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Sample records for syphilis

  1. Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Syphilis KidsHealth > For Teens > Syphilis Print A A A ... Symptoms? Syphilis happens in several different stages: Primary Syphilis In the first stage of syphilis, red, firm, ...

  2. Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Syphilis KidsHealth > For Teens > Syphilis A A A What's ... Symptoms? Syphilis happens in several different stages: Primary Syphilis In the first stage of syphilis, red, firm, ...

  3. Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the second stage. What happens during the second (secondary) stage of syphilis? The second stage can start as the sore is healing ... syphilis starts when symptoms from the first and second stages go away. The latent stage can last ...

  4. Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by bacteria. It infects the genital area, lips, mouth, or ... of both men and women. You usually get syphilis from sexual contact with someone who has it. ...

  5. Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... women should be tested for syphilis at their first prenatal visit. • You should get tested regularly for syphilis if you are sexually active and o are a man who has sex with men; o are living with HIV; or ...

  6. Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and puberty, syphilis may be a sign of sexual abuse. A pregnant woman with syphilis can spread the disease to her fetus through the placenta or during birth. It can result in stillbirth, a ... child and his sexual partner(s) should be tested for syphilis as well ...

  7. Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... kissing, hand contact, or other close personal contact. Pregnant women with syphilis can pass it on to their babies before birth. Am I at risk? Anyone having unprotected sexual contact with an infected person can get syphilis. Having more than one sexual partner increases ...

  8. [Syphilis].

    PubMed

    Dupin, N

    2016-11-01

    Syphilis is back since the beginning of this century. The epidemic affects mainly men having sex with men with a high proportion of HIV-infected patients. The classification of syphilis distinguishes early syphilis where patients are contagious (primary, secondary and early latent of less than one year) and late syphilis where patients are not (or less) contagious (late latent of more than one year and tertiary). The clinical presentation of syphilis has not changed. However, we must insist on the early forms of neurosyphilis, notably ophthalmic syphilis often under-diagnosed, as it affects the treatment. Serologic tests may be improved but are very helpful for the positive diagnosis and the follow-up after treatment. Treatment of early syphilis is based on one injection of benzathine benzyl penicillin G. Patients who have had syphilis must be regularly followed-up after treatment, as re-infections are common and are often asymptomatic. Copyright © 2016 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Peeling, Rosanna W; Mabey, David; Kamb, Mary L; Chen, Xiang-Sheng; Radolf, Justin D; Benzaken, Adele S

    2017-10-12

    Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum (T. pallidum) causes syphilis via sexual exposure or via vertical transmission during pregnancy. T. pallidum is renowned for its invasiveness and immune-evasiveness; its clinical manifestations result from local inflammatory responses to replicating spirochaetes and often imitate those of other diseases. The spirochaete has a long latent period during which individuals have no signs or symptoms but can remain infectious. Despite the availability of simple diagnostic tests and the effectiveness of treatment with a single dose of long-acting penicillin, syphilis is re-emerging as a global public health problem, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM) in high-income and middle-income countries. Syphilis also causes several hundred thousand stillbirths and neonatal deaths every year in developing nations. Although several low-income countries have achieved WHO targets for the elimination of congenital syphilis, an alarming increase in the prevalence of syphilis in HIV-infected MSM serves as a strong reminder of the tenacity of T. pallidum as a pathogen. Strong advocacy and community involvement are needed to ensure that syphilis is given a high priority on the global health agenda. More investment is needed in research on the interaction between HIV and syphilis in MSM as well as into improved diagnostics, a better test of cure, intensified public health measures and, ultimately, a vaccine.

  10. Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... which look like symptoms from other diseases. The painless syphilis sore that you would get after you ... are usually (but not always) firm, round, and painless. Because the sore is painless, it can easily ...

  11. Congenital syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital lues; Fetal syphilis ... which is passed from mother to child during fetal development or at birth. Nearly half of all ... Saunders; 2014:chap 143. Duff P. Maternal and fetal infections. In: Creasy RK, Resnik R, Iams JD, ...

  12. Treating Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Colby, W. David

    1992-01-01

    Background information on treating syphilis indicates that some currently recommended approaches to therapy are not optimal. There is no perfect drug schedule available, but penicillin remains the drug of choice. The author's recommendations for treatment and follow up are presented. PMID:21221354

  13. Vaccine development for syphilis.

    PubMed

    Lithgow, Karen V; Cameron, Caroline E

    2017-01-01

    Syphilis, caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, continues to be a globally prevalent disease despite remaining susceptible to penicillin treatment. Syphilis vaccine development is a viable preventative approach that will serve to complement public health-oriented syphilis prevention, screening and treatment initiatives to deliver a two-pronged approach to stemming disease spread worldwide. Areas covered: This article provides an overview of the need for development of a syphilis vaccine, summarizes significant information that has been garnered from prior syphilis vaccine studies, discusses the critical aspects of infection that would have to be targeted by a syphilis vaccine, and presents the current understanding within the field of the correlates of protection needed to be achieved through vaccination. Expert commentary: Syphilis vaccine development should be considered a priority by industry, regulatory and funding agencies, and should be appropriately promoted and supported.

  14. Gastric syphilis - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Tais Ferreira; Novis, Camila Freitas Lobo; Bottino, Caroline Bertolini; D'Acri, Antonio Macedo; Lima, Ricardo Barbosa; Martins, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    Gastric syphilis is an uncommon extracutaneous manifestation of syphilis, occurring in less than 1% of patients, presenting nonspecific clinical manifestations. In general, it occurs on secondary stage. The critical point is the recognition of the syphilitic gastric involvement, without which there may be incorrect diagnosis of malignancy of the digestive tract. In this report, a case of secondary syphilis with gastric involvement that had complete remission with benzathine penicillin will be described. PMID:27828649

  15. Early malignant syphilis*

    PubMed Central

    Ortigosa, Yara Martins; Bendazzoli, Paulo Salomão; Barbosa, Angela Marques; Ortigosa, Luciena Cegatto Martins

    2016-01-01

    Early malignant syphilis is a rare and severe variant of secondary syphilis. It is clinically characterized by lesions, which can suppurate and be accompanied by systemic symptoms such as high fever, asthenia, myalgia, and torpor state. We report a diabetic patient with characteristic features of the disease showing favorable evolution of the lesions after appropriate treatment. PMID:28300925

  16. Auckland: city of syphilis?

    PubMed

    Azariah, Sunita

    2016-12-16

    To briefly report on the large increase in cases of syphilis managed at Auckland Regional Sexual Health Service (ARSHS) in 2015. To raise awareness of syphilis as an emerging significant public health issue in Auckland. A search was conducted of the electronic patient management system at ARSHS for cases of syphilis diagnosed between 1st of January 2015 and 31st of December 2015. Those that fitted the Institute of Environmental Science and Research Ltd (ESR) case definitions for infectious syphilis were included and demographic, clinical and behavioural characteristics were described. One hundred and fifty-two cases of infectious syphilis were managed at ARSHS in 2015, which was a 78% increase from the previous year. The crude incidence rate was 9.5 cases per 100,000 head of population. As in previous years, the majority of cases were male (92%) and most of these were gay or bisexual men (GBM). Thirty-nine percent of cases were asymptomatic and 22% of cases were diagnosed with another STI. Twenty-eight percent of GBM were co-infected with HIV. While the overall number of heterosexual cases was small (n=35); there was a 3.8-fold increase from the numbers diagnosed in 2014 (n=9). The largest number of syphilis cases in recent decades was managed by the Auckland Regional Sexual Health Service in 2015. The increase in numbers is concerning as syphilis can enhance transmission and acquisition of HIV. Furthermore, other countries have noted increases in congenital syphilis cases when incidence in females has increased. It is important that all persons at risk of STI are tested for syphilis and that sexually active GBM in particular are tested regularly. Health professionals need to be made aware of who and when to test, and to refer or discuss any suspected cases with a specialist service as management of syphilis requires significant expertise.

  17. [Cardiovascular syphilis: diagnosis, treatment].

    PubMed

    Carrada-Bravo, Teodoro

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular tertiary syphilis may lead to aortitis, aortic aneurism, coronary stenosis, aortic insufficiency and, rarely, to myocarditis. The physician must be familiar with the clinical presentations of this process, including the asymptomatic variety and must be able to have an organized plan for the diagnosis and evaluation to establish or exclude the presence of cardiovascular pathology and the differential diagnosis with other entities. Once the etiologic and topographic diagnosis is established, the patient should be treated with penicillin, doxicycline and other antibiotics, and the consequences of the disorder, both actual and potential, should be considered before deciding weather to recommend surgical intervention. Although late syphilis can be prevented by appropriate therapy of early syphilis, this is a cardiovascular disease that most likely will continue to be diagnosed lately. Understanding of the pathology and pathophysiology of the disease, is most important for its prompt recognition and subsequent management. This paper reviews the natural history, diagnosis and therapy of cardiovascular syphilis.

  18. Syphilis: an unusual manifestation?

    PubMed Central

    Bezalely, Shai; Jacob, Giris; Flusser, Gideon; Ablin, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Syphilis is a widely investigated infectious venereal disease with varied presentations frequently mimicking other diseases. It progresses in distinct, well-characterised stages: early (primary and secondary), latent, and late (tertiary), each stage having its own unique presentations. However, there has been increasing evidence of atypical presentations. We describe one such presentation of early syphilis in its secondary stage. A man in his late 20s presented with a rash (which is typical of the secondary stage) and with bone pain with multiple lytic lesions (which is rare in the secondary stage but more typical of the tertiary stage). The patient was successfully treated for secondary syphilis. On the basis of our case, and on analysis of other case reports and research of early-stage syphilitic bone involvement, we conclude that the true incidence of bone involvement in early-stage syphilis may be higher than has been previously appreciated, and thus may be under-recognised and underdiagnosed. PMID:25239989

  19. Brief History of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Tampa, M; Sarbu, I; Matei, C; Benea, V; Georgescu, SR

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Before the discovery of Treponema pallidum as the etiologic agent, the origins of syphilis have been the subject of several debates. Diverse therapeutic agents were employed in an attempt to cure the disease. Examining the milestones in the history of syphilis, the present article reviews the existing theories that tried to explain the origins of the disease, the approach in art, the cultural and the evolution of the treatments from the empiric means to the discovery of penicillin. PMID:24653750

  20. Endemic syphilis and yaws

    PubMed Central

    Grin, E. I.

    1956-01-01

    Endemic syphilis and similar conditions are compared in this paper with yaws. Both are non-venereal and endemic, and they have very similar epidemiological characteristics. There is also considerable similarity in the clinical manifestations at the various stages of yaws and endemic syphilis, the differences that do appear being mainly due to different environmental and living conditions. No antigenic or immunogenic differences between syphilis and yaws have yet been demonstrated, and the sensitivity of both to penicillin is the same. Control measures for both diseases may be based on similar principles. The author considers the treponematoses to be closely related infections, and stresses the “unitarian” view put forward by various writers. PMID:13404469

  1. [Syphilis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Mandelbrot, Laurent; Marcollet, Anne

    2004-02-29

    Consequences of syphilis for mother, pregnancy, fetus and child are considerable, but preventable. Serological screening must be offered at the first prenatal visit, using both a treponemal (eg. TPHA) and a non treponemal (eg. VDRL or RPR) test. When the results are compatible with any type of active syphilis, treatment is required. The treatment of choice is penicillin: benzathine penicillin G, 2.4 million units intramuscular, repeated one week later, and most authors recommend a third dose if a late latent syphilis is suspected, or in case of coinfection with HIV. Women with a proven penicillin allergy can be desensitized. Alternative therapies, such as macrolids, are less well evaluated. Follow-up during and after therapy must not be neglected. In case of Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction, the mother should be managed on an inpatient basis, and the fetus carefully monitored. The VDRL should be repeated (usually every trimester), and therapy be renewed if there is not a significant decrease in titer. The fetus should be followed by serial ultrasound examinations. Finally, the child must be followed up clinically and biologically, and treated in case of congenital syphilis. The residual risk of adverse outcome is increased in case of reinfection, lack of maternal therapy or incomplete treatment, or when diagnosis and therapy are performed late in pregnancy.

  2. [Ocular syphilis: 9 cases].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, A S; Tea, S; Hustache Mathieu, L; Schwartz, C; Saleh, M; Delbosc, B

    2016-11-01

    Syphilis is a disease with ocular involvement may be opening and cover all ocular structures. The objective of the study was to retrospectively identify and describe all cases of ocular syphilis diagnosed in the ophthalmology department of Besançon University Hospital from March 2004 to April 2014. Between March 2004 and April 2014, we diagnosed and monitored 9 male patients (13 eyes) with ocular syphilis (1 interstitial keratitis, chorioretinitis associated with a 1 hyalite, 3 panuvéites, 1 chorioretinitis after placoid, 3 bilateral papillary edema). Patients had a mean age of 52.6 years (32-77 years) at diagnosis and the inaugural symptoms were in 100% of cases decreased visual acuity. The follow-up period ranged from 1 month to 5 years. The curative treatment included intravenous antibiotics penicillin G for 3 weeks. All patients had an improvement in their AV (AV initial range "counting fingers" and 0.6 versus AV final between 0.5 and 1 in decimal scale). Syphilis is a disease currently on the rise. It must be systematically sought before any inflammatory disease of the eye or papilledema. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Syphilis in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Genc, M.; Ledger, W.

    2000-01-01

    Syphilis can seriously complicate pregnancy and result in spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, non-immune hydrops, intrauterine growth restriction, and perinatal death, as well as serious sequelae in liveborn infected children. While appropriate treatment of pregnant women often prevents such complications, the major deterrent has been inability to identify the infected women and get them to undergo treatment. Screening in the first trimester with non-treponemal tests such as rapid plasma reagin (RPR) or venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL) test combined with confirmation of reactive individuals with treponemal tests such as the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) assay is a cost effective strategy. Those at risk should be retested in the third trimester. Treatment during pregnancy should be with penicillin. In determining a penicillin regimen, the clinician must consider the stage of the maternal infection and the HIV status of the mother. Patients who are allergic to penicillin should be desensitised before treatment. Despite appropriate treatment, as many as 14% will have a fetal death or deliver infected infants. Treatment may further be complicated by the Jarich–Herxheimer reaction, a complex allergic response to antigens released from dead micro-organisms, which can cause fetal distress and uterine contractions. Thanks to effective intervention strategies and inexpensive penicillin, syphilis rarely complicates pregnancy in the Western world today. In parts of the world where the traditional sexually transmitted diseases have not been controlled, the magnitude of problems associated with syphilis during pregnancy is reminiscent of that faced by the West during the early 1900s. Key Words: syphilis; pregnancy PMID:10858706

  4. Congenital syphilis: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Dzebolo, N N

    1980-08-01

    Congenital syphilis was discovered in a neonate with the unusual radiographic presentation of unilateral involvement of three bones showing lytic lesions and periostitis. Congenital syphilis should be considered in a newborn infant with these radiographic manifestations, especially when a suggestive history is obtained.

  5. Syphilis returns to the suburbs.

    PubMed

    Hargrove, Anna; Curtis, Nigel

    2006-05-01

    Congenital syphilis is now rare in Australia, particularly in suburban areas. The disease is both preventable and treatable, however, missed or late diagnosis can lead to catastrophic effects. We report an infant who developed congenital syphilis after multiple opportunities for preventing this condition were missed.

  6. Syphilis and Scherlievo in Dalmatia.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Franjo; Lipozenčić, Jasna

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the emergence of syphilis in Dalmatia, the coastal part of Croatia, at the very end of the 15(th) and the beginning of the 16(th) century, its presence up to the 20(th) century, making reference to the most important physicians that tried to cure the new disease. The archives of Dalmatian towns, their statutes, some literary works, travel writers, physician books, and articles by historians of medicine contain data on syphilis in Dalmatia. Syphilis was first observed in Zadar (1500), Trogir (1501) and Dubrovnik (1502). Among the first physicians who treated patients in Dubrovnik were Mariano Santo and Amatus Lusitanus. The latter was the first to make prosthesis for the palate defect to cure tertiary syphilis lesions. According to the statutes of Dalmatia towns, each had one or more paid physicians and pharmacists. The Ottoman travel writer Evlija Celebi gave an account of syphilis in Dalmatia in the 17(th) century. At the end of the 18(th) century and during the 19(th) century, endemic syphilis known as morbus de Scherlievo and morbus Brenensis appeared in Dalmatia. Because of the numerous cases observed in the region, new hospitals were opened in Dalmatian towns and the patients were hospitalized. Among the physicians who were engaged in the fight against syphilis in the 19th century, mention should be made of Giovanni Battista Cambieri, Nikola Selak and Božo Peričić. They all treated the affected patients and described syphilis and 'Scherlievo disease'in Croatian as well as in other languages. Syphilis was present in Dalmatia towns during the 15(th)-20(th) century, remaining a challenge and arousing the interest of current dermatovenereologists as well as other specialists.

  7. Laryngeal syphilis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lahav, Gil; Lahav, Yonatan; Ciobotaro, Pnina; Ziv, Nadia; Halperin, Doron

    2011-03-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. The complexity of the disease gained it the moniker "the great imitator"; it was William Osler who said, "He who knows syphilis, knows medicine." In 1866, Patrick Watson of Edinburgh, Scotland, reported a case of a 36-year-old man in whom syphilis destroyed the larynx.(1) The diagnosis was made postmortem. It was once believed that this was the first reported total laryngectomy, but the credit should actually be given to Christian Albert Theodor Billroth who performed this surgery on a patient with laryngeal carcinoma in 1873.

  8. Maternal syphilis: pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Stuart M.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the long history of medical interest in syphilis and its effects on pregnancy outcome, many fundamental questions about the pathophysiology and treatment of syphilis during pregnancy remain unanswered. However, understanding has been advanced by recent scientific reports such as those which delineate the complete sequence of the genome of the syphilis spirochaete, provide a more precise description of fetal and neonate infection by use of rabbit infectivity tests and describe the gestational age distribution of fetal death secondary to syphilis. It appears that fetal syphilitic involvement progresses in a rather predictable fashion, and although there is disagreement about the optimal prenatal treatment regimen, programmatic efforts to prevent fetal death must provide seropositive pregnant women with a recommended treatment early in pregnancy, and certainly before the third trimester. PMID:15356936

  9. Syphilis in the AIDS Era

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-18

    high risk of contracting syphilis, all HIV -infected patients should be screened for syphilis, and vice versa. The same holds true for other sexually...made to isolate the infecting organ- ism and no proved means of detecting T. pallidunt anti- gens exists. The antibody response in HIV -infected...patients, particulary in the later stages of AIDS, may be compromised, and thus the diagnosis may be ob- scuredShould all HIV -infected patients with neuro

  10. Prevalence Estimates of Complicated Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Julia C; Pedersen, Rolf; Marra, Christina M; Kerani, Roxanne P; Golden, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    We reviewed 68 cases of possible neurosyphilis among 573 syphilis cases in King County, WA, from 3rd January 2012 to 30th September 2013; 7.9% (95% confidence interval, 5.8%-10.5%) had vision or hearing changes, and 3.5% (95% confidence interval, 2.2%-5.4%) had both symptoms and objective confirmation of complicated syphilis with either abnormal cerebrospinal fluid or an abnormal ophthalmologic examination.

  11. Syphilis: presentations in general medicine.

    PubMed

    Nyatsanza, Farai; Tipple, Craig

    2016-04-01

    Syphilis is caused by the spirochete bacteriumTreponema pallidumand can be transmitted both sexually and from mother to child.T pallidumcan infect any organ and produces a clinical disease with a relapsing and remitting course. It is not hard to see, therefore, why it is often described as the great mimic. In this review, we provide an update of modern syphilis epidemiology, clinical presentations, and testing and treatment strategies.

  12. Syphilis detection using the Siemens ADVIA Centaur Syphilis treponemal assay.

    PubMed

    Donkers, Ad; Levy, H Roma; Letens-van Vliet, Annemiek

    2014-06-10

    Treponemal tests for detecting syphilis should be sufficiently sensitive and specific, especially when used as the first-line method in reverse-algorithm testing. We compared the Siemens ADVIA Centaur® Syphilis assay to 2 other commercial assays in use by the Star-MDC laboratory to evaluate its performance and usability. Agreement between the Siemens ADVIA Centaur Syphilis assay, Siemens IMMULITE® 2000 Syphilis Screen, and Biokit bioelisa Syphilis 3.0 assay was evaluated using 1251 patient samples (50 from known positives, 701 from patients referred for syphilis testing, and 500 from pregnant women). Reactive samples (i.e., reactive according to at least two of the three treponemal methods) were further evaluated using Western blot IgG and IgM, and Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) testing. Overall, positive and negative agreement was 100% between the Centaur and IMMULITE assays. In this study, overall agreement was 99.92% between either of the Siemens assays and the Biokit assay; positive agreement was 99%, and negative agreement was 100%. Overall, 0.88% (11/1251) of the samples were interpreted as positive/reactive based on the combined positive results by the ADVIA Centaur, IMMULITE 2000, and bioelisa assays; a positive Euroline anti-Treponema pallidum IgM blot; and a VDRL result of ≥1:8. In this study, no false-reactive samples were identified using this method. The Centaur Syphilis assay performance is comparable to the other 2 commercial assays. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Malignant syphilis in an immunocompetent female patient*

    PubMed Central

    Requena, Camila Bueno; Orasmo, Cínthia Rosane; Ocanha, Juliana Polizel; Barraviera, Silvia Regina Catharino Sartore; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2014-01-01

    Malignant syphilis is an uncommon manifestation of secondary syphilis, in which necrotic lesions may be associated with systemic signs and symptoms. Generally it occurs in an immunosuppressed patient, mainly HIV-infected, but might be observed on those who have normal immune response. Since there is an exponential increase in the number of syphilis cases, more diagnoses of malignant syphilis must be expected. We report a case in an immunocompetent female patient. PMID:25387504

  14. Syphilis soars in Russia.

    PubMed

    Ingram, M

    1995-07-08

    The number of adults with syphilis in Russia has increased 15-fold since the collapse of the Soviet Union. The rate in children is 20 times higher than it was 4 years ago. 126,500 cases were registered with the health ministry over the past year, while 7900 were in 1990. The number of cases in children increased from 38 in 1991 to 761 this year; most of these cases were acquired via sexual transmission. Lilia Tikhonova, the health ministry's chief specialist on sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), blamed the increases on "the complete perversion of our society's morals," the rapid growth of child prostitution, the influx of homeless people and refugees into the cities, and miracle cures that are used in place of seeing a specialist. In communist Russia, patients were required to register passport details and previous sexual contacts, and future sexual contact was forbidden for a period; anyone breaking these rules faced 5 years in jail. Current law only punishes those who knowingly infect their sexual partners. Health officials in the Ukraine, where a similar increase in the number of STDs has been noted, blame black market condoms. Over the past 5 years, cheap foreign condoms have flooded the market.

  15. Annular lichenoid syphilis: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Ananta; Singal, Archana; Gupta, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Syphilis is a disease known for centuries, but still continues to be a diagnostic challenge as the myriad manifestations of secondary syphilis can mimic a lot many dermatological disorders. Lichenoid syphilis is an uncommon entity, reported only occasionally in the penicillin era. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman presenting with localized annular lichenoid lesions on the neck.

  16. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Surveillance, 2014: Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... syphilis in 2014 ( Figure 36 ). P&S Syphilis by Sex and Sex Behavior As has been observed in previous years, ... 90.8%) of P&S syphilis cases with known sex ( Figure 37 , Tables 28 and 29 ). Among men, ...

  17. 42 CFR 493.923 - Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Syphilis serology. 493.923 Section 493.923 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.923 Syphilis serology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing in syphilis serology, a...

  18. 42 CFR 493.923 - Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Syphilis serology. 493.923 Section 493.923 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.923 Syphilis serology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing in syphilis serology, a...

  19. 42 CFR 493.923 - Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Syphilis serology. 493.923 Section 493.923 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.923 Syphilis serology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing in syphilis serology, a...

  20. 42 CFR 493.923 - Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Syphilis serology. 493.923 Section 493.923 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.923 Syphilis serology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing in syphilis serology, a...

  1. Sensorineural hearing loss due to secondary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Jeans, A R; Wilkins, E G L; Bonington, A

    2008-05-01

    We present a case of sudden sensorineural hearing loss occurring as a complication of secondary syphilis. Syphilis affecting the inner ear, or otosyphilis, is well described in historical literature, but has rarely been reported in recent times. However, following the resurgence of syphilis in the UK, unusual manifestations such as otosyphilis are likely to be seen increasingly commonly.

  2. Annular lichenoid syphilis: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Ananta; Singal, Archana; Gupta, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Syphilis is a disease known for centuries, but still continues to be a diagnostic challenge as the myriad manifestations of secondary syphilis can mimic a lot many dermatological disorders. Lichenoid syphilis is an uncommon entity, reported only occasionally in the penicillin era. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman presenting with localized annular lichenoid lesions on the neck. PMID:26396452

  3. Nodular tertiary syphilis in an immunocompetent patient*

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano; de Brito, Arival Cardoso; Nascimento, Bianca Angelina Macêdodo; Carvalho, Alessandra Haber; Drago, Marion Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Acquired syphilis can be divided into primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary stages. About 25% of patients with untreated primary syphilis will develop late signs that generally occur after three to five years, with involvement of several organs. The authors present an immunocompetent female who developed a tertiary stage syphilis presenting with long-standing nodular plaques. PMID:27579755

  4. Nodular tertiary syphilis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano; Brito, Arival Cardoso de; Nascimento, Bianca Angelina Macêdodo; Carvalho, Alessandra Haber; Drago, Marion Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Acquired syphilis can be divided into primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary stages. About 25% of patients with untreated primary syphilis will develop late signs that generally occur after three to five years, with involvement of several organs. The authors present an immunocompetent female who developed a tertiary stage syphilis presenting with long-standing nodular plaques.

  5. Papulosquamous dermatitis. Syphilis: a forgotten disease?

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulou, M; Andrady, U; Lord, M G; Macfarlane, A W

    2006-12-10

    We report a case of secondary syphilis in a 54-year-old, bisexual, HIV positive man. Although syphilis is a well-known sexually-transmitted infection, it is not widely seen nowadays. However, a possible diagnosis of syphilis should not be overlooked in any individual, irrespective of HIV status.

  6. Atypical Cutaneous Manifestations in Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Ivars Lleó, M; Clavo Escribano, P; Menéndez Prieto, B

    2016-05-01

    Although the diversity of the clinical manifestations of syphilis is well-known, atypical presentations can also occur. Such atypical presentations are associated with a high risk of transmission as a result of diagnostic confusion and treatment delays owing to the disease's ability to mimic other common skin diseases, deviate from classic clinical presentations, and adopt unique forms. Cases of atypical syphilis have been described most frequently in patients with concomitant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Because the incidence of syphilis has been growing over recent years -particularly in patients with HIV co-infection- dermatologists need to be familiar with the less well-known clinical presentations of this venereal disease. Copyright © 2015 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Congenital syphilis: The continuing scourge

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Prachi G.; Joshi, Rajesh; Kharkar, Vidya D.; Bhaskar, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital syphilis is a severe, disabling infection that occurs due to the transmission of Treponema pallidum across the placenta during pregnancy or from contact with an infectious genital lesion during delivery. However, its early diagnosis is often difficult because more than half of the affected infants are asymptomatic, and the signs in symptomatic infants may be subtle and nonspecific. Although its incidence is declining, this long-forgotten disease continues to affect pregnant women, resulting in considerable perinatal morbidity and mortality. We hereby report a case of a 2-month-old infant with early congenital syphilis presenting with joint swellings and Parrot's pseudoparalysis, a comparative rarity in the present scenario. The report also stresses upon the importance of implementing the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention recommendation that all the pregnant women should be screened for syphilis in the first antenatal visit in the first trimester and again in late pregnancy. PMID:26396451

  8. Did Adolf Hitler have syphilis?

    PubMed

    Retief, F P; Wessels, A

    2005-10-01

    The evidence that Adolf Hitler might have suffered from incapacitating syphilis is reviewed. Rumors that he acquired syphilis from a prostitute at the age of 20 years, with possible re-infection during World War I, can no longer be verified. Evidence is that he was sexually rather inactive throughout his life. Suggestions that Hitler's cardiac lesion and complaints such as transitory blindness, tremor of his left arm and leg, recurring abdominal pain and a skin lesion of the leg were of syphilitic aetiology cannot be supported. Hitler's progressive mental and physical deterioration after 1942, his growing paranoia, fits of rage, grandiosity and symptoms of possible dementia would fit in neurosyphilis. There are, however, also other explanations for his terminal syndrome, and evidence that repeated clinical examinations did not show the characteristic signs of dementia paralytica or tabes dorsalis, swings the balance of probability away from tertiary syphilis.

  9. Congenital syphilis after treatment of maternal syphilis with a penicillin regimen exceeding CDC guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Conover, C S; Rend, C A; Miller, G B; Schmid, G P

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although congenital syphilis usually occurs as a result of a failure to detect and treat syphilis in pregnant women, failures of the currently recommended regimen to prevent congenital syphilis have been reported. CASE: This report describes an infant with congenital syphilis despite maternal treatment with a regimen exceeding current CDC guidelines. CONCLUSION: Regardless of the regimen used to treat syphilis during pregnancy, clinicians should recognize the possibility of occasional treatment failures and the importance of adequate follow-up of infants at risk for congenital syphilis. PMID:9785110

  10. Secondary Syphilis With Hepatitis and Nephrotic Syndrome: A Rare Concurrence.

    PubMed

    Makker, Jasbir; Bajantri, Bharat; Nayudu, Suresh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Syphilis, a chronic multisystem disease, is caused by a spirochete, Treponema pallidum. Clinical presentation may expand to several stages including primary, secondary and latent syphilis, which may present as early or late syphilis. Nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis are well-known complications of secondary syphilis. To the best of our knowledge, secondary syphilis with coexisting renal and hepatic complications has rarely been reported. Here we present a rare case of concurrent nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis in a patient with secondary syphilis.

  11. Parotitis with secondary syphilis: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Hira, S K; Hira, R S

    1984-01-01

    Painless swelling of the parotid salivary gland was observed in a patient presenting with secondary syphilis. This case is of special interest to venereologists and surgeons as parotitis associated with syphilis may be mistaken for common tumours of the parotid glands. A diagnosis of syphilitic parotitis should be considered in patients presenting with swollen parotid salivary glands in countries where syphilis is prevalent. PMID:6704695

  12. Analytical and clinical comparison of Elecsys syphilis (Roche(®)) - Architect syphilis TP and reformulated Architect syphilis TP (Abbott(®)) assay.

    PubMed

    De Keukeleire, Steven; Desmet, Stefanie; Lagrou, Katrien; Oosterlynck, Julie; Verhulst, Manon; Van Besien, Jessica; Saegeman, Veroniek; Reynders, Marijke

    2017-03-01

    The performance of Elecsys Syphilis was compared to Architect Syphilis TP and Reformulated Architect Syphilis TP. The overall sensitivity and specificity were 98.4% and 99.5%, 97.7% and 97.1%, and 99.2% and 99.7% respectively. The assays are comparable and considered adequate for syphilis screening.

  13. OCULAR SYPHILIS IN A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT

    PubMed Central

    ROMAO, Elen A.; BOLELLA, Valdes R.; NARDIN, Maria Estela P.; HABIB-SIMAO, Maria Lucia; FURTADO, João Marcelo; MOYSES-NETO, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of ocular syphilis after a renal transplantation involving progressive vision loss without clinically identifiable ocular disease. Electroretinography showed signs of ischemia, especially in the internal retina. A serological test was positive for syphilis. Lumbar puncture revealed lymphocytic meningitis and a positive serologic test for syphilis in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was treated with penicillin, and had a quick vision improvement. In the case of transplant recipients, clinicians should always consider the diagnosis of ocular syphilis in cases with unexplained visual acuity decrement, as this condition may cause serious complications if not treated. PMID:27253748

  14. Periungual Lesion due to Secondary Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Leandro; Gioia Di Chiacchio, Nilton; Cury Rezende, Flávia; Di Chiacchio, Nilton

    2017-01-01

    Several countries experience a new epidemic of syphilis, mainly due to the changes in risk behaviors. Dermatologists play an important role in the diagnosis, since cutaneous manifestations are frequent during disease progression. We report a rare case of secondary syphilis with periungual involvement. Syphilis, especially in the secondary form, may present with different clinical features, affecting different organs, and mimicking many diseases. Although nail apparatus lesions are more common in the primary form of the disease, they may also be present in the secondary and tertiary forms. Therefore, a comprehensive knowledge of the diverse forms of syphilis presentation is important for an early diagnosis and timely treatment. PMID:28232918

  15. Periungual Lesion due to Secondary Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Leandro; Gioia Di Chiacchio, Nilton; Cury Rezende, Flávia; Di Chiacchio, Nilton

    2017-01-01

    Several countries experience a new epidemic of syphilis, mainly due to the changes in risk behaviors. Dermatologists play an important role in the diagnosis, since cutaneous manifestations are frequent during disease progression. We report a rare case of secondary syphilis with periungual involvement. Syphilis, especially in the secondary form, may present with different clinical features, affecting different organs, and mimicking many diseases. Although nail apparatus lesions are more common in the primary form of the disease, they may also be present in the secondary and tertiary forms. Therefore, a comprehensive knowledge of the diverse forms of syphilis presentation is important for an early diagnosis and timely treatment.

  16. Alopecia as the Presenting Symptom of Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Ornelas, Jennifer; Agbai, Oma N; Kiuru, Maija; Sivamani, Raja K

    2015-07-15

    Alopecia can be one of the many symptoms of secondary syphilis and the clinical presentations include essential syphilitic alopecia or symptomatic syphilitic alopecia. In this report, we present a case of a patient with essential syphilitic alopecia whose sole presenting symptom of syphilis was alopecia. Despite an initial negative rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, he was ultimately found to have syphilis on scalp biopsy. His alopecia improved following treatment with benzathine penicillin. This presentation serves as a reminder to clinicians to be cognizant of alopecia as a presenting sign of syphilis. A review of the specificity and sensitivity of the typical tests used for the diagnosis is presented.

  17. 42 CFR 493.923 - Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing in syphilis serology, a program... value. After the target value has been established for each response, the appropriateness of the... quantitative syphilis serology tests is the target value ±1 dilution. (3) The criterion for...

  18. [Syphilis and pregnancy: study of 94 cases].

    PubMed

    de la Calle, María; Cruceyra, Mireia; de Haro, Mar; Magdaleno, Fernando; Montero, María Dolores; Aracil, Javier; González, Antonio

    2013-08-17

    To study the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment strategies and perinatal outcomes of gestational syphilis. We performed a retrospective study of 94 pregnant women with syphilis whose gestation and delivery were monitored in a Department of Obstetrics from 2002 to 2010 among a total of 85,806 births of women without syphilis in the same period. The prevalence of gestational syphilis was 0.11%. Most of the women were foreign and the most prevalent type was late latent syphilis. Only 57 patients underwent right treatment despite adequate prescription. Maternal complications were confirmed in 31 pregnant women and 16 cases had fetal complications. We diagnosed 4 cases of neonatal syphilis, 3 of them with syphilitic meningitis, whose mothers had not completed the treatment correctly. The implementation of a mandatory syphilis serology in the pregnancy has enabled us to diagnose many cases of late latent syphilis. The successful completion of treatment must be ensured to prevent vertical transmission. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. [Injury by skull osteolytic secundary syphilis].

    PubMed

    Alessandro, Lucas; Camporro, Julieta Piar; Arakaki, Naomi; Orellana, Nora; Mora, Claudia Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Bone involvement of syphilis can be observed in tertiary and congenital syphilis. It is infrequent during the secondary stage. The skull is the most affected bone in secondary syphilis, and its most frequent form of presentation is proliferative osteitis. If the skull is affected, headache is usual and can be as intense as in meningitis. Osteolyitic lesions may be seen in complimentary imaging studies, with a moth eaten aspect. These lesions raise concern over a number of differential diagnoses, among which are infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. The definitive diagnosis is made by bone biopsy of the compromised bone. Molecular techniques in the affected tissues increases diagnostic performance. There is no standardized treatment protocol for syphilis since there are no guidelines available. We report a case of a 19 year old female, presenting with a unique osteolytic lesion in the skull due to secondary syphilis.

  20. Should all pregnant women be screened for syphilis?

    PubMed

    Buvé, Anne

    2007-09-01

    In industrialized countries, the incidence of syphilis has decreased dramatically since the discovery of penicillin in the 1940s. However, syphilis and congenital syphilis are far from eradicated, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Syphilis in pregnant women is a cause of adverse pregnancy outcomes that can be prevented by screening for syphilis and early treatment in pregnancy. Several studies have found screening of pregnant women for syphilis to be a highly cost-effective intervention, even if the prevalence of syphilis is low. Obstacles to universal screening of pregnant women include low awareness of syphilis and low quality of antenatal care and healthcare in general in many low- and middle-income countries. For these settings, we need simpler and more reliable serological tests for syphilis, but we also need to strengthen health services in general to ensure sustainable antenatal care services to ensure sustainability of syphilis screening programmes.

  1. Hallmarks in history of syphilis therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Karamanou, Marianna; Kyriakis, Kyriakos; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Androutsos, George

    2013-12-01

    At the end of the 15th century syphilis appeared in Europe as a devastating epidemic. For nearly four centuries mercury was regarded as a remedy of first-rate importance along with guaiac and potassium iodide. In the early 20th century, two new substances were added to syphilis therapeutics, namely arsenobenzol and bismuth. The absence of treponemal serum tests and the erroneous attribution of the positive Wassermann reaction exclusively to Treponema pallidum infection resulted in prolonged and non-proven effective treatments. In 1943 John Mahoney introduced penicillin, revolutionizing the treatment of syphilis.

  2. [Syphilis: a STD back to us].

    PubMed

    Flagothier, C; Arrese, J E; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    2004-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) show frequent epidemiological changes. We report a case of secondary syphilis diagnosed in a 32-year old woman during post-partum. The disease, although showing a typical presentation, raises the problem of dating with precision the contamination time. This is of importance for treating the newborn at risk of congenital syphilis. We highlight the constant attention that should be brought to disclose this venereal disease that shows so variable clinical and histological presentations. Syphilis seems on the rise in the Mosan valley and in some cities where prostitution is imported from Eastern Europe and Africa.

  3. Syphilis surveillance and trends of the syphilis epidemic in Germany since the mid-90s.

    PubMed

    Marcus, U; Bremer, V; Hamouda, O

    2004-12-01

    Recent surveillance reports from Europe and the United States show an increase in syphilis cases. Accurate epidemiological information about the distribution of syphilis is important for targeting screening and intervention programmes. The German syphilis notification system changed in 2001 from physician to laboratory-based reporting, which is complemented by a newly introduced sexually transmitted infection (STI) sentinel system. After reaching an all time low during the 1990s, syphilis notifications have increased significantly since 2001, coinciding with the introduction of the new reporting system. However, the increased reported incidence is reflecting a true rise in the number of cases and is not predominantly determined by more underreporting through the previous reporting system. The increase reflects syphilis outbreaks among men who have sex with men (MSM). The first of these outbreaks was observed in Hamburg in 1997. In 2003, incidence in men was ten times higher than in women. An estimated 75% of syphilis cases are currently diagnosed among MSM. A high proportion (according to sentinel data, up to 50%) of MSM diagnosed with syphilis are HIV positive. The continuously high number of syphilis cases diagnosed among heterosexuals in Germany in recent years compared with other western European countries may reflect the higher population movement between Germany and syphilis high incidence regions in south-east and eastern Europe.

  4. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study and women's health.

    PubMed

    Gamble, V N

    1997-01-01

    In May 1997, President Bill Clinton apologized for the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. The President's action underscores that in the 25 years since its public revelation, the study has moved from a singular historical event to a powerful metaphor that symbolizes racism in medicine, misconduct in human research, the arrogance of physicians, and government abuse of black people. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study also has implications for women's health. Discussion of the study usually ignores its impact on the wives of the victims. In addition, African-American women may be more reluctant to participate in clinical trials because of the shadow cast by the syphilis study and other incidents of medical abuse. Finally, the Tuskegee Syphilis Study reminds us that the battle against racism must be an integral part of the campaign to improve women's health.

  5. Can HIV Drugs Boost Syphilis Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 17, 2017 MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Gay and bisexual men taking antiretroviral drugs to treat ... why new and repeat cases of syphilis in gay and bisexual men have risen sharply compared to ...

  6. Oral syphilis: a series of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Moritz; Matter, Daniel; Schmidt-Westhausen, Andrea M; Bornstein, Michael M

    2014-02-01

    Syphilis is an infectious, usually sexually transmitted, disease caused by Treponema pallidum, subspecies pallidum. Because of the increasing prevalence in Europe during the past few years, dentists could be confronted with patients with oral manifestations of syphilis. Because oral lesions are highly contagious, it is vital to make the correct diagnosis quickly to initiate the proper therapy and to interrupt the chain of infection. We present the cases of 5 patients with syphilis-related oral lesions. These cases are representative because of their clinical presentation, age, and gender distribution and the diagnostic approach. The aim of the present report is to emphasize the importance of the dentist knowing and identifying syphilis in different stages to diagnose the disease and institute treatment at an early stage.

  7. [Reached multifocal secondary syphilis: A case presentation].

    PubMed

    Campana, F; Carvelli, J; Fricain, J C; Vergier, B; Boralevi, F; Kaplanski, G

    2016-04-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) related to Treponema pallidum. Secondary syphilis is the blood-borne systemic spread of Treponema. We report the case of secondary syphilis in a patient without risk of STIs factor. The clinical picture began with a genital affection followed by oral erosions and ulcers and an anterior and then posterior uveitis. Serology established the diagnosis and intravenous penicillin G treatment allowed for healing. Called the "great pretender" because of its clinical polymorphism, secondary syphilis can lead to formidable neurological and ophthalmological complications. Serological diagnosis is based on the use of treponemal and a nontreponemal tests. Penicillin G remains the treatment of choice and must be adapted according to the clinical damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Early syphilis affects markers of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kotsafti, Ourania; Paparizos, Vassilios; Kourkounti, Sofia; Chatziioannou, Argiro; Nicolaidou, Electra; Kapsimali, Violetta; Antoniou, Christina

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if early syphilis infection affects markers of HIV infection; CD4 T cells and viral load (VL). A retrospective study was performed on 160 HIV-positive patients (111 receiving antiretroviral therapy [ART] and 49 without ART). Early syphilis diagnosis was made in HIV patients during their follow-up at the HIV/AIDS Unit at a Greek Dermatology and Venereology Unit. The patients' blood tests were available at the time of diagnosis, as well as before and 12 weeks after early syphilis diagnosis. CD4 T cell counts and VL levels were measured. It was found that syphilis infection had a negative impact on the CD4 T cell counts in both groups, with reduced CD4 T cell counts observed in 84.6% (99/111) and 79.5% (39/49) of patients receiving and not receiving ART, respectively. After treatment for syphilis, CD4 T cell counts returned to pre-treatment levels in most patients, especially those receiving ART. There was a slight and transient VL increase. Patients receiving ART had a 27% increase in VL, compared to 71.4% among patients not receiving ART. Although the VL increase was slight (41-14,000 copies/ml) in the group under treatment, 4-5% (5/111) patients did not return to pre-treatment levels. Moreover, viral mutations associated with treatment resistance were identified in these patients. Early syphilis accelerates and complicates the progression of HIV infection. Early diagnosis and treatment of syphilis may prevent infection-associated complications in most instances. Consequently, prevention of syphilis and other sexually transmitted infections is of great importance for patients infected with HIV. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Syphilis presenting as the 'blue toe syndrome'.

    PubMed

    Federman, D G; Valdivia, M; Kirsner, R S

    1994-05-09

    The abrupt development of cyanotic and painful toes, "the blue toe syndrome," has been attributed to a number of medical conditions. We describe a patient in which the workup for this condition failed to elucidate a typical cause. Skin biopsy, serologic findings, and response to treatment led to the diagnosis of secondary syphilis. Our experience indicates that secondary syphilis should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with the blue toe syndrome.

  10. Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prepare Your Application Draft Specific Aims Outline Your Experiments Know Your Audience Write Your Research Plan Plan ... Applications Requesting Prior Clinical Trial Planning Application Vertebrate Animals Research Animals Involvement Codes Select Agents NIAID Select ...

  11. Syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems with your nervous system, including: Stroke Meningitis Hearing loss Visual problems Dementia Loss of pain and temperature sensations Sexual dysfunction in men (impotence) Bladder incontinence Sudden, lightning-like pains Cardiovascular problems These may include ...

  12. Secondary Syphilis With Hepatitis and Nephrotic Syndrome: A Rare Concurrence

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Jasbir; Bajantri, Bharat; Nayudu, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis, a chronic multisystem disease, is caused by a spirochete, Treponema pallidum. Clinical presentation may expand to several stages including primary, secondary and latent syphilis, which may present as early or late syphilis. Nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis are well-known complications of secondary syphilis. To the best of our knowledge, secondary syphilis with coexisting renal and hepatic complications has rarely been reported. Here we present a rare case of concurrent nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis in a patient with secondary syphilis. PMID:27298666

  13. Syphilis consequences and implications in delayed diagnosis: five cases of secondary syphilis presenting with ocular symptoms.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Eavan G; Hogan, Aideen; Kilmartin, Dara; McNally, Cora; Bergin, Colm

    2010-12-01

    Ocular manifestations of syphilis are uncommon. Five cases of ocular syphilis are presented, in four of which there was a delay in diagnosis. Four of the patients were men who have sex with men (MSM), and four patients were HIV negative.

  14. Neuro syphilis: Portrayals by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, O

    2009-01-01

    The developments in neuro syphilis in the 19 th century are integral parts of the history of psychiatry. The delineation of various aspects of neuro syphilis by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in three of his stories is discussed in brief.

  15. Syphilis hospitalisations in Portugal over the last decade.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Pinto, B; Freitas, A; Lisboa, C

    2016-02-01

    Although several studies have reported an increase of syphilis incidence over the last decade in Western Europe, information concerning syphilis epidemiology in Portugal remains scarce. Therefore, we sought to characterise acquired syphilis-associated hospitalisations in Portugal according to demographic and clinical data. We used a database containing all hospitalisations that occurred in mainland Portugal public hospitals with discharges between 2000 and 2014. We analysed all hospitalisations associated with ICD-9-CM codes 091-097.x (corresponding to acquired syphilis diagnosis) concerning inpatients' gender, age and comorbidities. The median length of stay and in-hospital mortality rates were also studied. Between 2000 and 2014, there were a total of 8974 syphilis-related hospitalisations in mainland Portugal. The rate of acquired syphilis hospitalisations per 100,000 inhabitants increased by 33 % during the studied period. Syphilis hospitalisation rates increased by 70 % in males and 139 % among patients aged over 55 years. On the other hand, they declined by 10 % in females and 20 % among patients younger than 55 years old. The percentage of syphilis episodes presenting cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric comorbidities increased, while the percentage of syphilis episodes presenting HIV co-infection decreased by 69 %. A fatal outcome was reported in 5 % of episodes; 4.6 % of them had acquired syphilis as the main reason for hospitalisation. This study illustrates that, despite being a preventable infection, syphilis remains a public health problem. The analysis of hospitalisation and administrative data helps to understand syphilis epidemiology and provides a supplement to traditional case notifications.

  16. Syphilis on the rise: A prolonged syphilis outbreak among HIV-infected patients in Northern Greece

    PubMed Central

    Tsachouridou, Olga; Skoura, Lemonia; Christaki, Eirini; Kollaras, Panagiotis; Sidiropoulou, Eleni; Zebekakis, Pantelis; Vakirlis, Efstratios; Margariti, Apostolia; Metallidis, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are a major public health issue in Europe. Numerous outbreaks of syphilis have been described recently and an increased prevalence of high-risk sexual practices has raised concern about the transmission of HIV and other STDs. Similarly, an increase in sexually transmitted infections has been recorded in Northern Greece. Methods This report describes a recent outbreak of syphilis in people living with HIV. The demographic, clinical, and serologic data of HIV patients diagnosed with syphilis were recorded and analyzed. Data on syphilis incidence from the general population was also compared to HIV patients’ data. Results Fifty-eight HIV-patients of the Infectious Diseases Unit of a tertiary hospital (5.2%) were diagnosed with syphilis during a three-year period (2008-2010). Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and coexistence of other STDs were independent predictors of syphilis (OR: 2.4, 95CI%: 1.26, 4.63, p=0.008; OR: 9.4, 95%CI: 4.49, 19.64, p<0.001, respectively). Origin from a country other than Greece (p=0.005), and homosexual contact (p=0.003), were separate risk factors for syphilis in the general population in the same area. Conclusion Diagnosis of a sexually transmitted disease in an HIV patient is a crucial clinical event that should trigger the clinician’s suspicion for high-risk sexual behavior. Sexual health assessments should be a routine process for HIV patients. PMID:27622160

  17. Cross-reactivity between Lyme and syphilis screening assays: Lyme disease does not cause false-positive syphilis screens.

    PubMed

    Patriquin, Glenn; LeBlanc, Jason; Heinstein, Charles; Roberts, Catherine; Lindsay, Robbin; Hatchette, Todd F

    2016-03-01

    Increased rates of Lyme disease and syphilis in the same geographic area prompted an assessment of screening test cross-reactivity. This study supports the previously described cross-reactivity of Lyme screening among syphilis-positive sera and reports evidence against the possibility of false-positive syphilis screening tests resulting from previous Borrelia burgdorferi infection.

  18. Shakespeare's chancre: did the bard have syphilis?

    PubMed

    Ross, John J

    2005-02-01

    Shakespeare's obsessive interest in syphilis, his clinically exact knowledge of its manifestations, the final poems of the sonnets, and contemporary gossip all suggest that he was infected with "the infinite malady." The psychological impact of venereal disease may explain the misogyny and revulsion from sex so prominent in the writings of Shakespeare's tragic period. This article examines the possibility that Shakespeare received successful treatment for syphilis and advances the following new hypothesis: Shakespeare's late-life decrease in artistic production, tremor, social withdrawal, and alopecia were due to mercury poisoning from syphilis treatment. He may also have had anasarca due to mercury-related membranous nephropathy. This medical misadventure may have prematurely ended the career of the greatest writer in the English language.

  19. Bone lesions in early congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, E U; Solomon, A

    1976-01-31

    A radiological study of bone changes in 112 children with congenital syphilis was undertaken. A similar number of normal children acted as a control group. Radiological examination of 5 syphilitic children showed that their bones were normal. Combined metaphyseal and periosteal lesions were the commonest bone disorders seen and are thus the most convincing radiological evidence of congenital syphilis. Transverse metaphyseal lucencies occur early in the disease, and with Wimburger's sign they are the prime evidence of pathology in syphilitic bone. Other radiographic changes are probably owing to minimal trauma in fragile disorganized bone. The occurrence of periosteal lesions alone has also been evaluated.

  20. Syphilis and HIV/Syphilis Co-infection Among Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM) in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Isabel; Johnson, Ayesha; Reina-Ortiz, Miguel; Rosas, Carlos; Sharma, Vinita; Teran, Santiago; Naik, Eknath; Salihu, Hamisu M; Teran, Enrique; Izurieta, Ricardo

    2016-12-05

    There is a reemergence of syphilis in the Latin American and Caribbean region. There is also very little information about HIV/Syphilis co-infection and its determinants. The aim of this study is to investigate knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding sexually transmitted infections (STIs), in particular syphilis infection and HIV/Syphilis co-infection, as well as to estimate the prevalence of syphilis among men who have sex with men (MSM) in a city with one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in Ecuador. In this study, questionnaires were administered to 291 adult MSM. Questions included knowledge about STIs and their sexual practices. Blood samples were taken from participants to estimate the prevalence of syphilis and HIV/syphilis co-infection. In this population, the prevalence of HIV/syphilis co-infection was 4.8%, while the prevalence of syphilis as mono-infection was 6.5%. Participants who had syphilis mono-infection and HIV/syphilis co-infection were older. Men who had multiple partners and those who were forced to have sex had increased odds of syphilis and HIV/syphilis co-infection. A high prevalence of syphilis and self-reported STI was observed, which warrants targeted behavioral interventions. Co-infections are a cause for concern when treating a secondary infection in a person who is immunocompromised. These data suggest that specific knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among MSM are associated with increased odds of STIs (including HIV/syphilis co-infections) in this region of Ecuador.

  1. Syphilis in the United States: on the rise?

    PubMed

    Peterman, Thomas A; Su, John; Bernstein, Kyle T; Weinstock, Hillard

    2015-02-01

    Syphilis rates and trends vary by population subgroup. Among men who have sex with men (MSM), rates of primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis are high throughout the USA (228.8 per 100,000 in 2013). P&S syphilis among women is much less common (0.9 per 100,000 in 2013) and occurs in isolated outbreaks plus in a few counties with persistent low levels of infection. Congenital syphilis trends closely follow P&S trends among women. These trends have implications for prevention. Routine screening among MSM can prevent tertiary syphilis, but despite interventions, rates of infection continue to rise among MSM and will soon approach those last seen in 1982 (estimate: 340.7 per 100,000). Control of syphilis among women is possible and important because it often leads to congenital syphilis. Outbreaks among heterosexuals can be halted by intensive screening, treatment and partner notification.

  2. [Maternal syphilis and congenital syphilis in Latin America: big problem, simple solution].

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Julia; Zacarías, Fernando; Mazin, Rafael

    2004-09-01

    From the data submitted to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) by nationwide programs against sexually transmitted diseases (STD), HIV infection, and AIDS (2002), one can estimate the overall prevalence of syphilis among pregnant women to be 3.1% and to range from 1.00% in Peru to 6.21% in Paraguay. According to these data, the incidence of congenital syphilis ranges from 1.4 per 1000 live births in El Salvador to 12.0 per 1000 live births in Honduras. Among men who engage in sex with other men, who often classify themselves as heterosexual, as well as in female sex workers, the prevalence of syphilis ranged from 5% to 15%. Factors that determine the persistence of congenital syphilis as public health problem include a lack of awareness of the seriousness of the problem among politicians, health officials, and health care providers, difficult access to prenatal care, and screening services, a low demand for the test among users, and the stigma and discrimination that surround sexually transmitted diseases (STD). This paper seeks to focus the attention of health professionals on maternal and congenital syphilis so they will undertake actions, using an interprogrammatic approach, to eliminate congenital syphilis from Latin America and the Caribbean. Eliminating congenital syphilis will only become possible if interventions targeting vulnerable groups are also implemented. PAHO's role in eliminating congenital syphilis includes determining the baseline situation in the Region as a whole and in each country, developing communication and procurement strategies, supporting nationwide programs, promoting operational research, and facilitating interprogrammatic coordination.

  3. Ocular Syphilis - Eight Jurisdictions, United States, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Sara E; Aubin, Mark; Atwell, Leah; Matthias, James; Cope, Anna; Mobley, Victoria; Goode, Alexandra; Minnerly, Sydney; Stoltey, Juliet; Bauer, Heidi M; Hennessy, Robin R; DiOrio, Dawne; Fanfair, Robyn Neblett; Peterman, Thomas A; Markowitz, Lauri

    2016-11-04

    Ocular syphilis, a manifestation of Treponema pallidum infection, can cause a variety of ocular signs and symptoms, including eye redness, blurry vision, and vision loss. Although syphilis is nationally notifiable, ocular manifestations are not reportable to CDC. Syphilis rates have increased in the United States since 2000. After ocular syphilis clusters were reported in early 2015, CDC issued a clinical advisory (1) in April 2015 and published a description of the cases in October 2015 (2). Because of concerns about an increase in ocular syphilis, eight jurisdictions (California, excluding Los Angeles and San Francisco, Florida, Indiana, Maryland, New York City, North Carolina, Texas, and Washington) reviewed syphilis surveillance and case investigation data from 2014, 2015, or both to ascertain syphilis cases with ocular manifestations. A total of 388 suspected ocular syphilis cases were identified, 157 in 2014 and 231 in 2015. Overall, among total syphilis surveillance cases in the jurisdictions evaluated, 0.53% in 2014 and 0.65% in 2015 indicated ocular symptoms. Five jurisdictions described an increase in suspected ocular syphilis cases in 2014 and 2015. The predominance of cases in men (93%), proportion of those who are men who have sex with men (MSM), and percentage who are HIV-positive (51%) are consistent with the epidemiology of syphilis in the United States. It is important for clinicians to be aware of potential visual complications related to syphilis infections. Prompt identification of potential ocular syphilis, ophthalmologic evaluation, and appropriate treatment are critical to prevent or manage visual symptoms and sequelae of ocular syphilis.

  4. Origin and evolution of syphilis: drifting myth.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Verma, Prashant; Chatterjee, Kingshuk; Chaudhuri, Anita; Chatterjee, Gautam; Rasool, Farhan

    2012-01-01

    The venereal form of treponematosis, caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum, plagued every major city in the preantibiotic era. "Civilization means syphilization," was an idea touted by Richard von Krafft-Ebing in the late 19th, and early 20th centuries that the effects of modern life make men more susceptible to syphilis and other diseases. Christopher Columbus was thought of as an importer of syphilis to Europe. Because his serendipitous voyages to the New World initiated the process of Spanish colonization, which foreshadowed general European colonization of the New World, it is difficult to rule out the cultural and political animosity created by Columbus and his men. These recent revelations are intriguing and may create dialogue that may subsequently challenge the age-old theory of "East to West" spread of venereal syphilis. This contribution warrants the continuation of study in this direction, taking into account skeletal studies that utilized radiocarbon dating technique and the phylogenetic analysis of the bacterial strains, offering a possible consensus on the origin and evolution of syphilis.

  5. Persistent serum immune complexes in syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Engel, S; Diezel, W

    1980-01-01

    Serum immune complexes were estimated by a polyethylene glycol precipitation method in 51 patients with early syphilis. The immune complexes were increased in 41% of patients before treatment and decreased to normal limits in only 56% during treatment. The results of the specific antireponemal tests using dissolved immune complexes show that antibodies from the immune complexes are specific antibodies. PMID:7427696

  6. Forgotten but Not Gone! Syphilis Induced Tenosynovitis

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, David; Walton, Mollie; Nagabandi, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Tenosynovitis, inflammation of a tendon and its synovial sheath, is a rare manifestation of secondary syphilis and if diagnosed early is reversible. Background. A 52-year-old male with past medical history of untreated syphilis presented with gradual onset of swelling and pain of the right fourth metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP). He reported a history of painless penile lesions after having sexual intercourse with a new partner approximately five months ago which was treated with sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. An RPR done at that time came back positive with a high titer; however, patient was lost to follow-up. On examination, patient had an edematous, nonerythematous right fourth proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint. Urgent irrigation, debridement, and exploration of the right hand into the tendon sheath were performed. With his history of syphillis, an RPR was done, which was reactive with a titer of 1 : 64. A confirmatory FTA-ABS test was completed, rendering a positive result. Based on his history of untreated syphilis, dormancy followed by clinical scenario of swelling of the right fourth finger, and a high RPR titer, he was diagnosed with secondary syphilis manifesting as tenosynovitis. PMID:28050292

  7. Primary syphilis cases in Guangdong Province 1995-2008: Opportunities for linking syphilis control and regional development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Syphilis cases have risen in many parts of China, with developed regions reporting the greatest share of cases. Since syphilis increases in these areas are likely driven by both increased screening and changes in sexual behaviours, distinguishing between these two factors is important. Examining municipal-level primary syphilis cases with spatial analysis allows a more direct understanding of changing sexual behaviours at a more policy-relevant level. Methods In this study we examined all reported primary syphilis cases from Guangdong Province, a southern province in China, since the disease was first incorporated into the mandatory reporting system in 1995. Spatial autocorrelation statistics were used to correlate municipal-level clustering of reported primary syphilis cases and gross domestic product (GDP). Results A total of 52,036 primary syphilis cases were reported over the period 1995-2008, and the primary syphilis cases increased from 0.88 per 100,000 population in 1995 to 7.61 per 100,000 in 2008. The Pearl River Delta region has a disproportionate share (44.7%) of syphilis cases compared to other regions. Syphilis cases were spatially clustered (p = 0.01) and Moran's I analysis found that syphilis cases were clustered in municipalities with higher GDP (p = 0.004). Conclusions Primary syphilis cases continue to increase in Guangdong Province, especially in the Pearl River Delta region. Considering the economic impact of syphilis and its tendency to spatially cluster, expanded syphilis testing in specific municipalities and further investigating the costs and benefits of syphilis screening are critical next steps. PMID:21192782

  8. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus secondary to syphilis infection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiaqiang; Hu, Chaohui; Zheng, Fenping; Cheng, Hao; Xuan, Junli; Li, Hong

    2013-07-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is caused by partial or complete renal resistance to the effects of antidiuretic hormone. Acquired NDI can be caused by electrolyte imbalances (eg, hypercalcemia), renal/extrarenal diseases (eg, chronic pyelonephritis), and drugs (eg, lithium toxicity). Syphilis has never been reported to cause NDI. The aim of this study was to report the case of a 56-year-old man with NDI secondary to syphilis. The 56-year-old patient presented with polyuria and polydipsia lasting more than 40 days. His urine specific gravity was 1.002. He had no history of chronic kidney disease or contact with toxicants. He had normal blood glucose levels. A water-deprivation test and vasopressin administration indicated NDI. His rapid plasma reagin titer was 1:128. The serum Treponema pallidum-particle agglutination test was positive. He reported engaging in unprotected, extramarital sex 6 months before polydipsia onset and thereafter developing a skin lesion on the external genitalia and arthralgia, both of which resolved spontaneously. Examination of renal biopsy specimens showed abundant plasmacytic and lymphocytic infiltration of the interstitium and low and flat tubular epithelial cells, indicating renal tubular injury. Silver staining revealed T. pallidum-like organisms. Immunohistochemical analysis with T. pallidum-specific antibody confirmed the presence of treponemes. The patient received 2.4 million U of benzathine penicillin im once a week for 3 weeks. His urine output gradually reduced; he recovered 1 month later. His urine specific gravity was 1.026, and his syphilis rapid plasma reagin titer was 1:8. Syphilis can cause NDI. The manifestations of syphilis and causes of acquired NDI are diverse.

  9. [A case of secondary syphilis with hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Tanyel, Esra; Taşdelen Fişgin, Nuriye; Sarikaya Genç, Hanife; Tülek, Necla

    2007-04-01

    Hepatitis is a rare clinical manifestation of syphilis. In this report a 50 years old male patient who was diagnosed as secondary syphilis presenting with hepatitis has been discussed. The patient was admitted to the hospital with high fever and skin rash, and his history revealed a suspected sexual contact. He indicated that he had been admitted to a health center eight months ago because of the presence of a penile wound, however VDRL (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory) test was negative at that time. Fever (39.5 degrees C), jaundice in skin and sclera, generalized macular and maculopapular skin rash including palms and soles, lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly were detected in physical examination. Laboratory tests yielded elevated erythrocyte sedimantation rate, high CRP levels and elevated liver enzyme levels, however viral hepatitis markers together with VDRL and TPHA (Treponema pallidum hemagglutination) tests were found negative. Ceftriaxone therapy was initiated because of the presence of high fever (40 degrees C) and 30 leukocyte/mm3 in urine, and the absence of bacteria in Gram staining of urine sample. However, the antibiotic therapy was discontinued since fever persisted. As the clinical signs and symptoms strongly indicated syphilis, the serological tests were repeated and VDRL positivity at 1/8 and TPHA positivity at 1/1280 titers were detected. Ceftriaxone therapy was restarted and continued for 14 days with complete cure. Since the spouse of the patient was also found VDRL and TPHA positive, she was treated with penicilin. The presentation of this case emphasized the importance of repeating the serological tests for syphilis since they might be negative in the early stages of infection. The case also indicates that syphilis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hepatitis.

  10. Syphilis in immigrants and the Canadian immigration medical examination.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, Douglas W; Gushulak, Brian D

    2008-02-01

    Immigrants to Canada must undergo screening for syphilis. This study presents the results of syphilis screening from 2000 to 2004 and describes its impact on Canadian syphilis reporting and epidemiology. The study identifies migrant groups at risk of syphilis disease. All permanent resident applicants 15 years of age or older; younger individuals who have syphilis risk factors, and long-term temporary resident applicants are required to have non-treponemal syphilis screening done. Reactive results were confirmed. Immigration-related syphilis screening results were analyzed for year, migrant origin, migrant age and classification. A total of 2,209 individuals were found with positive syphilis serology from the screening of 2,001,417 applicants. The sex ratio of positive cases was M:F = 1.4. Rates per 100,000 applicants were: refugees 286, refugee claimants 267, family class 187, temporary residents 85, and economic class 63. Age and geographic distribution reflected sexual transmission, known international prevalence, and the Canadian processes of immigration. Certain immigration class applicants from syphilis high-prevalence source countries are a significant source of syphilis notifications in Canada. Identifiable populations and the immigration application medical processes represent global public health policy and program opportunities at the national level.

  11. THE IMMUNOPATHOBIOLOGY OF SYPHILIS: THE MANIFESTATIONS AND COURSE OF SYPHILIS ARE DETERMINED BY THE LEVEL OF DELAYED-TYPE HYPERSENSITIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, J. Andrew; Dabiri, Ganary; Cribier, Bernard; Sell, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    Syphilis has plagued mankind for centuries and is currently resurgent in the Western hemisphere. While there has been a significant reduction of tertiary disease, and recognition of facilitative interactions with HIV infection, the natural history of syphilis has remained largely unchanged; thus, new strategies are required to more effectively combat this pathogen. The immunopathologic features of experimental syphilis in the rabbit; the course, stages, and pathology of human syphilis; and a comparison of human syphilis with leprosy suggest that the clinical course of syphilis and its tissue manifestations are determined by the balance between delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and humoral immunity to the causative agent, Treponema pallidum. A strong DTH response is associated with clearance of the infecting organisms in a well-developed chancre, whereas a cytotoxic T-cell response or strong humoral antibody response is associated with prolonged infection and progression to tertiary disease. Many of the protean symptoms/appearances of secondary and tertiary human syphilis are manifestations of immune reactions that fail to clear the organism, due to a lack of recruitment and more importantly, activation of macrophages by sensitized CD4 T-cells. The Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) vaccination can enhance DTH and has been shown to produce a low, but measurable beneficial effect in the prevention of leprosy, a disease that shows a disease spectrum with characteristics in common with syphilis. In the prevention of syphilis, a potential vaccine protective against syphilis should be designed to augment the DTH response. PMID:21694502

  12. EXPERIMENTAL SYPHILIS IN THE RABBIT

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Wade H.; Pearce, Louise

    1920-01-01

    From the study of a large series of rabbits with outspoken manifestations of generalized syphilis, lesions of the skin and appendages were found to constitute one of the largest and most varied groups of such affections. The conditions noted consisted of alopecias, onychia and paronychia, and lesions of the skin proper. It was found to be a matter of some difficulty to make a positive diagnosis of syphilitic alopecia, but there were three and possibly four conditions which appeared to be attributable to such an infection. The first of these took the form of a general or local roughening of the coat with falling of the hair which produced the typical moth-eaten appearance associated with syphilitic alopecia in the human subject. A second form of alopecia was essentially an abnormal looseness of the hair which permitted large areas of the body to be completely denuded. The third type of alopecia was associated with definite skin changes, and the hair was readily removable together with an adherent mass of epithelial scales. Paronychia was comparatively rare but was readily recognized by a characteristic infiltration and exfoliation of the skin about the base of the nails. The incidence of onychia is uncertain. Late in the course of the investigation it was found that alterations in the nails which were not entirely characteristic in themselves might occur in consequence of a syphilitic involvement of the nail beds which could not be detected by ordinary methods of examination. The cases which were recognized as syphilitic were those which showed an associated paronychia. Lesions of the skin were found to be one of the most frequent manifestations of a generalized infection in the rabbit. These lesions were divided into three classes: first, granulomatous lesions, second, infiltrations, and third, erythemata. The granulomata were lesions of a fleshy character which tended to grow to a very large size and presented all the characteristics of circumscribed primary

  13. Syphilis presenting as retinal detachment and orchitis in a young man with HIV.

    PubMed

    Yogo, Norihiro; Nichol, Aran Cunningham; Campbell, Thomas B; Erlandson, Kristine M

    2014-02-01

    Retinal detachment and testicular lesions are 2 rare presentations of syphilis. We describe a man with bilateral retinal detachment from ocular syphilis and syphilitic orchitis as a manifestation of syphilis and HIV coinfection.

  14. Prevalence of syphilis in pregnancy and prenatal syphilis testing in Brazil: Birth in Brazil study

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira; Szwarcwald, Celia Landmann; Souza, Paulo Roberto Borges; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Determine the coverage rate of syphilis testing during prenatal care and the prevalence of syphilis in pregnant women in Brazil. METHODS This is a national hospital-based cohort study conducted in Brazil with 23,894 postpartum women between 2011 and 2012. Data were obtained using interviews with postpartum women, hospital records, and prenatal care cards. All postpartum women with a reactive serological test result recorded in the prenatal care card or syphilis diagnosis during hospitalization for childbirth were considered cases of syphilis in pregnancy. The Chi-square test was used for determining the disease prevalence and testing coverage rate by region of residence, self-reported skin color, maternal age, and type of prenatal and child delivery care units. RESULTS Prenatal care covered 98.7% postpartum women. Syphilis testing coverage rate was 89.1% (one test) and 41.2% (two tests), and syphilis prevalence in pregnancy was 1.02% (95%CI 0.84;1.25). A lower prenatal coverage rate was observed among women in the North region, indigenous women, those with less education, and those who received prenatal care in public health care units. A lower testing coverage rate was observed among residents in the North, Northeast, and Midwest regions, among younger and non-white skin-color women, among those with lower education, and those who received prenatal care in public health care units. An increased prevalence of syphilis was observed among women with < 8 years of education (1.74%), who self-reported as black (1.8%) or mixed (1.2%), those who did not receive prenatal care (2.5%), and those attending public (1.37%) or mixed (0.93%) health care units. CONCLUSIONS The estimated prevalence of syphilis in pregnancy was similar to that reported in the last sentinel surveillance study conducted in 2006. There was an improvement in prenatal care and testing coverage rate, and the goals suggested by the World Health Organization were achieved in two regions. Regional

  15. Scaling up syphilis testing in China: implementation beyond the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Sarah J; Yin, Yue-Pin; Peeling, Rosanna W; Cohen, Myron S; Chen, Xiang-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    Abstract China is experiencing a syphilis epidemic of enormous proportions. The regions most heavily affected by syphilis correspond to regions where sexually transmitted HIV infection is also a major public health threat. Many high-risk patients in China fail to receive routine syphilis screening. This missed public health opportunity stems from both a failure of many high-risk individuals to seek clinical care and a disconnect between policy and practice. New point-of-care syphilis testing enables screening in non-traditional settings such as community organizations or sex venues. This paper describes the current Chinese syphilis policies, suggests a spatiotemporal framework (based on targeting high-risk times and places) to improve screening and care practices, and emphasizes a syphilis control policy extending beyond the clinical setting. PMID:20539859

  16. Syphilis in pregnant women in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Liljestrand, J; Bergström, S; Nieuwenhuis, F; Hederstedt, B

    1985-12-01

    To establish the prevalence of syphilis in pregnant women in Mozambique and evaluate present diagnostic methods, 1468 pregnant women in eight of the country's 10 provinces were examined using the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test. Positive serum samples were also analysed using the Treponema pallidum haemagglutination (TPHA) assay and one group was also analysed using the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorbed (FTA-ABS) test. The prevalence of VDRL seroreactivity was found to be between 4.5% and 14.6%, whereas the prevalence of treponemal disease as verified by TPHA or FTA-ABS tests was between 1.6% and 9.8%. It is concluded that syphilis is relatively common among pregnant women in Mozambique. The predictive value of a positive VDRL test, when adequately performed, was

  17. The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment: biotechnology and the administrative state.

    PubMed Central

    Roy, B.

