Science.gov

Sample records for syringe calibration factors

  1. Design considerations and initial validation of a liquid microflow calibration setup using parallel operated syringe pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvad, Claus; Krühne, Ulrich; Frederiksen, John

    2010-07-01

    Danish Technological Institute (DTI) currently offers traceable calibration of liquid flow rates down to 5 L h-1. However, the industry also requests traceable calibration below this point for flowmeters and pumps. Therefore, DTI is in the process of establishing a traceable calibration setup for such microfluidic devices. This paper addresses the design and uncertainty considerations for a setup based on gravimetric and volume traceability. The flow generation in the setup utilizes two parallel operated syringe pumps with different syringe volumes. The two syringes are programmed so one syringe can replace the pumping action of the second syringe without influencing the resulting flow. In that way it is possible to generate flow rates for calibration in the range from 6 L h-1 to 20 µL h-1. Traceability is currently achieved gravimetrically using special-purpose toploader balances. The resulting expanded uncertainty is expected to be below 0.1% between 6 L h-1 and 100 mL h-1, gradually increasing towards 2% between 100 mL h-1 and 1.2 mL h-1. Furthermore, a concept is proposed to achieve traceability in the full flow range from 6 L h-1 to 20 µL h-1 based on delivered volume divided by time with glass syringes as reference and an expanded uncertainty expected to be below 2%.

  2. Syringe shape and positioning relative to efficiency volume inside dose calibrators and its role in nuclear medicine quality assurance programs.

    PubMed

    Santos, J A M; Carrasco, M F; Lencart, J; Bastos, A L

    2009-06-01

    A careful analysis of geometry and source positioning influence in the activity measurement outcome of a nuclear medicine dose calibrator is presented for (99m)Tc. The implementation of a quasi-point source apparent activity curve measurement is proposed for an accurate correction of the activity inside several syringes, and compared with a theoretical geometric efficiency model. Additionally, new geometrical parameters are proposed to test and verify the correct positioning of the syringes as part of acceptance testing and quality control procedures.

  3. Demographic, risk, and spatial factors associated with over-the-counter syringe purchase among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Stopka, Thomas J; Lutnick, Alexandra; Wenger, Lynn D; Deriemer, Kathryn; Geraghty, Estella M; Kral, Alex H

    2012-07-01

    Since 2005, California law allowed over-the-counter (OTC) syringe sales pending local authorization. Although pharmacy sales of OTC syringes are associated with reduced injection-mediated risks and decreases in human immunodeficiency virus infection rates, little is known about the factors associated with syringe purchase among injection drug users (IDUs). Using a cross-sectional design, the authors applied targeted sampling to collect quantitative survey data from IDUs (n = 563) recruited in San Francisco, California, during 2008. They also compiled a comprehensive list of retail pharmacies, their location, and whether they sell OTC syringes. They used a novel combination of geographic information system and statistical analyses to determine the demographic, behavioral, and spatial factors associated with OTC syringe purchase by IDUs. In multivariate analyses, age, race, injection frequency, the type of drug injected, and the source of syringe supply were independently associated with OTC syringe purchases. Notably, the prevalence of OTC syringe purchase was 53% lower among African-American IDUs (adjusted prevalence ratio = 0.47, 95% confidence interval: 0.33, 0.67) and higher among injectors of methamphetamine (adjusted prevalence ratio = 1.35, 95% confidence interval: 1.07, 1.70). Two neighborhoods with high densities of IDUs had limited access to OTC syringes. Increased access to OTC syringes would potentially prevent blood-borne infectious diseases among IDUs.

  4. Syringe confiscation as an HIV risk factor: the public health implications of arbitrary policing in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Beletsky, Leo; Lozada, Remedios; Gaines, Tommi; Abramovitz, Daniela; Staines, Hugo; Vera, Alicia; Rangel, Gudelia; Arredondo, Jaime; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2013-04-01

    Female sex workers who inject drugs (FSW-IDUs) face elevated risk for HIV/STIs and constitute a key population for public health prevention. Through direct and indirect pathways including human rights violations, policing practices like syringe confiscation can compound FSW-IDU health risk and facilitate the spread of disease. We studied correlates of experiencing syringe confiscation among FSW-IDUs in northern Mexico, where formal policy allows for syringes to be available over the counter without a prescription, but police practices are often at odds with the law. FSW-IDUs reporting recent syringe sharing and unprotected sex with clients in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez were administered surveys and HIV/STI testing. Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of syringe confiscation. Among 624 respondent FSW-IDUs, prevalence of syringe confiscation in the last 6 months was 48%. The following factors were positively associated with syringe confiscation: testing positive for HIV (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11-5.80), reporting sexual abuse by police (aOR = 12.76, 95% CI = 6.58-24.72), engaging in groin injection (aOR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.15-2.93), injecting in public (aOR = 1.64; 95% CI = 1.14-2.36), and obtaining syringes from pharmacies (aOR = 1.54; 95% CI = 1.06-2.23). Higher education level was negatively associated with syringe confiscation (aOR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87-0.98) as was frequent injection with clients within the last month (aOR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.44-0.94). This analysis adds to the body of evidence linking unauthorized law enforcement actions targeting high-risk groups with HIV and other adverse health outcomes. Using a public health lens to conceptualize abuse as a structural risk factor, we advocate for multi-prong prevention, systematic monitoring, and evidence-based intervention response to deleterious police practices.

  5. Social and Political Factors Predicting the Presence of Syringe Exchange Programs in 96 US Metropolitan Areas

    PubMed Central

    Tempalski, Barbara; Flom, Peter L.; Friedman, Samuel R.; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Friedman, Judith J.; McKnight, Courtney; Friedman, Risa

    2007-01-01

    Community activism can be important in shaping public health policies. For example, political pressure and direct action from grassroots activists have been central to the formation of syringe exchange programs (SEPs) in the United States. We explored why SEPs are present in some localities but not others, hypothesizing that programs are unevenly distributed across geographic areas as a result of political, socioeconomic, and organizational characteristics of localities, including needs, resources, and local opposition. We examined the effects of these factors on whether SEPs were present in different US metropolitan statistical areas in 2000. Predictors of the presence of an SEP included percentage of the population with a college education, the existence of local AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) chapters, and the percentage of men who have sex with men in the population. Need was not a predictor. PMID:17267732

  6. Syringe sociology.

    PubMed

    Vitellone, Nicole

    2015-06-01

    In this article I consider the impact of social epistemologies for understanding the object of the syringe. My aim is to examine the process through which the syringe transforms from an injecting device to a tool of social and political inquiry. Paying particular attention to the uses of Foucault, Becker, Bourdieu, Freud and Latour in empirical studies of injecting heroin use, I examine the sociology of the syringe through the lens of habit and habitus, discourse and deviance, mourning and melancholia, attachment and agencement. In pursuing the theory behind the object my goal is to address a sociological object in the making. In so doing I show how the syringe has been significant for social research, social theory, and sociology. It is the difference the object makes that this article seeks to describe. In tracing the epistemology of the syringe I show how the object is important not just for knowledge of addiction but sociology itself. PMID:26072683

  7. Syringe sociology.

    PubMed

    Vitellone, Nicole

    2015-06-01

    In this article I consider the impact of social epistemologies for understanding the object of the syringe. My aim is to examine the process through which the syringe transforms from an injecting device to a tool of social and political inquiry. Paying particular attention to the uses of Foucault, Becker, Bourdieu, Freud and Latour in empirical studies of injecting heroin use, I examine the sociology of the syringe through the lens of habit and habitus, discourse and deviance, mourning and melancholia, attachment and agencement. In pursuing the theory behind the object my goal is to address a sociological object in the making. In so doing I show how the syringe has been significant for social research, social theory, and sociology. It is the difference the object makes that this article seeks to describe. In tracing the epistemology of the syringe I show how the object is important not just for knowledge of addiction but sociology itself.

  8. Adsorption of 99mTc-Sestamibi onto Plastic Syringes: Evaluation of Factors Affecting the Degree of Adsorption and Their Impact on Clinical Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Tiffinee N.; Troung, Duong T.; Paulsen, Andrew; Hruska, Carrie B.; O’Connor, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the extent of adhesion of 99mTc-sestamibi to syringes in patient procedures, determine factors that influence the degree of adhesion, and evaluate alternatives to our current practice that would either result in a more reproducible degree of adhesion or, ideally, eliminate adhesion. Methods The extent of adhesion was documented in 216 patient procedures and evaluated in detail in an additional 73 patient procedures. We evaluated the nature of the adhesion and its possible causes, including the location of adhesion in injection sets, the effect of syringe type, and the effect of prerinsing of syringes with various solutions of nonradiolabeled sestamibi and 99mTc-sestamibi. The extent of adhesion was reevaluated in 50 procedures performed using the syringe type that demonstrated the lowest adhesion rate. Results The degree of adhesion of 99mTc-sestamibi to the injection set was found to be 20.1% ± 8.0%, with a range (10th–90th percentiles) of 9%–31%. The primary cause of adhesion appeared to be the lubricant used inside the syringe barrel. Evaluation of 6 different syringe types identified a brand with a lower adhesion rate. Reevaluation in patient procedures using this brand showed a 5.2% ± 2.5% degree of adhesion, with a range (10th–90th percentiles) of 2.5%–7.7%. Conclusion Selection of the appropriate type of syringe can significantly reduce the magnitude and variability of residual 99mTc-sestamibi activity. With more reproducible residual activities, we have been able to achieve an approximately 20% reduction in the dispensed dose of 99mTc-sestamibi used in clinical procedures and a more consistent injected dose with less interpatient variation. The frequent changes in syringe design by manufacturers require that a quality control program for monitoring of residual activity be incorporated into clinical practice. This program has allowed us to maintain image quality and achieve more consistent injected patient

  9. Syringe possession arrests are associated with receptive syringe sharing in two Mexico-US border cities

    PubMed Central

    Pollini, Robin A.; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Lozada, Remedios M.; Ramos, Rebeca; Cruz, Michelle F.; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Case, Patricia; Burris, Scott; Pu, Minya; Frost, Simon D. W.; Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Miller, Cari; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Aims To identify factors associated with receptive syringe sharing among injection drug users (IDUs) and elucidate the association between syringe possession arrests and syringe sharing. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Mexican border cities of Tijuana, Baja California and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua. Participants IDUs in Tijuana (n = 222) and Ciudad Juarez (n = 206) were recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS). IDUs were ≥18 years and had injected illicit drugs in the past month. Measurements An interviewer-administered survey was used to collect quantitative data on socio-demographic, behavioral and contextual characteristics, including self-reported syringe sharing and arrests for syringe possession. Associations with receptive syringe sharing were investigated using logistic regression with RDS adjustment. Findings Overall, 48% of participants reported ever being arrested for carrying an unused/sterile syringe, even though syringe purchase and possession is legal in Mexico. Arrest for possessing unused/sterile syringes was associated independently with receptive syringe sharing [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.05; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.26, 3.35], as was injecting in a shooting gallery (AOR = 3.60; 95% CI: 2.21, 5.87), injecting in the street (AOR = 2.05; 95% CI: 1.18, 3.54) and injecting methamphetamine (AOR = 2.77; 95% CI: 1.41, 5.47) or cocaine (AOR = 1.96; 95% CI: 1.15, 3.36). More than half of participants (57%) had been arrested for possessing a used syringe; in a second model, arrest for used syringe possession was also associated independently with receptive sharing (AOR = 2.87; 95% CI: 1.76, 4.69). Conclusions We documented high levels of syringe-related arrests in two Mexican–US border cities and an independent association between these arrests and risky injection practices. Public health collaborations with law enforcement to modify the risk environment in which drug use occurs are essential to facilitate safer injection

  10. Calibration factors for the SNOOPY NP-100 neutron dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscu, D. F.; McNeill, F. E.; Chase, J.

    2007-10-01

    Within CANDU nuclear power facilities, only a small fraction of workers are exposed to neutron radiation. For these individuals, roughly 4.5% of the total radiation equivalent dose is the result of exposure to neutrons. When this figure is considered across all workers receiving external exposure of any kind, only 0.25% of the total radiation equivalent dose is the result of exposure to neutrons. At many facilities, the NP-100 neutron dosimeter, manufactured by Canberra Industries Incorporated, is employed in both direct and indirect dosimetry methods. Also known as "SNOOPY", these detectors undergo calibration, which results in a calibration factor relating the neutron count rate to the ambient dose equivalent rate, using a standard Am-Be neutron source. Using measurements presented in a technical note, readings from the dosimeter for six different neutron fields in six source-detector orientations were used, to determine a calibration factor for each of these sources. The calibration factor depends on the neutron energy spectrum and the radiation weighting factor to link neutron fluence to equivalent dose. Although the neutron energy spectra measured in the CANDU workplace are quite different than that of the Am-Be calibration source, the calibration factor remains constant - within acceptable limits - regardless of the neutron source used in the calibration; for the specified calibration orientation and current radiation weighting factors. However, changing the value of the radiation weighting factors would result in changes to the calibration factor. In the event of changes to the radiation weighting factors, it will be necessary to assess whether a change to the calibration process or resulting calibration factor is warranted.

  11. Syringe-injectable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Cheng, Zengguang; Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M.

    2015-07-01

    Seamless and minimally invasive three-dimensional interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating the syringe injection (and subsequent unfolding) of sub-micrometre-thick, centimetre-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 μm. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with >90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe-injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with three-dimensional structures, including (1) monitoring internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (2) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (3) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables the delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, the delivery of large-volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities, and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics.

  12. Syringe-injectable electronics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Cheng, Zengguang; Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-07-01

    Seamless and minimally invasive three-dimensional interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating the syringe injection (and subsequent unfolding) of sub-micrometre-thick, centimetre-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 μm. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with >90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe-injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with three-dimensional structures, including (1) monitoring internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (2) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (3) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables the delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, the delivery of large-volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities, and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics.

  13. Automated application of calibration factors on telemetered data

    SciTech Connect

    Kalibjian, J.R.; Voss, T.J.; Yio, J.J.

    1993-04-26

    A long standing problem in telemetry post processing is the application of correct calibration factors to telemetered data generated on a system which has had a history of hardware changes. These calibration problems become most exacerbated when old test data is being examined and there is uncertainty as to hardware configuration at the time of the test. In this paper a mechanism for introducing a high degree of reliability in the application of calibration factors is described in an implementation done for Brilliant Pebbles Flight Experiment Three (FE-3).

  14. Gas ampoule-syringe

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.

    1986-01-01

    A gas ampoule for the shipment and delivery of radioactive gases. The gas ampoule having a glass tube with serum bottle stopper on one end and a plunger tip in the opposite end all fitting in a larger plastic tube threaded on each end with absorbent between the tubes, is seated onto the internal needle assembly via a bushing associated with the plunger and locked into the syringe barrel via barrel-bushing locking caps. The design practically eliminates the possibility of personnel contamination due to an inadvertent exposure of such personnel to the contained radioactive gas.

  15. Gas ampoule-syringe

    DOEpatents

    Gay, D.D.

    1985-02-02

    A gas ampoule for the shipment and delivery of radioactive gases. The gas ampoule having a glass tube with serum bottle stopper on one and a plunger tip in the opposite end all fitting in a larger plastic tube threaded on each end with absorbent between the tubes, is seated onto the internal needle assembly via a bushing associated with the plunger and locked into the syringe barrel via barrel-bushing locking caps. The design practically eliminates the possibility of personnel contamination due to an inadvertent exposure of such personnel to the contained radioactive gas.

  16. Calibration of Local Area Weather Radar—Identifying significant factors affecting the calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Lisbeth; Jensen, Niels Einar; Madsen, Henrik

    2010-07-01

    A Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) is an X-band weather radar developed to meet the needs of high resolution rainfall data for hydrological applications. The LAWR system and data processing methods are reviewed in the first part of this paper, while the second part of the paper focuses on calibration. The data processing for handling the partial beam filling issue was found to be essential to the calibration. LAWR uses a different calibration process compared to conventional weather radars, which use a power-law relationship between reflectivity and rainfall rate. Instead LAWR uses a linear relationship of reflectivity and rainfall rate as result of the log transformation carried out by the logarithmic receiver as opposed to the linear receiver of conventional weather radars. Based on rain gauge data for a five month period from a dense network of nine gauges within a 500 × 500 m area and data from a nearby LAWR, the existing calibration method was tested and two new methods were developed. The three calibration methods were verified with three external gauges placed in different locations. It can be concluded that the LAWR calibration uncertainties can be reduced by 50% in two out of three cases when the calibration is based on a factorized 3 parameter linear model instead of a single parameter linear model.

  17. Auto-disable syringes for immunization: issues in technology transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, J. S.; Milstien, J. B.

    1999-01-01

    WHO and its partners recommend the use of auto-disable syringes, "bundled" with the supply of vaccines when donor dollars are used, in all mass immunization campaigns, and also strongly advocate their use in routine immunization programmes. Because of the relatively high price of auto-disable syringes, WHO's Technical Network for Logistics in Health recommends that activities be initiated to encourage the transfer of production technology for these syringes as a means of promoting their use and enhancing access to the technology. The present article examines factors influencing technology transfer, including feasibility, corporate interest, cost, quality assurance, intellectual property considerations, and probable time frames for implementation. Technology transfer activities are likely to be complex and difficult, and may not result in lower prices for syringes. Guidelines are offered on technology transfer initiatives for auto-disable syringes to ensure the quality of the product, the reliability of the supply, and the feasibility of the technology transfer activity itself. PMID:10680248

  18. Experiments with Disposable Hypodermic Syringes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, G. T.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Lists five experiments or demonstrations involving hypodermic syringes. The titles of experiments are Boyle's Law, Charles' Law, Atmospheric Pressure, Expansion of Gases, and Boiling at Reduced Pressure. Provides a list of materials, the typical data, and graphs where appropriate. (YP)

  19. jasonSWIR Calibration of Spectralon Reflectance Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Butler, James J.; Cooksey, Cahterine; Ding, Leibo; Thome, Kurtis J.

    2011-01-01

    Satellite instruments operating in the reflective solar wavelength region require accurate and precise determination of the Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) of laboratory-based diffusers used in their pre-flight and on-orbit radiometric calibrations. BRF measurements are required throughout the reflected-solar spectrum from the ultraviolet through the shortwave infrared. Spectralon diffusers are commonly used as a reflectance standard for bidirectional and hemispherical geometries. The Diffuser Calibration Laboratory (DCaL) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is a secondary calibration facility with reflectance measurements traceable to those made by the Spectral Tri-function Automated Reference Reflectometer (STARR) facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). For more than two decades, the DCaL has provided numerous NASA projects with BRF data in the ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS) and the Near infraRed (NIR) spectral regions. Presented in this paper are measurements of BRF from 1475nm to 1625nm obtained using an indium gallium arsenide detector and a tunable coherent light source. The sample was a 2 inch diameter, 99% white Spectralon target. The BRF results are discussed and compared to empirically generated data from a model based on NIST certified values of 6deg directional/hemispherical spectral reflectance factors from 900nm to 2500nm. Employing a new NIST capability for measuring bidirectional reflectance using a cooled, extended InGaAs detector, BRF calibration measurements of the same sample were also made using NIST's STARR from 1475nm to 1625nm at an incident angle of 0deg and at viewing angles of 40deg, 45deg, and 50deg. The total combined uncertainty for BRF in this ShortWave Infrared (SWIR) range is less than 1%. This measurement capability will evolve into a BRF calibration service in SWIR region in support of NASA remote sensing missions. Keywords: BRF, BRDF, Calibration, Spectralon, Reflectance, Remote Sensing.

  20. Calibration of Gyros with Temperature Dependent Scale Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belur, Sheela V.; Harman, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The general problem of gyro calibration can be stated as the estimation of the scale factors, misalignments, and drift-rate biases of the gyro using the on-orbit sensor measurements. These gyro parameters have been traditionally treated as temperature-independent in the operational flight dynamics ground systems at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), a scenario which has been successfully applied in the gyro calibration of a large number of missions. A significant departure from this is the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission where, due to the high thermal variations expected during the mission phase, it is necessary to model the scale factors as functions of temperature. This paper addresses the issue of gyro calibration for the MAP gyro model using a manufacturer-supplied model of the variation of scale factors with temperature. The problem is formulated as a least squares problem and solved using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm in the MATLAB(R) library function NLSQ. The algorithm was tested on simulated data with Gaussian noise for the quaternions as well as the gyro rates and was found to consistently converge close to the true values. Significant improvement in accuracy was noticed due to the estimation of the temperature-dependent scale factors as against constant scale factors.

  1. 21 CFR 872.6770 - Cartridge syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... syringe is a device intended to inject anesthetic agents subcutaneously or intramuscularly. The device... cartridge) containing anesthetic is placed. After attaching a needle to the syringe body and activating...

  2. 21 CFR 872.6770 - Cartridge syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... syringe is a device intended to inject anesthetic agents subcutaneously or intramuscularly. The device... cartridge) containing anesthetic is placed. After attaching a needle to the syringe body and activating...

  3. 21 CFR 872.6770 - Cartridge syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... syringe is a device intended to inject anesthetic agents subcutaneously or intramuscularly. The device... cartridge) containing anesthetic is placed. After attaching a needle to the syringe body and activating...

  4. 21 CFR 872.6770 - Cartridge syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... syringe is a device intended to inject anesthetic agents subcutaneously or intramuscularly. The device... cartridge) containing anesthetic is placed. After attaching a needle to the syringe body and activating...

  5. 21 CFR 872.6770 - Cartridge syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... syringe is a device intended to inject anesthetic agents subcutaneously or intramuscularly. The device... cartridge) containing anesthetic is placed. After attaching a needle to the syringe body and activating...

  6. A flute syringe for vitreous surgery.

    PubMed

    Escoffery, R F; Grand, M G

    1980-11-01

    We have devised a method whereby an inexpensive, disposable tuberculin syringe may be used as a flute syringe with retrograde flushing capability. This syringe is particularly useful in vitreous surgery and alleviates problems that occur with commercially available instruments of this type.

  7. Barriers to pharmacy-based syringe purchase among injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Pollini, Robin A; Lozada, Remedios; Gallardo, Manuel; Rosen, Perth; Vera, Alicia; Macias, Armando; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2010-06-01

    Injection drug users (IDUs) may be denied purchase of sterile syringes even where purchase without a prescription is legal. This study examined barriers to over-the-counter (OTC) syringe purchase among IDUs in Tijuana, Mexico. A quantitative survey and subsequent focus groups were used to quantify barriers to purchase, identify their correlates and provide in-depth exploration of syringe purchase experiences. Of 627 IDUs, 81% purchased a syringe in the past 6 months and 16% were refused or overcharged. Factors independently associated with refusal/overcharging were homelessness, receptive syringe sharing, >5 uses per syringe, and number of lifetime abscesses. Few pharmacies sold syringes to IDUs, who adapted by limiting purchase attempts to pharmacies known to sell syringes consistently. Failed purchases occurred when drug withdrawal required purchase at unusual times or locations, often following release from jail. IDUs reported syringe sharing, syringe reuse, and searching through unsecured medical waste for syringes in response to failed purchase attempts. Interventions to expand OTC syringe sales to IDUs, particularly near detention facilities, will facilitate safer injection practices.

  8. Does knowledge about bloodborne pathogens influence the reuse of medical injection syringes among women in Pakistan?

    PubMed

    Janjua, Naveed Z; Mahmood, Bushra; Imran Khan, M

    2014-01-01

    Injections with re-used syringes have been identified as a major risk factor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections in Pakistan. We analyzed data from the 2006-2007 Pakistan Demographic Health Survey (PDHS) to describe the distribution of injections administered with newly opened syringes and assessed the association of knowledge about bloodborne pathogens with syringe reuse in Pakistan. In the PDHS, women aged 12-49 years were enrolled through a multistage stratified cluster-sampling strategy across Pakistan. Approximately 10,000 women were interviewed to collect information regarding receiving injections, the use of syringes taken out of new unopened packages for their last injections, and knowledge regarding the transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), HBV and HCV through the re-use of syringes and transfusion of unscreened blood. Of the 5126/10,023 women who provided information concerning their last injection, 4342 (86%) received this injection with a new syringe taken out of an unopened package. The proportion of injections received with a new syringe increased with the education level, wealth, HIV knowledge and knowledge about HCV/HBV transmission through the re-use of syringes. In the multivariable model, respondents in the 4th (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.1, 95%CI: 1.4-3.0) and 5th (AOR: 2.4, 95%CI: 1.6-3.5) wealth quintiles, with some education (AOR: 1.4, 95%CI: 1.1-1.9), those in the 4th quartile of the HIV knowledge score (AOR: 1.5, 95%CI: 1.1-2.0), and those with the knowledge that a new syringe protects against HCV/HBV and HIV (AOR: 2.3, 95%CI: 1.5-3.5) were more likely to receive injections with a newly opened syringe. The patients' knowledge regarding the transmission of bloodborne pathogens is an important factor in receiving injections with a new syringe. PMID:24861642

  9. The cleaning of instruments and syringes

    PubMed Central

    Darmady, E. M.; Hughes, K. E. A.; Drewett, S. E.; Prince, D.; Tuke, Winifred; Verdon, Patricia

    1965-01-01

    The dangers to the handler of syringes used for routine injections were found to be negligible, but known infected syringes and those contaminated with antibiotics should be autoclaved before handling as a high proportion of these carry pathogenic organisms. Mechanical methods of cleaning syringes and instruments are assessed. The use of an artificial soil for testing purposes is described. Using this soil, ultrasonics by themselves are inadequate for cleaning syringes and instruments. Agitation with ultrasonics is essential for syringes, but is insufficient for instruments. Detergents are therefore an essential adjunct to the cleaning process. For syringes Pyroneg proved to be the most satisfactory, particularly if they had been previously siliconized. The best detergent for instruments contaminated with these types of soil was Penesolve 814 at a temperature of 95°C. but the instruments must be adequately rinsed after this treatment. A number of other detergents and cleaning agents are discussed. PMID:14247708

  10. Don't Throw Away Syringes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a variety of laboratory experiments including carbon dioxide reduction, animal respiration, atmospheric pressure determination, and others, that can be performed using discarded syringes. (GS)

  11. Syringe and needle exchange programs: Part I.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R H

    1993-03-01

    Syringe and needle exchange (SANE) programs appear to be a pragmatic approach to reducing the rising incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among intravenous drug users (IVDUs). One purported indication of the effectiveness of SANE programs is lower prevalence rates of cases of AIDS or of HIV seropositivity in cities with SANE programs than in cities without such programs. In each positive comparison cited, however, the lower levels of HIV seropositivity were already present before the establishment of SANE programs. A second indicator of SANE effectiveness is a reduction in prevalence of hepatitis B in SANE program participants. Multiple factors working in concert, not simply the SANE programs, however, account for such progress; such factors include reductions in sharing of uncleaned injection equipment; legal exchange or sale of syringes at pharmacies; regular rinsing of used "works" with bleach; and epidemiologic fluctuations in the prevalence or a saturation level of the hepatitis B virus in IVDUs. A third indicator of the value of SANE programs is that they enable some otherwise unreachable IVDUs to make contact with a social or health facility. SANE programs do not facilitate the induction of new IVDUs or increase the frequency of injection by older addicts. From 60% to 90% of SANE attenders will return borrowed used injection equipment. Most participants reported that they reduced the frequency of lending or borrowing unclean injection equipment. Counterbalancing the above, SANE programs attract only a minority of all IVDUs in most cities, and they fail to attract the youngest subset of IVDUs. The attrition rate is high; only a small percentage of attenders remain with the program for more than a few months. Although many of the initial concerns about SANE programs have not been realized and there have been important public health gains to those who continue to attend them, SANE programs deserve more careful, unbiased, longitudinal

  12. A multistate trial of pharmacy syringe purchase.

    PubMed

    Compton, Wilson M; Horton, Joe C; Cottler, Linda B; Booth, Robert; Leukefeld, Carl G; Singer, Merrill; Cunningham-Williams, Renee; Reich, Wendy; Fortuin Corsi, Karen; Staton, Michele; Fink, Joseph L; Stopka, Thomas J; Spitznagel, Edward L

    2004-12-01

    Pharmacies are a potential site for access to sterile syringes as a means for preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but the type and extent of their utility is uncertain. To examine pharmacy syringe purchase, we conducted a standardized, multistate study in urban and rural areas of four states in which attempts to purchase syringes were documented. Of 1,600 overall purchase attempts, 35% were refused. Colorado (25%) and Connecticut (28%) had significantly lower rates of refusal than Kentucky (41%) and Missouri (47%). Furthermore, urban settings had higher rates of refusal (40%) than rural settings (31%, P < .01). Race and gender did not have a consistent impact on rates of refusal. Despite potential advantages of pharmacies as sites for access to sterile syringes, pharmacy purchase of syringes faces significant obstacles in terms of the practices in different jurisdictions. PMID:15466847

  13. The association of syringe type and syringe cleaning with HCV infection among IDUs in Budapest, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Gyarmathy, V Anna; Neaigus, Alan; Mitchell, Mary M; Ujhelyi, Eszter

    2009-03-01

    We assessed whether syringe type, syringe cleaning and distributive syringe sharing were associated with self-reported and laboratory-confirmed HCV infection among Hungarian IDUs. Injecting drug users (N=215) were recruited from non-treatment settings in Budapest, Hungary between October 2005 and December 2006. Multivariate logistic regression models identified correlates of self-report of being HCV infected and testing positive for HCV. While 37% tested positive for HCV, 14% of the total (39% of those who tested positive) self-reported being HCV infected. Using any two-piece syringes was significantly associated with self-reported HCV infection, while distributive syringe sharing was not associated with self-report of being HCV infected. Engaging in receptive sharing of only one-piece syringes but always cleaning before reuse was not associated with testing HCV positive, while any receptive sharing of only one-piece syringes and not always cleaning before reuse was significantly associated with testing HCV positive. Sharing cookers and squirting drugs from one syringe into another syringe were not associated with testing HCV positive. The high percent of those HCV infected who did not know they were infected highlights the need to provide better access to confidential testing and counseling services. Counseling should emphasize secondary prevention of HCV among HCV infected IDUs. Our findings also indicate that syringe type and syringe cleaning practices may play a role in HCV transmission. Ethnographic research should identify the reasons why IDUs may use two-piece syringes and suggest means to reduce their use. Thorough cleaning of one-piece syringes when sterile syringes are unavailable may be an efficient way to reduce the risk of HCV infection. PMID:19058925

  14. Source geometry factors for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, D. R.; Sander, T.; Nutbrown, R. F.

    2015-03-01

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated 192Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR 192Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, ksg, is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR 192Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR 192Ir Flexisource ksg was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  15. Syringe exchange as a social movement: a case study of harm reduction in Oakland, California.

    PubMed

    Bluthenthal, R N

    1998-04-01

    The federal ban on funding for syringe exchange programs (SEPs) has greatly hampered attempts to prevent the spread of HIV among injection drug users in the United States. State laws prohibiting the possession and/or distribution of syringes have made SEPs illegal. These factors have lent a unique social movement quality to harm reduction efforts in the United States. Using a social movement perspective, this paper explores dynamics of the implementation and defense of the syringe exchange program in Oakland, California. The advantages and disadvantages of the social movement aspects of harm reduction are discussed. PMID:9596381

  16. Syringe exchange as a social movement: a case study of harm reduction in Oakland, California.

    PubMed

    Bluthenthal, R N

    1998-04-01

    The federal ban on funding for syringe exchange programs (SEPs) has greatly hampered attempts to prevent the spread of HIV among injection drug users in the United States. State laws prohibiting the possession and/or distribution of syringes have made SEPs illegal. These factors have lent a unique social movement quality to harm reduction efforts in the United States. Using a social movement perspective, this paper explores dynamics of the implementation and defense of the syringe exchange program in Oakland, California. The advantages and disadvantages of the social movement aspects of harm reduction are discussed.

  17. Results of an intercomparison for free space antenna factor measurements within the German Calibration Service (DKD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleine-Ostmann, Thomas; Huncke, Frank; Schwarzbeck, Dieter; Martetschläger, Otto; Gaßner, Jürgen; Guserle, Andreas; Römer, Christian; Hufnagel, Thomas; Lehmann, Mario; Karsten, Uwe; Schrader, Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we discuss the results of an intercomparison for free space antenna factor measurements performed within the German Calibration Service (DKD). Three different types of antennas covering the frequency range from 30 MHz to 26.5 GHz have been calibrated in five different laboratories using different methods and calibration sites to obtain the free space antenna factor. The results agree well within the uncertainties specified by the laboratories suggesting that different approaches and different measurement sites to obtain the free space antenna factor are well compatible.

  18. 21 CFR 870.1650 - Angiographic injector and syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Angiographic injector and syringe. 870.1650... injector and syringe. (a) Identification. An angiographic injector and syringe is a device that consists of a syringe and a high-pressure injector which are used to inject contrast material into the...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1650 - Angiographic injector and syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Angiographic injector and syringe. 870.1650... injector and syringe. (a) Identification. An angiographic injector and syringe is a device that consists of a syringe and a high-pressure injector which are used to inject contrast material into the...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1650 - Angiographic injector and syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Angiographic injector and syringe. 870.1650... injector and syringe. (a) Identification. An angiographic injector and syringe is a device that consists of a syringe and a high-pressure injector which are used to inject contrast material into the...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1650 - Angiographic injector and syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Angiographic injector and syringe. 870.1650... injector and syringe. (a) Identification. An angiographic injector and syringe is a device that consists of a syringe and a high-pressure injector which are used to inject contrast material into the...

  2. Stability of octreotide acetate in polypropylene syringes.

    PubMed

    Stiles, M L; Allen, L V; Resztak, K E; Prince, S J

    1993-11-01

    The stability of octreotide acetate in polypropylene syringes was studied. Polypropylene syringes were aseptically filled with 1 mL of octreotide acetate 0.2 mg/mL and stored at 3 or 23 degrees C under light protection or light exposure. Three syringes were prepared for each condition and each sampling time. Unopened 5-mL glass vials of the drug served as controls. Samples were removed immediately and at 8, 15, 22, and 29 days and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. At 3 degrees C, octreotide stored in light-protected syringes maintained more than 90% of its initial concentration for up to 29 days. However, at 22 days the concentration in the syringes stored at that temperature and exposed to light was less than 90% when the standard deviation is considered. At 23 degrees C, the drug was stable for only up to 15 days (light protection) and 22 days (light exposure) when the standard deviation is considered. Octreotide acetate in polypropylene syringes was stable for up to 29 days when stored at 3 degrees C and protected from light and for up to 22 days when stored at 23 degrees C and exposed to light.

  3. Syringe Disposal Among Injection Drug Users in San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Alexis N.; Carpenter, Lisa; Geckeler, Dara; Colfax, Grant; Kral, Alex H.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of improperly discarded syringes and to examine syringe disposal practices of injection drug users (IDUs) in San Francisco, we visually inspected 1000 random city blocks and conducted a survey of 602 IDUs. We found 20 syringes on the streets we inspected. IDUs reported disposing of 13% of syringes improperly. In multivariate analysis, obtaining syringes from syringe exchange programs was found to be protective against improper disposal, and injecting in public places was predictive of improper disposal. Few syringes posed a public health threat. PMID:20466956

  4. Prospective survey of re-used plastic syringes for diabetics.

    PubMed

    McLaren, E H

    1986-05-01

    In a 1 year prospective survey of the safety and economy of re-used plastic insulin syringes 9843 syringes were used 93,867 times with one possible injection site infection. On average syringes were used 5.7 days before changing. Re-use of plastic syringes would produce an annual saving of about ł15 per patient when compared with glass syringes.

  5. Syringe exchange programs --- United States, 2008.

    PubMed

    2010-11-19

    Persons who inject drugs should use a new, sterile needle and syringe for each injection. Syringe exchange programs (SEPs) provide free sterile syringes and collect used syringes from injection-drug users (IDUs) to reduce transmission of bloodborne pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus (HCV). As of March 2009, a total of 184 SEPs were known to be operating in 36 states, the District of Columbia (DC), and Puerto Rico (North American Syringe Exchange Network [NASEN], unpublished data, 2009). Of these, 123 (67%) SEP directors participated in a mail/telephone survey conducted by NASEN and Beth Israel Medical Center (New York, New York) that covered program operations for the calendar year 2008. To characterize SEPs in the United States, this report summarizes the findings from that survey and compares them with previous SEP survey results from the period 1994-2007. In 2008, the 123 SEPs reported exchanging 29.1 million syringes and had budgets totaling $21.3 million, of which 79% came from state and local governments. Most of the SEPs reported offering preventive health and clinical services in addition to basic syringe exchange: 87% offered HIV counseling and testing, 65% offered hepatitis C counseling and testing, 55% offered sexually transmitted disease screening, and 31% offered tuberculosis screening; 89% provided referrals to substance abuse treatment. Providing comprehensive prevention services and referrals to IDUs, such as those offered by many SEPs, can help reduce the spread of bloodborne infections and should increase access to health care and substance abuse treatment, thus serving as an effective public health approach for this population. PMID:21085091

  6. Factors affecting the repeatability of gamma camera calibration for quantitative imaging applications using a sealed source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anizan, N.; Wang, H.; Zhou, X. C.; Wahl, R. L.; Frey, E. C.

    2015-02-01

    Several applications in nuclear medicine require absolute activity quantification of single photon emission computed tomography images. Obtaining a repeatable calibration factor that converts voxel values to activity units is essential for these applications. Because source preparation and measurement of the source activity using a radionuclide activity meter are potential sources of variability, this work investigated instrumentation and acquisition factors affecting repeatability using planar acquisition of sealed sources. The calibration factor was calculated for different acquisition and geometry conditions to evaluate the effect of the source size, lateral position of the source in the camera field-of-view (FOV), source-to-camera distance (SCD), and variability over time using sealed Ba-133 sources. A small region of interest (ROI) based on the source dimensions and collimator resolution was investigated to decrease the background effect. A statistical analysis with a mixed-effects model was used to evaluate quantitatively the effect of each variable on the global calibration factor variability. A variation of 1 cm in the measurement of the SCD from the assumed distance of 17 cm led to a variation of 1-2% in the calibration factor measurement using a small disc source (0.4 cm diameter) and less than 1% with a larger rod source (2.9 cm diameter). The lateral position of the source in the FOV and the variability over time had small impacts on calibration factor variability. The residual error component was well estimated by Poisson noise. Repeatability of better than 1% in a calibration factor measurement using a planar acquisition of a sealed source can be reasonably achieved. The best reproducibility was obtained with the largest source with a count rate much higher than the average background in the ROI, and when the SCD was positioned within 5 mm of the desired position. In this case, calibration source variability was limited by the quantum noise.

  7. Syringe and Needle Size, Syringe Type, Vacuum Generation, and Needle Control in Aspiration Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Haseler, Luke J.; Sibbitt, Randy R.; Sibbitt, Wilmer L.; Michael, Adrian A.; Gasparovic, Charles M.; Bankhurst, Arthur D.

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: Syringes are used for diagnostic fluid aspiration and fine-needle aspiration biopsy in interventional procedures. We determined the benefits, disadvantages, and patient safety implications of syringe and needle size on vacuum generation, hand force requirements, biopsy/fluid yield, and needle control during aspiration procedures. Materials and Methods: Different sizes (1, 3, 5, 10, and 20 ml) of the conventional syringe and aspirating mechanical safety syringe, the reciprocating procedure device, were studied. Twenty operators performed aspiration procedures with the following outcomes measured: (1) vacuum (torr), (2) time to vacuum (s), (3) hand force to generate vacuum (torr-cm{sup 2}), (4) operator difficulty during aspiration, (5) biopsy yield (mg), and (6) operator control of the needle tip position (mm). Results: Vacuum increased tissue biopsy yield at all needle diameters (P < 0.002). Twenty-milliliter syringes achieved a vacuum of -517 torr but required far more strength to aspirate, and resulted in significant loss of needle control (P < 0.002). The 10-ml syringe generated only 15% less vacuum (-435 torr) than the 20-ml device and required much less hand strength. The mechanical syringe generated identical vacuum at all syringe sizes with less hand force (P < 0.002) and provided significantly enhanced needle control (P < 0.002). Conclusions: To optimize patient safety and control of the needle, and to maximize fluid and tissue yield during aspiration procedures, a two-handed technique and the smallest syringe size adequate for the procedure should be used. If precise needle control or one-handed operation is required, a mechanical safety syringe should be considered.

  8. Prevalence and predictors of transitions to and away from syringe exchange use over time in 3 US cities with varied syringe dispensing policies

    PubMed Central

    Green, Traci C.; Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Singer, Merrill; Beletsky, Leo; Grau, Lauretta E.; Marshall, Patricia; Heimer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Syringe exchange programs (SEPs) can reduce HIV risk among injecting drug users (IDUs) but their use may depend heavily on contextual factors such as local syringe policies. The frequency and predictors of transitioning over time to and from direct, indirect, and non-use of SEPs are unknown. We sought, over one year, to: (1) quantify and characterize transition probabilities of SEP attendance typologies; (2) identify factors associated with (a) change in typology, and (b) becoming and maintaining direct SEP use; and (3) quantify and characterize transition probabilities of SEP attendance before and after changes in policy designed to increase access. Using data collected from 583 IDUs participating in a three-city cohort study of SEPs, we conducted a latent transition analysis and multinomial regressions. Three typologies were detected: Direct SEP users, Indirect SEP users and Isolated IDUs. Transitions to direct SEP use were most prevalent. Factors associated with becoming or maintaining direct SEP use were female sex, Latino ethnicity, fewer injections per syringe, homelessness, recruitment city, injecting speedballs (cocaine and heroin), and police contact involving drug paraphernalia possession. Similar factors influenced transitions in the syringe policy change analysis. Policy change cities experienced an increase in Indirect SEP users (43% to 51%) with little increased direct use (29% to 31%). We found that, over time, IDUs tended to become Direct SEP users. Policies improving syringe availability influenced SEP use by increasing secondary syringe exchange. Interactions with police around drug paraphernalia may encourage SEP use for some IDUs and may provide opportunities for other health interventions. PMID:20537814

  9. Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody against Syringate Derivatives: Application of Immunochemical Detection of Methyl Syringate in Honey.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoji; Fujinaka, Rie; Juri, Maki; Yoshiki, Yui; Ishisaka, Akari; Kitamoto, Noritoshi; Nitta, Yoko; Ishikawa, Hirohito

    2016-08-24

    Syringic acid is one of the key skeletal structures of plant-derived chemicals. The derivatives of syringic acid have certain biological functions. In this study, a monoclonal antibody to syringic acid-based phytochemicals was prepared and characterized. The obtained antibody reacted with methyl syringate, syringic acid, and leonurine. Methyl syringate is a characteristic compound found in manuka honey, other honey varieties, and plants. Manuka honey was fractionated using HPLC, and the reactivity of the fractions with the antibody was examined. The antibody reacted with the fraction in which methyl syringate was eluted. The amount of methyl syringate in honeys as estimated by ELISA using the antibody had a good linearity compared with that estimated by HPLC. These results suggest that the antibody is applicable for the immunochemical detection of syringic acid derivatives in plants and foods. PMID:27477590

  10. Prefilled syringes: An innovation in parenteral packaging

    PubMed Central

    Makwana, Sagar; Basu, Biswajit; Makasana, Yogita; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2011-01-01

    Parenteral administration of pharmaceutical products is one of the most popular methods used to produce quick onset of action and also 100% bioavailability. Main problem occurs with the parenteral drug delivery is lack of convenience, affordability, accuracy, sterility, safety etc. Such drawbacks with this delivery system makes it less preferable. Hence, all the disadvantages of these systems can be easily overcome by use of prefilled syringes. The objective of this review article is to provide information regarding prefilled syringes; it's method of preparation, direction to use, advantages, its future scope, and development. PMID:23071944

  11. Prefilled syringes: An innovation in parenteral packaging.

    PubMed

    Makwana, Sagar; Basu, Biswajit; Makasana, Yogita; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2011-10-01

    Parenteral administration of pharmaceutical products is one of the most popular methods used to produce quick onset of action and also 100% bioavailability. Main problem occurs with the parenteral drug delivery is lack of convenience, affordability, accuracy, sterility, safety etc. Such drawbacks with this delivery system makes it less preferable. Hence, all the disadvantages of these systems can be easily overcome by use of prefilled syringes. The objective of this review article is to provide information regarding prefilled syringes; it's method of preparation, direction to use, advantages, its future scope, and development. PMID:23071944

  12. Prefilled syringes: An innovation in parenteral packaging.

    PubMed

    Makwana, Sagar; Basu, Biswajit; Makasana, Yogita; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2011-10-01

    Parenteral administration of pharmaceutical products is one of the most popular methods used to produce quick onset of action and also 100% bioavailability. Main problem occurs with the parenteral drug delivery is lack of convenience, affordability, accuracy, sterility, safety etc. Such drawbacks with this delivery system makes it less preferable. Hence, all the disadvantages of these systems can be easily overcome by use of prefilled syringes. The objective of this review article is to provide information regarding prefilled syringes; it's method of preparation, direction to use, advantages, its future scope, and development.

  13. Precision evaluation of calibration factor of a superconducting gravimeter using an absolute gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jin-yang; Wu, Shu-qing; Li, Chun-jian; Su, Duo-wu; Xu, Jin-yi; Yu, Mei

    2016-01-01

    The precision of the calibration factor of a superconducting gravimeter (SG) using an absolute gravimeter (AG) is analyzed based on linear least square fitting and error propagation theory and factors affecting the accuracy are discussed. It can improve the accuracy to choose the observation period of solid tide as a significant change or increase the calibration time. Simulation is carried out based on synthetic gravity tides calculated with T-soft at observed site from Aug. 14th to Sept. 2nd in 2014. The result indicates that the highest precision using half a day's observation data is below 0.28% and the precision exponentially increases with the increase of peak-to-peak gravity change. The comparison of results obtained from the same observation time indicated that using properly selected observation data has more beneficial on the improvement of precision. Finally, the calibration experiment of the SG iGrav-012 is introduced and the calibration factor is determined for the first time using AG FG5X-249. With 2.5 days' data properly selected from solid tide period with large tidal amplitude, the determined calibration factor of iGrav-012 is (-92.54423+/-0.13616) μGal/V (1μGal=10-8m/s2), with the relative accuracy of about 0.15%.

  14. Open-source syringe pump library.

    PubMed

    Wijnen, Bas; Hunt, Emily J; Anzalone, Gerald C; Pearce, Joshua M

    2014-01-01

    This article explores a new open-source method for developing and manufacturing high-quality scientific equipment suitable for use in virtually any laboratory. A syringe pump was designed using freely available open-source computer aided design (CAD) software and manufactured using an open-source RepRap 3-D printer and readily available parts. The design, bill of materials and assembly instructions are globally available to anyone wishing to use them. Details are provided covering the use of the CAD software and the RepRap 3-D printer. The use of an open-source Rasberry Pi computer as a wireless control device is also illustrated. Performance of the syringe pump was assessed and the methods used for assessment are detailed. The cost of the entire system, including the controller and web-based control interface, is on the order of 5% or less than one would expect to pay for a commercial syringe pump having similar performance. The design should suit the needs of a given research activity requiring a syringe pump including carefully controlled dosing of reagents, pharmaceuticals, and delivery of viscous 3-D printer media among other applications. PMID:25229451

  15. Adiabatic Compression in a Fire Syringe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayn, Carl H.; Baird, Scott C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using better materials in fire syringes to obtain more effective results during demonstrations which show the elevation in temperature upon a very rapid (adiabatic) compression of air. Also describes an experiment (using ignition temperatures) which introduces students to the use of thermocouples for high temperature measurements. (DH)

  16. Open-Source Syringe Pump Library

    PubMed Central

    Wijnen, Bas; Hunt, Emily J.; Anzalone, Gerald C.; Pearce, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores a new open-source method for developing and manufacturing high-quality scientific equipment suitable for use in virtually any laboratory. A syringe pump was designed using freely available open-source computer aided design (CAD) software and manufactured using an open-source RepRap 3-D printer and readily available parts. The design, bill of materials and assembly instructions are globally available to anyone wishing to use them. Details are provided covering the use of the CAD software and the RepRap 3-D printer. The use of an open-source Rasberry Pi computer as a wireless control device is also illustrated. Performance of the syringe pump was assessed and the methods used for assessment are detailed. The cost of the entire system, including the controller and web-based control interface, is on the order of 5% or less than one would expect to pay for a commercial syringe pump having similar performance. The design should suit the needs of a given research activity requiring a syringe pump including carefully controlled dosing of reagents, pharmaceuticals, and delivery of viscous 3-D printer media among other applications. PMID:25229451

  17. Safe practice in syringe pump management.

    PubMed

    Mukoreka, Juliette; Sisay, Isatta

    Syringe pumps offer an alternative route for delivering medicine when the oral route cannot be used. This is particularly important for patients receiving palliative care, for whom a continuous infusion of medication can improve symptom control. This article explains how to administer drugs safely using these devices. PMID:26182586

  18. The Disposable Syringe: More Experiments and Uses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Andrew

    1973-01-01

    Describes a variety of experiments that can be performed using the disposable syringe. Among others, these include the removal of oxygen during rusting, convection in a liquid and in air, gas collection in an electrolysis cell, small scale production of a fog, and hydrogen/oxygen extraction from a voltameter. (JR)

  19. Effect of Legal Status of Pharmacy Syringe Sales on Syringe Purchases by Persons Who Inject Drugs in San Francisco and San Diego, CA

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Saira S.; Armenta, Richard; Evans, Jennifer L.; Yu, Michelle; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Page, Kimberly; Davidson, Peter; Garfein, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Sharing blood-contaminated syringes is the main risk factor for acquiring and transmitting blood-borne infections among persons who inject drugs (PWID). To reduce this risk, in 2005, California enacted legislation allowing local health jurisdictions to legalize non-prescription syringe sales after approving a disease prevention demonstration project (DPDP). With San Francisco approving a DPDP immediately and San Diego never approving one, we compared PWID across cities for their use of pharmacies PWID to obtain syringes. PWID age 18–30 years old were recruited into separate studies in San Francisco (n=243) and San Diego (n=338) between 2008 and 2011. We used multivariable logistic regression to compare the proportions of PWID who obtained syringes from pharmacies by city while controlling for socio-demographics, injection practices and other risk behaviors. Overall, most PWID were white (71%), male (63%), and between the ages of 18–25 years (55%). Compared to San Francisco, a smaller proportion of PWID in San Diego had bought syringes from pharmacies in the prior three months (16.9% vs. 49.8%; p<0.001), which remained statistically significant after adjusting for socio-demographic and behavioral factors (adjusted odds ratio=4.45, 95% confidence interval: 2.98, 6.65). Use of pharmacies to obtain syringes was greater where it was legal to do so. Public health policy can influence HIV and hepatitis C associated risk among PWID; however, implementation of these policies is crucial for the benefits to be realized. PMID:26252980

  20. 21 CFR 880.6920 - Syringe needle introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Syringe needle introducer. 880.6920 Section 880... Devices § 880.6920 Syringe needle introducer. (a) Identification. A syringe needle introducer is a device that uses a spring-loaded mechanism to drive a hypodermic needle into a patient to a...

  1. 21 CFR 880.6920 - Syringe needle introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Syringe needle introducer. 880.6920 Section 880... Devices § 880.6920 Syringe needle introducer. (a) Identification. A syringe needle introducer is a device that uses a spring-loaded mechanism to drive a hypodermic needle into a patient to a...

  2. 21 CFR 880.6920 - Syringe needle introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Syringe needle introducer. 880.6920 Section 880... Devices § 880.6920 Syringe needle introducer. (a) Identification. A syringe needle introducer is a device that uses a spring-loaded mechanism to drive a hypodermic needle into a patient to a...

  3. 21 CFR 880.6920 - Syringe needle introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Syringe needle introducer. 880.6920 Section 880... Devices § 880.6920 Syringe needle introducer. (a) Identification. A syringe needle introducer is a device that uses a spring-loaded mechanism to drive a hypodermic needle into a patient to a...

  4. 21 CFR 880.6920 - Syringe needle introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Syringe needle introducer. 880.6920 Section 880... Devices § 880.6920 Syringe needle introducer. (a) Identification. A syringe needle introducer is a device that uses a spring-loaded mechanism to drive a hypodermic needle into a patient to a...

  5. Development of Syringe/Bottle Hybrids for Sampling Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, C.J.

    1998-01-08

    A convenient and effective sample bottle system based on simple modifications of disposable plastic syringes and bottles has been devised and tested for slurry samples. Syringe/ bottle hybrids (hereafter referred to as syringe bottles) have the convenience of regular flat-bottom bottles with screw cap closures. In addition, the syringe imparts a sliding and adjustable bottom to the bottle that forces the entire contents from the bottle. The system was designed especially to collect samples for high temperature work-ups of DWPF slurry samples. The syringe bottles together with fixed-bottom sample vial inserts would provide the DWPF with convenient and reliable methods for dealing with slurry samples.

  6. Comparative evaluation of endodontic pressure syringe, insulin syringe, jiffy tube, and local anesthetic syringe in obturation of primary teeth: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Mallayya C.; Srivastava, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare four methods of root canal obturation in primary teeth using conventional radiography. Materials and Methods: A total of 96 root canals of primary molars were prepared and obturated with zinc oxide eugenol. Obturation methods compared were endodontic pressure syringe, insulin syringe, jiffy tube, and local anesthetic syringe. The root canal obturations were evaluated by conventional radiography for the length of obturation and presence of voids. The obtained data were analyzed using Chi-square test. Results: The results showed significant differences between the four groups for the length of obturation (P < 0.05). The endodontic pressure syringe showed the best results (98.5% optimal fillings) and jiffy tube showed the poor results (37.5% optimal fillings) for the length of obturation. The insulin syringe (79.2% optimal fillings) and local anesthetic syringe (66.7% optimal fillings) showed acceptable results for the length of root canal obturation. However, minor voids were present in all the four techniques used. Conclusions: Endodontic pressure syringe produced the best results in terms of length of obturation and controlling paste extrusion from the apical foramen. However, insulin syringe and local anesthetic syringe can be used as effective alternative methods. PMID:27433062

  7. Real-time particle monitor calibration factors and PM2.5 emission factors for multiple indoor sources.

    PubMed

    Dacunto, Philip J; Cheng, Kai-Chung; Acevedo-Bolton, Viviana; Jiang, Ruo-Ting; Klepeis, Neil E; Repace, James L; Ott, Wayne R; Hildemann, Lynn M

    2013-08-01

    Indoor sources can greatly contribute to personal exposure to particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5). To accurately assess PM2.5 mass emission factors and concentrations, real-time particle monitors must be calibrated for individual sources. Sixty-six experiments were conducted with a common, real-time laser photometer (TSI SidePak™ Model AM510 Personal Aerosol Monitor) and a filter-based PM2.5 gravimetric sampler to quantify the monitor calibration factors (CFs), and to estimate emission factors for common indoor sources including cigarettes, incense, cooking, candles, and fireplaces. Calibration factors for these indoor sources were all significantly less than the factory-set CF of 1.0, ranging from 0.32 (cigarette smoke) to 0.70 (hamburger). Stick incense had a CF of 0.35, while fireplace emissions ranged from 0.44-0.47. Cooking source CFs ranged from 0.41 (fried bacon) to 0.65-0.70 (fried pork chops, salmon, and hamburger). The CFs of combined sources (e.g., cooking and cigarette emissions mixed) were linear combinations of the CFs of the component sources. The highest PM2.5 emission factors per time period were from burned foods and fireplaces (15-16 mg min(-1)), and the lowest from cooking foods such as pizza and ground beef (0.1-0.2 mg min(-1)). PMID:23784066

  8. Access to syringes for HIV prevention for injection drug users in St. Petersburg, Russia: syringe purchase test study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic in Russia is concentrated among injection drug users (IDUs). This is especially true for St. Petersburg where high HIV incidence persists among the city’s estimated 80,000 IDUs. Although sterile syringes are legally available, access for IDUs may be hampered. To explore the feasibility of using pharmacies to expand syringe access and provide other prevention services to IDUs, we investigated the current access to sterile syringes at the pharmacies and the correlation between pharmacy density and HIV prevalence in St. Petersburg. Methods 965 pharmacies citywide were mapped, classified by ownership type, and the association between pharmacy density and HIV prevalence at the district level was tested. We selected two districts among the 18 districts – one central and one peripheral – that represented two major types of city districts and contacted all operating pharmacies by phone to inquire if they stocked syringes and obtained details about their stock. Qualitative interviews with 26 IDUs provided data regarding syringe access in pharmacies and were used to formulate hypotheses for the pharmacy syringe purchase test wherein research staff attempted to purchase syringes in all pharmacies in the two districts. Results No correlation was found between the density of pharmacies and HIV prevalence at the district level. Of 108 operating pharmacies, 38 (35%) did not sell syringes of the types used by IDUs; of these, half stocked but refused to sell syringes to research staff, and the other half did not stock syringes at all. Overall 70 (65%) of the pharmacies did sell syringes; of these, 49 pharmacies sold single syringes without any restrictions and 21 offered packages of ten. Conclusions Trainings for pharmacists need to be conducted to reduce negative attitudes towards IDUs and increase pharmacists’ willingness to sell syringes. At a structural level, access to safe injection supplies for IDUs could be increased by including syringes

  9. Innovative self-calibration method for accelerometer scale factor of the missile-borne RINS with fiber optic gyro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Lei; Liu, Zengjun; Zhang, Yiming

    2016-09-19

    The calibration of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) is a key technique to improve the preciseness of the inertial navigation system (INS) for missile, especially for the calibration of accelerometer scale factor. Traditional calibration method is generally based on the high accuracy turntable, however, it leads to expensive costs and the calibration results are not suitable to the actual operating environment. In the wake of developments in multi-axis rotational INS (RINS) with optical inertial sensors, self-calibration is utilized as an effective way to calibrate IMU on missile and the calibration results are more accurate in practical application. However, the introduction of multi-axis RINS causes additional calibration errors, including non-orthogonality errors of mechanical processing and non-horizontal errors of operating environment, it means that the multi-axis gimbals could not be regarded as a high accuracy turntable. As for its application on missiles, in this paper, after analyzing the relationship between the calibration error of accelerometer scale factor and non-orthogonality and non-horizontal angles, an innovative calibration procedure using the signals of fiber optic gyro and photoelectric encoder is proposed. The laboratory and vehicle experiment results validate the theory and prove that the proposed method relaxes the orthogonality requirement of rotation axes and eliminates the strict application condition of the system. PMID:27661867

  10. HIV Risk Behavior among Amphetamine Injectors at U.S. Syringe Exchange Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braine, Naomi; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Goldblatt, Cullen; Zadoretzky, Cathy; Turner, Charles

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare HIV risk behaviors of amphetamine and non-amphetamine injectors at syringe exchange programs (SEP) in the United States and to identify factors associated with injection risk. This analysis is based on data from a random cross-section of participants at 13 SEPs in different parts of the country. All interviews…

  11. Source geometry factors for HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations.

    PubMed

    Shipley, D R; Sander, T; Nutbrown, R F

    2015-03-21

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated (192)Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR (192)Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, k(sg), is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR (192)Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR (192)Ir Flexisource k(sg) was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  12. Wrap spring clutch syringe ram and frit mixer

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Frank B.

    2006-07-25

    A wrap spring clutch syringe ram pushes at least one syringe with virtually instantaneous starting and stopping, and with constant motion at a defined velocity during the intervening push. The wrap spring clutch syringe ram includes an electric motor, a computer, a flywheel, a wrap spring clutch, a precision lead screw, a slide platform, and syringe reservoirs, a mixing chamber, and a reaction incubation tube. The electric motor drives a flywheel and the wrap spring clutch couples the precision lead screw to the flywheel when a computer enables a solenoid of the wrap spring clutch. The precision lead screw drives a precision slide which causes syringes to supply a portion of solution into the mixing chamber and the incubation tube. The wrap spring clutch syringe ram is designed to enable the quantitative study of solution phase chemical and biochemical reactions, particularly those reactions that occur on the subsecond time scale.

  13. Could low dead-space syringes really reduce HIV transmission to low levels?

    PubMed

    Vickerman, P; Martin, N K; Hickman, M

    2013-01-01

    Studies published by Zule and colleagues have suggested that use of low dead-space syringes (LDSS) instead of high dead-space syringes (HDSS) by injecting drug users (IDUs) could dramatically reduce HIV transmission. However, evidence is limited because experiments have considered a small range of syringe types and have been unable to reliably estimate the efficacy of using LDSS for reducing HIV transmission. We critically appraise available evidence to determine whether using LDSS is likely to dramatically reduce HIV transmission. We systematically review the literature on the dead-space volume of syringes and estimate the factor difference in blood volume transferred from sharing LDSS or HDSS. Existing data on the relationship between host viral load and HIV transmission risk is used to evaluate the likely efficacy of using LDSS instead of HDSS. An HIV transmission model is used to make conservative impact projections for switching to using LDSS, and explore the implications of heterogeneity in IDU transmission risk and syringe preferences. Although highly variable, reviewed studies suggest that HDSS have on average 10 times the dead-space volume of LDSS and could result in 6/54/489 times more blood being transferred after 0/1/2 water rinses. Assuming a conservative 2-fold increase in HIV transmission risk per 10-fold increase in infected blood inoculum, HDSS use could be associated with a mean 1.7/3.6/6.5-fold increase in transmission risk compared to LDSS for 0/1/2 rinses. However, even for a low efficacy estimate, modelling suggests that partially transferring to LDSS use from using HDSS could dramatically reduce HIV prevalence (generally >33% if LDSS use is 50%), but impact will depend on IDU behavioural heterogeneity and syringe preference. Indirect evidence suggests that encouraging HDSS users to use LDSS could be a powerful HIV prevention strategy. There is an urgent need to evaluate the real life effectiveness of this strategy.

  14. Characterization of responses and comparison of calibration factor for commercial MOSFET detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bharanidharan, Ganesan; Manigandan, Durai; Devan, Krishnamurthy; Subramani, Vellaiyan; Gopishankar, Natanasabapathi; Ganesh, Tharmar; Joshi, Rakeshchander; Rath, Gourakishore; Velmurugan, Jagadeesan; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu . E-mail: sganesan@annauniv.edu

    2005-01-01

    A commercial metal oxide silicon field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter of model TN502-RD has been characterized for its linearity, reproducibility, field size dependency, dose rate dependency, and angular dependency for Cobalt-60 ({sup 6}Co), 6-MV, and 15-MV beam energies. The performance of the MOSFET clearly shows that it is highly reproducible, independent of field size and dose rate. Furthermore, MOSFET has a very high degree of linearity, with r-value > 0.9 for all 3 energies. The calibration factor for 2 similar MOSFET detectors of model TN502-RD were also estimated and compared for all 3 energies. The calibration factor between the 2 similar MOSFET detectors shows a variation of about 1.8% for {sup 6}Co and 15 MV, and for 6 MV it shows variation of about 2.5%, indicating that calibration should be done whenever a new MOSFET is used. However, the detector shows considerable angular dependency of about 8.8% variation. This may be due to the variation in radiation sensitivity between flat and bubble sides of the MOSFET, and indicates that positional care must be taken while using MOSFET for stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy dosimetric applications.

  15. Note: Calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using only their resonant frequency and quality factor

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Friend, James R.

