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Sample records for system gps receivers

  1. Global Positioning System (GPS) Geodetic Receivers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-08

    Subti.) S. TYPE OF REPORT A PERFo COVERED Global Positioning System ( GPS ) Geodetic N/A Receivers S. PERFORMING OrG. REPORT NUMBER I N/A AUTNORf*) S...i N meueaed idautfy b block nmAr) The NAVSTAR Global Positioning System ( GPS ) when fully developed will pro- vide world-wide, all weather, continuous... Global Positioning System ( GPS ) when fully developed will provide world-wide, all weather, continuous, highly accurate radio navigation support to

  2. Military/Civilian Mixed-Mode Global Positioning System (GPS) Receiver (MMGR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) 5a...2003. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Space Vehicles, MMGR, AFRL, JPO, Mixed-Mode Global Positioning System Receiver, GPS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...239.18 1 Military/Civilian Mixed-Mode Global Positioning System ( GPS ) Receiver (MMGR) Andy Peczalski, Honeywell Aerospace Electronic Systems

  3. Framework For A Software-defined Global Positioning System (GPS) Receiver For Precision Munitions Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    the global positioning system ( GPS ) receivers for position, velocity, and “up-finding” in their guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) systems...report is shown in figure 1. The objective of this project is to use the SDR frontend to capture GPS data for use in Precision Simulation Environment...architecture for capturing GPS signals for future algorithm development. Reliable signal acquisition of the GPS waveform is challenging due to the high

  4. Global Positioning System Time Transfer Receiver (GPS/TTR) prototype design and initial test evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oaks, J.; Frank, A.; Falvey, S.; Lister, M.; Buisson, J.; Wardrip, C.; Warren, H.

    1982-01-01

    Time transfer equipment and techniques used with the Navigation Technology Satellites were modified and extended for use with the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. A prototype receiver was built and field tested. The receiver uses the GPS L1 link at 1575 MHz with C/A code only to resolve a measured range to the satellite. A theoretical range is computed from the satellite ephemeris transmitted in the data message and the user's coordinates. Results of user offset from GPS time are obtained by differencing the measured and theoretical ranges and applying calibration corrections. Results of the first field test evaluation of the receiver are presented.

  5. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  6. GPS navigation experiment using high precision GPS timing receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buisson, J. A.; Oaks, O. J.; Lister, M. J.; Wardrip, S. C.; Leschiutta, S.; Galliano, P. G.; Cordara, D.; Pettiti, V.; Detoma, E.; Dachel, P.

    1985-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) Time Transfer receivers were developed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) to provide synchronization for the NASA Global Laser Tracking Network (GLTN). The capabilities of the receiver are being expanded mainly through software modification to: Demonstrate the position location capabilities of a single channel receiver unsign the GPS C/A code; and Demonstrate the time/navigation capability of the receiver onboard a moving platform, by sequential tracking of GPS satellites.

  7. Portable device to assess dynamic accuracy of global positioning systems (GPS) receivers used in agricultural aircraft

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A device was designed to test the dynamic accuracy of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers used in aerial vehicles. The system works by directing a sun-reflected light beam from the ground to the aircraft using mirrors. A photodetector is placed pointing downward from the aircraft and circuitry...

  8. Proposed wireless system could interfere with key GPS receivers, U.S. officials testify

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-09-01

    A proposed $14 billion network that would increase broadband wireless access poses significant interference problems for existing GPS signals used for some critical U.S. federal science and public safety systems, said officials from NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and other experts at an 8 September hearing of the House of Representatives' Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. The officials cautioned that a terrestrial wireless network plan proposed by LightSquared LLC—which includes using frequencies adjacent to the GPS band—needs additional testing before it is given a green light by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). In addition, the officials said that although they hope there is a win-win solution to increasing broadband wireless options without harming GPS signals, a recently revised plan that LightSquared indicates would reduce interference to a large majority of GPS receivers still would present problems for a number of high-precision GPS systems.

  9. Design study of a low cost civil aviation GPS receiver system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cnossen, R.; Gilbert, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    A low cost Navstar receiver system for civil aviation applications was defined. User objectives and constraints were established. Alternative navigation processing design trades were evaluated. Receiver hardware was synthesized by comparing technology projections with various candidate system designs. A control display unit design was recommended as the result of field test experience with Phase I GPS sets and a review of special human factors for general aviation users. Areas requiring technology development to ensure a low cost Navstar Set in the 1985 timeframe were identified.

  10. Assessment of a non-dedicated GPS receiver system for precise airborne attitude determination

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, M.E.; Sun, H.; Owen, T.E.; Meindl, M.A.

    1994-09-01

    The use of a non-dedicated GPS receiver system for attitude determination was assessed in airborne mode through a test conducted at Sandia National Laboratories. Four independent NovAtel GPSCard{trademark} receivers were installed in Sandia`s Twin Engine Otter with two antennas mounted on the fuselage and two on the wing tips at separations of 6 to 18 m. A strapdown INS was also on board the aircraft in order to provide an independent attitude reference at rates between 4 and 10 Hz. During the multi-day test, GPS measurements were recorded between 1 and 10 Hz. Carrier phase measurements were post-processed using a double difference approach developed at The University of Calgary in which integer ambiguities were resolved in seconds using the known antenna separations as constraints. The tracking capability of the system is demonstrated under dynamics consisting of roll and pitch angles up to 45 and 12 degrees, respectively. Comparisons between the GPS and INS attitude angles are presented for two of the test days and show agreement at the several arcminute level. Conclusions are made with respect to system accuracy and performance in an operational airborne environment.

  11. PiVoT GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennersten, Miriam Dvorak; Banes, Anthony Vince; Boegner, Gregory J.; Dougherty, Lamar; Edwards, Bernard L.; Roman, Joseph; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has built an open architecture, 24 channel space flight GPS receiver. The CompactPCI PiVoT GPS receiver card is based on the Mitel/GEC Plessey Builder-2 board. PiVoT uses two Plessey 2021 correlators to allow tracking of up to 24 separate GPS SV's on unique channels. Its four front ends can support four independent antennas, making it a useful card for hosting GPS attitude determination algorithms. It has been built using space quality, radiation tolerant parts. The PiVoT card will track a weaker signal than the original Builder 2 board. It also hosts an improved clock oscillator. The PiVoT software is based on the original Plessey Builder 2 software ported to the Linux operating system. The software is POSIX complaint and can easily be converted to other POSIX operating systems. The software is open source to anyone with a licensing agreement with Plessey. Additional tasks can be added to the software to support GPS science experiments or attitude determination algorithms. The next generation PiVoT receiver will be a single radiation hardened CompactPCI card containing the microprocessor and the GPS receiver optimized for use above the GPS constellation. PiVoT was flown successfully on a balloon in July, 2001, for its first non-simulated flight.

  12. Qualification of TAOS satellite GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weninger, Roger M.; Sfeir, Richard; Forgette, Tom T.; Kelton, Phil T.; Najarian, Richard J.

    1992-03-01

    A light-weight, compact GPS receiver developed for a Technology for Autonomous Operational Survivability (TAOS) satellite planned for launch in 1993 is described. The receiver is capable of continuously tracking four primary GPS satellites and sequentially acquiring and tracking other visible satellites with its six channels. Using an eight-state extended Kalman filter it performs pseudo-range and continuous-carrier, delta-range measurements and estimates time-tagged, 3D user position and velocity. Results of qualification testing obtained from a multichannel GPS spaceborne simulation and evaluation system show that with a GPS constellation of 18 satellites and over a period where GDOP is less than 6, the receiver's rms spherical position and per axis velocity errors are less than 14.5 meters and 0.05 m/sec, respectively.

  13. A GPS Receiver for Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, William A.; Heckler, Gregory W.; Holt, Greg N.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Beginning with the launch of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in October of 2008, NASA will once again begin its quest to land humans on the Moon. This effort will require the development of new spacecraft which will safely transport people from the Earth to the Moon and back again, as well as robotic probes tagged with science, re-supply, and communication duties. In addition to the next-generation spacecraft currently under construction, including the Orion capsule, NASA is also investigating and developing cutting edge navigation sensors which will allow for autonomous state estimation in low Earth orbit (LEO) and cislunar space. Such instruments could provide an extra layer of redundancy in avionics systems and reduce the reliance on support and on the Deep Space Network (DSN). One such sensor is the weak-signal Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver "Navigator" being developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). At the heart of the Navigator is a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based acquisition engine. This engine allows for the rapid acquisition/reacquisition of strong GPS signals, enabling the receiver to quickly recover from outages due to blocked satellites or atmospheric entry. Additionally, the acquisition algorithm provides significantly lower sensitivities than a conventional space-based GPS receiver, permitting it to acquire satellites well above the GPS constellation. This paper assesses the performance of the Navigator receiver based upon three of the major flight regimes of a manned lunar mission: Earth ascent, cislunar navigation, and entry. Representative trajectories for each of these segments were provided by NASA. The Navigator receiver was connected to a Spirent GPS signal generator, to allow for the collection of real-time, hardware-in-the-loop results for each phase of the flight. For each of the flight segments, the Navigator was tested on its ability to acquire and track GPS satellites under the dynamical

  14. Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and GPS Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, B.

    1995-01-01

    It is proposed that a small fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) be used over a period of years to monitor the rise of pressure surfaces caused by the hypothesized rise in average temperature of the troposphere due to global warming. Global Positioning Satellite System (GPS) receivers would be used for the precise tracking required.

  15. Signal Processing Techniques for Anti-Jamming Global Positioning System (GPS) Receivers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    specifically for high JSR. With no specific focus on any particular IF estimator, the phase errors in this section are modeled as a zero-mean Gaussian white...of GPS receiver using array subspace projection in the presence has been analyzed. The phase errors are modeled as zero-mean white Gaussian , and...Middleton impulsive noise model [3] is composed of both Gaussian and impulsive noise components. The probability density function (PDF) is defined by

  16. High dynamic GPS receiver validation demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Statman, J. I.; Vilnrotter, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    The Validation Demonstration establishes that the high dynamic Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver concept developed at JPL meets the dynamic tracking requirements for range instrumentation of missiles and drones. It was demonstrated that the receiver can track the pseudorange and pseudorange rate of vehicles with acceleration in excess of 100 g and jerk in excess of 100 g/s, dynamics ten times more severe than specified for conventional High Dynamic GPS receivers. These results and analytic extensions to a complete system configuration establish that all range instrumentation requirements can be met. The receiver can be implemented in the 100 cu in volume required by all missiles and drones, and is ideally suited for transdigitizer or translator applications.

  17. GPS/CAPS dual-mode software receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Chunlin; Shi, Huli; Hu, Chao

    2009-03-01

    The positioning of the GPS or Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS) software receiver was developed on a software receiver platform. The structure of the GPS/CAPS dual-mode software receiver was put forward after analyzing the differences in the satellite identification, ranging code, spread spectrum, coordinate system, time system, carrier band, and navigation data between GPS and CAPS. Based on Matlab software on a personal computer, baseband signal processing and positioning procedures were completed using real GPS and CAPS radio frequency signals received by two antennas. Three kinds of experiments including GPS positioning, CAPS positioning, and GPS/CAPS positioning were carried out. Stability and precision of the results were analyzed and compared. The experimental results show that the precision of CAPS is similar to that of GPS, while the positioning precision of the GPS/CAPS dual-mode software receiver is 1-2 m higher than that of CAPS or GPS. The smallest average variance of the positioning can be obtained by using the GPS/CAPS dual-mode software receiver.

  18. Pre-Flight Testing of Spaceborne GPS Receivers using a GPS Constellation Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Davis, Edward; Alonso, R.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Global Positioning System (GPS) applications test facility has been established within the GSFC Guidance Navigation and Control Center. The GPS test facility is currently housing the Global Simulation Systems Inc. (GSSI) STR2760 GPS satellite 40-channel attitude simulator and a STR4760 12-channel navigation simulator. The facility also contains a few other resources such as an atomic time standard test bed, a rooftop antenna platform and a radome. It provides a new capability for high dynamics GPS simulations of space flight that is unique within the aerospace community. The GPS facility provides a critical element for the development and testing of GPS based technologies i.e. position, attitude and precise time determination used on-board a spacecraft, suborbital rocket balloon. The GPS simulation system is configured in a transportable rack and is available for GPS component development as well as for component, spacecraft subsystem and system level testing at spacecraft integration and tests sites. The GPS facility has been operational since early 1996 and has utilized by space flight projects carrying GPS experiments, such as the OrbView-2 and the Argentine SAC-A spacecrafts. The SAC-A pre-flight test data obtained by using the STR2760 simulator and the comparison with preliminary analysis of the GPS data from SAC-A telemetry are summarized. This paper describes pre-flight tests and simulations used to support a unique spaceborne GPS experiment. The GPS experiment mission objectives and the test program are described, as well as the GPS test facility configuration needed to verify experiment feasibility. Some operational and critical issues inherent in GPS receiver pre-flight tests and simulations using this GPS simulation, and test methodology are described. Simulation and flight data are presented. A complete program of pre-flight testing of spaceborne GPS receivers using a GPS constellation simulator is detailed.

  19. Pre-Flight Testing of Spaceborne GPS Receivers Using a GPS Constellation Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Davis, Edward; Alonso, Roberto

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Global Positioning System (GPS) applications test facility has been established within the GSFC Guidance Navigation and Control Center. The GPS test facility is currently housing the Global Simulation Systems Inc. (GSSI) STR2760 GPS satellite 40-channel attitude simulator and a STR4760 12-channel navigation simulator. The facility also contains a few other resources such as an atomic time standard test bed, a rooftop antenna platform and a radome. It provides a new capability for high dynamics GPS simulations of space flight that is unique within the aerospace community. The GPS facility provides a critical element for the development and testing of GPS based technologies i.e. position, attitude and precise time determination used on-board a spacecraft, suborbital rocket or balloon. The GPS simulator system is configured in a transportable rack and is available for GPS component development as well as for component, spacecraft subsystem and system level testing at spacecraft integration and test sites. The GPS facility has been operational since early 1996 and has been utilized by space flight projects carrying GPS experiments, such as the OrbView-2 and the Argentine SAC-A spacecrafts. The SAC-A pre-flight test data obtained by using the STR2760 simulator and the comparison with preliminary analysis of the GPS data from SAC-A telemetry are summarized. This paper describes pre-flight tests and simulations used to support a unique spaceborne GPS experiment. The GPS experiment mission objectives and the test program are described, as well as the GPS test facility configuration needed to verify experiment feasibility. Some operational and critical issues inherent in GPS receiver pre-flight tests and simulations using this GPS simulator, and test methodology are described. Simulation and flight data are presented. A complete program of pre-flight testing of spaceborne GPS receivers using a GPS constellation simulator is

  20. Doppler Test Results of Experimental GPS Receiver.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) which is intended to supplant the Navy system for navigation. (An...Bossler, John D., Clyde C. Good and Peter L. Bender, "Using the Global Positioning System ( GPS ) for Geodetic Positioning ", Bulletin Geodesique, 54 (4), 553...necessary and identify by block number) Geodesy Satellite Positioning Global Positioning System Surveying 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on ,eovoera~ldo

  1. Test results of the STI GPS time transfer receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. L.; Handlan, J.; Wheeler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Global time transfer, or synchronization, between a user clock and USNO UTC time can be performed using the Global Positioning System (GPS), and commercially available time transfer receivers. This paper presents the test results of time transfer using the GPS system and a Stanford Telecommunications, Inc. (STI) Time Transfer System (TTS) Model 502. Tests at the GPS Master Control Site (MCS) in Vandenburg, California and at the United States Naval Observatory (USNO) in Washington, D.C. are described. An overview of GPS, and the STI TTS 502 is presented. A discussion of the time transfer process and test concepts is included.

  2. Single-Receiver GPS Phase Bias Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertiger, William I.; Haines, Bruce J.; Weiss, Jan P.; Harvey, Nathaniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Existing software has been modified to yield the benefits of integer fixed double-differenced GPS-phased ambiguities when processing data from a single GPS receiver with no access to any other GPS receiver data. When the double-differenced combination of phase biases can be fixed reliably, a significant improvement in solution accuracy is obtained. This innovation uses a large global set of GPS receivers (40 to 80 receivers) to solve for the GPS satellite orbits and clocks (along with any other parameters). In this process, integer ambiguities are fixed and information on the ambiguity constraints is saved. For each GPS transmitter/receiver pair, the process saves the arc start and stop times, the wide-lane average value for the arc, the standard deviation of the wide lane, and the dual-frequency phase bias after bias fixing for the arc. The second step of the process uses the orbit and clock information, the bias information from the global solution, and only data from the single receiver to resolve double-differenced phase combinations. It is called "resolved" instead of "fixed" because constraints are introduced into the problem with a finite data weight to better account for possible errors. A receiver in orbit has much shorter continuous passes of data than a receiver fixed to the Earth. The method has parameters to account for this. In particular, differences in drifting wide-lane values must be handled differently. The first step of the process is automated, using two JPL software sets, Longarc and Gipsy-Oasis. The resulting orbit/clock and bias information files are posted on anonymous ftp for use by any licensed Gipsy-Oasis user. The second step is implemented in the Gipsy-Oasis executable, gd2p.pl, which automates the entire process, including fetching the information from anonymous ftp

  3. Real-Time Point Positioning Performance Evaluation of Single-Frequency Receivers Using NASA's Global Differential GPS System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Iijima, Byron; Meyer, Robert; Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Accad, Elie

    2004-01-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of a single-frequency receiver using the 1-Hz differential corrections as provided by NASA's global differential GPS system. While the dual-frequency user has the ability to eliminate the ionosphere error by taking a linear combination of observables, the single-frequency user must remove or calibrate this error by other means. To remove the ionosphere error we take advantage of the fact that the magnitude of the group delay in range observable and the carrier phase advance have the same magnitude but are opposite in sign. A way to calibrate this error is to use a real-time database of grid points computed by JPL's RTI (Real-Time Ionosphere) software. In both cases we evaluate the positional accuracy of a kinematic carrier phase based point positioning method on a global extent.