    1995-01-01

    The central issue of the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment was property: property in the body and intellectual property. Once removed from the body, tissue and body fluids were not legally the property of the Tuskegee subjects. Consequently, there was not a direct relationship between a patient and research that used his sera. The Public Health Service (PHS) was free to exercise its property right in Tuskegee sera to develop serologic tests for syphilis with commercial potential. To camouflage the true meaning, the PHS made a distinction between direct clinical studies and indirect studies of tissue and body fluids. This deception caused all reviews to date to limit their examination to documents labeled by the PHS as directly related to the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment. This excluded other information in the public domain. Despite the absence of a clinical protocol, this subterfuge led each to falsely conclude that the Tuskagee Syphilis Experiment was a clinical study. Based on publications of indirect research using sera and cerebrospinal fluid, this article conceives a very history of the Tuskagee Syphilis Experiment. Syphilis could only cultivate in living beings. As in slavery, the generative ability of the body made the Tuskegee subjects real property and gave untreated syphilis and the sera of the Tuskegee subjects immense commercial value. Published protocols exploited the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment to invent and commercialize biotechnology for the applied science of syphilis serology. PMID:7869408

  18. Barriers to antenatal syphilis screening in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Bocoum, Fadima Yaya; Kouanda, Seni; Zarowsky, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Despite advances in treatment and management, syphilis remains a major public health problem in Burkina Faso. Syphilis in pregnancy poses major health risks for the mother and the fetus and also increases the risk for HIV transmission. Despite its potential benefits, antenatal syphilis screening is often poorly implemented in many sub-Saharan African countries. The purpose of the study is to identify and understand barriers affecting health system performance for syphilis screening among pregnant women in Burkina Faso. Methods We conducted in-depth interviews and observations in the Kaya health district, Burkina Faso. Participants were purposively selected to capture a range of perspectives across different actors with different roles and responsibilities. Seventy-five interviews were conducted with health providers, district managers, facility managers, traditional healers, pregnant women, community health workers, and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO) managers. Interviews were transcribed and organized into codes and categories using NVivo software. Results Participants identified multiple barriers at health providers and community levels. Key barriers at provider level included fragmentation of services, poor communication, low motivation for prescription, and low awareness of syphilis burden. Cost of testing, distance to laboratory and lack of knowledge about syphilis were identified as barriers at community level. Conclusion The study highlights barriers such as distance, cost of testing, and knowledge about syphilis. The introduction of point of care testing for syphilis could be an entry point for improving coverage of antenatal syphilis screening. PMID:24624245

  19. Syphilis testing practices in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Thuy T; Kamb, Mary L; Luu, Minh; Ham, D Cal; Perez, Freddy

    2017-09-01

    To present the findings of the Pan American Health Organization's 2014 survey on syphilis testing policies and practices in the Americas. Representatives of national/regional reference and large, lower-level laboratories from 35 member states were invited to participate. A semi-structured, electronically administered questionnaire collected data on syphilis tests, algorithms, equipment/commodities, challenges faced and basic quality assurance (QA) strategies employed (i.e. daily controls, standard operating procedures, technician training, participating in external QA programmes, on-site evaluations). The 69 participating laboratories from 30 (86%) member states included 41 (59%) national/regional reference and 28 (41%) lower-level laboratories. Common syphilis tests conducted were the rapid plasma reagin (RPR) (62% of surveyed laboratories), venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL) (54%), fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) (41%) and Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA) (32%). Only three facilities reported using direct detection methods, and 28 (41% overall, 32% of lower-level facilities) used rapid tests. Most laboratories (62%) used only traditional testing algorithms (non-treponemal screening and treponemal confirmatory testing); however, 12% used only a reverse sequence algorithm (treponemal test first), and 14% employed both algorithms. Another nine (12%) laboratories conducted only one type of serologic test. Although most reference (97%) and lower-level (89%) laboratories used at least one QA strategy, only 16% reported using all five basic strategies. Commonly reported challenges were stock-outs of essential reagents or commodities (46%), limited staff training (73%) and insufficient equipment (39%). Many reference and clinical laboratories in the Americas face challenges in conducting appropriate syphilis testing and in ensuring quality of testing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd The Pan-American Health Organization retains

  20. Inadequate syphilis screening among women with prenatal care in a community with a high syphilis incidence.

    PubMed

    Trepka, Mary Jo; Bloom, Sharon A; Zhang, Guoyan; Kim, Sunny; Nobles, Robert E

    2006-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the extent to which pregnant women in a community with a high syphilis incidence were screened for syphilis according to standard recommendations of twice during prenatal care and at labor and delivery. Labor and delivery records from 4 hospitals in Miami-Dade County, Florida, were abstracted to obtain maternal and prenatal care characteristics and syphilis screening practices. Of the 1991 women, records indicated that 1655 (83%) were screened at least once during prenatal care, 220 (11%) were screened twice during prenatal care before delivery, and 184 (9%) were screened twice during prenatal care and at delivery. Attending a private clinic, having more than adequate prenatal care and having private insurance were associated with not being screened at least twice before delivery. Few women were screened according to standard recommendations, and provider or institutional-related factors affected adequacy of screening.

  1. [Untreated syphilis - from Oslo to Tuskegee].

    PubMed

    Sandvik, Anniken; Lie, Anne Kveim

    2016-12-01

    In the period from 1891 - 1910, around 2000 patients with syphilis were admitted to the Department of Dermatology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet. The head of the department, Cæsar Boeck (1845 - 1917), believed in allowing the disease to take its natural course and withheld treatment. He made detailed notes of the diagnosis and the clinical course of the disease for all his patients. Boeck's material is unique, and forms the basis for our current knowledge about the prognosis and course of syphilis infections. In 1928, the patients were scrutinised by Boeck's successor in the Department of Dermatology, Edvin Bruusgaard (1869 - 1934), and later by Trygve Gjestland (1911 - 1993). Gjestland's doctoral thesis from 1955 has remained as «The Oslo study of untreated syphilis.» This article presents a medical historical background for the study. Bruusgaard's and Gjestland's research was important for the Tuskegee Study in the USA, and the Oslo study gave implicit support to this research project, which posterity has emphatically condemned as ethically unacceptable.

  2. Syphilis: an atypical case of sepsis and multiple anogenital lesions in secondary syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nichole; Dhillon, Sonu; Cotter, John G.; Ahmed, Zohair

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of syphilis has historically been cyclical in nature, often in relation to the rise and fall of public health initiatives directed toward eradication along with social attitudes toward sexual practices. The incidence of syphilis has increased by 15% in the last 6 years in the United States, with similar increases worldwide. Herein, we present an atypical case of syphilis presenting with severe septic shock and multiple anogenital lesions in an immunocompetent host. A 22-year-old male with no significant past medical history presented with fevers, chills, sore throat, diaphoresis, and diarrhea. He was febrile, tachycardic, hypotensive, and unresponsive to fluid resuscitation requiring short-term vasopressor support. Physical exam revealed diffuse lymphadenopathy; lower extremity macular rash involving the soles of the feet; papular non-pustular lesions on the scrotum; and a 0.5 cm non-tender irregular, healing lesion on the shaft of the penis. Laboratory analysis was significant for leukocytosis and elevated creatinine. Serum screening rapid plasma reagin was positive, and further testing revealed a titer of 1:32, with confirmation via fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test. The patient was diagnosed with secondary syphilis, which was determined to be the underlying etiology of the sepsis as all other serological evaluations were negative. He was treated with penicillin G benzathine 2.4 million units intramuscular and supportive management, with improvement of symptoms. The patient engaged in high-risk sexual behaviors, including prior unprotected sexual contact with males. New research indicates that up to one-third of patients may present with atypical cutaneous manifestations, as demonstrated by this patient. It is important for physicians to familiarize themselves with the varied clinical presentations of syphilis, which include multiple anogenital lesions and tender primary lesions in primary or secondary syphilis. PMID:27802854

  3. Syphilis: Re-emergence of an old foe

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, Lola V.

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is caused by infection with Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, a not-yet-cultivable spiral-shaped bacterium that is usually transmitted by sexual contact with an infected partner or by an infected pregnant woman to her fetus. There is no vaccine to prevent syphilis. Diagnosis and treatment of infected individuals and their contacts is key to syphilis control programs that also include sex education and promotion of condom use to prevent infection. Untreated syphilis can progress through four stages: primary (chancre, regional lymphadenopathy), secondary (disseminated skin eruptions, generalized lymphadenopathy), latent (decreased re-occurrence of secondary stage manifestations, absence of symptoms), and tertiary (gummas, cardiovascular syphilis and late neurological symptoms). The primary and secondary stages are the most infectious. WHO estimates that each year 11 million new cases of syphilis occur globally among adults aged 15-49 years. Syphilis has re-emerged in several regions including North America, Western Europe, China and Australia. Host-associated factors that drive the re-emergence and spread of syphilis include high-risk sexual activity, migration and travel, and economic and social changes that limit access to health care. Early, uncomplicated syphilis is curable with a single intramuscular injection of benzathine penicillin G (BPG), the first line drug for all stages of syphilis. Emergence of macrolide-resistant T. pallidum has essentially precluded the empirical use of azithromycin as a second-line drug for treatment of syphilis. Virulence attributes of T. pallidum are poorly understood. Genomic and proteomic studies have provided some new information concerning how this spirochete may evade host defense mechanisms to persist for long periods in the host. PMID:28357375

  4. Economic Disparities and Syphilis Incidence in Massachusetts, 2001-2013.

    PubMed

    Smock, Laura; Caten, Evan; Hsu, Katherine; DeMaria, Alfred

    We used area-level indicators of poverty to describe economic disparities in the incidence rate of infectious syphilis in Massachusetts to (1) determine whether methods developed in earlier AIDS analyses in Massachusetts could be applied to syphilis and (2) characterize syphilis trends during a time of increased rates of syphilis incidence. Using census tract data and population counts from the US Census Bureau and Massachusetts data on syphilis, we analyzed the incidence rate of syphilis infection from 2001 to 2013 by the poverty level of the census tract in which people with syphilis resided, stratified by age, sex, and race/ethnicity. The syphilis incidence rate increased in all census tract groups in Massachusetts from 2001 to 2013, and disparities in incidence rates by area poverty level persisted over time. The overall incidence rate of syphilis increased 6.9-fold from 2001 to 2013 in all census tract poverty-level groupings (from 1.5 to 10.3 per 100 000 population), but the rise in rate was especially high in the poorest census tracts (from 5.6 to 31.0 per 100 000 population) and among men (from 2.2 to 19.4 per 100 000 population). The highest syphilis incidence rate was among non-Hispanic black people. The largest changes in incidence rate occurred after 2010. One region had a disproportionate increase in incidence rates and a disproportionate impact on the statewide trend. Census tract poverty analyses can inform the targeting of interventions that make progress toward reducing disparities in rates of syphilis incidence possible.

  5. Neuro syphilis: Portrayals by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, O.

    2009-01-01

    The developments in neuro syphilis in the 19th century are integral parts of the history of psychiatry. The delineation of various aspects of neuro syphilis by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in three of his stories is discussed in brief. PMID:19881059

  6. 42 CFR 493.1207 - Condition: Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Syphilis serology. 493.1207 Section 493.1207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1207 Condition: Syphilis serology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1207 - Condition: Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Syphilis serology. 493.1207 Section 493.1207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1207 Condition: Syphilis serology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of...

  8. 42 CFR 493.835 - Standard; Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard; Syphilis serology. 493.835 Section 493.835 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.835 Standard; Syphilis serology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event...

  9. 42 CFR 493.835 - Standard; Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard; Syphilis serology. 493.835 Section 493.835 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.835 Standard; Syphilis serology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event...

  10. 42 CFR 493.835 - Standard; Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard; Syphilis serology. 493.835 Section 493.835 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.835 Standard; Syphilis serology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event...

  11. 42 CFR 493.835 - Standard; Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard; Syphilis serology. 493.835 Section 493.835 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.835 Standard; Syphilis serology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event...

  12. 42 CFR 493.1207 - Condition: Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Syphilis serology. 493.1207 Section 493.1207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1207 Condition: Syphilis serology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of...

  13. 42 CFR 493.1207 - Condition: Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Syphilis serology. 493.1207 Section 493.1207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1207 Condition: Syphilis serology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of...

  14. 42 CFR 493.835 - Standard; Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Syphilis serology. 493.835 Section 493.835 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.835 Standard; Syphilis serology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1207 - Condition: Syphilis serology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Syphilis serology. 493.1207 Section 493.1207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1207 Condition: Syphilis serology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of...

  16. Epidemiological impact of a syphilis vaccine: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Champredon, D; Cameron, C E; Smieja, M; Dushoff, J

    2016-11-01

    Despite the availability of inexpensive antimicrobial treatment, syphilis remains prevalent worldwide, affecting millions of individuals. Furthermore, syphilis infection is suspected of increasing both susceptibility to, and tendency to transmit, HIV. Development of a syphilis vaccine would be a potentially promising step towards control, but the value of dedicating resources to vaccine development should be evaluated in the context of the anticipated benefits. Here, we use a detailed mathematical model to explore the potential impact of rolling out a hypothetical syphilis vaccine on morbidity from both syphilis and HIV and compare it to the impact of expanded 'screen and treat' programmes using existing treatments. Our results suggest that an efficacious vaccine has the potential to sharply reduce syphilis prevalence under a wide range of scenarios, while expanded treatment interventions are likely to be substantially less effective. Our modelled interventions in our simulated study populations are expected to have little effect on HIV, and in some scenarios lead to small increases in HIV incidence, suggesting that interventions against syphilis should be accompanied with interventions against other sexually transmitted infections to prevent the possibility that lower morbidity or lower perceived risk from syphilis could lead to increases in other sexually transmitted diseases.

  17. Identifying syphilis risk networks through venue attendance in San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Sally C; Fann, Charles K; Strona, Frank V; Wolf, Wendy; Cohen, Stephanie E; Philip, Susan S; Bernstein, Kyle T

    2014-05-01

    Prioritizing interventions for patients with syphilis who are part of large or interconnected sexual networks may be high yield for partner services, and identifying venues named by patients with syphilis who report high numbers of partners may help identify such networks. In this analysis, we explore differences between interviewed patients with early syphilis regarding where they met sex partners. With a cross-sectional design, we examined the distribution of total reported sex partners from male index patients with early syphilis interviewed through the San Francisco Department of Public Health partner services program and the self-reported venues named as places they met sex partners. Based on the median number of total partners among male cases of syphilis who named each venue, we categorized venues into 3 levels of partner frequency: high (>15 partners reported), medium (6-15 partners reported), and low (<6 partners reported). Interviewed patients with early syphilis were then classified into these venue categories, and sociodemographic and risk behaviors from electronic medical records and interviews were compared using χ tests. In 2011, 433 male patients with early syphilis named 32 venues. One hundred forty-three (32.3%) patients were categorized as high, 226 (51.0%) as medium, and 74 (16.7%) as low partner frequency venue users. Patients with early syphilis who reported meeting partners at high partner frequency venues were generally older, more likely to be white, have a previous syphilis infection, use methamphetamines in the previous year, and be HIV infected (all P < 0.05) compared with those who reported meeting partners at medium-frequency and low-frequency venues. Venues where partners are met may be an appropriate proxy for network membership. Targeting additional resources, outreach, and services to clients who attend high-frequency venues may have a positive impact on syphilis prevention efforts.

  18. Repeat Syphilis Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in California, 2002–2006: Implications for Syphilis Elimination Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Chew Ng, Rilene A.; Katz, Kenneth A.; Bernstein, Kyle T.; Samuel, Michael C.; Kerndt, Peter R.; Bolan, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined rates of and risk factors for repeat syphilis infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) in California. Methods. We analyzed 2002 to 2006 California syphilis surveillance system data. Results. During the study period, a mean of 5.9% (range: 4.9%–7.1% per year) of MSM had a repeat primary or secondary (PS) syphilis infection within 2 years of an initial infection. There was no significant increase in the annual proportion of MSM with a repeat syphilis infection (P = .42). In a multivariable model, factors associated with repeat syphilis infection were HIV infection (odds ratio [OR] = 1.65; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14, 2.37), Black race (OR = 1.84; 95% CI = 1.12, 3.04), and 10 or more recent sex partners (OR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.12, 3.50). Conclusions. Approximately 6% of MSM in California have a repeat PS syphilis infection within 2 years of an initial infection. HIV infection, Black race, and having multiple sex partners are associated with increased odds of repeat infection. Syphilis elimination efforts should include messages about the risk for repeat infection and the importance of follow-up testing. Public health attention to individuals repeatedly infected with syphilis may help reduce local disease burdens. PMID:22095364

  19. Recall of symptoms and treatment of syphilis and yaws by healthy blood donors screening positive for syphilis in Kumasi, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sarkodie, Francis; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Hassall, Oliver; Bates, Imelda; Bygbjerg, Ib C; Ullum, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    To describe the recalled medical history, clinical manifestations, and treatment of yaws and syphilis by syphilis seroreactive blood donors in Kumasi, Ghana. Of the blood donors at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana tested with the syphilis rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and later by rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, 526 were seroreactive. Four hundred and seventy-one (89.5%) of these subjects were confirmed with the Ortho-Vitros Syphilis TP test as the gold standard and were interviewed to determine past or present clinical manifestations of yaws and syphilis. Of the 471 respondent donors, 28 (5.9%) gave a history of skin lesions and sores; four (14.3%) of these subjects, who were all male and RPR-positive, recalled a diagnosis of syphilis. All four reported having had skin lesions/bumps with slow-healing sores, but only one of them had had these symptoms before the age of 15 years. A small proportion of confirmed seroreactive donors in this sample had any recall of symptoms or treatment for yaws or syphilis. These data suggest that clinical questioning adds little further information to the current screening algorithm. The relative contribution of yaws and syphilis to frequent positive tests in endemic areas remains speculative. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Syphilis in prostitutes from Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Smacchia, C; Parolin, A; Di Perri, G; Vento, S; Concia, E

    1998-02-21

    During the 1990s, a striking increase in the notification rate for syphilis has been observed in the Russian Federation and Eastern Europe. Given easier current access to international travel and migration from Eastern Europe, this trend is likely to involve Western Europe as well. To investigate this possibility, 110 foreign-born prostitutes (32 from Albania, 34 from tropical Africa, and 44 from Eastern Europe) presenting to an outpatient clinic in Verona, Italy, over a 19-month period were screened for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). At their initial visit, HIV infection was detected in 2 prostitutes (both African); 9 women were positive for serologic markers of active syphilis (5 from the former Soviet Union, 1 from Romania, 1 from Croatia, and 2 from Africa). By country of origin, the incidence of active syphilis was highest among immigrants from the former Soviet Union (5/18 or 27.8%). Although 65.9% of Eastern European women compared with 56.1% of women from other regions had been prostitutes for less than 1 year, Eastern European prostitutes were significantly more likely than their counterparts from Africa and Albania to have had more than 30 partners per week (70.5% vs. 51.5%) and to have become pregnant during the study period (40.9% vs. 11.8% of Africans and 18.7% of Albanians). Compared with their other Eastern European counterparts, Russian women had the least past experience in prostitution (77.8% had less than 1 year) and the highest incidence of pregnancy (50%). These findings indicate that Eastern European immigrants, especially those from the former Soviet Union, have little knowledge of STD risks or effective contraceptive use.

  1. Use of Lumbar Punctures in the Management of Ocular Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Reekie, Ian; Reddy, Yaviche

    2016-11-18

    Ocular syphilis has become rare in the developed world, but is a common presentation to ophthalmology departments in South Africa. We investigated the proportion of patients diagnosed with ocular syphilis who went on to receive lumbar punctures, and determined the fraction of these who had cerebrospinal fluid findings suggestive of neurosyphilis. We aimed to determine whether the use of lumbar punctures in ocular syphilis patients was beneficial in picking up cases of neurosyphilis. Retrospective study of case notes of patients admitted to two district hospitals in Durban, South Africa, with ocular syphilis over a 20-month period. A total of 31 of 68 ocular syphilis patients underwent lumbar puncture, and of these, eight (25.8%) had findings suggestive of neurosyphilis. Lumbar puncture in ocular syphilis patients should continue to be a routine part of the investigation of these patients; a large proportion of ocular syphilis patients show cerebrospinal fluid findings suggestive of neurosyphilis, are at risk of the complications of neurosyphilis, and should be managed accordingly.

  2. Epidemic Profile of Maternal Syphilis in China in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Lixia; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Fang; Wang, Qian; Qiao, Yaping; Su, Min; Jin, Xi; Qiu, Jie; Song, Li; Wang, Ailing

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiological characteristics and adverse pregnancy outcomes of pregnant women with syphilis infection in China. Methods. Data were from China's Information System of Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of Syphilis Management. Women who were registered in the system and delivered in 2013 were included in the analysis. Results. A total of 15884 pregnant women with syphilis infection delivered in China in 2013. 79.1% of infected women attended antenatal care at or before 37 gestational weeks; however, 55.4% received no treatment or initiated the treatment after 37 gestational weeks. 14.0% of women suffered serious adverse pregnancy outcomes including stillbirth/neonatal death, preterm delivery/low birth weight, or congenital syphilis in newborns. High maternal titer (≥1 : 64) and late treatment (>37 gestational weeks)/nontreatment were significantly associated with increased risk of congenital syphilis and the adjusted ORs were 1.88 (95% CI 1.27 to 2.80) and 3.70 (95% CI 2.36 to 5.80), respectively. Conclusion. Syphilis affects a great number of pregnant women in China. Large proportions of women are not detected and treated at an early pregnancy stage. Burden of adverse pregnancy outcomes is high among infected women. Comprehensive interventions still need to be strengthened to improve uptake of screening and treatment for maternal syphilis. PMID:26981537

  3. Syphilis in drug users in low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Coffin, Lara S; Newberry, Ashley; Hagan, Holly; Cleland, Charles M; Des Jarlais, Don C; Perlman, David C

    2010-01-01

    Genital ulcer disease (GUD), including syphilis, is an important cause of morbidity in low and middle income (LMI) countries and syphilis transmission is associated with HIV transmission. We conducted a literature review to evaluate syphilis infection among drug users in LMI countries for the period 1995-2007. Countries were categorized using the World Bank Atlas method [The World Bank. (2007). Data and statistics: Country groups. Retrieved online October 18, 2007 at http://go.worldbank.org/D7SN0B8YU0] according to 2006 gross national income per capita. Thirty-two studies were included (N=13,848 subjects), mostly from Southeast Asia with some from Latin America, Eastern Europe, Central and East Asia, North Africa and the Middle East but none from regions such as Sub-Saharan Africa. The median prevalence of overall lifetime syphilis (N=32 studies) was 11.1% (interquartile range: 6.3-15.3%) and of HIV (N=31 studies) was 1.1% (interquartile range: 0.22-5.50%). There was a modest relation (r=0.27) between HIV and syphilis prevalence. Median syphilis prevalence by gender was 4.0% (interquartile range: 3.4-6.6%) among males (N=11 studies) and 19.9% (interquartile range: 11.4-36.0%) among females (N=6 studies). There was a strong relation (r=0.68) between syphilis prevalence and female gender that may be related to female sex work. Drug users in LMI countries have a high prevalence of syphilis but data are limited and, in some regions, entirely lacking. Further data are needed, including studies targeting the risks of women. Interventions to promote safer sex, testing, counselling and education, as well as health care worker awareness, should be integrated in harm reduction programs and health care settings to prevent new syphilis infections and reduce HIV transmission among drug users and their partners in LMI countries.

  4. Prevalence and factors associated with syphilis in a Reference Center.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Natália Carolina Rodrigues Colombo; Meier, Denise Andrade Pereira; Pieri, Flávia Meneguetti; Alves, Elaine; Albanese, Silvia Paulino Ribeiro; Lentine, Edvilson Cristiano; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre; Dessunti, Elma Mathias

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of the rapid test (RT) for syphilis increases access of vulnerable populations to early diagnosis and treatment, impacting the outcomes of infection. We aimed to assess the prevalence of and factors associated with syphilis in a Center for Testing and Counseling (CTC). We conducted a cross-sectional study at a Reference Center for sexually transmitted disease (STD) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome in Londrina, Northern Paraná State, Southern Brazil. Data regarding the 5,509 individuals who underwent RT from June 2012 to December 2014 were collected from patient records and the CTC Information System and served as the basis to check associations of syphilis cases (346) and cases without syphilis (5,163). Nine patients' records were not found. OpenEpi was used to perform a prevalence analysis and determine odds ratios to assess the associations between sociodemographic and behavioral variables (independent variables) and cases of syphilis (dependent variable). An alpha value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. The prevalence of syphilis was 6.3%; higher in males (7.5%) than in females (4.3%, p <0.001). Syphilis was associated with an age of 25-34 years, little education, and single marital status. The main associated behavioral factors were men who have sex with men, drug users, STD patients, and those presenting with an STD in the last year. The use of alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, and crack was significantly associated with syphilis. Strategies for prevention and control of syphilis should be intensified, especially in populations identified as most vulnerable.

  5. UK national guidelines on the management of syphilis 2015.

    PubMed

    Kingston, M; French, P; Higgins, S; McQuillan, O; Sukthankar, A; Stott, C; McBrien, B; Tipple, C; Turner, A; Sullivan, A K; Radcliffe, Keith; Cousins, Darren; FitzGerald, Mark; Fisher, Martin; Grover, Deepa; Higgins, Stephen; Kingston, Margaret; Rayment, Michael; Sullivan, Ann

    2016-05-01

    These guidelines are an update for 2015 of the 2008 UK guidelines for the management of syphilis. The writing group have piloted the new BASHH guideline methodology, notably using the GRADE system for assessing evidence and making recommendations. We have made significant changes to the recommendations for screening infants born to mothers with positive syphilis serology and to facilitate accurate and timely communication between the teams caring for mother and baby we have developed a birth plan. Procaine penicillin is now an alternative, not preferred treatment, for all stages of syphilis except neurosyphilis, but the length of treatment for this is shortened. Other changes are summarised at the start of the guideline.

  6. A patient with primary syphilis of the hand.

    PubMed Central

    De Koning, G A; Blog, F B; Stolz, E

    1977-01-01

    The case history of a man with primary syphilis of the right hand is described. This type of luetic condition nowadays is rare. The incidence of genital, anorectal, and extragenital primary syphilis in both men and women and in sailors presenting at the Venereological Outpatient Clinic of the Department of Dermatology of the University Hospital Rotterdam-Dijkzigt during a period of seven years was studied. In sailors and women only genital primary lesions were found, whereas in male civilians 6.3% of cases of primary syphilis had anorectal lesions. The primary lesions in this study were different from those reported in earlier literature. Images PMID:606335

  7. The footprint of old syphilis: using a reverse screening algorithm for syphilis testing in a U.S. Geographic Information Systems-Based Community Outreach Program.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Neela D; Stout, Jason E; Miller, William C; Hecker, Emily J; Cox, Gary M; Norton, Brianna L; Sena, Arlene C

    2013-11-01

    The impact of syphilis reverse sequence screening has not been evaluated in community outreach. Using reverse sequence screening in neighborhoods identified with geographic information systems, we found that among 239 participants, 45 (19%) were seropositive. Of these, 3 (7%) had untreated syphilis, 33 (73%) had previously treated syphilis infection, and 9 (20%) had negative nontreponemal test results.

  8. Cannibalism and contagion: framing syphilis in counter-reformation Italy.

    PubMed

    Eamon, W

    1998-02-01

    The outbreak of syphilis in Europe elicited a variety of responses concerning the disease's origins and cure. In this essay, I examine the theory of the origins of syphilis advanced by the 16th-century Italian surgeon Leonardo Fioravanti. According to Fioravanti, syphilis was not new but had always existed, although it was unknown to the ancients. The syphilis epidemic, he argued, was caused by cannibalism among the French and Italian armies during the siege of Naples in 1494. Fioravanti's strange and novel theory is connected with his view of disease as corruption of the body caused by eating improper foods. His theory of bodily pollution, a metaphor for the corruption of society, coincided with Counter-Reformation concepts about sin and the social order.

  9. Syphilis: The Renaissance of an Old Disease with Oral Implications

    PubMed Central

    Carlos, Roman

    2009-01-01

    Syphilis is caused by Treponema pallidum an anaerobic filamentous spirochete. In recent years, striking outbreaks have occurred in USA, Canada, Russia, China and some areas of Central and Eastern Europe. Main epidemiology changes reflect sex industry, sexual promiscuity, decreasing use of barrier protection (i.e. condoms) due to false sense of security that nowadays sexually transmitted diseases are curable and lack of pertinent knowledge. Considering that the initial presentation of syphilis may be the oral cavity, it is of great relevance to include this disease in the differential diagnosis of unusual oral ulcerations and white patches. Primary syphilis is a highly infectious disease in which inappropriate treatment may be apparently curative while the patient remains highly infectious. It is then of pivotal importance that clinicians maintain a high clinical index of suspicion. At the present time, clinical-pathologic correlation together with serologic studies remain essential in establishing the diagnosis of syphilis. PMID:20596972

  10. Syphilis and MSM (Men Who Have Sex with Men)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Syphilis & MSM (Men Who Have Sex With Men) - CDC Fact Sheet Language: English (US) ... among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM). MSM Fact Sheet | View Images ...

  11. [Nodular secondary syphilis in a HIV patient mimicking cutaneous lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Baniandrés Rodríguez, O; Nieto Perea, O; Moya Alonso, L; Carrillo Gijón, R; Harto Castaño, A

    2004-05-01

    We report the case of a 61-year old man who, already for a month, had infiltrated plaques on the chest, back, neck and face as well as axilar lymphadenopathy, bearing a striking resemblance to lymphoma. During his stay in the hospital he had fever, sore throat, macules on the palms and soles and a depapilated plaque on the tongue and alopecia. A test for syphilis confirmed the diagnosis. The HIV serology was also positive. The nodular secondary syphilis is an unusual form that was first documented more than 20 years ago. Since then, only a few cases have been reported in which the first diagnosis included lymphoreticular malignancy. This form of secondary syphilis was found in the HIV-infected as well as non-infected patients. We discuss the atypical clinical course, the inappropriate serological reactions and the therapy in HIV infected patients with secondary syphilis.

  12. A report on syphilis control in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Sven

    1954-01-01

    This report presents the results of a six-month survey of the nature and extent of venereal diseases in Turkey which was undertaken by the author, on behalf of WHO, at the request of the Turkish Government. The first part of the report outlines the present venereal-disease-control system and includes descriptions of the work undertaken by public authorities, hospitals and dispensaries, mobile venereal-disease-control teams, and laboratories; in the second part, the author enumerates certain recommendations for the intensification of the current control programme. These recommendations are particularly concerned with the control of syphilis (since the incidence of other venereal diseases in Turkey is of very secondary importance), and with the expansion, standardization, and co-ordination of serodiagnostic facilities and services. It is suggested that there might be a gradual intensification and reorientation of the present programme. A proposed plan of operations for an eight-year period is described. PMID:13182590

  13. Secondary syphilis presenting with aortitis and coronary ostial occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, John A; MacNab, Anita; Sarma, Jaydeep; Ray, Simon; Kadir, Isaac; Muldoon, Eavan G

    2016-03-01

    Aortitis is an established manifestation of tertiary syphilis. We report a rare case of aortitis with ostial occlusion and left ventricular failure in secondary syphilis. Her management required a true multidisciplinary approach from multiple specialities due to complications of concomitant psychosis and a history of anaphylaxis to penicillin. This case illustrates the complexities of diagnosing and managing a rare presentation of this increasingly prevalent infection.

  14. Primary and secondary syphilis - Jefferson county, Alabama, 2002-2007.

    PubMed

    2009-05-08

    In June 2006, the Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) requested assistance from CDC to investigate and control a multiyear epidemic of syphilis in Jefferson County. The county had experienced a decrease in primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis cases, from 279 in 1995 to nine in 2002. By 2005, the incidence had begun to rise substantially, culminating with 238 cases in 2006 and 166 in 2007. Beginning in August 2006, CDC assisted the Jefferson County Department of Health (JCDH) in investigating the increase in cases and in planning control measures. This report summarizes the results of that investigation, which found that the characteristics of cases during 2002-2004 differed substantially from cases during 2005-2007. Declines in U.S. syphilis rates, which reached their lowest point in 2000, led to optimism that syphilis elimination (defined as the absence of sustained syphilis transmission) in the United States was possible, and CDC's National Syphilis Elimination Plan was launched in 1999. Although increased U.S. syphilis rates in the early 2000s have been reported to be associated primarily with transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM), the findings from this investigation indicate reemergence of syphilis among women and heterosexual men in Jefferson County. Public health officials in other areas should remain alert for similar epidemiologic shifts. Public health departments should facilitate access to effective treatment in sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics or other settings, consider selective screening in high-prevalence populations (e.g., in correctional settings), and ensure adequate partner notification and treatment.

  15. Clinical and socioeconomic determinants of congenital syphilis in Posadas, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lucy Anne; Deschutter, Enrique Jorge; Bornay-Llinares, Fernando Jorge; Hernandez-Aguado, Ildefonso; Silva, Gustavo; Piragine, Rosa Del Carmen; Lumbreras, Blanca

    2012-04-01

    To explore clinical and socioeconomic factors related to congenital syphilis in Posadas, Argentina. Data were collected from 102 mothers who had given birth to an infant with congenital syphilis at Dr. Ramón Madariaga Central Hospital (2005-2007) and 306 control mothers. Clinical and demographic information were collected from clinical records, and socioeconomic details were obtained by interview. Multivariable logistic regression was used to explore the relationships between congenital syphilis and clinical and socioeconomic factors. Receiving the recommended number of prenatal health checks had a clear protective effect on congenital syphilis in the univariate analysis (odds ratio (OR) 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31-0.86), as did being in a stable relationship (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.14-0.38). Furthermore, women with secondary education or above were over four-times less likely to have a child with congenital syphilis compared to women who had not completed primary school education, even after controlling for the number of prenatal health checks and other factors (adjusted OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.08-0.72). In addition, women with previous stillborn births were over three-times more likely to have a baby with congenital syphilis after controlling for education and prenatal care (adjusted OR 3.37, 95% CI 1.24-9.16). There is a clear opportunity for reducing the burden of congenital syphilis by promoting syphilis screening and treatment in women with previous stillborn births. In addition, the potential impact of more general policies addressing social determinants of health, such as those improving education, must not be overlooked. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Towards the Elimination of Syphilis in a Small Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Mungrue, Kameel; Edwards, Jeffrey; Fyzul, Azizah; Boodhai, Billy; Narinesingh, Adita; Nanlal, Shasta

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To describe the current epidemiological features of syphilis and congenital syphilis in Trinidad, 2009–2012. Methods. All laboratory confirmed syphilis cases diagnosed through a vertical program in the Ministry of Health, between 1/1/2009 and 31/12/2012, were identified. All relevant data were collected including address which was geocoded and mapped using ArcGIS 10.0 (Esri). Both spatial techniques and standardized incidence ratios were used to determine hot spots. Results. The annual cumulative incidence rate for syphilis remains high varying from 39 per 100 000 population in 2009 to 29 per 100 000 in 2012. We identified 3 “hot spots,” in urban areas of Trinidad. Young men and particularly young women in childbearing age 15–35 living in urban high density populations were commonly infected groups. Conclusion. The incidence of syphilis continues to be very high in Trinidad. New initiatives will have to be formulated in order to attain the global initiative to eradicate syphilis by 2015. PMID:26316981

  17. A mathematical model of syphilis transmission in an MSM population.

    PubMed

    Saad-Roy, C M; Shuai, Zhisheng; van den Driessche, P

    2016-07-01

    Syphilis is caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, and is a sexually transmitted disease with multiple stages. A model of transmission of syphilis in an MSM population (there has recently been a resurgence of syphilis in such populations) that includes infection stages and treatment is formulated as a system of ordinary differential equations. The control reproduction number is calculated, and it is proved that if this threshold parameter is below one, syphilis dies out; otherwise, if it is greater than one, it is shown that there exists a unique endemic equilibrium and that for certain special cases, this equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable. Using data from the literature on MSM populations, numerical methods are used to determine the variation and robustness of the control reproduction number with respect to the model parameters, and to determine adequate treatment rates for syphilis eradication. By assuming a closed population and no return to susceptibility, an epidemic model is obtained. Final outbreak sizes are numerically determined for various parameter values, and its variation and robustness to parameter value changes is also investigated. Results quantify the importance of early treatment for syphilis control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Social determinants of syphilis in South China: the effect of sibling position on syphilis and sexual risk behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Joseph D; Young, Darwin; Yang, Ligang; Yang, Bin; Adimora, Adaora A

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the relationship between sibling position and sexual risk based on behavioural and syphilis infection data from sexually transmitted infection (STI) patients in South China. Design A cross-sectional study examining sexual behaviours and syphilis infection. Setting 4 STI clinics in the Pearl River Delta of South China. Participants 1792 Chinese men and women attending STI clinics. Primary outcome measures STI history, syphilis infection defined as positive non-treponemal and treponemal tests. Results Among all clinic patients, 824 (46.3%) were first-born, 354 (19.9%) were middle-born and 602 (33.8%) were final-born. Middle-born individuals had a higher percentage of reported STI history (44.7% compared to 34.7%, p<0.001) and syphilis infection (9.7% compared to 4.9%, p=0.01) among men (n=1163) compared to other sibling positions in bivariate analyses, but not in the final multivariate model. The relationship between sibling position and syphilis was independent of income and education level. There was no trend observed between middle-born position and female sexual risk behaviours (n=626). Higher education was significantly associated with syphilis among women and men in respective multivariate models. Conclusions This study suggests that middle-born men in China may have an increased sexual risk compared to other sibling positions. As Chinese family and social structures change, a more thorough understanding of how demographic factors influence sexual risk behaviours is needed. PMID:23793689

  19. Recent Trends in the Serologic Diagnosis of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ameeta E.

    2014-01-01

    Complexities in the diagnosis of syphilis continue to challenge clinicians. While direct tests (e.g., microscopy or PCR) are helpful in early syphilis, the mainstay of diagnosis remains serologic tests. The traditional algorithm using a nontreponemal test (NTT) followed by a treponemal test (TT) remains the standard in many parts of the world. More recently, the ability to automate the TT has led to the increasingly widespread use of reverse algorithms using treponemal enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). Rapid, point-of-care TTs are in widespread use in developing countries because of low cost, ease of use, and reasonable performance. However, none of the current diagnostic algorithms are able to distinguish current from previously treated infections. In addition, the reversal of traditional syphilis algorithms has led to uncertainty in the clinical management of patients. The interpretation of syphilis tests is further complicated by the lack of a reliable gold standard for syphilis diagnostics, and the newer tests can result in false-positive reactions similar to those seen with older tests. Little progress has been made in the area of serologic diagnostics for congenital syphilis, which requires assessment of maternal treatment and serologic response as well as clinical and laboratory investigation of the neonate for appropriate management. The diagnosis of neurosyphilis continues to require the collection of cerebrospinal fluid for a combination of NTT and TT, and, while newer treponemal EIAs look promising, more studies are needed to confirm their utility. This article reviews current tests and discusses current controversies in syphilis diagnosis, with a focus on serologic tests. PMID:25428245

  20. Syphilis at the Crossroad of Phylogenetics and Paleopathology

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Fernando Lucas; de Mello, Joana Carvalho Moreira; Fraga, Ana Maria; Nunes, Kelly; Eggers, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    The origin of syphilis is still controversial. Different research avenues explore its fascinating history. Here we employed a new integrative approach, where paleopathology and molecular analyses are combined. As an exercise to test the validity of this approach we examined different hypotheses on the origin of syphilis and other human diseases caused by treponemes (treponematoses). Initially, we constructed a worldwide map containing all accessible reports on palaeopathological evidences of treponematoses before Columbus's return to Europe. Then, we selected the oldest ones to calibrate the time of the most recent common ancestor of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, T. pallidum subsp. endemicum and T. pallidum subsp. pertenue in phylogenetic analyses with 21 genetic regions of different T. pallidum strains previously reported. Finally, we estimated the treponemes' evolutionary rate to test three scenarios: A) if treponematoses accompanied human evolution since Homo erectus; B) if venereal syphilis arose very recently from less virulent strains caught in the New World about 500 years ago, and C) if it emerged in the Americas between 16,500 and 5,000 years ago. Two of the resulting evolutionary rates were unlikely and do not explain the existent osseous evidence. Thus, treponematoses, as we know them today, did not emerge with H. erectus, nor did venereal syphilis appear only five centuries ago. However, considering 16,500 years before present (yBP) as the time of the first colonization of the Americas, and approximately 5,000 yBP as the oldest probable evidence of venereal syphilis in the world, we could not entirely reject hypothesis C. We confirm that syphilis seems to have emerged in this time span, since the resulting evolutionary rate is compatible with those observed in other bacteria. In contrast, if the claims of precolumbian venereal syphilis outside the Americas are taken into account, the place of origin remains unsolved. Finally, the endeavor of

  1. A Web Application to Facilitate Syphilis Reactor Grid Evaluations.

    PubMed

    Avoundjian, Tigran; Khosropour, Christine M; Golden, Matthew R; Barbee, Lindley A; Dombrowski, Julia C

    2017-08-28

    Many health departments use a "reactor grid" to determine which laboratory-reported syphilis serologic test results require investigation. We developed a Web-based tool, the Syphilis Reactor Grid Evaluator (SRGE), to facilitate health department reactor grid evaluations and test the tool using data from Seattle & King County, Washington. We developed SRGE using the R Shiny Web application framework. When populated with a data set including titer results and final disposition codes, SRGE displays the percent of verified early syphilis cases by serologic titer result and patient age in each cell of the grid. The results can be optionally stratified by sex, test type, and previous rapid plasma reagin titer. The impact of closing laboratory results without investigation in cells selected by the user is dynamically computed. The SRGE calculates the percent of all laboratory reports closed ("efficiency gained"), the proportion of all early syphilis cases closed without investigation ("case finding loss"), and the ratio of percent of cases identified for investigation to percent of all laboratory reports investigated ("efficiency ratio"). After defining algorithms, users can compare them side-by-side, combine subgroup-specific algorithms, and export results. We used SRGE to compare the current Public Health-Seattle & King County (PHSKC) reactor grid to 5 alternate algorithms. Of 13,504 rapid plasma reagin results reported to PHSKC from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2015, 1565 were linked to verified early syphilis cases. Updating PHSKC's current reactor grid could result in an efficiency gain of 4.8% to 25.2% (653-3403 laboratory reports) and case finding loss of 1% to 8.4% (10-99 fewer cases investigated). The Syphilis Reactor Grid Evaluator can be used to rapidly evaluate alternative approaches to optimizing the reactor grid. Changing the reactor grid in King County to close more laboratory results without investigation could improve efficiency with minimal impact on

  2. Syphilis in composers and musicians--Mozart, Beethoven, Paganini, Schubert, Schumann, Smetana.

    PubMed

    Franzen, C

    2008-12-01

    In the pre-antibiotics era, syphilis was an extremely common disease. The first well-recorded European outbreak of what is now known as syphilis occurred in 1494, when it appeared among French troops besieging Naples. Thereafter, the disease spread all over Europe and, in the 18th and 19th centuries, many artists became victims of syphilis, among them poets, painters, philosophers, and musicians and composers. This review presents biographies of several musicians and composers that probably suffered from syphilis.

  3. Rapid Syphilis Testing Uptake for Female Sex Workers at Sex Venues in Southern China: Implications for Expanding Syphilis Screening

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang-Sheng; Yin, Yue-Ping; Shen, Crystal; Liu, Guo-Gu; Zhu, Zheng-Jun; Wei, Wan-Hui; Wang, Hong-Chun; Huang, Shui-Jie; Li, Jing; Tucker, Joseph D.; Mabey, David C.; Peeling, Rosanna W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Accessibility of syphilis testing services is critical in syphilis control programs for female sex workers (FSWs), but few FSWs attend public STI clinics or other testing sites. Introduction of free rapid syphilis testing (RST) into outreach programs for FSWs will help improve test uptake. Methods Commercial sex venues were identified in two cities in South China. In cooperation with health advocacy organizations, health outreach teams from local public health or medical facilities approached all types of sex venues in study areas to offer free RST. Acceptability and uptake of RST among FSWs were evaluated. Results A total of 2812 FSWs were offered RST and 2670 (95.0%) accepted syphilis testing. 182 (6.8%) FSWs had a positive RST result among whom 136 (74.7%) were willing to attend an STD clinic for confirmatory testing and treatment. More than half (89, 66.4%) of those with syphilis were not willing to notify their sex partners. Multivariate logistic analysis showed that syphilis test uptake was associated with residing in Jiangmen (AOR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.15–2.77), older age (AOR, 2.11, 95% CI, 1.17–3.79 for age of 31 years or above), and not working at a service venue (AOR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.10–2.34). Conclusions RST at sex venues is well accepted by FSWs when it is integrated into ongoing outreach services. Such programs provide excellent opportunities for expanding syphilis screening efforts among specific subgroups of FSW who are difficult to reach through clinic-based programs. PMID:23300709

  4. Histopathologic ear findings of syphilis: a temporal bone study.

    PubMed

    Hızlı, Ömer; Hızlı, Pelin; Kaya, Serdar; Monsanto, Rafael da Costa; Paparella, Michael M; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2016-09-01

    To the best of our knowledge, histopathologic studies of syphilitic ears have generally focused on hydropic changes; so far, no such studies have investigated peripheral vestibular otopathology using differential interference contrast microscopy, in patients with syphilis. For this study, we examined 13 human temporal bone samples from 8 patients with a history of syphilis. Using conventional light microscopy, we performed qualitative histopathologic assessment. In addition, using differential interference contrast microscopy, we performed type I and type II vestibular hair cell counts on each vestibular sense organ with minimal autolysis; in which the neuroepithelium was oriented perpendicular to the plane of section. We then compared vestibular hair cell densities (cells per 0.01 mm² surface area) in the syphilis group vs. the control group. In the syphilis group, we observed precipitate in the endolymphatic or perilymphatic spaces in 1 (7.7 %) of the samples and endolymphatic hydrops in eight (61.5 %) of the samples. Hydrops involved the cochlea (four samples) and/or saccule (four samples). In addition, the syphilis group experienced a significant loss of type II vestibular hair cells in the maculae of the utricle and saccule, and in the cristae of the lateral and posterior semicircular canals, as compared with the control group (P < 0.05).

  5. Infectious syphilis in women: what's old is new again?

    PubMed

    Shaw, Souradet Y; Ross, Craig; Nowicki, Deborah L; Marshall, Shelley; Stephen, Sandy; Davies, Christina; Riddell, Jennifer; Bailey, Kim; Elliott, Lawrence J; Reimer, Joss N; Plourde, Pierre J

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine trends in infectious syphilis epidemiology among women in Winnipeg, Canada. A descriptive study of syphilis among Winnipeg residents between 2003 and 30 June 2015 was undertaken. Adjusted rate ratios (ARR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) from Poisson regression analyses are reported. Characteristics of men and women were compared using logistic regression, with adjusted odds ratios (AOR) reported. Between 2014 and 2015, the rate of syphilis was 1.7/100,000, representing a five-fold increase since 2006-2013. All cases have been heterosexual, 90% 20-39 years of age, and 59% living in Winnipeg's inner core. Approximately 24% were pregnant at diagnosis; no cases of congenital syphilis have been reported. Compared to men, women were more likely to report alcohol use (AOR: 3.8, 95% CI: 1.2-11.9) and co-infection with chlamydia (AOR: 5.0, 95% CI: 1.1-22.9). In conclusion, the rates of infectious syphilis are increasing among women. Prenatal screening and education for inner-core women and the health care providers serving them should be prioritized.

  6. RPR Titer Variation in the Two Weeks Following Syphilis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Katherine M.; Wolff, Mark; Seña, Arlene C.; Martin, David H.; Behets, Frieda; Van Damme, Kathleen; Leone, Peter; McNeil, Linda; Gehrig, Meredyth L.; Hook, Edward W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Serologic tests for syphilis (STS) results at time of diagnosis are the basis for evaluating response to syphilis therapy. Following treatment, however, STS titers may continue to increase for several weeks. We evaluated RPR titer variation over the 14 days following therapy using data from a recent large, prospective RCT. Methods Prospectively enrolled participants in North America and Madagascar with primary, secondary or early latent syphilis were randomly assigned to penicillin, doxycycline (in the case of penicillin allergy) or azithromycin treatment. Blood for RPR analysis was drawn at days 0, 7, and 14 post-treatment. All RPR titers were determined simultaneously at a central laboratory. Results 470 patients had data available for at least 2 of 3 RPR measurements. Overall, 20% of patients showed a titer increase of at least one dilution in the 14 days following therapy. The greatest proportion of titer increases following therapy was seen in patients with primary syphilis. Comparing outcome of therapy using the initial (day 0) RPR titer vs. the maximal RPR titer (over 14 days), resulted in outcome reclassification in 2.98% of participants. Conclusions Despite the fact that about 20% of early syphilis patients had increases in RPR titers immediately following treatment, these changes rarely influenced assessment of therapeutic outcome. Only 3% of patients treated would have been reclassified. PMID:22801348

  7. Which theory for the origin of syphilis is true?

    PubMed

    Anteric, Ivana; Basic, Zeljana; Vilovic, Katarina; Kolic, Kresimir; Andjelinovic, Simun

    2014-12-01

    There are four theories about the origin of syphilis, of which the mostly represented one is the Columbian theory. This theory suggests that syphilis was brought into Europe in 1493 ad by the ship from Caribbean islands. The aim of this study is to test all theories on a sample of 403 skeletons: 135 from prehistory, 134 from antique, and 134 from medieval period and new age from the Dalmatia (Croatia). All skeletons were examined using standard anthropological methods. Paleopathological analysis was performed on each skeleton as well as additional radiographic method on one isolated skeleton. Paleopathological changes on skeletal remains connected with treponematosis. Paleopathological analysis revealed one skeleton from the antique period (second to 6th century A.D.) that exhibited skeletal markers similar to those described in one clinical case in which congenital syphilis was confirmed by a Wasserman reaction. Skeletal remains of this person were examined macroscopically and radiographically, and the differential diagnostics eliminated other considered pathologies as well as trauma. The finding of skeletal markers of syphilis on a skeleton from the antique supports the theory of pre-Columbian syphilis origin. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  8. Syphilis screening practices in blood transfusion facilities in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sarkodie, Francis; Hassall, Oliver; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Owusu-Ofori, Shirley; Bates, Imelda; Bygbjerg, Ib C; Ansah, Justina Kordai; Ullum, Henrik

    2016-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare laboratory practices for screening blood donors for syphilis at blood transfusion facilities in Ghana with the recommendations of the World Health Organization and the National Blood Service, Ghana (NBSG). The prevalence of syphilis antibodies in blood donors in Ghana was also estimated. Over an 11-month period, from February 2014 to January 2015, a semi-structured questionnaire was administered to 122 laboratory technical heads out of a total of 149 transfusion facilities in Ghana. The response rate was 81.9%. A total of 58 (48%) transfusion facilities tested donors for syphilis, with an estimated 3.7% seroprevalence (95% confidence interval 3.6-3.8%). A total of 62782 out of 91386 (68.7%) donations were tested with assays that are not recommended. The estimated syphilis seroprevalence in voluntary donations was 2.9%, compared to 4.0% in family donations (p=0.001). Only 6.9% of the health facilities were using standard operating procedures (SOPs). Despite international and national recommendations, more than half of the studied health facilities that provide blood transfusions in Ghana are not screening blood donations for syphilis. These data show a considerable mismatch between recommendations and practice, with serious consequences for blood safety and public health. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagnostic approaches in unsuspected oral lesions of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, C S; Saturno, J L; de Sousa, S C O M; da Silveira, F R X

    2014-12-01

    Awareness of the increased prevalence of syphilis is essential for early diagnosis and treatment, and to prevent the spread of the disease. Although serological studies are the primary tool used to confirm the diagnosis of secondary syphilis, biopsy of unsuspected oral lesions is not uncommon in the routine oral pathology laboratory. In these cases, histopathological characteristics are likely to indicate the possibility of syphilis, and an immunohistochemical reaction can confirm it. The aim of the present study was to highlight the histological features and test the efficacy of immunohistochemistry in the detection of Treponema pallidum in oral lesions biopsied with the assumption of a non-syphilitic disease. Thirty-nine tissue samples from patients for whom the possibility of syphilis was suggested on the basis of histopathological findings, were retrieved from the surgical oral pathology service files and submitted to immunohistochemical staining for T. pallidum. The study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Eighteen of the tissue samples were positive for T. pallidum. Following this, the contributing clinicians were contacted to check whether they had asked for serological examinations when the diagnostic report was received; for all 18 positive cases, the clinicians confirmed that the patients had tested positive at that time. This study shows the importance of clinical-pathological correlation and the value of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of unsuspected syphilis. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The introduction of syphilis point of care tests in resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Mabey, David Cw

    2017-04-01

    Syphilis remains an important and preventable cause of stillbirth and neonatal mortality. About 1 million women with active syphilis become pregnant each year. Without treatment, 25% of them will deliver a stillborn baby and 33% a low birth weight baby with an increased chance of dying in the first month of life. Adverse pregnancy outcomes due to syphilis can be prevented by screening pregnant women, and treating those who test positive with a single dose of penicillin before 28 weeks' gestation. Areas covered: This manuscript covers the impact of syphilis on pregnancy outcome, the diagnosis of syphilis, with a special focus on point of care (POC) tests, and challenges to the introduction of POC tests, and their potential impact on the control and prevention of syphilis in resource limited settings. Expert commentary: POC tests for syphilis are available which meet the ASSURED criteria, and could make syphilis screening accessible to all women anywhere in the world who attend an antenatal clinic. High quality dual POC tests for HIV and syphilis could ensure that well-funded programmes for the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV can contribute towards increased coverage of antenatal syphilis screening, and prevent more than 300,000 adverse pregnancy outcomes due to syphilis annually. Alongside investment to increase availability of syphilis POC tests, operational research is needed to understand how best to improve screening of pregnant women and to translate test availability into improved pregnancy outcomes.

  11. Could lengthening minocycline therapy better treat early syphilis?

    PubMed

    Shao, Li-Li; Guo, Rui; Shi, Wei-Jie; Liu, Yuan-Jun; Feng, Bin; Han, Long; Liu, Quan-Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum. Minocycline, a representative tetracycline derivative, has the greatest antimicrobial activity among all tetracyclines. There are few reports about treating syphilis with minocycline because there is a lack of efficacy data from controlled trials. We compared the rates of serological cure in patients with early syphilis who were treated with minocycline or benzathine penicillin G (BPG).During the study period, a total of 40 syphilis patients received the BPG treatment, which was a single intramuscular dose of 2.4 million units of BPG, and 156 patients were treated with minocycline; 77 patients were placed in the 2-week, standard minocycline therapy group and received 100 mg of minocycline orally, twice daily for 14 days, and 79 patients were placed in the 4-week, lengthened minocycline therapy group and received 100 mg of minocycline orally, twice daily for 28 days. The outcome of interest was the rate of serological cure in these patients.At the end of the 2-year follow-up, the serological cure rate of the 4-week, lengthened minocycline therapy group (87.34%) was higher than that of both the 2-week, standard minocycline therapy group (72.73%) and the BPG treatment group (77.50%). In addition, the curative effect of the 4-week, lengthened minocycline therapy was significantly greater than that of the 2-week, standard minocycline therapy in patients who were aged >40 years; exhibited an initial rapid plasma reagin titer ≥1: 32; or exhibited secondary syphilis (P = 0.000, 0.008, 0.000; <0.05).Minocycline appears to be an effective agent for treating early syphilis, especially when applied as a 4-week, lengthened therapy.

  12. Gestational and congenital syphilis epidemic in the Colombian Pacific Coast.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Adriana R; Castrillón, Maria Alejandra; Minotta, Alba Yadira; Rubiano, Luisa C; Castaño, Martha C; Salazar, Juan C

    2013-10-01

    Congenital syphilis (CS) is a major global public health problem. Buenaventura, a socioeconomically deprived municipality in the Colombian Pacific Coast, accounts for 6.6% of all CS cases in Colombia. To begin to understand the main reasons for the high rates of the disease in Buenaventura, we conducted a retrospective electronic health record analysis of all infants admitted with CS during the first 7 months of 2011 to the Hospital Departamental de Buenaventura, the city's main birthing hospital. The diagnosis of gestational syphilis and CS was based on a predefined Colombian public health service algorithm. Clinical, laboratory, and sociodemographic parameters for all infants studied, including maternal access to prenatal care, syphilis serologic diagnosis, and adequacy of penicillin treatment, were abstracted and analyzed. A total of 89 infants met the case definition for CS. Most mothers (80%) were affiliated with government-regulated or private health care insurance plans. While 64 (70%) of 92 attended at least 1 antenatal care visit and 59 of these 64 (84%) were screened for syphilis, only 5 (8%) of 59 received appropriate antibiotic therapy. Although most infants were asymptomatic at birth, prematurity (15/82) was common. Two infants died in the neonatal period, and 5 pregnancies ended in stillbirth. Our findings confirm that Buenaventura has a very high incidence of CS and demonstrate that existing antenatal care gestational syphilis programs are flawed. Prevention strategies should emphasize enhanced early syphilis screening in pregnancy, preferably through the implementation of point-of-care testing in the community and same-day treatment with at least 1 dose of penicillin.

  13. Could lengthening minocycline therapy better treat early syphilis?

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Li-Li; Guo, Rui; Shi, Wei-Jie; Liu, Yuan-Jun; Feng, Bin; Han, Long; Liu, Quan-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum. Minocycline, a representative tetracycline derivative, has the greatest antimicrobial activity among all tetracyclines. There are few reports about treating syphilis with minocycline because there is a lack of efficacy data from controlled trials. We compared the rates of serological cure in patients with early syphilis who were treated with minocycline or benzathine penicillin G (BPG). During the study period, a total of 40 syphilis patients received the BPG treatment, which was a single intramuscular dose of 2.4 million units of BPG, and 156 patients were treated with minocycline; 77 patients were placed in the 2-week, standard minocycline therapy group and received 100 mg of minocycline orally, twice daily for 14 days, and 79 patients were placed in the 4-week, lengthened minocycline therapy group and received 100 mg of minocycline orally, twice daily for 28 days. The outcome of interest was the rate of serological cure in these patients. At the end of the 2-year follow-up, the serological cure rate of the 4-week, lengthened minocycline therapy group (87.34%) was higher than that of both the 2-week, standard minocycline therapy group (72.73%) and the BPG treatment group (77.50%). In addition, the curative effect of the 4-week, lengthened minocycline therapy was significantly greater than that of the 2-week, standard minocycline therapy in patients who were aged >40 years; exhibited an initial rapid plasma reagin titer ≥1: 32; or exhibited secondary syphilis (P = 0.000, 0.008, 0.000; <0.05). Minocycline appears to be an effective agent for treating early syphilis, especially when applied as a 4-week, lengthened therapy. PMID:28033297

  14. Unilateral facial paralysis after treatment of secondary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Berger, Emily M; Galadari, Hassan I; Gottlieb, Alice B

    2008-06-01

    Bell's palsy is an acute facial paralysis of unknown etiology. Infections including syphilis have been implicated as causes for peripheral facial paresis. The Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction is an acute worsening of skin manifestations and systemic symptoms occurring after administration of antimicrobial therapy for spirochetal infections. Although rare, neurological signs can present as part of the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction. The authors report a case of Bell's palsy experienced by a patient shortly after treatment with penicillin for secondary syphilis and propose that this acute unilateral peripheral facial paralysis was a Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction in response to therapy.

  15. [The symbolic geopolitics of syphilis: an essay in historical anthropology].

    PubMed

    Carrara, S

    The article analyzes certain scientific ideas that Brazilian physicians, and particularly syphilologists, have held about this disease. During the 1920's especially, these specialists constructed a uniquely Brazilian version of the disease as they debated with foreign specialists on the origins, symptoms, and incidence of syphilis in Brazil. In their formulations, syphilis became a kind of natural symbol through which they expressed their desires to play a leading role within the international scientific community and put forth efforts to earn Brazil a new status in the world ranking of nations contesting the notion that Brazil was forever doomed to backwardness and barbarism because it was a tropical country with a racially mixed population.

  16. A review of recent advances in rapid point-of-care tests for syphilis.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Claire C; Larson, Elysia; Javanbakht, Marjan; Huang, Emily; Causer, Louise; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2015-04-01

    Syphilis is a curable disease, yet over 10million people worldwide are infected with syphilis each year. Syphilis case finding and subsequent treatment are key steps in syphilis control and prevention efforts. The advent of rapid point-of-care tests - which require minimal equipment, are easy to perform and are relatively low cost - have the potential to improve syphilis control by allowing for more widespread testing in clinical and non-clinical settings. However, strategies to maximise the potential public health impact of those tests are needed, and those include regulatory oversight, effective supply-chain management and quality assurance systems.

  17. [A Case of Rectal Syphilis Incidentally Found at Regular Medical Check-up].

    PubMed

    You, Ji Hong; Cho, Ki Won; Cha, Yoon Jin; Park, Hyo Jin

    2016-10-25

    Syphilis is a rare disease in the rectum. It is difficult to diagnose because the characteristics of the rectal syphilis rectal lesion are highly varied. The endoscopic findings of rectal syphilis are proctitis, ulcers, and masses. If rectal syphilis is suspected to be the cause for rectal lesions, it is important for physicians to consider the sexual history and sexual orientation of the patient. We report a case of incidental rectal syphilis in a 41-year-old man diagnosed during a regular medical check-up.

  18. [Seroprevalence of syphilis in pregnant women in San Luis Potosí].

    PubMed

    Noyola, Daniel E; Malacara-Alfaro, Octavio; Lima-Rogel, Victoria; Torres-Montes, Abraham

    2006-01-01

    To determine the seroprevalence of syphilis in pregnant women. A seroepidemiologic survey was conducted in 1857 women giving birth at a general hospital in the city of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Five women (0.27%) were diagnosed with syphilis at the time of delivery. Maternal factors associated with a greater likelihood of syphilis included older age, a higher number of pregnancies and living out of wedlock. The number of new bhorns exposed to syphilis during pregnancy in San Luis Potosi is underestimated. The results of this study support the need to identify syphilis in infected mothers at the time of delivery.

  19. Ten-year trends of syphilis in sero-surveillance of pregnant women in Rwanda and correlates of syphilis-HIV co-infection.

    PubMed

    Mutagoma, Mwumvaneza; Balisanga, Helene; Remera, Eric; Gupta, Neil; Malamba, Samuel S; Riedel, David J; Nsanzimana, Sabin

    2017-01-01

    Syphilis can be transmitted by pregnant women to their children and is a public health problem in Africa. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 24 antenatal clinics from 2002 to 2003 and increased to 30 sites from 2005 to 2011. Participants were tested for syphilis and HIV. Multi-variate logistic regression was performed to identify risks associated with syphilis and its co-infection with HIV. Results showed that syphilis decreased from 3.8% in 2002 to 2.0% in 2011. Syphilis in the HIV-infected participants increased from 6.0% in 2002 to 10.8% in 2011, but decreased from 3.7% to 1.7% in the HIV-negative participants. In 2011, syphilis in urban participants was 2.7% and 1.4% in rural ones. HIV-infected participants screened positive for syphilis more frequently in both rural (aOR = 3.64 [95% CI: 1.56%-8.51%]) and urban areas (aOR = 7.26 [95% CI: 5.04%-10.46%]). Older participants (25-49 years) residing in urban areas (aOR = 0.43[95% CI: 0.32%-0.58%]) and women with secondary or high education (aOR = 0.35[95% CI: 0.20%-0.62%]) were less likely to screen positive for syphilis. HIV-syphilis co-infection was more likely in women residing in urban areas (aOR = 8.32[95% CI: 3.54%-19.56%]), but less likely in women with secondary/high education (aOR = 0.11[95% CI: 0.01%-0.77%]). In conclusion, syphilis increased in HIV-positive pregnant women, but decreased in HIV-negative women. Positive HIV status and young age were associated risks for syphilis. HIV-syphilis co-infection was associated with a lower level of education and urban residence.

  20. Lives Saved Tool supplement detection and treatment of syphilis in pregnancy to reduce syphilis related stillbirths and neonatal mortality

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Globally syphilis is an important yet preventable cause of stillbirth, neonatal mortality and morbidity. Objectives This review sought to estimate the effect of detection and treatment of active syphilis in pregnancy with at least 2.4MU benzathine penicillin (or equivalent) on syphilis-related stillbirths and neonatal mortality. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review of multiple databases to identify relevant studies. Data were abstracted into standardised tables and the quality of evidence was assessed using adapted GRADE criteria. Where appropriate, meta-analyses were undertaken. Results Moderate quality evidence (3 studies) supports a reduction in the incidence of clinical congenital syphilis of 97% (95% c.i 93 – 98%) with detection and treatment of women with active syphilis in pregnancy with at least 2.4MU penicillin. The results of meta-analyses suggest that treatment with penicillin is associated with an 82% reduction in stillbirth (95% c.i. 67 – 90%) (8 studies), a 64% reduction in preterm delivery (95% c.i. 53 – 73%) (7 studies) and an 80% reduction in neonatal deaths (95% c.i. 68 – 87%) (5 studies). Although these effect estimates were large and remarkably consistent across studies, few of the studies adjusted for potential confounding factors and thus the overall quality of the evidence was considered low. However, given these large observed effects and a clear biological mechanism for effectiveness the GRADE recommendation is strong. Conclusion Detection and appropriate, timely penicillin treatment is a highly effective intervention to reduce adverse syphilis-related pregnancy outcomes. More research is required to identify the most cost-effective strategies for achieving maximum coverage of screening for all pregnant women, and access to treatment if required. PMID:21501460

  1. Time Series Modelling of Syphilis Incidence in China from 2005 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingyu; Zhang, Tao; Pei, Jiao; Liu, Yuanyuan; Li, Xiaosong; Medrano-Gracia, Pau

    2016-01-01

    The infection rate of syphilis in China has increased dramatically in recent decades, becoming a serious public health concern. Early prediction of syphilis is therefore of great importance for heath planning and management. In this paper, we analyzed surveillance time series data for primary, secondary, tertiary, congenital and latent syphilis in mainland China from 2005 to 2012. Seasonality and long-term trend were explored with decomposition methods. Autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) was used to fit a univariate time series model of syphilis incidence. A separate multi-variable time series for each syphilis type was also tested using an autoregressive integrated moving average model with exogenous variables (ARIMAX). The syphilis incidence rates have increased three-fold from 2005 to 2012. All syphilis time series showed strong seasonality and increasing long-term trend. Both ARIMA and ARIMAX models fitted and estimated syphilis incidence well. All univariate time series showed highest goodness-of-fit results with the ARIMA(0,0,1)×(0,1,1) model. Time series analysis was an effective tool for modelling the historical and future incidence of syphilis in China. The ARIMAX model showed superior performance than the ARIMA model for the modelling of syphilis incidence. Time series correlations existed between the models for primary, secondary, tertiary, congenital and latent syphilis.

  2. Stages of syphilis in South China - a multilevel analysis of early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ngai Sze; Huang, Shujie; Zheng, Heping; Chen, Lei; Zhao, Peizhen; Tucker, Joseph D; Yang, Li Gang; Goh, Beng Tin; Yang, Bin

    2017-01-31

    Early diagnosis of syphilis and timely treatment can effectively reduce ongoing syphilis transmission and morbidity. We examined the factors associated with the early diagnosis of syphilis to inform syphilis screening strategic planning. In an observational study, we analyzed reported syphilis cases in Guangdong Province, China (from 2014 to mid-2015) accessed from the national case-based surveillance system. We categorized primary and secondary syphilis cases as early diagnosis and categorized latent and tertiary syphilis as delayed diagnosis. Univariate analyses and multivariable logistic regressions were performed to identify the factors associated with early diagnosis. We also examined the factors associated with early diagnosis at the individual and city levels in multilevel logistic regression models with cases nested by city (n = 21), adjusted for age at diagnosis and gender. Among 83,944 diagnosed syphilis cases, 22% were early diagnoses. The city-level early diagnosis rate ranged from 7 to 46%, consistent with substantial geographic variation as shown in the multilevel model. Early diagnosis was associated with cases presenting to specialist clinics for screening, being male and attaining higher education level. Cases received syphilis testing in institutions and hospitals, and diagnosed in hospitals were less likely to be in early diagnosis. At the city-level, cases living in a city equipped with more hospitals per capita were less likely to be early diagnosis. To enhance early diagnosis of syphilis, city-specific syphilis screening strategies with a mix of passive and client/provider-initiated testing might be a useful approach.

  3. Time Series Modelling of Syphilis Incidence in China from 2005 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingyu; Zhang, Tao; Pei, Jiao; Liu, Yuanyuan; Li, Xiaosong; Medrano-Gracia, Pau

    2016-01-01

    Background The infection rate of syphilis in China has increased dramatically in recent decades, becoming a serious public health concern. Early prediction of syphilis is therefore of great importance for heath planning and management. Methods In this paper, we analyzed surveillance time series data for primary, secondary, tertiary, congenital and latent syphilis in mainland China from 2005 to 2012. Seasonality and long-term trend were explored with decomposition methods. Autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) was used to fit a univariate time series model of syphilis incidence. A separate multi-variable time series for each syphilis type was also tested using an autoregressive integrated moving average model with exogenous variables (ARIMAX). Results The syphilis incidence rates have increased three-fold from 2005 to 2012. All syphilis time series showed strong seasonality and increasing long-term trend. Both ARIMA and ARIMAX models fitted and estimated syphilis incidence well. All univariate time series showed highest goodness-of-fit results with the ARIMA(0,0,1)×(0,1,1) model. Conclusion Time series analysis was an effective tool for modelling the historical and future incidence of syphilis in China. The ARIMAX model showed superior performance than the ARIMA model for the modelling of syphilis incidence. Time series correlations existed between the models for primary, secondary, tertiary, congenital and latent syphilis. PMID:26901682

  4. The Impact of Syphilis Screening among Female Sex Workers in China: A Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Kate M.; Cox, Andrew P.; Mabey, David; Tucker, Joseph D.; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Vickerman, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background In China, female sex workers (FSWs) are at high risk of syphilis infection, but are hard to reach for interventions. Point-of-care testing introduces opportunities for expanding syphilis control measures. Modelling is used to estimate the impact of using rapid tests to screen FSWs for syphilis. In other settings, modelling has predicted large rebounds in infectious syphilis following screening, which may undermine any impact achieved. Methods A deterministic syphilis transmission model among FSWs and clients was fitted to data from Yunnan Province (FSW syphilis prevalence = 7.5%), and used to estimate the impact of rapid syphilis testing and treatment for FSWs. Impact projections were compared for different model structures that included risk heterogeneity amongst FSWs, incoming syphilis infections amongst new FSWs and clients and re-infection from FSWs' regular non-commercial partners. The rebound in syphilis prevalence after screening ceased was explored. Results All model structures suggest yearly syphilis screening could substantially reduce (by 72–88%) syphilis prevalence amongst FSWs in this setting over five years. However, incoming syphilis infections amongst new FSWs and clients or re-infections from regular non-commercial partners of FSWs can considerably reduce (>30%) the proportion of infections averted. Including heterogeneity in risk amongst FSWs had little effect upon the proportion of infections averted. In this setting, the rebound in syphilis prevalence after screening ceased is predicted to be slight, but it could be large in high prevalence settings. Conclusions Rapid test screening could dramatically reduce syphilis prevalence amongst hard-to-reach groups, but strategies to reduce re-infection from regular non-commercial partners are needed to maximise impact. PMID:23383249

  5. A decade of reorientation in the treatment of venereal syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Idsoe, O.; Guthe, T.; Christiansen, Sven; Krag, P.; Cutler, J. C.