    2014-11-15

    A simplified method for calibrating atomic force microscope cantilevers was recently proposed by Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 103705 (2012); Sec. III D] that relies solely on the resonant frequency and quality factor of the cantilever in fluid (typically air). This method eliminates the need to measure the hydrodynamic function of the cantilever, which can be time consuming given the wide range of cantilevers now available. Using laser Doppler vibrometry, we rigorously assess the accuracy of this method for a series of commercially available cantilevers and explore its performance under non-ideal conditions. This shows that the simplified method is highly accurate and can be easily implemented to perform fast, robust, and non-invasive spring constant calibration.

  16. Liquid drugs and high dead space syringes may keep HIV and HCV prevalence high - a comparison of Hungary and Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Gyarmathy, V Anna; Neaigus, Alan; Li, Nan; Ujhelyi, Eszter; Caplinskiene, Irma; Caplinskas, Saulius; Latkin, Carl A

    2010-01-01

    Despitevery similar political, drug policy and HIV prevention backgrounds, HIV and HCV prevalence is considerably different in Hungary (low HIV and moderate HCV prevalence) and Lithuania (high HCV and moderate HIV prevalence). Wecompared the drug use profile of Hungarian (n = 215) and Lithuanian (n = 300) injecting drug users (IDUs). Overall, compared with IDUs in Hungary, IDUs in Lithuania often injected opiates purchased in liquid form ('shirka'), used and shared 2-piece syringes (vs. 1-piece syringes) disproportionately more often, were less likely to acquire their syringes from legal sources and had significantly more experience with injected and less experience with non-injected drugs. It may not be liquid drugs per se that contribute to a higher prevalence of HCV and/or HIV, but it is probably factors associated with the injecting of liquid drugs, such as the wide-spread use and sharing of potentially contaminated 2-piece syringes acquired often from non-legal sources, and syringe-mediated drug sharing with 2-piece syringes. Scaling up substitution therapy, especially heroin replacement, combined with reducing the supply of liquid drugs may decrease the prevalence of high-risk injecting behaviours related to the injecting of liquid drugs and drug injecting-related infections among IDUs in Lithuania.

  17. Monte Carlo modeling provides accurate calibration factors for radionuclide activity meters.

    PubMed

    Zagni, F; Cicoria, G; Lucconi, G; Infantino, A; Lodi, F; Marengo, M

    2014-12-01

    Accurate determination of calibration factors for radionuclide activity meters is crucial for quantitative studies and in the optimization step of radiation protection, as these detectors are widespread in radiopharmacy and nuclear medicine facilities. In this work we developed the Monte Carlo model of a widely used activity meter, using the Geant4 simulation toolkit. More precisely the "PENELOPE" EM physics models were employed. The model was validated by means of several certified sources, traceable to primary activity standards, and other sources locally standardized with spectrometry measurements, plus other experimental tests. Great care was taken in order to accurately reproduce the geometrical details of the gas chamber and the activity sources, each of which is different in shape and enclosed in a unique container. Both relative calibration factors and ionization current obtained with simulations were compared against experimental measurements; further tests were carried out, such as the comparison of the relative response of the chamber for a source placed at different positions. The results showed a satisfactory level of accuracy in the energy range of interest, with the discrepancies lower than 4% for all the tested parameters. This shows that an accurate Monte Carlo modeling of this type of detector is feasible using the low-energy physics models embedded in Geant4. The obtained Monte Carlo model establishes a powerful tool for first instance determination of new calibration factors for non-standard radionuclides, for custom containers, when a reference source is not available. Moreover, the model provides an experimental setup for further research and optimization with regards to materials and geometrical details of the measuring setup, such as the ionization chamber itself or the containers configuration.

  18. Applications of spectral band adjustment factors (SBAF) for cross-calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, Gyanesh

    2013-01-01

    To monitor land surface processes over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, it is critical to have coordinated observations of the Earth's surface acquired from multiple spaceborne imaging sensors. However, an integrated global observation framework requires an understanding of how land surface processes are seen differently by various sensors. This is particularly true for sensors acquiring data in spectral bands whose relative spectral responses (RSRs) are not similar and thus may produce different results while observing the same target. The intrinsic offsets between two sensors caused by RSR mismatches can be compensated by using a spectral band adjustment factor (SBAF), which takes into account the spectral profile of the target and the RSR of the two sensors. The motivation of this work comes from the need to compensate the spectral response differences of multispectral sensors in order to provide a more accurate cross-calibration between the sensors. In this paper, radiometric cross-calibration of the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and the Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors was performed using near-simultaneous observations over the Libya 4 pseudoinvariant calibration site in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. The RSR differences of the analogous ETM+ and MODIS spectral bands provide the opportunity to explore, understand, quantify, and compensate for the measurement differences between these two sensors. The cross-calibration was initially performed by comparing the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectances between the two sensors over their lifetimes. The average percent differences in the long-term trends ranged from $-$5% to $+$6%. The RSR compensated ETM+ TOA reflectance (ETM+$^{ast}$) measurements were then found to agree with MODIS TOA reflectance to within 5% for all bands when Earth Observing-1 Hy- erion hyperspectral data were used to produce the SBAFs. These differences were later

  19. Radiance factor calibration of near-infrared spectral images of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, David R.; Bell, James F.

    2003-05-01

    We present radiometrically calibrated spectrophotometric images of Mars taken at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) near and during the 1995 and 1999 oppositions. Absolute intensity and radiance factor ( r F = I/F) values have been calculated for approximately 95% of the surface over all longitudes between -70° to 90° latitude in the 1.5- to 4.1-μm spectral region at a spectral resolution (Δλ/λ) of 1.5%. Values of radiance factor range from r F = 0.4 to 0.6 at 2.2 μm for the bright regions such as Moab and Arabia to r F = 0.12 to 0.3 at 2.2 μm around the dark regions Syrtis Major and Acidalia Planitia. Variations are seen due to seasonal dust and/or condensate cloud cover and viewing geometry. Our results are generally consistent with the few reported previous radiance factor determinations for Mars. These data are unique among ground-based data in their relatively high spatial resolution (≲200 km/pixel at the sub-Earth point) and coverage combined with their spectral resolution and coverage. These radiometrically calibrated observations can be used as input to studies focusing on spectral unmixing of surface and atmospheric components, radiative transfer modeling of disk and limb radiances, and photometric modeling of the martian phase function.

  20. Syringe Disposal among Injection Drug Users in Harlem and the Bronx during the New York State Expanded Syringe Access Demonstration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleland, Charles M.; Deren, Sherry; Fuller, Crystal M.; Blaney, Shannon; McMahon, James M.; Tortu, Stephanie; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Vlahov, David

    2007-01-01

    Effective January 1, 2001, New York State enacted the Expanded Syringe Access Demonstration Program (ESAP), allowing syringes to be sold in pharmacies without a prescription or dispensed through doctors, hospitals, and clinics to adults. A concern in the assessment of ESAP is its effects on syringe disposal practices. Syringe use data regarding…

  1. 21 CFR 870.1670 - Syringe actuator for an injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Syringe actuator for an injector. 870.1670 Section... actuator for an injector. (a) Identification. A syringe actuator for an injector is an electrical device that controls the timing of an injection by an angiographic or indicator injector and synchronizes...

  2. 21 CFR 870.1670 - Syringe actuator for an injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Syringe actuator for an injector. 870.1670 Section... actuator for an injector. (a) Identification. A syringe actuator for an injector is an electrical device that controls the timing of an injection by an angiographic or indicator injector and synchronizes...

  3. 21 CFR 870.1670 - Syringe actuator for an injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Syringe actuator for an injector. 870.1670 Section... actuator for an injector. (a) Identification. A syringe actuator for an injector is an electrical device that controls the timing of an injection by an angiographic or indicator injector and synchronizes...

  4. 21 CFR 870.1670 - Syringe actuator for an injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Syringe actuator for an injector. 870.1670 Section... actuator for an injector. (a) Identification. A syringe actuator for an injector is an electrical device that controls the timing of an injection by an angiographic or indicator injector and synchronizes...

  5. 21 CFR 870.1670 - Syringe actuator for an injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Syringe actuator for an injector. 870.1670 Section... actuator for an injector. (a) Identification. A syringe actuator for an injector is an electrical device that controls the timing of an injection by an angiographic or indicator injector and synchronizes...

  6. 21 CFR 870.1650 - Angiographic injector and syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... a syringe and a high-pressure injector which are used to inject contrast material into the heart... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Angiographic injector and syringe. 870.1650 Section 870.1650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  7. Use of SoloShot autodestruct syringes compared with disposable syringes, in a national immunization campaign in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Nelson, C M; Sutanto, A; Suradana, I G

    1999-01-01

    Autodestruct syringes can reduce the improper reuse of syringes, which present a significant risk in the transmission of bloodborne pathogens in developing countries, especially during immunization campaigns owing to the high number of injections given per session. SoloShot is an autodestruct syringe, distributed by UNICEF, which has been shown to be safer and easier to use than standard syringes. This study analyses the accuracy and dose-efficiency of SoloShot, compared with disposable syringes, during a national tetanus toxoid immunization campaign on the Indonesian island of Lombok. Observation and dose measurements revealed that SoloShot syringes delivered more precise and consistent doses and 15% more doses per vial than disposable syringes. Vaccine savings may partially be offset by the higher price of SoloShot. Vaccinators preferred SoloShot, describing it as easier to use, faster, and more accurate than the disposable syringe. The study indicates that SoloShot is highly appropriate for use in immunization campaigns by reducing vaccine wastage and improving injection safety.

  8. Use of SoloShot autodestruct syringes compared with disposable syringes, in a national immunization campaign in Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, C. M.; Sutanto, A.; Suradana, I. G.

    1999-01-01

    Autodestruct syringes can reduce the improper reuse of syringes, which present a significant risk in the transmission of bloodborne pathogens in developing countries, especially during immunization campaigns owing to the high number of injections given per session. SoloShot is an autodestruct syringe, distributed by UNICEF, which has been shown to be safer and easier to use than standard syringes. This study analyses the accuracy and dose-efficiency of SoloShot, compared with disposable syringes, during a national tetanus toxoid immunization campaign on the Indonesian island of Lombok. Observation and dose measurements revealed that SoloShot syringes delivered more precise and consistent doses and 15% more doses per vial than disposable syringes. Vaccine savings may partially be offset by the higher price of SoloShot. Vaccinators preferred SoloShot, describing it as easier to use, faster, and more accurate than the disposable syringe. The study indicates that SoloShot is highly appropriate for use in immunization campaigns by reducing vaccine wastage and improving injection safety. PMID:10063658

  9. Socio-Economic Status Determines Risk of Receptive Syringe Sharing Behaviors among Iranian Drug Injectors; A National Study

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Rezazade, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although needle and syringe sharing is one of the main routs of transmission of HIV in several countries in the middle east, very little is known about how socio-economic status of injecting drug users (IDUs) is linked to the receptive syringe sharing behaviors in these countries. Aim: To study socio-economic correlates of receptive needle and syringe sharing among IDUs in Iran. Methods: The study used data from the Unhide Risk Study, a national survey of IDUs. This study sampled 636 IDUs (91% male) via snowball sampling from eight provinces in Iran in 2009. Socio-demographic and drug use characteristics were collected. We used a logistic regression to determine factors associated with receptive needle and syringe sharing during the past 6 months. Results: From 636 IDUs enrolled in this study, 68% (n = 434) reported receptive needle and syringe sharing behaviors in the past 6 months. Odds of receptive needle and syringe sharing in the past 6 months was lower among IDUs who were male [odds ratios (OR) = 0.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.12–0.70], had higher education (OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.64–0.86) but higher among those who were unemployed (OR = 4.05, 95% CI = 1.50–10.94), and were single (OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.02–2.11). Conclusion: This study presented factors associated with risk of receptive needle and syringe sharing among Iranian IDUs. This information may be used for HIV prevention and harm reduction purposes. Socio-economic status of Iranian IDUs may be closely linked to high-risk injecting behaviors among them. PMID:25852577

  10. Calibration of relative sensitivity factors for impact ionization detectors with high-velocity silicate microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiege, Katherina; Trieloff, Mario; Hillier, Jon K.; Guglielmino, Massimo; Postberg, Frank; Srama, Ralf; Kempf, Sascha; Blum, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    Impact ionization mass spectrometers, e.g., the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) onboard the Cassini spacecraft can quantitatively analyze the chemical composition of impacting particles, if the ionization efficiencies of the elements to be quantified are appropriately calibrated. Although silicates are an abundant dust species inside and outside the Solar System, an experimental calibration was not available for elements typically found in silicates. We performed such a calibration by accelerating orthopyroxene dust of known composition with a modified Van de Graaff accelerator to velocities of up to 37.9 km s-1 and subsequent analyses by a high resolution impact ionization mass spectrometer, the Large Area Mass Analyzer (LAMA). The orthopyroxene dust, prepared from a natural rock sample, contains ∼90% orthopyroxene and ∼10% additional mineral species, such as clinopyroxene, spinel, amphibole, olivine and glasses, which are present as impurities within the orthopyroxene, due to inclusion or intergrowth. Hence, the dust material can be regarded as a multi-mineral mixture. After analyses, we find that most particle data cluster at a composition ascribed to pure orthopyroxene. Some data scatter is caused by stochastic effects, other data scatter is caused by the chemically different mineral impurities. Our data indicate that these minor mineral phases can be recognized within a multi-mineral mixture. Here, for the first time, we present experimentally derived relative sensitivity factors (RSFs) for impact ionization mass spectroscopy of silicates, enabling the quantitative determination of the composition of cosmic dust grains. Orthopyroxene data were used to infer RSFs for Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe and K, for particles with radii ranging from 0.04 μm to 0.2 μm and velocities between 19 and 37.9 km s-1, impacting on a Rh-target.

  11. Storage stability of bevacizumab in polycarbonate and polypropylene syringes

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, H; Sharma, G; Froome, A; Khaw, P T; Brocchini, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare and examine the storage stability of compounded bevacizumab in polycarbonate (PC) and polypropylene (PP) syringes over a 6-month period. PC syringes have been used in a recent clinical study and bevacizumab stability has not been reported for this type of syringe. Methods Repackaged bevacizumab was obtained from Moorfields Pharmaceuticals in PC and PP syringes. Bevacizumab from the stored syringes was analysed at monthly time points for a 6-month period and compared with bevacizumab from a freshly opened vial at each time point. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used to observe aggregation and degradation. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) provided information about the hydrodynamic size and particle size distribution of bevacizumab in solution. VEGF binding and the active concentration of bevacizumab was determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using Biacore. Results SDS-PAGE and SEC analysis did not show any changes in the presence of higher molecular weight species (HMWS) or degradation products in PC and PP syringes from T0 to T6 compared with bevacizumab sampled from a freshly opened vial. The hydrodynamic diameter of bevacizumab in the PC syringe after 6 months of storage was not significantly different to bevacizumab taken from a freshly opened vial. Using SPR, the VEGF binding activity of bevacizumab in the PC syringe was comparable to bevacizumab taken from a freshly opened vial. Conclusion No significant difference over a 6-month period was observed in the quality of bevacizumab repackaged into prefilled polycarbonate and polypropylene syringes when compared with bevacizumab that is supplied from the vial. PMID:25853399

  12. Syringe Stockpiling by Persons Who Inject Drugs: An Evaluation of Current Measures for Needle and Syringe Program Coverage.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Angus R; Aitken, Campbell K; Burns, Lucinda A; Cogger, Shelley; Dietze, Paul M

    2016-05-01

    Needle and syringe program (NSP) coverage is commonly used to assess NSP effectiveness. However, existing measures don't capture whether persons who inject drugs (PWIDs) stockpile syringes, an important and novel aspect of NSP coverage. In this study, we determine the extent of stockpiling in a sample of Australian PWIDs and assess whether including stockpiling enhances NSP coverage measures. As part of the Illicit Drug Reporting System study, PWIDs reported syringes procured and given away, total injections in the last month, and syringes currently stockpiled in 2014. We calculated NSP coverage with and without stockpiling to determine proportional change in adequate NSP coverage. We conducted receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to determine whether inclusion of stockpiled syringes in the measure improved sensitivity in discriminating cases and noncases of risky behaviors. Three-quarters of the sample reported syringe stockpiling, and stockpiling was positively associated with nonindigenous background, stable accommodation, no prison history, longer injecting careers, and more frequent injecting. Compared with previous measures, our measure was significantly better at discriminating cases of risky behaviors. Our results could inform NSP policy to loosen restricted-exchange practice, allowing PWIDs greater flexibility in syringe procurement practices, promoting greater NSP coverage, and reducing PWIDs' engagement in risky behaviors.

  13. Non-prescription syringe sales in California: a qualitative examination of practices among 12 local health jurisdictions.

    PubMed

    Rose, Valerie J; Backes, Glenn; Martinez, Alexis; McFarland, Willi

    2010-07-01

    Legislation permitting non-prescription syringe sales (NPSS) was passed in 2004 in California as a structural intervention designed to expand access to syringes for injection drug users. As of December 2009, 19 of California's 61 local health jurisdictions (LHJs) have approved policies to authorize pharmacies to sell non-prescription syringes. The legislation faces termination in 2010 if current evaluation efforts fail to demonstrate outcomes defined in the legislation. Using qualitative methods, we examined the systems and procedures associated with implementation; identified facilitators and barriers to implementation among 12 LHJs, and documented the role of public health in initiating and sustaining local programs. We identified consistent activities that led to policy implementation among LHJs and discovered several barriers that were associated with failure to implement local programs. Factors leading to NPSS were public health leadership; an inclusive planning process, marketing the program as a public health initiative; learning from others' efforts, successes, and failures; and identifying acceptable syringe disposal options in advance of program implementation. Health departments that were confronted with political and moral arguments lost momentum and ultimately assigned a lower priority to the initiative citing the loss of powerful public health advocates or a lack of human resources. Additional barriers were law enforcement, elected officials, and pharmacy opposition, and failure to resolve syringe disposal options to the satisfaction of important stakeholders. The lessons learned in this study should provide useful guidance for the remaining LHJs in California without NPSS programs. PMID:20405227

  14. Observational calibration of the projection factor of Cepheids. I. The type II Cepheid κ Pavonis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitfelder, J.; Kervella, P.; Mérand, A.; Gallenne, A.; Szabados, L.; Anderson, R. I.; Willson, M.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The distance of pulsating stars, in particular Cepheids, are commonly measured using the parallax of pulsation technique. The different versions of this technique combine measurements of the linear diameter variation (from spectroscopy) and the angular diameter variation (from photometry or interferometry) amplitudes, to retrieve the distance in a quasi-geometrical way. However, the linear diameter amplitude is directly proportional to the projection factor (hereafter p-factor), which is used to convert spectroscopic radial velocities (i.e., disk integrated) into pulsating (i.e., photospheric) velocities. The value of the p-factor and its possible dependence on the pulsation period are still widely debated. Aims: Our goal is to measure an observational value of the p-factor of the type-II Cepheid κ Pavonis. Methods: The parallax of the type-II Cepheid κ Pav was measured with an accuracy of 5% using HST/FGS. We used this parallax as a starting point to derive the p-factor of κ Pav, using the SPIPS technique (Spectro-Photo-Interferometry of Pulsating Stars), which is a robust version of the parallax-of-pulsation method that employs radial velocity, interferometric and photometric data. We applied this technique to a combination of new VLTI/PIONIER optical interferometric angular diameters, new CORALIE and HARPS radial velocities, as well as multi-colour photometry and radial velocities from the literature. Results: We obtain a value of p = 1.26 ± 0.07 for the p-factor of κ Pav. This result agrees with several of the recently derived Period-p-factor relationships from the literature, as well as previous observational determinations for Cepheids. Conclusions: Individual estimates of the p-factor are fundamental to calibrating the parallax of pulsation distances of Cepheids. Together with previous observational estimates, the projection factor we obtain points to a weak dependence of the p-factor on period. Based on observations realized with ESO

  15. [Cytotoxicity evaluation of the disposable medical syringe piston].

    PubMed

    He, Huahong; Li, Wei; Wu, Ting

    2010-03-01

    When some testing institutions performed biological evaluation to the disposable medical syringe piston, cytotoxicity was found. According to the biological evaluation testing Selection Guide proposed by Ministry of Health and the Comments of Sample Provider, We performed biological evaluation to one sample by using 5 tests of basic biological evaluation. Cytotoxicity was found, which was probably caused by the residue of the lotion. This research provides reference for objective evaluation of disposable medical syringe piston and safe guarantee of the product.

  16. New gas-liquid equilibration method: syringe tonometer.

    PubMed

    Wallace, W D; Cutler, C A; Clark, J S

    1981-05-01

    This new apparatus for gas-liquid equilibration (tonometry) in a transportable vessel is designed for tonometry of blood or buffer solution in a specially designed syringe. Gas enters the syringe chamber through small holes in the tip of the syringe plunger and bubbles upward through the sample. The syringe plunger is a second chamber, which is used for warming and humidifying the gas before it enters the tonometer chamber. The entire syringe is housed in a transparent, temperature-controlled environment during equilibration. After equilibration, the sample is easily entered into a blood-gas analyzer. At most, gas-liquid O2/CO2 equilibration for 2.5 mL of buffer or blood requires less than 13 min. Comparisons with a standard thin-film tonometer show good agreement for pO2 and pCO2 over the range 0-93 kPa (0-700 mmHg) and 2-20 kPa (14-150 mmHg), respectively. The syringe tonometer eliminates contamination of the sample during transfer and transport to the analyzer, thus making tonometry more technique-independent. The apparatus is simple and easy to use, with definite advantages over existing methods of tonometry.

  17. The association between law enforcement encounters and syringe sharing among IDUs on skid row: a mixed methods analysis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Karla D; Simon-Freeman, Rebecca; Bluthenthal, Ricky N

    2013-10-01

    The legal environment is one factor that influences injection drug users' (IDUs) risk for HIV and other bloodborne pathogens such as hepatitis C virus (HCV). We examined the association between law enforcement encounters (i.e., arrests and citations) and receptive syringe sharing among IDUs in the context of an intensified policing effort. We conducted a mixed methods analysis of 30 qualitative and 187 quantitative interviews with IDUs accessing services at a Los Angeles, CA syringe exchange program from 2008 to 2009. Qualitative findings illustrate concerns related to visibility, drug withdrawal, and previous history of arrest/incarceration. In quantitative analysis, the number of citations received, current homelessness, and perceiving that being arrested would be a "big problem" were independently associated with recent syringe sharing. Findings illustrate some of the unintended public health consequences associated with intensified street-level policing, including risk for HIV and HCV transmission. PMID:23620243

  18. The effects of different syringe volume, needle size and sample volume on blood gas analysis in syringes washed with heparin

    PubMed Central

    Küme, Tuncay; Şişman, Ali Rıza; Solak, Ahmet; Tuğlu, Birsen; Çinkooğlu, Burcu; Çoker, Canan

    2012-01-01

    Introductıon: We evaluated the effect of different syringe volume, needle size and sample volume on blood gas analysis in syringes washed with heparin. Materials and methods: In this multi-step experimental study, percent dilution ratios (PDRs) and final heparin concentrations (FHCs) were calculated by gravimetric method for determining the effect of syringe volume (1, 2, 5 and 10 mL), needle size (20, 21, 22, 25 and 26 G) and sample volume (0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 mL). The effect of different PDRs and FHCs on blood gas and electrolyte parameters were determined. The erroneous results from nonstandardized sampling were evaluated according to RiliBAK’s TEa. Results: The increase of PDRs and FHCs was associated with the decrease of syringe volume, the increase of needle size and the decrease of sample volume: from 2.0% and 100 IU/mL in 10 mL-syringe to 7.0% and 351 IU/mL in 1 mL-syringe; from 4.9% and 245 IU/mL in 26G to 7.6% and 380 IU/mL in 20 G with combined 1 mL syringe; from 2.0% and 100 IU/mL in full-filled sample to 34% and 1675 IU/mL in 0.5 mL suctioned sample into 10 mL-syringe. There was no statistical difference in pH; but the percent decreasing in pCO2, K+, iCa2+, iMg2+; the percent increasing in pO2 and Na+ were statistical significance compared to samples full-filled in syringes. The all changes in pH and pO2 were acceptable; but the changes in pCO2, Na+, K+ and iCa2+ were unacceptable according to TEa limits except fullfilled-syringes. Conclusions: The changes in PDRs and FHCs due nonstandardized sampling in syringe washed with liquid heparin give rise to erroneous test results for pCO2 and electrolytes. PMID:22838185

  19. Placing the Dynamics of Syringe Exchange Programs in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Drawing upon the broader health, social, and political geography literature this paper outlines a framework for considering place-based processes through which syringe exchange availability may be understood. It is argued that the geographic distribution of syringe exchange programs (SEPs) in the United States is linked to the social and political conditions of particular localities through three place characteristics: (1) structural constraints; (2) social and spatial distancing of injection drug users; and (3) localized action. Although SEPs remain a controversial issue and face ongoing obstacles from the government, law enforcement and local communities, they continue to operate through the efforts of grassroots organizations and local activists. Action on this issue occurs locally, and the characteristics of place-based factors will affect whether particular areas adopt SEPs. PMID:16797217

  20. Weighted calibration with reduced number of signals by weighing factor modelling: application to the identification of explosives by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Beatriz; Bettencourt da Silva, Ricardo J N; Camões, M Filomena G F C; Salgueiro, Pedro A S

    2013-12-01

    The linear weighted regression model (LW) can be used to calibrate analytical instrumentation in a range of quantities (e.g. concentration or mass) wider than possible by the linear unweighted regression model, LuW (i.e. the least squares regression model), since this model can be applied when signals are not equally precise through the calibration range. If precision of signals varies within the calibration range, the regression line should be defined taking into account that more precise signals are more reliable and should count more to define regression parameters. Nevertheless, the LW requires the determination of the variation of signals precision through the calibration range. Typically, this information is collected experimentally for each calibration, requiring a large number of replicate collection of signals of calibrators. This work proposes reducing the number of signals needed to perform LW calibrations by developing models of weighing factors robust to daily variations of instrument sensibility. These models were applied to the determination of the ionic composition of the water soluble fraction of explosives. The adequacy of the developed models was tested through the analysis of control standards, certified reference materials and the ion balance of anions and cations in aqueous extracts of explosives, considering the measurement uncertainty estimated by detailed metrological models. The high success rate of the comparisons between estimated and known quantity values of reference solutions, considering results uncertainty, proves the validity of developed metrological models. The relative expanded measurement uncertainty of single determinations ranged from 1.93% to 35.7% for calibrations performed along 4 months. PMID:24267095

  1. Weighted calibration with reduced number of signals by weighing factor modelling: application to the identification of explosives by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Beatriz; Bettencourt da Silva, Ricardo J N; Camões, M Filomena G F C; Salgueiro, Pedro A S

    2013-12-01

    The linear weighted regression model (LW) can be used to calibrate analytical instrumentation in a range of quantities (e.g. concentration or mass) wider than possible by the linear unweighted regression model, LuW (i.e. the least squares regression model), since this model can be applied when signals are not equally precise through the calibration range. If precision of signals varies within the calibration range, the regression line should be defined taking into account that more precise signals are more reliable and should count more to define regression parameters. Nevertheless, the LW requires the determination of the variation of signals precision through the calibration range. Typically, this information is collected experimentally for each calibration, requiring a large number of replicate collection of signals of calibrators. This work proposes reducing the number of signals needed to perform LW calibrations by developing models of weighing factors robust to daily variations of instrument sensibility. These models were applied to the determination of the ionic composition of the water soluble fraction of explosives. The adequacy of the developed models was tested through the analysis of control standards, certified reference materials and the ion balance of anions and cations in aqueous extracts of explosives, considering the measurement uncertainty estimated by detailed metrological models. The high success rate of the comparisons between estimated and known quantity values of reference solutions, considering results uncertainty, proves the validity of developed metrological models. The relative expanded measurement uncertainty of single determinations ranged from 1.93% to 35.7% for calibrations performed along 4 months.

  2. Attitudes of North Carolina law enforcement officers toward syringe decriminalization

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Corey S.; Johnston, Jill; Zerden, Lisa de Saxe; Clark, Katie; Castillo, Tessie; Childs, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background North Carolina, like much of the U.S. South, is disproportionately affected by HIV and hepatitis. This persistently high disease burden may be driven in part by laws that criminalize the possession and distribution of syringes for illicit drug use. Legal change to decriminalize syringes may reduce infection rates in the state, but is unlikely absent support from law enforcement actors. Methods We analyzed the responses of 350 North Carolina law enforcement officers to a confidential, anonymous survey. The survey instrument collected data regarding self-reported needle-stick injury (NSI), blood borne disease risk perception and attitudes toward syringe decriminalization. Results 82% of respondents reported that contracting HIV was a “big concern” for them. 3.8% of respondents reported ever receiving a job-related NSI, a rate of 36 NSI per 10,000 officer-years. Majorities of respondents reported positive views regarding syringe decriminalization, with approximately 63% agreeing that it would be “good for the community” and 60% agreeing that it would be “good for law enforcement.” Black and female officers were significantly less likely to agree that on-the-job NSI was a “big concern” and significantly more likely to agree that it would be good for law enforcement. Conclusions These findings suggest that many North Carolina LEOs understand the public health benefits of syringe access programs and may be inclined to support syringe decriminalization legislation. Further research is indicated to determine the causes of observed differences in perceptions of bloodborne disease risk and attitudes toward syringe decriminalization by race and sex. PMID:25193720

  3. A method for the determination of syringe needle punctures in rubber stoppers using stereoscopic light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Platek, S Frank; Keisler, Mark A; Ranieri, Nicola; Reynolds, Todd W; Crowe, John B

    2002-09-01

    The ability to accurately determine the number of syringe needle penetration holes through the rubber stoppers in pharmaceutical vials and rubber septa in intravenous (i.v.) line and bag ports has been a critical factor in a number of forensic cases involving the thefts of controlled substances or suspected homicide by lethal injection. In the early 1990s, the microscopy and microanalysis group of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Forensic Chemistry Center (FCC) developed and implemented a method (unpublished) to locate needle punctures in rubber pharmaceutical vial stoppers. In 1996, as part of a multiple homicide investigation, the Indiana State Police Laboratory (ISPL) contacted the FCC for information on a method to identify and count syringe needle punctures through rubber stoppers in pharmaceutical vials. In a joint project and investigation using the FCC's needle hole location method and applying a method of puncture site mapping developed by the ISPL, a systematic method was developed to locate, identify, count, and map syringe punctures in rubber bottle stoppers or i.v. bag ports using microscopic analysis. The method requires documentation of punctures on both sides of the rubber stoppers and microscopic analysis of each suspect puncture site. The final result of an analysis using the method is a detailed diagram of puncture holes on both sides of a questioned stopper and a record of the minimum number of puncture holes through a stopper.

  4. The Neuroprotective Effect of Syringic Acid on Spinal Cord Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tokmak, Mehmet; Yuksel, Yasemin; Sehitoglu, Muserref Hilal; Guven, Mustafa; Akman, Tarik; Aras, Adem Bozkurt; Cosar, Murat; Abbed, Khalid M

    2015-10-01

    Acute arterial occlusions via different vascular pathologies are the main causes of spinal cord ischemia. We investigated neuroprotective effects of syringic acid on spinal cord ischemia injury in rats. Rats were divided into four groups: (I) sham-operated control rats, (II) spinal cord ischemia group, (III) spinal cord ischemia group performed syringic acid, and (IV) spinal cord ischemia group performed methylprednisolone intraperitoneally. Spinal cord ischemia was performed by the infrarenal aorta cross-clamping model. The spinal cord was removed after the procedure. The biochemical and histopathological changes were observed within the samples. Functional assessment was performed for neurological deficit scores. A significant decrease was seen in malondialdehyde levels in group III as compared to group II (P < 0.05). Besides these, nuclear respiratory factor-1 and superoxide dismutase activity of group III were significantly higher than group II (P < 0.05). In histopathological samples, when group III was compared with group II, there was a significant decrease in numbers of apoptotic neurons (P < 0.05). In immunohistochemical staining, BECN1 and caspase-3-immunopositive neurons were significantly decreased in group III compared with group II (P < 0.05). The neurological deficit scores of group III were significantly higher than group II at twenty-fourth hour of ischemia (P < 0.05). Our study revealed that syringic acid pretreatment in spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion reduced oxidative stress and neuronal degeneration as a neuroprotective agent. Ultrastructural studies are required for syringic acid to be developed as a promising therapeutic agent to be utilized for human spinal cord ischemia in the future.

  5. Automatic In-Syringe Dispersive Microsolid Phase Extraction Using Magnetic Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Maya, Fernando; Palomino Cabello, Carlos; Estela, Jose Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor; Turnes Palomino, Gemma

    2015-08-01

    A novel automatic strategy for the use of micro- and nanomaterials as sorbents for dispersive microsolid phase extraction (D-μ-SPE) based on the lab-in-syringe concept is reported. Using the developed technique, the implementation of magnetic metal-organic framework (MOF) materials for automatic solid-phase extraction has been achieved for the first time. A hybrid material based on submicrometric MOF crystals containing Fe3O4 nanoparticles was prepared and retained in the surface of a miniature magnetic bar. The magnetic bar was placed inside the syringe of an automatic bidirectional syringe pump, enabling dispersion and subsequent magnetic retrieval of the MOF hybrid material by automatic activation/deactivation of magnetic stirring. Using malachite green (MG) as a model adsorption analyte, a limit of detection of 0.012 mg/L and a linear working range of 0.04-2 mg/L were obtained for a sample volume equal to the syringe volume (5 mL). MG preconcentration was linear up to a volume of 40 mL, obtaining an enrichment factor of 120. The analysis throughput is 18 h(-1), and up to 3000 extractions/g of material can be performed. Recoveries ranging between 95 and 107% were obtained for the analysis of MG in different types of water and trout fish samples. The developed automatic D-μ-SPE technique is a safe alternative for the use of small-sized materials for sample preparation and is readily implementable to other magnetic materials independent of their size and shape and can be easily hyphenated to the majority of detectors and separation techniques. PMID:26138320

  6. Automatic In-Syringe Dispersive Microsolid Phase Extraction Using Magnetic Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Maya, Fernando; Palomino Cabello, Carlos; Estela, Jose Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor; Turnes Palomino, Gemma

    2015-08-01

    A novel automatic strategy for the use of micro- and nanomaterials as sorbents for dispersive microsolid phase extraction (D-μ-SPE) based on the lab-in-syringe concept is reported. Using the developed technique, the implementation of magnetic metal-organic framework (MOF) materials for automatic solid-phase extraction has been achieved for the first time. A hybrid material based on submicrometric MOF crystals containing Fe3O4 nanoparticles was prepared and retained in the surface of a miniature magnetic bar. The magnetic bar was placed inside the syringe of an automatic bidirectional syringe pump, enabling dispersion and subsequent magnetic retrieval of the MOF hybrid material by automatic activation/deactivation of magnetic stirring. Using malachite green (MG) as a model adsorption analyte, a limit of detection of 0.012 mg/L and a linear working range of 0.04-2 mg/L were obtained for a sample volume equal to the syringe volume (5 mL). MG preconcentration was linear up to a volume of 40 mL, obtaining an enrichment factor of 120. The analysis throughput is 18 h(-1), and up to 3000 extractions/g of material can be performed. Recoveries ranging between 95 and 107% were obtained for the analysis of MG in different types of water and trout fish samples. The developed automatic D-μ-SPE technique is a safe alternative for the use of small-sized materials for sample preparation and is readily implementable to other magnetic materials independent of their size and shape and can be easily hyphenated to the majority of detectors and separation techniques.

  7. Sterilizable syringes: excessive risk or cost-effective option?

    PubMed Central

    Battersby, A.; Feilden, R.; Nelson, C.

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, many poorer countries have chosen to use disposable instead of sterilizable syringes. Unfortunately, the infrastructure and management systems that are vital if disposables are to be used safely do not exist. WHO estimates that up to 30% of injections administered are unsafe. The traditional sterilizable syringe had many disadvantages, some of which have been minimized through better design and the use of modern materials; others have been overcome because staff are able to demonstrate that they have performed safely. For example, the time-steam saturation-temperature (TST) indicator has enabled staff to demonstrate that a sterilizing cycle has been successfully completed. Health facility staff must be able to sterilize equipment, and the sterilizable syringe remains the least costly means of administering an injection. Data from countries that have acceptable systems for processing clinical waste indicate that safe and environmentally acceptable disposal, destruction and final containment cost nearly as much as the original cost of a disposable syringe. By careful supervision of staff behaviour and good management, some countries have demonstrated that they are able to administer safe injections with sterilizable syringes at a price they can afford. PMID:10593029

  8. Not sold here: limited access to legally available syringes at pharmacies in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sterile syringe access is a critical component of HIV prevention programs. Although retail pharmacies provide convenient outlets for syringe access, injection drug users (IDUs) may encounter barriers to syringe purchase even where purchase without a prescription is legal. We sought to obtain an objective measure of syringe access in Tijuana, Mexico, where IDUs report being denied or overcharged for syringes at pharmacies. Methods Trained "mystery shoppers" attempted to buy a 1 cc insulin syringe according to a predetermined script at all retail pharmacies in three Tijuana neighborhoods. The same pharmacies were surveyed by telephone regarding their syringe sales policies. Data on purchase attempts were analyzed using basic statistics to obtain an objective measure of syringe access and compared with data on stated sales policies to ascertain consistency. Results Only 46 (28.4%) of 162 syringe purchase attempts were successful. Leading reasons for unsuccessful attempts were being told that the pharmacy didn't sell syringes (35.3%), there were no syringes in stock (31.0%), or a prescription was required (20.7%). Of 136 pharmacies also surveyed by telephone, a majority (88.2%) reported selling syringes but only one-third (32.5%) had a successful mystery shopper purchase; the majority of unsuccessful purchases were attributed to being told the pharmacy didn't sell syringes. There was similar discordance regarding prescription policies: 74 pharmacies said in the telephone survey that they did not require a prescription for syringes, yet 10 of these pharmacies asked the mystery shopper for a prescription. Conclusions IDUs in Tijuana have limited access to syringes through retail pharmacies and policies and practices regarding syringe sales are inconsistent. Reasons for these restrictive and inconsistent practices must be identified and addressed to expand syringe access, reduce syringe sharing and prevent HIV transmission. PMID:21609471

  9. Effect of environmental conditions on radon concentration-track density calibration factor of solid-state nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sersy, A.; Mansy, M.; Hussein, A.

    2004-04-01

    In this work, the effect of environmental conditions viz., temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) on the track density--radon concentrations calibration factor (K) has been studied for CR-39 and LR-115 track detectors. The factor K was determined using a reference radon chamber in the National Institute for Standards (NIS) in Egypt. Track detectors were etched at the recommended optimum etching conditions. It is found that, the calibration factor K varies with both T and RH, so they should be considered for the sake of uncertainty reduction. Good agreement is found between the calculated and measured values of K and the compatibility between them is in the range of experimental uncertainty.

  10. Hyaluronic acid filler injections with a 31-gauge insulin syringe.

    PubMed

    Lim, Adrian C

    2010-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid gel is a commonly used skin/soft tissue filler in cosmetic dermatology. Hyaluronic acid fillers are packaged in proprietary luer-lock syringes that can be injected via a 30-gauge, 27-gauge or larger diameter needle depending on the consistency of the gel. A method of decanting proprietary hyaluronic acid fillers into multiple 31-gauge insulin syringes for injection is described. The use of a 31-gauge insulin syringe for filler injections can potentially enhance the injection process through more accurate product delivery and placement. This has the potential to produce a more balanced and symmetrical outcome for patients. Additional benefits include less injection pain, less bleeding/bruising and higher levels of patient satisfaction.

  11. Volumetric Lattice Boltzmann Simulation for Fluid dynamics and Turbulence in Practical Syringes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Everton; Deep, Debanjan; Yu, Huidan (Whitney)

    2012-11-01

    We conduct numerical experiments to study fluid dynamics and turbulence in syringes using volumetric lattice Boltzmann method (VLBM) that is developed for dealing with arbitrary moving boundaries. Several common used medical syringes are used to predict the efficiency and safety of syringes experiencing low flow infusion rates. It is found that smaller size syringes reach a steady flow rate much sooner than larger ones, which are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. The relation between the syringe size and its steady flow rate is revealed. At low flow rates, corner vortices are observed. We explore conditions that lead to turbulent flow aiming to aid safer syringe application in nursing practices.

  12. Investigation of factors affecting the heater wire method of calibrating fine wire thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, E. G.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical investigation was made of a transient method of calibrating fine wire thermocouples. The system consisted of a 10 mil diameter standard thermocouple (Pt, Pt-13% Rh) and an 0.8 mil diameter chromel-alumel thermocouple attached to a 20 mil diameter electrically heated platinum wire. The calibration procedure consisted of electrically heating the wire to approximately 2500 F within about a seven-second period in an environment approximating atmospheric conditions at 120,000 feet. Rapid periodic readout of the standard and fine wire thermocouple signals permitted a comparison of the two temperature indications. An analysis was performed which indicated that the temperature distortion at the heater wire produced by the thermocouple junctions appears to be of negligible magnitude. Consequently, the calibration technique appears to be basically sound, although several practical changes which appear desirable are presented and discussed. Additional investigation is warranted to evaluate radiation effects and transient response characteristics.

  13. Survival of Hepatitis C Virus in Syringes Is Dependent on the Design of the Syringe-Needle and Dead Space Volume

    PubMed Central

    Binka, Mawuena; Paintsil, Elijah; Patel, Amisha; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Heimer, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Many people who inject drugs (PWID) use syringes with detachable needles, which have high dead space (HDS). Contaminated HDS blood may substantially contribute to the transmission of HIV, hepatitis C (HCV), and other blood-borne viruses within this population. Newly designed low dead space (LDS) syringe-needle combinations seek to reduce blood-borne virus transmission among PWID. We evaluated the infectivity of HCV-contaminated residual volumes recovered from two LDS syringe-needle combinations. Methods We tested two different design approaches to reducing the dead space. One added a piston to the plunger; the other reduced the dead space within the needle. The two approaches cannot be combined. Recovery of genotype-2a reporter HCV from LDS syringe-needle combinations was compared to recovery from insulin syringes with fixed needles and standard HDS syringe-needle combinations. Recovery of HCV from syringes was determined immediately following their contamination with HCV-spiked plasma, after storage at 22°C for up to 1 week, or after rinsing with water. Results Insulin syringes with fixed needles had the lowest proportion of HCV-positive syringes before and after storage. HCV recovery after immediate use ranged from 47%±4% HCV-positive 1 mL insulin syringes with 27-gauge ½ inch needles to 98%±1% HCV-positive HDS 2 mL syringes with 23-gauge 1¼ inch detachable needles. LDS combinations yielded recoveries ranging from 65%±5% to 93%±3%. Recovery was lower in combinations containing LDS needles than LDS syringes. After 3 days of storage, as much as 6-fold differences in virus recovery was observed, with HCV recovery being lower in combinations containing LDS needles. Most combinations with detachable needles required multiple rinses to reduce HCV infectivity to undetectable levels whereas a single rinse of insulin syringes was sufficient. Conclusions Our study, the first to assess the infectivity of HCV in residual volumes of LDS syringes and needles

  14. A microbiological study of the contamination of the syringes used in anaesthesia practice.

    PubMed

    Lessard, M R; Trépanier, C A; Gourdeau, M; Denault, P H

    1988-11-01

    In many operating theatres, it is common practice to reuse disposable plastic syringes with the same needles for several injections to different patients during the same day. This practice could lead to bacterial contamination of these syringes, making them an infection hazard to patients. We did a microbiologic survey of 100 of the most frequently reused syringes in our operating rooms and a control group of 100 single-use syringes. Only three of the syringes were contaminated in each group. None of the patients exposed to the syringes having a positive culture showed any sign of sepsis. Our data suggest that reusing plastic syringes is not associated with an increase in the incidence of bacterial contamination. However, contamination of the syringes by patients' blood, with the risk of cross-infections, remains a possibility and further studies are needed to evaluate this potential hazard.

  15. Bilateral syringeal coupling during phonation of a songbird.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, S; Capranica, R R

    1986-12-01

    The syrinx of oscine birds ("true songbirds") is a double vocal organ, and each side has generally been presumed to function independently under separate neural control during phonation. A significant counterexample is demonstrated here in the production of a common vocalization by the black-capped chickadee (Parus atricapillus), in which the 2 acoustic sources of the syrinx interact in a nonlinear fashion. The chickadee produces a sound with multiple frequency components that superficially resemble harmonics. An analysis of vocal production after unilateral and bilateral syringeal denervation shows instead that these frequency components are sum and difference frequencies, or heterodyne frequencies, resulting from cross-modulation between the 2 syringeal sides. A limited form of this bilateral coupling may be achieved after unilateral denervation of either syringeal side but not after bilateral denervation. Unilaterally denervated birds are capable of significant improvement in coupling after 10 d, too short a period for neural regrowth. These results suggest that coupling arises from a passive physical interaction between the 2 syringeal sources which is activated or regulated in some fashion by neural control from either side.

  16. Stability and availability of cyclosporine stored in plastic syringes.

    PubMed

    Ptachcinski, R J; Walker, S; Burckart, G J; Venkataramanan, R

    1986-03-01

    The stability and availability of cyclosporine from the oral dosage form when stored in plastic syringes were examined. Solutions of cyclosporine were stored in plastic syringes for 28 days at 25 degrees C. Half of the solutions remained in room light, and samples were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 hours and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. The remaining samples were protected from light, and samples were obtained at 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Samples stored in plastic were compared with control solutions stored in the original amber bottle. All samples were analyzed for unchanged cyclosporine by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Cyclosporine was stable and completely available from the oral dosage form when stored in plastic syringes for up to 28 days. There was no difference in the stability of cyclosporine between the solutions exposed to room light and those protected from light. Solutions of the oral dosage form of cyclosporine may be stored in plastic syringes without protection from light for up to 28 days.

  17. Needle and Syringe Cleaning Practices among Injection Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Dennis G.; Harbke, Colin R.; Canty, John R.; Reynolds, Grace L.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluates the effect of needle exchange on the bleach-mediated disinfection (BMD) practices of 176 needle and syringe sharing injection drug users (IDUs). Results reveal that IDUs who traded sex for money or drugs were less likely to practice BMD, and IDUs who reported a reduced number of sex partners were more likely to practice BMD. (Contains 36…

  18. Sterility and quality of blood dispensed in syringes for infants.

    PubMed

    Strauss, R G; Crawford, G F; Elbert, C; Floss, A M; Liesch, M

    1986-01-01

    A unit-dose system was designed to dispense precise quantities of blood in a form ready for immediate transfusion into neonatal patients. The principles were similar to those used by pharmacies to dispense individual doses of drugs. In the blood center, the precise volume of blood ordered for a neonatal patient was aspirated through a microaggregate filter into a labeled plastic syringe for dispensing to the nursery in a correspondingly labeled zip-lock plastic bag. In the nursery, the premeasured and prefiltered blood was ready for immediate infusion, and the syringe was attached directly to a mechanical infusion pump. Several experiments were performed to ensure sterility and quality of whole blood dispensed by this system. Over 300 aerobic and anaerobic cultures were performed, and it was concluded that the extra handling required to prepare syringes of blood did not lead to bacterial contamination. In addition, the quality of whole blood was maintained, for at least 6 hours, equally well in syringes as it was in blood bags stored under standard blood bank conditions when assessed by hematocrit, blood pH, and measurements of plasma potassium, glucose, lactic dehydrogenase, and free hemoglobin. Thus, unit dose dispensing offers a precise and convenient method to prepare small, accurately measured quantities of filtered, sterile, and quality blood products for neonatal patients.

  19. 41 CFR 109-27.5009 - Control of hypodermic needles and syringes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... needles and syringes. 109-27.5009 Section 109-27.5009 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... Guidelines § 109-27.5009 Control of hypodermic needles and syringes. Effective procedures and practices shall provide for the management and physical security of hypodermic needles and syringes to prevent illegal...

  20. Social-structural contexts of needle and syringe sharing behaviours of HIV-positive injecting drug users in Manipur, India: a mixed methods investigation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Few investigations have assessed risk behaviours and social-structural contexts of risk among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Northeast India, where injecting drug use is the major route of HIV transmission. Investigations of risk environments are needed to inform development of effective risk reduction interventions. Methods This mixed methods study of HIV-positive IDUs in Manipur included a structured survey (n = 75), two focus groups (n = 17), seven in-depth interviews, and two key informant interviews. Results One-third of survey participants reported having shared a needle/syringe in the past 30 days; among these, all the men and about one-third of the women did so with persons of unknown HIV serostatus. A variety of social-structural contextual factors influenced individual risk behaviours: barriers to carrying sterile needles/syringes due to fear of harassment by police and "anti-drug" organizations; lack of sterile needles/syringes in drug dealers' locales; limited access to pharmacy-sold needles/syringes; inadequate coverage by needle and syringe programmes (NSPs); non-availability of sterile needles/syringes in prisons; and withdrawal symptoms superseding concern for health. Some HIV-positive IDUs who shared needles/syringes reported adopting risk reduction strategies: being the 'last receiver' of needles/syringes and not a 'giver;' sharing only with other IDUs they knew to be HIV-positive; and, when a 'giver,' asking other IDUs to wash used needles/syringes with bleach before using. Conclusions Effective HIV prevention and care programmes for IDUs in Northeast India may hinge on several enabling contexts: supportive government policy on harm reduction programmes, including in prisons; an end to harassment by the police, army, and anti-drug groups, with education of these entities regarding harm reduction, creation of partnerships with the public health sector, and accountability to government policies that protect IDUs' human rights; adequate

  1. Note: On the wavelength dependence of the intensity calibration factor of extreme ultraviolet spectrometer determined with profile measurement of bremsstrahlung continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, N.; Morita, S.; Dong, C. F.; Goto, M.; Maezawa, H.; Miyauchi, H.

    2015-06-15

    The absolute calibration factor of extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic instrument which has recently been determined from absolute radiation profile measurement of bremsstrahlung continuum has been investigated by comparing the calculated diffraction efficiency of grating. An overall tendency of the wavelength dependence of the calibration factor from 40 Å to 500 Å can be reproduced by that of the grating efficiency, especially the agreement between the measured calibration factor and the calculated grating efficiency has been found to be fairly good for the wavelength range 200 Å-500 Å.

  2. Improvement and calibration of a SSNT personal dosemeter and study of importance of albedo factor for dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Torkzadeh, F; Taheri, M

    2007-01-01

    The Neutriran albedo neutron dosemeter has been improved and calibrated for neutron personal dosimetry. The Monte Carlo code MCNP4b was used to calculate the thermal neutrons backscattered from the body (albedo factor). Backscattering from the wall, ceiling and floor in calibration room was considered also via simulation by MCNP4C. A semi automated counting system applying a high-resolution scanner was used for counting of tracks. An 241Am source was used to produce similar alpha particles from 10B (n,alpha)7Li reaction for the optimisation of scanner parameters to distinguish and separate the tracks in SSNTD, which lead to a better distinction between etched alpha tracks and, consequently, a higher linear region of dose characteristic. PMID:16980708

  3. Disinfection of syringes contaminated with hepatitis C virus by rinsing with household products.

    PubMed

    Binka, Mawuena; Paintsil, Elijah; Patel, Amisha; Lindenbach, Brett D; Heimer, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background.  Hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission among people who inject drugs (PWID) is associated with the sharing of injection paraphernalia. People who inject drugs often "disinfect" used syringes with household products when new syringes are unavailable. We assessed the effectiveness of these products in disinfecting HCV-contaminated syringes. Methods.  A genotype-2a reporter virus assay was used to assess HCV infectivity in syringes postrinsing. Hepatitis C virus-contaminated 1 mL insulin syringes with fixed needles and 1 mL tuberculin syringes with detachable needles were rinsed with water, Clorox bleach, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, isopropanol, Lysol, or Dawn Ultra at different concentrations. Syringes were either immediately tested for viable virus or stored at 4°C, 22°C, and 37°C for up to 21 days before viral infectivity was determined. Results.  Most products tested reduced HCV infectivity to undetectable levels in insulin syringes. Bleach eliminated HCV infectivity in both syringes. Other disinfectants produced virus recovery ranging from high (5% ethanol, 77% ± 12% HCV-positive syringes) to low (1:800 Dawn Ultra, 7% ± 7% positive syringes) in tuberculin syringes. Conclusions.  Household disinfectants tested were more effective in fixed-needle syringes (low residual volume) than in syringes with detachable needles (high residual volume). Bleach was the most effective disinfectant after 1 rinse, whereas other diluted household products required multiple rinses to eliminate HCV. Rinsing with water, 5% ethanol (as in beer), and 20% ethanol (as in fortified wine) was ineffective and should be avoided. Our data suggest that rinsing of syringes with household disinfectants may be an effective tool in preventing HCV transmission in PWID when done properly.

  4. A syringe-like injection mechanism in Photorhabdus luminescens toxins.

    PubMed

    Gatsogiannis, Christos; Lang, Alexander E; Meusch, Dominic; Pfaumann, Vanda; Hofnagel, Oliver; Benz, Roland; Aktories, Klaus; Raunser, Stefan

    2013-03-28

    Photorhabdus luminescens is an insect pathogenic bacterium that is symbiotic with entomopathogenic nematodes. On invasion of insect larvae, P. luminescens is released from the nematodes and kills the insect through the action of a variety of virulence factors including large tripartite ABC-type toxin complexes (Tcs). Tcs are typically composed of TcA, TcB and TcC proteins and are biologically active only when complete. Functioning as ADP-ribosyltransferases, TcC proteins were identified as the actual functional components that induce actin-clustering, defects in phagocytosis and cell death. However, little is known about the translocation of TcC into the cell by the TcA and TcB components. Here we show that TcA in P. luminescens (TcdA1) forms a transmembrane pore and report its structure in the prepore and pore state determined by cryoelectron microscopy. We find that the TcdA1 prepore assembles as a pentamer forming an α-helical, vuvuzela-shaped channel less than 1.5 nanometres in diameter surrounded by a large outer shell. Membrane insertion is triggered not only at low pH as expected, but also at high pH, explaining Tc action directly through the midgut of insects. Comparisons with structures of the TcdA1 pore inserted into a membrane and in complex with TcdB2 and TccC3 reveal large conformational changes during membrane insertion, suggesting a novel syringe-like mechanism of protein translocation. Our results demonstrate how ABC-type toxin complexes bridge a membrane to insert their lethal components into the cytoplasm of the host cell. We believe that the proposed mechanism is characteristic of the whole ABC-type toxin family. This explanation of toxin translocation is a step towards understanding the host-pathogen interaction and the complex life cycle of P. luminescens and other pathogens, including human pathogenic bacteria, and serves as a strong foundation for the development of biopesticides. PMID:23515159

  5. Over-the-counter but out of reach: a pharmacy-based survey of OTC syringe sales in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pollini, Robin A; Gallardo, Manuel; Ruiz, Serena; Case, Patricia; Zaller, Nickolas; Lozada, Remedios

    2014-05-01

    Sterile syringe access is critical to HIV prevention efforts targeting injection drug users (IDUs) but some pharmacies do not sell syringes over-the-counter (OTC) even where such sales are legal. We conducted a pharmacy survey in Tijuana, Mexico (where OTC sales are legal) to characterize attitudes toward syringe sales and to explore support for expanding pharmacy-based HIV prevention efforts. Of 203 respondents, 28% supported OTC syringe sales to IDUs and 74% said their pharmacy required a prescription for at least some syringe sales. Support for OTC syringe sales was independently associated with selling OTC syringes, understanding the role of sterile syringes in HIV prevention, and recognizing pharmacies as an important health resource for IDUs. Most respondents supported an expanded role for pharmacies in HIV prevention, exclusive of OTC syringe sales. Our study provides information for developing interventions to promote OTC syringe sales and expanding pharmacy-based distribution of HIV-related information and resources.

  6. Determining the Absolute Concentration of Nanoparticles without Calibration Factor by Visualizing the Dynamic Processes of Interfacial Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wo, Xiang; Li, Zhimin; Jiang, Yingyan; Li, Minghe; Su, Yu-Wen; Wang, Wei; Tao, Nongjian

    2016-02-16

    Previous approaches of determining the molar concentration of nanoparticles often relied on the calibration factors extracted from standard samples or required prior knowledge regarding the geometry, optical, or chemical properties. In the present work, we proposed an absolute quantification method that determined the molar concentration of nano-objects without any calibration factor or prior knowledge. It was realized by monitoring the dynamic adsorption processes of individual nanoparticles with a high-speed surface plasmon resonance microscopy. In this case, diffusing nano-objects stochastically collided onto an adsorption interface and stayed there ("hit-n-stay" scenario), resulting in a semi-infinite diffusion system. The dynamic processes were analyzed with a theoretical model consisting of Fick's laws of diffusion and random-walk assumption. The quantification of molar concentration was achieved on the basis of an analytical expression, which involved only physical constants and experimental parameters. By using spherical polystyrene nanoparticles as a model, the present approach provided a molar concentration with excellent accuracy. PMID:26781326

  7. Introducing auto-disable syringes to the national immunization programme in Madagascar.

    PubMed Central

    Drain, Paul K.; Ralaivao, Josoa S.; Rakotonandrasana, Alexander; Carnell, Mary A.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety and coverage benefits of auto-disable (AD) syringes, weighed against the financial and logis- tical costs, and to create appropriate health policies in Madagascar. METHODS: Fifteen clinics in Madagascar, trained to use AD syringes, were randomized to implement an AD syringe only, mixed (AD syringes used only on non-routine immunization days), or sterilizable syringe only (control) programme. During a five-week period, data on administered vaccinations were collected, interviews were conducted, and observations were recorded. FINDINGS: The use of AD syringes improved coverage rates by significantly increasing the percentage of vaccines administered on non-routine immunization days (AD-only 4.3%, mixed 5.7%, control 1.1% (P<0.05)). AD-only clinics eliminated sterilization sessions for vaccinations, whereas mixed clinics reduced the number of sterilization sessions by 64%. AD syringes were five times more expensive than sterilizable syringes, which increased AD-only and mixed clinics' projected annual injection costs by 365% and 22%, respectively. However, introducing AD syringes for all vaccinations would only increase the national immunization budget by 2%. CONCLUSION: The use of AD syringes improved vaccination coverage rates by providing ready-to-use sterile syringes on non-routine immunization days and decreasing the number of sterilization sessions, thereby improving injection safety. The mixed programme was the most beneficial approach to phasing in AD syringes and diminishing logistical complications, and it had minimal costs. AD syringes, although more expensive, can feasibly be introduced into a developing country's immunization programme to improve vaccination safety and coverage. PMID:14576886

  8. A comparison of syringe disposal practices among injection drug users in a city with versus a city without needle and syringe programs

    PubMed Central

    Tookes, Hansel E.; Kral, Alex H.; Wenger, Lynn D.; Cardenas, Gabriel A.; Martinez, Alexis N.; Sherman, Recinda L.; Pereyra, Margaret; Forrest, David W.; Lalota, Marlene; Metsch, Lisa R.

    2012-01-01

    Background The United States (U.S.) approved use of federal funds for needle and syringe programs (NSPs) in December 2009. This study compares syringe disposal practices in a U.S. city with NSPs to a U.S. city without NSPs by examining the prevalence of improperly discarded syringes in public places and the self-reported syringe disposal practices of injection drug users (IDUs) in the two cities. Methods We conducted visual inspection walkthroughs in a random sample of the top-quartile of drug-affected neighborhoods in San Francisco, California (a city with NSPs) and Miami, Florida (a city without NSPs). We also conducted quantitative surveys of adult IDUs in San Francisco (N=602) and Miami (N=448). Results In the visual inspections, we found 44 syringes/1000 census blocks in San Francisco, and 371/1000 census blocks in Miami. Survey results showed that in San Francisco 13% of syringes IDUs reported using in the 30 days preceding the study interviews were disposed of improperly versus 95% of syringes by IDUs in Miami. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, IDUs in Miami had over 34 times the adjusted odds of public syringe disposal relative to IDUs in San Francisco (adjusted odds ratio=34.2, 95% CI = 21.92, 53.47). Conclusions We found eight-fold more improperly disposed syringes on walkthroughs in the city without NSPs compared to the city with NSPs, which was corroborated by survey data. NSPs may help IDUs dispose of their syringes safely in cities with large numbers of IDUs. PMID:22209091

  9. Prevalence and Correlates of the Use of Prefilled Syringes Among Persons Who Inject Drugs in San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Armenta, Richard F; Roth, Alexis M; Wagner, Karla D; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Brodine, Stephanie K; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Munoz, Fatima A; Garfein, Richard S

    2015-12-01

    Persons who inject drugs (PWID) are at increased risk for blood-borne virus (BBV) infections and overdose resulting from high-risk injecting practices. Studies of prefilled syringe use ([PFSU] using a syringe that already contained drug solution when it was obtained by the user), an injection practice previously described in Eastern Europe, suggest that it increases susceptibility to BBV. However, little is known about this practice in the USA. Data were obtained from an ongoing cohort study of PWID to determine the prevalence and assess correlates of PFSU in San Diego, CA. Baseline interviews assessed socio-demographics and drug use behaviors. Logistic regression was used to identify factors independently associated with ever using a prefilled syringe (yes/no). Participants (n = 574) were predominately males (73.9%) and white (50.9%) with a mean age of 43.4 years (range 18-80); 33.3% reported ever using prefilled syringes, although only 4.9% reported use in the past 6 months. In multivariable analyses, PFSU was independently associated with ever having a rushed injection due to police presence [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.51, 95% CI 1.66, 3.79], ever being in prison (AOR = 1.80, 95% CI 1.23, 2.63), injecting most often in public versus private places in the past 6 months (AOR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.11, 2.48), and injecting drugs in Mexico (AOR = 1.70, 95% CI 1.16, 2.49). Results indicate that a history of PFSU is common and associated with environmental factors that may also increase risk for adverse health outcomes. Studies are needed to better understand PFSU in order to develop interventions to prevent adverse outcomes associated with their use. PMID:26382653

  10. Prevalence and Correlates of the Use of Prefilled Syringes Among Persons Who Inject Drugs in San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Armenta, Richard F; Roth, Alexis M; Wagner, Karla D; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Brodine, Stephanie K; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Munoz, Fatima A; Garfein, Richard S

    2015-12-01

    Persons who inject drugs (PWID) are at increased risk for blood-borne virus (BBV) infections and overdose resulting from high-risk injecting practices. Studies of prefilled syringe use ([PFSU] using a syringe that already contained drug solution when it was obtained by the user), an injection practice previously described in Eastern Europe, suggest that it increases susceptibility to BBV. However, little is known about this practice in the USA. Data were obtained from an ongoing cohort study of PWID to determine the prevalence and assess correlates of PFSU in San Diego, CA. Baseline interviews assessed socio-demographics and drug use behaviors. Logistic regression was used to identify factors independently associated with ever using a prefilled syringe (yes/no). Participants (n = 574) were predominately males (73.9%) and white (50.9%) with a mean age of 43.4 years (range 18-80); 33.3% reported ever using prefilled syringes, although only 4.9% reported use in the past 6 months. In multivariable analyses, PFSU was independently associated with ever having a rushed injection due to police presence [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.51, 95% CI 1.66, 3.79], ever being in prison (AOR = 1.80, 95% CI 1.23, 2.63), injecting most often in public versus private places in the past 6 months (AOR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.11, 2.48), and injecting drugs in Mexico (AOR = 1.70, 95% CI 1.16, 2.49). Results indicate that a history of PFSU is common and associated with environmental factors that may also increase risk for adverse health outcomes. Studies are needed to better understand PFSU in order to develop interventions to prevent adverse outcomes associated with their use.