  4. Evaluation of solar radio bursts' effect on GPS receiver signal tracking within International GPS Service network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiyu; Gao, Yang; Liu, Zhizhao

    2005-06-01

    The direct interference from solar radio bursts (SRB) has not usually been considered as a potential threat to global positioning system (GPS) signal tracking, since the flux densities of most bursts are below 40,000 solar flux units (sfu), a threat threshold to GPS L1 frequency proposed by Klobuchar et al. (1999). Recent analysis indicated that a much lower threshold should be adopted for codeless or semicodeless dual-frequency GPS receivers. In this investigation, severe signal corruptions were found at dayside International GPS Service GPS receiver stations during a large solar radio burst that accompanied the super flare of 28 October 2003. Almost no GPS L2 signals were tracked during the solar flux peak time for areas near the subsolar point. Correlation analysis was performed between the rate of loss of lock on GPS L2 frequency and solar radio flux density at different bands, and a correlation index as high as 0.75 is revealed in the 1415 MHz solar radiation band, which is located between the two GPS operating frequencies L2 (1227.60 MHz) and L1 (1575.42 MHz). The correlation analysis indicates that GPS signal losses of lock were primarily caused by microwave in-band interference and that the threat threshold of SRB effects on the GPS system should be re-evaluated, since the flux density of the burst at 1415 MHz was just 4,000-12,000 sfu, which is far below the previously proposed threat threshold. The signal-tracking performance of different types of GPS receivers during such a super flare event is also presented.

  5. Networked differential GPS system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, K. Tysen (Inventor); Loomis, Peter V. W. (Inventor); Kalafus, Rudolph M. (Inventor); Sheynblat, Leonid (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An embodiment of the present invention relates to a worldwide network of differential GPS reference stations (NDGPS) that continually track the entire GPS satellite constellation and provide interpolations of reference station corrections tailored for particular user locations between the reference stations Each reference station takes real-time ionospheric measurements with codeless cross-correlating dual-frequency carrier GPS receivers and computes real-time orbit ephemerides independently. An absolute pseudorange correction (PRC) is defined for each satellite as a function of a particular user's location. A map of the function is constructed, with iso-PRC contours. The network measures the PRCs at a few points, so-called reference stations and constructs an iso-PRC map for each satellite. Corrections are interpolated for each user's site on a subscription basis. The data bandwidths are kept to a minimum by transmitting information that cannot be obtained directly by the user and by updating information by classes and according to how quickly each class of data goes stale given the realities of the GPS system. Sub-decimeter-level kinematic accuracy over a given area is accomplished by establishing a mini-fiducial network.

  6. High dynamic, low volume GPS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A new GPS receiver concept and design are presented to meet the high dynamic and low volume requirements for range applications in missiles and drones. The receiver has the potential to satisfy all range requirements with one basic receiver, which has significant potential economic benefit over the alternate approach of using a family of receivers, each tailored for specific applications. The main new concept is to use approximate maximum likelihood estimates of pseudo range and range-rate, rather than tracking with carrier phase locked loops and code delay locked loops. Preliminary analysis indicates that receivers accelerating at 50 g or more can track with position errors due to acceleration of approximately 0.2 m/g, or 10 m at 50 g. Implementation is almost entirely digital to meet the low volume requirements.

  7. Impact of Swarm GPS receiver updates on POD performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den IJssel, Jose; Forte, Biagio; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    The Swarm satellites are equipped with state-of-the-art Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, which are used for the precise geolocation of the magnetic and electric field instruments, as well as for the determination of the Earth's gravity field, the total electron content and low-frequency thermospheric neutral densities. The onboard GPS receivers deliver high-quality data with an almost continuous data rate. However, the receivers show a slightly degraded performance when flying over the geomagnetic poles and the geomagnetic equator, due to ionospheric scintillation. Furthermore, with only eight channels available for dual-frequency tracking, the amount of collected GPS tracking data is relatively low compared with various other missions. Therefore, several modifications have been implemented to the Swarm GPS receivers. To optimise the amount of collected GPS data, the GPS antenna elevation mask has slowly been reduced from 10° to 2°. To improve the robustness against ionospheric scintillation, the bandwidths of the GPS receiver tracking loops have been widened. Because these modifications were first implemented on Swarm-C, their impact can be assessed by a comparison with the close flying Swarm-A satellite. This shows that both modifications have a positive impact on the GPS receiver performance. The reduced elevation mask increases the amount of GPS tracking data by more than 3 %, while the updated tracking loops lead to around 1.3 % more observations and a significant reduction in tracking losses due to severe equatorial scintillation. The additional observations at low elevation angles increase the average noise of the carrier phase observations, but nonetheless slightly improve the resulting reduced-dynamic and kinematic orbit accuracy as shown by independent satellite laser ranging (SLR) validation. The more robust tracking loops significantly reduce the large carrier phase observation errors at the geomagnetic poles and along the geomagnetic

  8. Shuttle Global Positioning System (GPS) system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsen, P. W.

    1979-01-01

    The various integration problems in the Shuttle GPS system were investigated. The analysis of the Shuttle GPS link was studied. A preamplifier was designed since the Shuttle GPS antennas must be located remotely from the receiver. Several GPS receiver architecture trade-offs were discussed. The Shuttle RF harmonics and intermode that fall within the GPS receiver bandwidth were analyzed. The GPS PN code acquisition was examined. Since the receiver clock strongly affects both GPS carrier and code acquisition performance, a clock model was developed.

  9. Going Up. A GPS Receiver Adapts to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightsey, E. Glenn; Simpson, James E.

    2000-01-01

    Current plans for the space station call for the GPS receiver to be installed on the U.S. lab module of the station in early 2001 (ISS Assembly Flight SA), followed by the attachment of the antenna array in late 2001 (Flight 8A). At that point the U.S. ISS guidance and control system will be operational. The flight of SIGI on the space station represents a "coming of age" for GPS technology on spacecraft. For at least a decade, the promise of using GPS receivers to automate spacecraft operations, simplify satellite design, and reduce mission costs has enticed satellite designers. Integration of this technology onto spacecraft has been slower than some originally anticipated. However, given the complexity of the GPS sensor, and the importance of the functions it performs, its incorporation into mainstream satellite design has probably occurred at a very reasonable pace. Going from providing experimental payloads on small, unmanned satellites to performing critical operational functions on manned vehicles has been a major evolution. If all goes as planned in the next few months, GPS receivers will soon provide those critical functions on one of the most complex spacecraft in history, the International Space Station.

  10. GPS Receiver for a Student Satellite Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundin, E.; Andersson, J.

    This paper covers work that has been carried out during the investigation phase for the M-2 project, which is a satellite project performed by students at Department of Space Physics in Kiruna at the University of Umeå. The goal for this part of the project was to investigate how a suitable GPS receiver onboard the satellite should be built or bought. The first part of the paper covers some of the basics in GPS theory and how it works. The satellite is planned to be small and cheap, with a mass of approximately 7 kg and a power budget of around 7W. Some basic OEM receivers are compared, and methods are presented to verify that they will work at velocities above the limits defined by ITAR (International Traffic in Arms Regulations). If the manufacturer is willing to modify the software the next step is to apply for a licence from US Department of Defence. An alternative solution is to build the device ourselves, or have someone make it for us. The most suitable solution is probably the Orionkit from Mitel. This solution is successfully used in some sounding rockets launched in Sweden. The price will be about 5000 Euro, and the power consumption will be about 100mW, which is much cheaper and uses much less power compared with one of the best OEM, Ashtech G12.

  11. Software Defined GPS Receiver for International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Courtney B.; Robison, David E.; Koelewyn, Cynthia Lee

    2011-01-01

    JPL is providing a software defined radio (SDR) that will fly on the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the CoNNeCT project under NASA's SCaN program. The SDR consists of several modules including a Baseband Processor Module (BPM) and a GPS Module (GPSM). The BPM executes applications (waveforms) consisting of software components for the embedded SPARC processor and logic for two Virtex II Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) that operate on data received from the GPSM. GPS waveforms on the SDR are enabled by an L-Band antenna, low noise amplifier (LNA), and the GPSM that performs quadrature downconversion at L1, L2, and L5. The GPS waveform for the JPL SDR will acquire and track L1 C/A, L2C, and L5 GPS signals from a CoNNeCT platform on ISS, providing the best GPS-based positioning of ISS achieved to date, the first use of multiple frequency GPS on ISS, and potentially the first L5 signal tracking from space. The system will also enable various radiometric investigations on ISS such as local multipath or ISS dynamic behavior characterization. In following the software-defined model, this work will create a highly portable GPS software and firmware package that can be adapted to another platform with the necessary processor and FPGA capability. This paper also describes ISS applications for the JPL CoNNeCT SDR GPS waveform, possibilities for future global navigation satellite system (GNSS) tracking development, and the applicability of the waveform components to other space navigation applications.

  12. GPS receiver CODE bias estimation: A comparison of two methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Anthony M.; Jayachandran, P. T.; Themens, D. R.; Langley, R. B.

    2017-04-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a valuable tool in the measurement and monitoring of ionospheric total electron content (TEC). To obtain accurate GPS-derived TEC, satellite and receiver hardware biases, known as differential code biases (DCBs), must be estimated and removed. The Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) provides monthly averages of receiver DCBs for a significant number of stations in the International Global Navigation Satellite Systems Service (IGS) network. A comparison of the monthly receiver DCBs provided by CODE with DCBs estimated using the minimization of standard deviations (MSD) method on both daily and monthly time intervals, is presented. Calibrated TEC obtained using CODE-derived DCBs, is accurate to within 0.74 TEC units (TECU) in differenced slant TEC (sTEC), while calibrated sTEC using MSD-derived DCBs results in an accuracy of 1.48 TECU.

  13. Fast-Acquisition/Weak-Signal-Tracking GPS Receiver for HEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintemitz, Luke; Boegner, Greg; Sirotzky, Steve

    2004-01-01

    A report discusses the technical background and design of the Navigator Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver -- . a radiation-hardened receiver intended for use aboard spacecraft. Navigator is capable of weak signal acquisition and tracking as well as much faster acquisition of strong or weak signals with no a priori knowledge or external aiding. Weak-signal acquisition and tracking enables GPS use in high Earth orbits (HEO), and fast acquisition allows for the receiver to remain without power until needed in any orbit. Signal acquisition and signal tracking are, respectively, the processes of finding and demodulating a signal. Acquisition is the more computationally difficult process. Previous GPS receivers employ the method of sequentially searching the two-dimensional signal parameter space (code phase and Doppler). Navigator exploits properties of the Fourier transform in a massively parallel search for the GPS signal. This method results in far faster acquisition times [in the lab, 12 GPS satellites have been acquired with no a priori knowledge in a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) scenario in less than one second]. Modeling has shown that Navigator will be capable of acquiring signals down to 25 dB-Hz, appropriate for HEO missions. Navigator is built using the radiation-hardened ColdFire microprocessor and housing the most computationally intense functions in dedicated field-programmable gate arrays. The high performance of the algorithm and of the receiver as a whole are made possible by optimizing computational efficiency and carefully weighing tradeoffs among the sampling rate, data format, and data-path bit width.

  14. Architecture and performance of a new GPS time transfer and positioning receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kido, T. I.; Ould, P. C.; Vanwechel, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the Interstate Electronics 4200 GPS Receiver System that has been developed for time transfer and low dynamic positioning applications. The receiver employs the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) l sub 1 C/A code and has three optional solution modes fo the clock/navigation state estimation.

  15. NAVIGATION PERFORMANCE IN HIGH EARTH ORBITS USING NAVIGATOR GPS RECEIVER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, William; Naasz, Bo; Moreau, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    NASA GSFC has developed a GPS receiver that can acquire and track GPS signals with sensitivity significantly lower than conventional GPS receivers. This opens up the possibility of using GPS based navigation for missions in high altitude orbit, such as Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) in a geostationary orbit, and the Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) Mission, in highly eccentric orbits extending to 12 Earth radii and higher. Indeed much research has been performed to study the feasibility of using GPS navigation in high Earth orbits and the performance achievable. Recently, GSFC has conducted a series of hardware in-the-loop tests to assess the performance of this new GPS receiver in various high Earth orbits of interest. Tracking GPS signals to down to approximately 22-25 dB-Hz, including signals from the GPS transmitter side-lobes, steady-state navigation performance in a geostationary orbit is on the order of 10 meters. This paper presents the results of these tests, as well as sensitivity analysis to such factors as ionosphere masks, use of GPS side-lobe signals, and GPS receiver sensitivity.

  16. Low-cost digital GPS receiver with software carrier detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M. H.

    1988-08-01

    The satellite navigation system global positioning system (GPS) will play a major role in the field of navigation. It will be able to compete with all previously existing radio navigation systems. Low-cost receivers will be built for a number of civilian users, such as general aviation, sea and land navigation. To permit production at low cost for the civil market, a new technique for a C/A (course and acquisition) code receiver has been developed. All the signal detecting and processing is carried out with the digital signal processing software in a Texas Instruments TMS 320C10. The advantage of this method is that complex functions can be effected in a computer program instead of in analog or digital circuits. This reduces the costs of the parts used in the receiver and also avoids calibration. Taken together, these two features greatly reduce the price of a navigation set. This paper discusses the underlying principles leading to this new receiver.

  17. Absolute Time Error Calibration of GPS Receivers Using Advanced GPS Simulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    29th Annual Precise Time a d Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting ABSOLUTE TIME ERROR CALIBRATION OF GPS RECEIVERS USING ADVANCED GPS SIMULATORS E.D...DC 20375 USA Abstract Preche time transfer eq)er&nen& using GPS with t h e stabd?v’s under ten nanoseconh are common& being reported willrbr the... time transfer communily. Relarive calibrations are done by naeasurhg the time error of one GPS receiver versus a “known master refmence receiver.” Z?t

  18. NASA's GPS tracking system for Aristoteles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. S.; Hajj, G.; Kursinski, E. R.; Kyriacou, C.; Meehan, T. K.; Melbourne, William G.; Neilan, R. E.; Young, L. E.; Yunck, Thomas P.

    1991-12-01

    NASA 's Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking system for Artistoteles receivers and a GPS flight receiver aboard Aristoteles is described. It will include a global network of GPS ground receivers and a GPS flight receiver aboard Aristoteles. The flight receiver will operate autonomously; it will provide real time navigation solutions for Aristoteles and tracking data needed by ESOC for operational control of the satellite. The GPS flight and ground receivers will currently and continuously track all visible GPS satellites. These observations will yield high accuracy differential positions and velocities of Aristoteles in a terrestrial frame defined by the locations of the globally distributed ground work. The precise orbits and tracking data will be made available to science investigators as part of the geophysical data record. The characteristics of the GPS receivers, both flight and ground based, that NASA will be using to support Aristoteles are described. The operational aspects of the overall tracking system, including the data functions and the resulting data products are summarized. The expected performance of the tracking system is compared to Aristoteles requirements and the need to control key error sources such as multipath is identified.

  19. Fault tolerant GPS/Inertial System design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alison K.; Sturza, Mark A.; Deangelis, Franco; Lukaszewski, David A.

    The use of a GPS/Inertial integrated system in future launch vehicles motivates the described design of the present fault-tolerant system. The robustness of the navigation system is enhanced by integrating the GPS with an inertial fault-tolerant system. Three layers of failure detection and isolation are incorporated to determine the nature of flaws in the inertial instruments, the GPS receivers, or the integrated navigation solution. The layers are based on: (1) a high-rate parity algorithm for instrument failures; (2) a similar parity algorithm for GPS satellite or receiver failures; and (3) a GPS navigation solution to monitor inertial navigation failures. Dual failures of any system component can occur in any system component without affecting the performance of launch-vehicle navigation or guidance.

  20. Unprecented syntonization and syncronization accuracy via simultaneous viewing with GPS receivers: Construction characteristics of an NBS/GPS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. D.; Weiss, M.; Clements, A.; Allan, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The National Bureau of Standards/Global Positioning System (NBS/GPS) receiver is discussed. It is designed around the concept of obtaining high accuracy, low cost time and frequency comparisons between remote frequency standards and clocks with the intent to aid international time and frequency coordination. Preliminary tests of this comparison technique between Boulder, CO and Washington, D.C indicate the ability to do accurate time transfer to better that 10 ns, and frequency measurements to better than 1 part in 10 to the 14th power. The hardware and software of the receiver is detailed. The receiver is fully automatic with a built-in 0.1 ns resolution time interval counter. A microprocessor does data processing. Satellite signal stabilities are routinely at the 5 ns level for 15 s averages, and the internal receiver stabilities are at the 1 ns level.

