalence were 0.49% and 17.29% respectively. Syphilis incidence rate was 7.22 per 100 person-years (6.53 in Yangzhou and 7.76 in Changzhou) during the 6-month follow-up with retention fractions of 27.38% and 35.15% for Yangzhou and Changzhou respectively. Majority of the participants were middle-aged, high school educated, married, living with partners and non-migrants. Very few subjects reported recent and consistent condom-use with regular partners. Although considerable number of MSCs reported recent sexual exposure with female sex workers (FSW) and non-FSW casual partners, the proportion of reported condom use was very low during those exposures. In multivariate analyses higher age, having recent sex with FSWs and being HIV-positive were associated with higher syphilis sero-positivity while higher education was protective. In bivariate analyses, being married, divorced/widowed, official residency of the study cities and non-use of condom with regular partners predicted higher risk. Conclusions Considering the potential bridging role of MSCs between high and low-risk populations, effective intervention strategies among them targeting the correlates of syphilis infection are urgently called for in Jiangsu province of China. PMID:24743839

  15. Evaluation of FlaB1, FlaB2, FlaB3, and Tp0463 of Treponema pallidum for serodiagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuanhao; Xiao, Jinhong; Xie, Yafeng; Xiao, Yongjian; Wang, Chuan; Kuang, Xingxing; Xu, Man; Li, Ranhui; Zeng, Tiebing; Liu, Shuanquan; Yu, Jian; Zhao, Feijun; Wu, Yimou

    2016-02-01

    Syphilis is a multistage disease caused by the invasive spirochete Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, and accurate diagnosis is important for the prevention and treatment of syphilis. Here, to identify appropriate diagnostic antigens for serodiagnosis of syphilis, 6 recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified, including flagellins (FlaB1 [Tp0868], FlaB2 [Tp0792], and FlaB3 [Tp0870]), Tp0463, Tp0751, and Tp1038. The sensitivities were determined by screening sera from individuals with primary (n=82), secondary (n=115), latent (n=105), and congenital (n=65) syphilis. The specificities were determined by screening sera from uninfected controls (n=30) and potentially cross-reactive infections including Lyme disease (n=30), leptospirosis (n=5), and hepatitis B (n=30). Our data showed that FlaB1, FlaB2, FlaB3, Tp0463, and Tp1038 exhibited higher overall sensitivities and specificities for detecting IgG antibody, with 95.4% and 98.9%, 92.6% and 95.8%, 95.1% and 95.8%, 92.6% and 97.9%, and 95.9% and 98.9%, respectively. In contrast, Tp0751 demonstrated only an overall sensitivity of 39.2%. For comparison, the sensitivity and specificity of Architect Syphilis TP were determined to be 98.1% and 93.7%, respectively. In addition, FlaB1, FlaB2, FlaB3, and Tp0463 demonstrated excellent performance for detecting IgM antibody in primary and congenital syphilis, with sensitivities of 76.8% and 83.1%, 72.0% and 87.7%, 74.4% and 89.2%, and 64.6% and 75.3%, respectively. These results indicate that FlaB1, FlaB2, FlaB3, and Tp0463 could be as novel diagnostic candidates for serodiagnosis of syphilis.

  16. Drug-Related Behaviors Independently Associated with Syphilis Infection among Female Sex Workers in two Mexico-U.S. Border Cities

    PubMed Central

    Loza, O.; Patterson, T.L.; Rusch, M.; Martínez, G.A.; Lozada, R.; Staines-Orozco, H.; Magis-Rodríguez, C.; Strathdee, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To identify correlates of active syphilis infection among female sex workers (FSWs) in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez. DESIGN Cross-sectional analyses of baseline interview data. Correlates of active syphilis (antibody titers >1:8) were identified by logistic regression. SETTING Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, two Mexican cities on the U.S. border that are situated on major drug trafficking routes and where prostitution is quasi-legal. PARTICIPANTS 914 FSWs aged ≥18 years without known HIV infection who had recent unprotected sex with clients. MEASUREMENTS Baseline interviews and testing for syphilis antibody using Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) and rapid plasma reagin (RPR) tests. FINDINGS Median age and duration in sex work were 32 and 4 years, respectively. Overall, 18.0% had ever injected drugs, 14.2% often or always used illegal drugs before or during sex in the past month, 37.7% had clients who injected drugs in the last 6 months, and 68.6% reported having clients from the U.S. Prevalence of HIV and active syphilis were 5.9% and 10.3%, respectively. Factors independently associated with active syphilis included injecting drugs (AOR: 2.39; 95% CI: 1.40, 4.80), using illegal drugs before or during sex (AOR: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.16, 3.65), and having any U.S. clients (AOR: 2.85; 95% CI: 1.43, 5.70). CONCLUSIONS Among female sex workers in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, drug-using behaviors were more closely associated with active syphilis than were sexual behaviors, suggesting the possibility of parenteral transmission of T. pallidum. Syphilis eradication programs should consider distributing sterile syringes to drug injectors and assisting FSWs with safer-sex negotiation in the context of drug use. PMID:20456292

  17. Safety of Benzathine Penicillin for Preventing Congenital Syphilis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Galvao, Tais F.; Silva, Marcus T.; Serruya, Suzanne J.; Newman, Lori M.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Pereira, Mauricio G.; Fescina, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To estimate the risk of serious adverse reactions to benzathine penicillin in pregnant women for preventing congenital syphilis. Methods We searched for clinical trials or cohorts that assessed the incidence of serious adverse reactions to benzathine penicillin in pregnant women and the general population (indirect evidence). MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and other databases were searched up to December 2012. The GRADE approach was used to assess quality of evidence. Absolute risks of each study were calculated along with their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). We employed the DerSimonian and Laird random effects model in the meta-analyses. Results From 2,765 retrieved studies we included 13, representing 3,466,780 patients. The studies that included pregnant women were conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of benzathine penicillin: no serious adverse reactions were reported among the 1,244 pregnant women included. In the general population, among 2,028,982 patients treated, 4 died from an adverse reaction. The pooled risk of death was virtually zero. Fifty-four cases of anaphylaxis were reported (pooled absolute risk = 0.002%; 95% CI: 0%–0.003% I2 = 12%). From that estimate, penicillin treatment would be expected to result in an incidence of 0 to 3 cases of anaphylaxis per 100,000 treated. Any adverse reactions were reported in 6,377 patients among 3,465,322 treated with penicillin (pooled absolute risk = 0.169%; 95% CI: 0.073%–0.265% I2 = 97%). The quality of evidence was very low. Conclusion Studies that assessed the risk of serious adverse events due to benzathine penicillin treatment in pregnant women were scarce, but no reports of adverse reactions were found. The incidence of severe adverse outcomes was very low in the general population. The risk of treating pregnant women with benzathine penicillin to prevent congenital syphilis appears very low and does not outweigh its benefits. Further research is needed to improve the

  18. A STUDY OF THE RELATION OF TREPONEMA PALLIDUM TO LYMPHOID TISSUES IN EXPERIMENTAL SYPHILIS

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Louise; Brown, Wade H.

    1922-01-01

    A widespread dissemination of Treponema pallidum from a local focus of inoculation in the rabbit constantly occurs by way of the lymphatics. Spirochetes were regularly recovered from the satellite lymph nodes by animal inoculation after scrotal inoculation; they were present as early as 2 days, when no specific primary reaction was detected, and at later periods of from 5 to 61 days after inoculation. Other superficial nodes at remote sites such as the popliteals and with no syphilitic lesions in the drainage area have also been shown to harbor active organisms. Although spirochetes were found in relatively few of the lymph node emulsions, the orchitis resulting from their injection was of a rapidly progressive type with an incubation period but slightly longer than that produced by a testicular or skin nodule emulsion rich in spirochetes. It has further been shown that a syphilitic infection is sufficiently established in the rabbit body within 48 hours after scrotal inoculation so that the primary lesion is no longer essential for its maintenance. Active treponemata survive in the popliteal lymph nodes for long periods of time and have been regularly recovered from them in cases of true latency. The lymph nodes, therefore, function as reservoirs of the organisms. The ability to recover the spirochetes from lymphoid tissue through successive generations is seen in the serial passage of lymph node emulsion to testicle during an 18 months period. The persistence of spirochetes in lymphoid tissue irrespective of the presence or absence of syphilitic lesions is a characteristic and fundamental feature of syphilis of the rabbit. The existence of infection, therefore, may be demonstrated at any time by the recovery of spirochetes from the popliteal lymph nodes by animal inoculation. This fact is of great practical importance in the therapy of the infection and may be profitably utilized in determining the ultimate effect of a therapeutic agent. These experiments

  19. Respondent-driven sampling of injection drug users in two U.S.-Mexico border cities: recruitment dynamics and impact on estimates of HIV and syphilis prevalence.

    PubMed

    Frost, Simon D W; Brouwer, Kimberly C; Firestone Cruz, Michelle A; Ramos, Rebeca; Ramos, Maria Elena; Lozada, Remedios M; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2006-11-01

    Respondent-driven sampling (RDS), a chain referral sampling approach, is increasingly used to recruit participants from hard-to-reach populations, such as injection drug users (IDUs). Using RDS, we recruited IDUs in Tijuana and Ciudad (Cd.) Juárez, two Mexican cities bordering San Diego, CA and El Paso, TX, respectively, and compared recruitment dynamics, reported network size, and estimates of HIV and syphilis prevalence. Between February and April 2005, we used RDS to recruit IDUs in Tijuana (15 seeds, 207 recruits) and Cd. Juárez (9 seeds, 197 recruits), Mexico for a cross-sectional study of behavioral and contextual factors associated with HIV, HCV and syphilis infections. All subjects provided informed consent, an anonymous interview, and a venous blood sample for serologic testing of HIV, HCV, HBV (Cd. Juárez only) and syphilis antibody. Log-linear models were used to analyze the association between the state of the recruiter and that of the recruitee in the referral chains, and population estimates of the presence of syphilis antibody were obtained, correcting for biased sampling using RDS-based estimators. Sampling of the targeted 200 recruits per city was achieved rapidly (2 months in Tijuana, 2 weeks in Cd. Juárez). After excluding seeds and missing data, the sample prevalence of HCV, HIV and syphilis were 96.6, 1.9 and 13.5% respectively in Tijuana, and 95.3, 4.1, and 2.7% respectively in Cd. Juárez (where HBV prevalence was 84.7%). Syphilis cases were clustered in recruitment trees. RDS-corrected estimates of syphilis antibody prevalence ranged from 12.8 to 26.8% in Tijuana and from 2.9 to 15.6% in Ciudad Juárez, depending on how recruitment patterns were modeled, and assumptions about how network size affected an individual's probability of being included in the sample. RDS was an effective method to rapidly recruit IDUs in these cities. Although the frequency of HIV was low, syphilis prevalence was high, particularly in Tijuana. RDS

  20. Respondent-Driven Sampling of Injection Drug Users in Two U.S.–Mexico Border Cities: Recruitment Dynamics and Impact on Estimates of HIV and Syphilis Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Firestone Cruz, Michelle A.; Ramos, Rebeca; Ramos, Maria Elena; Lozada, Remedios M.; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2006-01-01

    Respondent-driven sampling (RDS), a chain referral sampling approach, is increasingly used to recruit participants from hard-to-reach populations, such as injection drug users (IDUs). Using RDS, we recruited IDUs in Tijuana and Ciudad (Cd.) Juárez, two Mexican cities bordering San Diego, CA and El Paso, TX, respectively, and compared recruitment dynamics, reported network size, and estimates of HIV and syphilis prevalence. Between February and April 2005, we used RDS to recruit IDUs in Tijuana (15 seeds, 207 recruits) and Cd. Juárez (9 seeds, 197 recruits), Mexico for a cross-sectional study of behavioral and contextual factors associated with HIV, HCV and syphilis infections. All subjects provided informed consent, an anonymous interview, and a venous blood sample for serologic testing of HIV, HCV, HBV (Cd. Juárez only) and syphilis antibody. Log-linear models were used to analyze the association between the state of the recruiter and that of the recruitee in the referral chains, and population estimates of the presence of syphilis antibody were obtained, correcting for biased sampling using RDS-based estimators. Sampling of the targeted 200 recruits per city was achieved rapidly (2 months in Tijuana, 2 weeks in Cd. Juárez). After excluding seeds and missing data, the sample prevalence of HCV, HIV and syphilis were 96.6, 1.9 and 13.5% respectively in Tijuana, and 95.3, 4.1, and 2.7% respectively in Cd. Juárez (where HBV prevalence was 84.7%). Syphilis cases were clustered in recruitment trees. RDS-corrected estimates of syphilis antibody prevalence ranged from 12.8 to 26.8% in Tijuana and from 2.9 to 15.6% in Ciudad Juárez, depending on how recruitment patterns were modeled, and assumptions about how network size affected an individual’s probability of being included in the sample. RDS was an effective method to rapidly recruit IDUs in these cities. Although the frequency of HIV was low, syphilis prevalence was high, particularly in Tijuana. RDS

  1. Declining Inconsistent Condom Use but Increasing HIV and Syphilis Prevalence Among Older Male Clients of Female Sex Workers: Analysis From Sentinel Surveillance Sites (2010-2015), Guangxi, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Abraham Bussell, Scottie; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhenzhu; Lan, Guanghua; Zhu, Qiuying; Liu, Wei; Tang, Shuai; Li, Rongjian; Huang, Wenbo; Huang, Yuman; Liang, Fuxiong; Wang, Lu; Shao, Yiming; Ruan, Yuhua

    2016-05-01

    Clients of female sex workers (CFSWs) are a bridge population for the spread of HIV and syphilis to low or average risk heterosexuals. Most studies have examined the point prevalence of these infections in CFSWs. Limited evidence suggests that older age CFSWs are at a higher risk of acquiring sexually transmitted diseases compared with younger clients. Thus, we sought to describe long-term trends in HIV, syphilis, and hepatitis C (HCV) to better understand how these infections differ by sex worker classification and client age. We also examined trends in HIV, syphilis, and HCV among categories of female sex workers (FSWs).We conducted serial cross-sectional studies from 2010 to 2015 in Guangxi autonomous region, China. We collected demographic and behavior variables. FSWs and their clients were tested for HIV, syphilis, and HCV antibodies. Positive HIV and syphilis serologies were confirmed by Western blot and rapid plasma regain, respectively. Clients were categorized as middle age (40-49 years) and older clients (≥50 years). FSWs were categorized as high-tier, middle-tier, or low-tier based on the payment amount charged for sex and their work venue. Chi-square test for trends was used for testing changes in prevalence over time.By 2015, low-tier FSWs (LTFSWs) accounted for almost half of all FSWs; and they had the highest HIV prevalence at 1.4%. HIV prevalence declined significantly for FSWs (high-tier FSW, P = 0.003; middle-tier FSWs; P = 0.021; LTFSWs, P < 0.001). Syphilis infections significantly declined for FSWs (P < 0.001) but only to 7.3% for LTFSWs. HCV and intravenous drug use were uncommon in FSWs. HIV prevalence increased for older age clients (1.3%-2.0%, P = 0.159) while syphilis prevalence remained stable. HCV infections were halved among older clients in 3 years (1.7%-0.8%, P < 0.001). Condom use during the last sexual encounter increased for FSWs and CFSWs. Few clients reported sex with men or intravenous drug use. Clients

  2. Is there a legacy of the U.S. Public Health Syphilis Study at Tuskegee in HIV/AIDS-related beliefs among heterosexual African-Americans and Latinos?

    PubMed

    Mays, Vickie M; Coles, Courtney N; Cochran, Susan D

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the US Public Health Syphilis Study at Tuskegee is sometime cited as a principal reason for the relatively low participation rates seen among racial/ethnic minorities, particularly African Americans, in biomedical research. However, only a few studies have actually explored this possibility. We use data from a random digit dial telephone survey of 510 African-Americans and 253 Latinos, age 18 to 45 years, to investigate associations between knowledge of the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee and endorsement of HIV/AIDS conspiracy theories. All respondents were drawn from an area of low-income, predominantly race-segregated inner city households in Los Angeles. Results indicate that African Americans were significantly more likely than Latinos to endorse HIV/AIDS conspiracy theories. Further, African Americans were more aware of the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee (SST). Nevertheless, 72% of African Americans and 94% of Latinos reported that they have never heard of the Syphilis Study at Tuskegee. Further, while awareness of the Syphilis Study at Tuskegee was a significant predictor of endorsing HIV/AIDS conspiracy theories, results suggest that other factors may be more important in accounting for low biomedical and behavioral study participation rates. PMID:23308036

  3. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis and HIV in China: What drives political prioritization and what can this tell us about promoting dual elimination?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dadong; Hawkes, Sarah; Buse, Kent

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study aims to identify reasons behind the lower political priority of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of syphilis compared with HIV, despite the former presenting a much larger and growing burden than the latter, in China, over the 20 years prior to 2010. Methods We undertook a comparative policy analysis, based on informant interviews and documentation review of control of MTCT of syphilis and HIV, as well as nonparticipant observation of relevant meetings/trainings to investigate agenda-setting prior to 2010. Results We identified several factors contributing to the lower priority accorded to MTCT of syphilis: relative neglect at a global level, dearth of international financial and technical support, poorly unified national policy community with weak accountability mechanisms, insufficient understanding of the epidemic and policy options, and a prevailing negative framing of syphilis that resulted in significant stigmatization. Conclusion A dual elimination goal will only be reached when prioritization of MTCT of syphilis is enhanced in both the international and national agendas. PMID:25968490

  4. Operations research study to implement HIV and syphilis point-of-care tests and assess client perceptions in a marginalised area of Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Flores, Elaine C; Lluque, Maria E; Chiappe, Marina; Lino, Rosabel; Bayer, Angela M

    2015-09-01

    In Peru, a significant proportion of people tested for HIV and syphilis do not receive timely results. Our objective was to assess the institutional feasibility of implementing simultaneous HIV/syphilis point-of-care tests and client perceptions regarding these point-of-care tests. Point-of-care tests were implemented in a hospital consultation room in a marginalised zone of Lima. A time-series design was used to compare the proportion of tested clients who received timely results, with and without the point-of-care test intervention. Experience and satisfaction with point-of-care tests was evaluated with 149 people. In the 6 months without intervention, 69% and 61% of clients tested for HIV and syphilis, respectively, received their results within the required 45-minute window. During the 2-month point-of-care test intervention, all clients tested for HIV (n = 387) and syphilis (n = 398) received their results within 45 minutes. All clients surveyed were completely satisfied (52%) or satisfied (48%) with the simultaneous HIV/syphilis point-of-care test screening process. Additionally, 73% strongly agreed with the statement 'I feel satisfied with the rapid testing process.' Screening using point-of-care tests represents an important opportunity to reduce the time, resource and cost burden for users and institutions and increase the proportion of users receiving their test results in a timely manner.

  5. Prevalence of syphilis infection and associations with sexual risk behaviours among HIV-positive men who have sex with men in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Wang, Min; Zaller, Nickolas; Wang, Jun; Song, Dandan; Qu, Yuhuang; Sui, Xin; Dong, Zhengxin; Operario, Don; Zhang, Hongbo

    2014-05-01

    The aims of this study were to understand the prevalence and correlates of syphilis infection among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in Shanghai, China. A total of 200 HIV-positive MSM participants were recruited using "snowball" sampling. Participants were tested for syphilis and completed a one-time questionnaire which included demographic characteristics, sexual behaviours with male and female sexual partners, substance use, and use of antiretroviral medications. Prevalence of syphilis infection was 16.5%. Among HIV/syphilis co-infected participants, 63.6% reported having anal sex with male partners and 24.2% did not use condoms consistently during the past six months; 66.7% reported having oral sex with male partners and 51.5% reported unprotected oral sex during the past six months. Factors associated with testing seropositive for syphilis infection included receptive anal sex with a male partner in the past six months (AOR = 12.61, 90% CI = 2.38-66.89), illicit drug use in the past six months (AOR = 11.47, 90% CI = 2.47-53.45), and use of antiretroviral medication (AOR = 4.48, 90% CI = 1.43-14.05). These data indicate a need for "positive prevention" interventions targeting HIV-positive MSM in China. PMID:24285600

  6. Neonate human remains: a window of opportunity to the molecular study of ancient syphilis.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Rafael; Solórzano, Eduvigis; Díaz, Nancy; Álvarez-Sandoval, Brenda A; González-Ruiz, Mercedes; Cañadas, Mari Pau; Simões, Nelson; Isidro, Albert; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2012-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis can be a useful tool in bacterial disease diagnosis in human remains. However, while the recovery of Mycobacterium spp. has been widely successful, several authors report unsuccessful results regarding ancient treponemal DNA, casting doubts on the usefulness of this technique for the diagnosis of ancient syphilis. Here, we present results from an analysis of four newborn specimens recovered from the crypt of "La Ermita de la Soledad" (XVI-XVII centuries), located in the province of Huelva in the southwest of Spain. We extracted and analyzed aDNA in three independent laboratories, following specific procedures generally practiced in the aDNA field, including cloning of the amplified DNA fragments and sequencing of several clones. This is the most ancient case, reported to date, from which detection of DNA from T. pallidum subspecies pallidum has been successful in more than one individual, and we put forward a hypothesis to explain this result, taking into account the course of the disease in neonate individuals. PMID:22567153

  7. Remember Tuskegee: public health student knowledge of the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, S S; Etheredge, G D; Metayer, C; Martin, S A

    1996-01-01

    The ethical problems that surrounded the Tuskegee Syphilis Study prompted widespread public criticism when they first surfaced in 1972; the Tuskegee Study remains an important case in bioethics. We recently examined public health student knowledge of the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Study as part of an ethics curriculum needs assessment at Tulane University. A brief questionnaire was administered to 236 graduate students currently enrolled in seven epidemiology courses. Basic demographic information was obtained along with information about degree program. A series of questions was then asked to assess student knowledge of bioethics including the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Study. Only 19% (46 of 236) of the students demonstrated knowledge of the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Study. Knowledge of the Tuskegee Study's ethical significance was higher among students who were from the United States and those who were enrolled in the epidemiology program (P < .05). The ethical problems that surrounded the Tuskegee Study have rarely been encountered in public health. However, this important case stands as an exemplar of the potential for ethical abuses in human subjects research. Such cases ought to be highlighted in public health curricula. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH): blacks, African Americans, educational curriculum, epidemiology, ethics, public health, racism.