  11. SU-E-T-491: Importance of Energy Dependent Protons Per MU Calibration Factors in IMPT Dose Calculations Using Monte Carlo Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Randeniya, S; Mirkovic, D; Titt, U; Guan, F; Mohan, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), energy dependent, protons per monitor unit (MU) calibration factors are important parameters that determine absolute dose values from energy deposition data obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Purpose of this study was to assess the sensitivity of MC-computed absolute dose distributions to the protons/MU calibration factors in IMPT. Methods: A “verification plan” (i.e., treatment beams applied individually to water phantom) of a head and neck patient plan was calculated using MC technique. The patient plan had three beams; one posterior-anterior (PA); two anterior oblique. Dose prescription was 66 Gy in 30 fractions. Of the total MUs, 58% was delivered in PA beam, 25% and 17% in other two. Energy deposition data obtained from the MC simulation were converted to Gy using energy dependent protons/MU calibrations factors obtained from two methods. First method is based on experimental measurements and MC simulations. Second is based on hand calculations, based on how many ion pairs were produced per proton in the dose monitor and how many ion pairs is equal to 1 MU (vendor recommended method). Dose distributions obtained from method one was compared with those from method two. Results: Average difference of 8% in protons/MU calibration factors between method one and two converted into 27 % difference in absolute dose values for PA beam; although dose distributions preserved the shape of 3D dose distribution qualitatively, they were different quantitatively. For two oblique beams, significant difference in absolute dose was not observed. Conclusion: Results demonstrate that protons/MU calibration factors can have a significant impact on absolute dose values in IMPT depending on the fraction of MUs delivered. When number of MUs increases the effect due to the calibration factors amplify. In determining protons/MU calibration factors, experimental method should be preferred in MC dose calculations

  12. Observational calibration of the projection factor of Cepheids. II. Application to nine Cepheids with HST/FGS parallax measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitfelder, J.; Mérand, A.; Kervella, P.; Gallenne, A.; Szabados, L.; Anderson, R. I.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The distance to pulsating stars is classically estimated using the parallax-of-pulsation (PoP) method, which combines spectroscopic radial velocity (RV) measurements and angular diameter (AD) estimates to derive the distance of the star. A particularly important application of this method is the determination of Cepheid distances in view of the calibration of their distance scale. However, the conversion of radial to pulsational velocities in the PoP method relies on a poorly calibrated parameter, the projection factor (p-factor). Aims: We aim to measure empirically the value of the p-factors of a homogeneous sample of nine bright Galactic Cepheids for which trigonometric parallaxes were measured with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Fine Guidance Sensor. Methods: We use the SPIPS algorithm, a robust implementation of the PoP method that combines photometry, interferometry, and radial velocity measurements in a global modeling of the pulsation of the star. We obtained new interferometric angular diameter measurements using the PIONIER instrument at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), completed by data from the literature. Using the known distance as an input, we derive the value of the p-factor of the nine stars of our sample and study its dependence with the pulsation period. Results: We find the following p-factors: p = 1.20 ± 0.12 for RT Aur, p = 1.48 ± 0.18 for T Vul, p = 1.14 ± 0.10 for FF Aql, p = 1.31 ± 0.19 for Y Sgr, p = 1.39 ± 0.09 for X Sgr, p = 1.35 ± 0.13 for W Sgr, p = 1.36 ± 0.08 for β Dor, p = 1.41 ± 0.10 for ζ Gem, and p = 1.23 ± 0.12 for ℓ Car. Conclusions: The values of the p-factors that we obtain are consistently close to p = 1.324 ± 0.024. We observe some dispersion around this average value, but the observed distribution is statistically consistent with a constant value of the p-factor as a function of the pulsation period (χ2 = 0.669). The error budget of our determination of the p-factor values is

  13. Modified Tessari Tourbillon technique for making foam sclerotherapy with silicone-free syringes.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Mark S; Patel, Salil B

    2015-10-01

    The longevity of foam made using sodium tetradecyl sulphate and gas (air or a CO2:O2 mixture) is increased significantly if silicone-free syringes are used over the normal syringes containing silicone oil lubrication. However, the plungers in silicone-free syringes start sticking after several passages when making foam for sclerotherapy, preventing the smooth injection of the resulting foam. We describe a three syringe technique which allows foam to be made using the Tessari Tourbillon 'three-way stopcock' principle between two syringes, but with the foam ending up in a third syringe which has not undergone multiple passages of the plunger. This allows a smoother injection of the resultant foam, which is particularly useful when injecting small diameter veins under ultrasound control. PMID:25288590

  14. Modified Tessari Tourbillon technique for making foam sclerotherapy with silicone-free syringes.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Mark S; Patel, Salil B

    2015-10-01

    The longevity of foam made using sodium tetradecyl sulphate and gas (air or a CO2:O2 mixture) is increased significantly if silicone-free syringes are used over the normal syringes containing silicone oil lubrication. However, the plungers in silicone-free syringes start sticking after several passages when making foam for sclerotherapy, preventing the smooth injection of the resulting foam. We describe a three syringe technique which allows foam to be made using the Tessari Tourbillon 'three-way stopcock' principle between two syringes, but with the foam ending up in a third syringe which has not undergone multiple passages of the plunger. This allows a smoother injection of the resultant foam, which is particularly useful when injecting small diameter veins under ultrasound control.

  15. [The comparison of the micro-syringe with clinical usage].

    PubMed

    Peng, Junyan; Qian, Jianguo; Zhang, Lei

    2014-07-01

    Micro-syringe as a result of the high frequency of clinical use, direct contact with patients, the failure of its equipment will have a direct impact on the patient's disease status. Researchers in this paper, by simulating the test fluid, electrical safety testing and analysis of statistical methods such as maintenance records, consider six kinds of common injection pump, in terms of performance, safety and the failure rate of three performance. Compared the performance analysis, summarized the various types of injection pump characteristics, researchers make suggestions to clinical departments, equipment procurement and equipment management departments for usage and improvement.

  16. Long-term survey of a syringe-dispensing machine needle exchange program: answering public concerns

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Syringe-dispensing machines (SDM) provide syringes at any time even to hard-to-reach injecting drug users (IDUs). They represent an important harm reduction strategy in large populated urban areas such as Paris. We analyzed the performance of one of the world's largest SDM schemes based in Paris over 12 years to understand its efficiency and its limitations, to answer public and stakeholder concerns and optimize its outputs. Methods Parisian syringe dispensing and exchange machines were monitored as well as their sharp disposals and associated bins over a 12-year period. Moreover, mechanical counting devices were installed on specific syringe-dispensing/exchange machines to record the characteristics of the exchange process. Results Distribution and needle exchange have risen steadily by 202% for the distribution and 2,000% for syringe recovery even without a coin counterpart. However, 2 machines out of 34 generate 50% of the total activity of the scheme. It takes 14 s for an IDU to collect a syringe, while the average user takes 3.76 syringes per session 20 min apart. Interestingly, collection time stops early in the evening (19 h) for the entire night. Conclusions SDMs had an increasing distribution role during daytime as part of the harm reduction strategy in Paris with efficient recycling capacities of used syringes and a limited number of kits collected by IDU. Using counting devices to monitor Syringe Exchange Programs (SEPs) is a very helpful tool to optimize use and answer public and stakeholder concerns. PMID:24885902

  17. Arrests and incarceration of injection drug users for syringe possession in Massachusetts: implications for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Case, P; Meehan, T; Jones, T S

    1998-01-01

    Multiperson use of syringes is a major risk behavior responsible for the spread of HIV-1 among injection drug users (IDUs). In Massachusetts, two laws regulate syringes: one is a prescription law prohibiting possession or purchase of syringes without a prescription, and the other makes it illegal to possess drug paraphernalia, including syringes. In 1993, Massachusetts amended the prescription law to permit the establishment of syringe exchange programs in two cities. Enrolled participants are allowed to possess syringes anywhere in the state, and about 5% of the estimated 40,000 IDUs in Massachusetts are program participants. To understand how HIV prevention efforts with active IDUs may be constrained by the enforcement of laws criminalizing possession of syringes after the amendment in the law, we reviewed data from multiple sources to assess the number of arrests for syringe possession in 10 large cities in Massachusetts to evaluate incarceration rates and lengths of sentences for those convicted of syringe possession and to estimate costs of incarceration for those convicted of syringe possession. At least 824 persons were arrested for syringe possession in 1995. In examining the data on convictions, we found that 417 persons were convicted in 1994 of syringe possession in the absence of other serious charges, and of these, 41.0% were sentenced to incarceration. The average sentence imposed was 5 months (range, 3 days-2 years). Assuming that those convicted serve about two thirds of their sentences, the cost of incarceration was estimated at $1,140,183 excluding costs for arrest, pretrial detention, prosecution, or other costs of enforcement. Costs for incarcerating persons convicted of both syringe and drug possession were not included; the total cost of incarceration of persons convicted of possession of a syringe, with or without other major charges, is probably considerably higher. Had these funds been allocated to pay for drug treatment, 1629 admissions to

  18. Design, evaluation, and dissemination of a plastic syringe clip to improve dosing accuracy of liquid medications.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Garrett J; Dinh, Cindy; Gutierrez, Amanda; Lukomnik, Julia; Lu, Benjamin; Shah, Kamal; Slough, Tara; Yeh, Ping Teresa; Mirabal, Yvette; Gray, Lauren Vestewig; Marton, Stephanie; Adler, Michelle; Schutze, Gordon E; Wickham, Hadley; Oden, Maria; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2013-09-01

    Pediatricians in Africa requested a tool to improve caregiver dosing of liquid antiretroviral medication. We developed, evaluated and disseminated a clip to control the amount of medication drawn into an oral syringe. In a laboratory, a user tested clips of different lengths, corresponding to different volumes, by drawing water into a syringe with a clip. In Texas and Malawi, 149 adults attempted to measure Pepto-Bismol™ using a syringe with a clip, a syringe without a clip, and a dosing cup, in a randomly assigned order. In the laboratory, the volume of liquid, ranging from 1 to 4.5 mL, drawn into the syringe was always within at least 5 μL of the intended dose. In Texas, 84% of doses were accurate within ±10%, vs. 63% using the syringe alone, and 21% with the dosing cup. In Malawi, 98% of doses were accurate to within ±10%, vs. 90% using the syringe alone, and 27% with the dosing cup. For target accuracy values within ±45% (±21%), a significantly higher fraction of Houston (Kamangira) participants delivered an accurate dose using the syringe with the clip than with the syringe alone (p < 0.05). The clip enables a greater proportion of users to accurately measure liquid medication.

  19. [Measurement of peak correction factor of Farmer chamber for calibration of flattening filter free (FFF) clinical photon beams].

    PubMed

    Kontra, Gábor; Major, Tibor; Polgár, Csaba

    2015-06-01

    Farmer-type ionization chambers are considered the most reliable detectors and for this reason they are most frequently used for the calibration of photon beams of medical linear accelerators. Flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams of linear accelerators have recently started to be used in radiotherapy. The dose profile of FFF beams is peaked in the center of the field and the dose distribution will be inhomogeneous along the axis of the 2.3 cm long measuring volume of the Farmer chamber. The peaked radiation field will result in volume averaging effects in the large Farmer chamber, therefore this chamber will underestimate the true central axis dose. Our objective was to determine the value of the peak correction factor (Kp) of Farmer-type chamber with measurements to avoid the underestimation of the central axis dose during the calibration of FFF radiation fields. Measurements were made with 6 MV and 10 MV flattened (6X and 10X) and FFF beams (6XFFF and 10XFFF) of a Varian TrueBeam medical linear accelerator in a solid water phantom at 10 cm depth. The source surface distance (SSD) was 100 cm, the field size was 10×10 cm and the dose rate was always 400 MU/min during the measurements. We delivered 100 MU in each measurement and the absorbed dose to water was calculated according to the IAEA TRS-398 dosimetry protocol. The measured signals of the ionization chambers were always corrected for the ion recombination loss. The ion recombination correction factors (Kr) were determined with the two-voltage method separately for the used ion chambers and for flattened and unflattened beams. First, we measured the dose to water with PTW TM30012 Farmer chamber in 6XFFF and 6X beams, then calculated the ratio of doses of 6XFFF and 6X beams (R6,Farmer). Immediately after this we repeated the above measurements with PTW TM31010 Semiflex chamber and determined the ratio of doses of 6XFFF and 6X beams again (R6,Semiflex). The length of the sensitive volume of the Semiflex

  20. [Measurement of peak correction factor of Farmer chamber for calibration of flattening filter free (FFF) clinical photon beams].

    PubMed

    Kontra, Gábor; Major, Tibor; Polgár, Csaba

    2015-06-01

    Farmer-type ionization chambers are considered the most reliable detectors and for this reason they are most frequently used for the calibration of photon beams of medical linear accelerators. Flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams of linear accelerators have recently started to be used in radiotherapy. The dose profile of FFF beams is peaked in the center of the field and the dose distribution will be inhomogeneous along the axis of the 2.3 cm long measuring volume of the Farmer chamber. The peaked radiation field will result in volume averaging effects in the large Farmer chamber, therefore this chamber will underestimate the true central axis dose. Our objective was to determine the value of the peak correction factor (Kp) of Farmer-type chamber with measurements to avoid the underestimation of the central axis dose during the calibration of FFF radiation fields. Measurements were made with 6 MV and 10 MV flattened (6X and 10X) and FFF beams (6XFFF and 10XFFF) of a Varian TrueBeam medical linear accelerator in a solid water phantom at 10 cm depth. The source surface distance (SSD) was 100 cm, the field size was 10×10 cm and the dose rate was always 400 MU/min during the measurements. We delivered 100 MU in each measurement and the absorbed dose to water was calculated according to the IAEA TRS-398 dosimetry protocol. The measured signals of the ionization chambers were always corrected for the ion recombination loss. The ion recombination correction factors (Kr) were determined with the two-voltage method separately for the used ion chambers and for flattened and unflattened beams. First, we measured the dose to water with PTW TM30012 Farmer chamber in 6XFFF and 6X beams, then calculated the ratio of doses of 6XFFF and 6X beams (R6,Farmer). Immediately after this we repeated the above measurements with PTW TM31010 Semiflex chamber and determined the ratio of doses of 6XFFF and 6X beams again (R6,Semiflex). The length of the sensitive volume of the Semiflex

  1. Simultaneous extraction and determination of albendazole and triclabendazole by a novel syringe to syringe dispersive liquid phase microextraction-solidified floating organic drop combined with high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Mohammad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad

    2016-08-17

    A syringe to syringe dispersive liquid phase microextraction-solidified floating organic drop was introduced and used for the simultaneous extraction of trace amounts of albendazole and triclabendazole from different matrices. The extracted analytes were determined by high performance liquid chromatography along with fluorescence detection. The analytical parameters affecting the microextraction efficiency including the nature and volume of the extraction solvent, sample volume, sample pH, ionic strength and the cycles of extraction were optimized. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.1-30.0 μg L(-1) and 0.2-30.0 μg L(-1) with determination coefficients of 0.9999 and 0.9998 for albendazole and triclabendazole respectively. The detection limits defined as three folds of the signal to noise ratio were found to be 0.02 μg L(-1) for albendazole and 0.06 μg L(-1) for triclabendazole. The inter-day and intra-day precision (RSD%) for both analytes at three concentration levels (0.5, 2.0 and 10.0 μg L(-1)) were in the range of 6.3-10.1% and 5.0-7.5% respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to determine albendazole and triclabendazole in water, cow milk, honey, and urine samples.

  2. Empirical Calibration of the P-Factor for Cepheid Radii Determined Using the IR Baade-Wesselink Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, Michael D.; Laney, C. D.

    2012-05-01

    We have used 41 galactic Cepheids for which parallax or cluster/association distances are available, and for which pulsation parallaxes can be calculated, to calibrate the p-factor to be used in K-band Baade-Wesselink radius calculations. Our sample includes the 10 Cepheids from Benedict et al. (2007), and three additional Cepheids with Hipparcos parallaxes derived from van Leeuwen et al. (2007). Turner and Burke (2002) list cluster distances for 33 Cepheids for which radii have been or (in a few cases) can be calculated. Revised cluster distances from Turner (2010), Turner and Majaess (2008, 2012), and Majaess and Turner (2011, 2012a, 2012b) have been used where possible. Radii have been calculated using the methods described in Laney and Stobie (1995) and converted to K-band absolute magnitudes using the methods described in van Leeuwen et al. (2007), Feast et al. (2008), and Laney and Joner (2009). The resulting pulsation parallaxes have been used to estimate the p-factor for each Cepheid. These new results stand in contradiction to those derived by Storm et al. (2011), but are in good agreement with theoretical predictions by Nardetto et al. (2009) and with interferometric estimates of the p-factor, as summarized in Groenewegen (2007). We acknowledge the Brigham Young University College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences for continued support of research done using the facilities and personnel at the West Mountain Observatory. This support is connected with NSF/AST grant #0618209.

  3. SUMS calibration test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Calibration was performed on the shuttle upper atmosphere mass spectrometer (SUMS). The results of the calibration and the as run test procedures are presented. The output data is described, and engineering data conversion factors, tables and curves, and calibration on instrument gauges are included. Static calibration results which include: instrument sensitive versus external pressure for N2 and O2, data from each scan of calibration, data plots from N2 and O2, and sensitivity of SUMS at inlet for N2 and O2, and ratios of 14/28 for nitrogen and 16/32 for oxygen are given.

  4. Mechanical properties of composites as functions of the syringe storage temperature and energy dose

    PubMed Central

    CHAVES, Fernanda Oliveira; de FARIAS, Natália Coelho; MEDEIROS, Luciano Marcelo de Mello; ALONSO, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; DI HIPÓLITO, Vinicius; D'ALPINO, Paulo Henrique Perlatti

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanical properties of different classifications of composites indicated for posterior application as functions of the storage condition and of the energy dose. Material and Methods: Specimens (8x2x2 mm) were obtained according to the factors: I) Composites (3M ESPE): Filtek P60, Filtek Z350XT, and Filtek Silorane; II) Syringe storage conditions: room temperature, aged, oven, refrigerator, and freezer; and III) Energy dose: 24 J/cm2 and 48 J/cm2. After photoactivation, the specimens were stored at 37ºC for 24 h. After storage, a three-point bending test was carried out in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. Flexural strength (S) and flexural modulus (E) were calculated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results: Different storage conditions significantly affected the silorane composite for S; conversely, no effects were noted in terms of E. The accelerated aging protocol significantly increased the S of Filtek P60 and Filtek Silorane, whereas storage in the oven significantly decreased the S for all of the composites tested. Filtek P60 was the only composite not affected by the lower storage temperatures tested for S, whereas for the silorane this parameter was impacted at the same conditions. The factor "dose" was not statistically significant. Conclusions: The syringe storage at different temperature conditions proved to influence mostly the flexural strength, a clinically important characteristic considering the posterior indication of the materials tested. The silorane composite should not be stored at lower temperatures. PMID:25075673

  5. Glass delamination: a comparison of the inner surface performance of vials and pre-filled syringes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianxiu; Lavalley, Virginie; Mangiagalli, Paolo; Wright, Justin M; Bankston, Theresa E

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of glass delamination is a serious concern for parenteral drug products. Over the past several years, there has been a series of product recalls involving glass delamination in parenteral drugs stored in vials which has led to heightened industry and regulatory scrutiny. In this study, a two-pronged approach was employed to assess the inner surface durability of vials and pre-filled syringes. Non-siliconized syringes were used in order to directly compare glass to glass performance between vials and syringes. The vial and syringe performance was screened with pharmaceutically relevant formulation conditions. The influence of pH, buffer type, ionic strength, and glass type and source was evaluated. In addition, an aggressive but discriminating formulation condition (glutaric acid, pH 11) was used to ascertain the impact of syringe processing. Advanced analytical tools including inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and dynamic secondary ion mass spectroscopy showed significant differences in glass performance between vials and syringes. Pre-filled syringes outperform vials for most tests and conditions. The manufacturing conditions for vials lead to glass defects, not found in pre-filled syringes, which result in a less chemically resistant surface. The screening methodology presented in this work can be applied to assess suitability of primary containers for specific drug applications.

  6. Inhibitory Activities of Alkyl Syringates and Related Compounds on Aflatoxin Production.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Tomohiro; Iimura, Kurin; Kimura, Taichi; Yamamoto, Toshiyoshi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2016-06-07

    Inhibitors of aflatoxin production of aflatoxigenic fungi are useful for preventing aflatoxin contamination in crops. As methyl syringate weakly inhibits aflatoxin production, aflatoxin production inhibitory activities of additional alkyl syringates with alkyl chains from ethyl to octyl were examined. Inhibitory activity toward aflatoxin production of Aspergillus flavus became stronger as the length of the alkyl chains on the esters became longer. Pentyl, hexyl, heptyl, and octyl syringates showed strong activity at 0.05 mM. Heptyl and octyl parabens, and octyl gallate also inhibited aflatoxin production as strongly as octyl syringate. Alkyl parabens and alkyl gallates inhibit the complex II activity of the mitochondrial respiration chain; thus, whether alkyl syringates inhibit complex II activity was examined. Inhibitory activities of alkyl syringates toward complex II also became stronger as the length of the alkyl chains increased. The complex II inhibitory activity of octyl syringate was comparable to that of octyl paraben and octyl gallate. These results suggest that alkyl syringates, alkyl parabens, and alkyl gallates, including commonly used food additives, are useful for aflatoxin control.

  7. Determination of the Specific Heat Ratio of a Gas in a Plastic Syringe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    The rapid compression or expansion of a gas in a plastic syringe is a poor approximation of an adiabatic process. Heat exchange with the walls of the syringe brings the gas to equilibrium in an amount of time that is not significantly greater than the length of the compression or expansion itself. Despite this limitation, it is still possible to…

  8. Inhibitory Activities of Alkyl Syringates and Related Compounds on Aflatoxin Production.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Tomohiro; Iimura, Kurin; Kimura, Taichi; Yamamoto, Toshiyoshi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of aflatoxin production of aflatoxigenic fungi are useful for preventing aflatoxin contamination in crops. As methyl syringate weakly inhibits aflatoxin production, aflatoxin production inhibitory activities of additional alkyl syringates with alkyl chains from ethyl to octyl were examined. Inhibitory activity toward aflatoxin production of Aspergillus flavus became stronger as the length of the alkyl chains on the esters became longer. Pentyl, hexyl, heptyl, and octyl syringates showed strong activity at 0.05 mM. Heptyl and octyl parabens, and octyl gallate also inhibited aflatoxin production as strongly as octyl syringate. Alkyl parabens and alkyl gallates inhibit the complex II activity of the mitochondrial respiration chain; thus, whether alkyl syringates inhibit complex II activity was examined. Inhibitory activities of alkyl syringates toward complex II also became stronger as the length of the alkyl chains increased. The complex II inhibitory activity of octyl syringate was comparable to that of octyl paraben and octyl gallate. These results suggest that alkyl syringates, alkyl parabens, and alkyl gallates, including commonly used food additives, are useful for aflatoxin control. PMID:27338472

  9. Inhibitory Activities of Alkyl Syringates and Related Compounds on Aflatoxin Production

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Tomohiro; Iimura, Kurin; Kimura, Taichi; Yamamoto, Toshiyoshi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of aflatoxin production of aflatoxigenic fungi are useful for preventing aflatoxin contamination in crops. As methyl syringate weakly inhibits aflatoxin production, aflatoxin production inhibitory activities of additional alkyl syringates with alkyl chains from ethyl to octyl were examined. Inhibitory activity toward aflatoxin production of Aspergillus flavus became stronger as the length of the alkyl chains on the esters became longer. Pentyl, hexyl, heptyl, and octyl syringates showed strong activity at 0.05 mM. Heptyl and octyl parabens, and octyl gallate also inhibited aflatoxin production as strongly as octyl syringate. Alkyl parabens and alkyl gallates inhibit the complex II activity of the mitochondrial respiration chain; thus, whether alkyl syringates inhibit complex II activity was examined. Inhibitory activities of alkyl syringates toward complex II also became stronger as the length of the alkyl chains increased. The complex II inhibitory activity of octyl syringate was comparable to that of octyl paraben and octyl gallate. These results suggest that alkyl syringates, alkyl parabens, and alkyl gallates, including commonly used food additives, are useful for aflatoxin control. PMID:27338472

  10. The Washington Needle Depot: fitting healthcare to injection drug users rather than injection drug users to healthcare: moving from a syringe exchange to syringe distribution model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Needle exchange programs chase political as well as epidemiological dragons, carrying within them both implicit moral and political goals. In the exchange model of syringe distribution, injection drug users (IDUs) must provide used needles in order to receive new needles. Distribution and retrieval are co-existent in the exchange model. Likewise, limitations on how many needles can be received at a time compel addicts to have multiple points of contact with professionals where the virtues of treatment and detox are impressed upon them. The centre of gravity for syringe distribution programs needs to shift from needle exchange to needle distribution, which provides unlimited access to syringes. This paper provides a case study of the Washington Needle Depot, a program operating under the syringe distribution model, showing that the distribution and retrieval of syringes can be separated with effective results. Further, the experience of IDUs is utilized, through paid employment, to provide a vulnerable population of people with clean syringes to prevent HIV and HCV. PMID:20047690

  11. Pharmacy access to syringes among injecting drug users: follow-up findings from Hartford, Connecticut.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, M; Baer, H A; Scott, G; Horowitz, S; Weinstein, B

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To break the link between drug use and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), in 1992 the state of Connecticut rescinded a 14-year ban on pharmacy sales of syringes without a physician's prescription. In 1993, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) evaluated the impact of the new legislation on access to syringes among injecting drug users (IDUs) and found an initial pattern of expanded access. However, it also found that some pharmacies, after negative experiences with IDU customers, reverted to requiring a prescription. This chapter reports findings from a four-year follow-up study of current IDU access to over-the-counter (OTC) pharmacy syringes in Hartford, Connecticut. METHODS: Through structured interviews, brief telephone interviews, and mailed surveys, data on nonprescription syringe sale practices were collected on 27 pharmacies, including 18 of the 21 pharmacies in Hartford and none from pharmacies in contiguous towns, during June and July 1997. Interview data on pharmacy syringe purchase from two sample of IDUs, a group of out-of-treatment injectors recruited through street outreach, and a sample of users of the Hartford Needle Exchange Program, also are reported. RESULTS: The study found that, while market trends as well as negative experiences have further limited pharmacy availability of nonprescription syringes, pharmacies remain an important source of sterile syringes for IDUs. However, the distribution of access in not even; in some areas of the city it is much easier to purchase nonprescription syringes than in other. All of the seven pharmacies located on the north end of Hartford reported that they had a policy of selling OTC syringes, whereas only six (54.5%) of the II pharmacies located on the south end have such a policy. Overt racial discrimination was not found to be a barrier to OTC access to syringes. CONCLUSIONS: To further decrease acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) risk among IDUs, there is a need for

  12. Pre-filled syringes: a review of the history, manufacturing and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Gregory; Rogers, J Aaron; Miller, Reagan L

    2015-01-01

    Pre-filled syringes are convenient devices for the delivery of parenteral medications. They are small which makes them easy to carry and are dependable for delivering a precise dose of medication. These and many other reasons are leading to their growth in the pharmaceutical market. There are a number of review articles that describe the advantages and disadvantages of pre-filled syringes. However, there are few journal articles that present information on their manufacturing and challenges. The intent of this review article is to provide information on the history of the pre-filled syringe, methods of their manufacture, methods of filling syringes as a drug product and to examine the types of syringes available. This type of knowledge can familiarize the formulation scientist with the choices available and their possible challenges. PMID:25589433

  13. Measurement of factor VIII activity using one-stage clotting assay: a calibration curve has not to be systematically included in each run.

    PubMed

    Lattes, S; Appert-Flory, A; Fischer, F; Jambou, D; Toulon, P

    2011-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is usually evaluated using activated partial thromboplastin time-based one-stage clotting assays. Guidelines for clotting factor assays indicate that a calibration curve should be included each time the assay is performed. Therefore, FVIII measurement is expensive, reagent- and time-consuming. The aim of this study was to compare FVIII activities obtained using the same fully automated assay that was calibrated once (stored calibration curve) or each time the assay was performed. Unique lots of reagents were used throughout the study. We analysed 255 frozen plasma samples from patients who were prescribed FVIII measurement including treated and untreated haemophilia A patients. Twenty-six runs were performed on a 28-week period, each including four lyophilized control and at most 10 patient plasma samples. In control samples, FVIII activities were not significantly different when the assay was performed using the stored calibration curve or was daily calibrated. The same applied to FVIII activities in patient plasma samples that were not significantly different throughout the measuring range of activities [68.3% (<1-179) vs. 67.6% (<1-177), P=0.48] and no relevant bias could be demonstrated when data were compared according to Bland and Altman. These results suggest that in the studied technical conditions, performing the FVIII assay using a stored calibration curve is reliable, for at least 6 months. Therefore, as far as the same lots of reagents are used, it is not mandatory to include a calibration curve each time the FVIII assay was performed. However, this strategy has to be validated if the assay is performed in different technical conditions.

  14. A simple pore water hydrogen diffusion syringe sampler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is an important intermediate product and electron donor in microbial metabolism. Concentrations of dissolved H 2 are often diagnostic of the predominant terminal electron-accepting processes in ground water systems or aquatic sediments. H2 concentrations are routinely measured in ground water monitoring wells but are rarely measured in saturated aquatic sediments due to a lack of simple and practical sampling methods. This report describes the design and development (including laboratory and field testing) of a simple, syringe-based H 2 sampler in (1) saturated, riparian sediments, (2) surface water bed sediments, and (3) packed intervals of a fractured bedrock borehole that are inaccessible by standard pumped methods. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  15. [Uncertainty of cross calibration-applied beam quality conversion factor for the Japan Society of Medical Physics 12].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Naoki; Kita, Akinobu; Takemura, Akihiro; Nishimoto, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Toshiki

    2014-09-01

    The uncertainty of the beam quality conversion factor (k(Q,Q0)) of standard dosimetry of absorbed dose to water in external beam radiotherapy 12 (JSMP12) is determined by combining the uncertainty of each beam quality conversion factor calculated for each type of ionization chamber. However, there is no guarantee that ionization chambers of the same type have the same structure and thickness, so there may be individual variations. We evaluated the uncertainty of k(Q,Q0) for JSMP12 using an ionization chamber dosimeter and linear accelerator without a specific device or technique in consideration of the individual variation of ionization chambers and in clinical radiation field. The cross calibration formula was modified and the beam quality conversion factor for the experimental values [(k(Q,Q0))field] determined using the modified formula. It's uncertainty was calculated to be 1.9%. The differences between (k(Q,Q0))field of experimental values and k(Q,Q0) for Japan Society of Medical Physics 12 (JSMP12) were 0.73% and 0.88% for 6- and 10-MV photon beams, respectively, remaining within ± 1.9%. This showed k(Q,Q0) for JSMP12 to be consistent with (k(Q,Q0))field of experimental values within the estimated uncertainty range. Although inter-individual differences may be generated, even when the same type of ionized chamber is used, k(Q,Q0) for JSMP12 appears to be consistent within the estimated uncertainty range of (k(Q,Q0)field.

  16. Innovative methodology for intercomparison of radionuclide calibrators using short half-life in situ prepared radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, P. A.; Santos, J. A. M.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: An original radionuclide calibrator method for activity determination is presented. The method could be used for intercomparison surveys for short half-life radioactive sources used in Nuclear Medicine, such as{sup 99m}Tc or most positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals. Methods: By evaluation of the resulting net optical density (netOD) using a standardized scanning method of irradiated Gafchromic XRQA2 film, a comparison of the netOD measurement with a previously determined calibration curve can be made and the difference between the tested radionuclide calibrator and a radionuclide calibrator used as reference device can be calculated. To estimate the total expected measurement uncertainties, a careful analysis of the methodology, for the case of{sup 99m}Tc, was performed: reproducibility determination, scanning conditions, and possible fadeout effects. Since every factor of the activity measurement procedure can influence the final result, the method also evaluates correct syringe positioning inside the radionuclide calibrator. Results: As an alternative to using a calibrated source sent to the surveyed site, which requires a relatively long half-life of the nuclide, or sending a portable calibrated radionuclide calibrator, the proposed method uses a source preparedin situ. An indirect activity determination is achieved by the irradiation of a radiochromic film using {sup 99m}Tc under strictly controlled conditions, and cumulated activity calculation from the initial activity and total irradiation time. The irradiated Gafchromic film and the irradiator, without the source, can then be sent to a National Metrology Institute for evaluation of the results. Conclusions: The methodology described in this paper showed to have a good potential for accurate (3%) radionuclide calibrators intercomparison studies for{sup 99m}Tc between Nuclear Medicine centers without source transfer and can easily be adapted to other short half-life radionuclides.

  17. 78 FR 20116 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Glass Syringes for Delivering...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... Staff; Glass Syringes for Delivering Drug and Biological Products: Technical Information To Supplement... availability of draft guidance for industry and FDA staff entitled ``Glass Syringes for Delivering Drug and... glass syringes that comply with the ISO 11040-4 standard when connected to devices (``connecting...

  18. In-syringe magnetic stirring-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for automation and downscaling of methylene blue active substances assay.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Ruth; Horstkotte, Burkhard; Cerdà, Victor

    2014-12-01

    A simple and rapid method for the determination of the methylene blue active substances assay based on in-syringe automation of magnetic stirring-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was developed. The proposed method proved to be valid for the determination of anionic surfactant in waste, pond, well, tap, and drinking water samples. Sample mixing with reagents, extraction and phase separation were performed within the syringe of an automated syringe pump containing a magnetic stirring bar for homogenization and solvent dispersion. The syringe module was used upside-down to enable the use of chloroform as an extraction solvent of higher density than water. The calibration was found to be linear up to 0.3mg/L using only 200 µL of solvent and 4 mL of sample. The limits of detection (3σ) and quantification (10σ) were 7.0 µg/L and 22 µg/L, respectively. The relative standard deviation for 10 replicate determinations of 0.1mg/L SBDS was below 3%. Concentrations of anionic surfactants in natural water samples were in the range of 0.032-0.213 mg/L and no significant differences towards the standard method were found. Standard additions gave analyte recoveries between 95% and 106% proving the general applicability and adequateness of the system to MBSA index determination. Compared to the tedious standard method requiring up to 50 mL of chloroform, the entire procedure took only 345 s using 250-times less solvent.

  19. Syringe exchange in Canada: good but not enough to stem the HIV tide.

    PubMed

    Hankins, C A

    1998-04-01

    This article provides a historical perspective on the development of syringe exchange in Canada, the Canadian legal and policy context, evaluation and monitoring strategies, and current challenges facing HIV prevention efforts among injecting drug users. Despite the fact that it is legal to sell, exchange, or provide an IDU with a syringe and there are no laws in Canada requiring a physician's prescription to justify possession of a syringe, policy development and programming have not been adequate to hold HIV at bay in several cities across the country. Although there have been concerted efforts by syringe and needle exchange programs to increase the supply of injecting equipment, HIV prevalence continues to rise, provoking a rethinking of the role of syringe exchange. In a coordinated strategy for HIV prevention among drug users in Canada, needle and syringe exchange is not itself in question; however, ghettoization and needle quota systems may have had an adverse impact on prevention programming. A national action plan has been developed which aims to decentralize both methadone maintenance and syringe and needle exchange programs, increase access to detoxification and treatment modalities, and advocate for changes in the criminal justice system and law enforcement practices.

  20. Accuracy and reproducibility of low dose insulin administration using pen-injectors and syringes

    PubMed Central

    Gnanalingham, M; Newland, P; Smith, C

    1998-01-01

    Many children with diabetes require small doses of insulin administered with syringes or pen-injector devices (at the Booth Hall Paediatric Diabetic Clinic, 20% of children aged 0-5 years receive 1-2 U insulin doses). To determine how accurately and reproducibly small doses are delivered, 1, 2, 5, and 10 U doses of soluble insulin (100 U/ml) were dispensed in random order 15times from five new NovoPens (1.5 ml), five BD-Pens (1.5 ml), and by five nurses using 30 U syringes. Each dose was weighed, and intended and actual doses compared. The two pen-injectors delivered less insulin than syringes, differences being inversely proportional to dose. For 1 U (mean (SD)): 0.89 (0.04) U (NovoPen), 0.92 (0.03) U (BD-Pen), 1.23 (0.09) U (syringe); and for 10 U: 9.8 (0.1) U (NovoPen), 9.9 (0.1) U (BD-Pen), 10.1 (0.1) U (syringe). The accuracy (percentage errors) of the pen-injectors was similar and more accurate than syringes delivering 1, 2, and 5 U of insulin. Errors for 1 U: 11(4)% (NovoPen), 8(3)% (BD-Pen), 23(9)% (syringe). The reproducibility (coefficient of variation) of actual doses was similar (< 7%) for all three devices, which were equally consistent at underdosing (pen-injectors) or overdosing (syringes) insulin. All three devices, especially syringes, are unacceptably inaccurate when delivering 1 U doses of insulin. Patients on low doses need to be educated that their dose may alter when they transfer from one device to another.

 PMID:9771255

  1. Strong composition-dependent variation of MCs + calibration factors in TiO x and GeO x ( x ≤ 2) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnaser, Hubert; Le, Yongkang; Su, Weifeng

    2006-07-01

    The emission of MCs + secondary ions (M designates the analyte species) from TiO x (0.2 ≤ x ≤ 2) and GeO x (0.001 ≤ x ≤ 0.8) films under Cs + bombardment was examined. The relative calibration factors of OCs +/TiCs + and OCs +/GeCs + were determined and were found to depend pronouncedly on the O/Ti and O/Ge atomic concentration ratios. Specifically, with increasing oxygen content OCs + ions form much more efficiently (as compared to TiCs + or GeCs + ions), an enhancement amounting to more than a factor of 10 for the highest oxygen concentrations. Concurrently, the formation of TiOCs + or GeOCs + ions increases drastically. For both oxide systems, an empirical relation for the oxygen-concentration dependence of the relative calibration factors could be established.

  2. SAR calibration technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. L.; Larson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) calibration technology including a general description of the primary calibration techniques and some of the factors which affect the performance of calibrated SAR systems are reviewed. The use of reference reflectors for measurement of the total system transfer function along with an on-board calibration signal generator for monitoring the temporal variations of the receiver to processor output is a practical approach for SAR calibration. However, preliminary error analysis and previous experimental measurements indicate that reflectivity measurement accuracies of better than 3 dB will be difficult to achieve. This is not adequate for many applications and, therefore, improved end-to-end SAR calibration techniques are required.

  3. Plastic-Syringe Induced Silicone Contamination in Organic Photvoltaic Fabrication: Implications for Small-Volume Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, John A.; Nalwa, Kanwar S.; Mahadevapuram, Rakesh; Chen, Yuqing; Anderegg, James; Chaudhary, Sumit

    2012-05-15

    Herein, the implications of silicone contamination found in solution-processed conjugated polymer solar cells are explored. Similar to a previous work based on molecular cells, we find this contamination as a result of the use of plastic syringes during fabrication. However, in contrast to the molecular case, we find that glass-syringe fabricated devices give superior performance than plastic-syringe fabricated devices in poly(3-hexylthiophene)-based cells. We find that the unintentional silicone addition alters the solution’s wettability, which translates to a thinner, less absorbent film on spinning. With many groups studying the effects of small-volume additives, this work should be closely considered as many of these additives may also directly alter the solutions’ wettability, or the amount of silicone dissolved off the plastic syringes, or both. Thereby, film thickness, which generally is not reported in detail, can vary significantly from device to device.

  4. Using human rights law to advocate for syringe exchange programs in European prisons.

    PubMed

    Lines, Rick

    2006-12-01

    The European Convention on Human Rights can be used to advocate for the provision of syringe exchange programs in prisons, says Rick Lines in this article, which is based on a presentation at an abstract-driven session at the conference. The author outlines the arguments that states might use to avoid having to implement syringe exchange programs, and counters these arguments with reference to human rights law and jurisprudence.

  5. Effectiveness of ear syringing in general practice: a randomised controlled trial and patients' experiences.

    PubMed Central

    Memel, David; Langley, Carole; Watkins, Chris; Laue, Barbara; Birchall, Martin; Bachmann, Max

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ear syringing is a common procedure performed for a variety of symptoms in primary care. Reports of its effectiveness vary considerably and no randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have been performed. AIM: To estimate the effect of ear syringing on hearing thresholds and on symptoms leading to ear syringing in general practice. DESIGN OF STUDY: Randomised single-blind controlled trial. Before-and-after self-assessments of symptoms. SETTING: Patients from three general practices in the Bristol area attending twice-weekly clinics dedicated to ear syringing over a 12-week period. METHOD: Patients were randomly assigned to have their hearing tested before and after ear syringing, or twice before ear syringing. Changes in hearing threshold were measured by pure tone audiometry (PTA). All patients completed sef-assessment forms of symptoms using Likert scales before, and one week after, ear syringing. RESULTS: Hearing threshold improved by 10 dB or more in 34% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 21% to 47%) of the intervention group and 1.6% of control group (number needed to treat = 3.1, 95% CI = 2.2 to 5.2, P<0.001). The levels of improvement in the intervention group ranged between 15 dB and 36 dB. The symptoms that most commonly improved included hearing on the phone, pain, a feeling of blocked ears, and hearing one-to-one. There was a strong relationship between the change thresholds, as measure using PTA, and self-reports of hearing improvement. Secondary analysis was unable to identify predictors of objectively measured improvement. CONCLUSION: Ear syringing improved hearing threshold in a substantial proportion of patients. An even larger proportion reported an improvement in symptoms. It was not possible to predict which patients would benefit. PMID:12434959

  6. A syringe injection rate detector employing a dual Hall-effect sensor configuration.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Biswarup; George, Boby; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2013-01-01

    Injection of fluids in the body using needle syringes is a standard clinical practice. The rate of injection can have various pathological effects on the body such as the pain perceived or in case of anesthesia, the amount of akinesia attained. Hence, a training system with a modified syringe employing a simple measurement scheme where a trainee can observe and practice the rate of injection prior to administering on actual human subjects, can be of great value towards reduction of complications in real life situations. In this paper, we develop a system for measurement of syringe injection rate with two Hall-effect sensors. Ring magnets attached to the body of the syringe along with the dual Hall-effect sensor configuration help in determining the position of the piston with respect to the syringe body. The two Hall-sensors are arranged in a differential configuration such that a linear relationship is obtained between the volume of liquid in the syringe (in ml) and the Hall-effect sensor output voltages. A prototype developed validated the measurement scheme. The rate of injection was displayed in real-time with a LabVIEW based Virtual Instrument. The error was within acceptable limits illustrating its efficacy for practical training purposes.

  7. Syringe Exchange in the United States: A National Level Economic Evaluation of Hypothetical Increases in Investment

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Brian W.; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Pinkerton, Steven D.; Holtgrave, David R.

    2014-01-01

    To examine whether increasing investment in needle/syringe exchange programs (NSPs) in the US would be cost-effective for HIV prevention, we modeled HIV incidence in hypothetical cases with higher NSP syringe supply than current levels, and estimated number of infections averted, cost per infection averted, treatment costs saved, and financial return on investment. We modified Pinkerton’s model, which was an adaptation of Kaplan’s simplified needle circulation theory model, to compare different syringe supply levels, account for syringes from non-NSP sources, and reflect reduction in syringe sharing and contamination. With an annual $10 to $50 million funding increase, 194–816 HIV infections would be averted (cost per infection averted $51,601– $61,302). Contrasted with HIV treatment cost savings alone, the rate of financial return on investment would be 7.58–6.38. Main and sensitivity analyses strongly suggest that it would be cost-saving for the US to invest in syringe exchange expansion. PMID:24824043

  8. A syringe injection rate detector employing a dual Hall-effect sensor configuration.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Biswarup; George, Boby; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2013-01-01

    Injection of fluids in the body using needle syringes is a standard clinical practice. The rate of injection can have various pathological effects on the body such as the pain perceived or in case of anesthesia, the amount of akinesia attained. Hence, a training system with a modified syringe employing a simple measurement scheme where a trainee can observe and practice the rate of injection prior to administering on actual human subjects, can be of great value towards reduction of complications in real life situations. In this paper, we develop a system for measurement of syringe injection rate with two Hall-effect sensors. Ring magnets attached to the body of the syringe along with the dual Hall-effect sensor configuration help in determining the position of the piston with respect to the syringe body. The two Hall-sensors are arranged in a differential configuration such that a linear relationship is obtained between the volume of liquid in the syringe (in ml) and the Hall-effect sensor output voltages. A prototype developed validated the measurement scheme. The rate of injection was displayed in real-time with a LabVIEW based Virtual Instrument. The error was within acceptable limits illustrating its efficacy for practical training purposes. PMID:24110792

  9. Chemicals eluting from disposable plastic syringes and syringe filters alter neurite growth, axogenesis and the microtubule cytoskeleton in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tet Woo; Tumanov, Sergey; Villas-Bôas, Silas G; Montgomery, Johanna M; Birch, Nigel P

    2015-04-01

    Cultures of dissociated hippocampal neurons are often used to study neuronal cell biology. We report that the development of these neurons is strongly affected by chemicals leaching from commonly used disposable medical-grade syringes and syringe filters. Contamination of culture medium by bioactive substance(s) from syringes and filters occurred with multiple manufacturing lots and filter types under normal use conditions and resulted in changes to neurite growth, axon formation and the neuronal microtubule cytoskeleton. The effects on neuronal morphology were concentration dependent and significant effects were detected even after substantial dilution of the contaminated medium. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses revealed many chemicals eluting from the syringes and filters. Three of these chemicals (stearic acid, palmitic acid and 1,2-ethanediol monoacetate) were tested but showed no effects on neurite growth. Similar changes in neuronal morphology were seen with high concentrations of bisphenol A and dibutyl phthalate, two hormonally active plasticisers. Although no such compounds were detected by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, unknown plasticisers in leachates may affect neurites. This is the first study to show that leachates from laboratory consumables can alter the growth of cultured hippocampal neurons. We highlight important considerations to ensure leachate contamination does not compromise cell biology experiments.

  10. Syringe Access, Syringe Sharing, and Police Encounters among People Who Inject Drugs in New York City: A Community-Level Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Beletsky, Leo; Heller, Daliah; Jenness, Samuel M.; Neaigus, Alan; Gelpi-Acosta, Camila; Hagan, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Background Injection drug user (IDU) experience and perceptions of police practices may alter syringe exchange program (SEP) use or influence risky behaviour. Previously, no community-level data had been collected to identify the prevalence or correlates of police encounters reported by IDUs in the United States. Methods New York City IDUs recruited through respondent-driven sampling were asked about past-year police encounters and risk behaviours, as part of the National HIV Behavioural Surveillance study. Data were analysed using multiple logistic regression. Results A majority (52%) of respondents (n=514) reported being stopped by police officers; 10% reported syringe confiscation. In multivariate modelling, IDUs reporting police stops were less likely to use SEPs consistently (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.40–0.89), and IDUs who had syringes confiscated may have been more likely to share syringes (AOR=1.76; 95% CI=0.90–3.44), though the finding did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Findings suggest that police encounters may influence consistent SEP use. The frequency of IDU-police encounters highlights the importance of including contextual and structural measures in infectious disease risk surveillance, and the need to develop approaches harmonizing structural policing and public health. PMID:23916801

  11. SU-E-T-298: Small Field Total Scatter Factors Using a Commercial Scintillator Detector: Calibration Parameters Are Not Independent of Field Size

    SciTech Connect

    Jornet, N; Carrasco de Fez, P; Jordi, O; Latorre-Musoll, A; Eudaldo, T; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Ribas Morales, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy in total scatter factor (Sc,p) determination for small fields using commercial plastic scintillator detector (PSD). The manufacturer's spectral discrimination method to subtract Cerenkov light from the signal is discussed. Methods: Sc,p for field sizes ranging from 0.5 to 10 cm were measured using PSD Exradin (Standard Imaging) connected to two channel electrometer measuring the signals in two different spectral regions to subtract the Cerenkov signal from the PSD signal. A Pinpoint ionisation chamber 31006 (PTW) and a non-shielded semiconductor detector EFD (Scanditronix) were used for comparison. Measures were performed for a 6 MV X-ray beam. The Sc,p are measured at 10 cm depth in water for a SSD=100 cm and normalized to a 10'10 cm{sup 2} field size at the isocenter. All detectors were placed with their symmetry axis parallel to the beam axis.We followed the manufacturer's recommended calibration methodology to subtract the Cerenkov contribution to the signal as well as a modified method using smaller field sizes. The Sc,p calculated by using both calibration methodologies were compared. Results: Sc,p measured with the semiconductor and the PinPoint detectors agree, within 1.5%, for field sizes between 10'10 and 1'1 cm{sup 2}. Sc,p measured with the PSD using the manufacturer's calibration methodology were systematically 4% higher than those measured with the semiconductor detector for field sizes smaller than 5'5 cm{sup 2}. By using a modified calibration methodology for smalls fields and keeping the manufacturer calibration methodology for fields larger than 5'5cm{sup 2} field Sc,p matched semiconductor results within 2% field sizes larger than 1.5 cm. Conclusion: The calibration methodology proposed by the manufacturer is not appropriate for dose measurements in small fields. The calibration parameters are not independent of the incident radiation spectrum for this PSD. This work was partially financed by grant 2012 of

  12. High dead-space syringe use among people who inject drugs in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rafful, Claudia; Zule, William; González-Zúñiga, Patricia E.; Werb, Dan; Elena Medina-Mora, María; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background High dead-space syringes (HDSS) are believed to confer an elevated risk of acquiring HIV and other blood-borne infections. Objectives We identified prevalence and correlates of HDSS use among injection drug users (IDU) in Tijuana, Mexico, where syringe purchase and possession is legal without a prescription. Methods Beginning in 2011, IDU who reported being 18 years or older, who injected drugs within the last month were recruited into a prospective study. At baseline and semi-annually, 557 IDU underwent HIV-testing and interviewer-administered surveys. Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of using HDSS. Results Of 557 IDU, 40% had ever used HDSS, mostly because no other syringe type was available (72%), or because they were easier to get (20%). Controlling for sex and age at first injection, use of HDSS was associated with cocaine as the first drug injected (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR]:2.68; Confidence Interval 95% [CI]:1.15-6.22), having been stopped or arrested by police (AOR:1.84; 95% CI:1.11-3.07), being deported from the US (AOR:1.64; 95%CI:1.06-2.53), and believing it is illegal to carry syringes (AOR:1.78; 95%CI:1.01-3.15). Conclusion Use of HDSS is surprisingly common among IDU in Tijuana. Efforts are needed to expand coverage of low-dead space syringes through existing syringe exchange programs. Education is required to increase awareness of the harms associated with HDSS, and to inform IDU that syringe possession is legal across Mexico. PMID:25695145

  13. DC non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet generated using a syringe needle electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matra, Khanit

    2016-07-01

    Non-thermal plasma jet was generated by applying a dc source voltage between the syringe needle anode with flowing Argon gas and a planar or a hollow copper cathode in an atmospheric-pressure environment. The two operating discharge modes, which were self-pulsing and a continuous discharge mode, these were mainly controlled by the limitations of the current flowing in the discharge circuit. A ballast resistor was an important factor in affecting the limitations of the operating discharge mode. The gas breakdown was initially generated in the self-pulsing discharge mode at the source voltage of 1.2 kV. This was slightly higher than the breakdown voltage at the experimental condition of 1 lpm of Argon and a 1 mm electrode gap distance. The peak self-pulsing discharge currents were up to 15–20 A with a self-pulsing frequency in the range of 10–20 kHz. The continuous discharge mode could be observed at the higher source voltage with the continuous discharge current within the range of a few milliamperes.

  14. Incarceration is associated with used syringe lending among active injection drug users with detectable plasma HIV-1 RNA: a longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Informed by recent studies demonstrating the central role of plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL) on HIV transmission, interventions to employ HIV antiretroviral treatment as prevention (TasP) are underway. To optimize these efforts, evidence is needed to identify factors associated with both non-suppressed VL and HIV risk behaviours. Thus, we sought to assess the possible role played by exposure to correctional facilities on VL non-suppression and used syringe lending among HIV-seropositive people who use injection drugs (PWID). Methods We used data from the ACCESS study, a community-recruited prospective cohort. We used longitudinal multivariate mixed-effects analyses to estimate the relationship between incarceration and plasma HIV-1 RNA > 500 copies/mL among antiretroviral therapy (ART)-exposed active PWID and, during periods of non-suppression, the relationship between incarceration and used syringe lending. Results Between May 1996 and March 2012, 657 ART-exposed PWID were recruited. Incarceration was independently associated with higher odds of VL non-suppression (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 1.54, 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI]: 1.10, 2.16). In a separate multivariate model restricted to periods of VL non-suppression, incarceration was independently associated with lending used syringes (AOR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.03, 3.18). Conclusions The current findings demonstrate that incarceration is associated with used syringe lending among active PWID with detectable plasma HIV-1 RNA. Our results provide a possible pathway for the commonly observed association between incarceration and increased risk of HIV transmission. Our results suggest that alternatives to incarceration of non-violent PWID and evidence-based combination HIV prevention interventions for PWID within correctional facilities are urgently needed. PMID:24289651

  15. Stability of micafungin sodium solutions at different concentrations in glass bottles and syringes.

    PubMed

    Briot, Thomas; Vrignaud, Sandy; Lagarce, Frédéric

    2015-08-15

    Micafungin is a costly treatment and packaging of 50 mg or 100 mg bottles only are available, while doses lower than 5 mg and 20 mg are often necessary in neonates and paediatrics patients, respectively. The stability of micafungin sodium in polypropylene syringes and glass bottles was studied at different concentrations. Solutions of micafungin diluted with NaCl 0.9% were prepared in glass bottles (20 and 10 mg/mL) or syringes (1 and 0.5 mg/mL) and stored at 25 °C, 60% humidity (RH), in the dark (ICH conditions). Solutions were also exposed to heat (70 °C) or alkaline solution (NaOH) in order to force degradation. Samples were analysed at days 1, 5, 8 (for bottles) and also 15 (for syringes) after the preparation and assayed in triplicate. Stability was studied using a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic method. Syringes stored at 25 °C retained over 90% of their initial concentration over the study period. Temperature and alkaline conditions had significant effect on the stability of micafungin, leading to apparition of degradation products. Moreover, sub visible particles were in the specification of the European Pharmacopeia along 15 days. To conclude, micafungin diluted in NaCl 0.9% and stored in polypropylene syringes was chemically stable for at least 15 days at 25 °C in the dark. PMID:26187166

  16. The TRPA1 Agonist, Methyl Syringate Suppresses Food Intake and Gastric Emptying

    PubMed Central

    Song, Seo Hyeon; Jung, Myungji; Kim, Yiseul; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channel ankryn 1 (TRPA1) expressed in the gastrointestinal tract is associated with gastric motility, gastric emptying, and food intake. In this study, we investigated the effects of methyl syringate, a specific and selective TRPA1 agonist, on food intake, gastric emptying, and gut hormone levels in imprinting control region (ICR) mice. The administration of methyl syringate suppressed cumulative food intake and gastric emptying. In addition, treatment with ruthenium red (RR), a general cation channel blocker, and HC-030031, a selective TRPA1 antagonist, inhibited methyl syringate-induced reduction of food intake and delayed gastric emptying in ICR mice. Methyl syringate also increased plasma peptide YY (PYY) levels, but not glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels. The elevation in PYY was blocked by treatment with RR and HC-030031. The present findings indicate that methyl syringate regulates food intake and gastric emptying through a TRPA1-mediated pathway and, by extension, can contribute to weight suppression. PMID:23990963

  17. Effect of polarization and geometric factors on quantitative laser-induced fluorescence- to-Raman intensity ratios of water samples and a new calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Killinger, Dennis K.

    2003-09-01

    A 266-nm laser-induced fluorescence system was used to study the effect of polarization of the excitation source and geometry of the collection optics on the ratio of the signal from a fluorescence standard, quinine sulfate, and the Raman scatter from water. Although the ratio is sometimes considered to be a constant and is used for intersystem comparisons, our studies showed that the Raman signal and, thus, the ratio can vary by a factor of up to 3.6. These experimental values agree with previous studies by others involving gas and flame Raman spectroscopy and suggest a new calibration method for intersystem comparison of different fluorescence systems.

  18. Training students to use syringe pumps: an experimental comparison of e-learning and classroom training.

    PubMed

    Grundgeiger, Tobias; Kolb, Lorenz; Korb, Maximilian O; Mengelkamp, Christoph; Held, Volker

    2016-04-01

    The inadequate use of syringe pumps can jeopardize patient safety, and syringe pump trainings are conducted to manage this risk. A critical step in this risk management process is the learning success of trainees. In the present paper, we compared an e-learning approach with standard classroom training in learning success effectives, trainees' opinion on the trainings, and investigated the relation between technological affinity and learning success. The results showed that e-learning was as effective as classroom training but nursing students' confidence in using the pump and satisfaction with the training was decreased for e-learning compared with classroom training. We discuss the results in context of the nursing e-learning literature. Finally, we discuss the literature for risk identification, risk analysis, risk treatment, and risk monitoring and control in the context of syringe pump training and add the lessons learned from the evaluated e-learning program. PMID:26368041

  19. Training students to use syringe pumps: an experimental comparison of e-learning and classroom training.

    PubMed

    Grundgeiger, Tobias; Kolb, Lorenz; Korb, Maximilian O; Mengelkamp, Christoph; Held, Volker

    2016-04-01

    The inadequate use of syringe pumps can jeopardize patient safety, and syringe pump trainings are conducted to manage this risk. A critical step in this risk management process is the learning success of trainees. In the present paper, we compared an e-learning approach with standard classroom training in learning success effectives, trainees' opinion on the trainings, and investigated the relation between technological affinity and learning success. The results showed that e-learning was as effective as classroom training but nursing students' confidence in using the pump and satisfaction with the training was decreased for e-learning compared with classroom training. We discuss the results in context of the nursing e-learning literature. Finally, we discuss the literature for risk identification, risk analysis, risk treatment, and risk monitoring and control in the context of syringe pump training and add the lessons learned from the evaluated e-learning program.

  20. Anemometer calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bate, T.; Calkins, D. E.; Price, P.; Veikins, O.

    1971-01-01

    Calibrator generates accurate flow velocities over wide range of gas pressure, temperature, and composition. Both pressure and flow velocity can be maintained within 0.25 percent. Instrument is essentially closed loop hydraulic system containing positive displacement drive.

  1. Recent incarceration independently associated with syringe sharing by injection drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Evan; Li, Kathy; Small, Will; Montaner, Julio S.; Schechter, Martin T.; Kerr, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Few prospective studies are available on the relationship between incarceration and HIV risk among injection drug users (IDUs). The authors evaluated self-reported rates of syringe sharing and incarceration among a cohort of IDUs. METHODS: This study analyzed syringe lending by HIV-infected IDUs and syringe borrowing by HIV-negative IDUs among participants enrolled in the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study (VIDUS). Since serial measures for each individual were available, variables potentially associated with each outcome (syringe lending and borrowing) were evaluated using generalized estimating equations for binary outcomes. RESULTS: The study sample consisted of 1,475 IDUs who were enrolled into the VIDUS cohort from May 1996 through May 2002. At baseline, 1,123 (76%) reported a history of incarceration since they first began injecting drugs. Of these individuals, 351 (31%) reported at baseline that they had injected drugs while incarcerated. Among 318 baseline HIV-infected IDUs, having been incarcerated in the six months prior to each interview remained independently associated with syringe lending during the same period (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06, 1.69; p=0.015). Similarly, among the 1,157 baseline HIV-negative IDUs, having been incarcerated in the six months prior to each interview remained independently associated with reporting syringe borrowing during the same period (adjusted OR=1.26; 95% CI 1.12, 1.44; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Incarceration was independently associated with risky needle sharing for HIV-infected and HIV-negative IDUs. This evidence of HIV risk behavior should reinforce public health concerns about the high rates of incarceration among IDUs. PMID:15842116

  2. Cements containing syringic acid esters -- o-ethoxybenzoic acid and zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Brauer, G M; Stansbury, J W

    1984-02-01

    Fissure caries is reduced when syringic acid is incorporated into a cariogenic diet of rats. It was therefore of interest to synthesize n-hexyl and 2-ethylhexyl syringate and to evaluate the properties of cements with these compounds as ingredients. Liquids containing the esters dissolved in o-ethoxybenzoic acid (EBA) - when mixed with powders made up from zinc oxide, aluminum oxide, and hydrogenated rosin - hardened in from four to nine min. Properties of the cements were determined, when possible, according to ANSI/ADA specification tests. Depending on the powder-liquid ratio employed, we obtained compositions with varying physical properties desirable for different dental applications. The syringate cements, compared with the commonly used ZOE materials, have improved compressive and tensile strength, lower water solubility, do not inhibit polymerization, and are compatible with acrylic monomers. These cements pass, and mostly greatly exceed, the requirements for ZOE-type restorative materials. They also bond significantly to resins, composites, and non-precious metals. The bond strength is somewhat less than that of n-hexyl vanillate-EBA cement, but greatly exceeds the adhesion to various substrates of ZOE luting agents. Cements containing n-hexyl syringate were somewhat brittle. Best results were obtained with liquid compositions containing 5% 2-ethylhexyl syringate, 7% n-hexyl vanillate, and 88% EBA, which yielded non-brittle materials. These cements, because of the syringate ingredient, may possess caries-reducing properties. Thus, perhaps in conjunction with fluoride additives, they would be useful as insulating bases, pulp capping agents, root canal sealers, soft tissue packs, or intermediate restoratives.

  3. Negotiating access: Social barriers to purchasing syringes at pharmacies in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Peter J.; Lozada, Remedios; Rosen, Perth C.; Macias, Armando; Gallardo, Manuel; Pollini, Robin A.

    2012-01-01

    Background One common public health response to the emergence of HIV has been the provision of sterile syringes to people who inject drugs. In Mexico specialized syringe exchanges are rare, and the sale of needles through pharmacies is often the only way people who inject drugs can obtain sterile syringes. However, people who inject drugs in Tijuana, Mexico report considerable social barriers to successfully purchasing syringes at pharmacies. Methods Between October 2008 and March 2009 we conducted seven in-depth focus groups with 47 people who inject drugs in Tijuana, Mexico. Focus group transcripts were analysed using a descriptive and thematic approach rooted in grounded theory. Results We found that injectors offered a number of explanations for why pharmacies were reluctant to sell them syringes, including fear of police; attitudes toward drug use; fear of stereotypical drug user behaviour such as petty theft, violence, or distressing behaviour; and related fears that an obvious drug using clientèle would drive away other customers. Injectors described a range of ways of attempting to re-frame or negotiate interactions with pharmacy staff so that these and related concerns were ameliorated. These included tactics as simple as borrowing cleaner clothing, through to strategies for becoming ‘known’ to pharmacy staff as an individual rather than as a member of a stigmatized group. Conclusion Increasing the ability of pharmacy staff and people who inject drugs to successfully negotiate syringe sales are highly desirable. Interventions designed to improve this likelihood need to capitalize on existing solutions developed ad-hoc by people who inject drugs and pharmacy staff, and should focus on broadening the range of ‘identities’ which pharmacy staff are able to accept as legitimate customers. Approaches to achieve this end might include sensitizing pharmacy staff to the needs of people who inject drugs; facilitating individual drug users meeting individual

  4. Protein quantification by chemiluminescent Western blotting: elimination of the antibody factor by dilution series and calibration curve.