  1. SATMIX Time-Scale Comparisons Using a Single-Channel Fast-Sequencing GPS Receiver with Carrier-Phase Smoothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-12-01

    GPS system time received must be determined for the same observation time to ensure that, after exchange of the CV data, these data can be assigned...averaging the GPS signals of as many satellites as possible. As the intentionally introduced deviations of the received GPS system time from its...nominal value are different for each satellite, but limited in their extent and not correlated among each other, the true GPS system time can be better

  2. Building a GPS Receiver for Space Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirotzky, Steve; Heckler, G. W.; Boegner, G.; Roman, J.; Wennersten, M.; Butler, R.; Davis, M.; Lanham, A.; Winternitz, L.; Thompson, W.; Bamford, B.; Banes, V.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 4 years the Component Systems and Hardware branch at NASA GSFC has pursued an inhouse effort to build a unique space-flight GPS receiver. This effort has resulted in the Navigator GPS receiver. Navigator's first flight opportunity will come with the STS-125 HST-SM4 mission in August 2008. This paper covers the overall hardware design for the receiver and the difficulties encountered during the transition from the breadboard design to the final flight hardware design. Among the different lessons learned, the paper stresses the importance of selecting and verifying parts that are appropriate for space applications, as well as what happens when these parts are not accurately characterized by their datasheets. Additionally, the paper discusses what analysis needs to be performed when deciding system frequencies and filters. The presentation also covers how to prepare for thermal vacuum testing, and problems that may arise during vibration testing. It also contains what criteria should be considered when determining which portions of a design to create in-house, and which portions to license from a third party. Finally, the paper shows techniques which have proven to be extraordinarily helpful in debugging and analysis.

  3. Development And Test of A Digitally Steered Antenna Array for The Navigator GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, Heitor David; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Winternitz, Luke M. B.; Hassouneh, Munther A.; Price, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS)-based navigation has become common for low-Earth orbit spacecraft as the signal environment is similar to that on the Earth s surface. The situation changes abruptly, however, for spacecraft whose orbital altitudes exceed that of the GPS constellation. Visibility is dramatically reduced and signals that are present may be very weak and more susceptible to interference. GPS receivers effective at these altitudes require increased sensitivity, which often requires a high-gain antenna. Pointing such an antenna can pose a challenge. One efficient approach to mitigate these problems is the use of a digitally steered antenna array. Such an antenna can optimally allocate gain toward desired signal sources and away from interferers. This paper presents preliminary results in the development and test of a digitally steered antenna array for the Navigator GPS research program at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center. In particular, this paper highlights the development of an array and front-end electronics, the development and test of a real-time software GPS receiver, and implementation of three beamforming methods for combining the signals from the array. Additionally, this paper discusses the development of a GPS signal simulator which produces digital samples of the GPS L1C/A signals as they would be received by an arbitrary antenna array configuration. The simulator models transmitter and receiver dynamics, near-far and multipath interference, and has been a critical component in both the development and test of the GPS receiver. The GPS receiver system was tested with real and simulated GPS signals. Preliminary results show that performance improvement was achieved in both the weak signal and interference environments, matching analytical predictions. This paper summarizes our initial findings and discusses the advantages and limitations of the antenna array and the various beamforming methods.

  4. Implementation of an Efficient High-Accuracy Model for Personal GPS Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonekawa, Masashi; Tanaka, Toshiyuki

    Positioning systems supported by satellites are increasingly used because of the widespread use of cheap and small personal Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers. Personal GPS receivers are used in cellular phones and car navigation systems. The positioning method used by these personal GPS receivers often produces inaccurate positioning results. Because of the price and size constraints of personal GPS receivers, their accuracy is compromised, and as a result, high-accuracy positioning methods are not widely used. In this paper, we propose a high-accuracy positioning method that can be used with personal GPS receivers. Our proposed method is based on a new approach that takes into account both the systems and solar wind environments. To verify our method, we target the positioning accuracy equivalent to that of the dual-frequency positioning system, which is the highest-accuracy positioning method among all standalone positioning methods. Our approach is implemented in software only, meaning it can be implemented in even the most widely used GPS receivers. Processing speeds associated with the implementation of our proposed method using the CPUs of cellular phones and car navigation systems are well-tolerated.

  5. Using ionospheric scintillation indices to estimate GPS receiver tracking performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmas, Zeynep G.; Aquino, Marcio; Dodson, Alan

    2010-05-01

    The Institute of Engineering Surveying and Space Geodesy (IESSG), at the University of Nottingham, has been involved with ionospheric scintillation research and its impact on users of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) since 2001. The IESSG hosts a comprehensive archive of scintillation data recorded during the last high of the solar cycle (2001-2003) by four GSV4004 receivers (GPS Silicon Valley) in the UK and Norway, at geographic latitudes varying from 53N to 71N. The scintillation data that forms this ~3-year archive is given solely by the widely used scintillation indices S4 and σφ (in particular the latter's 60 second version). Aquino et al (2007) describe a strategy devised to enable the combination of these scintillation indices and the spectral parameters T (the spectral strength of the phase noise at 1 Hz) and p (the spectral slope), extracted from high-rate GPS phase and amplitude data, with state-of-the-art receiver tracking models in order to study receiver tracking performance under scintillation conditions. Strangeways (2009) later devised a method to calculate the scintillation parameters T and p over a range of Fresnel frequencies based only on the scintillation indices, i.e. when high rate data is not available, as in the case of the IESSG archive of 2001-2003. This paper shows initial investigations on the retrieval of the spectral parameters p and T from actual GPS scintillation indices recorded more recently in Trondheim (app. Lat 64N, Long 10E) on 23 April 2008. T and p values are estimated from S4 and σφ and compared with actual spectral parameters obtained from high rate data that are now being recorded. The paper then takes investigations a step further, by comparing the output of a state of the art tracking model when the estimated and actual spectral parameters are used as input, respectively. This paper gives an initial insight on the applicability of the method to mitigate the effects of the ionospheric scintillation on

  6. High-precision coseismic displacement estimation with a single-frequency GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bofeng; Zhang, Xiaohong; Ren, Xiaodong; Li, Xingxing

    2015-07-01

    To improve the performance of Global Positioning System (GPS) in the earthquake/tsunami early warning and rapid response applications, minimizing the blind zone and increasing the stability and accuracy of both the rapid source and rupture inversion, the density of existing GPS networks must be increased in the areas at risk. For economic reasons, low-cost single-frequency receivers would be preferable to make the sparse dual-frequency GPS networks denser. When using single-frequency GPS receivers, the main problem that must be solved is the ionospheric delay, which is a critical factor when determining accurate coseismic displacements. In this study, we introduce a modified Satellite-specific Epoch-differenced Ionospheric Delay (MSEID) model to compensate for the effect of ionospheric error on single-frequency GPS receivers. In the MSEID model, the time-differenced ionospheric delays observed from a regional dual-frequency GPS network to a common satellite are fitted to a plane rather than part of a sphere, and the parameters of this plane are determined by using the coordinates of the stations. When the parameters are known, time-differenced ionospheric delays for a single-frequency GPS receiver could be derived from the observations of those dual-frequency receivers. Using these ionospheric delay corrections, coseismic displacements of a single-frequency GPS receiver can be accurately calculated based on time-differenced carrier-phase measurements in real time. The performance of the proposed approach is validated using 5 Hz GPS data collected during the 2012 Nicoya Peninsula Earthquake (Mw 7.6, 2012 September 5) in Costa Rica. This shows that the proposed approach improves the accuracy of the displacement of a single-frequency GPS station, and coseismic displacements with an accuracy of a few centimetres are achieved over a 10-min interval.

  7. A Geometry-Based Cycle Slip Detection and Repair Method with Time-Differenced Carrier Phase (TDCP) for a Single Frequency Global Position System (GPS) + BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) Receiver

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Chuang; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Ming; Shu, Bao; Xu, Longwei; Zhang, Rufei

    2016-01-01

    As the field of high-precision applications based on carriers continues to expand, the development of low-cost, small, modular receivers and their application in diverse scenarios and situations with complex data quality has increased the requirements of carrier-phase data preprocessing. A new geometry-based cycle slip detection and repair method based on Global Position System (GPS) + BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) is proposed. The method uses a Time-differenced Carrier Phase (TDCP) model, which eliminates the Inner-System Bias (ISB) between GPS and BDS, and it is conducive to the effective combination of GPS and BDS. It avoids the interference of the noise of the pseudo-range with cycle slip detection, while the cycle slips are preserved as integers. This method does not limit the receiver frequency number, and it is applicable to single-frequency data. The process is divided into two steps to detect and repair cycle slip. The first step is cycle slip detection, using the Improved Local Analysis Method (ILAM) to find satellites that have cycle slips; The second step is to repair the cycle slips, including estimating the float solution of changes in ambiguities at the satellites that have cycle slips with the least squares method and the integer solution of the cycle slips by rounding. In the process of rounding, in addition to the success probability, a decimal test is carried out to validate the result. Finally, experiments with filed test data are carried out to prove the effectiveness of this method. The results show that the detectable cycle slips number with GPS + BDS is much greater than that with GPS. The method can also detect the non-integer outliers while fixing the cycle slip. The maximum decimal bias in repair is less than that with GPS. It implies that this method takes full advantages of multi-system. PMID:27929390

  8. A Geometry-Based Cycle Slip Detection and Repair Method with Time-Differenced Carrier Phase (TDCP) for a Single Frequency Global Position System (GPS) + BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) Receiver.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chuang; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Ming; Shu, Bao; Xu, Longwei; Zhang, Rufei

    2016-12-05

    As the field of high-precision applications based on carriers continues to expand, the development of low-cost, small, modular receivers and their application in diverse scenarios and situations with complex data quality has increased the requirements of carrier-phase data preprocessing. A new geometry-based cycle slip detection and repair method based on Global Position System (GPS) + BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) is proposed. The method uses a Time-differenced Carrier Phase (TDCP) model, which eliminates the Inner-System Bias (ISB) between GPS and BDS, and it is conducive to the effective combination of GPS and BDS. It avoids the interference of the noise of the pseudo-range with cycle slip detection, while the cycle slips are preserved as integers. This method does not limit the receiver frequency number, and it is applicable to single-frequency data. The process is divided into two steps to detect and repair cycle slip. The first step is cycle slip detection, using the Improved Local Analysis Method (ILAM) to find satellites that have cycle slips; The second step is to repair the cycle slips, including estimating the float solution of changes in ambiguities at the satellites that have cycle slips with the least squares method and the integer solution of the cycle slips by rounding. In the process of rounding, in addition to the success probability, a decimal test is carried out to validate the result. Finally, experiments with filed test data are carried out to prove the effectiveness of this method. The results show that the detectable cycle slips number with GPS + BDS is much greater than that with GPS. The method can also detect the non-integer outliers while fixing the cycle slip. The maximum decimal bias in repair is less than that with GPS. It implies that this method takes full advantages of multi-system.

  9. Precise Clock Solutions Using Carrier Phase from GPS Receivers in the International GPS Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumberge, J. F.; Jefferson, D. C.; Stowers, D. A.; Tjoelker, R. L.; Young, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    As one of its activities as an Analysis Center in the International GPS Service (IGS), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) uses data from a globally distributed network of geodetic-quality GPS receivers to estimate precise clock solutions, relative to a chosen reference, for both the GPS satellites and GPS receiver internal clocks, every day. The GPS constellation and ground network provide geometrical strength resulting in formal errors of about 100 p sec for these estimates. Some of the receivers in the global IGS network contain high quality frequency references, such as hydrogen masers. The clock solutions for such receivers are smooth at the 20-p sec level on time scales of a few minutes. There are occasional (daily to weekly) shifts at the microsec level, symptomatic of receiver resets, and 200-p sec-level discontinuities at midnight due to 1-day processing boundaries. Relative clock solutions among 22 IGS sites proposed as "fiducial" in the IGS/BIPM pilot project have been examined over a recent 4-week period. This allows a quantitative measure of receiver reset frequency as a function of site. For days and-sites without resets, the Allan deviation of the relative clock solutions is also computed for subdaily values of tau..

  10. Predicting metabolic rate during level and uphill outdoor walking using a low-cost GPS receiver.

    PubMed

    de Müllenheim, Pierre-Yves; Dumond, Rémy; Gernigon, Marie; Mahé, Guillaume; Lavenu, Audrey; Bickert, Sandrine; Prioux, Jacques; Noury-Desvaux, Bénédicte; Le Faucheur, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of using speed and grade data obtained from a low-cost global positioning system (GPS) receiver to estimate metabolic rate (MR) during level and uphill outdoor walking. Thirty young, healthy adults performed randomized outdoor walking for 6-min periods at 2.0, 3.5, and 5.0 km/h and on three different grades: 1) level walking, 2) uphill walking on a 3.7% mean grade, and 3) uphill walking on a 10.8% mean grade. The reference MR [metabolic equivalents (METs) and oxygen uptake (V̇o2)] values were obtained using a portable metabolic system. The speed and grade were obtained using a low-cost GPS receiver (1-Hz recording). The GPS grade (Δ altitude/distance walked) was calculated using both uncorrected GPS altitude data and GPS altitude data corrected with map projection software. The accuracy of predictions using reference speed and grade (actual[SPEED/GRADE]) data was high [R(2) = 0.85, root-mean-square error (RMSE) = 0.68 MET]. The accuracy decreased when GPS speed and uncorrected grade (GPS[UNCORRECTED]) data were used, although it remained substantial (R(2) = 0.66, RMSE = 1.00 MET). The accuracy was greatly improved when the GPS speed and corrected grade (GPS[CORRECTED]) data were used (R(2) = 0.82, RMSE = 0.79 MET). Published predictive equations for walking MR were also cross-validated using actual or GPS speed and grade data when appropriate. The prediction accuracy was very close when either actual[SPEED/GRADE] values or GPS[CORRECTED] values (for level and uphill combined) or GPS speed values (for level walking only) were used. These results offer promising research and clinical applications related to the assessment of energy expenditure during free-living walking.

  11. A Generic Receiver Tracking Model for GPS Ionospheric Amplitude Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paula, E. R.; Moraes, A. D.; Perrella, W. J.; Galera Monico, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Ionospheric scintillations result in rapid variations in phase and amplitude of the radio signal, which propagates through the ionosphere. Depending on the temporal and spatial situation, the scintillation can represent a problem in the availability and precision of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). Scintillations affect the receiver performance, specially the tracking loop level. Depending on the scintillation level, the receiver might increase the measurement errors or even can lead to a loss of lock of the carrier and code loops. In extreme cases, the scintillation can result in full disrupting of the receiver. In this work we introduce a generic model to evaluate the effects of ionospheric amplitude scintillation on GPS receiver tracking loops. This model is based on α-μ distribution, which can be seen as a generalized fading model, that includes a variety of distributions such as Gamma, Nakagami-m, Exponential, Weibull, one-sided Gaussian and Rayleigh. Differently from the model based only on Nakagami-m, this one is not limited to S4< 0,71 which allows using it to predict amplitude scintillation effects for stronger scenarios. The estimation of α-μ coefficients, the empirical parameterization based on field measurements and the typical values estimated based on observations made during the last solar maximum are presented and discussed.

  12. Global Positioning System (GPS) Modernization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM ( GPS ) MODERNIZATION Lt. Col. C. McGinn, Capt. S...CA 90501, USA Abstract The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) signal is now the primary means of obtaining precise time to an internationally accepted...number. 1. REPORT DATE NOV 2000 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2000 to 00-00-2000 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Global Positioning System ( GPS

  13. Calibration of the BEV GPS Receiver by Using TWSTFT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    B. Blanzano, and O. Koudelka, 2008, “Time transfer with nanosecond accuracy for the realization of International Atomic Time,” Metrologia , 45, 185...TAI computation,” Metrologia , 45, 35-45 [4] A. Niessner, 14 January 2008, “BEV Report to BIPM of the calibration result for the GPS receivers

  14. Experience at the CENAM With Time and Frequency Standards Signals Received by the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Centro Nacional de Metrologia, Cenam,Time and Frequency Division,Apdo. Postal 1-100 Centro,C.P. 76900, Queretaro ...one day. But the nearest and frequently locked stations of LORAN-C system at CENAM, Queretaro , Qro. were Raymondville, Texas, and Gillette, Wyoming

  15. Performance Evaluation of Block Acquisition and Tracking Algorithms Using an Open Source GPS Receiver Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Ganesh K.; Akopian, David; Heckler, Gregory W.; Winternitz, Luke B.

    2011-01-01

    Location technologies have many applications in wireless communications, military and space missions, etc. US Global Positioning System (GPS) and other existing and emerging Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are expected to provide accurate location information to enable such applications. While GNSS systems perform very well in strong signal conditions, their operation in many urban, indoor, and space applications is not robust or even impossible due to weak signals and strong distortions. The search for less costly, faster and more sensitive receivers is still in progress. As the research community addresses more and more complicated phenomena there exists a demand on flexible multimode reference receivers, associated SDKs, and development platforms which may accelerate and facilitate the research. One of such concepts is the software GPS/GNSS receiver (GPS SDR) which permits a facilitated access to algorithmic libraries and a possibility to integrate more advanced algorithms without hardware and essential software updates. The GNU-SDR and GPS-SDR open source receiver platforms are such popular examples. This paper evaluates the performance of recently proposed block-corelator techniques for acquisition and tracking of GPS signals using open source GPS-SDR platform.