  8. Syphilis: Review with Emphasis on Clinical, Epidemiologic, and Some Biologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ameeta E.; Romanowski, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    Syphilis is a chronic disease with a waxing and waning course, the manifestations of which have been described for centuries. It occurs worldwide, and the incidence varies significantly with geographic location. Transmission is mainly by sexual contact. The causative organism, Treponema pallidum, was first described in 1905, but because of the inability to culture the organism and the limitations of direct microscopy, serologic testing is the mainstay of laboratory diagnosis. The disease has been arbitrarily divided into several stages. The primary stage is defined by a chancre at the site of inoculation. The secondary stage is characterized by a polymorphic rash, lymphadenopathy, and other systemic manifestations. A variable asymptomatic latent period follows, which for epidemiologic purposes is divided into early (<1 year) and late (>1 year) stages. The early stages (primary, secondary, and early latent) are potentially infectious. The tertiary stage is the most destructive and is marked by cardiovascular and neurologic sequelae and gummatous involvement of any organ system. Congenital infection may result in protean early or late manifestations. Unlike many other bacteria causing infectious diseases, the organism remains sensitive to penicillin, and this remains the mainstay of therapy. PMID:10194456

  9. Neonate Human Remains: A Window of Opportunity to the Molecular Study of Ancient Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Montiel, Rafael; Solórzano, Eduvigis; Díaz, Nancy; Álvarez-Sandoval, Brenda A.; González-Ruiz, Mercedes; Cañadas, Mari Pau; Simões, Nelson; Isidro, Albert; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2012-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis can be a useful tool in bacterial disease diagnosis in human remains. However, while the recovery of Mycobacterium spp. has been widely successful, several authors report unsuccessful results regarding ancient treponemal DNA, casting doubts on the usefulness of this technique for the diagnosis of ancient syphilis. Here, we present results from an analysis of four newborn specimens recovered from the crypt of “La Ermita de la Soledad” (XVI–XVII centuries), located in the province of Huelva in the southwest of Spain. We extracted and analyzed aDNA in three independent laboratories, following specific procedures generally practiced in the aDNA field, including cloning of the amplified DNA fragments and sequencing of several clones. This is the most ancient case, reported to date, from which detection of DNA from T. pallidum subspecies pallidum has been successful in more than one individual, and we put forward a hypothesis to explain this result, taking into account the course of the disease in neonate individuals. PMID:22567153

  10. Clinical and pathologic diagnosis and different diagnosis of syphilis cervical lymphadenitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yufen; Zhang, Xinlian; Xu, Nan; Wang, Libo; Li, Fangchao; Zhang, Ping; Miao, Lanfang; Yang, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the clinical pathologic characteristics and differential diagnosis of syphilitic cervical lymphadenitis, and to improve the rate of its diagnosis and treatment. Methods: Retrospectively analyzed the clinical history, Trepone pallidum-ELISA (TP-ELISA), rapid plasma regain test (RPR) and routine pathological examination of the patient diagnosed as syphilis lymphadenitis. And review related literatures. Results: The main clinical presentation was multiple palpable cervical lymph nodes. The multiple nodes were hard, fixed, and the major diameter of the larger one was 2 cm. The main pathological changes included: the capsule was significantly thickened; reactive hyperplasia of lymphoid follicular with sky star phenomenon; occlusive endovasculitis; perivascular inflammation; the proliferation of epithelioid histiocytes can form granulomas with few multinucleated giant cells; few necrosis. TP-ELISA and RPR were positive. Conclusions: The pathological changes of syphilitic lymphadenitis have a variety of performance with relatively specific and suggestive alterations which requires a combination of clinical history and laboratory test before the diagnosis, and the clinicians can reduce misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis of the disease by increasing vigilance of it. PMID:26722588

  11. High frequency of the 23S rRNA A2058G mutation of Treponema pallidum in Shanghai is associated with a current strategy for the treatment of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haikong; Li, Kang; Gong, Weimin; Yan, Limeng; Gu, Xin; Chai, Ze; Guan, Zhifang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2015-02-01

    The preferred drugs for the treatment of syphilis, benzathine and procaine penicillin, have not been available in Shanghai for many years, and currently, the incidence of syphilis is increasing. Alternative antibiotics for patients with syphilis during the benzathine and procaine penicillin shortage include macrolides. The failure of macrolide treatment in syphilis patients has been reported in Shanghai, but the reason for this treatment failure remains unclear. We used polymerase chain reaction technology to detect a 23S rRNA A2058G mutation in Treponema pallidum in 109 specimens from syphilis patients. The use of azithromycin/erythromycin in the syphilis patients and the physicians' prescription habits were also assessed based on two questionnaires regarding the use of macrolides. A total of 104 specimens (95.4%) were positive for the A2058G mutation in both copies of the 23S rRNA gene, indicating macrolide resistance. A questionnaire provided to 122 dermatologists showed that during the penicillin shortage, they prescribed erythromycin and azithromycin for 8.24±13.95% and 3.21±6.37% of their patients, respectively, and in the case of penicillin allergy, erythromycin and azithromycin were prescribed 15.24±22.89% and 7.23±16.60% of the time, respectively. A second questionnaire provided to the syphilis patients showed that 150 (33.7%), 106 (23.8%) and 34 (7.6%) individuals had used azithromycin, erythromycin or both, respectively, although the majority did not use the drugs for syphilis treatment. Our findings suggest that macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum is widespread in Shanghai. More than half of the syphilis patients had a history of macrolide use for other treatment purposes, which may have led to the high prevalence of macrolide resistance. Physicians in China are advised to not use azithromycin for early syphilis.

  12. High frequency of the 23S rRNA A2058G mutation of Treponema pallidum in Shanghai is associated with a current strategy for the treatment of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haikong; Li, Kang; Gong, Weimin; Yan, Limeng; Gu, Xin; Chai, Ze; Guan, Zhifang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2015-02-01

    The preferred drugs for the treatment of syphilis, benzathine and procaine penicillin, have not been available in Shanghai for many years, and currently, the incidence of syphilis is increasing. Alternative antibiotics for patients with syphilis during the benzathine and procaine penicillin shortage include macrolides. The failure of macrolide treatment in syphilis patients has been reported in Shanghai, but the reason for this treatment failure remains unclear. We used polymerase chain reaction technology to detect a 23S rRNA A2058G mutation in Treponema pallidum in 109 specimens from syphilis patients. The use of azithromycin/erythromycin in the syphilis patients and the physicians' prescription habits were also assessed based on two questionnaires regarding the use of macrolides. A total of 104 specimens (95.4%) were positive for the A2058G mutation in both copies of the 23S rRNA gene, indicating macrolide resistance. A questionnaire provided to 122 dermatologists showed that during the penicillin shortage, they prescribed erythromycin and azithromycin for 8.24±13.95% and 3.21±6.37% of their patients, respectively, and in the case of penicillin allergy, erythromycin and azithromycin were prescribed 15.24±22.89% and 7.23±16.60% of the time, respectively. A second questionnaire provided to the syphilis patients showed that 150 (33.7%), 106 (23.8%) and 34 (7.6%) individuals had used azithromycin, erythromycin or both, respectively, although the majority did not use the drugs for syphilis treatment. Our findings suggest that macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum is widespread in Shanghai. More than half of the syphilis patients had a history of macrolide use for other treatment purposes, which may have led to the high prevalence of macrolide resistance. Physicians in China are advised to not use azithromycin for early syphilis. PMID:26038763

  13. Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network laboratory guidelines for the use of serological tests (excluding point-of-care tests) for the diagnosis of syphilis in Canada.

    PubMed

    Levett, Paul N; Fonseca, Kevin; Tsang, Raymond Sw; Kadkhoda, Kamran; Serhir, Bouchra; Radons, Sandra M; Morshed, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis, caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, is an infection recognized since antiquity. It was first reported at the end of the 15th century in Europe. Infections may be sexually transmitted as well as spread from an infected mother to her fetus or through blood transfusions. The laboratory diagnosis of syphilis infection is complex. Because this organism cannot be cultured, serology is used as the principal diagnostic method. Some of the issues related to serological diagnoses are that antibodies take time to appear after infection, and serology screening tests require several secondary confirmatory tests that can produce complex results needing interpretation by experts in the field. Traditionally, syphilis screening was performed using either rapid plasma reagin or Venereal Disease Research Laboratory tests, and confirmed by treponemal tests such as MHA-TP, TPPA or FTA-Abs. Currently, that trend is reversed, ie, most of the laboratories in Canada now screen for syphilis using treponemal enzyme immunoassays and confirm the status of infection using rapid plasma reagin or Venereal Disease Research Laboratory tests; this approach is often referred to as the reverse algorithm. This chapter reviews guidelines for specimen types and sample collection, treponemal and non-treponemal tests utilized in Canada, the current status of serological tests for syphilis in Canada, the complexity of serological diagnosis of syphilis infection and serological testing algorithms. Both traditional and reverse sequence algorithms are recommended and the algorithm used should be based on a combination of local disease epidemiology, test volumes, performance of the proposed assays and available resources.

  14. High incidence of HIV and syphilis among migrant men who have sex with men in Beijing, China: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Hengyi; Ma, Wenzhe; Lu, Hongyan; Wang, Lu; Zheng, Hui; Zhu, Yingying; Peng, Zhihang; Yu, Rongbin; Wang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the study was to investigate the incidence of HIV and syphilis and their related factors, as well as to examine the predictors associated with seroconversion among migrant men who have sex with men (MSM) in Beijing, China. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Beijing, China. Participants 511 HIV-negative migrant MSM. Primary and secondary outcome measures Sociodemographic and behavioural information of participants, HIV and syphilis incidence rates, and factors associated with HIV/syphilis seroconversion and cohort retention. Results Of the 511 participants, 60.3% (308) and 52.4% (273) were retained at the 4- and 8-month follow-up visits, respectively. The HIV and syphilis incidence rates were 7.83 (95% CI 4.48 to 12.72) and 11.11 (95% CI 6.47 to 17.80) per 100 person-years, respectively. HIV seroconversion was significantly associated with ‘had first anal intercourse at age 15 or younger’ (adjusted HR (aHR) 9.20, 95% CI 1.94 to 43.56) and ‘ever had group sex’ (aHR 4.30, 95% CI 1.40 to 13.18). Bisexual orientation (aHR 5.09, 95% CI 1.02 to 25.57) was significantly associated with syphilis seroconversion. Predictors associated with both 4- and 8-month retention rates included age ≥25 years old and living in Beijing for more than 1 year. Conclusions The high incidence of HIV and syphilis among migrant MSM is a cause for concern. A comprehensive strategy should be implemented to maintain a higher retention rate among migrant MSM. PMID:25227626

  15. Conventional systemic treatments associated with therapeutic sites of local lesions of secondary syphilis in the oral cavity in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Giovani, Elcio Magdalena; de Paula Neto, Edson Rodrigues; Vieira, Bruno Caputo; de Andrade, Daniela Miranda Richarte

    2012-01-01

    Patients with HIV infection may develop common diseases with atypical clinical features. HIV infection can change the classic clinical course of syphilis and increase the incidence of malignant syphilis. Malignant syphilis is a rare subtype of secondary syphilis that presents special clinical and histological features and has been associated with several processes characterized by variable degrees of immunosuppression. It is necessary to consider the possibility of this entity in the differential diagnoses in HIV-infected patients with cutaneous lesions. The dental surgeon (or oral surgeon) is vital to the medical team for promoting the health and improving the quality of life of syphilis patients. A patient with HIV infection was referred to us for complaints of a white patch on the tongue, stinging and burning sensation on the tongue, loss of taste, and dryness of the mouth. On clinical examination, the patient was found to have a tabetic gait (the Prussian soldier gait) associated with Charcot arthropathy. We also identified bilateral lesions with ulceration and exposure of the tissue that were tender, characterized by discrete necrosis. The treatment that was initiated at that time involved cleaning the area with gauze to remove all the white patches, followed by rinsing with bicarbonate in water (one teaspoon of baking soda dissolved in half a glass of water) four times a day. Additionally, fluconazole (100 mg/day for 7 days) was prescribed. We diagnosed secondary malignant syphilis of approximately 5 days duration. As an adjunctive therapy, we performed low-intensity laser treatment using a GaAsAl (gallium-aluminum arsenide) laser at 790 nm. With this treatment there was progressive resolution of the lesions. PMID:23422616

  16. Conventional systemic treatments associated with therapeutic sites of local lesions of secondary syphilis in the oral cavity in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Giovani, Elcio Magdalena; de Paula Neto, Edson Rodrigues; Vieira, Bruno Caputo; de Andrade, Daniela Miranda Richarte

    2012-01-01

    Patients with HIV infection may develop common diseases with atypical clinical features. HIV infection can change the classic clinical course of syphilis and increase the incidence of malignant syphilis. Malignant syphilis is a rare subtype of secondary syphilis that presents special clinical and histological features and has been associated with several processes characterized by variable degrees of immunosuppression. It is necessary to consider the possibility of this entity in the differential diagnoses in HIV-infected patients with cutaneous lesions. The dental surgeon (or oral surgeon) is vital to the medical team for promoting the health and improving the quality of life of syphilis patients. A patient with HIV infection was referred to us for complaints of a white patch on the tongue, stinging and burning sensation on the tongue, loss of taste, and dryness of the mouth. On clinical examination, the patient was found to have a tabetic gait (the Prussian soldier gait) associated with Charcot arthropathy. We also identified bilateral lesions with ulceration and exposure of the tissue that were tender, characterized by discrete necrosis. The treatment that was initiated at that time involved cleaning the area with gauze to remove all the white patches, followed by rinsing with bicarbonate in water (one teaspoon of baking soda dissolved in half a glass of water) four times a day. Additionally, fluconazole (100 mg/day for 7 days) was prescribed. We diagnosed secondary malignant syphilis of approximately 5 days duration. As an adjunctive therapy, we performed low-intensity laser treatment using a GaAsAl (gallium-aluminum arsenide) laser at 790 nm. With this treatment there was progressive resolution of the lesions.

  17. A negative nontreponemal and/or specific antitreponemal IgM test does not exclude active infectious syphilis: evidence from a rabbit infectivity test

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Rong; Tong, Man-Li; Gao, Kun; Zhu, Xiao-Zhen; Fan, Jin-Yi; Zheng, Wei-Hong; Li, Shu-Lian; Lin, Hui-Ling; Liu, Li-Li; Yang, Tian-Ci

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The diagnostic criteria for active infectious syphilis in the clinic are important matter of controversy and debate. So far, clinicians habitually do use the negative results of the nontreponemal and/or the specific antitreponemal IgM as the evidences of disease-free or active infection-free status. Method: We present a case study involving a patient who was admitted to Zhongshan Hospital because of cerebral infarct. Clinical examination indicated he had a history of latent syphilis with negative nontreponemal and specific antitreponemal IgM tests. The cerebrospinal fluid sample from the patient was inoculated into seronegative New Zealand rabbit. Results: Motile Treponema pallidum was detected by a rabbit infectivity test in the patient's cerebrospinal fluid. This syphilis strain was confirmed by DNA subtyping form of “centers for disease control subtype/tp0548 sequence type”, and the strain type was 14d/f. Treatment with benzathine penicillin provided no apparent benefit, but treatment with aqueous crystalline penicillin G, especially recommended for neurosyphilis, led to disease regression. No evidence of cerebral infarct was observed during a 2-year follow-up period. Conclusion: The definitive differential diagnosis of active infectious syphilis should be reconsidered. Moreover, selecting the appropriate penicillin preparation is important because T pallidum can reside in sequestered sites. It is necessary to treat a patient with known invasion of the central nervous system with aqueous crystalline penicillin G, if previous treatment for syphilis failed and patients had some clinical neurological presentation that is otherwise unexplained, but that could represent neurosyphilis. Additional studies are needed to confirm the results in other syphilis patients. PMID:27495107

  18. [Juan Marin Rojas M.D., First Professor of History of Medicine at Universidad de Chile and his "Essay about the origin of syphilis"].

    PubMed

    Laval, Enrique

    2014-06-01

    Dr. Juan Marín Rojas, M.D., was the first Professor of History of Medicine at Universidad de Chile, navy doctor, diplomat, writer and literary critic. Member of the International Society of History of Medicine, and Correspondent Member for Chile of the "Office de Documentation de Médecine et Pharmacie Militaire", Liege, Belgium, from which his "Essay about the origin of syphilis" is transcribed with interesting historical facts and little known arguments that affirm the non-american origin of syphilis, but "aspire to leave a doubt, given not a contrary conviction".

  19. Syphilis and human experimentation from the first appearance of the disease to World War II: a historical perspective and reflections on ethics.

    PubMed

    Cuerda-Galindo, E; Sierra-Valentí, X; González-López, E; López-Muñoz, F

    2014-10-01

    Physicians have conducted research on syphilis for centuries, seeking to understand its etiology and the means of transmission as well as find ways to prevent and cure the disease. Their research practices often strayed from today's ethical standards. In this paper we review ethical aspects of the long history of research on syphilis with emphasis on the experiments performed in the 20th century. The description of research around the time of World War II covers medical experiments carried out in US prisons and in the experimentation centers established by Japanese doctors in occupied territory, as well as experiments in Nazi Germany and the treatment of syphilitics there. PMID:24268559

  20. Syphilis and human experimentation from the first appearance of the disease to World War II: a historical perspective and reflections on ethics.

    PubMed

    Cuerda-Galindo, E; Sierra-Valentí, X; González-López, E; López-Muñoz, F

    2014-10-01

    Physicians have conducted research on syphilis for centuries, seeking to understand its etiology and the means of transmission as well as find ways to prevent and cure the disease. Their research practices often strayed from today's ethical standards. In this paper we review ethical aspects of the long history of research on syphilis with emphasis on the experiments performed in the 20th century. The description of research around the time of World War II covers medical experiments carried out in US prisons and in the experimentation centers established by Japanese doctors in occupied territory, as well as experiments in Nazi Germany and the treatment of syphilitics there.

  1. Decreased incidence of syphilis in both men and women associated with male circumcision: a prospective study among HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples

    PubMed Central

    Pintye, Jillian; Baeten, Jared M.; Manhart, Lisa; Celum, Connie; Ronald, Allan; Mugo, Nelly; Mujugira, Andrew; Cohen, Craig; Were, Edwin; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Kiarie, James; Heffron, Renee

    2014-01-01

    Background Male circumcision is a primary HIV-1 prevention intervention for men. It is uncertain whether male circumcision reduces the risk of syphilis among men and their female partners. Methods Using data from a prospective study among HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples from Kenya and Uganda, we assessed whether male circumcision was associated with incident syphilis in men and in their female partners. Multivariate Andersen-Gill survival methods were used, adjusted for age, sexual behavior, and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels of the HIV-1 infected partner. Findings 4716 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples (37·5% with an HIV-1 infected male) were followed for a median of 2·75 years. At enrollment, 1575 (53·5%) HIV-1 uninfected and 560 (32·4%) HIV-1 infected men were circumcised; an additional 69 (4·2%) HIV-1 infected and 132 (4·8%) HIV-1 uninfected men became circumcised during study follow up. 221 incident syphilis infections were observed: 46 among HIV-1 infected men (incidence 1·10 per 100 person-years), 76 among HIV-1 uninfected men (1·09 per 100 person-years), 54 among HIV-1 infected women (0·77 per 100 person-years) and 45 among HIV-1 uninfected women (1·11 per 100 person-years). Male circumcision was associated with a 42% reduction in incident syphilis in men (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.58 95% CI 0·37–0·91) including a 62% reduction among HIV-1 infected men (aHR 0·38, 95% CI 0·18–0·81) and a non-significant reduction in incident syphilis among HIV-1 uninfected men (aHR 0·64, 95% CI 0·36–1·11). Among women, circumcision of their male partners was associated with a 59% reduction in incident syphilis (aHR 0.41 95% CI 0.25–0.69), including a 75% reduction among HIV-1 uninfected women (aHR 0·25, 95% CI 0·08–0·76) and a 48% reduction among HIV-1 infected women (aHR 0·52, 95% CI 0·27–0·97). Interpretation In this large prospective cohort study among HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, male circumcision was associated with decreased risk

  2. Bridging the Epidemic: A Comprehensive Analysis of Prevalence and Correlates of HIV, Hepatitis C, and Syphilis, and Infection among Female Sex Workers in Guangxi Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Shen, Zhiyong; Morano, Jamie P.; Khoshnood, Kaveh; Wu, Zunyou; Lan, Guanghua; Zhu, Qiuying; Zhou, Yuejiao; Tang, Shuai; Liu, Wei; Chen, Jie; Tang, Zhenzhu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Female sex workers (FSWs) are at highest risk for contracting HIV and facilitating the current heterosexual HIV epidemic in Guangxi, China, yet little is known of the impact of recent harm reduction campaigns in the province. We analyzed sentinel surveillance data collected between 2010 and 2012 in Guangxi to explore correlations between the prevalence of HIV, hepatitis C (HCV), and syphilis and risk behaviors of different categories of FSWs in Guangxi. Methods The sentinel surveillance data for 5,1790 FSWs in all 14 prefectures and 64 city/county regions of Guangxi, China from 2010 to 2012 were collected. Differences between three categories of FSWs (grouped by venue) and disease trends (HIV, HCV, and syphilis) by year were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses as to evaluate risk factors correlated with HIV, HCV, or syphilis infection. Results HIV and HCV prevalence remained constant across the three FSW categories; however, syphilis prevalence showed a significant increase from 5.7% to 7.3% for low-tier FSWs. Most cases with HIV, HCV, syphilis and intravenous drug use were seen in low-tier FSWs. Testing positive for HIV and syphilis were most correlated with being HCV positive (AOR 4.12 and AOR 4.36), only completing elementary school (AOR 3.71 and AOR 2.35), low tier venues (AOR 2.02 and AOR 2.00), and prior STI (AOR 1.40 and AOR 3.56), respectively. HCV infection was correlated with ever injecting drugs (AOR 60.65) and testing positive for syphilis (AOR 4.16) or HIV (AOR 3.74). Conclusions This study highlights that low tier FSWs with lower formal education levels are the most vulnerable population at risk for acquiring and transmitting HIV, HCV, and syphilis in Guangxi, China. Condom distribution with evolution to safer sex practices are the reasons to explain the non-increasing prevalence of HIV, HCV in Guangxi for 2010–2012. PMID:25723548