    PubMed

    Charette, Steve J; Lambert, Herman; Nadeau, Philippe J; Landry, Jacques

    2010-02-28

    Quantification of chemiluminescent signals from a Western blot is routinely used to determine the increase or the decrease in protein expression or modification in cell or tissue extracts. However, although scientists readily agree that such a procedure is not quantitative, it is nonetheless used quantitatively in most publications without appropriate controls that would increase the accuracy of the measurement. Here we reexamined this aspect and found that the primary antibody itself influences the relation between the Western blot signal and the protein amount on the membrane. This relation is non-linear and varies from one antibody to another. In that context, we strongly encourage researchers to use dilution series and calibration curve when quantifying protein by Western blot using chemiluminescent signal.

  5. Monte Carlo-derived TLD cross-calibration factors for treatment verification and measurement of skin dose in accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    PubMed

    Garnica-Garza, H M

    2009-03-21

    Monte Carlo simulation was employed to calculate the response of TLD-100 chips under irradiation conditions such as those found during accelerated partial breast irradiation with the MammoSite radiation therapy system. The absorbed dose versus radius in the last 0.5 cm of the treated volume was also calculated, employing a resolution of 20 microm, and a function that fits the observed data was determined. Several clinically relevant irradiation conditions were simulated for different combinations of balloon size, balloon-to-surface distance and contents of the contrast solution used to fill the balloon. The thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) cross-calibration factors were derived assuming that the calibration of the dosemeters was carried out using a Cobalt 60 beam, and in such a way that they provide a set of parameters that reproduce the function that describes the behavior of the absorbed dose versus radius curve. Such factors may also prove to be useful for those standardized laboratories that provide postal dosimetry services.

  6. Community Impact of Pharmacy-Randomized Intervention to Improve Access to Syringes and Services for Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Natalie D.; Amesty, Silvia; Rivera, Alexis V.; Harripersaud, Katherine; Turner, Alezandria; Fuller, Crystal M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In an effort to reduce HIV transmission among injection drug users (IDUs), New York State deregulated pharmacy syringe sales in 2001 through the Expanded Syringe Access Program by removing the requirement of a prescription. With evidence suggesting pharmacists' ability to expand their public health role, a structural,…

  7. Cross-linked silicone coating: a novel prefilled syringe technology that reduces subvisible particles and maintains compatibility with biologics.

    PubMed

    Depaz, Roberto A; Chevolleau, Tzvetelina; Jouffray, Sébastien; Narwal, Roja; Dimitrova, Mariana N

    2014-05-01

    Prefilled syringes (PFSs) offer improvements in the delivery of drugs to patients compared with traditional vial presentations and are becoming necessities in an increasingly competitive biologics market. However, the development of a product in a PFS must take into account potential incompatibilities between the drug and the components of the syringe. One such component is silicone oil, which has previously been suggested to promote protein aggregation, loss of soluble protein, and an increase in the particulate content of injectable formulations. This study evaluated the particulate content in a model buffer system (polysorbate 80/phosphate-buffered saline) after agitation in glass syringes with a novel cross-linked silicone coating. We also evaluated the compatibility of two monoclonal antibodies with these syringes. We report that syringes with this novel coating, compared with standard siliconized syringes, exhibited reduced particle content and enhanced integrity of the lubricant layer as determined by reflectometry, optical microscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements, while maintaining the desired functional properties of the syringe and the antibodies' stability profiles as determined by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography. Enhanced integrity of the lubricant coating led to significantly fewer subvisible particles in the liquid formulations, particularly after agitation stresses introduced by shipping of the syringes. PMID:24643773

  8. Image Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peay, Christopher S.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Calibrate_Image calibrates images obtained from focal plane arrays so that the output image more accurately represents the observed scene. The function takes as input a degraded image along with a flat field image and a dark frame image produced by the focal plane array and outputs a corrected image. The three most prominent sources of image degradation are corrected for: dark current accumulation, gain non-uniformity across the focal plane array, and hot and/or dead pixels in the array. In the corrected output image the dark current is subtracted, the gain variation is equalized, and values for hot and dead pixels are estimated, using bicubic interpolation techniques.

  9. Flow Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Flow Technology Inc. worked with Lewis Research Center to develop a system for monitoring two different propellants being supplied to a spacecraft rocket thruster. They then commercialized the technology in the Microtrack, an extremely precise low-flow calibration system. Moog Inc., one of the device's primary users, measures the flow rate or the speed at which hydraulic oil flows through pin sized holes in disc shaped sapphires with the Microtrack. Using this data, two orifices with exactly the same flow rate can be matched as a pair and used as masters in servovalve production. The microtrack can also be used to calibrate other equipment.

  10. Childhood sexual abuse and syringe sharing among people who inject drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, William; Ti, Lianping; Marshall, Brandon D.L.; Dong, Huiru; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Childhood sexual abuse is associated with adverse health outcomes. However, the impact of sexual abuse on HIV risk behaviors among people who inject drugs (IDU) has not been thoroughly characterized. We therefore sought to identify whether childhood sexual abuse was associated with syringe sharing among a sample of IDU in Vancouver, Canada. We assessed sexual abuse among two cohorts of IDUs via the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between childhood sexual abuse and syringe sharing. In total, 1380 IDU were included in the study, and 426 (30.9%) IDU reported childhood sexual abuse. Syringe sharing (Adjusted Odds Ratio = 1.83, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.28–2.60) remained independently associated with childhood sexual abuse after adjustment for potential confounders. Given that a history of childhood sexual abuse appears to be elevated among IDU who engage in HIV risk behaviors (i.e., syringe sharing), HIV prevention efforts should include efforts to address historical trauma in this population. PMID:25428283

  11. 41 CFR 109-27.5009 - Control of hypodermic needles and syringes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Control of hypodermic needles and syringes. 109-27.5009 Section 109-27.5009 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT...

  12. 41 CFR 109-27.5009 - Control of hypodermic needles and syringes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control of hypodermic needles and syringes. 109-27.5009 Section 109-27.5009 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT...

  13. 41 CFR 109-27.5009 - Control of hypodermic needles and syringes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Control of hypodermic needles and syringes. 109-27.5009 Section 109-27.5009 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT...

  14. STS-43 MS Lucid works with BIMDA-02 cell syringes on OV-104's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-43 Mission Specialist (MS) Shannon W. Lucid works with Bioserve- Instrumentation Technology Associates Materials Dispersion Apparatus (BIMDA) cell syringes at the forward lockers on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Fluorescent lighting fixtures are set up at Lucid's left on a mounting bracket and behind her.

  15. 41 CFR 109-27.5009 - Control of hypodermic needles and syringes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 27-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.50-Inventory Management Policies, Procedures, and... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control of hypodermic needles and syringes. 109-27.5009 Section 109-27.5009 Public Contracts and Property Management...

  16. Residual Injection Risk Behavior, HIV Infection, and the Evaluation of Syringe Exchange Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Des Jarlais, Don C.; Braine, Naomi; Yi, Huso; Turner, Charles

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed relationships between residual risk behavior (risk behavior among persons participating in effective HIV prevention programs) and HIV infection. Structured interviews and HIV tests were obtained from participants in six large U.S. syringe exchange programs. Program characteristics were obtained through interviews with the…

  17. From ideology to logistics: the organizational aspects of syringe exchange in a period of institutional consolidation.

    PubMed

    Henman, A R; Paone, D; Des Jarlais, D C; Kochems, L M; Friedman, S R

    1998-04-01

    The initial period in the establishment of syringe exchange projects is often characterized by overt conflict: between community AIDS activists, on the one hand, and public officials and political leaders who remain ideologically opposed to the introduction of measures perceived as condoning illicit drug use. In this context, professionals concerned with legitimating the new institutions of syringe exchange may sometimes neglect aspects of their everyday logistics and social organization, obscuring the important choices which have to be made to carry these initiatives forward. In particular, the contrast between formally-constituted institutions-the "storefront" or "community-based" syringe exchange programs (SEPs)-and the model of low-threshold syringe availability through pharmacies, vending machines, and user networks, is here presented not as an either/or choice but rather as a pair of complementary strategies which respond to diverse needs and target different populations. The advantages and disadvantages of each particular approach make it likely that maximum effectiveness will be achieved through a combination of every possible form of needle distribution, each tailored to specific and cultural circumstances. The case is here examined in the light of the experience of the SEPs in New York City, from their clandestine origins in 1990 through their first years of official functioning in 1992-1996.

  18. Comparison between ultrasonic irrigation and syringe irrigation in clinical and laboratory studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shulan; Liu, Jianxin; Dong, Gang; Peng, Bin; Yang, Pishan; Chen, Zhenggang; Yang, Fang; Guo, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic irrigation and syringe irrigation were compared for their efficacy at cleaning root canal in vivo and in vitro. The in vivo study used 60 anterior teeth or premolars from 60 patients with periapical periodontitis who were randomly assigned to a syringe irrigation group (group S) or an ultrasonic irrigation group (group U). After instrumentation with a K-file using the step-back technique, the two groups received ultrasonic or syringe irrigation using 40 mL of 2.5% NaOCl respectively, followed by conventional lateral compaction. The in vitro study used 60 extracted single-canal premolars, which were also divided into U and S groups, and underwent the same irrigation and compaction. Forty of them were evaluated histologically by light microscopy, and the remaining 20 by scanning electron microscopy. No difference in main root canal filling was observed between the U and S groups. Notably, group U had a larger number of obturated lateral canals than group S. Moreover, a smaller amount of organic debris and more open dentinal tubules were observed in the root canal in group U than in group S. Our findings suggest that ultrasonic irrigation has a greater capacity to clean instrumented root canals than syringe irrigation. (J Oral Sci 58, 373-378, 2016). PMID:27665977

  19. Suppression of Methionine Oxidation of a Pharmaceutical Antibody Stored in a Polymer-Based Syringe.

    PubMed

    Masato, Amano; Kiichi, Fukui; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2016-02-01

    Oxidation of methionine residues is one of the well-known deteriorations in monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics. Because methionine oxidation may affect their efficacy and pharmacokinetic profile, oxidation levels should be strictly controlled during their storage period. In this study, we revealed that when a therapeutic antibody was filled into a cyclo olefin polymer-based syringe and stored in a blister pack with an oxygen absorber, the methionine oxidation production under thermal or light stress was suppressed because of the reduction in the concentration of dissolved oxygen. Also unexpectedly, fewer amounts of the high-molecular-weight species and the acidic variants of the antibody were generated under thermal or light stress. Although the high-molecular-weight species contains methionine oxidants at similar levels to those in a monomer species, they were likely to be constituted from a higher amount of the oxidative species of internal disulfide linkage, tyrosine, or histidine. Because the dissolved oxygen could be readily removed from the mAb solution in the polymer-based syringe owing to its high gas permeability, this study shows the advantages of the polymer-based syringe with an oxygen absorber over glass syringes in terms of the suppression of the methionine oxidation and oxidative high molecular species. PMID:26462145

  20. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: Bilateral Supplementary Comparison P1-APMP.EM.RF-S4: Calibration factor of thermistor mount power sensors: in Type-N, 30 MHz 3000 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tieren; Hall, Blair

    2004-01-01

    This is the final report on the APMP bilateral supplementary comparison in RF power measurement P1-APMP.EM.RF-S4. The purpose of the comparison is to determine the level of consistency of calibration results given by two national standards laboratories. This is a comparison of one of the high-frequency key quantities. The comparison protocol was based on that used in the key comparison CCEM.RF-K8; however, the frequency points differ. One of the participants, the National Measurement Laboratory, also took part in CCEM.RF-K8. The travelling standard is a Hewlett-Packard 8478B thermistor mount, with a type-N male RF connector. The calibration factor is determined at a number of frequencies between 30 MHz and 3000 MHz, together with an appropriate statement of uncertainty. Measurements have been made at a nominal power level of 1 mW. The value of the reflection coefficient is also determined, as it is needed for the uncertainty calculation. The pilot laboratory was the National Measurement Laboratory, in Australia, and the comparison coordinator was the Measurement Standards Laboratory of New Zealand. This report contains a brief description of the measurement set-ups at each laboratory and a summary of the associated uncertainty budgets. The actual measurements from each laboratory are presented as they appear in calibration certificates from the respective laboratories. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the APMP, according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  1. In-syringe extraction using dissolvable layered double hydroxide-polymer sponges templated from hierarchically porous coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Milad; Frizzarin, Rejane M; Maya, Fernando; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-07-01

    Herein we report the use of cobalt porous coordination polymers (PCP) as intermediates to prepare advanced extraction media based on layered double hydroxides (LDH) supported on melamine polymer foam. The obtained dissolvable Ni-Co LDH composite sponges can be molded and used as sorbent for the in-syringe solid-phase extraction (SPE) of phenolic acids from fruit juices. The proposed sorbent is obtained due to the surfactant-assisted self-assembly of Co(II)/imidazolate PCPs on commercially available melamine foam, followed by the in situ conversion of the PCP into the final dissolvable LDH coating. Advantageous features for SPE are obtained by using PCPs with hierarchical porosity (HPCPs). The LDH-sponge prepared using intermediate HPCPs (HLDH-sponge) is placed in the headspace of a glass syringe, enabling flow-through extraction followed by analyte elution by the dissolution of the LDH coating in acidic conditions. Three phenolic acids (gallic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and caffeic acid) were extracted and quantified using high performance liquid chromatography. Using a 5mL sample volume, the obtained detection limits were 0.15-0.35μgL(-1). The proposed method for the preparation of HLDH-sponges showed a good reproducibility as observed from the intra- and inter-day RSD's, which were <10% for all analytes. The batch-to-batch reproducibility for three different batches of HLDH-sponges was 10.6-11.2%. Enrichment factors of 15-21 were obtained. The HLDH-sponges were applied satisfactorily to the determination of phenolic acids in natural and commercial fruit juices, obtaining relative recoveries among 89.7-95.3%.

  2. Sharing of Needles and Syringes among Men Who Inject Drugs: HIV Risk in Northwest Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Pasa, M. Kamal; Alom, Kazi Robiul; Bashri, Zubaida; Vermund, Sten H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Injection drug use is prevalent in northwestern Bangladesh. We sought to explore the context of needle/syringe sharing among persons who inject drugs (PWID), examining risk exposures to blood-borne infections like the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis in a region where these dual epidemics are likely to expand. Methods We used a qualitative research approach to learn about injection practices, conducting 60 in-depth interviews among PWID. We then conducted 12 focus group discussions (FGDs) that generated a checklist of salient issues, and followed up with personal observations of typical days at the drug-use venues. Content and interpretative frameworks were used to analyze qualitative information and socio-demographic information, using SPSS software. Results We found that needle/syringe-sharing behaviours were integrated into the overall social and cultural lives of drug users. Sharing behaviours were an central component of PWID social organization. Sharing was perceived as an inherent element within reciprocal relationships, and sharing was tied to beliefs about drug effects, economic adversity, and harassment due to their drug user status. Carrying used needles/syringes to drug-use venues was deemed essential since user-unfriendly needle-syringe distribution schedules of harm reduction programmes made it difficult to access clean needles/syringes in off-hours. PWID had low self-esteem. Unequal power relationships were reported between the field workers of harm reduction programmes and PWID. Field workers expressed anti-PWID bias and judgmental attitudes, and also had had misconceptions about HIV and hepatitis transmission. PWID were especially disturbed that no assistance was forthcoming from risk reduction programme staff when drug users manifested withdrawal symptoms. Conclusion Interventions must take social context into account when scaling up programmes in diverse settings. The social organization of PWID include values that

  3. Associations of serum insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 levels with biomarker-calibrated protein, dairy product and milk intake in the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Jeannette M; Gunter, Marc J; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Prentice, Ross L; Neuhouser, Marian L; Tinker, Lesley F; Vitolins, Mara Z; Strickler, Howard D

    2014-03-14

    It is well established that protein-energy malnutrition decreases serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I levels, and supplementation of 30 g of whey protein daily has been shown to increase serum IGF-I levels by 8 % after 2 years in a clinical trial. Cohort studies provide the opportunity to assess associations between dietary protein intake and IGF axis protein levels under more typical eating conditions. In the present study, we assessed the associations of circulating IGF axis protein levels (ELISA, Diagnostic Systems Laboratories) with total biomarker-calibrated protein intake, as well as with dairy product and milk intake, among postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative (n 747). Analyses were carried out using multivariate linear regression models that adjusted for age, BMI, race/ethnicity, education, biomarker-calibrated energy intake, alcohol intake, smoking, physical activity and hormone therapy use. There was a positive association between milk intake and free IGF-I levels. A three-serving increase in milk intake per d (approximately 30 g of protein) was associated with an estimated average 18·6 % higher increase in free IGF-I levels (95 % CI 0·9, 39·3 %). However, total IGF-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) levels were not associated with milk consumption and nor were there associations between biomarker-calibrated protein intake, biomarker-calibrated energy intake, and free IGF-I, total IGF-I or IGFBP-3 levels. The findings of the present study carried out in postmenopausal women are consistent with clinical trial data suggesting a specific relationship between milk consumption and serum IGF-I levels, although in the present study this association was only statistically significant for free, but not total, IGF-I or IGFBP-3 levels.

  4. Autologous fat grafting: use of closed syringe microcannula system for enhanced autologous structural grafting

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Robert W; Harrell, David B

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Provide background for use of acquiring autologous adipose tissue as a tissue graft and source of adult progenitor cells for use in cosmetic plastic surgery. Discuss the background and mechanisms of action of closed syringe vacuum lipoaspiration, with emphasis on accessing adipose-derived mesenchymal/stromal cells and the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) for use in aesthetic, structural reconstruction and regenerative applications. Explain a proven protocol for acquiring high-quality autologous fat grafts (AFG) with use of disposable, microcannula systems. Design Explain the components and advantage of use of the patented super luer-lock and microcannulas system for use with the closed-syringe system. A sequential explanation of equipment selection for minimally traumatic lipoaspiration in small volumes is presented, including use of blunt injection cannulas to reduce risk of embolism. Results Thousands of AFG have proven safe and efficacious for lipoaspiration techniques for large and small structural fat grafting procedures. The importance and advantages of gentle harvesting of the adipose tissue complex has become very clear in the past 5 years. The closed-syringe system offers a minimally invasive, gentle system with which to mobilize subdermal fat tissues in a suspension form. Resulting total nuclear counting of undifferentiated cells of the adipose-derived -SVF suggests that the yield achieved is better than use of always-on, constant mechanical pump applied vacuum systems. Conclusion Use of a closed-syringe lipoaspiration system featuring disposable microcannulas offers a safe and effective means of harvesting small volumes of nonmanipulated adipose tissues and its accompanying progenitor cells within the SVF. Closed syringes and microcannulas are available as safe, sterile, disposable, compact systems for acquiring high-quality AFG. Presented is a detailed, step-by-step, proven protocol for performing quality autologous structural adipose

  5. SU-E-I-22: Dependence On Calibration Phantom and Field Area of the Conversion Factor Used to Calculate Skin Dose During Neuro-Interventional Fluoroscopic Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, V K; Vijayan, S; Rudin, S R; Bednarek, D R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the appropriate calibration factor to use when calculating skin dose with our real-time dose-tracking system (DTS) during neuro-interventional fluoroscopic procedures by evaluating the difference in backscatter from different phantoms and as a function of entrance-skin field area. Methods: We developed a dose-tracking system to calculate and graphically display the cumulative skin-dose distribution in real time. To calibrate the DTS for neuro-interventional procedures, a phantom is needed that closely approximates the scattering properties of the head. We compared the x-ray backscatter from eight phantoms: 20-cm-thick solid water, 16-cm diameter water-filled container, 16-cm CTDI phantom, modified-ANSI head phantom, 20-cm-thick PMMA, Kyoto-Kagaku PBU- 50 head, Phantom-Labs SK-150 head, and RSD RS-240T head. The phantoms were placed on the patient table with the entrance surface at 15 cm tube-side from the isocenter of a Toshiba Infinix C-arm, and the entrance-skin exposure was measured with a calibrated 6-cc PTW ionization chamber. The measurement included primary radiation, backscatter from the phantom and forward scatter from the table and pad. The variation in entrance-skin exposure was also measured as a function of the skin-entrance area for a 30x30 cm by 20-cm-thick PMMA phantom and the SK-150 head phantom using four different added beam filters. Results: The entranceskin exposure values measured for eight different phantoms differed by up to 12%, while the ratio of entrance exposure of all phantoms relative to solid water showed less than 3% variation with kVp. The change in entrance-skin exposure with entrance-skin area was found to differ for the SK-150 head compared to the 20-cm PMMA phantom and the variation with field area was dependent on the added beam filtration. Conclusion: To accurately calculate skin dose for neuro-interventional procedures with the DTS, the phantom for calibration should be carefully chosen since different

  6. Investigation by syringe method of effect of tampons on production in vitro of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A C; Crass, B A; Bergdoll, M S

    1987-01-01

    A syringe method was designed to test the effect of tampons on the growth of three toxic shock syndrome-associated strains of Staphylococcus aureus and their in vitro production of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) under different conditions. Various amounts of TSST-1 were recovered from different tampons inoculated with these strains. Generally, the addition of 10% porcine blood to the growth medium, incubation in the presence of 5% CO2, or the combination of these two factors resulted in the stimulation of TSST-1 production. PMID:3793877

  7. Investigation by syringe method of effect of tampons on production in vitro of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lee, A C; Crass, B A; Bergdoll, M S

    1987-01-01

    A syringe method was designed to test the effect of tampons on the growth of three toxic shock syndrome-associated strains of Staphylococcus aureus and their in vitro production of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) under different conditions. Various amounts of TSST-1 were recovered from different tampons inoculated with these strains. Generally, the addition of 10% porcine blood to the growth medium, incubation in the presence of 5% CO2, or the combination of these two factors resulted in the stimulation of TSST-1 production.

  8. Iterative Magnetometer Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an iterative method for three-axis magnetometer (TAM) calibration that makes use of three existing utilities recently incorporated into the attitude ground support system used at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The method combines attitude-independent and attitude-dependent calibration algorithms with a new spinning spacecraft Kalman filter to solve for biases, scale factors, nonorthogonal corrections to the alignment, and the orthogonal sensor alignment. The method is particularly well-suited to spin-stabilized spacecraft, but may also be useful for three-axis stabilized missions given sufficient data to provide observability.

  9. Neuroprotection of a novel synthetic caffeic acid-syringic acid hybrid compound against experimentally induced transient cerebral ischemic damage.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Hye; Yan, Bing Chun; Park, Joon Ha; Yeun, Go Heum; Yim, Yongbae; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jae-Chul; Hwang, In Koo; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Young-Myeong; Lee, Yun Lyul; Park, Jeong Ho; Won, Moo-Ho

    2013-03-01

    We investigated effects of caffeic acid, syringic acid, and their synthesis on transient cerebral ischemic damage in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region. In the 10 mg/kg caffeic acid-, syringic acid-, and 20 mg/kg syringic-treated ischemia groups, we did not find any significant neuroprotection in the ischemic hippocampal CA region. In the 20 mg/kg caffeic acid- and 10 mg/kg caffeic acid-syringic acid-treated ischemia groups, moderate neuroprotection was found in the hippocampal CA1 region. In the 20 mg/kg caffeic acid-syringic acid-treated ischemia group, a strong neuroprotective effect was found in the ischemic hippocampal CA1 region: about 89 % of hippocampal CA1 region pyramidal neurons survived. We also observed changes in glial cells (astrocytes and microglia) in the ischemic hippocampal CA1 region in all the groups. Among them, the distribution pattern of the glial cells was only in the 20 mg/kg caffeic acid-syringic acid-treated ischemia group similar to that in the sham group (control). In brief, 20 mg/kg caffeic acid-syringic acid showed a strong neuroprotective effect with an inhibition of glia activation in the hippocampal CA1 region induced by transient cerebral ischemia.

  10. Pseudo Linear Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    2003-01-01

    Previous high fidelity onboard attitude algorithms estimated only the spacecraft attitude and gyro bias. The desire to promote spacecraft and ground autonomy and improvements in onboard computing power has spurred development of more sophisticated calibration algorithms. Namely, there is a desire to provide for sensor calibration through calibration parameter estimation onboard the spacecraft as well as autonomous estimation on the ground. Gyro calibration is a particularly challenging area of research. There are a variety of gyro devices available for any prospective mission ranging from inexpensive low fidelity gyros with potentially unstable scale factors to much more expensive extremely stable high fidelity units. Much research has been devoted to designing dedicated estimators such as particular Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) algorithms or Square Root Information Filters. This paper builds upon previous attitude, rate, and specialized gyro parameter estimation work performed with Pseudo Linear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA). The PSELIKA advantage is the use of the standard linear Kalman Filter algorithm. A PSELIKA algorithm for an orthogonal gyro set which includes estimates of attitude, rate, gyro misalignments, gyro scale factors, and gyro bias is developed and tested using simulated and flight data. The measurements PSELIKA uses include gyro and quaternion tracker data.

  11. Diffusion of the D.A.R.E and Syringe Exchange Programs

    PubMed Central

    Des Jarlais, Don C.; Sloboda, Zili; Friedman, Samuel R.; Tempalski, Barbara; McKnight, Courtney; Braine, Naomi

    2006-01-01

    We examined the diffusion of the D.A.R.E program to reduce use of illicit drugs among school-aged children and youths and the diffusion of syringe exchange programs to reduce HIV transmission among injection drug users. The D.A.R.E program was diffused widely in the United States despite a lack of evidence for its effectiveness; there has been limited diffusion of syringe exchange in the United States, despite extensive scientific evidence for its effectiveness. Multiple possible associations between diffusion and evidence of effectiveness exist, from widespread diffusion without evidence of effectiveness to limited diffusion with strong evidence of effectiveness. The decision theory concepts of framing and loss aversion may be useful for further research on the diffusion of public health innovations. PMID:16809601

  12. Stability of Commercially Available Grape and Compounded Cherry Oral Vancomycin Preparations Stored in Syringes and Cups.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Loren; Lewis, Paul; Luu, Yao; Brown, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stability of two preparations of vancomycin oral solution in two different storage containers, capped amber oral-dosing syringes and heat-sealed oral-dosing cups, stored under refrigerated conditions. Commercially available grape-flavored vancomycin oral preparation and compounded vancomycin for intravenous use in cherry syrup oral preparation were divided into 5-mL aliquots into heat-sealed plastic dosing cups and capped oral-dosing syringes. All samples were stored under refrigeration (2°C to 8°C) and evaluated at days 0, 3, 7, 14, 30, 60, and 90. For each evaluation, samples were visually inspected and analyzed for potency using a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic method with ultraviolet detection. Over the study period, at least 90% of the initial concentrations for the preparation and the product in both storage containers were retained at 60 days. The commercially available oral vancomycin further demonstrated stability within 90% out to 90 days in the syringe and the unit-dose cups. Visual inspection revealed no changes in the grape-flavored vancomycin oral preparation, but a detectable red-dye precipitate could be seen in the crevices of the dosing cups from the vancomycin in cherry syrup oral preparation after 60 days. Commercially available grape-flavored vancomycin oral preparation was stable up to 90 days, and com- pounded vancomycin for intravenous use in cherry syrup oral preparation maintained stability for 60 days when dispensed in capped amber polypropylene oral-dosing syringes and heat-sealed plastic dosing cups when stored at refrigerated conditions. PMID:27323427

  13. Stability of Commercially Available Grape and Compounded Cherry Oral Vancomycin Preparations Stored in Syringes and Cups.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Loren; Lewis, Paul; Luu, Yao; Brown, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stability of two preparations of vancomycin oral solution in two different storage containers, capped amber oral-dosing syringes and heat-sealed oral-dosing cups, stored under refrigerated conditions. Commercially available grape-flavored vancomycin oral preparation and compounded vancomycin for intravenous use in cherry syrup oral preparation were divided into 5-mL aliquots into heat-sealed plastic dosing cups and capped oral-dosing syringes. All samples were stored under refrigeration (2°C to 8°C) and evaluated at days 0, 3, 7, 14, 30, 60, and 90. For each evaluation, samples were visually inspected and analyzed for potency using a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic method with ultraviolet detection. Over the study period, at least 90% of the initial concentrations for the preparation and the product in both storage containers were retained at 60 days. The commercially available oral vancomycin further demonstrated stability within 90% out to 90 days in the syringe and the unit-dose cups. Visual inspection revealed no changes in the grape-flavored vancomycin oral preparation, but a detectable red-dye precipitate could be seen in the crevices of the dosing cups from the vancomycin in cherry syrup oral preparation after 60 days. Commercially available grape-flavored vancomycin oral preparation was stable up to 90 days, and com- pounded vancomycin for intravenous use in cherry syrup oral preparation maintained stability for 60 days when dispensed in capped amber polypropylene oral-dosing syringes and heat-sealed plastic dosing cups when stored at refrigerated conditions.

  14. The Impact of Legalizing Syringe Exchange Programs on Arrests Among Injection Drug Users in California

    PubMed Central

    Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Lorvick, Jennifer; Anderson, Rachel; Flynn, Neil; Kral, Alex H.

    2007-01-01

    Legislation passed in 2000 allowed syringe exchange programs (SEPs) in California to operate legally if local jurisdictions declare a local HIV public health emergency. Nonetheless, even in locales where SEPs are legal, the possession of drug paraphernalia, including syringes, remained illegal. The objective of this paper is to examine the association between the legal status of SEPs and individual arrest or citation for drug paraphernalia among injection drug users (IDUs) in California from 2001 to 2003. Using data from three annual cross-sections (2001-03) of IDUs attending 24 SEPs in 16 California counties (N = 1,578), we found that overall, 14% of IDUs in our sample reported arrest or citation for paraphernalia in the 6 months before the interview. Further analysis found that 17% of IDUs attending a legal SEP (defined at the county level) reported arrest or citation for drug paraphernalia compared to 10% of IDUs attending an illegal SEP (p = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the adjusted odds ratio of arrest or citation for drug paraphernalia was 1.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2, 2.3] for IDUs attending legal SEPs compared to IDUs attending illegal SEPs, after controlling for race/ethnicity, age, homelessness, illegal income, injection of amphetamines, years of injection drug use, frequency of SEP use, and number of needles received at last visit. IDUs attending SEPs with legal status may be more visible to police, and hence, more subject to arrest or citation for paraphernalia. These findings suggest that legislative efforts to decriminalize the operation of SEPs without concurrent decriminalization of syringe possession may result in higher odds of arrest among SEP clients, with potentially deleterious implications for the health and well-being of IDUs. More comprehensive approaches to removing barriers to accessing sterile syringes are needed if our public health goals for reducing new HIV/HCV infections are to be obtained. PMID:17265133

  15. ALTEA calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaconte, V.; Altea Team

    The ALTEA project is aimed at studying the possible functional damages to the Central Nervous System (CNS) due to particle radiation in space environment. The project is an international and multi-disciplinary collaboration. The ALTEA facility is an helmet-shaped device that will study concurrently the passage of cosmic radiation through the brain, the functional status of the visual system and the electrophysiological dynamics of the cortical activity. The basic instrumentation is composed by six active particle telescopes, one ElectroEncephaloGraph (EEG), a visual stimulator and a pushbutton. The telescopes are able to detect the passage of each particle measuring its energy, trajectory and released energy into the brain and identifying nuclear species. The EEG and the Visual Stimulator are able to measure the functional status of the visual system, the cortical electrophysiological activity, and to look for a correlation between incident particles, brain activity and Light Flash perceptions. These basic instruments can be used separately or in any combination, permitting several different experiments. ALTEA is scheduled to fly in the International Space Station (ISS) in November, 15th 2004. In this paper the calibration of the Flight Model of the silicon telescopes (Silicon Detector Units - SDUs) will be shown. These measures have been taken at the GSI heavy ion accelerator in Darmstadt. First calibration has been taken out in November 2003 on the SDU-FM1 using C nuclei at different energies: 100, 150, 400 and 600 Mev/n. We performed a complete beam scan of the SDU-FM1 to check functionality and homogeneity of all strips of silicon detector planes, for each beam energy we collected data to achieve good statistics and finally we put two different thickness of Aluminium and Plexiglas in front of the detector in order to study fragmentations. This test has been carried out with a Test Equipment to simulate the Digital Acquisition Unit (DAU). We are scheduled to

  16. Calibration of infusion pumps using liquids whose physical properties differ from those of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, E.; Furtado, A.; Almeida, N.; Moura, S.; Martins, R.; Sousa, L.; Filipe, E.

    2015-02-01

    Infusion medical devices are used in field applications, namely in clinical environments, here are used several types of liquids, according to the therapeutic to be administrated into the patient. In order to determine the influence of the fluids physical properties, such as viscosity and density and to produce an adequate reference liquid, tests were performed with a syringe pump, using the gravimetric method as reference calibration method.

  17. Drugs given by a syringe driver: a prospective multicentre survey of palliative care services in the UK.

    PubMed

    Wilcock, Andrew; Jacob, Jayin K; Charlesworth, Sarah; Harris, Elayne; Gibbs, Margaret; Allsop, Helen

    2006-10-01

    The use of a syringe driver to administer drugs by continuous subcutaneous infusion is common practice in the UK. Over time, drug combinations used in a syringe driver are likely to change and the aim of this survey was to obtain a more recent snapshot of practice. On four separate days, at two-week intervals, a questionnaire was completed for every syringe driver in use by 15 palliative care services. Of 336 syringe drivers, the majority contained either two or three drugs, but one-fifth contained only one drug. The median (range) volume of the infusions was 15 (9.5-48) mL, and duration of infusion was generally 24 hours. Only one combination was reported as visually incompatible, and there were 13 site reactions (4% of total). Laboratory physical and chemical compatibility data are available for less than half of the most frequently used combinations. PMID:17060264

  18. Chemical stability and adsorption of atracurium besylate injections in disposable plastic syringes.

    PubMed

    Pramar, Y V; Loucas, V A; Word, D

    1996-06-01

    Atracurium besylate (AB) is supplied as a sterile, non-pyrogenic aqueous solution for intravenous use. Hospitals pre-fill disposable plastic syringes with these solutions so that they are ready for immediate use when required. Drug loss due to potential adsorption on to the plastic material of the syringes has not been studied. Atracurium is also administered by intravenous infusion using a diluted solution in either 5% dextrose injection (USP) or 0.9% sodium chloride injection USP. Drug solutions not used within 24 h are usually discarded, resulting in tremendous waste. The purpose of these investigations was to determine the adsorption behaviour of atracurium when stored in plastic syringes, and to study the degradation of atracurium in i.v. fluids. For the adsorption study, 10 mg/ml solutions were used, whereas the diluted infusion solutions were prepared to contain 0.5 mg/ml of atracurium. Drug degradation was monitored using a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography method. Degradation studies were conducted at 5 degrees C, 25 degrees C and 40 degrees C. Refrigeration was observed to improve drug stability. The manufacturer's recommended expiry period was too conservative. Storage at room temperature for up to 6 weeks can be safely recommended, without significant loss of chemical stability.

  19. Antimicrobial Effect of Ozone Made by KP Syringe of High-Frequency Ozone Generator

    PubMed Central

    Prebeg, Domagoj; Katunarić, Marina; Budimir, Ana; Šegović, Sanja; Anić, Ivica

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the antibacterial effect of ozone on suspension of three different bacteria inoculated in prepared canals of extracted human teeth. Material and methods Ozone was produced by special KP syringe of high frequency ozone generator Ozonytron (Biozonix, München, Germany) from aspirated atmospheric air by dielectric barrier discharge and applied through the tip of the syringe to the prepared root canal. The microorganisms used were Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Results However, none of the methods was 100% effective against the three bacterial types in suspension. Application of ozone significantly decreased the absolute count of microorganisms (89.3%), as well as the count of each type of bacteria separately (Staphylococcus aureus 94.0%; Staphylococcus epidermidis 88.6% and Enterococcus faecalis 79.7%). Ozone generated by KP syringe was statistically more effective compared to NaOCl as positive control, for Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Conclusion The absolute count of Enterococcus faecalis was statistically decreased without a statistically significant difference between the tested group and positive control, respectively. Among the three types of bacteria in suspension, KP probe had the lowest antimicrobial effect against Enterococcus faecalis. PMID:27789911

  20. Field calibration of multi-scattering correction factor for aethalometer aerosol absorption coefficient during CAPMEX Campaign, 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. W.; Yoon, S. C.; Park, R.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Filter-based instrument, such as aethalometer, is being widely used to measure equivalent black carbon(EBC) mass concentration and aerosol absorption coefficient(AAC). However, many other previous studies have poited that AAC and its aerosol absorption angstrom exponent(AAE) are strongly affected by the multi-scattering correction factor(C) when we retrieve AAC from aethalometer EBC mass concentration measurement(Weingartner et al., 2003; Arnott et al., 2005; Schmid et al., 2006; Coen et al., 2010). We determined the C value using the method given in Weingartner et al. (2003) by comparing 7-wavelngth aethalometer (AE-31, Magee sci.) to 3-wavelength Photo-Acoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS-3, DMT) at Gosan climate observatory, Korea(GCO) during Cheju ABC plume-asian monsoon experiment(CAPMEX) campaign(August and September, 2008). In this study, C was estimated to be 4.04 ± 1.68 at 532 nm and AAC retrieved with this value was decreased as approximately 100% as than that retrieved with soot case value from Weingartner et al (2003). We compared the AAC determined from aethalomter measurements to that from collocated Continuous Light Absorption Photometer (CLAP) measurements from January 2012 to December 2013 at GCO and found good agreement in both AAC and AAE. This result suggests the determination of site-specific C is crucially needed when we calculate AAC from aethalometer measurements.

  1. A mathematical model to predict the risk of hepatitis B infection through needle/syringe sharing in mass vaccination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Japanese Government settled a class litigation case with hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers who claim to have been infected through needle/syringe sharing in childhood mass vaccination with a blanket compensation agreement. However, it is difficult to estimate how many of the present HBV carriers were infected horizontally from mass vaccination and how many were infected vertically from mothers. Methods A mathematical model to predict the risk of infection through needle/syringe sharing in mass vaccination was proposed and a formula was developed. The formula was presented in a logarithmic graph enabling users to estimate how many people will be infected if a needle/syringe is shared by how many people for how many times under certain probability of infection. The formula was then applied to the historical data of mass tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) and BCG inoculation, from which a best estimate of how much needle/syringe sharing was practiced in different birth cohorts was determined. Results For the oldest cohort born between 1951 and 1955, the prevalence of HBV carriers—0.65% at birth through vertical transmission—more than doubled in 1995 (1.46%) through horizontal transmission. If the probability of infection through needle/syringe sharing is assumed to be 10%, it is theoretically likely that an average of five or more people shared a needle/syringe four times to achieve the prevalence of HBV carriers in 1995. However, for the youngest cohort born between 1981 and 1985, the effects of needle/syringe sharing were negligible because the later prevalence of HBV carriers was lower than the prevalence at birth. Conclusions More than half of the HBV carriers born in the early 1950s might have contracted the disease by mass vaccinations. Japan’s experience needs to be shared with other countries as a caution in conducting mass vaccination programs under scarce needle/syringe supply (291 words). PMID:24252667

  2. [Comparison of the absorbed dose at calibration depth of photon beams using the Japan Society of Medical Physics 12 beam quality conversion factor in the presence or absence of a waterproofing sleeve].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Naoki; Takemura, Akihiro; Kita, Akinobu; Murai, Emi; Nishimoto, Yasuhiro; Toi, Akiko; Shimada, Masato; Sasamoto, Kouhei; Adachi, Toshiki

    2013-10-01

    In standard external beam radiotherapy dosimetry, which is based on absorbed dose by water, the absorbed dose at any calibration depth is calculated using the same beam quality conversion factor, regardless of the presence or absence of a waterproofing sleeve. In this study, we evaluated whether there were differences between absorbed doses at calibration depths calculated using a beam quality conversion factor including a wall correction factor that corresponds to a waterproofing sleeve thickness of 0.3 mm, and without a waterproofing sleeve. The Japan Society of Medical Physics (JSMP) has reported that the uncertainty of the results using a beam quality conversion factor that included a wall correction factor corresponding to a waterproofing sleeve thickness of 0.3 mm, regardless of the presence or absence of the sleeve, was 0.2%. This uncertainty proved to be in agreement with the reported range.

  3. Using a modified syringe technique to adjust the intracuff pressure of a laryngeal mask airway.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kuo-Chuan; Chen, Wei-Hung; Shih, Yu-Hsuan; Yeh, Li-Ren

    2015-12-01

    Limiting the intracuff pressure of a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) to <60 cmH2O is recommended in clinical practice. This report aimed to assess the efficacy of a modified syringe technique to adjust the intracuff pressure of an LMA. In a preclinical study, commercially available 20-mL syringes were attached to the pilot balloon of LMAs with different preset intracuff pressures (40 cmH2O, 50 cmH2O, 60 cmH2O, 70 cmH2O, 80 cmH2O, 100 cmH2O, and 120 cmH2O). After attachment, the syringe plunger was allowed to passively rebound. If no rebound of the plunger was observed after attachment, 1 mL of air was withdrawn and the plunger was allowed to passively rebound again. This technique allowed the plunger to overcome static friction and avoid excessive deflation of the LMA cuffs. The intracuff pressure was measured using a manometer after the plunger ceased moving. In the preclinical study, the intracuff pressure was always less than or close to 60 cmH2O after adjustment using this modified syringe technique. After evaluating the performance and characteristics of the syringe in the preclinical study, we concluded that the modified syringe technique may be useful for adjusting LMA intracuff pressure effectively. PMID:25962713

  4. Antenna Calibration and Measurement Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Cortes, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    A document describes the Antenna Calibration & Measurement Equipment (ACME) system that will provide the Deep Space Network (DSN) with instrumentation enabling a trained RF engineer at each complex to perform antenna calibration measurements and to generate antenna calibration data. This data includes continuous-scan auto-bore-based data acquisition with all-sky data gathering in support of 4th order pointing model generation requirements. Other data includes antenna subreflector focus, system noise temperature and tipping curves, antenna efficiency, reports system linearity, and instrument calibration. The ACME system design is based on the on-the-fly (OTF) mapping technique and architecture. ACME has contributed to the improved RF performance of the DSN by approximately a factor of two. It improved the pointing performances of the DSN antennas and productivity of its personnel and calibration engineers.

  5. In-coupled syringe assisted octanol-water partition microextraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for simultaneous determination of neonicotinoid insecticide residues in honey.

    PubMed

    Vichapong, Jitlada; Burakham, Rodjana; Srijaranai, Supalax

    2015-07-01

    A simple and fast method namely in-coupled syringe assisted octanol-water partition microextraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed for the extraction, preconcentration and determination of neonicotinoid insecticide residues (e.g. imidacloprid, acetamiprid, clothianidin, thiacloprid, thiamethoxam, dinotefuran, and nitenpyram) in honey. The experimental parameters affected the extraction efficiency, including kind and concentration of salt, kind of disperser solvent and its volume, kind of extraction solvent and its volume, shooting times and extraction time were investigated. The extraction process was carried out by rapid shooting of two syringes. Therefore, rapid dispersion and mass transfer processes was created between phases, and thus affects the extraction efficiency of the proposed method. The optimum extraction conditions were 10.00 mL of aqueous sample, 10% (w/v) Na2SO4, 1-octanol (100µL) as an extraction solvent, shooting 4 times and extraction time 2min. No disperser solvent and centrifugation step was necessary. Linearity was obtained within the range of 0.1-3000 ngmL(-1), with the correlation coefficients greater than 0.99. The high enrichment factor of the target analytes was 100 fold and low limit of detection (0.25-0.50 ngmL(-1)) could be obtained. This proposed method has been successfully applied in the analysis of neonicotinoid residues in honey, and good recoveries in the range of 96.93-107.70% were obtained. PMID:25882403

  6. A Novel Tetrahydrofolate-Dependent O-Demethylase Gene Is Essential for Growth of Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 with Syringate

    PubMed Central

    Masai, Eiji; Sasaki, Miyuki; Minakawa, Yasunori; Abe, Tomokuni; Sonoki, Tomonori; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2004-01-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 degrades syringate to 3-O-methylgallate (3MGA), which is finally converted to pyruvate and oxaloacetate via multiple pathways in which protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase, 3MGA dioxygenase, and gallate dioxygenase are involved. Here we isolated the syringate O-demethylase gene (desA), which complemented the growth deficiency on syringate of a Tn5 mutant of the SYK-6 derivative strain. The desA gene is located 929 bp downstream of ferA, encoding feruloyl-coenzyme A synthetase, and consists of a 1,386-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 50,721 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of desA showed 26% identity in a 325-amino-acid overlap with that of gcvT of Escherichia coli, which encodes the tetrahydrofolate (H4folate)-dependent aminomethyltransferase involved in glycine cleavage. The cell extract of E. coli carrying desA converted syringate to 3MGA only when H4folate was added to the reaction mixture. DesA catalyzes the transfer of the methyl moiety of syringate to H4folate, forming 5-methyl-H4folate. Vanillate and 3MGA were also used as substrates for DesA; however, the relative activities toward them were 3 and 0.4% of that toward syringate, respectively. Disruption of desA in SYK-6 resulted in a growth defect on syringate but did not affect growth on vanillate, indicating that desA is essential to syringate degradation. In a previous study the ligH gene, which complements the growth deficiency on vanillate and syringate of a chemical-induced mutant of SYK-6, DC-49, was isolated (S. Nishikawa, T. Sonoki, T. Kasahara, T. Obi, S. Kubota, S. Kawai, N. Morohoshi, and Y. Katayama, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:836-842, 1998). Disruption of ligH resulted in the same phenotype as DC-49; its cell extract, however, was found to be able to convert vanillate and syringate in the presence of H4folate. The possible role of ligH is discussed. PMID:15090517

  7. A novel tetrahydrofolate-dependent O-demethylase gene is essential for growth of Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 with syringate.

    PubMed

    Masai, Eiji; Sasaki, Miyuki; Minakawa, Yasunori; Abe, Tomokuni; Sonoki, Tomonori; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2004-05-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 degrades syringate to 3-O-methylgallate (3MGA), which is finally converted to pyruvate and oxaloacetate via multiple pathways in which protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase, 3MGA dioxygenase, and gallate dioxygenase are involved. Here we isolated the syringate O-demethylase gene (desA), which complemented the growth deficiency on syringate of a Tn5 mutant of the SYK-6 derivative strain. The desA gene is located 929 bp downstream of ferA, encoding feruloyl-coenzyme A synthetase, and consists of a 1,386-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 50,721 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of desA showed 26% identity in a 325-amino-acid overlap with that of gcvT of Escherichia coli, which encodes the tetrahydrofolate (H(4)folate)-dependent aminomethyltransferase involved in glycine cleavage. The cell extract of E. coli carrying desA converted syringate to 3MGA only when H(4)folate was added to the reaction mixture. DesA catalyzes the transfer of the methyl moiety of syringate to H(4)folate, forming 5-methyl-H(4)folate. Vanillate and 3MGA were also used as substrates for DesA; however, the relative activities toward them were 3 and 0.4% of that toward syringate, respectively. Disruption of desA in SYK-6 resulted in a growth defect on syringate but did not affect growth on vanillate, indicating that desA is essential to syringate degradation. In a previous study the ligH gene, which complements the growth deficiency on vanillate and syringate of a chemical-induced mutant of SYK-6, DC-49, was isolated (S. Nishikawa, T. Sonoki, T. Kasahara, T. Obi, S. Kubota, S. Kawai, N. Morohoshi, and Y. Katayama, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:836-842, 1998). Disruption of ligH resulted in the same phenotype as DC-49; its cell extract, however, was found to be able to convert vanillate and syringate in the presence of H(4)folate. The possible role of ligH is discussed.

  8. Retention of 99mTc-DMSA(III) and 99mTc-nanocolloid in different syringes affects imaging quality.

    PubMed

    Bauwens, Matthias; Pooters, Ivo; van der Pol, Jochen; Mottaghy, Felix M; van Kroonenburgh, Marinus

    2014-04-01

    (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid [DMSA(III)] and colloidal human serum albumin ((99m)Tc-nanocolloid) are widely used radiopharmaceuticals. Recently, in our institution we encountered image quality problems in DMSA scans after changing the brand of syringes we were using, which triggered us to look into the adsorption properties of syringes from different brands for (99m)Tc-DMSA(III) and (99m)Tc-nanocolloid. We also describe a clinical case in which adsorption of (99m)Tc-DMSA(III) caused inferior imaging quality. DMSA and nanocolloid were labeled with (99m)Tc following manufacturer guidelines. After synthesis, syringes with (99m)Tc-DMSA(III) and (99m)Tc-nanocolloid were stored for 15, 30, 60, and 120 min. We evaluated Luer Lock syringes manufactured by different brands such as Artsana, Henke-Sass-Wolf, B. Braun Medical N.V., CODAN Medizinische Geräte GmbH & Co KG, Becton Dickinson and Company, and Terumo Europe. Adsorption of (99m)Tc-DMSA(III) and (99m)Tc-nanocolloid was acceptably low for all syringes (<13%), except for two brands with (99m)Tc-DMSA(III) adsorption rates of 36 and 30%, respectively, and for one brand with a (99m)Tc-nanocolloid adsorption rate of 27%. Adsorption of (99m)Tc-DMSA(III) and (99m)Tc-nanocolloid reaches critical levels in syringes produced by two brands, potentially causing poor image quality--for example, in DMSA scans using pediatric radiopharmaceutical doses. It is advised to check the compatibility of any radiopharmaceutical with syringes as an integral part of the quality assurance program.

  9. Summary of OARE flight calibration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.

    1995-01-01

    To date, the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) has flown on the shuttle orbiter for five missions; namely, STS-40, STS-50, STS-58, STS-62, and STS-65. The OARE instrument system contains a three-axis accelerometer which can resolve accelerations to the nano-g (10(exp -9) g) level and a full calibration station to permit in situ bias and scale factor calibration measurements. This calibration capability eliminates the large uncertainty encountered with accelerometers flown in the past on the orbiter which use ground-based calibrations to provide absolute acceleration measurements. A detailed flight data report presentation is given for the OARE calibration measurements from all missions, along with an estimate of the calibration errors. The main aim is to collect, process, and present the calibration data in one archival report. These calibration data are the necessary key ingredient to produce the absolute acceleration levels from the OARE acceleration flight data.

  10. Needle-free transdermal delivery using PLGA nanoparticles: effect of particle size, injection pressure and syringe orifice diameter.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Hee; Tijing, Leonard D; Kim, Cheol Sang; Lee, Kang-Min

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of particle size and other injection factors on the skin penetration of nanoparticles delivered with a needle-free injector. Experimental and simulation tests were carried out at various parameters. In addition to testing different sizes of nanoparticles, we also observed the effects of several injection pressures and syringe orifice diameters (SOD) on the dispersion pattern of the nanoparticles after injection. Our results showed that as the nanoparticle size increased from 45 nm to 452 nm, the resulting puncture opening, channel diameter, and depth of the nanoparticle dispersion decreased, but the width of the dispersion increased. Conversely, as the SOD increased, the puncture opening, channel diameter, and depth of the dispersion increased, but width of the dispersion decreased. Increasing the injection pressure also decreased the size, depth, and width of the puncture opening. These results identify how these three parameters affect nanoparticle delivery from a needle-free injector; therefore, our findings will be beneficial for optimization and further study of needle-free injectors as a mechanism for transdermal delivery of nanoparticles. PMID:25456991

  11. Spectrophotometric study of the copigmentation of malvidin 3-O-glucoside with p-coumaric, vanillic and syringic acids.

    PubMed

    Malaj, Naim; De Simone, Bruna Clara; Quartarolo, Angelo Domenico; Russo, Nino

    2013-12-15

    Anthocyanins are a natural source of pigments in plants and their processed food products have become attractive and excellent candidates to replace the synthetic colourants due to their characteristic intense colours and associated health benefits. The intermolecular copigmentation between anthocyanins and other colourless compounds has been reported to be an important way to enhance and stabilise the colour intensity of aqueous solutions. In the present work we report the equilibrium constant, stoichiometric ratio and the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°) related to the intermolecular copigmentation reactions of the anthocyanin malvidin 3-O-glucoside with one hydroxycinnamic acid (p-coumaric acid) and two O-methylated hydroxybenzoic acids (vanillic and syringic acid). Different factors which affect their interactions such as copigment concentration, pH and temperature of the medium are examined at two pH levels (pH=2.50 and 3.65) corresponding to those of the major food mediums where these reactions take place (fruit juices, wine, jams etc.).

  12. Increased Access to Unrestricted Pharmacy Sales of Syringes in Seattle–King County, Washington: Structural and Individual-Level Changes, 1996 Versus 2003

    PubMed Central

    Deibert, Ryan J.; Goldbaum, Gary; Parker, Theodore R.; Hagan, Holly; Marks, Robert; Hanrahan, Michael; Thiede, Hanne

    2006-01-01

    We examined pharmacists’ attitudes and practices related to syringe sales to injection drug users before and after legal reform and local programming to enhance sterile syringe access. We replicated a 1996 study by conducting pharmacist phone surveys and syringe test-buys in randomly selected pharmacies. Test-buy success increased from 48% in 1996 to 65% in 2003 (P=.04). Pharmacists agreeing that syringes should be available to injection drug users through pharmacy purchase increased from 49% to 71% (P<.01). Pharmacy policies and pharmacist attitudes were strongly associated with syringe access. Structural changes, including policy reform and pharmacy outreach, appear to increase syringe access. Interventions should address pharmacy policies and pharmacist attitudes and policies. PMID:16809607

  13. Expanded syringe exchange programs and reduced HIV infection among new injection drug users in Tallinn, Estonia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Estonia has experienced an HIV epidemic among intravenous drug users (IDUs) with the highest per capita HIV prevalence in Eastern Europe. We assessed the effects of expanded syringe exchange programs (SEP) in the capital city, Tallinn, which has an estimated 10,000 IDUs. Methods SEP implementation was monitored with data from the Estonian National Institute for Health Development. Respondent driven sampling (RDS) interview surveys with HIV testing were conducted in Tallinn in 2005, 2007 and 2009 (involving 350, 350 and 327 IDUs respectively). HIV incidence among new injectors (those injecting for < = 3 years) was estimated by assuming (1) new injectors were HIV seronegative when they began injecting, and (2) HIV infection occurred at the midpoint between first injection and time of interview. Results SEP increased from 230,000 syringes exchanged in 2005 to 440,000 in 2007 and 770,000 in 2009. In all three surveys, IDUs were predominantly male (80%), ethnic Russians (>80%), and young adults (mean ages 24 to 27 years). The proportion of new injectors decreased significantly over the years (from 21% in 2005 to 12% in 2009, p = 0.005). HIV prevalence among all respondents stabilized at slightly over 50% (54% in 2005, 55% in 2007, 51% in 2009), and decreased among new injectors (34% in 2005, 16% in 2009, p = 0.046). Estimated HIV incidence among new injectors decreased significantly from 18/100 person-years in 2005 and 21/100 person-years in 2007 to 9/100 person-years in 2009 (p = 0.026). Conclusions In Estonia, a transitional country, a decrease in the HIV prevalence among new injectors and in the numbers of people initiating injection drug use coincided with implementation of large-scale SEPs. Further reductions in HIV transmission among IDUs are still required. Provision of 70 or more syringes per IDU per year may be needed before significant reductions in HIV incidence occur. PMID:21718469

  14. The compatibility and stability of octreotide acetate in the presence of diamorphine hydrochloride in polypropylene syringes.

    PubMed

    Fielding, H; Kyaterekera, N; Skellern, G G; Tettey, J N; McDade, J R; Msuya, Z; Watson, D G; Urie, J

    2000-05-01

    Varying concentrations of octreotide acetate (Sandostatin) and diamorphine hydrochloride were prepared and stored in polypropylene syringes at 37 degrees C in the dark. The solutions were analysed for octreotide acetate content using a validated HPLC method at regular intervals over a 48-h period. The results indicate that octreotide acetate remains stable in the presence of diamorphine hydrochloride at 37 degrees C for 24 h. In addition, the solutions prepared maintained their clarity, with no signs of precipitation upon visual examination under normal light conditions.

  15. Primary and Secondary Analysis of Local Elected Officials’ Decisions to Support or Oppose Pharmacy Sale of Syringes in California

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Valerie J.

    2010-01-01

    Under California law, local governments may authorize pharmacies within their jurisdictions to sell ten or fewer syringes to an adult without prescription, proof of identity, or proof of medical need. Local governments may simultaneously exempt adults from prosecution for violation of state drug paraphernalia codes for possession of ten or fewer syringes for personal use. Both of these provisions are temporary and sunset on December 31, 2010, unless subsequent state legislation amends that date. The objective of our study was to ascertain how and why local policymakers made their decisions regarding non-prescription syringe sale (NPSS). We examined influences on their decisions, including specific messengers and the arguments that were most salient to their decision making. We selected jurisdictions that were geographically representative of California counties; those with and without syringe exchange programs, and those that had passed or rejected NPSS. We conducted nine semi-structured interviews in five jurisdictions. To enrich primary data collection, we analyzed secondary data by reviewing audio, video, and written transcripts of public hearings and newspaper coverage in five jurisdictions, including three jurisdictions without primary interview data. Among proponents of NPSS, we identified common themes, including: (1) public health research provided conclusive evidence for reduction in HIV and hepatitis transmission without problems of crime, drug use, or unsafe discard of syringes; (2) the local health officer was the key to influencing local policymakers; (3) recall of prior debates over syringe exchange served to inform their decision making; and (4) a lack of local opposition or controversy. Common concerns among opponents of NPSS included: (1) that there would be an increase in unsafe discard of syringes; (2) loss of an important law enforcement tool; (3) that drug users were incapable of desired behavior change; and (4) that research was inconclusive

  16. Calibration of sound calibrators: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milhomem, T. A. B.; Soares, Z. M. D.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of calibration of sound calibrators. Initially, traditional calibration methods are presented. Following, the international standard IEC 60942 is discussed emphasizing parameters, target measurement uncertainty and criteria for conformance to the requirements of the standard. Last, Regional Metrology Organizations comparisons are summarized.

  17. Fibre architecture and song activation rates of syringeal muscles are not lateralized in the European starling

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, A. M.; Meyers, R. A.; Cooper, B. G.; Goller, F.

    2010-01-01

    The songbird vocal organ, the syrinx, is composed of two sound generators, which are independently controlled by sets of two extrinsic and four intrinsic muscles. These muscles rank among the fastest vertebrate muscles, but the molecular and morphological foundations of this rapid physiological performance are unknown. Here we show that the four intrinsic muscles in the syrinx of male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) are composed of fast oxidative and superfast fibres. Dorsal and ventral tracheobronchialis muscles contain slightly more superfast fibres relative to the number of fast oxidative fibres than dorsal and ventral syringealis muscles. This morphological difference is not reflected in the highest, burst-like activation rate of the two muscle groups during song as assessed with electromyographic recordings. No difference in fibre type ratio was found between the corresponding muscles of the left and right sound generators. Airflow and electromyographic measurements during song indicate that maximal activation rate and speed of airflow regulation do not differ between the two sound sources. Whereas the potential for high-speed muscular control exists on both sides, the two sound generators are used differentially for modulation of acoustic parameters. These results show that large numbers of superfast fibre types are present in intrinsic syringeal muscles of a songbird, providing further confirmation of rapid contraction kinetics. However, syringeal muscles are composed of two fibre types which raises questions about the neuromuscular control of this heterogeneous muscle architecture. PMID:20228343

  18. Psychiatric comorbidity is associated with drug use and HIV risk in syringe exchange participants.

    PubMed

    Disney, Elizabeth; Kidorf, Michael; Kolodner, Ken; King, Van; Peirce, Jessica; Beilenson, Peter; Brooner, Robert K

    2006-08-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of psychiatric comorbidity on substance use disorder prevalence, HIV risk behavior, and other problem severity in male and female out-of-treatment injection drug users newly registered at a syringe exchange program. Participants (N = 338) were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV, the Addiction Severity Index, and the Risk Assessment Battery, and classified into one of four diagnostic groups: (1) no antisocial personality disorder (APD) or Axis I psychiatric disorder (N = 162), (2) APD only (N = 74), (3) Axis I psychiatric disorder only (N = 55), or (4) APD plus Axis I psychiatric disorder (N = 47). Psychiatric comorbidity was associated with higher rates of substance use disorder and more HIV risk and other problem severity. In general, participants with both APD and an Axis I disorder exhibited the most problem severity. APD was uniquely associated with higher prevalence for each substance use disorder assessed in this study and with elevated HIV risk. These results support and extend studies conducted with opioid-dependent individuals recruited from treatment and community settings, and reinforce the need to develop interventions to encourage syringe exchange program participants to enroll in treatment.

  19. Analysis of Hypodermic Needles and Syringes for the Presence of Blood and Polydimethylsiloxane (Silicone) Utilizing Microchemical Tests and Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Crowe, John B; Lanzarotta, Adam; Witkowski, Mark R; Andria, Sara E

    2015-07-01

    Suspect hypodermic needles and syringes were seized from an unlicensed individual who was allegedly injecting patients with silicone (polydimethylsiloxane [PDMS]) for cosmetic enhancement. Since control syringe barrels and needles often contain an interfering PDMS lubricant, a risk for false positives of foreign PDMS exists. The focus of this report was to minimize this risk and determine a quick and reliable test for the presence of blood in PDMS matrices. Using ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy, the risk for false-positive identification of foreign PDMS was reduced by (i) overfilling the sampling aperture to prevent spectral distortions and (ii) sampling a region of the suspect syringe/needle assembly where manufacturer-applied PDMS is not typically located. Analysis for blood indicated that the Teichman microchemical test was effective for detecting blood in the presence of PDMS. Overall, detecting PDMS established intent and detecting blood established that the needle containing the PDMS had been used for injection.

  20. Detector response and intensity cross-contribution as contributing factors to the observed non-linear calibration curves in mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Sie, Meng-Jie; Chen, Bud-Gen; Chang, Chiung Dan; Lin, Chia-Han; Liu, Ray H

    2011-01-21

    It is a common knowledge that detector fatigue causes a calibration curve to deviate from the preferred linear relationship at the higher concentration end. With the adaptation of an isotopically labeled analog of the analyte as the internal standard (IS), cross-contribution (CC) of the intensities monitored for the ions designating the analyte and the IS can also result in a non-linear relationship at both ends. A novel approach developed to assess 'the extent and the effect of [CC]… in quantitative GC-MS analysis' can be extended (a) to examine whether a specific set of CC values is accurate; and (b) to differentiate whether the observed non-linear calibration curve is caused by detector fatigue or the CC phenomenon. Data derived from the exemplar secobarbital (SB)/SB-d(5) system (as di-butyl-derivatives) are used to illustrate this novel approach. Comparing the non-linear nature of calibration data that are empirically observed to that derived from theoretical calculation (with the incorporation of adjustment resulting from the ion CC phenomenon), supports the conclusions that (a) both CC and detector fatigue contribute significantly to the observed non-linear nature of the calibration curve based on ion-pair m/z 207/212; and (b) detector fatigue is the dominating contributor when the calibration curve is based on ion-pair m/z 263/268.