  16. Group delay variations of GPS transmitting and receiving antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanninger, Lambert; Sumaya, Hael; Beer, Susanne

    2017-03-01

    GPS code pseudorange measurements exhibit group delay variations at the transmitting and the receiving antenna. We calibrated C1 and P2 delay variations with respect to dual-frequency carrier phase observations and obtained nadir-dependent corrections for 32 satellites of the GPS constellation in early 2015 as well as elevation-dependent corrections for 13 receiving antenna models. The combined delay variations reach up to 1.0 m (3.3 ns) in the ionosphere-free linear combination for specific pairs of satellite and receiving antennas. Applying these corrections to the code measurements improves code/carrier single-frequency precise point positioning, ambiguity fixing based on the Melbourne-Wübbena linear combination, and determination of ionospheric total electron content. It also affects fractional cycle biases and differential code biases.

  17. Design and predicted performance of the GPS demonstration receiver for the NASA Topex satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, Lance; Hailey, Lenard; Geier, G. Jeffrey; Davis, Robert; Huth, Gaylord; Munson, Timothy N.

    1988-01-01

    NASA's Ocean Topography Experiment (Topex) satellite will perform topographic ocean mapping. Topex will carry an experimental tracking system based on the use of GPS (Global Positioning System). An onboard GPS Demonstration Receiver (GPSDR) will be used with a network of up to ten receivers at precisely known ground sites. Following a brief overview of the Topex mission and its derived accuracy requirements, the authors describe the design of the GPSDR. The major hardware and software components are reviewed and discussed. Projected receiver tracking and navigation performance measures are presented and discussed.

  18. GPS & GLONASS mass-market receivers: positioning performances and peculiarities.

    PubMed

    Dabove, Paolo; Manzino, Ambrogio M

    2014-11-25

    Over the last twenty years, positioning with low cost Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) sensors have rapidly developed around the world at both a commercial and academic research level. For many years these instruments have only acquired the GPS constellation but are now able to track the Global'naja Navigacionnaja Sputnikovaja Sistema (GLONASS) constellation. This characteristic is very interesting, especially if used in hard-urban environments or in hard conditions where satellite visibility is low. The goal of this research is to investigate the contribution of the GLONASS constellation for mass-market receivers in order to analyse the performance in real time (Network Real Time Kinematic-NRTK positioning) with post-processing approaches. Under these conditions, it is possible to confirm that mass-market sensors could be a valid alternative to a more expensive receiver for a large number of surveying applications, but with low cost hardware the contribution of the GLONASS constellation for fixing ambiguities is useless, if not dangerous.

  19. GPS & GLONASS Mass-Market Receivers: Positioning Performances and Peculiarities

    PubMed Central

    Dabove, Paolo; Manzino, Ambrogio M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, positioning with low cost Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) sensors have rapidly developed around the world at both a commercial and academic research level. For many years these instruments have only acquired the GPS constellation but are now able to track the Global’naja Navigacionnaja Sputnikovaja Sistema (GLONASS) constellation. This characteristic is very interesting, especially if used in hard-urban environments or in hard conditions where satellite visibility is low. The goal of this research is to investigate the contribution of the GLONASS constellation for mass-market receivers in order to analyse the performance in real time (Network Real Time Kinematic—NRTK positioning) with post-processing approaches. Under these conditions, it is possible to confirm that mass-market sensors could be a valid alternative to a more expensive receiver for a large number of surveying applications, but with low cost hardware the contribution of the GLONASS constellation for fixing ambiguities is useless, if not dangerous. PMID:25429405

  20. A pseudolite-based positioning system for legacy GNSS receivers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chongwon; So, Hyoungmin; Lee, Taikjin; Kee, Changdon

    2014-03-27

    The ephemeris data format of legacy GPS receivers is improper for positioning stationary pseudolites on the ground. Therefore, to utilize pseudolites for navigation, GPS receivers must be modified so that they can handle the modified data formats of the pseudolites. Because of this problem, the practical use of pseudolites has so far been limited. This paper proposes a pseudolite-based positioning system that can be used with unmodified legacy GPS receivers. In the proposed system, pseudolites transmit simulated GPS signals. The signals use standard GPS ephemeris data format and contain ephemeris data of simulated GPS satellites, not those of pseudolites. The use of the standard format enables the GPS receiver to process pseudolite signals without any modification. However, the position output of the GPS receiver is not the correct position in this system, because there are additional signal delays from each pseudolite to the receiver. A post-calculation process was added to obtain the correct receiver position using GPS receiver output. This re-estimation is possible because it is based on known information about the simulated signals, pseudolites, and positioning process of the GPS receiver. Simulations using generated data and live GPS data are conducted for various geometries to verify the proposed system. The test results show that the proposed system provides the desired user position using pseudolite signals without requiring any modifications to the legacy GPS receiver. In this initial study, a pseudolite-only indoor system was assumed. However, it can be expanded to a GPS-pseudolite system outdoors.

  1. Testing of the International Space Station and X-38 Crew Return Vehicle GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Campbell, Chip; Carpenter, Russell; Davis, Ed; Kizhner, Semion; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Davis, George; Jackson, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the process and results of the performance testing of the GPS receiver planned for use on the International Space Station (ISS) and the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). The receiver is a Force-19 unit manufactured by Trimble Navigation and Modified in software by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to perform navigation and attitude determination in space. The receiver is the primary source of navigation and attitude information for ISS and CRV. Engineers at GSFC have developed and tested the new receiver with a Global Simulation Systems Ltd (GSS) GPS Signal Generator (GPSSG). This paper documents the unique aspects of ground testing a GPS receiver that is designed for use in space. A discussion of the design and tests using the GPSSG, documentation, data capture, data analysis, and lessons learned will precede an overview of the performance of the new receiver. A description of the challenges of that were overcome during this testing exercise will be presented. Results from testing show that the receiver will be within or near the specifications for ISS attitude and navigation performance. The process for verifying other requirements such as Time to First Fix, Time to First Attitude, selection/deselection of a specific GPS satellite vehicles (SV), minimum signal strength while still obtaining attitude and navigation, navigation and attitude output coverage, GPS week rollover, and Y2K requirements are also given in this paper.

  2. Testing of the International Space Station and X-38 Crew Return Vehicle GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Campbell, Chip; Carpenter, Russell; Davis, Ed; Kizhner, Semion; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Davis, George; Jackson, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the process and results of the performance testing of the GPS receiver planned for use on the International Space Station (ISS) and the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). The receiver is a Force-19 unit manufactured by Trimble Navigation and modified in software by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to perform navigation and attitude determination in space. The receiver is the primary source of navigation and attitude information for ISS and CRV. Engineers at GSFC have developed and tested the new receiver with a Global Simulation Systems Ltd (GSS) GPS Signal Generator (GPSSG). This paper documents the unique aspects of ground testing a GPS receiver that is designed for use in space. A discussion of the design of tests using the GPSSG, documentation, data capture, data analysis, and lessons learned will precede an overview of the performance of the new receiver. A description of the challenges that were overcome during this testing exercise will be presented. Results from testing show that the receiver will be within or near the specifications for ISS attitude and navigation performance. The process for verifying other requirements such as Time to First Fix, Time to First Attitude, selection/deselection of a specific GPS satellite vehicles (SV), minimum signal strength while still obtaining attitude and navigation, navigation and attitude output coverage, GPS week rollover, and Y2K requirements are also given in this paper.

  3. Guidelines for the Design of GPS and LORAN Receiver Controls and Displays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-01

    Systems Center has sponsored a program of research to address issues in Loran and GPS receiver design. This report first reviews the literature on...efficiently. The design variations also make it difficult to certify receivers for different applications. As a result, the Volpe National Transportation

  4. Comparison of GPS receiver DCB estimation methods using a GPS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung-Kyu; Park, Jong-Uk; Min Roh, Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Jeong

    2013-07-01

    Two approaches for receiver differential code biases (DCB) estimation using the GPS data obtained from the Korean GPS network (KGN) in South Korea are suggested: the relative and single (absolute) methods. The relative method uses a GPS network, while the single method determines DCBs from a single station only. Their performance was assessed by comparing the receiver DCB values obtained from the relative method with those estimated by the single method. The daily averaged receiver DCBs obtained from the two different approaches showed good agreement for 7 days. The root mean square (RMS) value of those differences is 0.83 nanoseconds (ns). The standard deviation of the receiver DCBs estimated by the relative method was smaller than that of the single method. From these results, it is clear that the relative method can obtain more stable receiver DCBs compared with the single method over a short-term period. Additionally, the comparison between the receiver DCBs obtained by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) and those of the IGS Global Ionosphere Maps (GIM) showed a good agreement at 0.3 ns. As the accuracy of DCB values significantly affects the accuracy of ionospheric total electron content (TEC), more studies are needed to ensure the reliability and stability of the estimated receiver DCBs.

  5. Performance Enhancement of Land Vehicle Positioning Using Multiple GPS Receivers in an Urban Area

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jong-Hwa; Jee, Gyu-In

    2016-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is the most widely used navigation system in land vehicle applications. In urban areas, the GPS suffers from insufficient signal strength, multipath propagation and non-line-of-sight (NLOS) errors, so it thus becomes difficult to obtain accurate and reliable position information. In this paper, an integration algorithm for multiple receivers is proposed to enhance the positioning performance of GPS for land vehicles in urban areas. The pseudoranges of multiple receivers are integrated based on a tightly coupled approach, and erroneous measurements are detected by testing the closeness of the pseudoranges. In order to fairly compare the pseudoranges, GPS errors and terms arising due to the differences between the positions of the receivers need to be compensated. The double-difference technique is used to eliminate GPS errors in the pseudoranges, and the geometrical distance is corrected by projecting the baseline vector between pairs of receivers. In order to test and analyze the proposed algorithm, an experiment involving live data was performed. The positioning performance of the algorithm was compared with that of the receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM)-based integration algorithm for multiple receivers. The test results showed that the proposed algorithm yields more accurate position information in urban areas. PMID:27754411

  6. Performance Enhancement of Land Vehicle Positioning Using Multiple GPS Receivers in an Urban Area.

    PubMed

    Song, Jong-Hwa; Jee, Gyu-In

    2016-10-14

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is the most widely used navigation system in land vehicle applications. In urban areas, the GPS suffers from insufficient signal strength, multipath propagation and non-line-of-sight (NLOS) errors, so it thus becomes difficult to obtain accurate and reliable position information. In this paper, an integration algorithm for multiple receivers is proposed to enhance the positioning performance of GPS for land vehicles in urban areas. The pseudoranges of multiple receivers are integrated based on a tightly coupled approach, and erroneous measurements are detected by testing the closeness of the pseudoranges. In order to fairly compare the pseudoranges, GPS errors and terms arising due to the differences between the positions of the receivers need to be compensated. The double-difference technique is used to eliminate GPS errors in the pseudoranges, and the geometrical distance is corrected by projecting the baseline vector between pairs of receivers. In order to test and analyze the proposed algorithm, an experiment involving live data was performed. The positioning performance of the algorithm was compared with that of the receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM)-based integration algorithm for multiple receivers. The test results showed that the proposed algorithm yields more accurate position information in urban areas.

  7. Testing Rtk GPS System In Urban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirti, A.; Ata, E.

    RTK GPS is provided with cm accuracy and real time surveying system. For providing this conditions, the reference is necessary for high accuracy position. Because this sta- tion is transmitted the corrections to the other receivers. At the some time this system is required common satellites on the receiver to compute integer ambiguity solution. In addition to the conditions, the data transmission device's range is very important. Although RTK GPS technique has a lot of advantages, many problems meet in prac- tice. One of the most important problem in RTK system, which is very useful and reliable in the rural areas, uses in the urban areas. We search this article, how influence RTK GPS applications on satellite numbers, multipath, data transmission device's range capability and etc. in the urban areas.

  8. A Performance Analysis of Low-Cost GPS Receivers in Kinematic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkan, R. M.; Saka, M. H.

    Low-cost OEM GPS receivers with the capability of tracking the carrier phase are now used for many applications in the navigation and tracking arena. These receivers provide flexibility in applying carrier smoothing algorithms to improve the pseudorange positioning accuracy and even perform carrier-phase differential positioning. In this study, the performance of a low-cost single-frequency OEM GPS receiver for high-accuracy kinematic positioning in marine applications is investigated. As a first step, a set of zero baseline tests were carried out to evaluate the performance of the GPS receivers. In the second stage, a kinematic test was conducted at the Halic (Golden Horn), Istanbul. The results show that kinematic positioning with centimetre level accuracy can be achieved by the low-cost OEM GPS receiver in differential mode, suggesting its use in a variety of kinematic applications. The use of such a system could considerably reduce the cost of the GPS receiver and the total project costs of many applications.

  9. A Real-Time Capable Software-Defined Receiver Using GPU for Adaptive Anti-Jam GPS Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jiwon; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; De Lorenzo, David S.; Lo, Sherman; Enge, Per; Akos, Dennis; Lee, Jiyun

    2011-01-01

    Due to their weak received signal power, Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are vulnerable to radio frequency interference. Adaptive beam and null steering of the gain pattern of a GPS antenna array can significantly increase the resistance of GPS sensors to signal interference and jamming. Since adaptive array processing requires intensive computational power, beamsteering GPS receivers were usually implemented using hardware such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). However, a software implementation using general-purpose processors is much more desirable because of its flexibility and cost effectiveness. This paper presents a GPS software-defined radio (SDR) with adaptive beamsteering capability for anti-jam applications. The GPS SDR design is based on an optimized desktop parallel processing architecture using a quad-core Central Processing Unit (CPU) coupled with a new generation Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) having massively parallel processors. This GPS SDR demonstrates sufficient computational capability to support a four-element antenna array and future GPS L5 signal processing in real time. After providing the details of our design and optimization schemes for future GPU-based GPS SDR developments, the jamming resistance of our GPS SDR under synthetic wideband jamming is presented. Since the GPS SDR uses commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and processors, it can be easily adopted in civil GPS applications requiring anti-jam capabilities. PMID:22164116

  10. A real-time capable software-defined receiver using GPU for adaptive anti-jam GPS sensors.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jiwon; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; De Lorenzo, David S; Lo, Sherman; Enge, Per; Akos, Dennis; Lee, Jiyun

    2011-01-01

    Due to their weak received signal power, Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are vulnerable to radio frequency interference. Adaptive beam and null steering of the gain pattern of a GPS antenna array can significantly increase the resistance of GPS sensors to signal interference and jamming. Since adaptive array processing requires intensive computational power, beamsteering GPS receivers were usually implemented using hardware such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). However, a software implementation using general-purpose processors is much more desirable because of its flexibility and cost effectiveness. This paper presents a GPS software-defined radio (SDR) with adaptive beamsteering capability for anti-jam applications. The GPS SDR design is based on an optimized desktop parallel processing architecture using a quad-core Central Processing Unit (CPU) coupled with a new generation Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) having massively parallel processors. This GPS SDR demonstrates sufficient computational capability to support a four-element antenna array and future GPS L5 signal processing in real time. After providing the details of our design and optimization schemes for future GPU-based GPS SDR developments, the jamming resistance of our GPS SDR under synthetic wideband jamming is presented. Since the GPS SDR uses commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and processors, it can be easily adopted in civil GPS applications requiring anti-jam capabilities.

  11. GPS (Global Positioning System) Range Applications Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-31

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) as a source of Time i. Space Position ...THE ANALYTIC SCIENCES CORPORATION 2. GPS OVERVIEW This chapter provides a short, general introduction to the Global Positioning System ( GPS ) and...chapters. 2.1 SYSTEM OPERATION The NAVSTAR Global Positioning System ( GPS ) is a space- based radio navigation system designed to provide users with

  12. Digital signal processor and processing method for GPS receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Jr., Jess B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A digital signal processor and processing method therefor for use in receivers of the NAVSTAR/GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS) employs a digital carrier down-converter, digital code correlator and digital tracking processor. The digital carrier down-converter and code correlator consists of an all-digital, minimum bit implementation that utilizes digital chip and phase advancers, providing exceptional control and accuracy in feedback phase and in feedback delay. Roundoff and commensurability errors can be reduced to extremely small values (e.g., less than 100 nanochips and 100 nanocycles roundoff errors and 0.1 millichip and 1 millicycle commensurability errors). The digital tracking processor bases the fast feedback for phase and for group delay in the C/A, P.sub.1, and P.sub.2 channels on the L.sub.1 C/A carrier phase thereby maintaining lock at lower signal-to-noise ratios, reducing errors in feedback delays, reducing the frequency of cycle slips and in some cases obviating the need for quadrature processing in the P channels. Simple and reliable methods are employed for data bit synchronization, data bit removal and cycle counting. Improved precision in averaged output delay values is provided by carrier-aided data-compression techniques. The signal processor employs purely digital operations in the sense that exactly the same carrier phase and group delay measurements are obtained, to the last decimal place, every time the same sampled data (i.e., exactly the same bits) are processed.

  13. Estimation and analysis of GPS receiver differential code biases using KGN in Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, B. K.; Cho, J. H.; Lee, S. J.