    1954-01-01

    As experience with penicillin in the treatment of venereal syphilis has grown over the last decade, this drug, used without adjuvants, has become increasingly widely accepted as being effective, convenient, non-toxic, and relatively inexpensive. Metal chemotherapy required the use of repeated subcurative doses over a long period of time and was essentially suppressive in character; penicillin can be given in the form of repository preparations which ensure a treponemacidal blood-level of long duration. These can be given in large single doses or in repeated smaller doses; the therapeutic results will not vary whichever of these procedures is used. In the first part of this paper, the authors discuss the effect of penicillin and the time factor, the choice of penicillin preparation, the mode of administration, and the reaction to infection with Treponema pallidum. In the second part, they consider the present status of penicillin therapy in venereal syphilis, dealing with the principles of follow-up and control; with the treatment of early, latent, late, and congenital syphilis; and with the treatment of incubating syphilis and contacts. PMID:13182586

  6. Evaluation of ID-PaGIA syphilis antibody test.

    PubMed

    Naaber, Paul; Makoid, Ene; Aus, Anneli; Loivukene, Krista; Poder, Airi

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory diagnosis of syphilis is usually accomplished by serology. There are currently a large number of different commercial treponemal tests available that vary in format, sensitivity and specificity. To evaluate the ID-PaGIA Syphilis Antibody Test as an alternative to other specific treponemal tests for primary screening or confirmation of diagnosis. Serum samples from healthy adults (n = 100) were used for detection of specificity of ID-PaGIA. To evaluate sensitivity of ID-PaGIA serum samples (n = 101) from patients with confirmed or suspected syphilis were tested for syphilis antibodies with FTA-Abs IgM, ID-PaGIA, ELISA IgM and TPHA tests. No false-positive results were found with ID-PaGIA. Sensitivity of various treponemal tests was the following: FTA-Abs IgM: 95.5%, ID-PaGIA and ELISA IgM: 94%, and TPHA 75%. The positive and negative predictive values of ID-PaGIA were 100 and 89.5%, respectively. Compared with other treponemal tests ID-PaGIA has excellent sensitivity and specificity.

  7. Extracutaneous atypical syphilis in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Paula; Imaz, Arkaitz; Calatayud, Laura; García, Olga; Saumoy, María; Podzamczer, Daniel

    2017-07-21

    We describe a series of cases of syphilis with atypical extracutaneous clinical presentation diagnosed in HIV-infected patients. Retrospective observational study. All cases of syphilis diagnosed in HIV-infected patients during the period between June 2013 and June 2016 in a tertiary hospital of the Barcelona metropolitan area were analysed. A total of 71 cases of syphilis were diagnosed, 32 of them presenting with clinical signs or symptoms. Seven of these cases (9.8% of the total and 21.8% of the symptomatic cases) had atypical presentations with extracutaneous involvement: ocular (4), gastric (1), multiple hepatic abscesses (1) and generalised adenopathies (1). Patients were treated with intramuscular or intravenous penicillin and the clinical and serological evolution was good in all of them. Extracutaneous atypical clinical presentations were observed in 21.8% of symptomatic cases of syphilis in HIV+ patients with ocular involvement being the most freqent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Bone pain as the presenting manifestation of secondary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Middleton, S; Rowntree, C; Rudge, S

    1990-08-01

    A 31 year old fireman presented with acute pain and tenderness in both shins and forearms. Radiographs were normal but bone scintigraphy showed widespread increased isotope uptake. Serology was consistent with a diagnosis of secondary syphilis, and the patient's symptoms resolved completely six weeks after a course of penicillin.

  9. Risk factors for syphilis in women: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    de Macêdo, Vilma Costa; de Lira, Pedro Israel Cabral; de Frias, Paulo Germano; Romaguera, Luciana Maria Delgado; Caires, Silvana de Fátima Ferreira; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine the sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors related to the occurrence of syphilis in women treated at public maternity hospitals. METHODS This is a case-control study (239 cases and 322 controls) with women admitted to seven maternity hospitals in the municipality of Recife, Brazil, from July 2013 to July 2014. Eligible women were recruited after the result of the VDRL (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory) under any titration. The selection of cases and controls was based on the result of the serology for syphilis using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). The independent variables were grouped into: sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical and obstetric history, and health care in prenatal care and maternity hospital. Information was obtained by interview, during hospitalization, with the application of a questionnaire. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using logistic regression to identify the predicting factors of the variable to be explained. RESULTS The logistic regression analysis identified as determinant factors for gestational syphilis: education level of incomplete basic education or illiterate (OR = 2.02), lack of access to telephone (OR = 2.4), catholic religion (OR = 1.70 ), four or more pregnancies (OR = 2.2), three or more sexual partners in the last year (OR = 3.1), use of illicit drugs before the age of 18 (OR = 3.0), and use of illicit drugs by the current partner (OR = 1.7). Only one to three prenatal appointments (OR = 3.5) and a previous history of sexually transmitted infection (OR = 9.7) were also identified as determinant factors. CONCLUSIONS Sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors are associated with the occurrence of syphilis in women and should be taken into account in the elaboration of universal strategies aimed at the prevention and control of syphilis, but with a focus on situations of greater vulnerability. PMID:28832758

  10. Analytical evaluation of nine serological assays for diagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Malm, K; Andersson, S; Fredlund, H; Norrgren, H; Biague, A; Månsson, F; Ballard, R; Unemo, M

    2015-12-01

    The diagnosis of syphilis is most frequently dependent on antibody detection with serological assays. Assays for both treponemal and non-treponemal antibodies are needed to provide a sensitive and specific diagnosis. For decades, a first screening has been done with non-treponemal assays, followed by treponemal. However, in recent years, following laboratory automation, the reverse sequence screening algorithms have been developed, using a treponemal assay as the initial screening test. To evaluate serological assays for treponemal and non-treponemal antibodies, to use in reverse algorithm screening of syphilis. Six treponemal assays (one IgM-specific assay), two non-treponemal assays and one novel dual point-of-care (POC) assay for serological diagnosis of syphilis were evaluated. Serum samples from Guinea-Bissau and Sweden were examined, as well as two performance panels and samples from blood donors. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each assay, using different assays as gold standard test. The Macro-Vue RPR Card test was the most sensitive non-treponemal test and the TrepSure Anti-Treponema EIA Screen and the SeroDia TP-PA were the most sensitive and specific treponemal assays. Among the automated assays, both the Liaison Treponema Screen and Architect Syphilis TP showed high sensitivity, however, the former had clearly higher specificity. In resourced settings, where the reverse sequence algorithm is preferred for screening, an automated treponemal immunoassay for initial screening subsequently followed by the TrepSure test or TP-PA assay as a second treponemal assay appear highly effective. Finally, a quantitative highly sensitive non-treponemal assay, e.g. the Macro-Vue RPR Card test, could then be used as a supplementary test to evaluate activity of the syphilis infection. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  11. Histologic features of secondary syphilis: A multicenter retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Flamm, Alexandra; Parikh, Kruti; Xie, Qiang; Kwon, Eun Ji; Elston, Dirk M

    2015-12-01

    Secondary syphilis has a wide spectrum of clinical and histologic manifestations. We sought to determine the frequency of histopathological features characterizing secondary syphilis, and which are most common in specimens displaying few diagnostic findings. In a multicenter, retrospective analysis of biopsy-proven secondary syphilis, cases were subcategorized by the number of histologic characteristics present. The 106 cases mostly had 5 to 7 of the features studied. Many features were scarcer in cases with 5 or fewer features, including endothelial swelling (87.7% overall vs 72.4% ≤5 features), plasma cells (69.8% vs 48.3%), and elongated rete ridges (75.5% vs 27.6%). Specimens with 5 or fewer features were more likely to be truncal (61.1% vs 34.4% overall), demonstrate rete ridge effacement (44.8% vs 19.8%), and have pityriasis rosea (33.3% vs 17.2%) or drug eruption (33.3% vs 10.9%) in the clinical differential. An interstitial inflammatory pattern was the most common characteristic of specimens with 5 or fewer features (75.9%). This was a retrospective review. The independent value of many histologic features of syphilis may be overestimated. Combinations of endothelial swelling, interstitial inflammation, irregular acanthosis, and elongated rete ridges should raise the possibility of syphilis, along with the presence of vacuolar interface dermatitis with a lymphocyte in nearly every vacuole and lymphocytes with visible cytoplasm. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Historical and medical review of syphilis-afflicted army leaders, rulers and statesmen].

    PubMed

    Marinković, Zivorad; Dukić, Slobodanka

    2011-01-01

    Syphilis has changed the course of history. It is a sexually transmitted disease caused by spiral-shaped bacterium, Treponema pallidum. The disease has been known under many names during history, and has had a prominent role in history and literature for the last several hundred years. Since its recognition in 15th-century Europe as a new disease, syphilis has been the subject of great mystery and legends. Many believe that syphilis was brought to Europe by Columbus and his sailors, and, thereafter, many famous persons, such as political figures (King Charles VIII, Queen Mary I, Catherine the Great, Paul I, Vladimir Lenin), musicians and literary greats suffered from syphilis. Syphilis is a chronic, multistage disease with diverse and wide-ranging manifestations. Congenital syphilis is of particular concern, where the lack of prenatal testing and antibiotic treatment of infected pregnant women results in congenital infection of the fetus. Syphilis exists even nowadays and according to the World Health Organization estimates, there are 12 million new cases of syphilis occurring each year. While syphilis eradication seems a biologically plausible goal, the major political, cultural, and logistic difficulties involved make it unlikely. Regrettably, rather than becoming an infection of historical significance, syphilis continues to challenge researchers and clinicians in the era of HIV.

  13. Performance evaluation of the Elecsys syphilis assay for the detection of total antibodies to Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Enders, Martin; Hunjet, Andrea; Gleich, Michael; Imdahl, Roland; Mühlbacher, Annelies; Schennach, Harald; Chaiwong, Kriangsak; Sakuldamrongpanich, Tasanee; Turhan, Ajda; Sertöz, Rüchan; Wolf, Eva; Mayer, Wolfgang; Tao, Chuanmin; Wang, Lan Lan; Semprini, Simona; Sambri, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis is a health problem of increasing incidence in recent years that may have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. There are many diagnostic tests available for syphilis, but there is no gold standard, and diagnosis therefore usually relies upon a combination of tests. In this multicenter study, we evaluated the treponemal Elecsys syphilis assay for use in the diagnosis of syphilis in routine samples, i.e., when syphilis is suspected or during antenatal or blood donation screening. The sensitivity and specificity of the Elecsys syphilis assay were compared head to head with those of other treponemal assays used in routine clinical practice and were assessed in potentially cross-reactive samples from patients with Epstein-Barr virus, HIV, and Lyme disease. In a total of 8,063 syphilis-negative samples collected from routine diagnostic requests and blood donations, the Elecsys syphilis assay had a specificity of 99.88%. In 928 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 99.57 to 100% (the result is presented as a range depending on whether four initially indeterminate samples are included in the assessment). The specificity of the Elecsys syphilis assay in patients with other infections was 100%; no false-positive samples were identified. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Performance Evaluation of the Elecsys Syphilis Assay for the Detection of Total Antibodies to Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Enders, Martin; Hunjet, Andrea; Gleich, Michael; Imdahl, Roland; Mühlbacher, Annelies; Schennach, Harald; Chaiwong, Kriangsak; Sakuldamrongpanich, Tasanee; Turhan, Ajda; Sertöz, Rüchan; Wolf, Eva; Mayer, Wolfgang; Tao, Chuanmin; Wang, Lan Lan; Semprini, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Syphilis is a health problem of increasing incidence in recent years that may have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. There are many diagnostic tests available for syphilis, but there is no gold standard, and diagnosis therefore usually relies upon a combination of tests. In this multicenter study, we evaluated the treponemal Elecsys syphilis assay for use in the diagnosis of syphilis in routine samples, i.e., when syphilis is suspected or during antenatal or blood donation screening. The sensitivity and specificity of the Elecsys syphilis assay were compared head to head with those of other treponemal assays used in routine clinical practice and were assessed in potentially cross-reactive samples from patients with Epstein-Barr virus, HIV, and Lyme disease. In a total of 8,063 syphilis-negative samples collected from routine diagnostic requests and blood donations, the Elecsys syphilis assay had a specificity of 99.88%. In 928 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 99.57 to 100% (the result is presented as a range depending on whether four initially indeterminate samples are included in the assessment). The specificity of the Elecsys syphilis assay in patients with other infections was 100%; no false-positive samples were identified. PMID:25355799

  15. Factors associated with syphilis infection: a comprehensive analysis based on a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Li, S-L; Lin, H-L; Lin, Z-F; Zhu, X-Z; Fan, J-Y; Gao, K; Zhang, H-L; Lin, L-R; Liu, L-L; Tong, M-L; Niu, J-J; Yang, T-C

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to comprehensively evaluate factors that influence the likelihood of syphilis infection from risk-taking behaviours and medical conditions. A retrospective case-control study was conducted by enrolling 664 syphilis inpatients (excluding 11 congenital syphilis patients) and 800 sex- and age-matched controls. Medical histories, clinical data and patient interview data were collected and subjected to logistic regression analyses. The prevalence of syphilis in the study population was 3·9% (675/17,304). By univariate analysis, syphilis infection was associated with migration between cities, marital status, smoking, reproductive history, hypertension, elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) (P < 0·05). A high rate of syphilis-HBV co-infection was observed in HIV-negative patients and further research revealed an association between syphilis and specific HBV serological reactivity. Syphilis was also associated with the frequency, duration and status of tobacco use. Multivariate analysis indicated that syphilis infection was independently associated with migration between cities [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1·368, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·048-1·785], current smoking (aOR 1·607, 95% CI 1·177-2·195), elevated BUN (aOR 1·782, 95% CI 1·188-2·673) and some serological patterns of HBV infection. To prevent the spread of infectious diseases, inpatients and blood donors should be tested for HIV, syphilis, HBV and HCV simultaneously.

  16. Knowledge, behaviors, and attitudes of HIV-infected men about syphilis.

    PubMed

    Valdes, A; Cazanave, C; Dabis, F; Neau, D; Lacoste, D; Gaborieau, V; Farbos, S; Dworkin, M S

    2017-09-21

    To explore knowledge on syphilis, sexual behaviors, and attitudes in men living with HIV in southwestern France. In the ANRS CO3 Aquitaine Cohort of people living with HIV (PLHIV), a self-administered questionnaire was proposed to all male PLHIV attending one of the seven participating clinics between September 22 and October 24, 2014. The 15 questions explored patient knowledge about syphilis disease, attitudes, and behaviors during sexual intercourse. Among 302 patients surveyed, 101 reported at least one episode of syphilis. A history of syphilis was associated with awareness that syphilis was on the rise in men who have sex with men (MSM) in the Aquitaine region (46% vs. 22%, P<0.0001). Knowledge that syphilis could be transmitted by oral sex was low in both patients with (37%) and without (20%) a history of syphilis (P=0.0045). Patients with a history of syphilis more often used recreational drugs (RR 1.6; P=0.0028). Among 160 patients who had sexual intercourse with a man in the past 12 months, 23% reported using condoms for oral intercourse and 80% reported using condoms for anal intercourse. Sixty-two per cent of MSM declared being ready to change their practice if informed about the rise in syphilis. This survey revealed important information gaps in PLHIV about syphilis and related behavior. The reported receptiveness of this population to behavioral change may help inform educational interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. The Global Epidemiology of Syphilis in the Past Century – A Systematic Review Based on Antenatal Syphilis Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Chris Richard; Osbak, Kara; Tsoumanis, Achilleas

    2016-01-01

    Background How can we explain the uneven decline of syphilis around the world following the introduction of penicillin? In this paper we use antenatal syphilis prevalence (ASP) to investigate how syphilis prevalence varied worldwide in the past century, and what risk factors correlate with this variance. Methods 1) A systematic review using PubMed and Google Scholar was conducted to identify countries with published data relating to ASP estimates from before 1952 until the present. Eleven countries were identified (Canada, Denmark, Finland, India, Japan, Norway, Singapore, South Africa, United States of America (USA), United Kingdom (UK) and Zimbabwe). The ASP epidemic curve for each population was depicted graphically. In South Africa and the USA, results are reported separately for the black and white populations. 2) National antenatal syphilis prevalence estimates for 1990 to 1999 and 2008 were taken from an Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation database on the prevalence of syphilis in low risk populations compiled for the Global Burden of Diseases study and from a recent review paper respectively. National ASPs were depicted graphically and regional median ASPs were calculated for both time periods. 3) Linear regression was used to test for an association between ASP in 1990–1999 and 2008 and four risk factors (efficacy of syphilis screening/treatment, health expenditure, GDP per capita and circumcision prevalence). WHO world regions were included as potential explanatory variables. Results In most populations, ASP dropped to under 1% before 1960. In Zimbabwe and black South Africans, ASP was high in the pre-penicillin period, dropped in the post-penicillin period, but then plateaued at around 6% until the end of the 20th century when ASP dropped to just above 1%. In black Americans, ASP declined in the post penicillin period, but plateaued at 3–5% thereafter. ASP was statistically significantly higher in sub-Saharan Africa in 1990–1999 and 2008

  18. [Syphilis positivity in puerperal women: still a challenge in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Celeste S; Guimarães, Mark D C

    2004-09-01

    To investigate the factors associated with positive syphilis serology results in puerperal women who were receiving care at 24 health centers accredited by Brazil's National Program on Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS. This cross-sectional study included a probabilistic random sample of 3047 puerperal women. The eligibility criterion was being admitted for delivery or curettage in the selected centers. After an interview to collect demographic and clinical information, a blood sample was taken and then examined with the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) slide test. With positive VDRL results, the fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption test (FTA-Abs) was used for confirmation. The event considered for analysis was positivity on the VDRL test, with confirmation by the FTA-Abs. For the statistical analysis, odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. The model fit was assessed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. The prevalence of syphilis among the women studied was 1.7%. Multivariate analysis showed that increased risk for positive VDRL and FTA-Abs results was associated with the following characteristics: family income below one minimum wage, age < 17 years at first sexual intercourse, age < or = 14 years at first pregnancy, history of syphilis or of other sexually transmitted diseases prior to the current pregnancy, treatment for syphilis during the current pregnancy, partner having been tested for syphilis, having a positive HIV test result or having no HIV test result on record, previous preterm delivery, and stillbirth as an outcome of pregnancy. Only 43% of the women had had six or more prenatal visits, and only 3% had had one VDRL test during the first trimester of pregnancy and another VDRL test during the third trimester, as is recommended by Brazil's national Ministry of Health. This study shows that the problem of congenital syphilis is far from being solved in Brazil. It is necessary to provide adolescents with family

  19. Evaluation of the BioPlex 2200 syphilis system as a first-line method of reverse-sequence screening for syphilis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Antonella; Nardini, Paola; Foschi, Claudio; Moroni, Alessandra; D'Antuono, Antonietta; Bacchi Reggiani, Letizia; Cevenini, Roberto

    2013-07-01

    Despite recent technological advances, the diagnosis of syphilis remains a challenging enterprise. Actually, most high-volume laboratories have adopted the "reverse algorithm" due several factors, including the potential to automate testing. Recently, immunoassays processed on random-access systems have been proposed as screening tests. The purpose of this study was to evaluate diagnostic performances of BioPlex 2200 Syphilis IgG and BioPlex 2200 Syphilis IgM, tests based on Multiplex Flow technology, in comparison with the performance of Architect Syphilis TP, a chemiluminescent immunoassay for the detection of IgG and/or IgM anti-Treponema pallidum antibodies. A retrospective study was performed with a panel of 100 blood donor sera, a panel of 350 clinical and laboratory-characterized syphilitic sera, and 170 samples obtained from subjects with potentially interfering conditions. Moreover, 200 unselected samples submitted to the Microbiology Laboratory of St. Orsola Hospital in Bologna for routine screening for syphilis were evaluated. As confirmatory tests, T. pallidum hemagglutination and Western blot assays were used. Considering the IgG Western blot (WB) assay to be the gold standard method, BioPlex 2200 Syphilis IgG specificity was far higher than Architect Syphilis TP specificity (89.7% versus 78.4%, respectively), whereas the sensitivity was 100% for both automated methods. Compared to the IgM WB assay, BioPlex 2200 Syphilis IgM performed with a specificity of 94.9%, whereas the sensitivity was 84.8%. Considering the excellent ease of use and automation, the high sample throughput and its valuable analytical performances, BioPlex Syphilis 2200 IgG could represent a suitable choice for high-volume laboratories. BioPlex Syphilis 2200 IgM could be considered a good addition to IgG testing for uncovering active infections.

  20. [Ocular Syphilis Complicated with HIV Infection: A Report of 3 Cases].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kazuaki; Yanagisawa, Naoki; Sasaki, Shugo; Sekiya, Ryoko; Sekiya, Noritaka; Suganuma, Akihiko; Ajisawa, Atsushi; Imamura, Akifumi

    2016-05-01

    We present 3 cases of ocular syphilis in patients who had been newly diagnosed as having HIV. All the patients had only complained of ophthalmologic symptoms at the time of their initial visit. Treatment with penicillin was successful, resulting in no significant sequelae. Ocular syphilis may lead to reduced visual acuity or even blindness if left untreated. However, the diagnosis may be challenging, since patients may lack symptoms that are commonly observed in cases with primary and secondary syphilis. Considering the recent increase in the number of syphilis patients, clinicians should be aware of ocular syphilis and should have a high index of suspicion for syphilis in any patient at risk so as to ensure a prompt diagnosis.

  1. Novel Treponema pallidum Recombinant Antigens for Syphilis Diagnostics: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Kubanov, Aleksey; Runina, Anastassia

    2017-01-01

    The recombinant protein technology considerably promoted the development of rapid and accurate treponema-specific laboratory diagnostics of syphilis infection. For the last ten years, the immunodominant recombinant inner membrane lipoproteins are proved to be sensitive and specific antigens for syphilis screening. However, the development of an enlarged T. pallidum antigen panel for diagnostics of early and late syphilis and differentiation of syphilis stages or cured syphilis remains as actual goal of multidisciplinary expertise. Current review revealed novel recombinant antigens: surface-exposed proteins, adhesins, and periplasmic and flagellar proteins, which are promising candidates for the improved syphilis serological diagnostics. The opportunities and limitations of diagnostic usage of these antigens are discussed and the criteria for selection of optimal antigens panel summarized. PMID:28523273

  2. Osteomyelitis as the only manifestation of late latent syphilis: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z-Y; Zhang, Y; Qiu, K-F; Du, S-X

    2011-06-01

    Bone infection, particularly of the skull and the long bones of the legs and arms, despite being a common characteristic of tertiary stage syphilis and congenital syphilis in the past, is seldom encountered clinically due to effective antibiotic therapy. We report a case of a 62-year-old man who presented with one-month acute pain in the left leg. Treponema pallidum particle agglutination test was positive, and radiography showed a pathological fracture of the left tibiofibula. Surgical debridement and biopsy of the bone marrow were performed and a pathological diagnosis of syphilis osteomyelitis was entertained. The patient's symptoms resolved completely after a six-week course of penicillin. We identified 17 previously published cases of bone lesions of syphilis, eight of which had syphilitic osteomyelitis, seven were syphilitic osteitis and two had syphilitic periostitis. We suggest that bone lesions such as osteomyelitis caused by syphilis can be the only manifestation of late latent syphilis.

  3. Racial trends in syphilis among men with same-sex partners in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Landrum, S; Beck-Sague', C; Kraus, S

    1988-01-01

    Early syphilis cases attributable to homosexual transmission declined in DeKalb County, Georgia, from 191 in 1981 to 97 in 1985. This decline occurred only among White men with same sex partners (SSP); early syphilis among Black men with same sex partners has risen. This pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that changes in sexual behavior instituted by White men at risk of acquiring HTLV-III/LAV infection may have resulted in decreased incidence of early syphilis among those men.

  4. Tertiary Syphilis in the Cervical Spine: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Salem, K. M. I.; Majeed, H.; Bommireddy, R.; Klezl, Z.

    2012-01-01

    As the prevalence of syphilis rises, an increase in tertiary syphilis with spinal involvement is predicted. We report what we believe to be the first case of compressive cervical spine syphilitic gummata, with central cord compression signs. We also review the relevant literature to date. The diagnosis of syphilis in the spine relies on the physician to be aware of it as part of the differential diagnosis. Treponemal laboratory tests are an important aid in establishing a diagnosis. PMID:24436850

  5. A case of secondary syphilis mimicking palmoplantar psoriasis in HIV infected patient.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano; Brito, Arival Cardoso de; Nascimento, Bianca Angelina Macêdo do; Carvalho, Alessandra Haber; Nascimento, Manoel Dias do

    2015-01-01

    Due to diverse clinical and histopathological presentations, diagnosis of secondary syphilis can occasionally prove challenging. Variable clinical presentations of secondary syphilis in HIV disease may result in an incorrect diagnosis and an inappropriate treatment regimen. Similarly, the histology of secondary syphilitic lesions may show considerable variation, depending on the clinical morphology of the eruption. We report a case of secondary syphilis in an HIV infected patient with cutaneous palmoplantar lesions simulating palmoplantar psoriasis.

  6. Performance of Syphilis Sentinel Surveillance in the context of endemic Treponematoses: experience from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Dassah, Edward Tieru; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Mayaud, Philippe

    2016-12-09

    Use of treponemal tests to screen for syphilis (caused by Treponema pallidum pallidum) poses challenges with infection status classification, especially in settings where other treponemal infections are endemic. This study aimed to determine the validity of the syphilis surveillance testing strategy implemented since 2004 using two treponemal tests, and estimate the seroprevalence of active syphilis infection in Ghana where yaws (caused by Treponema pallidum pertenue) is endemic. We retested sera from the 2007 HIV sentinel survey (HSS) using a traditional algorithm, quantitative rapid plasma reagin test followed by qualitative Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay. The adjusted seroprevalence of active syphilis was calculated by applying the proportions of active syphilis within identified categories of HSS samples during the retesting, to the entire population of HSS samples. The 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for each proportion, and the t-test was used to assess differences in proportions. Of 2,214 samples that were retested, 203 (9.2%) had active syphilis infection, 21 (0.9%) were biological false reactions, 640 (28.9%) were past or treated syphilis infections, and 1,350 (61%) were uninfected. The current syphilis testing strategy overestimated the seroprevalence of active syphilis infection by a third (HSS versus traditional algorithm: 6.0% (95% CI: 5.6-6.3) vs. 4.5% (95% CI: 4.2-4.8); p < 0.001), and had low positive predictive value (16.8%) for detecting active syphilis infection. More than half (51.9%) of HSS syphilis positive cases were actually past/treated treponemal infections, possibly previous exposure to yaws. There is an urgent need to review the current syphilis sentinel surveillance testing strategy in Ghana in the context of concurrent endemic treponematoses, to better inform policy.

  7. Evaluation of Elecsys Syphilis Assay for Routine and Blood Screening and Detection of Early Infection.

    PubMed

    Kremastinou, J; Polymerou, V; Lavranos, D; Aranda Arrufat, A; Harwood, J; Martínez Lorenzo, M J; Ng, K P; Queiros, L; Vereb, I; Cusini, M

    2016-09-01

    Treponema pallidum infections can have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Screening and diagnosis of syphilis require assays with high specificity and sensitivity. The Elecsys Syphilis assay is an automated treponemal immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against T. pallidum The performance of this assay was investigated previously in a multicenter study. The current study expands on that evaluation in a variety of diagnostic settings and patient populations, at seven independent laboratories. The samples included routine diagnostic samples, blood donation samples, samples from patients with confirmed HIV infections, samples from living organ or bone marrow donors, and banked samples, including samples previously confirmed as syphilis positive. This study also investigated the seroconversion sensitivity of the assay. With a total of 1,965 syphilis-negative routine diagnostic samples and 5,792 syphilis-negative samples collected from blood donations, the Elecsys Syphilis assay had specificity values of 99.85% and 99.86%, respectively. With 333 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 100% regardless of disease stage. The assay also showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with samples from 69 patients coinfected with HIV. The Elecsys Syphilis assay detected infection in the same bleed or earlier, compared with comparator assays, in a set of sequential samples from a patient with primary syphilis. In archived serial blood samples collected from 14 patients with direct diagnoses of primary syphilis, the Elecsys Syphilis assay detected T. pallidum antibodies for 3 patients for whom antibodies were not detected with the Architect Syphilis TP assay, indicating a trend for earlier detection of infection, which may have the potential to shorten the time between infection and reactive screening test results. Copyright © 2016 Kremastinou et al.

  8. Evaluation of Elecsys Syphilis Assay for Routine and Blood Screening and Detection of Early Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kremastinou, J.; Polymerou, V.; Lavranos, D.; Aranda Arrufat, A.; Harwood, J.; Martínez Lorenzo, M. J.; Ng, K. P.; Queiros, L.; Vereb, I.

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum infections can have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Screening and diagnosis of syphilis require assays with high specificity and sensitivity. The Elecsys Syphilis assay is an automated treponemal immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against T. pallidum. The performance of this assay was investigated previously in a multicenter study. The current study expands on that evaluation in a variety of diagnostic settings and patient populations, at seven independent laboratories. The samples included routine diagnostic samples, blood donation samples, samples from patients with confirmed HIV infections, samples from living organ or bone marrow donors, and banked samples, including samples previously confirmed as syphilis positive. This study also investigated the seroconversion sensitivity of the assay. With a total of 1,965 syphilis-negative routine diagnostic samples and 5,792 syphilis-negative samples collected from blood donations, the Elecsys Syphilis assay had specificity values of 99.85% and 99.86%, respectively. With 333 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 100% regardless of disease stage. The assay also showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with samples from 69 patients coinfected with HIV. The Elecsys Syphilis assay detected infection in the same bleed or earlier, compared with comparator assays, in a set of sequential samples from a patient with primary syphilis. In archived serial blood samples collected from 14 patients with direct diagnoses of primary syphilis, the Elecsys Syphilis assay detected T. pallidum antibodies for 3 patients for whom antibodies were not detected with the Architect Syphilis TP assay, indicating a trend for earlier detection of infection, which may have the potential to shorten the time between infection and reactive screening test results. PMID:27358468

  9. Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle and the case of congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Arthur M; Ruggere, Christine

    2006-01-01

    In 1894, Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle wrote "The Third Generation," a short story involving the transmission of congenital syphilis from generation to generation. Analysts of his writings have interpreted the pathogenetic mechanism involved in modern terms: infection of mother by father and then transplacental infection of the fetus. However, a review of the contemporary literature and the history of the concepts of congenital and "hereditary" syphilis demonstrates that the late 19th-century understanding of the process involved a Lamarckian transmission of paternal infection, via the sperm at the moment of conception. It was undoubtedly this concept that Doyle learned in medical school in the late 1870s and that provided the background to his story.

  10. Musculoskeletal involvement of syphilis – a forgotten lesson

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Jesus Vallejo; Molnar, Szabolcs Lajos; Val, Sami Mansour; Arnal, Rafael Gracia

    2012-01-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease with a myriad of presentation and called ‘the great impostor’ for the variety of the symptoms. As a venereal disease it is transmissible mainly by sexual contact with infectious lesions but can spread by blood contamination. Without treatment it progresses through early and late syphilis. Since the introduction of penicillin its prevalence has strongly dropped but was never eradicated entirely. As the frequency and the progression are largely controlled there are several symptoms which are not common and can be a difficult differential diagnostic problem nowadays. The authors present a case where decades passed between the primary event and the actual hospitalisation with fever of unknown origin and coexistent swollen joint deformities. The patient was not treated entirely from his primary event and later, psoriasis was settled as a diagnosis, which was the cause of neglecting the secondary phase’s skin lesions. PMID:22787187

  11. [Health-worker barriers to syphilis screening in pregnant women in Bolivia's Los Andes network].

    PubMed

    Tinajeros, Freddy; Ares, Lucila Rey; Elías, Vanessa; Reveiz, Ludovic; Sánchez, Franz; Mejía, Martha; Hernández, Rosalinda; Revollo, Rita

    2017-05-25

    Identify health-worker barriers that keep pregnant women who receive prenatal care from being screened for syphilis (Los Andes Health Network, Bolivia). Semi-structured interviews were done with 46 health care providers and 249 clinical health records of pregnant women were analyzed in eight public health facilities in the Los Andes network. Health-worker barriers to syphilis screening in pregnant women included lack of time by personnel to raise awareness of the benefit of syphilis screening; some mentioned that syphilis tests should only be done in facilities that attend deliveries and have a laboratory; lack of communication between clinicians and laboratory personnel; and problems with provision of supplies and reagents. The clinical record review found that only 55.4% contained syphilis laboratory results and only 37.4% of perinatal clinical histories had records of laboratory results. The interviews found that providers believe that syphilis screening is done in 100% of pregnant women receiving prenatal care. Syphilis screening is not being done according to Bolivia's strategy for the elimination of congenital syphilis, and is not done on more than half of pregnant women in prenatal care with perinatal clinical history records. This is not perceived by health professionals and can become a barrier to syphilis screening in pregnant women.

  12. Evolution of the syphilis epidemic among men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Marc M.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    Syphilis has existed for millenni, but its epidemiology was only recently linked to men who have sex with men (MSM) after the introduction of penicillin in the 1940s; the syphilis epidemic became concentrated within the MSM community in subsequent decades. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in the 1980s led to a surge of new syphilis cases and revealed the potentiation between HIV and syphilis, as evidenced by a shift in the natural history of neurosyphilis. In response, MSM revolutionised their sexual behaviour by implementing community-driven seroadaptive strategies to stem HIV transmission. The Centers for Disease Control in the US called for the elimination of syphilis in the late 1990s since the rates had fallen sharply but this effort was overtaken by a resurgence of global outbreaks among MSM in the 2000s, many of which were linked to methamphetamine use and sexual networking websites. Syphilis remains highly prevalent today, especially among MSM and individuals infected with HIV, and it continues to present a significant public health conundrum. Innovative syphilis prevention strategies are warranted. MSM engaging in high-risk behaviour such as condomless anal receptive intercourse, sex with multiple partners or recreational drug use should be routinely screened for syphilis infection; they should also be counselled about the limits of seroadaptive behaviours and HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis as they relate to syphilis transmission. PMID:25514173

  13. Prosthetic rehabilitation of palatal perforation in a patient with ‘syphilis: the great imitator’

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Varsha; Vaithilingam, Yuvraj; Livingstone, David; Pillai, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmissible disease caused by treponema palladium, a microaerophilic spirochete. Syphilis may progress from primary to tertiary stage if left unnoticed and untreated. Dentists should be vigilant and suspect sexually transmitted infections such as syphilis in the differential diagnosis of oral inflammatory or ulcerative lesions with palatal perforation. Moreover, it is imperative that dentists should have knowledge about its stages, characteristic features, oral presentation and prosthetic rehabilitation. This case report describes a case of tertiary syphilis with palatal perforation and the prosthetic rehabilitation of the defect with a prosthetic obturator. PMID:24891485

  14. Clinical Spectrum of Oral Secondary Syphilis in HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Amador, Velia; Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Esquivel-Pedraza, Lilly; Saeb-Lima, Marcela; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background. Oral lesions may constitute the first clinical manifestation in secondary syphilis, but detailed descriptions in HIV-infected individuals are scarce. Objective. To describe the clinical characteristics of oral secondary syphilis in HIV-infected patients and its relevance in the early diagnosis of syphilis. Methods. Twenty HIV/AIDS adult subjects with oral secondary syphilis lesions presenting at two HIV/AIDS referral centers in Mexico City (2003-2011) are described. An oral examination was performed by specialists in oral pathology and medicine; when possible, a punch biopsy was done, and Warthin-Starry stain and immunohistochemistry were completed. Intraoral herpes virus infection and erythematous candidosis were ruled out by cytological analysis. Diagnosis of oral syphilis was confirmed with positive nontreponemal test (VDRL), and, if possible, fluorescent treponemal antibody test. Results. Twenty male patients (median age 31.5, 21-59 years) with oral secondary syphilis lesions were included. Oral lesions were the first clinical sign of syphilis in 16 (80%) cases. Mucous patch was the most common oral manifestation (17, 85.5%), followed by shallow ulcers (2, 10%) and macular lesions (1, 5%). Conclusions. Due to the recent rise in HIV-syphilis coinfection, dental and medical practitioners should consider secondary syphilis in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions, particularly in HIV-infected patients.

  15. Clinical Spectrum of Oral Secondary Syphilis in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Esquivel-Pedraza, Lilly; Saeb-Lima, Marcela; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background. Oral lesions may constitute the first clinical manifestation in secondary syphilis, but detailed descriptions in HIV-infected individuals are scarce. Objective. To describe the clinical characteristics of oral secondary syphilis in HIV-infected patients and its relevance in the early diagnosis of syphilis. Methods. Twenty HIV/AIDS adult subjects with oral secondary syphilis lesions presenting at two HIV/AIDS referral centers in Mexico City (2003–2011) are described. An oral examination was performed by specialists in oral pathology and medicine; when possible, a punch biopsy was done, and Warthin-Starry stain and immunohistochemistry were completed. Intraoral herpes virus infection and erythematous candidosis were ruled out by cytological analysis. Diagnosis of oral syphilis was confirmed with positive nontreponemal test (VDRL), and, if possible, fluorescent treponemal antibody test. Results. Twenty male patients (median age 31.5, 21–59 years) with oral secondary syphilis lesions were included. Oral lesions were the first clinical sign of syphilis in 16 (80%) cases. Mucous patch was the most common oral manifestation (17, 85.5%), followed by shallow ulcers (2, 10%) and macular lesions (1, 5%). Conclusions. Due to the recent rise in HIV-syphilis coinfection, dental and medical practitioners should consider secondary syphilis in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions, particularly in HIV-infected patients. PMID:26316966

  16. Prosthetic rehabilitation of palatal perforation in a patient with 'syphilis: the great imitator'.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Varsha; Vaithilingam, Yuvraj; Livingstone, David; Pillai, Ajay

    2014-06-02

    Syphilis is a sexually transmissible disease caused by treponema palladium, a microaerophilic spirochete. Syphilis may progress from primary to tertiary stage if left unnoticed and untreated. Dentists should be vigilant and suspect sexually transmitted infections such as syphilis in the differential diagnosis of oral inflammatory or ulcerative lesions with palatal perforation. Moreover, it is imperative that dentists should have knowledge about its stages, characteristic features, oral presentation and prosthetic rehabilitation. This case report describes a case of tertiary syphilis with palatal perforation and the prosthetic rehabilitation of the defect with a prosthetic obturator. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  17. Characterization of sera with discordant results from reverse sequence screening for syphilis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyunghoon; Park, Hyewon; Roh, Eun Youn; Shin, Sue; Park, Kyoung Un; Park, Myoung Hee; Song, Eun Young

    2013-01-01

    Reverse sequence screening for syphilis (RSSS) (screening with treponemal tests, followed by confirmation with nontreponemal tests) has been increasingly adopted. CDC recommends confirmation of discordant results (reactive EIA/CIA and nonreactive nontreponemal test) with Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA). We characterized sera with discordant results from RSSS with Architect Syphilis TP CIA. Among 15,713 screening tests using Architect Syphilis TP at Seoul National University Gangnam Center between October 2010 and May 2011, 260 (1.7%) showed reactive results. Rapid plasma reagin (RPR) and TP-PA were performed on 153 available sera among them. On sera with discordant results between Architect Syphilis TP and TP-PA, INNO-LIA Syphilis Score and FTA-ABS were performed. Among 153 sera, RPR was nonreactive in 126 (82.4%). Among them, TP-PA was positive in 103 (81.7%), indeterminate (±) in 7 (5.6%), and negative in 16 (12.7%). Out of 16 CIA(+)/RPR(-)/TP-PA(-) sera, INNO-LIA Syphilis Score and/or FTA-ABS were negative on 14 sera. Out of 7 CIA(+)/RPR(-)/TP-PA(±) sera, INNO-LIA Syphilis Score and FTA-ABS were positive/reactive in 6 sera. RSSS with confirmation by TP-PA on sera with discordant results between Architect Syphilis TP and RPR effectively delineated those discordant results and could be successfully adopted for routine checkup for syphilis.

  18. Characterization of Sera with Discordant Results from Reverse Sequence Screening for Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyunghoon; Park, Hyewon; Roh, Eun Youn; Shin, Sue; Park, Kyoung Un; Park, Myoung Hee; Song, Eun Young

    2013-01-01

    Reverse sequence screening for syphilis (RSSS) (screening with treponemal tests, followed by confirmation with nontreponemal tests) has been increasingly adopted. CDC recommends confirmation of discordant results (reactive EIA/CIA and nonreactive nontreponemal test) with Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA). We characterized sera with discordant results from RSSS with Architect Syphilis TP CIA. Among 15,713 screening tests using Architect Syphilis TP at Seoul National University Gangnam Center between October 2010 and May 2011, 260 (1.7%) showed reactive results. Rapid plasma reagin (RPR) and TP-PA were performed on 153 available sera among them. On sera with discordant results between Architect Syphilis TP and TP-PA, INNO-LIA Syphilis Score and FTA-ABS were performed. Among 153 sera, RPR was nonreactive in 126 (82.4%). Among them, TP-PA was positive in 103 (81.7%), indeterminate (±) in 7 (5.6%), and negative in 16 (12.7%). Out of 16 CIA(+)/RPR(−)/TP-PA(−) sera, INNO-LIA Syphilis Score and/or FTA-ABS were negative on 14 sera. Out of 7 CIA(+)/RPR(−)/TP-PA(±) sera, INNO-LIA Syphilis Score and FTA-ABS were positive/reactive in 6 sera. RSSS with confirmation by TP-PA on sera with discordant results between Architect Syphilis TP and RPR effectively delineated those discordant results and could be successfully adopted for routine checkup for syphilis. PMID:23509699

  19. [Educating health workers is key in congenital syphilis elimination in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Garcés, Juan Pablo; Rubiano, Luisa Consuelo; Orobio, Yenifer; Castaño, Martha; Benavides, Elizabeth; Cruz, Adriana

    2017-09-01

    Colombia promotes the diagnosis and treatment of gestational syphilis in a single visit using rapid diagnostic tests to prevent mother-to-child transmission. Additionally, integrated health programs pursue the coordinated prevention of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis/HIV. To identify knowledge gaps among health workers in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis/HIV and to provide recommendations to support these programs. We conducted a descriptive study based on 306 surveys of health workers in 39 health institutions in the city of Cali. Surveys inquired about planning, management and implementation of services for pregnant women, clinical knowledge of HIV/syphilis rapid diagnostic tests, and prior training. Knowledge deficits in the management of gestational syphilis were detected among the surveyed health workers, including physicians. Rapid tests for syphilis are currently used in clinical laboratories in Cali, however, procedural deficiencies were observed in their use, including quality control assurance. During the two years prior to the survey, training of health workers in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis/HIV had been limited. Health workers are interested in identifying and treating gestational syphilis in a single event, in using rapid diagnostic tests and in receiving training. Intensive training targeting health workers, policy/decision makers and academic groups is needed to ensure adequate implementation of new strategies for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis/HIV.

  20. New Proteins for a New Perspective on Syphilis Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brenden C.; Simpson, Yvonne; Morshed, Muhammad G.; Cowen, Laura L. E.; Hof, Rebecca; Wetherell, Charmaine

    2013-01-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum; it can be effectively treated with penicillin yet remains prevalent worldwide, due in part to the shortcomings of current diagnostic tests. Here we report the production of soluble recombinant versions of three novel diagnostic candidate proteins, Tp0326, Tp0453, and a Tp0453-Tp0326 chimera. The sensitivities of these recombinant proteins were assessed by screening characterized serum samples from primary, secondary, and latent stages of infection (n = 169). The specificities were assessed by screening false positives identified with the standard diagnostic testing algorithm (n = 21), samples from patients with potentially cross-reactive infections (Leptospira spp., Borrelia burgdorferi, Helicobacter pylori, Epstein-Barr virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, or cytomegalovirus) (n = 38), and samples from uninfected individuals (n = 11). The sensitivities of Tp0326, Tp0453, and the Tp0453-Tp0326 chimera were found to be 86%, 98%, and 98%, respectively, and the specificities were 99%, 100%, and 99%. In a direct comparison, the Captia syphilis (T. pallidum)-G enzyme immunoassay (Trinity Biotech) was used to screen the same serum samples and was found to have a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 90%. In particular, Tp0453 and the chimera exhibited superior accuracy in classifying analytical false-positive samples (100%, compared to 43% for the Captia assay). These findings identify Tp0453 and the Tp0453-Tp0326 chimera as novel syphilis-specific diagnostic candidates that surpass the performance of a currently available diagnostic enzyme immunoassay test for syphilis and that allow accurate detection of all stages of infection. PMID:23100335

  1. Solitary spinal dural syphilis granuloma mimicking a spinal meningioma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heng-Jun; Zhan, Ren-Ya; Chen, Man-Tao; Cao, Fei; Zheng, Xiu-Jue

    2014-01-01

    Dural granuloma is extremely rare. To our knowledge, there has no case reported solitary spinal dural syphilis granuloma worldwide so far. Here we report our findings in a 49-year-old woman, who presented with 10-year progressive left lower-limb numbness and two weeks of right lower-limb numbness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested a homogeneous enhanced spindle-shaped lesion, 2.9 × 1.5 cm in size, occupying the spinal intradural extramedullary space, at the level of Thoracic (T)-2/3, which mimicked the appearance of spinal meningioma. The Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) test titer of 1:8, and the venereal diseases research laboratory of cerebral spinal fluid (VDRL-CSF) was reactive, so confirmed neurosyphilis was considered. After formal anti-syphilis treatment, posterior laminectomy surgery was performed, and the lesion was completely separated and extirpated. Final histopathologic diagnosis of the lesion was confirmed as chronic granulomatous inflammation, combined with the neurosyphilis history, spinal dural syphilis granuloma was finally diagnosed. Postoperatively, the patient recovered without any further treatment.

  2. Laboratory diagnosis and interpretation of tests for syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, S A; Steiner, B M; Rudolph, A H

    1995-01-01

    The lack of a method for demonstrating the presence of Treponema pallidum by growth necessitates the use of alternative methods. Traditionally, these methods are divided into direct detection methods (animal inoculation, dark-field microscopy, etc.) and serologic tests for the presence of patient antibody against T. pallidum. Serologic methods are further divided into two classes. One class, the nontreponemal tests, detects antibodies to lipoidal antigens present in either the host or T. pallidum; examples are the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory and rapid plasma reagin and tests. Reactivity in these tests generally indicates host tissue damage that may not be specific for syphilis. Because these tests are easy and inexpensive to perform, they are commonly used for screening, and with proper clinical signs they are suggestive of syphilis. The other class of test, the treponemal tests, uses specific treponemal antigens. Confirmation of infection requires a reactive treponemal test. Examples of the treponemal tests are the microhemagglutination assay for antibodies to T. pallidum and the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test. These tests are more expensive and complicated to perform than the nontreponemal tests. On the horizon are a number of direct antigen, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and PCR techniques. Several of these techniques have shown promise in clinical trials for the diagnosis of congenital syphilis and neurosyphilis that are presently difficult to diagnose. PMID:7704889

  3. The syphilis problem in Asir province, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    El Ghoroury, A. A.

    1954-01-01

    A combined national and international venereal disease team began activities in Saudi Arabia in November 1952, moving from Mecca to Asir province in May 1953, where it remained for two months examining and treating various groups of the population. A total of 309 cases of syphilis among a population of approximately 3,000 at Abha was given complete clinical and serological examination and treatment with PAM, in doses varying from 2.4 to 6.0 million units. Serological tests were made on 2,359 blood samples. Only one primary lesion was found; but secondary lesions were quite common, amounting to 5.8% of all cases treated, while tertiary lesions represented 12.6% of all cases treated and 67.2% of all clinical cases. Considerable variations in the prevalence of syphilis were noted among the different quarters of the town of Abha and among different tribes and villages. All the age-groups were more or less equally affected, but the females generally showed a higher positivity-rate than the males. All these features—together with the low social, economic, and sanitary standards of the population and many prevalent social habits, such as the use of common eating and drinking implements — would seem to indicate that the syphilis met in Asir, and locally known as “shadjar”, “balash”, “fringi”, “mabrouk”, or “wardi”, should be included with the endemic treponematoses met with elsewhere in the world. PMID:13182591

  4. Curse on two generations: a history of congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Before the microbiologic era, venereal diseases were poorly distinguished. Congenital syphilis was believed to be transmitted during conception by the father's sperm, during delivery in the birth canal, or from infected milk or breasts. The most frequent maternofetal transmission was not considered because the mother's primary infection remained undiagnosed. The concept of treating infants with mercury transmitted by nurses' milk prompted the founding of a specialized infant hospital in Vaugirard in 1780: lactating syphilitic women received mercury orally and by rubbing it into the skin. Their own infant and a second infected infant from the foundling hospital were believed to be cured by their milk. Underwood described snuffles in 1789 and Bertin periosteal bone disease in 1810. Tardive congenital lues with keratitis, deafness, and notched upper incisors were described by Hutchinson in 1863. Feeding remained difficult, as wet nursing transmitted syphilis to the nurse and other infants. Specialized institutions tried goat or donkey milk. A debate between contagionists assuming exclusively maternal infection and hereditists assuming germinal transmission by the father's sperm continued throughout the 19th century. Schaudinn and Hoffmann identified Spirochaeta pallida in 1905. When Ehrlich discovered the efficacy of salvarsan in 1910, Noeggerath treated infants with the new drug, pioneering the injection into scalp veins. In 1943, Lentz and Ingraham established penicillin treatment for congenital syphilis. Whereas this drug effectively prevented maternofetal transmission, treating infants remained difficult due to the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Congenital syphilis in neonates with nonreactive nontreponemal test results.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, P S; Cantey, J B; Zeray, F; Leos, N K; Sheffield, J S; Wendel, G D; Sánchez, P J

    2017-10-01

    Infants whose mothers had syphilis during pregnancy were studied to determine how often exposed newborns with normal physical examinations and nonreactive nontreponemal serologic tests had abnormal laboratory or radiographic studies. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from infants born to mothers with syphilis and had a normal examination and a nonreactive nontreponemal test. Some infants had IgM immunoblotting, PCR testing or rabbit infectivity testing (RIT) performed. From 1984 to 2002, 115 infants had a nonreactive serum Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL)/rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test and a normal physical examination at birth. Among 87 infants born to mothers who had untreated syphilis, 4 had a positive serum IgM immunoblot or PCR test, but none had spirochetes recovered by RIT. Two infants had anemia, one had an elevated serum alanine aminotransferase concentration and one with Down's syndrome had direct hyperbilirubinemia. Among 14 infants born to mothers treated <4 weeks before delivery, none had abnormal laboratory or radiographic tests, although 1 of 11 had a reactive serum IgM immunoblot. Among 14 infants born to mothers treated ⩾4 weeks before delivery, none had abnormal laboratory or radiographic tests. Newborns with normal physical examination and nonreactive nontreponemal test results are unlikely to have abnormalities detected on conventional laboratory and radiographic testing.

  6. Treponemal antibody-absorbent enzyme immunoassay for syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J; Lin, T M; Schubert, C M; Halbert, S P

    1986-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay for the diagnosis of syphilis (ELISA-SY) was developed with solid-phase extracts of Treponema pallidum, specimen diluent containing Reiter treponeme absorbent, and three 30-min incubations. The ELISA-SY results were determined in comparison with a standardized positive control and reported as a percentage of strong positive control. In tests with 1,005 serum samples from a venereal disease clinic and other sources, 98.2% agreement was found with fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption (FTA-ABS) results, and 98.3% agreement was found with T. pallidum passive hemagglutination (PHA) findings. Only 1 of 29 sera originally considered to be biologically false-positive by ELISA-SY; the latter specimen was also positive by PHA and FTA-ABS tests performed in our laboratories. Serum samples from clinically diagnosed syphilitics (16 primary-stage isolates, 7 secondary-stage isolates, and 3-latent-stage isolates) were all positive by ELISA-SY, FTA-ABS, and PHA. Serum samples from 51 newborns suspected of having syphilis on the basis of positive cardiolipin flocculation tests showed 98% agreement of ELISA-SY results with FTA-ABS and PHA findings. Sera from all 61 patients with a variety of autoimmune and other diseases known to be associated with biologically false-positive reactions for syphilis were negative by this ELISA-SY. The specificity of the ELISA procedure for T. pallidum antibody was also confirmed immunologically by blocking experiments. PMID:3519659

  7. Syphilis and HIV infection among prisoners in Maputo, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Vaz, R G; Gloyd, S; Folgosa, E; Kreiss, J

    1995-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out among 1284 male and 54 female prisoners to assess the prevalence of and risk factors for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) in 4 correctional institutions of Maputo, Mozambique. Among the men, 32% reported a history of prostitute contact and 41% reported a history of STD. Only 9% reported having ever used condoms. Seventy (5.5%) men reported having had sexual intercourse while in prison, in all but one instance this involved sex with another man. There was no reported intravenous drug use. One hundred and four (7.8%) inmates had positive serological tests for syphilis and 8 (0.6%) had antibodies to HIV. Among men, syphilis was associated with a history of genital ulcer [odds ratio (OR) = 3.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.4, 6.4] and uncircumcised status (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.0, 2.5). This study demonstrates that syphilis is common among inmates in Maputo and that risk behaviours for STD transmission exist within Maputo prisons. There is a need for STD screening and treatment programmes within prisons in Mozambique and the introduction of educational interventions, including condom promotion.

  8. British Ocular Syphilis Study (BOSS): 2-year national surveillance study of intraocular inflammation secondary to ocular syphilis.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Rashmi G; Goh, Beng T; Westcott, Mark C

    2014-06-12

    The British Ocular Syphilis Study (BOSS) is the first national prospective epidemiological study of intraocular syphilis (IOS) in light of the global increase in early syphilis (ES). The aims were to ascertain the UK incidence, demographics, clinical features, laboratory data, and posttreatment visual outcomes of patients with IOS. Prospective study of IOS, reported through the national reporting system (British Ocular Surveillance Unit) from 2009 to 2011. Case definition was any adult presenting with intraocular inflammation in ES. A total of 41 new cases (63 eyes) of IOS were reported, giving an annual incidence of 0.3 per million UK adult population. Mean age was 48.7 years (range, 20.6-75.1); 90.2% were male. All had RPR/VDRL titers of ≥1:16. Bilateral ocular involvement occurred in 56%; in unilateral cases, the left eye was more commonly affected (P = 0.009). Mean presenting logMAR visual acuity was 0.52 (20/63 Snellen; range, -0.2 to 2.30 logMAR). Panuveitis was the commonest diagnosis, seen in 41.3%, and isolated anterior uveitis was uncommon (9.5%). Subgroup analysis between HIV-positive and -negative patients found no significant differences in terms of proportion of bilateral disease, presenting or post treatment acuity. HIV-positive patients had higher rates of panuveitis. At final follow-up, 92.1% had visual acuity ≥ 0.3 logMAR (20/40 Snellen) after antibiotic therapy. This study is the largest prospective series of ocular syphilis in the post-penicillin era. It confirms good visual outcomes for treated IOS, irrespective of HIV status or time to presentation. The study identified an unexpected preponderance for left eye involvement in uniocular cases; which is unexplained. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  9. Maternal and congenital syphilis in Bolivia, 1996: prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed Central

    Southwick, K. L.; Blanco, S.; Santander, A.; Estenssoro, M.; Torrico, F.; Seoane, G.; Brady, W.; Fears, M.; Lewis, J.; Pope, V.; Guarner, J.; Levine, W. C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The present study was carried out in seven maternity hospitals to determine the prevalence of maternal syphilis at the time of delivery and the associated risk factors, to conduct a pilot project of rapid syphilis testing in hospital laboratories, to assure the quality of syphilis testing, and to determine the rate of congenital syphilis in infants born to women with syphilis at the time of delivery--all of which would provide baseline data for a national prevention programme in Bolivia. METHODS: All women delivering either live-born or stillborn infants in the seven participating hospitals in and around La Paz, El Alto, and Cochabamba between June and November 1996 were eligible for enrolment in the study. FINDINGS: A total of 61 out of 1428 mothers (4.3%) of live-born infants and 11 out of 43 mothers (26%) of stillborn infants were found to have syphilis at delivery. Multivariate analysis showed that women with live-born infants who had less than secondary-level education, who did not watch television during the week before delivery (this was used as an indicator of socioeconomic status), who had a previous history of syphilis, or who had more than one partner during the pregnancy were at increased risk of syphilis. While 76% of the study population had received prenatal care, only 17% had syphilis testing carried out during the pregnancy; 91% of serum samples that were reactive to rapid plasma reagin (RPR) tests were also reactive to fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption (FTA-ABS) testing. There was 96% agreement between the results from local hospital laboratories and national reference laboratories in their testing of RPR reactivity of serum samples. Congenital syphilis infection was confirmed by laboratory tests in 15% of 66 infants born to women with positive RPR and FTA-ABS testing. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that a congenital syphilis prevention programme in Bolivia could substantially reduce adverse infant outcomes due to this

  10. Factors associated with reinfection of syphilis in reference centers for sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Valéria Correa de; Donalisio, Maria Rita; Cordeiro, Ricardo

    2017-06-26

    We aim to analyze trend of syphilis and factors associated with recurrent episodes of syphilis among adults and adolescents attended in a STI/AIDS reference centers in Campinas, state of São Paulo, 2004 to 2012. Medical records, pharmacy data, and notification database were accessed to analyze trends of syphilis and sociodemographic, epidemiological and clinical variables associated with reinfection of syphilis. After univariate analysis, a hierarchical logistic regression model was adjusted to analyze variables associated with more than one episode of syphilis (dependent variable). First step (sex, age, and years of schooling) were tested and in the second, epidemiological and clinical variables. A total of 1,009 episodes of syphilis were identified among 860 adolescents and adults, 117 individuals (13.6%) presented with more than one episode of syphilis. Factors associated with more than one episode of syphilis were sex (male) (OR = 4.28; 95%CI 1.31-14.0), age (OR = 1.02; 95%CI 1.00-1.04), homosexual/bisexual orientation (OR = 2.29; 95%CI 1.22-4.32), HIV coinfection (OR = 3.54; 95%CI 2.22-5.63), and absence of STI symptoms at the time of syphilis diagnostic (OR = 1.70; 95%CI 1.03-2.80). The number of cases of syphilis and proportion in relation to STI increased in recent years in a specific population attended in a STI/AIDS reference centers in Campinas. Association with HIV, homosexual/bisexual orientation and the silent clinical characteristic of cases confirm the necessity to implement more aggressive strategies to prevent the occurrence of syphilis and other STI in specific populations with higher disease risk.

  11. Syphilis in Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Warning Sign for HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Gállego-Lezáun, C; Arrizabalaga Asenjo, M; González-Moreno, J; Ferullo, I; Teslev, A; Fernández-Vaca, V; Payeras Cifre, A

    2015-11-01

    To describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of syphilis in men who have sex with men (MSM) in an area of Mallorca, Spain. We performed a retrospective analysis of syphilis cases in MSM seen at a hospital in Mallorca between January 2005 and June 2013. Fifty-five cases of syphilis were recorded in MSM during the study period (34.3% of all cases diagnosed), and 74.5% of these patients had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. The two diseases had been diagnosed simultaneously in 70.7% of this population. Patients with HIV coinfection had a median CD4 count of 456cells/μL (range, 29-979 cells/μL). Syphilis was diagnosed clinically in 49.1% of cases and by screening in the remaining 50.9%. The most common form of syphilis was late latent or indeterminate syphilis (41.9% of cases). In the group of men with syphilis, MSM had a higher risk of HIV infection. A majority of MSM with syphilis had HIV coinfection. HIV screening is therefore essential in this population and could even result in early diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  12. Response to therapy following retreatment of serofast early syphilis patients with benzathine penicillin.

    PubMed

    Seña, Arlene C; Wolff, Mark; Behets, Frieda; Van Damme, Kathleen; Martin, David H; Leone, Peter; McNeil, Linda; Hook, Edward W

    2013-02-01

    Persistent nontreponemal titers after treatment are common among patients with early syphilis. We retreated 82 human immunodeficiency virus-negative early syphilis participants who were serofast at 6 months using benzathine penicillin. Only 27% exhibited serological response after retreatment and after an additional 6 months of follow-up.

  13. Amoxicillin and Ceftriaxone as Treatment Alternatives to Penicillin for Maternal Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Katanami, Yuichi; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Takaya, Saho; Yamamoto, Kei; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Takeshita, Nozomi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Ohmagari, Norio

    2017-05-01

    There is no proven alternative to penicillin for treatment of maternal syphilis. We report 2 case-patients with maternal syphilis who were successfully treated without penicillin. We used amoxicillin and probenecid for the first case-patient and amoxicillin, probenecid, and ceftriaxone for the second case-patient.

  14. Tonsillar Syphilis: an Unusual Site of Infection Detected by Treponema pallidum PCR

    PubMed Central

    Smith, John R. M.; Tsang, Raymond S. W.

    2015-01-01

    With the reemergence of syphilis, it is important that both clinical and public health practitioners recognize the various clinical manifestations of this disease (formerly known as “the great imitator”) and become familiar with the newer diagnostic tests. Here we report the first case of tonsillar syphilis diagnosed by PCR. PMID:26179306

  15. Acute periostitis in early acquired syphilis simulating shin splints in a jogger.

    PubMed

    Meier, J L; Mollet, E

    1986-01-01

    Acute periostitis affecting the long bones is a characteristic but uncommon manifestation of syphilis in the adult with an early acquired infection. This report describes the history of a jogger who developed acute localized periostitis of the shaft of both tibiae during the early stage of acquired syphilis. Symptomatology was initially attributed to the medial tibial stress syndrome.

  16. Don’t Forget What You Can’t See: A Case of Ocular Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Monica I.; Lee, Annie W.C.; Sumsion, Sean M.; Gorchynski, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    This case describes an emergency department (ED) presentation of ocular syphilis in a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patient. This is an unusual presentation of syphilis and one that emergency physicians should be aware of. The prevalence of syphilis has reached epidemic proportions since 2001 with occurrences primarily among men who have sex with men (MSM). This is a case of a 24-year-old male who presented to our ED with bilateral painless vision loss. The patient’s history and ED workup were notable for MSM, positive rapid plasmin reagin (RPR) and HIV tests and fundus exam consistent with ocular syphilis, specifically uveitis. Ocular manifestations of syphilis can present at any stage of syphilis. The 2010 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines now recommend that ocular syphilis be treated as neurosyphilis regardless of the lumbar puncture results. There is a paucity of emergency medicine literature on ocular syphilis. For emergency physicians it is important to be aware of iritis, uveitis, or chorioretinitis as ocular manifestations of neurosyphilis especially in this high-risk population and to obtain RPR and HIV tests in the ED to facilitate early diagnosis, and treatment and to prevent irreversible vision loss. PMID:27429702

  17. A systematic review of pediatric sensorineural hearing loss in congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Chau, Justin; Atashband, Shahnaz; Chang, Estelle; Westerberg, Brian D; Kozak, Frederick K

    2009-06-01

    Congenital syphilis is a known cause of progressive sensorineural hearing loss. The prevalence of syphilitic sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in childhood is not clearly defined. To determine the frequency and characteristics of pediatric SNHL following intrauterine infection with or exposure to Treponema pallidum in order to develop evidence-based guidelines for audiologic monitoring. Medline (1950-March 2008), EMBASE (1980-March 2008), CINAHL (1982-March 2008), BIOSIS Previews (1969-March 2008), and Cochrane databases. Manual search of references of identified articles and book chapters. Articles with an inception cohort of children infected with T. pallidum during pregnancy, positive serological identification of syphilis infection in the antenatal period or pathognomonic clinical signs of congenital syphilis infection, and longitudinal serial audiologic evaluations to identify the prevalence and progression of SNHL. Patient information, maternal and infant serologic status, and audiometric data extracted in an independent fashion. Discrepancies resolved through mutual consensus. Descriptive statistics. One prospective cohort study met the inclusion criteria. No cases of SNHL in infants with early congenital syphilis treated with antibiotics in the neonatal period were identified. There have been no reports of children with confirmed congenital SNHL secondary to in utero syphilis infection. Newborns with positive syphilis serology should have hearing screening performed at birth and receive treatment with an appropriate course of penicillin therapy. Longitudinal hearing screening is recommended for all pediatric patients with congenital syphilis, as further studies documenting longitudinal audiometric data for patients previously treated either fully or partly for congenital syphilis are required.

  18. Global Estimates of Syphilis in Pregnancy and Associated Adverse Outcomes: Analysis of Multinational Antenatal Surveillance Data

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Lori; Kamb, Mary; Hawkes, Sarah; Gomez, Gabriela; Say, Lale; Seuc, Armando; Broutet, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization initiative to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of syphilis aims for ≥90% of pregnant women to be tested for syphilis and ≥90% to receive treatment by 2015. We calculated global and regional estimates of syphilis in pregnancy and associated adverse outcomes for 2008, as well as antenatal care (ANC) coverage for women with syphilis. Methods and Findings Estimates were based upon a health service delivery model. National syphilis seropositivity data from 97 of 193 countries and ANC coverage from 147 countries were obtained from World Health Organization databases. Proportions of adverse outcomes and effectiveness of screening and treatment were from published literature. Regional estimates of ANC syphilis testing and treatment were examined through sensitivity analysis. In 2008, approximately 1.36 million (range: 1.16 to 1.56 million) pregnant women globally were estimated to have probable active syphilis; of these, 80% had attended ANC. Globally, 520,905 (best case: 425,847; worst case: 615,963) adverse outcomes were estimated to be caused by maternal syphilis, including approximately 212,327 (174,938; 249,716) stillbirths (>28 wk) or early fetal deaths (22 to 28 wk), 91,764 (76,141; 107,397) neonatal deaths, 65,267 (56,929; 73,605) preterm or low birth weight infants, and 151,547 (117,848; 185,245) infected newborns. Approximately 66% of adverse outcomes occurred in ANC attendees who were not tested or were not treated for syphilis. In 2008, based on the middle case scenario, clinical services likely averted 26% of all adverse outcomes. Limitations include missing syphilis seropositivity data for many countries in Europe, the Mediterranean, and North America, and use of estimates for the proportion of syphilis that was “probable active,” and for testing and treatment coverage. Conclusions Syphilis continues to affect large numbers of pregnant women, causing substantial perinatal morbidity and mortality that

  19. Risk Factors Associated with Incident Syphilis in a Cohort of High-Risk Men in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Konda, Kelika A.; Roberts, Chelsea P.; Maguiña, Jorge L.; Leon, Segundo R.; Clark, Jesse L.; Coates, Thomas J.; Caceres, Carlos F.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Syphilis is concentrated among high-risk groups, but the epidemiology of syphilis reinfection is poorly understood. We characterized factors associated with syphilis incidence, including reinfection, in a high-risk cohort in Peru. Methods Participants in the NIMH CPOL trial were assessed at baseline and 2 annual visits with HIV/STI testing and behavioral surveys. Participants diagnosed with syphilis also attended 4- and 9-month visits. All participants underwent syphilis testing with RPR screening and TPPA confirmation. Antibiotic treatment was provided according to CDC guidelines. Reinfection was defined as a 4-fold titer increase or recurrence of seroreactivity after successful treatment with subsequent negative RPR titers. The longitudinal analysis used a Possion generalized estimating equations model with backward selection of variables in the final model (criteria P <0.02). Results Of 2,709 participants, 191 (7.05%) were RPR-reactive (median 1:8, range 1:1–1:1024) with TPPA confirmation. There were 119 total cases of incident syphilis, which included both reinfection and first-time incident cases. In the bivariate analysis, the oldest 2 quartiles of age (incidence ratio (IR) 3.84; P <0.001 and IR 8.15; P <0.001) and being MSM/TW (IR 6.48; P <0.001) were associated with higher risk of incident syphilis infection. Of the sexual risk behaviors, older age of sexual debut (IR 12.53; P <0.001), not being in a stable partnership (IR 1.56, P = 0.035), higher number of sex partners (IR 3.01; P <0.001), unprotected sex in the past 3 months (IR 0.56; P = 0.003), HIV infection at baseline (IR 3.98; P <0.001) and incident HIV infection during the study period (IR 6.26; P = 0.003) were all associated with incident syphilis. In the multivariable analysis, older age group (adjusted incidence ratio (aIR) 6.18; P <0.001), men reporting having sex with a man (aIR 4.63; P <0.001), and incident HIV infection (aIR 4.48; P = 0.008) were significantly associated

  20. Risk Factors Associated with Incident Syphilis in a Cohort of High-Risk Men in Peru.

    PubMed

    Park, Hayoung; Konda, Kelika A; Roberts, Chelsea P; Maguiña, Jorge L; Leon, Segundo R; Clark, Jesse L; Coates, Thomas J; Caceres, Carlos F; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is concentrated among high-risk groups, but the epidemiology of syphilis reinfection is poorly understood. We characterized factors associated with syphilis incidence, including reinfection, in a high-risk cohort in Peru. Participants in the NIMH CPOL trial were assessed at baseline and 2 annual visits with HIV/STI testing and behavioral surveys. Participants diagnosed with syphilis also attended 4- and 9-month visits. All participants underwent syphilis testing with RPR screening and TPPA confirmation. Antibiotic treatment was provided according to CDC guidelines. Reinfection was defined as a 4-fold titer increase or recurrence of seroreactivity after successful treatment with subsequent negative RPR titers. The longitudinal analysis used a Possion generalized estimating equations model with backward selection of variables in the final model (criteria P <0.02). Of 2,709 participants, 191 (7.05%) were RPR-reactive (median 1:8, range 1:1-1:1024) with TPPA confirmation. There were 119 total cases of incident syphilis, which included both reinfection and first-time incident cases. In the bivariate analysis, the oldest 2 quartiles of age (incidence ratio (IR) 3.84; P <0.001 and IR 8.15; P <0.001) and being MSM/TW (IR 6.48; P <0.001) were associated with higher risk of incident syphilis infection. Of the sexual risk behaviors, older age of sexual debut (IR 12.53; P <0.001), not being in a stable partnership (IR 1.56, P = 0.035), higher number of sex partners (IR 3.01; P <0.001), unprotected sex in the past 3 months (IR 0.56; P = 0.003), HIV infection at baseline (IR 3.98; P <0.001) and incident HIV infection during the study period (IR 6.26; P = 0.003) were all associated with incident syphilis. In the multivariable analysis, older age group (adjusted incidence ratio (aIR) 6.18; P <0.001), men reporting having sex with a man (aIR 4.63; P <0.001), and incident HIV infection (aIR 4.48; P = 0.008) were significantly associated. We report a high rate of syphilis

  1. [A meta-analysis of HIV seroprevalence in pregnant women with syphilis and the impact of syphilis infection on mother-to-child HIV transmission].