  1. Effect of air moisture content on adhesion to dentine: a comparison of dental air/water syringe tips.

    PubMed

    Lau, A; Bennani, V; Chandler, N; Hanlin, S; Lowe, B

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the spray pattern and air moisture content produced by single-use syringe and multiple-use syringe tips. The drying efficacy was evaluated by analyzing the spray and by detecting the presence of moisture in the air blast through the tips. Single-use tips had a more consistent spray pattern and produced a moisture-free airflow compared to the multiple-use tips. The differences were statistically significant. Adhesion to dentine between tooth preparations dried with the two tips was evaluated using a tensile test. The differences were statistically insignificant. PMID:25831716

  2. Calibrating the BOLD response without administering gases: comparison of hypercapnia calibration with calibration using an asymmetric spin echo.

    PubMed

    Blockley, Nicholas P; Griffeth, Valerie E M; Simon, Aaron B; Dubowitz, David J; Buxton, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    The calibrated BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) technique was developed to quantify the BOLD signal in terms of changes in oxygen metabolism. In order to achieve this a calibration experiment must be performed, which typically requires a hypercapnic gas mixture to be administered to the participant. However, an emerging technique seeks to perform this calibration without administering gases using a refocussing based calibration. Whilst hypercapnia calibration seeks to emulate the physical removal of deoxyhaemoglobin from the blood, the aim of refocussing based calibration is to refocus the dephasing effect of deoxyhaemoglobin on the MR signal using a spin echo. However, it is not possible to refocus all of the effects that contribute to the BOLD signal and a scale factor is required to estimate the BOLD scaling parameter M. In this study the feasibility of a refocussing based calibration was investigated. The scale factor relating the refocussing calibration to M was predicted by simulations to be approximately linear and empirically measured to be 0.88±0.36 for the visual cortex and 0.93±0.32 for a grey matter region of interest (mean±standard deviation). Refocussing based calibration is a promising approach for greatly simplifying the calibrated BOLD methodology by eliminating the need for the subject to breathe special gas mixtures, and potentially provides the basis for a wider implementation of quantitative functional MRI.

  3. Estimation of lead in biological samples of oral cancer patients chewing smokeless tobacco products by ionic liquid-based microextraction in a single syringe system.

    PubMed

    Arain, Sadaf S; Kazi, Tasneem G; Arain, Asma J; Afridi, Hassan I; Arain, Muhammad B; Brahman, Kapil D; Naeemullah; Panhwar, Abdul H; Arain, Mariam S

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have reported that the chewing habit of smokeless tobacco (SLT) has been associated with oral cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the trace levels of lead (Pb) in biological samples (blood, scalp hair) of oral cancer patients and referents of the same age group (range 30-60 years). As the concentrations of Pb are very low in biological samples, so a simple and efficient ionic liquid-based microextraction in a single syringe system has been developed, as a prior step to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In this procedure, the hydrophobic chelates of Pb with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) were extracted into fine droplets of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C4MIM][PF6] within a syringe while using Triton X-114 as a dispersant. Factors influencing the microextraction efficiency and determination, such as pH of the sample, volume of [C4MIM][PF6] and Triton X-114, ligand concentration, and incubation time, were studied. To validate the proposed method, certified reference materials were analyzed and the results of Pb(2+) were in good agreement with certified values. At optimum experimental values of significant variables, detection limit and enhancement factor were found to be 0.412 μg/L and 80, respectively. The coexisting ions showed no obvious negative outcome on Pb preconcentration. The proposed method was applied satisfactorily for the preconcentration of Pb(2+) in acid-digested SLT and biological samples of the study population. It was observed that oral cancer patients who consumed different SLT products have 2-3-fold higher levels of Pb in scalp hair and blood samples as compared to healthy referents (p < 0.001). While 31.4-50.8% higher levels of Pb were observed in referents chewing different SLT products as compared to nonconsumers (p < 0.01). PMID:25903188

  4. Estimation of lead in biological samples of oral cancer patients chewing smokeless tobacco products by ionic liquid-based microextraction in a single syringe system.

    PubMed

    Arain, Sadaf S; Kazi, Tasneem G; Arain, Asma J; Afridi, Hassan I; Arain, Muhammad B; Brahman, Kapil D; Naeemullah; Panhwar, Abdul H; Arain, Mariam S

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have reported that the chewing habit of smokeless tobacco (SLT) has been associated with oral cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the trace levels of lead (Pb) in biological samples (blood, scalp hair) of oral cancer patients and referents of the same age group (range 30-60 years). As the concentrations of Pb are very low in biological samples, so a simple and efficient ionic liquid-based microextraction in a single syringe system has been developed, as a prior step to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In this procedure, the hydrophobic chelates of Pb with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) were extracted into fine droplets of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C4MIM][PF6] within a syringe while using Triton X-114 as a dispersant. Factors influencing the microextraction efficiency and determination, such as pH of the sample, volume of [C4MIM][PF6] and Triton X-114, ligand concentration, and incubation time, were studied. To validate the proposed method, certified reference materials were analyzed and the results of Pb(2+) were in good agreement with certified values. At optimum experimental values of significant variables, detection limit and enhancement factor were found to be 0.412 μg/L and 80, respectively. The coexisting ions showed no obvious negative outcome on Pb preconcentration. The proposed method was applied satisfactorily for the preconcentration of Pb(2+) in acid-digested SLT and biological samples of the study population. It was observed that oral cancer patients who consumed different SLT products have 2-3-fold higher levels of Pb in scalp hair and blood samples as compared to healthy referents (p < 0.001). While 31.4-50.8% higher levels of Pb were observed in referents chewing different SLT products as compared to nonconsumers (p < 0.01).

  5. Absolute calibration in vivo measurement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kruchten, D.A.; Hickman, D.P.

    1991-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems will eliminate the need to generate a series of human surrogate structures (i.e., phantoms) for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define physiological structure, size, and composition. The MRI image provides a digitized representation of the physiological structure, which allows for any mathematical distribution of radionuclides within the body. Using Monte Carlo transport codes, the emission spectrum from the body is predicted. The in vivo measurement equipment is calibrated using the Monte Carlo code and adjusting for the intrinsic properties of the detection system. The calibration factors are verified using measurements of existing phantoms and previously obtained measurements of human volunteers. 8 refs.

  6. Molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction in a syringe filter for determination of triazine herbicides in Radix Paeoniae Alba by ultra-fast liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinpei; Wang, Yuanpeng; Sun, Qun; Xu, Bo; Yu, Yong; Wang, Xinghua

    2016-02-01

    A novel, cost-effective and simple solid phase extraction (SPE) method, by using a syringe connected with a nylon membrane filter as the adsorbent container, was developed for the extraction of triazine herbicides from Radix Paeoniae Alba (RPA) samples. The selective molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) synthesized with the template of atrazine were employed as the adsorbents for the enrichment and purification of analytes. The extraction parameters, including the volume and type of loading solvent, the type of washing solvent and eluting solvent, were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the final extracts were analyzed by ultra-fast liquid chromatography (UFLC). Recoveries of the developed method range from 92.4% to 107.3% with intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 8.2%. The calibration curve is linear in the concentration range of 0.005-2.4 µg g(-1) for desmetryn, atrazine and terbumeton, and 0.005-1.5 µg g(-1) for dimethametryn and dipropetryn, with the correlation coefficient (R(2)) higher than 0.9995. The limits of detection (LODs) of five triazine herbicides are in the range of 0.09-0.39 ng g(-1), which are lower than the maximum residue levels (MRLs) established by various official organizations. Analytical results of three real Radix Paeoniae Alba samples indicate that the proposed method is cost-effective and easy-to-use than other routine pretreatment methods.

  7. Molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction in a syringe filter for determination of triazine herbicides in Radix Paeoniae Alba by ultra-fast liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinpei; Wang, Yuanpeng; Sun, Qun; Xu, Bo; Yu, Yong; Wang, Xinghua

    2016-02-01

    A novel, cost-effective and simple solid phase extraction (SPE) method, by using a syringe connected with a nylon membrane filter as the adsorbent container, was developed for the extraction of triazine herbicides from Radix Paeoniae Alba (RPA) samples. The selective molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) synthesized with the template of atrazine were employed as the adsorbents for the enrichment and purification of analytes. The extraction parameters, including the volume and type of loading solvent, the type of washing solvent and eluting solvent, were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the final extracts were analyzed by ultra-fast liquid chromatography (UFLC). Recoveries of the developed method range from 92.4% to 107.3% with intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 8.2%. The calibration curve is linear in the concentration range of 0.005-2.4 µg g(-1) for desmetryn, atrazine and terbumeton, and 0.005-1.5 µg g(-1) for dimethametryn and dipropetryn, with the correlation coefficient (R(2)) higher than 0.9995. The limits of detection (LODs) of five triazine herbicides are in the range of 0.09-0.39 ng g(-1), which are lower than the maximum residue levels (MRLs) established by various official organizations. Analytical results of three real Radix Paeoniae Alba samples indicate that the proposed method is cost-effective and easy-to-use than other routine pretreatment methods. PMID:26653483

  8. Measure for Measure: Calibrating Ten Commonly Used Calibration Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraw, Gregory; Kuch, Fred; Gutierrez, Antonio P.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the dimensionality of 10 different calibration measures using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The 10 measures were representative of five interpretative families of measures used to assess monitoring accuracy based on a 2 (performance) x 2 (monitoring judgment) contingency table. We computed scores for each of the measures…

  9. Using Pharmacies in a Structural Intervention to Distribute Low Dead Space Syringes to Reduce HIV and HCV Transmission in People Who Inject Drugs.

    PubMed

    Oramasionwu, Christine U; Johnson, Terence L; Zule, William A; Carda-Auten, Jessica; Golin, Carol E

    2015-06-01

    Ongoing injection drug use contributes to the HIV and HCV epidemics in people who inject drugs. In many places, pharmacies are the primary source of sterile syringes for people who inject drugs; thus, pharmacies provide a viable public health service that reduces blood-borne disease transmission. Replacing the supply of high dead space syringes with low dead space syringes could have far-reaching benefits that include further prevention of disease transmission in people who inject drugs and reductions in dosing inaccuracies, medication errors, and medication waste in patients who use syringes. We explored using pharmacies in a structural intervention to increase the uptake of low dead space syringes as part of a comprehensive strategy to reverse these epidemics. PMID:25880955

  10. Using Pharmacies in a Structural Intervention to Distribute Low Dead Space Syringes to Reduce HIV and HCV Transmission in People Who Inject Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Terence L.; Zule, William A.; Carda-Auten, Jessica; Golin, Carol E.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing injection drug use contributes to the HIV and HCV epidemics in people who inject drugs. In many places, pharmacies are the primary source of sterile syringes for people who inject drugs; thus, pharmacies provide a viable public health service that reduces blood-borne disease transmission. Replacing the supply of high dead space syringes with low dead space syringes could have far-reaching benefits that include further prevention of disease transmission in people who inject drugs and reductions in dosing inaccuracies, medication errors, and medication waste in patients who use syringes. We explored using pharmacies in a structural intervention to increase the uptake of low dead space syringes as part of a comprehensive strategy to reverse these epidemics. PMID:25880955

  11. Using Pharmacies in a Structural Intervention to Distribute Low Dead Space Syringes to Reduce HIV and HCV Transmission in People Who Inject Drugs.

    PubMed

    Oramasionwu, Christine U; Johnson, Terence L; Zule, William A; Carda-Auten, Jessica; Golin, Carol E

    2015-06-01

    Ongoing injection drug use contributes to the HIV and HCV epidemics in people who inject drugs. In many places, pharmacies are the primary source of sterile syringes for people who inject drugs; thus, pharmacies provide a viable public health service that reduces blood-borne disease transmission. Replacing the supply of high dead space syringes with low dead space syringes could have far-reaching benefits that include further prevention of disease transmission in people who inject drugs and reductions in dosing inaccuracies, medication errors, and medication waste in patients who use syringes. We explored using pharmacies in a structural intervention to increase the uptake of low dead space syringes as part of a comprehensive strategy to reverse these epidemics.

  12. Organizational issues in the implementation of a hospital-based syringe exchange program.

    PubMed

    Masson, Carmen L; Sorensen, James L; Grossman, Nina; Sporer, Karl A; Des Jarlais, Don C; Perlman, David C

    2010-05-01

    Little published information exists to guide health care institutions in establishing syringe exchange program (SEP) services. To address this gap, this article discusses organizational issues encountered in the implementation of a hospital-based SEP in San Francisco, California (USA). Investigators collaborated with a community organization in implementing a county hospital-based SEP. SEP services integrated into a public hospital presented unique challenges directly related to their status as a health care institution. In the course of introducing SEP services into a hospital setting as part of a clinical trial, various ethical, legal, and logistical issues were raised. Based on these experiences, this paper provides guidance on how to integrate an SEP into a traditional health care institution.

  13. [Children's distress during application of local anaesthesia. Computerized tool versus traditional syringe].

    PubMed

    van Dinter, N; van Maanen, E J; Versloot, J; Veerkamp, J S J

    2006-04-01

    This study compared the level of distress in children during the application of local anaesthesia by a computerized tool (Wand) and by a traditional syringe. The influence of children's mild or extreme anxiety regarding the dental procedure was also determined. 125 children between the ages of 4 and 11 years old participated in this study. Their discomfort was recorded on videotape and marked on the Venham scale and the Observational Scale of Behavioral Distress at 15 second intervals. Parents rated their child's level of anxiety on the Dental Subscale of the Children's Fear Survey Schedule. The results indicate that mildly anxious children suffered less distress and showed less muscle tension, verbal protest and body movement during the first 2 intervals when the computerized tool was used. However, the maximum distress score at the moment of injection was similar in both methods. There was no difference found in the level of distress in the highly anxious children. PMID:16669292

  14. Non-stick syringe needles: Beneficial effects of thin film metallic glass coating.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jinn P; Yu, Chia-Chi; Tanatsugu, Yusuke; Yasuzawa, Mikito; Shen, Yu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of Zr-based (Zr53Cu33Al9Ta5) thin film metallic glass (TFMG) for the coating of syringe needles and compares the results with those obtained using titanium nitride and pure titanium coatings. TFMG coatings were shown to reduce insertion forces by ∼66% and retraction forces by ∼72%, when tested using polyurethane rubber block. The benefits of TFMG-coated needles were also observed when tested using muscle tissue from pigs. In nano-scratch tests, the TFMG coatings achieved a coefficient of friction (COF) of just ∼0.05, which is about one order of magnitude lower than those of other coatings. Finite-element modeling also indicates a significant reduction in injection and retraction forces. The COF can be attributed to the absence of grain boundaries in the TFMG coating as well as a smooth surface morphology and low surface free energy. PMID:27573062

  15. Systematic evaluation of dissolved lead sorption losses to particulate syringe filter materials.

    PubMed

    Minning, Thomas; Lytle, Darren A; Pham, Maily; Kelty, Keith

    2015-06-01

    Distinguishing between soluble and particulate lead in drinking water is useful in understanding the mechanism of lead release and identifying remedial action. Typically, particulate lead is defined as the amount of lead removed by a 0.45-μm filter. Unfortunately, there is little guidance regarding selection of filter membrane material and little consideration to the possibility of the sorption of dissolved lead to the filter. The objective of this work was to examine the tendency of 0.45-μm syringe filter materials to adsorb lead. Tests were performed with water containing 40 and 24 μg/L soluble lead at pH 7 buffered with 50 mg C/L dissolved inorganic concentration (DIC). The amounts of lead sorbed greatly varied by filter, and only two filter types, polypropylene and mixed cellulose esters, performed well and are recommended. Great care must be taken in choosing a filter when filtering soluble lead and interpreting filter results.

  16. Non-stick syringe needles: Beneficial effects of thin film metallic glass coating

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jinn P.; Yu, Chia-Chi; Tanatsugu, Yusuke; Yasuzawa, Mikito; Shen, Yu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of Zr-based (Zr53Cu33Al9Ta5) thin film metallic glass (TFMG) for the coating of syringe needles and compares the results with those obtained using titanium nitride and pure titanium coatings. TFMG coatings were shown to reduce insertion forces by ∼66% and retraction forces by ∼72%, when tested using polyurethane rubber block. The benefits of TFMG-coated needles were also observed when tested using muscle tissue from pigs. In nano-scratch tests, the TFMG coatings achieved a coefficient of friction (COF) of just ∼0.05, which is about one order of magnitude lower than those of other coatings. Finite-element modeling also indicates a significant reduction in injection and retraction forces. The COF can be attributed to the absence of grain boundaries in the TFMG coating as well as a smooth surface morphology and low surface free energy. PMID:27573062

  17. Immunochemical authentication of manuka honey using a monoclonal antibody specific to a glycoside of methyl syringate.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoji; Araki, Yukako; Juri, Maki; Fujinaka, Rie; Ishisaka, Akari; Kitamoto, Noritoshi; Nitta, Yoko; Niwa, Toshio; Takimoto, Yosuke

    2014-11-01

    Leptosperin, a novel glycoside of methyl syringate, is exclusively present in manuka honey derived from the Leptospermum species Leptospermum scoparium. Quantification of leptosperin might thus be applicable for authentication of honey. The concentration of leptosperin has high linearity with antibacterial activity. We established a monoclonal antibody to leptosperin and characterized the antibody in detail by a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), comparing the results with those of the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for validation. The antigen in manuka honey was confirmed as leptosperin by HPLC fractionation with quantitation by an ELISA. Leptosperin contents of 50 honey samples were analyzed by an established ELISA, which can handle 20 samples (duplicate) on one 96-well plate. Significant coincidence with the chemical quantitation was observed. Immunochemical quantitation of leptosperin would be an economical and facile method for the possible authentication of manuka honey, allowing many honey samples to be processed and analyzed by an ELISA simultaneously.

  18. Organizational Issues in the Implementation of a Hospital-Based Syringe Exchange Program

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Carmen L.; Sorensen, James L.; Grossman, Nina; Sporer, Karl A.; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Perlman, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Little published information exists to guide health care institutions in establishing syringe exchange program (SEP) services. To address this gap, this article discusses organizational issues encountered in the implementation of a hospital-based SEP in San Francisco, California (USA). Investigators collaborated with a community organization in implementing a county hospital-based SEP. SEP services integrated into a public hospital presented unique challenges directly related to their status as a health care institution. In the course of introducing SEP services into a hospital setting as part of a clinical trial, various ethical, legal, and logistical issues were raised. Based on these experiences, this paper provides guidance on how to integrate an SEP into a traditional health care institution. PMID:20397875

  19. Non-stick syringe needles: Beneficial effects of thin film metallic glass coating.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jinn P; Yu, Chia-Chi; Tanatsugu, Yusuke; Yasuzawa, Mikito; Shen, Yu-Lin

    2016-08-30

    This paper reports on the use of Zr-based (Zr53Cu33Al9Ta5) thin film metallic glass (TFMG) for the coating of syringe needles and compares the results with those obtained using titanium nitride and pure titanium coatings. TFMG coatings were shown to reduce insertion forces by ∼66% and retraction forces by ∼72%, when tested using polyurethane rubber block. The benefits of TFMG-coated needles were also observed when tested using muscle tissue from pigs. In nano-scratch tests, the TFMG coatings achieved a coefficient of friction (COF) of just ∼0.05, which is about one order of magnitude lower than those of other coatings. Finite-element modeling also indicates a significant reduction in injection and retraction forces. The COF can be attributed to the absence of grain boundaries in the TFMG coating as well as a smooth surface morphology and low surface free energy.

  20. Relative Bioavailability of a Single Dose of Belimumab Administered Subcutaneously by Prefilled Syringe or Autoinjector in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Murtaugh, Thomas; Gilbert, Jane; Barton, Matthew E.; Fire, Joseph; Groark, James; Fox, Norma Lynn; Roth, David; Gordon, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intravenous belimumab is approved for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus; subcutaneous self‐administration would enable greater patient access. This study assessed relative bioavailability, tolerability, and safety of 1 subcutaneous dose of self‐administered belimumab by healthy subjects using a single‐use autoinjector or prefilled syringe. Subjects (randomized 1:1:1:1) self‐administered belimumab 200 mg subcutaneously (abdomen or thigh) by prefilled syringe or autoinjector. Pharmacokinetics, adverse events (AEs), injection‐site pain, and administration errors were recorded. Of 81 subjects, 5 experienced administration errors and were excluded from pharmacokinetic analyses. Mean serum belimumab concentration profiles were similar for both devices, with a weak trend toward higher concentrations for thigh injection compared with abdominal injections. Maximum observed serum concentration was slightly higher with the autoinjector (27.0 vs 25.3 µg/mL) and area under the concentration–time curve slightly lower (701 vs 735 day · μg/mL), compared with the prefilled syringe. Incidence of AEs was 51% (41 of 81 subjects; headache was most common), with no serious or severe AEs. Median injection‐site pain scores were low (0 after 1 hour). Device handling was reported as acceptable by ≥95% of autoinjector users and ≥90% of prefilled syringe users for each characteristic assessed. These results support the use of either device for belimumab subcutaneous administration. PMID:27163500

  1. Methyl syringate, a low-molecular-weight phenolic ester, as an activator of the chemosensory ion channel TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Son, Hee Jin; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Jae-Ho; Ishii, Sho; Misaka, Takumi; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2012-12-01

    Transient receptor potential channel ankryn 1 (TRPA1) and transient receptor potential channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) are members of the TRP superfamily of structurally related, nonselective cation channels and are often coexpressed in sensory neurons. Extracts of the first leaves of Kalopanax pictus Nakai (Araliaceae) have been shown to activate hTRPA1 and hTRPV1. Therefore, the effects of six commercially available chemicals (methyl syringate, coniferyl alcohol, protocatechuic acid, hederacoside C, α-hederin, and eleutheroside B) found in K. pictus were investigated on cultured cells expressing hTRPA1 and hTRPV1. Of the six compounds, methyl syringate selectively activated hTRPA1 (EC(50) = 507.4 μM), but not hTRPV1. Although methyl syringate had a higher EC(50) compared with allyl isothiocyanate (EC(50) = 7.4 μM) and cinnamaldehyde (EC(50) = 22.2 μM), the present study provides evidence that methyl syringate from K. pictus is a specific and selective activator of hTRPA1.

  2. Three-dimensional Quantitative Porosity Characterization of Syringe- versus Hand-mixed Set Epoxy Resin Root Canal Sealer.

    PubMed

    De-Deus, Gustavo; Scelza, Miriam Z; Neelakantan, Prasanna; Sharma, Subash; Neves, Aline de Almeida; Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the porosity characteristics of AH Plus Jet(tm) syringe-mix and the conventional hand-mixed AH Plus root canal sealers by three-dimensional quantitative high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Seven test specimens were prepared from each tested sealer by a single operator following the manufacturer's instructions and poured into pre-lubricated plastic split-ring moulds. Set sealer test specimens were scanned using a micro-CT device and the shadow images were reconstructed into cross-sectional slices. The evaluated parameters were (i) total pore count, (ii) total pore volume and mean pore volume, (iii) total porosity (% of pore volume in relation to total sealer volume) and (iv) mean pore distance to the sealer lateral external surface. In both groups, most pores were localized within the external sealer perimeter (0.05 mm from the external surface). Hand-mixed AH Plus specimens showed statistically significant higher mean total pore count, total pore volume and total porosity (p=0.001) than the syringe-mixed specimens. However, mean pore sizes in AH Plus syringe-mixed specimens were significantly higher (p=0.046) than the AH Plus hand-mixed counterparts. Hand-mixed AH Plus was associated with higher total mean pore count, volume and total porosity compared to syringe mixed AH Plus. PMID:26963204

  3. Access to sterile syringes for injecting drug users in New York City: politics and perception (1984-2010).

    PubMed

    Heller, Daliah; Paone, Denise

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, political and social environments have shaped public health response to injecting drug use, and New York City represents a salient example. The history of "harm reduction" in New York City is characterized within changing historical periods and in relation to the actions of stakeholders. The expansion is traced over four periods: (i) 1984-1989: emergence, activism, and science; (ii) 1990-1994 reckoning: syringe exchange legislation and consolidation; (iii) 1995-1999: bureaucratization, opposition, and challenges to institutional control; and (iv) 2000-2010 revitalization: expansion of syringe access and harm reduction. It is clear from this review that the leadership of activism and the work of advocates catalyzed syringe access policy and practice. Without this "push," it is unlikely that New York City would have experienced the dramatic decline in HIV infection among drug injectors in the 1990s. Second, successful arguments for expanding syringe access in New York City were based on the high HIV/AIDS infection rates. Thus, program developments were advocated as HIV prevention interventions, rather than as expanded services for addressing broader health and social issues of injecting drug use. PMID:21303234

  4. Syringe Injectable Electronics: Precise Targeted Delivery with Quantitative Input/Output Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Guosong; Fu, Tian-Ming; Zhou, Tao; Schuhmann, Thomas G; Huang, Jinlin; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-10-14

    Syringe-injectable mesh electronics with tissue-like mechanical properties and open macroporous structures is an emerging powerful paradigm for mapping and modulating brain activity. Indeed, the ultraflexible macroporous structure has exhibited unprecedented minimal/noninvasiveness and the promotion of attractive interactions with neurons in chronic studies. These same structural features also pose new challenges and opportunities for precise targeted delivery in specific brain regions and quantitative input/output (I/O) connectivity needed for reliable electrical measurements. Here, we describe new results that address in a flexible manner both of these points. First, we have developed a controlled injection approach that maintains the extended mesh structure during the "blind" injection process, while also achieving targeted delivery with ca. 20 μm spatial precision. Optical and microcomputed tomography results from injections into tissue-like hydrogel, ex vivo brain tissue, and in vivo brains validate our basic approach and demonstrate its generality. Second, we present a general strategy to achieve up to 100% multichannel I/O connectivity using an automated conductive ink printing methodology to connect the mesh electronics and a flexible flat cable, which serves as the standard "plug-in" interface to measurement electronics. Studies of resistance versus printed line width were used to identify optimal conditions, and moreover, frequency-dependent noise measurements show that the flexible printing process yields values comparable to commercial flip-chip bonding technology. Our results address two key challenges faced by syringe-injectable electronics and thereby pave the way for facile in vivo applications of injectable mesh electronics as a general and powerful tool for long-term mapping and modulation of brain activity in fundamental neuroscience through therapeutic biomedical studies.

  5. A Syringe-Like Love Dart Injects Male Accessory Gland Products in a Tropical Hermaphrodite

    PubMed Central

    Koene, Joris M.; Liew, Thor-Seng; Montagne-Wajer, Kora; Schilthuizen, Menno

    2013-01-01

    Sexual conflict shapes the evolution of many behaviours and processes involved in reproduction. Nearly all evidence supporting this comes from species where the sexes are separated. However, a substantial proportion of animals and most plants are hermaphroditic, and theoretical work predicts that sexual conflict plays an important role even when the sexes are joined within one individual. This seems to have resulted in bizarre mating systems, sophisticated sperm packaging and complex reproductive morphologies. By far the best-known example of such a strategy in hermaphrodites is the shooting of so-called love-darts in land snails. All known love darts carry a gland product on their outside and enter this into the partner’s hemolymph by stabbing. Here, we show that species of the snail genus Everettia possess a syringe-like dart that serves as a real injection needle. Their dart is round in cross-section, contains numerous channels, and has perforations along its side. Histology and electron microscopy show that these holes connect to the channels inside the dart and run all the way up to the elaborate mucus glands that are attached to the dart sac. This is the first report on a love dart that is used as a syringe to directly inject the gland product into the partner’s hemolymph. Although the exact use and function of this dart remains to be demonstrated, this clearly adds to the complexity of the evolution of reproductive strategies in hermaphrodites in general. Moreover, the perforations on the outside of the love dart resemble features of other injection devices, thus uncovering common design and repeated evolution of such features in animals. PMID:23894565

  6. Anterior and middle superior alveolar nerve block for anesthesia of maxillary teeth using conventional syringe

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Ignacio; Soto, Reinaldo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dental procedures in the maxilla typically require multiple injections and may inadvertently anesthetize facial structures and affect the smile line. To minimize these inconveniences and reduce the number of total injections, a relatively new injection technique has been proposed for maxillary procedures, the anterior and middle superior alveolar (AMSA) nerve block, which achieves pulpal anesthesia from the central incisor to second premolar through palatal approach with a single injection. The purpose of this article is to provide background information on the anterior and middle superior alveolar nerve block and demonstrate its success rates of pulpal anesthesia using the conventional syringe. Materials and Methods: Thirty Caucasian patients (16 men and 14 women) with an average age of 22 years-old, belonging to the School of Dentistry of Los Andes University, were selected. All the patients received an AMSA nerve block on one side of the maxilla using the conventional syringe, 1 ml of lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:100.000 was injected to all the patients. Results: The AMSA nerve block obtained a 66% anesthetic success in the second premolar, 40% in the first premolar, 60% in the canine, 23.3% in the lateral incisor, and 16.7% in the central incisor. Conclusions: Because of the unpredictable anesthetic success of the experimental teeth and variable anesthesia duration, the technique is disadvantageous for clinical application as the first choice, counting with other techniques that have greater efficacy in the maxilla. Although, anesthetizing the teeth without numbing the facial muscles may be useful in restorative dentistry. PMID:23559916

  7. A syringe-like love dart injects male accessory gland products in a tropical hermaphrodite.

    PubMed

    Koene, Joris M; Liew, Thor-Seng; Montagne-Wajer, Kora; Schilthuizen, Menno

    2013-01-01

    Sexual conflict shapes the evolution of many behaviours and processes involved in reproduction. Nearly all evidence supporting this comes from species where the sexes are separated. However, a substantial proportion of animals and most plants are hermaphroditic, and theoretical work predicts that sexual conflict plays an important role even when the sexes are joined within one individual. This seems to have resulted in bizarre mating systems, sophisticated sperm packaging and complex reproductive morphologies. By far the best-known example of such a strategy in hermaphrodites is the shooting of so-called love-darts in land snails. All known love darts carry a gland product on their outside and enter this into the partner's hemolymph by stabbing. Here, we show that species of the snail genus Everettia possess a syringe-like dart that serves as a real injection needle. Their dart is round in cross-section, contains numerous channels, and has perforations along its side. Histology and electron microscopy show that these holes connect to the channels inside the dart and run all the way up to the elaborate mucus glands that are attached to the dart sac. This is the first report on a love dart that is used as a syringe to directly inject the gland product into the partner's hemolymph. Although the exact use and function of this dart remains to be demonstrated, this clearly adds to the complexity of the evolution of reproductive strategies in hermaphrodites in general. Moreover, the perforations on the outside of the love dart resemble features of other injection devices, thus uncovering common design and repeated evolution of such features in animals.

  8. Methyl syringate: a chemical marker of asphodel (Asphodelus microcarpus Salzm. et Viv.) monofloral honey.

    PubMed

    Tuberoso, Carlo I G; Bifulco, Ersilia; Jerković, Igor; Caboni, Pierluigi; Cabras, Paolo; Floris, Ignazio

    2009-05-13

    During the liquid chromatographic study of the phenolic fraction of monofloral honeys was detected in the asphodel honey ( Asphodelus microcarpus Salzm. et Viv.) chromatogram a distinctive peak not detected in other monofloral honeys such as Arbutus unedo L., Hedysarum coronarium , Eucalyptus spp., and Galactites tomentosa . After thin layer chromatography (TLC) purification and characterization by NMR and LC-MS/MS, the compound was identified as methyl syringate (MSYR) and confirmed against an original standard. Levels of MSYR were measured in honeys of 2005, 2006, and 2007 by HPLC-DAD analysis. Level determination of MSYR was repeated in 2008 for 2006 and 2007 honeys to evaluate chemical stability of this phenolic compound. Levels of MSYR measured 1 year after the sampling did not show significant statistical differences (p < 0.05). The stability of MSYR was also confirmed by 12 asphodel honey samples collected in 2005 that showed amounts of methyl syringate comparable with those found in fresh honey. For the evaluation of MSYR origin, samples of nectars were collected from flowers and the content of MSYR was measured. Levels of MSYR in honeys are originated from the nectar with an average contribution of the nectar to the honey of 80%. Melissopalinological analysis did not allow the attribution of the honey monofloral origin because levels of asphodel pollen were <6% for all analyzed samples. Previously reported levels of MSYR for robinia, rape, chestnut, clover, linden blossom, dandelion, sunflower, thyme, manuka, and fir honeys were <5 mg/kg. For this reason, a minimum level of 122.6 mg/kg for MSYR in asphodel honeys can be considered as a chemical marker and, unlike the melissopalynological analysis, can be used for the origin attribution and to evaluate the percent of asphodel nectar in the honey. PMID:19309074

  9. Improving self-calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enßlin, Torsten A.; Junklewitz, Henrik; Winderling, Lars; Greiner, Maksim; Selig, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Response calibration is the process of inferring how much the measured data depend on the signal one is interested in. It is essential for any quantitative signal estimation on the basis of the data. Here, we investigate self-calibration methods for linear signal measurements and linear dependence of the response on the calibration parameters. The common practice is to augment an external calibration solution using a known reference signal with an internal calibration on the unknown measurement signal itself. Contemporary self-calibration schemes try to find a self-consistent solution for signal and calibration by exploiting redundancies in the measurements. This can be understood in terms of maximizing the joint probability of signal and calibration. However, the full uncertainty structure of this joint probability around its maximum is thereby not taken into account by these schemes. Therefore, better schemes, in sense of minimal square error, can be designed by accounting for asymmetries in the uncertainty of signal and calibration. We argue that at least a systematic correction of the common self-calibration scheme should be applied in many measurement situations in order to properly treat uncertainties of the signal on which one calibrates. Otherwise, the calibration solutions suffer from a systematic bias, which consequently distorts the signal reconstruction. Furthermore, we argue that nonparametric, signal-to-noise filtered calibration should provide more accurate reconstructions than the common bin averages and provide a new, improved self-calibration scheme. We illustrate our findings with a simplistic numerical example.

  10. Development of new portable miniaturize solid phase microextraction of silver-APDC complex using micropipette tip in-syringe system couple with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Arain, Mariam Shahzadi; Samoon, Muhammad Kashif

    2016-02-01

    An innovative and simple miniaturized solid phase microextraction (M-SPME) method, was developed for preconcentration and determination of silver(I) in the fresh and waste water samples. For M-SPME, a micropipette tip packed with activated carbon cloth (ACC) as sorbent, in a syringe system. The size, morphology and elemental composition of ACC before and after adsorption of analyte have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The sample solution treated with a complexing reagent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), was drawn into the syringe filled with ACC and dispensed manually for 2 to 10 aspirating/dispensing cycle. Then the Ag- complex sorbed on the ACC in micropipette was quantitatively eluted by drawing and dispensing of different concentrations of acids for 2 to 5 aspirating/dispensing cycles. The extracted Ag ions with modifier were injected directly into the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency, including the concentration of ligand, pH, sample volume, eluent type, concentration and volume was investigated. Validity and accuracy of the developed method was checked by the standard addition method. Reliability of the proposed methodology was checked by the relative standard deviation (%RSD), which was found to be < 5%. Under the optimized experimental variables, the limits of detection (LOD) and enhancement factors (EF), were obtained to be 0.86 ng L- 1 and 120, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver ions in fresh and waste water samples.

  11. Effervescence-assisted β-cyclodextrin/attapulgite composite for the in-syringe dispersive solid-phase extraction of pyrethroids in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Panjie; Li, Xiaobing; Hu, Lu; Gao, Haixiang; Zhang, Sanbing; Zhou, Wenfeng; Lu, Runhua

    2016-06-01

    In this research, an effervescence-assisted β-cyclodextrin/attapulgite composite (β-CD/ATP) for the in-syringe dispersive solid-phase extraction (EAIS-DSPE) of pyrethroids in environmental samples was developed for the first time. A syringe was used to conduct the extraction procedure and a small amount of β-CD/ATP was dispersed into the solution with the release of carbon dioxide when the effervescent tablet components dissolved in water. Then, the sorbent was recovered using a filter membrane, and the analytes were directly eluted using acetonitrile. In the process, the β-CD/ATP sorbent resulted in an excellent extraction efficiency compared to commercially available sorbents such as C18 and HLB. Moreover, in the extraction procedure, both the β-cyclodextrin inclusion interactions (especially the hydrophobic effects) and the special structure of the ATP contributed to the efficient enrichment of pyrethroids in aqueous media. The amount of β-CD/ATP sorbent, the volume of desorption, the ratio of NaH2PO4/Na2CO3, the volume of the sample, and the pH were screened using a Plackett-Burman design. All factors affecting the procedure were optimized by applying a central composite design. Under the optimized conditions, a good repeatability (RSDs) ranging from 1.7 to 2.3, linearity (2.5-500μgL(-1)), limits of detection (LODs) (0.15-1.03μgL(-1)), and an acceptable recoveries (76.8-86.5%) were achieved. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of pyrethroids in environmental samples including river water, reservoir water and lake water. PMID:27130127

  12. Development of new portable miniaturize solid phase microextraction of silver-APDC complex using micropipette tip in-syringe system couple with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Arain, Mariam Shahzadi; Samoon, Muhammad Kashif

    2016-02-01

    An innovative and simple miniaturized solid phase microextraction (M-SPME) method, was developed for preconcentration and determination of silver(I) in the fresh and waste water samples. For M-SPME, a micropipette tip packed with activated carbon cloth (ACC) as sorbent, in a syringe system. The size, morphology and elemental composition of ACC before and after adsorption of analyte have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The sample solution treated with a complexing reagent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), was drawn into the syringe filled with ACC and dispensed manually for 2 to 10 aspirating/dispensing cycle. Then the Ag- complex sorbed on the ACC in micropipette was quantitatively eluted by drawing and dispensing of different concentrations of acids for 2 to 5 aspirating/dispensing cycles. The extracted Ag ions with modifier were injected directly into the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency, including the concentration of ligand, pH, sample volume, eluent type, concentration and volume was investigated. Validity and accuracy of the developed method was checked by the standard addition method. Reliability of the proposed methodology was checked by the relative standard deviation (%RSD), which was found to be <5%. Under the optimized experimental variables, the limits of detection (LOD) and enhancement factors (EF), were obtained to be 0.86 ng L(-1) and 120, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver ions in fresh and waste water samples.

  13. Development of new portable miniaturize solid phase microextraction of silver-APDC complex using micropipette tip in-syringe system couple with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Arain, Mariam Shahzadi; Samoon, Muhammad Kashif

    2016-02-01

    An innovative and simple miniaturized solid phase microextraction (M-SPME) method, was developed for preconcentration and determination of silver(I) in the fresh and waste water samples. For M-SPME, a micropipette tip packed with activated carbon cloth (ACC) as sorbent, in a syringe system. The size, morphology and elemental composition of ACC before and after adsorption of analyte have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The sample solution treated with a complexing reagent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), was drawn into the syringe filled with ACC and dispensed manually for 2 to 10 aspirating/dispensing cycle. Then the Ag- complex sorbed on the ACC in micropipette was quantitatively eluted by drawing and dispensing of different concentrations of acids for 2 to 5 aspirating/dispensing cycles. The extracted Ag ions with modifier were injected directly into the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency, including the concentration of ligand, pH, sample volume, eluent type, concentration and volume was investigated. Validity and accuracy of the developed method was checked by the standard addition method. Reliability of the proposed methodology was checked by the relative standard deviation (%RSD), which was found to be <5%. Under the optimized experimental variables, the limits of detection (LOD) and enhancement factors (EF), were obtained to be 0.86 ng L(-1) and 120, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver ions in fresh and waste water samples. PMID:26520476

  14. Evaluation of expanded uncertainties in luminous intensity and illuminance calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Sametoglu, Ferhat

    2008-11-01

    Detector-based calibrating methods and expressions for calculation of photometric uncertainties related to uncertainties in the calibrations of luminous intensity of a light source, illuminance responsivity of a photometer head, and calibration factors of an illuminance meter are discussed. These methods permit luminous intensity calibrations of incandescent light sources, luminous responsivity calibrations of photometer heads, and calibration factors of illuminance meters to be carried out with relative expanded uncertainties (with a level of confidence of 95.45%) of 0.4%, 0.4%, and 0.6%, respectively.

  15. Evaluation of expanded uncertainties in luminous intensity and illuminance calibrations.

    PubMed

    Sametoglu, Ferhat

    2008-11-01

    Detector-based calibrating methods and expressions for calculation of photometric uncertainties related to uncertainties in the calibrations of luminous intensity of a light source, illuminance responsivity of a photometer head, and calibration factors of an illuminance meter are discussed. These methods permit luminous intensity calibrations of incandescent light sources, luminous responsivity calibrations of photometer heads, and calibration factors of illuminance meters to be carried out with relative expanded uncertainties (with a level of confidence of 95.45%) of 0.4%, 0.4%, and 0.6%, respectively.

  16. Implicit Spacecraft Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an implicit algorithm for spacecraft onboard instrument calibration, particularly to onboard gyro calibration. This work is an extension of previous work that was done where an explicit gyro calibration algorithm was applied to the AQUA spacecraft gyros. The algorithm presented in this paper was tested using simulated data and real data that were downloaded from the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) spacecraft. The calibration tests gave very good results. A comparison between the use of the implicit calibration algorithm used here with the explicit algorithm used for AQUA spacecraft indicates that both provide an excellent estimation of the gyro calibration parameters with similar accuracies.

  17. Automated Camera Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Siqi; Cheng, Yang; Willson, Reg

    2006-01-01

    Automated Camera Calibration (ACAL) is a computer program that automates the generation of calibration data for camera models used in machine vision systems. Machine vision camera models describe the mapping between points in three-dimensional (3D) space in front of the camera and the corresponding points in two-dimensional (2D) space in the camera s image. Calibrating a camera model requires a set of calibration data containing known 3D-to-2D point correspondences for the given camera system. Generating calibration data typically involves taking images of a calibration target where the 3D locations of the target s fiducial marks are known, and then measuring the 2D locations of the fiducial marks in the images. ACAL automates the analysis of calibration target images and greatly speeds the overall calibration process.

  18. The NRC autocollimator calibration facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eves, B. J.

    2013-10-01

    An autocollimator calibration facility has been developed based upon both a precision rotary table and a sine-bar. The traceability of the system is through sub-division of the circle and hence to the SI unit of angle, and does not require traceability to the definition of the metre. The rotary encoder that measures the angle of the rotary table is calibrated through circle closure techniques to a combined standard uncertainty of 0.013 arcsec at 5° intervals. The rotation of the sine-bar is measured by two interferometers, and together with the rotary encoder, enables calibration of the scale factor of an autocollimator to a combined standard uncertainty of 1.8 × 10-5.

  19. Analytical multicollimator camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration with the U.S. Geological survey multicollimator determines the calibrated focal length, the point of symmetry, the radial distortion referred to the point of symmetry, and the asymmetric characteristiecs of the camera lens. For this project, two cameras were calibrated, a Zeiss RMK A 15/23 and a Wild RC 8. Four test exposures were made with each camera. Results are tabulated for each exposure and averaged for each set. Copies of the standard USGS calibration reports are included. ?? 1978.

  20. Are major reductions in new HIV infections possible with people who inject drugs? The case for low dead-space syringes in highly affected countries.

    PubMed

    Zule, William A; Cross, Harry E; Stover, John; Pretorius, Carel

    2013-01-01

    Circumstantial evidence from laboratory studies, mathematical models, ecological studies and bio behavioural surveys, suggests that injection-related HIV epidemics may be averted or reversed if people who inject drugs (PWID) switch from using high dead-space to using low dead-space syringes. In laboratory experiments that simulated the injection process and rinsing with water, low dead space syringes retained 1000 times less blood than high dead space syringes. In mathematical models, switching PWID from high dead space to low dead space syringes prevents or reverses injection-related HIV epidemics. No one knows if such an intervention is feasible or what effect it would have on HIV transmission among PWID. Feasibility studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) will be needed to answer these questions definitively, but these studies will be very expensive and take years to complete. Rather than waiting for them to be completed, we argue for an approach similar to that used with needle and syringe programs (NSP), which were promoted and implemented before being tested more rigorously. Before implementation, rapid assessments that involve PWID will need to be conducted to ensure buy-in from PWID and other local stakeholders. This commentary summarizes the existing evidence regarding the protective effects of low dead space syringes and estimates potential impacts on HIV transmission; it describes potential barriers to transitioning PWID from high dead space to low dead space needles and syringes; and it presents strategies for overcoming these barriers.

  1. A novel approach to Lab-In-Syringe Head-Space Single-Drop Microextraction and on-drop sensing of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Šrámková, Ivana; Horstkotte, Burkhard; Sklenářová, Hana; Solich, Petr; Kolev, Spas D

    2016-08-31

    A novel approach to the automation technique Lab-In-Syringe, also known as In-Syringe Analysis, is proposed which utilizes a secondary inlet into the syringe void, used as a size-adaptable reaction chamber, via a channel passing through the syringe piston. This innovative approach allows straightforward automation of head-space single-drop microextraction, involving accurately controlled drop formation and handling, and the possibility of on-drop analyte quantification. The syringe was used in upside-down orientation and in-syringe magnetic stirring was carried out, which allowed homogenous mixing of solutions, promotion of head-space analyte enrichment, and efficient syringe cleaning. The superior performance of the newly developed system was illustrated with the development of a sensitive method for total ammonia determination in surface waters. It is based on head-space extraction of ammonia into a single drop of bromothymol blue indicator created inside the syringe at the orifice of the syringe piston channel and on-drop sensing of the color change via fiber optics. The slope of the linear relationship between absorbance and time was used as the analytical signal. Drop formation and performance of on-drop monitoring was further studied with rhodamine B solution to give a better understanding of the system's performance. A repeatability of 6% RSD at 10 μmol L(-1) NH3, a linear range of up to 25 μmol L(-1) NH3, and a limit of detection of 1.8 μmol L(-1) NH3 were achieved. Study of interferences proved the high robustness of the method towards humic acids, high sample salinity, and the presence of detergents, thus demonstrating the method superiority compared to the state-of-the-art gas-diffusion methods. A mean analyte recovery of 101.8% was found in analyzing spiked environmental water samples.

  2. A novel approach to Lab-In-Syringe Head-Space Single-Drop Microextraction and on-drop sensing of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Šrámková, Ivana; Horstkotte, Burkhard; Sklenářová, Hana; Solich, Petr; Kolev, Spas D

    2016-08-31

    A novel approach to the automation technique Lab-In-Syringe, also known as In-Syringe Analysis, is proposed which utilizes a secondary inlet into the syringe void, used as a size-adaptable reaction chamber, via a channel passing through the syringe piston. This innovative approach allows straightforward automation of head-space single-drop microextraction, involving accurately controlled drop formation and handling, and the possibility of on-drop analyte quantification. The syringe was used in upside-down orientation and in-syringe magnetic stirring was carried out, which allowed homogenous mixing of solutions, promotion of head-space analyte enrichment, and efficient syringe cleaning. The superior performance of the newly developed system was illustrated with the development of a sensitive method for total ammonia determination in surface waters. It is based on head-space extraction of ammonia into a single drop of bromothymol blue indicator created inside the syringe at the orifice of the syringe piston channel and on-drop sensing of the color change via fiber optics. The slope of the linear relationship between absorbance and time was used as the analytical signal. Drop formation and performance of on-drop monitoring was further studied with rhodamine B solution to give a better understanding of the system's performance. A repeatability of 6% RSD at 10 μmol L(-1) NH3, a linear range of up to 25 μmol L(-1) NH3, and a limit of detection of 1.8 μmol L(-1) NH3 were achieved. Study of interferences proved the high robustness of the method towards humic acids, high sample salinity, and the presence of detergents, thus demonstrating the method superiority compared to the state-of-the-art gas-diffusion methods. A mean analyte recovery of 101.8% was found in analyzing spiked environmental water samples. PMID:27506353

  3. “Associations of Serum Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF-I) and IGFBP-3 Levels Biomarker-Calibrated Protein, Dairy, and Milk Intake in the Women's Health Initiative”1

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Jeannette M.; Gunter, Marc J.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Prentice, Ross L.; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Tinker, Lesley F.; Vitolins, Mara Z.; Strickler, Howard D.

    2014-01-01

    It is well-established that protein-energy malnutrition decreases serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) levels, and supplementation of 30 grams of whey protein daily increased serum IGF-1 levels by 8% after 2 years in a clinical trial(1). Cohort studies provide the opportunity to assess associations between dietary protein intake and the IGF-axis under more typical eating conditions. We studied the associations of circulating IGF-axis protein levels (ELISA, Diagnostic Systems Laboratories) with total biomarker-calibrated protein intake, as well as dairy and milk intake, among postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative (n=747). Analyses were conducted using multivariate linear regression models that adjusted for age, BMI, race/ethnicity, education, biomarker-calibrated energy, alcohol, smoking, physical activity, and hormone therapy use. There was a positive association between milk intake and free-IGF-1. A 3 serving increase in milk intake per day (~30 grams of protein) was associated with an estimated average 18.6% higher increase in free IGF-1 (95% CI 0.9% to 39.3%). Total IGF-I and IGFBP-3, however, were not associated with milk consumption, nor were there associations between biomarker-calibrated protein intake, biomarker-calibrated energy, and free IGF-I, total IGF-I, or IGFBP-3. This study of postmenopausal women is consistent with clinical trial data suggesting a specific relationship between milk consumption and serum IGF-I levels; albeit, in our dataset, this association was only statistically significant for free, but not total, IGF-I nor IGFBP-3. PMID:24094144

  4. Simple Syringe Filtration Methods for Reliably Examining Dissolved and Colloidal Trace Element Distributions in Remote Field Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiller, A. M.

    2002-12-01

    Methods for obtaining reliable dissolved trace element samples frequently utilize clean labs, portable laminar flow benches, or other equipment not readily transportable to remote locations. In some cases unfiltered samples can be obtained in a remote location and transported back to a lab for filtration. However, this may not always be possible or desirable. Additionally, methods for obtaining information on colloidal composition are likewise frequently too cumbersome for remote locations as well as being time-consuming. For that reason I have examined clean methods for collecting samples filtered through 0.45 and 0.02 micron syringe filters. With this methodology, only small samples are collected (typically 15 mL). However, with the introduction of the latest generation of ICP-MS's and microflow nebulizers, sample requirements for elemental analysis are much lower than just a few years ago. Thus, a determination of a suite of first row transition elements is frequently readily obtainable with samples of less than 1 mL. To examine the "traditional" (<0.45 micron) dissolved phase, 25 mm diameter polypropylene syringe filters and all polyethylene/polypropylene syringes are utilized. Filters are pre-cleaned in the lab using 40 mL of approx. 1 M HCl followed by a clean water rinse. Syringes are pre-cleaned by leaching with hot 1 M HCl followed by a clean water rinse. Sample kits are packed in polyethylene bags for transport to the field. Results are similar to results obtained using 0.4 micron polycarbonate screen filters, though concentrations may differ somewhat depending on the extent of sample pre-rinsing of the filter. Using this method, a multi-year time series of dissolved metals in a remote Rocky Mountain stream has been obtained. To examine the effect of colloidal material on dissolved metal concentrations, 0.02 micron alumina syringe filters have been utilized. Other workers have previously used these filters for examining colloidal Fe distributions in lake

  5. Variations in the gliding characteristics of 10-ml plastic syringes used to locate the extradural space by "loss of resistance" techniques.

    PubMed

    Bricker, S R; Coleman, P

    1988-12-01

    The gliding characteristics were evaluated of 10-ml plastic syringes used to identify the extradural space by "loss of resistance" techniques. This was undertaken quantitatively, by measuring the force necessary to depress syringe plungers, and qualitatively, by examining travel characteristics in terms of the force applied, together with the rate and uniformity of plunger travel. An important cause of inadvertent dural puncture is the use of syringes with plungers that do not move freely; this study has identified wide variations between makes which may be of particular relevance to anaesthetists inexperienced in techniques of extradural analgesia.

  6. Standalone Calibration Toolset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, M.

    2013-12-01

    Radioxenon measurements require a well calibrated nuclear detector, which typically requires several weeks to perform a complex analysis of the resulting data to determine the detection efficiencies. To reduce the need to have an expert in nuclear physics, PNNL has developed a Standalone Calibration Toolset (SCT), which will aid an analyst in B-y nuclear detector calibration. SCT takes data generated from measurement of isotopically pure calibration samples: Xe-135, Xe-133, Xe-133m and Xe-131m, and generates nuclear detector configuration files. This will result in a simplified calibration and will make verification and corrections to b-g detectors routine.

  7. Reduction of Systematic Errors in Diagnostic Receivers Through the Use of Balanced Dicke-Switching and Y-Factor Noise Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    John Musson, Trent Allison, Roger Flood, Jianxun Yan

    2009-05-01

    Receivers designed for diagnostic applications range from those having moderate sensitivity to those possessing large dynamic range. Digital receivers have a dynamic range which are a function of the number of bits represented by the ADC and subsequent processing. If some of this range is sacrificed for extreme sensitivity, noise power can then be used to perform two-point load calibrations. Since load temperatures can be precisely determined, the receiver can be quickly and accurately characterized; minute changes in system gain can then be detected, and systematic errors corrected. In addition, using receiver pairs in a balanced approach to measuring X+, X-, Y+, Y-, reduces systematic offset errors from non-identical system gains, and changes in system performance. This paper describes and demonstrates a balanced BPM-style diagnostic receiver, employing Dicke-switching to establish and maintain real-time system calibration. Benefits of such a receiver include wide bandwidth, solid absolute accuracy, improved position accuracy, and phase-sensitive measurements. System description, static and dynamic modelling, and measurement data are presented.

  8. Residual gas analyzer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienkamp, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A technique which employs known gas mixtures to calibrate the residual gas analyzer (RGA) is described. The mass spectra from the RGA are recorded for each gas mixture. This mass spectra data and the mixture composition data each form a matrix. From the two matrices the calibration matrix may be computed. The matrix mathematics requires the number of calibration gas mixtures be equal to or greater than the number of gases included in the calibration. This technique was evaluated using a mathematical model of an RGA to generate the mass spectra. This model included shot noise errors in the mass spectra. Errors in the gas concentrations were also included in the valuation. The effects of these errors was studied by varying their magnitudes and comparing the resulting calibrations. Several methods of evaluating an actual calibration are presented. The effects of the number of gases in then, the composition of the calibration mixture, and the number of mixtures used are discussed.

  9. Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment: Calibration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.; Ritter, James R.; Larman, Kevin T.

    1995-01-01

    The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), which has flown on STS-40, STS-50, and STS-58, contains a three-axis accelerometer with a single, nonpendulous, electrostatically suspended proofmass, which can resolve accelerations to the 10(sub -9) g level. The experiment also contains a full calibration station to permit in situ bias and scale-factor calibration. This on-orbit calibration capability eliminates the large uncertainty of ground-based calibrations encountered with accelerometers flown in the past on the Orbiter, and thus provides absolute acceleration measurement accuracy heretofore unachievable. This is the first time accelerometer scale-factor measurements have been performed on orbit. A detailed analysis of the calibration process is given, along with results of the calibration factors from the on-orbit OARE flight measurements on STS-58. In addition, the analysis of OARE flight-maneuver data used to validate the scale-factor measurements in the sensor's most sensitive range are also presented. Estimates on calibration uncertainties are discussed. These uncertainty estimates provides bounds on the STS-58 absolute acceleration measurements for future applications.

  10. Flight calibration assessment of HiRAP accelerometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moast, Christina D.

    1993-01-01

    A flight derived method of calibrating the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP) flight data has been developed and is discussed for Shuttle Orbiter missions STS-35 and STS-40. These two mission data sets have been analyzed using ground calibration factors and flight derived calibration factors. This flight technique evolved early in the flight program when it was recognized that ground calibration factors are insufficient to determine absolute low-acceleration levels. The application of flight calibration factors to the data sets from these missions produced calibrated acceleration levels within an accuracy of less than +/- 1.5 microgravity of zero during a time in the flight when the acceleration level was known to be less than 1.0 microgravity. This analysis further confirms the theory that flight calibrations are required in order to obtain the absolute measurement of low-frequency, low-acceleration flight signals.

  11. Factors relating to eating style, social desirability, body image and eating meals at home increase the precision of calibration equations correcting self-report measures of diet using recovery biomarkers: findings from the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The extent to which psychosocial and diet behavior factors affect dietary self-report remains unclear. We examine the contribution of these factors to measurement error of self-report. Methods In 450 postmenopausal women in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study doubly labeled water and urinary nitrogen were used as biomarkers of objective measures of total energy expenditure and protein. Self-report was captured from food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), four day food record (4DFR) and 24 hr. dietary recall (24HR). Using regression calibration we estimated bias of self-reported dietary instruments including psychosocial factors from the Stunkard-Sorenson Body Silhouettes for body image perception, the Crowne-Marlowe Social Desirability Scale, and the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (R-18) for cognitive restraint for eating, uncontrolled eating, and emotional eating. We included a diet behavior factor on number of meals eaten at home using the 4DFR. Results Three categories were defined for each of the six psychosocial and diet behavior variables (low, medium, high). Participants with high social desirability scores were more likely to under-report on the FFQ for energy (β = -0.174, SE = 0.054, p < 0.05) and protein intake (β = -0.142, SE = 0.062, p < 0.05) compared to participants with low social desirability scores. Participants consuming a high percentage of meals at home were less likely to under-report on the FFQ for energy (β = 0.181, SE = 0.053, p < 0.05) and protein (β = 0.127, SE = 0.06, p < 0.05) compared to participants consuming a low percentage of meals at home. In the calibration equations combining FFQ, 4DFR, 24HR with age, body mass index, race, and the psychosocial and diet behavior variables, the six psychosocial and diet variables explained 1.98%, 2.24%, and 2.15% of biomarker variation for energy, protein, and protein density respectively. The variations explained are

  12. A novel and innovative technique of using a disposable syringe and mesh for harvesting fat for structural fat grafting

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, B. C.; Nagaraj, Pradeep Kumar; Ananteshwar, Y. N.; Srikanth, V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Successful restoration of structure and function using autologous free fat grafts has remained elusive. Review of literature shows that various harvesting and preparation techniques have been suggested. The goal of these techniques is to obtain greater adipocyte cell survival and consequently more reliable clinical results. Materials and Methods: In our technique, a piece of mesh is kept at one end of the lipoaspiration syringe, which is then connected to the Suction pump. As one syringe fills, it is replaced by another one until the required amount of fat is obtained. Results: By using a polypropylene mesh in our technique, we can separate the transfusate from the harvested fat graft during harvesting itself. The fat graft thus obtained is dense and concentrated, with fewer impurities. Conclusion: Hence, we recommend our technique as a reliable method for extracting sterile emulsified fat in an economical way. PMID:25991892

  13. Hyaluronic acid filler and botulinum Neurotoxin delivered simultaneously in the same syringe for effective and convenient combination aesthetic rejuvenation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Julie R

    2010-09-01

    Facial aesthetics and rejuvenation techniques have been evolving, with the most commonly applied techniques being the use of hyaluronic acid fillers and botulinum neurotoxins. Because of complementary actions, it is common for both products to be used in the same anatomical sites to optimize outcomes, either administered consecutively at one visit or at two separate visits. The author shows for the first time that hyaluronic acid (HA) and botulinum neurotoxin (BNT) can be delivered in combination in the same syringe--at the same time--to rejuvenate the upper face. Not only does concomitant administration result in excellent clinical outcome, without apparently compromising the attributes of either product alone, but this technique enhances the patient experience by allowing the use of small-gauge needles and inherently decreasing, by half or more, the number of needle sticks incurred. Larger studies are underway to study optimal techniques for administering HA and BNT combined in a single syringe.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of syringic acid against Cronobacter sakazakii and its effect on cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Sun, Yi; Zheng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Xiaorong; Song, Kaikuo; Jia, Zhenyu; Chen, Yifei; Yang, Miaochun; Liu, Xin; Dong, Rui; Xia, Xiaodong

    2016-04-15

    Syringic acid (SA) has been reported to exhibit antibacterial ability against various microorganisms, but little work has been done on its effect on Cronobacter sakazakii. In this study, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of SA against various C. sakazakii strains were determined. Moreover, changes in intracellular ATP concentration, intracellular pH (pHin), membrane potential and membrane integrity were measured to evaluate the influence of SA on cell membrane. Finally, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) was used to assess the morphological changes of bacterial cells caused by SA. It was shown that the MICs of SA against all tested C. sakazakii strains were 5mg/mL. SA retarded bacterial growth, and caused cell membrane dysfunction, which was evidenced by intracellular ATP concentration decrease, pHin reduction, cell membrane hyperpolarization and changes in cellular morphology. These findings indicated that SA has potential to be developed as a natural preservative to control C. sakazakii in foods associated with this pathogen and prevent related infections.

  15. Functional Evaluation and Characterization of a Newly Developed Silicone Oil-Free Prefillable Syringe System

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Keisuke; Nakamura, Koji; Yamashita, Arisa; Abe, Yoshihiko; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro; Kanazawa, Yukie; Funatsu, Kaori; Yoshimoto, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    The functionality of a newly developed silicone oil-free (SOF) syringe system, of which the plunger stopper is coated by a novel coating technology (i-coating™), was assessed. By scanning electron microscopy observations and other analysis, it was confirmed that the plunger stopper surface was uniformly covered with the designed chemical composition. A microflow imaging analysis showed that the SOF system drastically reduced both silicone oil (SO) doplets and oil-induced aggregations in a model protein formulation, whereas a large number of subvisible particles and protein aggregations were formed when a SO system was used. Satisfactory container closure integrity (CCI) was confirmed by means of dye and microorganism penetration studies. Furthermore, no significant difference between the break loose and gliding forces was observed in the former, and stability studies revealed that the SOF system could perfectly show the aging independence in break loose force observed in the SO system. The results suggest that the introduced novel SOF system has a great potential and represents an alternative that can achieve very low subvisible particles, secure CCI, and the absence of a break loose force. In particular, no risk of SO-induced aggregation can bring additional value in the highly sensitive biotech drug market. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:1520–1528, 2014 PMID:24643749

  16. A portable multi-syringe flow system for spectrofluorimetric determination of iodide in seawater.

    PubMed

    Frizzarin, Rejane M; Aguado, Enrique; Portugal, Lindomar A; Moreno, Daniel; Estela, José M; Rocha, Fábio R P; Cerdà, Victor

    2015-11-01

    A miniaturized analyzer encompassing a poly(methyl methacrylate) chip with integrated spectrofluorimetric detection and solutions propelling by a multi-syringe module is proposed. Iodide was determined through its catalytic effect on the reaction between Ce(IV) and As(III). Matrix isopotential synchronous fluorescence was explored to set the excitation and emission wavelengths. A two-level full factorial design allowed to evaluate the significance of variables (Ce(IV), As(III) and H2SO4 concentrations) and their interaction effects in the experimental domain. A Doehlert Matrix was applied to identify the critical values. The optimized procedure showed a linear response from 1 to 100 μg L(-1) (S=53.7+2.61C, in which S is the net fluorescence and C is iodide concentration in μg L(-1)). Detection limit, coefficient of variation (n=6) and sampling rate were estimated at 0.3 μg L(-1), 0.8% and 20 h(-1), respectively. Recoveries within 90-117% were estimated for iodide spiked to seawater samples. The proposed procedure stands out because of the portability, robustness, and simplicity for in-field analysis of iodide in seawater. PMID:26452941

  17. Systematic evaluation of dissolved lead sorption losses to particulate syringe filter materials.

    PubMed

    Minning, Thomas; Lytle, Darren A; Pham, Maily; Kelty, Keith

    2015-06-01

    Distinguishing between soluble and particulate lead in drinking water is useful in understanding the mechanism of lead release and identifying remedial action. Typically, particulate lead is defined as the amount of lead removed by a 0.45-μm filter. Unfortunately, there is little guidance regarding selection of filter membrane material and little consideration to the possibility of the sorption of dissolved lead to the filter. The objective of this work was to examine the tendency of 0.45-μm syringe filter materials to adsorb lead. Tests were performed with water containing 40 and 24 μg/L soluble lead at pH 7 buffered with 50 mg C/L dissolved inorganic concentration (DIC). The amounts of lead sorbed greatly varied by filter, and only two filter types, polypropylene and mixed cellulose esters, performed well and are recommended. Great care must be taken in choosing a filter when filtering soluble lead and interpreting filter results. PMID:26017807

  18. Scotch-Yoke mechanism for a syringe pump - A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramoth Kumar, M.; Akash, K.; Venkatesan, M.