    2011-05-01

    The total electron content (TEC) estimation by the Global Positioning System (GPS) can be seriously affected by the differential code biases (DCB), referred to as inter-frequency biases (IFB), of the satellite and receiver so that an accuracy of GPS-TEC value is dependent on the error of DCBs estimation. In this paper, we proposed the singular value decomposition (SVD) method to estimate the DCB of GPS satellites and receivers using the Korean GPS network (KGN) in South Korea. The receiver DCBs of about 49 GPS reference stations in KGN were determined for the accurate estimation of the regional ionospheric TEC. They obtained from the daily solution have large biases ranging from +5 to +27 ns for geomagnetic quiet days. The receiver DCB of SUWN reference station was compared with the estimates of IGS and JPL global ionosphere map (GIM). The results have shown comparatively good agreement at the level within 0.2 ns. After correction of receiver DCBs and knowing the satellite DCBs, the comparison between the behavior of the estimated TEC and that of GIMs was performed for consecutive three days. We showed that there is a good agreement between KASI model and GIMs.

  14. GPS/GLONASS Combined Precise Point Positioning with Receiver Clock Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuhong; Chen, Xinghan; Guo, Fei

    2015-06-30

    Research has demonstrated that receiver clock modeling can reduce the correlation coefficients among the parameters of receiver clock bias, station height and zenith tropospheric delay. This paper introduces the receiver clock modeling to GPS/GLONASS combined precise point positioning (PPP), aiming to better separate the receiver clock bias and station coordinates and therefore improve positioning accuracy. Firstly, the basic mathematic models including the GPS/GLONASS observation equations, stochastic model, and receiver clock model are briefly introduced. Then datasets from several IGS stations equipped with high-stability atomic clocks are used for kinematic PPP tests. To investigate the performance of PPP, including the positioning accuracy and convergence time, a week of (1-7 January 2014) GPS/GLONASS data retrieved from these IGS stations are processed with different schemes. The results indicate that the positioning accuracy as well as convergence time can benefit from the receiver clock modeling. This is particularly pronounced for the vertical component. Statistic RMSs show that the average improvement of three-dimensional positioning accuracy reaches up to 30%-40%. Sometimes, it even reaches over 60% for specific stations. Compared to the GPS-only PPP, solutions of the GPS/GLONASS combined PPP are much better no matter if the receiver clock offsets are modeled or not, indicating that the positioning accuracy and reliability are significantly improved with the additional GLONASS satellites in the case of insufficient number of GPS satellites or poor geometry conditions. In addition to the receiver clock modeling, the impacts of different inter-system timing bias (ISB) models are investigated. For the case of a sufficient number of satellites with fairly good geometry, the PPP performances are not seriously affected by the ISB model due to the low correlation between the ISB and the other parameters. However, the refinement of ISB model weakens the

  15. GPS/GLONASS Combined Precise Point Positioning with Receiver Clock Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuhong; Chen, Xinghan; Guo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that receiver clock modeling can reduce the correlation coefficients among the parameters of receiver clock bias, station height and zenith tropospheric delay. This paper introduces the receiver clock modeling to GPS/GLONASS combined precise point positioning (PPP), aiming to better separate the receiver clock bias and station coordinates and therefore improve positioning accuracy. Firstly, the basic mathematic models including the GPS/GLONASS observation equations, stochastic model, and receiver clock model are briefly introduced. Then datasets from several IGS stations equipped with high-stability atomic clocks are used for kinematic PPP tests. To investigate the performance of PPP, including the positioning accuracy and convergence time, a week of (1–7 January 2014) GPS/GLONASS data retrieved from these IGS stations are processed with different schemes. The results indicate that the positioning accuracy as well as convergence time can benefit from the receiver clock modeling. This is particularly pronounced for the vertical component. Statistic RMSs show that the average improvement of three-dimensional positioning accuracy reaches up to 30%–40%. Sometimes, it even reaches over 60% for specific stations. Compared to the GPS-only PPP, solutions of the GPS/GLONASS combined PPP are much better no matter if the receiver clock offsets are modeled or not, indicating that the positioning accuracy and reliability are significantly improved with the additional GLONASS satellites in the case of insufficient number of GPS satellites or poor geometry conditions. In addition to the receiver clock modeling, the impacts of different inter-system timing bias (ISB) models are investigated. For the case of a sufficient number of satellites with fairly good geometry, the PPP performances are not seriously affected by the ISB model due to the low correlation between the ISB and the other parameters. However, the refinement of ISB model weakens the

  16. Global Positioning System receiver evaluation results

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, R.H.

    1993-09-01

    A Sandia project currently uses an outdated Magnavox 6400 Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver as the core of its navigation system. The goal of this study was to analyze the performance of the current GPS receiver compared to newer, less expensive models and to make recommendations on how to improve the performance of the overall navigation system. This paper discusses the test methodology used to experimentally analyze the performance of different GPS receivers, the test results, and recommendations on how an upgrade should proceed. Appendices contain detailed information regarding the raw data, test hardware, and test software.

  17. Functional description of signal processing in the Rogue GPS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Over the past year, two Rogue GPS prototype receivers have been assembled and successfully subjected to a variety of laboratory and field tests. A functional description is presented of signal processing in the Rogue receiver, tracing the signal from RF input to the output values of group delay, phase, and data bits. The receiver can track up to eight satellites, without time multiplexing among satellites or channels, simultaneously measuring both group delay and phase for each of three channels (L1-C/A, L1-P, L2-P). The Rogue signal processing described requires generation of the code for all three channels. Receiver functional design, which emphasized accuracy, reliability, flexibility, and dynamic capability, is summarized. A detailed functional description of signal processing is presented, including C/A-channel and P-channel processing, carrier-aided averaging of group delays, checks for cycle slips, acquistion, and distinctive features.

  18. GPS-based system for satellite tracking and geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertiger, Willy I.; Thornton, Catherine L.

    1989-01-01

    High-performance receivers and data processing systems developed for GPS are reviewed. The GPS Inferred Positioning System (GIPSY) and the Orbiter Analysis and Simulation Software (OASIS) are described. The OASIS software is used to assess GPS system performance using GIPSY for data processing. Consideration is given to parameter estimation for multiday arcs, orbit repeatability, orbit prediction, daily baseline repeatability, agreement with VLBI, and ambiguity resolution. Also, the dual-frequency Rogue receiver, which can track up to eight GPS satellites simultaneously, is discussed.

  19. Performance Assessment of Two GPS Receivers on Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Christine A.; Schutz, Bob E.

    1996-01-01

    Space Shuttle STS-69 was launched on September 7, 1995, carrying the Wake Shield Facility (WSF-02) among its payloads. The mission included two GPS receivers: a Collins 3M receiver onboard the Endeavour and an Osborne flight TurboRogue, known as the TurboStar, onboard the WSF-02. Two of the WSF-02 GPS Experiment objectives were to: (1) assess the ability to use GPS in a relative satellite positioning mode using the receivers on Endeavour and WSF-02; and (2) assess the performance of the receivers to support high precision orbit determination at the 400 km altitude. Three ground tests of the receivers were conducted in order to characterize the respective receivers. The analysis of the tests utilized the Double Differencing technique. A similar test in orbit was conducted during STS-69 while the WSF-02 was held by the Endeavour robot arm for a one hour period. In these tests, biases were observed in the double difference pseudorange measurements, implying that biases up to 140 m exist which do not cancel in double differencing. These biases appear to exist in the Collins receiver, but their effect can be mitigated by including measurement bias parameters to accommodate them in an estimation process. An additional test was conducted in which the orbit of the combined Endeavour/WSF-02 was determined independently with each receiver. These one hour arcs were based on forming double differences with 13 TurboRogue receivers in the global IGS network and estimating pseudorange biases for the Collins. Various analyses suggest the TurboStar overall orbit accuracy is about one to two meters for this period, based on double differenced phase residuals of 34 cm. These residuals indicate the level of unmodeled forces on Endeavour produced by gravitational and nongravitational effects. The rms differences between the two independently determined orbits are better than 10 meters, thereby demonstrating the accuracy of the Collins-determined orbit at this level as well as the

  20. GENESIS: GPS Environmental and Earth Science Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, George

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews the GPS ENvironmental and Earth Science Information System (GENESIS). The objectives of GENESIS are outlined (1) Data Archiving, searching and distribution for science data products derived from Space borne TurboRogue Space Receivers for GPS science and other ground based GPS receivers, (2) Data browsing using integrated visualization tools, (3) Interactive web/java-based data search and retrieval, (4) Data subscription service, (5) Data migration from existing GPS archived data, (6) On-line help and documentation, and (7) participation in the WP-ESIP federation. The presentation reviews the products and services of Genesis, and the technology behind the system.

  1. Architecture and field test results of a digital GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyle, Chris; Thomas, James; Leasure, Steven

    The PA9050 series of stet receivers perform digital correlation at baseband using five parallel Tracking channels. There are three correlators in each tracking channel and automatic moding is provided to maximize dynamic performance under the prevailing signal-to-noise environment. Pseudorate measurements are used at 10 Hz, with pseudorange updates at 1 Hz, to generate the navigation solution using a Kalman filter which has up to 11 state elements, depending on application. Kalman filter moding occurs during periods of bad geometry, and an uncoupled height bias estimator filter is also provided. Open-loop correction of the incoming IN data is performed within the PA9050 receiver using the GPS position and velocity solution as the reference data. Demonstrator receivers have been extensively and successfully tested in rotary and fixed-wing aircraft as well as on surface vessels and land vehicles; stand-alone and IN-aided trials have been carried out.

  2. Pilot GPS/LORAN Receiver Programming Performance: A Laboratory Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS Pilot GPS/LORAN Receiver Programming Performance: A Laboratory Evaluation FA4E2/A4007 6. AUTHOR(S) Edwin F...tonne (t) 1 tonne (t) a 1.000 kilograms (kg) a 1.1 short tons VOLUME (APPROXIMATE) VOLUME (APPROXIMATE) 1 teaspoon (tsp) a 5 milliliters (ml) 1...ft. ft 3) a 0.03 cubic meter (m3 ) 1 cubic yard (cu yd. yd 3) a 0.76 cubic meter (m 3 ) TEMPERATURE (EXACT) TEMPERATURE (EXACT) ((x-32)( 5 /9)]F - y’C

  3. A New Indoor Positioning System Architecture Using GPS Signals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Chen, Wu; Xu, Ying; Ji, Shengyue

    2015-04-29

    The pseudolite system is a good alternative for indoor positioning systems due to its large coverage area and accurate positioning solution. However, for common Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, the pseudolite system requires some modifications of the user terminals. To solve the problem, this paper proposes a new pseudolite-based indoor positioning system architecture. The main idea is to receive real-world GPS signals, repeat each satellite signal and transmit those using indoor transmitting antennas. The transmitted GPS-like signal can be processed (signal acquisition and tracking, navigation data decoding) by the general receiver and thus no hardware-level modification on the receiver is required. In addition, all Tx can be synchronized with each other since one single clock is used in Rx/Tx. The proposed system is simulated using a software GPS receiver. The simulation results show the indoor positioning system is able to provide high accurate horizontal positioning in both static and dynamic situations.

  4. A New Indoor Positioning System Architecture Using GPS Signals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Chen, Wu; Xu, Ying; Ji, Shengyue

    2015-01-01

    The pseudolite system is a good alternative for indoor positioning systems due to its large coverage area and accurate positioning solution. However, for common Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, the pseudolite system requires some modifications of the user terminals. To solve the problem, this paper proposes a new pseudolite-based indoor positioning system architecture. The main idea is to receive real-world GPS signals, repeat each satellite signal and transmit those using indoor transmitting antennas. The transmitted GPS-like signal can be processed (signal acquisition and tracking, navigation data decoding) by the general receiver and thus no hardware-level modification on the receiver is required. In addition, all Tx can be synchronized with each other since one single clock is used in Rx/Tx. The proposed system is simulated using a software GPS receiver. The simulation results show the indoor positioning system is able to provide high accurate horizontal positioning in both static and dynamic situations. PMID:25938199

  5. Simulation of a navigator algorithm for a low-cost GPS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    The analytical structure of an existing navigator algorithm for a low cost global positioning system receiver is described in detail to facilitate its implementation on in-house digital computers and real-time simulators. The material presented includes a simulation of GPS pseudorange measurements, based on a two-body representation of the NAVSTAR spacecraft orbits, and a four component model of the receiver bias errors. A simpler test for loss of pseudorange measurements due to spacecraft shielding is also noted.

  6. GPS/GLONASS Time Transfer with 20-Channel Dual GNSS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daly, P.; Riley, S.

    1996-01-01

    One of the world's two global navigation systems, the Global Positioning System (GPS), is already fully operational (April 1994) and the other, the Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) will become operational by the end of 1995 or early 1996. Each will offer, independently of the other, precise location and time transfer continuously anywhere in the world and indeed in space itself. Many potential users, in particular the civil aviation community, are keenly interested in a joint GPS/GLONASS operation since it would offer substantial advantages in defining and maintaining the integrity of the navigation aid. Results are presented on the characterization of GPS/GLONASS time comparison using a 20-channel dual receiver developed and constructed at the University of Leeds, UK.

  7. Relative Attitude Determination of Earth Orbiting Formations Using GPS Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightsey, E. Glenn

    2004-01-01

    Satellite formation missions require the precise determination of both the position and attitude of multiple vehicles to achieve the desired objectives. In order to support the mission requirements for these applications, it is necessary to develop techniques for representing and controlling the attitude of formations of vehicles. A generalized method for representing the attitude of a formation of vehicles has been developed. The representation may be applied to both absolute and relative formation attitude control problems. The technique is able to accommodate formations of arbitrarily large number of vehicles. To demonstrate the formation attitude problem, the method is applied to the attitude determination of a simple leader-follower along-track orbit formation. A multiplicative extended Kalman filter is employed to estimate vehicle attitude. In a simulation study using GPS receivers as the attitude sensors, the relative attitude between vehicles in the formation is determined 3 times more accurately than the absolute attitude.

  8. The MARCOR GPS mobile data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothblatt, Martin

    1991-01-01

    Market research revealed several key demands for an Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) Global Positioning System (GPS) radio. The demands were for minimization of urban building blockage, easy programmability to minimize mobile data transmission costs, high accuracy for street map level coordination, interface capability with non-digital Specialized Mobile Radios (SMR), and a selling price close to that of alternatives such as Signposts and Loran-C. A team of experts was assembled to surmount these challenges and deliver a GPS radio for $500 to $1000, which operates at high accuracy in an urban environment and is plug-compatible with nearly all vehicle radios. Among the engineering and production breakthroughs described here are a unique Simultrac (Trademark) approach to satellite tracking, enabling up to eight GPS satellites to be used for position determination with a 2-channel receiver, and a receiver-in-a-microphone design. A powerful Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) allowed GPS to be brought within easy reach of millions of AVL users such as bus, taxi, and delivery vehicle fleets.

  9. Flight Performance Evaluation of Three GPS Receivers for Sounding Rocket Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton; Diehl, James; Montenbruck, Oliver; Markgraf, Markus; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In preparation for the European Space Agency Maxus-4 mission, a sounding rocket test flight was carried out at Esrange,, near Kiruna, Sweden on February 19, 2001 to validate existing ground facilities and range safety installations. Due to the absence of a dedicated scientific payload, the flight offered the opportunity to test multiple GPS receivers and assess their performance for the tracking of sounding rockets. The receivers included an Ashtech G12 HDMA receiver, a BAE (Canadian Marconi) Allstar receiver and a Mitel Orion receiver. All of them provide CIA code tracking on the L1 frequency to determine the user position and make use of Doppler measurements to derive the instantaneous velocity. Among the receivers, the G12 has been optimized for use under highly dynamic conditions and has earlier been flown successfully on NASA sounding rockets [Bull, ION-GPS-2000]. The Allstar is representative of common single frequency receivers for terrestrial applications and received no particular modification, except for the disabling of the common altitude and velocity constraints that would otherwise inhibit its use for space application. The Orion receiver, finally, employs the same Mitel chipset as the Allstar, but has received various firmware modifications by DLR to safeguard it against signal losses and improve its tracking performance [Montenbruck et al., ION-GPS-2000]. While the two NASA receivers were driven by a common wrap-around antenna, the DLR experiment made use of a switchable antenna system comprising a helical antenna in the tip of the rocket and two blade antennas attached to the body of the vehicle. During the boost a peak acceleration of roughly 17g's was achieved which resulted in a velocity of about 1100 m/s at the end of the burn. At apogee, the rocket reached a maximum altitude of over 80 km. A detailed analysis of the attained flight data will be given in the paper together with a evaluation of different receiver designs and antenna concepts.

  10. Calibration of the delay time in the GMS/GPS time transfer receivers using portable reference receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikawa, Takao; Miki, Chihiro; Uratsuka, Makoto; Kawai, Eiji; Imae, Michito

    1989-04-01

    The Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) of Japan and the National Measurement Laboratory (NML) of Australia have performed international time transfer using the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) since 1986. The precision of the time transfer using GPS is 10 ns, while that using GMS is 20 ns. However, there has been a bias of 200 ns between the time transfer results of the two time links, which is mainly due to the estimation error of the delay time in the time transfer receivers. To improve this bias error, CRL developed a portable reference receiver (PRX) for the GMS time transfer to calibrate the delay time in the time transfer receivers. In November and December 1987, a calibration experiment was carried out by the PRX method for GMS and GPS between CRL and NML. As the result of the experiment, the bias was reduced from 200 to 75 ns and the accuracy of the time transfer between CRL and NML was significantly improved.