  3. Risk factors for HIV and syphilis infection among male sex workers who have sex with men: a cross-sectional study in Hangzhou, China, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yan; Zhu, Chunyan; Chen, Shuchang; Geng, Qingshan; Fu, Rong; Li, Xiting; Xu, Ke; Cheng, Jie; Ding, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of HIV and syphilis infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) in male sex workers (MSW). Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Hangzhou, China. Participants 259 MSW in MSM were recruited by respondent-driven sampling from May 2011 to December 2011.The inclusion criteria were: (1) age ≥18 years; (2) engaging in sex with men in the previous year and (3) willing to cooperate in the implementation of the study. Outcome measures HIV-related knowledge, high-risk behaviour and condom use. Results Among these MSW in MSM, 23.2% were infected with HIV and/or syphilis, 8.9% were infected only with HIV, 12.7% only with syphilis and 1.5% with HIV/syphilis co-infection; 96.6% sold sex to males, 8.9% bought sex from males and 15.4% sold sex to females; 49.0% had non-commercial sex behaviours with males and 24.3% with females. The rate of condom use while having commercial sex with clients was 86.9% and 53.3% (selling anal and oral sex to males, respectively), 95.5% (buying sex from males) and 77.5% (selling sex to females), respectively. Regarding their non-commercial sex behaviour, the rate of condom use was 77.2% (with males) and 49.2% (with females), respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that age >30 years (OR 1.055; 95% CIs 1.015 to 1.095) and having ≥10 non-commercial male sex partners (OR, 1.573; 95% CI 1.018 to 2.452) were significantly associated with HIV/syphilis infection, while heterosexuality (OR, 0.238; 95% CI 0.066 to 0.855) was significantly associated with a low HIV/syphilis infection rate. Conclusions The MSW in MSM population in Hangzhou has a high prevalence of HIV/syphilis infection, poor perceived risks of HIV and more engagement in unsafe sex with its clients and partners, in addition to a low rate of condom use. These risk factors may account for their relatively high infection rate of HIV/syphilis. PMID:25922096

  4. Non-human Immunodeficiency Virus-related Ocular Syphilis in a Korean Population: Clinical Manifestations and Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yonguk; Kwak, Hyung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical manifestations and treatment outcomes of ocular syphilis in patients without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Methods A total of 45 eyes from 39 patients with ocular syphilis confirmed by serologic tests were reviewed retrospectively. The included cases were all non-HIV-infected patients presenting with intraocular inflammation from 2002 to 2014 at Kyung Hee University Hospital. Medical records of 45 eyes were analyzed and included best-corrected visual acuity and ophthalmologic examination findings of the anterior and posterior segments to determine the focus of inflammation. Optical coherence tomography and fluorescein angiography findings as well as both medical and surgical management were also analyzed. Results The mean patient age was 61.0 years (range, 37 to 89 years). Bilateral ocular involvement occurred in 6 patients (15.4%), and diagnoses at presentation were most frequently related to posterior uveitis (38%), followed by panuveitis (29%) and optic neuritis (11%). Isolated interstitial keratitis and intermediate uveitis were uncommon (4%, both). Twenty-eight eyes (62.2%) were treated with penicillin, and 11 eyes (24.4%) underwent surgical treatment. The mean baseline best corrected visual acuity was 0.79 ± 0.59 (mean ± standard deviation, logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution) and significantly improved to 0.60 ± 0.63 at the final follow-up after treatment (p = 0.019). Mean visual improvement was significantly greater in the penicillin-treated group (p = 0.001). Visual impairment at the final visit occurred in 11 eyes (24.4%). Among the visual impairment group, 10 eyes (90.1%) had posterior segment-involving uveitis. Conclusions Visual outcomes of treated, non-HIV-related ocular syphilis were favorable regardless of time to presentation. Posterior segment-involving uveitis at presentation was associated with poor visual outcome. PMID:27729756

  5. Male circumcision and risk of syphilis, chancroid, and genital herpes: a systematic review and meta‐analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, H A; Thomas, S L; Munabi, S K; Hayes, R J

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Male circumcision is associated with reduced risk of HIV infection. This may be partly because of a protective effect of circumcision on other sexually transmitted infections (STI), especially those causing genital ulcers, but evidence for such protection is unclear. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta‐analyses of the associations between male circumcision and infection with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV‐2), Treponema pallidum, or Haemophilus ducreyi. Methods Electronic databases (1950–2004) were searched using keywords and text terms for herpes simplex, syphilis, chancroid, ulcerative sexually transmitted diseases, or their causative agents, in conjunction with terms to identify epidemiological studies. References of key articles were hand searched, and data were extracted using standardised forms. Random effects models were used to summarise relative risk (RR) where appropriate. Results 26 articles met the inclusion criteria. Most syphilis studies reported a substantially reduced risk among circumcised men (summary RR = 0.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.54 to 0.83), although there was significant between study heterogeneity (p = 0.01). The reduced risk of HSV‐2 infection was of borderline statistical significance (summary RR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.01). Circumcised men were at lower risk of chancroid in six of seven studies (individual study RRs: 0.12 to 1.11). Conclusions This first systematic review of male circumcision and ulcerative STI strongly indicates that circumcised men are at lower risk of chancroid and syphilis. There is less association with HSV‐2. Potential male circumcision interventions to reduce HIV in high risk populations may provide additional benefit by protecting against other STI. PMID:16581731

  6. Would Targeting Increase Efficiency of Syphilis Partner Services Programs?—Data From New York City, Philadelphia, Texas, and Virginia

    PubMed Central

    Hoots, Brooke E.; Lewis, Felicia M.T.; Anschuetz, Greta; Schillinger, Julia A.; Blank, Susan; Foskey, Tammy; Stover, Jeffrey A.; Peterman, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Targeted partner notification (PN), or limiting PN to groups in which efforts are most successful, has been suggested as a potentially cost-effective alternative to providing PN for all syphilis case-patients. The purpose of this study was to identify index case characteristics associated with highest yield partner elicitation and subsequent case finding to determine whether some groups could be reasonably excluded from PN efforts. Methods We examined index case characteristics and PN metrics from syphilis case management records of 4 sexually transmitted disease control programs—New York City, Philadelphia, Texas, and Virginia. Partner elicitation was considered successful when a case-patient named 1 or more partners during interview. Case finding was considered successful when a case-patient had 1 or more partners who were tested and had serologic evidence of syphilis exposure. Associations between case characteristics and proportion of pursued case-patients with successful partner elicitation and case finding were evaluated using χ2 tests. Results Successful partner elicitation and new case finding was most likely for index case-patients who were younger and diagnosed at public sexually transmitted disease clinics. However, most characteristics of index case-patients were related to success at only a few sites, or varied in the direction of the relationship by site. Other than late latent case-patients, few demographic groups had a yield far below average. Conclusions If implemented, targeted PN will require site-specific data. Sites may consider eliminating PN for late latent case-patients. The lack of demographic groups with a below average yield suggests that sites should not exclude other groups from PN. PMID:24825340

  7. Prevalence and risk factors associated with HIV infection, hepatitis and syphilis in a state prison of São Paulo.

    PubMed

    El Maerrawi, Ilham; Carvalho, Heráclito Barbosa

    2015-02-01

    Given the importance of the control of sexually transmitted infections in the general population and specifically in the prison system, we rolled out this cross-sectional study in 2007. Standard questionnaires and blood samples were accessed among 680 prisoners. The protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee. We determined the following seroprevalences: HIV, 1.8% (95%CI = 0.1-3.3); HBV, 21.0% (95%CI = 17.8-25.1); HBV, 5.3% (95%CI = 3.5-7.6) and syphilis 5.3% (95%CI = 3.5-7.6). Logistic regression identified significant associations with (p < 0.05): HIV: injectable drug use (OR = 15.4), age over 30 years (OR = 13.3), cocaine use (OR = 5.4) and crack-cocaine use (OR = 5.2); HBV: injectable drug use (OR = 3.4), history of previous sexually transmitted infection (OR = 2.3), age over 30 years (OR = 1.9) and more than 5 years in prison (OR = 2.2); HCV: injectable drug use (OR = 9.65), marijuana use in prison (OR = 2.9) and age over 30 years (OR = 8.4) and for syphilis: homosexual relationship (OR = 7.8) and previous syphilis reported (OR = 7.7). These prevalences remain high when compared to the general population, however, HIV infection had decreased compared with previous studies in prisoners while the other studied infections remained unchanged. Preventive actions to reduce sexual and parenteral risk have been advocated. However, measures capable of controlling these infections still have not made an impact. PMID:24733152

  8. Incidence of HIV and the Prevalence of HIV, Hepatitis B and Syphilis among Youths in Maputo, Mozambique: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Macovela, Eulália; Gonçalves, Emília; Augusto, Orvalho; Ismael, Nália; Sitoe, Nádia; De Schacht, Caroline; Bhatt, Nilesh; Meggi, Bindiya; Araujo, Carolina; Sandström, Eric; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Nilsson, Charlotta; Andersson, Sören; Jani, Ilesh; Osman, Nafissa

    2015-01-01

    Background Prevalence of HIV in Mozambique among individuals aged 15–49 years is 11.5%. The HIV prevalence is higher in women than in men across the country, peaking at ages 25–29 years and 35–39 years, respectively. In this study, we aimed at determining the prevalence and incidence of HIV, prevalence of Hepatitis B (HBV), and prevalence of syphilis in youths. We also characterized a cohort of youths for future participation in phase I/II HIV vaccine trials. Methods The study was conducted at a youth clinic in Maputo Central Hospital from August 2009 to October 2011. Youths of both genders aged 18–24 years (n = 1380) were screened for HIV using a sequential algorithm of two immunochromatographic assays, HBV using an enzyme linked immunosorbant test, and syphilis using a treponemal immunochromatographic strip test. The HIV seronegative participants (n = 1309) were followed-up for 12 months with quarterly study visits. The clinical and behavioral data were collected using structured questionnaires. The HIV seroconversions were confirmed by a molecular assay. Results The study population was female dominant (76.8%). All participants had a formal education, with 44.6% studying for technical or higher education degrees. The mean age at sexual debut was 16.6 years (SD: ±1.74), with 85.6% reporting more than one sexual partner in life. The screening showed the prevalence of HIV, HBV, and syphilis at 5.1% (95% CI: 3.97–6.31), 12.2% (95% CI 10.5%–14.0%), and 0.36% (95% CI 0.15%–0.84%), respectively. The HIV incidence rate was found to be 1.14/100 person years (95% CI: 0.67–1.92). Retention rates were stable throughout the study being 85.1% at the last visit. Conclusion Incidence of HIV in this cohort of youths in Maputo was relatively low. Also, the prevalence of HIV and syphilis was lower than the national values in this age group. However, the HBV prevalence was higher than in previous reports in the country. PMID:25798607

  9. Prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections and factors associated with syphilis among female sex workers in Panama

    PubMed Central

    Hakre, Shilpa; Arteaga, Griselda; Núñez, Aurelio E; Bautista, Christian T; Bolen, Aimee; Villarroel, Maria; Peel, Sheila A; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela; Scott, Paul T; Pascale, Juan M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Biological and behavioural surveillance of HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among populations at highest risk have been used to monitor trends in prevalence and in risk behaviours. Sex work in Panama is regulated through registration with the Social Hygiene Programme, Ministry of Health. We estimated prevalence of HIV and STIs, and factors associated with active syphilis among female sex workers (FSWs). Methods A cross-sectional study using venue-based, time-space sampling was conducted among FSWs in Panama from 2009 to 2010. FSWs were interviewed about sociodemographic characteristics, sexual risk behaviour, health history and drug use using an anonymous structured questionnaire. Blood was collected for serological testing of HIV and other STIs. Factors associated with active syphilis were studied using logistic regression analysis. Results The overall HIV-1 prevalence of 0.7% varied by FSW category; 1.6% in 379 unregistered, and 0.2% in 620 registered FSWs. Overall prevalence (and 95% CI) of STIs were: syphilis antibody, 3.8% (2.7% to 5.2%); herpes simplex virus type 2 antibody (anti-HSV-2), 74.2% (71.4% to 76.9%); hepatitis B surface antigen, 0.6% (0.2% to 1.3%); hepatitis B core antibody, 8.7% (7.0% to 10.6%); and hepatitis C antibody, 0.2% (0.0% to 0.7%). In multivariate analysis, registration (adjusted OR (AOR)=0.35; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.74), having a history of STI (AOR=2.37; 95% CI 1.01 to 5.58), forced sex (AOR=2.47; 95% CI 1.11 to 5.48), and anti-HSV-2 (AOR=10.05; 95% CI 1.36 to 74.38) were associated with active syphilis. Conclusions Although HIV prevalence is low among FSWs in Panama, unregistered FSWs bear a higher burden of HIV and STIs than registered FSWs. Programmes aimed at overcoming obstacles to registration, and HIV, STI and harm reduction among unregistered FSWs is warranted to prevent HIV transmission, and to improve their sexual and reproductive health. PMID:23002191

  10. Laboratory Evaluation of a Dual-Path Platform Assay for Rapid Point-of-Care HIV and Syphilis Testing.

    PubMed

    Leon, S R; Ramos, L B; Vargas, S K; Kojima, N; Perez, D G; Caceres, C F; Klausner, J D

    2016-02-01

    We assessed the laboratory performance of the Chembio dual-path platform HIV-syphilis rapid immunodiagnostic test and electronic reader for detection of HIV and Treponema pallidum antibodies in 450 previously characterized serum specimens. For visual or electronic reader HIV antibody detection, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 98.7%. For visual T. pallidum antibody detection, the test sensitivity was 94.7% and the specificity was 100.0%; with the electronic reader, the sensitivity was 94.7% and the specificity was 99.7%. PMID:26659215

  11. Misinformation and misbeliefs in the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis fuel mistrust in the healthcare system.

    PubMed Central

    White, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    The Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis (TSUS) is an important issue in research, healthcare, ethics and race relations. The assumed consequences of knowledge of this study on the African-American community include mistrust of the healthcare system. In the July 2005 issue of the Journal of the National Medical Association, Brandon, Isaac and LaVeist (the authors), who were at the Center for Health Disparities Solutions, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, reported the results of black-white differences in awareness of and knowledge about the TSUS and the effect of that awareness and knowledge on medical mistrust. The study surveyed blacks, whites and others in the Baltimore, MD community about their knowledge of and attitudes about the TSUS. The respondents who were aware of the TSUS were asked survey items to assess specific factual information about the TSUS. The respondents who were not aware of the TSUS were read a brief description of the TSUS taken from the CDC website. Both groups were asked if a similar study was possible today. The authors performed a regression analysis of mistrust of medical care based on race, knowledge of the TSUS and demographic variables. The editorial identified and explained challenges in the article, i.e., challenges in calculations, demographic analysis by race, knowledge of TSUS, cultural sensitivity and methodology. The authors miscalculated the "similar proportions" of blacks and whites who were aware of the TSUS; the recalculated proportions, favoring whites, were different than reported by others. There was no demographic analysis by race in their article--also different than other published reports. Most respondents--blacks and whites--who were aware of the TSUS at baseline answered incorrectly the author-selected questions about the TSUS, particularly the fact-based question of whether the TSUS researchers gave syphilis to the men-not dissimilar to one other report. The source for TSUS information (the CDC

  12. Misinformation and misbeliefs in the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis fuel mistrust in the healthcare system.

    PubMed

    White, Robert M

    2005-11-01

    The Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis (TSUS) is an important issue in research, healthcare, ethics and race relations. The assumed consequences of knowledge of this study on the African-American community include mistrust of the healthcare system. In the July 2005 issue of the Journal of the National Medical Association, Brandon, Isaac and LaVeist (the authors), who were at the Center for Health Disparities Solutions, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, reported the results of black-white differences in awareness of and knowledge about the TSUS and the effect of that awareness and knowledge on medical mistrust. The study surveyed blacks, whites and others in the Baltimore, MD community about their knowledge of and attitudes about the TSUS. The respondents who were aware of the TSUS were asked survey items to assess specific factual information about the TSUS. The respondents who were not aware of the TSUS were read a brief description of the TSUS taken from the CDC website. Both groups were asked if a similar study was possible today. The authors performed a regression analysis of mistrust of medical care based on race, knowledge of the TSUS and demographic variables. The editorial identified and explained challenges in the article, i.e., challenges in calculations, demographic analysis by race, knowledge of TSUS, cultural sensitivity and methodology. The authors miscalculated the "similar proportions" of blacks and whites who were aware of the TSUS; the recalculated proportions, favoring whites, were different than reported by others. There was no demographic analysis by race in their article--also different than other published reports. Most respondents--blacks and whites--who were aware of the TSUS at baseline answered incorrectly the author-selected questions about the TSUS, particularly the fact-based question of whether the TSUS researchers gave syphilis to the men-not dissimilar to one other report. The source for TSUS information (the CDC

  13. Serum Regulation of In Vitro Lymphocyte Responses in Early Experimental Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Baker-Zander, Sharon A.; Sell, Stewart; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    1982-01-01

    Sera from rabbits with early experimental syphilis were tested for their effect on in vitro lymphocyte transformation responses to related specific antigens (sonicated T. pallidum), unrelated specific antigens (sheep erythrocytes), and the T cell mitogen, concanavalin A. Results were compared with responses in preinfection sera and in sera from sham-infected rabbits. Titration experiments in which normal serum was used indicated that optimal lymphocyte responsiveness is obtained with a final serum concentration of 1%. Under these conditions, no differences in concanavalin A stimulation were observed in cultures with syphilitic sera. Responses to sonicated T. pallidum were inhibited, but only by 17 to 25% when compared with the response in preinfection sera. In cultures containing 10% serum, inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation to sonicated T. pallidum antigens was evident with sera from all syphilitic animals from day 10 (55% inhibition) through day 31 (80% inhibition) of infection. Responses to concanavalin A and sheep erythrocytes were significantly inhibited by day 10 sera; only 20% of the sera tested demonstrated substantial nonspecific inhibitory capacity. No differences were evident among sera from any of the sham-infected animals or among the preinfection sera from either group. Pooled serum with high inhibitory activity was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE ion exchange chromatography, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Two separate inhibitors were identified: (i) a low-molecular-weight, ammonium sulfate-soluble, nonspecific inhibitory fraction containing albumin and alpha-globulins with the capacity to inhibit both antigen and mitogen responses and (ii) a high-molecular-weight, ammonium sulfate-precipitable, inhibitory fraction containing alpha-globulin and FTA-ABS-reactive immunoglobulin M which affected only the antigen-specific response to sonicated T. pallidum. Immunodiffusion failed to detect immunoglobulin or T. pallidum antigens

  14. The origin and antiquity of syphilis revisited: an appraisal of Old World pre-Columbian evidence for treponemal infection.

    PubMed

    Harper, Kristin N; Zuckerman, Molly K; Harper, Megan L; Kingston, John D; Armelagos, George J

    2011-01-01

    For nearly 500 years, scholars have argued about the origin and antiquity of syphilis. Did Columbus bring the disease from the New World to the Old World? Or did syphilis exist in the Old World before 1493? Here, we evaluate all 54 published reports of pre-Columbian, Old World treponemal disease using a standardized, systematic approach. The certainty of diagnosis and dating of each case is considered, and novel information pertinent to the dating of these cases, including radiocarbon dates, is presented. Among the reports, we did not find a single case of Old World treponemal disease that has both a certain diagnosis and a secure pre-Columbian date. We also demonstrate that many of the reports use nonspecific indicators to diagnose treponemal disease, do not provide adequate information about the methods used to date specimens, and do not include high-quality photographs of the lesions of interest. Thus, despite an increasing number of published reports of pre-Columbian treponemal infection, it appears that solid evidence supporting an Old World origin for the disease remains absent.

  15. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study, 1932 to 1972: implications for HIV education and AIDS risk education programs in the black community.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, S B; Quinn, S C

    1991-01-01

    The Tuskegee study of untreated syphilis in the Negro male is the longest nontherapeutic experiment on human beings in medical history. The strategies used to recruit and retain participants were quite similar to those being advocated for HIV/AIDS prevention programs today. Almost 60 years after the study began, there remains a trail of distrust and suspicion that hampers HIV education efforts in Black communities. The AIDS epidemic has exposed the Tuskegee study as a historical marker for the legitimate discontent of Blacks with the public health system. The belief that AIDS is a form of genocide is rooted in a social context in which Black Americans, faced with persistent inequality, believe in conspiracy theories about Whites against Blacks. These theories range from the belief that the government promotes drug abuse in Black communities to the belief that HIV is a manmade weapon of racial warfare. An open and honest discussion of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study can facilitate the process of rebuilding trust between the Black community and public health authorities. This dialogue can contribute to the development of HIV education programs that are scientifically sound, culturally sensitive, and ethnically acceptable. Images p1500-a p1502-a p1503-a PMID:1951814

  16. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of a rapid immunochromatographic test and the rapid plasma reagin test for antenatal syphilis screening in Mozambique.