    2016-09-01

    Syringe Pump is mainly used in microfluidics, where precise flow rate is required. Precise flow rate is achieved by using minimum torque and at low speed, for such requirements a mechanism has to be constructed. The input is from a stepper motor, so a rotary to linear motion converting mechanism is required, which will work efficiently on such low torque applications. This work mainly looks into feasibility of scotch yoke rather than conventionally used crank and slider mechanism. Scotch yoke is a rotary to linear conversion mechanism. It contains mainly two parts i) a rolling scotch and ii) a sliding yoke. The yoke is driven by a pin eccentrically placed on the scotch. Since proximity of the mechanism is nearer to the source, the loss accounted is less in the case of scotch yoke. In this work both crank-slider and scotch-yoke are examined through simulation using MSC ADAMS software and the maximum velocity of that can be achieved is obtained analytically through Kinematic analysis of scotch-yoke mechanism.

  19. Functional evaluation and characterization of a newly developed silicone oil-free prefillable syringe system.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Keisuke; Nakamura, Koji; Yamashita, Arisa; Abe, Yoshihiko; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro; Kanazawa, Yukie; Funatsu, Kaori; Yoshimoto, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Shigeru

    2014-05-01

    The functionality of a newly developed silicone oil-free (SOF) syringe system, of which the plunger stopper is coated by a novel coating technology (i-coating™), was assessed. By scanning electron microscopy observations and other analysis, it was confirmed that the plunger stopper surface was uniformly covered with the designed chemical composition. A microflow imaging analysis showed that the SOF system drastically reduced both silicone oil (SO) doplets and oil-induced aggregations in a model protein formulation, whereas a large number of subvisible particles and protein aggregations were formed when a SO system was used. Satisfactory container closure integrity (CCI) was confirmed by means of dye and microorganism penetration studies. Furthermore, no significant difference between the break loose and gliding forces was observed in the former, and stability studies revealed that the SOF system could perfectly show the aging independence in break loose force observed in the SO system. The results suggest that the introduced novel SOF system has a great potential and represents an alternative that can achieve very low subvisible particles, secure CCI, and the absence of a break loose force. In particular, no risk of SO-induced aggregation can bring additional value in the highly sensitive biotech drug market. PMID:24643749

  20. Assessing Syringe Exchange Program Access among Persons Who Inject Drugs (PWID) in the District of Columbia.

    PubMed

    Allen, Sean T; Ruiz, Monica S; Jones, Jeff

    2016-02-01

    Prior research has explored spatial access to syringe exchange programs (SEPs) among persons who inject drugs (PWID), but these studies have been based on limited data from short periods of time. No research has explored changes in spatial access to SEPs among PWID longitudinally. The purpose of this research is to examine spatial access to SEPs among PWID who accessed services at a SEP in Washington, District of Columbia (DC), from 1996 to 2010. The geometric point distance estimation technique was used to calculate the mean walking distance PWID traveled from the centroid point of their zip code of home residence to the mobile exchange site where they accessed SEP services. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to examine differences in walking distance measures by year. The results of this research suggest that the distance DC PWID traveled to access SEP services remained relatively constant (approximately 2.75 mi) from 2003 to 2008, but increased to just over 4 mi in 2010. This research provides support for expanding SEP operations such that PWID have increased access to their services. Increasing SEP accessibility may help resolve unmet needs among injectors. PMID:26786782

  1. Syringe filtration methods for examining dissolved and colloidal trace element distributions in remote field locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiller, Alan M.

    2003-01-01

    It is well-established that sampling and sample processing can easily introduce contamination into dissolved trace element samples if precautions are not taken. However, work in remote locations sometimes precludes bringing bulky clean lab equipment into the field and likewise may make timely transport of samples to the lab for processing impossible. Straightforward syringe filtration methods are described here for collecting small quantities (15 mL) of 0.45- and 0.02-microm filtered river water in an uncontaminated manner. These filtration methods take advantage of recent advances in analytical capabilities that require only small amounts of waterfor analysis of a suite of dissolved trace elements. Filter clogging and solute rejection artifacts appear to be minimal, although some adsorption of metals and organics does affect the first approximately 10 mL of water passing through the filters. Overall the methods are clean, easy to use, and provide reproducible representations of the dissolved and colloidal fractions of trace elements in river waters. Furthermore, sample processing materials can be prepared well in advance in a clean lab and transported cleanly and compactly to the field. Application of these methods is illustrated with data from remote locations in the Rocky Mountains and along the Yukon River. Evidence from field flow fractionation suggests that the 0.02-microm filters may provide a practical cutoff to distinguish metals associated with small inorganic and organic complexes from those associated with silicate and oxide colloids.

  2. Direct Evidence of Egestion and Salivation of Xylella fastidiosa Suggests Sharpshooters Can Be "Flying Syringes".

    PubMed

    Backus, Elaine A; Shugart, Holly J; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Morgan, J Kent; Shatters, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is unique among insect-transmitted plant pathogens because it is propagative but noncirculative, adhering to and multiplying on the cuticular lining of the anterior foregut. Any inoculation mechanism for X. fastidiosa must explain how bacterial cells exit the vector's stylets via the food canal and directly enter the plant. A combined egestion-salivation mechanism has been proposed to explain these unique features. Egestion is the putative outward flow of fluid from the foregut via hypothesized bidirectional pumping of the cibarium. The present study traced green fluorescent protein-expressing X. fastidiosa or fluorescent nanoparticles acquired from artificial diets by glassy-winged sharpshooters, Homalodisca vitripennis, as they were egested into simultaneously secreted saliva. X. fastidiosa or nanoparticles were shown to mix with gelling saliva to form fluorescent deposits and salivary sheaths on artificial diets, providing the first direct, conclusive evidence of egestion by any hemipteran insect. Therefore, the present results strongly support an egestion-salivation mechanism of X. fastidiosa inoculation. Results also support that a column of fluid is transiently held in the foregut without being swallowed. Evidence also supports (but does not definitively prove) that bacteria were suspended in the column of fluid during the vector's transit from diet to diet, and were egested with the held fluid. Thus, we hypothesize that sharpshooters could be true "flying syringes," especially when inoculation occurs very soon after uptake of bacteria, suggesting the new paradigm of a nonpersistent X. fastidiosa transmission mechanism. PMID:26020829

  3. A laser syringe aimed at delivering drug into the outer layer of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoh, Jack J.; Jang, Hun-jae; Park, Mi-ae; Han, Tae-hee; Hah, Jung-moo

    2012-07-01

    A desire to eliminate hypodermic needle in transdermal drug delivery may now be realized. Imaging of the skin after injection of fluorescent probe and biotin via the bio-ballistic technique revealed the epidermal and dermal layers which were stained well below 60 μm underneath the abdominal skin of the guinea-pig. An extensive network of cells are shown in the deeper layer of the stained dermis as the distributed fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) dose is administered by repeated injection via the laser-based microjet. Here, we show our method of laser-based microjet drug delivery is capable of breaching guinea-pig's skin tissue and then delivering controlled dose of drug to the targeted region between 10 to 400 μm underneath the outermost layer of the skin. While minimizing pain and tissue damage by reducing the injection volume to ˜100 nl per pulse and the microjet diameter of half the conventional syringe needle in 100 μm, the optimally controlled delivery of liquid drug by the irradiated laser pulse is shown possible.

  4. Investigation by improved syringe method of effect of tampons on production in vitro of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, A C; Downs, S A

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-seven types of commercial tampons from five manufacturers were tested in a sealed-syringe method to determine their effect on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and the production of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1. In this improvement of the syringe method, the available air is limited to that which is contained within the sealed syringe containing the tampon. The culture medium was buffered, and blood and CO2 were included in the incubation to better simulate the vaginal environment during menstruation. Variables of tampon weight, composition, air volume, and absorbency were examined for their effect on the production of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1. Generally, with the exception of brand E, toxin production in the presence of tampons was equal to or lower than that in a sealed control syringe containing air but no tampon. PMID:2808672

  5. Place of Residence Moderates the Relationship Between Emotional Closeness and Syringe Sharing Among Injection Drug Using Clients of Sex Workers in the US-Mexico Border Region.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Karla D; Pitpitan, Eileen V; Valente, Thomas W; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Rusch, Melanie; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Chavarin, Claudia V; Patterson, Thomas L

    2015-06-01

    Injection drug-using men from the US and Mexico who purchase sex in Tijuana, Mexico are at risk for transmitting HIV to their contacts in both countries via syringe sharing. We used social network methods to understand whether place of residence (US vs. Mexico) moderated the effect of emotional closeness on syringe sharing. We interviewed 199 drug-using men who reported paying/trading for sex in Tijuana, Mexico using an epidemiological and social network survey and collected samples for HIV/STI testing. Seventy-two men reported using injection drugs with 272 network contacts. Emotional closeness was strongly associated with syringe sharing in relationship where the partner lives in the US, while the relationship between emotional closeness and syringe sharing was considerably less strong in dyads where the partner lives in Mexico. Efforts to reduce HIV risk behaviors in emotionally close relationships are needed, and could benefit from tailoring to the environmental context of the relationship.

  6. Place of Residence Moderates the Relationship Between Emotional Closeness and Syringe Sharing Among Injection Drug Using Clients of Sex Workers in the US-Mexico Border Region

    PubMed Central

    Pitpitan, Eileen V.; Valente, Thomas W.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Rusch, Melanie; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Chavarin, Claudia V.; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Injection drug-using men from the US and Mexico who purchase sex in Tijuana, Mexico are at risk for transmitting HIV to their contacts in both countries via syringe sharing. We used social network methods to understand whether place of residence (US vs. Mexico) moderated the effect of emotional closeness on syringe sharing. We interviewed 199 drug-using men who reported paying/trading for sex in Tijuana, Mexico using an epidemiological and social network survey and collected samples for HIV/STI testing. Seventy-two men reported using injection drugs with 272 network contacts. Emotional closeness was strongly associated with syringe sharing in relationship where the partner lives in the US, while the relationship between emotional closeness and syringe sharing was considerably less strong in dyads where the partner lives in Mexico. Efforts to reduce HIV risk behaviors in emotionally close relationships are needed, and could benefit from tailoring to the environmental context of the relationship. PMID:25613593

  7. AutoSyP: A Low-Cost, Low-Power Syringe Pump for Use in Low-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Juarez, Alexa; Maynard, Kelley; Skerrett, Erica; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Dube, Queen; Oden, Z. Maria

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the design and evaluation of AutoSyP, a low-cost, low-power syringe pump intended to deliver intravenous (IV) infusions in low-resource hospitals. A constant-force spring within the device provides mechanical energy to depress the syringe plunger. As a result, the device can run on rechargeable battery power for 66 hours, a critical feature for low-resource settings where the power grid may be unreliable. The device is designed to be used with 5- to 60-mL syringes and can deliver fluids at flow rates ranging from 3 to 60 mL/hour. The cost of goods to build one AutoSyP device is approximately $500. AutoSyP was tested in a laboratory setting and in a pilot clinical study. Laboratory accuracy was within 4% of the programmed flow rate. The device was used to deliver fluid to 10 healthy adult volunteers and 30 infants requiring IV fluid therapy at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi. The device delivered fluid with an average mean flow rate error of −2.3% ± 1.9% for flow rates ranging from 3 to 60 mL/hour. AutoSyP has the potential to improve the accuracy and safety of IV fluid delivery in low-resource settings. PMID:27382075

  8. A new syringe pump apparatus for the retrieval and temporal analysis of helium in groundwaters and geothermal fluids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barry, P.H.; Hilton, David R.; Tryon, M.D.; Brown, K.M.; Kulongoski, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    [1] We present details of a newly designed syringe pump apparatus for the retrieval and temporal analysis of helium (SPARTAH). The device is composed of a commercially available syringe pump connected to coils of Cu tubing, which interface the syringe and the groundwater or geothermal wellhead. Through test deployments at geothermal wells in Iceland and California, we show that well fluids are drawn smoothly, accurately, and continuously into the Cu tubing and can be time-stamped through user-determined operating parameters. In the laboratory, the tubing is sectioned to reveal helium (He) characteristics of the fluids at times and for durations of interest. The device is capable of prolonged deployments, up to 6 months or more, with minimal maintenance. It can be used to produce detailed time series records of He, or any other geochemical parameter, in groundwaters and geothermal fluids. SPARTAH has application in monitoring projects assessing the relationship between external transient events (e.g., earthquakes) and geochemical signals in aqueous fluids. ?? 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Assessment of MODIS Reflected Solar Calibration Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Sun, Junqiang; Butler, James

    2011-01-01

    Determination of the calibration accuracy and traceability of a remote sensing instrument is a driving issue in the use of satellite data for calibration inter-comparisons and studying climate change. The Terra and Aqua MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments have successfully operated for more than 11 and 9 years, respectively. Twenty of the thirty six MODIS spectral bands are in the reflected solar region with center wavelengths ranging from 0.41 to 2.2 microns. MODIS reflective solar band (RSB) on-orbit calibration is reflectance based through the use of an on-board solar diffuser (SO). The calibration uncertainty requirements are +/-2.0% for the RSB reflectance factors at sensor specified typical scene reflectances or radiances. The SO bi-directional reflectance factor (BRF) was characterized pre-launch and its on-orbit changes are tracked by an on-board solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). This paper provides an assessment of MODIS RSB on-orbit calibration traceability and uncertainty for its Level 1B (L1B) reflectance factors. It examines in details each of the uncertainty contributors, including those from pre-launch measurements as well as on-orbit observations. Common challenging issues and differences due to individual sensors' specific characteristics and on-orbit performance are also discussed in this paper. Guidance and recommendations are presented, based on lessons from MODIS RSB calibration uncertainty assessment, for the development of future instrument calibration and validation plans.

  10. Randomized, community-based pharmacy intervention to expand services beyond sale of sterile syringes to injection drug users in pharmacies in New York City.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Natalie D; Amesty, Silvia; Rivera, Alexis V; Harripersaud, Katherine; Turner, Alezandria; Fuller, Crystal M

    2013-09-01

    Structural interventions may help reduce racial/ethnic disparities in HIV. In 2009 to 2011, we randomized pharmacies participating in a nonprescription syringe access program in minority communities to intervention (pharmacy enrolled and delivered HIV risk reduction information to injection drug users [IDUs]), primary control (pharmacy only enrolled IDUs), and secondary control (pharmacy did not engage IDUs). Intervention pharmacy staff reported more support for syringe sales than did control staff. An expanded pharmacy role in HIV risk reduction may be helpful.

  11. Wireless Inclinometer Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A special system was fabricated to properly calibrate the wireless inclinometer, a new device that will measure the Orbiter s hang angle. The wireless inclinometer has a unique design and method of attachment to the Orbiter that will improve the accuracy of the measurements, as well as the safety and ease of the operation. The system properly calibrates the four attached inclinometers, in both the horizontal and vertical axes, without needing to remove any of the component parts. The Wireless Inclinometer Calibration System combines (1) a calibration fixture that emulates the point of attachment to the Orbiter in both the horizontal and vertical axes and the measurement surfaces, (2) an application-specific software program that accepts calibration data such as dates, zero functions, or offsets and tables, and (3) a wireless interface module that enables the wireless inclinometer to communicate with a calibration PC.

  12. Radiometer Calibration and Characterization

    1994-12-31

    The Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) software is a data acquisition and data archival system for performing Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL). RCC provides a unique method of calibrating solar radiometers using techniques that reduce measurement uncertainty and better characterize a radiometer’s response profile. The RCC software automatically monitors and controls many of the components that contribute to uncertainty in an instrument’s responsivity.

  13. A semi-automatic microextraction in packed sorbent, using a digitally controlled syringe, combined with ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography as a new and ultra-fast approach for the determination of prenylflavonoids in beers.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, João L; Alves, Vera L; Rodrigues, Fátima P; Figueira, José A; Câmara, José S

    2013-08-23

    In this work a highly selective and sensitive analytical procedure based on semi-automatic microextraction by packed sorbents (MEPS) technique, using a new digitally controlled syringe (eVol(®)) combined with ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC), is proposed to determine the prenylated chalcone derived from the hop (Humulus lupulus L.), xanthohumol (XN), and its isomeric flavonone isoxanthohumol (IXN) in beers. Extraction and UHPLC parameters were accurately optimized to achieve the highest recoveries and to enhance the analytical characteristics of the method. Important parameters affecting MEPS performance, namely the type of sorbent material (C2, C8, C18, SIL, and M1), elution solvent system, number of extraction cycles (extract-discard), sample volume, elution volume, and sample pH, were evaluated. The optimal experimental conditions involves the loading of 500μL of sample through a C18 sorbent in a MEPS syringe placed in the semi-automatic eVol(®) syringe followed by elution using 250μL of acetonitrile (ACN) in a 10 extractions cycle (about 5min for the entire sample preparation step). The obtained extract is directly analyzed in the UHPLC system using a binary mobile phase composed of aqueous 0.1% formic acid (eluent A) and ACN (eluent B) in the gradient elution mode (10min total analysis). Under optimized conditions good results were obtained in terms of linearity within the established concentration range with correlation coefficients (R) values higher than 0.986, with a residual deviation for each calibration point below 12%. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) obtained were 0.4ngmL(-1) and 1.0ngmL(-1) for IXN, and 0.9ngmL(-1) and 3.0ngmL(-1) for XN, respectively. Precision was lower than 4.6% for IXN and 8.4% for XN. Typical recoveries ranged between 67.1% and 99.3% for IXN and between 74.2% and 99.9% for XN, with relative standard deviations %RSD no larger than 8%. The applicability of the proposed analytical

  14. Evaluation of a new syringe presentation of reduced-antigen content diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine in healthy adolescents - A single blind randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Pavia-Ruz, Noris; Abarca, Katia; Lepetic, Alejandro; Cervantes-Apolinar, Maria Yolanda; Hardt, Karin; Jayadeva, Girish; Kuriyakose, Sherine; Han, Htay Htay; de la O, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-antigen-content diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (dTpa) vaccine, Boostrix™, is indicated for booster vaccination of children, adolescents and adults. The original prefilled disposable dTpa syringe presentation was recently replaced by another prefilled-syringe presentation with latex-free tip-caps and plunger-stoppers. 671 healthy adolescents aged 10–15 years who had previously received 5 or 6 previous DT(P)/dT(pa) vaccine doses, were randomized (1:1) to receive dTpa booster, injected using the new (dTpa-new) or previous syringe (dTpa-previous) presentations. Immunogenicity was assessed before and 1-month post-booster vaccination; safety/reactogenicity were assessed during 31-days post-vaccination. Non-inferiority of dTpa-new versus dTpa-previous was demonstrated for all antigens (ULs 95% CIs for GMC ratios ranged between 1.03-1.13). 1-month post-booster, immune responses were in similar ranges for all antigens with both syringe presentations. dTpa delivered using either syringe presentation was well-tolerated. These clinical results complement the technical data and support the use of the new syringe presentation to deliver the dTpa vaccine. PMID:26075317

  15. Evaluation of a new syringe presentation of reduced-antigen content diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine in healthy adolescents--A single blind randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Pavia-Ruz, Noris; Abarca, Katia; Lepetic, Alejandro; Cervantes-Apolinar, Maria Yolanda; Hardt, Karin; Jayadeva, Girish; Kuriyakose, Sherine; Han, Htay Htay; de la O, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-antigen-content diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (dTpa) vaccine, Boostrix™, is indicated for booster vaccination of children, adolescents and adults. The original prefilled disposable dTpa syringe presentation was recently replaced by another prefilled-syringe presentation with latex-free tip-caps and plunger-stoppers. 671 healthy adolescents aged 10-15 years who had previously received 5 or 6 previous DT(P)/dT(pa) vaccine doses, were randomized (1:1) to receive dTpa booster, injected using the new (dTpa-new) or previous syringe (dTpa-previous) presentations. Immunogenicity was assessed before and 1-month post-booster vaccination; safety/reactogenicity were assessed during 31-days post-vaccination. Non-inferiority of dTpa-new versus dTpa-previous was demonstrated for all antigens (ULs 95% CIs for GMC ratios ranged between 1.03-1.13). 1-month post-booster, immune responses were in similar ranges for all antigens with both syringe presentations. dTpa delivered using either syringe presentation was well-tolerated. These clinical results complement the technical data and support the use of the new syringe presentation to deliver the dTpa vaccine. PMID:26075317

  16. Client-Level Coverage of Needle and Syringe Program and High-Risk Injection Behaviors: A Case Study of People Who Inject Drugs in Kermanshah, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Noroozi, Mehdi; Mirzazadeh, Ali; Noroozi, Alireza; Mehrabi, Yadoallah; Hajebi, Ahmad; Zamani, Saman; Sharifi, Hamid; Higgs, Peter; Soori, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background Needle-syringe programs (NSP) have been running in Iran since 2002. However, the coverage of such program among the NSP clients at the individual level was not studies yet. This study aimed to determine the client coverage of NSP and its correlation with high injection-related risk behaviors. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Kermanshah province, Iran, in 2014. 230 people who inject drugs (PWID) recruited from two drop-in centers (DICs) from April to September 2014, participated in a face-to-face interview to provide information related individual coverage of NSP, demographic characteristics, and injecting behaviors 30 days prior to the interview. Findings Overall, the average of syringe coverage was 158% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 65.7-205.5], while 56% (95% CI = 40-97) have individual converge less than 100%. Needle/syringe sharing was significantly higher among individual with low NSP coverage [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.3-6.2]. About 85% participants with coverage of less than 100% reported reuse of syringe within the last 30 days (AOR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.4-7.7). Conclusion PWID are different regarding their NSP individual-level converges. There are certain clusters of PWID, who do not receive sufficient number of syringes. Given that insufficient individual syringe coverage level is highly associated with injection risk behaviors, reasons for such low converge need to be assessed and addressed carefully. PMID:26885353

  17. The Science of Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a broad overview of the many issues involved in calibrating astronomical data, covering the full electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to gamma rays, and considering both ground-based and space-based missions. These issues include the science drivers for absolute and relative calibration, the physics behind calibration and the mechanisms used to transfer it from the laboratory to an astronomical source, the need for networks of calibrated astronomical standards, and some of the challenges faced by large surveys and missions.

  18. Miniaturized ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction in a coupled-syringe system combined with UV for extraction and determination of danazol in danazol capsule and mice serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Aiqin; Zhu, Xiashi

    2016-04-01

    In this study, for the first time, a coupled 1-mL microsyringe system was utilized to perform a miniaturized ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-DLLME) method. Danazol was extracted and determined via the developed method followed by micro-volume ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV). The extraction process was carried out by the injection of extraction solvent ionic liquid 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C8mimPF6] into sample solution (syringe A), and then rapid shoot the solution into syringe B. After that the shooting was repeated several times at a rate of 1 cycle/s. The extraction procedure was induced by the formation of cloudy solution, which was composed of fine drops of [C8mimPF6] dispersed entirely into sample solution with the help of shooting without any dispersive solvent, ultrasonication or high temperature. Several important parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were studied and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.055 μg/mL (capsule) or 0.054 μg/mL (serum) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.62-25 μg/mL. The proposed method was successfully applied to danazol capsule and the real mice serum samples and good spiked recoveries in the range of 90.5-103.4% were obtained. The obtained results of this work were in good agreement with the results of HPLC.

  19. Miniaturized ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction in a coupled-syringe system combined with UV for extraction and determination of danazol in danazol capsule and mice serum.

    PubMed

    Gong, Aiqin; Zhu, Xiashi

    2016-04-15

    In this study, for the first time, a coupled 1-mL microsyringe system was utilized to perform a miniaturized ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-DLLME) method. Danazol was extracted and determined via the developed method followed by micro-volume ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV). The extraction process was carried out by the injection of extraction solvent ionic liquid 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C8mimPF6] into sample solution (syringe A), and then rapid shoot the solution into syringe B. After that the shooting was repeated several times at a rate of 1 cycle/s. The extraction procedure was induced by the formation of cloudy solution, which was composed of fine drops of [C8mimPF6] dispersed entirely into sample solution with the help of shooting without any dispersive solvent, ultrasonication or high temperature. Several important parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were studied and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.055 μg/mL (capsule) or 0.054 μg/mL (serum) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.62-25 μg/mL. The proposed method was successfully applied to danazol capsule and the real mice serum samples and good spiked recoveries in the range of 90.5-103.4% were obtained. The obtained results of this work were in good agreement with the results of HPLC.

  20. Improving Viability of Stem Cells During Syringe Needle Flow Through the Design of Hydrogel Cell Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Mulyasasmita, Widya; Su, James; Lampe, Kyle J.

    2012-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising therapy for a myriad of debilitating diseases; however, current delivery protocols using direct injection result in poor cell viability. We demonstrate that during the actual cell injection process, mechanical membrane disruption results in significant acute loss of viability at clinically relevant injection rates. As a strategy to protect cells from these damaging forces, we hypothesize that cell encapsulation within hydrogels of specific mechanical properties will significantly improve viability. We use a controlled in vitro model of cell injection to demonstrate success of this acute protection strategy for a wide range of cell types including human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), human adipose stem cells, rat mesenchymal stem cells, and mouse neural progenitor cells. Specifically, alginate hydrogels with plateau storage moduli (G′) ranging from 0.33 to 58.1 Pa were studied. A compliant crosslinked alginate hydrogel (G′=29.6 Pa) yielded the highest HUVEC viability, 88.9%±5.0%, while Newtonian solutions (i.e., buffer only) resulted in 58.7%±8.1% viability. Either increasing or decreasing the hydrogel storage modulus reduced this protective effect. Further, cells within noncrosslinked alginate solutions had viabilities lower than media alone, demonstrating that the protective effects are specifically a result of mechanical gelation and not the biochemistry of alginate. Experimental and theoretical data suggest that extensional flow at the entrance of the syringe needle is the main cause of acute cell death. These results provide mechanistic insight into the role of mechanical forces during cell delivery and support the use of protective hydrogels in future clinical stem cell injection studies. PMID:22011213

  1. On-line lab-in-syringe cloud point extraction for the spectrophotometric determination of antimony.

    PubMed

    Frizzarin, Rejane M; Portugal, Lindomar A; Estela, José M; Rocha, Fábio R P; Cerdà, Victor

    2016-02-01

    Most of the procedures for antimony determination require time-consuming sample preparation (e.g. liquid-liquid extraction with organic solvents), which are harmful to the environment. Because of the high antimony toxicity, a rapid, sensitive and greener procedure for its determination becomes necessary. The goal of this work was to develop an analytical procedure exploiting for the first time the cloud point extraction on a lab-in-syringe flow system aiming at the spectrophotometric determination of antimony. The procedure was based on formation of an ion-pair between the antimony-iodide complex and H(+) followed by extraction with Triton X-114. The factorial design showed that the concentrations of ascorbic acid, H2SO4 and Triton X-114, as well as second and third order interactions were significant at the 95% confidence level. A Box-Behnken design was applied to obtain the response surfaces and to identify the critical values. System is robust at the 95% confidence level. A linear response was observed from 5 to 50 µg L(-1), described by the equation A=0.137+0.050C(Sb) (r=0.998). The detection limit (99.7% confidence level), the coefficient of variation (n=5; 15 µg L(-1)) and the sampling rate was estimated at 1.8 µg L(-1), 1.6% and 16 h(-1), respectively. The procedure allows quantification of antimony in the concentrations established by environmental legislation (6 µg L(-1)) and it was successfully applied to the determination of antimony in freshwater samples and antileishmanial drugs, yielding results in agreement with those obtained by HGFAAS at the 95% confidence level. PMID:26653503

  2. On-line lab-in-syringe cloud point extraction for the spectrophotometric determination of antimony.

    PubMed

    Frizzarin, Rejane M; Portugal, Lindomar A; Estela, José M; Rocha, Fábio R P; Cerdà, Victor

    2016-02-01

    Most of the procedures for antimony determination require time-consuming sample preparation (e.g. liquid-liquid extraction with organic solvents), which are harmful to the environment. Because of the high antimony toxicity, a rapid, sensitive and greener procedure for its determination becomes necessary. The goal of this work was to develop an analytical procedure exploiting for the first time the cloud point extraction on a lab-in-syringe flow system aiming at the spectrophotometric determination of antimony. The procedure was based on formation of an ion-pair between the antimony-iodide complex and H(+) followed by extraction with Triton X-114. The factorial design showed that the concentrations of ascorbic acid, H2SO4 and Triton X-114, as well as second and third order interactions were significant at the 95% confidence level. A Box-Behnken design was applied to obtain the response surfaces and to identify the critical values. System is robust at the 95% confidence level. A linear response was observed from 5 to 50 µg L(-1), described by the equation A=0.137+0.050C(Sb) (r=0.998). The detection limit (99.7% confidence level), the coefficient of variation (n=5; 15 µg L(-1)) and the sampling rate was estimated at 1.8 µg L(-1), 1.6% and 16 h(-1), respectively. The procedure allows quantification of antimony in the concentrations established by environmental legislation (6 µg L(-1)) and it was successfully applied to the determination of antimony in freshwater samples and antileishmanial drugs, yielding results in agreement with those obtained by HGFAAS at the 95% confidence level.

  3. Needle and syringe programs in Yunnan, China yield health and financial return

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As a harm reduction strategy in response to HIV epidemics needle and syringes programs (NSPs) were initiated throughout China in 2002. The effectiveness of NSPs in reducing the spread of infection in such an established epidemic is unknown. In this study we use data from Yunnan province, the province most affected by HIV in China, to (1) estimate the population benefits in terms of infections prevented due to the programs; (2) calculate the cost-effectiveness of NSPs. Methods We developed a mathematical transmission model, informed by detailed behavioral and program data, which accurately reflected the unique HIV epidemiology among Yunnan injecting drug users (IDUs) in the presence of NSPs. We then used the model to estimate the likely epidemiological and clinical outcomes without NSPs and conducted a health economics analysis to determine the cost-effectiveness of the program. Results It is estimated that NSPs in Yunnan have averted approximately 16-20% (5,200-7,500 infections) of the expected HIV cases since 2002 and led to gains of 1,300-1,900 DALYs. The total $1.04 million spending on NSPs from 2002 to 2008 has resulted in an estimated cost-saving over this period of $1.38-$1.97 million due to the prevention of HIV and the associated costs of care and management. Conclusion NSPs are not only cost-effective but cost-saving in Yunnan. Significant scale-up of NSPs interventions across China and removal of the societal and political barriers that compromise the effects of NSPs should be a health priority of the Chinese government. PMID:21507267

  4. Photogrammetric camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.; Ziemann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Section 2 (Calibration) of the document "Recommended Procedures for Calibrating Photogrammetric Cameras and Related Optical Tests" from the International Archives of Photogrammetry, Vol. XIII, Part 4, is reviewed in the light of recent practical work, and suggestions for changes are made. These suggestions are intended as a basis for a further discussion. ?? 1984.

  5. Calibration and validation areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, Y.

    1984-08-01

    Difficulties in calibrating the SEASAT altimeter using the Bermuda laser site are recalled, and the use of Dakar (Senegal) for altimeter calibration is discussed. The site is flat, has clear skies for 200 to 250 days per year, and a local tide model is available. Atmospheric parameters can be studied using existing facilities with two additional weather stations.

  6. OLI Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian; Morfitt, Ron; Kvaran, Geir; Biggar, Stuart; Leisso, Nathan; Czapla-Myers, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Goals: (1) Present an overview of the pre-launch radiance, reflectance & uniformity calibration of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) (1a) Transfer to orbit/heliostat (1b) Linearity (2) Discuss on-orbit plans for radiance, reflectance and uniformity calibration of the OLI

  7. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    SciTech Connect

    Schuhen, M.D.; Dean, T.A.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  8. On-Orbit Calibration of Satellite Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashmall, Joseph A.; Radomski, Mark; Sedlak, Joseph; Harman, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In order to maneuver satellites accurately from one attitude to another, onboard rate sensing gyroscopes usually must be calibrated after launch. Several algorithms have been used to determine gyro biases, misalignments, and scale factors. This paper describes algorithms that have been used in the past, discusses their advantages and limitations, and describes a new algorithm and the gyro calibration results obtained using this new algorithm. The new algorithm has significant operational advantages in addition to being at least as accurate as other algorithms.

  9. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets.

  10. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.

    1998-11-17

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets. 3 figs.

  11. Towards Automating Spacecraft Attitude Sensor Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph; Welter, Gary; Ottenstein, Neil

    2003-01-01

    With a view towards reducing cost and complexity for spacecraft early mission support at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), efforts are being made to automate the attitude sensor calibration process. This paper addresses one of the major components needed by such a system. The beneficiaries of an improved calibration process are missions that demand moderate to high precision attitude knowledge or that need to perform accurate attitude slews. Improved slew accuracy reduces the time needed for re-acquisition of fine-pointing after each attitude maneuver, Rapid target acquisition can be very important for astronomical targeting or for off-nadir surface feature targeting by Earth-oriented spacecraft. The normal sequence of on-orbit calibration starts with alignment calibration of the star trackers and possibly the Sun sensor. Their relative alignment needs to be determined using a sufficiently large data set so their fields of view are adequately sampled. Next, the inertial reference unit (IRU) is calibrated for corrections to its alignment and scale factors. The IRU biases are estimated continuously by the onboard attitude control system, but the IRU alignment and scale factors are usually determined on the ground using a batch-processing method on a data set that includes several slews sufficient to give full observability of all the IRU calibration parameters. Finally, magnetometer biases, alignment, and its coupling to the magnetic torquers are determined in order io improve momentum management and occasionally for use in the attitude determination system. The detailed approach used for automating calibrations will depend on whether the automated system resides on the ground or on the spacecraft with an ultimate goal of autonomous calibration. Current efforts focus on a ground-based system driving subsystems that could run either on the ground or onboard. The distinction is that onboard calibration should process the data sequentially rather than in a

  12. The Monoglyceride Content Affects the Self-Assembly Behavior, Rheological Properties, Syringeability, and Mucoadhesion of In Situ-Gelling Liquid Crystalline Phase.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Kariane M; Teixeira, Cristian C C; Kaminski, Renata C K; Sarmento, Victor H V; Couto, Renê O; Pulcinelli, Sandra H; Freitas, Osvaldo

    2016-08-01

    This article reports the development of a precursor liquid crystalline system based on a mixture of monoglycerides (MO) and Cremophor(®) (CREM) that exhibits in situ gelation to a liquid crystalline phase. The effects of different MO/CREM ratios and the water content (WC) on several performance characteristics were investigated with a full factorial design. The formulations were characterized by polarized light microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, and water uptake assays. Rheological, syringeability, and mucoadhesion evaluation were also performed. The polarized light microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering results for average and high MO/CREM ratios (2.1 and 4.0, respectively) indicated the coexistence of phases in transition to the liquid crystalline phase, independently of the WC. These systems became more viscous after taking up water, showing peaks characteristic of a cubic phase. Systems that had average and high MO/CREM ratios also exhibited shear-thinning behavior and high elasticity. Most systems showed suitable mucoadhesion for buccal purposes. Response surface methodology results demonstrated that the relative contribution of MO was the principal factor that affected the performance of the system. Accordingly, these precursor systems with average to high MO/CREM ratios and an average WC (10% w/w) demonstrated physicochemical and mucoadhesive properties that could enable them to be used as an in situ-gelling controlled drug delivery platform.

  13. Gemini facility calibration unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay-Howat, Suzanne K.; Harris, John W.; Gostick, David C.; Laidlaw, Ken; Kidd, Norrie; Strachan, Mel; Wilson, Ken

    2000-08-01

    High-quality, efficient calibration instruments is a pre- requisite for the modern observatory. Each of the Gemini telescopes will be equipped with identical facility calibration units (GCALs) designed to provide wavelength and flat-field calibrations for the suite of instruments. The broad range of instrumentation planned for the telescopes heavily constrains the design of GCAL. Short calibration exposures are required over wavelengths from 0.3micrometers to 5micrometers , field sizes up to 7 arcminutes and spectral resolution from R-5 to 50,000. The output from GCAL must mimic the f-16 beam of the telescope and provide a uniform illumination of the focal plane. The calibration units are mounted on the Gemini Instrument Support Structure, two meters from the focal pane, necessitating the use of large optical components. We will discuss the opto-mechanical design of the Gemini calibration unit, with reference to those feature which allow these stringent requirements to be met. A novel reflector/diffuser unit replaces the integration sphere more normally found in calibration systems. The efficiency of this system is an order of magnitude greater than for an integration sphere. A system of two off-axis mirrors reproduces the telescope pupil and provides the 7 foot focal plane. The results of laboratory test of the uniformity and throughput of the GCAL will be presented.

  14. Individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices among young adult injection drug users in San Diego

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Fátima; Burgos, José Luis; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Teshale, Eyasu; Garfein, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    Unsafe injection practices significantly increase the risk of hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among injection drug users (IDUs). We examined individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices in young adult IDUs in San Diego, California. Of 494 IDUs, 46.9% reported receptive syringe sharing and 68.8% sharing drug preparation paraphernalia in the last 3 months. Unsafe injection practices were associated with increased odds of having friends who injected drugs with used syringes, injecting with friends, sexual partners, and injecting heroin. Perceived high susceptibility to HIV and perceived barriers to obtaining sterile syringes were associated with increased odds of receptive syringe sharing, but not with sharing injection paraphernalia. Over half IDUs reported unsafe injection practices, and our results suggest that personal relationships might influence IDUs’ perceptions that dictate behavior. Integrated interventions addressing individual and socio-environmental factors are needed to promote safe injection practices in this population. PMID:24920342

  15. Individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices among young adult injection drug users in San Diego.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Fátima; Burgos, José Luis; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Teshale, Eyasu; Garfein, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    Unsafe injection practices significantly increase the risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among injection drug users (IDUs). We examined individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices in young adult IDUs in San Diego, California. Of 494 IDUs, 46.9 % reported receptive syringe sharing and 68.8 % sharing drug preparation paraphernalia in the last 3 months. Unsafe injection practices were associated with increased odds of having friends who injected drugs with used syringes, injecting with friends or sexual partners, and injecting heroin. Perceived high susceptibility to HIV and perceived barriers to obtaining sterile syringes were associated with increased odds of receptive syringe sharing, but not with sharing injection paraphernalia. Over half the IDUs reported unsafe injection practices. Our results suggest that personal relationships might influence IDUs' perceptions that dictate behavior. Integrated interventions addressing individual and socio-environmental factors are needed to promote safe injection practices in this population. PMID:24920342

  16. Conditions for calibration of an isothermal titration calorimeter using chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Sgarlata, Carmelo; Zito, Valeria; Arena, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The reaction of protonation of 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (TRIS) is a suitable one for the calibration of isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC), providing that experimental conditions are appropriately chosen. The conditions and methods for handling experimental data from a nanowatt-ITC are discussed. Also, the binding of Ba(2+) to 18-Crown-6 is successfully used to check the accuracy and precision of the chemical calibration performed with TRIS. This latter reaction has the additional advantage that the data can also be used for a check on the determination of the value of a binding constant. The anomaly of the first injection in ITC is analyzed and, by combining calorimetric and spectroscopic measurements, it is shown that it mainly results from a backlash effect of the syringe plunger rather than from a diffusion effect. PMID:23196751

  17. Calibration of acoustic transients.

    PubMed

    Burkard, Robert

    2006-05-26

    This article reviews the appropriate stimulus parameters (click duration, toneburst envelope) that should be used when eliciting auditory brainstem responses from mice. Equipment specifications required to calibrate these acoustic transients are discussed. Several methods of calibrating the level of acoustic transients are presented, including the measurement of peak equivalent sound pressure level (peSPL) and peak sound pressure level (pSPL). It is hoped that those who collect auditory brainstem response thresholds in mice will begin to use standardized methods of acoustic calibration, so that hearing thresholds across mouse strains obtained in different laboratories can more readily be compared.

  18. Dynamic Pressure Calibration Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, P. C.; Cate, K. H.; Young, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Vibrating columns of fluid used to calibrate transducers. Dynamic pressure calibration standard developed for calibrating flush diaphragm-mounted pressure transducers. Pressures up to 20 kPa (3 psi) accurately generated over frequency range of 50 to 1,800 Hz. System includes two conically shaped aluminum columns one 5 cm (2 in.) high for low pressures and another 11 cm (4.3 in.) high for higher pressures, each filled with viscous fluid. Each column mounted on armature of vibration exciter, which imparts sinusoidally varying acceleration to fluid column. Signal noise low, and waveform highly dependent on quality of drive signal in vibration exciter.

  19. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  20. Airdata Measurement and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This memorandum provides a brief introduction to airdata measurement and calibration. Readers will learn about typical test objectives, quantities to measure, and flight maneuvers and operations for calibration. The memorandum informs readers about tower-flyby, trailing cone, pacer, radar-tracking, and dynamic airdata calibration maneuvers. Readers will also begin to understand how some data analysis considerations and special airdata cases, including high-angle-of-attack flight, high-speed flight, and nonobtrusive sensors are handled. This memorandum is not intended to be all inclusive; this paper contains extensive reference and bibliography sections.

  1. Compact radiometric microwave calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wollack, E. J.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Fixsen, S. M.

    2006-06-15

    The calibration methods for the ARCADE II instrument are described and the accuracy estimated. The Steelcast coated aluminum cones which comprise the calibrator have a low reflection while maintaining 94% of the absorber volume within 5 mK of the base temperature (modeled). The calibrator demonstrates an absorber with the active part less than one wavelength thick and only marginally larger than the mouth of the largest horn and yet black (less than -40 dB or 0.01% reflection) over five octaves in frequency.

  2. DIRBE External Calibrator (DEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Clair L.; Thurgood, V. Alan; Allred, Glenn D.

    1987-01-01

    Under NASA Contract No. NAS5-28185, the Center for Space Engineering at Utah State University has produced a calibration instrument for the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). DIRBE is one of the instruments aboard the Cosmic Background Experiment Observatory (COBE). The calibration instrument is referred to as the DEC (Dirbe External Calibrator). DEC produces a steerable, infrared beam of controlled spectral content and intensity and with selectable point source or diffuse source characteristics, that can be directed into the DIRBE to map fields and determine response characteristics. This report discusses the design of the DEC instrument, its operation and characteristics, and provides an analysis of the systems capabilities and performance.

  3. Comparison of drug delivery with autoinjector versus manual prefilled syringe and between three different autoinjector devices administered in pig thigh.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert L; Wilmot, John G; Belluscio, Beth A; Cleary, Kevin; Lindisch, David; Tucker, Robin; Wilson, Emmanuel; Shukla, Rajesh B

    2016-01-01

    Parenteral routes of drug administration are often selected to optimize actual dose of drug delivered, assure high bioavailability, bypass first-pass metabolism or harsh gastrointestinal environments, as well as maximize the speed of onset. Intramuscular (IM) delivery can be preferred to intravenous delivery when initiating intravenous access is difficult or impossible. Drugs can be injected intramuscularly using a syringe or an automated delivery device (autoinjector). Investigation into the IM delivery dynamics of these methods may guide further improvements in the performance of injection technologies. Two porcine model studies were conducted to compare differences in dispersion of injectate volume for different methods of IM drug administration. The first study compared the differences in the degree of dispersion and uptake of injectate following the use of a manual syringe and an autoinjector. The second study compared the spatial spread of the injected formulation, or dispersion volume, and uptake of injectate following the use of five different autoinjectors (EpiPen(®) [0.3 mL], EpiPen(®) Jr [0.3 mL], Twinject(®) [0.15 mL, 0.3 mL], and Anapen(®) 300 [0.3 mL]) with varying needle length, needle gauge, and force applied to the plunger. In the first study, the autoinjector provided higher peak volumes of injectate, indicating a greater degree of dispersion, compared with manual syringe delivery. In the second study, EpiPen autoinjectors resulted in larger dispersion volumes and higher initial dispersion ratios, which decreased rapidly over time, suggesting a greater rate of uptake of injectate than the other autoinjectors. The differences in dispersion and uptake of injectate are likely the result of different functional characteristics of the delivery systems. Both studies demonstrate that the functional characteristics of the method for delivering IM injections impact the dispersion and uptake of the material injected, which could significantly affect the

  4. Comparison of drug delivery with autoinjector versus manual prefilled syringe and between three different autoinjector devices administered in pig thigh

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert L; Wilmot, John G; Belluscio, Beth A; Cleary, Kevin; Lindisch, David; Tucker, Robin; Wilson, Emmanuel; Shukla, Rajesh B

    2016-01-01

    Parenteral routes of drug administration are often selected to optimize actual dose of drug delivered, assure high bioavailability, bypass first-pass metabolism or harsh gastrointestinal environments, as well as maximize the speed of onset. Intramuscular (IM) delivery can be preferred to intravenous delivery when initiating intravenous access is difficult or impossible. Drugs can be injected intramuscularly using a syringe or an automated delivery device (autoinjector). Investigation into the IM delivery dynamics of these methods may guide further improvements in the performance of injection technologies. Two porcine model studies were conducted to compare differences in dispersion of injectate volume for different methods of IM drug administration. The first study compared the differences in the degree of dispersion and uptake of injectate following the use of a manual syringe and an autoinjector. The second study compared the spatial spread of the injected formulation, or dispersion volume, and uptake of injectate following the use of five different autoinjectors (EpiPen® [0.3 mL], EpiPen® Jr [0.3 mL], Twinject® [0.15 mL, 0.3 mL], and Anapen® 300 [0.3 mL]) with varying needle length, needle gauge, and force applied to the plunger. In the first study, the autoinjector provided higher peak volumes of injectate, indicating a greater degree of dispersion, compared with manual syringe delivery. In the second study, EpiPen autoinjectors resulted in larger dispersion volumes and higher initial dispersion ratios, which decreased rapidly over time, suggesting a greater rate of uptake of injectate than the other autoinjectors. The differences in dispersion and uptake of injectate are likely the result of different functional characteristics of the delivery systems. Both studies demonstrate that the functional characteristics of the method for delivering IM injections impact the dispersion and uptake of the material injected, which could significantly affect the

  5. Comparison of drug delivery with autoinjector versus manual prefilled syringe and between three different autoinjector devices administered in pig thigh.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert L; Wilmot, John G; Belluscio, Beth A; Cleary, Kevin; Lindisch, David; Tucker, Robin; Wilson, Emmanuel; Shukla, Rajesh B

    2016-01-01

    Parenteral routes of drug administration are often selected to optimize actual dose of drug delivered, assure high bioavailability, bypass first-pass metabolism or harsh gastrointestinal environments, as well as maximize the speed of onset. Intramuscular (IM) delivery can be preferred to intravenous delivery when initiating intravenous access is difficult or impossible. Drugs can be injected intramuscularly using a syringe or an automated delivery device (autoinjector). Investigation into the IM delivery dynamics of these methods may guide further improvements in the performance of injection technologies. Two porcine model studies were conducted to compare differences in dispersion of injectate volume for different methods of IM drug administration. The first study compared the differences in the degree of dispersion and uptake of injectate following the use of a manual syringe and an autoinjector. The second study compared the spatial spread of the injected formulation, or dispersion volume, and uptake of injectate following the use of five different autoinjectors (EpiPen(®) [0.3 mL], EpiPen(®) Jr [0.3 mL], Twinject(®) [0.15 mL, 0.3 mL], and Anapen(®) 300 [0.3 mL]) with varying needle length, needle gauge, and force applied to the plunger. In the first study, the autoinjector provided higher peak volumes of injectate, indicating a greater degree of dispersion, compared with manual syringe delivery. In the second study, EpiPen autoinjectors resulted in larger dispersion volumes and higher initial dispersion ratios, which decreased rapidly over time, suggesting a greater rate of uptake of injectate than the other autoinjectors. The differences in dispersion and uptake of injectate are likely the result of different functional characteristics of the delivery systems. Both studies demonstrate that the functional characteristics of the method for delivering IM injections impact the dispersion and uptake of the material injected, which could significantly affect the

  6. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  7. Neuroprotective effects of syringic acid against OGD/R-induced injury in cultured hippocampal neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yidong; Zhang, Liang; Sun, Shukai; Yi, Zhenheng; Jiang, Xue; Jia, Dong

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral ischemic injury and treatment are important topics in neurological science. In the present study, an in vitro model of cerebral ischemia was established by subjecting primary cultures of hippocampal neuronal cells to oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reperfusion (OGD/R), in order to evaluate the possible neuroprotective role of syringic acid (SA). The results of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol‑2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays showed that pre-treatment with SA (0.1, 1, 10, and 20 µM) attenuated OGD/R-induced neuronal injury in a dose-dependent manner, with evidence of increased cell viability and decreased LDH leakage. In addition, oxidative stress markers were evaluated using commercial kits, and the results demonstrated that OGD/R exposure induced distinct oxidative stress, accompanied by elevated levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) production, and reduced activity of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD), which were dose-dependently restored by pre-treatment with SA. In addition, the concentration of intracellular free calcium [Ca2+]i and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP or Δψm) were determined in order to evaluate the degree of neuronal damage by performing flow cytometric analysis and observing the cells under a fluorescence microscope, respectively. We demonstrated that pre-treatment with SA inhibited elevations in [Ca2+]i, whereas it increased the MMP dose-dependently following exposure to OGD/R. Western blot analysis revealed that OGD/R promoted cell apoptosis with concomitant increases in Bax and caspase-3 expression, and reduced Bcl-2 expression, which was reversed by pre‑treatment with SA in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, these effects were mediated through the JNK and p38 pathways, as pre‑treatment with SA inhibited the OGD/R-induced increase in phosphorylated (p-)JNK and p-p38 expression. Taken together, these

  8. Roundness calibration standard

    DOEpatents

    Burrus, Brice M.

    1984-01-01

    A roundness calibration standard is provided with a first arc constituting the major portion of a circle and a second arc lying between the remainder of the circle and the chord extending between the ends of said first arc.

  9. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C.F. Ahlers, H.H. Liu

    2001-12-18

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00 (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions.

  10. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C. Ahlers; H. Liu

    2000-03-12

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00. These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions.

  11. Radar altimeter calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, C. R.

    1983-02-01

    The operating principles and design of a radar altimeter representative of those proposed of ERS-1 are described and geophysical influences on the measurements are discussed. General aspects of calibration are examined, and the critical areas of time and frequency resolution pointed out. A method of internal calibration of delay and backscatter coefficient, by rerouting the tramsitter signal, is described. External prelaunch calibration can be carried out by airborne trials, or using a return signal simulator. It is established that airborne calibration requires high altitudes and high speeds, and is likely to be difficult and expensive. The design of a return signal simulator is shown to be very difficult. No feasible design is identified.

  12. Investigation of a secondary syringe exchange program for homeless young adult injection drug users in San Francisco, California, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Sears, C; Guydish, J R; Weltzien, E K; Lum, P J

    2001-06-01

    This study investigated an HIV prevention program for homeless young adult injection drug users (IDUs) that combined a secondary syringe exchange program (SEP) with community-level activities. Homeless young IDUs were recruited from street-based settings in San Francisco, and a structured questionnaire was administered. The secondary SEP operated in a circumscribed geographic area, and for analytic purposes respondents were assigned to the intervention site group if they primarily spent time in this area (n = 67), or the comparison site group if they primarily spent time elsewhere (n = 55). Almost all (96%) intervention site youth had used the secondary SEP in the past 30 days and were significantly more likely to regularly use SEP. In bivariate analysis, comparison site IDUs were more likely to share syringes, reuse syringes, share the cotton used to filter drugs, and use condoms with casual sex partners only inconsistently. In multivariate analysis, comparison site remained positively associated with sharing syringes (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 3.748; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.406-9.988), reusing syringes (AOR, 2.769; 95% CI,1.120-6.847), and inconsistent condom use with casual sex partners (AOR, 4.825; 95% CI, 1.392- 16.721). This suggests that the intervention was effective in delivering SEP services to homeless young adult IDUs, and that IDUs who frequented the intervention site had a lower HIV risk than comparison group IDUs.

  13. Aggregation and Particle Formation of Therapeutic Proteins in Contact With a Novel Fluoropolymer Surface Versus Siliconized Surfaces: Effects of Agitation in Vials and in Prefilled Syringes.

    PubMed

    Teska, Brandon M; Brake, Jeffrey M; Tronto, Gregory S; Carpenter, John F

    2016-07-01

    We examined the effects of an accelerated agitation protocol on 2 protein therapeutics, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and Avastin (bevacizumab), in contact with a novel fluoropolymer surface and more typical siliconized surfaces. The fluoropolymer surface provides "solid-phase" lubrication for the syringe plunger-obviating the need for silicone oil lubrication in prefilled syringes. We tested the 2 surfaces in a vial system and in prefilled glass syringes. We also examined the effects of 2 buffers, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and 0.2-M glycine, with and without the addition of polysorbate 20, on agitation-induced aggregation of IVIG. Aggregation was monitored by measuring subvisible particle formation and soluble protein loss. In both vials and syringes, protein particle formation was much lower during agitation with the fluoropolymer surface than with the siliconized surface. Also, particle formation was greater in PBS than in glycine buffer, an effect attributed to lower colloidal stability of IVIG in PBS. Polysorbate 20 in the formulation greatly inhibited protein particle formation. Overall, the fluoropolymer plunger surface in an unsiliconized glass barrel was demonstrated to be a viable solution for eliminating silicone oil droplets from prefilled syringe formulations and providing a consistent system for rationale formulation development and simplified particle analysis. PMID:27233685

  14. Automated in-syringe single-drop head-space micro-extraction applied to the determination of ethanol in wine samples.

    PubMed

    Srámková, Ivana; Horstkotte, Burkhard; Solich, Petr; Sklenářová, Hana

    2014-05-30

    A novel approach of head-space single-drop micro-extraction applied to the determination of ethanol in wine is presented. For the first time, the syringe of an automated syringe pump was used as an extraction chamber of adaptable size for a volatile analyte. This approach enabled to apply negative pressure during the enrichment step, which favored the evaporation of the analyte. Placing a slowly spinning magnetic stirring bar inside the syringe, effective syringe cleaning as well as mixing of the sample with buffer solution to suppress the interference of acetic acid was achieved. Ethanol determination was based on the reduction of a single drop of 3mmol L(-1) potassium dichromate dissolved in 8mol L(-1) sulfuric acid. The drop was positioned in the syringe inlet in the head-space above the sample with posterior spectrophotometric quantification. The entire procedure was carried out automatically using a simple sequential injection analyzer system. One analysis required less than 5min including the washing step. A limit of detection of 0.025% (v/v) of ethanol and an average repeatability of less than 5.0% RSD were achieved. The consumption of dichromate reagent, buffer, and sample per analysis were only 20μL, 200μL, and 1mL, respectively. The results of real samples analysis did not differ significantly from those obtained with the references gas chromatography method.

  15. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  16. Cumulative sum quality control for calibrated breast density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, John J.; Cao Ke; Beam, Craig

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Breast density is a significant breast cancer risk factor. Although various methods are used to estimate breast density, there is no standard measurement for this important factor. The authors are developing a breast density standardization method for use in full field digital mammography (FFDM). The approach calibrates for interpatient acquisition technique differences. The calibration produces a normalized breast density pixel value scale. The method relies on first generating a baseline (BL) calibration dataset, which required extensive phantom imaging. Standardizing prospective mammograms with calibration data generated in the past could introduce unanticipated error in the standardized output if the calibration dataset is no longer valid. Methods: Sample points from the BL calibration dataset were imaged approximately biweekly over an extended timeframe. These serial samples were used to evaluate the BL dataset reproducibility and quantify the serial calibration accuracy. The cumulative sum (Cusum) quality control method was used to evaluate the serial sampling. Results: There is considerable drift in the serial sample points from the BL calibration dataset that is x-ray beam dependent. Systematic deviation from the BL dataset caused significant calibration errors. This system drift was not captured with routine system quality control measures. Cusum analysis indicated that the drift is a sign of system wear and eventual x-ray tube failure. Conclusions: The BL calibration dataset must be monitored and periodically updated, when necessary, to account for sustained system variations to maintain the calibration accuracy.

  17. Aerosol backscatter lidar calibration and data interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, M. J.; Menzies, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    A treatment of the various factors involved in lidar data acquisition and analysis is presented. This treatment highlights sources of fundamental, systematic, modeling, and calibration errors that may affect the accurate interpretation and calibration of lidar aerosol backscatter data. The discussion primarily pertains to ground based, pulsed CO2 lidars that probe the troposphere and are calibrated using large, hard calibration targets. However, a large part of the analysis is relevant to other types of lidar systems such as lidars operating at other wavelengths; continuous wave (CW) lidars; lidars operating in other regions of the atmosphere; lidars measuring nonaerosol elastic or inelastic backscatter; airborne or Earth-orbiting lidar platforms; and lidars employing combinations of the above characteristics.

  18. Integrated calibration sphere and calibration step fixture for improved coordinate measurement machine calibration

    DOEpatents

    Clifford, Harry J.

    2011-03-22

    A method and apparatus for mounting a calibration sphere to a calibration fixture for Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) calibration and qualification is described, decreasing the time required for such qualification, thus allowing the CMM to be used more productively. A number of embodiments are disclosed that allow for new and retrofit manufacture to perform as integrated calibration sphere and calibration fixture devices. This invention renders unnecessary the removal of a calibration sphere prior to CMM measurement of calibration features on calibration fixtures, thereby greatly reducing the time spent qualifying a CMM.

  19. Student understanding of the volume, mass, and pressure of air within a sealed syringe in different states of compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Berg, Kevin Charles

    Problem-solving strategies in the physical sciences have been characterized by a dependence on algorithmic techniques often devoid of any reasoning skills. The purpose of this study was to examine student responses to a task relating to Boyle's Law for gases, which did not demand the use of a mathematical equation for its solution. Students (17- to 18-year-olds) in lower sixth form from two colleges in the Leeds district of Yorkshire in England were asked to respond to a task relating to pressure and volume measurements of air within a sealed syringe in different states of compression. Both qualitative and quantitative tasks for the sealed syringe system were examined. It was found that 34% to 38% of students did not understand the concepts of volume and mass, respectively, of a gas under such circumstances. Performance on an inverse ratio (2:1) task was shown to depend on gender and those students who performed well on the 2:1 inverse ratio task did not necessarily perform well on a different inverse ratio task when an arithmetic averaging principle was present. Tasks which draw upon qualitative knowledge as well as quantitative knowledge have the potential to reduce dependence on algorithms, particularly equation substitution and solution. The implications for instructional design are discussed.Received: 14 April 1993; Revised: 29 June 1994;

  20. Estrogens determination in wastewater samples by automatic in-syringe dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction prior silylation and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    González, Alba; Avivar, Jessica; Cerdà, Víctor

    2015-09-25

    A new procedure for the extraction, preconcentration and simultaneous determination of the estrogens most used in contraception pharmaceuticals (estrone, 17β-estradiol, estriol, and 17α-ethynylestradiol), cataloged as Contaminants of Emergent Concern by the Environmental Protection Agency of the United States (US-EPA), is proposed. The developed system performs an in-syringe magnetic stirring-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (in-syringe-MSA-DLLME) prior derivatization and gas chromatography (GC-MS). Different extraction (carbon tetrachloride, ethyl acetate, chloroform and trichloroethylene) and disperser solvents (acetone, acetonitrile and methanol) were tested. Chloroform and acetone were chosen as extraction and disperser solvent, respectively, as they provided the best extraction efficiency. Then, a multivariate optimization of the extraction conditions was carried out. Derivatization conditions were also studied to ensure the conversion of the estrogens to their respective trimethylsilyl derivatives. Low LODs and LOQs were achieved, i.e. between 11 and 82ngL(-1), and 37 and 272ngL(-1), respectively. Good values for intra and inter-day precision were obtained (RSDs≤7.06% and RSD≤7.11%, respectively). The method was successfully applied to wastewater samples.

  1. High dead-space syringes and the risk of HIV and HCV infection among injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Zule, William A; Bobashev, Georgiy

    2009-03-01

    This study examines the association between using and sharing high dead-space syringes (HDSSs)--which retain over 1000 times more blood after rinsing than low dead-space syringes (LDSSs)--and prevalent HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among injecting drug users (IDUs). A sample of 851 out-of-treatment IDUs was recruited in Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, between 2003 and 2005. Participants were tested for HIV and HCV antibodies. Demographic, drug use, and injection practice data were collected via interviews. Data were analyzed using multiple logistic regression analysis. Participants had a mean age of 40 years and 74% are male, 63% are African American, 29% are non-Hispanic white, and 8% are of other race/ethnicity. Overall, 42% of participants had ever used an HDSS and 12% had shared one. HIV prevalence was 5% among IDUs who had never used an HDSS compared with 16% among IDUs who had shared one. The HIV model used a propensity score approach to adjust for differences between IDUs who had used an HDSS and those who had never used one. The HCV models included all potential confounders as covariates. A history of sharing HDSSs was associated with prevalent HIV (odds ratio=2.50; 95% confidence interval=1.01, 6.15). Use and sharing of HDSSs were also associated with increased odds of HCV infection. Prospective studies are needed to determine if sharing HDSSs is associated with increased HIV and HCV incidence among IDUs.

  2. Parabens determination in cosmetic and personal care products exploiting a multi-syringe chromatographic (MSC) system and chemiluminescent detection.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Melisa; Portugal, Lindomar A; Avivar, Jessica; Estela, José Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2015-10-01

    Parabens are widely used in dairy products, such as in cosmetics and personal care products. Thus, in this work a multi-syringe chromatographic (MSC) system is proposed for the first time for the determination of four parabens: methylparaben (MP), ethylparaben (EP), propylparaben (PP) and butylparaben (BP) in cosmetics and personal care products, as a simpler, practical, and low cost alternative to HPLC methods. Separation was achieved using a 5mm-long precolumn of reversed phase C18 and multi-isocratic separation, i.e. using two consecutive mobile phases, 12:88 acetonitrile:water and 28:72 acetonitrile:water. The use of a multi-syringe buret allowed the easy implementation of chemiluminescent (CL) detection after separation. The chemiluminescent detection is based on the reduction of Ce(IV) by p-hydroxybenzoic acid, product of the acid hydrolysis of parabens, to excite rhodamine 6G (Rho 6G) and measure the resulting light emission. Multivariate designs combined with the concepts of multiple response treatments and desirability functions have been employed to simultaneously optimize and evaluate the responses. The optimized method has proved to be sensitive and precise, obtaining limits of detection between 20 and 40 µg L(-1) and RSD <4.9% in all cases. The method was satisfactorily applied to cosmetics and personal care products, obtaining no significant differences at a confidence level of 95% comparing with the HPLC reference method.