  11. Civil Application of Differential GPS Using a Single Channel Sequential Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) and its potential for area navigation, landing, and takeoff under minimum ceilings and advanced air traffic control operation is discussed. The following topics are reported: status of the GPS system; GPS signal availability for the civil community; alternative differential GPS concepts; predicted performance enhancement achievable with differential GPS and the operational improvements which will result; and a development program to test and evaluate differential GPS concepts, performance and operational procedures applicable to helicopters. Potential benefits which will be derived from helicopter use of GPS in the differential mode are identified.

  12. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) As of FY 2015 President’s Budget...00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Responsible Office References Program Name Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) DoD Component Air Force

  13. 47 CFR 87.151 - Special requirements for differential GPS receivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special requirements for differential GPS receivers. 87.151 Section 87.151 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND... differential GPS receivers. (a) The receiver shall achieve a message failure rate less than or equal to...

  14. A Pseudolite-Based Positioning System for Legacy GNSS Receivers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chongwon; So, Hyoungmin; Lee, Taikjin; Kee, Changdon

    2014-01-01

    The ephemeris data format of legacy GPS receivers is improper for positioning stationary pseudolites on the ground. Therefore, to utilize pseudolites for navigation, GPS receivers must be modified so that they can handle the modified data formats of the pseudolites. Because of this problem, the practical use of pseudolites has so far been limited. This paper proposes a pseudolite-based positioning system that can be used with unmodified legacy GPS receivers. In the proposed system, pseudolites transmit simulated GPS signals. The signals use standard GPS ephemeris data format and contain ephemeris data of simulated GPS satellites, not those of pseudolites. The use of the standard format enables the GPS receiver to process pseudolite signals without any modification. However, the position output of the GPS receiver is not the correct position in this system, because there are additional signal delays from each pseudolite to the receiver. A post-calculation process was added to obtain the correct receiver position using GPS receiver output. This re-estimation is possible because it is based on known information about the simulated signals, pseudolites, and positioning process of the GPS receiver. Simulations using generated data and live GPS data are conducted for various geometries to verify the proposed system. The test results show that the proposed system provides the desired user position using pseudolite signals without requiring any modifications to the legacy GPS receiver. In this initial study, a pseudolite-only indoor system was assumed. However, it can be expanded to a GPS-pseudolite system outdoors. PMID:24681674

  15. The Performance Analysis of a Real-Time Integrated INS/GPS Vehicle Navigation System with Abnormal GPS Measurement Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Duong, Thanh Trung; Liao, Jhen-Kai

    2013-01-01

    The integration of an Inertial Navigation System (INS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) is common in mobile mapping and navigation applications to seamlessly determine the position, velocity, and orientation of the mobile platform. In most INS/GPS integrated architectures, the GPS is considered to be an accurate reference with which to correct for the systematic errors of the inertial sensors, which are composed of biases, scale factors and drift. However, the GPS receiver may produce abnormal pseudo-range errors mainly caused by ionospheric delay, tropospheric delay and the multipath effect. These errors degrade the overall position accuracy of an integrated system that uses conventional INS/GPS integration strategies such as loosely coupled (LC) and tightly coupled (TC) schemes. Conventional tightly coupled INS/GPS integration schemes apply the Klobuchar model and the Hopfield model to reduce pseudo-range delays caused by ionospheric delay and tropospheric delay, respectively, but do not address the multipath problem. However, the multipath effect (from reflected GPS signals) affects the position error far more significantly in a consumer-grade GPS receiver than in an expensive, geodetic-grade GPS receiver. To avoid this problem, a new integrated INS/GPS architecture is proposed. The proposed method is described and applied in a real-time integrated system with two integration strategies, namely, loosely coupled and tightly coupled schemes, respectively. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, field tests with various scenarios are conducted and the results are compared with a reliable reference system. PMID:23955434

  16. The performance analysis of a real-time integrated INS/GPS vehicle navigation system with abnormal GPS measurement elimination.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Duong, Thanh Trung; Liao, Jhen-Kai

    2013-08-15

    The integration of an Inertial Navigation System (INS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) is common in mobile mapping and navigation applications to seamlessly determine the position, velocity, and orientation of the mobile platform. In most INS/GPS integrated architectures, the GPS is considered to be an accurate reference with which to correct for the systematic errors of the inertial sensors, which are composed of biases, scale factors and drift. However, the GPS receiver may produce abnormal pseudo-range errors mainly caused by ionospheric delay, tropospheric delay and the multipath effect. These errors degrade the overall position accuracy of an integrated system that uses conventional INS/GPS integration strategies such as loosely coupled (LC) and tightly coupled (TC) schemes. Conventional tightly coupled INS/GPS integration schemes apply the Klobuchar model and the Hopfield model to reduce pseudo-range delays caused by ionospheric delay and tropospheric delay, respectively, but do not address the multipath problem. However, the multipath effect (from reflected GPS signals) affects the position error far more significantly in a consumer-grade GPS receiver than in an expensive, geodetic-grade GPS receiver. To avoid this problem, a new integrated INS/GPS architecture is proposed. The proposed method is described and applied in a real-time integrated system with two integration strategies, namely, loosely coupled and tightly coupled schemes, respectively. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, field tests with various scenarios are conducted and the results are compared with a reliable reference system.

  17. Gps monitoring of the la valette landslide (french alps) with two mono-frequency receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squarzoni, C.; Delacourt, C.; Allemand, P.

    2003-04-01

    In the last years, the Global Positioning System techniques have been more and more employed in landslide monitoring. Here we present an application of the GPS techniques on the La Valette landslide, located in the Ubaye Valley in the southern French Alps. This complex landslide is composed by an upper part affected essentially by rotational mechanism, a central part with a generally translational movement and a lower part, occasionally transforming in mud flow in coincidence with strong rainfall events. Displacement rates are in average of a few centimetres per month and can reach one centimetre per day during spring. GPS data presented in this study have been acquired with a couple of mono-frequency GPS receivers Magellan ProMARK X-CM associated with multipath-resistant antennas and processed with the Magellan post-processing software MSTAR. Nine points have been set in the whole zone, seven of them in the moving area, one in a stable area near the landslide and one on the facing slope, used as reference point. For each measure, one GPS receiver is placed on the base point and the second one is placed on each monitored point for one-hour sessions. The baseline between base and monitored point ranges from 480 and 1660 m. Nine campaigns of measure have been made between October 2000 and October 2002, to follow the evolution of the surface displacements. The GPS results have been compared with the distance-meter measurements achieved on the same site by RTM Service (Restauration des Terrains de Montagne). The velocities obtained by the two methods are similar. The advantage of the GPS technique is the obtention of the real 3D displacement vector. These measurements have been combined with SAR interferometric data in order to derive a 3D map of the deformation.

  18. Preliminary study of low-cost GPS receivers for time synchronization of wireless sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, R.; Nagayama, T.; Jo, H.; Spencer, B. F., Jr.

    2012-04-01

    Growing public concern regarding the health of the aging civil infrastructure has spurred research in structural health monitoring (SHM). Recent advances in wireless smart sensor (WSS) technology has significantly lowered the cost of SHM systems and resulted in WSS being successfully implemented at full-scale. However, assuring accurate timesynchronized WSS nodes in a network is still a challenging problem. Generally, WSS synchronization is realized by communicating a sensors' CPU clock information over the network. However, such a synchronization approach becomes more challenging as the network size increases. Reliable communication is not easily achieved due to longer communication distance, larger numbers of sensors, and complexity of a distributed sensor network. Moreover, CPU clocks may not be sufficiently reliable for accurate time-synchronization due to substantial tolerance errors in crystal and/or temperature effects. In this study, the use of low-cost GPS receivers for time synchronizing WSSs is explored to resolve these issues. GPS sensors offer the potential to provide high-accuracy synchronization --- nano-second level even with low-cost GPS receivers. The GPS-assisted time synchronization approach overcomes network communication limitations to realize time-synchronization in large-scale networks of WSS.

  19. Integrated Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Dewayne Randolph

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a user-friendly Integrated GPS lab manual. This manual will help range engineers at NASA to integrate the use of GPS Simulators, GPS receivers, computers, MATLAB software, FUGAWI software and SATELLITE TOOL KIT software. The lab manual will be used in an effort to help NASA engineers predict GPS Coverage of planned operations and analyze GPS coverage of operation post mission. The Integrated GPS Laboratory was used to do GPS Coverage for two extensive case studies. The first scenario was an airplane trajectory in which an aircraft flew from Cape Canaveral to Los Angeles, California. In the second scenario, a rocket trajectory was done whereas a rocket was launched from Cape Canaveral to one thousand kilometers due east in the Atlantic Ocean.

  20. Signal quality monitoring for GPS augmentation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitelman, Alexander Michael

    Civilian applications of the Global Positioning System have grown rapidly over the past decade. One of the most significant examples is guidance for aviation. In conjunction with specially designed equipment on the ground, GPS can provide precision approach and landing capability for aircraft. As with other safety-critical aviation applications, GPS-based landing systems must meet stringent accuracy, safety, and availability requirements set by the Federal Aviation Administration. Currently, compliance with FAA requirements is ensured by a host of monitors including the Signal Quality Monitor, a module specifically tasked with continuously observing raw GPS signals for interference and distortion. This dissertation focuses on several theoretical and practical aspects of SQM design. The discussion begins with in-depth analysis of the seminal event in SQM, a significant anomaly on GPS space vehicle 19 initially observed in 1993. At the time, a tenfold increase in vertical position error was reported when this satellite was in view. Little consensus was initially reached about the exact origin, nature, or magnitude of the distortion; this section considers these effects in detail. The analysis is then extended to compute a rigorous upper bound for differential error. Starting with the architecture of a basic landing system, a theoretical worst-case is derived that maximizes user error while defying detection by the ground station. A simplified distortion model, adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organization in response to the worst-case analysis, is also described. The discussion then describes the design and construction of an arbitrary GPS generator. Essential features include architecture, shielding, independent signal and noise levels, and fast switching between two input channels. Two example applications are presented to illustrate the instrument's utility. A theoretical analysis of the ICAO model is validated by measuring the spectra of generated

  1. Radiation characterization report for the GPS Receiver microcontroller chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-06-01

    The overall objective of this characterization test was to determine the sensitivity of the Motorola 68332 32-bit microcontroller to radiation induced single event upset and latch-up (SEU/SEL). The microcontroller is a key component of the GPS Receiver which will be a subsystem of the satellite required for the 'FORTE' experiment. Testing was conducted at the Single Event Effects Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The results obtained included a latch-up (SEL) threshold LET (Linear Energy Transfer) of 20 MeV-sq cm/mg and an upset (SEU) threshold LET of 5 MeV-sq cm/mg. The SEU threshold is typical of this technology, commercial 0.8 micrometers HCMOS. Some flow errors were observed that were not reset by the internal watchdog timer of the 68332. It is important that the Receiver design include a monitor of the device, such as an external watch-dog timer, that would initiate a reset of the program when this type of upset occurs. The SEL threshold is lower than would be expected for this 12 micrometer epi layer process and suggests the need for a strategy that would allow for a hard reset of the controller when a latch-up event occurs. Analysis of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum for the FORTE orbit was done and the results indicate a worst case latch-up rate for this device of 6.3 x 10(exp -5) latch-ups per device day or roughly one latch-up per 43.5 device years.

  2. GPS-based certification for the microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, C. L.; Young, L. E.; Wu, S. C.; Thomas, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    An MLS (microwave landing system) certification system based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) is described. To determine the position history of the flight inspection aircraft during runway approach, signals from the GPS satellites, together with on-board radar altimetry, are used. It is shown that the aircraft position relative to a fixed point on the runway at threshold can be determined to about 30 cm vertically and 1 m horizontally. A requirement of the system is that the GPS receivers be placed on each flight inspection aircraft and at selected ground sites. The effects of different error sources on the determination of aircraft instantaneous position and its dynamics are analyzed.

  3. Low latitude ionospheric scintillation and zonal irregularity drifts observed with GPS-SCINDA system and closely spaced VHF receivers in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olwendo, O. J.; Baluku, T.; Baki, P.; Cilliers, P. J.; Mito, C.; Doherty, P.

    2013-05-01

    In this study we have used VHF and GPS-SCINDA receivers located at Nairobi (36.8°E, 1.3°S, dip -24.1°) in Kenya, to investigate the ionospheric scintillation and zonal drift irregularities of a few hundred meter-scale irregularities associated with equatorial plasma density bubbles for the period 2011. From simultaneous observations of amplitude scintillation at VHF and L-band frequencies, it is evident that the scintillation activity is higher during the post sunset hours of the equinoctial months than at the solstice. While it is noted that there is practically no signatures of the L-band scintillation in solstice months (June, July, December, January) and after midnight, VHF scintillation does occur in the solstice months and show post midnight activity through all the seasons. VHF scintillation is characterized by long duration of activity and slow fading that lasts till early morning hours (05:00 LT). Equinoctial asymmetry in scintillation occurs with higher occurrence in March-April than in September-October. The occurrence of post midnight VHF scintillation in this region is unusual and suggests some mechanisms for the formation of scintillation structure that might not be clearly understood. Zonal drift velocities of irregularities were measured using cross-correlation analysis with time series of the VHF scintillation structure from two closely spaced antennas. Statistical analyses of the distribution of zonal drift velocities after sunset hours indicate that the range of the velocities is 30-160 m/s. This is the first analysis of the zonal plasma drift velocity over this region. Based on these results we suggest that the east-west component of the plasma drift velocity may be related to the evolution of plasma bubble irregularities caused by the prereversal enhancement of the eastward electric fields. The equinoctial asymmetry of the drift velocities and scintillation could be attributed to the asymmetry of neutral winds in the thermosphere that drives

  4. 47 CFR 87.151 - Special requirements for differential GPS receivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special requirements for differential GPS... differential GPS receivers. (a) The receiver shall achieve a message failure rate less than or equal to one failed message per 1000 full-length (222 bytes) application data messages, while operating over a...

  5. New approaches for tracking earth orbiters using modified GPS ground receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, S. M.; Young, L. E.; Nandi, S.; Haines, B. J.; Dunn, C. E.; Edwards, C. D.

    1993-01-01

    A Global Positioning System (GPS) flight receiver provides a means to precisely determine orbits for satellites in low to moderate altitude orbits. Above a 5000-km altitude, however, relatively few GPS satellites are visible. New approaches to orbit determination for satellites at higher altitudes could reduce DSN antenna time needed to provide navigation and orbit determination support to future missions. Modification of GPS ground receivers enables a beacon from the orbiter to be tracked simultaneously with GPS data. The orbit accuracy expected from this GPS-like tracking (GLT) technique is expected to be in the range of a few meters or better for altitudes up to 100,000 km with a global ground network. For geosynchronous satellites, however, there are unique challenges due to geometrical limitations and to the lack of strong dynamical signature in tracking data. We examine two approaches for tracking the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) geostationary orbiters. One uses GLT with a global network; the other relies on a small 'connected element' ground network with a distributed clock for short-baseline differential carrier phase (SB Delta Phi). We describe an experiment planned for late 1993, which will combine aspects of both GLT and SB Delta Phi, to demonstrate a new approach for tracking the Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRSs) that offers a number of operationally convenient and attractive features. The TDRS demonstration will be in effect a proof-of-concept experiment for a new approach to tracking spacecraft which could be applied more generally to deep-space as well as near-Earth regimes.