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Pablo J.; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Brentlinger, Paula E.; Blanco, Ana J.; Floriano, Florencia; Sairosse, Josefa; Gloyd, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Programmes to control syphilis in developing countries are hampered by a lack of laboratory services, delayed diagnosis, and doubts about current screening methods. We aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of an immunochromatographic strip (ICS) test and the rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test with the combined gold standard (RPR, Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay and direct immunofluorescence stain done at a reference laboratory) for the detection of syphilis in pregnancy. METHODS: We included test results from 4789 women attending their first antenatal visit at one of six health facilities in Sofala Province, central Mozambique. We compared diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values) of ICS and RPR done at the health facilities and ICS performed at the reference laboratory. We also made subgroup comparisons by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and malaria status. FINDINGS: For active syphilis, the sensitivity of the ICS was 95.3% at the reference laboratory, and 84.1% at the health facility. The sensitivity of the RPR at the health facility was 70.7%. Specificity and positive and negative predictive values showed a similar pattern. The ICS outperformed RPR in all comparisons (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: The diagnostic accuracy of the ICS compared favourably with that of the gold standard. The use of the ICS in Mozambique and similar settings may improve the diagnosis of syphilis in health facilities, both with and without laboratories. PMID:16501726

  17. Syphilis 1855 and HIV-AIDS 2007: Historical reflections on the tendency to blame human anatomy for the action of micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Darby, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I discuss the parallels between responses to syphilis in nineteenth century Britain and HIV/AIDS in contemporary Africa. In each case, an incurable disease connected with sexual behaviour aroused fear, stigmatisation and moralistic responses, as well as a desperate scramble to find an effective means of control. In both cases, circumcision of adult males, and then of children or infants, was proposed as the key tactic. In the ensuing debates over the effectiveness and propriety of this approach, three questions occupied health authorities in both Victorian Britain and the contemporary world: (1) Were circumcised men at significantly lower risk of these diseases? (2) If there was evidence pointing to an affirmative answer, was it altered anatomy or different behaviour that explained the difference? (3) Given that circumcision was a surgical procedure with attendant risks of infection, was it possible that circumcision spread syphilis or HIV? I show that in both situations the answers to these questions were inconclusive, argue that circumcision played little or no role in the eventual control of syphilis and suggest that attention to nineteenth century debates may assist contemporary policy-makers to avoid the treatment dead-ends and ethical transgressions that marked the war on syphilis.

  18. Syphilis 1855 and HIV-AIDS 2007: Historical reflections on the tendency to blame human anatomy for the action of micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Darby, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I discuss the parallels between responses to syphilis in nineteenth century Britain and HIV/AIDS in contemporary Africa. In each case, an incurable disease connected with sexual behaviour aroused fear, stigmatisation and moralistic responses, as well as a desperate scramble to find an effective means of control. In both cases, circumcision of adult males, and then of children or infants, was proposed as the key tactic. In the ensuing debates over the effectiveness and propriety of this approach, three questions occupied health authorities in both Victorian Britain and the contemporary world: (1) Were circumcised men at significantly lower risk of these diseases? (2) If there was evidence pointing to an affirmative answer, was it altered anatomy or different behaviour that explained the difference? (3) Given that circumcision was a surgical procedure with attendant risks of infection, was it possible that circumcision spread syphilis or HIV? I show that in both situations the answers to these questions were inconclusive, argue that circumcision played little or no role in the eventual control of syphilis and suggest that attention to nineteenth century debates may assist contemporary policy-makers to avoid the treatment dead-ends and ethical transgressions that marked the war on syphilis. PMID:25268631

  19. Challenges in Treating Secondary Syphilis Osteitis in an Immunocompromised Patient with a Penicillin Allergy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Al Turk, Bashar; Mohan, Girish

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection that remains fairly commonplace. The introduction of penicillin aided in curbing the incidence of disease; however, with the advent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), syphilis is now on a resurgence with sometimes curious presentations. We present a case of a 36-year-old Caucasian gentleman with untreated HIV who complained of a skin eruption and joint pains for 6 weeks, prompting the diagnosis of secondary syphilis osteitis. Skin lesions were reminiscent of “malignant” syphilis. CD4 count was 57 cells/μL. RPR was elevated with 1 : 64 titer and positive confirmatory TP-PA. Radiography of the limbs revealed polyostotic cortical irregularities corroborated on bone scintigraphy. The patient had an unknown penicillin allergy and was unwilling to conduct a trial of penicillin-based therapy. He was subsequently treated with doxycycline 100 mg twice daily for 6 weeks and commenced antiretroviral therapy, noting dramatic improvement in both the skin lesions and joint pains. Unfortunately, he defaulted on follow-up, precluding serial RPR and bone imaging. Penicillin allergies have proven to be quite a conundrum in such patients, without much recourse for alternative therapy. Doxycycline with/without azithromycin is other options worth considering. PMID:27313920

  20. Challenges in Treating Secondary Syphilis Osteitis in an Immunocompromised Patient with a Penicillin Allergy: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ali, Robert; Perez-Downes, Julio; Baidoun, Firas; Al Turk, Bashar; Isache, Carmen; Mohan, Girish; Perniciaro, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection that remains fairly commonplace. The introduction of penicillin aided in curbing the incidence of disease; however, with the advent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), syphilis is now on a resurgence with sometimes curious presentations. We present a case of a 36-year-old Caucasian gentleman with untreated HIV who complained of a skin eruption and joint pains for 6 weeks, prompting the diagnosis of secondary syphilis osteitis. Skin lesions were reminiscent of "malignant" syphilis. CD4 count was 57 cells/μL. RPR was elevated with 1 : 64 titer and positive confirmatory TP-PA. Radiography of the limbs revealed polyostotic cortical irregularities corroborated on bone scintigraphy. The patient had an unknown penicillin allergy and was unwilling to conduct a trial of penicillin-based therapy. He was subsequently treated with doxycycline 100 mg twice daily for 6 weeks and commenced antiretroviral therapy, noting dramatic improvement in both the skin lesions and joint pains. Unfortunately, he defaulted on follow-up, precluding serial RPR and bone imaging. Penicillin allergies have proven to be quite a conundrum in such patients, without much recourse for alternative therapy. Doxycycline with/without azithromycin is other options worth considering. PMID:27313920

  1. Scaling Down to Scale Up: A Health Economic Analysis of Integrating Point-of-Care Syphilis Testing into Antenatal Care in Zambia during Pilot and National Rollout Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Ncube, Alexander Tshaka; Sweeney, Sedona; Fleischer, Colette; Mumba, Grace Tembo; Gill, Michelle M.; Strasser, Susan; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Terris-Prestholt, Fern

    2015-01-01

    Maternal syphilis results in an estimated 500,000 stillbirths and neonatal deaths annually in Sub-Saharan Africa. Despite the existence of national guidelines for antenatal syphilis screening, syphilis testing is often limited by inadequate laboratory and staff services. Recent availability of inexpensive rapid point-of-care syphilis tests (RST) can improve access to antenatal syphilis screening. A 2010 pilot in Zambia explored the feasibility of integrating RST within prevention of mother-to-child-transmission of HIV services. Following successful demonstration, the Zambian Ministry of Health adopted RSTs into national policy in 2011. Cost data from the pilot and 2012 preliminary national rollout were extracted from project records, antenatal registers, clinic staff interviews, and facility observations, with the aim of assessing the cost and quality implications of scaling up a successful pilot into a national rollout. Start-up, capital, and recurrent cost inputs were collected, including costs of extensive supervision and quality monitoring during the pilot. Costs were analysed from a provider’s perspective, incremental to existing antenatal services. Total and unit costs were calculated and a multivariate sensitivity analysis was performed. Our accompanying qualitative study by Ansbro et al. (2015) elucidated quality assurance and supervisory system challenges experienced during rollout, which helped explain key cost drivers. The average unit cost per woman screened during rollout ($11.16) was more than triple the pilot unit cost ($3.19). While quality assurance costs were much lower during rollout, the increased unit costs can be attributed to several factors, including higher RST prices and lower RST coverage during rollout, which reduced economies of scale. Pilot and rollout cost drivers differed due to implementation decisions related to training, supervision, and quality assurance. This study explored the cost of integrating RST into antenatal care in

  2. Scaling Down to Scale Up: A Health Economic Analysis of Integrating Point-of-Care Syphilis Testing into Antenatal Care in Zambia during Pilot and National Rollout Implementation.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Katharine D; Ansbro, Éimhín M; Ncube, Alexander Tshaka; Sweeney, Sedona; Fleischer, Colette; Tembo Mumba, Grace; Gill, Michelle M; Strasser, Susan; Peeling, Rosanna W; Terris-Prestholt, Fern

    2015-01-01

    Maternal syphilis results in an estimated 500,000 stillbirths and neonatal deaths annually in Sub-Saharan Africa. Despite the existence of national guidelines for antenatal syphilis screening, syphilis testing is often limited by inadequate laboratory and staff services. Recent availability of inexpensive rapid point-of-care syphilis tests (RST) can improve access to antenatal syphilis screening. A 2010 pilot in Zambia explored the feasibility of integrating RST within prevention of mother-to-child-transmission of HIV services. Following successful demonstration, the Zambian Ministry of Health adopted RSTs into national policy in 2011. Cost data from the pilot and 2012 preliminary national rollout were extracted from project records, antenatal registers, clinic staff interviews, and facility observations, with the aim of assessing the cost and quality implications of scaling up a successful pilot into a national rollout. Start-up, capital, and recurrent cost inputs were collected, including costs of extensive supervision and quality monitoring during the pilot. Costs were analysed from a provider's perspective, incremental to existing antenatal services. Total and unit costs were calculated and a multivariate sensitivity analysis was performed. Our accompanying qualitative study by Ansbro et al. (2015) elucidated quality assurance and supervisory system challenges experienced during rollout, which helped explain key cost drivers. The average unit cost per woman screened during rollout ($11.16) was more than triple the pilot unit cost ($3.19). While quality assurance costs were much lower during rollout, the increased unit costs can be attributed to several factors, including higher RST prices and lower RST coverage during rollout, which reduced economies of scale. Pilot and rollout cost drivers differed due to implementation decisions related to training, supervision, and quality assurance. This study explored the cost of integrating RST into antenatal care in

  3. Scaling Down to Scale Up: A Health Economic Analysis of Integrating Point-of-Care Syphilis Testing into Antenatal Care in Zambia during Pilot and National Rollout Implementation.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Katharine D; Ansbro, Éimhín M; Ncube, Alexander Tshaka; Sweeney, Sedona; Fleischer, Colette; Tembo Mumba, Grace; Gill, Michelle M; Strasser, Susan; Peeling, Rosanna W; Terris-Prestholt, Fern

    2015-01-01

    Maternal syphilis results in an estimated 500,000 stillbirths and neonatal deaths annually in Sub-Saharan Africa. Despite the existence of national guidelines for antenatal syphilis screening, syphilis testing is often limited by inadequate laboratory and staff services. Recent availability of inexpensive rapid point-of-care syphilis tests (RST) can improve access to antenatal syphilis screening. A 2010 pilot in Zambia explored the feasibility of integrating RST within prevention of mother-to-child-transmission of HIV services. Following successful demonstration, the Zambian Ministry of Health adopted RSTs into national policy in 2011. Cost data from the pilot and 2012 preliminary national rollout were extracted from project records, antenatal registers, clinic staff interviews, and facility observations, with the aim of assessing the cost and quality implications of scaling up a successful pilot into a national rollout. Start-up, capital, and recurrent cost inputs were collected, including costs of extensive supervision and quality monitoring during the pilot. Costs were analysed from a provider's perspective, incremental to existing antenatal services. Total and unit costs were calculated and a multivariate sensitivity analysis was performed. Our accompanying qualitative study by Ansbro et al. (2015) elucidated quality assurance and supervisory system challenges experienced during rollout, which helped explain key cost drivers. The average unit cost per woman screened during rollout ($11.16) was more than triple the pilot unit cost ($3.19). While quality assurance costs were much lower during rollout, the increased unit costs can be attributed to several factors, including higher RST prices and lower RST coverage during rollout, which reduced economies of scale. Pilot and rollout cost drivers differed due to implementation decisions related to training, supervision, and quality assurance. This study explored the cost of integrating RST into antenatal care in

  4. Characterizing the Syphilis-Causing Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum Proteome Using Complementary Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Simon; Lithgow, Karen V.; Meehan, Conor J.; Strouhal, Michal; Šmajs, David; Cameron, Caroline E.; Van Ostade, Xaveer; Kenyon, Chris R.; Van Raemdonck, Geert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum is the etiological agent of syphilis, a chronic multistage disease. Little is known about the global T. pallidum proteome, therefore mass spectrometry studies are needed to bring insights into pathogenicity and protein expression profiles during infection. Methodology/Principal Findings To better understand the T. pallidum proteome profile during infection, we studied T. pallidum ssp. pallidum DAL-1 strain bacteria isolated from rabbits using complementary mass spectrometry techniques, including multidimensional peptide separation and protein identification via matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and electrospray ionization (ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap) tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 6033 peptides were detected, corresponding to 557 unique T. pallidum proteins at a high level of confidence, representing 54% of the predicted proteome. A previous gel-based T. pallidum MS proteome study detected 58 of these proteins. One hundred fourteen of the detected proteins were previously annotated as hypothetical or uncharacterized proteins; this is the first account of 106 of these proteins at the protein level. Detected proteins were characterized according to their predicted biological function and localization; half were allocated into a wide range of functional categories. Proteins annotated as potential membrane proteins and proteins with unclear functional annotations were subjected to an additional bioinformatics pipeline analysis to facilitate further characterization. A total of 116 potential membrane proteins were identified, of which 16 have evidence supporting outer membrane localization. We found 8/12 proteins related to the paralogous tpr gene family: TprB, TprC/D, TprE, TprG, TprH, TprI and TprJ. Protein abundance was semi-quantified using label-free spectral counting methods. A low correlation (r = 0.26) was found between previous microarray signal data and

  5. Prevalence of herpes simplex type 2 and syphilis serology among young adults in a rural Gambian community

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, M.; van der Sande, M.; West, B.; Paine, K.; Ceesay, S.; Bailey, R.; Walraven, G.; Morison, L.; McAdam, K.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate prevalence and risk factors for herpes simplex 2 (HSV2) positivity, syphilis and Chlamydia trachomatis infection among rural people aged 15–34 in the Gambia. Methods: Questionnaires and serum samples were collected from 1076 men and women aged 15–34 during a cross sectional prevalence survey in a rural area of the Gambia. Sera were screened for antibodies to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV2), and for syphilis using Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA) and rapid plasma reagin (RPR) tests. Urine was tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for C trachomatis infection. Results: 28% of women and 5% of men were HSV2 ELISA positive; 10% of women and 2% of men were TPHA positive; and 7% of women and 1% of men were both RPR and TPHA positive. Out of 1030 urine sample tested only six were positive for C trachomatis. 7% of those who reported never having sex were positive for one or other of these tests. Prevalences of all STIs increased with age and were higher in women than men. Women were much less likely than men to seek treatment for STI symptoms at a health centre. Married people were at increased risk of an STI compared with single people. Jola and Fula women had a higher prevalence of HSV2 than women from other ethnic groups, and Fulas also had a higher prevalence of RPR/TPHA positivity. The limited number of sexual behaviour questions were not significantly associated with STIs after adjustment for age, marital status, and ethnic group. Conclusions: The prevalences of the ulcerative infections HSV2 and syphilis in this population are a cause for concern. In a setting where HIV1 prevalence remains low this indicates an urgent need for STI control and behaviour change programmes to prevent an HIV epidemic. Concerns about the validity of reported sexual behaviour data high light the necessity of biological markers in the evaluation of behaviour change programmes. Key Words: seroepidemiological studies; Africa; herpes simplex

  6. Demographic, risk factors and motivations among blood donors with reactive serologic tests for syphilis in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, S. C.; de Almeida-Neto, C.; Nishiya, A. S.; Oliveira, C. D. L.; Ferreira, J. E.; Alencar, C. S.; Levi, J. E.; Salles, N. A.; Mendrone, A.; Sabino, E. C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective To identify the demographic characteristics, risk factors and motivations for donating among blood donors with reactive serologic tests for syphilis. Background Post-donation interviews with syphilis seropositive blood donors improve recruitment and screening strategies. Methods This case–control study compares 75 Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL)> 8, EIA+ (enzyme immunoassay) and FTA-ABS+ (fluorescent treponemal antibody); 80 VDRL−, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+; and 34 VDRL− and EIA− donors between 2004 and 2009. Donors were assessed by their demographic characteristics, sexual behaviour, history of alcohol and illicit drugs use, and motivations to donate. Results Donors with VDRL> 8weremore likely to be divorced [AOR = 12·53; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·30–120·81], to have had more than six sexual partners (AOR = 7·1; 95% CI 1·12–44·62) and to report male–male-sex in the past 12 months (AOR = 8·18; 95% CI 1·78–37·60). Donors with VDRL−, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+ were less likely to be female (AOR = 0·26; 95% CI 0·07–0·96), more likely to be older (AOR = 10·2; 95% CI 2·45–42·58≥39 and <60 years old) and to have had more than six sexual partners in the past 12 months (AOR = 8·37; 95% CI 1·49–46·91). There was no significant difference among groups regarding illicit drugs use; 30·7% (VDRL> 8) and 12·5% (VDRL−, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+) of donors reported that they had been at risk for HIV infection (P =0·004). One-third of donors came to the blood bank to help a friend or a relative who needed blood. Conclusion Although donors exposed to syphilis reported and recognised some high risk behaviour, most were motivated by direct appeal to donate blood. Monitoring the risk profile of blood donors can benefit public health and improve blood safety. PMID:24779667

  7. TORCH Infections. Toxoplasmosis, Other (syphilis, varicella-zoster, parvovirus B19), Rubella, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Herpes infections.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Barbara J; Carey, J Christopher

    2002-08-01

    Perinatal infections account for 2% to 3% of all congenital anomalies. TORCH, which includes Toxoplasmosis, Other (syphilis, varicella-zoster, parvovirus B19), Rubella, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Herpes infections, are some of the most common infections associated with congenital anomalies. Most of the TORCH infections cause mild maternal morbidity, but have serious fetal consequences, and treatment of maternal infection frequently has no impact on fetal outcome. Therefore, recognition of maternal disease and fetal monitoring once disease is recognized are important for all clinicians. Knowledge of these diseases will help the clinician appropriately counsel mothers on preventive measures to avoid these infections, and will aid in counseling parents on the potential for adverse fetal outcomes when these infections are present. PMID:12150751

  8. Exploring the "legacy" of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: a follow-up study from the Tuskegee Legacy Project.

    PubMed

    Katz, Ralph V; Green, B Lee; Kressin, Nancy R; James, Sherman A; Wang, Min Qi; Claudio, Cristina; Russell, Stephanie Luise

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this follow-up 2003 3-City Tuskegee Legacy Project (TLP) Study was to validate or refute our prior findings from the 1999-2000 4 City TLP Study, which found no evidence to support the widely acknowledged "legacy" of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (TSS), ie, that blacks are reluctant to participate in biomedical studies due to their knowledge of the TSS. The TLP Questionnaire was administered in this random-digit-dial telephone survey to a stratified random sample of 1162 black, white, and Puerto Rican Hispanic adults in 3 different US cities. The findings from this current 3-City TLP Study fail to support the widely acknowledged "legacy" of the TSS, as awareness of the TSS was not statistically associated with the willingness to participate in biomedical studies. These findings, being in complete agreement with our previous findings from our 1999-2000 4-City TLP, validate those prior findings.

  9. The Rationalization of Unethical Research: Revisionist Accounts of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the New Zealand "Unfortunate Experiment".

    PubMed

    Paul, Charlotte; Brookes, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Two studies, widely condemned in the 1970s and 1980s-the Tuskegee study of men with untreated syphilis and the New Zealand study of women with untreated carcinoma in situ of the cervix-received new defenses in the 21st century. We noted remarkable similarities in both the studies and their defenses. Here we evaluate the scientific, political, and moral claims of the defenders. The scientific claims are largely based on incomplete or misinterpreted evidence and exaggeration of the uncertainties of science. The defenders' political arguments mistakenly claim that identity politics clouded the original critiques; in fact such politics opened the eyes of the public to exploitation. The moral defenses demonstrate an overreliance on codes of conduct and have implications for research ethics today.

  10. HIV, HCV, HBV, HSV, and syphilis prevalence among female sex workers in Tehran, Iran, by using respondent-driven sampling.

    PubMed

    Moayedi-Nia, Saeedeh; Bayat Jozani, Zahra; Esmaeeli Djavid, Gholamreza; Entekhabi, Fatemeh; Bayanolhagh, Saeed; Saatian, Minoo; Sedaghat, Abbas; Nikzad, Rana; Jahanjoo Aminabad, Fatemeh; Mohraz, Minoo

    2016-01-01

    To find out the prevalence of HIV, HCV, HBV, HSV, and syphilis infections among female sex workers (FSWs) in Tehran, a cross-sectional study by using respondent-driven sampling (RDS) method was conducted. From December 2012 to April 2013 FSWs in Tehran were recruited. Inclusion criteria consisted of trading sex during the 12 months prior to this study and selling sex for at least 6 months in participants' lifetime. Among 161 consenting participants, 5% were infected with HIV. Moreover, 8.1% of FSWs were HCV positive, 37.9% were of HSV type1/type2, 1.2% of participants were infected with HBV, and none of the participants were infected with syphilis. HIV-positive participants were significantly more likely to be co-infected with HSV type1/type2, be younger, have more sexual partners and especially more clients during seven days prior to this study and report more history of having at least one of sexually transmitted infections symptoms in 12 months prior the study. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, being infected with HSV and also being under 25 years of age were found to be independently associated with HIV infection. Compared with the prevalence of HIV among general population of Tehran, relatively high prevalence of HIV and other viral infections among FSWs should be considered. All in all, it is critical to commence effective counter-measures for this high-risk group if the aim is to prevent spreading of these viruses to general population. PMID:26565671

  11. Seroprevalence of syphilis amongst pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in a rural hospital in north west Ethiopia.