  3. NIMBY localism and national inequitable exclusion alliances: The case of syringe exchange programs in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Tempalski, Barbara; Friedman, Risa; Keem, Marie; Cooper, Hannah; Friedman, Samuel R.

    2007-01-01

    Syringe exchange programs (SEPs) aim to reduce the harm associated with injection drug use (IDU). Although they have been accepted as critical components of HIV prevention in many parts of the world, they are often unwelcome and difficult to set up and maintain, even in communities hardest hit by IDU-related HIV transmission. This research examines socio-cultural and political processes that shape community and institutional resistance toward establishing and maintaining SEPs. These processes are configured and reinforced through the socio-spatial stigmatizing of IDUs, and legal and public policy against SEPs. Overarching themes the paper considers are: (1) institutional and/or political opposition based on (a) political and law enforcement issues associated with state drug paraphernalia laws and local syringe laws; (b) harassment of drug users and resistance to services for drug users by local politicians and police; and (c) state and local government (in)action or opposition; and (2) the stigmatization of drug users and location of SEPs in local neighborhoods and business districts. Rather than be explained by “not in my back yard” localism, this pattern seems best conceptualized as an “inequitable exclusion alliance” (IEA) that institutionalizes national and local stigmatizing of drug users and other vulnerable populations. PMID:18978931

  4. New technique for calibrating hydrocarbon gas flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Puster, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for measuring calibration correction factors for hydrocarbon mass flowmeters is described. It is based on the Nernst theorem for matching the partial pressure of oxygen in the combustion products of the test hydrocarbon, burned in oxygen-enriched air, with that in normal air. It is applied to a widely used type of commercial thermal mass flowmeter for a number of hydrocarbons. The calibration correction factors measured using this technique are in good agreement with the values obtained by other independent procedures. The technique is successfully applied to the measurement of differences as low as one percent of the effective hydrocarbon content of the natural gas test samples.

  5. Calibration Method of an Ultrasonic System for Temperature Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yueke; Qiao, Chunjie; Dai, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    System calibration is fundamental to the overall accuracy of the ultrasonic temperature measurement, and it is basically involved in accurately measuring the path length and the system latency of the ultrasonic system. This paper proposes a method of high accuracy system calibration. By estimating the time delay between the transmitted signal and the received signal at several different temperatures, the calibration equations are constructed, and the calibrated results are determined with the use of the least squares algorithm. The formulas are deduced for calculating the calibration uncertainties, and the possible influential factors are analyzed. The experimental results in distilled water show that the calibrated path length and system latency can achieve uncertainties of 0.058 mm and 0.038 μs, respectively, and the temperature accuracy is significantly improved by using the calibrated results. The temperature error remains within ±0.04°C consistently, and the percentage error is less than 0.15%. PMID:27788252

  6. Towards A Modern Calibration Of The 238U/235U Paleoredox Proxy: Apparent Uranium Isotope Fractionation Factor During U(VI)-U(IV) Reduction In The Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolison, J. M.; Stirling, C. H.; Middag, R.; Rijkenberg, M. J. A.; De Baar, H. J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The isotopic compositions of redox-sensitive metals, including uranium (U), in marine sediments have recently emerged as powerful diagnostic tracers of the redox state of the ancient ocean-atmosphere system. Interpretation of sedimentary isotopic information requires a thorough understating of the environmental controls on isotopic fractionation in modern anoxic environments before being applied to the paleo-record. In this study, the relationship between ocean anoxia and the isotopic fractionation of U was investigated in the water column and sediments of the Black Sea. The Black Sea is the world's largest anoxic basin and significant removal of U from the water column and high U accumulation rates in modern underlying sediments have been documented. Removal of U from the water column occurs during the redox transition of soluble U(VI) to relatively insoluble U(IV). The primary results of this study are two-fold. First, significant 238U/235U fractionation was observed in the water column of the Black Sea, suggesting the reduction of U induces 238U/235U fractionation with the preferential removal of 238U from the aqueous phase. Second, the 238U/235U of underlying sediments is related to the water column through the isotope fractionation factor of the reduction reaction but is influenced by mass transport processes. These results provide important constraints on the use of 238U/235U as a proxy of the redox state of ancient oceans.

  7. [2000-year history of the ear syringe and its relationship to the enema. Images from the history of otorhinolaryngology, represented by instruments from the collection of the Ingolstadt Medical History Museum].

    PubMed

    Feldmann, H

    1999-08-01

    SYRINGES WITH A PISTON AND THEIR USE AS "CLYSTER ORICULARIUS" IN THE ANCIENT ROME: Syringes with a piston were already known in ancient times and have been mentioned as a device for spraying rose water (Philon of Byzantium, about 230 BC), and for fighting fires (Heron of Alexandria about 110 AD). Celsus mentions it several times in his grand opus "De Medicina" (1st century AD) in the treatment of purulent discharge from the ear and for removing foreign bodies from the external ear canal. He always calls it "clyster oricularius", i.e. ear syringe, even when he describes its use in applications other than otological, such as in urology. Later the ear syringe fell from favor for a very long time and was reinvented only at the beginning of the 19th century. IRRIGATION OF THE BOWELS, FROM THE BAG SYRINGE TO THE PISTON SYRINGE: Irrigations of the bowels, clysters, were performed from ancient times to the 18th century with a baglike syringe using the bladder of animals as a pouch. Syringes with a piston were used by barbers and surgeons only for cleansing wounds or irrigating natural cavities of the body. Irrigation of the external ear canal had completely fallen from favor. In France in the 18th century large syringes with a piston made of tin oder brass came into use for enemas and replaced the old baglike devices. THE REINVENTION OF THE EAR SYRINGE AFTER THE PROTOTYPE OF THE ENEMA SYRINGE: Itard, an otologist in France in 1821, was the first to describe irrigating the ear with a syringe to remove hard wax. He recommended using an enema syringe ("seringue à lavement") for the procedure. Soon after his publication special ear syringes of appropriate size were developed and described by Beck in Freiburg, Germany, in 1827; by Fabrizi in Modena, Italy, 1839; and Schmalz in Dresden, Germany, 1846, who also introduced the kidney-shaped bowel for catching the water. Apart from that, small baglike syringes made of rubber were devised especially for use by the patient himself

  8. The Prison Economy of Needles and Syringes: What Opportunities Exist for Blood Borne Virus Risk Reduction When Prices Are so High?

    PubMed Central

    Treloar, Carla; McCredie, Luke; Lloyd, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Aim A formal Needle and Syringe Program (NSP) is not provided in Australian prisons. Injecting equipment circulates in prisons as part of an informal and illegal economy. This paper examined how this economy generates blood-borne virus (BBV) risk and risk mitigation opportunities for inmates. Method The HITS-p cohort recruited New South Wales inmates who had reported ever injecting drugs and who had a negative HCV serological test within 12 months prior to enrolment. For this study, qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 participants enrolled in HITS-p. Participants included 10 women and were incarcerated in 12 prisons. Results A needle/syringe was nominated as being typically priced in the ‘inside’ prison economy at $100-$150, with a range of $50-$350. Purchase or hire of equipment was paid for in cash (including transactions that occurred outside prison) and in exchange for drugs and other commodities. A range of other resources was required to enable successful needle/syringe economies, especially relationships with visitors and other prisoners, and violence to ensure payment of debts. Strategies to mitigate BBV risk included retaining one needle/syringe for personal use while hiring out others, keeping drug use (and ownership of equipment) “quiet”, stealing used equipment from the prison health clinic, and manufacture of syringes from other items available in the prison. Conclusions The provision of prison NSP would disrupt the inside economies built around contraband needles/syringes, as well as minimise BBV risk. However, any model of prison NSP should be interrogated for any unanticipated markets that could be generated as a result of its regulatory practices. PMID:27611849

  9. Psychophysical contrast calibration

    PubMed Central

    To, Long; Woods, Russell L; Goldstein, Robert B; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Electronic displays and computer systems offer numerous advantages for clinical vision testing. Laboratory and clinical measurements of various functions and in particular of (letter) contrast sensitivity require accurately calibrated display contrast. In the laboratory this is achieved using expensive light meters. We developed and evaluated a novel method that uses only psychophysical responses of a person with normal vision to calibrate the luminance contrast of displays for experimental and clinical applications. Our method combines psychophysical techniques (1) for detection (and thus elimination or reduction) of display saturating nonlinearities; (2) for luminance (gamma function) estimation and linearization without use of a photometer; and (3) to measure without a photometer the luminance ratios of the display’s three color channels that are used in a bit-stealing procedure to expand the luminance resolution of the display. Using a photometer we verified that the calibration achieved with this procedure is accurate for both LCD and CRT displays enabling testing of letter contrast sensitivity to 0.5%. Our visual calibration procedure enables clinical, internet and home implementation and calibration verification of electronic contrast testing. PMID:23643843

  10. Polarimetric Palsar Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touzi, R.; Shimada, M.

    2008-11-01

    Polarimetric PALSAR system parameters are assessed using data sets collected over various calibration sites. The data collected over the Amazonian forest permits validating the zero Faraday rotation hypotheses near the equator. The analysis of the Amazonian forest data and the response of the corner reflectors deployed during the PALSAR acquisitions lead to the conclusion that the antenna is highly isolated (better than -35 dB). Theses results are confirmed using data collected over the Sweden and Ottawa calibration sites. The 5-m height trihedrals deployed in the Sweden calibration site by the Chalmers University of technology permits accurate measurement of antenna parameters, and detection of 2-3 degree Faraday rotation during day acquisition, whereas no Faraday rotation was noted during night acquisition. Small Faraday rotation angles (2-3 degree) have been measured using acquisitions over the DLR Oberpfaffenhofen and the Ottawa calibration sites. The presence of small but still significant Faraday rotation (2-3 degree) induces a CR return at the cross-polarization HV and VH that should not be interpreted as the actual antenna cross-talk. PALSAR antenna is highly isolated (better than -35 dB), and diagonal antenna distortion matrices (with zero cross-talk terms) can be used for accurate calibration of PALSAR polarimetric data.

  11. Calibration Under Uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2005-03-01

    This report is a white paper summarizing the literature and different approaches to the problem of calibrating computer model parameters in the face of model uncertainty. Model calibration is often formulated as finding the parameters that minimize the squared difference between the model-computed data (the predicted data) and the actual experimental data. This approach does not allow for explicit treatment of uncertainty or error in the model itself: the model is considered the %22true%22 deterministic representation of reality. While this approach does have utility, it is far from an accurate mathematical treatment of the true model calibration problem in which both the computed data and experimental data have error bars. This year, we examined methods to perform calibration accounting for the error in both the computer model and the data, as well as improving our understanding of its meaning for model predictability. We call this approach Calibration under Uncertainty (CUU). This talk presents our current thinking on CUU. We outline some current approaches in the literature, and discuss the Bayesian approach to CUU in detail.

  12. POLCAL - POLARIMETRIC RADAR CALIBRATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, J.

    1994-01-01

    Calibration of polarimetric radar systems is a field of research in which great progress has been made over the last few years. POLCAL (Polarimetric Radar Calibration) is a software tool intended to assist in the calibration of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems. In particular, POLCAL calibrates Stokes matrix format data produced as the standard product by the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) airborne imaging synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR). POLCAL was designed to be used in conjunction with data collected by the NASA/JPL AIRSAR system. AIRSAR is a multifrequency (6 cm, 24 cm, and 68 cm wavelength), fully polarimetric SAR system which produces 12 x 12 km imagery at 10 m resolution. AIRSTAR was designed as a testbed for NASA's Spaceborne Imaging Radar program. While the images produced after 1991 are thought to be calibrated (phase calibrated, cross-talk removed, channel imbalance removed, and absolutely calibrated), POLCAL can and should still be used to check the accuracy of the calibration and to correct it if necessary. Version 4.0 of POLCAL is an upgrade of POLCAL version 2.0 released to AIRSAR investigators in June, 1990. New options in version 4.0 include automatic absolute calibration of 89/90 data, distributed target analysis, calibration of nearby scenes with calibration parameters from a scene with corner reflectors, altitude or roll angle corrections, and calibration of errors introduced by known topography. Many sources of error can lead to false conclusions about the nature of scatterers on the surface. Errors in the phase relationship between polarization channels result in incorrect synthesis of polarization states. Cross-talk, caused by imperfections in the radar antenna itself, can also lead to error. POLCAL reduces cross-talk and corrects phase calibration without the use of ground calibration equipment. Removing the antenna patterns during SAR processing also forms a very important part of the calibration of SAR data. Errors in the

  13. A miniature remote deadweight calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Tcheng, Ping

    A miniature, computer-controlled, deadweight calibrator was developed to remotely calibrate a force transducer mounted in a cryogenic chamber. This simple mechanism allows automatic loading and unloading of deadweights placed onto a skin friction balance during calibrations. Equipment for the calibrator includes a specially designed set of five interlocking 200-milligram weights, a motorized lifting platform, and a controller box taking commands from a microcomputer on an IEEE interface. The computer is also used to record and reduce the calibration data and control other calibration parameters. The full-scale load for this device is 1,000 milligrams; however, the concept can be extended to accommodate other calibration ranges.

  14. Calibration Systems Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2006-02-01

    The Calibration Systems project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is aimed towards developing and demonstrating compact Quantum Cascade (QC) laser-based calibration systems for infrared imaging systems. These on-board systems will improve the calibration technology for passive sensors, which enable stand-off detection for the proliferation or use of weapons of mass destruction, by replacing on-board blackbodies with QC laser-based systems. This alternative technology can minimize the impact on instrument size and weight while improving the quality of instruments for a variety of missions. The potential of replacing flight blackbodies is made feasible by the high output, stability, and repeatability of the QC laser spectral radiance.

  15. Exploration of new multivariate spectral calibration algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Haaland, David Michael; Melgaard, David Kennett; Martin, Laura Elizabeth; Wehlburg, Christine Marie; Pell, Randy J.; Guenard, Robert D.

    2004-03-01

    A variety of multivariate calibration algorithms for quantitative spectral analyses were investigated and compared, and new algorithms were developed in the course of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. We were able to demonstrate the ability of the hybrid classical least squares/partial least squares (CLSIPLS) calibration algorithms to maintain calibrations in the presence of spectrometer drift and to transfer calibrations between spectrometers from the same or different manufacturers. These methods were found to be as good or better in prediction ability as the commonly used partial least squares (PLS) method. We also present the theory for an entirely new class of algorithms labeled augmented classical least squares (ACLS) methods. New factor selection methods are developed and described for the ACLS algorithms. These factor selection methods are demonstrated using near-infrared spectra collected from a system of dilute aqueous solutions. The ACLS algorithm is also shown to provide improved ease of use and better prediction ability than PLS when transferring calibrations between near-infrared calibrations from the same manufacturer. Finally, simulations incorporating either ideal or realistic errors in the spectra were used to compare the prediction abilities of the new ACLS algorithm with that of PLS. We found that in the presence of realistic errors with non-uniform spectral error variance across spectral channels or with spectral errors correlated between frequency channels, ACLS methods generally out-performed the more commonly used PLS method. These results demonstrate the need for realistic error structure in simulations when the prediction abilities of various algorithms are compared. The combination of equal or superior prediction ability and the ease of use of the ACLS algorithms make the new ACLS methods the preferred algorithms to use for multivariate spectral calibrations.

  16. The Absolute Radiometric Calibration of Space - Sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Ronald Gene

    1987-09-01

    The need for absolute radiometric calibration of space-based sensors will continue to increase as new generations of space sensors are developed. A reflectance -based in-flight calibration procedure is used to determine the radiance reaching the entrance pupil of the sensor. This procedure uses ground-based measurements coupled with a radiative transfer code to characterize the effects the atmosphere has on the signal reaching the sensor. The computed radiance is compared to the digital count output of the sensor associated with the image of a test site. This provides an update to the preflight calibration of the system and a check on the on-board internal calibrator. This calibration procedure was used to perform a series of five calibrations of the Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM). For the 12 measurements made in TM bands 1-3, the RMS variation from the mean as a percentage of the mean is (+OR-) 1.9%, and for measurements in the IR, TM bands 4,5, and 7, the value is (+OR-) 3.4%. The RMS variation for all 23 measurements is (+OR-) 2.8%. The absolute calibration techniques were put to another test with a series of three calibration of the SPOT-1 High Resolution Visible, (HRV), sensors. The ratio, HRV-2/HRV-1, of absolute calibration coefficients compared very well with ratios of histogrammed data obtained when the cameras simultaneously imaged the same ground site. Bands PA, B1 and B3 agreed to within 3%, while band B2 showed a 7% difference. The procedure for performing a satellite calibration was then used to demonstrate how a calibrated satellite sensor can be used to quantitatively evaluate surface reflectance over a wide range of surface features. Predicted reflectance factors were compared to values obtained from aircraft -based radiometer data. This procedure was applied on four dates with two different surface conditions per date. A strong correlation, R('2) = .996, was shown between reflectance values determined from satellite imagery and low-flying aircraft

  17. PERSONALISED BODY COUNTER CALIBRATION USING ANTHROPOMETRIC PARAMETERS.

    PubMed

    Pölz, S; Breustedt, B

    2016-09-01

    Current calibration methods for body counting offer personalisation for lung counting predominantly with respect to ratios of body mass and height. Chest wall thickness is used as an intermediate parameter. This work revises and extends these methods using a series of computational phantoms derived from medical imaging data in combination with radiation transport simulation and statistical analysis. As an example, the method is applied to the calibration of the In Vivo Measurement Laboratory (IVM) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) comprising four high-purity germanium detectors in two partial body measurement set-ups. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code and the Extended Cardiac-Torso (XCAT) phantom series have been used. Analysis of the computed sample data consisting of 18 anthropometric parameters and calibration factors generated from 26 photon sources for each of the 30 phantoms reveals the significance of those parameters required for producing an accurate estimate of the calibration function. Body circumferences related to the source location perform best in the example, while parameters related to body mass show comparable but lower performances, and those related to body height and other lengths exhibit low performances. In conclusion, it is possible to give more accurate estimates of calibration factors using this proposed approach including estimates of uncertainties related to interindividual anatomical variation of the target population. PMID:26396263

  18. Improved Regression Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skrondal, Anders; Kuha, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    The likelihood for generalized linear models with covariate measurement error cannot in general be expressed in closed form, which makes maximum likelihood estimation taxing. A popular alternative is regression calibration which is computationally efficient at the cost of inconsistent estimation. We propose an improved regression calibration…

  19. Thermistor mount efficiency calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W.

    1980-05-01

    Thermistor mount efficiency calibration is accomplished by use of the power equation concept and by complex signal-ratio measurements. A comparison of thermistor mounts at microwave frequencies is made by mixing the reference and the reflected signals to produce a frequency at which the amplitude and phase difference may be readily measured.

  20. Satellite altimeter calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolenkiewicz, R.; Martin, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines calibration techniques which can most effectively satisfy the requirements of future satellites carrying high-accuracy radar altimeters, such as the ESA ERS-1 and the NASA/CNES Topex/Poseidon satellites scheduled for launch during the next five years. The calibration accuracies and the advantages and disadvantages of the four currently proposed calibration techniques for over-water calibration are discussed: (1) a tide gauge on a tower at-sea and a nearby laser, (2) a laser and a tide gauge on an island with an offshore satellite pass and a geoid tie between the satellite ground track and the laser, (3) a tide gauge on a tower at-sea with satellite positioning from multiple lasers and a GPS, and (4) a laser and a tide gauge on a tower at-sea. Error budgets for these techniques, developed on the basis of state-of-the-art tracking systems, were found to have one sigma height uncertainties in the 2.8 to 4.9 cm range.

  1. The JWST Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Christine; Muzerolle, James; Dixon, William Van Dyke; Izela Diaz, Rosa; Bushouse, Howard A.

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will launch in 2018 and carry four science instruments that will observe the sky at 0.7 - 29 micron: the Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam), the Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS), the Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec), and the Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI). The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) is currently building a data reduction pipeline that will provide not only basic calibrated data but also higher level science products. All of the JWST detectors will be operated in non-destructive readout mode. Therefore, the first step in the pipeline will be to calculate the slopes of indivudal non-destructive readout ramps or integrations. The next step will be to generate calibrated slope images that are represent the basic calibrated data. The final step will be to combine data taken across multiple integrations and exposure. For the direct imaging and integral field spectroscopy modes, the pipeline will produce calibrated mosaicks. For the coronagraphic modes, the pipeline will produce contrast curves and PSF subtracted images.

  2. Satellite altimeter calibration techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolenkiewicz, R.; Martin, C. F.

    This paper examines calibration techniques which can most effectively satisfy the requirements of future satellites carrying high-accuracy radar altimeters, such as the ESA ERS-1 and the NASA/CNES Topex/Poseidon satellites scheduled for launch during the next five years. The calibration accuracies and the advantages and disadvantages of the four currently proposed calibration techniques for over-water calibration are discussed: (1) a tide gauge on a tower at-sea and a nearby laser, (2) a laser and a tide gauge on an island with an offshore satellite pass and a geoid tie between the satellite ground track and the laser, (3) a tide gauge on a tower at-sea with satellite positioning from multiple lasers and a GPS, and (4) a laser and a tide gauge on a tower at-sea. Error budgets for these techniques, developed on the basis of state-of-the-art tracking systems, were found to have one sigma height uncertainties in the 2.8 to 4.9 cm range.

  3. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    SciTech Connect

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  4. Computerized tomography calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Herbert P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A set of interchangeable pieces comprising a computerized tomography calibrator, and a method of use thereof, permits focusing of a computerized tomographic (CT) system. The interchangeable pieces include a plurality of nestable, generally planar mother rings, adapted for the receipt of planar inserts of predetermined sizes, and of predetermined material densities. The inserts further define openings therein for receipt of plural sub-inserts. All pieces are of known sizes and densities, permitting the assembling of different configurations of materials of known sizes and combinations of densities, for calibration (i.e., focusing) of a computerized tomographic system through variation of operating variables thereof. Rather than serving as a phanton, which is intended to be representative of a particular workpiece to be tested, the set of interchangeable pieces permits simple and easy standardized calibration of a CT system. The calibrator and its related method of use further includes use of air or of particular fluids for filling various openings, as part of a selected configuration of the set of pieces.

  5. Calibration Of Oxygen Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalenski, M. A.; Rowe, E. L.; Mcphee, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Readings corrected for temperature, pressure, and humidity of air. Program for handheld computer developed to ensure accuracy of oxygen monitors in National Transonic Facility, where liquid nitrogen stored. Calibration values, determined daily, based on entries of data on barometric pressure, temperature, and relative humidity. Output provided directly in millivolts.

  6. Pleiades Absolute Calibration : Inflight Calibration Sites and Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachérade, S.; Fourest, S.; Gamet, P.; Lebègue, L.

    2012-07-01

    In-flight calibration of space sensors once in orbit is a decisive step to be able to fulfil the mission objectives. This article presents the methods of the in-flight absolute calibration processed during the commissioning phase. Four In-flight calibration methods are used: absolute calibration, cross-calibration with reference sensors such as PARASOL or MERIS, multi-temporal monitoring and inter-bands calibration. These algorithms are based on acquisitions over natural targets such as African deserts, Antarctic sites, La Crau (Automatic calibration station) and Oceans (Calibration over molecular scattering) or also new extra-terrestrial sites such as the Moon and selected stars. After an overview of the instrument and a description of the calibration sites, it is pointed out how each method is able to address one or several aspects of the calibration. We focus on how these methods complete each other in their operational use, and how they help building a coherent set of information that addresses all aspects of in-orbit calibration. Finally, we present the perspectives that the high level of agility of PLEIADES offers for the improvement of its calibration and a better characterization of the calibration sites.

  7. Simplified Vicarious Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Thomas; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary

    2010-01-01

    A measurement-based radiance estimation approach for vicarious radiometric calibration of spaceborne multispectral remote sensing systems has been developed. This simplified process eliminates the use of radiative transfer codes and reduces the number of atmospheric assumptions required to perform sensor calibrations. Like prior approaches, the simplified method involves the collection of ground truth data coincident with the overpass of the remote sensing system being calibrated, but this approach differs from the prior techniques in both the nature of the data collected and the manner in which the data are processed. In traditional vicarious radiometric calibration, ground truth data are gathered using ground-viewing spectroradiometers and one or more sun photometer( s), among other instruments, located at a ground target area. The measured data from the ground-based instruments are used in radiative transfer models to estimate the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) target radiances at the time of satellite overpass. These TOA radiances are compared with the satellite sensor readings to radiometrically calibrate the sensor. Traditional vicarious radiometric calibration methods require that an atmospheric model be defined such that the ground-based observations of solar transmission and diffuse-to-global ratios are in close agreement with the radiative transfer code estimation of these parameters. This process is labor-intensive and complex, and can be prone to errors. The errors can be compounded because of approximations in the model and inaccurate assumptions about the radiative coupling between the atmosphere and the terrain. The errors can increase the uncertainty of the TOA radiance estimates used to perform the radiometric calibration. In comparison, the simplified approach does not use atmospheric radiative transfer models and involves fewer assumptions concerning the radiative transfer properties of the atmosphere. This new technique uses two neighboring uniform

  8. Mercury CEM Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  9. Uncertainty and calibration analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.

    1991-03-01

    All measurements contain some deviation from the true value which is being measured. In the common vernacular this deviation between the true value and the measured value is called an inaccuracy, an error, or a mistake. Since all measurements contain errors, it is necessary to accept that there is a limit to how accurate a measurement can be. The undertainty interval combined with the confidence level, is one measure of the accuracy for a measurement or value. Without a statement of uncertainty (or a similar parameter) it is not possible to evaluate if the accuracy of the measurement, or data, is appropriate. The preparation of technical reports, calibration evaluations, and design calculations should consider the accuracy of measurements and data being used. There are many methods to accomplish this. This report provides a consistent method for the handling of measurement tolerances, calibration evaluations and uncertainty calculations. The SRS Quality Assurance (QA) Program requires that the uncertainty of technical data and instrument calibrations be acknowledged and estimated. The QA Program makes some specific technical requirements related to the subject but does not provide a philosophy or method on how uncertainty should be estimated. This report was prepared to provide a technical basis to support the calculation of uncertainties and the calibration of measurement and test equipment for any activity within the Experimental Thermal-Hydraulics (ETH) Group. The methods proposed in this report provide a graded approach for estimating the uncertainty of measurements, data, and calibrations. The method is based on the national consensus standard, ANSI/ASME PTC 19.1.

  10. ``Calibration-on-the-spot'': How to calibrate an EMCCD camera from its images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Kim I.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    In localization-based microscopy, super-resolution is obtained by analyzing isolated diffraction-limited spots imaged, typically, with EMCCD cameras. To compare experiments and calculate localization precision, the photon-to-signal amplification factor is needed but unknown without a calibration of the camera. Here we show how this can be done post festum from just a recorded image. We demonstrate this (i) theoretically, mathematically, (ii) by analyzing images recorded with an EMCCD camera, and (iii) by analyzing simulated EMCCD images for which we know the true values of parameters. In summary, our method of calibration-on-the-spot allows calibration of a camera with unknown settings from old images on file, with no other info needed. Consequently, calibration-on-the-spot also makes future camera calibrations before and after measurements unnecessary, because the calibration is encoded in recorded images during the measurement itself, and can at any later time be decoded with calibration-on-the-spot. This work was supported by the Lundbeck Foundation and the Danish Council for Strategic Research Grant No. 10-092322 (PolyNano).

  11. Evaluation of the Amount of Debris extruded apically by using Conv-entional Syringe, Endovac and Ultrasonic Irrigation Technique: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Tambe, Varsha H; Nagmode, Pradnya S; Vishwas, Jayshree R; P, Saujanya K; Angadi, Prabakar; Ali, Fareedi Mukram

    2013-01-01

    Background: To compare the amount of debris extruded apically by using conventional syringe, Endovac & Ultrasonic irrigation. Materials & Methods: Thirty freshly extracted mandibular premolars were selected, working length was determined and mounted in a debris and collection apparatus. The canals were prepared. After each instrument change, 1 ml. of 3% sodium hypochlorite was used as irrigation. Debris extruded apically by using conventional syringe, endovac& ultrasonic irrigation tech, was measured using the electronic balance to determine its weight and statistical analysis was performed. The mean difference between the groups was determined using statistical analysis within the groups &between the groups for equal variances. Results: Among all the groups, significantly less debris were found apically in the Endovac group (0.96) compared to conventional and ultrasonic group (1.23) syringe. Conclusion: The present study showed that endovac system extrudes less amount of debris apically as compared to ultrasonic followed by conventional so incidence of flare up can be reduce by using endovac irrigation system. How to cite this article: Tambe V H, Nagmode P S, Vishwas J R, Saujanya K P, Angadi P, Ali F M. Evaluation of the Amount of Debris extruded apically by using Conventional Syringe, Endovac and Ultrasonic Irrigation Technique: An In Vitro Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):63-66. PMID:24155604

  12. Acceptability of Rapid Point-of-Care Hepatitis C Tests Among People Who Inject Drugs and Utilize Syringe-Exchange Programs.

    PubMed

    Barocas, Joshua A; Linas, Benjamin P; Kim, Arthur Y; Fangman, John; Westergaard, Ryan P

    2016-03-01

    People who inject drugs may benefit from point-of-care hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing offered at syringe exchanges. We sought to understand whether this population would be willing to undergo rapid HCV testing. We found that there was broad support for rapid HCV testing, especially among younger people who inject drugs with high perceived risk. PMID:27191007

  13. Acceptability of Rapid Point-of-Care Hepatitis C Tests Among People Who Inject Drugs and Utilize Syringe-Exchange Programs

    PubMed Central

    Barocas, Joshua A.; Linas, Benjamin P.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Fangman, John; Westergaard, Ryan P.

    2016-01-01

    People who inject drugs may benefit from point-of-care hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing offered at syringe exchanges. We sought to understand whether this population would be willing to undergo rapid HCV testing. We found that there was broad support for rapid HCV testing, especially among younger people who inject drugs with high perceived risk. PMID:27191007

  14. Neighborhood differences in patterns of syringe access, use, and discard among injection drug users: implications for HIV outreach and prevention education.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, David; Shaw, Susan; Teng, Wei; Hiser, Poppy; Singer, Merrill

    2003-09-01

    The article presents results from the Syringe Access, Use, and Discard: Context in AIDS Risk research project comparing two neighborhoods by (1) socioeconomic and demographic characteristics; (2) patterns of syringe access, use, and discard; and (3) encounters with a local human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) outreach project targeted to injection drug users (IDUs). The results show that IDUs in more economically advantaged neighborhoods were more likely to acquire syringes from a single source (rather than multiple sources), more likely to inject alone in their own residence (rather than public injection locales), and more likely to dispose of syringes in private garbage cans rather alleys or dumpsters. These results are further associated with the likelihood of encountering street outreach workers, with IDUs in more affluent neighborhoods much less likely to have any such contacts. Based on the different patterns of access, use, and discard evident in each neighborhood, the results indicate that different and more carefully tailored local outreach and prevention strategies are urgently needed.

  15. Mercury Calibration System

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

    2009-03-11

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on

  16. Automated Gravimetric Calibration to Optimize the Accuracy and Precision of TECAN Freedom EVO Liquid Handler.

    PubMed

    Bessemans, Laurent; Jully, Vanessa; de Raikem, Caroline; Albanese, Mathieu; Moniotte, Nicolas; Silversmet, Pascal; Lemoine, Dominique

    2016-10-01

    High-throughput screening technologies are increasingly integrated into the formulation development process of biopharmaceuticals. The performance of liquid handling systems is dependent on the ability to deliver accurate and precise volumes of specific reagents to ensure process quality. We have developed an automated gravimetric calibration procedure to adjust the accuracy and evaluate the precision of the TECAN Freedom EVO liquid handling system. Volumes from 3 to 900 µL using calibrated syringes and fixed tips were evaluated with various solutions, including aluminum hydroxide and phosphate adjuvants, β-casein, sucrose, sodium chloride, and phosphate-buffered saline. The methodology to set up liquid class pipetting parameters for each solution was to split the process in three steps: (1) screening of predefined liquid class, including different pipetting parameters; (2) adjustment of accuracy parameters based on a calibration curve; and (3) confirmation of the adjustment. The run of appropriate pipetting scripts, data acquisition, and reports until the creation of a new liquid class in EVOware was fully automated. The calibration and confirmation of the robotic system was simple, efficient, and precise and could accelerate data acquisition for a wide range of biopharmaceutical applications. PMID:26905719

  17. Automated Gravimetric Calibration to Optimize the Accuracy and Precision of TECAN Freedom EVO Liquid Handler

    PubMed Central

    Bessemans, Laurent; Jully, Vanessa; de Raikem, Caroline; Albanese, Mathieu; Moniotte, Nicolas; Silversmet, Pascal; Lemoine, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screening technologies are increasingly integrated into the formulation development process of biopharmaceuticals. The performance of liquid handling systems is dependent on the ability to deliver accurate and precise volumes of specific reagents to ensure process quality. We have developed an automated gravimetric calibration procedure to adjust the accuracy and evaluate the precision of the TECAN Freedom EVO liquid handling system. Volumes from 3 to 900 µL using calibrated syringes and fixed tips were evaluated with various solutions, including aluminum hydroxide and phosphate adjuvants, β-casein, sucrose, sodium chloride, and phosphate-buffered saline. The methodology to set up liquid class pipetting parameters for each solution was to split the process in three steps: (1) screening of predefined liquid class, including different pipetting parameters; (2) adjustment of accuracy parameters based on a calibration curve; and (3) confirmation of the adjustment. The run of appropriate pipetting scripts, data acquisition, and reports until the creation of a new liquid class in EVOware was fully automated. The calibration and confirmation of the robotic system was simple, efficient, and precise and could accelerate data acquisition for a wide range of biopharmaceutical applications. PMID:26905719

  18. A Comparison of Two Balance Calibration Model Building Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLoach, Richard; Ulbrich, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    Simulated strain-gage balance calibration data is used to compare the accuracy of two balance calibration model building methods for different noise environments and calibration experiment designs. The first building method obtains a math model for the analysis of balance calibration data after applying a candidate math model search algorithm to the calibration data set. The second building method uses stepwise regression analysis in order to construct a model for the analysis. Four balance calibration data sets were simulated in order to compare the accuracy of the two math model building methods. The simulated data sets were prepared using the traditional One Factor At a Time (OFAT) technique and the Modern Design of Experiments (MDOE) approach. Random and systematic errors were introduced in the simulated calibration data sets in order to study their influence on the math model building methods. Residuals of the fitted calibration responses and other statistical metrics were compared in order to evaluate the calibration models developed with different combinations of noise environment, experiment design, and model building method. Overall, predicted math models and residuals of both math model building methods show very good agreement. Significant differences in model quality were attributable to noise environment, experiment design, and their interaction. Generally, the addition of systematic error significantly degraded the quality of calibration models developed from OFAT data by either method, but MDOE experiment designs were more robust with respect to the introduction of a systematic component of the unexplained variance.

  19. MODIS Solar Reflective Calibration Traceability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Long-term climate data records often consist of observations made by multiple sensors. It is, therefore, extremely important to have instrument overlap, to be able to track instrument stability, to quantify, measurement uncertainties, and to establish absolute scale traceable to the International System of Units (SI). The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a key instrument for both the Terra and Aqua missions, which were launched in December 1999 and May 2002, respectively. It has 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) with wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.2 micrometers and observes the Earth at three nadir spatial resolutions: 0.25km, 0.5km, and 1km. MODIS RSB on-orbit calibration is reflectance based with reference to the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) of its on-board solar diffuser (SD). The SD BRF characterization was made pre-launch by the instrument vendor using reference samples traceable directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). On-orbit SD reflectance degradation is tracked by an on-board solar diffuser monitor (SDSM). This paper provides details of this calibration chain, from prelaunch to on-orbit operation, and associated uncertainty assessments. Using MODIS as an example, this paper also discusses challenges and key design requirements for future missions developed for accurate climate studies.

  20. Input calibration for negative originals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuijn, Chris

    1995-04-01

    One of the major challenges in the prepress environment consists of controlling the electronic color reproduction process such that a perfect match of any original can be realized. Whether this goal can be reached depends on many factors such as the dynamic range of the input device (scanner, camera), the color gamut of the output device (dye sublimation printer, ink-jet printer, offset), the color management software etc. The characterization of the color behavior of the peripheral devices is therefore very important. Photographs and positive transparents reflect the original scene pretty well; for negative originals, however, there is no obvious link to either the original scene or a particular print of the negative under consideration. In this paper, we establish a method to scan negatives and to convert the scanned data to a calibrated RGB space, which is known colorimetrically. This method is based on the reconstruction of the original exposure conditions (i.e., original scene) which generated the negative. Since the characteristics of negative film are quite diverse, a special calibration is required for each combination of scanner and film type.

  1. Absolute calibration of sniffer probes on Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseev, D.; Laqua, H. P.; Marsen, S.; Stange, T.; Braune, H.; Erckmann, V.; Gellert, F.; Oosterbeek, J. W.

    2016-08-01

    Here we report the first measurements of the power levels of stray radiation in the vacuum vessel of Wendelstein 7-X using absolutely calibrated sniffer probes. The absolute calibration is achieved by using calibrated sources of stray radiation and the implicit measurement of the quality factor of the Wendelstein 7-X empty vacuum vessel. Normalized absolute calibration coefficients agree with the cross-calibration coefficients that are obtained by the direct measurements, indicating that the measured absolute calibration coefficients and stray radiation levels in the vessel are valid. Close to the launcher, the stray radiation in the empty vessel reaches power levels up to 340 kW/m2 per MW injected beam power. Furthest away from the launcher, i.e., half a toroidal turn, still 90 kW/m2 per MW injected beam power is measured.

  2. Hydrometer calibration by hydrostatic weighing with automated liquid surface positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, Jesus; Wright, John D.; Bean, Vern E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe an automated apparatus for calibrating hydrometers by hydrostatic weighing (Cuckow's method) in tridecane, a liquid of known, stable density, and with a relatively low surface tension and contact angle against glass. The apparatus uses a laser light sheet and a laser power meter to position the tridecane surface at the hydrometer scale mark to be calibrated with an uncertainty of 0.08 mm. The calibration results have an expanded uncertainty (with a coverage factor of 2) of 100 parts in 106 or less of the liquid density. We validated the apparatus by comparisons using water, toluene, tridecane and trichloroethylene, and found agreement within 40 parts in 106 or less. The new calibration method is consistent with earlier, manual calibrations performed by NIST. When customers use calibrated hydrometers, they may encounter uncertainties of 370 parts in 106 or larger due to surface tension, contact angle and temperature effects.

  3. Absolute calibration of sniffer probes on Wendelstein 7-X.

    PubMed

    Moseev, D; Laqua, H P; Marsen, S; Stange, T; Braune, H; Erckmann, V; Gellert, F; Oosterbeek, J W

    2016-08-01

    Here we report the first measurements of the power levels of stray radiation in the vacuum vessel of Wendelstein 7-X using absolutely calibrated sniffer probes. The absolute calibration is achieved by using calibrated sources of stray radiation and the implicit measurement of the quality factor of the Wendelstein 7-X empty vacuum vessel. Normalized absolute calibration coefficients agree with the cross-calibration coefficients that are obtained by the direct measurements, indicating that the measured absolute calibration coefficients and stray radiation levels in the vessel are valid. Close to the launcher, the stray radiation in the empty vessel reaches power levels up to 340 kW/m(2) per MW injected beam power. Furthest away from the launcher, i.e., half a toroidal turn, still 90 kW/m(2) per MW injected beam power is measured. PMID:27587121

  4. The Calibration Reference Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, P.; Miller, T.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a software architecture and implementation for using rules to determine which calibration files are appropriate for calibrating a given observation. This new system, the Calibration Reference Data System (CRDS), replaces what had been previously used for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) calibration pipelines, the Calibration Database System (CDBS). CRDS will be used for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) calibration pipelines, and is currently being used for HST calibration pipelines. CRDS can be easily generalized for use in similar applications that need a rules-based system for selecting the appropriate item for a given dataset; we give some examples of such generalizations that will likely be used for JWST. The core functionality of the Calibration Reference Data System is available under an Open Source license. CRDS is briefly contrasted with a sampling of other similar systems used at other observatories.

  5. Calibration of the Urbana lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerny, T.; Sechrist, C. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A method for calibrating data obtained by the Urban sodium lidar system is presented. First, an expression relating the number of photocounts originating from a specific altitude range to the soodium concentration is developed. This relation is then simplified by normalizing the sodium photocounts with photocounts originating from the Rayleigh region of the atmosphere. To evaluate the calibration expression, the laser linewidth must be known. Therefore, a method for measuring the laser linewidth using a Fabry-Perot interferometer is given. The laser linewidth was found to be 6 + or - 2.5 pm. Problems due to photomultiplier tube overloading are discussed. Finally, calibrated data is presented. The sodium column abundance exhibits something close to a sinusoidal variation throughout the year with the winter months showing an enhancement of a factor of 5 to 7 over the summer months.

  6. Evaluating calibrations of normal incident pyrheliometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignola, Frank; Lin, Fuding

    2010-08-01

    When an Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer is calibrated against an Eppley Hickey Frieden Absolute Cavity Radiometer, the instrument systematically deviates from the absolute cavity readings. The reason for this deviation is not understood. Comparisons are made between one pyrheliometer and an absolute cavity radiometer on selected clear days over a period of 8 months in Eugene, Oregon. The ratios of the readings from the two instruments are correlated against wind speed, pressure, temperature, relative humidity, beam intensity, and zenith angle to determine if any of these parameters statistically influence the calibration process. Wind speed, pressure, beam intensity, and air mass are shown to be statistically significant factors in determining the responsivity of the normal incident pyrheliometer. The results of these tests are evaluated and discussed. Use of air mass instead of zenith angle is proposed for calibration reports.

  7. Gap Test Calibrations and Their Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandusky, Harold

    2011-06-01

    Common tests for measuring the threshold for shock initiation are the NOL large scale gap test (LSGT) with a 50.8-mm diameter donor/gap and the expanded large scale gap test (ELSGT) with a 95.3-mm diameter donor/gap. Despite the same specifications for the explosive donor and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) gap in both tests, calibration of shock pressure in the gap versus distance from the donor scales by a factor of 1.75, not the 1.875 difference in their sizes. Recently reported model calculations suggest that the scaling discrepancy results from the viscoelastic properties of PMMA in combination with different methods for obtaining shock pressure. This is supported by the consistent scaling of these donors when calibrated in water-filled aquariums. Calibrations with water gaps will be provided and compared with PMMA gaps. Scaling for other donor systems will also be provided. Shock initiation data with water gaps will be reviewed.

  8. Gap Test Calibrations And Their Scalin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandusky, Harold

    2012-03-01

    Common tests for measuring the threshold for shock initiation are the NOL large scale gap test (LSGT) with a 50.8-mm diameter donor/gap and the expanded large scale gap test (ELSGT) with a 95.3-mm diameter donor/gap. Despite the same specifications for the explosive donor and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) gap in both tests, calibration of shock pressure in the gap versus distance from the donor scales by a factor of 1.75, not the 1.875 difference in their sizes. Recently reported model calculations suggest that the scaling discrepancy results from the viscoelastic properties of PMMA in combination with different methods for obtaining shock pressure. This is supported by the consistent scaling of these donors when calibrated in water-filled aquariums. Calibrations and their scaling are compared for other donors with PMMA gaps and for various donors in water.

  9. Multivariate Regression with Calibration*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han; Wang, Lie; Zhao, Tuo

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new method named calibrated multivariate regression (CMR) for fitting high dimensional multivariate regression models. Compared to existing methods, CMR calibrates the regularization for each regression task with respect to its noise level so that it is simultaneously tuning insensitive and achieves an improved finite-sample performance. Computationally, we develop an efficient smoothed proximal gradient algorithm which has a worst-case iteration complexity O(1/ε), where ε is a pre-specified numerical accuracy. Theoretically, we prove that CMR achieves the optimal rate of convergence in parameter estimation. We illustrate the usefulness of CMR by thorough numerical simulations and show that CMR consistently outperforms other high dimensional multivariate regression methods. We also apply CMR on a brain activity prediction problem and find that CMR is as competitive as the handcrafted model created by human experts. PMID:25620861

  10. Phase calibration generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigman, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    A phase calibration system was developed for the Deep Space Stations to generate reference microwave comb tones which are mixed in with signals received by the antenna. These reference tones are used to remove drifts of the station's receiving system from the detected data. This phase calibration system includes a cable stabilizer which transfers a 20 MHz reference signal from the control room to the antenna cone. The cable stabilizer compensates for delay changes in the long cable which connects its control room subassembly to its antenna cone subassembly in such a way that the 20 MHz is transferred to the cone with no significant degradation of the hydrogen maser atomic clock stability. The 20 MHz reference is used by the comb generator and is also available for use as a reference for receiver LO's in the cone.

  11. Environmental calibration chamber operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal vacuum capabilities are provided for the development, calibration, and functional operation checks of flight sensors, sources, and laboratory and field instruments. Two systems are available. The first is a 46 cm diameter diffusion pumped vacuum chambler of the bell jar variety. It has an internal thermal shroud, LN2 old trap, two viewing ports, and various electrical and fluid feedthroughs. The other, also an oil diffusion pumped system, consists of a 1.8 m diameter by 2.5 m long stainless steel vacuum tank, associated pumping and control equipment, a liquid nitrogen storage and transfer system and internal IR/visible calibration sources. This is a two story system with the chamber located on one floor and the pumping/cryogenic systems located on the floor below.

  12. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  13. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, John P.; Larson, Ronald A.; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Hall, Harold J.; Stoddard, Billy D.; Davis, Sean G.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Conrad, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  14. Automatic volume calibration system

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, A.J.; Aaron, C.C.

    1985-05-06

    The Automatic Volume Calibration System presently consists of three independent volume-measurement subsystems and can possibly be expanded to five subsystems. When completed, the system will manually or automatically perform the sequence of valve-control and data-acquisition operations required to measure given volumes. An LSI-11 minicomputer controls the vacuum and pressure sources and controls solenoid control valves to open and close various volumes. The input data are obtained from numerous displacement, temperature, and pressure sensors read by the LSI-11. The LSI-11 calculates the unknown volume from the data acquired during the sequence of valve operations. The results, based on the Ideal Gas Law, also provide information for feedback and control. This paper describes the volume calibration system, its subsystems, and the integration of the various instrumentation used in the system's design and development. 11 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Fast calibration of gas flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, R. V.; Wilson, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    Digital unit automates calibration sequence using calculator IC and programmable read-only memory to solve calibration equations. Infrared sensors start and stop calibration sequence. Instrument calibrates mass flowmeters or rotameters where flow measurement is based on mass or volume. This automatic control reduces operator time by 80 percent. Solid-state components are very reliable, and digital character allows system accuracy to be determined primarily by accuracy of transducers.

  16. Calibration of Germanium Resistance Thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladner, D.; Urban, E.; Mason, F. C.

    1987-01-01

    Largely completed thermometer-calibration cryostat and probe allows six germanium resistance thermometers to be calibrated at one time at superfluid-helium temperatures. In experiments involving several such thermometers, use of this calibration apparatus results in substantial cost savings. Cryostat maintains temperature less than 2.17 K through controlled evaporation and removal of liquid helium from Dewar. Probe holds thermometers to be calibrated and applies small amount of heat as needed to maintain precise temperature below 2.17 K.

  17. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  18. Calibration of hydrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorefice, Salvatore; Malengo, Andrea

    2006-10-01

    After a brief description of the different methods employed in periodic calibration of hydrometers used in most cases to measure the density of liquids in the range between 500 kg m-3 and 2000 kg m-3, particular emphasis is given to the multipoint procedure based on hydrostatic weighing, known as well as Cuckow's method. The features of the calibration apparatus and the procedure used at the INRiM (formerly IMGC-CNR) density laboratory have been considered to assess all relevant contributions involved in the calibration of different kinds of hydrometers. The uncertainty is strongly dependent on the kind of hydrometer; in particular, the results highlight the importance of the density of the reference buoyant liquid, the temperature of calibration and the skill of operator in the reading of the scale in the whole assessment of the uncertainty. It is also interesting to realize that for high-resolution hydrometers (division of 0.1 kg m-3), the uncertainty contribution of the density of the reference liquid is the main source of the total uncertainty, but its importance falls under about 50% for hydrometers with a division of 0.5 kg m-3 and becomes somewhat negligible for hydrometers with a division of 1 kg m-3, for which the reading uncertainty is the predominant part of the total uncertainty. At present the best INRiM result is obtained with commercially available hydrometers having a scale division of 0.1 kg m-3, for which the relative uncertainty is about 12 × 10-6.

  19. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    H. H. Liu

    2003-02-14

    This report has documented the methodologies and the data used for developing rock property sets for three infiltration maps. Model calibration is necessary to obtain parameter values appropriate for the scale of the process being modeled. Although some hydrogeologic property data (prior information) are available, these data cannot be directly used to predict flow and transport processes because they were measured on scales smaller than those characterizing property distributions in models used for the prediction. Since model calibrations were done directly on the scales of interest, the upscaling issue was automatically considered. On the other hand, joint use of data and the prior information in inversions can further increase the reliability of the developed parameters compared with those for the prior information. Rock parameter sets were developed for both the mountain and drift scales because of the scale-dependent behavior of fracture permeability. Note that these parameter sets, except those for faults, were determined using the 1-D simulations. Therefore, they cannot be directly used for modeling lateral flow because of perched water in the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain. Further calibration may be needed for two- and three-dimensional modeling studies. As discussed above in Section 6.4, uncertainties for these calibrated properties are difficult to accurately determine, because of the inaccuracy of simplified methods for this complex problem or the extremely large computational expense of more rigorous methods. One estimate of uncertainty that may be useful to investigators using these properties is the uncertainty used for the prior information. In most cases, the inversions did not change the properties very much with respect to the prior information. The Output DTNs (including the input and output files for all runs) from this study are given in Section 9.4.

  20. Calibration Matters: Advances in Strapdown Airborne Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, D.

    2015-12-01

    Using a commercial navigation-grade strapdown inertial measurement unit (IMU) for airborne gravimetry can be advantageous in terms of cost, handling, and space consumption compared to the classical stable-platform spring gravimeters. Up to now, however, large sensor errors made it impossible to reach the mGal-level using such type IMUs as they are not designed or optimized for this kind of application. Apart from a proper error-modeling in the filtering process, specific calibration methods that are tailored to the application of aerogravity may help to bridge this gap and to improve their performance. Based on simulations, a quantitative analysis is presented on how much IMU sensor errors, as biases, scale factors, cross couplings, and thermal drifts distort the determination of gravity and the deflection of the vertical (DOV). Several lab and in-field calibration methods are briefly discussed, and calibration results are shown for an iMAR RQH unit. In particular, a thermal lab calibration of its QA2000 accelerometers greatly improved the long-term drift behavior. Latest results from four recent airborne gravimetry campaigns confirm the effectiveness of the calibrations applied, with cross-over accuracies reaching 1.0 mGal (0.6 mGal after cross-over adjustment) and DOV accuracies reaching 1.1 arc seconds after cross-over adjustment.

  1. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP

    DOEpatents

    Owren, H.M.; Johnson, B.M.; Smith, V.L.

    1958-04-22

    The time calibrator of an electric signal displayed on an oscilloscope is described. In contrast to the conventional technique of using time-calibrated divisions on the face of the oscilloscope, this invention provides means for directly superimposing equal time spaced markers upon a signal displayed upon an oscilloscope. More explicitly, the present invention includes generally a generator for developing a linear saw-tooth voltage and a circuit for combining a high-frequency sinusoidal voltage of a suitable amplitude and frequency with the saw-tooth voltage to produce a resultant sweep deflection voltage having a wave shape which is substantially linear with respect to time between equal time spaced incremental plateau regions occurring once each cycle of the sinusoidal voltage. The foregoing sweep voltage when applied to the horizontal deflection plates in combination with a signal to be observed applied to the vertical deflection plates of a cathode ray oscilloscope produces an image on the viewing screen which is essentially a display of the signal to be observed with respect to time. Intensified spots, or certain other conspicuous indications corresponding to the equal time spaced plateau regions of said sweep voltage, appear superimposed upon said displayed signal, which indications are therefore suitable for direct time calibration purposes.

  2. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    T. Ghezzehej

    2004-10-04

    The purpose of this model report is to document the calibrated properties model that provides calibrated property sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models (UZ models). The calibration of the property sets is performed through inverse modeling. This work followed, and was planned in, ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 1.2.6 and 2.1.1.6). Direct inputs to this model report were derived from the following upstream analysis and model reports: ''Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170038]); ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169855]); ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]); ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]). Additionally, this model report incorporates errata of the previous version and closure of the Key Technical Issue agreement TSPAI 3.26 (Section 6.2.2 and Appendix B), and it is revised for improved transparency.

  3. Calibration of MICROSCOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiu, E.; Rodrigues, M.; Touboul, P.; Pradels, G.

    The MICROSCOPE mission is planned for launch in early 2009. It aims to verify the Equivalence Principle to an accuracy of 10-15, which is currently difficult to obtain on Earth because of the intrinsic limitations of the torsion pendulum and disturbing phenomena, like seismic activity. In space the experiment can take advantage of the quiet environment provided by a drag-free satellite. The instrument used for the test is a differential electrostatic accelerometer composed of two inertial sensors with test-masses made of different materials: one in Platinum Rhodium alloy, the other in Titanium alloy. The space experiment will also benefit from a second differential accelerometer with both test-masses of the same material, which will be used as a reference instrument to characterise the disturbing signals and sensitivities. The in-orbit calibration of the instrument is mandatory to validate the space test and several procedures have been previously proposed, taking advantage of the satellite propulsion system or the a priori knowledge of natural in-orbit applied accelerations. Due to the actual configuration of the MICROSCOPE propulsion system, the possibility of accurate satellite manoeuvres is limited but sufficient. This paper presents the necessary compromise between the knowledge of satellite and instrument parameters and the calibration procedures. The scenario of the MICROSCOPE in-orbit calibration phase is finely defined in agreement with the required performances for the EP test accuracy.

  4. Traceable periodic force calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, Ch; Kieckenap, G.; Glöckner, B.; Buß, A.; Kumme, R.

    2012-06-01

    A procedure for dynamic force calibration using sinusoidal excitations of force transducers is described. The method is based on a sinusoidal excitation of force transducers equipped with an additional top mass excited with an electrodynamic shaker system. The acting dynamic force can in this way be determined according to Newton's law as mass times acceleration, whereby the acceleration is measured on the surface of the top mass with the aid of laser interferometers. The dynamic sensitivity, which is the ratio of the electrical output signal of the force transducer and the acting dynamic force, is the main point of interest of such a dynamic calibration. In addition to the sensitivity, the parameter stiffness and damping of the transducer can also be determined. The first part of the paper outlines a mathematical model to describe the dynamic behaviour of a transducer. This is followed by a presentation of the traceability of the measured quantities involved and their uncertainties. The paper finishes with an example calibration of a 25 kN strain gauge force transducer.

  5. Radiation calibration targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Several prominent features of Mars Pathfinder and surrounding terrain are seen in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder on July 4 (Sol 1), the spacecraft's first day on the Red Planet. Portions of a lander petal are at the lower part of the image. At the left, the mechanism for the high-gain antenna can be seen. The dark area along the right side of the image represents a portion of the low-gain antenna. The radiation calibration target is at the right. The calibration target is made up of a number of materials with well-characterized colors. The known colors of the calibration targets allow scientists to determine the true colors of the rocks and soils of Mars. Three bull's-eye rings provide a wide range of brightness for the camera, similar to a photographer's grayscale chart. In the middle of the bull's-eye is a 5-inch tall post that casts a shadow, which is distorted in this image due to its location with respect to the lander camera.

    A large rock is located at the near center of the image. Smaller rocks and areas of soil are strewn across the Martian terrain up to the horizon line.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  6. In situ hydrodynamic lateral force calibration of AFM colloidal probes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sangjin; Franck, Christian

    2011-11-01

    Lateral force microscopy (LFM) is an application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to sense lateral forces applied to the AFM probe tip. Recent advances in tissue engineering and functional biomaterials have shown a need for the surface characterization of their material and biochemical properties under the application of lateral forces. LFM equipped with colloidal probes of well-defined tip geometries has been a natural fit to address these needs but has remained limited to provide primarily qualitative results. For quantitative measurements, LFM requires the successful determination of the lateral force or torque conversion factor of the probe. Usually, force calibration results obtained in air are used for force measurements in liquids, but refractive index differences between air and liquids induce changes in the conversion factor. Furthermore, in the case of biochemically functionalized tips, damage can occur during calibration because tip-surface contact is inevitable in most calibration methods. Therefore, a nondestructive in situ lateral force calibration is desirable for LFM applications in liquids. Here we present an in situ hydrodynamic lateral force calibration method for AFM colloidal probes. In this method, the laterally scanned substrate surface generated a creeping Couette flow, which deformed the probe under torsion. The spherical geometry of the tip enabled the calculation of tip drag forces, and the lateral torque conversion factor was calibrated from the lateral voltage change and estimated torque. Comparisons with lateral force calibrations performed in air show that the hydrodynamic lateral force calibration method enables quantitative lateral force measurements in liquid using colloidal probes.

  7. Improved dewpoint-probe calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, J. G.; Theodore, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    Relatively-simple pressure-control apparatus calibrates dewpoint probes considerably faster than conventional methods, with no loss of accuracy. Technique requires only pressure measurement at each calibration point and single absolute-humidity measurement at beginning of run. Several probes can be calibrated simultaneously and points can be checked above room temperature.

  8. Dynamic Calibration of Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. W.; Davis, W. T.; Davis, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    Sinusoidal calibration signal produced in 4- to 100-Hz range. Portable oscillating-pressure device measures dynamic characteristics of pressure transducers installed in models or aircraft at frequency and oscillating-pressure ranges encountered during unsteady-pressure-measurement tests. Calibration is over range of frequencies and amplitudes not available with commercial acoustic calibration devices.

  9. Internet-based calibration of a multifunction calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    BUNTING BACA,LISA A.; DUDA JR.,LEONARD E.; WALKER,RUSSELL M.; OLDHAM,NILE; PARKER,MARK

    2000-04-17

    A new way of providing calibration services is evolving which employs the Internet to expand present capabilities and make the calibration process more interactive. Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology are collaborating to set up and demonstrate a remote calibration of multifunction calibrators using this Internet-based technique that is becoming known as e-calibration. This paper describes the measurement philosophy and the Internet resources that can provide real-time audio/video/data exchange, consultation and training, as well as web-accessible test procedures, software and calibration reports. The communication system utilizes commercial hardware and software that should be easy to integrate into most calibration laboratories.

  10. Internet-Based Calibration of a Multifunction Calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    BUNTING BACA,LISA A.; DUDA JR.,LEONARD E.; WALKER,RUSSELL M.; OLDHAM,NILE; PARKER,MARK

    2000-12-19

    A new way of providing calibration services is evolving which employs the Internet to expand present capabilities and make the calibration process more interactive. Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology are collaborating to set up and demonstrate a remote calibration of multijunction calibrators using this Internet-based technique that is becoming known as e-calibration. This paper describes the measurement philosophy and the Internet resources that can provide real-time audio/video/data exchange, consultation and training, as well as web-accessible test procedures, software and calibration reports. The communication system utilizes commercial hardware and software that should be easy to integrate into most calibration laboratories.

  11. Calibration of triaxial fluxgate gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Vcelak, Jan

    2006-04-15

    The description of simple and fast calibration procedures used for double-probe triaxial fluxgate gradiometer is provided in this paper. The calibration procedure consists of three basic steps. In the first step both probes are calibrated independently in order to reach constant total field reading in every position. Both probes are numerically aligned in the second step in order that the gradient reading is zero in homogenous magnetic field. The third step consists of periodic drift calibration during measurement. The results and detailed description of each calibration step are presented and discussed in the paper. The gradiometer is finally verified during the detection of the metal object in the measuring grid.

  12. Mercury CEM Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2008-02-29

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks. The power industry desires to conduct at least a full year of monitoring before the formal monitoring and reporting requirement begins on January 1, 2009. It is important for the industry to have available reliable, turnkey equipment from CEM vendors. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The generators are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 requires that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards (Federal Register 2007). Traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury generators (EPA 2007). The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of generators by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the generator models that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The

  13. A variable acceleration calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas H.

    2011-12-01

    A variable acceleration calibration system that applies loads using gravitational and centripetal acceleration serves as an alternative, efficient and cost effective method for calibrating internal wind tunnel force balances. Two proof-of-concept variable acceleration calibration systems are designed, fabricated and tested. The NASA UT-36 force balance served as the test balance for the calibration experiments. The variable acceleration calibration systems are shown to be capable of performing three component calibration experiments with an approximate applied load error on the order of 1% of the full scale calibration loads. Sources of error are indentified using experimental design methods and a propagation of uncertainty analysis. Three types of uncertainty are indentified for the systems and are attributed to prediction error, calibration error and pure error. Angular velocity uncertainty is shown to be the largest indentified source of prediction error. The calibration uncertainties using a production variable acceleration based system are shown to be potentially equivalent to current methods. The production quality system can be realized using lighter materials and a more precise instrumentation. Further research is needed to account for balance deflection, forcing effects due to vibration, and large tare loads. A gyroscope measurement technique is shown to be capable of resolving the balance deflection angle calculation. Long term research objectives include a demonstration of a six degree of freedom calibration, and a large capacity balance calibration.

  14. Self-Calibrating Pressure Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A self-calibrating pressure transducer is disclosed. The device uses an embedded zirconia membrane which pumps a determined quantity of oxygen into the device. The associated pressure can be determined, and thus, the transducer pressure readings can be calibrated. The zirconia membrane obtains oxygen .from the surrounding environment when possible. Otherwise, an oxygen reservoir or other source is utilized. In another embodiment, a reversible fuel cell assembly is used to pump oxygen and hydrogen into the system. Since a known amount of gas is pumped across the cell, the pressure produced can be determined, and thus, the device can be calibrated. An isolation valve system is used to allow the device to be calibrated in situ. Calibration is optionally automated so that calibration can be continuously monitored. The device is preferably a fully integrated MEMS device. Since the device can be calibrated without removing it from the process, reductions in costs and down time are realized.

  15. OARE flight maneuvers and calibration measurements on STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.; Ritter, James R.; Larman, Kevin T.

    1994-01-01

    The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), which has flown on STS-40, STS-50, and STS-58, contains a three axis accelerometer with a single, nonpendulous, electrostatically suspended proofmass which can resolve accelerations to the nano-g level. The experiment also contains a full calibration station to permit in situ bias and scale factor calibration. This on-orbit calibration capability eliminates the large uncertainty of ground-based calibrations encountered with accelerometers flown in the past on the orbiter, thus providing absolute acceleration measurement accuracy heretofore unachievable. This is the first time accelerometer scale factor measurements have been performed on orbit. A detailed analysis of the calibration process is given along with results of the calibration factors from the on-orbit OARE flight measurements on STS-58. In addition, the analysis of OARE flight maneuver data used to validate the scale factor measurements in the sensor's most sensitive range is also presented. Estimates on calibration uncertainties are discussed. This provides bounds on the STS-58 absolute acceleration measurements for future applications.