  6. Evaluation of micro-GPS receivers for tracking small-bodied mammals

    PubMed Central

    Shipley, Lisa A.; Forbey, Jennifer S.; Olsoy, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    GPS telemetry markedly enhances the temporal and spatial resolution of animal location data, and recent advances in micro-GPS receivers permit their deployment on small mammals. One such technological advance, snapshot technology, allows for improved battery life by reducing the time to first fix via postponing recovery of satellite ephemeris (satellite location) data and processing of locations. However, no previous work has employed snapshot technology for small, terrestrial mammals. We evaluated performance of two types of micro-GPS (< 20 g) receivers (traditional and snapshot) on a small, semi-fossorial lagomorph, the pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), to understand how GPS errors might influence fine-scale assessments of space use and habitat selection. During stationary tests, microtopography (i.e., burrows) and satellite geometry had the largest influence on GPS fix success rate (FSR) and location error (LE). There was no difference between FSR while animals wore the GPS collars above ground (determined via light sensors) and FSR generated during stationary, above-ground trials, suggesting that animal behavior other than burrowing did not markedly influence micro-GPS errors. In our study, traditional micro-GPS receivers demonstrated similar FSR and LE to snapshot receivers, however, snapshot receivers operated inconsistently due to battery and software failures. In contrast, the initial traditional receivers deployed on animals experienced some breakages, but a modified collar design consistently functioned as expected. If such problems were resolved, snapshot technology could reduce the tradeoff between fix interval and battery life that occurs with traditional micro-GPS receivers. Our results suggest that micro-GPS receivers are capable of addressing questions about space use and resource selection by small mammals, but that additional techniques might be needed to identify use of habitat structures (e.g., burrows, tree cavities, rock crevices) that

  7. Evaluation of micro-GPS receivers for tracking small-bodied mammals.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Laura A; Rachlow, Janet L; Shipley, Lisa A; Forbey, Jennifer S; Johnson, Timothy R; Olsoy, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    GPS telemetry markedly enhances the temporal and spatial resolution of animal location data, and recent advances in micro-GPS receivers permit their deployment on small mammals. One such technological advance, snapshot technology, allows for improved battery life by reducing the time to first fix via postponing recovery of satellite ephemeris (satellite location) data and processing of locations. However, no previous work has employed snapshot technology for small, terrestrial mammals. We evaluated performance of two types of micro-GPS (< 20 g) receivers (traditional and snapshot) on a small, semi-fossorial lagomorph, the pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), to understand how GPS errors might influence fine-scale assessments of space use and habitat selection. During stationary tests, microtopography (i.e., burrows) and satellite geometry had the largest influence on GPS fix success rate (FSR) and location error (LE). There was no difference between FSR while animals wore the GPS collars above ground (determined via light sensors) and FSR generated during stationary, above-ground trials, suggesting that animal behavior other than burrowing did not markedly influence micro-GPS errors. In our study, traditional micro-GPS receivers demonstrated similar FSR and LE to snapshot receivers, however, snapshot receivers operated inconsistently due to battery and software failures. In contrast, the initial traditional receivers deployed on animals experienced some breakages, but a modified collar design consistently functioned as expected. If such problems were resolved, snapshot technology could reduce the tradeoff between fix interval and battery life that occurs with traditional micro-GPS receivers. Our results suggest that micro-GPS receivers are capable of addressing questions about space use and resource selection by small mammals, but that additional techniques might be needed to identify use of habitat structures (e.g., burrows, tree cavities, rock crevices) that

  8. The use of the AOA TTR-4P GPS receiver in operation at the BIPM for real-time restitution of GPS time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Claudine

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System is an outstanding tool for the dissemination of time. Using mono-channel C/A-code GPS time receivers, the restitution of GPS time through the satellite constellation presents a peak-to-peak discrepancy of several tens of nanoseconds without SA but may be as high as several hundreds of nanoseconds with SA. As a consequence, civil users are more and more interested in implementing hardware and software methods for efficient restitution of GPS time, especially in the framework of the project of a real-time prediction of UTC (UTCp) which could be available in the form of time differences (UTCp - GPS time). Previous work, for improving the real-time restitution of GPS time with SA, to the level obtained without SA, focused on the implementation of a Kalman filter based on past data and updated at each new observation. An alternative solution relies upon the statistical features of the noise brought about by SA; it has already been shown that the SA noise is efficiently reduced by averaging data from numerous satellites observed simultaneously over a sufficiently long time. This method was successfully applied to data from a GPS time receiver, model AOA TTR-4P, connected to the cesium clock kept at the BIPM. This device, a multi-channel, dual frequency, P-code GPS time receiver, is one of the first TTR-4P units in operation in a civil laboratory. Preliminary comparative studies of this new equipment with conventional GPS time receivers are described in this paper. The results of an experimental restitution of GPS time, obtained in June 1993, are also detailed: 3 to 6 satellites were observed simultaneously with a sample interval of 15 s, an efficient smoothing of SA noise was realized by averaging data on all observed satellites over more than 1 hour. When the GPS system is complete in 1994, 8 satellites will be observable continuously from anywhere in the world and the same level of uncertainty will be obtained using a shorter averaging

  9. Gravity field error analysis: Applications of GPS receivers and gradiometers on low orbiting platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrama, E.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver as a tracking facility and a gradiometer as a separate instrument on a low orbiting platform offers a unique tool to map the Earth's gravitational field with unprecedented accuracies. The former technique allows determination of the spacecraft's ephemeris at any epoch to within 3 to 10 cm, the latter permits the measurement of the tensor of second order derivatives of the gravity field to within 0.01 to 0.0001 Eotvos units depending on the type of gradiometer. First, a variety of error sources in gradiometry where emphasis is placed on the rotational problem pursuing as well a static as a dynamic approach is described. Next, an analytical technique is described and applied for an error analysis of gravity field parameters from gradiometer and GPS observation types. Results are discussed for various configurations proposed on Topex/Poseidon, Gravity Probe-B, and Aristoteles, indicating that GPS only solutions may be computed up to degree and order 35, 55, and 85 respectively, whereas a combined GPS/gradiometer experiment on Aristoteles may result in an acceptable solution up to degree and order 240.

  10. An Efficient Acquisition Scheme for a High Sensitivity Assisted GPS Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhixing; Fan, Chunming; Asano, Shoichiro; Kishimoto, Nobuhiro; Hojo, Harumasa; Yasuda, Akio

    Automatic location identification is required for emergency calls in Japan and many other countries. However, promptly providing a reliable position is a problem in places where the global positioning system (GPS) signal is extremely weak. We propose an acquisition scheme for the assisted GPS (AGPS) architecture based on a timing-synchronized mobile network. System errors as well as code uncertainty range and frequency uncertainty range are discussed. With this method, the acquisition search range is significantly reduced, and a long-time coherent correlation is made possible. Simulations and experiments prove that the method is fast, efficient and power-saving for the user handset. Furthermore, the AGPS receiver can perform a short TTFF (Time To First Fix) start even with no ephemeris kept in the handset.

  11. Real-time GPS seismology with a stand-alone receiver: A preliminary feasibility demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colosimo, G.; Crespi, M.; Mazzoni, A.

    2011-11-01

    We show the feasibility of a real-time estimation of waveforms and coseismic displacements, within a few centimeters in accuracy, with a stand-alone dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver using a so-called "variometric" approach. The approach is based on time single-differences of carrier phase observations collected at a high-rate (1 Hz or more) using a stand-alone receiver, and on standard GPS broadcast products (orbits and clocks), which are ancillary information routinely available in real time. In the approach, first, the time series of epoch-by-epoch displacements are estimated. Then, provided that the collected observations are continuous, they can be summed over the interval (limited to a few minutes) over which an earthquake occurs. Since epoch-by-epoch displacements divided by the interval between consecutive epochs are essentially equal to the epoch-by-epoch velocities, this is equivalent to saying that we are using the GPS receiver as a velocimeter. Estimation biases, due to the possible mismodeling of various intervening effects (such as multipath, residual clock errors, orbit errors, and atmospheric errors), accumulate over time and display their signature as a trend in coseismic displacements. The trend can be considered linear and easily removed, at least for short intervals. Since the proposed approach (named VADASE (Variometric Approach for Displacements Analysis Stand-alone Engine)) does not require either additional technological complexity or a centralized data analysis, in principle it can be embedded into GPS receiver firmware, thereby providing a significant contribution to tsunami warning and other hazard assessment systems. After a preliminary test using a simulated example, the effectiveness of this approach was proven using real data. We analyzed the 1 Hz GPS data recorded by the International Global Navigation Satellite Systems Service station BREW during the Denali Fault, Alaska, earthquake (Mw 7.9, 3 November, 2002

  12. Precise orbit determination for the shuttle radar topography mission using a new generation of GPS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertiger, W.; Bar-Sever, Y.; Desai, S.; Duncan, C.; Haines, B.; Kuang, D.; Lough, M.; Reichert, A.; Romans, L.; Srinivasan, J.; Webb, F.; Young, L.; Zumberge, J.

    2000-01-01

    The BlackJack family of GPS receivers has been developed at JPL to satisfy NASA's requirements for high-accuracy, dual-frequency, Y-codeless GPS receivers for NASA's Earth science missions. In this paper we will present the challenges that were overcome to meet this accuracy requirement. We will discuss the various reduced dynamic strategies, Space Shuttle dynamic models, and our tests for accuracy that included a military Y-code dual-frequency receiver (MAGR).

  13. Comparative analysis of high-frequency dynamic measurement experiment for vibration sensor and GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Keliang; Song, Zichao; Zhou, Mingduan; Liu, Miao

    2015-12-01

    Sensor technology applied in dynamic measurement in recent years become the mainly focus subject of attention. In this paper, the high-frequency data collected by two kinds of sensors from vibration sensor and GPS receiver are comparatively analyzed. The integrated scheme of dynamic measurement is proposed based on the high-frequency data for vibration sensor and GPS receiver. The result of experiment is shown that the above sensors with the some same characteristics based on the advantages of the sensors applied in the scheme. Finally, the feasibility and effectiveness of the integrated scheme for the vibration sensor and GPS receiver is verified in the dynamic measurement experiment.

  14. Learning Geospatial Analysis Skills with Consumer-Grade GPS Receivers and Low Cost Spatial Analysis Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linehan, Peter E.

    2006-01-01

    Spatial analysis technologies are increasingly important tools for all aspects of forest resource management. Field work previously accomplished with map, compass, and engineers' scale is now being augmented, or superseded, by the use of GPS and GIS. Professional-grade GPS receivers and commercial GIS software are preferred for their accuracy and…

  15. Swarm GPS Receiver Performance under the Influence of Ionospheric Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Le; Schön, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    The Swarm mission launched on 22 November 2013 is ESA's first constellation of satellites to study the dynamics of the Earth's magnetic field and its interaction with the Earth system. This mission consists of three identical satellites in near-polar orbits , two flying almost side-by-side at an initial altitude of 460 km, the third flying in a higher orbit of about 530 km. Each satellite is equipped with a high precision 8-channels dual-frequency receiver for the precise orbit determination, which is also the essential fundament in order to take full advantage of the data information provided by this constellation, e.g. for the recovery of gravity field. The quality of the final orbit determination depends on the observation data from the receivers. In this contribution, we will analyze the performance of the Swarm on-board receivers, especially under the influence of ionospheric scintillation caused by ionospheric irregularities. This is a prerequisite for high quality satellite positioning as well as a sound study of the ionosphere. Ionospheric scintillation can lead to the phase disturbances, cycle slips or even loss of signal tracking. The RINEX observation data from Swarm Level 1b products are used to analyze the Swarm receiver performance. We will demonstrate the signal strength, code and phase noise, different linear combinations (geometry free, ionosphere free), as well as GDOP values for the 3 Swarm satellites. The first results show that the observation data are severely disturbed and the signals could be lost around the geomagnetic equator and geomagnetic poles where the ionosphere is active. The results also show that the receivers are more stable in those areas after the update in October 2015.

  16. Improving the Quality of Low-Cost GPS Receiver Data for Monitoring Using Spatial Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Schwieger, Volker

    2016-06-01

    The investigations on low-cost single frequency GPS receivers at the Institute of Engineering Geodesy (IIGS) show that u-blox LEA-6T GPS receivers combined with Trimble Bullet III GPS antennas containing self-constructed L1-optimized choke rings can already obtain an accuracy in the range of millimeters which meets the requirements of geodetic precise monitoring applications (see [27]). However, the quality (accuracy and reliability) of low-cost GPS receiver data, particularly in shadowing environment, should still be improved, since the multipath effects are the major error for the short baselines. For this purpose, several adjoined stations with low-cost GPS receivers and antennas were set up next to the metal wall on the roof of the IIGS building and measured statically for several days. The time series of three-dimensional coordinates of the GPS receivers were analyzed. Spatial correlations between the adjoined stations, possibly caused by multipath effect, will be taken into account. The coordinates of one station can be corrected using the spatial correlations of the adjoined stations, so that the quality of the GPS measurements is improved. The developed algorithms are based on the coordinates and the results will be delivered in near-real-time (in about 30 minutes), so that they are suitable for structural health monitoring applications.

  17. Real-time Scintillation Monitoring in Alaska from a Longitudinal Chain of ASTRA's SM-211 GPS TEC and Scintillation Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Reynolds, A.; Santana, J.; Hampton, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Amplitude and phase scintillation can cause serious difficulties for GPS receivers. Intense scintillation can cause loss of lock. High latitude studies generally show that phase scintillation can be severe, but the amplitude scintillation tends to be small. The reason for this is not yet understood. Furthermore, the actual causes of the ionospheric irregularities that produce high latitude scintillation are not well understood. While the gradient drift instability is thought to be important in the F-region, there may be other structures present in either the E- or F-regions. The role of particle precipitation is also not well understood. Four of ASTRA's CASES GPS receivers were deployed in Alaska to demonstrate our ability to map scintillation in realtime, to provide space weather services to GPS users, and to initiate a detailed investigation of these effects. These dual-frequency GPS receivers measure total electron content (TEC) and scintillation. The scintillation monitors were deployed in a longitudinal chain at sites in Kaktovic, Fort Yukon, Poker Flat, and Gakona. Scintillation statistics show phase scintillations to be largest at Kaktovic and smallest at Gakona. We present GPS phase scintillation and auroral emission results from the Alaska chain to characterize the correspondence between scintillation and auroral features, and to investigate the role of high latitude auroral features in driving the phase scintillations. We will also present data showing how phase scintillation can cause other GPS receivers to lose lock. The data and results are particularly valuable because they illustrate some of the challenges of using GPS systems for positioning and navigation in an auroral region like Alaska. These challenges for snowplough drivers were recently highlighted, along with the CASES SM-211 space weather monitor, in a special video in which ASTRA and three other small businesses were presented with an entrepreneurial award from William Shatner (http://youtu.be/bIVKEQH_YPk).

  18. Real-time GPS seismology with a stand-alone receiver: a preliminary feasibility demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colosimo, G.; Crespi, M.; Mazzoni, A.

    2010-12-01

    We show the feasibility of waveforms and coseismic displacements real-time estimation at few centimeters accuracy level by a stand-alone dual-frequency GPS receiver through a variometric approach. This approach is based on the time single-differences of the carrier phase observations collected at high-rate (1Hz or more) by a stand-alone receiver and on the standard GPS broadcast products (orbits, clocks). Time series of epoch-by-epoch displacements are estimated at first; then, they can be summed over the interval (limited to few minutes) when the earthquake occurs, provided the collected observations are continuous. The estimation biases due to mismodeling accumulate over time and display as a trend, which can be considered linear and easily removed thanks to the shortness of the interval. Since the proposed approach does not require any additional technological complexity nor centralized data analysis, in principle it can be embedded into the receiver firmware, providing also a significant contribution to tsunami warning systems. After a preliminary test regarding a simulated example, the effectiveness has been proven over real data. In details, we have analyzed the 1Hz GPS data recorded by the IGS station BREW during the Denali Fault, Alaska earthquake (Mw 7.9, November 3, 2002, 22:12:41 UTC) and the 5 Hz data collected by some stations included into the UNAVCO-Plate Boundary Observatory network and California Real Time Network (CRTN) during the Baja California, Mexico earthquake (Mw 7.2, April 04, 2010, 22:40:42 UTC). The comparisons with results obtained with different strategies show an agreement within few centimeters; examples for Baja California earthquake (waveforms for stations P496 e P744, to be compared with http://www.unavco.org/research_science/science_highlights/2010/M7.2-Baja.html) are shown in Figures 1 and 2. Fig. 1 - P496 Fig. 2 - P744

  19. Flight Performance Evaluation of Three GPS Receivers for Sounding Rocket Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton; Diehl, James; Montenbruck, Oliver; Markgraf, Markus; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In preparation for the European Space Agency Maxus-4 mission, a sounding rocket test flight was carried out at Esrange, near Kiruna, Sweden on February 19, 2001 to validate existing ground facilities and range safety installations. Due to the absence of a dedicated scientific payload, the flight offered the opportunity to test multiple GPS receivers and assess their performance for the tracking of sounding rockets. The receivers included an Ashtech G12 HDMA receiver, a BAE (Canadian Marconi) Allstar receiver and a Mitel Orion receiver. All of them provide C/A code tracking on the L1 frequency to determine the user position and make use of Doppler measurements to derive the instantaneous velocity. Among the receivers, the G12 has been optimized for use under highly dynamic conditions and has earlier been flown successfully on NASA sounding rockets. The Allstar is representative of common single frequency receivers for terrestrial applications and received no particular modification, except for the disabling of the common altitude and velocity constraints that would otherwise inhibit its use for space application. The Orion receiver, finally, employs the same Mitel chipset as the Allstar, but has received various firmware modifications by DLR to safeguard it against signal losses and improve its tracking performance. While the two NASA receivers were driven by a common wrap-around antenna, the DLR experiment made use of a switchable antenna system comprising a helical antenna in the tip of the rocket and two blade antennas attached to the body of the vehicle. During the boost a peak acceleration of roughly l7g's was achieved which resulted in a velocity of about 1100 m/s at the end of the burn. At apogee, the rocket reached an altitude of over 80 km. A detailed analysis of the attained flight data is given together with a evaluation of different receiver designs and antenna concepts.

  20. GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Frank H.

    2006-01-01

    Geodetic networks support the TRF requirements of NASA ESE missions. Each of SLR, VLBI, GPS substantially and uniquely contributes to TRF determination. NASA's SLR, VLBI, and GPS groups collaborate toward wide-ranging improvements in the next 5 years. NASA leverages considerable resources through its significant activity in international services. NASA faces certain challenges in continuing and advancing these activities. The Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) is an accurate, stable set of positions and velocities. The TRF provides the stable coordinate system that allows us to link measurements over space and time. The geodetic networks provide data for determination of the TRF as well as direct science observations.