    PubMed Central

    Azeze, B; Fantahun, M; Kidan, K G; Haile, T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the seroprevalence of syphilis in pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics in a rural hospital in Ethiopia and describe their characteristics so that timely and effective care can be offered. SUBJECTS--Pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics at a rural hospital. METHODS--A cross sectional study was conducted at a rural hospital in north west Ethiopia in September 1994. Data were collected on socio demographic characteristics and past history of sexually transmitted diseases of antenatal care attenders from the records of the hospital. Sera from these pregnant women were examined for syphilis using the VDRL test. VDRL positivity was cross tabulated with socio demographic variables and past history of sexually transmitted diseases. RESULTS--Two hundred and seventy pregnant women were included in the study. Median age of the respondents was 25.2 years. A substantial majority were orthodox Christians (97.4%) and married (92.6%). Town dwellers constituted 58.2% of the antenatal care attenders. Only 4.7% of the women started attending antenatal care clinics during the first trimester. Thirty seven women (13.7%) were found to be VDRL positive. Past history of sexually transmitted diseases was significantly associated with VDRL positivity (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS--High VDRL positivity rate is observed in this study. Certain risk factors may be responsible for current and past episodes of sexually transmitted diseases. There is a need for improvement of antenatal care activities at different levels of health care. Appropriate strategies should be devised for prevention and control of sexually transmitted diseases in women of reproductive age groups and the general population. PMID:8566970

  12. High prevalence of HIV and syphilis and associated factors among low-fee female sex workers in mainland China: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of HIV and syphilis among middle and high-fee female sex workers (FSWs) has been widely reported but little is known among low-fee FSWs. This study aims to determine the prevalence and associated factors of HIV and syphilis among low-fee FSWs in China. Methods A cross-sectional study design was used. A convenience sample of low-fee FSWs was recruited from venues by outreach workers in 12 cities. Structured questionnaire interviews and blood sampling for HIV and syphilis were carried out. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used for assessing potential associated factors. Results This study enrolled 781 low-fee FSWs. There were 37 (4.7%) HIV positive participants and 117 (15.0%) participants were infected with syphilis. Final multivariate analysis identified five factors associated with HIV infection: older age (OR:2.6, 95% CI:1.1-6.1), local household registration (OR:3.3, 95% CI:1.5-6.9), employed in Yunnan province (OR:2.7, 95% CI:1.1-6.7), soliciting in self-rented rooms and “market day” buildings (OR:3.9, 95% CI:1.5-10.0), injection drug use in the past 6 months (OR:13.5, 95% CI:4.5-40.1); and four factors associated with syphilis infection: older age (OR:1.8, 95% CI:1.2-2.9), employed in Yunnan province (OR:2.1, 95% CI:1.2-3.6), soliciting in self-rented rooms and “market day” buildings (OR:2.3, 95% CI:1.4-3.7) , and no consistent condom use with clients in the past 30 days (OR:1.6, 95% CI:1.0-2.6). Conclusions A high prevalence of HIV and syphilis were found among low-fee FSWs. Those soliciting in self-rented rooms and “market day” buildings with the lowest income, and injection drug users (IDUs) in this population should take priority in further intervention strategies. PMID:24767104

  13. Using electronic readers to monitor progress toward elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and syphilis: An opinion piece.

    PubMed

    Wedderburn, Catherine J; Murtagh, Maurine; Toskin, Igor; Peeling, Rosanna W

    2015-06-01

    Electronic readers and smartphones have the potential to standardize the interpretation of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and provide timely surveillance program data. RDTs are widely used for HIV and are being increasingly used for syphilis screening in pregnant women. Following the WHO initiative for the validation of elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and syphilis, there is a need for more extensive testing and data monitoring. However, access to timely and accurate data can be challenging once testing is decentralized as data quality at remote sites is often difficult to verify. Electronic RDT readers can help to ensure quality and allow automated data transmission, creating an opportunity for real-time surveillance to inform control strategies and assess intervention impact. Furthermore, by linking the data to existing supply chain management software, stockouts can be minimized. The present opinion piece looks at the opportunities and challenges of using these tools within national elimination programs. PMID:25983212

  14. A population-based study of syphilis and sexually transmitted disease syndromes in north-western Tanzania. 2. Risk factors and health seeking behaviour.

    PubMed Central

    Newell, J; Senkoro, K; Mosha, F; Grosskurth, H; Nicoll, A; Barongo, L; Borgdorff, M; Klokke, A; Changalucha, J; Killewo, J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine risk factors for syphilis and sexually transmitted disease (STD) syndromes, and to study health seeking behaviour among those with STD syndromes, in the population of Mwanza Region, North-Western Tanzania. METHODS--A population-based random cluster sample survey, stratified by rural, roadside or urban residence, of 4173 individuals aged 15-54 years was performed in 1990-91. The seroprevalence of syphilis and the prevalence and incidence of self-reported genital ulcer syndrome (GUS) and genital discharge syndrome (GDS) are reported in the accompanying paper. This paper reports on risk factors for these conditions and on health seeking behaviour among those reporting them. RESULTS--In both sexes, the risk of STDs increased with the reported number of sexual partners in the previous five years. Men who were separated, divorced or widowed were at increased risk of STDs, but this was not the case among women. Higher educational status was associated with an increased risk of urethral discharge in males but with a decreased prevalence of syphilis in females. Male circumcision was associated with an increased risk of urethral discharge but a reduced prevalence of syphilis. Nearly all men, and 90% of women, reporting symptoms of genital discharge or ulceration had sought treatment. Of these, approximately 70% of males and 60% of females had sought treatment in the official health sector. CONCLUSIONS--Targetted health education concerning risk reduction for HIV infection and other STDs should be a high priority in this population. Improved case management of STDs in health centres and dispensaries may have a substantial impact on the incidence of these infections. PMID:8282292

  15. The Epidemic of HIV, Syphilis, Chlamydia and Gonorrhea and the Correlates of Sexual Transmitted Infections among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Jiangsu, China, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Geng-Feng; Jiang, Ning; Hu, Hai-Yang; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Yin, Yue-Ping; Mahapatra, Sanchita; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Chen, Xiang-Sheng; Babu, Giridhar R.; Xu, Xiao-Qin; Ding, Ping; Qiu, Tao; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Guo, Hongxiong; Huan, Xi-Ping; Tang, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Background In China, the HIV/AIDS epidemic is expanding among men who have sex with men (MSM). As independent risk factors of HIV infection, the epidemics of Chlamydia (CT) and Gonorrhea (NG) in MSM were not well studied, particular for the risk factors of these infectious. The objectives of current reported study were to understand the dynamics of HIV and other sexual transmitted infections (STIs) among MSM in Jiangsu, China, and to measure factors that correlated with STIs. Methods In order to gain more participants, a multisite cross-sectional study design was used in our study, by using convenience-sampling to recruit MSM in two Changzhou and Yangzhou, Jiangsu, China, between the July and October of 2009. Results In this comprehensive survey involving MSM in two cities of Jiangsu province of China, the prevalence of STIs of CT (6.54%), NG (3.63%), syphilis (20.34%) and HIV (11.62%) were measured. Overall, the STIs prevalence (CT, NG or syphilis) for the participants in our study was 26.39%, meanwhile, 3.4% (14 out of the 413) participants had at least two kinds of STIs. Meeting casual partners at parks, public restrooms or other public areas, having had anal sex with men in the past six months, having had STI symptoms in the past year were positively correlated with STIs positive, with adjusted ORs of 4.61(95%CI 1.03–20.75), 1.91(95%CI 1.14–3.21) and 2.36(95%CI 1.07,5.24). Conclusion Our study findings reiterate the fact that Chinese MSM are highly susceptible to acquiring syphilis, CT, NG and HIV, and there is an urgent need for intervention targeted towards this population. Behavioral measures should constitute an important part of the targeted intervention. Furthermore, the already implemented preventive and diagnostic services for HIV should be expanded to include syphilis CT and NG, too. PMID:25775451

  16. Vulnerability in the context of HIV and syphilis infection in a population of men who have sex with men (MSM) in Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brignol, Sandra; Dourado, Inês; Amorim, Leila D; Kerr, Lígia Regina Franco Sansigolo

    2015-05-01

    Social, individual, and programmatic vulnerability of men who have sex with men (MSM) in the context of the HIV epidemic and other sexually transmitted infections (STI) is a reality in many countries. The survey Behavior, Attitudes, Practices, and Prevalence of HIV and Syphilis in Men Who Have Sex with Men in 10 Brazilian Cities selected 383 MSM in the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil, using the respondent driven sampling (RDS) technique. Individual vulnerability early sexual initiation (51%), average of eight sex partners, and unprotected receptive anal sex with casual (32%) and steady partners (45%) and positive rapid tests HIV (6.5%) and syphilis (9%). Social vulnerability young adults (80%), black race/skin color (91%), mean monthly family income of BRL 1,000.00, and personal history of discrimination (57%). Programmatic factors no previous HIV test (63%) and no access to lubricant gel (88%). The study showed a profile of vulnerability and the urgent need for interventions and STI prevention in the MSM population in Salvador, in addition to high prevalence rates for HIV and syphilis. PMID:26083178

  17. Doxycycline Prophylaxis to Reduce Incident Syphilis among HIV-Infected Men who have Sex with Men who Continue to Engage in High Risk Sex: A Randomized, Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bolan, Robert K.; Beymer, Matthew R.; Weiss, Robert E.; Flynn, Risa P.; Leibowitz, Arleen A.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Incident syphilis infections continue to be especially prevalent among a core group of HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). Because of synergy between syphilis and HIV infections, innovative means for controlling incident syphilis infections are needed. Methods Thirty MSM who had syphilis twice or more since their HIV diagnosis were randomized to receive either daily doxycycline prophylaxis or contingency management (CM) with incentive payments for remaining free of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Subjects were tested for the bacterial STDs gonorrhea (NG), chlamydia (CT) and syphilis at Weeks 12, 24, 36 and 48 and completed a behavioral risk questionnaire during each visit to assess number of partners, condom use and drug use since the last visit. Generalized linear mixed models were used to analyze differences between arms in STD incidence and risk behaviors at follow-up. Results Doxycycline arm subjects were significantly less likely to test positive for any selected bacterial STD during 48 weeks of follow-up (OR: 0.27; CI: 0.09-0.83) compared to CM arm subjects (p = 0.02).There were no significant self-reported risk behavior differences between the Doxycycline and CM arms at follow-up. Conclusions Daily doxycycline taken prophylactically was associated with a decreased incidence of NG, CT, or syphilis incident infections among a core group of HIV-infected MSM at high risk for these infections. Safe and effective biomedical tools should be included in the efforts to control transmission of syphilis, especially in this population. A randomized clinical trial should be conducted to confirm and extend these findings. PMID:25585069

  18. HIV, Syphilis, and Behavioral Risk Factors among Female Sex Workers before and after Implementation of Harm Reduction Programs in a High Drug-Using Area of China

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Stephen W.; Song, Benli; Liu, Qianping; Xu, Yunan; Dong, Hui; Xing, Hui; Shao, Yiming; Ruan, Yuhua

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of harm reduction programs on HIV and syphilis infection and related risk behaviors among female sex workers (FSWs) in a drug trafficking city in Southwest China. Design Before and after harm reduction program study. Methods Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted among FSWs before and after harm reduction programs were launched in Xichang city, Sichuan province. The first and second cross-sectional surveys were conducted in 2004 and 2010, respectively. Temporal changes in odds of HIV, syphilis, and behavioral risk factors were assessed by multivariable logistic regression while controlling for socio-demographics. Results The 2004 and 2010 cross-sectional surveys recruited 343 and 404 FSWs, respectively. From 2004 to 2010, the odds of syphilis infection decreased by 35% and was of borderline statistical significance (AOR: 0.65, 95% CI: 0.41–1.03), while odds of HIV infection rose, but not significantly (AOR: 4.12, 95% CI: 0.76–22.45). Although odds of unprotected sex with primary sex partners did not significantly change over time (AOR: 0.96; 95% CI: 0.61–1.50), odds of unprotected sex with clients declined significantly and remarkably (AOR: 0.14, 95% CI: 0.09–0.21). Notably, the odds of reporting ≥10 new sex partners in the previous month increased by 37% (AOR: 1.37; 95% CI: 0.98–1.90). Conclusions Harm reduction strategies may be an effective means of reducing unprotected sex with clients among FSWs. Future research is needed to better target both FSWs and IDUs and interrupt bridging networks for HIV transmission in high drug-using areas of China. PMID:24416319

  19. Quantitative analysis of tpr gene expression in Treponema pallidum isolates: Differences among isolates and correlation with T-cell responsiveness in experimental syphilis.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Molini, Barbara; Godornes, Charmie; Barrett, Lynn; Van Voorhis, Wesley; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptional analysis of the tpr genes in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (referred to here as simply T. pallidum) has been limited to date, and yet the expression of members of this gene family is likely relevant to the pathogenesis of syphilis. Recently, immunological studies and semiquantitative mRNA analysis led to the hypothesis of the modulation of tpr gene transcription during infection and suggested that various strains of T. pallidum might differentially express these genes. In this study we developed a real-time amplification assay to quantify the tpr mRNAs with respect to the 47-kDa lipoprotein message and to compare transcript levels among four different strains of T. pallidum. In addition, we analyzed the lymphocyte responsiveness pattern toward the Tpr antigens in late experimental syphilis to identify tpr genes that had been expressed during the course of infection. The T-cell response has been implicated in clearance of treponemes from early lesions, and some of the Tprs were identified as strong targets of the cellular immune response. We show that message for many of the tpr genes can be detected in treponemes harvested at the peak of early infection. Interestingly, tprK seems to be preferentially expressed in almost every strain, and it is uniformly the target of the strongest cellular immune response. These studies demonstrate the differential expression of certain tpr genes among strains of T. pallidum, and further studies are needed to explore the relationship between tpr gene expression and the clinical course of syphilis in infected individuals.

  20. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus and syphilis among individuals attending anonymous testing for HIV in Luanda, Angola.

    PubMed

    Guimarães Nebenzahl, H; Lopes, A; Castro, R; Pereira, F

    2013-01-24

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis remain major infections around the world. In Angola there are about 166 000 individuals living with HIV, representing a prevalence of 1.98% in adults between 15 and 49 years of age. In a 2003 study in Luanda, 4.5% of pregnant women had antibodies to HIV and 8.1% to HBV, and 5.4% were infected with Treponema pallidum. Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV-1 and 2, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum serological markers, and hence the prevalence of these infections, in individuals attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Luanda, Angola, and the burden of these infections in the Angolan population. Methods. Individuals attending a centre for anonymous testing for HIV were randomly included in the study. All samples were tested for HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-HCV and anti-HIV-1 and 2 antibodies and antibodies to T. pallidum. Results. A total of 431 individuals (262 women and 169 men) were studied, of whom 10.0% (43/431) were seropositive for T. pallidum and 4.6% had active syphilis; 8.8% (38/431) were seropositive for HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 (of these, 78.9% were HIV-1-positive, 2.6% HIV-2-positive and 18.4% co-infected); 9.3% (40/431) were HBsAg-positive, while 8.1% (35/431) had antibodies to HCV. Of 102 patients with positive results, 26 (25.5%, or 6.0% of the total of 431 patients) were positive for more than one of the organisms studied. Rates of co-infection were as follows: 2.3% (10/431) for HIV/HBV, 0.9% (4/431) for HIV/HCV, and 0.9% (4/431) for HCV/HBV. Three individuals with active syphilis had viral co-infection, hepatitis B in 1 case and HIV in 2. Five individuals (1.2% of the total) were seropositive for three infections, HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C in 3 cases and HIV, hepatitis C and syphilis in 2. Conclusions. A high prevalence of co-infection with the infections studied was found in this population, including HIV

  1. Changes in HIV and syphilis prevalence among female sex workers from three serial cross-sectional surveys in Karnataka state, South India

    PubMed Central

    Isac, Shajy; Ramesh, B M; Rajaram, S; Washington, Reynold; Bradley, Janet E; Reza-Paul, Sushena; Beattie, Tara S; Blanchard, James F; Moses, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper examined trends over time in condom use, and the prevalences of HIV and syphilis, among female sex workers (FSWs) in South India. Design Data from three rounds of cross-sectional surveys were analysed, with HIV and high-titre syphilis prevalence as outcome variables. Multivariable analysis was applied to examine changes in prevalence over time. Setting Five districts in Karnataka state, India. Participants 7015 FSWs were interviewed over three rounds of surveys (round 1=2277; round 2=2387 and round 3=2351). Women who reported selling sex in exchange for money or gifts in the past month, and aged between 18 and 49 years, were included. Interventions The surveys were conducted to monitor a targeted HIV prevention programme during 2004–2012. The main interventions included peer-led community outreach, services for the treatment and prevention of sexually transmitted infections, and empowering FSWs through community mobilisation. Results HIV prevalence declined significantly from rounds 1 to 3, from 19.6% to 10.8% (adjusted OR (AOR)=0.48, p<0.001); high-titre syphilis prevalence declined from 5.9% to 2.4% (AOR=0.50, p<0.001). Reductions were observed in most substrata of FSWs, although reductions among new sex workers, and those soliciting clients using mobile phones or from home, were not statistically significant. Condom use ‘always’ with occasional clients increased from 73% to 91% (AOR=1.9, p<0.001), with repeat clients from 52% to 86% (AOR=5.0, p<0.001) and with regular partners from 12% to 30% (AOR=4.2, p<0.001). Increased condom use was associated with exposure to the programme. However, condom use with regular partners remained low. Conclusions The prevalences of HIV infection and high-titre syphilis among FSWs have steadily declined with increased condom use. Further reductions in prevalence will require intensification of prevention efforts for new FSWs and those soliciting clients using mobile phones or from home, as well as

  2. [From the Belle Époque to the city of vice: the fight against syphilis in Belém, Pará, 1921-1924].

    PubMed

    Henrique, Márcio Couto; Amador, Luiza Helena Miranda

    2016-01-26

    This article analyzes the fight against syphilis in Belém, capital of the Brazilian state of Pará, between 1921 and 1924. When Instituto de Profilaxia e Doenças Venéreas (Institute for Prophylaxis and Venereal Diseases) was founded, headed by Dr. Heraclídes de Souza Araújo, many restrictions were imposed on prostitution in a bid to make prostitutes partners in the city's sanitation reform. The documents produced by the institute and published in newspapers of the day reveal the various clashes that occurred between doctors, the civil police force, and prostitutes, highlighting the prostitutes' attitudes to state intervention in their activities.

  3. Serological markers for treponemal infection in children in rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania: evidence of syphilis or non-venereal treponematoses?

    PubMed Central

    Klouman, E; Masenga, E J; Sam, N E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the seroprevalence of treponemal infection and possible risk factors among children aged 0-14 in the general population of a rural Tanzanian village. METHODS: The survey was conducted as a part of a cross section study of a total village population on HIV and sexually transmitted disease. Among 1708 registered children aged 0-14, the 553 first attending were tested for treponemal infection with both rapid plasma reagin test (RPR) and Treponema pallidum Haemagglutination test (TPHA). These children belonged to a household cohort--also including their parents, siblings, and other household members--with 1339 members; 1224 (91.4% participated in the survey and 82.1% of these were tested for treponemal infection. RESULTS: The overall prevalence for the TPHA test was 6.4% among girls and 1.1% among boys (odds ratio, OR = 6.5; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.9-22.3). The sex difference was most pronounced in the age group 10-14; 11.1% among girls versus 1.0% among boys (OR = 12.8; CI: 1.6-101.9). Among the 20 children who were TPHA positive, we found two cases of active, congenital syphilis. There was a lack of association between positive serology in children and positive serology in their parents. CONCLUSION: The highly significant predominance of girls testing positive for TPHA, and the concomitant lack of association between parents' and children's serostatus might point to sexual transmission as being the most common route of transmission of treponemal infection in girls during childhood in this village. The sources of infection for the seropositive girls are possibly found outside the family. PMID:9582474

  4. Comparison of an automated rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test with the conventional RPR card test in syphilis testing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Han; Lim, Chae Seung; Lee, Min-Geol; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2014-01-01

    Objective We compared the automated non-treponemal reagin (rapid plasma reagin (RPR)) test with the conventional RPR card test for usefulness in clinical applications. Setting A comparative study of laboratory methods using clinical specimens in a single institute. Participants A total of 112 serum samples including 59 Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA)-positive and 53 TPPA-negative specimens were evaluated. Outcome measures HiSens Auto RPR LTIA (HBI, Anyang, Korea) was compared with Macro-Vue RPR Card Tests (Becton Dickinson BD Microbiology Systems, Sparks, Maryland, USA). Treponemal-specific tests were performed by Serodia TPPA assay (Fujirebio, Tokyo, Japan). The percentage agreement, κ value and overall sensitivity and specificity of the two RPR tests were compared. Seroconversion rates after treatment were also compared for each RPR test. Results The percentage agreement between the two RPR tests was 78.6% (κ 0.565; 95% CI 0.422 to 0.709). Sensitivity and specificity of the automated RPR test relative to the TPPA test was 52.5% (95% CI 39.1% to 65.7%) and 94.3% (95% CI 84.3% to 98.8%), respectively, while the same values for the conventional RPR card test were 86.4% (95% CI 75% to 93.9%) and 94.3% (95% CI 84.3% to 98.8%), respectively. The conventional RPR card test showed overall higher positivity than the automated RPR test, whereas the automated RPR test showed higher seroconversion (43.5%, 10/23) than the conventional RPR card test (4.3%, 1/23) in treated patients. Conclusions The automated RPR test showed overall lower sensitivity than the conventional RPR test based on the treponemal test, but higher seroconversion after treatment. The automated RPR test could be used to monitor treatment response, especially in the reverse screening algorithm in syphilis testing. PMID:25552608

  5. Lessons learned from integrating simultaneous triple point-of-care screening for syphilis, hepatitis B, and HIV in prenatal services through rural outreach teams in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adriana; Sabidó, Meritxell; Camey, Elsy; Batres, Anabelle; Casabona, Jordi

    2015-06-01

    Mother-to-child-transmission of HIV, syphilis, and hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a challenge in Guatemala, especially in rural regions. A triple antenatal screening program for these infections using point-of-care (POC) testing offered through outreach teams was implemented in the municipality of Puerto de San José. One year following program implementation, antenatal care coverage increased to 99.6% (32.5% increase, P<0.001), testing uptake increased to 50.3% for HIV and syphilis (143.9% (P<0.001) and 1.3% (P=0.89) increase, respectively), and HBV testing increased from 0 to 42.2%. Lessons learned showed that, despite the expansion of triple antenatal POC screening in rural Guatemala, a shortage of healthcare workers and poor supply chain management limited screening uptake. Moreover, training is essential to help health workers overcome their fear of communicating positive results and improve partner notification. Engagement of community health workers was essential to build local capacity and facilitate community acceptance. PMID:25968489

  6. HIV, hepatitis and syphilis prevalence and correlates of condom use during anal sex among men who have sex with men in the Republic of Moldova.