    PubMed

    Wang, T T; Xu, Y; Li, Z Z; Chen, L Z

    2016-11-06

    Objective: To estimate HIV seroprevalence among pregnant women with syphilis and evaluate the influence of syphilis infection on mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of HIV by meta-analysis. Methods: We conducted a systematic literature search for 1 678 articles related to maternal syphilis and HIV infection published until October 1(st) 2015 using the PubMed, Web of Science, Chinese Web of Knowledge, Wanfang, Weipu, and SinoMed databases and evaluated the quality of each papers using the STROBE checklist, and the keywords were " pregnant women/maternal/pregnancy" , "syphilis/AIDS" , "HIV/human immunodeficiency virus" , "mother- to-child transimission/vertical transmission" . Excluding studies with the special subgroups of HIV-positive pregnant women as the research objects, review or meeting abstract, impossibility of full-text acquisition, sample size <50, duplication or impossibility of data extraction, finally, 16 studies were included. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to estimate HIV seroprevalence among pregnant women with syphilis and the RR of MTCT for women infected with both syphilis and HIV. Subgroup analyses were undertaken by study location, sample size, use of anti-retroviral therapy and study quality. Results: Sixteen studies with a combined sample of 110 573 pregnant women were included in the analysis. Of these, ten reported HIV seroprevalences among pregnant women with syphilis and six studies evaluated the influence of syphilis infection on MTCT of HIV. Pooled estimates yielded a HIV seroprevalence of 11.6% (95% CI: 6.7%-19.5%) among pregnant women with syphilis. We estimated that the risk of MTCT of HIV was 1.86 times (RR=1.86, 95% CI: 0.89%-3.89%) higher among pregnant women with syphilis compared with those only infected with HIV-although this effect was not statistically significant. Cochran's Q test showed a high degree of heterogeneity in estimates of HIV seroprevalence and the effect of syphilis infection on MTCT of HIV across studies

  2. [Twelve years of experience in the diagnosis of syphilis in Mexico. Period 2001-2012].

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Campuzano, Roberto; Galnares-Olalde, Javier Andrés; Blachman-Braun, Ruben; Berebichez-Fridman, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    To determine the incidence of syphilis in Mexico in patients suspected of having the disease or any risk factor. We performed a descriptive, longitudinal, randomized design study from the period of January 2001 to December 2012, where 51,302 samples were analyzed for syphilis in risk groups. A 39.73% frequency of positive cases was calculated. The estimated average age of detection was 29.08 years. It was found that syphilis affects 47.05% of males and 52.85% of females. The most affected states were Chiapas, Tabasco, and Hidalgo. Syphilis, despite its decrease in frequency, is an important disease in the major risk groups, so it is vital to take preventive measures to reduce the occurrence of new cases and eliminate cases of congenital syphilis.

  3. The rise of infectious syphilis in Victoria and the impact of enhanced clinical testing.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kelly; Guy, Rebecca; Leslie, David; Goller, Jane; Medland, Nicholas; Roth, Norman; Lewis, Jenny; Hellard, Margaret

    2008-02-01

    Passive surveillance indicates a clear increase in infectious syphilis cases in Victoria, but trends are likely to be influenced by changes in testing. We therefore used testing data from two Melbourne clinics with a high caseload of men who have sex with men to examine infectious syphilis prevalence, time trends and risk factors for infection. We extracted laboratory testing data on all males tested for syphilis at the clinics between 2000 and 2004, including demographic information, syphilis test results and laboratory information used to assign HIV status (a HIV positive diagnosis or HIV positive clinical monitoring data). Of 7,906 syphilis tests conducted at the two clinics, overall 1.4% resulted in a diagnosis of infectious syphilis, significantly increasing from 0.5% in 2000 to 2.5% in 2004, p<0.01, and among HIV positive males significantly increasing from 0.0% in 2000 to 6.1% in 2004, p<0.01. The frequency of annual syphilis testing among HIV positive males attending for any STI testing significantly increased from 47.3% in 2000 to 81.4% in 2004, p<0.01. Between 2002 and 2003, the syphilis testing rate per 1,000 consultations increased by 44% (from 65.3 to 94.3 tests per 1,000 consultations) compared with a 500% increase in the infectious syphilis diagnosis rate (from 0.2 to 1.2 positive tests per 1,000 consultations). The increase in infectious syphilis notifications appears unrelated to the observed increased in testing and is more likely to be attributed to increased transmission, highlighting the need for urgent prevention interventions.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of HIV and syphilis antenatal screening: a modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Claire C.; Larson, Elysia; Anderson, Laura J.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The World Health Organization called for the elimination of maternal-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV and syphilis, a harmonized approach for the improvement of health outcomes for mothers and children. Testing early in pregnancy, treating seropositive pregnant women, and preventing syphilis re-infection can prevent MTCT of HIV and syphilis. We assessed the health and economic outcomes of a dual testing strategy in a simulated cohort of 100,000 antenatal care patients in Malawi. Methods We compared four screening algorithms: (1) HIV rapid test only, (2) dual HIV and syphilis rapid tests, (3) single rapid tests for HIV and syphilis, and (4) HIV rapid and syphilis laboratory tests. We calculated the expected number of adverse pregnancy outcomes, the expected costs, and the expected newborn disability adjusted life years (DALYs) for each screening algorithm. The estimated costs and DALYs for each screening algorithm were assessed from a societal perspective using Markov progression models. Additionally, we conducted a Monte Carlo multi-way sensitivity analysis, allowing for ranges of inputs. Results Our cohort decision model predicted the lowest number of adverse pregnancy outcomes in the dual HIV and syphilis rapid test strategy. Additionally, from the societal perspective, the costs of prevention and care using a dual HIV and syphilis rapid testing strategy was both the least costly ($226.92 per pregnancy) and resulted in the fewest DALYs (116,639) per 100,000 pregnancies. In the Monte Carlo simulation the dual HIV and syphilis algorithm was always cost saving and almost always reduced disability adjusted life years (DALYs) compared to HIV testing alone. Conclusion The results of the cost-effectiveness analysis showed that a dual HIV and syphilis test was cost saving compared to all other screening strategies. Adding dual rapid testing to the existing prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programs in Malawi and similar countries is likely to

  5. Usefulness of Positron Emission Tomography in Patients with Syphilis: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Zheng, Xin; Liu, Xiu-Qin

    2017-05-05

    Diagnosis of syphilis is difficult. Follow-up and therapy evaluation of syphilitic patients are poor. Little is known about positron emission tomography (PET) in syphilis. This review was to systematically review usefulness of PET for diagnosis, disease extent evaluation, follow-up, and treatment response assessment in patients with syphilis. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov, and three Chinese databases (SinoMed, Wanfang, and CNKI) for English and Chinese language articles from inception to September 2016. We also collected potentially relevant studies and reviews using a manual search. The search keywords included the combined text and MeSH terms "syphilis" and "positron emission tomography". We included studies that reporting syphilis with a PET scan before and/or after antibiotic treatment. The diagnosis of syphilis was based on serological criteria or dark field microscopy. Outcomes include pre- and post-treatment PET scan, pre- and post-treatment computed tomography, and pre- and post-treatment magnetic resonance imaging. We excluded the articles not published in English or Chinese or not involving humans. Of 258 identified articles, 34 observational studies were included. Thirty-three studies were single-patient case reports and one study was a small case series. All patients were adults. The mean age of patients was 48.3 ± 12.1 years. In primary syphilis, increased fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) accumulation could be seen at the site of inoculation or in the regional lymph nodes. In secondary syphilis with lung, bone, gastrointestinal involvement, or generalized lymphadenopathy, increased FDG uptake was the most commonly detected changes. In tertiary syphilis, increased glucose metabolic activity, hypometabolic lesions, or normal glucose uptake might be seen on PET. There were five types of PET scans in neurosyphilis. A repeated PET scan after treatment revealed apparent or complete resolution of the

  6. Rapid Syphilis Tests as Catalysts for Health Systems Strengthening: A Case Study from Peru

    PubMed Central

    García, Patricia J.; Cárcamo, César P.; Chiappe, Marina; Valderrama, Maria; La Rosa, Sayda; Holmes, King K.; Mabey, David C. W.; Peeling, Rosanna W.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Untreated maternal syphilis leads to adverse pregnancy outcomes. The use of point of care tests (POCT) offers an opportunity to improve screening coverage for syphilis and other aspects of health systems. Our objective is to present the experience of the introduction of POCT for syphilis in Peru and describe how new technology can catalyze health system strengthening. Methods The study was implemented from September 2009–November 2010 to assess the feasibility of the use of a POCT for syphilis for screening pregnant women in Lima, Peru. Outcomes measured included access to syphilis screening, treatment coverage, partner treatment, effect on patient flow and service efficiency, acceptability among providers and patients, and sustainability. Results Before the introduction of POCT, a pregnant woman needed 6 visits to the health center in 27 days before she received her syphilis result. We trained 604 health providers and implemented the POCT for syphilis as the “two for one strategy”, offering with one finger stick both syphilis and HIV testing. Implementation of the POCT resulted in testing and treatment on the first visit. Screening and treatment coverages for syphilis improved significantly compared with the previous year. Implementation of POCT has been scaled up nationally since the study ended, and coverages for screening, treatment and partner treatment have remained over 92%. Conclusions Implementation of POCT for syphilis proved feasible and acceptable, and led to improvement in several aspects of health services. For the process to be effective we highlight the importance of: (1) engaging the authorities; (2) dissipating tensions between providers and identifying champions; (3) training according to the needs; (4) providing monitoring, supervision, support and recognition; (5) sharing results and discussing actions together; (6) consulting and obtaining feedback from users; and (7) integrating with other services such as with rapid HIV

  7. Social network investigation of a syphilis outbreak in Ottawa, Ontario

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo-Scott, H; Cutler, J; Friedman, D; Hendriks, A; Jolly, AM

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of syphilis in Ottawa, Ontario, has risen substantially since 2000 to six cases per 100,000 in 2003, again to nine cases per 100,000 in 2007, and recently rose to 11 cases per 100,000 in 2010. The number of cases reported in the first quarter of 2010 was more than double that in the first quarter of 2009. OBJECTIVE: In May 2010, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care requested the assistance of the Field Epidemiology Program to describe the increase in infectious syphilis rates and to identify social network sources and prevention messages. METHODS: Syphilis surveillance data were routinely collected from January 1, 2009 to July 15, 2010, and social networks were constructed from an enhanced social network questionnaire. Univariate comparisons between the enhanced surveillance group and the remaining cases from 2009 on non-normally distributed data were conducted using Kruskal-Wallis tests and χ2 tests. RESULTS: The outbreak cases were comprised of 89% men. Seventeen of the 19 most recent cases consented to answer the questionnaire, which revealed infrequent use of condoms, multiple sex partners and sex with a same-sex partner. Information regarding social venues where sex partners were met was plotted together with sexual partnerships, linking 18 cases and 40 contacts, representing 37% of the outbreak population and connecting many of the single individuals and dyads. CONCLUSION: Uncovering the places sex partners met was an effective proxy measure of high-risk activities shared with infected individuals and demonstrates the potential for focusing on interventions at one named bar and one Internet site to reach a high proportion of the population at risk. PMID:26600816

  8. Syphilis in art: an entertainment in four parts. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Morton, R S

    1990-02-01

    It is widely recognised that the history of art reveals the contemporary attitudes of societies and artists to changing patterns of social and sexual behaviour. This collection of artistic creations shows that representations of syphilis in art, over more than five centuries, are consistent with this view. The first quarter century of the morbus gallicus in Europe, starting in 1493, coincided with the spread of Renaissance influence, including printing. A host of pamphlets with woodcut illustrations reflected public alarm at the epidemic proportions and severity of the new disease, with its disabling and sometimes deadly consequences. Also revealed in these early works are the astrological and theological beliefs of disease causation as well as identifiable and serious attempts at public education. These twinned themes of understanding and educational endeavour recur together throughout the centuries and take many forms as man attempts to outline and influence attitudes and so improve his medico-social health. Attitudes to causation changed with experience so that by the beginning of the 17th century the morbus gallicus is no longer a mere contagion but recognised socially and represented artistically, as a morbus venereus. Its clinical presentation had changed remarkably from the alarming early days; and so too had its prevalence--from epidemic to endemic proportions. We find that the artists of both the 16th and 17th centuries, while somewhat reticent about syphilis, are nonetheless at pains to suggest that sex is not without its serious side effects. Their artistic exhortations suggest women as the source of the disease, so that we find Venus shown as both ideal love and the source of contamination. Such attitudes contrast strikingly with what follows. The 18th century is characterised by the sophisticated elements of European societies taking an irreverent or satirical view of sex and syphilis. In England this is reflected in the works of Hogarth and other

  9. [The treatment of syphilis with mercury: an exemplary therapeutic history].

    PubMed

    Tilles, G; Wallach, D

    1996-01-01

    Prior to the first use of penicillin against syphilis in 1943, mercury had a prominent position in the medical practice despite a tremendous toxicity and a questionable efficiency. In fact, during 450 years mercury remained the guarantee of efficacy. The modalities of use increased, the durations of treatment lengthened without any evidence of a worsening morbidity. This history of an exceptional duration seems to be a good example of the weight of tradition or habit in the medical practice, of the importance of the constraints supported by the patients, of the necessity and the difficulties to evaluate the treatments without error.

  10. Syphilis in art: an entertainment in four parts. Part 1.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R S

    1990-01-01

    It is widely recognised that the history of art reveals the contemporary attitudes of societies and artists to changing patterns of social and sexual behaviour. This collection of artistic creations shows that representations of syphilis in art, over more than five centuries, are consistent with this view. The first quarter century of the morbus gallicus in Europe, starting in 1493, coincided with the spread of Renaissance influence, including printing. A host of pamphlets with woodcut illustrations reflected public alarm at the epidemic proportions and severity of the new disease, with its disabling and sometimes deadly consequences. Also revealed in these early works are the astrological and theological beliefs of disease causation as well as identifiable and serious attempts at public education. These twinned themes of understanding and educational endeavour recur together throughout the centuries and take many forms as man attempts to outline and influence attitudes and so improve his medico-social health. Attitudes to causation changed with experience so that by the beginning of the 17th century the morbus gallicus is no longer a mere contagion but recognised socially and represented artistically, as a morbus venereus. Its clinical presentation had changed remarkably from the alarming early days; and so too had its prevalence--from epidemic to endemic proportions. We find that the artists of both the 16th and 17th centuries, while somewhat reticent about syphilis, are nonetheless at pains to suggest that sex is not without its serious side effects. Their artistic exhortations suggest women as the source of the disease, so that we find Venus shown as both ideal love and the source of contamination. Such attitudes contrast strikingly with what follows. The 18th century is characterised by the sophisticated elements of European societies taking an irreverent or satirical view of sex and syphilis. In England this is reflected in the works of Hogarth and other

  11. Endemic syphilis in the Bakwena Reserve of the Bechuanaland Protectorate

    PubMed Central

    Murray, J. F.; Merriweather, A. M.; Freedman, M. L.

    1956-01-01

    A form of endemic syphilis exists in the Bakwena Reserve of the Bechuanaland Protectorate known by the local name of “dichuchwa”. It is similar to bejel, njovera and the endemic syphilis reported elsewhere in the world. The Government of the Protectorate, with the assistance of WHO and UNICEF, began in November 1953 a mass campaign in the Reserve to control this disease and, at the same time, to study its epidemiological, clinical, social and therapeutic aspects. The seropositivity rate in the Reserve was found to be 37%. Dichuchwa is a childhood and family disease, usually spread non-venereally. The early lesions are similar to secondary lesions of sporadic venereal syphilis, and are often followed by tertiary lesions affecting mainly the skin, nasopharynx and long bones. Primary lesions are rare but may occur under certain epidemiological conditions if the inoculum is sufficiently large; thus a mother may develop primary sores on the nipples through suckling an infected infant. Lesions of the cardiovascular and central nervous systems and congenital syphilis are also rare. Superinfection of an already infected and allergic host is probably the chief reason for the frequency of the tertiary lesions. Treatment of the disease with penicillin is very effective, and the authors believe that mass treatment of cases and contacts combined with an improvement in the standards of hygiene could eradicate the disease. ImagesFig. 61Fig. 62Fig. 63Fig. 64Fig. 74Fig. 75Fig. 76Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 43Fig. 44Fig. 45Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 33Fig. 50Fig. 51Fig. 52Fig. 53Fig. 54Fig. 55Fig. 56Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 46Fig. 47Fig. 48Fig. 49Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 57Fig. 58Fig. 59Fig. 60Fig. 65Fig. 66Fig. 67Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 21Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 68Fig. 69Fig. 70Fig. 71Fig. 72Fig. 73Fig. 37Fig. 38Fig. 39Fig. 28Fig. 29Fig. 30Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 40Fig. 41Fig. 42 PMID:13404470

  12. Observance of Kassowitz law-late congenital syphilis: Palatal perforation and saddle nose deformity as presenting features.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Govindan; Kalaivani, Subramanian

    2013-01-01

    Late congenital syphilis refers to the people with syphilis from the age of 2 to 30 years. We report a case of late congenital syphilis in a 9 year old girl with perforation of palate and saddle nose deformity. Kassowitz law was also observed (if a woman with untreated syphilis has series of pregnancies, the likelihood of infection of the fetus in later pregnancies becomes less). Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) and Treponema pallidum hemagglutination (TPHA) were reactive. Computed tomography (CT) scan of paranasal sinus showed maxillary and nasal polyps. The case reported here is a rare presentation of late congenital syphilis with perforation of palate and saddle nose deformity.

  13. Changes in the state-level distribution of primary and secondary syphilis in the USA, 1985-2007.

    PubMed

    Chesson, Harrell W; Sternberg, Maya; Leichliter, Jami S; Aral, Sevgi O

    2010-12-01

    To examine changes over time in the distribution of primary and secondary syphilis cases across states, using Lorenz curves and Gini coefficients. For each year from 1985 to 2007, the Gini coefficient for the state-level distribution of male and female syphilis cases was calculated. The Gini coefficient can range from 0 (indicating equality in syphilis rates across states) to 1 (indicating complete inequality such that all syphilis cases occur in one state). The Gini coefficients for men are notably lower (indicating more equality in the distribution of syphilis across states) in recent years (in which men who have sex with men (MSM) account for most syphilis cases) than in the heterosexual epidemic of the late 1980s and early 1990s. Although syphilis rates in men were similar in 1995 and 2007 (6.7 and 6.6 per 100,000, respectively), the Gini coefficient for male syphilis decreased from 0.523 in 1995 to 0.333 in 2007. For syphilis in women, Gini coefficients have not shown the same degree of decline. The spread of MSM syphilis cases to urban areas across the nation is likely to be a main cause of the decreased concentration of male syphilis cases across states from 1995 to 2007.

  14. Automation of a flocculation test for syphilis on Groupamatic equipment.

    PubMed Central

    Garretta, M; Paris-Hamelin, A; Gener, J; Muller, A; Matte, C; Vaisman, A

    1975-01-01

    A flocculation reaction employing a cardiolipid antigen was used for syphilis screening on Groupamatic equipment in parallel with conventional screening reactions: Kolmer CF, RPCF, Kahn, Kline, and RPR. The positive samples were confirmed by FTA-200, FTA-ABS, TPI, and in some cases by TPHA. There were 5,212 known samples which had already been tested by all methods and of which 1,648 were positive, and 58,636 screened samples including 65 positives. Half of the samples in the first series were taken without anticoagulant; the remainder were collected in potassium EDTA. The percentage of false positives with the Groupamatic was about 1-4 per cent. The percentage of false negatives among positve (greater than or equal+) samples varied from 0-18 to 1-3 per cent.; on the other hand the sensitivity was less good for samples giving doubtful and/or dissociated reactions in conventional screening reactions. The specificity and sensitivity of this technique are acceptable for a blood transfusion centre. The reproducibility is excellent and the automatic reading of results accurate. Additional advantages are rapidity (340 samples processed per hour); simultaneous performance of eleven other immunohaematological reactions; no contamination between samples; automatic reading, interpretation, and print-out of results; and saving of time because samples are not filed sequentially and are automatically identified when the results are obtained. Although the importance of syphilis in blood transfusion seems small, estimates of the risk are difficult and further investigations are planned. Images PMID:1098731

  15. The rise and fall of syphilis in Renaissance Europe.

    PubMed

    Tognotti, Eugenia

    2009-06-01

    The rapid changes that syphilis underwent after the first major outbreak that occurred in Naples in the mid-1490s are believed to constitute the first well-documented example of a human disease. The new plague was of exceptional virulence, highly contagious and causing severe ulceration at the site of infection. According to medical and other historical sources, the 'genius epidemics' changed some years after this onset, and a slower-progressing form of syphilis seems to have replaced the initial severe form, as do many virulent epidemic infectious diseases that appear in devastating forms in a previously uninfected population. But what exactly were the features of the disease at the moment of its appearance in Europe at the end of the fifteenth century? How many years did it take for the early, virulent form to be replaced and become endemic? What was the pace of these changes through the decades following the onset of the epidemic? In this essay, I review these issues through an analysis of a large number of chronologically-ordered primary historical sources.

  16. [Syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus infection: an endemic infection in men who have sex with men].

    PubMed

    González-Domenech, Carmen M; Antequera Martín-Portugués, Isabel; Clavijo-Frutos, Encarnación; Márquez-Solero, Manuel; Santos-González, Jesús; Palacios-Muñoz, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    to analyse epidemiological, clinical, and analytical features of HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) diagnosed with syphilis in the Infectious Diseases Unit (Hospital Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga, Spain) during 2004-2013. An observational study was conducted on 196 syphilis episodes in 167 MSM infected with HIV (2004-2013). Epidemiological, clinical, and analytical data were collected. Annual syphilis incidence among HIV-MSM is calculated as the number of syphilis episodes among MSM in one year divided by the number of MSM followed up in that year. Incidence ranged from 1.2% (2007) to 7.8% (2012). There were asymptomatic episodes in 42.8% cases, and an HIV-syphilis coincident diagnosis in 28.5%. The annual incidence of syphilis has increased within HIV infected MSM. One third of the syphilis episodes were simultaneous to HIV diagnosis and near half of them were asymptomatic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. [Gestational syphilis and associated factors in public hospitals of Peru during 2000-2010].

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Tapia, Vilma; Serruya, Suzanne J

    2014-04-01

    To determine the epidemiological profile of gestational syphilis and associated factors in a Peruvian population. The study is a secondary analysis of data obtained from public hospitals in Peru for the 2000-2010 period. 652,636 pregnant women were included from 37 cities and 45 health centers in Peru. The prevalence of gestational syphilis was 0.7%, while 80.7% reported screening for gestational syphilis. The highest prevalence of maternal syphilis is found in the lowland rainforest followed by the highland rainforest. In the three regions of Peru decreased prevalence of gestational syphilis has been seen throughout the years. The prevalence for 2010 are 0.2% on the coast, in the highlands 0.23% and 0.47% in the jungle. The lack of education and prenatal care, high parity, cohabiting or single, and living in the jungle, are associated with having a positive syphilis test. The results suggests that prevalence of gestational syphilis has declined over the decade 2000-2010.

  18. Current Perspectives on Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to provide an update on the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis by drawing upon some important basic concepts and reviewing the most recent literature on the diagnosis and treatment of syphilis in pregnancy. New technologies, such as automated and point-of-care immunologic tests, are shifting some paradigms, which will certainly be further investigated in the forthcoming years. This is the time to carefully evaluate traditional as well as new strategies to prevent congenital syphilis. Adverse outcomes of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis can be prevented with antenatal screening and penicillin therapy, which proved to have an excellent cost-benefit ratio even in populations with a low prevalence of syphilis. However, syphilis epidemiology is influenced by socioeconomic and cultural factors, and major challenges are faced by poor and developing countries in which the severity of the problem is extremely alarming. On the other hand, the emergence of new technologies has raised doubts about the best algorithm to be used when proper laboratory resources are available. Conditions are quite heterogeneous across populations, and some procedures should not be generalized while there is no evidence that supports some changes and while in-depth studies about local conditions are not conducted. Official organizations need to be alert in order to avoid isolated decisions and ensure that evidence-based guidelines be used in the management of syphilis in pregnancy. PMID:27081586

  19. Educational video tool to increase syphilis knowledge among black and Hispanic male patients.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, John Paul; Kaltwassar, Sydney; McClellan, Mary; Burton, William B; Blank, Arthur; Calderon, Yvette

    2010-02-01

    To determine the effectiveness of an educational video entitled Syphilis and Men to increase syphilis knowledge among at-risk Black and Hispanic male patients. In this randomized controlled trial, participants were randomly assigned to one of four groups and completed a pre-test survey, viewed the video (intervention group) and/or completed a post-test knowledge survey. Our analysis assessed whether the intervention group in comparison to the control group had an increase in syphilis knowledge, regardless of self-reported socio-demographic and sexual behavior characteristics associated with increased risk for syphilis infection. Two hundred and six (206) males were studied. The intervention group participants scored on average 24.8 percentage points higher than the control group participants (p<.001) on the post-test survey after viewing the video. This difference was present regardless of certain self-reported socio-demographic and sexual behavior characteristics associated with increased risk for syphilis infection. The Syphilis and Men video is a five-minute, low-cost tool that increased syphilis knowledge among Black and Hispanic male patients and could have similar effects in other settings.

  20. A novel response to an outbreak of infectious syphilis in Christchurch, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Edward; Young, Heather; Parkes, Catherine; Coshall, Maureen; Dickson, Nigel; Psutka, Rebecca; Saxton, Peter; Pink, Ramon; Adams, Katharine

    2015-04-01

    During 2012, Christchurch experienced a dramatic increase in cases of infectious syphilis among men who have sex with men. This was accompanied by some novel trends; notably, the acquisition of infection in a younger age group, with local sexual contacts, commonly via the use of social media. This study is a report on an approach to case identification and public health communication as a component of a multifaceted outbreak response. Enhanced syphilis surveillance data on public health responses to outbreaks of sexually transmissible infections was collated and reviewed, alongside clinical records and literature. Reported outbreak response methods were adapted for the Christchurch cohort. A Facebook page was created to raise awareness of infectious syphilis, the importance of screening and where to get tested. Twenty-six males were diagnosed with infectious syphilis in 2012, an increase from previous years, of which 22 reported only male sexual contact. High use of social media used to find potential sexual contacts was reported. Enhanced syphilis surveillance characterised in detail an infectious syphilis outbreak in Christchurch. Index cases were identified, contact tracing mapping was used to identify transmission networks and social media was also used to educate the risk group. There was a decrease in infectious syphilis presentations, with no cases in the last 3 months of 2012.

  1. Is antenatal syphilis screening still cost effective in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Terris-Prestholt, F; Watson-Jones, D; Mugeye, K; Kumaranayake, L; Ndeki, L; Weiss, H; Changalucha, J; Todd, J; Lisekie, F; Gumodoka, B; Mabey, D; Hayes, R

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the cost effectiveness of on-site antenatal syphilis screening and treatment in Mwanza, Tanzania. To compare this intervention with other antenatal and child health interventions, specifically the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). Methods: The economic costs of adding the intervention to routine antenatal care were assessed. Cost effectiveness (CE) ratios of the intervention were obtained for low birth weight (LBW) live births and stillbirths averted and cost per DALY saved. Cost per DALY saved was also estimated for previous CE studies of syphilis screening. The CE of the intervention at different syphilis prevalence rates was modelled. Results: The economic cost of the intervention is $1.44 per woman screened, $20 per woman treated, and $187 per adverse birth outcome averted. The cost per DALY saved is $110 with LBW as the only adverse outcome. When including stillbirth, this estimate improves 10-fold to $10.56 per DALY saved. The cost per DALY saved from all syphilis screening studies ranged from $3.97 to $18.73. Conclusions: Syphilis screening is shown to be at least as cost effective as PMTCT and more cost effective than many widely implemented interventions. There is urgent need for scaling up syphilis screening and treatment in high prevalence areas. The CE of screening interventions is highly dependent on disease prevalence. In combination, PMTCT and syphilis screening and treatment interventions may achieve economies of scope and thus improved efficiency. PMID:14573832

  2. The co-occurrence of intimate partner violence and syphilis among pregnant women in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Olavarrieta, Claudia; Wilson, Kate S; García, Sandra G; Revollo, Rita; Richmond, Kara; Paz, Francisco; Chavez, Lorena P

    2009-12-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexually transmitted infections (STI) are epidemics that disproportionately affect women. This study determined IPV prevalence and the association between IPV and positive syphilis tests among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in three provinces in Bolivia. We administered structured questionnaires to women after syphilis testing. The questionnaire included sociodemographic variables and four questions form the modified version of the Abuse Assessment Screen (AAS) to assess physical and sexual violence. Of 6002 women who completed the violence questionnaire and had a syphilis test, 20.4% (n=1227) reported physical or sexual abuse or both committed by their partner in the past year. Prevalence of positive syphilis tests was twice as high among women who reported IPV (8%) than among women who did not (4%) (p<0.01). Women's age (younger), education level (lower), occupation as homemaker, being in a consensual union, more previous pregnancies, lower economic status, and language spoken at home (Spanish and an indigenous language), as well as history of IPV in the past 12 months, were significantly associated with positive syphilis tests in bivariate analysis. History of IPV remained significantly associated with positive syphilis tests in multivariate analysis (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.23-2.07). In addition, low education among women's partners and having at least one previous pregnancy were positively associated with IPV in multivariate analysis. There is a significant association between history of partner violence and a positive syphilis test among pregnant women, suggesting that syphilis can be an important negative health consequence of IPV. Bolivia's new maternal and infant health program in antenatal clinics, which includes universal syphilis screening, should also provide screening and follow-up care for IPV.

  3. Check Yourself: a social marketing campaign to increase syphilis screening in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Plant, Aaron; Javanbakht, Marjan; Montoya, Jorge A; Rotblatt, Harlan; O'Leary, Christopher; Kerndt, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health launched Check Yourself, a new social marketing campaign, as part of ongoing efforts to address the persistent syphilis epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the county. The goals of the campaign were to increase syphilis testing and knowledge among MSM. Check Yourself was planned with careful attention to the principles of social marketing, including formative research, market segmentation, and an emphasis on building a strong brand. A cross-sectional survey using a time-location sample was conducted in 2009 for the evaluation. The survey assessed demographics, syphilis knowledge, and recent syphilis testing as well as unaided awareness, aided awareness, and confirmed awareness, meaning that a person had both awareness of the campaign and could correctly identify that the campaign was about syphilis. The total sample size was 306. Unaided awareness for Check Yourself was 20.7%, and aided awareness was 67.5%, bringing total campaign awareness to 88.2%; confirmed awareness was 30.4%. Unaided campaign awareness was associated with syphilis knowledge and important risk behaviors for syphilis, indicating that the campaign reached an appropriate audience. Total awareness was not associated with recent syphilis testing in a multivariate model. However, MSM with confirmed awareness were more than 6 times more likely to have been recently tested. The evaluation of Check Yourself found that the campaign had a very strong brand among MSM. Although total awareness was not associated with syphilis testing, confirmed awareness, a more robust measure, was strongly associated.

  4. Utility of the Determine Syphilis TP rapid test in commercial sex venues in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Campos, P E; Buffardi, A L; Chiappe, M; Buendía, C; Garcia, P J; Carcamo, C P; Garnett, G; White, P

    2006-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to evaluate the utility of the Determine Syphilis TP test performed in Peruvian commercial sex venues for the detection of active syphilis; and determine the feasibility of integrating rapid syphilis testing for female sex workers (FSW) into existing health outreach services. Methods We tested 3586 female sex workers for syphilis by Determine in the field using whole blood fingerstick, and by rapid plasma reagin (RPR) and Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA) in a central laboratory in Lima using sera. Results 97.4% of the FSW offered rapid syphilis testing participated; and among those who tested positive, 87% visited the local health centre for treatment. More than twice as many specimens were RPR reactive using serum in Lima (5.7%) than tested positive by whole blood Determine in the field (2.8%), and although most were confirmed by TPHA, only a small proportion (0.7%) were RPR reactive at ⩾1:8 dilutions, and likely indicating active syphilis. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of the Determine Syphilis TP test in whole blood when compared to serum RPR reactivity at any dilution confirmed by TPHA as the gold standard were 39.3%, 99.2% and 71.4%, respectively. Sensitivity improved to 64.0% when using serum RPR ⩾1:8 confirmed by TPHA. Invalid tests were rare (0.3%). Conclusions Rapid syphilis testing in sex work venues proved feasible, but Determine using whole blood obtained by fingerstick was substantially less sensitive than reported in previous laboratory‐based studies using serum. Although easy to perform in outreach venues, the utility of this rapid syphilis test was relatively low in settings where a large proportion of the targeted population has been previously tested and treated. PMID:17116642

  5. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with syphilis: 5 year-case study from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Leeyaphan, Charussri; Jiamton, Sukhum; Prasertworonun, Nuntida; Maneeprasopchoke, Pitchaya; Omcharoen, Viboon

    2014-09-01

    Syphilis has been increasing dramatically worldwide since 2000, especially among men who have sex with men (MSM), and in those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However most previous reports studied about prevalence and riskfactors ofsyphilis in MSMpopulation without statistical comparison with non-MSMpopulation. The present study aimed to describe epidemiological trends, clinical manifestations, laboratory investigation, treatment, and HIV co-infection in patients diagnosed with syphilis, including statistical evaluation these data between MSMand non-MSM as well as HIV and non-HIVpopulations. This was a retrospective medical records review ofpatients diagnosed with syphilis who attended Sexual Transmitted Diseases (STD) clinic between January 2008 and December 2012. Demographic data, clinical manifestations, HIVstatus, VDRL titer; and treatment regimens were collected. Of the 922 patients that attended the STD clinic, 143 syphilis patients were recruited with an overall prevalence of 15.5%. Twenty-six patients were MSM and 31 were HIV infected patients. Prevalence rate of syphilis in MSMand HIV infected patients were 2.8% and 3.4%, respectively. Prevalence had upward trend that startedfrom 2008 and reachedpeak in 2011. When taking MSMinto account, MSMsignificantly had younger age than non-MSM Early stage ofsyphilis, VDRL titer higher than 1:32 at diagnosis, and MSMpopulation were significantly associated with HIV-positivity among syphilis patients. Regarding treatment ofsyphilis, median time to cure syphilis was 117 days (95% confidence interval = 93-141). Treatment regimen, MSM and HIVco-infection did not significantly show influence on duration to cure. Prevalence ofsyphilis has been continuously increasing. MSM with syphilis significantly associated with younger age. Moreover, early stage of syphilis, VDRL titer higher than 1:32, and MSMpopulation were significantly related with HIVinfection. Treatment regimen, MSM and HIVco-infection did not

  6. [Syphilis in adolescent mothers in the city of Posadas, Province of Misiones].

    PubMed

    Jacquier, N; Dos Santos, L; Deschutter, J D; Duarte, B; Rodriguez Fermepin, M; Martinelli, M; de Torres, R A

    1999-01-01

    During three months (April to June 1997) 1,238 consecutive pregnant women were studied at the time of delivery at the Madariaga public Hospital. Syphilis was confirmed in 26 (2.1%) women, and 15 cases (57.7%) of congenital syphilis were demonstrated in newborns one of whom was a stillborn. Of the syphilitic women 61.5% were 20 years old (average), 65.4% were single, 19.2% had a stable partner and 15.4% were married; 70% of them had finished elementary school (seven years), but despite this discrete level of instruction and that they were benefited with free health attention, 73% of them had not started or completed the pregnancy control. None of these women acted as sexual workers or were drug users; 57.7% were unemployed and the remainder worked as domestic servants or were still going to school. Menarca started at 13 (average) and the age of the first sexual activity was 15 (average). The distribution of the cases of syphilis within the city area shows four clusters that coincide with the lower income population, but not with marginal groups. The failure to submit to medical control during pregnancy among syphilitic women is directly linked with an increased risk for congenital syphilis. The specific prevalence of syphilis in women (20 years old or less) pregnant or not, shows an alarming hidden epidemic situation. An interinstitutional and communitary program, with direct interventions within the detected population clusters, is now underway in order to control syphilis. Undesired pregnancy and syphilis seem to be associated with adolescent unsafe sex conducts. A coordinated program between Public Health Service and National Misiones University is operating, visiting home by home, in order to decrease or eliminate congenital syphilis and is considered a priority health problem. Unfortunately, if sexual conducts do not undergo changes in the near future, at least by the correct use of condoms, HIV will replace syphilis.

  7. The prevalence and correlates of syphilis and HIV among homosexual and bisexual men in Shijiazhuang, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Hui; Liu, Shu-Jun; Hu, Ling-Ling; Li, Jie-Fang; Liu, Li-Hua; Wei, Ning

    2016-02-01

    Bisexual men (men who have sex with men and women) are potential epidemiological bridges responsible for the spread of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections from men who have sex with men only to the heterosexual population. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of syphilis and HIV and the factors associated with syphilis infection among men who have sex with men and women and men who have sex with men only from Shijiazhuang, China. In 2011-2013, a cross-sectional cohort of 427 men who have sex with men was recruited by a snowball sampling method and tested for syphilis and HIV. Chi square and logistic regression were performed to identify syphilis risk factors. Among the 427 men who have sex with men, 71 (16.6%) cases were syphilis-positive and 16 cases (3.7%) were HIV-positive. The proportions of men who have sex with men and women and men who have sex with men only in the total sample were 31.4% and 68.6%, respectively. Men who have sex with men and women exhibited double the syphilis prevalence of men who have sex with men only and were more likely to practice insertive anal sex. Higher education level, being married, having more male partners, and both receptive and insertive anal sex roles were associated with syphilis among men who have sex with men and women. Residing in suburban areas, being married, being HIV positive, and an absence of desire to change sexual orientation were associated with syphilis among men who have sex with men only. Therefore, men who have sex with men and women represent an important sub-group in the syphilis epidemic and further interventions should be developed to reduce risk among different sub-sets of men who have sex with men. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Commercial sex venues, syphilis and methamphetamine use among female sex workers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dianming; Liao, Meizhen; Jiang, Zhenxia; Zhang, Xijiang; Mao, Wenwen; Zhang, Ning; Tao, Xiaorun; Huang, Tao; Bi, Zhenqiang; Aliyu, Muktar; Wu, Pingsheng; Jiang, Baofa; Jia, Yujiang

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the factors associated with methamphetamine (MA) use, syphilis, and unprotected sex among female sex workers from different type of venues in Qingdao City, Shandong Province of China. Three consecutive cross-sectional surveys provided information on demographics, sexual and drug use behaviors, and HIV-related services. Of 1187 participants, 3.0% were infected with syphilis; 30.2% ever used MA; 58.3% ever had unprotected commercial sex in the past month. The prevalence rates of syphilis and MA use were 2.5% and 33.0% for participants recruited from saunas, night clubs, bars or hotels; 2.7% and 28.3% for hair/beauty salon-based participants; and 4.5% and 15.8% for street-based participants. Street-based MA users were more likely to be single, non-Shandong residents, have first lifetime sex act at younger age, and recruited in 2008 (vs. 2006). Saunas, night clubs, bars, or hotels-based MA users were more likely to be younger, sex debut at younger age, have longer duration of sex work, have unprotected commercial sex, and be syphilis-infected. Hair/beauty salon-based MA users were more likely to be non-Shandong residents, younger, and to have unprotected commercial sex. Syphilis among the sauna-, night club-, bar-, or hotel-based participants was associated with MA use and ever receipt of HIV testing. Syphilis among the hair/beauty salon-based participants was associated with longer duration of sex work. MA users who frequent commercial sex venues are engaging in high-risk behaviors and are at risk for syphilis/other sexually transmitted diseases. Better-targeted intervention efforts to curtail the epidemics of MA use and HIV/syphilis should therefore take cognizance of the role of commercial sex venues as focal points of MA use and syphilis/sexually transmitted disease transmission.

  9. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the scientific concept of racial nervous resistance.

    PubMed

    Crenner, Christopher

    2012-04-01

    In 1932, the U.S. Public Health Service began a study of untreated syphilis among black men in Macon County, Alabama. This project, later known as the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, became one of the most notorious ventures of twentieth-century medicine. Much has been written on it. Historians have suggested that scientific racism strongly influenced the study. But specific links between earlier racial science and the scientific conduct of the study have remained unexplored. The examination in this paper of the concept of a racially determined resistance to syphilis in the nervous system establishes such a link. Discussion of nervous resistance to syphilis appeared in the medical literature in the early twentieth century as a conjecture about the natural inferiority of blacks. White physicians used the concept to interpret racial differences in neurosyphilis as evidence of the rudimentary development of the brain. A small community of African American physicians joined other national experts in syphilis who chose to explain apparent racial differences through alternate mechanisms. But the scientific advisors to the Tuskegee Syphilis Study favored the concept of a racial resistance to neurosyphilis and steered the early design of the study to help to elucidate it. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study was an examination of untreated syphilis, but it also became a demonstration of a putative racial characteristic of syphilis long considered evidence of the natural inferiority of blacks. An examination of the concept of racial nervous resistance and its influence on the research in Macon County helps to define the influence of scientific racism on this notorious medical study.

  10. The tradition algorithm approach underestimates the prevalence of serodiagnosis of syphilis in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Peng, Xiuming; Xie, Tiansheng; Jin, Changzhong; Liu, Fumin; Wu, Nanping

    2017-07-01

    Currently, there are three algorithms for screening of syphilis: traditional algorithm, reverse algorithm and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) algorithm. To date, there is not a generally recognized diagnostic algorithm. When syphilis meets HIV, the situation is even more complex. To evaluate their screening performance and impact on the seroprevalence of syphilis in HIV-infected individuals, we conducted a cross-sectional study included 865 serum samples from HIV-infected patients in a tertiary hospital. Every sample (one per patient) was tested with toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST), T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA), and Treponema pallidum enzyme immunoassay (TP-EIA) according to the manufacturer's instructions. The results of syphilis serological testing were interpreted following different algorithms respectively. We directly compared the traditional syphilis screening algorithm with the reverse syphilis screening algorithm in this unique population. The reverse algorithm achieved remarkable higher seroprevalence of syphilis than the traditional algorithm (24.9% vs. 14.2%, p < 0.0001). Compared to the reverse algorithm, the traditional algorithm also had a missed serodiagnosis rate of 42.8%. The total percentages of agreement and corresponding kappa values of tradition and ECDC algorithm compared with those of reverse algorithm were as follows: 89.4%,0.668; 99.8%, 0.994. There was a very good strength of agreement between the reverse and the ECDC algorithm. Our results supported the reverse (or ECDC) algorithm in screening of syphilis in HIV-infected populations. In addition, our study demonstrated that screening of HIV-populations using different algorithms may result in a statistically different seroprevalence of syphilis.

  11. Poor awareness of syphilis prevention and treatment knowledge among six different populations in south China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaobing; Hong, Fuchang; Lan, Lina; Zhang, Chunlai; Feng, Tiejian; Yang, Yingzhou

    2016-03-28

    China is facing an emerging epidemic of syphilis, and the cities in south China are most affected. Knowledge is a key factor in the prevention of syphilis infection, however, little is reported about how much people know about syphilis. This study was aimed at assessing peoples' awareness status in a city located in south China. Six populations were recruited for this study, including urban residents, factory workers, college students, pregnant women, female sex workers (FSWs), and men who have sex with men (MSM). A questionnaire designed by the National Center for Disease Control and Prevention was used to assess participants' awareness of syphilis knowledge. About 5% of participants were randomly selected to conduct a telephone survey for confirming the validity of fieldwork. The study recruited 3470 participants, and 61.2% of participants were assigned to the awareness group. College students had the smallest percentage of awareness at 51.7% (371/718), followed by FSWs at 53.9% (200/371), factory workers at 56.0% (381/679), urban residents at 65.4% (435/665), pregnant women at 66.0% (451/683), and MSM at 81.1% (287/354). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that MSM and FSWs-but not factory workers and pregnant women-had more awareness of syphilis knowledge when comparing with urban residents; however, college students presented less awareness of syphilis knowledge than urban residents. Participants of younger age, of female gender, with lower education levels and without Shenzhen hukou possessed less awareness of syphilis knowledge than those of older age, of male gender, with higher education levels and with Shenzhen hukou respectively. The percentages of awareness on syphilis knowledge found in this study are far from the benchmark set in the national 10-year plan. Tailored interventions for different subgroups to increase syphilis awareness are urgently warranted.

  12. A retrospective cross-sectional quantitative molecular approach in biological samples from patients with syphilis.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Miguel; Antelo, Minia; Ferreira, Rita; Azevedo, Jacinta; Santo, Irene; Borrego, Maria José; Gomes, João Paulo

    2017-03-01

    Syphilis is the sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum, a pathogen highly adapted to the human host. As a multistage disease, syphilis presents distinct clinical manifestations that pose different implications for diagnosis. Nevertheless, the inherent factors leading to diverse disease progressions are still unknown. We aimed to assess the association between treponemal loads and dissimilar disease outcomes, to better understand syphilis. We retrospectively analyzed 309 DNA samples distinct anatomic sites associated with particular syphilis manifestations. All samples had previously tested positive by a PCR-based diagnostic kit. An absolute quantitative real-time PCR procedure was used to precisely quantify the number of treponemal and human cells to determine T. pallidum loads in each sample. In general, lesion exudates presented the highest T. pallidum loads in contrast with blood-derived samples. Within the latter, a higher dispersion of T. pallidum quantities was observed for secondary syphilis. T. pallidum was detected in substantial amounts in 37 samples of seronegative individuals and in 13 cases considered as syphilis-treated. No association was found between treponemal loads and serological results or HIV status. This study suggests a scenario where syphilis may be characterized by: i) heterogeneous and high treponemal loads in primary syphilis, regardless of the anatomic site, reflecting dissimilar duration of chancres development and resolution; ii) high dispersion of bacterial concentrations in secondary syphilis, potentially suggesting replication capability of T. pallidum while in the bloodstream; and iii) bacterial evasiveness, either to the host immune system or antibiotic treatment, while remaining hidden in privileged niches. This work highlights the importance of using molecular approaches to study uncultivable human pathogens, such as T. pallidum, in the infection process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  13. Utility of the Determine Syphilis TP rapid test in commercial sex venues in Peru.

    PubMed

    Campos, P E; Buffardi, A L; Chiappe, M; Buendía, C; Garcia, P J; Carcamo, C P; Garnett, G; White, P; Holmes, K K

    2006-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the utility of the Determine Syphilis TP test performed in Peruvian commercial sex venues for the detection of active syphilis; and determine the feasibility of integrating rapid syphilis testing for female sex workers (FSW) into existing health outreach services. We tested 3586 female sex workers for syphilis by Determine in the field using whole blood fingerstick, and by rapid plasma reagin (RPR) and Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA) in a central laboratory in Lima using sera. 97.4% of the FSW offered rapid syphilis testing participated; and among those who tested positive, 87% visited the local health centre for treatment. More than twice as many specimens were RPR reactive using serum in Lima (5.7%) than tested positive by whole blood Determine in the field (2.8%), and although most were confirmed by TPHA, only a small proportion (0.7%) were RPR reactive at >or=1:8 dilutions, and likely indicating active syphilis. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of the Determine Syphilis TP test in whole blood when compared to serum RPR reactivity at any dilution confirmed by TPHA as the gold standard were 39.3%, 99.2% and 71.4%, respectively. Sensitivity improved to 64.0% when using serum RPR >or=1:8 confirmed by TPHA. Invalid tests were rare (0.3%). Rapid syphilis testing in sex work venues proved feasible, but Determine using whole blood obtained by fingerstick was substantially less sensitive than reported in previous laboratory-based studies using serum. Although easy to perform in outreach venues, the utility of this rapid syphilis test was relatively low in settings where a large proportion of the targeted population has been previously tested and treated.

  14. Evaluation of a New Competitive Immunoassay (BioElisa Syphilis) for Screening for Treponema pallidum Antibodies at Various Stages of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Ebel, Anne; Bachelart, Loïc; Alonso, Jean-Michel

    1998-01-01

    The BioElisa Syphilis, a new competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for Treponema pallidum whole antigen that uses specific human immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies as the competitor, was evaluated for potential use in screening for syphilis at various stages. The results obtained by this competitive EIA were compared with those obtained by the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-abs) test and the T. pallidum hemagglutination assay (TPHA). Serum samples from 434 patients with positive TPHA and FTA-abs test results, including patients with primary, latent, secondary, and tertiary syphilis and neurosyphilis, were investigated. Two samples tested negative by competitive EIA but were weakly reactive by the TPHA and the FTA-abs test. Sixteen serum samples from patients with clinically documented active syphilis, including several patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus, tested positive by the competitive EIA. There was a direct inverse correlation between EIA indices and titers in the TPHA and the FTA-abs test for all samples that tested positive. Specificity was assessed by testing 358 serum samples which tested negative for syphilis by TPHA and the FTA-abs test, including 100 serum samples from patients with documented infectious or autoimmune diseases. Only two serum samples gave a weakly positive EIA result. Thus, competitive EIA had a sensitivity of 99.5% and a specificity of 99.4% relative to the results of the FTA-abs test and TPHA. Our evaluation shows that BioElisa Syphilis is a sensitive, specific, and simple assay for screening for syphilis. PMID:9466741

  15. A probable case of congenital syphilis from pre-Columbian Austria.

    PubMed

    Gaul, Johanna Sophia; Grossschmidt, Karl; Gusenbauer, Christian; Kanz, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the skeletal remains of a subadult from an archeological site in Austria. Radiocarbon dating and archeological attribution indicate that this individual is of pre-Columbian origin. Most of the skeleton was recovered, and only the teeth and the orbital roofs show changes. Dental defects such as the mulberry molar and a tapered, fang-like canine suggest a diagnosis of congenital syphilis. This is the first probable case of congenital syphilis from pre-Columbian Central Europe. Our findings contribute to the pre-Columbian theory, offering counter evidence to the assumption that syphilis was carried from Columbus' crew from the New to the Old World.

  16. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis of Reiter Treponeme Axial filaments as a diagnostic test for syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Nell, E E; Hardy, P H

    1978-01-01

    Purified axial filaments from the cultivable Reiter treponeme, previously shown to share an antigenic component with pathogenic Treponemia pallidum, were evaluated as antigen in a diagnostic test for syphilis. Antibody to the filaments was revealed by counterimmunoelectrophoresis. Conditions that produced optimal results in the test were established. A total of 343 sera from normal individuals, biological false-positive reactors, and from patients in the different stages of syphilis were subjected to the test. The results indicate the test to be sensitive and highly specific for detecting treponemal antibodies in human syphilis. PMID:359586

  17. Syphilis Predicts HIV Incidence Among Men and Transgender Women Who Have Sex With Men in a Preexposure Prophylaxis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Marc M.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Glidden, David V.; Liu, Albert Y.; McMahan, Vanessa M.; Guanira, Juan V.; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Fernandez, Telmo; Grant, Robert M.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Buchbinder, Susan; Casapia, Martin; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Guanira, Juan; Kallas, Esper; Lama, Javier; Mayer, Kenneth; Montoya, Orlando; Schechter, Mauro; Veloso, Valdiléa

    2014-01-01

    Background. Syphilis infection may potentiate transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We sought to determine the extent to which HIV acquisition was associated with syphilis infection within an HIV preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trial and whether emtricitabine/tenofovir (FTC/TDF) modified that association. Methods. The Preexposure Prophylaxis Initiative (iPrEx) study randomly assigned 2499 HIV-seronegative men and transgender women who have sex with men (MSM) to receive oral daily FTC/TDF or placebo. Syphilis prevalence at screening and incidence during follow-up were measured. Hazard ratios for the effect of incident syphilis on HIV acquisition were calculated. The effect of FTC/TDF on incident syphilis and HIV acquisition was assessed. Results. Of 2499 individuals, 360 (14.4%) had a positive rapid plasma reagin test at screening; 333 (92.5%) had a positive confirmatory test, which did not differ between the arms (FTC/TDF vs placebo, P = .81). The overall syphilis incidence during the trial was 7.3 cases per 100 person-years. There was no difference in syphilis incidence between the study arms (7.8 cases per 100 person-years for FTC/TDF vs 6.8 cases per 100 person-years for placebo, P = .304). HIV incidence varied by incident syphilis (2.8 cases per 100 person-years for no syphilis vs 8.0 cases per 100 person-years for incident syphilis), reflecting a hazard ratio of 2.6 (95% confidence interval, 1.6–4.4; P < .001). There was no evidence for interaction between randomization to the FTC/TDF arm and incident syphilis on HIV incidence. Conclusions. In HIV-seronegative MSM, syphilis infection was associated with HIV acquisition in this PrEP trial; a syphilis diagnosis should prompt providers to offer PrEP unless otherwise contraindicated. PMID:24928295

  18. Uptake of Home-Based Syphilis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing Among Male Partners of Pregnant Women in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mark, Jennifer; Kinuthia, John; Roxby, Alison C; Krakowiak, Daisy; Osoti, Alfred; Richardson, Barbra A; Gone, Molly Ann; Asila, Victor; Parikh, Saloni; Farquhar, Carey

    2017-09-01

    Few men are tested for syphilis or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during their partner's pregnancy, a high-risk period for HIV and syphilis transmission. Offering home-based rapid testing of syphilis to couples during pregnancy can support prevention efforts to reduce transmission of sexually transmitted diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes. We assessed men's uptake of paired (separate tests, single blood draw) point-of-care syphilis and HIV tests within a randomized controlled trial of pregnant women who received clinic or home partner HIV testing. We evaluated acceptance of paired HIV-syphilis testing during pregnancy or at 6 months postpartum, and evaluated whether addition of syphilis testing affected the uptake of HIV testing among men. Of 601 women, we were unable to meet 101 male partners, and 180 tested before syphilis tests were available. Paired syphilis and HIV testing was offered at home to 80 men during pregnancy and to 230 men postpartum. For syphilis, 93% of men agreed to test during pregnancy and 98% agreed postpartum. For paired syphilis and HIV testing, 91% of men tested for both during pregnancy and 96% tested postpartum. Before syphilis test introduction, 96% of men accepted HIV testing, compared with 95% of men who accepted HIV testing when paired testing was offered. Uptake of syphilis and HIV testing was high among male partners offered couple testing at home. Introducing syphilis testing did not adversely affect HIV testing among men. Point-of-care diagnostics outside facilities can increase testing of male partners who rarely accompany women to antenatal clinics.

  19. Factors associated with syphilis incidence in the HIV-infected in the era of highly active antiretrovirals.

    PubMed

    Shilaih, Mohaned; Marzel, Alex; Braun, Dominique L; Scherrer, Alexandra U; Kovari, Helen; Young, Jim; Calmy, Alexandra; Darling, Katharine; Battegay, Manuel; Hoffmann, Matthias; Bernasconi, Enos; Thurnheer, Maria C; Günthard, Huldrych F; Kouyos, Roger D

    2017-01-01

    After several years of steady decline, syphilis is reemerging globally as a public health hazard, especially among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Syphilis resurgence is observed mainly in men who have sex with men (MSM), yet other transmission groups are affected too. In this manuscript, we study the factors associated with syphilis incidence in the Swiss HIV cohort study in the era of highly effective antiretrovirals. Using parametric interval censored models with fixed and time-varying covariates, we studied the immunological, behavioral, and treatment-related elements associated with syphilis incidence in 3 transmission groups: MSM, heterosexuals, and intravenous drug users. Syphilis incidence has been increasing annually since 2005, with up to 74 incident cases per 1000 person-years in 2013, with MSM being the population with the highest burden (92% of cases). While antiretroviral treatment (ART) in general did not affect syphilis incidence, nevirapine (NVP) was associated with a lower hazard of syphilis incidence (multivariable hazard ratio 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0). We observed that condomless sex and younger age were associated with higher syphilis incidence. Moreover, time-updated CD4, nadir CD4, and CD8 cell counts were not associated with syphilis incidence. Finally, testing frequency higher than the recommended once a year routine testing was associated with a 2-fold higher risk of acquiring syphilis. Condomless sex is the main driver of syphilis resurgence in the Swiss HIV Cohort study; ART and immune reconstitution provide no protection against syphilis. This entails targeted interventions and frequent screening of high-risk populations. There is no known effect of NVP on syphilis; therefore, further clinical, epidemiological, and microbiological investigation is necessary to validate our observation.

  20. Clinical Evaluation of Fully Automated Elecsys(®) Syphilis Assay for the Detection of Antibodies of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongdong; An, Jingna; Wang, Tingting; Tao, Chuanmin; Wang, Lanlan

    2016-11-01

    The resurgence of syphilis in recent years has become a serious threat to the public health worldwide, and the serological detection of specific antibodies against Treponema pallidum (TP) remains the most reliable method for laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. The performance of the Elecsys(®) Syphilis assay, a brand new electrochemiluminescene immunoassay (ECLIA), was assessed by large amounts of samples in this study. In comparison with InTec assay, the Elecsys(®) Syphilis assay was evaluated in 146 preselected samples from patients with syphilis, 1803 clinical routine samples, and 175 preselected samples from specific populations with reportedly increased rates of false-positive syphilis test results. Discrepancy samples must be investigated by Mikrogen Syphilis recomline assay. There was an overall agreement of 99.58% between two assays (Kappa = 0.975). The sensitivity and specificity of the Elecsys(®) Syphilis assay were 100.0% (95% CI, 96.8-100.0%) and 99.8% (95% CI, 99.5-100.0%), respectively. The Elecsys syphilis assay displays better sensitivity (100%), specificity (99.8%), PPV (98.7%), and NPV (100%) in 2124 samples enrolled, compared with the InTec assay. Considering the excellent ease of use and automation, high throughput, and its superior sensitivity, especially in primary syphilis, the Elecsys(®) Syphilis assay could represent an outstanding choice for screening of syphilis in high-volume laboratories. However, more attention was still needed, or the results must be confirmed by other treponemal immunoassays. The new Elecsys(®) Syphilis assay is applied to patients with malignant neoplasm or HIV infection. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Factors associated with syphilis incidence in the HIV-infected in the era of highly active antiretrovirals

    PubMed Central

    Shilaih, Mohaned; Marzel, Alex; Braun, Dominique L.; Scherrer, Alexandra U.; Kovari, Helen; Young, Jim; Calmy, Alexandra; Darling, Katharine; Battegay, Manuel; Hoffmann, Matthias; Bernasconi, Enos; Thurnheer, Maria C.; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Kouyos, Roger D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract After several years of steady decline, syphilis is reemerging globally as a public health hazard, especially among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Syphilis resurgence is observed mainly in men who have sex with men (MSM), yet other transmission groups are affected too. In this manuscript, we study the factors associated with syphilis incidence in the Swiss HIV cohort study in the era of highly effective antiretrovirals. Using parametric interval censored models with fixed and time-varying covariates, we studied the immunological, behavioral, and treatment-related elements associated with syphilis incidence in 3 transmission groups: MSM, heterosexuals, and intravenous drug users. Syphilis incidence has been increasing annually since 2005, with up to 74 incident cases per 1000 person-years in 2013, with MSM being the population with the highest burden (92% of cases). While antiretroviral treatment (ART) in general did not affect syphilis incidence, nevirapine (NVP) was associated with a lower hazard of syphilis incidence (multivariable hazard ratio 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.2–1.0). We observed that condomless sex and younger age were associated with higher syphilis incidence. Moreover, time-updated CD4, nadir CD4, and CD8 cell counts were not associated with syphilis incidence. Finally, testing frequency higher than the recommended once a year routine testing was associated with a 2-fold higher risk of acquiring syphilis. Condomless sex is the main driver of syphilis resurgence in the Swiss HIV Cohort study; ART and immune reconstitution provide no protection against syphilis. This entails targeted interventions and frequent screening of high-risk populations. There is no known effect of NVP on syphilis; therefore, further clinical, epidemiological, and microbiological investigation is necessary to validate our observation. PMID:28079818

  2. Low viral suppression and high HIV diagnosis rate among men who have sex with men with syphilis--Baltimore, Maryland.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Laura A; Pearl, Marcia L; Flynn, Colin; Ross, Christine; Hart-Cooper, Geoffrey; Elmore, Kim; Blythe, David; Morgan, James; Oster, Alexandra M

    2015-04-01

    The burden of syphilis and HIV among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) in Baltimore, Maryland, is substantial. Syphilis and HIV surveillance data were analyzed to characterize MSM with syphilis, including those with repeat infection and HIV coinfection, to strengthen prevention efforts. MSM 15 years or older from Baltimore City or County diagnosed as having early syphilis in 2010 to 2011 were included. Those previously treated for syphilis in 2007 to 2011 were considered to have repeat syphilis infection. HIV surveillance data were used to identify HIV coinfection and assess viral suppression. For MSM not diagnosed as having HIV at or before their syphilis diagnosis, annual HIV diagnosis rates were estimated, using Baltimore City data. Of 460 MSM with early syphilis in 2010 or 2011, 92 (20%) had repeat infection; 55% of MSM with a single diagnosis and 86% with repeat infection were HIV coinfected. Among MSM diagnosed as having HIV, viral suppression was low (25%, or 46% of those with a viral load reported). Among Baltimore City MSM without a prior HIV diagnosis, estimated annual HIV diagnosis rates were high (5% for those with 1 syphilis diagnosis, 23% for those with repeat infection). Baltimore-area MSM with syphilis, particularly those with repeat infection, represent a unique population for whom coinfection with HIV is high. Increasing frequency of syphilis and HIV testing among Baltimore area MSM with a syphilis diagnosis and prioritizing HIV-infected MSM with syphilis in efforts to achieve viral suppression may improve outcomes locally for both infections.

  3. A defined syphilis vaccine candidate inhibits dissemination of Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Lithgow, Karen V.; Hof, Rebecca; Wetherell, Charmaine; Phillips, Drew; Houston, Simon; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2017-01-01

    Syphilis is a prominent disease in low- and middle-income countries, and a re-emerging public health threat in high-income countries. Syphilis elimination will require development of an effective vaccine that has thus far remained elusive. Here we assess the vaccine potential of Tp0751, a vascular adhesin from the causative agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Tp0751-immunized animals exhibit a significantly reduced bacterial organ burden upon T. pallidum challenge compared with unimmunized animals. Introduction of lymph nodes from Tp0751-immunized, T. pallidum-challenged animals to naive animals fails to induce infection, confirming sterile protection. These findings provide evidence that Tp0751 is a promising syphilis vaccine candidate. PMID:28145405

  4. Syphilis and HIV co-infection. Epidemiology, treatment and molecular typing of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2015-12-01

    The studies included in this PhD thesis examined the interactions of syphilis, which is caused by Treponema pallidum, and HIV. Syphilis reemerged worldwide in the late 1990s and hereafter increasing rates of early syphilis were also reported in Denmark. The proportion of patients with concurrent HIV has been substantial, ranging from one third to almost two thirds of patients diagnosed with syphilis some years. Given that syphilis facilitates transmission and acquisition of HIV the two sexually transmitted diseases are of major public health concern. Further, syphilis has a negative impact on HIV infection, resulting in increasing viral loads and decreasing CD4 cell counts during syphilis infection. Likewise, HIV has an impact on the clinical course of syphilis; patients with concurrent HIV are thought to be at increased risk of neurological complications and treatment failure. Almost ten per cent of Danish men with syphilis acquired HIV infection within five years after they were diagnosed with syphilis during an 11-year study period. Interestingly, the risk of HIV declined during the later part of the period. Moreover, HIV-infected men had a substantial increased risk of re-infection with syphilis compared to HIV-uninfected men. As one third of the HIV-infected patients had viral loads >1,000 copies/ml, our conclusion supported the initiation of cART in more HIV-infected MSM to reduce HIV transmission. During a five-year study period, including the majority of HIV-infected patients from the Copenhagen area, we observed that syphilis was diagnosed in the primary, secondary, early and late latent stage. These patients were treated with either doxycycline or penicillin and the rate of treatment failure was similar in the two groups, indicating that doxycycline can be used as a treatment alternative - at least in an HIV-infected population. During a four-year study period, the T. pallidum strain type distribution was investigated among patients diagnosed by PCR

  5. Atypical presentation of syphilis in an HTLV-I infected patient.

    PubMed

    Carnaúba, Dimas; Bittencourt, Achiléa; Brites, Carlos

    2003-08-01

    We report the case of a 44 year-old female, who presented a long-lasting, clinically atypical, secondary syphilis ("malignant syphilis") in the right foot, which started six months before medical evaluation. The patient had a serological diagnosis of HTLV-I infection and syphilis two years before the onset of the skin lesions, following a blood donation. As she believed she was allergic to penicillin, she initially received sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim, without any improvement of the clinical picture. After failure of this first treatment regimen, she was given penicillin, which promoted complete healing of the lesion. We found evidence that infection by HTLV-I is capable of modifying the clinical course of secondary syphilis.

  6. Value of serological diagnosis in congenital syphilis. Report of nine cases.

    PubMed Central

    Borobio, M V; Nogales, M C; Palomares, J C

    1980-01-01

    The diagnosis of congenital syphilis is difficult since it depends mainly on the results of serological tests. The results of five serological tests (three specific and two non-specific) in nine neonates with congenital syphilis are compared with those obtained in three with passively acquired antibodies. It appeared that the serological diagnosis of congenital syphilis must be based on the finding of specific neonatal antibodies in cord serum, which give positive results to the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test for immunoglobulin M, together with high titres of total IgM and negative results to latex tests. The non-specific tests are useful for confirming the efficacy of treatment. The mean number of cases of congenital syphilis in Seville is 0.81/1000 live births. PMID:7448581

  7. Prevalence of syphilis among female sex workers and their clients in Togo in 2011.

    PubMed

    Halatoko, Wemboo Afiwa; Landoh, Dadja Essoya; Saka, Bayaki; Akolly, Koffi; Layibo, Yao; Yaya, Issifou; Gbetoglo, Dodji; Banla, Abiba Kere; Pitché, Palokinam

    2017-02-21

    During the last ten years, a resurgence of syphilis has occurred in many countries worldwide, including Togo. Previous studies have shown a wide range of syphilis infection among the female sex workers (FSWs), from 1.5 to 42.1%. In Togo, Key populations, including FSWs, are rarely involved in the sentinel surveillance programs to determine the prevalence of HIV and syphilis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of syphilis among female sex workers (FSWs) and their clients in Togo. We conducted a cross-sectional study in December 2011 targeting FSWs and their clients in Togo. Among participant who consented, we collected blood samples for syphilis and HIV testing. In total, 1,836 participants (1,106 FSWs and 730 clients) were included in the survey. Their mean age was 28.6 ± 9 years. The prevalence of syphilis was 2.2% (2.2% among FSWs compare to 2.3% among their clients, p = 0.82). This prevalence was higher among FSWs over 30 years old compare to those less than 30 years old (Odd Ratio (OR) =5.03; 95% CI [1.95-13.49]). Single FSWs were three times less likely to have syphilis than those living in couple or married (OR = 3.11; CI 95% [1.16-8.83]). Brothel based or declared FSWs were 4 times more likely to be infected by syphilis than secret ones (OR = 3.89; CI 95% [1.60-9.54]). Out of the 1,836 participants of the survey, 165 (8.9%) were HIV positive. Having syphilis was associated with HIV infection (OR = 3.41; IC 95% [1.53-7.41]). This study showed that: i) the prevalence of syphilis among FSWs and their clients was high; ii) syphilis was significantly associated with HIV infection. It is necessary to increase awareness campaigns and emphasize on condom use among this key population group.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of HIV and syphilis antenatal screening: a modelling study.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Claire C; Larson, Elysia; Anderson, Laura J; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-08-01

    The WHO called for the elimination of maternal-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV and syphilis, a harmonised approach for the improvement of health outcomes for mothers and children. Testing early in pregnancy, treating seropositive pregnant women and preventing syphilis reinfection can prevent MTCT of HIV and syphilis. We assessed the health and economic outcomes of a dual testing strategy in a simulated cohort of 100 000 antenatal care patients in Malawi. We compared four screening algorithms: (1) HIV rapid test only, (2) dual HIV and syphilis rapid tests, (3) single rapid tests for HIV and syphilis and (4) HIV rapid and syphilis laboratory tests. We calculated the expected number of adverse pregnancy outcomes, the expected costs and the expected newborn disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for each screening algorithm. The estimated costs and DALYs for each screening algorithm were assessed from a societal perspective using Markov progression models. Additionally, we conducted a Monte Carlo multiway sensitivity analysis, allowing for ranges of inputs. Our cohort decision model predicted the lowest number of adverse pregnancy outcomes in the dual HIV and syphilis rapid test strategy. Additionally, from the societal perspective, the costs of prevention and care using a dual HIV and syphilis rapid testing strategy was both the least costly ($226.92 per pregnancy) and resulted in the fewest DALYs (116 639) per 100 000 pregnancies. In the Monte Carlo simulation the dual HIV and syphilis algorithm was always cost saving and almost always reduced DALYs compared with HIV testing alone. The results of the cost-effectiveness analysis showed that a dual HIV and syphilis test was cost saving compared with all other screening strategies. Updating existing prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programmes in Malawi and similar countries to include dual rapid testing for HIV and syphilis is likely to be advantageous. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  9. A nodular-ulcerative form of secondary syphilis in AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Benjamin D.; Balavenkataraman, Arvind; Weinstein, Mitchell R.

    2017-01-01

    An uncommon variant in the pre-AIDS era, lues maligna is a nodular-ulcerative form of secondary syphilis. We present a case of a 41-year-old man with HIV infection who developed fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, right upper quadrant abdominal pain, weight loss, watery diarrhea, and a painless, nonpruritic rash. He had diffuse nodular-ulcerative lesions in various stages of development. He was found to have a CD4 count of 101 cells/mm3 (22%), an HIV viral load of 2,735,060 copies/mL, and a positive rapid plasma reagin at 1:64. He was started on emtricitabine, tenofovir, and dolutegravir, as well as doxycycline. He was given benzathine penicillin 2.4 million units intramuscularly and within hours developed a Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction. Skin lesions showed signs of healing, and constitutional symptoms improved 48 hours later. PMID:28127144

  10. [Positive syphilis serodiagnositic tests in air transport workers].

    PubMed

    Castoro, G

    1980-07-14

    The present study was carried out by the Aeronautic Medicine Section of Alitalia at Fiumicino, where in the years 1976-1977 and in the first four months of 1978, 6700 samples of serum from ground and air personnel were analysed as part of a preventive medicine check-up. A high percentage of positivity (9 per thousand in 1976, 12 per thousand in 1977 and 11 per thousand in the first four months of 1978) was observed. The problems of continual travelling and staying in countries were syphilis presents a very high morbility rate are the reasons for the infection. Social, sanitary, deontological and human problems of department physicians delegated to treat the disease are discussed.

  11. Fibronectin tetrapeptide is target for syphilis spirochete cytadherence

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.D.; Baseman, J.B.; Alderete, J.F.

    1985-11-01

    The syphilis bacterium, Treponema pallidum, parasitizes host cells through recognition of fibronectin (Fn) on cell surfaces. The active site of the Fn molecule has been identified as a four-amino acid sequence, arg-gly-asp-ser (RGDS), located on each monomer of the cell-binding domain. The synthetic heptapeptide gly-arg-gly-asp-ser-pro-cys (GRGDSPC), with the active site sequence RGDS, specifically competed with SVI-labeled cell-binding domain acquisition by T. pallidum. Additionally, the same heptapeptide with the RGDS sequence diminished treponemal attachment to HEp-2 and HT1080 cell monolayers. Related heptapeptides altered in one key amino acid within the RGDS sequence failed to inhibit Fn cell-binding domain acquisition or parasitism of host cells by T. pallidum. The data support the view that T. pallidum cytadherence of host cells is through recognition of the RGDS sequence also important for eukaryotic cell-Fn binding.