  16. Comparison of magnetic probe calibration at nano and millitesla magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahl, Ryan A.; Rovey, Joshua L.; Pommerenke, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field probes are invaluable diagnostics for pulsed inductive plasma devices where field magnitudes on the order of tenths of tesla or larger are common. Typical methods of providing a broadband calibration of dot{{B}} probes involve either a Helmholtz coil driven by a function generator or a network analyzer. Both calibration methods typically produce field magnitudes of tens of microtesla or less, at least three and as many as six orders of magnitude lower than their intended use. This calibration factor is then assumed constant regardless of magnetic field magnitude and the effects of experimental setup are ignored. This work quantifies the variation in calibration factor observed when calibrating magnetic field probes in low field magnitudes. Calibration of two dot{{B}} probe designs as functions of frequency and field magnitude are presented. The first dot{{B}} probe design is the most commonly used design and is constructed from two hand-wound inductors in a differential configuration. The second probe uses surface mounted inductors in a differential configuration with balanced shielding to further reduce common mode noise. Calibration factors are determined experimentally using an 80.4 mm radius Helmholtz coil in two separate configurations over a frequency range of 100-1000 kHz. A conventional low magnitude calibration using a vector network analyzer produced a field magnitude of 158 nT and yielded calibration factors of 15 663 ± 1.7% and 4920 ± 0.6% {T}/{V {s}} at 457 kHz for the surface mounted and hand-wound probes, respectively. A relevant magnitude calibration using a pulsed-power setup with field magnitudes of 8.7-354 mT yielded calibration factors of 14 615 ± 0.3% and 4507 ± 0.4% {T}/{V {s}} at 457 kHz for the surface mounted inductor and hand-wound probe, respectively. Low-magnitude calibration resulted in a larger calibration factor, with an average difference of 9.7% for the surface mounted probe and 12.0% for the hand-wound probe. The

  17. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the

  18. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the

  19. Absolute radiometric calibration of Landsat using a pseudo invariant calibration site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helder, D.; Thome, K.J.; Mishra, N.; Chander, G.; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Angal, A.; Choi, Tae-young

    2013-01-01

    Pseudo invariant calibration sites (PICS) have been used for on-orbit radiometric trending of optical satellite systems for more than 15 years. This approach to vicarious calibration has demonstrated a high degree of reliability and repeatability at the level of 1-3% depending on the site, spectral channel, and imaging geometries. A variety of sensors have used this approach for trending because it is broadly applicable and easy to implement. Models to describe the surface reflectance properties, as well as the intervening atmosphere have also been developed to improve the precision of the method. However, one limiting factor of using PICS is that an absolute calibration capability has not yet been fully developed. Because of this, PICS are primarily limited to providing only long term trending information for individual sensors or cross-calibration opportunities between two sensors. This paper builds an argument that PICS can be used more extensively for absolute calibration. To illustrate this, a simple empirical model is developed for the well-known Libya 4 PICS based on observations by Terra MODIS and EO-1 Hyperion. The model is validated by comparing model predicted top-of-atmosphere reflectance values to actual measurements made by the Landsat ETM+ sensor reflective bands. Following this, an outline is presented to develop a more comprehensive and accurate PICS absolute calibration model that can be Système international d'unités (SI) traceable. These initial concepts suggest that absolute calibration using PICS is possible on a broad scale and can lead to improved on-orbit calibration capabilities for optical satellite sensors.

  20. Link calibration against receiver calibration: an assessment of GPS time transfer uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovera, G. D.; Torre, J.-M.; Sherwood, R.; Abgrall, M.; Courde, C.; Laas-Bourez, M.; Uhrich, P.

    2014-10-01

    We present a direct comparison between two different techniques for the relative calibration of time transfer between remote time scales when using the signals transmitted by the Global Positioning System (GPS). Relative calibration estimates the delay of equipment or the delay of a time transfer link with respect to reference equipment. It is based on the circulation of some travelling GPS equipment between the stations in the network, against which the local equipment is measured. Two techniques can be considered: first a station calibration by the computation of the hardware delays of the local GPS equipment; second the computation of a global hardware delay offset for the time transfer between the reference points of two remote time scales. This last technique is called a ‘link’ calibration, with respect to the other one, which is a ‘receiver’ calibration. The two techniques require different measurements on site, which change the uncertainty budgets, and we discuss this and related issues. We report on one calibration campaign organized during Autumn 2013 between Observatoire de Paris (OP), Paris, France, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (OCA), Calern, France, and NERC Space Geodesy Facility (SGF), Herstmonceux, United Kingdom. The travelling equipment comprised two GPS receivers of different types, along with the required signal generator and distribution amplifier, and one time interval counter. We show the different ways to compute uncertainty budgets, leading to improvement factors of 1.2 to 1.5 on the hardware delay uncertainties when comparing the relative link calibration to the relative receiver calibration.

  1. Calibration procedure for Slocum glider deployed optical instruments.

    PubMed

    Cetinić, Ivona; Toro-Farmer, Gerardo; Ragan, Matthew; Oberg, Carl; Jones, Burton H

    2009-08-31

    Recent developments in the field of the autonomous underwater vehicles allow the wide usage of these platforms as part of scientific experiments, monitoring campaigns and more. The vehicles are often equipped with sensors measuring temperature, conductivity, chlorophyll a fluorescence (Chl a), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence, phycoerithrin (PE) fluorescence and spectral volume scattering function at 117 degrees, providing users with high resolution, real time data. However, calibration of these instruments can be problematic. Most in situ calibrations are performed by deploying complementary instrument packages or water samplers in the proximity of the glider. Laboratory calibrations of the mounted sensors are difficult due to the placement of the instruments within the body of the vehicle. For the laboratory calibrations of the Slocum glider instruments we developed a small calibration chamber where we can perform precise calibrations of the optical instruments aboard our glider, as well as sensors from other deployment platforms. These procedures enable us to obtain pre- and post-deployment calibrations for optical fluorescence instruments, which may differ due to the biofouling and other physical damage that can occur during long-term glider deployments. We found that biofouling caused significant changes in the calibration scaling factors of fluorescent sensors, suggesting the need for consistent and repetitive calibrations for gliders as proposed in this paper.

  2. Multivariate calibration applied to the quantitative analysis of infrared spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Multivariate calibration methods are very useful for improving the precision, accuracy, and reliability of quantitative spectral analyses. Spectroscopists can more effectively use these sophisticated statistical tools if they have a qualitative understanding of the techniques involved. A qualitative picture of the factor analysis multivariate calibration methods of partial least squares (PLS) and principal component regression (PCR) is presented using infrared calibrations based upon spectra of phosphosilicate glass thin films on silicon wafers. Comparisons of the relative prediction abilities of four different multivariate calibration methods are given based on Monte Carlo simulations of spectral calibration and prediction data. The success of multivariate spectral calibrations is demonstrated for several quantitative infrared studies. The infrared absorption and emission spectra of thin-film dielectrics used in the manufacture of microelectronic devices demonstrate rapid, nondestructive at-line and in-situ analyses using PLS calibrations. Finally, the application of multivariate spectral calibrations to reagentless analysis of blood is presented. We have found that the determination of glucose in whole blood taken from diabetics can be precisely monitored from the PLS calibration of either mind- or near-infrared spectra of the blood. Progress toward the non-invasive determination of glucose levels in diabetics is an ultimate goal of this research. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  3. The absolute radiometric calibration of space-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Ronald Gene

    A reflectance based inflight calibration procedure is used to determine the radiance reaching the entrance pupil of a sensor. This procedure uses ground based measurements coupled with a radiative transfer code to characterize the effects the atmosphere has on the signal reaching the sensor. The computed radiance is compared to the digital count output of the sensor associated with the image of a test site. This provides an update to the preflight calibration of the system and a check on the on-board internal calibrator. This calibration procedure was used to perform a series of 5 calibrations of the LANDSAT-5 Thematic Mapper. The absolute calibration techniques were put to another test with a series of 3 calibration of the SPOT-1 High Resolution Visible sensors. The procedure for performing a satellite calibration was then used to demonstrate how a calibrated satellite sensor can be used to quantitatively evaluate surface reflectance over a wide range of surface features. Predicted reflectance factors were compared to values obtained from aircraft based radiometer data. A strong correlation was shown between reflectance values determined from satellite imagery and low flying aircraft data.

  4. ALTEA: The instrument calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaconte, V.; Belli, F.; Bidoli, V.; Casolino, M.; di Fino, L.; Narici, L.; Picozza, P.; Rinaldi, A.; Sannita, W. G.; Finetti, N.; Nurzia, G.; Rantucci, E.; Scrimaglio, R.; Segreto, E.; Schardt, D.

    2008-05-01

    The ALTEA program is an international and multi-disciplinary project aimed at studying particle radiation in space environment and its effects on astronauts’ brain functions, as the anomalous perception of light flashes first reported during Apollo missions. The ALTEA space facility includes a 6-silicon telescopes particle detector, and is onboard the International Space Station (ISS) since July 2006. In this paper, the detector calibration at the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS18 at GSI Darmstadt will be presented and compared to the Geant 3 Monte Carlo simulation. Finally, the results of a neural network analysis that was used for ion discrimination on fragmentation data will also be presented.

  5. Estimated uncertainty of calibrations of freestanding prismatic liquefied natural gas cargo tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Siegwarth, J.D.; LaBrecque, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    The accuracy of the tank calibrated by the photogrammetric technique was examined during the calibration of fifteen freestanding prismatic LNG transport tanks. This examination indicated that the calibration accuracy of the tanks calibrated in the storage position was better than plus or minus 0.1%. Additional factors influencing the accuracy of the calibration of the tanks, such as the effects of installing the tanks into the ship and loading the ships with LNG, were examined in the course of this work and the results are reported here. The various measurements used by various NBS personnel to analyze the calibration accuracy are detailed in the eight Appendices included in this report.

  6. Statistical design of mass spectrometry calibration procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, C.K.

    1996-11-01

    The main objective of this task was to agree on calibration procedures to estimate the system parameters (i.e., dead-time correction, ion-counting conversion efficiency, and detector efficiency factors) for SAL`s new Finnigan MAT-262 mass spectrometer. SAL will use this mass spectrometer in a clean-laboratory which was opened in December 1995 to measure uranium and plutonium isotopes on environmental samples. The Finnigan MAT-262 mass spectrometer has a multi-detector system with seven Faraday cup detectors and one ion- counter for the measurement of very small signals (e.g. 10{sup -17} Ampere range). ORNL has made preliminary estimates of the system parameters based on SAL`s experimental data measured in late 1994 when the Finnigan instrument was relatively new. SAL generated additional data in 1995 to verify the calibration procedures for estimating the dead-time correction factor, the ion-counting conversion factor and the Faraday cup detector efficiency factors. The system parameters estimated on the present data will have to be reestablished when the Finnigan MAT-262 is moved-to the new clean- laboratory. Different methods will be used to analyzed environmental samples than the current measurement methods being used. For example, the environmental samples will be electroplated on a single filament rather than using the current two filament system. An outline of the calibration standard operating procedure (SOP) is included.

  7. Use of Radiometrically Calibrated Flat-Plate Calibrators in Calibration of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas-García, D.; Méndez-Lango, E.

    2015-08-01

    Most commonly used, low-temperature, infrared thermometers have large fields of view sizes that make them difficult to be calibrated with narrow aperture blackbodies. Flat-plate calibrators with large emitting surfaces have been proposed for calibrating these infrared thermometers. Because the emissivity of the flat plate is not unity, its radiance temperature is wavelength dependent. For calibration, the wavelength pass band of the device under test should match that of the reference infrared thermometer. If the device under test and reference radiometer have different pass bands, then it is possible to calculate the corresponding correction if the emissivity of the flat plate is known. For example, a correction of at is required when calibrating a infrared thermometer with a "" radiometrically calibrated flat-plate calibrator. A method is described for using a radiometrically calibrated flat-plate calibrator that covers both cases of match and mismatch working wavelength ranges of a reference infrared thermometer and infrared thermometers to be calibrated with the flat-plate calibrator. Also, an application example is included in this paper.

  8. The MISR Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruegge, Carol J.; Diner, David J.; Duval, Valerie G.

    1996-01-01

    The Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) is currently under development for NASA's Earth Observing System. The instrument consists of nine pushbroom cameras, each with four spectral bands in the visible and near-infrared. The cameras point in different view directions to provide measurements from nadir to highly oblique view angles in the along-track plane. Multiple view-angle observations provide a unique resource for studies of clouds, aerosols, and the surface. MISR is built to challenging radiometric and geometric performance specifications. Radiometric accuracy, for example, must be within +/- 3%/ 1 sigma, and polarization insensitivity must be better than +/- 1 %. An onboard calibrator (OBC) provides monthly updates to the instrument gain coefficients. Spectralon diffuse panels are used within the OBC to provide a uniform target for the cameras to view. The absolute radiometric scale is established both preflight and in orbit through the use of detector standards. During the mission, ground data processing to accomplish radiometric calibration, geometric rectification and registration of the nine view-angle imagery, and geophysical retrievals will proceed in an automated fashion. A global dataset is produced every 9 days. This paper details the preflight characterization of the MISR instrument, the design of the OBC, and the radiance product processing.

  9. A Simple Accelerometer Calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, R. A.; Islamy, M. R. F.; Munir, M. M.; Latief, H.; Irsyam, M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    High possibility of earthquake could lead to the high number of victims caused by it. It also can cause other hazards such as tsunami, landslide, etc. In that case it requires a system that can examine the earthquake occurrence. Some possible system to detect earthquake is by creating a vibration sensor system using accelerometer. However, the output of the system is usually put in the form of acceleration data. Therefore, a calibrator system for accelerometer to sense the vibration is needed. In this study, a simple accelerometer calibrator has been developed using 12 V DC motor, optocoupler, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and AVR 328 microcontroller as controller system. The system uses the Pulse Wave Modulation (PWM) form microcontroller to control the motor rotational speed as response to vibration frequency. The frequency of vibration was read by optocoupler and then those data was used as feedback to the system. The results show that the systems could control the rotational speed and the vibration frequencies in accordance with the defined PWM.

  10. Optical calibration of SNO +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leming, Edward; SNO+ Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Situated 2 km underground in Sudbury, Northern Ontario, the SNO + detector consists of an acrylic sphere 12 m in diameter containing 780 tons of target mass, surrounded by approximately 9,500 PMTs. For SNO, this target mass was heavy water, however the change to SNO + is defined by the change of this target mass to a novel scintillator. With the lower energy threshold, low intrinsic radioactivity levels and the best shielding against muons and cosmogenic activation of all existing neutrino experiments, SNO + will be sensitive to exciting new physics. The experiment will be studying solar, reactor, super nova and geo-neutrinos, though the main purpose of SNO + is the search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of Te-130. To meet the requirements imposed by the physics on detector performance, a detailed optical calibration is needed. Source deployment must be kept to a minimum and eliminated if possible, in order to meet the stringent radiopurity requirements. This led to the development of the Embedded LED/laser Light Injection Entity (ELLIE) system. This talk provides a summary of the upgrades to from SNO to SNO +, discussing the requirements on and methods of optical calibration, focusing on the deployed laserball and ELLIE system.

  11. Multigamma-ray calibration sources

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.A.; Massey, T.N.

    1983-05-01

    We have calibrated a self-consistent set of multigamma-ray standards using the automated multi-spectrometry ..gamma..-ray counting facility at LLNL's Nuclear Chemistry Division. Pure sources of long-lived activity were produced by mass separation and/or chemical purification. The sources were counted individually and in combination on several different calibrated spectrometer systems. These systems utilize various detectors ranging from small (x-ray) detectors to large volume high-purity Ge detectors. This has allowed the use of the most ideal individual detector-efficiency characteristics for the determination of the relative ..gamma..-ray intensities. Precise energy measurements, reported earlier (Meyer, 1976) have been performed by an independent method. Both the energy and ..gamma..-ray-emission probabilities determined compare well with independently established values such as the recent ICRM intercomparison of /sup 152/Eu. We discuss our investigations aimed at resolving the shape of the efficiency response function up to 10 MeV for large volume Ge(Li) and high-purity Ge detectors. Recent results on the ..gamma..-ray-emission probabilities per decay for /sup 149/Gd and /sup 168/Tm multigamma-ray sources are discussed. For /sup 168/Tm, we deduce a 0.01% ..beta../sup -/ branch to the 87.73-keV level in /sup 168/Yb rather than the previous value which was a factor of 200 greater. In addition, we describe current cooperative efforts aimed at establishing a consistent set of data for short-lived fission products. Included are recent measurements on the bromine fission products with ..gamma.. rays up to 7 MeV.

  12. Dual-syringe reactive electrospinning of cross-linked hyaluronic acid hydrogel nanofibers for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuan; Ghosh, Kaustabh; Li, Bingquan; Sokolov, Jonathan C; Clark, Richard A F; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2006-10-20

    A facile fabrication of a cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel nanofibers by a reactive electrospinning method is described. A thiolated HA derivative, 3,3'-dithiobis(propanoic dihydrazide)-modified HA (HA-DTPH), and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) are selected as the cross-linking system. The cross-linking reaction occurs simultaneously during the electrospinning process using a dual-syringe mixing technique. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) is added into the spinning solution as a viscosity modifier to facilitate the fiber formation and is selectively removed with water after the electrospinning process. The nanofibrous structure of the electrospun HA scaffold is well preserved after hydration with an average fiber diameter of 110 nm. A cell morphology study on fibronectin (FN)-adsorbed HA nanofibrous scaffolds shows that the NIH 3T3 fibroblasts migrate into the scaffold through the nanofibrous network, and demonstrate an elaborate three-dimensional dendritic morphology within the scaffold, which reflects the dimensions of the electrospun HA nanofibers. These results suggest the application of electrospun HA nanofibrous scaffolds as a potential material for wound healing and tissue regeneration. [image: see text] Laser scanning confocal microscopy demonstrates that the NIH3T3 fibroblast develops an extended 3D dendritic morphology within the fibronectin-adsorbed electrospun HA nanofibrous scaffold. PMID:17022092

  13. Reduced risk of hepatitis B and hepatitis C among injection drug users in the Tacoma syringe exchange program.

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, H; Jarlais, D C; Friedman, S R; Purchase, D; Alter, M J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This case-control study examined the association between syringe exchange use and hepatitis B and C in injection drug users. METHODS. Case patients included 28 injection drug users with acute hepatitis B and 20 with acute hepatitis C reported to the health department in a sentinel hepatitis surveillance county; control subjects were injection drug users with no markers of exposure to hepatitis B or C (n = 38 and 26, respectively) attending health department services during the same period. Data were abstracted from clinic records. RESULTS. Seventy-five percent of case patients with hepatitis B and 26% of control subjects had never used the exchange; similar proportions were found for the hepatitis C case and control groups. After adjustment for demographic characteristics and duration of injecting drugs, nonuse of the exchange was associated with a sixfold greater risk of hepatitis B (odds ratio [OR] = 5.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5, 20.4) and a sevenfold greater risk of hepatitis C (OR = 7.3; 95% CI = 1.6, 32.8). CONCLUSIONS. The results suggest that use of the exchange led to a significant reduction in hepatitis B and hepatitis C in the county and may have also prevented a substantial proportion of human immunodeficiency virus infections in injection drug users. PMID:7485666

  14. Fully-automated in-syringe dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of caffeine in coffee beverages.

    PubMed

    Frizzarin, Rejane M; Maya, Fernando; Estela, José M; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-12-01

    A novel fully-automated magnetic stirring-assisted lab-in-syringe analytical procedure has been developed for the fast and efficient dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) of caffeine in coffee beverages. The procedure is based on the microextraction of caffeine with a minute amount of dichloromethane, isolating caffeine from the sample matrix with no further sample pretreatment. Selection of the relevant extraction parameters such as the dispersive solvent, proportion of aqueous/organic phase, pH and flow rates have been carefully evaluated. Caffeine quantification was linear from 2 to 75mgL(-1), with detection and quantification limits of 0.46mgL(-1) and 1.54mgL(-1), respectively. A coefficient of variation (n=8; 5mgL(-1)) of a 2.1% and a sampling rate of 16h(-1), were obtained. The procedure was satisfactorily applied to the determination of caffeine in brewed, instant and decaf coffee samples, being the results for the sample analysis validated using high-performance liquid chromatography. PMID:27374593

  15. Stability of Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride, Lorazepam, and Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate in 0.9% Sodium Chloride Stored in Polypropylene Syringes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Collin R; Halford, Zachery; MacKay, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting is problematic for many patients undergoing chemotherapy. Multiple-drug treatments have been developed to mitigate chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. A patient-controlled infusion of diphenhydramine hydrochloride, lorazepam, and dexamethasone sodium phosphate has been studied in patients who are refractory to first-line therapy. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical compatibility of this three-drug combination is not available in the published literature. Chemical compatibility was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Visual observation was employed to detect change in color, clarity, or gas evolution. Turbidity and pH measurements were performed in conjunction with visual observation at hours 0, 24, and 48. Results showed that diphenhydramine hydrochloride 4 mg/mL, lorazepam 0.16 mg/mL, and dexamethasone sodium phosphate 0.27 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride stored in polypropylene syringes were compatible, and components retained greater than 95% of their original concentration over 48 hours when stored at room temperature. PMID:26625573

  16. Identification of Catechin, Syringic Acid, and Procyanidin B2 in Wine as Stimulants of Gastric Acid Secretion.

    PubMed

    Liszt, Kathrin Ingrid; Eder, Reinhard; Wendelin, Sylvia; Somoza, Veronika

    2015-09-01

    Organic acids of wine, in addition to ethanol, have been identified as stimulants of gastric acid secretion. This study characterized the influence of other wine compounds, particularly phenolic compounds, on proton secretion. Forty wine parameters were determined in four red wines and six white wines, including the contents of organic acids and phenolic compounds. The secretory activity of the wines was determined in a gastric cell culture model (HGT-1 cells) by means of a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye. Red wines stimulated proton secretion more than white wines. Lactic acid and the phenolic compounds syringic acid, catechin, and procyanidin B2 stimulated proton secretion and correlated with the pro-secretory effect of the wines. Addition of the phenolic compounds to the least active white wine sample enhanced its proton secretory effect by 65 ± 21% (p < 0.05). These results indicate that not only malic and lactic acid but also bitter and astringent tasting phenolic compounds in wine contribute to its stimulatory effect on gastric acid secretion.

  17. Stability of Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride, Lorazepam, and Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate in 0.9% Sodium Chloride Stored in Polypropylene Syringes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Collin R; Halford, Zachery; MacKay, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting is problematic for many patients undergoing chemotherapy. Multiple-drug treatments have been developed to mitigate chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. A patient-controlled infusion of diphenhydramine hydrochloride, lorazepam, and dexamethasone sodium phosphate has been studied in patients who are refractory to first-line therapy. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical compatibility of this three-drug combination is not available in the published literature. Chemical compatibility was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Visual observation was employed to detect change in color, clarity, or gas evolution. Turbidity and pH measurements were performed in conjunction with visual observation at hours 0, 24, and 48. Results showed that diphenhydramine hydrochloride 4 mg/mL, lorazepam 0.16 mg/mL, and dexamethasone sodium phosphate 0.27 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride stored in polypropylene syringes were compatible, and components retained greater than 95% of their original concentration over 48 hours when stored at room temperature.

  18. Diverse role of microbially bioconverted product of cabbage (Brassica oleracea) by Pseudomonas syringe pv. T1 on inhibiting Candida species.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Vivek K; Kang, Sun Chul; Park, Euiho; Jeon, Weon-Tai; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2011-02-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the anticandidal effects of bioconverted product, obtained from the microbial conversion of cabbage (Brassica oleracea) by a bacterial strain Pseudomonas syringe pv. T1 (Ps-T1) against various isolates of Candida species. The diameters of zones of inhibition of bioconverted product of cabbage (10 μl, corresponding to 500 μg/disc) against Candida albicans KACC 30003 and 30062, Candida geochares KACC 30061, Candida saitoana KACC 41238 and Candida glabrata P00368 were found between 10±1 and 16±0.8 mm. The bioconverted product was tested for the minimum inhibitory and minimum fungicidal concentration values against the tested pathogens which were found in the range of 125-500 and 125-500 μg/ml, respectively. On the viable counts of the tested fungal pathogens, the bioconverted product showed a remarkable anticandidal effect. Also the study of using scanning electron microscopy on the morphology of C.albicans KACC 30062 revealed potential detrimental effect of bioconverted product at MIC concentration. The results of this study suggest that bioconverted product of cabbage by Ps-T1 holds potential therapeutic value and medicinal significance to control Candida species.

  19. Determination of clenbuterol from pork samples using surface molecularly imprinted polymers as the selective sorbents for microextraction in packed syringe.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Lei, Chunmei; Zhang, Siruo; Bai, Gang; Zhou, Huiyan; Sun, Min; Fu, Qiang; Chang, Chun

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a selective sample pretreatment procedure combing surface molecularly imprinted polymers and microextraction in packed syringe (SMIPs-MEPS) was developed for the analysis of clenbuterol (CLB) from pork samples. SMIPs for CLB were synthesized on silica gel particles through a sol-gel process. A series of characterization and adsorption experiments revealed that the SMIPs exhibited porous structures, good thermal stability, high adsorption capacity and a fast mass transfer rate. The obtained SMIPs were employed as selective sorbents of SMIPs-MEPS for extraction of CLB from pork samples. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated, including the pH of sample solution, number of draw-eject cycles, volume of sample, type and volume of washing solution, and the type and volume of elution solution. Under the optimized conditions, a simple and rapid method for the determination of CLB from pork samples was established by coupling with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The whole pretreatment process was rapid and it can be accomplished with 2min. The limit of quantitation and the limit of detection for CLB were 0.02 and 0.009μgkg(-1), respectively. The average recoveries of CLB at three spiked levels ranged from 86.5% to 91.2% with the relative standard deviations (RSD) ≤6.3%. PMID:24463040

  20. Organizational Impact of the Introduction of a New Portable Syringe Pump for Iloprost Therapy in Italian Hospital Settings

    PubMed Central

    Restelli, Umberto; Faggioli, Paola; Scolari, Francesca; Gussoni, Gualberto; Valerio, Antonella; Sciascera, Alba; Croce, Davide; Mazzone, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The study aims at assessing the organizational and economic impact related to the use of a new portable syringe pump (Pompa Infonde®, Italfarmaco S.p.A., Cinisello Balsamo, Italy) at a hospital level. Methodology: Based on the HTA approach, the analysis assessed the organizational and economic impact of the new device at hospital level, using the traditional methods of Iloprost infusion as comparator. After a pilot evaluation, the organizational impact was assessed within 24 Italian hospitals. Structured interviews were conducted with clinicians and nurses. According to the Hospital-Based HTA approach, a questionnaire assessed the impact on human resources, training activities, internal meetings, spaces needed, facilities, clinical practice implications. Using Activity Based Costing approach, the economic evaluation was performed within the pilot center “Ospedale Civile” of Legnano, Italy. Findings: The new device leads to a positive managerial impact, with a substantial reduction of time to monitor patients by nurses. This resulted in a better management of human resources and in a reduction in nursing cost. Although a mild negative impact on training time for personnel, the structured interviews allowed the identification of three main areas of positive impact: (i) efficiency of internal processes, (ii) clinical pathways, (iii) synergies between wards. Originality: The organizational impact of Pompa Infonde®, showed that it is an efficient alternative to traditional methods, with benefits in the management of patients administered with Iloprost.

  1. Implementation Study of Patient-Ready Syringes Containing 25 mg/mL Methotrexate Solution for Use in Treating Ectopic Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Respaud, R.; Gaudy, A. S.; Arlicot, C.; Tournamille, J. F.; Viaud-Massuard, M. C.; Elfakir, C.; Antier, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Ectopic pregnancy (EP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality during the first trimester of pregnancy. Small unruptured tubal pregnancies can be treated medically with a single dose of methotrexate (MTX). Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the stability of a 25 mg/mL solution of MTX to devise a secure delivery circuit for the preparation and use of this medication in the management of EP. Method. MTX solutions were packaged in polypropylene syringes, stored over an 84-day period, and protected from light either at +2 to +8°C or at 23°C. We assessed the physical and chemical stability of the solutions at various time points over the storage period. A pharmaceutical delivery circuit was implemented that involved the batch preparation of MTX syringes. Results. We show that 25 mg/mL MTX solutions remain stable over an 84-day period under the storage conditions tested. Standard doses were prepared, ranging from 50 mg to 100 mg. The results of this study suggest that MTX syringes can be prepared in advance by the pharmacy, ready to be dispensed at any time that a diagnosis of EP is made. Conclusion. The high stability of a 25 mg/mL MTX solution in polypropylene syringes makes it possible to implement a flexible and cost-effective delivery circuit for ready-to-use preparations of this drug, providing 24-hour access and preventing treatment delays. PMID:24900977

  2. Determination of ammonium in aqueous samples using new headspace dynamic in-syringe liquid-phase microextraction with in situ derivitazation coupled with liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Muniraj, Sarangapani; Yan, Cheing-Tong; Shih, Hou-Kung; Ponnusamy, Vinoth Kumar; Jen, Jen-Fon

    2012-11-19

    A new simultaneous derivatization and extraction method for the preconcentration of ammonia using new one-step headspace dynamic in-syringe liquid-phase microextraction with in situ derivatization was developed for the trace determination of ammonium in aqueous samples by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD). The acceptor phase (as derivatization reagent) containing o-phthaldehyde and sodium sulfite was held within a syringe barrel and immersed in the headspace of sample container. The gaseous ammonia from the alkalized aqueous sample formed a stable isoindole derivative with the acceptor phase inside the syringe barrel through the reciprocated movements of plunger. After derivatization-cum-extraction, the acceptor phase was directly injected into LC-FLD for analysis. Parameters affecting the ammonia evolution and the extraction/derivatization efficiency such as sample matrix, pH, temperature, sampling time, and the composition of derivatization reagent, reaction temperature, and frequency of reciprocated plunger, were studied thoroughly. Results indicated that the maximum extraction efficiency was obtained by using 100μL derivatization reagent in a 1-mL gastight syringe under 8 reciprocated movements of plunger per min to extract ammonia evolved from a 20mL alkalized aqueous solution at 70°C (preheated 4min) with 380rpm stirring for 8min. The detection was linear in the concentration range of 0.625-10μM with the correlation coefficient of 0.9967 and detection limit of 0.33μM (5.6ng mL(-1)) based on SN(-1)=3. The method was applied successfully to determine ammonium in real water samples without any prior cleanup of the samples, and has been proved to be a simple, sensitive, efficient and cost-effective procedure for trace ammonium determination in aqueous samples.

  3. Color-coded prefilled medication syringes decrease time to delivery and dosing errors in simulated prehospital pediatric resuscitations: A randomized crossover trial☆, ☆

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Allen D.; Hernandez, Caleb; Jones, Seth; Moreira, Maria E.; Blumen, Jason R.; Hopkins, Emily; Sande, Margaret; Bakes, Katherine; Haukoos, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication dosing errors remain commonplace and may result in potentially life-threatening outcomes, particularly for pediatric patients where dosing often requires weight-based calculations. Novel medication delivery systems that may reduce dosing errors resonate with national healthcare priorities. Our goal was to evaluate novel, prefilled medication syringes labeled with color-coded volumes corresponding to the weight-based dosing of the Broselow Tape, compared to conventional medication administration, in simulated prehospital pediatric resuscitation scenarios. Methods We performed a prospective, block-randomized, cross-over study, where 10 full-time paramedics each managed two simulated pediatric arrests in situ using either prefilled, color-coded-syringes (intervention) or their own medication kits stocked with conventional ampoules (control). Each paramedic was paired with two emergency medical technicians to provide ventilations and compressions as directed. The ambulance patient compartment and the intravenous medication port were video recorded. Data were extracted from video review by blinded, independent reviewers. Results Median time to delivery of all doses for the intervention and control groups was 34 (95% CI: 28–39) seconds and 42 (95% CI: 36–51) seconds, respectively (difference = 9 [95% CI: 4–14] seconds). Using the conventional method, 62 doses were administered with 24 (39%) critical dosing errors; using the prefilled, color-coded syringe method, 59 doses were administered with 0 (0%) critical dosing errors (difference = 39%, 95% CI: 13–61%). Conclusions A novel color-coded, prefilled syringe decreased time to medication administration and significantly reduced critical dosing errors by paramedics during simulated prehospital pediatric resuscitations. PMID:26247145

  4. NASA Metrology and Calibration, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The proceedings of the fourth annual NASA Metrology and Calibration Workshop are presented. This workshop covered (1) review and assessment of NASA metrology and calibration activities by NASA Headquarters, (2) results of audits by the Office of Inspector General, (3) review of a proposed NASA Equipment Management System, (4) current and planned field center activities, (5) National Bureau of Standards (NBS) calibration services for NASA, (6) review of NBS's Precision Measurement and Test Equipment Project activities, (7) NASA instrument loan pool operations at two centers, (8) mobile cart calibration systems at two centers, (9) calibration intervals and decals, (10) NASA Calibration Capabilities Catalog, and (11) development of plans and objectives for FY 1981. Several papers in this proceedings are slide presentations only.

  5. Fabrication and calibration of sensitively photoelastic biocompatible gelatin spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Henry; Ceniceros, Ericson; McCormick, Zephyr

    2013-11-01

    Photoelastic gelatin can be used to measure forces generated by organisms in complex environments. We describe manufacturing, storage, and calibration techniques for sensitive photoelastic gelatin spheres to be used in aqueous environments. Calibration yields a correlation between photoelastic signal and applied force to be used in future studies. Images for calibration were collected with a digital camera attached to a linear polariscope. The images were then processed in Matlab to determine the photoelastic response of each sphere. The effect of composition, gelatin concentration, glycerol concentration, sphere size, and temperature were all examined for their effect on signal response. The minimum detectable force and the repeatability of our calibration technique were evaluated for the same sphere, different spheres from the same fabrication batch, and spheres from different batches. The minimum force detectable is 10 μN or less depending on sphere size. Factors which significantly contribute to errors in the calibration were explored in detail and minimized.

  6. Calibration of neutron albedo dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R B; Eisenhauer, C M

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that by calibrating neutron albedo dosemeters under the proper conditions, two complicating effects will essentially cancel out, allowing accurate calibrations with no need for explicit corrections. The 'proper conditions' are: a large room (> or = 8 m on a side). use of a D2O moderated 252Cf source, and a source-to-phantom calibration distance of approximately 70 cm. PMID:12212898

  7. Neural networks for calibration tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur

    1993-01-01

    Artificial neural networks are suitable for performing pattern-to-pattern calibrations. These calibrations are potentially useful for facilities operations in aeronautics, the control of optical alignment, and the like. Computed tomography is compared with neural net calibration tomography for estimating density from its x-ray transform. X-ray transforms are measured, for example, in diffuse-illumination, holographic interferometry of fluids. Computed tomography and neural net calibration tomography are shown to have comparable performance for a 10 degree viewing cone and 29 interferograms within that cone. The system of tomography discussed is proposed as a relevant test of neural networks and other parallel processors intended for using flow visualization data.

  8. Calorimeters for pulsed lasers: calibration.

    PubMed

    Thacher, P D

    1976-07-01

    A calibration technique is developed and tested in which a calorimeter used for single-shot laser pulse energy measurements is calibrated with reference to a cw power standard using a chopped cw laser beam. A pulsed laser is required only to obtain the relative time response of the calorimeter to a pulse. With precautions as to beam alignment and wavelength, the principal error of the technique is that of the cw standard. Calibration of two thermopiles with cone receivers showed -2.5% and -3.5% agreement with previous calibrations made by the National Bureau of Standards. PMID:20165270

  9. Quality Management and Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkus, Henk G.

    Good specification of a product’s performance requires adequate characterization of relevant properties. Particulate products are usually characterized by some PSD, shape or porosity parameter(s). For proper characterization, adequate sampling, dispersion, and measurement procedures should be available or developed and skilful personnel should use appropriate, well-calibrated/qualified equipment. The characterization should be executed, in agreement with customers, in a wellorganized laboratory. All related aspects should be laid down in a quality handbook. The laboratory should provide proof for its capability to perform the characterization of stated products and/or reference materials within stated confidence limits. This can be done either by internal validation and audits or by external GLP accreditation.

  10. RX130 Robot Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugal, Mario

    2012-10-01

    In order to create precision magnets for an experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a new reverse engineering method has been proposed that uses the magnetic scalar potential to solve for the currents necessary to produce the desired field. To make the magnet it is proposed to use a copper coated G10 form, upon which a drill, mounted on a robotic arm, will carve wires. The accuracy required in the manufacturing of the wires exceeds nominal robot capabilities. However, due to the rigidity as well as the precision servo motor and harmonic gear drivers, there are robots capable of meeting this requirement with proper calibration. Improving the accuracy of an RX130 to be within 35 microns (the accuracy necessary of the wires) is the goal of this project. Using feedback from a displacement sensor, or camera and inverse kinematics it is possible to achieve this accuracy.

  11. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, Roland L.; Cannon, Theodore W.

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  12. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  13. Inspection system calibration methods

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2004-12-28

    An inspection system calibration method includes producing two sideband signals of a first wavefront; interfering the two sideband signals in a photorefractive material, producing an output signal therefrom having a frequency and a magnitude; and producing a phase modulated operational signal having a frequency different from the output signal frequency, a magnitude, and a phase modulation amplitude. The method includes determining a ratio of the operational signal magnitude to the output signal magnitude, determining a ratio of a 1st order Bessel function of the operational signal phase modulation amplitude to a 0th order Bessel function of the operational signal phase modulation amplitude, and comparing the magnitude ratio to the Bessel function ratio.

  14. Computer-aided calibration: Asking the right questions

    SciTech Connect

    Turvill, I.H.

    1995-12-01

    Anyone involved with instrumentation and control would find it hard to avoid the ever-increasing promotion of calibrators. Calibrators and calibration are everywhere: in magazines, at trade shows, in ISO 9000 audits, and in instrument technician`s shops. The growth in this market is screamingly obvious. However, changes in the market for calibrators are not limited to increased demand for these products. Today`s trends emerge from several root causes. These include shifts in customer preference and behavior, changing relationships between firms involved in the different stages of the chain that supplies customers, and exogenous factors such as stricter government regulations and tighter industrial standards. In recent years, the United States federal government, through its Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), has placed increasing demands on {open_quotes}smokestack{close_quotes} industries to demonstrate effective monitoring of pollutants. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires that all pharmaceutical companies validate their manufacturing processes. Many manufacturers recognize that the industries they serve are faced with increasing demand for instrument recalibration and documentation with decreasing maintenance resources. In response to the need for systems that can square the circle, manufacturers have introduced computer-aided calibration (CAC) systems that automatically execute calibration procedures and collect test and calibration data, which significantly improves productivity. The array of such systems now available is staggering. In certain instances, suppliers offer only hardware, such as calibrators, sources, and simulators that can communicate with a software package. Some software houses offer universal calibration packages, which can communicate with a wide variety of calibrators, or none. Others, usually hardware manufacturers, offer complete packages that consist of a calibrator and proprietary software.

  15. BXS Re-calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J; /SLAC

    2010-11-24

    Early in the commissioning it was noticed by Cecile Limborg that the calibration of the BXS spectrometer magnet seemed to be different from the strength of the BX01/BX02 magnets. First the BX01/BX02 currents were adjusted to 135 MeV and the beam energy was adjusted to make the horizontal orbit flat. Then BX01/BX02 magnets were switched off and BXS was adjusted to make the horizontal orbit in the spectrometer line flat, without changing the energy of the beam. The result was that about 140-141 MeV were required on the BXS magnet. This measurement was repeated several times by others with the same results. It was not clear what was causing the error: magnet strength or layout. A position error of about 19 mm of the BXS magnet could explain the difference. Because there was a significant misalignment of the vacuum chamber in the BXS line, the alignment of the whole spectrometer line was checked. The vacuum chamber was corrected, but the magnets were found to be in the proper alignment. So we were left with one (or conceivably two) magnet calibration errors. Because BXS is a wedged shaped magnet, the bend angle depends on the horizontal position of the incoming beam. As mentioned, an offset of the beam position of 19 mm would increase or decrease the bend angle roughly by the ratio of 135/141. The figure of 19 mm is special and caused a considerable confusion during the design and measurement of the BXS magnet. This is best illustrated in Figure 1 which was taken out of the BXS Traveler document. The distance between the horizontal midplanes of the poles and the apex of the beam path was chosen to be 19 mm so the beam is close to the good field region throughout its entire path. Thus it seemed possible that there was an error that resulted in the beam not being on this trajectory, or conversely, that the magnetic measurements were done on the wrong trajectory and the magnet was then mis-calibrated. Mechanical measurements of the vacuum chamber made in the tunnel

  16. Method calibration of the model 13145 infrared target projectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianxia; Gao, Yuan; Han, Ying

    2014-11-01

    The SBIR Model 13145 Infrared Target Projectors ( The following abbreviation Evaluation Unit ) used for characterizing the performances of infrared imaging system. Test items: SiTF, MTF, NETD, MRTD, MDTD, NPS. Infrared target projectors includes two area blackbodies, a 12 position target wheel, all reflective collimator. It provide high spatial frequency differential targets, Precision differential targets imaged by infrared imaging system. And by photoelectricity convert on simulate signal or digital signal. Applications software (IR Windows TM 2001) evaluate characterizing the performances of infrared imaging system. With regards to as a whole calibration, first differently calibration for distributed component , According to calibration specification for area blackbody to calibration area blackbody, by means of to amend error factor to calibration of all reflective collimator, radiance calibration of an infrared target projectors using the SR5000 spectral radiometer, and to analyze systematic error. With regards to as parameter of infrared imaging system, need to integrate evaluation method. According to regulation with -GJB2340-1995 General specification for military thermal imaging sets -testing parameters of infrared imaging system, the results compare with results from Optical Calibration Testing Laboratory . As a goal to real calibration performances of the Evaluation Unit.

  17. A new polarimetric active radar calibrator and calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianguo; Xu, Xiaojian

    2015-10-01

    Polarimetric active radar calibrator (PARC) is one of the most important calibrators with high radar cross section (RCS) for polarimetry measurement. In this paper, a new double-antenna polarimetric active radar calibrator (DPARC) is proposed, which consists of two rotatable antennas with wideband electromagnetic polarization filters (EMPF) to achieve lower cross-polarization for transmission and reception. With two antennas which are rotatable around the radar line of sight (LOS), the DPARC provides a variety of standard polarimetric scattering matrices (PSM) through the rotation combination of receiving and transmitting polarization, which are useful for polarimatric calibration in different applications. In addition, a technique based on Fourier analysis is proposed for calibration processing. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed DPARC and processing technique.

  18. Robust calibration method for pure rotational Raman lidar temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Chen, Siying; Zhang, Yinchao; Guo, Pan; Chen, He; Chen, Binglong

    2015-08-10

    A new calibration method for pure rotational Raman lidar temperature measurement is described in this work. The method forms a temperature-dependent term in the intensity ratio, which is calculable with the radiosonde data, and then derives a calibration factor, with which the temperature is retrievable from the lidar return. The method is demonstrated and compared with existing methods through simulations and experiments. Results of the comparison show that the proposed method could provide more accurate calibrations under low signal-to-noise ratio conditions and could thus reduce the lidar performance requirement for temperature retrieval.

  19. A self-calibrating optomechanical force sensor with femtonewton resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, John; Stirling, Julian; Cervantes, Felipe Guzmán; Pratt, Jon R.; Shaw, Gordon A.

    2014-12-01

    We report the development of an ultrasensitive optomechanical sensor designed to improve the accuracy and precision of force measurements with atomic force microscopy. The sensors reach quality factors of 4.3 × 106 and force resolution on the femtonewton scale at room temperature. Self-calibration of the sensor is accomplished using radiation pressure to create a reference force. Self-calibration enables in situ calibration of the sensor in extreme environments, such as cryogenic ultra-high vacuum. The senor technology presents a viable route to force measurements at the atomic scale with uncertainties below the percent level.

  20. A self-calibrating optomechanical force sensor with femtonewton resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, John Stirling, Julian; Pratt, Jon R.; Shaw, Gordon A.; Cervantes, Felipe Guzmán

    2014-12-08

    We report the development of an ultrasensitive optomechanical sensor designed to improve the accuracy and precision of force measurements with atomic force microscopy. The sensors reach quality factors of 4.3 × 10{sup 6} and force resolution on the femtonewton scale at room temperature. Self-calibration of the sensor is accomplished using radiation pressure to create a reference force. Self-calibration enables in situ calibration of the sensor in extreme environments, such as cryogenic ultra-high vacuum. The senor technology presents a viable route to force measurements at the atomic scale with uncertainties below the percent level.

  1. Calibration of the ARID robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L

    1992-01-01

    The author has formulated a new, general model for specifying the kinematic properties of serial manipulators. The new model kinematic parameters do not suffer discontinuities when nominally parallel adjacent axes deviate from exact parallelism. From this new theory the author develops a first-order, lumped-parameter, calibration-model for the ARID manipulator. Next, the author develops a calibration methodology for the ARID based on visual and acoustic sensing. A sensor platform, consisting of a camera and four sonars attached to the ARID end frame, performs calibration measurements. A calibration measurement consists of processing one visual frame of an accurately placed calibration image and recording four acoustic range measurements. A minimum of two measurement protocols determine the kinematics calibration-model of the ARID for a particular region: assuming the joint displacements are accurately measured, the calibration surface is planar, and the kinematic parameters do not vary rapidly in the region. No theoretical or practical limitations appear to contra-indicate the feasibility of the calibration method developed here.

  2. Cobalt source calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Rizvi, H.M.

    1999-12-03

    The data obtained from these tests determine the dose rate of the two cobalt sources in SRTC. Building 774-A houses one of these sources while the other resides in room C-067 of Building 773-A. The data from this experiment shows the following: (1) The dose rate of the No.2 cobalt source in Building 774-A measured 1.073 x 10{sup 5} rad/h (June 17, 1999). The dose rate of the Shepherd Model 109 Gamma cobalt source in Building 773-A measured 9.27 x 10{sup 5} rad/h (June 25, 1999). These rates come from placing the graduated cylinder containing the dosimeter solution in the center of the irradiation chamber. (2) Two calibration tests in the 774-A source placed the graduated cylinder with the dosimeter solution approximately 1.5 inches off center in the axial direction. This movement of the sample reduced the measured dose rate 0.92% from 1.083 x 10{sup 5} rad/h to 1.073 x 10{sup 5} rad/h. and (3) A similar test in the cobalt source in 773-A placed the graduated cylinder approximately 2.0 inches off center in the axial direction. This change in position reduced the measured dose rate by 10.34% from 1.036 x 10{sup 6} to 9.27 x 10{sup 5}. This testing used chemical dosimetry to measure the dose rate of a radioactive source. In this method, one determines the dose by the chemical change that takes place in the dosimeter. For this calibration experiment, the author used a Fricke (ferrous ammonium sulfate) dosimeter. This solution works well for dose rates to 10{sup 7} rad/h. During irradiation of the Fricke dosimeter solution the Fe{sup 2+} ions ionize to Fe{sup 3+}. When this occurs, the solution acquires a slightly darker tint (not visible to the human eye). To determine the magnitude of the change in Fe ions, one places the solution in an UV-VIS Spectrophotometer. The UV-VIS Spectrophotometer measures the absorbency of the solution. Dividing the absorbency by the total time (in minutes) of exposure yields the dose rate.

  3. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Smith, V.L.; Carstensen, H.K.

    1959-11-24

    An improved time calibrated sweep circuit is presented, which extends the range of usefulness of conventional oscilloscopes as utilized for time calibrated display applications in accordance with U. S. Patent No. 2,832,002. Principal novelty resides in the provision of a pair of separate signal paths, each of which is phase and amplitude adjustable, to connect a high-frequency calibration oscillator to the output of a sawtooth generator also connected to the respective horizontal deflection plates of an oscilloscope cathode ray tube. The amplitude and phase of the calibration oscillator signals in the two signal paths are adjusted to balance out feedthrough currents capacitively coupled at high frequencies of the calibration oscillator from each horizontal deflection plate to the vertical plates of the cathode ray tube.

  4. Local hadron calibration with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Paola; ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group

    2011-04-01

    The method of Local Hadron Calibration is used in ATLAS as one of the two major calibration schemes for the reconstruction of jets and missing transverse energy. The method starts from noise suppressed clusters and corrects them for non-compensation effects and for losses due to noise threshold and dead material. Jets are reconstructed using the calibrated clusters and are then corrected for out of cone effects. The performance of the corrections applied to the calorimeter clusters is tested with detailed GEANT4 information. Results obtained with this procedure are discussed both for single pion simulations and for di-jet simulations. The calibration scheme is validated on data, by comparing the calibrated cluster energy in data with Mote Carlo simulations. Preliminary results obtained with GeV collision data are presented. The agreement between data and Monte Carlo is within 5% for the final cluster scale.

  5. Calibration of platinum resistance thermometers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, D. H.; Terbeek, H. G.; Malone, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Results of five years experience in calibrating about 1000 commercial platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) are reported. These PRT were relatively small and rugged, with ice-point resistances from 200 to 5000 ohms. Calibrations normalized in terms of resistance-difference ratios (Cragoe Z function) were found to be remarkably uniform for five of six different types of PRT tested, and to agree very closely with normalized calibrations of the primary reference standard type PRT. The Z function normalization cancels residual resistances which are not temperature dependent and simplifies interpolation between calibration points when the quality of a given type of PRT has been established in terms of uniform values of the Z function. Measurements at five or six well spaced base-point temperatures with Z interpolation will suffice to calibrate a PRT accurately from 4 to 900 K.

  6. High uptake of naloxone-based overdose prevention training among previously incarcerated syringe-exchange program participants

    PubMed Central

    Barocas, Joshua A.; Baker, Lisa; Hull, Shawnika J.; Stokes, Scott; Westergaard, Ryan P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Incarceration is common among people who inject drugs. Prior research has shown that incarceration is a marker of elevated risk for opioid overdose, suggesting that the criminal justice system may be an important, under-utilized venue for implementing overdose prevention strategies. To better understand the feasibility and acceptability of such strategies, we evaluated the utilization of naloxone-based overdose prevention training among people who inject drugs with and without a history of incarceration. Methods We surveyed clients who utilize a multi-site syringe exchange program (SEP) in 2 cities in the Midwestern United States. Participants completed an 88-item, computerized survey assessing history of incarceration, consequences associated with injection, injecting practices, and uptake of harm reduction strategies. Results Among 543 respondents who injected drugs in the prior 30 days, 243 (43%) reported prior incarceration. Comparing those with and without a history of incarceration, there were no significant differences with respect to age, gender, or race. Those who observed an overdose, experienced overdose, and received training to administer or have administered naloxone were more likely to report incarceration. Overall, 69% of previously incarcerated clients had been trained to administer naloxone. Conclusion People who inject drugs with a history of incarceration appear to have a higher risk of opioid overdose than those never incarcerated, and are more willing to utilize naloxone as an overdose prevention strategy. Naloxone training and distribution is an important component of comprehensive prevention services for persons with opioid use disorders. Expansion of services for persons leaving correctional facilities should be considered. PMID:26143300

  7. Establishing a NORM based radiation calibration facility.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J

    2016-05-01

    An environmental radiation calibration facility has been constructed by the Radiation and Nuclear Sciences unit of Queensland Health at the Forensic and Scientific Services Coopers Plains campus in Brisbane. This facility consists of five low density concrete pads, spiked with a NORM source, to simulate soil and effectively provide a number of semi-infinite uniformly distributed sources for improved energy response calibrations of radiation equipment used in NORM measurements. The pads have been sealed with an environmental epoxy compound to restrict radon loss and so enhance the quality of secular equilibrium achieved. Monte Carlo models (MCNP),used to establish suitable design parameters and identify appropriate geometric correction factors linking the air kerma measured above these calibration pads to that predicted for an infinite plane using adjusted ICRU53 data, are discussed. Use of these correction factors as well as adjustments for cosmic radiation and the impact of surrounding low levels of NORM in the soil, allows for good agreement between the radiation fields predicted and measured above the pads at both 0.15 m and 1 m. PMID:26921707

  8. In situ broadband cryogenic calibration for two-port superconducting microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Jen-Hao; Anlage, Steven M.

    2013-03-15

    We introduce an improved microwave calibration method for use in a cryogenic environment, based on a traditional three-standard calibration, the Thru-Reflect-Line (TRL) calibration. The modified calibration method takes advantage of additional information from multiple measurements of an ensemble of realizations of a superconducting resonator, as a new pseudo-Open standard, to correct errors in the TRL calibration. We also demonstrate an experimental realization of this in situ broadband cryogenic calibration system utilizing cryogenic switches. All calibration measurements are done in the same thermal cycle as the measurement of the resonator (requiring only an additional 20 min), thus avoiding 4 additional thermal cycles for traditional TRL calibration (which would require an additional 12 days). The experimental measurements on a wave-chaotic microwave billiard verify that the new method significantly improves the measured scattering matrix of a high-quality-factor superconducting resonator.

  9. In situ broadband cryogenic calibration for two-port superconducting microwave resonators.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jen-Hao; Anlage, Steven M

    2013-03-01

    We introduce an improved microwave calibration method for use in a cryogenic environment, based on a traditional three-standard calibration, the Thru-Reflect-Line (TRL) calibration. The modified calibration method takes advantage of additional information from multiple measurements of an ensemble of realizations of a superconducting resonator, as a new pseudo-Open standard, to correct errors in the TRL calibration. We also demonstrate an experimental realization of this in situ broadband cryogenic calibration system utilizing cryogenic switches. All calibration measurements are done in the same thermal cycle as the measurement of the resonator (requiring only an additional 20 min), thus avoiding 4 additional thermal cycles for traditional TRL calibration (which would require an additional 12 days). The experimental measurements on a wave-chaotic microwave billiard verify that the new method significantly improves the measured scattering matrix of a high-quality-factor superconducting resonator.

  10. CP-50 calibration facility radiological safety assessment document

    SciTech Connect

    Chilton, M.W.; Hill, R.L.; Eubank, B.F.

    1980-03-01

    The CP-50 Calibration Facility Radiological Safety Assessment document, prepared at the request of the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy to satisfy provisions of ERDA Manual Chapter 0531, presents design features, systems controls, and procedures used in the operation of the calibration facility. Site and facility characteristics and routine and non-routine operations, including hypothetical incidents or accidents are discussed and design factors, source control systems, and radiation monitoring considerations are described.

  11. Diode calibration manual

    SciTech Connect

    Brunk, J.L.

    1989-09-01

    This procedure is not for the faint of heart. It is a time consuming, complex series of journeys through advanced GAMANAL and the vagueness of analyzer electronics. A knowledge of TRIX AC, DLTV, and IMP on the Octopus system and DSCOPE, PE2, and Symphony on a PC class machine is required. Be aware that the example in this document is a condensation of information that takes up four feet of shelf space. In the attempt to convert the nomenclature of the 7600 version of GAMANAL to that of the CRAY version, there will be confusion with some of the terms used. The 7600 versions relied on punched cards to a great extent where the CRAY version doesn't use them at all. In order not to introduce a new set of nomenclature, I have changed the reference from card to card image. I hope that this will cause the least impact on the vernacular and cause the least amount of confusion possible. This document is a rewritten update of an unpublished document by Bob Wikkerink in 1980. His document was the only written record of the procedures needed to calibrate the Environmental Sciences Low Level Counting Facility. This document updates and expands this information.

  12. A calibrated Franklin chimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonta, Igor; Williams, Earle

    1994-05-01

    Benjamin Franklin devised a simple yet intriguing device to measure electrification in the atmosphere during conditions of foul weather. He constructed a system of bells, one of which was attached to a conductor that was suspended vertically above his house. The device is illustrated in a well-known painting of Franklin (Cohen, 1985). The elevated conductor acquired a potential due to the electric field in the atmosphere and caused a brass ball to oscillate between two bells. The purpose of this study is to extend Franklin's idea by constructing a set of 'chimes' which will operate both in fair and in foul weather conditions. In addition, a mathematical relationship will be established between the frequency of oscillation of a metallic sphere in a simplified geometry and the potential on one plate due to the electrification of the atmosphere. Thus it will be possible to calibrate the 'Franklin Chimes' and to obtain a nearly instantaneous measurement of the potential of the elevated conductor in both fair and foul weather conditions.

  13. The ENEA-IRP thoron calibration facility.

    PubMed

    Calamosca, M; Penzo, S

    2010-10-01

    To check the consistency of a (220)Rn measurement, performed by passive alpha track detector (ATD), the use of an accurate (220)Rn exposure calibration facility is mandatory. The ENEA Radon Service developed a new CR-39 ATD-Tn, coupled to the radon ATD-Rn and, to assess its sensitivity, had to design a small calibration facility, which has been recently modified to improve the spatial homogeneity exposure conditions inside the chamber, to get a continuous monitoring of the (220)Rn concentration and to reduce radon contamination. A better knowledge of the circuit response allowed selecting the best-operating conditions and how to regulate the thoron concentration. The active thoron monitor has been changed to serve as a continuous sampling and measuring device rather than a grab one; particular care has been devoted to assess the (216)Po losses on the device's inner surfaces and to evaluate the chamber transit time correction factor.

  14. Energy calibration of the fly's eye detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Cassiday, G. L.; Cooper, R.; Elbert, J. W.; Gerhardy, P. R.; Ko, S.; Loh, E. C.; Mizumoto, Y.; Sokolsky, P.; Steck, D.

    1985-01-01

    The methods used to calibrate the Fly's eye detector to evaluate the energy of EAS are discussed. The energy of extensive air showers (EAS) as seen by the Fly's Eye detector are obtained from track length integrals of observed shower development curves. The energy of the parent cosmic ray primary is estimated by applying corrections to account for undetected energy in the muon, neutrino and hadronic channels. Absolute values for E depend upon the measurement of shower sizes N sub e(x). The following items are necessary to convert apparent optical brightness into intrinsical optical brightness: (1) an assessment of those factors responsible for light production by the relativistic electrons in an EAS and the transmission of light thru the atmosphere, (2) calibration of the optical detection system, and (3) a knowledge of the trajectory of the shower.

  15. Small Scale Mass Flow Plug Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A simple control volume model has been developed to calculate the discharge coefficient through a mass flow plug (MFP) and validated with a calibration experiment. The maximum error of the model in the operating region of the MFP is 0.54%. The model uses the MFP geometry and operating pressure and temperature to couple continuity, momentum, energy, an equation of state, and wall shear. Effects of boundary layer growth and the reduction in cross-sectional flow area are calculated using an in- integral method. A CFD calibration is shown to be of lower accuracy with a maximum error of 1.35%, and slower by a factor of 100. Effects of total pressure distortion are taken into account in the experiment. Distortion creates a loss in flow rate and can be characterized by two different distortion descriptors.

  16. Calibration method for radiometric and wavelength calibration of a spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, Edward M.

    1998-12-01

    A new calibration target or Certified Reference Material (CRM) has been designed that uses violet, orange, green and cyan dyes ont cotton paper. This paper type was chosen because it has a relatively flat spectral response from 400 nm to 700 nm and good keeping properties. These specific dyes were chosen because the difference signal between the orange, cyan, green and purple dyes have certain characteristics that then a low the calibration of an instrument. The ratio between the difference readings is a direct function of the center wavelength of a given spectral band. Therefore, the radiometric and spectral calibration can be determined simultaneously from the physical properties of the reference materials.

  17. L-band tone-code-data transponder calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brisken, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of this program were to identify and quantify factors which affect the performance of the L-band tone-code-data ranging transponders. Specific objectives included the following: (1) assemble the L-band ranging transponder, previously deployed in Hawaii for the tracking of the ATS-5 satellite, at the GE Radio-Optical Observatory; (2) configure the observatory to conduct calibration exercises with the transponder; and (3) conduct sufficient calibration experiments to demonstrate factors which degrade transponder accuracy, precision, and reliability, to quantify these factors where possible, and to verify long term transponder stability under controlled conditions.

  18. Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

    2009-03-12

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks throughput the U.S. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor calibrators/generators. These devices are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 and vacated by a Federal appeals court in early 2008 required that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Despite the vacature, mercury emissions regulations in the future will require NIST traceable calibration standards, and EPA does not want to interrupt the effort towards developing NIST traceability protocols. The traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued a conceptual interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The EPA traceability protocol document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of calibrator models by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the calibrators that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma

  19. Hot-wire calibration in subsonic/transonic flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagabushana, K. A.; Ash, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    A different approach for calibrating hot-wires, which simplifies the calibration procedure and reduces the tunnel run-time by an order of magnitude was sought. In general, it is accepted that the directly measurable quantities in any flow are velocity, density, and total temperature. Very few facilities have the capability of varying the total temperature over an adequate range. However, if the overheat temperature parameter, a(sub w), is used to calibrate the hot-wire then the directly measurable quantity, voltage, will be a function of the flow variables and the overheat parameter i.e., E = f(u,p,a(sub w), T(sub w)) where a(sub w) will contain the needed total temperature information. In this report, various methods of evaluating sensitivities with different dependent and independent variables to calibrate a 3-Wire hot-wire probe using a constant temperature anemometer (CTA) in subsonic/transonic flow regimes is presented. The advantage of using a(sub w) as the independent variable instead of total temperature, t(sub o), or overheat temperature parameter, tau, is that while running a calibration test it is not necessary to know the recovery factor, the coefficients in a wire resistance to temperature relationship for a given probe. It was deduced that the method employing the relationship E = f (u,p,a(sub w)) should result in the most accurate calibration of hot wire probes. Any other method would require additional measurements. Also this method will allow calibration and determination of accurate temperature fluctuation information even in atmospheric wind tunnels where there is no ability to obtain any temperature sensitivity information at present. This technique greatly simplifies the calibration process for hot-wires, provides the required calibration information needed in obtaining temperature fluctuations, and reduces both the tunnel run-time and the test matrix required to calibrate hotwires. Some of the results using the above techniques are presented

  20. Digital breast tomosynthesis geometry calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinying; Mainprize, James G.; Kempston, Michael P.; Mawdsley, Gordon E.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2007-03-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D x-ray technique for imaging the breast. The x-ray tube, mounted on a gantry, moves in an arc over a limited angular range around the breast while 7-15 images are acquired over a period of a few seconds. A reconstruction algorithm is used to create a 3D volume dataset from the projection images. This procedure reduces the effects of tissue superposition, often responsible for degrading the quality of projection mammograms. This may help improve sensitivity of cancer detection, while reducing the number of false positive results. For DBT, images are acquired at a set of gantry rotation angles. The image reconstruction process requires several geometrical factors associated with image acquisition to be known accurately, however, vibration, encoder inaccuracy, the effects of gravity on the gantry arm and manufacturing tolerances can produce deviations from the desired acquisition geometry. Unlike cone-beam CT, in which a complete dataset is acquired (500+ projections over 180°), tomosynthesis reconstruction is challenging in that the angular range is narrow (typically from 20°-45°) and there are fewer projection images (~7-15). With such a limited dataset, reconstruction is very sensitive to geometric alignment. Uncertainties in factors such as detector tilt, gantry angle, focal spot location, source-detector distance and source-pivot distance can produce several artifacts in the reconstructed volume. To accurately and efficiently calculate the location and angles of orientation of critical components of the system in DBT geometry, a suitable phantom is required. We have designed a calibration phantom for tomosynthesis and developed software for accurate measurement of the geometric parameters of a DBT system. These have been tested both by simulation and experiment. We will present estimates of the precision available with this technique for a prototype DBT system.