    PubMed

    Zohrabyan, L; Johnston, L; Scutelniciuc, O; Iovita, A; Todirascu, L; Costin, T; Plesca, V; Cotelnic-Harea, T; Ionascu, G

    2013-05-01

    Limited data on HIV prevalence and related risks among men who have sex with men (MSM) exist in the Republic of Moldova. In Chisinau and Balti, 188 and 209, respectively, men who reported having anal or oral sex in the last six months with another man, aged ≥16 years were recruited into a study in 2010 using respondent-driven sampling methods. MSM reported having multiple male and female partners and inconsistent condom use. In Chisinau, 2% of MSM were HIV seropositive, 3.7% had antibodies to hepatitis C (HCV), 5.7% had antibodies to hepatitis B (HBV) and 12.1% had syphilis. In Balti, less than 1% of MSM were HIV seropositive, 1.2% had antibodies to HCV, 3.2% had antibodies to HBV and only 0.5% had syphilis. MSM who used a condom at last anal sex with a man were less likely to reside in Chisinau, to have casual sex partners and to have had an HIV test in the last year and were more likely to know where to get an HIV test. Although HIV prevalence was low, MSM practice a number of risky sexual behaviours that may heighten the risk of further HIV transmission in this population and to the wider population.

  7. Quarantine as a public health measure against an emerging infectious disease: syphilis in Zurich at the dawn of the modern era (1496–1585)

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Gabriella Eva Cristina; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Bagheri, Homayoun C.

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is considered as one of the most devastating sexually transmitted diseases in human history. Based on historical records, the “Böse Blattern” (German for “Evil Pocks”) spread through Europe after 1495 and shared symptoms with what we know today as syphilis. Many cities took measures to protect their population. Here, transliterations of archival documents from the 15th and 16th century (provided in the appendix) are used to trace the steps taken by the governing authorities in Zurich to deal with this emerging infectious disease. One of the central measures taken by the city was to establish a quarantine facility referred to as the “Blatternhaus”. The city doctors, including the well-known physician and naturalist Conrad Gessner, oversaw the obligatory quarantine and treatment of patients with symptoms. Treatment could range from better nutrition, herbal remedies and skin ointments to aggressive heat therapy and “smoking”. Furthermore, the affliction was suspected as a sexually acquired disease, hence prostitutes and infected foreigners were extradited from the city. Meanwhile, the church used its social influence to promote a more “Christian” behavior. In several respects, the public health measures taken in the 16th century against a new and menacing epidemic do not diverge in their basic rationale from approaches used during the 20th century and today. PMID:27303653

  8. Lessons learned from integrating simultaneous triple point-of-care screening for syphilis, hepatitis B, and HIV in prenatal services through rural outreach teams in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adriana; Sabidó, Meritxell; Camey, Elsy; Batres, Anabelle; Casabona, Jordi

    2015-06-01

    Mother-to-child-transmission of HIV, syphilis, and hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a challenge in Guatemala, especially in rural regions. A triple antenatal screening program for these infections using point-of-care (POC) testing offered through outreach teams was implemented in the municipality of Puerto de San José. One year following program implementation, antenatal care coverage increased to 99.6% (32.5% increase, P<0.001), testing uptake increased to 50.3% for HIV and syphilis (143.9% (P<0.001) and 1.3% (P=0.89) increase, respectively), and HBV testing increased from 0 to 42.2%. Lessons learned showed that, despite the expansion of triple antenatal POC screening in rural Guatemala, a shortage of healthcare workers and poor supply chain management limited screening uptake. Moreover, training is essential to help health workers overcome their fear of communicating positive results and improve partner notification. Engagement of community health workers was essential to build local capacity and facilitate community acceptance.

  9. False-positive tests for syphilis associated with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus infection among intravenous drug abusers. Valencian Study Group on HIV Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Aguado, I; Bolumar, F; Moreno, R; Pardo, F J; Torres, N; Belda, J; Espacio, A

    1998-11-01

    The role of HIV, hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B virus infections in the production of biological false-positive reactions for syphilis was evaluated in two large samples of intravenous drug abusers and homosexual men attending AIDS prevention centers in Spain. A significantly increased odds ratio (OR) for false-positive tests for syphilis [OR 2.23, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.76-2.83] was observed for HIV-seropositive intravenous drug abusers; biological false-positive reactions were also more frequent (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.30-2.31) among intravenous drug abusers who were hepatitis B virus seropositive but not among those who were hepatitis C virus seropositive (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.48-1.69). Among homosexuals, the association between HIV and biological false-positive reactions was restricted to subjects who were also intravenous drug abusers, indicating the crucial role of intravenous drug abuse. Only 20.5% of intravenous drug abusers with a previous biological false-positive reaction yielded a false-positive result in their subsequent visit.

  10. Quarantine as a public health measure against an emerging infectious disease: syphilis in Zurich at the dawn of the modern era (1496-1585).

    PubMed

    Gall, Gabriella Eva Cristina; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Bagheri, Homayoun C

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is considered as one of the most devastating sexually transmitted diseases in human history. Based on historical records, the "Böse Blattern" (German for "Evil Pocks") spread through Europe after 1495 and shared symptoms with what we know today as syphilis. Many cities took measures to protect their population. Here, transliterations of archival documents from the 15(th) and 16(th) century (provided in the appendix) are used to trace the steps taken by the governing authorities in Zurich to deal with this emerging infectious disease. One of the central measures taken by the city was to establish a quarantine facility referred to as the "Blatternhaus". The city doctors, including the well-known physician and naturalist Conrad Gessner, oversaw the obligatory quarantine and treatment of patients with symptoms. Treatment could range from better nutrition, herbal remedies and skin ointments to aggressive heat therapy and "smoking". Furthermore, the affliction was suspected as a sexually acquired disease, hence prostitutes and infected foreigners were extradited from the city. Meanwhile, the church used its social influence to promote a more "Christian" behavior. In several respects, the public health measures taken in the 16(th) century against a new and menacing epidemic do not diverge in their basic rationale from approaches used during the 20(th) century and today. PMID:27303653

  11. Introduction of Syphilis Point-of-Care Tests, from Pilot Study to National Programme Implementation in Zambia: A Qualitative Study of Healthcare Workers’ Perspectives on Testing, Training and Quality Assurance

    PubMed Central

    Ansbro, Éimhín M.; Gill, Michelle M.; Reynolds, Joanna; Shelley, Katharine D.; Strasser, Susan; Sripipatana, Tabitha; Ncube, Alexander Tshaka; Tembo Mumba, Grace; Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Mabey, David

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis affects 1.4 million pregnant women globally each year. Maternal syphilis causes congenital syphilis in over half of affected pregnancies, leading to early foetal loss, pregnancy complications, stillbirth and neonatal death. Syphilis is under-diagnosed in pregnant women. Point-of-care rapid syphilis tests (RST) allow for same-day treatment and address logistical barriers to testing encountered with standard Rapid Plasma Reagin testing. Recent literature emphasises successful introduction of new health technologies requires healthcare worker (HCW) acceptance, effective training, quality monitoring and robust health systems. Following a successful pilot, the Zambian Ministry of Health (MoH) adopted RST into policy, integrating them into prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV clinics in four underserved Zambian districts. We compare HCW experiences, including challenges encountered in scaling up from a highly supported NGO-led pilot to a large-scale MoH-led national programme. Questionnaires were administered through structured interviews of 16 HCWs in two pilot districts and 24 HCWs in two different rollout districts. Supplementary data were gathered via stakeholder interviews, clinic registers and supervisory visits. Using a conceptual framework adapted from health technology literature, we explored RST acceptance and usability. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Key themes in qualitative data were explored using template analysis. Overall, HCWs accepted RST as learnable, suitable, effective tools to improve antenatal services, which were usable in diverse clinical settings. Changes in training, supervision and quality monitoring models between pilot and rollout may have influenced rollout HCW acceptance and compromised testing quality. While quality monitoring was integrated into national policy and training, implementation was limited during rollout despite financial support and mentorship. We illustrate that new

  12. The Prevalence of HIV by Ethnic Group Is Correlated with HSV-2 and Syphilis Prevalence in Kenya, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Chris Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background. This paper investigates two issues: do ethnic/racial groups with high HIV prevalences also have higher prevalences of other STIs? and is HIV prevalence by ethnic group correlated with the prevalence of circumcision, concurrency, or having more than one partner in the preceding year? Methods. We used Spearman's correlation to estimate the association between the prevalence of HIV per ethnic/racial group and HSV-2, syphilis, symptoms of an STI, having more than one partner in the past year, concurrency, and circumcision in Kenya, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Results. We found that in each country HSV-2, syphilis, and symptomatic STIs were positively correlated with HIV prevalence (HSV-2: Kenya rho = 0.50, P = 0.207; South Africa rho-1, P = 0.000; USA rho-1, P = 0.000, Syphilis: Kenya rho = 0.33, P = 0.420; South Africa rho-1, P = 0.000; USA rho-1, P = 0.000, and STI symptoms: Kenya rho = 0.92, P = 0.001; South Africa rho-1, P = 0.000; UK rho = 0.87, P = 0.058; USA rho-1, P = 0.000). The prevalence of circumcision was only negatively associated with HIV prevalence in Kenya. Both having more than one partner in the previous year and concurrency were positively associated with HIV prevalence in all countries (concurrency: Kenya rho = 0.79, P = 0.036; South Africa rho-1, P = 0.000; UK 0.87, P = 0.058; USA rho-1, P = 0.000 and multiple partners: Kenya rho = 0.82, P = 0.023; South Africa rho-1, P = 0.000; UK rho = 0.87, P = 0.058; USA rho-1, P = 0.000). Not all associations were statistically significant. Conclusion. Further attention needs to be directed to what determines higher rates of partner change and concurrency in communities with high STI prevalence. PMID:25328516

  13. [From the Belle Époque to the city of vice: the fight against syphilis in Belém, Pará, 1921-1924].

    PubMed

    Henrique, Márcio Couto; Amador, Luiza Helena Miranda

    2016-01-26

    This article analyzes the fight against syphilis in Belém, capital of the Brazilian state of Pará, between 1921 and 1924. When Instituto de Profilaxia e Doenças Venéreas (Institute for Prophylaxis and Venereal Diseases) was founded, headed by Dr. Heraclídes de Souza Araújo, many restrictions were imposed on prostitution in a bid to make prostitutes partners in the city's sanitation reform. The documents produced by the institute and published in newspapers of the day reveal the various clashes that occurred between doctors, the civil police force, and prostitutes, highlighting the prostitutes' attitudes to state intervention in their activities. PMID:27276041

  14. Hepatitis C-seroconversion within three to six months after having contracted clinical syphilis and/or lymphogranuloma venereum rectitis in five homosexually active, HIV seropositive men.

    PubMed

    Pelgrom, J M; Vogelaers, D; Colle, I

    2008-01-01

    Five Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) seropositive homosexually active men experienced hepatitis C-seroconversion in the period between September 2004 and January 2007 at a single HIV Reference Center (University Hospital Ghent, Belgium). There was no history of intravenous drug use. All had unprotected anal sex with multiple other HIV seropositive men in the recent past. All of them had clinical syphilis and/or lymphogranuloma venereum rectitis within three to six months before the hepatitis C-seroconversion was detected. This confirms the observations in other case reports and studies originating from the Netherlands, France, the United Kingdom and Germany, illustrating sexual transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in this high-risk group. Physicians should be aware of the persistent high-risk behaviour in a subgroup of HIV seropositive homosexually active men and perform intensive sexual counselling and screening for other sexually transmitted diseases, including HCV, during medical follow-up. PMID:19186567

  15. Socialization Patterns and Their Association with Unprotected Anal Intercourse, HIV, and Syphilis Among High-Risk Men Who Have Sex with Men and Transgender Women in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Verre, MC; Peinado, J; Segura, ER; Clark, JC; Gonzales, P; Benites, C; Cabello, R; Sanchez, J; Lama, JR

    2014-01-01

    The association of socialization patterns with unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) and HIV/STI prevalence remains underexplored in men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TW) in developing country settings. We evaluated the correlation of UAI, HIV, and syphilis with MSM/TW venue attendance and social network size among high-risk MSM and TW in Peru according to self-reported sexual identity. Frequency of venue attendance and MSM/TW social network size were lowest among heterosexual MSM and highest among TW respondents. Attendance (frequent or occasional) at MSM/TW venues was associated with increased odds of insertive UAI among heterosexual participants. Frequent venue attendance was associated with increased odds of receptive UAI among gay/homosexual, bisexual, and TW participants. Further investigation of the differing socialization patterns and associations with HIV/STI transmission within subgroups of Peruvian MSM and TW will enable more effective prevention interventions for these populations. PMID:24788782

  16. Socialization patterns and their associations with unprotected anal intercourse, HIV, and syphilis among high-risk men who have sex with men and transgender women in Peru.

    PubMed

    Verre, Michael C; Peinado, Jesus; Segura, Eddy R; Clark, Jesse; Gonzales, Pedro; Benites, Carlos; Cabello, Robinson; Sanchez, Jorge; Lama, Javier R

    2014-10-01

    The association of socialization patterns with unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) and HIV/STI prevalence remains underexplored in men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TW) in developing country settings. We evaluated the correlation of UAI, HIV, and syphilis with MSM/TW venue attendance and social network size among high-risk MSM and TW in Peru according to self-reported sexual identity. Frequency of venue attendance and MSM/TW social network size were lowest among heterosexual MSM and highest among TW respondents. Attendance (frequent or occasional) at MSM/TW venues was associated with increased odds of insertive UAI among heterosexual participants. Frequent venue attendance was associated with increased odds of receptive UAI among gay/homosexual, bisexual, and TW participants. Further investigation of the differing socialization patterns and associations with HIV/STI transmission within subgroups of Peruvian MSM and TW will enable more effective prevention interventions for these populations.

  17. Prevalence and risk factors of HIV and syphilis, and knowledge and risk behaviors related to HIV/AIDS among men who have sex with men in Chongqing, China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenzhe; Wu, Gohui; Zheng, Hui; Zhang, Wenjuan; Peng, Zhihang; Yu, Rongbin; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High HIV prevalence and incidence burdens have been reported in men who have sex with men (MSM) in Chongqing, China. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), to appraise the knowledge and risk behaviors related to HIV/AIDS among MSM, and to analyze the possible causes of deviation between behavior and knowledge to make better strategies. We recruited 617 MSM from February to July in 2008 by using a respondent-driven sampling (RDS) method in Chongqing, China. Through the collection of questionnaire-based data and biological testing results from all objects, we launched a cross-sectional survey. STATA/SE was used for data analysis by frequency, ANOVA, rank sum test and logistic regression models. MSM with syphilis (OR=4.16, 95%CI: 2.35-7.33, P<0.0001) were more likely to be HIV infected. Being a company employee (OR=3.64, 95%CI: 1.22-10.08, P<0.0001) and having bought male for sex (OR=3.52, 95%CI: 1.10-11.32, P < 0.034) were associated with a higher probability of syphilis. MSM with younger age, higher education and greater monthly income had a higher mean knowledge score. MSM who had HIV testing had a higher mean knowledge score than those who never had. Students, venues for finding sex partners by Internet and homosexuals in MSM had a higher mean knowledge score compared to other occupations, venues for finding sex partners and sexual orientation. There is an urgent need for delivery of barrier and biomedical interventions with coordinated behavioral and structural strategies to improve the effect of HIV interventions among MSM.

  18. Comparison of CDC and sequence-based molecular typing of syphilis treponemes: tpr and arp loci are variable in multiple samples from the same patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular typing of syphilis-causing strains provides important epidemiologic data. We tested whether identified molecular subtypes were identical in PCR-positive parallel samples taken from the same patient at a same time. We also tested whether subtype prevalence differs in skin and blood samples. Results Eighteen syphilis positive patients (showing both positive serology and PCR), with two PCR-typeable parallel samples taken at the same time, were tested with both CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and sequence-based typing. Samples taken from 9 of 18 patients were completely typed for TP0136, TP0548, 23S rDNA, arp, and tpr loci. The CDC typing revealed 11 distinct genotypes while the sequence-based typing identified 6 genotypes. When results from molecular typing of TP0136, TP0548, and 23S rDNA were analyzed in samples taken from the same patient, no discrepancies in the identified genotypes were found; however, there were discrepancies in 11 of 18 patients (61.1%) samples relative to the arp and tpr loci. In addition to the above described typing, 127 PCR-positive swabs and whole blood samples were tested for individual genotype frequencies. The repetition number for the arp gene was lower in whole blood (WB) samples compared to swab samples. Similarly, the most common tpr RFLP type “d” was found to have lower occurrence rates in WB samples while type “e” had an increased occurrence in these samples. Conclusions Differences in the CDC subtypes identified in parallel samples indicated genetic instability of the arp and tpr loci and suggested limited applicability of the CDC typing system in epidemiological studies. Differences in treponemal genotypes detected in whole blood and swab samples suggested important differences between both compartments and/or differences in adherence of treponeme variants to human cells. PMID:23898829

  19. Gonorrhea, Chlamydia, and Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... egg travels from the ovary to the uterus. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Ovaries: The ...

  20. [Frequency of HIV-1, rubella, syphilis, toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, simple herpes virus, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, Chagas disease and HTLV I/II infection in pregnant women of State of Mato Grosso do Sul].

    PubMed

    Figueiró-Filho, Ernesto Antonio; Senefonte, Flávio Renato de Almeida; Lopes, Alessandro Henrique Antunes; de Morais, Orlando Oliveira; Souza Júnior, Virgílio Gonçalves; Maia, Tamara Lemos; Duarte, Geraldo

    2007-01-01

    It was aimed to estimate the frequency of syphilis, rubella, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, toxoplasmosis, Chagas disease, HTLV I/II, simple herpes virus, HIV-1 and cytomegalovirus in pregnant women and to evaluate the relationship between age and the frequency of the infections studied. A transversal study of 32,512 pregnant women submitted to pre-natal screening in the period of November 2002 to October 2003. The frequency of the tried infections among the pregnant women were 0.2% of HIV-1, 0.03% of rubella, 0.8% of syphilis, 0.4% of toxoplasmosis, 0.05% of cytomegalovirus, 0.02% of simple herpes virus, 0.3% of HBsAg, 0.1% of hepatitis C, 0.1% of HTLV and 0.1% of Chagas disease. There was significative statistical association between age and prenatal infection of rubella, cytomegalovirus, Chagas disease and herpes virus. The rates of frequency of rubella, syphilis, toxoplasmosis, Chagas disease and cytomegalovirus in pregnant women studied were lower than the compared rates.