  12. Secondary syphilis in cali, Colombia: new concepts in disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Adriana R; Pillay, Allan; Zuluaga, Ana V; Ramirez, Lady G; Duque, Jorge E; Aristizabal, Gloria E; Fiel-Gan, Mary D; Jaramillo, Roberto; Trujillo, Rodolfo; Valencia, Carlos; Jagodzinski, Linda; Cox, David L; Radolf, Justin D; Salazar, Juan C

    2010-05-18

    Venereal syphilis is a multi-stage, sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochetal bacterium Treponema pallidum (Tp). Herein we describe a cohort of 57 patients (age 18-68 years) with secondary syphilis (SS) identified through a network of public sector primary health care providers in Cali, Colombia. To be eligible for participation, study subjects were required to have cutaneous lesions consistent with SS, a reactive Rapid Plasma Reagin test (RPR-titer > or = 1 : 4), and a confirmatory treponemal test (Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody Absorption test- FTA-ABS). Most subjects enrolled were women (64.9%), predominantly Afro-Colombian (38.6%) or mestizo (56.1%), and all were of low socio-economic status. Three (5.3%) subjects were newly diagnosed with HIV infection at study entry. The duration of signs and symptoms in most patients (53.6%) was less than 30 days; however, some patients reported being symptomatic for several months (range 5-240 days). The typical palmar and plantar exanthem of SS was the most common dermal manifestation (63%), followed by diffuse hypo- or hyperpigmented macules and papules on the trunk, abdomen and extremities. Three patients had patchy alopecia. Whole blood (WB) samples and punch biopsy material from a subset of SS patients were assayed for the presence of Tp DNA polymerase I gene (polA) target by real-time qualitative and quantitative PCR methods. Twelve (46%) of the 26 WB samples studied had quantifiable Tp DNA (ranging between 194.9 and 1954.2 Tp polA copies/ml blood) and seven (64%) were positive when WB DNA was extracted within 24 hours of collection. Tp DNA was also present in 8/12 (66%) skin biopsies available for testing. Strain typing analysis was attempted in all skin and WB samples with detectable Tp DNA. Using arp repeat size analysis and tpr RFLP patterns four different strain types were identified (14d, 16d, 13d and 22a). None of the WB samples had sufficient DNA for typing. The clinical and microbiologic

  13. An extraordinary case of syphilis presenting with a labial ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Filiz T.; Salaeva, Kenyul; Altunay, Ilknur K.; Yalcın, Ozben

    2016-01-01

    In the differential diagnosis of patients with ulcers on the lips characteristics like the duration of the ulcer, number, size, depth, shape, base, margins, and distribution are considered. Such ulcers arise from many diseases particularly, viral and bacterial infections, malignancies can also be responsible. Classic syphilitic chancres are painless erosions settled on hard papule; these are evident in the genital area in more than 90% of patients. This study describes a case of a 38-year-old female patient presenting with a painful ulcer covering 3 quarters of the upper lip showing settlement on erythematous, edematous, and indurated plaque covered with hemorrhagic crusts. The aim of this study was to consider differences between the classic syphilitic chancre typically found in the genital region from extragenital chancres and to raise awareness of the possibility of primary syphilis when patients present with painful ulcers on the lip. PMID:27761567

  14. Secondary Syphilis in Cali, Colombia: New Concepts in Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Adriana R.; Pillay, Allan; Zuluaga, Ana V.; Ramirez, Lady G.; Duque, Jorge E.; Aristizabal, Gloria E.; Fiel-Gan, Mary D.; Jaramillo, Roberto; Trujillo, Rodolfo; Valencia, Carlos; Jagodzinski, Linda; Cox, David L.; Radolf, Justin D.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    Venereal syphilis is a multi-stage, sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochetal bacterium Treponema pallidum (Tp). Herein we describe a cohort of 57 patients (age 18–68 years) with secondary syphilis (SS) identified through a network of public sector primary health care providers in Cali, Colombia. To be eligible for participation, study subjects were required to have cutaneous lesions consistent with SS, a reactive Rapid Plasma Reagin test (RPR-titer ≥1∶4), and a confirmatory treponemal test (Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody Absorption test- FTA-ABS). Most subjects enrolled were women (64.9%), predominantly Afro-Colombian (38.6%) or mestizo (56.1%), and all were of low socio-economic status. Three (5.3%) subjects were newly diagnosed with HIV infection at study entry. The duration of signs and symptoms in most patients (53.6%) was less than 30 days; however, some patients reported being symptomatic for several months (range 5–240 days). The typical palmar and plantar exanthem of SS was the most common dermal manifestation (63%), followed by diffuse hypo- or hyperpigmented macules and papules on the trunk, abdomen and extremities. Three patients had patchy alopecia. Whole blood (WB) samples and punch biopsy material from a subset of SS patients were assayed for the presence of Tp DNA polymerase I gene (polA) target by real-time qualitative and quantitative PCR methods. Twelve (46%) of the 26 WB samples studied had quantifiable Tp DNA (ranging between 194.9 and 1954.2 Tp polA copies/ml blood) and seven (64%) were positive when WB DNA was extracted within 24 hours of collection. Tp DNA was also present in 8/12 (66%) skin biopsies available for testing. Strain typing analysis was attempted in all skin and WB samples with detectable Tp DNA. Using arp repeat size analysis and tpr RFLP patterns four different strain types were identified (14d, 16d, 13d and 22a). None of the WB samples had sufficient DNA for typing. The clinical and microbiologic

  15. [Spatial analysis of syphilis and gonorrhea infections in a Public Health Service in Madrid].

    PubMed

    Wijers, Irene G M; Sánchez Gómez, Amaya; Taveira Jiménez, Jose Antonio

    2017-06-21

    Sexually transmitted diseases are a significant public health problem. Within the Madrid Autonomous Region, the districts with the highest syphilis and gonorrhea incidences are part of the same Public Health Service (Servicio de Salud Pública del Área 7, SSPA 7). The objective of this study was to identify, by spatial analysis, clusters of syphilis and gonorrhea infections in this SSPA in Madrid. All confirmed syphilis and gonorrhea cases registered in SSPA 7 in Madrid were selected. Moran's I was calculated in order to identify the existence of spatial autocorrelation and a cluster analysis was performed. Clusters and cumulative incidences (CI) per health zone were mapped. The district with most cases was Centro (CI: 67.5 and 160.7 per 100.000 inhabitants for syphilis and gonorrhea, respectively) with the highest CI (120.0 and 322.6 per 100.000 inhabitants) in the Justicia health zone.91.6% of all syphilis cases and 89.6% of gonorrhea cases were among men who have sex with men (MSM). Moran's I was 0.54 and 0.55 (p=0.001) for syphilis and gonorrhea, respectively. For syphilis, a cluster was identified including the six health zones of the Centro district, with a relative risk (RR)of 6.66 (p=0.001). For gonorrhea, a cluster was found including the Centro district, three health zones of the Chamberí district and one of Latina (RR 5.05; p=0.001). Centro was the district with most cases of syphilis and gonorrhea and the most affected population were MSM. For both infections, clusters were found with an important overlap. By identifying the most vulnerable health zones and populations, these results can help to design public health measures for preventing sexually transmitted diseases.

  16. Analysis of 3 algorithms for syphilis serodiagnosis and implications for clinical management.

    PubMed

    Tong, Man-Li; Lin, Li-Rong; Liu, Li-Li; Zhang, Hui-Lin; Huang, Song-Jie; Chen, Yu-Yan; Guo, Xiao-Jing; Xi, Ya; Liu, Long; Chen, Fu-Yi; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Zhang, Qiao; Yang, Tian-Ci

    2014-04-01

    Algorithms for the diagnosis of syphilis continue to be a source of great controversy, and numerous test interpretations have perplexed many clinicians. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 24 124 subjects to analyze 3 syphilis testing algorithms: traditional algorithm, reverse algorithm, and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) algorithm. Every serum sample was simultaneously evaluated using the rapid plasma reagin, Treponema pallidum particle agglutination, and chemiluminescence immunoassay tests. With the results of clinical diagnoses of syphilis as a gold standard, we evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the 3 syphilis testing algorithms. The κ coefficient was used to compare the concordance between the reverse algorithm and the ECDC algorithm. Overall, 2749 patients in our cohort were diagnosed with syphilis. The traditional algorithm had the highest negative likelihood ratio (0.24), a missed diagnosis rate of 24.2%, and only 75.81% sensitivity. However, both the reverse and ECDC algorithms had higher diagnostic efficacy than the traditional algorithm. Their sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 99.38%-99.85%, 99.98%-100.00%, and 99.93%-99.96%, respectively. Moreover, the overall percentage of agreement and κ value between the reverse and the ECDC algorithms were 99.9% and 0.996, respectively. Our research supported use of the ECDC algorithm, in which syphilis screening begins with a treponemal immunoassay that is followed by a second, different treponemal assay as a confirmatory test in high-prevalence populations. In addition, our results indicated that nontreponemal assay is unnecessary for syphilis diagnosis but can be recommended for determining serological activity and the effect of syphilis treatment.

  17. Immunoregulatory properties of serum from patients with different stages of syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J J; Mangi, R J; Lee, R; Dwyer, J M

    1980-01-01

    The response of lymphocytes from 17 patients with primary, secondary, and tertiary syphilis to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and to allogeneic lymphocytes was normal in heterologous serum; however, the responsiveness of cells from some patients with primary and secondary disease was significantly reduced in the presence of autologous serum. As cells from healthy controls invariably responded better to these stimuli in autologous serum, the sera from 81 patients with syphilis were screened for immunosuppressive properties. Sera from 25 primary, 32 secondary, two tertiary, six congenital, and 16 latent cases of syphilis were examined for their ability to reduce the responsiveness of normal cells to PHA. These experiments were performed with test sera as the sole source of serum for the cultures or with test sera added to cultures containing optimally supportive amounts of pooled human plasma. Stimulation of normal cells from one control in human plasma and 20% test serum showed that only in sera from congenital cases of syphilis was the mean response significantly different from the response seen in control sera; a significant increase in the response to stimulation occurred. The range of response to PHA with sera from cases of primary and secondary syphilis was wider than with normal sera. Sera from five (20%) cases of primary and 14 (44%) cases of secondary syphilis appeared to be immunosuppressive. When retested on another sample of normal cells, these sera were consistently immunosuppressive even in the presence of 15% pooled human plasma. Thus, in early syphilis antigenic stimulation may result in the release from suppressor cells of non-specific immunoregulators of cell-mediated immunity. Such phenomena may be a prelude to the development of tolerance to treponemal antigens. In congenital syphilis the development of suppressor cells may be impaired, resulting in the apparent immunostimulatory properties of serum from such cases. PMID:7427694

  18. Incident syphilis infection among people who inject drugs in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pines, Heather A; Rusch, Melanie L; Vera, Alicia; Rangel, Gudelia; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2015-12-01

    Given that syphilis is associated with HIV infection among people who inject drugs (PWID), we examined syphilis incidence among PWID in Tijuana, Mexico. From 2006 to 2007, 940 PWID (142 women and 798 men) were recruited via respondent-driven sampling and followed for 18 months. At semi-annual visits, participants were tested for syphilis and completed surveys, which collected information on socio-demographics, sexual behaviours, substance use and injection behaviours. Poisson regression was used to estimate syphilis incidence rates (IRs), incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Twenty-one participants acquired syphilis during follow-up (IR = 1.57 per 100 person-years, 95% CI: 1.02-2.41). In a multivariate analysis, syphilis incidence was higher among women (IRR = 3.90, 95% CI: 1.37-11.09), HIV-positive participants (IRR = 4.60, 95% CI: 1.58-13.39) and those who reported ever exchanging sex for drugs, money, or other goods (IRR = 2.74, 95% CI: 0.97-7.76), while syphilis incidence was lower among those living in Tijuana for a longer duration (IRR = 0.95 per year, 95% CI: 0.91-1.00) and those reporting at least daily injection drug use (past 6 months) (IRR = 0.22, 95% CI: 0.09-0.54). Our findings suggest interventions that address the destabilising conditions associated with migration and integrate sexual and drug-related risk reduction strategies may help reduce syphilis incidence among PWID along the Mexico-US border. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Prevalence of Syphilis among Blood and Stem Cell Donors in Saudi Arabia: An Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Elyamany, Ghaleb; Al amro, Mohamed; Pereira, Winston Costa; Alsuhaibani, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Syphilis is one of the known transfusion-transmissible infections and causes 100,000 deaths yearly, with around 90% of these deaths occurring in the developing world. Little data is available regarding the prevalence of syphilis among Saudi blood and stem cell donors. We conducted a survey on the incidence of syphilis among all blood and stem cell donors. Methods This study was conducted at the Prince Sultan Military Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in the 10 years period data during 2006–2015. Data were analyzed about full history, physical examination, age, sex, weight, profession, marital status, number of the donations, data of last donation, having a relation who received blood transfusion, as well as the screening test results of the donated blood. We determined the seroprevalence of infection and compared by sex and other variable through frequency analysis, Chi square, Fisher, and prevalence ratios. Results Approximately 240,000 blood donors were screened and studied in the period of study. Most of the blood donors were male (98.3%) and 89% of them were citizens of Saudi Arabia. According to our findings, we estimated that, in the last 10 years, approximately 0.044% of all the blood donors were syphilis positive cases. No cases were detected as positive for syphilis among stem cell donors. Only 60 blood donors tested positive for syphilis. In addition, we studied 202 stem cell transplant donors during the same period, of which 59% were male and none texted positive for syphilis. Conclusions A concerted effort between the government, health care providers, regulatory bodies and accreditation agencies have all contributed in eliminating the risk of spreading syphilis among blood donors. PMID:27757184

  20. Go big or go home: impact of screening coverage on syphilis infection dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tuite, Ashleigh; Fisman, David

    2016-02-01

    Syphilis outbreaks in urban men who have sex with men (MSM) are an ongoing public health challenge in many high-income countries, despite intensification of efforts to screen and treat at-risk individuals. We sought to understand how population-level coverage of asymptomatic screening impacts the ability to control syphilis transmission. We developed a risk-structured deterministic compartmental mathematical model of syphilis transmission in a population of sexually active MSM. We assumed a baseline level of treatment of syphilis cases due to seeking medical care in all scenarios. We evaluated the impact of sustained annual population-wide screening coverage ranging from 0% to 90% on syphilis incidence over the short term (20 years) and at endemic equilibrium. The relationship between screening coverage and equilibrium syphilis incidence displayed an inverted U-shape relationship, with peak equilibrium incidence occurring with 20-30% annual screening coverage. Annual screening of 62% of the population was required for local elimination (incidence <1 case per 100 000 population). Results were qualitatively similar in the face of differing programmatic, behavioural and natural history assumptions, although the screening thresholds for local elimination differed. With 6-monthly or 3-monthly screening, the population coverage required to achieve local elimination was reduced to 39% or 23%, respectively. Although screening has the potential to control syphilis outbreaks, suboptimal coverage may paradoxically lead to a higher equilibrium infection incidence than that observed in the absence of intervention. Suboptimal screening programme design should be considered as a possible contributor to unsuccessful syphilis control programmes in the context of the current epidemic. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Clinical Outcomes of In Vitro Fertilization among Chinese Infertile Couples Treated for Syphilis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Xiaomiao; Yuan, Ping; Fang, Tingfeng; Ouyang, Nengyong; Li, Ruiqi; Ou, Songbang; Wang, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    To compare the clinical outcomes of infertile patients with and without syphilis after in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET), in this case-control study, 320 infertile couples were enrolled and divided into syphilis (n = 160) and control groups (n = 160). The primary IVF outcomes were the clinical pregnancy rate and the birth of a healthy baby. All syphilis patients received the standard anti-syphilis treatment before undergoing IVF/ICSI. Our results showed that the endometrial thickness of the syphilis group was greater than that of the control group following hCG injection (16.9±5.4 vs. 13.0±4.7 mm, P<0.001). The numbers of normally fertilized eggs and normally cleaved fertilized eggs and the implantation rate were 6.8±4.8, 6.3±4.7 and 24.2%, respectively, for the syphilis group and 8.3±4.6, 8.1±4.6 and 34.4%, respectively, for the control group, and these values were significantly different between the groups. The clinical pregnancy rate was lower in the syphilis group compared with that in the control group (43.8% vs. 55.6%, P = 0.03). Lower offspring birth weight was observed in the infected male group compared with those in the infected female (2.7±0.4 vs. 3.0±0.4 kg, P = 0.01) and infected couple groups (2.7±0.4 vs. 3.1±0.5 kg, P = 0.007). Therefore, syphilis infection reduces the clinical pregnancy rate after IVF/ICSI. PMID:26208116

  2. Syphilis Mimicking Other Dermatological Diseases: Reactive Arthritis and Mucha-Habermann Disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Carneiro, Sueli Coelho; Pirmez, Rodrigo; de Hollanda, Taciana Rocha; Cuzzi, Tullia; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    The authors present two cases of syphilis: one mimicking reactive arthritis and the other Mucha-Habermann disease. Both reports illustrate syphilis as ‘the great imitator’, a description given by Sir William Osler, and call attention to the strong need for awareness among physicians of all specialties, especially the younger ones, who are not used to seeing this increasingly prevalent disease, as it once was in the past. PMID:23467097

  3. Prenatal Transmission of Syphilis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Brazil: Achieving Regional Targets for Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Cerda, Rodrigo; Perez, Freddy; Domingues, Rosa Maria S.M.; Luz, Paula M.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Caffe, Sonja; Francke, Jordan A.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Ciaranello, Andrea L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Pan-American Health Organization has called for reducing (1) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) to ≤0.30 infections/1000 live births (LB), (2) HIV MTCT risk to ≤2.0%, and (3) congenital syphilis (CS) incidence to ≤0.50/1000 LB in the Americas by 2015. Methods. Using published Brazilian data in a mathematical model, we simulated a cohort of pregnant women from antenatal care (ANC) through birth. We investigated 2 scenarios: “current access” (89.1% receive one ANC syphilis test and 41.1% receive 2; 81.7% receive one ANC HIV test and 18.9% receive birth testing; if diagnosed, 81.0% are treated for syphilis and 87.5% are treated for HIV) and “ideal access” (95% of women undergo 2 HIV and syphilis screenings; 95% receive appropriate treatment). We conducted univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses on key inputs. Results. With current access, we projected 2.95 CS cases/1000 LB, 0.29 HIV infections/1000 LB, 7.1% HIV MTCT risk, and 11.11 intrauterine fetal demises (IUFD)/1000 pregnancies, with significant regional variation. With ideal access, we projected improved outcomes: 1.00 CS cases/1000 LB, 0.10 HIV infections/1000 LB, HIV MTCT risk of 2.4%, and 10.65 IUFD/1000 pregnancies. Increased testing drove the greatest improvements. Even with ideal access, only HIV infections/1000 LB met elimination goals. Achieving all targets required testing and treatment >95% and reductions in prevalence and incidence of HIV and syphilis. Conclusions. Increasing access to care and HIV and syphilis antenatal testing will substantially reduce HIV and syphilis MTCT in Brazil. In addition, regionally tailored interventions reducing syphilis incidence and prevalence and supporting HIV treatment adherence are necessary to completely meet elimination goals. PMID:26180825

  4. Diverging gonorrhea and syphilis trends in the 1980s: are they real?

    PubMed Central

    Gershman, K A; Rolfs, R T

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the divergence in national trends of gonorrhea and syphilis from 1986 to 1989 in the United States was real and if overall trends masked a contemporaneous increase in both diseases in a core group. METHODS. We analyzed the following: (1) reported cases of gonorrhea and primary and secondary syphilis in the United States for the years 1981 to 1989, (2) gonorrhea screening results from six states for the years 1985 to 1989, and (3) reported cases of gonorrhea and primary and secondary syphilis by census tract for the years 1986 to 1989 in one city. RESULTS. The incidence of gonorrhea decreased 22% in the United States from 1986 to 1989 while the incidence of primary and secondary syphilis increased 59%. Among Blacks, syphilis incidence increased 100% and gonorrhea incidence decreased 13%; among Whites and Hispanics, the incidence of both diseases decreased. Results from gonorrhea screening among females in six states agree with gonorrhea incidence trends in those areas. Race-specific and census tract analyses of data from a number of metropolitan areas where overall rates diverged did not demonstrate a group in which the incidence of both diseases increased. CONCLUSIONS. We conclude that diverging trends of gonorrhea and syphilis from 1986 to 1989 are real and emphasize differences in the epidemiologic characteristics of these two sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:1928523

  5. Herpes simplex virus 2 and syphilis among young drug users in Baltimore, Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Plitt, S; Sherman, S; Strathdee, S; Taha, T

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the sex specific seroprevalence and correlates of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) and syphilis among a cohort of young drug users. Methods: Drug users aged 15–30 years old who used heroin, cocaine, or crack were recruited between October 1999 and August 2002. Baseline interviews gathered information on sociodemographics, drug use and sexual behaviours. Serum was tested at baseline for HSV-2 and syphilis seroreactivity. For each sexually transmitted infection (STI), infected and non-infected participants were stratified by sex and compared using χ2, Mann-Whitney tests, and logistic regression. Results: Of the 543 participants recruited, 42.4% were female and 39.3% were African-American. The seroprevalence of STIs among females and males, respectively, were HSV-2: 58.7% and 22.0%; syphilis: 4.3% and 0.3%. In multivariate models, older age, African-American race, having over 30 lifetime sex partners, current HIV infection and previous incarceration were independently associated with HSV-2 infection among males. For females, older age, African-American race, sex trade, and daily heroin use were independently associated with HSV-2. For females, only a self reported previous syphilis diagnosis was associated with current syphilis seroreactivity in multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Examination of this cohort revealed a particularly high seroprevalence of HSV-2 and syphilis, especially among female drug users. Few infected participants had been previously diagnosed with these infections. PMID:15923296

  6. A community level syphilis prevention programme: outcome data from a controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ross, M; Chatterjee, N; Leonard, L

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the impact of a small media campaign to reduce syphilis through testing, treatment, and condom use in two urban predominantly African-American communities with high syphilis rates. Methods: Data were collected from intervention and comparison zip codes using cross sectional street intercept interviews at baseline and 2 years later (n = 1630) following a small media syphilis prevention campaign with role model story posters, billboards, and other merchandise. Community businesses and a community based organisation served as partners, distributing condoms and small media. Results: Comparing intervention with comparison zip codes, there were significant increases in condom use in last sexual act, and some aspects of knowledge of syphilis. However, there was significant cross contamination of media impact, with respondents in the comparison zip code seeing an average of two media items compared with three in the intervention zip code. Media exposure was associated with significant increases in knowledge of syphilis, testing, and condom use. Conclusions: Targeted community based small media interventions using community partners for distribution are effective in increasing syphilis knowledge, testing, and condom use. PMID:15054168

  7. Syphilis and HIV co-infection: excellent response to multiple doses of benzathine penicillin.

    PubMed

    Saje, Andreja; Tomažič, Janez

    2014-03-01

    The number of new syphilis diagnoses in Slovenia is steadily increasing, especially among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). We studied the effect of penicillin for treating syphilis in HIV co-infected patients and risk factors for treatment failure. The primary endpoint was response to therapy (fourfold reduction of VDRL at month 12). Three hundred forty-two paper records were reviewed and MSM with positive VDRL and/or TPHA and serological follow up of at least 12 months were enrolled in the survey. Incidence of syphilis increased from 1.2% (2005) and 2.9% (2007) to 6.4% (2009) and 3.8% (2011, until July). Two hundred sixty-one (76.3%) were MSM and 102 (29.8%) were co-infected; 54.0% had primary/secondary syphilis, 37.0% latent syphilis, and 9.0% neurosyphilis. Patients with primary/secondary/latent syphilis were treated with three doses of benzathine penicillin (2.4 MU i.m.). Treatment was successful in 92.2%. With respect to risk factors, there was no difference between the "success" and "failure" group. Twenty-six patients (25.5%) had re-infections. The rate of cure in our study population was excellent, probably due to a low degree of immunosuppression and a three-dose benzathine penicillin regimen.

  8. Community Reactions to a Syphilis Prevention Campaign for Gay and Bisexual Men in Los Angeles County

    PubMed Central

    Nanín, José E.; Bimbi, David S.; Grov, Christian; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2010-01-01

    “Stop the Sores” (STS), a humor-based syphilis prevention campaign, was implemented in response to increasing syphilis prevalence among gay and bisexual men in Los Angeles County. In 2004, 564 men completed surveys measuring exposure and reactions to the campaign and syphilis testing. Mean age was 39, and men of color comprised a significant proportion of the sample (46.8%). Most men reported being HIV-negative (79.3%). Overall, 7.8% of the sample reported ever having syphilis; HIV-positive men were six times more likely to report this. Over one half of the sample (58.5%) reported exposure to the campaign. Men reporting any recent unprotected anal sex were twice more likely (than those who did not) to see the campaign. Men of color were twice more likely than White men to report wanting to speak to their friends about it. Finally, 39.1% of men exposed to the campaign reported being tested for syphilis as a result. Factors related to higher likelihood to test for syphilis included HIV seropositive status, any recent unprotected anal insertive sex, recent use of methamphetamine, recent use of “poppers,” and recent use of erectile dysfunction drugs. Although STS was somewhat effective, outreach efforts to particular subgroups may need to increase. PMID:19291502

  9. Late Neurosyphilis and Tertiary Syphilis in Guangdong Province, China: Results from a Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weiming; Huang, Shujie; Chen, Lei; Yang, Ligang; Tucker, Joseph D.; Zheng, Heping; Yang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Due to challenges in diagnosis and the need for complex laboratory tests, misdiagnosis of neurosyphilis and tertiary syphilis is common in China. We validated the diagnosis and examined the treatment of late neurosyphilis and tertiary syphilis in Guangdong Province, China. A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect data from late neurosyphilis and tertiary syphilis cases reported between 2009 and 2014 in Guangdong, China. Descriptive analysis, bivariate analyses and multiple logistic regressions were performed to determine the structural factors associated with correct diagnosis and standard treatment of late neurosyphilis and tertiary syphilis. Among the 3805 respondents (3805/3936, 96.7%), 1,837 (48.3%) met the misdiagnosed criteria. The misdiagnosis rate decreased over the study period (54.2% in 2009 and 41.8% in 2014). Only 27.1% and 24.9% of the correctly diagnosed late neurosyphilis and tertiary syphilis cases received standard treatment, respectively. Multiple logistic regression revealed that departments of dermatology or STDs [aOR = 3.24, 95% CI: 2.66–3.95], county or township level hospitals [aOR = 2.89, 95% CI: 2.14–3.89], and hospitals situated outside of Pearl River Delta area [aOR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.46–1.97] had higher likelihood in misdiagnosis of neurosyphilis, compared to the reference groups. Targeted trainings for physicians and expanded syphilis screening services are urgently needed. PMID:28338084

  10. Influence of Detection Method and Study Area Scale on Syphilis Cluster Identification in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Veronica; Hampton, Kristen H; Gesink, Dionne C; Serre, Marc L; Emch, Michael; Leone, Peter A; Samoff, Erika; Miller, William C

    2016-04-01

    Identifying geographical clusters of sexually transmitted infections can aid in targeting prevention and control efforts. However, detectable clusters can vary between detection methods because of different underlying assumptions. Furthermore, because disease burden is not geographically homogenous, the reference population is sensitive to the study area scale, affecting cluster outcomes. We investigated the influence of cluster detection method and geographical scale on syphilis cluster detection in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. We analyzed primary and secondary syphilis cases reported in North Carolina (2003-2010). Primary and secondary syphilis incidence rates were estimated using census tract-level population estimates. We used 2 cluster detection methods: local Moran's I using an areal adjacency matrix and Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic using a variable size moving circular window. We evaluated 3 study area scales: North Carolina, Piedmont region, and Mecklenburg County. We focused our investigation on Mecklenburg, an urban county with historically high syphilis rates. Syphilis clusters detected using local Moran's I and Kulldorff's scan statistic overlapped but varied in size and composition. Because we reduced the scale to a high-incidence urban area, the reference syphilis rate increased, leading to the identification of smaller clusters with higher incidence. Cluster demographic characteristics differed when the study area was reduced to a high-incidence urban county. Our results underscore the importance of selecting the correct scale for analysis to more precisely identify areas with high disease burden. A more complete understanding of high-burden cluster location can inform resource allocation for geographically targeted sexually transmitted infection interventions.

  11. Adverse pregnancy outcomes following syphilis treatment in pregnancy in the UK.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Harriet E; Isitt, Catherine E; Broomhall, Harriet M; Perry, Alison E; Wilson, Janet D

    2016-10-01

    Syphilis infection in pregnancy is known to cause a number of severe adverse pregnancy outcomes, including second-trimester miscarriage, stillbirth, very pre-term delivery and neonatal death, in addition to congenital syphilis. A retrospective review of women with positive syphilis serology and a pregnancy outcome between 2005 and 2012 in Leeds, UK, was performed. In all, 57 cases of positive syphilis serology in pregnancy were identified: 24 with untreated syphilis treated in the current pregnancy (Group 1); seven with reported but unconfirmed prior treatment who were retreated (Group 2); and 26 adequately treated prior to pregnancy (Group 3). The rate of severe adverse pregnancy outcomes in Group 1 at 21% was significantly higher than the 0% outcome of Group 3 (p = 0.02). The severe adverse pregnancy outcomes were two second-trimester miscarriages, two pre-term births at 25 and 28 weeks and one stillbirth at 32 weeks. There were no cases of term congenital syphilis or term neonatal death, but we observed high rates of other adverse pregnancy outcomes despite treatment during pregnancy. Rapid referral for treatment is needed before 18 weeks in order to minimise adverse pregnancy outcomes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Preferable procedure for the screening of syphilis in clinical laboratories in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Di; Xu, Dong-Jiang; Su, Jian-Rong

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid expansion of infectious syphilis all over the world, optimal procedures for screening syphilis are urgently required. Conventional methods for the diagnosis of syphilis are time- and labor-consuming. We compared automated chemiluminescent micro-particle immunoassay (CLIA) with conventional methods to verify whether CLIA is feasible for syphilis screening. A cross-sectional assay was conducted on 3962 serum samples tested by CLIA, rapid plasma reagin test (RPR), and Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA). Meanwhile, another 36 000 sera were screened for syphilis using CLIA and the positive samples were confirmed using TPPA, RPR or Western blotting. The sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 99.8% for CLIA, and 65% and 99.6% for RPR. With the elevation of the optical density value of samples to cut-off ratio (S/CO) value, the true-positive rate of CLIA increased significantly, and when the S/CO value exceeded 10, the true-positive rate of CLIA reached 100%. The false-positive rate of CLIA was 0.22%; pregnant women had the most false-positive results, followed by elderly people and cancer patients. CLIA is suggested as a screening test for the diagnosis of syphilis, while TPPA and RPR are required for confirming the positive samples and monitoring their activity.

  13. Epidemiology of syphilis-related hospitalisations in Spain between 1997 and 2006: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ariza-Megía, M Carmen; González-Escalada, Alba; Álvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Gil-deMiguel, Ángel; Gil-Prieto, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Objective In order to illustrate the important public health impact of syphilis, which is a preventable infection, the epidemiology of syphilis-related hospitalisations in Spain was studied over a 10-year period. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using the National Epidemiological Surveillance System for Hospital Data (Minimum Data Set). All hospitalisations due to syphilis infection in any diagnostic position (ICD-9-CM 090–097) between 1997 and 2006 were analysed, according to the Spanish version of the International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision (ICD-9-CM). Results There were 9556 hospitalisations associated with syphilis in Spain. The hospitalisation rate was 2.33 per 100 000 population, the mortality rate was 0.07 per 100 000 population and the lethality was 3.17%. The hospitalisation rate increased significantly after 2000 and was higher in men. Conclusion Syphilis remains a major public health problem because of both potential complications and its close association with HIV infection. It is necessary to promote early diagnosis, ensure treatment in patients with syphilis and emphasise health promotion and prevention programmes. PMID:22080538

  14. Origins of syphilis and management in the immunocompetent patient: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Farhi, David; Dupin, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Despite the continued efficacy of penicillin since the 1940s, many aspects of the natural history, diagnosis, and management of syphilis remain controversial. A key factor among the numerous factors explaining the persistence of significant areas of controversies is the absence of a gold standard direct method for distinguishing between the different stages of syphilis and appraising treatment response. This contribution presents an overview of some of the most debated aspects of the origins, diagnosis, and management of syphilis in immunocompetent patients. The two main current hypotheses on the origins of Treponema pallidum are the "Columbian" and the "Pre-Columbian" hypotheses. Strong evidence supports that Columbus' crew brought T pallidum to Europe at the time of discovery of the New World. Because T pallidum culture and inoculation to animals are not readily available methods, the gold standard method for the diagnosis of syphilis is the direct identification of T pallidum by dark field microscopy or direct fluorescent antibody tests. These methods, however, are inapplicable in many patients, and thus the diagnosis of syphilis is usually based on the clinical and serologic picture. Serologic tests should only be considered as surrogate markers of the disease and do not provide definite distinction between syphilis stages. The optimal combination of serologic tests is still undefined. Other areas of controversy include the identification of patients who would benefit from a lumbar puncture, the diagnostic criteria of neurosyphilis, and the most relevant markers of treatment response.

  15. Syphilis and HIV infection among displaced pregnant women in rural Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Cossa, H A; Gloyd, S; Vaz, R G; Folgosa, E; Simbine, E; Diniz, M; Kreiss, J K

    1994-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted among displaced pregnant women in Mozambique to determine the prevalence and correlates of HIV infection and syphilis. Between September 1992 and February 1993, 1728 consecutive antenatal attendees of 14 rural clinics in Zambézia were interviewed, examined, and tested for HIV and syphilis antibodies. The seroprevalence of syphilis and HIV were 12.2% and 2.9%, respectively. Reported sexual abuse was frequent (8.4%) but sex for money was uncommon. A positive MHA-TP result was significantly associated with unmarried status, history of past STD, HIV infection, and current genital ulcers, vaginal discharge, or genital warts. Significant correlates of HIV seropositivity included anal intercourse, history of past STD, and syphilis. In summary, displaced pregnant women had a high prevalence of syphilis but a relatively low HIV seroprevalence suggesting recent introduction of HIV infection in this area or slow spread of the epidemic. A syphilis screening and treatment programme is warranted to prevent perinatal transmission and to reduce the incidence of chancres as a cofactor for HIV transmission.

  16. Déjà vu? A Comparison of Syphilis Outbreaks in Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Hallmark, Camden J; Hill, Mandy J; Luswata, Charles; Watkins, Kellie L; Thornton, Lupita; McNeese, Marlene; Ross, Michael W

    2016-09-01

    After reaching an all-time low in 2000, syphilis incidence in the United States has increased as the burden shifted from heterosexuals to men who have sex with men (MSM). Houston, Texas, experienced 2 outbreaks of syphilis during this transformation in trends. Further evaluation is necessary to determine if these outbreaks occurred among the same subpopulations. Surveillance data collected on all reported infectious syphilis cases in Houston from 1971 to 2013 were analyzed. Trends in incidence among MSM and human immunodeficiency virus-positive Houston residents were examined. Peak syphilis years subsequent to 1999, years 2007 and 2012, were compared to determine if outbreaks arose in distinctive subpopulations. Categorical variables between these years were compared using chi-square and Fisher's exact tests, whereas further associations between the years were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. Incidence among MSM was 20.9 to 32.1 times higher than other men from 2005 to 2013. After adjusting for covariates, cases in 2012 were significantly more likely to be Hispanic (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.61; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.03-2.53), reported meeting partners via the Internet (AOR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.18-2.58), and engaged in anonymous sex (AOR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.40-2.63) in comparison to cases in 2007. We found marked disparities of syphilis by subpopulation in Houston. Herein, we present evidence that outbreaks have been distinct in a major southern city with a high burden of syphilis.

  17. Prevalence of Traditional and Reverse-Algorithm Syphilis Screening in Laboratory Practice: A Survey of Participants in the College of American Pathologists Syphilis Serology Proficiency Testing Program.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, Daniel D; Genzen, Jonathan R; Bashleben, Christine P; Faix, James D; Ansari, M Qasim

    2017-01-01

    -Syphilis serology screening in laboratory practice is evolving. Traditionally, the syphilis screening algorithm begins with a nontreponemal immunoassay, which is manually performed by a laboratory technologist. In contrast, the reverse algorithm begins with a treponemal immunoassay, which can be automated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recognized both approaches, but little is known about the current state of laboratory practice, which could impact test utilization and interpretation. -To assess the current state of laboratory practice for syphilis serologic screening. -In August 2015, a voluntary questionnaire was sent to the 2360 laboratories that subscribe to the College of American Pathologists syphilis serology proficiency survey. -Of the laboratories surveyed, 98% (2316 of 2360) returned the questionnaire, and about 83% (1911 of 2316) responded to at least some questions. Twenty-eight percent (378 of 1364) reported revision of their syphilis screening algorithm within the past 2 years, and 9% (170 of 1905) of laboratories anticipated changing their screening algorithm in the coming year. Sixty-three percent (1205 of 1911) reported using the traditional algorithm, 16% (304 of 1911) reported using the reverse algorithm, and 2.5% (47 of 1911) reported using both algorithms, whereas 9% (169 of 1911) reported not performing a reflex confirmation test. Of those performing the reverse algorithm, 74% (282 of 380) implemented a new testing platform when introducing the new algorithm. -The majority of laboratories still perform the traditional algorithm, but a significant minority have implemented the reverse-screening algorithm. Although the nontreponemal immunologic response typically wanes after cure and becomes undetectable, treponemal immunoassays typically remain positive for life, and it is important for laboratorians and clinicians to consider these assay differences when implementing, using, and interpreting serologic syphilis screening

  18. Untreated maternal syphilis and adverse outcomes of pregnancy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kamb, Mary L; Newman, Lori M; Mark, Jennifer; Broutet, Nathalie; Hawkes, Sarah J

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of reported estimates of adverse pregnancy outcomes among untreated women with syphilis and women without syphilis. Methods PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Libraries were searched for literature assessing adverse pregnancy outcomes among untreated women with seroreactivity for Treponema pallidum infection and non-seroreactive women. Adverse pregnancy outcomes were fetal loss or stillbirth, neonatal death, prematurity or low birth weight, clinical evidence of syphilis and infant death. Random-effects meta-analyses were used to calculate pooled estimates of adverse pregnancy outcomes and, where appropriate, heterogeneity was explored in group-specific analyses. Findings Of the 3258 citations identified, only six, all case-control studies, were included in the analysis. Pooled estimates showed that among untreated pregnant women with syphilis, fetal loss and stillbirth were 21% more frequent, neonatal deaths were 9.3% more frequent and prematurity or low birth weight were 5.8% more frequent than among women without syphilis. Of the infants of mothers with untreated syphilis, 15% had clinical evidence of congenital syphilis. The single study that estimated infant death showed a 10% higher frequency among infants of mothers with syphilis. Substantial heterogeneity was found across studies in the estimates of all adverse outcomes for both women with syphilis (66.5% [95% confidence interval, CI: 58.0–74.1]; I2 = 91.8%; P < 0.001) and women without syphilis (14.3% [95% CI: 11.8–17.2]; I2 = 95.9%; P < 0.001). Conclusion Untreated maternal syphilis is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. These findings can inform policy decisions on resource allocation for the detection of syphilis and its timely treatment in pregnant women. PMID:23476094

  19. Evaluation of the diagnostic performance and operational characteristics of four rapid immunochromatographic syphilis tests in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Bocoum, Fadima Yaya; Ouédraogo, Henri; Tarnagda, Grissoum; Kiba, Alice; Tiendrebeogo, Simon; Bationo, Fabrice; Liestman, Benjamin; Diagbouga, Serge; Zarowsky, Christina; Traoré, Ramata Ouédraogo; Kouanda, Séni

    2015-06-01

    Little information is available on the rapid diagnostic testing for syphilis in Burkina Faso. The objectives of the study were (i) to assess the sensitivity and specificity of four on site rapid tests in comparison with Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA) as a gold standard and (ii) to evaluate the operational characteristics of those tests among health workers in a maternity unit. Four rapid syphilis tests commercially available in Burkina Faso were evaluated using archived serum samples and Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay (TPHA) as the gold standard. Blood samples were collected between November 2011 and June 2012 from blood donors at the Regional Blood Transfusion Center of Ouagadougou. The sensitivity and specificity of the tests were calculated. Evaluation of operational characteristics such as clarity of pamphlet, complexity of technique, duration, was conducted in a first-level healthcare center with health workers in maternity unit. Alere DetermineTM Syphilis was the most sensitive of the four rapid syphilis tests evaluated. It was followed by SD Bioline Syphilis 3.0, Cypress Diagnostics Syphilis Quick test and Accu-Tell ® Rapid Anti-TP, which was the least sensitive. The four tests demonstrated a good diagnostic specificity for syphilis (95-98%), and healthcare workers found them easy to use. The study allowed confirming the good performance of three of four rapid syphilis tests in Burkina Faso. More research will be conducted to assess the feasibility of introducing selected rapid tests for syphilis in antenatal care services.

  20. Estimating disease burden of maternal syphilis and associated adverse pregnancy outcomes in India, Nigeria, and Zambia in 2012.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Sheng; Khaparde, Sunil; Prasad, Turlapati L N; Srinivas, Vani; Anyaike, Chukwuma; Ijaodola, Gbenga; Ngige, Evelyn; Tembo Mumba, Grace; Phiri, Carolline; Tambatamba, Bushimbwa; Chavan, Laxmikant; Seguy, Nicole; Oyelade, Taiwo A; Bvulani, Malumo Sarai; Newman, Lori M

    2015-06-01

    To estimate maternal syphilis and its associated adverse pregnancy outcomes in India, Nigeria, and Zambia. An online estimation tool was used to generate point estimates and uncertainty ranges of maternal syphilis and adverse pregnancy outcomes due to mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). The most recent data (2010-2012) on antenatal care coverage, syphilis seroprevalence, and syphilis screening and treatment coverage at the subnational level in India, Nigeria, and Zambia were used to estimate disease burden for 2012. Sensitivity analysis was conducted for three screening and treatment scenarios (current coverages, current coverages minus 20%, and ideal coverages consistent with WHO targets for eliminating MTCT of syphilis). A total of 103 960, 74 798, and 9072 pregnant women with probable active syphilis were estimated to occur in India, Nigeria, and Zambia, resulting in 53 187, 37 045, and 2973 adverse outcomes, respectively; approximately 1.6%, 4.8%, and 37.0% of these were averted under the current service coverages in India, Nigeria, and Zambia. The disease burden varied significantly in its subnational distribution within India and Nigeria, but was distributed evenly across Zambia. The obtained results suggest an ongoing, unaverted high burden of maternal syphilis and associated adverse outcomes in India, Nigeria, and Zambia. Screening and treatment for syphilis must be scaled-up significantly in these countries to achieve elimination of MTCT of syphilis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Incidence of syphilis, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 1 January 2010 through 31 August 2015.

    PubMed

    Clark, Leslie L; Hunt, Devin J

    2015-09-01

    In 2014,the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported significant increases in cases of primary and secondary syphilis in the U.S.; among beneficiaries of the Military Health System, monthly surveillance reports tracking reportable medical events of syphilis have reflected similar increases. This analysis reports on incident cases and rates of syphilis among active component service members of the U.S. Armed Forces from 1 January 2010 through 31 August 2015. During the surveillance period, 2,976 cases of syphilis were diagnosed. Crude incidence rates increased from 30.9 cases per 100,000 person-years (p-yrs) in 2010 to 47.4 cases per 100,000 p-yrs in 2015. Males accounted for 88.7% of cases. Incidence rates of syphilis were highest among service members who were black, non-Hispanic or who were aged 20-29 years. About one-quarter of syphilis cases (24.4%; 727 cases) were diagnosed as HIV infected. Primary and secondary syphilis cases comprised 42% of all syphilis cases. Increasing rates of primary and secondary syphilis in active component service members reflect similar trends reported in the U.S. civilian population.

  2. The management of isolated positive syphilis enzyme immunoassay results in HIV-negative patients attending a sexual health clinic.

    PubMed

    Thorley, Nicola; Adebayo, Michael; Smit, Erasmus; Radcliffe, Keith

    2016-08-01

    An unconfirmed positive treponemal enzyme immunoassay (enzyme immunoassay positive, Treponema pallidum particle agglutination negative and rapid plasma reagin negative) presents a clinical challenge to distinguish early syphilis infection from false-positive results. These cases are referred for syphilis line assay (INNO-LIA) and recalled for repeat syphilis serology. We performed a retrospective audit to establish the proportion of HIV-negative cases with unconfirmed positive enzyme immunoassay results, the proportion of these cases that received an INNO-LIA test and repeat syphilis serology testing and reviewed the clinical outcomes; 0.35% (80/22687) cases had an unconfirmed positive treponemal enzyme immunoassay result. Repeat syphilis serology was performed in 80% (64/80) cases, but no additional cases of syphilis were identified. Eighty-eight per cent (70/80) received an INNO-LIA test; 14% (5/37) unconfirmed enzyme immunoassay-positive cases with no prior history of syphilis were confirmed on INNO-LIA assay, supporting a diagnosis of latent syphilis. As a confirmatory treponemal test, the INNO-LIA assay may be more useful than repeat syphilis serological testing. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. A review and update on adult syphilis, with particular reference to its treatment.

    PubMed

    Goldmeier, D; Hay, P

    1993-01-01

    Syphilis has become less common in Europe in the last decade, but has once again become a major problem in the USA, and remains so in many developing countries. Several treponemal genes have now been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, allowing study of treponemal proteins. The importance of cell mediated immunity in syphilis has been demonstrated in animal models. A diagnosis of syphilis is usually confirmed by dark-field microscopy or serological tests. Seroconversion may be delayed in HIV infected individuals. A positive reaginic test in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has a high specificity but low sensitivity in the diagnosis of neurosyphilis. Indeed, virulent treponemes can be identified in CSF samples which have negative reaginic tests, normal cell counts and protein levels. In the CSF, the FTA-Abs test has a high sensitivity but low specificity for neurosyphilis. Penicillin remains the treatment of choice for all stages of syphilis, although it penetrates the blood brain barrier poorly. Treatment with intramuscular benzathine penicillin 2.4 million units stat, or 600,000 units procaine penicillin daily does not produce treponemicidal levels within the CSF. However, the incidence of neurosyphilis is low in immunocompetent patients treated with such regimens during early syphilis. Acceptable alternatives in penicillin-allergic patients include ceftriaxone and doxycycline. Erythromycin is not recommended as it has produced unacceptably high rates of treatment failure. Recently, a strain of macrolide-resistant Treponema pallidum was isolated from a patient with secondary syphilis. For the treatment of neurosyphilis, treponemicidal levels of penicillin can be achieved in the CSF using 2.4 million units procaine penicillin daily with concurrent probenecid 500 mg 4 times a day, or an intravenous infusion of benzyl penicillin 12-24 million units daily. Early syphilis can be treated adequately over 10 days, but 21 to 28 days is appropriate for late syphilis. In HIV

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of Rapid Syphilis Screening in Prenatal HIV Testing Programs in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Schackman, Bruce R; Neukermans, Christopher P; Fontain, Sandy N. Nerette; Nolte, Claudine; Joseph, Patrice; Pape, Jean W; Fitzgerald, Daniel W

    2007-01-01

    Background New rapid syphilis tests permit simple and immediate diagnosis and treatment at a single clinic visit. We compared the cost-effectiveness, projected health outcomes, and annual cost of screening pregnant women using a rapid syphilis test as part of scaled-up prenatal testing to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission in Haiti. Methods and Findings A decision analytic model simulated health outcomes and costs separately for pregnant women in rural and urban areas. We compared syphilis syndromic surveillance (rural standard of care), rapid plasma reagin test with results and treatment at 1-wk follow-up (urban standard of care), and a new rapid test with immediate results and treatment. Test performance data were from a World Health Organization–Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases field trial conducted at the GHESKIO Center Groupe Haitien d'Etude du Sarcome de Kaposi et des Infections Opportunistes in Port-au-Prince. Health outcomes were projected using historical data on prenatal syphilis treatment efficacy and included disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) of newborns, congenital syphilis cases, neonatal deaths, and stillbirths. Cost-effectiveness ratios are in US dollars/DALY from a societal perspective; annual costs are in US dollars from a payer perspective. Rapid testing with immediate treatment has a cost-effectiveness ratio of $6.83/DALY in rural settings and $9.95/DALY in urban settings. Results are sensitive to regional syphilis prevalence, rapid test sensitivity, and the return rate for follow-up visits. Integrating rapid syphilis testing into a scaled-up national HIV testing and prenatal care program would prevent 1,125 congenital syphilis cases and 1,223 stillbirths or neonatal deaths annually at a cost of $525,000. Conclusions In Haiti, integrating a new rapid syphilis test into prenatal care and HIV testing would prevent congenital syphilis cases and stillbirths, and is cost-effective. A similar approach may

  5. A Laboratory-Based Evaluation of Four Rapid Point-of-Care Tests for Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Causer, Louise M.; Kaldor, John M.; Fairley, Christopher K.; Donovan, Basil; Karapanagiotidis, Theo; Leslie, David E.; Robertson, Peter W.; McNulty, Anna M.; Anderson, David; Wand, Handan; Conway, Damian P.; Denham, Ian; Ryan, Claire; Guy, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Syphilis point-of-care tests may reduce morbidity and ongoing transmission by increasing the proportion of people rapidly treated. Syphilis stage and co-infection with HIV may influence test performance. We evaluated four commercially available syphilis point-of-care devices in a head-to-head comparison using sera from laboratories in Australia. Methods Point-of-care tests were evaluated using sera stored at Sydney and Melbourne laboratories. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by standard methods, comparing point-of-care results to treponemal immunoassay (IA) reference test results. Additional analyses by clinical syphilis stage, HIV status, and non-treponemal antibody titre were performed. Non-overlapping 95% confidence intervals (CI) were considered statistically significant differences in estimates. Results In total 1203 specimens were tested (736 IA-reactive, 467 IA-nonreactive). Point-of-care test sensitivities were: Determine 97.3%(95%CI:95.8–98.3), Onsite 92.5%(90.3–94.3), DPP 89.8%(87.3–91.9) and Bioline 87.8%(85.1–90.0). Specificities were: Determine 96.4%(94.1–97.8), Onsite 92.5%(90.3–94.3), DPP 98.3%(96.5–99.2), and Bioline 98.5%(96.8–99.3). Sensitivity of the Determine test was 100% for primary and 100% for secondary syphilis. The three other tests had reduced sensitivity among primary (80.4–90.2%) compared to secondary syphilis (94.3–98.6%). No significant differences in sensitivity were observed by HIV status. Test sensitivities were significantly higher among high-RPR titre (RPR≥8) (range: 94.6–99.5%) than RPR non-reactive infections (range: 76.3–92.9%). Conclusions The Determine test had the highest sensitivity overall. All tests were most sensitive among high-RPR titre infections. Point-of-care tests have a role in syphilis control programs however in developed countries with established laboratory infrastructures, the lower sensitivities of some tests observed in primary syphilis suggest these would

  6. Risk factors for syphilis in women: case-control study.

    PubMed

    Macêdo, Vilma Costa de; Lira, Pedro Israel Cabral de; Frias, Paulo Germano de; Romaguera, Luciana Maria Delgado; Caires, Silvana de Fátima Ferreira; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar

    2017-08-17

    To determine the sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors related to the occurrence of syphilis in women treated at public maternity hospitals. This is a case-control study (239 cases and 322 controls) with women admitted to seven maternity hospitals in the municipality of Recife, Brazil, from July 2013 to July 2014. Eligible women were recruited after the result of the VDRL (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory) under any titration. The selection of cases and controls was based on the result of the serology for syphilis using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). The independent variables were grouped into: sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical and obstetric history, and health care in prenatal care and maternity hospital. Information was obtained by interview, during hospitalization, with the application of a questionnaire. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using logistic regression to identify the predicting factors of the variable to be explained. The logistic regression analysis identified as determinant factors for gestational syphilis: education level of incomplete basic education or illiterate (OR = 2.02), lack of access to telephone (OR = 2.4), catholic religion (OR = 1.70 ), four or more pregnancies (OR = 2.2), three or more sexual partners in the last year (OR = 3.1), use of illicit drugs before the age of 18 (OR = 3.0), and use of illicit drugs by the current partner (OR = 1.7). Only one to three prenatal appointments (OR = 3.5) and a previous history of sexually transmitted infection (OR = 9.7) were also identified as determinant factors. Sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors are associated with the occurrence of syphilis in women and should be taken into account in the elaboration of universal strategies aimed at the prevention and control of syphilis, but with a focus on situations of greater vulnerability. Determinar os fatores sociodemográficos, comportamentais e de assistência à sa

  7. Syphilis in HIV-infected mothers and infants: results from the NICHD/HPTN 040 study.

    PubMed

    Yeganeh, Nava; Watts, Heather D; Camarca, Margaret; Soares, Gabriel; Joao, Esau; Pilotto, Jose Henrique; Gray, Glenda; Theron, Gerhard; Santos, Breno; Fonseca, Rosana; Kreitchmann, Regis; Pinto, Jorge; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa; Ceriotto, Mariana; Machado, Daisy Maria; Grinzstejn, Beatriz; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdilea G; Morgado, Mariza G; Bryson, Yvonne; Mofenson, Lynne M; Nielsen-Saines, Karin

    2015-03-01

    Untreated syphilis during pregnancy is associated with spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, prematurity and infant mortality. Syphilis may facilitate HIV transmission, which is especially concerning in low- and middle-income countries where both diseases are common. We performed an analysis of data available from NICHD/HPTN 040 (P1043), a study focused on the prevention of intrapartum HIV transmission to 1684 infants born to 1664 untreated HIV-infected women. This analysis evaluates risk factors and outcomes associated with a syphilis diagnosis in this cohort of HIV-infected women and their infants. Approximately, 10% of women (n=171) enrolled had serological evidence of syphilis without adequate treatment documented and 1.4% infants (n=24) were dually HIV and syphilis infected. Multivariate logistic analysis showed that compared with HIV-infected women, co-infected women were significantly more likely to self-identify as non-white (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.5, 95% CI: 1.5-4.2), to consume alcohol during pregnancy (AOR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1-2.1) and to transmit HIV to their infants (AOR 2.1, 95% CI: 1.3-3.4), with 88% of HIV infections being acquired in utero. As compared with HIV-infected or HIV-exposed infants, co-infected infants were significantly more likely to be born to mothers with venereal disease research laboratory titers≥1:16 (AOR 3, 95% CI: 1.1-8.2) and higher viral loads (AOR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1-1.9). Of 6 newborns with symptomatic syphilis, 2 expired shortly after birth, and 2 were HIV-infected. Syphilis continues to be a common co-infection in HIV-infected women and can facilitate in utero transmission of HIV to infants. Most infants are asymptomatic at birth, but those with symptoms have high mortality rates.

  8. Performance of routine syphilis serology in the Ethiopian cohort on HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Dorigo-Zetsma, J; Belewu, D; Meless, H; Sanders, E; Coutinho, R; Schaap, A; Wolday, D

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the performance of routine syphilis screening during 5 year follow up of Ethiopian factory workers, participating in a cohort study on HIV/AIDS. Methods: Syphilis serology test results of factory workers, who each donated at least six blood samples were evaluated. Screening in 1997–8 had been performed by the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay and in 1999–2001 by the rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test. TPPA had been followed by RPR or RPR by TPPA, in case of a positive screening result. Samples of study subjects showing inconsistent sequential TPPA and/or RPR results were retested independently by three laboratory technicians. Results: A total of 540 cohort participants (8.3% HIV positive at enrolment) donated 4376 blood samples (mean 8.3 per subject). From 93 of the 176 participants with at least one positive TPPA result during follow up, 152 samples were retested by RPR and/or TPPA. Based on the revised syphilis test results, the 540 cohort participants were classified as having no (70.5%), past (20.6%), prevalent (6.9%), or incident (2.0%) syphilis. The RPR screening test was difficult to interpret and yielded 8.2% biological false positive (BFP) RPR results, or 3.2% if weak positive results were excluded. There was no correlation between HIV infection and BFP RPR reactions. Sample mix-ups were detected in 1.2%. Conclusion: Evaluation of routine syphilis screening as performed in a long term cohort study on HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia showed difficulties encountered in syphilis screening programmes such as a high percentage of BFP RPR, inconsistencies in interpretation of the RPR test, and sample mix ups. The findings stress the need to develop a syphilis screening assay that is easy to perform and interpret and to implement quality assurance programmes. PMID:15054167

  9. Prenatal syphilis infection is a possible cause of preterm delivery among immigrant women from eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Tridapalli, E; Capretti, M G; Sambri, V; Marangoni, A; Moroni, A; D'Antuono, A; Bacchi, M L; Faldella, G

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of maternal syphilis at delivery and neonatal syphilis infection in an Italian urban area, in connection with the increased flow of immigration. Study design A prospective surveillance study was carried out in Bologna, Italy, from November 2000 to March 2006. All pregnant women were screened for syphilis at delivery. Infants born to seropositive mothers were enrolled in a prospective follow‐up. Results During the study period 19 205 women gave birth to 19 548 infants. A total of 85 women were seropositive for syphilis at delivery. The overall syphilis seroprevalence in pregnant women was 0.44%, but it was 4.3% in women from eastern Europe and 5.8% in women from Central–South America. Ten women were first found positive at delivery, as they did not receive any prenatal care. Nine of these were from eastern Europe. All their infants were asymptomatic, but six had both reactive immunoglobulin (Ig)M western blot and rapid plasma reagin tests and were considered prenatally infected. Three of six were preterm (gestational age <37 weeks). Conclusions In Italy, congenital syphilis infection is strictly related to immigration from eastern Europe. Although it is asymptomatic, it could cause premature delivery. Therefore, it is necessary to perform serological tests during the third trimester in mothers coming from endemic areas to adequately treat syphilis in pregnancy and prevent congenital infection. If the mother's test results are not available at delivery, it is necessary to investigate the newborn, especially if it is born prematurely. PMID:17098768

  10. Screening for syphilis among men who have sex with men in various clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Debattista, J; Dwyer, J; Anderson, R; Rowling, D; Patten, J; Mortlock, M

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of syphilis infections among men who have sex with men (MSM) accessing the Brisbane Sexual Health Clinic during the period 1997 up to May 2003, data were collated through three clinical programmes conducted by the service—a large inner city mainstream sexual health clinic and two small outreach sessional clinics conducted on the site of male sex on premises venues (SOPV). Data analysis also provided the opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of the smaller outreach clinics to access populations of MSM less likely to attend or identify at the larger mainstream clinic, and therefore enhance the detection of previously undiagnosed sexually transmissible infections. Methods: Computerised records from 1997–2003 were collated for a statistical analysis of syphilis and other STI pathology results for all MSM accessing the mainstream clinic, and two outreach clinics. Results: A review of client charts showed that 16 new syphilis diagnoses were made over the previous 5 years, but only two of these infections (both through the mainstream clinic) were early syphilis and therefore transmissible. All other cases were latent infections. A higher proportion of bisexual men was identified with positive syphilis serology but this was just below significance (p = 0.06). Significantly, almost a third of syphilis diagnoses (all latent) were made at SOPV outreach clinics, despite the much lower proportion of clients seen overall through the SOPV clinics. For other sexually transmissible infections, the mainstream clinic demonstrated greater efficiency at case detection. Conclusion: Outreach clinics located in male saunas may serve an effective function in syphilis screening by facilitating access for a particular subpopulation of MSM (bisexual, married men). These outreach clinics may provide important outlets for education and opportunistic screening of asymptomatic MSM and foster a greater willingness for men to honestly self identify

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus-positive secondary syphilis mimicking cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Michiko; Fujii, Yoshiyuki; Ozaki, Keiji; Urano, Yoshio; Iwasa, Masami; Nakamura, Shingen; Fujii, Shiro; Abe, Masahiro; Sato, Yasuharu; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2015-10-08

    Malignant syphilis or lues maligna is a severe form of secondary syphilis that was commonly reported in the pre-antibiotic era, and has now reemerged with the advent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. However, the characteristic histopathological findings of malignant syphilis remain controversial. The aim of this case report was to clarify the clinical and histopathological findings of HIV-positive malignant secondary syphilis. A Japanese man in his forties complained of fever, skin lesions, headache, and myalgia without lymphadenopathy during the previous 4 weeks. The skin lesions manifested as erythematous, nonhealing, ulcerated papules scattered on his trunk, extremities, palm, and face. Although the skin lesions were suspected to be cutaneous T-cell lymphomas on histological analyses, they lacked T-cell receptor Jγ rearrangement; moreover, immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the presence of spirochetes. The patient was administered antibiotics and anti-retroviral therapy, which dramatically improved the symptoms. On the basis of these observations of the skin lesions, we finally diagnosed the patient with HIV-associated secondary syphilis that mimicked cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The patient's systemic CD4+ lymphocyte count was very low, and the infiltrate was almost exclusively composed of CD8+ atypical lymphocytes; therefore, the condition was easily misdiagnosed as cutaneous lymphoma. Although the abundance of plasma cells is a good indicator of malignant syphilis on skin histological analyses, in some cases, the plasma cell count may be very low. Therefore, a diagnosis of malignant secondary syphilis should be considered before making a diagnosis of primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma or lymphoma associated with HIV infection.

  12. Sexual risk behaviors, HIV, and syphilis among female sex workers in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Kakchapati, Sampurna; Singh, Dipendra Raman; Rawal, Bir Bahadhur; Lim, Apiradee

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Female sex workers (FSWs) are a key-affected population susceptible to acquiring HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), as well as transmitting the virus to others. The aim of the study was to assess HIV and syphilis prevalence among FSWs in Nepal and to examine factors associated with it. Materials and methods The study was based on Integrated Biological and Behavioral Surveillance (IBBS) surveys among FSWs in Nepal from 2004 to 2015. Statistical analysis used chi-squared test to assess statistically significant risk factors for HIV and syphilis. Logistic regression models were used to identify the most important determinants for each outcome. Results A total of 5,958 FSWs were tested, and among them, 100 (1.7%) were HIV positive and 230 (3.9%) were syphilis positive. The multivariate analysis revealed that syphilis was higher among those street-based, aged ≥35 years, illiterate, and with a duration of sex work of >3 years. HIV was higher among those aged ≥35 years, illiterate, street-based, and with a duration of sex work >3 years. Syphilis was strongly correlated with HIV. Conclusion HIV epidemic among FSWs in Nepal appears in the stagnant trend, whereas STI epidemic has increased in recent years. The high influencing factors for HIV and syphilis prevalence were advanced age, street-based, lower education, and longer duration of sex work. Urgent efforts, as part of routine HIV/STI prevention and intervention, are required to reduce the high burden of syphilis among FSWs. PMID:28184170

  13. [Integrated screening for HIV, syphilis, and toxoplasmosis among pregnant women in the Central African Republic].

    PubMed

    Gamba, E P; Nambei, W S; Kamandji, L

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of syphilis and toxoplasmosis infection in pregnant women in the Central African Republic who were and were not HIV-infected, in the framework of HIV surveillance. This case-control study included 270 HIV(+) and 217 HIV(-) pregnant women among 4 750 women who attended prenatal-care clinics throughout the Central African Republic from November 2011 through January 2012. Blood specimens were collected and serological evidence of HIV1/2 was analyzed by ELISA1 and ELISA2. The Toxoplasma gondii antibody was detected with the Toxo-Hai Fumouze(®) diagnostic kit. A VDRL test was performed to screen for syphilis in all study participants. Of the 434 samples tested, 33 (7.60%) were positive for syphilis: 21 (9.7%) among HIV(+) and 12 (5.5%) among HIV(-) women (p = 0.1031); 221 (50.90%) were positive for toxoplasmosis: 117 (53.9%) among HIV(+) and 104 (47.9%) among HIV(-) women (p = 0, 2119). Coinfection with HIV, syphilis, and toxoplasmosis was found in 6.00%. No association was found between coinfection and age, parity, and residence area. The rate of syphilis infection was very high in pregnant women living in rural areas (ORcrude = 4.37; 95% CI = 2,11, 9.05). This study showed a high prevalence of toxoplasmosis and syphilis in pregnant women in the Central African Republic, regardless of their HIV infection status. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are common in pregnant women living in rural areas. It may be appropriate to include routine serological screening tests to determine of toxoplasmosis, syphilis and HIV in pregnant women in this country.

  14. [Circulating levels of Th1- and Th2-chemokines increase in patients with early syphilis].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Anyou; Wang, Chenchen; Sun, Hong; Han, Hongfang; Wang, Fengchao; Zhang, Lunjun; Hu, Jianguo

    2017-03-01

    Objective To study the changes of plasma T helper type I (Th1)-and Th2-chemokine levels and analyze their roles in immune response and pathogenesis of early syphilis. Methods Heparin-anticoagulated peripheral blood was collected from 56 patients with early syphilis (primary syphilis, PS, n=22; secondary syphilis, SS, n=34) and healthy controls (HC, n=20). The levels of plasma Th1 chemokines including monokine induced by interferon-γ (MIG), interferon-γ inducible protein-10 (IP-10), interferon-inducible T-cell α chemoattractant (I-TAC) and Th2 chemokines including thymus-and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) were examined using ELISA. Meanwhile, the levels of plasma cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4 and TNF-α) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were detected. Results The levels of plasma MIG, IP-10 and TARC, MDC in the patients with PS and SS were significantly higher than those in the healthy controls. Moreover, the level of I-TAC in the patients with SS was significantly higher than that in the healthy controls. In particular, the levels of plasma Th1 chemokines (MIG, IP-10 and I-TAC) in the patients with SS significantly increased compared with those with PS. However, no significant difference was observed in the levels of plasma Th2 chemokines (TARC and MDC) between the patients with PS and SS. The correlation analysis showed that there was an obvious positive correlation between IP-10 and MIG, I-TAC, IFN-γ, TNF-α levels in the patients with early syphilis. Furthermore, the levels of MIG and IP-10 were positively associated with plasma CRP in the patients with early syphilis. Conclusion Both Th1 chemokines and Th2 chemokines are involved in immune response of early syphilis.

  15. Syphilis in HIV-Infected Mothers and Infants: Results from the NICHD/HPTN 040 Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Nava; Watts, Heather D.; Camarca, Margaret; Soares, Gabriel; Joao, Esau; Pilotto, Jose Henrique; Gray, Glenda; Theron, Gerhard; Santos, Breno; Fonseca, Rosana; Kreitchmann, Regis; Pinto, Jorge; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa; Ceriotto, Mariana; Machado, Daisy Maria; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Grinzstejn, Beatriz; Morgado, Mariza G; Bryson, Yvonne; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Nielsen-Saines, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Background Untreated syphilis during pregnancy is associated with spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, prematurity and infant mortality. Syphilis may facilitate HIV transmission, which is especially concerning in low and middle income countries where both diseases are common. Methods We performed an analysis of data available from NICHD/HPTN 040 (P1043), a study focused on the prevention of intrapartum HIV transmission to 1684 infants born to 1664 untreated HIV-infected women. The present analysis evaluates risk factors and outcomes associated with a syphilis diagnosis in this cohort of HIV-infected women and their infants. Results Approximately 10% (n=171) of women enrolled had serological evidence of syphilis without adequate treatment documented and 1.4% (n=24) infants were dually HIV and syphilis infected. Multivariate logistic analysis showed that compared to HIV-infected women, co-infected women were significantly more likely to self-identify as non-white (AOR 2.5, 95% CI 1.5-4.2), to consume alcohol during pregnancy (AOR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1) and to transmit HIV to their infants (AOR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.4), with 88% of HIV infections being acquired in-utero. As compared to HIV infected or HIV exposed infants, co-infected infants were significantly more likely to be born to mothers with VDRL titers ≥1:16 (AOR 3, 95% CI 1.1-8.2) and higher viral loads (AOR 1.5 95% CI 1.1-1.9). Of 6 newborns with symptomatic syphilis, 2 expired shortly after birth, and 2 were HIV-infected. Conclusion Syphilis continues to be a common co-infection in HIV-infected women and can facilitate in utero transmission of HIV to infants. Most infants are asymptomatic at birth, but those with symptoms have high mortality rates. PMID:25742089

  16. Stria vascularis and cochlear hair cell changes in syphilis: A human temporal bone study.

    PubMed

    Hızlı, Ömer; Kaya, Serdar; Hızlı, Pelin; Paparella, Michael M; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2016-12-01

    To observe any changes in stria vascularis and cochlear hair cells in patients with syphilis. We examined 13 human temporal bone samples from 8 patients with syphilis (our syphilis group), as well as 12 histopathologically normal samples from 9 age-matched patients without syphilis (our control group). We compared, between the two groups, the mean area of the stria vascularis (measured with conventional light microscopy connected to a personal computer) and the mean percentage of cochlear hair cell loss (obtained from cytocochleograms). In our syphilis group, only 1 (7.7%) of the 13 samples had precipitate in the endolymphatic or perilymphatic spaces; 8 (61.5%) of the samples revealed the presence of endolymphatic hydrops (4 cochlear, 4 saccular). The mean area of the stria vascularis did not significantly differ, in any turn of the cochlea, between the 2 groups (P>0.1). However, we did find significant differences between the 2 groups in the mean percentage of outer hair cells in the apical turn (P<0.026) and in the mean percentage of inner hair cells in the basal (P=0.001), middle (P=0.004), and apical (P=0.018) turns. In 7 samples in our syphilis group, we observed either complete loss of the organ of Corti or a flattened organ of Corti without any cells in addition to the absence of both outer and inner hair cells. In this study, syphilis led either to complete loss of the organ of Corti or to significant loss of cochlear hair cells, in addition to cochleosaccular hydrops. But the area of the stria vascularis did not change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Case report: Neuropathic arthropathy of the hip as a sequela of undiagnosed tertiary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Viens, Nicholas A; Watters, Tyler Steven; Vinson, Emily N; Brigman, Brian E

    2010-11-01

    Neuropathic arthropathy is characterized by rapidly progressive bone destruction in the setting of impaired nociceptive and proprioceptive innervation to the involved joint. It is seen most commonly in the foot and ankle, secondary to peripheral neuropathy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Other less common sites of involvement may include the knee, hip, shoulder, and spine, depending on the underlying etiology. Neuropathic arthropathy can be associated with tabes dorsalis, a unique manifestation of late, tertiary neurosyphilis that may arise in individuals with untreated syphilis many years after initial infection, and usually involves the knee, or less commonly, the hip. We report the case of a 73-year-old man with neuropathic arthropathy of the hip and tabes dorsalis attributable to previously undiagnosed tertiary syphilis. There was considerable delay in the diagnosis and unnecessary diagnostic testing owing to failure to consider syphilis as the cause. With the advent of effective antimicrobial therapy and public health campaigns, the relationship between untreated syphilis and neuropathic arthropathy has been primarily a historic point of interest. However, current epidemiologic research suggests a resurgence of syphilis in the United States, with an increased incidence of patients presenting with manifestations of tertiary syphilis from unidentified and untreated primary infections. Treatment options for neuropathic arthropathy of the hip are limited. Arthrodesis has had poor success and treatment with THA has had high complication rates. Syphilis is not merely a historic cause of neuropathic arthropathy. Neurosyphilis and tabes dorsalis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with rapid joint destruction consistent with Charcot arthropathy and no other apparent cause.