  1. Test uptake and case detection of syphilis, HIV, and hepatitis C among women undergoing prenatal screening in British Columbia, 2007 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Margot; Money, Deborah M; Alvarez, Maria; Buxton, Jane A; Krajden, Mel; Lester, Richard T; Ogilvie, Gina; Gilbert, Mark

    2014-06-01

    Objectif : La mesure dans laquelle les tests de dépistage de la rubéole, de la syphilis, du VIH et de l’hépatite C (VHC) ont été utilisés et les tendances en ce qui concerne la détection de cas de ces maladies ont été comparées, entre 2007 et 2011, chez les cohortes de femmes faisant l’objet d’un dépistage prénatal en Colombie-Britannique. L’analyse a mis en jeu le croisement de données de surveillance et de laboratoire centralisées à l’échelle provinciale, afin de déterminer la mesure dans laquelle les tests de dépistage prénatal ont été utilisés et de comparer le taux d’infections nouvellement diagnostiquées au taux d’infections prévalentes. Méthodes : Nous avons inclus les prélèvements prénataux, issus de Britanno-colombiennes âgées de 16 à 45 ans, qui ont été soumis au cours de la période allant de 2007 à 2011. Les dossiers de laboratoire ont été liés aux systèmes de surveillance provinciaux en vue d’identifier les cas maternels confirmés de syphilis et de VIH. La présence d’un statut de séropositivité préalable a été établie, pour ce qui est du VIH et du VHC, en ce qui concerne les cas préalablement confirmés ayant été identifiés à partir des dossiers de laboratoire. Nous avons déterminé les taux d’infections au VIH et au VHC nouvellement identifiées au moment du dépistage prénatal (nouveaux diagnostics par 100 000 par année). La prévalence du VIH et du VHC équivalait à la somme de tous les diagnostics, tant nouveaux que préalables (prévalence par 100 000 par année). Résultats : Chez 233 203 femmes, 96,9 % ont fait l’objet d’un dépistage visant la rubéole, 93,3 % ont fait l’objet d’un dépistage visant la syphilis, 93,8 % ont fait l’objet d’un dépistage visant le VIH et 21,5 % ont fait l’objet d’un dépistage visant le VHC. Entre 2007 et 2011, les taux globaux de nouveaux diagnostics ont été de 15,4, de 5,1 et de 82,8 cas par 100 000

  2. A cross-sectional study of HIV and syphilis infections among male students who have sex with men (MSM) in northeast China: implications for implementing HIV screening and intervention programs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background China has 76.2 million high school and college students, in which the number of reported HIV/AIDS cases is increasing rapidly. Most of these cases are attributed to male-to-male sexual contact. Few studies have explored HIV prevalence and behavioural characteristics of Chinese male students who have sex with men (MSM). Methods A cross-sectional study of MSM high school and college students in Liaoning Province was conducted. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews and blood specimens were obtained and tested for HIV and syphilis. Results There were 436 eligible participants. HIV and syphilis prevalence was 3.0% and 5.0%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, sexual orientation known by family members (OR: 7.3; 95% CI: 1.5-34.6), HIV/AIDS information obtained from clinical doctors (OR: 6.7; 95% CI: 1.7-25.9), HIV/AIDS information obtained through free educational services and materials such as voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) and condom distribution services (OR: 0.2; 95% CI: 0.4-1.0), inconsistent condom use (OR: 5.7; 95%: 1.3-25.3), sexual partner experienced anal bleeding after insertive anal intercourse (OR: 6.8; 95% CI: 1.6-28.4), and history of illegal drug use (OR: 18.9; 95% CI: 2.2-165.3) were found to be significantly associated with HIV infection. Conclusions Greater effort should be made towards stemming the HIV and syphilis epidemics among Chinese student MSM. Immediate screening and comprehensive interventions towards student MSM should be implemented in order to curb the spread of HIV. Family and school-based interventions should be considered to target this educated, yet vulnerable, population. PMID:21554742

  3. Associations of current marital status and living arrangements with HIV and syphilis risk: findings from a community-based sample of men who have sex with men in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Li, Dongliang; Vermund, Sten H; Zhang, Chen; Ruan, Yuhua; Yin, Lu; Liu, Hongjie; Amico, K Rivet; Shao, Yiming; Qian, Han-Zhu

    2016-11-01

    Chinese men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionally affected by HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), but little is known about the role of current marital status and living arrangements in shaping their HIV/syphilis risk. A cross-sectional study was conducted among MSM in Beijing, China to assess their sociodemographic/behavioral characteristics between married and single MSM, and test the hypothesis that currently married MSM have a lower odds of being HIV- and/or syphilis-infected. Participants were recruited via short message services, peer referral, internet, and community outreach. Data collection was based on a questionnaire survey and self-report. Infection status was lab-confirmed. Multivariable logistic regression modeling was used to assess the association of marital status and living arrangement with HIV/syphilis risk. Of the 3588 MSM, infection prevalence was high (HIV = 12.7%; syphilis = 7.5%). Compared to single MSM living with their boyfriends or male sex partners, single/alone MSM and married MSM living with wives were less likely to practice condomless insertive (CIAI) or receptive (CRAI) anal intercourse with men; while married MSM living with boyfriends or male sex partner were more likely to practice CIAI and CRAI, and married MSM were more likely to practice condomless vaginal sex. Compared to men living with boyfriends/sexual partners, significantly reduced odds of being HIV-positive were seen among married MSM who were living alone (aOR: 0.52; 95%CI: 0.28, 0.94) or living with their wives (aOR: 0.53; 95%CI: 0.31, 0.89). Similarly, single MSM living alone (aOR: 0.67; 95%CI: 0.48, 0.95) and married MSM living with their wives were comparatively less likely to be syphilis-infected (aOR: 0.43; 95%CI: 0.23, 0.79). Future efforts should consider characteristics of marital status and living arrangements for designing subgroup-specific risk reduction strategies among Chinese MSM. PMID:27236988

  4. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redoxmore » system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg²⁺-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg²⁺-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg²⁺ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.« less

  5. Evidence for Posttranslational Protein Flavinylation in the Syphilis Spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and Biochemical Insights from the Catalytic Core of a Periplasmic Flavin-Trafficking Protein

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg2+-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg2+-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg2+ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm. PMID:25944861

  6. Text Messaging for Enhancement of Testing and Treatment for Tuberculosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus, and Syphilis: A Survey of Attitudes Toward Cellular Phones and Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Person, Anna K.; Blain, Michela L.M.; Jiang, Helen; Rasmussen, Petra W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors surrounding healthcare-related mobile phone use and text messaging among persons at risk for or infected with tuberculosis (TB) or the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods: An anonymous survey was conducted in three groups of subjects: (1) HIV-infected persons attending an HIV clinic; (2) persons with latent TB infection at a public health clinic; and (3) persons presenting for TB, HIV, and syphilis screening at a community screening site. Results: Three hundred fifteen (n  = 315) persons responded to the survey, of whom 241 (76.5%) owned a cell phone. Cell phone owners were younger and more educated than nonowners. Transportation difficulty and forgetting appointments were cited as significant barriers by 34.2% and 39.5% of respondents, respectively. Fifty-six percent of subjects felt it would be acceptable to receive text message appointment reminders, and 33% felt that text message reminders to take medications would be acceptable. Younger age and cell phone ownership were significantly associated with acceptance of text message reminders. Black and Hispanic subjects were more likely to feel that text message reminders for appointments or medications were helpful than White subjects. Further, Black and Hispanic subjects, as well as subjects with lower educational attainment, were more receptive to healthcare-related educational text messages. Conclusions: Cell phones and text messaging were prevalent among our subjects attending HIV and TB clinics, and subjects were generally receptive to text messaging for healthcare-related communication. Interventions that explore the potential for text messaging to improve clinic attendance, medication adherence, and health knowledge should be explored. PMID:21457085

  7. Development of a novel protein biochip enabling validation of immunological assays and detection of serum IgG and IgM antibodies against Treponema pallidum pathogens in the patients with syphilis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Na-Li; Ye, Lei; Schneider, Marion E; Du, Yi-Xin; Xu, Yuan-Hong; Fan, Li-Bin; Du, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-15

    In this study, we developed a novel protein biochip methodology that was characterized by dithiobis (succinimidyl undecanoate) (DSU) and specialized for detection of serum IgG and IgM antibodies against Treponema pallidum pathogens in the patients with syphilis, respectively. The biochips were validated by a dimension of atomic force microscope (AFM). The visualized detection limit of IgG antibody on the biochip was 0.39μg/ml. Finally, 286 serum samples from the patients with syphilis were simultaneously tested on the rTpN15-17-47 coated biochips. The results were evaluated in comparison with the assays of T. pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) and the toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST). The result demonstrated that the relative positive rate in the 286 patients by biochip was 99.0%, similar to that by TPPA (97.9%, P>0.05) and higher than that by TRUST, (76.2%, P<0.01). The detection specificities were 100% for the biochip and the TPPA and 97.0% for the TRUST. Thus, the protein biochip would provide a useful platform not only for enabling concurrent detection of the infectious antibodies directed against T. pallidum on a larger scale, but also for monitoring therapy modality of the disease.

  8. High Prevalence and High Incidence of Coinfection with Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and Syphilis and Low Rate of Effective Vaccination against Hepatitis B in HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men with Known Date of HIV Seroconversion in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Klaus; Thamm, Michael; Bock, Claus-Thomas; Scheufele, Ramona; Kücherer, Claudia; Muenstermann, Dieter; Hagedorn, Hans-Jochen; Jessen, Heiko; Dupke, Stephan; Hamouda, Osamah; Gunsenheimer-Bartmeyer, Barbara; Meixenberger, Karolin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at higher risk for coinfection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and syphilis than the general population. HIV infection and these coinfections accelerate disease progression reciprocally. This study evaluated the prevalence and incidence of these coinfections in HIV1-positive MSM in Germany. Materials and Methods As part of a nationwide, multicenter, prospective cohort study of HIV-infected MSM, plasma samples collected yearly were screened for HBsAg and antibodies to HBc, HBs, HCV, and syphilis. Samples with indications of active HBV or HCV infection were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Prevalence and incidence of each infection and incidence rates per study participant were calculated, and incidences over 4-year time intervals compared. Results This study screened 5,445 samples from 1,843 MSM. Median age at HIV seroconversion was 33 years. Prevalences of active, cleared, and occult HBV, and of active/cleared HCV were 1.7%, 27.1%, 0.2%, and 8.2%, respectively, and 47.5% had been effectively vaccinated against HBV. Prevalence of antibodies to Treponema pallidum and of triple or quadruple sexually transmitted infections (STIs) were 39.6% and 18.9%, respectively. Prevalence of STI, cleared HBV, HBV vaccination, and history of syphilis differed significantly among age groups. Incidences of HBV, HCV, and syphilis were 2.51, 1.54, and 4.06 per 100 person-years, respectively. Incidences of HCV and syphilis increased over time. HCV incidence was significantly higher in MSM coinfected with syphilis and living in Berlin, and syphilis incidence was significantly higher for MSM living in Berlin. Discussion Despite extensive HBV vaccination campaigns, fewer than 50% of screened MSM were effectively vaccinated, with a high proportion of HIV-positive MSM coinfected with HBV. High rates of STI coinfections in HIV-positive MSM and increasing incidences emphasize the need for better tailored campaigns for

  9. Prevalence and correlates of HIV, syphilis, and hepatitis B and C infection and harm reduction program use among male injecting drug users in Kabul, Afghanistan: A cross-sectional assessment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A nascent HIV epidemic and high prevalence of risky drug practices were detected among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Kabul, Afghanistan from 2005-2006. We assessed prevalence of HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), syphilis, and needle and syringe program (NSP) use among this population. Methods IDUs were recruited between June, 2007 and March, 2009 and completed questionnaires and rapid testing for HIV, HCV, HBsAg, and syphilis; positive samples received confirmatory testing. Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of HIV, HCV, and current NSP use. Results Of 483 participants, all were male and median age, age at first injection, and duration of injection were 28, 24, and 2.0 years, respectively. One-fifth (23.0%) had initiated injecting within the last year. Reported risky injecting practices included ever sharing needles/syringes (16.9%) or other injecting equipment (38.4%). Prevalence of HIV, HCV Ab, HBSAg, and syphilis was 2.1% (95% CI: 1.0-3.8), 36.1% (95% CI: 31.8-40.4), 4.6% (95% CI: 2.9-6.9), and 1.2% (95% CI: 0.5-2.7), respectively. HIV and HCV infection were both independently associated with sharing needles/syringes (AOR = 5.96, 95% CI: 1.58 - 22.38 and AOR = 2.33, 95% CI: 1.38 - 3.95, respectively). Approximately half (53.8%) of the participants were using NSP services at time of enrollment and 51.3% reported receiving syringes from NSPs in the last three months. Current NSP use was associated with initiating drug use with injecting (AOR = 2.58, 95% CI: 1.22 - 5.44), sharing injecting equipment in the last three months (AOR = 1.79, 95% CI: 1.16 - 2.77), prior incarceration (AOR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.06 - 2.32), and greater daily frequency of injecting (AOR = 1.40 injections daily, 95% CI: 1.08 - 1.82). Conclusions HIV and HCV prevalence appear stable among Kabul IDUs, though the substantial number having recently initiated injecting raises concern that transmission risk may increase over time. Harm

  10. The Prevalence of Syphilis in England and Wales on the Eve of the Great War: Re-visiting the Estimates of the Royal Commission on Venereal Diseases 1913–1916

    PubMed Central

    Szreter, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Public fears of widespread venereal disease led in 1913 to the appointment of The Royal Commission on Venereal Diseases (RCVD). In 1916 its Final Report offered only a single cautious and somewhat imprecise summary statement about the likely prevalence of venereal diseases in England and Wales. Although the significance of contemporary attitudes to venereal disease has attracted a good deal of historiographic attention, no historian or demographer has since investigated this aspect of the Royal Commission's work. This article critically re-examines the most important quantitative evidence presented to the Royal Commission relating to the years immediately prior to the First World War. It utilises this evidence to produce new estimates of the probable prevalence of syphilis among adult males, both nationally and among certain geographical divisions and social groups in the national population; and also to offer a comment on the likely prevalence of gonorrhoea. PMID:25067890

  11. The Prevalence of Syphilis in England and Wales on the Eve of the Great War: Re-visiting the Estimates of the Royal Commission on Venereal Diseases 1913-1916.

    PubMed

    Szreter, Simon

    2014-08-01

    Public fears of widespread venereal disease led in 1913 to the appointment of The Royal Commission on Venereal Diseases (RCVD). In 1916 its Final Report offered only a single cautious and somewhat imprecise summary statement about the likely prevalence of venereal diseases in England and Wales. Although the significance of contemporary attitudes to venereal disease has attracted a good deal of historiographic attention, no historian or demographer has since investigated this aspect of the Royal Commission's work. This article critically re-examines the most important quantitative evidence presented to the Royal Commission relating to the years immediately prior to the First World War. It utilises this evidence to produce new estimates of the probable prevalence of syphilis among adult males, both nationally and among certain geographical divisions and social groups in the national population; and also to offer a comment on the likely prevalence of gonorrhoea.

  12. The Prevalence of Syphilis in England and Wales on the Eve of the Great War: Re-visiting the Estimates of the Royal Commission on Venereal Diseases 1913-1916.

    PubMed

    Szreter, Simon

    2014-08-01

    Public fears of widespread venereal disease led in 1913 to the appointment of The Royal Commission on Venereal Diseases (RCVD). In 1916 its Final Report offered only a single cautious and somewhat imprecise summary statement about the likely prevalence of venereal diseases in England and Wales. Although the significance of contemporary attitudes to venereal disease has attracted a good deal of historiographic attention, no historian or demographer has since investigated this aspect of the Royal Commission's work. This article critically re-examines the most important quantitative evidence presented to the Royal Commission relating to the years immediately prior to the First World War. It utilises this evidence to produce new estimates of the probable prevalence of syphilis among adult males, both nationally and among certain geographical divisions and social groups in the national population; and also to offer a comment on the likely prevalence of gonorrhoea. PMID:25067890

  13. The Legacy of the U. S. Public Health Services Study of Untreated Syphilis in African American Men at Tuskegee on the Affordable Care Act and Health Care Reform Fifteen Years After President Clinton's Apology.

    PubMed

    Mays, Vickie M

    2012-11-01

    This special issue addresses the legacy of the United States Public Health Service Syphilis Study on health reform, particularly the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The 12 manuscripts cover the history and current practices of ethical abuses affecting American Indians, Latinos, Asian Americans and African Americans in the United States and in one case, internationally. Commentaries and essays include the voice of a daughter of one of the study participants in which we learn of the stigma and maltreatment some of the families experienced and how the study has impacted generations within the families. Consideration is given in one essay to utilizing narrative storytelling with the families to help promote healing. This article provides the reader a roadmap to the themes that emerged from the collection of articles. These themes include population versus individual consent issues, need for better government oversight in research and health care, the need for overhauling our bioethics training to develop a population level, culturally driven approach to research bioethics. The articles challenge and inform us that some of our assumptions about how the consent process best works to protect racial/ethnic minorities may be merely assumptions and not proven facts. Articles challenge the belief that low participation rates seen in biomedical studies have resulted from the legacy of the USPHS Syphilis Study rather than a confluence of factors rooted in racism, bias and negative treatment. Articles in this special issue challenge the "cultural paranoia" of mistrust and provide insights into how the distrust may serve to lengthen rather than shorten the lives of racial/ethnic minorities who have been used as guinea pigs on more than one occasion. We hope that the guidance offered on the importance of developing a new framework to bioethics can be integrated into the foundation of health care reform.

  14. The Legacy of the U. S. Public Health Services Study of Untreated Syphilis in African American Men at Tuskegee on the Affordable Care Act and Health Care Reform Fifteen Years After President Clinton’s Apology

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Vickie M.

    2013-01-01

    This special issue addresses the legacy of the United States Public Health Service Syphilis Study on health reform, particularly the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The 12 manuscripts cover the history and current practices of ethical abuses affecting American Indians, Latinos, Asian Americans and African Americans in the United States and in one case, internationally. Commentaries and essays include the voice of a daughter of one of the study participants in which we learn of the stigma and maltreatment some of the families experienced and how the study has impacted generations within the families. Consideration is given in one essay to utilizing narrative storytelling with the families to help promote healing. This article provides the reader a roadmap to the themes that emerged from the collection of articles. These themes include population versus individual consent issues, need for better government oversight in research and health care, the need for overhauling our bioethics training to develop a population level, culturally driven approach to research bioethics. The articles challenge and inform us that some of our assumptions about how the consent process best works to protect racial/ethnic minorities may be merely assumptions and not proven facts. Articles challenge the belief that low participation rates seen in biomedical studies have resulted from the legacy of the USPHS Syphilis Study rather than a confluence of factors rooted in racism, bias and negative treatment. Articles in this special issue challenge the “cultural paranoia” of mistrust and provide insights into how the distrust may serve to lengthen rather than shorten the lives of racial/ethnic minorities who have been used as guinea pigs on more than one occasion. We hope that the guidance offered on the importance of developing a new framework to bioethics can be integrated into the foundation of health care reform. PMID:23630410

  15. EXPERIMENTAL SYPHILIS IN THE RABBIT

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Wade H.; Pearce, Louise

    1920-01-01

    From a study of the phenomena of the primary infection on the one hand, and the phenomena of local spread, or dissemination, on the other, it is seen that a multiplicity of lesions develops in the testicle and scrotum of the rabbit which have much the same characteristics irrespective of their origin. Some of these lesions are clearly recognizable as primary lesions or parts of a primary reaction to infection, while others are just as clearly the results of dissemination of the virus from a primary focus of infection or correspond with lesions which are commonly spoken of as secondary lesions. The effort to draw a sharp line of distinction between these two groups of lesions or between a primary and a secondary stage of infection in the rabbit, however, would be largely an arbitrary procedure. The fact is that the tissues of the scrotum and testicle of the rabbit constitute favorable surroundings for the localization and development of pallidum infections. Under ordinary circumstances, a large part of the reaction to infection which expresses itself in the formation of lesions recognizable by ordinary methods of examination takes place in these tissues. These lesions present certain broad and general characteristics without regard to whether they are primary or secondary in origin; the reaction is merely a reaction to a syphilitic infection which in either case may assume the most diverse character. Further, it would appear that in rabbits infected with such strains of Treponema pallidum as we have used, the virus is never confined to the area occupied by the so called primary lesion, or chancre, but always spreads and always gives rise to a regional adenopathy. There may be no lesions to indicate the progress of this dissemination, but an examination of the inguinal nodes shows that dissemination occurs very soon after inoculation, and a pallidum reaction may be detected in these glands even before infection can be recognized in the scrotum. Subsequently lesions develop in all parts of the scrotum and testicle, sometimes involving the entire testicle or scrotum, and at others, forming focalized lesions with an especial predilection for certain locations such as the epididymis, the mediastinum testis, the tunics, and the dorsal folds of the scrotum. In some instances, more or less continuous lesions form along the course of the perivascular lymphatics, suggesting that this is one path taken in the dissemination of the organism. It is probable, however, that lesions of a gross character develop more as a result of accumulation of spirochetes than of mere invasion of the lymphatics since they are not a constant accompaniment of the local infection, while invasion of the lymphatics and extension of the infection to the regional lymph nodes occur in all cases. PMID:19868424

  16. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg²⁺-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg²⁺-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg²⁺ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.

  17. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Surveillance, 2014: Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... race/ethnicity group except for Native Hawaiians/Other Pacific Islanders during 2013–2014 ( Figure 40 ). As in ... among whites, the rate among Native Hawaiians/Other Pacific Islanders (6.5 cases per 100,000 population) ...

  18. Did Catherine the Great of Russia have syphilis?

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R S

    1991-01-01

    Catherine the Great (1729-96) ruled Russia for the last 34 years of her life. She pursued many reforms with energy, intelligence and political shrewdness. Not least amongst her activities was a serious interest in matters of public health which extended to personal involvement in the care of the venereally infected. This paper suggests that perhaps her zeal in this last was based on more than social awareness. Images PMID:1774056

  19. BARIUM SULPHATE ABSORPTION AND THE SERUM DIAGNOSIS OF SYPHILIS.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-02-01

    The so-called syphilitic antibodies can be removed from a serum by means of absorption with barium sulphate. The removal is due either to an adsorption or a mechanical absorption. The activity of the syphilitic antibodies is thereby unimpaired. The readiness with which the absorption is accomplished with barium sulphate varies considerably with different syphilitic sera. That barium sulphate exerts the same absorbing effect upon non-syphilitic serum components is made evident by the interfering property which the latter manifest in the absorption experiment of the syphilitic antibodies. The selective removal of the serum components, other than the syphilitic antibodies, by means of barium sulphate absorption is, therefore, impossible. On the other hand, a partial removal of these components, with but little removal of the syphilitic antibodies, may be effected when the content of a given serum is poor in syphilitic antibodies and comparatively rich in the indifferent serum components. But this is impossible if the conditions are reversed. The main reasons why some negative syphilitic sera may be so modified by the barium sulphate treatment as to give positive reactions, are explained below, but these apply only to those methods in which inactivated serum is employed. The inactivation reduces the antibody content to about one-fourth to one-fifth of the original. When the serum is very rich in antibodies, this does not affect the result of the fixation test. But when the amount of the antibodies is small, the process of inactivation creates conditions quite unexpected. It may produce such a condition that a given amount of the serum contains, after inactivation, only one or two antibody units, while the other serum components remain undiminished. Here one must not lose sight of the vital fact that these apparently indifferent serum constituents are not at all indifferent in the fixation processes. They may possess affinities which are similar to those of complement for the fixing combination of syphilitic serum and antigen. Speaking quantitatively, one unit of the syphilitic antibodies plus antigen will fix 0.1 cubic centimeter of guinea pig complement, but this unit can also be saturated and blocked by nearly the same amount of the seemingly indifferent serum component of the serum to be tested. Moreover, the regular amount of inactivated serum used in the Wassermann system is 0.2 cubic centimeter, a quantity sufficient to saturate two units of the fixing combination. Fortunately, this self-saturation of the syphilitic antibody-antigen combination by the other serum components is not constant in occurrence, owing to the wide variations of the fixability of the serum components of man. Here the benefit of Wechselmann's procedure becomes obvious. By removing a surplus of the fixable indifferent serum components by means of barium sulphate, the serum is made to react positively, or more strongly than before the treatment with barium sulphate. This masking of the positive reaction through the self-saturation is liable to occur in any system in which inactivated serum is recommended. Another equally important factor in masking the positive reaction in a serum in which the antibodies are poor, is the presence in considerable amount of natural antisheep amboceptor in human serum. It is a plain and simple fact that an excess of hemolytic amboceptor renders a positive reaction feeble or completely negative. As we have shown in our present investigation, a hemolytic amboceptor can be removed from the serum by means of absorption with barium sulphate. Thus it is easy to understand why Wechselmann found that barium sulphate absorption improves the reaction in the original Wassermann system. The treatment of syphilitic serum with this salt can have a twofold benefit in the case of the original method of Wassermann; namely, the removal of certain interfering serum components and the removal or diminishing of the natural antisheep amboceptor present in the syphilitic serum. In the method of Noguchi, there is no necessity for applying the barium sulphate absorption. Noguchi recommends the use of unheated serum, hence the absolute amount of the serum employed is only one-half of the absolute amount of complement. Eventually an old serum may be anticomplementary and need inactivation, but if the result is doubtful in this instance, a fresh serum from the same patient may be secured and subjected to reëxamination. In this method there is no danger of introducing an amount of hemolytic amboceptor which is both unknown and uncontrollable, for the reason that human serum is usually devoid of isolysin (antihuman hemolytic amboceptor), and, if the latter is present, it never reaches the strength which shows any effect upon the hemolytic system employed. We conclude, therefore, that the barium sulphate absorption is to be recommended for the original method of Wassermann under certain conditions, but that it is unnecessary for the antihuman hemolytic system of Noguchi.