  18. The effects of early syphilis on CD4 counts and HIV-1 RNA viral loads in blood and semen

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, S; McSorley, J; Copas, A; Bennett, J; Edwards, S; Kaye, S; Kirk, S; French, P; Weller, I

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of early syphilis on blood and semen plasma HIV-1 viral loads and CD4 counts. Methods: In a retrospective case-control study, blood plasma HIV-1 viral loads and CD4 counts in cases during early syphilis (n = 63, 27 receiving antiretroviral therapy) were compared to those before and after syphilis and with controls with non-systemic acute sexually transmitted infections (STI) (n = 104, 39 receiving antiretroviral therapy). In a prospective substudy in those not receiving antiretroviral therapy, semen plasma viral loads during early syphilis (n = 13) were compared with those 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment for syphilis and with controls with no STIs (n = 20). Results: Retrospective study: CD4 counts were similar in cases (median 410, n = 139 counts) during early syphilis compared to before (485, n = 80) and after (475, n = 88). In a secondary analysis, a drop in CD4 count (21%) among those with early latent syphilis was observed compared with controls. Blood plasma viral loads did not change significantly overall or in those with primary, secondary, or early latent syphilis. Effects were similar on or off antiretroviral therapy. Prospective study: blood and semen viral loads were slightly higher in cases compared with controls but treatment of early syphilis did not reduce either. Conclusions: We detected no association between early syphilis and changes in blood or semen viral load or CD4 count. Increased HIV-1 infectivity associated with early syphilis is unlikely to be associated with increased levels of HIV-1 RNA in blood or semen. PMID:16199736

  19. Predictors of Serological Cure and Serofast State After Treatment in HIV-Negative Persons With Early Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Seña, Arlene C.; Wolff, Mark; Martin, David H.; Behets, Frieda; Van Damme, Kathleen; Leone, Peter; Langley, Carol; McNeil, Linda; Hook, Edward W.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Syphilis management requires serological monitoring after therapy. We compared factors associated with serological response after treatment of early (ie, primary, secondary, or early latent) syphilis. Methods. We performed secondary analyses of data from a prospective, randomized syphilis trial conducted in the United States and Madagascar. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–negative participants aged ≥18 years with early syphilis were enrolled from 2000–2009. Serological testing was performed at baseline and at 3 and 6 months after treatment. At 6 months, serological cure was defined as a negative rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test or a ≥4-fold decreased titer, and serofast status was defined as a ≤2-fold decreased titer or persistent titers that did not meet criteria for treatment failure. Results. Data were available from 465 participants, of whom 369 (79%) achieved serological cure and 96 (21%) were serofast. In bivariate analysis, serological cure was associated with younger age, fewer sex partners, higher baseline RPR titers, and earlier syphilis stage (P ≤ .008). There was a less significant association with Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction after treatment (P = .08). Multivariate analysis revealed interactions between log-transformed baseline titer with syphilis stage, in which the likelihood of cure was associated with increased titers among participants with primary syphilis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] for 1 unit change in log2 titer, 1.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25–2.70), secondary syphilis (AOR, 3.15; 95% CI, 2.14–4.65), and early latent syphilis (AOR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.44–2.40). Conclusions. Serological cure at 6 months after early syphilis treatment is associated with age, number of sex partners, Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction, and an interaction between syphilis stage and baseline RPR titer. PMID:21998287

  20. Clinical diagnosis of syphilis: a ten-year retrospective analysis in a South Australian urban sexual health clinic.

    PubMed

    Forrest, C E; Ward, A

    2016-12-01

    National notifications for infectious syphilis in Australia have increased in recent years. Outside of sexual health clinics, junior clinicians seldom encounter this disease in its infectious stage (primary, secondary and early latent). With such a variable clinical presentation, textbook teaching is no substitute for real-life experience. The importance of accurate classification and staging of disease is relevant to the risk of transmission and determines treatment duration. In this article, the authors review the clinical presentation of syphilis over ten years in an urban sexual health clinic with a focus on the clinical presentation and diagnosis of infectious syphilis, in particular secondary syphilis, compared with that outlined in the Australian National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System guidelines. This retrospective review of all patients diagnosed with syphilis at an urban sexual health clinic showed that between 2005 and 2015, 226 cases of syphilis were diagnosed. Documentation of impression of clinical staging of disease was present in 46% of the cases. Seventeen of these cases were recorded as secondary syphilis. The criteria used by clinicians to diagnose the secondary syphilis cases were consistent with criteria defined by the Australian National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System. All cases of secondary syphilis had at least one cutaneous manifestation of disease. The demographic of the cohort of syphilis cases was consistent with that recorded in the literature. This review showed that the clinician's diagnosis of secondary syphilis in this service is consistent with the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System guidelines. Continuing education of junior medical staff is important to facilitate diagnosis and improve documentation of clinical staging, minimise disease transmission and ensure appropriate treatment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Recent Syphilis Infection Prevalence and Risk Factors Among Male Low-Income Populations in Coastal Peruvian Cities

    PubMed Central

    Snowden, Jonathan M.; Konda, Kelika A.; Leon, Segundo R.; Giron, Jessica M.; Escobar, Guadalupe; Coates, Thomas J.; Caceres, Carlos F.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to examine the epidemiology of syphilis among high-risk socially marginalized populations in urban, coastal Peru, to quantify the prevalence of recent syphilis infection and identify risk factors. Methods Survey data and serologic specimens were collected from a population-based sample of 3 populations: men who have sex with only men (MSOM), socially marginalized heterosexual men, and socially marginalized women. Syphilis prevalence was determined for each population, and multivariate analysis was used to analyze risk factors for recent syphilis infection among the MSOM and among the socially marginalized men. Results The prevalence of recent syphilis infection was 10.5% among the MSOM, 1.5% among the socially marginalized men, and 2.0% among the women. Among both MSOM and the socially marginalized men, recent syphilis infection was significantly associated with Herpes simplex virus Type 2 infection (prevalence ratio = 1.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.03–3.74, and PR = 3.72; 95% CI, 2.12–6.53, respectively). Recent syphilis infection was also significantly associated with HIV infection among the socially marginalized men (PR = 11.13; 95% CI, 4.50 –27.51) and with the number of sexually active years among the MSOM (PR = 1.05, 95% CI, 1.01–1.10). Conclusions All 3 groups included in this study exhibited a high prevalence of recent syphilis infection, with recent infection being most prevalent among the MSOM. These findings demonstrate the need for more effective syphilis control services among those populations, to decrease syphilis-associated morbidity, transmission of syphilis, and the potential transmission of HIV. PMID:19940809

  2. Prioritizing Congenital Syphilis Control in South China: A Decision Analytic Model to Inform Policy Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Nicholas X.; Rydzak, Chara; Yang, Li-Gang; Vickerman, Peter; Yang, Bin; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Hawkes, Sarah; Chen, Xiang-Sheng; Tucker, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Syphilis is a major public health problem in many regions of China, with increases in congenital syphilis (CS) cases causing concern. The Chinese Ministry of Health recently announced a comprehensive 10-y national syphilis control plan focusing on averting CS. The decision analytic model presented here quantifies the impact of the planned strategies to determine whether they are likely to meet the goals laid out in the control plan. Methods and Findings Our model incorporated data on age-stratified fertility, female adult syphilis cases, and empirical syphilis transmission rates to estimate the number of CS cases associated with prenatal syphilis infection on a yearly basis. Guangdong Province was the focus of this analysis because of the availability of high-quality demographic and public health data. Each model outcome was simulated 1,000 times to incorporate uncertainty in model inputs. The model was validated using data from a CS intervention program among 477,656 women in China. Sensitivity analyses were performed to identify which variables are likely to be most influential in achieving Chinese and international policy goals. Increasing prenatal screening coverage was the single most effective strategy for reducing CS cases. An incremental increase in prenatal screening from the base case of 57% coverage to 95% coverage was associated with 106 (95% CI: 101, 111) CS cases averted per 100,000 live births (58% decrease). The policy strategies laid out in the national plan led to an outcome that fell short of the target, while a four-pronged comprehensive syphilis control strategy consisting of increased prenatal screening coverage, increased treatment completion, earlier prenatal screening, and improved syphilis test characteristics was associated with 157 (95% CI: 154, 160) CS cases averted per 100,000 live births (85% decrease). Conclusions The Chinese national plan provides a strong foundation for syphilis control, but more comprehensive measures

  3. Evaluation of SD Bioline HIV/syphilis Duo rapid test kits in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Geeta; Singh, Dipendra Raman; Ojha, Hemanta Chandra; Ojha, Chet Raj; Mishra, Shravan Kumar; Malla, Karishma; Chaudhary, Puspa; Regmi, Kiran

    2016-08-26

    Accurate and prompt diagnosis of HIV and syphilis simultaneously has reinforcing effect on their control program because of their prevalent co-infection. Availability of a simple user-friendly two-pronged and affordable detection tools brings down the cost of health care. They are important in the antenatal clinics, with added opportunity for intervention and prevention of mother to child transmission. In cooperation with rapid test kit manufacturers, SD Bioline, NPHL and NCASC, an evaluation of commercially available HIV/syphilis Duo rapid test kit (SD Bioline) to assess its performance and operational characteristics was done in the present study. A prospective laboratory-based cross sectional study was conducted at a large Women's Hospital. Ten thousand pregnant women, visiting the Hospital for antenatal care or for delivery, were enrolled in study. Tests were performed by the SD Bioline HIV/Syphilis Duo kit as well as national algorithm for HIV and syphilis diagnosis which were considered gold standard. Sensitivity, Specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value along with kappa coefficient were calculated for the kit under evaluation. The sensitivity, specificity, Negative predictive value and Positive predictive value of the kit for HIV diagnosis were 100 % (95 % CI 83.18-100 %, 99.96-100 %, 83.18-100 %, and 99.96-100 %, respectively). Kappa value was found to be 1.0. Out of total cases, results of 9985 (99.85 %) cases were concordant with National algorithm for syphilis diagnosis. Thirteen (0.13 %) cases were found false positive while two were false negative. The sensitivity of the kit for syphilis diagnosis was found to be 95.45 % (95 % CI 84.86-98.74 %) and specificity was 99.87 % (95 % CI; 99.78-99.92 %). Positive predictive value was 76.36 % (95 % CI; 63.65-85.63 %) and Negative predictive value was 99.89 % (95 % CI; 99.39-99.99 %). Kappa value was found to be 0.85. The performance characteristics of SD Bioline

  4. Misrepresentations of the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis.

    PubMed

    White, Robert M

    2005-04-01

    The Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis (TSUS) is the subject of medical research, healthcare, ethics, race relations and fictitious media portrayals (e.g., movie, play). Unraveling misrepresentations about the TSUS is important because prevailing views continue to contribute to alleged mistrust of the medical system by the black community and compromised doctor-patient and researcher-participant relationships. A comparative analysis of standard TSUS information was conducted and included evidenced-based alternative information in an effort to: (a) contextualize the TSUS with accurate medical, public health and historical information and (b) balance claims of racism, nontreatment and denial of treatment. An article in the Winter 2003 Radcliffe Quarterly misrepresented the images of two historical African-American health institutions, the John A. Andrew Memorial Hospital and the Tuskegee Veterans Administration Hospital. A critical analysis challenges these pictorial misrepresentations and documents, in part, a continuing and prevailing pattern of biased misrepresentations in discussions about the TSUS. The National Medical Association (NMA) and the Journal of the National Medical Association have a history of advocacy for African-American health, a record of combating racial discrimination and a quest for truth about the status of the black community. As past NMA historical notables have performed through their advancement, service and leadership, health professionals now have the opportunity, obligation and information to educate the American community about the TSUS with evidenced-based information.

  5. Misrepresentations of the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    White, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    The Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis (TSUS) is the subject of medical research, healthcare, ethics, race relations and fictitious media portrayals (e.g., movie, play). Unraveling misrepresentations about the TSUS is important because prevailing views continue to contribute to alleged mistrust of the medical system by the black community and compromised doctor-patient and researcher-participant relationships. A comparative analysis of standard TSUS information was conducted and included evidenced-based alternative information in an effort to: (a) contextualize the TSUS with accurate medical, public health and historical information and (b) balance claims of racism, nontreatment and denial of treatment. An article in the Winter 2003 Radcliffe Quarterly misrepresented the images of two historical African-American health institutions, the John A. Andrew Memorial Hospital and the Tuskegee Veterans Administration Hospital. A critical analysis challenges these pictorial misrepresentations and documents, in part, a continuing and prevailing pattern of biased misrepresentations in discussions about the TSUS. The National Medical Association (NMA) and the Journal of the National Medical Association have a history of advocacy for African-American health, a record of combating racial discrimination and a quest for truth about the status of the black community. As past NMA historical notables have performed through their advancement, service and leadership, health professionals now have the opportunity, obligation and information to educate the American community about the TSUS with evidenced-based information. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 p581-a PMID:15868777

  6. Diagnosing congenital syphilis using Hutchinson's method: Differentiating between syphilitic, mercurial, and syphilitic-mercurial dental defects.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Stella; Sassani, Sadaf; Henneberg, Maciej; Henneberg, Renata J

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on the dental abnormalities observed by Sir Jonathan Hutchinson, Henry Moon and Alfred Fournier in patients with congenital syphilis and in those treated with mercury, in order to define alterations in dental morphology attributable to each of these causes. These definitions are applied to reported paleopathological cases, exploring various etiologies behind the defects, in order to aid in the diagnosis of congenital syphilis. Original works were examined for descriptions of dental abnormalities in congenital syphilis and in mercurial treatments. These descriptions were compared with dentitions of paleopathological cases (n = 4) demonstrating abnormalities attributed to congenital syphilis. Distinct morphological differences were recognized between congenital syphilitic teeth and teeth affected by mercury. Mercury produces a pronounced deficiency in enamel of incisors, canines and first permanent molars that become rugged and pitted, and of dirty grey honeycombed appearance. Mercury-induced dental changes are evident in three out of four cases studied here. In one case, only syphilitic changes were present. Dental changes in congenital syphilis range from no visible signs to those beyond the classical models of Hutchinson, Moon and Fournier. Treatment of neonates and infants with mercury produces additional changes. Signs of disease and treatment with mercury on teeth may occur together; permanent incisors, first molars and canines, are typically affected, premolars and second/third molars are usually spared. Signs of treatment with mercury might be the only evidence of the occurrence of the disease as mercury was rarely used to treat other diseases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. UNILATERAL OPTIC NEURITIS AND CENTRAL RETINAL VASCULITIS DUE TO OCULAR SYPHILIS.

    PubMed

    Khan, Murtaza S; Kuruppu, Dulanji K; Popli, Tanav A; Moorthy, Ramana S; Mackay, Devin D

    2017-08-14

    Report a case of concurrent unilateral optic neuritis and central retinal artery occlusion as the presenting signs of syphilis. A case report of a 22-year-old man with progressive unilateral vision loss. With no known previous history of syphilis, genital lesions, or other extraocular manifestations, the patient presented with pain with eye movements and decreased color vision. His vision dramatically worsened after a course of oral steroids. Examination was remarkable for severe right optic disk edema with a macular cherry-red spot and mild posterior uveitis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the orbits with contrast revealed enhancement and enlargement of the distal right optic nerve. Fluorescein angiography demonstrated delayed filling of the right central retinal artery, suggestive of impending central retinal artery occlusion. Syphilis serologies were positive from the serum, and cerebrospinal fluid Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test was reactive, consistent with neurosyphilis. Oral steroids were discontinued and vision improved with 2 weeks of intravenous penicillin. This unusual case highlights one of the possible initial presentations of syphilis: unilateral optic neuritis and central retinal artery vasculitis with mild posterior uveitis. The worsening of vision after administration of oral steroids also highlights a potential complication of oral steroid use in the absence of a known etiology of vision loss. A thorough history and examination may be helpful in identifying risk factors for infectious causes, including syphilis, and should prompt additional evaluation.

  8. [Congenital syphilis incidence disparities in Colombia 2005 to 2011: an ecological study].

    PubMed

    Alzate-Granados, Juan P; Sánchez-Bello, Nubia F; Amaya-Arias, Ana C; Peralta-Pizza, Fernando; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier

    2012-10-01

    Syphilis is a systemic, infecto-contagious, sexually-transmitted disease caused by the spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum. Interventions reducing congenital syphilis incidence represent two of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG). Diagnostic and treatment methods are available for managing congenital syphilis; even so, variations occur in seroprevalence and the number of annual cases worldwide, so the situation continues to be worrying. This study was aimed at describing disparities per department regarding congenital syphilis incidence in Colombia from 2005 to 2011. Colombian Institute of Health (Instituto Nacional de Salud-INS) surveillance system records and Colombian Statistics Department (Departamento Administrativo Nacional de Estadística-DANE) records of live births (LB) and basic unsatisfied needs (BUN) from 2005 to 2011 were analyzed. Results Overall incidence in Colombia rose from 2.15 cases per 1,000 LB in 2005, (1,550 cases) to 3.28 cases per 1,000 LB in 2011 (2,078 cases), thereby moving further away from the MDG (0.5 per 1,000 LB). The growing number of cases of congenital syphilis indicates that this continues being a priority problem for public health and that the Overall Healthcare-related Social Security System (OHSSS) has not been able to resolve it, in spite of increased coverage and the resources which this entity has received during the last few years. Such situation demands a re-evaluation of the OHSSS's real impact on public healthcare results.

  9. Feasibility of one-stop antenatal syphilis screening in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia: women and providers perspectives.

    PubMed

    Munkhuu, Bayalag; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; McNeil, Edward; Janchiv, Radnaabazar

    2009-07-01

    Congenital syphilis can be prevented by antenatal syphilis screening, however, the complexity of delivering prenatal service can result in low screening rates, and thus lower prevention and treatment rates. One-stop antenatal syphilis screening, which includes rapid testing and treatment, is the proposed method to overcome this problem. The feasibility of this type of screening needs to be tested to dertermine its effectiveness. In this study, the opinions and level of satisfaction of women undergoing antenatal care and their health care providers regarding a one-stop syphylis screening and treatment service at two antenatal clinics in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia were assessed. The majority of the 246 women studied were satisfied with the service. The mean aggregate satisfaction score derived from 12 questions regarding specific aspects of satisfaction was 3.2. Most providers were also satisfied, not reporting any significant problems interfering with routine antenatal care. However, all providers felt the one-stop service is time consuming and leads to high staff workloads and needs good clinical management. The provider preferred instead to treat husbands presumptively to avoid the possibility of diagnosing couples with discordant syphilis, which could lead to possible violence. A one-stop syphilis diagnosis and treatment service during antenatal care is feasible in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia from both the women's and providers' perspectives.

  10. Syphilis testing in antenatal care: Policies and practices among laboratories in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Luu, Minh; Ham, Cal; Kamb, Mary L; Caffe, Sonja; Hoover, Karen W; Perez, Freddy

    2015-06-01

    To asses laboratory syphilis testing policies and practices among laboratories in the Americas. Laboratory directors or designees from PAHO member countries were invited to participate in a structured, electronically-delivered survey between March and August, 2014. Data on syphilis tests, algorithms, and quality control (QC) practices were analyzed, focusing on laboratories receiving specimens from antenatal clinics (ANCs). Surveys were completed by 69 laboratories representing 30 (86%) countries. Participating laboratories included 36 (52%) national or regional reference labs and 33 (48%) lower-level laboratories. Most (94%) were public sector facilities and 71% reported existence of a national algorithm for syphilis testing in pregnancy, usually involving both treponemal and non-treponemal testing (72%). Less than half (41%) used rapid syphilis tests (RSTs); and only seven laboratories representing five countries reported RSTs were included in the national algorithm for pregnant women. Most (83%) laboratories serving ANCs reported using some type of QC system; 68% of laboratories reported participation in external QC. Only 36% of laboratories reported data to national/local surveillance. Half of all laboratories serving ANC settings reported a stockout of one or more essential supplies during the previous year (median duration, 30days). Updating laboratory algorithms, improving testing standards, integrating data into existing surveillance, and improved procurement and distribution of commodities may be needed to ensure elimination of MTCT of syphilis in the Americas. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Prevalence of anaemia, syphilis and hepatitis B in pregnant women in Nausori, Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Tayler-Smith, K.; Khogali, M.; Marks, G. B.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: An antenatal clinic serving a population of 47 604 in Nausori, Fiji. Objective: 1) To estimate the prevalence of anaemia, syphilis and hepatitis B in pregnant women attending their first antenatal visit; and 2) to estimate the uptake of treatment for syphilis and for the prevention of hepatitis B transmission in affected individuals. Design: Retrospective review of the clinic register and patient records for the year 2011. Results: The prevalence of anaemia, hepatitis B and syphilis were respectively 22%, 2% and 5%. Among women with syphilis, 78% of those for whom data were available received a complete course of three doses of penicillin during their pregnancy, and 83% of babies born to women with hepatitis B received hepatitis B immunoglobulin. Conclusion: The prevalence of anaemia in pregnant women has declined but remains high, and further research is required to identify the major causes of this condition in Fiji. The prevalence of syphilis has remained static, while hepatitis B has decreased over the past decade. There are some gaps in the implementation of effective interventions to manage these conditions in pregnant women. PMID:26393000

  12. Increase in Primary and Secondary Syphilis Notifications in Men in Tokyo, 2007-2013.

    PubMed

    Sugishita, Yoshiyuki; Yamagishi, Takuya; Arima, Yuzo; Hori, Narumi; Seki, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    The number of notified syphilis cases in Tokyo has more than doubled in recent years. The number of reported primary and secondary syphilis cases increased from 108 cases (0.8 per 100,000 population) in 2007 to 245 cases in 2013 (1.9 per 100,000 population). During this period, the majority of cases was male (905/1,024), and the recent increase among primary and secondary syphilis cases was attributed to the increase among males (90/108 [83%] cases in 2007 to 218/245 [89%] cases in 2013); men aged 20-49 years contributed most to the increase, with those aged 30-34 years having the highest notification rate in 2013. Male-to-male transmission was the primary route of infection reported, and men who have sex with men (MSM) accounted for nearly 80% of male cases in 2013. Syphilis appears to be reemerging in Tokyo, and reducing the risk of acquiring syphilis among MSM aged 20-49 years should be a public health priority in Tokyo.

  13. The Great Impostor: Transaminitis Masking the Coinfection of Syphilis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Capatina-Rata, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The incidence of syphilis continues to rise in the United States over the past 15 years. This disease process is classified into stages and may present with a coinfection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Case Report. We present a case of a 32-year-old African American male who presented with cutaneous manifestations of secondary syphilis and transaminitis. A workup revealed that the transaminitis was secondary to underlying syphilitic hepatitis in the presence of HIV coinfection. The patient had a reactive rapid plasma reagin (RPR) of 1 : 64 TU and reactive Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA). Lab findings showed alkaline phosphate (ALP) of 648 unit/L, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) of 251 unit/L, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) of 409 unit/L. Conclusion. Syphilitic hepatitis is a recognized entity in the medical literature. It is a manifestation of secondary syphilis and it is more commonly seen in coinfected patients with both syphilis and HIV. Therefore, primary care physicians should keep infectious etiologies (e.g., syphilis and HIV) in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with unexplained liver dysfunction in a cholestatic pattern. PMID:28400821

  14. Comparison of automated treponemal and nontreponemal test algorithms as first-line syphilis screening assays.

    PubMed

    Huh, Hee Jin; Chung, Jae Woo; Park, Seong Yeon; Chae, Seok Lae

    2016-01-01

    Automated Mediace Treponema pallidum latex agglutination (TPLA) and Mediace rapid plasma reagin (RPR) assays are used by many laboratories for syphilis diagnosis. This study compared the results of the traditional syphilis screening algorithm and a reverse algorithm using automated Mediace RPR or Mediace TPLA as first-line screening assays in subjects undergoing a health checkup. Samples from 24,681 persons were included in this study. We routinely performed Mediace RPR and Mediace TPLA simultaneously. Results were analyzed according to both the traditional algorithm and reverse algorithm. Samples with discordant results on the reverse algorithm (e.g., positive Mediace TPLA, negative Mediace RPR) were tested with Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA). Among the 24,681 samples, 30 (0.1%) were found positive by traditional screening, and 190 (0.8%) by reverse screening. The identified syphilis rate and overall false-positive rate according to the traditional algorithm were lower than those according to the reverse algorithm (0.07% and 0.05% vs. 0.64% and 0.13%, respectively). A total of 173 discordant samples were tested with TPPA by using the reverse algorithm, of which 140 (80.9%) were TPPA positive. Despite the increased false-positive results in populations with a low prevalence of syphilis, the reverse algorithm detected 140 samples with treponemal antibody that went undetected by the traditional algorithm. The reverse algorithm using Mediace TPLA as a screening test is more sensitive for the detection of syphilis.

  15. Correlates of Syphilis Seroreactivity Among Pregnant Women: The HIVNET 024 Trial in Malawi, Tanzania, and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Dara; Goldenberg, Robert L.; Read, Jennifer S.; Wang, Jing; Hoffman, Irving F.; Saathoff, Elmar; Kafulafula, George; Aboud, Said; Martinson, Francis E. A.; Dahab, Maysoon; Vermund, Sten H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to determine correlates of syphilis seroprevalence among HIV-infected and -uninfected antenatal attendees in an African multisite clinical trial, and to improve strategies for maternal syphilis prevention. Results A total of 2270 (86%) women were HIV-infected and 366 (14%) were HIV-uninfected. One hundred seventy-five (6.6%) were syphilis-seropositive (7.3% among HIV-infected and 2.6% HIV-uninfected women). Statistically significant correlates included geographic site (odds ratio [OR] = 4.5, Blantyre; OR = 3.2, Lilongwe; OR = 9.0, Lusaka vs. Dar es Salaam referent); HIV infection (OR = 3.3); age 20 to 24 years (OR = 2.5); being divorced, widowed, or separated (OR = 2.9); genital ulcer treatment in the last year (OR = 2.9); history of stillbirth (OR = 2.8, one stillbirth; OR = 4.3, 2–5 stillbirths); and history of preterm delivery (OR = 2.7, one preterm delivery). Conclusion Many women without identified risk factors were syphilis-seropositive. Younger HIV-infected women were at highest risk. Universal integrated antenatal HIV and syphilis screening and treatment is essential in sub-Saharan African settings. PMID:16601659

  16. Azithromycin-resistant syphilis-causing strains in Sydney, Australia: prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Read, Phillip; Jeoffreys, Neisha; Tagg, Kaitlin; Guy, Rebecca J; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Donovan, Basil

    2014-08-01

    Azithromycin has shown high efficacy in randomized trials when used for treating infectious syphilis in Africa. However, its use in clinical practice has been limited by the development of antimicrobial drug resistance. Resistance has not previously been reported from Australasia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for azithromycin-resistant syphilis-causing strains in Sydney, Australia. We evaluated 409 samples that were PCR positive for Treponema pallidum DNA collected between 2004 and 2011 for the presence of the A2058G mutation, which confers resistance to macrolide antibiotics such as azithromycin. Overall, 84% of samples harbored the mutation. The prevalence of the mutation increased during the study period (P trend, 0.003). We also collected clinical and demographic data on 220 patients from whom these samples had been collected to determine factors associated with the A2058G mutation; 97% were from men who have sex with men. Reporting sex in countries other than Australia was associated with less macrolide resistance (adjusted odds ratio, 0.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.09 to 0.66; P = 0.005), with other study factors showing no association (age, HIV status, recent macrolide use, stage of syphilis, or history of prior syphilis). Azithromycin cannot be recommended as an alternative treatment for syphilis in Sydney. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Syphilis epidemics: a descriptive study of patients diagnosed in a tertiary hospital between 2011 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Fustà, Xavier; Fuertes, Irene; Lugo-Colón, Rossie; Blanco, José Luís; Baras, Núria; Alsina-Gibert, Mercè

    2017-06-13

    In the last decade, the incidence of syphilis has increased in our health area. Our objective is to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with syphilis at our centre and their relationship with HIV. The clinical and epidemiological variables of patients diagnosed with syphilis in a third-level hospital over a period of 4.5 years, as well as their HIV status, were analysed through a descriptive study. There was a significant increase in the incidence of syphilis in the period 2011-2015. We included 220 patients, 98% men (94% MSM). 62% were HIV+ and 89% came in early/infectious stages of the disease. 7% were concomitantly diagnosed with HIV. There was a high number of sexual partners and frequent use of drugs associated with sexual activity (46%). The incidence of syphilis has increased in our centre in the last 2 years. The most affected group is MSM, with high HIV prevalence and risk behaviours for STI acquisition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Serological Response to Treatment of Syphilis with Doxycycline Compared with Penicillin in HIV-infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten; Hoffmann, Steen; Cowan, Susan; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Benfield, Thomas; Gerstoft, Jan; Katzenstein, Terese Lea

    2016-08-23

    Serological response to treatment of syphilis with orally administered doxycycline or intramuscularly administered penicillin was assessed in patients with concurrent HIV. All HIV-infected individuals diagnosed with syphilis attending 3 hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark were included. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) associated with serological outcome were modelled using propensity-score-adjusted logistic regression analysis. In total, 202 cases were treated with doxycycline or intramuscular penicillin. At 12 months, serological failure was observed in 12 cases (15%) treated with doxycycline and in 8 cases (17%) treated with penicillin (OR 0.78 (95% CI 0.16-3.88), p = 0.76). The serological cure rate at 12 months was highest in patients with primary syphilis (100%), followed by patients with secondary (89%), early latent (71%) and late latent (67%) syphilis (p = 0.006). In conclusion, this study provides evidence for the use of doxycycline as a treatment option when treating a HIV-infected population for syphilis.

  19. Immune Evasion and Recognition of the Syphilis Spirochete in Blood and Skin of Secondary Syphilis Patients: Two Immunologically Distinct Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Adriana R.; Ramirez, Lady G.; Zuluaga, Ana V.; Pillay, Allan; Abreu, Christine; Valencia, Carlos A.; La Vake, Carson; Cervantes, Jorge L.; Dunham-Ems, Star; Cartun, Richard; Mavilio, Domenico; Radolf, Justin D.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical syndrome associated with secondary syphilis (SS) reflects the propensity of Treponema pallidum (Tp) to escape immune recognition while simultaneously inducing inflammation. Methods To better understand the duality of immune evasion and immune recognition in human syphilis, herein we used a combination of flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and transcriptional profiling to study the immune response in the blood and skin of 27 HIV(-) SS patients in relation to spirochetal burdens. Ex vivo opsonophagocytosis assays using human syphilitic sera (HSS) were performed to model spirochete-monocyte/macrophage interactions in vivo. Results Despite the presence of low-level spirochetemia, as well as immunophenotypic changes suggestive of monocyte activation, we did not detect systemic cytokine production. SS subjects had substantial decreases in circulating DCs and in IFNγ-producing and cytotoxic NK-cells, along with an emergent CD56−/CD16+ NK-cell subset in blood. Skin lesions, which had visible Tp by IHC and substantial amounts of Tp-DNA, had large numbers of macrophages (CD68+), a relative increase in CD8+ T-cells over CD4+ T-cells and were enriched for CD56+ NK-cells. Skin lesions contained transcripts for cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α), chemokines (CCL2, CXCL10), macrophage and DC activation markers (CD40, CD86), Fc-mediated phagocytosis receptors (FcγRI, FcγR3), IFN-β and effector molecules associated with CD8 and NK-cell cytotoxic responses. While HSS promoted uptake of Tp in conjunction with monocyte activation, most spirochetes were not internalized. Conclusions Our findings support the importance of macrophage driven opsonophagocytosis and cell mediated immunity in treponemal clearance, while suggesting that the balance between phagocytic uptake and evasion is influenced by the relative burdens of bacteria in blood and skin and the presence of Tp subpopulations with differential capacities for binding opsonic antibodies. They also

  20. Missed and delayed syphilis treatment and partner elicitation: a comparison between STD clinic and non-STD clinic patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sanny Y; Johnson, Michelle; Sunenshine, Rebecca; England, Bob; Komatsu, Ken; Taylor, Melanie

    2009-07-01

    Because of increases in reported syphilis, we sought to identify factors associated with missed and delayed syphilis treatment and partner elicitation interview. We reviewed syphilis cases reported during June 1, 2006 to May 31, 2007 and conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses to determine demographic and clinical predictors of missed and delayed syphilis treatment and partner elicitation interview. Of 638 syphilis cases, 38 (6%) were identified as untreated cases. Median time-to-treatment was 7 days (range: 0-380) and median time-to-partner elicitation interview was 14 days (range: 0-380 days) for all case-patients. Both intervals were shorter for patients among whom syphilis was diagnosed at the STD clinic versus non-STD facilities. In multivariate analysis, diagnosis at a non-STD clinic (AOR: 2.6; 95% CI, 1.0-6.9) and having a late infection of unknown duration (AOR: 2.1; 95% CI, 1.0-4.6) were significantly associated with untreated syphilis. Time-to-treatment and time-to-partner elicitation interview were shorter for patients among whom syphilis was diagnosed at the STD clinic. For non-STD settings in Maricopa County, improvements in quality of care (i.e., timely treatment) and expeditious public health interventions (i.e., partner elicitation interview) are needed.

  1. [HIV and syphilis coinfection in pregnancy and vertical HIV transmission: a study based on epidemiological surveillance data].

    PubMed

    Acosta, Lisiane M W; Gonçalves, Tonantzin Ribeiro; Barcellos, Nêmora Tregnago

    2016-12-01

    To estimate the rate of HIV and syphilis coinfection among pregnant women living in Porto Alegre, Brazil, as well as the association of coinfection with vertical HIV transmission and socioeconomic variables. This analytical retrospective cross-sectional study employed data from the regular epidemiological surveillance system for the period from 2010 to 2013. Data were obtained regarding pregnant women with HIV and exposed children, syphilis in pregnancy, and congenital syphilis. The study population included 1 500 HIV-positive women with deliveries from 2010 to 2013. Of these, 155 (10.3%) were also infected with syphilis, corresponding to an HIV and syphilis coinfection rate of 10.2% (± 1.5%). The coinfected group had lower education levels, higher prevalence of black women, and greater HIV exposure related to drug use by the woman or a partner. Coinfected women had more delayed HIV diagnosis (for example, during childbirth) and greater prevalence of lacking prenatal care (44%). Crude analysis showed an association between vertical HIV transmission and HIV and syphilis co-infection (PR = 2.1; 95%CI: 1.21-3.74; P = 0.01) that persisted in the adjusted analysis. A profile of increased vulnerability was identified among pregnant women with HIV and syphilis coinfection. A positive impact of the treatment to reduce congenital syphilis and eliminate vertical transmission of HIV depends on enhanced access to qualified health care.

  2. Rash and hepatitis within days of starting a new antiretroviral regimen: nevirapine hypersensitivity, secondary syphilis or both?

    PubMed

    Saxon, Cara J; Helbert, Matthew R; Komolafe, Adeniyi J; Higgins, Stephen P

    2014-03-01

    We report a case in which an HIV-positive man developed general malaise, skin rash and biochemical hepatitis within days of starting a nevirapine-based antiretroviral treatment regimen. At the same time, his syphilis serology proved positive. We discuss the diagnostic dilemma: was this a nevirapine hypersensitivity reaction, secondary syphilis or both?

  3. Syphilis may be a confounding factor, not a causative agent, in syphilitic ALS.

    PubMed

    Tuk, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Based upon a review of published clinical observations regarding syphilitic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), I hypothesize that syphilis is actually a confounding factor, not a causative factor, in syphilitic ALS. Moreover, I propose that the successful treatment of ALS symptoms in patients with syphilitic ALS using penicillin G and hydrocortisone is an indirect consequence of the treatment regimen and is not due to the treatment of syphilis. Specifically, I propose that the observed effect is due to the various pharmacological activities of penicillin G ( e.g., a GABA receptor antagonist) and/or the multifaceted pharmacological activity of hydrocortisone. The notion that syphilis may be a confounding factor in syphilitic ALS is highly relevant, as it suggests that treating ALS patients with penicillin G and hydrocortisone-regardless of whether they present with syphilitic ALS or non-syphilitic ALS-may be effective at treating this rapidly progressive, highly devastating disease.

  4. Facebook-Augmented Partner Notification in a Cluster of Syphilis Cases in Milwaukee

    PubMed Central

    Oyervides, Otilio; Grande, Katarina M.; Prater, Daphne; Vann, Vannessa; Reitl, Irmine; Biedrzycki, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Public health professionals face many challenges in infectious disease cluster case identification and partner notification (PN), especially in populations using social media as a primary communication venue. We present a method using Facebook and social network diagram illustration to identify, link, and notify individuals in a cluster of syphilis cases in young black men who have sex with men (MSM). Use of Facebook was crucial in identifying two of 55 individuals with syphilis, and the cooperation of socially connected individuals with traditional PN methods yielded a high number of contacts per case. Integration of PN services for HIV and sexually transmitted diseases, as well as collaboration between the city and state information systems, assisted in the cluster investigation. Given that rates of syphilis and HIV infection are increasing significantly in young African American MSM, the use of social media can provide an additional avenue to facilitate case identification and notification. PMID:24385648

  5. A case of secondary syphilis with mucous patches on the hard palate.

    PubMed

    Ban, M; Ohtani, M; Seishima, M

    1995-01-01

    A rare case of secondary syphilis showing mucous patches on the hard palate is reported. A 31-year-old male had two erosive patches which were slightly raised on his hard palate. A linear lesion was also present on the inside of his right alveolar process. Many red-brown macules on his abdomen and bilateral inguinal lymphadenopathy accompanied these symptoms. The serological tests for syphilis were positive: VDRL test 1:512, TPHA test 1:20,480, and IgM-FTA-ABS test 1:40. Immunohistochemical staining with rabbit monoclonal antibody to Treponema pallidum by the biotin-streptoavidin system detected treponemal organisms in the paraffin-embedded specimen from his mucous patch. A diagnosis of secondary syphilis was made, and he was given amoxicillin (AMPC) at 750 mg per day for 4 weeks. His eruptions, including the mucous patch, healed in a week.

  6. Awareness of the Tuskegee syphilis study: impact on offenders' decisions to decline research participation.

    PubMed

    Poythress, Norman; Epstein, Monica; Stiles, Paul; Edens, John F

    2011-01-01

    Ethnic and racial minorities are often under-represented in research. There is considerable speculation that Blacks, in particular, are discouraged from research participation because of researcher improprieties in the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) Syphilis Study at Tuskegee (aka the Tuskegee Syphilis Study [TSS]), a 40-year (1932-1972) study in which investigators withheld medical treatment from African-American men infected with syphilis. We debriefed 281 offenders who declined participation in a research study to assess the extent to which knowledge of the TSS impacted their decisions not to enroll. Relatively few (44/281; 15.6%) reported awareness of the TSS. Half (n = 22) of these "aware" individuals could cite factually accurate information about the TSS, and only four individuals indicated that awareness of TSS had "somewhat" influenced their decision to not participate. Findings suggest that the legacy of the TSS played a relatively minor role in these offenders' decisions to decline research participation.

  7. A rare case of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome presenting as secondary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Asma; Skalweit, Marion J

    2015-09-01

    Immune reconstitution syndrome has rarely been reported in the context of syphilis infection. We report a patient with AIDS (CD4 42 cells/mm(3), viral load 344,000 cp/ml), treated previously for secondary syphilis and started on an integrase inhibitor-based single-tablet antiretroviral treatment regimen. After four weeks of antiretroviral treatment, he presented with non-tender, non-blanching erythematous nodules on his chest, an elevated rapid plasma reagin (1:1024) and immune reconstitution (CD4 154 cells/mm(3), HIV-RNA 130 cp/ml). A detailed workup to exclude opportunistic infections including secondary and neurosyphilis was performed. The patient was continued on antiretroviral treatment and treated empirically for neurosyphilis given cerebrospinal lymphocytosis and dermatopathology suggesting treponemal antigen-driven B-cell hyperplasia. We favour a diagnosis of immune reconstitution in association with prior syphilis infection attributable to rapid and potent immune restoration afforded by integrase inhibitors.

  8. Syphilis is back: presentation of three cases at the ENT department.

    PubMed

    Gugatschka, M; Hammer, G P; Koele, W; Reiter, H; Friedrich, G; Lang-Loidolt, D

    2012-01-01

    Syphilis is a sexually-transmitted disease caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum, and is transmitted either through sexual contact or vertically across the placenta. Rates of infection were at a low point in the early 1990s. Since then, increasing numbers of new cases of infections have been observed in all Western countries. Presentation of three patients with syphilis who presented within a short period of time in an ENT outpatient clinic. One must be aware of the increasing incidence of syphilis, even in head and neck disciplines. Typical symptoms of an early infection are an ulcerous lesion in the mouth, with or without cervical lymphadenopathy. The main therapy is high doses of penicillin G administered intramuscularly. Other simultaneous sexually-transmitted diseases, especially HIV infection, must be excluded. Unnoticed and untreated patients may develop late and life-threatening complications.

  9. Facebook-augmented partner notification in a cluster of syphilis cases in Milwaukee.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Paul; Oyervides, Otilio; Grande, Katarina M; Prater, Daphne; Vann, Vannessa; Reitl, Irmine; Biedrzycki, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Public health professionals face many challenges in infectious disease cluster case identification and partner notification (PN), especially in populations using social media as a primary communication venue. We present a method using Facebook and social network diagram illustration to identify, link, and notify individuals in a cluster of syphilis cases in young black men who have sex with men (MSM). Use of Facebook was crucial in identifying two of 55 individuals with syphilis, and the cooperation of socially connected individuals with traditional PN methods yielded a high number of contacts per case. Integration of PN services for HIV and sexually transmitted diseases, as well as collaboration between the city and state information systems, assisted in the cluster investigation. Given that rates of syphilis and HIV infection are increasing significantly in young African American MSM, the use of social media can provide an additional avenue to facilitate case identification and notification.

  10. State of the art syphilis diagnostics: rapid point-of-care tests.

    PubMed

    Kay, Natasha S; Peeling, Rosanna W; Mabey, David C

    2014-01-01

    Syphilis remains an important and entirely preventable cause of stillbirth and neonatal mortality. More than 1 million women with active syphilis become pregnant each year. Without treatment, 25% of them will deliver a stillborn baby, 33% will deliver a live low-birth weight baby with an increased chance of dying in the first month of life. Adverse pregnancy outcomes due to syphilis can be prevented by screening pregnant women, and treating those who test positive with a single dose of penicillin before 28 weeks gestation. Until recently access to screening in low- and middle-income countries has been limited, since screening tests have been laboratory based, requiring equipment, electricity and trained laboratory staff. Now a number of rapid, cheap, simple and accurate screening tests are available and can give a result in 15-20 min, enabling those who require treatment to be treated at their first visit.

  11. Detection of immunoglobulin M in cerebrospinal fluid from syphilis patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J B; Farshy, C E; Hunter, E F; Hambie, E A; Wobig, G H; Larsen, S A

    1986-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were evaluated in an immunoglobulin M enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IgM ELISA) for syphilis with sonic extracts of Treponema pallidum coated on polystyrene plates. The ELISA procedure was reproducible, and T. pallidum antigens were stable., A total of 15 CSF samples from patients with neurosyphilis, 18 CSF samples from patients with syphilis, 12 CSF samples from patients treated for syphilis, and 494 CSF samples from patients with neurologic or other systemic diseases were tested. The IgM ELISA gave reactive results in all of six symptomatic and congenital neurosyphilitic patients and none of nine asymptomatic neurosyphilitic patients. Of 524 CSF samples from nonneurosyphilitic individuals, 513 were nonreactive, resulting in 98% test specificity. The IgM ELISA in CSF should prove to be useful for confirmation of symptomatic neurosyphilis. PMID:3533984

  12. The science behind pre-Columbian evidence of syphilis in Europe: research by documentary.

    PubMed

    Armelagos, George J; Zuckerman, Molly K; Harper, Kristin N

    2012-03-01

    This article discusses the presentation of scientific findings by documentary, without the process of peer review. We use, as an example, PBS's "The Syphilis Enigma," in which researchers presented novel evidence concerning the origin of syphilis that had never been reviewed by other scientists. These "findings" then entered the world of peer-reviewed literature through citations of the documentary itself or material associated with it. Here, we demonstrate that the case for pre-Columbian syphilis in Europe that was made in the documentary does not withstand scientific scrutiny. We also situate this example from paleopathology within a larger trend of "science by documentary" or "science by press conference," in which researchers seek to bypass the peer review process by presenting unvetted findings directly to the public. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The Science behind Pre-Columbian Evidence of Syphilis in Europe: Research by Documentary

    PubMed Central

    Armelagos, George J.; Zuckerman, Molly K.; Harper, Kristin N.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the presentation of scientific finding via documentary and absent the process of peer-review. We use, as an example, PBS’s Syphilis Enigma, in which researchers presented novel evidence concerning the origin of syphilis that had never been reviewed by other scientists. These “findings” then entered the world of peer-reviewed literature through citations of the documentary itself or material associated with the documentary. Here, we demonstrate that the case for pre-Columbian syphilis in Europe that was made in the documentary does not withstand scientific scrutiny. We also situate this example from paleopathology within a larger trend of “science by documentary” or “science by press conference,” in which researchers seek to bypass the peer review process by presenting unvetted findings directly to the public. PMID:22499439

  14. State-Specific Rates of Primary and Secondary Syphilis Among Men Who Have Sex with Men - United States, 2015.

    PubMed

    de Voux, Alex; Kidd, Sarah; Grey, Jeremy A; Rosenberg, Eli S; Gift, Thomas L; Weinstock, Hillard; Bernstein, Kyle T

    2017-04-07

    In 2015, the rate of reported primary and secondary syphilis in the United States was 7.5 cases per 100,000 population, nearly four times the previous lowest documented rate of 2.1 in 2000 (1). In 2015, 81.7% of male primary and secondary syphilis cases with information on the sex of the sex partner were among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (collectively referred to as MSM) (1). These data suggest a disproportionate incidence of disease among MSM. However, attempts to quantify this disparity have been hindered by limited data on the size of the MSM population at the state level. To produce the first estimates of state-specific rates of primary and secondary syphilis among MSM, CDC used MSM population estimates based on a new methodology (2) and primary and secondary syphilis case counts reported in 2015 to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System. Among 44 states reporting information on the sex of sex partners for ≥70% of male cases, the overall rate of primary and secondary syphilis among all men (aged ≥18 years) in the United States in 2015 was 17.5 per 100,000, compared with 309.0 among MSM and 2.9 among men who reported sex with women only. The overall rate of primary and secondary syphilis among MSM was 106.0 times the rate among men who have sex with women only and 167.5 times the rate among women.* These data highlight the disproportionate impact of syphilis among MSM and underscore the need for innovative and targeted syphilis prevention measures at the state and local level, especially among MSM. It is important that health care providers recognize the signs and symptoms of syphilis, screen sexually active MSM for syphilis at least annually, and provide timely treatment according to national sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines (3).

  15. Incidence of syphilis seroconversion among HIV-infected persons in Asia: results from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Young; Boettiger, David; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Huy, Bui Vu; Wong, Wing Wai; Ditangco, Rossana; Lee, Man Po; Oka, Shinichi; Durier, Nicolas; Choi, Jun Yong

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of syphilis have been described among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) in Western communities, whereas reports in Asian countries are limited. We aimed to characterize the incidence and temporal trends of syphilis among HIV-infected MSM compared with HIV-infected non-MSM in Asian countries. Patients enrolled in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database cohort and with a negative non-treponemal test since enrolment were analyzed. Incidence of syphilis seroconversion, defined as a positive non-treponemal test after previously testing negative, was evaluated among patients at sites performing non-treponemal tests at least annually. Factors associated with syphilis seroconversion were investigated at sites doing non-treponemal testing in all new patients and subsequently testing routinely or when patients were suspected of having syphilis. We included 1010 patients from five sites that performed non-treponemal tests in all new patients; those included had negative non-treponemal test results during enrolment and subsequent follow-ups. Among them, 657 patients were from three sites conducting regular non-treponemal testing. The incidence of syphilis seroconversion was 5.38/100 person-years (PY). Incidence was higher in MSM than non-MSM (7.64/100 PY vs. 2.44/100 PY, p<0.001). Among MSM, the incidence rate ratio (IRR) for every additional year from 2009 was 1.19 (p=0.051). MSM status (IRR 3.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.88-6.47), past syphilis diagnosis (IRR 5.15, 95% CI 3.69-7.17) and younger age (IRR 0.84 for every additional 10 years, 95% CI 0.706-0.997) were significantly associated with syphilis seroconversion. We observed a higher incidence of syphilis seroconversion among HIV-infected MSM and a trend to increasing annual incidence. Regular screening for syphilis and targeted interventions to limit transmission are needed in this population.

  16. Introduction of rapid tests for large-scale syphilis screening among female, male, and transgender sex workers in Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Sachin; Daly, Celine; Agarwal, Vidyunmala; Gaikwad, Sanjeevsingh B; George, Bitra

    2011-06-01

    Despite widespread availability of rapid plasma reagin (RPR) for syphilis screening at sex worker (SW)-dedicated project clinics, uptake of syphilis testing remains low and prevalence of syphilis remains high among SWs in Maharashtra, India. The primary reasons given for refusal of RPR were fear of venipuncture and long waiting times for results. Between December 2007 and February 2008, rapid point of contact diagnostic tests (Syphicheck-WB, Qualpro Diagnostics, India) using finger-prick samples were introduced for syphilis screening, with RPR confirmation test of positives. Uptake of syphilis screening among clinic attenders increased to 63.1% compared with an average of 14.3% before the intervention. Among the 19,809 SWs who were screened, 598 tested positive (3% prevalence of lifetime infection). Of these, 395 (66.1%) accepted RPR confirmation test; 337 (88.3%) were seroreactive, 160 (40.5%) had titers ≥1:8 (active syphilis). The projected overall prevalence of active syphilis among all SWs screened was 1.2% but varied by site and typology of sex work (brothel-based, 2.4%; bar-based, 0.5%; street-based, 2.3%; male SWs, 0.2%; transgender, 11.3%; home-based, 0.6%). The introduction of rapid tests dramatically increased the uptake of syphilis screening in this large-scale intervention among a high-risk population in India. However, only two-thirds of SWs with a positive rapid test accepted a confirmatory RPR test. The high proportion (40.5%) of active syphilis among those testing positive on the rapid screening test justifies treatment even if confirmatory testing is declined. A commercially available, simple, rapid nontreponemal test is needed to further strengthen syphilis screening.

  17. Clinical prediction and diagnosis of neurosyphilis in HIV-infected patients with early Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Dumaresq, Jeannot; Langevin, Stéphanie; Gagnon, Simon; Serhir, Bouchra; Deligne, Benoît; Tremblay, Cécile; Tsang, Raymond S W; Fortin, Claude; Coutlée, François; Roger, Michel

    2013-12-01

    The diagnosis of neurosyphilis (NS) is a challenge, especially in HIV-infected patients, and the criteria for deciding when to perform a lumbar puncture (LP) in HIV-infected patients with syphilis are controversial. We retrospectively reviewed demographic, clinical, and laboratory data from 122 cases of HIV-infected patients with documented early syphilis who underwent an LP to rule out NS, and we evaluated 3 laboratory-developed validated real-time PCR assays, the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay, the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) assay, and the line immunoassay INNO-LIA Syphilis, for the diagnosis of NS from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of these patients. NS was defined by a reactive CSF-VDRL test result and/or a CSF white blood cell (WBC) count of >20 cells/μl. Thirty of the 122 patients (24.6%) had early NS. Headache, visual symptoms, a CD4 cell count of <500 cells/μl, and viremia, as defined by an HIV-1 RNA count of ≥50 copies/ml, were associated with NS in multivariate analysis (P = <0.001 for each factor). Blood serum rapid plasma reagin (RPR) titers were not associated with early NS (P = 0.575). For the diagnosis of NS, the PCR, FTA-ABS, TPPA, and INNO-LIA assays had sensitivities of 58%, 100%, 68%, and 100%, specificities of 67%, 12%, 49%, and 13%, and negative predictive values of 85%, 100%, 84%, and 100%, respectively. Visual disturbances, headache, uncontrolled HIV-1 viremia, and a CD4 cell count of <500 cells/μl were predictors of NS in HIV-infected patients with early syphilis, while blood serum RPR titers were not; therefore, RPR titers should not be used as the sole criterion for deciding whether to perform an LP in early syphilis. When applied to CSF samples, the INNO-LIA Syphilis assay easily helped rule out NS.

  18. Sensitivity and specificity of point-of-care rapid combination syphilis-HIV-HCV tests.

    PubMed

    Hess, Kristen L; Fisher, Dennis G; Reynolds, Grace L

    2014-01-01

    New rapid point-of-care (POC) tests are being developed that would offer the opportunity to increase screening and treatment of several infections, including syphilis. This study evaluated three of these new rapid POC tests at a site in Southern California. Participants were recruited from a testing center in Long Beach, California. A whole blood specimen was used to evaluate the performance of the Dual Path Platform (DPP) Syphilis Screen & Confirm, DPP HIV-Syphilis, and DPP HIV-HCV-Syphilis rapid tests. The gold-standard comparisons were Treponema pallidum passive particle agglutination (TPPA), rapid plasma reagin (RPR), HCV enzyme immunoassay (EIA), and HIV-1/2 EIA. A total of 948 whole blood specimens were analyzed in this study. The sensitivity of the HIV tests ranged from 95.7-100% and the specificity was 99.7-100%. The sensitivity and specificity of the HCV test were 91.8% and 99.3%, respectively. The treponemal-test sensitivity when compared to TPPA ranged from 44.0-52.7% and specificity was 98.7-99.6%. The non-treponemal test sensitivity and specificity when compared to RPR was 47.8% and 98.9%, respectively. The sensitivity of the Screen & Confirm test improved to 90.0% when cases who were both treponemal and nontreponemal positive were compared to TPPA+/RPR ≥ 1 ∶ 8. The HIV and HCV on the multi-infection tests showed good performance, but the treponemal and nontreponemal tests had low sensitivity. These results could be due to a low prevalence of active syphilis in the sample population because the sensitivity improved when the gold standard was limited to those more likely to be active cases. Further evaluation of the new syphilis POC tests is required before implementation into testing programs.

  19. Clinical manifestations and cerebrospinal fluid status in ocular syphilis in HIV-Negative patients.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ting; Wu, Xinjun; Zhou, Shaona; Wang, Qianqiu; Li, Daning

    2016-06-06

    Syphilis with ocular involvement has reemerged as a critical health problem. The aim of the present study was to explore the clinical manifestations and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) status in ocular syphilis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative patients. The clinical records of patients with ocular syphilis presenting to the Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital in the period from January 2011 to December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The median age of 25 HIV-negative patients with ocular syphilis was 53 years, 18 patients (72.0 %) were males and 7 (28.0 %) were females. None of them self-identified themselves as men who had sex with men (MSM). The ocular lesions included: uveitis (13 cases), optic neuropathy (6 cases), retinal vasculitis (5 cases), retinal detachment (3 cases), and neuroretinitis (4 cases). Serum toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST) titer ranged from 1 to 512, with a median of 64. Overall, 18 (72.0 %) of the 25 patients had abnormal CSF results, 15 (60.0 %) CSF samples had elevated white blood cell counts, 13 (52.0 %) had elevated protein levels, and 9 (36.0 %) had reactive CSF Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test, respectively. Mann-Whitney U tests showed higher serum TRUST titer (>32) correlated with the abnormal CSF results. The demographic characteristics of patients with ocular syphilis in this study were different from previous reports. The study showed a high CSF abnormal rate in HIV-negative patients. The recommendation for CSF examination from all patients with ocular syphilis, including HIV-negative cases, is strongly supported by the present data.

  20. Influence of detection method and study area scale on syphilis cluster identification in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Escamilla, Veronica; Hampton, Kristen H.; Gesink, Dionne C.; Serre, Marc L.; Emch, Michael; Leone, Peter A.; Samoff, Erika; Miller, William C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Identifying geographical clusters of sexually transmitted infections can aid in targeting prevention and control efforts. However, detectable clusters can vary between detection methods because of different underlying assumptions. Furthermore, because disease burden is not geographically homogenous, the reference population is sensitive to the study area scale, affecting cluster outcomes. We investigated the influence of cluster detection method and geographical scale on syphilis cluster detection in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. Methods We analyzed primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis cases reported in North Carolina (2003–2010). Primary and secondary syphilis incidence rates were estimated using census tract-level population estimates. We used two cluster detection methods: local Moran’s I using an areal adjacency matrix, and Kulldorff’s spatial scan statistic using a variable size moving circular window. We evaluated three study area scales: North Carolina, Piedmont region, and Mecklenburg County. We focused our investigation on Mecklenburg, an urban county with historically high syphilis rates. Results Syphilis clusters detected using local Moran’s I and Kulldorff’s scan statistic overlapped but varied in size and composition. Because we reduced the scale to a high incidence urban area, the reference syphilis rate increased, leading to the identification of smaller clusters with higher incidence. Cluster demographic characteristics differed when the study area was reduced to a high incidence urban county. Conclusion Our results underscore the importance of selecting the correct scale for analysis to more precisely identify areas with high disease burden. A more complete understanding of high burden cluster location can inform resource allocation for geographically targeted sexually transmitted infection interventions. PMID:26967297

  1. The incidence of congenital syphilis in the United Kingdom: February 2010 to January 2015.

    PubMed

    Simms, I; Tookey, P A; Goh, B T; Lyall, H; Evans, B; Townsend, C L; Fifer, H; Ison, C

    2017-01-01

    To estimate the incidence of congenital syphilis in the UK. Prospective study. United Kingdom. Children born between February 2010 and January 2015 with a suspected diagnosis of congenital syphilis were reported through an active surveillance system. Number of congenital syphilis cases and incidence. For all years, reported incidence was below the WHO threshold for elimination (<0.5/1000 live births). Seventeen cases (12 male, five female) were identified. About 50% of infants (8/17) were born preterm (<37 weeks' gestation): median birthweight 2000 g (865-3170 g). Clinical presentation varied from asymptomatic to acute disease, including severe anaemia, hepatosplenomegaly, rhinitis, thrombocytopaenia, skeletal damage, and neurosyphilis. One infant was deaf and blind. Median maternal age was 20 years (17-31) at delivery. Where maternal stage of infection was recorded, 6/10 had primary, 3/10 secondary and 1/10 early latent syphilis. Most mothers were white (13/16). Country of birth was recorded for 12 mothers: UK (n = 6), Eastern Europe (n = 3), Middle East (n = 1), and South East Asia (n = 2). The social circumstances of mothers varied and included drug use and sex work. Some experienced difficulty accessing health care. The incidence of congenital syphilis is controlled and monitored by healthcare services and related surveillance systems, and is now below the WHO elimination threshold. However, reducing the public health impact of this preventable disease in the UK is highly dependent on the successful implementation of WHO elimination standards across Europe. Congenital syphilis incidence in the UK is at a very low level and well below the WHO elimination threshold. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  2. Field evaluation of a dual rapid diagnostic test for HIV infection and syphilis in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Claire C; Leon, Segundo R; Huang, Emily; Brown, Brandon J; Ramos, Lourdes B; Vargas, Silver K; Flores, Juan A; Caceres, Carlos F; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-05-01

    Screening for HIV and syphilis in key populations is recommended by the WHO to reduce the morbidity, mortality and transmission associated with undiagnosed and untreated infections. Rapid point-of-care tests that can detect multiple infections with a single fingerprick whole blood specimen using a single device are gaining popularity. We evaluated the field performance of a rapid dual HIV and syphilis test in people at high risk of HIV and syphilis infections. Participants included men who have sex with men and transgender women recruited in Lima, Peru. Reference standard testing for detection of HIV and syphilis infections, conducted using blood samples from venipuncture, included Treponema pallidum particle agglutination and fourth-generation HIV enzyme immunoassay for which positive results had a confirmation HIV Western blot test. For the evaluation test, SD BIOLINE HIV/Syphilis Duo test (Standard Diagnostics, Korea), a fingerprick blood specimen was used. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and the exact binomial method was used to determine 95% CIs. A total of 415 participants were recruited for the study. The dual test sensitivity for detection of T. pallidum infection was 89.2% (95% CI 83.5% to 93.5%) and specificity 98.8% (95% CI 96.5% to 99.8%). For detection of HIV infection, the sensitivity of the dual test was 99.1% (95% CI 94.8% to 100%) and specificity 99.4% (95% CI 97.7% to 99.9%). This high performing dual test should be considered for the use in clinical settings to increase uptake of simultaneous testing of HIV and syphilis and accelerate time to treatment for those who need it. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. HIV and Syphilis Infection among Men attending a Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinic in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Colón-López, Vivian; Ortiz, Ana P.; Banerjee, Geetanjoli; Gertz, Alida M.; García, Hermes

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the demographic, behavioral, and clinical factors associated with HIV and syphilis infection among a sample of men attending a sexually transmitted infection clinic during 2009 to 2010 in San Juan, Puerto Rico (PR). Methods A sample of 350 clinical records from men visiting the clinic for the first time during 2009 to 2010 was reviewed. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the study sample, and bivariate analyses were performed separately for HIV and syphilis to identify factors associated with these infectious diseases. Variables that were significantly associated (p<0.05) with HIV and syphilis in the bivariate analysis were considered for inclusion in the logistic regression models. Results Overall, 11.2% and 14.1% of the men were infected with HIV and syphilis, respectively, and 5.1% were coinfected with HIV and syphilis. In multivariate logistic regression models, ever injecting drugs (POR = 8.1; 95%Cl 3.0, 21.8) and being a man who has sex with men (MSM) (POR = 5.3; 95%CI 2.3, 11.9) were positively associated with HIV infection. Being a man older than 45 years (POR = 4.0; 95%CI: 1.9, 8.9) and being an MSM (POR = 2.5; 95%CI: 1.3, 4.9) were both significantly associated with syphilis infection. Conclusion These findings reinforce the need for greater education and prevention efforts for HIV and other STIs among men in PR, particularly those who are MSM. However, there is a need to make an a priori assessment of the level of health literacy in the members of this group so that a culturally sensitive intervention can be provided to the men who attend this STI clinic. PMID:23556260

  4. [Iridoschisis associated to congenital syphilis: serological confirmation at the 80's].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Carro, G; Vilanova, M; Antuña, M G; Cárcaba, V; Junceda-Moreno, J

    2009-07-01

    Female in her eighties is admitted suffering from unilateral ocular pain. On examination we observed, as well as corneal abrasion, a bilateral iridoschisis with a frayed iris, unfolded between its stromal layers. This rare case is related either to senile degenerative change or to angle-closure glaucoma. However, it is also associated with congenital syphilis with or without the presence of interstitial keratitis. Infant conjunctivitis and a "salt and pepper" appearance of the fundus oculi complete the diagnosis. It is confirmed that the patient had suffered from congenital late syphilis, cured by the age of 80: this confirmation is reached by treponemal (RPR-) and non-treponemal (TPHA+) serological tests.

  5. Three cases of ocular syphilis and the resurgence of the disease in Queensland

    PubMed Central

    Sara, Sergio A; McAllister, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The past few years has seen a resurgence of syphilis. It is predominantly associated within men who have sex with men and also within heterosexual Indigenous Australians. Possessing the ability to mimic a variety of ocular diseases, it typically manifests as uveitis, although it can affect any structure within the eye. Thus, a high degree of clinical suspicion by ophthalmologists is required to prevent disease progression and ocular morbidity. Patients require prolonged antibiotic treatment with intravenous benzylpenicillin and outpatient monitoring to successfully resolve the infection. We describe a case series of ocular syphilis presentations in Queensland, Australia. PMID:27672343

  6. Aortic aneurysm in a patient with syphilis-related spinal pain and paraplegia.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Daniel Brito; Oliveira, Danise Senna; Rovere, Rodrigo Kraft; de Oliveira Filho, Umberto Lopes

    2017-01-01

    The tertiary stage of syphilis is nowadays extremely rare, showing predilection for the cardiovascular and nervous systems. A 57-year-old Caucasian man sought medical assistance due to back pain that evolved to paraplegia of the lower limbs. A thoracic CT scan demonstrated an important aneurysmatic lesion of the descending thoracic aorta causing erosion of the vertebral bodies and VDRL and FTA-abs positivity. Although rare, syphilitic aortitis, the hallmark of cardiovascular syphilis, should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with thoracic aneurysm when in the absence of classic risk factors for atherosclerosis, especially in cases that progress with erosion of vertebral bodies.

  7. Study of distribution and factors affecting syphilis epidemic among inner-city minorities of Baltimore.

    PubMed

    Williams, P B; Ekundayo, O

    2001-11-01

    Disparities in health and medical conditions among ethnic and racial groups have been repeatedly documented. These inequalities, which have been noted in the recent past, include health outcomes such as quality of life and mortality, process, accessibility and appropriateness of care, and the prevalence of certain degenerative conditions and infectious diseases. Syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease (STD) which seemed to have disappeared or had been controlled over the years, has now re-emerged as a major public health problem in many rural, urban and suburban communities. Progression of the current rate of syphilis, which erupted in Baltimore during the later part of 1994, has continued unabated, most especially among the ethnic minorities, despite efforts of the Baltimore City Health Department and Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to control the epidemic. With the current incidence rates of 270 per 100 000 live births for congenital syphilis and 99.3 per 100 000 population for primary, secondary and latent syphilis (96% of the cases being in the non-white population), Baltimore becomes the city with the highest number of syphilis cases in the nation, surpassing the national average of 2.6 cases per 100 000 population. This study, which utilizes a combination of retrospective and questionnaire-oriented approach, was designed to assess factors that influenced the high incidence of syphilis among Baltimore inner-city dwellers between 1994 and 1998. Data for the study included syphilis reports from private physicians, the Baltimore City Health Department, STD clinics, the Center for Disease Control (CDC), and ethnographic interviews. Factors favoring the distribution and infectivity of the disease among the inner-city dwellers include greater poverty, high level of communication gaps between providers and a cross-section of minority inner-city dwellers, exchange of sex for crack cocaine, lower educational background, and inadequate and

  8. Antenatal Syphilis Screening Using Point-of-Care Testing in Sub-Saharan African Countries: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuznik, Andreas; Lamorde, Mohammed; Nyabigambo, Agnes; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Untreated syphilis in pregnancy is associated with adverse clinical outcomes for the infant. Most syphilis infections occur in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where coverage of antenatal screening for syphilis is inadequate. Recently introduced point-of-care syphilis tests have high accuracy and demonstrate potential to increase coverage of antenatal screening. However, country-specific cost-effectiveness data for these tests are limited. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of antenatal syphilis screening for 43 countries in SSA and estimate the impact of universal screening on stillbirths, neonatal deaths, congenital syphilis, and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted. Methods and Findings The decision analytic model reflected the perspective of the national health care system and was based on the sensitivity (86%) and specificity (99%) reported for the immunochromatographic strip (ICS) test. Clinical outcomes of infants born to syphilis-infected mothers on the end points of stillbirth, neonatal death, and congenital syphilis were obtained from published sources. Treatment was assumed to consist of three injections of benzathine penicillin. Country-specific inputs included the antenatal prevalence of syphilis, annual number of live births, proportion of women with at least one antenatal care visit, per capita gross national income, and estimated hourly nurse wages. In all 43 sub-Saharan African countries analyzed, syphilis screening is highly cost-effective, with an average cost/DALY averted of US$11 (range: US$2–US$48). Screening remains highly cost-effective even if the average prevalence falls from the current rate of 3.1% (range: 0.6%–14.0%) to 0.038% (range: 0.002%–0.113%). Universal antenatal screening of pregnant women in clinics may reduce the annual number of stillbirths by up to 64,000, neonatal deaths by up to 25,000, and annual incidence of congenital syphilis by up to 32,000, and

  9. Notes from the field: repeat syphilis infection and HIV coinfection among men who have sex with men--Baltimore, Maryland, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    2013-08-16

    Syphilis diagnoses in the United States have increased substantially over the past decade, and most cases occurred among men who have sex with men (MSM). Nationally, rates of primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis reported among men increased, from 3.0 cases per 100,000 population in 2001 to 8.2 in 2011. In 2011, approximately 72% of P&S syphilis cases occurred among MSM*, among whom new diagnoses of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have increased in recent years. Infection with syphilis increases the likelihood of acquiring and transmitting HIV; moreover, the occurrence of syphilis in an HIV-infected person is an indication of behavior that might increase the likelihood of HIV transmission. The population of Baltimore, Maryland, is particularly affected by syphilis and HIV. In 2011, the Baltimore metropolitan statistical area (MSA) had the second highest rate of reported cases of P&S syphilis (11.4 per 100,000 population) and the sixth highest estimated rate of diagnoses of HIV infection (33.8 per 100,000 population) compared with other MSAs in the United States. Local public health officials have noted a subpopulation of MSM diagnosed with repeat syphilis infection; they believe that this subpopulation might bear a disproportionate burden of both syphilis and HIV infection and that intensifying syphilis and HIV prevention efforts among this subpopulation might reduce syphilis and HIV transmission overall in the Baltimore area.

  10. Multisite Laboratory Evaluation of a Dual Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Syphilis Point-of-Care Rapid Test for Simultaneous Detection of HIV and Syphilis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Claire C.; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Ondondo, Raphael O.; Bukusi, Elizabeth Anne; Dagnra, Claver Anoumou; Oo, Khin Yi; Pe, Eh Htoo; Khamsay, Chanthavysouk; Houng, Le Thi; Campuzano, Roberto Vázquez; Estes, Jason; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Background.  Recently, test developers have created rapid point-of-care tests that can simultaneously detect multiple infections within the same specimen using a single device. The SD BIOLINE Duo HIV/Syphilis rapid point-of-care test uses a solid-phase immunochromatographic assay to detect immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgM, and IgA antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific antigens (HIV-1 gp41, sub O, HIV-2 gp36) and recombinant Treponema pallidum antigen (17 kDa) in human serum. This study was a multisite laboratory-based evaluation of the performance of SD BIOLINE HIV/Syphilis Duo test using previously characterized sera in 6 countries. Methods.  Laboratories in Ghana, Mexico, Laos, Togo, Kenya, and Myanmar participated in the evaluation during 2012–2013. Each site characterized sera using T pallidum particle agglutination assay or T pallidum hemagglutination assay and HIV enzyme immunoassay, Western blot, and/or HIV antibody rapid tests. Those gold standard test results were compared with SD BIOLINE Duo test results. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of test performance and used the exact binomial method to calculate 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results.  The sensitivity and specificity for the HIV antibody test component (n = 2336) were estimated at 99.91% (95% CI, 99.51% and 100%) and 99.67% (95% CI, 99.16% and 99.91%), respectively. For the T pallidum test component (n = 2059), the sensitivity and specificity were estimated at 99.67% (95% CI, 98.82% and 99.96%) and 99.72% (95% CI, 99.29% and 99.92%), respectively. Conclusions.  The sensitivity and specificity of the SD BIOLINE HIV/Syphilis Duo test were consistently high across sera specimens from 6 countries around the world. Dual rapid tests should be considered for improved HIV and syphilis screening coverage. PMID:25734088

  11. Multisite Laboratory Evaluation of a Dual Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Syphilis Point-of-Care Rapid Test for Simultaneous Detection of HIV and Syphilis Infection.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Claire C; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Ondondo, Raphael O; Bukusi, Elizabeth Anne; Dagnra, Claver Anoumou; Oo, Khin Yi; Pe, Eh Htoo; Khamsay, Chanthavysouk; Houng, Le Thi; Campuzano, Roberto Vázquez; Estes, Jason; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2014-03-01

    Recently, test developers have created rapid point-of-care tests that can simultaneously detect multiple infections within the same specimen using a single device. The SD BIOLINE Duo HIV/Syphilis rapid point-of-care test uses a solid-phase immunochromatographic assay to detect immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgM, and IgA antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific antigens (HIV-1 gp41, sub O, HIV-2 gp36) and recombinant Treponema pallidum antigen (17 kDa) in human serum. This study was a multisite laboratory-based evaluation of the performance of SD BIOLINE HIV/Syphilis Duo test using previously characterized sera in 6 countries. Laboratories in Ghana, Mexico, Laos, Togo, Kenya, and Myanmar participated in the evaluation during 2012-2013. Each site characterized sera using T pallidum particle agglutination assay or T pallidum hemagglutination assay and HIV enzyme immunoassay, Western blot, and/or HIV antibody rapid tests. Those gold standard test results were compared with SD BIOLINE Duo test results. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of test performance and used the exact binomial method to calculate 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The sensitivity and specificity for the HIV antibody test component (n = 2336) were estimated at 99.91% (95% CI, 99.51% and 100%) and 99.67% (95% CI, 99.16% and 99.91%), respectively. For the T pallidum test component (n = 2059), the sensitivity and specificity were estimated at 99.67% (95% CI, 98.82% and 99.96%) and 99.72% (95% CI, 99.29% and 99.92%), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the SD BIOLINE HIV/Syphilis Duo test were consistently high across sera specimens from 6 countries around the world. Dual rapid tests should be considered for improved HIV and syphilis screening coverage.

  12. Syphilis Trends among Men Who Have Sex with Men in the United States and Western Europe: A Systematic Review of Trend Studies Published between 2004 and 2015

    PubMed Central

    Abara, Winston E.; Hess, Kristen L.; Neblett Fanfair, Robyn; Bernstein, Kyle T.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Globally, men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately burdened with syphilis. This review describes the published literature on trends in syphilis infections among MSM in the US and Western Europe from 1998, the period with the fewest syphilis infections in both geographical areas, onwards. We also describe disparities in syphilis trends among various sub-populations of MSM. We searched electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Global Health, PsychInfo, CAB Abstracts, CINAHL, Sociological Abstracts, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and LILACS) for peer-reviewed journal articles that were published between January 2004 and June 2015 and reported on syphilis cases among MSM at multiple time points from 1998 onwards. Ten articles (12 syphilis trend studies/reports) from the US and eight articles (12 syphilis trend studies/reports) from Western Europe were identified and included in this review. Taken together, our findings indicate an increase in the numbers and rates (per 100,000) of syphilis infections among MSM in the US and Western Europe since 1998. Disparities in the syphilis trends among MSM were also noted, with greater increases observed among HIV-positive MSM than HIV-negative MSM in both the US and Western Europe. In the US, racial minority MSM and MSM between 20 and 29 years accounted for the greatest increases in syphilis infections over time whereas White MSM accounted for most syphilis infections over time in Western Europe. Multiple strategies, including strengthening and targeting current syphilis screening and testing programs, and the prompt treatment of syphilis cases are warranted to address the increase in syphilis infections among all MSM in the US and Western Europe, but particularly among HIV-infected MSM, racial minority MSM, and young MSM in the US. PMID:27447943

  13. Syphilis Trends among Men Who Have Sex with Men in the United States and Western Europe: A Systematic Review of Trend Studies Published between 2004 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Abara, Winston E; Hess, Kristen L; Neblett Fanfair, Robyn; Bernstein, Kyle T; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Globally, men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately burdened with syphilis. This review describes the published literature on trends in syphilis infections among MSM in the US and Western Europe from 1998, the period with the fewest syphilis infections in both geographical areas, onwards. We also describe disparities in syphilis trends among various sub-populations of MSM. We searched electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Global Health, PsychInfo, CAB Abstracts, CINAHL, Sociological Abstracts, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and LILACS) for peer-reviewed journal articles that were published between January 2004 and June 2015 and reported on syphilis cases among MSM at multiple time points from 1998 onwards. Ten articles (12 syphilis trend studies/reports) from the US and eight articles (12 syphilis trend studies/reports) from Western Europe were identified and included in this review. Taken together, our findings indicate an increase in the numbers and rates (per 100,000) of syphilis infections among MSM in the US and Western Europe since 1998. Disparities in the syphilis trends among MSM were also noted, with greater increases observed among HIV-positive MSM than HIV-negative MSM in both the US and Western Europe. In the US, racial minority MSM and MSM between 20 and 29 years accounted for the greatest increases in syphilis infections over time whereas White MSM accounted for most syphilis infections over time in Western Europe. Multiple strategies, including strengthening and targeting current syphilis screening and testing programs, and the prompt treatment of syphilis cases are warranted to address the increase in syphilis infections among all MSM in the US and Western Europe, but particularly among HIV-infected MSM, racial minority MSM, and young MSM in the US.

  14. Trends in Primary and Secondary Syphilis Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Heffelfinger, James D.; Swint, Emmett B.; Berman, Stuart M.; Weinstock, Hillard S.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the epidemiology of primary and secondary syphilis in the United States and estimated the percentages of cases occurring among men who have sex with men (MSM). Methods. We reviewed US syphilis surveillance data from 1990 through 2003. We estimated the number of cases occurring among MSM by modeling changes in the ratio of syphilis cases among men to cases among women. Results. During 1990 through 2000, the rate of primary and secondary syphilis decreased 90% overall, declining 90% among men and 89% among women. The overall rate increased 19% between 2000 and 2003, reflecting a 62% increase among men and a 53% decrease among women. In 2003, an estimated 62% of reported cases occurred among MSM. Conclusions. Increasing syphilis cases among MSM account for most of the recent overall increase in rates and may be a harbinger of increasing rates of HIV infection among MSM. National efforts are under way to improve monitoring of syphilis trends, better understand factors associated with the observed increases, and improve efforts to prevent syphilis transmission. PMID:17463387

  15. Acceptable Interventions to Reduce Syphilis Transmission Among High-Risk Men Who Have Sex With Men in Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Aaron; Javanbakht, Marjan; Cross, John; Montoya, Jorge A.; Bolan, Robert; Kerndt, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined perceptions of and attitudes toward existing and potential syphilis interventions, including case management and Web-based programs, to increase syphilis testing among high-risk men who have sex with men (MSM). Methods. Between October 2010 and June 2011, we conducted in-depth interviews with 19 MSM in Los Angeles, California, with repeat early syphilis infections (primary, secondary, and early latent syphilis) within the previous 5 years. We analyzed the interviews inductively to determine the most acceptable potential interventions. Results. Experiences with health department and community-based standard of care case management were generally positive. The most popular interventions among respondents included a Web site providing information on syphilis and syphilis testing, automated Web reminders to test, being paid to test, free online home testing kits, and preexposure prophylactic medication. Respondents’ beliefs that they would continue to practice high-risk sexual behaviors reinforced their reasons for wanting increased accessibility and convenient testing strategies. Conclusions. Public health officials should consider participant responses to potential interventions for syphilis, which suggest that high-risk MSM would consider testing more often or using other interventions. PMID:25602881

  16. Video tool to promote knowledge of syphilis among black and Hispanic men recruited from clinical and non-clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, John P; Guilliames, Conair; Sánchez, Nelson F; Calderon, Yvette; Burton, William B

    2010-06-01

    Recent syphilis outbreaks in metropolitan cities are attributed to men who have sex with men (MSM) with a significant proportion of Black or Hispanic identity. However, there are few syphilis interventions that are tailored to minority MSM. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to assess whether Black and Hispanic MSM recruited from various venues who viewed the "Syphilis and Men" video showed an increase in syphilis knowledge, regardless of self-reported characteristics associated with increased risk for syphilis infection. Of the 168 participants, 91.1% were Black or Hispanic and 64.9% had a male partner in the past 6 months. The video intervention group had a significant increase of 19.5-20.9 percentage points on the post-test survey, depending on the venue. This difference was present irrespective of participant socio-demographic and health-related characteristics. The "Syphilis and Men" video is a brief, cost-limited intervention to promote syphilis knowledge among Black and Hispanic MSM that can potentially be implemented in various venues.

  17. Increased incidence of syphilis in men who have sex with men and risk management strategies, Germany, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Klaus; Schmidt, Axel J.; Drewes, Jochen; Bremer, Viviane; Marcus, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    In Germany, the number of reported syphilis cases increased between 11% and 22% per year between 2010 and 2014. We analysed syphilis surveillance data and data of four behavioural surveys on men who have sex with men (MSM) in Germany (2003, 2007, 2010, 2013) to assess if this rise is ongoing and to find possible explanations for it. Syphilis notifications increased in 2015 by 19% to a total of 6,834. This was mainly due to increasing notifications in MSM of all age groups in larger German cities. Data from the behavioural surveys on MSM in Germany showed a simultaneous increase of selective condom use as HIV-status-bases risk management strategy and the number of syphilis cases. MSM diagnosed with HIV reported condomless anal intercourse with non-steady partners more frequent than MSM not diagnosed with HIV or untested for HIV, but the latter also reported higher frequencies of this behaviour in the more recent surveys. Transmission in HIV-positive MSM probably plays an important, but not exclusive role, for the syphilis dynamics in Germany. A risk adapted routine screening for sexually active MSM and potentially innovative approaches to increase early screening and treatment of syphilis such as internet counselling, home sampling, home testing and broadening venue-based (rapid) testing, should be critically evaluated to effectively reduce syphilis infections. PMID:27813472

  18. Increased incidence of syphilis in men who have sex with men and risk management strategies, Germany, 2015.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Klaus; Schmidt, Axel J; Drewes, Jochen; Bremer, Viviane; Marcus, Ulrich

    2016-10-27

    In Germany, the number of reported syphilis cases increased between 11% and 22% per year between 2010 and 2014. We analysed syphilis surveillance data and data of four behavioural surveys on men who have sex with men (MSM) in Germany (2003, 2007, 2010, 2013) to assess if this rise is ongoing and to find possible explanations for it. Syphilis notifications increased in 2015 by 19% to a total of 6,834. This was mainly due to increasing notifications in MSM of all age groups in larger German cities. Data from the behavioural surveys on MSM in Germany showed a simultaneous increase of selective condom use as HIV-status-bases risk management strategy and the number of syphilis cases. MSM diagnosed with HIV reported condomless anal intercourse with non-steady partners more frequent than MSM not diagnosed with HIV or untested for HIV, but the latter also reported higher frequencies of this behaviour in the more recent surveys. Transmission in HIV-positive MSM probably plays an important, but not exclusive role, for the syphilis dynamics in Germany. A risk adapted routine screening for sexually active MSM and potentially innovative approaches to increase early screening and treatment of syphilis such as internet counselling, home sampling, home testing and broadening venue-based (rapid) testing, should be critically evaluated to effectively reduce syphilis infections. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  19. Prevalence of HIV and Syphilis Infection among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yunhua; Li, Dongliang; Lu, Dabing; Ruan, Yuhua; Qi, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To figure out the most current prevalence of HIV and syphilis in MSM in China. Methods. A meta-analysis was conducted on the studies searched through PubMed, CNKI, and Wanfang published between 1 January 2009 and 11 April 2013. Results. Eighty-four eligible studies, either in Chinese or in English, were included in this review. The pooled prevalence of HIV and syphilis infection in MSM in China was 6.5% and 11.2%, respectively. The subgroup analyses indicated that the prevalence of HIV infection was higher in the economically less developed cities than that in the developed cities (7.5% versus 6.1%, P < 0.05). In contrast, the prevalence of syphilis infection was lower in less developed cities than in developed cities (8.6% versus 15.1%). Studies with a sample size smaller than 500 had a lower prevalence of HIV and syphilis infection than those with a sample size greater than 500 (5.9% versus 7.2% for HIV; 11.0% versus 11.5% for syphilis, respectively). Conclusions. HIV and syphilis infection are prevalent in MSM in China. The different prevalence of HIV and syphilis infection between developing and developed cities underscores the need to target prevention strategies based on economic conditions. PMID:24868533

  20. Towards elimination of parent-to-child transmission of syphilis in India: a rapid situation review to inform national strategy.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Vani; Turlapati, Prasad Ln; Bhola, Anil K; Singh, Aman K; Rajan, Shobini; Gupta, Radha S; Khaparde, Sunil D

    2015-01-01

    In February 2015, India's National AIDS Control Organisation, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, launched a national strategy towards elimination of parent-to-child transmission (E-PTCT) of syphilis, with a goal to reduce the incidence of congenital syphilis to 0.3 cases per 1000 live births by 2017. As part of the development of the national strategy, a rapid situation analysis was undertaken to ascertain the current practices, challenges and barriers for E-PTCT of syphilis in India. The analysis was conducted during February and March 2014 in five states selected from five different regions of India. Key informant interviews were conducted with key stakeholders at facility, state and district level. Content analysis was used to identify the themes. Key barriers identified for E-PTCT of syphilis were: low priority for antenatal syphilis testing among providers, limited access to testing, untrained human resources, shortage of test kits and benzathine penicillin, nonadherence to the national protocol for syphilis testing, and poor recording and reporting of antenatal syphilis data. The analysis also identified opportunities for functional integration of E-PTCT within existing maternal and child health programmes. Health-care providers and programme managers expressed a need for training in the programme for E-PTCT of syphilis. The situation analysis identified that, for successful implementation of E-PTCT of syphilis, it is essential that state and district programme managers adopt this initiative; coordinate the programme; plan for an adequate budget in their programme implementation plan; ensure an uninterrupted supply of standardized diagnostics kits and drugs at all levels of health care; and adhere to E-PTCT guidelines when implementing the programme.

  1. Systematic Differences in Risk Behaviours and Syphilis Prevalence across Types of Female Sex Workers: a Preliminary Study in Liuzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Chen, Xiang-Sheng; Merli, M. Giovanna; Weir, Sharon S.; Henderson, Gail E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Female sex workers (FSWs) have become one of the key populations for HIV/STI control in China. Categorization of FSWs can help prioritize HIV/STI intervention efforts. We examined two possible categorizations of FSWs and the relationship with syphilis infection risk in Liuzhou City, China. Methods From October 2009 to February 2010, a total of 583 FSWs recruited by respondent-driven sampling in a cross-sectional survey were tested for syphilis and interviewed to collect socio-demographic and behavioural information. Respondents were categorized based on transaction price for vaginal sex and type of sex work location. The relationship between the two categorizations and syphilis infection risk was assessed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results The prevalence rates of lifetime and active syphilis infection were 8.6% and 4.1% respectively. Lifetime and active syphilis prevalence were higher among FSWs in the lowest price category (52.7% and 25.4% respectively) and those working in streets (69.7% and 39.8% respectively) or through telephone (46.3% and 17.0% respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that lifetime syphilis prevalence was significantly higher among street-(Adjusted odds ratio AOR 38.7, 95% CI 10.7-139.9) and telephone-based FSWs (AOR 10.8, 95% CI 3.3-35.1), and that active syphilis prevalence was significantly higher among street-based FSWs (AOR 15.2, 95% CI 3.7-62.1) after adjusting for demographic and behavioural factors. Conclusions Categorization based on sex work location was more closely related to the risk of syphilis infection than the price classification. Street- and telephone-based FSWs had significantly higher risk of syphilis infection. Focused interventions among these particular high-risk FSWs subgroups are warranted. PMID:22337106

  2. Risk factors for syphilis infection among pregnant women: results of a case‐control study in Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Chen, Xiang‐Sheng; Hong, Fu‐Chang; Pan, Peng; Yang, Fan; Cai, Yu‐Mao; Yin, Yue‐Ping; Peeling, Rosanna W; Mabey, David

    2007-01-01

    Background China has been experiencing a rapidly growing syphilis epidemic since the early 1990s, with the reported incidence of congenital syphilis increasing from 0.01 cases per 100 000 live births in 1991 to 19.7 cases per 100 000 live births in 2005. Detailed studies of risk factors for syphilis in pregnant women are needed to inform new preventive interventions. Objective To investigate factors associated with recent syphilis infection among pregnant women and recommend strategies for improved preventive interventions in the community. Methods A case–control study was conducted among women attending antenatal clinics in Shenzhen City, South China. Cases were antenatal clinic women testing positive for early syphilis, based on laboratory results, with those testing negative being controls. All participants completed the same anonymous questionnaire covering demographics, lifestyle, sexual behaviour, and sexual partnerships. Results 129 cases and 345 controls were recruited. Syphilis was significantly associated with unmarried status, less education, multiple sex partners, travel of sex partner in the past 12 months, a history of induced abortion, and previous sexually transmitted infections. Overall, there were no differences between syphilis‐positive and negative women in household registration status (hukou), living district and duration in Shenzhen, monthly income, and age at first sex. Conclusions Many demographic and behavioural risk factors are associated with syphilis among pregnant women. In the government congenital syphilis control programme, comprehensive preventive interventions should be provided in all clinical settings in addition to the current procedures for syphilis screening among antenatal women. PMID:17675391

  3. Characteristics of gonorrhea and syphilis cases among the Roma ethnic group in Belgrade, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Bjekić, Milan; Vlajinac, Hristina; Šipetić-Grujičić, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    The Roma ethnic group is the largest and most marginalized minority in Europe, believed to be vulnerable to sexually transmitted infections. The purpose of the study was to investigate frequency and characteristics of gonorrhea and syphilis among the Roma population in Belgrade. Data from the City Institute for Skin and Venereal Diseases to which all gonorrhea and syphilis cases are referred were analyzed. During the period of 2010-2014 sexually transmitted infections were more frequent among Roma than in rest of Belgrade population. Average percentages of Roma among all reported subjects with syphilis and those with gonorrhea were 9.6% and 13.5%, respectively, while the percentage of Roma in the total Belgrade population was about 1.6%. Roma with syphilis and gonorrhea were more frequently men (75%), most frequently aged 20-29 years (43.4%), never married (64.5%), with elementary school or less (59.2%), unemployed (80.3%), and heterosexual (89.5%). Among Roma 10.5% were sex workers and 68.4% did not know the source of their infection. Significant differences between Roma cases and other cases in Belgrade in all characteristics observed were in agreement with differences between Roma population and the total population of Serbia. The present study confirmed the vulnerability of the Roma population to sexually transmitted infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Sexually transmitted diseases and native Americans: trends in reported gonorrhea and syphilis morbidity, 1984-88.

    PubMed Central

    Toomey, K E; Oberschelp, A G; Greenspan, J R

    1989-01-01

    Native Americans experienced higher reported gonorrhea and syphilis morbidity than did non-Native Americans from 1984 through 1988 in 13 States with large Native American populations. Gonorrhea rates among American Indians and Alaska Natives were approximately twice the rates for non-Indians. The highest gonorrhea rate was reported among Alaska Natives, with a 5-year average of 1,470 cases per 100,000, more than five times the average non-Native rate in Alaska. The average primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis rate from 1984 through 1988 was more than two times higher among Native Americans, largely due to high syphilis morbidity in Arizona and New Mexico. In Arizona the average American Indian P&S syphilis case rate was seven times higher than the non-Indian rate. True rates for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) among Native Americans may be higher than those reported due to racial misclassification of Native American cases, particularly in nonreservation areas. Improved recognition and reporting of STD cases among Native Americans are needed to target STD prevention and education more effectively. PMID:2511589

  5. Syphilis as a Sole Indicator of Sexual Abuse: Two Cases with No Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Susan; Chadwick, David L.

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of suspected sexual abuse of five-year-old children with syphilis are reported. Lack of confirmation of abuse by either child or in parental interviews led to closing of the cases by Child Protection Services and continued residence by the children in their original homes. (DB)

  6. A Novel Quantum Dots-Based Point of Care Test for Syphilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Li, Ding; He, Rong; Guo, Qin; Wang, Kan; Zhang, Xueqing; Huang, Peng; Cui, Daxiang

    2010-05-01

    One-step lateral flow test is recommended as the first line screening of syphilis for primary healthcare settings in developing countries. However, it generally shows low sensitivity. We describe here the development of a novel fluorescent POC (Point Of Care) test method to be used for screening for syphilis. The method was designed to combine the rapidness of lateral flow test and sensitiveness of fluorescent method. 50 syphilis-positive specimens and 50 healthy specimens conformed by Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) were tested with Quantum Dot-labeled and colloidal gold-labeled lateral flow test strips, respectively. The results showed that both sensitivity and specificity of the quantum dots-based method reached up to 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91-100%), while those of the colloidal gold-based method were 82% (95% CI, 68-91%) and 100% (95% CI, 91-100%), respectively. In addition, the naked-eye detection limit of quantum dot-based method could achieve 2 ng/ml of anti-TP47 polyclonal antibodies purified by affinity chromatography with TP47 antigen, which was tenfold higher than that of colloidal gold-based method. In conclusion, the quantum dots were found to be suitable for labels of lateral flow test strip. Its ease of use, sensitiveness and low cost make it well-suited for population-based on-the-site syphilis screening.

  7. Detailed Knowledge of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: Who Knows What? A Framework for Health Promotion Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, B. Lee; Li, Lin; Morris, J. Fontain; Gluzman, Rima; Davis, Jenna L.; Wang, Min Qi; Katz, Ralph V.

    2011-01-01

    This report explores the level of detailed knowledge about the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (TSS) among 848 Blacks and Whites in three U.S. cities across an array of demographic variables. The Tuskegee Legacy Project (TLP) Questionnaire was used, which was designed to explore the willingness of minorities to participate in biomedical studies. A…

  8. Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Syphilis Using Two- and Three-Dimensional Ultrasonography: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Araujo Júnior, Edward; Martins Santana, Eduardo Felix; Rolo, Liliam Cristine; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    The numbers of syphilis cases have been increasing considerably, especially in eastern europe, thereby contributing towards greater chances of cases of congenital syphilis. Some of the complications of congenital syphilis can be detected on two-dimensional ultrasonography (2DUS), and these are generally manifested in the second trimester of pregnancy. The commonest ultrasonographic signs are hepatosplenomegaly, placentomegaly, and fetal growth restriction, while lower-frequency occurrences include intrahepatic calcifications, ascites, fetal hydrops, and even fetal death. Three-dimensional ultrasonography (3DUS) is a relatively new imaging technique that is adjuvant to 2DUS and enables detailed assessment of the fetal surface anatomy. We present a case of a 21-year-old primigravida with a diagnosis of congenital syphilis, with obstetric 2DUS findings of hepatosplenomegaly, ascites, pericardial effusion and hyperechogenicity of the cerebral parenchyma. 3DUS in rendering mode allowed clear assessment of the fetal limbs, especially the feet, which appeared twisted and lacked some toes. It allowed the parents to understand the pathological condition better and improved prenatal management and neonatal followup. 3DUS can be used routinely for assessing fetal malformations resulting from congenital infections. PMID:22957281

  9. Educational intervention in Primary Care for the prevention of congenital syphilis 1

    PubMed Central

    Lazarini, Flaviane Mello; Barbosa, Dulce Aparecida

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to evaluate the efficiency of educational interventions related to the knowledge of health care professionals of Primary Care and to verify the impact on the vertical transmission rates of congenital syphilis. Method: a quasi-experimental study conducted in the city of Londrina, Paraná, between 2013 and 2015. An educational intervention on diagnosis, treatment and notification was carried out with 102 professionals with knowledge measurement before and after the intervention. Incidence and mortality data from congenital syphilis were taken from the system for notifiable diseases (SINAN) and the Mortality Information System (SIM). Excel tabulation and statistical analysis was done in the Statistical Package for Social Sciences, version 2.1. A descriptive and inferential analysis was performed. Results: the mean number of correct responses increased from 53% to 74.3% after the intervention (p < 0.01). The adherence to professional training was 92.6%. There was a significant reduction in the vertical transmission rate of syphilis from 75% in 2013 to 40.2% in 2015. In 2014 and 2015 there were no records of infant mortality from this condition. Conclusion: the educational intervention significantly increased the knowledge of health professionals about syphilis and collaborated to reduce the rate of vertical transmission of the disease. PMID:28146181

  10. HIV, HSV-2 and syphilis among married couples in India: patterns of discordance and concordance.

    PubMed

    Arora, Paul; Nagelkerke, Nico; Sgaier, Sema K; Kumar, Rajesh; Dhingra, Neeraj; Jha, Prabhat

    2011-10-01

    Differences in sexual networks probably explain the disparity in the scale of HIV epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa and India. HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) discordant couple studies provide insights into important aspects of these sexual networks. The authors quantify the role of male sexual behaviour in HIV transmission in married couples in India. The authors analysed patterns of HIV and STI discordance in married couples from two community surveys in India: the National Family Health Study-3 for HIV-1 and the Centre for Global Health Research health check-up for HSV-2 and syphilis. A statistical model was used to estimate the fraction of infections introduced by each of the two partners. Only 0.8%, 16.0% and 3.5% of couples were infected (either partner or both) with HIV-1, HSV-2 and syphilis, respectively. A large proportion of infected couples were discordant (73.0%, 56.3% and 84.2% for HIV-1, HSV-2 and syphilis, respectively). This model estimated that, among couples with any STI, the male partner introduced the infection the majority of the time (HIV-1: 85.4%, HSV-2: 64.1%, syphilis: 75.0%). Male sexual activity outside of marriage appears to be a driving force for the Indian HIV/STI epidemic. Male client and female sex worker contacts should remain a primary target of the National AIDS Control Program in India.

  11. Treponema pallidum specific IgM haemagglutination test for serodiagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, T; Kubo, E; Yokota, M; Kayashima, T; Tomizawa, T

    1984-01-01

    The Treponema pallidum specific IgM haemagglutination (TP-IgM-HA) test uses erythrocytes sensitised with antiserum to human IgM to separate IgM from IgG in serum. Specific antitreponemal IgM captured in this way is detected by adding a second reagent comprising erythrocytes sensitised with T pallidum antigen. Eighty two serum samples from 82 patients with untreated syphilis, 521 samples from 73 patients with treated syphilis, and 1872 samples from people who did not have syphilis were examined by the 19S(IgM)-TPHA (T pallidum haemagglutination), IgM-FTA-ABS (fluorescent treponemal antibody absorbed), TP-IgM-ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay), and TP-IgM-HA tests for the presence of 19S(IgM) antibodies specific to treponemes. The sensitivity of the TP-IgM-HA test was 97.6% and the specificity was 99.7%. We also traced IgM specific to treponemes in untreated patients with primary syphilis by four different tests. The TP-IgM-HA test results clearly reflected the effect of the treatment. PMID:6394097

  12. Lessons from the syphilis outbreak in homosexual men in east London

    PubMed Central

    Hourihan, M; Wheeler, H; Houghton, R; Goh, B

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the epidemiology, presentation, and diagnosis of early syphilis in 103 homosexual men in east London. Methods: A retrospective study using data from KC60 returns, the Health Protection Agency (HPA) enhanced surveillance forms and case notes. Results: 40 cases of primary (PS), 40 of secondary (SS) and 23 of early latent syphilis were identified, 33% co-infected with HIV. 41% had concurrent sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Pain featured in 35% of PS and itch in 13% of rashes. Dark ground microscopy (DGM), performed in 44 of the symptomatic cases, was positive in 37 (84%) allowing early management. Initial syphilis serology was negative in 15/40 (37%) cases of PS. 51% and 49% opted for parenteral and oral treatment, respectively. In 53/103 (51%) cases oral sex was the only risk factor. 86% of infections were UK acquired. Only 4% of contacts were seen. Conclusion: This outbreak, reflecting the resurgence of syphilis across the United Kingdom, highlights several important points. Painful chancres and itchy rash are common presentations. DGM is a highly sensitive diagnostic tool. Initial negative serological screening tests are common in PS and sero-surveillance for 3 months is recommended. The high prevalence of concomitant STIs indicates ongoing unprotected sexual intercourse. Oral sex is a significant risk factor and is a distinctly "unsafe" practice. Conventional partner notification is ineffective. Other methods of screening of the at-risk homosexual population are warranted. Continued education is required to reduce STI acquisition in homosexual men. PMID:15572625

  13. Characterization and six-month follow-up on a cohort of newborns with congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Cristian; Cifuentes, Yolanda

    2016-03-03

    Congenital syphilis is a preventable disease. However, the incidence in Colombia has increased and reached the figure of 3.28 cases per 1,000 live births in 2011.  To characterize newborns with congenital syphilis and describe follow-up over 6 months following their diagnosis and treatment.  Between August, 2011, and February, 2012, in Hospital La Victoria, sede Instituto Materno Infantil, newborns with congenital syphilis were identified and treated. Clinical and laboratory follow-up was carried out for six months until it was determined that the disease was cured. The analyzed variables included patients' clinical and laboratory characteristics.  In this period, we identified 29 cases that met the criteria of congenital syphilis, with a frequency in the institution of one case per 69 births. There was one stillbirth and one neonatal death, four were premature, and five had growth restriction. Of the 28 live births, 15 were asymptomatic. There were two cases with neurosyphilis, representing 15% of symptomatic newborns. Follow-up was done on 18 out of 27 children (66.6%), including most symptomatic cases and the two cases of neurosyphilis. All cases showed the expected decrease in VDRL titers without clinical sequelae, meeting the criteria of being cured.  A high incidence of the disease, failure to prevent it, varied expression in its presentation, and the effectiveness of treatment in the neonatal period were evidenced in this study.

  14. [Trend analysis of acquired syphilis in Mexico from 2003 to 2013].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Ortiz, Antonia; Uribe-Salas, Felipe J; Olamendi-Portugal, Ma Leonidez; García-Cisneros, Santa; Conde-Glez, Carlos Jesús; Sánchez-Alemán, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    To identify the population group in which syphilis increase was concentrated. The information was collected from the Mexico health statistical yearbooks. The information disaggregated by sex, age group and state during the period 2003 to 2013 was used to form different databases. Linear regression analysis with confidence interval at 95% was used to evaluate changes over time in different population groups. An increase of 0.67 cases per 100,000 population (95%CI 0.30-1.04) in men was detected from 2010. The increase was concentrated in each group of 20-24 and 25-44. The highest incidence of acquired syphilis was reported in the last two years: 2012 and 2013. The last year reported a 1.85 times higher incidence than reported in 2003. Aguascalientes, Distrito Federal, Durango, Mexico, Oaxaca, Puebla, Quintana Roo, Yucatan and Zacatecas reported that syphilis increased during the study period. Acquired syphilis may be reemerging in our country among young men; this increase is not uniform across the country, it is necessary to focus intervention measures for this sexually transmitted infection.

  15. Prevalence of HIV infection and predictors for syphilis infection among female sex workers in southern China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fan; Jia, Yujiang; Sun, Xinhua; Wang, Lan; Liu, Wei; Xiao, Yan; Zeng, Gang; Li, Chunmei; Liu, Jianbo; Cassell, Holly; Chen, Huey T; Vermund, Sten H

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and risk factors for syphilis infection among female sex workers (FSWs) in Liuzhou City, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, southern China. A cross-sectional study recruited FSWs using a venue-based method and subsequent snowball sampling with mapping strategies. Questionnaire-based interviews were conducted to collect demographic and behavioral information. Blood was tested for syphilis (RPR with TPPA confirmation) and HIV (EIA with Western blot confirmation) infections. Of the 362 eligible participants, 81.7% were non-local residents (60.5% from other parts of Guangxi and 21.2% were non-Guangxi residents); 58.0% belonged to non-Han minority ethnic groups; 37.5% reported inconsistent condom use with their clients and 71.2% reported inconsistent condom use with their regular sex partners during the past month. Nearly 10% reported having had sex with drug users. The prevalence rates for HIV and syphilis infections were 2.3% and 11.0%, respectively. Almost half (46.6%) of participants reported having had STD symptoms. Inconsistent condom use with clients in the past month (AOR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.8-13.8), less education (OR = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.1-7.4), and HIV infection (AOR = 8.1; 95% CI = 1.1-68.5) were independently associated with syphilis infection.

  16. Syphilis as a Sole Indicator of Sexual Abuse: Two Cases with No Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Susan; Chadwick, David L.

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of suspected sexual abuse of five-year-old children with syphilis are reported. Lack of confirmation of abuse by either child or in parental interviews led to closing of the cases by Child Protection Services and continued residence by the children in their original homes. (DB)

  17. Detailed Knowledge of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: Who Knows What? A Framework for Health Promotion Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, B. Lee; Li, Lin; Morris, J. Fontain; Gluzman, Rima; Davis, Jenna L.; Wang, Min Qi; Katz, Ralph V.

    2011-01-01

    This report explores the level of detailed knowledge about the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (TSS) among 848 Blacks and Whites in three U.S. cities across an array of demographic variables. The Tuskegee Legacy Project (TLP) Questionnaire was used, which was designed to explore the willingness of minorities to participate in biomedical studies. A…

  18. Syphilis detection: evaluation of serological screening and pilot reverse confirmatory assay algorithm in blood donors.

    PubMed

    Sommese, Linda; Paolillo, Rossella; Sabia, Chiara; Costa, Dario; De Pascale, Maria Rosaria; Iannone, Carmela; Esposito, Antonella; Schiano, Concetta; Napoli, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    Serological assays are still considered the most useful tests in the diagnosis of syphilis. Since no single serological assay is able to provide a satisfactory result, in our laboratory we have evaluated the usefulness of a commercially-available immunoblot to diagnose syphilis infection among blood donors. From October 2012 to June 2013, 4572 blood donors were screened for syphilis with an automated chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA). To confirm the presence of treponemal antibodies, CMIA-reactive sera were tested by standard Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA). In addition, an alternative confirmatory test - the immunoblot INNO-LIA assay was introduced in our laboratory. Since two additional positives among CMIA-reactive-TPHA-negative samples were found, we concluded that the INNO-LIA immunoblot allowed a better detection of syphilis compared to TPHA. A confirmatory strategy based on the use of two treponemal assays could meet the screening requirements for blood donors as well as in our centre. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Use of Treponema pallidum PCR in Testing of Ulcers for Diagnosis of Primary Syphilis1

    PubMed Central

    Sednaoui, Patrice; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ferry, Tristan; Toutous-Trellu, Laurence; Cavassini, Matthias; Yassir, Fatima; Martinez de Tejada, Begoña; Emonet, Stéphane; Combescure, Christophe; Schrenzel, Jacques; Perneger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) has been noted as a valid method for diagnosing syphilis. We compared Tp-PCR to a combination of darkfield microscopy (DFM), the reference method, and serologic testing in a cohort of 273 patients from France and Switzerland and found the diagnostic accuracy of Tp-PCR was higher than that for DFM. PMID:25531672

  20. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus, syphilis, hepatitis B and C in blood donations in Namibia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transfusion Transmissible Infections (TTIs) such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), syphilis, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are infections which are common in some communities in Southern Africa. It is important to screen blood donations for these infections. Methods This is a retrospective study which involved reviewing of previous blood donation records for the year 2012 in Namibia. The records were analyzed to determine the prevalence of HIV, syphilis, Hepatitis B and C among blood donations with regard to gender, age and geographical region of the donors. Results The findings indicated a significantly low prevalence of HIV, syphilis, HBsAg and anti-Hepatitis C among the blood donations. A low infection rate of 1.3% by any of the four tested TTIs was found among the blood donations given by the donor population in Namibia in 2012. Conclusion The blood donations given by the donor population in Namibia has a low infection rate with the HIV, syphilis, HBsAg and anti-HCV. A strict screening regime must continue to be used as the infections are still present albeit in small numbers. PMID:24884633

  1. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus, syphilis, hepatitis B and C in blood donations in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Mavenyengwa, Rooyen T; Mukesi, Munyaradzi; Chipare, Israel; Shoombe, Esra

    2014-05-05

    Transfusion Transmissible Infections (TTIs) such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), syphilis, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are infections which are common in some communities in Southern Africa. It is important to screen blood donations for these infections. This is a retrospective study which involved reviewing of previous blood donation records for the year 2012 in Namibia. The records were analyzed to determine the prevalence of HIV, syphilis, Hepatitis B and C among blood donations with regard to gender, age and geographical region of the donors. The findings indicated a significantly low prevalence of HIV, syphilis, HBsAg and anti-Hepatitis C among the blood donations. A low infection rate of 1.3% by any of the four tested TTIs was found among the blood donations given by the donor population in Namibia in 2012. The blood donations given by the donor population in Namibia has a low infection rate with the HIV, syphilis, HBsAg and anti-HCV. A strict screening regime must continue to be used as the infections are still present albeit in small numbers.

  2. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome presenting as secondary syphilis with polymorphous erythema and knee arthritis.

    PubMed

    Brochard, J; Khatchatourian, L; Woaye-Hune, P; Biron, C; Lefebvre, M; Denis-Musquer, M; Grange, P; Dupin, N; Raffi, F

    2017-03-08

    Syphilis and HIV are strongly linked to one another and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation can complicate matters. A 24-years-old homosexual man was hospitalized for fever, cough and headache. HIV infection had been diagnosed 5 years earlier but he discontinued ART for the last 2 years. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. [A study of Kyokan Gijuku: a supplement to the history of syphilis testing in Tokyo].

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Atsuo; Higuchi, Teruo

    2009-09-01

    The testing and treatment of licensed prostitutes for syphilis in the Tokyo area began around February 1872 (Meiji 5) within the Yoshiwara red-light district, surprisingly enough from the request of the brothels themselves. In 1876 (Meiji 9), an ordinance for the testing of licensed prostitutes for syphilis was passed, making testing and treatment mandatory, but little research has been done on the changes this brought about within the district in the intervening period. It is this interval of time that we have undertaken to examine, making use not only of laws, ordinances, and other public documents, but also manners and customs, incidents within the district, and sources from the hygiene police, among other materials. The results of our research into the four-and-a-half-year period beginning in May 1871 (Meiji 4) lead us to surmise that, due to three disastrous conflagrations, the district hit an economic dead end, and its syphilis testing activities were swallowed up by an officialdom bent on strengthening the hygienic police. Some of the physicians at the Kyokan Gijuku showed a subjective concern with syphilis testing at the Yoshiwara in its early stages, but they never carried out systematic education on the subject within the school.

  4. A Novel Quantum Dots–Based Point of Care Test for Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    One-step lateral flow test is recommended as the first line screening of syphilis for primary healthcare settings in developing countries. However, it generally shows low sensitivity. We describe here the development of a novel fluorescent POC (Point Of Care) test method to be used for screening for syphilis. The method was designed to combine the rapidness of lateral flow test and sensitiveness of fluorescent method. 50 syphilis-positive specimens and 50 healthy specimens conformed by Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) were tested with Quantum Dot-labeled and colloidal gold-labeled lateral flow test strips, respectively. The results showed that both sensitivity and specificity of the quantum dots–based method reached up to 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91–100%), while those of the colloidal gold-based method were 82% (95% CI, 68–91%) and 100% (95% CI, 91–100%), respectively. In addition, the naked-eye detection limit of quantum dot–based method could achieve 2 ng/ml of anti-TP47 polyclonal antibodies purified by affinity chromatography with TP47 antigen, which was tenfold higher than that of colloidal gold–based method. In conclusion, the quantum dots were found to be suitable for labels of lateral flow test strip. Its ease of use, sensitiveness and low cost make it well-suited for population-based on-the-site syphilis screening. PMID:20672123

  5. The distribution of chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis cases across states and counties in the USA, 2007.

    PubMed

    Chesson, Harrell W; Sternberg, Maya; Leichliter, Jami S; Aral, Sevgi O

    2010-12-01

    To examine the distribution of chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis in the USA through the use of Lorenz curves and Gini coefficients. The distribution of three sexually transmitted diseases (STD; chlamydia, gonorrhoea and primary and secondary syphilis) was examined across states and counties in the USA in 2007, based on reported case numbers. Gini coefficients, which can range from 0 (equality in STD rates across geographical units) to 1 (complete inequality such that all STD occur in one geographical unit) were calculated. Overall, chlamydia was the most evenly distributed and syphilis was the most concentrated of the three STD examined. The Gini coefficients for chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis were 0.121, 0.255 and 0.334, respectively, when examined across states, and 0.319, 0.494 and 0.630, respectively, when examined across counties. Differences in Gini coefficients were observed when the STD distributions were examined by sex, race/ethnicity and age group. The use of Lorenz curves and Gini coefficients can help to assess inequalities in the distribution of STD, to gauge the suitability of geographically targeted interventions, and to help in determining the epidemic phase of STD. Having a better understanding of the disparities in the distribution of STD across states and counties by sex, race/ethnicity and age group might help in understanding why disparities in STD rates exist across different groups and in developing interventions to address these disparities.

  6. Antigenic Variation of TprK Facilitates Development of Secondary Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Tara B.; Molini, Barbara J.; Fernandez, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    Although primary syphilis lesions heal spontaneously, the infection is chronic, with subsequent clinical stages. Healing of the primary chancre occurs as antibodies against outer membrane antigens facilitate opsonophagocytosis of the bacteria by activated macrophages. TprK is an outer membrane protein that undergoes antigenic variation at 7 variable regions, and variants are selected by immune pressure. We hypothesized that individual TprK variants escape immune clearance and seed new disseminated lesions to cause secondary syphilis. As in human syphilis, infected rabbits may develop disseminated secondary skin lesions. This study explores the nature of secondary syphilis, specifically, the contribution of antigenic variation to the development of secondary lesions. Our data from the rabbit model show that the odds of secondary lesions containing predominately TprK variant treponemes is 3.3 times higher than the odds of finding TprK variants in disseminated primary lesions (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.98 to 11.0]; P = 0.055) and that 96% of TprK variant secondary lesions are likely seeded by single treponemes. Analysis of antibody responses demonstrates significantly higher antibody titers to tprK variable region sequences found in the inoculum compared to reactivity to tprK variant sequences found in newly arising secondary lesions. This suggests that tprK variants escape the initial immune response raised against the V regions expressed in the inoculum. These data further support a role for TprK in immune evasion and suggest that the ability of TprK variants to persist despite a robust immune response is instrumental in the development of later stages of syphilis. PMID:25225245

  7. [Syphilis in sixteenth-century in Bologna. Health care and social assistance (Part one)].

    PubMed

    Sabbatani, S

    2006-03-01

    Syphilis arrived in Bologna in the summer of 1495, after Fornovo's battle on the Taro where Charles VIII's army, following the invasion of Naples, fought against the anti-French league who faced up to the invaders as they withdrew. It was the battle-weary Bolognesi, prisoners, deserters and probably some prostitutes following the French and mercenary army who introduced the infection into the city. At the beginning of the syphilis epidemic, the disease was very aggressive with particularly visible symptoms and many resulting deaths. Subsequently, contemporaries mention an abatement of this aggressivity in time spans that varied, but in no cases exceeded 60 years. In 1507 Bologna lost its political autonomy, becoming dependent on Rome. This was symptomatic of the upheavals throughout Italy in the sixteenth century. In this situation of economic and institutional crisis the Bolognesi were able to react with decision to the epidemic, re-converting the municipal hospital dedicated to S. Maria dei Guarini during the sixteenth century. This hospital, specializing in treating syphilis, was called "Ospedale di San Giobbe". It was closed in 1798, after the entry of the French army into Bologna. In 1560 the Bolognesi, realising that the most important causes of the spread of syphilis were social degradation, prostitution and poverty, founded another institution for the poor and for the prevention of prostitution. This institution was developed by the Opera dei Mendicanti and provided hospitality during the 1590 famine, in a city of 55,000 inhabitants, for as many as 1400 poor and sick. We also present the cure (guaiac and mercury) that they used at the time against syphilis. In such a difficult historical period beset with political and economic problems, the Bolognesi established two important institutions and showed that social solidarity is a value for the whole population.

  8. [Syphilis in sixteenth-century in Bologna. Health care and social assistance (part two)].

    PubMed

    Sabbatani, S

    2006-06-01

    Syphilis arrived in Bologna in the summer of 1495, after Fornovo's battle on the Taro where Charles VIII's army, following the invasion of Naples, fought against the anti-French league who faced up to the invaders as they withdrew. It was the battle-weary Bolognesi, prisoners, deserters and probably some prostitutes following the French and mercenary army who introduced the infection into the city. At the beginning of the syphilis epidemic, the disease was very aggressive with particularly visible symptoms and many resulting deaths. Subsequently, contemporaries mention an abatement of this aggressivity in time spans that varied, but in no cases exceeded 60 years. In 1507 Bologna lost its political autonomy, becoming dependent on Rome. This was symptomatic of the upheavals throughout Italy in the sixteenth century. In this situation of economic and institutional crisis the Bolognesi were able to react with decision to the epidemic, re-converting the municipal hospital dedicated to S. Maria dei Guarini during the sixteenth century. This hospital, specializing in treating syphilis, was called "Ospedale di San Giobbe". It was closed in 1798, after the entry of the French army into Bologna. In 1560 the Bolognesi, realising that the most important causes of the spread of syphilis were social degradation, prostitution and poverty, founded another institution for the poor and for the prevention of prostitution. This institution was developed by the Opera dei Mendicanti and provided hospitality during the 1590 famine, in a city of 55,000 inhabitants, for as many as 1400 poor and sick. We also present the cure (guaiac and mercury) that they used at the time against syphilis. In such a difficult historical period beset with political and economic problems, the Bolognesi established two important institutions and showed that social solidarity is a value for the whole population.

  9. Genital Cytomegalovirus Replication Predicts Syphilis Acquisition among HIV-1 Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Gianella, Sara; Smith, Davey M.; Daar, Eric S.; Dube, Michael P.; Lisco, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid; Haubrich, Richard H.; Morris, Sheldon R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Sexually transmitted infections (STI) are common among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). While behavioral factors are important in STI acquisition, other biological factors such as immune modulation due to chronic viral infection may further predispose to STI acquisition. Design Post Hoc analysis including data collected over 12 months of follow-up from 131 HIV-infected MSM receiving antiretroviral therapy and screened for incident bacterial STI every 3 months. Methods Genital secretions collected at baseline were used to measure herpesvirus replication and inflammatory cytokines. Baseline predictors of STI were determined using survival analysis of time to incident STI. Results All participants were seropositive for cytomegalovirus (CMV), and 52% had detectable genital CMV at baseline. Thirty-five individuals acquired STI during follow-up, sometimes with multiple pathogen (17 syphilis, 21 gonorrhea, 14 chlamydia). Syphilis acquisition was associated with genital CMV replication at baseline (19.1% CMV-shedders versus 4.8% non-shedders, p=0.03) and younger age (p=0.02). Lower seminal MCP-1 was associated with higher seminal CMV levels and with syphilis acquisition (p<0.01). For syphilis acquisition, in multivariable Cox-Proportional Hazard model adjusted hazard rates were 3.56 (95%CI:1.00–12.73) for baseline CMV replication and 2.50 (0.92–6.77) for younger age. Conclusions This post hoc analysis suggest that CMV-associated decrease in seminal MCP-1 levels might predispose HIV-infected MSM to syphilis acquisition, but not other STI. Future studies should determine underlying mechanisms and if a causal association exists. PMID:26061824

  10. High frequency of neurosyphilis in HIV-positive patients diagnosed with early syphilis.

    PubMed

    Firlag-Burkacka, E; Swiecki, P; Cielniak, I; Siwak, E; Gizinska, J; Bakowska, E; Kubicka, J; Pulik, P; Kowalski, J; Podlasin, R; Horban, A

    2016-05-01

    Syphilis is an infection frequently seen with HIV, and European guidelines on the management of syphilis suggest that HIV-infected patients may have an increased risk of early neurological involvement, sometimes asymptomatic. Recent study shows a relationship between neurosyphilis and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HIV viral load (VL), which in turn may be associated with subsequent neurocognitive decline. The aim of the study was estimation of the frequency of neurosyphilis among HIV-positive patients with early syphilis. The study included all patients diagnosed with early syphilis who had lumbar puncture performed in the years 2008-2012. Analysis included CSF parameters (serology, mononuclear cells, protein, glucose, chloride and lactate levels), CD4 count, serum VL and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Diagnosis of neurosyphilis was confirmed by CSF serology [positive fluorescent treponemal antibody and/or Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test(s)] and increased number of mononuclear cells. Statistical analysis included χ(2) tests with an accepted significance level of P < 0.05. Lumbar puncture was performed in 72 patients, all men, with median age 33 (interquartile range 11) years. Neurosyphilis was confirmed in 65 (90.28%) of the patients. No statistically significant association between CSF parameters and CD4 count was found. However, statistically significant associations were found only between pleocytosis and serum VL > 1000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL (P = 0.0451), as well as HAART treatment (P = 0.0328). The proportion of confirmed neurosyphilis cases, also in patients with low serum VDRL titres, was very high. Considering the high proportion of patients who objected to having LP performed in the absence of neurological symptoms and the risk associated with this procedure, it may be preferable to use treatments with good CNS penetration in all HIV-positive patients with early syphilis. © 2015 British HIV Association.

  11. Seroprevalence and diagnosis of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections among blood donors.

    PubMed

    Tafesse, Tadesse Bekele; Gebru, Addis Adera; Gobalee, Semgne; Belay, Gosaye Degu; Belew, Molla Teferi; Ataro, Demelash; Ebrahim, Belay Ali; Shebeshi, Getachew Mekonnon; Yimam, Yonas

    2017-01-01

    Blood transfusion is one of the most important therapeutic options of life-saving intervention for recipients who are in diseased or non-diseased conditions with severe blood loss. However, it is associated with certain risks which can lead to adverse consequences that may cause acute or delayed complications and bring the risk of transfusion-transmissible infections including HIV, Hepatitis B & C and Syphilis. So, there might be a fatal risk instead of life saving. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive and reliable tabulation of available data on seroprevalence and diagnosis of HIV, HBV, HCV and Syphilis infections among blood donors. We searched studies reporting the prevalence rate of HIV, HBV, HCV and Syphilis infections among blood donors that were published between October 2009 and June 2016, using databases of PubMed, Scopus, MEDLINE, Elsevier, ScienceDirect, EBSCO, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Web of Science with keywords: ``Hepatitis C Virus'', ``Hepatitis B Virus'', ``HIV'', ``Syphilis'', ``Seroprevalence'', and ``blood donor''. The seroprevalence of HBV and HCV was highest in African countries as compared to others continents, predominantly the West African region with a range of 10.0% to 14.96% and 1.5% to 8.69%, respectively, while the overall seropositivity of HIV and syphilis infection show a significant declining pattern through successive years globally, even though relatively higher prevalence rate was observed among older age and those with low level of education. There is a problem during selection, diagnoses and screening process in developing nations primarily due to shortage of sensitive screening test kits, highly qualified human resource and lack of proper standard operating procedures and hence, the safety of blood and blood products are the primary threats in the region. Proper clinical diagnosis and screening method should be applied during blood donation and therefore, all the donated blood should be screened properly for

  12. Screening for syphilis during pregnancy in Nigeria: a practice that must continue.

    PubMed

    Taiwo, Samuel Sunday; Adesiji, Yemisi Olukemi; Adekanle, Daniel Adebode

    2007-08-01

    To determine the seroprevalence rate of syphilis among pregnant women attending the antenatal clinics of a teaching and a state specialist hospital in Nigeria, in order to ascertain whether maternal screening should be incorporated into routine antenatal care of our hospitals. A screening for syphilis for 505 newly registered pregnant women was carried out using the qualitative rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test. All reactive sera were then subjected to the quantitative RPR test to estimate the titre of each sample. The Treponema pallidum haemagglutination antibody (TPHA) test was used as confirmatory test of all positive RPR sera. A total of 50 women (9.9%) were positive for RPR; 15 (2.97%) were positive for TPHA, giving a seroprevalence rate of 2.97%. A total of 32 women (6.34%) were RPR positive at 1:2, 7 (1.39%) at 1:4 and 11 (2.2%) at 1:8. Of the women positive for RPR at 1:2, 2 were also TPHA positive, 2 of the 7 positive at 1:4 were TPHA positive, while all 11 positive women at 1:8 were TPHA positive. In all, 70% of all RPR positive women screened were biological false positives. Eleven of the 15 women had high titre active syphilis (RPR > or = 1:8, TPHA+) while 4 had low titre active syphilis (RPR <1:8, TPHA+). The 2.97% seroprevalence rate obtained after accounting for biological false positives was considered high. Screening for syphilis in pregnancy should be incorporated into routine antenatal practice in Nigerian hospitals.

  13. Duration of syphilis symptoms at presentations in men who have sex with men in Australia: are current public health campaigns effective?

    PubMed

    Chow, E P F; Dutt, K; Fehler, G; Denham, I; Chen, M Y; Batrouney, C; Peel, J; Read, T R H; Bradshaw, C S; Fairley, C K

    2016-01-01

    The rapid rise in syphilis cases has prompted a number of public health campaigns to assist men who have sex with men (MSM) recognize and present early with symptoms. This study aimed to investigate the temporal trend of the duration of self-report symptoms and titre of rapid plasma reagin (RPR) in MSM with infectious syphilis. Seven hundred and sixty-one syphilis cases in MSM diagnosed at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC) from 2007-2013 were reviewed. Median duration of symptoms and RPR titres in each year were calculated. The median durations of symptoms with primary and secondary syphilis were 9 [interquartile range (IQR) 6-14] days and 14 (IQR 7-30) days, respectively. The overall median titre of RPR in secondary syphilis (median 128, IQR 64-256) was higher than in primary syphilis (median 4, IQR 1-32) and in early latent syphilis (median 32, IQR 4-64). The median duration of symptoms for primary syphilis, secondary syphilis and titre of RPR level did not change over time. Public health campaigns were not associated with a significant shorter time from onset of symptoms to treatment. Alternative strategies such as more frequent testing of MSM should be promoted to control the syphilis epidemic in Australia.

  14. What is the role of a full physical examination in the management of asymptomatic patients with late syphilis?

    PubMed

    Dabis, R; Radcliffe, K

    2012-12-01

    According to the British Association for Sexual Health and HIV guidelines, a full physical examination is recommended in patients with possible late syphilis. The aim of this audit was to review all cases of late syphilis diagnosed at our centre since 1994 to see if a full cardiovascular and neurological examination was documented and also to see what a full examination contributed to the management of asymptomatic patients. Of the 480 medical notes audited, 295 patients were asymptomatic of whom 288 (98%) had normal physical examinations; the rest were either not documented, declined or defaulted follow-up. Seven asymptomatic patients had positive clinical findings but these did not lead to a diagnosis of cardiovascular or neurological syphilis. This audit has shown that performing a physical examination in asymptomatic patients added no benefit in diagnosing complications of late syphilis; it would appear that the physical examination did not alter the management.

  15. Syphilis and human experimentation from World War II to the present: a historical perspective and reflections on ethics.

    PubMed

    Cuerda-Galindo, E; Sierra-Valenti, X; González-López, E; López-Muñoz, F

    2014-11-01

    Even after the Nuremberg code was published, research on syphilis often continued to fall far short of ethical standards. We review post-World War II research on this disease, focusing on the work carried out in Guatemala and Tuskegee. Over a thousand adults were deliberately inoculated with infectious material for syphilis, chancroid, and gonorrhea between 1946 and 1948 in Guatemala, and thousands of serologies were performed in individuals belonging to indigenous populations or sheltered in orphanages. The Tuskegee syphilis study, conducted by the US Public Health Service, took place between 1932 and 1972 with the aim of following the natural history of the disease when left untreated. The subjects belonged to a rural black population and the study was not halted when effective treatment for syphilis became available in 1945. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  16. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios of PCR in the diagnosis of syphilis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ninet, Béatrice; Perneger, Thomas V; Combescure, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    To systematically review and estimate pooled sensitivity and specificity of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique compared to recommended reference tests in the diagnosis of suspected syphilis at various stages and in various biological materials. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Search of three electronic bibliographic databases from January 1990 to January 2012 and the abstract books of five congresses specialized in the infectious diseases' field (1999-2011). Search key terms included syphilis, Treponema pallidum or neurosyphilis and molecular amplification, polymerase chain reaction or PCR. We included studies that used both reference tests to diagnose syphilis plus PCR and we presented pooled estimates of PCR sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR) per syphilis stages and biological materials. Of 1160 identified abstracts, 69 were selected and 46 studies used adequate reference tests to diagnose syphilis. Sensitivity was highest in the swabs from primary genital or anal chancres (78.4%; 95% CI: 68.2-86.0) and in blood from neonates with congenital syphilis (83.0%; 55.0-95.2). Most pooled specificities were ∼95%, except those in blood. A positive PCR is highly informative with a positive LR around 20 in ulcers or skin lesions. In the blood, the positive LR was <10. The pooled values of LR showed that T. pallidum PCR was more efficient to confirm than to exclude syphilis diagnosis in lesions. PCR is a useful diagnostic tool in ulcers, especially when serology is still negative and in medical settings with a high prevalence of syphilis.

  17. Western Immunoblotting with Five Treponema pallidum Recombinant Antigens for Serologic Diagnosis of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Sambri, Vittorio; Marangoni, Antonella; Eyer, Christina; Reichhuber, Christine; Soutschek, Erwin; Negosanti, Massimo; D'Antuono, Antonietta; Cevenini, Roberto

    2001-01-01

    Five immunodominant Treponema pallidum recombinant polypeptides (rTpN47, rTmpA, rTpN37, rTpN17, and rTpN15) were blotted onto strips, and 450 sera (200 from blood donors, 200 from syphilis patients, and 50 potentially cross-reactive) were tested to evaluate the diagnostic performance of recombinant Western blotting (recWB) in comparison with in-house whole-cell lysate antigen-based immunoblotting (wclWB) and T. pallidum hemagglutination (MHA-TP) for the laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. None of the serum specimens from blood donors or from potential cross-reactors gave a positive result when evaluated by recWB, wclWB, or MHA-TP. The evaluation of the immunoglobulin G immune response by recWB in sera from patients with different stages of syphilis showed that rTmpA was the most frequently identified antigen (95%), whereas only 41% of the specimens were reactive to rTpN37. The remaining recombinant polypeptides were recognized as follows: rTpN47, 92.5%; rTpN17, 89.5%; and rTpN15, 67.5%. The agreement between recWB and MHA-TP was 95.0% (100% with sera from patients with latent and late disease), and the concordance between wclWB and MHA-TP was 92.0%. The overall concordance between recWB and wclWB was 97.5% (100% with sera from patients with secondary and late syphilis and 94.6 and 98.6% with sera from patients with primary and latent syphilis, respectively). The overall sensitivity of recWB was 98.8% and the specificity was 97.1% with MHA-TP as the reference method. These values for sensitivity and specificity were slightly superior to those calculated for wclWB (sensitivity, 97.1%, and specificity, 96.1%). With wclWB as the standard test, the sensitivity and specificity of recWB were 98.9 and 99.3%, respectively. These findings suggest that the five recombinant polypeptides used in this study could be used as substitutes for the whole-cell lysate T. pallidum antigens and that this newly developed recWB test is a good, easy-to-use confirmatory method for the

  18. The immunological response to syphilis differs by HIV status; a prospective observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Chris; Osbak, Kara Krista; Crucitti, Tania; Kestens, Luc

    2017-01-31

    It is not known if there is a difference in the immune response to syphilis between HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. We prospectively recruited all patients with a new diagnosis of syphilis and tested their plasma for IFNα, IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IP-10, MCP-1, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-17A at baseline pre-treatment and 6 months following therapy. A total of 79 HIV-infected [44 primary/secondary syphilis (PSS) and 35 latent syphilis (LS)] and 12 HIV-uninfected (10 PSS and 2 LS) cases of syphilis and 30 HIV-infected controls were included in the study. At the baseline visit, compared to the control group, concentrations of IL-10 were significantly elevated in the HIV-infected and uninfected groups. The level of IL-10 was significantly higher in the HIV-infected compared to the HIV-uninfected PSS group (25.3 pg/mL (IQR, 4.56-41.76) vs 2.73 pg/mL (IQR, 1.55-9.02), P = 0.0192). In the HIV-infected PSS group (but not the HIV-infected LS or HIV-uninfected PSS groups) the IP-10, MIP-1b, IL-6 and IL-8 were raised compared to the controls. IL-10 levels decreased but did not return to control baseline values by 6 months in HIV infected PSS and LS and HIV uninfected PSS. PSS and LS in HIV-infected individuals is characterized by an increase in inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10. The increase of IL-10 is greater in HIV-infected than uninfected individuals. Further work is required to ascertain if this is part of an immunological profile that correlates with adverse outcomes such as serofast syphilis and neurosyphilis, in HIV-infected individuals.

  19. Syphilis during pregnancy: a preventable threat to maternal-fetal health.

    PubMed

    Rac, Martha W F; Revell, Paula A; Eppes, Catherine S

    2017-04-01

    Syphilis remains the most common congenital infection worldwide and has tremendous consequences for the mother and her developing fetus if left untreated. Recently, there has been an increase in the number of congenital syphilis cases in the United States. Thus, recognition and appropriate treatment of reproductive-age women must be a priority. Testing should be performed at initiation of prenatal care and twice during the third trimester in high-risk patients. There are 2 diagnostic algorithms available and physicians should be aware of which algorithm is utilized by their testing laboratory. Women testing positive for syphilis should undergo a history and physical exam as well as testing for other sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. Serofast syphilis can occur in patients with previous adequate treatment but persistent low nontreponemal titers (<1:8). Syphilis can infect the fetus in all stages of the disease regardless of trimester and can sometimes be detected with ultrasound >20 weeks. The most common findings include hepatomegaly and placentomegaly, but also elevated peak systolic velocity in the middle cerebral artery (indicative of fetal anemia), ascites, and hydrops fetalis. Pregnancies with ultrasound abnormalities are at higher risk of compromise during syphilotherapy as well as fetal treatment failure. Thus, we recommend a pretreatment ultrasound in viable pregnancies when feasible. The only recommended treatment during pregnancy is benzathine penicillin G and it should be administered according to maternal stage of infection per Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. Women with a penicillin allergy should be desensitized and then treated with penicillin appropriate for their stage of syphilis. The Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction occurs in up to 44% of gravidas and can cause contractions, fetal heart rate abnormalities, and even stillbirth in the most severely affected pregnancies. We recommend all viable pregnancies receive the

  20. [The congenital syphilis protocol used at the Instituto Materno Infantil-Hospital la Victoria, Bogotá].

    PubMed

    Cifuentes-Cifuentes, Mery Y; Ojeda-Enríquez, Cindy V

    2013-01-01

    Examining a cohort of women having a reactive venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL) test on delivery (and their newborn) to describe adherence to the Colombian treatment regime to prevent congenital syphilis and identify adverse clinical outcomes. A descriptive study of 73 pregnant women and their new born was carried out at the Instituto Materno Infantil-Hospital La Victoria during 2008. Syphilis was detected in 50 women during their pregnancy and 23 when giving birth; 34 % became re-infected. 29 % were drug addicts, 19 % indigent and 23% had a history of syphilis. 7 cases were considered successful regarding antenatal treatment. Congenital syphilis frequency at the institution was 1 case per 46 births; there were 8 fetal deaths (12 %) and 58 cases of congenital syphilis in the newborn (27 symptomatic and 31 asymptomatic). 7 newborn had neurosyphilis, 17 suffered growth restriction and 6 were premature. Attending antenatal care, detecting syphilis during pregnancy and providing some type of treatment were related to decreased mortality, fewer symptomatic newborn and fewer infants having IUGR. Pregnant female drug addicts did not attend or lacked prenatal care and had a greater number of symptomatic newborn, involving growth restriction and being premature. It is recommended that pregnant women be encouraged to attend prenatal care and that health personnel should become involved in detecting the disease, verifying treatment in couples (i.e. including the sexual partner)and training in the institution's maternal and neonatal care programs.

  1. Factors associated with HIV and syphilis co-infection among men who have sex with men in seven Chinese cities.

    PubMed

    Das, Aritra; Li, Jianjun; Zhong, Fei; Ouyang, Lin; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Tang, Weiming; Fu, Gengfeng; Zhao, Jinkou; Detels, Roger

    2015-03-01

    HIV-syphilis co-infection is often cited as a major reason behind recent resurgence in syphilis prevalence among men who have sex with men in China. Most published literatures explore factors associated with either HIV or syphilis, but not their co-infection. We analysed data from a cross-sectional survey on men who have sex with men in seven Chinese cities. Snowball sampling was used to recruit participants for the survey. Socio-demographic and behavioural predictors for HIV-syphilis mono/co-infection were examined using ordinal logistic regression. Factor scores were used to summarise (1) HIV-related knowledge and (2) access to HIV preventive services. Prevalence of HIV, syphilis, and their co-infection, among 2936 self-identified men who have sex with men, were 7.7%, 14.3%, and 2.6%, respectively. In the adjusted analysis, the significant positive correlates of poorer diagnoses (co-infection vs mono- and no infection or co- and mono-infection vs no infection) were: 30 to 39 years and ≥40 years age, education up to senior high school, unprotected anal intercourse, recent sexually transmitted infection symptoms, incorrect knowledge about routes of transmission, and access to preventive or counselling/testing services for HIV. For effective control of this dual epidemic, integrated HIV and syphilis surveillance and targeted intervention strategies for Chinese men who have sex with men are needed urgently.

  2. Factors associated with HIV and syphilis co-infection among men who have sex with men in seven Chinese cities

    PubMed Central

    Das, Aritra; Li, Jianjun; Zhong, Fei; Ouyang, Lin; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Tang, Weiming; Fu, Gengfeng; Zhao, Jinkou; Detels, Roger

    2014-01-01

    HIV-syphilis co-infection is often cited as a major reason behind recent resurgence in syphilis prevalence among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. Most published literatures explore factors associated with either HIV or syphilis, but not their co-infection. We analyzed data from a cross-sectional survey on MSM in seven Chinese cities. Snowball sampling was used to recruit participants for the survey. Socio-demographic and behavioral predictors for HIV-syphilis mono/co-infection were examined using ordinal logistic regression. Factor scores were used to summarize; 1) HIV related knowledge, and 2) access to HIV preventive services. Prevalence of HIV, syphilis, and their co-infection, among 2936 self-identified MSM, were 7.7%, 14.3%, and 2.6%, respectively. In the adjusted analysis, the significant positive correlates of poorer diagnoses (co-infection vs mono- & no infection or co- & mono-infection vs no infection) were −30 to 39 years and ≥40 years age, education up to senior high school, unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), recent STD symptoms, incorrect knowledge about routes of transmission, and access to preventive or counselling/testing services for HIV. For effective control of this dual epidemic, integrated HIV and syphilis surveillance and targeted intervention strategies for Chinese MSM are need of the hour. PMID:24737881

  3. Clinical comparison of the Treponema pallidum CAPTIA syphilis-G enzyme immunoassay with the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption immunoglobulin G assay for syphilis testing.

    PubMed

    Halling, V W; Jones, M F; Bestrom, J E; Wold, A D; Rosenblatt, J E; Smith, T F; Cockerill, F R

    1999-10-01

    Recently, a treponema-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme immunoassay (EIA), the CAPTIA Syphilis-G (Trinity Biotech, Jamestown, N.Y.), has become available as a diagnostic test for syphilis. A total of 89 stored sera previously tested by the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) IgG assay were evaluated by the CAPTIA EIA. The FTA-ABS IgG procedure was performed by technologists unblinded to results of rapid plasmid reagin (RPR) testing of the same specimens. Borderline CAPTIA-positive samples (antibody indices of >/=0.650 and 0.900, the sample was considered positive. Thirteen of 89 (15%) samples had discrepant results. Compared to the FTA-ABS assay, the CAPTIA EIA had a sensitivity and specificity and positive and negative predictive values of 70.7, 97.9, 96.7, and 79.7%, respectively. In another analysis, discrepancies between results were resolved by repeated FTA-ABS testing (technologists were blinded to previous RPR results) and patient chart reviews. Seven CAPTIA-negative samples which were previously interpreted (unblinded) as minimally reactive by the FTA method were subsequently interpreted (blinded) as nonreactive. One other discrepant sample (CAPTIA negative and FTA-ABS positive [at an intensity of 3+], unblinded) was FTA negative with repeated testing (blinded). For the five remaining discrepant samples, chart reviews indicated that one patient (CAPTIA negative and FTA-ABS positive [minimally reactive], blinded) had possible syphilis. These five samples were also evaluated and found to be negative by another treponema-specific test, the Treponema pallidum microhemagglutination assay. Therefore, after repeated testing and chart reviews, 2 of the 89 (2%) samples had discrepant results; the adjusted sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 96.7, 98.3, 96.7, and 98.3%, respectively. This study demonstrates that the CAPTIA IgG EIA is a

  4. [Beautiful girls' ugly malady--selected passages from the history of guilty sex and syphilis].

    PubMed

    Forrai, Judit

    2008-10-05

    In Budapest at the end of the 19th century, visiting brothels was an important part of night life, including the risk of some venereal disease (v.d.) like syphilis, the in-vogue illness of the age. The expansion of prostitution could be explained with the continuous growth of economy and social development as a consequence of urbanization. Prostitution has grown in innumerable forms, levels and places in order to meet all requirements since this was the only tolerated form of sexuality "out of homes". The police headquarters' duty was to control the observation of rules prescribed for prostitutes. Data and information were available only on registered "professional" prostitutes because references on hidden prostitution were hard to find. Liberalization of the strict rules and regalements on brothels and "staff" began at the time when the increase of prostitution and simultaneously, of syphilis overreached the capacity of the Police and the Health Care System.

  5. [Tertiary syphilis diagnosed in a psychiatric unit in Buenos Aires, XXI century].

    PubMed

    Cestaro, Omar A; Calicchio, Ada D; Loidl, Fabián; Presas, Lina

    2012-01-01

    It is a common belief that syphilis, since its effective treatment, is eradicated. However, because of failure prevention and control it is still present. Therefore, we describe what happened in our service with a young patient who was admitted with a presumptive diagnosis of delusional syndrome with a history of multiple symptoms and signs that led him to wander around different specialties in many hospitals. Semiology led us to think of neurosyphilis which was confirmed by laboratory tests on blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Due was then applied in addition to psychiatric treatment for syphilis, but despite this, the patient had a torpid evolution given the lateness of his picture. In this paper we wish to make a warning to doctors about the need to consider when framing neurosyphilis differential diagnosis and thus avoid the progression of the disease.

  6. Florida's multifaceted response for increases in syphilis among MSM: the Miami-Ft. Lauderdale initiative.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Karla; Bulecza, Susan; George, Daniel; Burns, Tomas E; Jordahl, Lori

    2005-10-01

    After many years of declining rates, it became apparent in 1999 that syphilis cases were on the rise in Florida. Data analysis identified that the outbreak was predominately contained in Miami and Ft. Lauderdale and among men who have sex with men. An in-depth investigation was undertaken to identify the risk factors, the best way to attack the outbreak, and how to build sustainability into implemented strategies. After thorough review of the data and extensive dialogue with local public health and community participants, the Bureau of STD Prevention & Control developed initiatives that focused public awareness through print, radio, and television media resources; expanded access to men's health services; and enhanced education/training for public and private health care providers, STD program field staff, and community representatives. This initiative has resulted in unprecedented community involvement in syphilis control efforts.

  7. [Staging of scientific facts in syphilis education. "The Shipwrecked" in the Berlin German Theater (1913)].

    PubMed

    Lazardzig, J

    2002-04-01

    The "Deutsche Gesellschaft zur Bekämpfung der Geschlechtskrankheiten" (DGBG) used plays as a means of public education. The play "Damaged Goods" (Les Avariés) by the French dramatist Eugéne Brieux (1858-1932) was used extensively for this purpose in Germany between 1910 and 1920. By proliferating a specific image of both the medical profession and the syphilis, it helped established the self-confidence of the then new dermatological discipline. The teaching of Alfred Fournier (1832-1914) provided the medical background for the play. In "The Inheritance of Syphilis" (1882) Fournier had laid the dramatic framework for Brieux' play. Analyzing the Berlin premiere of "Damaged Goods" on June 25 1913 in the German Theatre/Berlin, the interplay between scientific facts and theatrical license and their diverse influences on the public becomes obvious.