  20. Syphilis and MSM (Men Who Have Sex with Men)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men – New York City, 2001 . MMWR 2002;51(38);853. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ... –- Six U.S. Cities, 1994 -1998 . MMWR 2002;51(33);733. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ...

  1. Is there a difference between hare syphilis and rabbit syphilis? Cross infection experiments between rabbits and hares.

    PubMed

    Lumeij, Johannes T; Mikalová, Lenka; Smajs, David

    2013-05-31

    Cross infection of rabbits and hares with Treponema paraluiscuniculi from rabbits and the related microorganism from hares, which was provisionally named "Treponema paraluisleporis", revealed that T. paraluiscuniculi affects rabbits clinically, but only causes seroconversion in hares without causing clinical disease, while "T. paraluisleporis" induces disease in both rabbits and hares. The 16S rRNA gene of "T. paraluisleporis" was sequenced (GenBank acc. no. JX899416) and compared to the sequence of T. paraluiscuniculi strain Cuniculi A. A phylogenetic tree based on the sequence alignment of 2002 bp taken from several treponemal strains was constructed. Both "T. paraluisleporis" and T. paraluiscuniculi are clustered together indicating their common origin. The close phylogenetic relatedness of both representatives supports the conclusion that subspecies or ecovar status should be given to these strains rather than species status. A more appropriate species name might be Treponema paraluisleporidarum. The genitive refers to the nominative Leporidae (family of rabbits and hares). The naturally occurring strain in rabbits would than be T. paraluisleporidarum ecovar Cuniculus and the strain from hares T. paraluisleporidarum ecovar Lepus. Since the former seems to have fewer physiological hosts, ecovar Lepus may represent an evolutionary ancestor of ecovar Cuniculus.

  2. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the urine. PCH has been linked to secondary syphilis, tertiary syphilis, and other viral or bacterial infections. Sometimes the ... help. For example, if PCH is caused by syphilis, symptoms may get better when the syphilis is ...

  3. Use of Tunable, Pulsed Dye Laser for Quantitative Fluorescence in Syphilis Serology (FTA-ABS Test)

    PubMed Central

    Kasatiya, S. S.; Lambert, N. G.; Laurence, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    A pulsed dye laser was used as an excitation source in a fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) test. A high precision in quantitative fluorescence was obtained with this high-power excitation source coupled to an electronic detection system and a storage oscilloscope by standardization of fluorescence evaluation and through elimination of human error. One 0.4-μs pulse exposure was sufficient to record fluorescence intensity data on the oscilloscope. Absence of fading of fluorescence after repeated excitation permitted multiple readings of the same microscope field. Almost 100% reproducible results were obtained for the FTA-ABS test with 40 samples. Electronic detection of fluorescence and the high sensitivity obtained with laser excitation raise doubts about the relative value of quantitative immunofluorescence in the FTA-ABS test. PMID:4598221

  4. UNICEF, syphilis and the state: negotiating female citizenship in the post-Second World War world.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Few charitable organizations have achieved the status of global recognition enjoyed by UNICEF, the United Nations Children's Fund, which embodies the international effort to provide for needy children the world over. Created because of its synchronicity with the United Nations' stated purpose—to maintain peace in the world—UNICEF launched its operations in 1946. Its founding, early operations and eventual restructuring reveal a great deal about concurrent political and economic events, but also provide keen insight into international ideas about who qualified for full citizenship in the post-war world. The consequences of UNICEF's policies, procedures and practices posed challenges to notions of citizenship for both women and children. It challenged citizenship not by questioning sex-specific gender roles, but by judiciously adhering to the United Nations' promise to create equality for men and women alike. UNICEF found itself in the unique position to be able to globalize definitions of what constituted full citizenship in any nation, due to its rapid expansion throughout the world. Through its programs, especially those related to health care, it not only challenged these roles in the West, but began over several decades to complicate the definition of citizenship as it became a forceful presence in Asia and Africa throughout the 1970s.

  5. UNICEF, syphilis and the state: negotiating female citizenship in the post-Second World War world.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Few charitable organizations have achieved the status of global recognition enjoyed by UNICEF, the United Nations Children's Fund, which embodies the international effort to provide for needy children the world over. Created because of its synchronicity with the United Nations' stated purpose—to maintain peace in the world—UNICEF launched its operations in 1946. Its founding, early operations and eventual restructuring reveal a great deal about concurrent political and economic events, but also provide keen insight into international ideas about who qualified for full citizenship in the post-war world. The consequences of UNICEF's policies, procedures and practices posed challenges to notions of citizenship for both women and children. It challenged citizenship not by questioning sex-specific gender roles, but by judiciously adhering to the United Nations' promise to create equality for men and women alike. UNICEF found itself in the unique position to be able to globalize definitions of what constituted full citizenship in any nation, due to its rapid expansion throughout the world. Through its programs, especially those related to health care, it not only challenged these roles in the West, but began over several decades to complicate the definition of citizenship as it became a forceful presence in Asia and Africa throughout the 1970s. PMID:20939149

  6. Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Study and Legacy Recruitment for Experimental AIDS Vaccines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Kimberly Sessions

    2005-01-01

    For African Americans, medical research often connotes exploitation and cruelty, making recruiting African Americans to participate in HIV vaccine trials particularly daunting. But infusing adult education principles into such efforts is both increasing African American participation and helping heal the legacy of the Tuskegee experiment.

  7. [Position hopeless lost--Heinrich Dreuw's lonely struggle against syphilis and Salvarsan].

    PubMed

    Mildenberger, Florian

    2011-01-01

    The invention of Salvarsan (Triaminotrihydroxy-arsenobenzol) in 1910 meant a revolution in the medical treatment. Chemotherapy was born and its founder Paul Ehrlich is still famous for his experimental work. In medical history mostly successes, not widespread discussions about misuse or failing of the new drug were. The Berlin doctor Heinrich Dreuw was a key figure in these debates. He and his colleagues presented evidence that Salvarsan was not an effective drug and just an expensive placebo, which helped pharmaceutical trusts earning more money. Dreuw even attacked state medical branches for infringement against patients. At last doubts about Salvarsan never disappeared.

  8. THE COMPARATIVE MERITS OF VARIOUS COMPLEMENTS AND AMBOCEPTORS IN THE SERUM DIAGNOSIS OF SYPHILIS.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-01-01

    1. The maximum activity of an antihuman hemolytic amboceptor may be obtained by employing the homologous or heterologous complement, according to the variable relations existing between the species furnishing the amboceptor and the one supplying the complement. Thus, some amboceptors are best reactivated by the complement of the same species, while others may act most strongly when reactivated with the complements of certain suitable heterologous species. 2. From the above it is clear that the complementary activity of a given serum may be very variable according to the varieties of amboceptors employed. In expressing the complementary activity of a serum, the species of the host of the amboceptor must always be stated. Thus, one serum may have many different complementary titers according to the amboceptors used. A similar variation in the titers of the amboceptors occurs when a variety of complements are employed. 3. Certain species of animals (pig and sheep) yield sera which are comparatively poor in reactivating most varieties of antihuman amboceptors. The complements of these species deteriorate rapidly. 4. The serum of chicken contained but little complement for the amboceptors derived from the mammalia, while the amboceptor from the chicken was only poorly, or not at all, reactivable by the complements contained in the mammalian sera. The serum of pig was the only variety which reactivated this amboceptor in a fair degree. 5. For the fixation tests guinea pig complement is the most favorable. This complement is also the most active and durable of those which have been studied. The complements of pig and sheep are quite fixable, but their weakness and rapid deterioration render them unsuitable for fixation purposes. Rabbit complement is quite active but is not easily fixable. Goat complement is, as already stated, difficult to fix, in spite of its strong complementary activity. The other complements are unsuitable because of their feeble complementary activity. 6. For fixation tests the antihuman amboceptors produced in the rabbit and guinea pig are suitable. They are, moreover, very active and do not cause the phenomenon of non-fixation. The amboceptors from other animals are unsuitable, as we cannot find a complement which strongly reactivates them. The amboceptor from the goat is unsuitable because of the danger of masking the fixation phenomenon by subsequent hemolysis. 7. In summing up, we arrive at the conclusion that the rabbit is the best animal for producing antihuman amboceptor, and the guinea pig for supplying complement. The guinea pig produces a good amboceptor, but its small size renders it second in choice. So far, no other animals have been found useful for the fixation experiments.

  9. Syphilitic aseptic meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    Syphilitic aseptic meningitis is a complication of untreated syphilis. It involves inflammation of the tissues covering the ... Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochete bacteria Treponema pallidum . Syphilis has three main ...

  10. Superoxide reductase from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: crystallization and structure determination using soft X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Silva, Teresa; Trincão, José; Carvalho, Ana L.; Bonifácio, Cecília; Auchère, Françoise; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J. G.; Romão, Maria J.

    2005-11-01

    Superoxide reductase is a non-haem iron-containing protein involved in resistance to oxidative stress. The oxidized form of the protein has been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure solved. A highly redundant X-ray diffraction data set was collected on a rotating-anode generator using Cu Kα X-ray radiation. Four Fe atoms were located in the asymmetric unit corresponding to four protein molecules arranged as a dimer of homodimers. Superoxide reductase is a 14 kDa metalloprotein containing a catalytic non-haem iron centre [Fe(His){sub 4}Cys]. It is involved in defence mechanisms against oxygen toxicity, scavenging superoxide radicals from the cell. The oxidized form of Treponema pallidum superoxide reductase was crystallized in the presence of polyethylene glycol and magnesium chloride. Two crystal forms were obtained depending on the oxidizing agents used after purification: crystals grown in the presence of K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} belonged to space group P2{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 60.3, b = 59.9, c = 64.8 Å, β = 106.9°) and diffracted beyond 1.60 Å resolution, while crystals grown in the presence of Na{sub 2}IrCl{sub 6} belonged to space group C2 (a = 119.4, b = 60.1, c = 65.6 Å, β = 104.9°) and diffracted beyond 1.55 Å. A highly redundant X-ray diffraction data set from the C2 crystal form collected on a copper rotating-anode generator (λ = 1.542 Å) clearly defined the positions of the four Fe atoms present in the asymmetric unit by SAD methods. A MAD experiment at the iron absorption edge confirmed the positions of the previously determined iron sites and provided better phases for model building and refinement. Molecular replacement using the P2{sub 1} data set was successful using a preliminary trace as a search model. A similar arrangement of the four protein molecules could be observed.

  11. Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network laboratory guidelines for the use of direct tests to detect syphilis in Canada.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Raymond Sw; Morshed, Muhammad; Chernesky, Max A; Jayaraman, Gayatri C; Kadkhoda, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and/or its nucleic acid can be detected by various methods such as microscopy, rabbit infectivity test or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. The rabbit infectivity test for T. pallidum, although very sensitive, has been discontinued from most laboratories due to ethical issues related to the need for animal inoculation with live T. pallidum, the technically demanding procedure and long turnaround time for results, thus making it impractical for routine diagnostic use. Dark-field and phase-contrast microscopy are still useful at clinic- or hospital-based laboratories for near-bedside detection of T. pallidum in genital, skin or mucous lesions although their availability is decreasing. The lack of reliable and specific anti-T. pallidum antibodies and its inferior sensitivity to PCR may explain why the direct fluorescent antibody test for T. pallidum is not widely available for clinical use. Immunohistochemical staining for T. pallidum also depends on the availability of specific antibodies, and the method is only applicable for histopathological examination of biopsy and autopsy specimens necessitating an invasive specimen collection approach. With recent advances in molecular diagnostics, PCR is considered to be the most reliable, versatile and practical for laboratories to implement. In addition to being an objective and sensitive test for direct detection of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum DNA in skin and mucous membrane lesions, the resulting PCR amplicons from selected gene targets can be further characterized for antimicrobial (macrolide) susceptibility testing, strain typing and identification of T. pallidum subspecies.

  12. 75 FR 6671 - Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... should be received within 30 days of this notice. Proposed Project Congenital Syphilis (CS) Case... collection for congenital syphilis case investigations with a revised ``Congenital Syphilis (CS) Case... ``resident city'' information blocks from the CS Form. Reducing congenital syphilis is a national...

  13. Seropositivity rates for toxoplasmosis, rubella, syphilis, cytomegalovirus, hepatitis and HIV among pregnant women receiving care at a public health service, São Paulo state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Márcia Aparecida dos Santos; Matos, Cinara de Cássia Brandão de; Spegiorin, Lígia Cosentino Junqueira Franco; Oliani, Denise Cristina Mós Vaz; Oliani, Antonio Hélio; Mattos, Luiz Carlos de

    2010-01-01

    Infectious and parasitic diseases affecting women during their reproductive age may result in vertical transmission. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence for TORSCH among pregnant women receiving care at a university hospital. Records of 574 pregnant women who received medical attention from January 2006 to December 2007 were assessed. The mean age was 27.2 ± 6.5 years ranging from 13 to 44. The results of the immunodiagnostic tests were: 62.0% (345/556) for IgG and 3.4% (19/556) for IgM anti-T. gondii; 93.1% (433/465) for IgG and 0.6% (3/465) for IgM anti-rubella; 0.9% (5/561) for VDRL; 1.8% (10/554) for HBsAg; 0.7% (4/545) for anti-HCV and 2.1% (11/531) for HIV. In conclusion, the results of immunodiagnostic tests for the TORSCH panel among pregnant women attending a perinatal service of a university hospital are in agreement with those reported by previous studies and by governmental sources. PMID:21340301

  14. Acroangiodermatitis (pseudo-Kaposi's sarcoma) in an HIV sero-positive patient with syphilis and hepatitis C virus coinfection: clinical and dermatopathological features.

    PubMed

    Bernardes Filho, Fred; Martins, Gustavo; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Andrade, Cecília Vianna de; Kac, Bernard Kawa

    2014-01-01

    Acroangiodermatitis is an angioproliferative disease usually related to chronic venous insufficiency, and it is considered a clinical and histological simulator of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Immunohistochemistry is the suitable method to differentiate between these two entities. It reveals the following immunostaining profile: immunopositivity with anti-CD34 antibody is restricted to the vascular endothelium in acroangiodermatitis, and diffuse in the KS (endothelial cells and perivascular spindle cells); immunopositivity with anti-HHV-8 only in KS cases. We report the case of an HIV seropositive patient without apparent vascular disease, who presented violaceous and brownish erythematous lesions on the feet, and whose histopathology and immunohistochemistry indicated the diagnosis of acroangiodermatitis. PMID:25184919

  15. STUDIES IN THE SEROLOGY OF SYPHILIS : III. EXPLANATION OF THE FORTIFYING EFFECT OF CHOLESTERIN UPON THE ANTIGEN AS USED IN THE WASSERMANN AND FLOCCULATION TESTS.

    PubMed

    Eagle, H

    1930-10-31

    When cholesterinized antigen is dropped into an excess of water, the rapid flocculation of cholesterin crystals is prevented by the fact that, as tiny aggregates form, they adsorb a protective surface of hydrophilic lecithin (i.e., antigen) which endows the particles with its own stable surface properties and thus prevents further aggregation. The colloidally dispersed antigen-cholesterin particles have approximately the same isoelectric point (pH 1.9), critical potential (1 to 5 millivolts) and coagulation value (0.75 M NaCl) as pure antigen particles of the same concentration, while the corresponding values for cholesterin are pH 2.1 to 3.4 (probably due to an associated impurity), >100 millivolts, and <0.001 N NaCl, respectively. Presumably, this adsorption of antigen by the cholesterin nucleus is determined by the fact that the former has a lower surface tension against water. At any rate, many surface active substances (serum; alcoholic extract of milk, egg or any animal tissue; Na-oleate; Na-glycocholeate; Na-taurocholate) cause a similar stable dispersion of cholesterin; and conversely, many otherwise water-insoluble substances of the most diverse chemical structure can be made to form a stable colloidal suspension by adding antigen to their alcoholic solutions before dropping into water. The colloidal suspension formed by antigen alone is very finely dispersed: only a few of the particles exceed the limits of dark field visibility. Cholesterin causes a marked increase in the number of these particles, out of all proportion to its mass; thus, one part of cholesterin to five of antigen causes a ten-fold increase in such visible particles, at the expense of the submicroscopic micellae formed by antigen alone. At the same time, the suspension becomes much more turbid. The particles remain discrete until the cholesterin: antigen ratio exceeds 1:1, when slight microscopic aggregation is observed; microscopic flocculation is seen only when this ratio exceeds 5:1, when there is not sufficient antigen to act as an efficient protective colloid. Cholesterin therefore causes a coarsened dispersion of antigen by forming a relatively large nucleus upon which antigen is adsorbed. As shown in the text, the larger the antigen particle the greater is its avidity for reagin per unit surface or mass. Thus, the coarse sol formed by dropping water-into-antigen is about twice as efficient as a finely dispersed antigen-into-water sol of the same concentration. The coarsened dispersion caused by cholesterin completely explains the greater sensitivity of the cholesterinized antigen in complement fixation. The same factor obtains in the flocculation reactions. In addition, the coarsened dispersion acts as a preliminary quasi-aggregation, facilitating by just so much the subsequent formation of visible clumps (or sedimenting aggregates) upon the addition of syphilitic serum; moreover, there is less surface in a coarse sol, with more reagin per unit surface, and correspondingly more efficient flocculation. The foregoing would be of purely academic interest were it not for the following considerations. From several points of view cholesterin is unsatisfactory as a sensitizer for antigen. Its solubility in alcohol is small. Even the 0.6 per cent concentration used in the Kahn test is difficult to keep in solution. Yet, as our experiments show, its sensitizing action increases indefinitely with its concentration. If it were sufficiently soluble, even 3 per cent could be used to advantage, increasing the sensitivity of 1(1/2) per cent antigen for complement fixation some 200 to 400 per cent, instead of about 50 per cent, as does 0.2 per cent cholesterin. Since, as we have shown, the sensitizing action of cholesterin upon antigen is due solely to the coarse dispersion it causes, and since it is quite inert during the actual combination of the lipoid particles with reagin, it can be replaced by any substance with similar physical properties. The problem in hand was therefore to find a water-insoluble substance, very soluble in alcohol, with so high an interfacial tension against water that, as in the case of cholesterin, microscopic particles would adsorb antigen when the alcoholic solution of the two is dropped into water. Given such a substance, it would be possible to obtain a more sensitive antigen for both complement fixation and flocculation, but particularly for the former. These theoretical expectations have been realized in a group of substances shortly to be reported: they make possible an antigen which is from 2 to 10 times as efficient in the Wassermann test as any now available.

  16. Screening Tests for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... or colonoscopy) Diabetes screening Gonorrhea test HIV test Syphilis test Get tested for chlamydia yearly through age ... to be tested for HIV. Get tested for syphilis if you are at increased risk or pregnant. ...

  17. Genital Herpes - Initial Visits to Physicians' Offices, United States, 1966-2012

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Overview National Profile Chlamydia Figures Gonorrhea Figures Syphilis Figures Other STDs Figures Special Focus Profiles Women ... Case Definitions Case Definitions Part 2 Contributors Slides Syphilis Profiles GISP Profiles File Formats Help: How do ...

  18. 2012 Sexually Transmitted Diseases Surveillance

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Overview National Profile Chlamydia Figures Gonorrhea Figures Syphilis Figures Other STDs Figures Special Focus Profiles Women ... Case Definitions Case Definitions Part 2 Contributors Slides Syphilis Profiles GISP Profiles Related Links STD Home STD ...

  19. Treatments for Specific Types of STDs/STIs

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequent screening with Pap smear tests. 4 [top] Syphilis If recognized during the early stages, usually within the first year of infection, syphilis can be treated with a singular intramuscular injection ...

  20. Interstitial keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cornea. This condition is often caused by infections. Syphilis is the most common cause of interstitial keratitis, ... Tuberculosis In the United States, most cases of syphilis are recognized and treated before this eye condition ...