  8. Brief communication: a case of congenital syphilis during the colonial period in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Mansilla, J; Pijoan, C M

    1995-06-01

    Congenital syphilis has been diagnosed very seldom in ancient populations. The case that we examined comes from San Jeronimo's Church (17th and 18th centuries AD; Mexico City). Coffin 43 contained an incomplete skeleton of an approximately 2-year-old infant. The pathological lesions of this skeleton include bilateral osteochondritis, diaphyseal osteomyelitis, and osteitis and/or periostitis on the long bones. The radiographic appearance depicts symmetrical osteomyelitic foci, particularly at the proximal extremity of both tibiae (Wimberger's sign). The skull exhibits hydrocephaly and periosteal changes on the vault, and the unerupted upper incisors evince dental hypoplasia and other pathological alterations reminiscent of Hutchinson's incisors. All these features strongly suggest a case of early congenital syphilis.

  9. Congenital Syphilis Presenting with Only Nephrotic Syndrome: Reemergence of a Forgotten Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Hee; Song, Ji Ho; Kim, Chan Jong; Yang, Eun Mi

    2017-08-01

    Syphilis infection has re-emerged after years of declining incidence. The prevalence of congenital syphilis (CS) has increased in Korea and other countries during the last few decades. Untreated infants develop symptoms such as rhinorrhea, anemia, jaundice, cutaneous lesions, hepatosplenomegaly, and pseudoparalysis within weeks or months. Significant renal disease is uncommon in CS, and clinical renal involvement varies from mild transient proteinuria to frank nephrosis. We report a 2-month-old infant with CS who presented with only nephrotic syndrome (NS). The previously healthy infant presented with NS and showed no other syphilitic manifestations. Remission of the NS was achieved with adequate penicillin treatment. No recurrence of proteinuria was observed during the 1 year of follow-up. Although rare, this long forgotten disease continues to affect pregnant women, resulting in prenatal or postnatal mortality. We still consider the possibility of syphilitic nephropathy and therefore serologic testing for congenital NS. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  10. Secondary syphilis in the oral cavity and the role of the dental surgeon in STD prevention, diagnosis and treatment: a case series study.

    PubMed

    Seibt, Creta Elisa; Munerato, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. Syphilis has three clinical stages and may present various oral manifestations, mainly at the secondary stage. The disease mimics other more common oral mucosa lesions, going undiagnosed and with no proper treatment. Despite the advancements in medicine toward prevention, diagnosis, and treatment syphilis remains a public health problem worldwide. In this sense, dental surgeons should be able to identify the most common manifestations of the disease in the oral cavity, pointing to the role of this professional in prevention and diagnosis. This study describes a case series of seven patients with secondary syphilis presenting different oral manifestations.

  11. Viral Loads Among HIV-Infected Persons Diagnosed With Primary and Secondary Syphilis in 4 US Cities: New York City, Philadelphia, PA, Washington, DC, and Phoenix, AZ.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Melanie M; Newman, Daniel R; Schillinger, Julia A; Lewis, Felicia M T; Furness, Bruce; Braunstein, Sarah; Mickey, Tom; Skinner, Julia; Eberhart, Michael; Opoku, Jenevieve; Blank, Susan; Peterman, Thomas A

    2015-10-01

    Incident syphilis among HIV-infected persons indicates the ongoing behavioral risk for HIV transmission. Detectable viral loads (VLs) among coinfected cases may amplify this risk. Primary and secondary cases reported during 2009-2010 from 4 US sites were crossmatched with local HIV surveillance registries to identify syphilis case-persons infected with HIV before or shortly after the syphilis diagnosis. We examined HIV VL and CD4 results collected within 6 months before or after syphilis diagnosis for the coinfected cases identified. Independent correlates of detectable VLs (≥200 copies/mL) were determined. We identified 1675 cases of incident primary or secondary syphilis among persons with HIV. Median age was 37 years; 99.5% were men, 41.1% were African American, 24.5% were Hispanics, and 79.9% of the HIV diagnoses were made at least 1 year before syphilis diagnosis. Among those coinfected, there were no VL results reported for 188 (11.2%); of the 1487 (88.8%) with reported VL results, 809 (54.4%) had a detectable VL (median, 25,101 copies/mL; range, 206-3,590,000 copies/mL). Detectable VLs independently correlated with syphilis diagnosed at younger age, at an sexually transmitted disease clinic, and closer in time to HIV diagnosis. More than half of syphilis case-persons identified with HIV had a detectable VL collected within 6 months of the syphilis diagnosis. This suggests virologic and active behavioral risk for transmitting HIV.

  12. Incidence and Risk Factors for Incident Syphilis among HIV-1-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men in a Large Urban HIV Clinic in Tokyo, 2008−2015

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Takeshi; Teruya, Katsuji; Shibata, Satoshi; Yanagawa, Yasuaki; Kobayashi, Taiichiro; Mizushima, Daisuke; Aoki, Takahiro; Kinai, Ei; Yazaki, Hirohisa; Tsukada, Kunihisa; Genka, Ikumi; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of incident syphilis infection among HIV-1-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) largely remains unknown. Methods The incidence and risk factors for incident syphilis (positive TPHA and RPR> = 1:8) among HIV-1-infected MSM who visited a large HIV clinic in Tokyo for the first time between 2008 and 2013 were determined, using clinical data and stored blood samples taken every three months for screening and determination of the date of incident syphilis. Poisson regression compared the incidence of syphilis at different observation periods. Results Of 885 HIV-1-infected MSM with baseline data, 34% either presented with active syphilis at baseline (21%) or became infected with syphilis during follow-up (13%). After excluding 214 patients (MSM with syphilis at baseline (n = 190) and no follow-up syphilis test (n = 24)), of 671 men, 112 (17%) developed incident syphilis with an incidence of 43.7/1,000 person-years [95% CI, 36.5–52.3]. The incidence decreased slightly during observation period although the trend was not significant (2008–2009: 48.2/1,000 person-years, 2010–2011: 51.1/1,000 person-years, 2012–2013: 42.6/1,000 person-years, 2014 to 2015: 37.9/1,000 person-years, p = 0.315). Multivariable analysis identified young age (<33 years versus >40, HR 4.0, 95%CI 2.22–7.18, p<0.001), history of syphilis at baseline (HR 3.0, 95%CI 2.03–4.47, p<0.001), positive anti-amoeba antibody (HR 1.8, 95%CI 1.17–2.68, p = 0.006), and high baseline CD4 count (CD4 ≥350 /μL versus CD4 <200, HR 1.6, 95%CI 1.00–2.53, p = 0.050) as risk factors for incident syphilis. Incidence of syphilis was particularly high among young patients (age <33 years: 60.1/1,000 person-years). Interestingly, 37% of patients with incident syphilis were asymptomatic. Conclusions Although incidence of syphilis did not increase during the observation period, it was high among HIV-1-infected MSM, especially among young HIV-1-infected MSM and those with history

  13. Incidence and Risk Factors for Incident Syphilis among HIV-1-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men in a Large Urban HIV Clinic in Tokyo, 2008-2015.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Takeshi; Teruya, Katsuji; Shibata, Satoshi; Yanagawa, Yasuaki; Kobayashi, Taiichiro; Mizushima, Daisuke; Aoki, Takahiro; Kinai, Ei; Yazaki, Hirohisa; Tsukada, Kunihisa; Genka, Ikumi; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiology of incident syphilis infection among HIV-1-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) largely remains unknown. The incidence and risk factors for incident syphilis (positive TPHA and RPR> = 1:8) among HIV-1-infected MSM who visited a large HIV clinic in Tokyo for the first time between 2008 and 2013 were determined, using clinical data and stored blood samples taken every three months for screening and determination of the date of incident syphilis. Poisson regression compared the incidence of syphilis at different observation periods. Of 885 HIV-1-infected MSM with baseline data, 34% either presented with active syphilis at baseline (21%) or became infected with syphilis during follow-up (13%). After excluding 214 patients (MSM with syphilis at baseline (n = 190) and no follow-up syphilis test (n = 24)), of 671 men, 112 (17%) developed incident syphilis with an incidence of 43.7/1,000 person-years [95% CI, 36.5-52.3]. The incidence decreased slightly during observation period although the trend was not significant (2008-2009: 48.2/1,000 person-years, 2010-2011: 51.1/1,000 person-years, 2012-2013: 42.6/1,000 person-years, 2014 to 2015: 37.9/1,000 person-years, p = 0.315). Multivariable analysis identified young age (<33 years versus >40, HR 4.0, 95%CI 2.22-7.18, p<0.001), history of syphilis at baseline (HR 3.0, 95%CI 2.03-4.47, p<0.001), positive anti-amoeba antibody (HR 1.8, 95%CI 1.17-2.68, p = 0.006), and high baseline CD4 count (CD4 ≥350 /μL versus CD4 <200, HR 1.6, 95%CI 1.00-2.53, p = 0.050) as risk factors for incident syphilis. Incidence of syphilis was particularly high among young patients (age <33 years: 60.1/1,000 person-years). Interestingly, 37% of patients with incident syphilis were asymptomatic. Although incidence of syphilis did not increase during the observation period, it was high among HIV-1-infected MSM, especially among young HIV-1-infected MSM and those with history of syphilis, in Tokyo. Regular screening for syphilis

  14. Decline in syphilis seroprevalence among females of reproductive age in Northern Cape Province, South Africa, 2003-2012: utility of laboratory-based information.

    PubMed

    Ballah, Ngormbu J; Kuonza, Lazarus R; De Gita, Gloria; Musekiwa, Alfred; Williams, Seymour; Takuva, Simbarashe

    2017-05-01

    Strengthening current surveillance systems for syphilis is important to track and monitor disease burden. We used routinely collected laboratory information to generate surveillance estimates for syphilis trends among women of reproductive age (12-49 years) in the Northern Cape Province, a high syphilis burden region (2003 [8.6%] to 2011 [3.8%]) in South Africa. We extracted records meeting inclusion criteria from the National Health Laboratory Service electronic database for the period 2003-2012. A total of 286,024 women were included in the analysis. Syphilis seropositivity decreased between 2003 (5.7%) and 2012 (1.8%); p trend = 0.001, which was largely consistent with findings reported in the annual national syphilis and HIV survey from 2003 (8.6%) to 2011 (3.8%). Annually for the period from 2003 to 2012 there was an approximate 14% reduction in the prevalence ratio of syphilis seroprevalence (PR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.85-0.87, p < 0.001). Three of five districts had significant decreases in syphilis seropositivity over this period. There were also declines in prevalence ratios for syphilis seropositivity for the various age groups for the period. This study shows that the national laboratory database in South Africa can be used as a complimentary surveillance tool to describe and understand trends in syphilis seroprevalence in South Africa.

  15. Reported Estimates of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes among Women with and without Syphilis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jiabi; Yang, Tubao; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Tan, Hongzhuan; Feng, Tiejian; Fu, Hanlin

    2014-01-01

    Background To estimate probability of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs) among women with and without syphilis through a systematic review of published literatures. Methodology/Principal Findings Chinese and English literatures were searched for studies assessing pregnancy outcomes in the presence of maternal syphilis through August 2013. The prevalence estimates were summarized and analyzed by meta-analysis. Fifty-four literatures involving 11398 syphilitic women and 43342 non-syphilitic women were included from 4187 records initially found. Among untreated mothers with syphilis, pooled estimates were 76.8% for all APOs, 36.0% for congenital syphilis, 23.2% for preterm, 23.4% for low birth weight, 26.4% for stillbirth or fetal loss, 14.9% for miscarriage and 16.2% for neonatal deaths. Among syphilitic mother receiving treatment only in the late trimester (>28 weeks), pooled estimates were 64.4% for APOs, 40.6% for congenital syphilis, 17.6% for preterm, 12.4% for low birth weight, and 21.3% for stillbirth or fetal loss. Among syphilitic mothers with high titers (≥1∶8), pooled estimates were 42.8% for all APOs, 25.8% for congenital syphilis, 15.1% for preterm, 9.4% for low birth weight, 14.6% for stillbirth or fetal loss and 16.0% for neonatal deaths. Among non-syphilitic mothers, the pooled estimates were 13.7% for all APOs, 7.2% for preterm birth, 4.5% for low birth weight, 3.7% for stillbirth or fetal loss, 2.3% for miscarriage and 2.0% for neonatal death. Begg's rank correlation test indicated little evidence of publication bias (P>0.10). Substantial heterogeneity was found across studies in the estimates of all adverse outcomes for both women with syphilis (I2 = 93.9%; P<0.0001) and women without syphilis (I2 = 94.8%; P<0.0001). Conclusions/Significance Syphilis continues to be an important cause of substantial perinatal morbidity and mortality, which reminds that policy-makers charged with resource allocation that the elimination of mother

  16. Incidence of syphilis seroconversion among HIV-infected persons in Asia: results from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin Young; Boettiger, David; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Huy, Bui Vu; Wong, Wing Wai; Ditangco, Rossana; Lee, Man Po; Oka, Shinichi; Durier, Nicolas; Choi, Jun Yong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Outbreaks of syphilis have been described among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) in Western communities, whereas reports in Asian countries are limited. We aimed to characterize the incidence and temporal trends of syphilis among HIV-infected MSM compared with HIV-infected non-MSM in Asian countries. Methods Patients enrolled in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database cohort and with a negative non-treponemal test since enrolment were analyzed. Incidence of syphilis seroconversion, defined as a positive non-treponemal test after previously testing negative, was evaluated among patients at sites performing non-treponemal tests at least annually. Factors associated with syphilis seroconversion were investigated at sites doing non-treponemal testing in all new patients and subsequently testing routinely or when patients were suspected of having syphilis. Results We included 1010 patients from five sites that performed non-treponemal tests in all new patients; those included had negative non-treponemal test results during enrolment and subsequent follow-ups. Among them, 657 patients were from three sites conducting regular non-treponemal testing. The incidence of syphilis seroconversion was 5.38/100 person-years (PY). Incidence was higher in MSM than non-MSM (7.64/100 PY vs. 2.44/100 PY, p<0.001). Among MSM, the incidence rate ratio (IRR) for every additional year from 2009 was 1.19 (p=0.051). MSM status (IRR 3.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.88–6.47), past syphilis diagnosis (IRR 5.15, 95% CI 3.69–7.17) and younger age (IRR 0.84 for every additional 10 years, 95% CI 0.706–0.997) were significantly associated with syphilis seroconversion. Conclusions We observed a higher incidence of syphilis seroconversion among HIV-infected MSM and a trend to increasing annual incidence. Regular screening for syphilis and targeted interventions to limit transmission are needed in this population. PMID:27774955

  17. Hepatitis B, HIV, and Syphilis Seroprevalence in Pregnant Women and Blood Donors in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Mbah, Rahel; Rembert, Nicole J.; Tancho, Samuel; Halle-Ekane, Gregory E.; Enah, Comfort; Welty, Thomas K.; Tih, Pius M.; Tita, Alan T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated seroprevalence and correlates of selected infections in pregnant women and blood donors in a resource-limited setting. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of laboratory seroprevalence data from pregnant women and voluntary blood donors from facilities in Cameroon in 2014. Rapid tests were performed to detect hepatitis B surface antigen, syphilis treponemal antibodies, and HIV-1/2 antibodies. Blood donations were also tested for hepatitis C and malaria. Results. The seroprevalence rates and ranges among 7069 pregnant women were hepatitis B 4.4% (1.1–9.6%), HIV 6% (3.0–10.2%), and syphilis 1.7% (1.3–3.8%) with significant variability among the sites. Correlates of infection in pregnancy in adjusted regression models included urban residence for hepatitis B (aOR 2.9, CI 1.6–5.4) and HIV (aOR 3.5, CI 1.9–6.7). Blood donor seroprevalence rates and ranges were hepatitis B 6.8% (5.0–8.8%), HIV 2.2% (1.4–2.8%), syphilis 4% (3.3–4.5%), malaria 1.9%, and hepatitis C 1.7% (0.5–2.5%). Conclusions. Hepatitis B, HIV, and syphilis infections are common among pregnant women and blood donors in Cameroon with higher rates in urban areas. Future interventions to reduce vertical transmission should include universal screening for these infections early in pregnancy and provision of effective prevention tools including the birth dose of univalent hepatitis B vaccine. PMID:27578957

  18. What's new in sexually transmitted infections in the HIV care setting: focus on syphilis and gonorrhea.

    PubMed

    Marrazzo, Jeanne M

    Sexually transmitted infections are a resurgent problem in HIV disease. The number of new cases of syphilis among men who have sex with men has continued to increase, requiring renewed vigilance in screening, diagnosis, and treatment. Drug-resistant gonorrhea has prompted changes in treatment regimens and warrants continued monitoring. This article summarizes an IAS-USA continuing education webinar presented by Jeanne M. Marrazzo, MD, MPH, in January 2014.

  19. Field Evaluation of a Dual Rapid Immunodiagnostic Test for HIV and Syphilis infection in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Claire C.; Leon, Segundo R.; Huang, Emily; Ramos, Lourdes B.; Vargas, Silver K.; Flores, Juan A.; Konda, Kelika A.; Caceres, Carlos F.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated prevention for HIV and syphilis is warranted because both syphilis and HIV infections have evidence-based, scalable interventions using current health care mechanisms. The advent of dual rapid point-of-care tests, single devices that can detect multiple infections using the same specimen, provides the opportunity to integrate the screening of syphilis into HIV programs, potentially increasing the numbers of people tested and allowing for same-day testing and treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MedMira Multiplo Rapid TP/HIV Antibody Test (MedMira Inc, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada), a qualitative, rapid immunoassay that detects antibodies to T. pallidum and HIV. Methods The reference standard test for comparison to the T. pallidum component of the Multiplo TP/HIV Test was Treponema Pallidum Particle Agglutination assay. For the HIV component, the reference test included a 4th-generation enzyme immunoassay with a confirmatory Western blot test. Results The sensitivity and specificity for the HIV antibody component were 93.8% (95% CI: 69.8%, 99.8%) and 100% (95% CI: 97.7%, 100%), respectively. The Treponema pallidum component of the test had a sensitivity of 81.0% (95% CI: 68.1%, 94.6%) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI: 97.6%, 100%). Conclusions Our study showed excellent performance of the HIV antibody component of the test and very good performance for the Treponema pallidum antibody component of the MedMira Multiplo Rapid TP/HIV Antibody Test, which should be considered to improve screening coverage. Use of effective dual tests will create improved access to more comprehensive care by integrating the screening of syphilis into HIV prevention programs. PMID:26650998

  20. [Rob of the physician. An unequaled example of the past "secret remedy"against syphilis].

    PubMed

    Androutsos, Georges; Karamanou, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Since the 16th century syphilis treatment increased the use of mercury despite its strong toxicity. In 1764 in Paris Doctor Boyveau created the so-called rob without mercury and experimented it at the Bicêtre Hospital with the approval of the medical authorities. It was a real important success lasting till 1828, as Giradeau de Saint-Gervais took back the brand. However the suspicion of mercury in the remedy could not be proved.

  1. Antibiotic Desensitization Therapy in Secondary Syphilis and Listeria Infection: Case Reports and Review of Desensitization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Magpantay, Gil; Madar, Cristian S; Hsue, Gunther; Belnap, Conrad

    2011-01-01

    Two adult cases, one of secondary syphilis and one of Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia, in which antibiotic desensitization therapy was utilized to assist treatment of active infection in the face of severe penicillin allergy. Clinical considerations are discussed that led to the decision to employ a formal desensitization procedure. Antibiotic desensitization protocols can facilitate optimal and safe antibiotic therapy in the appropriate clinical setting. PMID:22187514

  2. Prognosis of ocular syphilis in patients infected with HIV in the antiretroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Motoyuki; Nishijima, Takeshi; Yashiro, Shigeko; Teruya, Katsuji; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Katai, Naomichi; Oka, Shinichi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    To describe the clinical course and prognosis of ocular syphilis in patients infected with HIV-1 in the antiretroviral therapy (ART) era. We conducted a single-centre retrospective chart review of ocular syphilis in patients infected with HIV-1 diagnosed between August 1997 and July 2015. The prognosis of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was analysed. The study subjects were 30 eyes of 20 men who had sex with men (MSM) (median age, 41). Loss of vision and posterior uveitis were the most common ocular clinical features (43%) and location of inflammation at presentation (50%), respectively. The median baseline BCVA was 0.4 (IQR 0.2-1.2), including three eyes with hand motion. BCVA≤0.4 at diagnosis was significantly associated with posterior uveitis or panuveitis (p=0.044). Seventy-five per cent were treated with intravenous benzylpenicillin and 53% were diagnosed with neurosyphilis. After treatment (median follow-up: 21 months), BCVA improved in 89% of the eyes, including all eyes with hand motion, to a median BCVA of 1.2 (IQR 0.8-1.2). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that >28 days of ocular symptoms before diagnosis was the only factor associated with poor prognosis of BCVA. Three patients (15%) developed recurrence after treatment. The prognosis of BCVA in HIV-infected patients with ocular syphilis in the ART era was favourable after proper treatment. Having >28 days of ocular symptoms before diagnosis was associated with poor prognosis. Changes in visual acuity in HIV-infected MSM should prompt an immediate assessment for ocular syphilis as delays in diagnosis and therapy can lead to irreversible visual loss. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. A WHO study of treatment schedules for early syphilis in use throughout the world

    PubMed Central

    Willcox, R. R.

    1954-01-01

    Ten years have elapsed since penicillin was introduced in the treatment of syphilis. In order to appraise recent trends in syphilotherapy in the world, WHO carried out a detailed study of treatment practices in early syphilis. A questionnaire was circulated to leading venereologists and clinics in the world, and 277 replies were received from 55 countries giving particulars of 294 schedules. A total of 65.3% of the participants used penicillin alone and 28.9% used it in combination with other drugs. In North America all clinics relied solely on penicillin as against 52.2% in Europe; and procaine penicillin G in oil with aluminium monostearate (PAM) was used in 91% of clinics in the Americas and Asia and in 60.6% of European clinics. The most common dosage of penicillin in all stages of early syphilis was 4.8-6.0 million units; but appreciably larger doses were used in Europe than elsewhere, some 39.4% of schedules using 10.8 million units or more. There were single instances of 36 million units being given. Consolidation treatment was given in none of the North American clinics; seldom in Asia; by about one-third of the participants in Central and South America; and, for secondary syphilis, in 59% of European schedules. This study shows that with intensive treatment with PAM the saving in drug cost to clinics over the classical courses of arsenic and bismuth may be as much as £4 per case, but the overhead expenses are, of course, not reduced. PMID:13182588

  4. Identifying the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: implications of results from recall and recognition questions

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background This analysis assessed whether Blacks, Whites and Puerto-Rican (PR) Hispanics differed in their ability to identify the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (TSS) via open-ended questions following lead-in recognition and recall questions. Methods The Tuskegee Legacy Project (TLP) Questionnaire was administered via a Random-Digit Dial (RDD) telephone survey to a stratified random sample of Black, White and PR Hispanic adults in three U.S. cities. Results The TLP Questionnaire was administered to 1,162 adults (356 African-Americans, 313 PR Hispanics, and 493 non-Hispanic Whites) in San Juan, PR, Baltimore, MD and New York City, NY. Recall question data revealed: 1) that 89% or more of Blacks, Whites, and PR Hispanics were not able to name or definitely identify the Tuskegee Syphilis Study by giving study attributes; and, 2) that Blacks were the most likely to provide an open-ended answer that identified the Tuskegee Syphilis Study as compared to Whites and PR Hispanics (11.5% vs 6.3% vs 2.9%, respectively) (p ≤ 0.002). Even when probed by a recognition question, only a minority of each racial/ethnic group (37.1%, 26.9%, and 8.6%, for Blacks, Whites and PR Hispanics, respectively) was able to clearly identify the TSS (p < 0.001). Conclusions The two major implications of these findings for health disparity researchers are 1) that it is unlikely that detailed knowledge of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study has any current widespread influence on the willingness of minorities to participate in biomedical research, and 2) that caution should be applied before assuming that what community leaders 'know and are aware of' is equally 'well known' within their community constituencies. PMID:20015361

  5. Oral syphilis: report of three cases and characterization of the inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Strieder, Luciana Rocha; León, Jorge Esquiche; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Kaminagakura, Estela

    2015-04-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum. This study reports 3 cases of syphilis and highlights the importance of identifying oral lesions for its final diagnosis. Case 1: a 48-year-old male patient presented with a bleeding ulcer in the lower lip. Overall clinical examination revealed patchy alopecia and skin target lesions. Case 2: a 61-year-old male patient presented with white spots on the lateral tongue and nodules on the dorsum of the tongue. Overall clinical examination showed erythematous target lesions on the abdomen, forearm, palms of the hand, and soles of the feet. Case 3: a 17-year-old male patient presented with an ulcerated lesion on the tongue and lymph node involvement. The following serologic tests were requested: Venereal Disease Research Laboratory, fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption, anti-HIV-1 and anti-HIV-2, and anti-hepatitis C virus. An incisional biopsy revealed epithelial hyperplasia associated with intense and diffuse mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltration consisting mainly of plasma cells, in a perivascular and perineural distribution. The final diagnosis in the 3 patients was syphilis. Treatment consisted of 1 weekly dose of penicillin (2.4 million units, intramuscular) for 2 or 3 weeks. Immunohistochemical reactions for XIIIa, CD3, CD20, CD68, CD163, S100, CD1a, CD11c, CD83, CD138, and CD208 were performed. Clinicians should be familiarized with oral syphilis lesions in order to be able to diagnose this emerging infectious disease of variable clinical presentation.

  6. BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON SO-CALLED SYPHILIS ANTIGEN.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-01-05

    Noguchi has repeatedly done before) that the antigen should be selected from the aceton-insoluble fractions. Iodine Value in Relation to Antigenic Value.-Speaking generally of the aceton-insoluble fraction, a high antigenic value is associated with a high iodine value of lipoids obtained from the liver and heart. This rule does not, however, apply to the corresponding fraction from the brain. Standard Antigen.-The preparation of a standard antigen for Noguchi's method for the diagnosis of syphilis is given just before the summary. The directions will enable one to make a stock solution, from which, at any time, a suitable antigenic emulsion may be obtained.

  7. [Introduction of rapid syphilis and HIV testing in prenatal care in Colombia: qualitative analysis].

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Manjarrés, María Teresa; Gaitán-Duarte, Hernando Guillermo; Caicedo, Sidia; Gómez, Berta; Pérez, Freddy

    2016-12-01

    Interpret perceptions of Colombian health professionals concerning factors that obstruct and facilitate the introduction of rapid syphilis and HIV testing in prenatal care services. A qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews was carried out. A convenience sample was selected with 37 participants, who included health professionals involved in prenatal care services, programs for pregnant women, clinical laboratories, and directors of health care units or centers, as well as representatives from regional departments and the Ministry of Health. Colombia does not do widespread screening with rapid syphilis and HIV tests in prenatal care. The professionals interviewed stated they did not have prior experience in the use of rapid tests-except for laboratory staff-or in the course of action in response to a positive result. The insurance system hinders access to timely diagnosis and treatment. Health authorities perceive a need to review existing standards, strengthen the first level of care, and promote comprehensive prenatal care starting with contracts between insurers and health service institutional providers. Participants recommended staff training and integration between health-policymaking and academic entities for updating training programs. The market approach and the characteristics of the Colombian health system constitute the main barriers to implementation of rapid testing as a strategy for elimination of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis and HIV. Measures identified include making changes in contracts between insurers and health service institutional providers, adapting the timing and duration of prenatal care procedures, and training physicians and nurses involved in prenatal care.

  8. Population Dependency of Measles, Syphilis, and Amebiasis in Japan and Community Evolution.

    PubMed

    Yoshikura, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Fumihiko

    2017-05-24

    The population dependency of measles, syphilis, and amebiasis was expressed as P = kN(m), where P, N, and m were number of patients, population size, and a constant (~2 for measles, and 1.3~1.4 for syphilis and amebiasis), respectively. The population size dependency emerged only when conditions other than population size, such as infant mortality, hygienic condition, vaccination practices, and others, improved to the same level in all the prefectures in Japan. The formation of prefectures and municipalities was well simulated by the random coin toss assuming that people are attracted to a community with a probability proportional to the number of the residents to the 1.3rd power. When the number of inflow population was plotted against the number of the resident population in a prefecture, or when the number of coins that were added in a round was plotted against the number of coins that were present before the coin toss, the plots fell on a straight line with the slope ~1.3, which was almost the same as the slope obtained when the number of cases of syphilis or amebiasis was plotted against the population size.

  9. Dental stigmata and enamel thickness in a probable case of congenital syphilis from XVI century Croatia.

    PubMed

    Lauc, Tomislav; Fornai, Cinzia; Premužić, Zrinka; Vodanović, Marin; Weber, Gerhard W; Mašić, Boris; Rajić Šikanjić, Petra

    2015-10-01

    To analyse the dental remains of an individual with signs of congenital syphilis by using macroscopic observation, CBCT and micro-CT images, and the analysis of the enamel thickness. Anthropological analysis of human skeletal remains from the 16th century archaeological site Park Grič in Zagreb, Croatia discovered a female, 17-20 years old at the time of death, with dental signs supportive of congenital syphilis: mulberry molars and canine defects, as well as non-specific hypoplastic changes on incisors. The focus of the analysis was on three aspects: gross morphology, hypoplastic defects of the molars, canines and incisors, as well as enamel thickness of the upper first and second molars. The observed morphology of the first molars corresponds to the typical aspect of mulberry molars, while that of the canines is characterised by hypomineralisation. Hypoplastic grooves were observed on the incisal edges of all incisors. The enamel of the first molars is underdeveloped while in the second molars a thick-enamelled condition is observed. Our observations for the dental and skeletal evidence are supportive to a diagnosis of congenital syphilis for this specimen from XVI century Croatia. The use of CT imaging helped documenting the diagnostic features and quantifying the effect of the dental stigmata on first molars. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Recent change in congenital syphilis in Korea: Retrospective 10 year study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Han; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Sun-Hee; Lee, Jin; Yoon, Hoi Soo; Cha, Sung-Ho; Choi, Yong-Sung

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate recent clinical and anthropologic features of neonates with reactive serology for syphilis and their mothers from three institutions in Korea over an 11-year-period. The medical records of 20 neonates with reactive serology for syphilis and their mothers at three centers (Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, and Korea Electric Power Corporation Hospital) seen between January 2000 and December 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Among 20 mothers, 16 (80%) were native Korean and four (20%) were foreign-born immigrants. Two mothers (10%) were unmarried. The annual distribution of cases was three (15%) in 2000, one each (5%) in 2005 and 2006, respectively, two each (10%) in 2007 and 2008, respectively, six (30%) in 2009, and five (25%) in 2010. Just over half (55%) occurred across 2009 and 2010. All neonates, by definition, were diagnosed with presumptive congenital syphilis (CS). Among the neonates, four had positive cerebrospinal fluid venereal disease research laboratory test, and three exhibited symptoms and signs. In three centers in Seoul, Korea, the observed number of CS cases was higher in 2009 and 2010 than in previous years. This finding is consistent with a trend toward increasing prevalence of international marriage and suggests that more meticulous screening of CS is needed. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  11. Essential mixed cryoglobulinaemia with false-positive serological tests for syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R R; Pusey, C; Schifferli, J; Johnston, N A

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of serum from a patient with cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis showed a mixed cryoglobulin with a monoclonal IgM kappa-antiglobulin component (6.5 mg/ml), strong rheumatoid factor activity (latex titre 1/5000), and positive serological tests for syphilis (fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorbed and Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay). After removal of antiglobulin activity by immunoabsorption with heat-aggregated gammaglobulin all serological test results for treponemal infection became negative. Serological tests for syphilis and rheumatoid factor on the supernatant from whole serum (minus cryoglobulin) remained positive though at a lower titre (latex 1/1250). Cryoglobulin isolated from whole serum retained rheumatoid and TPHA reactivity but was negative in the FTA-ABS test. The IgM and IgG cryoglobulin components purified by gel filtration on Sepharose showed no antitreponemal reactivity even when tested individually. Reducing the concentration of cryoglobulin to 1.5 mg/ml by plasma exchange converted the test results for syphilis to doubtful-positive or negative. These results indicated that high concentrations of antiglobulin activity may be associated with falsely positive specific antitreponemal test results and that this phenomenon depends on the concentration of cryoglobulin in the test sample. PMID:6824906

  12. [Prevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C and syphilis in female sex workers in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Camejo, María I; Mata, Gloria; Díaz, Marcos

    2003-06-01

    In Venezuela, female sex workers are submitted to a preventive control of syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, other very important sexually transmitted infections are not evaluated. A study was carried out to identify the sociocultural background of a group of sex workers and its association with the seroprevalence of hepatitis B and C markers, in addition to routine evaluation. A total of 212 female sex workers who attended the control center of sexually transmitted infections (STI) in the city of Los Teques, Venezuela, were evaluated. Women were asked their age, educational background, use of contraceptive methods and condoms. Blood was drawn to determine the prevalence of syphilis, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibodies to hepatitis B core (anti-HBc), hepatitis C (anti-HCV) and HIV. The prevalence of syphilis was 2.4%, seroprevalence of anti-HCV was 0.5%, HBsAg 3.8% and anti-HBc 13.8%. No cases of HIV were observed. Higher prevalence of hepatitis B markers was associated with a lower level of education (p<0.05) and higher age (p<0.05). It was found that 38.5% of participant women never used condoms and 25.6% did not use any contraceptive method. It could be necessary to implement preventive programs to immunize sex workers against hepatitis B virus as well as education programs on condom use for their protection against sexually transmitted infections.

  13. Response of HIV-infected patients with syphilis to therapy with penicillin or intravenous ceftriaxone

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ceftriaxone is commonly used as an alternative antibiotic drug in treating syphilis but clinical data on its efficacy are limited. Objective: To evaluate the response of HIV-infected patients with active syphilis to treatment with penicillin or ceftriaxone. Methods A retrospective study involving 24 consecutive patients with a positive Veneral Disease Research Laboratory test (VDRL) and at least one specific treponemal test. 12 patients were treated with different regimens of high-dose penicillin G for at least 2 weeks. Another 12 patients were treated with ceftriaxone 1-2 g per day intravenously for 10-21 days. Results After a median follow up of 18,3 months all patients of the penicillin-treated group and 11 of 12 ceftriaxone-treated patients showed a ≥ 4-fold decline in VDRL-titers; 91% of them already within 6 months after therapy. Conclusion Our serological data demonstrate a comparable efficacy of currently recommened penicillin and ceftriaxone treatment regimens for active syphilis in HIV-infected patients. PMID:21463980

  14. [Clinical and therapeutic differences in neuro-ophthalmological involvement secondary to syphilis].

    PubMed

    Crespo-Burillo, J A; Gil-Perez, D; Alarcia-Alejos, R; Hernando-Quintana, N; Garcia-Rubio, S; Martin-Martinez, J

    2014-09-16

    INTRODUCTION. There are many forms of neuro-ophthalmological involvement secondary to syphilis, and not all of them are well known. Our aim is to determine the clinical and therapeutic differences in these patients. CASE REPORTS. Our sample included eight patients diagnosed with an ocular and neuro-ophthalmological disorder due to syphilis over the years 2012 and 2013. Five of them presented uveitis, pan-eveitis being the most frequent, with three cases. Two cases presented papilloedema and another displayed retrobulbar optic neuropathy. A total of 62.5% were diagnosed with neurosyphilis, the presence of which was related with compromise of the optic nerve (p = 0.035). None of them gave positive for VDRL in cerebrospinal fluid and they were diagnosed by the presence of FTA antibodies together with high protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid, lymphocytic pleocytosis or intrathecal synthesis of antibodies. In the absence of uveitis, diagnosis was delayed by a mean time of 2.6 months (p = 0.047). All the patients, except one who required a vitrectomy, progressed favourably with intravenous antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSIONS. In cases of neuro-ophthalmological compromise, whether inflammatory or non-inflammatory, the physician must bear syphilis in mind as a potential causation in order to avoid delays in the diagnosis, since early well-tailored treatment can prevent permanent loss of sight.

  15. The syphilis epidemics in Hungary 1985-2004, before entering the European Union.

    PubMed

    Talha, Elyas; Nagy, Károly; Horváth, Attila

    2013-09-01

    In the decade prior to the turn of the millennium, great interest was raised, and rightly so, by the STD (syphilis and HIV/AIDS) epidemic that developed in the Eastern-Central European Region. Its coincidence with the far-reaching political and economic changes that took place at that time suggested a link between the two events.Hungary, where these infections had had low incidence before the period investigated, also experienced an increase in STD incidence. The trend in syphilis infection during the 20 years between 1985-2004, that preceded the turn of the millennium and when finally Hungary joined the European Union, have been analyzed. Due to the nature of venereological epidemiological surveillance in Hungary, syphilis prevalence data are appropriate for further analysis from socio-demographic aspects. Behavioural changes underlying the specific features of the epidemics in Hungary had developed several years earlier and cannot be linked to the political and economic changes that started in the early 90s. The only exception is the phenomenon of growing migration that appeared simultaneously with the political changes and had a decisive impact on the spread and level of infection in some areas in the country. As shown by our data, trends seen in specific demographic groups (females, rural population) preceded the suddenly occurring political changes by about 15 years.

  16. Transient aortitis documented by positron emission tomography in a case series of men and transgender women infected with syphilis.

    PubMed

    Joseph Davey, Dvora; Kojima, Noah; Konda, Kelika A; Gupta, Pawan; Leon, Segundo R; Calvo, Gino M; Caceres, Carlos F; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2017-09-02

    Syphilis infection persists globally contributing to preventable and treatable morbidity and mortality. How extensive early syphilis disseminates is unknown. To better understand the relationship between early syphilis infection and inflammation over time, our study enrolled six individuals recently infected with syphilis for sequential positron emission tomography (PET) scans. We evaluated a case series of six individuals with high syphilis titres (two secondary, two early latent and two latent, unknown duration, but with high titre) who received sequential PET scans to assess inflammation over time and its response to treatment. At time of PET scan, four of the six individuals were co-infected with HIV. One of the four was not on antiretroviral therapy and three of the four were not virally suppressed (viral load of >400 copies/mL). Baseline rapid plasma reagin (RPR) titres ranged from 1:64 to 1:256 (four of the six participants had prior non-reactive RPR results). Five of the six participants had mild to intense hypermetabolic PET scan activity consistent with cervical (n=5), axillary (n=4), inguinal (n=5) and retroperitoneal (n=1) adenopathy. Mild hypermetabolic activity in the thoracic aortic wall, suggesting aortitis, was present among the same five participants and resolved within 30 days for four of the five participants and 60 days for the other participant. However, widespread lymphadenopathy remained present in PET scans up to 3 months following treatment in two participants. We did not find any abnormal PET scan activity of the central nervous system. We found abnormal aortic wall PET scan activity suggesting aortitis to be common in a case series of patients with early syphilis. In research settings, PET scans may be a sensitive tool to monitor inflammation associated with syphilis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless

  17. Syphilis among middle-aged female sex workers in China: a three-site cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongjie; Dumenci, Levent; Morisky, Donald E; Xu, Yongfang; Li, Xiaojing; Jiang, Baofa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study addresses the lack of empirical studies about the epidemic of syphilis among middle-aged female sex workers (FSWs). The objectives of this study were to investigate prevalence of syphilis, and its potential risk factors among middle-aged FSWs in China. Design A cross-sectional study with respondent-driven sampling (RDS). Setting A multisite study conducted at three Chinese cites (Nanning, Hefei, and Qingdao) with different levels of sexually transmitted diseases in 2014. Participants 1245 middle-aged female sex workers who were over 35 years old (about 400 per study site). Main outcome measures Unprotected commercial sex, and syphilis and HIV infection were biologically tested and measured. Results The RDS-adjusted prevalence of active syphilis was 17.3% in Hefei, 9.9% in Qingdao, and 5.4% in Nanning. The RDS-adjusted prevalence of prevalent syphilis was between 6.8% and 33.6% in the three cities. The proportion of unprotected sex in the past 48 h verified by the prostate-specific antigen test (PSA) was between 27.8% and 42.4%. Multiple log-binomial regression analyses indicate that middle-aged FSWs who had 5 or more clients in the past week prior to interviews and engaged in unprotected sex were more likely to be active syphilitic cases. Middle-aged FSWs who had rural residency were less likely to be active syphilitic cases. Conclusions In contrast with previous studies that reported low prevalence of syphilis and high prevalence of protected sex among FSWs in China, both the prevalence of syphilis and unprotected sex were high among middle-aged FSWs. Evidence-based intervention programmes should be developed and evaluated among this vulnerable population in China and other countries with similar settings. PMID:27165644

  18. Sexual behaviors and HIV/syphilis testing among transgender individuals in China: implications for expanding HIV testing services.

    PubMed

    Best, John; Tang, Weiming; Zhang, Ye; Han, Larry; Liu, Fengying; Huang, Shujie; Yang, Bin; Wei, Chongyi; Tucker, Joseph D

    2015-05-01

    HIV and syphilis are disproportionately common among transgender individuals globally, yet few studies have investigated transgender HIV/syphilis risk and testing in low- and middle-income nations. We conducted an online survey of men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender individuals to examine sexual behaviors and HIV/syphilis testing in China. We recruited MSM and transgender individuals from 2 major Chinese lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Web platforms. χ Test and logistic regression were used to compare risk behaviors, HIV and syphilis testing history, and prevalence between transgender individuals and other MSM. Among the 1320 participants, 52 (3.9%) self-identified as transgender. Demographics, including education, employment, and marital status, were similar between both groups, whereas transgender individuals were older. Condomless anal intercourse rate was comparable between the groups. Transgender individuals were less likely to report ever testing for HIV (34.6% vs. 62.0%) and syphilis (15.7% vs. 31.2%) with adjusted odds ratios of 0.36 (95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.65) and 0.42 (95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.91), respectively. We found a trend toward a higher HIV prevalence among transgender individuals (11.1% vs. 5.7%, P = 0.12). Transgender individuals have suboptimal HIV and syphilis testing rates in China. Given the substantial risk behaviors and burden of HIV/STI in the general Chinese MSM population and a lack of knowledge about transgender individuals, enhanced HIV/syphilis testing programs for transgender individuals in China are needed.

  19. Sexual Behaviors and HIV/Syphilis Testing Among Transgender Individuals in China: Implications for Expanding HIV Testing Services

    PubMed Central

    Best, John; Tang, Weiming; Zhang, Ye; Han, Larry; Liu, Fengying; Huang, Shujie; Yang, Bin; Wei, Chongyi; Tucker, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV and syphilis are disproportionately common among transgender individuals globally, yet few studies have investigated transgender HIV/syphilis risk and testing in low and middle-income nations. We conducted an online survey of men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender individuals to examine sexual behaviors, and HIV/syphilis testing in China. Methods We recruited MSM and transgender individuals from two-major Chinese lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) web platforms. Chi-square and logistic regression were used to compare risk behaviors, HIV and syphilis testing history, and prevalence between transgender individuals and other MSM. Results Among the 1320 participants, 52 (3·9%) self-identified as transgender. Demographics, including education, employment, and marital status were similar between both groups, while transgender individuals were older. Condomless anal intercourse rate was comparable between the groups. Transgender individuals were less likely to report ever testing for HIV (34·6% VS 62·0%) and syphilis (15·7% VS 31·2%) with adjusted ORs of 0·36 (95% CI 0·20–0·65) and 0·42 (95% CI 0·20–0·91), respectively. We found a trend towards higher HIV prevalence among transgender individuals (11·1% VS5·7%, P=0·12). Conclusion Transgender individuals have suboptimal HIV and syphilis testing rates in China. Given the substantial risk behaviors and burden of HIV/STI in the general Chinese MSM population and lack of knowledge about transgender individuals, enhanced HIV/syphilis testing programs for transgender individuals in China are needed. PMID:25868142

  20. Regulatory T Cells in Peripheral Blood and Cerebrospinal Fluid of Syphilis Patients with and without Neurological Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang; Wang, Cuini; Lu, Haikong; Gu, Xin; Guan, Zhifang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2013-01-01

    Background Syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease caused by spirochetal bacterium Treponema pallidum, can progress to affect the central nervous system, causing neurosyphilis. Accumulating evidence suggest that regulatory T cells (Tregs) may play an important role in the pathogenesis of syphilis. However, little is known about Treg response in neurosyphilis. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed Treg frequencies and Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) levels in the blood and CSF of 431 syphilis patients without neurological involvement, 100 neurosyphilis patients and 100 healthy donors. Suppressive function of Tregs in peripheral blood was also assessed. Among syphilis patients without neurological involvement, we found that secondary and serofast patients had increased Treg percentages, suppressive function and TGF-β levels in peripheral blood compared to healthy donors. Serum Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) titers were positively correlated with Treg numbers in these patients. Compared to these syphilis patients without neurological involvement, neurosyphilis patients had higher Treg frequency in peripheral blood. In the central nervous system, neurosyphilis patients had higher numbers of leukocytes in CSF compared to syphilis patients without neurological involvement. CD4+ T cells were the predominant cell type in the inflammatory infiltrates in CSF of neurosyphilis patients. Interestingly, among these neurosyphilis patients, a significant decrease in CSF CD4+ CD25high Treg percentage and number was observed in symptomatic neurosyphilis patients compared to those of asymptomatic neurosyphilis patients, which may be associated with low CSF TGF-β levels. Conclusions Our findings suggest that Tregs might play an important role in both bacterial persistence and neurologic compromise in the pathogenesis of syphilis. PMID:24244772

  1. Was infectious syphilis being misclassified in remote Australian outbreaks? Evidence that informed modification of the national case definition.

    PubMed

    Preston-Thomas, Annie; Ryder, Nathan; Harmen, Sonia; Fagan, Patricia

    2015-12-31

    To assess the ability of the national case definition to identify infectious syphilis during an outbreak affecting predominantly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a remote Australian region. A retrospective case series study of all non-congenital syphilis cases in the region notified between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2012 was performed. The national infectious syphilis case definition was compared with an expanded case definition derived from experienced clinician assessment and the definition proposed in the Interim Guidelines for the Public Health Management of Syphilis Outbreaks in Remote Populations in Australia from the Communicable Diseases Network Australia (CDNA). Two hundred and forty syphilis cases were notified, of which 44 (18.3%) were symptomatic. The national case definition classified 106 (44.2%) cases as infectious, compared with 182 (75.8%) using the clinician-derived expanded case definition and 165 (68.8%) by the interim guidelines case definition. Seven confirmed and 6 probable cases were diagnosed as a result of contact tracing of probable infectious cases identified using the expanded case definition. The national case definition for infectious syphilis applied in this remote Australian outbreak underestimated infectious cases when compared with experienced clinicians' evaluation by up to 76 cases (42%) and was inadequate to monitor the magnitude of a syphilis outbreak in such a setting. This may compromise surveillance and resource allocation decisions, and could reduce the capacity to interrupt transmission and contain an outbreak. A revised national case definition, informed by this analysis, was released by CDNA in July 2015.

  2. Drug-related behaviors independently associated with syphilis infection among female sex workers in two Mexico-US border cities.

    PubMed

    Loza, Oralia; Patterson, Thomas L; Rusch, Melanie; Martínez, Gustavo A; Lozada, Remedios; Staines-Orozco, Hugo; Magis-Rodríguez, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2010-08-01

    To identify correlates of active syphilis infection among female sex workers (FSWs) in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez. Cross-sectional analyses of baseline interview data. Correlates of active syphilis (antibody titers >1 : 8) were identified by logistic regression. Setting Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, two Mexican cities on the US border that are situated on major drug trafficking routes and where prostitution is quasi-legal. A total of 914 FSWs aged > or =18 years without known human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who had had recent unprotected sex with clients. Baseline interviews and testing for syphilis antibody using Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) and rapid plasma reagin (RPR) tests. Median age and duration in sex work were 32 and 4 years, respectively. Overall, 18.0% had ever injected drugs, 14.2% often or always used illegal drugs before or during sex in the past month, 31.4% had clients in the last 6 months who injected drugs, and 68.6% reported having clients from the United States. Prevalence of HIV and active syphilis were 5.9% and 10.3%, respectively. Factors independently associated with active syphilis included injecting drugs (AOR: 2.39; 95% CI: 1.40, 4.08), using illegal drugs before or during sex (AOR: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.16, 3.65) and having any US clients (AOR: 2.85; 95% CI: 1.43, 5.70). Among female sex workers in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, drug-using behaviors were associated more closely with active syphilis than were sexual behaviors, suggesting the possibility of parenteral transmission of T. pallidum. Syphilis eradication programs should consider distributing sterile syringes to drug injectors and assisting FSWs with safer-sex negotiation in the context of drug use.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of a point‐of‐care syphilis test when used among pregnant women in Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Tinajeros, F; Grossman, D; Richmond, K; Steele, M; Garcia, S G; Zegarra, L; Revollo, R

    2006-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance of a point‐of‐care (POC) syphilis test when used in urban Bolivian maternity hospitals. Methods We tested 8892 pregnant women for syphilis using the Abbott Determine Syphilis TP rapid POC test and rapid plasma reagin (RPR) in the laboratory of four large urban maternity hospitals where national statistics reported a syphilis prevalence of at least 3%. Sera were stored and transferred to the national reference laboratory (INLASA) where RPR testing was repeated. When the reference laboratory staff observed a positive RPR result, a Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA) was performed to confirm these findings. We calculated test performance characteristics for the POC test and hospital RPR using RPR performed at the reference laboratory confirmed by TPPA as the reference standard. Participants received treatment during their initial visit based on the POC test results. Results The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and positive predictive values of the POC syphilis test were: 91.8% (95% confidence intervals 88.4% to 94.5%), 98.5% (98.2% to 98.8%), 71.0% (66.6% to 75.2%), and 99.7% (99.5% to 99.8%), respectively. The RPR values were 75.7% (70.8% to 80.2%), 99.0% (98.9% to 99.3%), 76.9% (72.0% to 81.3%), and 99.0% (98.8% to 99.2%), respectively. Conclusion The Abbott Determine Syphilis TP test proved to be more sensitive than routine RPR and had comparable specificity. POC testing may be a simple way to expand syphilis screening to clinics with no laboratory facilities, improve case detection, and facilitate treatment delivery. PMID:17121762

  4. Prevalence of HIV, Syphilis, HCV and Their High Risk Behaviors among Migrant Workers in Eastern China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Zheng, Hui; Chen, Xin; Su, Jing; Peng, Zhihang; Yu, Rongbin; Wang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to understand the knowledge about AIDS, identify the correlates and determine the prevalence of HIV infection, syphilis, HCV among migrant workers in Zhejiang, China. Methods A cross-sectional study using face-to-face anonymous questionnaire interviews was conducted and blood samples were collected for HIV, syphilis and Hepatitis C infection screening. Results 17,377 (92.8%) of 18,730 migrant workers approached were interviewed. Among 17,377 participants, the HIV/AIDS knowledge rate was 66.2%. A total of 12,694 (73%) of the participants reported having ever had sexual intercourse, with 30.1% of single participants reporting having had sexual intercourse. Among those respondents with sexual experiences, 7.5% admitted they had two or more sexual partners and 4.9% reported having had sex with casual (unpaid) partners in the previous 12 months, whilst 3.7% had paid for sex. More than half of those who had paid for sex (59.4%) had not used a condom every time in their sexual acts with the sex workers. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that high risk sexual behavior (defined as sex with a casual or commercial sex partner without using a condom consistently) was associated with being divorced or widowed (P<0.05 for single); male gender; shorter duration of stay in Zhejiang; working in factory, market or domestic service (P<0.05 for odd job); having a province of origin inside Zhejiang; and drug use. The prevalence of HIV and HCV infections were 0.02% (95% CI: 0.01%–0.06%) and 0.40% (95%CI: 0.31%–0.51%), respectively. The prevalence of syphilis among those who were sexually active was 0.55% (95% CI: 0.43%–0.70%). Risk factors for syphilis included shorter duration of stay in Zhejiang, ethnic minority status, being divorced or widowed and having had multiple sex partners. Conclusions Much greater efforts are needed to promote safer sex, and programs for the control of syphilis need to be tailored for migrant workers

  5. Diagnostic value of recombinant Tp0821 protein in serodiagnosis for syphilis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Y; Xu, M; Wang, C; Xiao, J; Xiao, Y; Jiang, C; You, X; Zhao, F; Zeng, T; Liu, S; Kuang, X; Wu, Y

    2016-04-01

    Syphilis is a multistage sexually transmitted disease that remains a serious public health concern worldwide. The coexistence of Treponema pallidum with other closely related members of spirochaeta, such as Leptospira spp. and Borrelia burgdorferi, has complicated the serodiagnosis due to cross-reactive antigens. In this study, recombinant Tp0821 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by metal affinity chromatography. Then enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on Tp0821 for the detection of specific antibodies were established. The relative positive rates of the IgM ELISA and the IgG ELISA were found to be 91·0 and 98·3%, respectively, when screening 578 syphilis specimens. The specificities were 94·3 and 100%, respectively, when cross-checking with serum samples obtained from 30 patients with Lyme disease, five patients with leptospirosis, and 52 uninfected controls. In addition, relative positive rates and specificities of Tp0821 for human sera were all 100% in Western blotting. When compared to the syphilis diagnostic tests commonly used in clinical settings, we found that the results of Tp0821-based ELISAs correlated well with the results of the treponemal tests, specifically the T. pallidum particle agglutination (TP-PA) test and the chemiluminescent immunoassay (CIA). Thus, these findings identify Tp0821 as a novel serodiagnostic candidate for syphilis. In this study, we expressed and purified the Treponema pallidum protein Tp0821 and developed Tp0821-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of specific antibodies. The serodiagnostic performance of the recombinant protein was then evaluated. When compared to the results of syphilis diagnostic tests commonly used in clinical settings, we found that the reactivities of syphilitic sera with the recombinant antigen correlated well with the results of the treponemal tests, specifically the T. pallidum particle agglutination (TP-PA) test and the

  6. Population and dyadic-based seroincidence of herpes simplex virus-2 and syphilis in southern India.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Chad H; Schneider, John A; Dandona, Rakhi; Lakshmi, Vemu; Kumar, G Anil; Sudha, Talasila; Akbar, Mohammed; Ahmed, G Md Mushtaq; Ramgopal, Sri P; Armbruster, Benjamin; Alary, Michel; Dandona, Lalit

    2015-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) and syphilis are associated with increased risk of HIV, highlighting the importance of understanding their transmission dynamics. In India, most studies of HSV-2 and syphilis incidence are in high-risk populations and may not accurately reflect infectious activity. In this study, we aim to define HSV-2/syphilis incidence and risk factors in a population sample. We conducted a longitudinal population-based survey in Andhra Pradesh, India, in two rounds: 2004-2005 and 2010-2011. Sociodemographic and behavioural data were collected, and dried blood spots tested for HSV-2 and Treponema pallidum IgG. After calculating sexually transmitted infection (STI) incidence, associated factors were assessed using modified Poisson regression and within-couple transmission rates modelled using seroconcordance/discordance data. 12,617 adults participated at baseline with 8494 at follow-up. Incidence of HSV-2 and syphilis per 1000 person-years was 25.6 (95% CI 24.1 to 27.2) and 3.00 (95% CI 2.52 to 3.54). Incidence of HSV-2 was higher in women vs. men (31.1 vs. 20.2) and in rural vs urban residents (31.1 vs 19.0) (p<0.05 for both). STI seroincidence increased in a step-wise fashion with age and was associated with spousal seropositivity for both sexes (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 2.59 to 6.78). Within couples the rate of transmission per 1000 couple-years from men to women vs. women to men was higher for HSV-2 (193.3 vs. 119.0) compared with syphilis (27.6 vs. 198.8), p<0.05 for both. HSV-2 has higher incidence among subpopulations such as women, rural residents and older-aged individuals, suggesting a need for more generalised STI prevention approaches among populations traditionally considered low risk. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Synthesized prevention and control of one decade for mother-to-child transmission of syphilis and determinants associated with congenital syphilis and adverse pregnancy outcomes in Shenzhen, South China.

    PubMed

    Qin, J-B; Feng, T-J; Yang, T-B; Hong, F-C; Lan, L-N; Zhang, C-L; Liu, X-L; Yang, Y-Z; Xiao, S-Y; Tan, H-Z

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effectiveness of an intervention program on mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of syphilis and investigate determinants of congenital syphilis (CS) and adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs). The Shenzhen local government initiated an intervention program of MTCT of syphilis in 2001. Based on this program, maternal and paternal factors associated with CS and APOs among syphilitic women were investigated from 2007 to 2012 by a prospective cohort study. From 2002 to 2012, 2,441,237 pregnant women were screened and screening coverage reached 97.2 % in 2012. In the background of continuing growth of CS in China, CS in Shenzhen significantly decreased from 109.3 cases in 2002 to 9.9 cases in 2012 per 100,000 live births. Maternal education (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]CS = 0.65; aORAPOs = 0.79) and history of syphilis (aORCS = 0.28; aORAPOs = 0.61), as well as paternal age (aORCS = 0.62; aORAPOs = 0.86) and education (aORCS = 0.66; aORAPOs = 0.86) were negatively associated with CS and APOs, but maternal unmarried status (aORCS = 1.95; aORAPOs = 2.61), inadequate antenatal care (ANC) (aORCS = 3.61; aORAPOs = 1.79), more sexual partners (aORCS = 1.51; aORAPOs = 1.39), every week of delay in treatment (aORCS = 2.82; aORAPOs = 1.27), higher baseline titers of nontreponemal antibodies (aORCS = 5.65; aORAPOs = 1.47), early syphilis (aORCS = 23.24; aORAPOs = 26.95), and non-penicillin treatment (aORCS = 3.00; aORAPOs = 2.16), as well as paternal history of cocaine use (aORCS = 2.70; aORAPOs = 2.44) and positive (aORCS = 4.14; aORAPOs = 1.50) or unknown (aORCS = 2.37; aORAPOs = 2.06) status of syphilis increased the risk of CS and APOs. Condom use (aOR = 0.70) decreased MTCT of syphilis. A ten-year program consisting of screening and treatment, early ANC, health education, partners tracking, detection, and treatment, follow-up visits, and information management is an effective means to block MTCT of syphilis. Maternal and paternal

  8. The diagnostic performance evaluation of the SD BIOLINE HIV/syphilis Duo rapid test in southern Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Shimelis, Techalew; Tadesse, Endale

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the diagnostic performance of the SD BIOLINE HIV/syphilis Duo rapid test. Design A hospital-based cross-sectional study. Setting This evaluation was conducted at one of the largest hospitals in southern Ethiopia. Participants Serum samples obtained from clients attending the antiretroviral therapy and voluntary counselling and testing centres were used. Sera were originally collected for the purpose of investigating syphilis epidemiology. The performance of the test to detect HIV was evaluated using 400 sera (200 HIV positives and 200 HIV negatives). Also, its performance to detect syphilis was evaluated using 85 syphilis positive and 100 syphilis negative serum samples. Individuals <15 years of age or syphilis treated or those with ≤50 cells/µL CD4 cell count were originally excluded. Outcome measures HIV screening was carried out according to the national rapid diagnostic testing (RDT) algorithm: Shenghai Kehua Bioengineering (KHB) test kit as a screening test, followed by the HIV1/2 STAT-PAK assay if positive. Where the result of the STAT-PAK is discordant with KHB, Unigold HIV is used as a tiebreaker to determine the result. We also used ELISA to resolve discordant HIV results. Syphilis serostatus was determined using the Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA). Results The respective sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the SD BIOLINE HIV/syphilis Duo test were 100, 99.5, 99.5 and 100% for HIV and 97.6, 96, 95.4 and 98% for syphilis testing, respectively. In reference to TPHA, the test kit reported 4 false positives and 2 false negative results for syphilis. The κ values were 0.99 for HIV testing and 0.94 for syphilis testing. Conclusions The excellent performance of the SD BIOLINE HIV/syphilis Duo test to detect HIV as well as syphilis facilitates the integration of syphilis testing and treatment to the already established HIV prevention programme, ultimately contributing

  9. Management of Adult Syphilis: Key Questions to Inform the 2015 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Khalil G

    2015-12-15

    A panel of experts generated 8 "key questions" in the management of adult syphilis. A systematic literature review was conducted and tables of evidence were constructed to answer these important questions. Penicillin is the drug of choice to treat syphilis. Doxycycline to treat early and late latent syphilis is an acceptable alternate option if penicillin cannot be used. There is no added benefit to enhanced antimicrobial therapy when treating human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons with syphilis. If a patient misses a dose of penicillin in a course of weekly therapy for late syphilis, clinical experience suggests that an interval of 10-14 days between doses might be acceptable before restarting the sequence of injections. Pharmacologic considerations suggest that an interval of 7-9 days between doses, if feasible, may be more optimal. Missed doses are not acceptable for pregnant women. A cerebrospinal fluid examination to diagnose neurosyphilis is recommended in persons diagnosed with tertiary syphilis (eg, cardiovascular syphilis or late benign syphilis), persons with neurological signs or symptoms consistent with neurosyphilis, and asymptomatic persons whose serological titers do not decline appropriately following recommended therapy and in whom reinfection is ruled out. Infection and reinfection rates, particularly among men who have sex with men, are high. Frequent serological screening of this population appears to be the most cost-efficient intervention. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continues to recommend the use of the traditional rapid plasma reagin-based screening algorithm. The positive predictive value for syphilis associated with an isolated unconfirmed reactive treponemal chemiluminescence assay or enzyme immunoassay is low if the epidemiological risk and clinical probability for syphilis are low. Among pregnant women with serodiscordant serologies (positive treponemal tests and a negative nontreponemal test), the risk of

  10. Prevalence and factors associated with syphilis in parturient women in Northeast, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital syphilis is a major public health concern, even after the implementation of intervention protocols in several countries. This study aimed to analyze the prevalence and socio-demographic, behavioral and institutional factors associated with syphilis in parturient women attending public maternity hospitals in Northeast, Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from June to September 2010 with a proportionate stratified sampling of 222 parturient women using a structured questionnaire. The study analyzed socio-demographic, behavioral and institutional variables. The structured questionnaire was conducted with parturient women and complementary information was obtained through hospitals records, admission forms and prenatal cards. Data were stored using the Statistical Package SPSS version 18. A descriptive statistical analysis was performed using frequency distribution, central tendency and measures of spread for the variables. A bivariate analysis was done using chi square test and Fisher’s exact test, with a significance level of 5% and a 95% confidence interval, in order to analyze the relation between the variables and risk factors for syphilis. The multivariate logistic regression analysis was done in the statistical package STATA, version 11.0. Results The prevalence of syphilis in parturient women was 7.7%. The bivariate analyses showed that the rate was higher among women who: were from Fortaleza (p = 0.019), studied for less than nine years (p = 0.044), had more than one sexual partner in life (p = 0.021), did not live with partner (p = 0.022), used illegal drugs (p < 0.0001), whose partner used illegal drugs and had diagnosis of syphilis (p = 0.001 and p < 0.0001 respectively). The non-adjusted analysis found significant positive association between syphilis and the following variable: being from Fortaleza (OR = 7.26; CI 95% = 1.49-100.20), having studied for less than nine years (OR

  11. Prevalence and factors associated with syphilis in parturient women in Northeast, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Maria Alix Leite; de Freitas, Silvio Carlos Rocha; de Moura, Heber José; Gondim, Ana Paula Soares; da Silva, Raimunda Magalhães

    2013-03-07

    Congenital syphilis is a major public health concern, even after the implementation of intervention protocols in several countries. This study aimed to analyze the prevalence and socio-demographic, behavioral and institutional factors associated with syphilis in parturient women attending public maternity hospitals in Northeast, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted from June to September 2010 with a proportionate stratified sampling of 222 parturient women using a structured questionnaire. The study analyzed socio-demographic, behavioral and institutional variables. The structured questionnaire was conducted with parturient women and complementary information was obtained through hospitals records, admission forms and prenatal cards. Data were stored using the Statistical Package SPSS version 18. A descriptive statistical analysis was performed using frequency distribution, central tendency and measures of spread for the variables. A bivariate analysis was done using chi square test and Fisher's exact test, with a significance level of 5% and a 95% confidence interval, in order to analyze the relation between the variables and risk factors for syphilis. The multivariate logistic regression analysis was done in the statistical package STATA, version 11.0. The prevalence of syphilis in parturient women was 7.7%. The bivariate analyses showed that the rate was higher among women who: were from Fortaleza (p = 0.019), studied for less than nine years (p = 0.044), had more than one sexual partner in life (p = 0.021), did not live with partner (p = 0.022), used illegal drugs (p < 0.0001), whose partner used illegal drugs and had diagnosis of syphilis (p = 0.001 and p < 0.0001 respectively). The non-adjusted analysis found significant positive association between syphilis and the following variable: being from Fortaleza (OR = 7.26; CI 95% = 1.49-100.20), having studied for less than nine years (OR = 7.97; CI 95% = 0

  12. Declining Inconsistent Condom Use but Increasing HIV and Syphilis Prevalence Among Older Male Clients of Female Sex Workers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Abraham Bussell, Scottie; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhenzhu; Lan, Guanghua; Zhu, Qiuying; Liu, Wei; Tang, Shuai; Li, Rongjian; Huang, Wenbo; Huang, Yuman; Liang, Fuxiong; Wang, Lu; Shao, Yiming; Ruan, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clients of female sex workers (CFSWs) are a bridge population for the spread of HIV and syphilis to low or average risk heterosexuals. Most studies have examined the point prevalence of these infections in CFSWs. Limited evidence suggests that older age CFSWs are at a higher risk of acquiring sexually transmitted diseases compared with younger clients. Thus, we sought to describe long-term trends in HIV, syphilis, and hepatitis C (HCV) to better understand how these infections differ by sex worker classification and client age. We also examined trends in HIV, syphilis, and HCV among categories of female sex workers (FSWs). We conducted serial cross-sectional studies from 2010 to 2015 in Guangxi autonomous region, China. We collected demographic and behavior variables. FSWs and their clients were tested for HIV, syphilis, and HCV antibodies. Positive HIV and syphilis serologies were confirmed by Western blot and rapid plasma regain, respectively. Clients were categorized as middle age (40–49 years) and older clients (≥50 years). FSWs were categorized as high-tier, middle-tier, or low-tier based on the payment amount charged for sex and their work venue. Chi-square test for trends was used for testing changes in prevalence over time. By 2015, low-tier FSWs (LTFSWs) accounted for almost half of all FSWs; and they had the highest HIV prevalence at 1.4%. HIV prevalence declined significantly for FSWs (high-tier FSW, P = 0.003; middle-tier FSWs; P = 0.021; LTFSWs, P < 0.001). Syphilis infections significantly declined for FSWs (P < 0.001) but only to 7.3% for LTFSWs. HCV and intravenous drug use were uncommon in FSWs. HIV prevalence increased for older age clients (1.3%–2.0%, P = 0.159) while syphilis prevalence remained stable. HCV infections were halved among older clients in 3 years (1.7%–0.8%, P < 0.001). Condom use during the last sexual encounter increased for FSWs and CFSWs. Few clients reported sex with men or intravenous

  13. Quantitative profile of cardiolipin and group treponemal IgD antibodies in syphilis estimated by single radial immunodiffusion technique (SRID).

    PubMed

    Ionescu, A D; Petcovici, M; Ionescu-Dorohoi, T

    1989-01-01

    150 serum samples (reactive in VDRL, Reiter-ELISA, FTA-Abs tests), from male patients 25-45 years old, in various stages of syphilis whether treated or untreated, were tested for IgD by SRID. On 154 sera from healthy males 25-45 years old, the reference normal values for IgD levels were established, as: 0-131.2 IU/ml with a mean of 29.92 +/- 29.61 IU/ml. Cardiolipin and group treponemal fraction values for IgD class were obtained by assessing the difference between the immunodiffusion diameter values produced by sera before and after complete absorption with VDRL antigen or delipidated T. reiteri suspension. The individual, mean +/- SD values (expressed in IU/ml) and the percentage of cardiolipin and treponemal IgD of the total IgD class were calculated for each stage. The mean value of the total IgD class, excepting secondary syphilis (sigma 2) 52.53 +/- 26.66 IU/ml), did not overstep the normal levels but all minimal individual values from syphilitic patients (7.09-14.89 IU/ml) surpassed significantly the normal minimal values which were less than or equal to 3.54 IU/ml. The total lack of cardiolipin (IgD and the presence of group treponemal IgD in all sera of the syphilis stages studied were manifest. The group treponemal IgD mean values ranged between 7-9 IU/ml, with a maximum of 19.32 +/- 10.58 IU/ml in sigma 2 followed by latent syphilis (sigma lat) with a mean value of 9.37 +/- 4.9 IU/ml. A significant percentage of treponemal IgD vs total IgD was recorded: primary syphilis (sigma 1) 32.01%, primary-secondary syphilis (sigma 1-2) 28.76%, sigma 2 36.77%, sigma lat and treated persistent seroreactive syphilis (sigma t+) 29.61%. The high proportion of treponemal IgD in latent and treated persistent reactive syphilis suggests a steady activation of B lymphocytes by treponemal antigens and presumably is an expression of an active infectious process. The absence of cardiolipin IgD and the presence of only the treponemal IgD, in all sera from all stages, might

  14. Sociodemographic factors and the variation in syphilis rates among US counties, 1984 through 1993: an ecological analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Kilmarx, P H; Zaidi, A A; Thomas, J C; Nakashima, A K; St Louis, M E; Flock, M L; Peterman, T A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Syphilis in the United States is focally distributed, with high incidence rates in the South and in metropolitan areas nationwide. In this study an ecological analysis, using the county as the unit of analysis, was performed to generate hypotheses about community-level determinants of syphilis rates. METHODS: Bivariate rank correlations and multivariate, backward stepwise elimination linear regressions were performed. Mean annual incidence of primary- and secondary-stage syphilis in a county was the dependent variable, and county sociodemographic characteristics (from census data) were the independent variables. RESULTS: In the multivariate regression model, sociodemographic characteristics accounted for 71% of the variation in syphilis rates among counties. With other factors accounted for, the most highly correlated characteristics were percentage non-Hispanic Black population, county location in the South, percentage of the population that was urban, percentage Hispanic population, and percentage of births to women younger than 20 years. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the variation in syphilis rates among counties is accounted for by sociodemographic characteristics. Identification and remediation of modifiable health determinants for which these factors are markers are needed to improve the health status of these populations. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:9431280

  15. HIV and syphilis infection among men who have sex with men--Bangkok, Thailand, 2005-2011.

    PubMed

    2013-06-28

    Although efforts to control the heterosexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic in Thailand had shown success by the late 1990s, HIV continued to spread in other risk groups, including men who have sex with men (MSM). In 2003, the Thailand Ministry of Public Health-U.S. CDC Collaboration (TUC) started surveillance among MSM in Bangkok, finding an HIV prevalence of 17.3%. By 2005, HIV prevalence in this group had risen to 28.3% and has since stabilized at around 30%. To obtain additional information about HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevalence and incidence in a clinic-based population of MSM, TUC, in collaboration with the Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Center, analyzed data collected at the Silom Community Clinic (SCC), an HIV and STI testing center targeting MSM. This report describes trends in HIV and syphilis prevalence and incidence seen among SCC MSM clients during 2005-2011. At first clinic visit, the prevalence of HIV infection among 4,762 clients was 28.3% and of syphilis (all