  1. Range filtering for sequential GPS receivers with external sensor augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell

    1987-01-01

    The filtering of the satellite range and range-rate measurements from single channel sequential Global Positioning System receivers is usually done with an extended Kalman filter which has state variables defined in terms of an orthogonal navigation reference frame. An attractive suboptimal alternative is range-domain filtering, in which the individual satellite measurements are filtered separately before they are combined for the navigation solution. The main advantages of range-domain filtering are decreased processing and storage requirements and simplified tuning. Several range filter mechanization alternatives are presented, along with an innovative approach for combining the filtered range-domain quantities to determine the navigation state estimate. In addition, a method is outlined for incorporating measurements from auxiliary sensors such as altimeters into the navigation state estimation scheme similarly to the satellite measurements. A method is also described for incorporating inertial measurements into the navigation state estimator as a process driver.

  2. Project Echo: Receiving System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohm, E. A.

    1961-01-01

    A tracking horn-reflector antenna, a maser preamplifier (and standby parametric preamplifier), and a special FM demodulator were combined to form a low-noise receiving system which made possible the establishment of a high-quality voice circuit via the Echo I passive satellite. This paper describes the 2390-Mc receiving system located at the Bell Telephone Laboratories facility in Holmdel, New Jersey.

  3. Line Focus Receiver Infrared Temperature Survey System

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelin, Tim

    2010-06-01

    For ongoing maintenance and performance purposes, solar parabolic trough field operators desire to know that the Heat Collection Elements (HCEs) are performing properly. Measuring their temperature is one way of doing this One 30MW field can contain approximately 10,000 HCE's. This software interfaces with a GPS receiver and an infrared camera. It takes global positioning data from the GPS and uses this information to automate the infrared image capture and temperature analysis of individual solar parabolic HCEs in a solar parabolic trough field With this software system an entire 30MW field can be surveyed in 2-3 days.

  4. Navigator GPS Receiver for Fast Acquisition and Weak Signal Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winternitz, Luke; Moreau, Michael; Boegner, Gregory J.; Sirotzky, Steve

    2004-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing a new space-borne GPS receiver that can operate effectively in the full range of Earth orbiting missions from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to geostationary and beyond. Navigator is designed to be a fully space flight qualified GPS receiver optimized for fast signal acquisition and weak signal tracking. The fast acquisition capabilities provide exceptional time to first fix performance (TIFF) with no a priori receiver state or GPS almanac information, even in the presence of high Doppler shifts present in LEO (or near perigee in highly eccentric orbits). The fast acquisition capability also makes it feasible to implement extended correlation intervals and therefore significantly reduce Navigator s acquisition threshold. This greatly improves GPS observability when the receiver is above the GPS constellation (and satellites must be tracked from the opposite side of the Earth) by providing at least 10 dB of increased acquisition sensitivity. Fast acquisition and weak signal tracking algorithms have been implemented and validated on a hardware development board. A fully functional version of the receiver, employing most of the flight parts, with integrated navigation software is expected by mid 2005. An ultimate goal of this project is to license the Navigator design to an industry partner who will then market the receiver as a commercial product.

  5. Pre-Launch Testing of GPS Receivers for Geodetic Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, George; Davis, Edward; Luthcke, Scott; Hawkins, Kimberly; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The methodology used and the results obtained in the pre-flight testing of the Blackjack Global Positioning System (GPS) space receiver for the Vegetation Canopy Lidar Mission (VCL) and the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) spacecraft is described. Both real and simulated signals were used to: (1) assess the accuracy and coverage of the navigation solutions, (2) assess the accuracy and stability of the 1-PPS timing signal, (3) assess the precision of the carrier phase observable, and (4) measure the cold-start time to first fix. In addition, an anechoic chamber was used to measure the antenna phase centers with millimeter-level precision. While the test results have generally been excellent and are discussed in this paper, emphasis is placed on describing the test methodology. It is anticipated that future geodetic satellite missions using GPS for navigation, timing, and precise orbit determination (POD) can employ the same tests for pre-launch performance assessment of their particular receiver.

  6. Preliminary Analysis of the CASES GPS Receiver Performance during Simulated Seismic Displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Rosa-Perkins, A.; Reynolds, A.; Crowley, G.; Azeem, I.

    2014-12-01

    We explore the ability of a new GPS software receiver, called CASES (Connected Autonomous Space Environment Sensor), to measure seismic displacements in realtime. Improvements in GPS technology over the last 20 years allow for precise measurement of ground motion during seismic events. For example, GPS data has been used to calculate displacement histories at an earthquake's epicenter and fault slip estimations with great accuracy. This is supported by the ability to measure displacements directly using GPS, bypassing the double integration that accelerometers require, and by higher clipping limits than seismometers. The CASES receiver developed by ASTRA in collaboration with Cornell University and the University of Texas, Austin represents a new geodetic-quality software-based GPS receiver that measures ionospheric space weather in addition to the usual navigation solution. To demonstrate, in a controlled environment, the ability of the CASES receiver to measure seismic displacements, we simulated ground motions similar to those generated during earthquakes, using a shake box instrumented with an accelerometer and a GPS antenna. The accelerometer measured the box's actual displacement. The box moved on a manually controlled axis that underwent varied one-dimensional motions (from mm to cm) at different frequencies and amplitudes. The CASES receiver was configured to optimize the accuracy of the position solution. We quantified the CASES GPS receiver performance by comparing the GPS solutions against the accelerometer data using various statistical analysis methods. The results of these tests will be presented. The CASES receiver is designed with multiple methods of accessing the data in realtime, ranging from internet connection, blue-tooth, cell-phone modem and Iridium modem. Because the CASES receiver measures ionospheric space weather in addition to the usual navigation solution, CASES provides not only the seimic signal, but also the ionospheric space weather

  7. Estimating the Receiver Delay for Ionosphere-Free Code (P3) GPS Time Transfer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    1994, “Technical Directives for Standardization of GPS Time Receiver Software,” Metrologia , 31, 69-79. [3] P. Defraigne and G. Petit, 2003, “Time...Transfer to TAI Using Geodetic Receivers,” Metrologia , 40, 184-188. [4] J. White, R. Beard, G. P. Landis, G. Petit, and E. Powers, 2002, “Dual

  8. Efficient detection and signal parameter estimation with applications to high dynamic GPS receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.

    1988-01-01

    A novel technique for simultaneously detecting data and estimating the parameters of a received carrier signal phase modulated by unknown data and experiencing very high Doppler, Doppler rate, etc. is discussed. Such a situation arises, for example, in the case of Global Positioning Systems (DPS) where the signal parameters are directly related to the position, velocity and acceleration of the GPS receiver. The proposed scheme is based upon first estimating the received signal local (data dependent) parameters over two consecutive bit periods, followed by the detection of a possible jump in these parameters. The presence of a detected jump signifies a data transition which is then removed from the received signal. This effectively demodulated signal is then processed to provide the estimates of global (data independent) parameters of the signal related to the position, velocity, etc. of the receiver. One of the key features of the proposed algorithm is the introduction of two different schemes which can provide an improvement of up to 3 dB over the conventional implementation of Kalman filter as applied to phase and frequency estimation, under low to medium signal-to-noise ratio conditions.

  9. Determination of the ionospheric foF2 using a stand-alone GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijaya, Dudy D.; Haralambous, Haris; Oikonomou, Christina; Kuntjoro, Wedyanto

    2017-03-01

    The critical frequency of ionospheric F2 layer (foF2) is a measure of the highest frequency of radio signal that may be reflected back by the F2 layer, and it is associated with ionospheric peak electron density in the F2 layer. Accurate long-term foF2 variations are usually derived from ionosonde observations. In this paper, we propose a new method to observe foF2 using a stand-alone global positioning system (GPS) receiver. The proposed method relies on the mathematical equation that relates foF2 to GPS observations. The equation is then implemented in the Kalman filter algorithm to estimate foF2 at every epoch of the observation (30-s rate). Unlike existing methods, the proposed method does not require any additional information from ionosonde observations and does not require any network of GPS receivers. It only requires as inputs the ionospheric scale height and the modeled plasmaspheric electron content, which practically can be derived from any existing ionospheric/plasmaspheric model. We applied the proposed method to estimate long-term variations of foF2 at three GPS stations located at the northern hemisphere (NICO, Cyprus), the southern hemisphere (STR1, Australia) and the south pole (SYOG, Antarctic). To assess the performance of the proposed method, we then compared the results against those derived by ionosonde observations and the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 model. We found that, during the period of high solar activity (2011-2012), the values of absolute mean bias between foF2 derived by the proposed method and ionosonde observations are in the range of 0.2-0.5 MHz, while those during the period of low solar activity (2009-2010) are in the range of 0.05-0.15 MHz. Furthermore, the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) values during high and low solar activities are in the range of 0.8-0.9 MHz and of 0.6-0.7 MHz, respectively. We also noticed that the values of absolute mean bias and RMSE between foF2 derived by the proposed method and the

  10. Standalone GPS L1 C/A Receiver for Lunar Missions.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Vincenzo; Blunt, Paul; Botteron, Cyril; Tian, Jia; Leclère, Jérôme; Wang, Yanguang; Basile, Francesco; Farine, Pierre-André

    2016-03-09

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) were originally introduced to provide positioning and timing services for terrestrial Earth users. However, space users increasingly rely on GNSS for spacecraft navigation and other science applications at several different altitudes from the Earth surface, in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), Medium Earth Orbit (MEO), Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), and feasibility studies have proved that GNSS signals can even be tracked at Moon altitude. Despite this, space remains a challenging operational environment, particularly on the way from the Earth to the Moon, characterized by weaker signals with wider gain variability, larger dynamic ranges resulting in higher Doppler and Doppler rates and critically low satellite signal availability. Following our previous studies, this paper describes the proof of concept "WeakHEO" receiver; a GPS L1 C/A receiver we developed in our laboratory specifically for lunar missions. The paper also assesses the performance of the receiver in two representative portions of an Earth Moon Transfer Orbit (MTO). The receiver was connected to our GNSS Spirent simulator in order to collect real-time hardware-in-the-loop observations, and then processed by the navigation module. This demonstrates the feasibility, using current technology, of effectively exploiting GNSS signals for navigation in a MTO.

  11. Standalone GPS L1 C/A Receiver for Lunar Missions

    PubMed Central

    Capuano, Vincenzo; Blunt, Paul; Botteron, Cyril; Tian, Jia; Leclère, Jérôme; Wang, Yanguang; Basile, Francesco; Farine, Pierre-André

    2016-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) were originally introduced to provide positioning and timing services for terrestrial Earth users. However, space users increasingly rely on GNSS for spacecraft navigation and other science applications at several different altitudes from the Earth surface, in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), Medium Earth Orbit (MEO), Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), and feasibility studies have proved that GNSS signals can even be tracked at Moon altitude. Despite this, space remains a challenging operational environment, particularly on the way from the Earth to the Moon, characterized by weaker signals with wider gain variability, larger dynamic ranges resulting in higher Doppler and Doppler rates and critically low satellite signal availability. Following our previous studies, this paper describes the proof of concept “WeakHEO” receiver; a GPS L1 C/A receiver we developed in our laboratory specifically for lunar missions. The paper also assesses the performance of the receiver in two representative portions of an Earth Moon Transfer Orbit (MTO). The receiver was connected to our GNSS Spirent simulator in order to collect real-time hardware-in-the-loop observations, and then processed by the navigation module. This demonstrates the feasibility, using current technology, of effectively exploiting GNSS signals for navigation in a MTO. PMID:27005628

  12. An Interdisciplinary Approach at Studying the Earth-Sun System with GPS/GNSS and GPS-like Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuffada, Cinzia; Hajj, George; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Chao, Yi; Ao, Chi; Zumberge, James

    2005-01-01

    The value of Global Positioning Satellites (GPS) measurements to atmospheric science, space physics, and ocean science, is now emerging or showing a potential to play a major role in the evolving programs of NASA, NSF and NOAA. The objective of this communication is to identify and articulate the key scientific questions that are optimally, or perhaps uniquely, addressed by GPS or GPS-like observations, and discuss their relevance to existing or planned national Earth-science research programs. The GPS-based ocean reflection experiments performed to date have demonstrated the precision and spatial resolution suitable to altimetric applications that require higher spatial resolution and more frequent repeat than the current radar altimeter satellites. GPS radio occultation is promising as a climate monitoring tool because of its benchmark properties: its raw observable is based on extremely accurate timing measurements. GPS-derived temperature profiles can provide meaningful climate trend information over decadal time scales without the need for overlapping missions or mission-to-mission calibrations. By acquiring data as GPS satellites occult behind the Earth's limb, GPS also provides high vertical resolution information on the vertical structure of electron density with global coverage. New experimental techniques will create more comprehensive TEC maps by using signals reflected from the oceans and received in orbit. This communication will discuss a potential future GNSS Earth Observing System project which would deploy a constellation of satellites using GPS and GPS-like measurements, to obtain a) topography measurements based on GPS reflections with an accuracy and horizontal resolution suitable for eddy monitoring, and h) climate-records quality atmospheric temperature profiles. The constellation would also provide for measurements of ionospheric elec tron density. This is a good example of an interdisciplinary mission concept, with broad science objectives

  13. LANL receiver system development

    SciTech Connect

    Laubscher, B.; Cooke, B.; Cafferty, M.; Olivas, N.

    1997-08-01

    The CALIOPE receiver system development at LANL is the story of two technologies. The first of these technologies consists of off-the-shelf mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) detectors and amplifiers. The vendor for this system is Kolmar Technologies. This system was fielded in the Tan Trailer I (TTI) in 1995 and will be referred to in this paper as GEN I. The second system consists of a MCT detector procured from Santa Barbara Research Center (SBRC) and an amplifier designed and built by LANL. This system was fielded in the Tan Trailer II (TTII) system at the NTS tests in 1996 and will be referred to as GEN II. The LANL CALIOPE experimental plan for 1996 was to improve the lidar system by progressing to a higher rep rate laser to perform many shots in a much shorter period of time. In keeping with this plan, the receiver team set a goal of developing a detector system that was background limited for the projected 100 nanosecond (ns) laser pulse. A set of detailed simulations of the DIAL lidar experiment was performed. From these runs, parameters such as optimal detector size, field of view of the receiver system, nominal laser return power, etc. were extracted. With this information, detector physics and amplifier electronic models were developed to obtain the required specifications for each of these components. These derived specs indicated that a substantial improvement over commercially available, off-the-shelf, amplifier and detector technologies would be needed to obtain the goals. To determine if the original GEN I detector was usable, the authors performed tests on a 100 micron square detector at cryogenic temperatures. The results of this test and others convinced them that an advanced detector was required. Eventually, a suitable detector was identified and a number of these single element detectors were procured from SBRC. These single element detectors were witness for the detector arrays built for another DOE project.

  14. A GPS measurement system for precise satellite tracking and geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, T. P.; Wu, S.-C.; Lichten, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    NASA is pursuing two key applications of differential positioning with the Global Positioning System (GPS): sub-decimeter tracking of earth satellites and few-centimeter determination of ground-fixed baselines. Key requirements of the two applications include the use of dual-frequency carrier phase data, multiple ground receivers to serve as reference points, simultaneous solution for use position and GPS orbits, and calibration of atmospheric delays using water vapor radiometers. Sub-decimeter tracking will be first demonstrated on the TOPEX oceanographic satellite to be launched in 1991. A GPS flight receiver together with at least six ground receivers will acquire delta range data from the GPS carriers for non-real-time analysis. Altitude accuracies of 5 to 10 cm are expected. For baseline measurements, efforts will be made to obtain precise differential pseudorange by resolving the cycle ambiguity in differential carrier phase. This could lead to accuracies of 2 or 3 cm over a few thousand kilometers. To achieve this, a high-performance receiver is being developed, along with improved calibration and data processing techniques. Demonstrations may begin in 1986.

  15. GPS synchronized power system phase angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert E.; Sterlina, Patrick S.

    1994-09-01

    This paper discusses the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) synchronized equipment for the measurement and analysis of key power system quantities. Two GPS synchronized phasor measurement units (PMU) were installed before testing. It was indicated that PMUs recorded the dynamic response of the power system phase angles when the northern California power grid was excited by the artificial short circuits. Power system planning engineers perform detailed computer generated simulations of the dynamic response of the power system to naturally occurring short circuits. The computer simulations use models of transmission lines, transformers, circuit breakers, and other high voltage components. This work will compare computer simulations of the same event with field measurement.

  16. Sub-Daily Northern Hemisphere Ionospheric Maps Using a World-Wide Network of GPS Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Brian D.; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Edwards, Charles D.

    1993-01-01

    Ionospheric total electron mapping content (TEC) data derived from dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) signals from 30 globally distributed network sites are fit into a simple ionospheric shell model,...

  17. International time transfer and portable clock evaluation using GPS timing receivers: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardrip, S. C.; Buisson, J. A.; Oaks, O. J.; Lister, M. J.; Detoma, E.; Dachel, P.; Stalder, T.; Warren, H.; Winkler, G. M. R.; Luther, G.

    1985-01-01

    The overall experiment was designed to test the positioning and navigation capabilities of the GPS timing receivers developed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for the NASA Goddard Laser Tracking Network (GITN). To perform this experiment, a reliable and redundant time scale was set up onboard the ship, and a back-up on shore. This situation provided the opportunity to perform simultaneously a timing experiment ideally divided into two parts, the main objectives of the experimentation being: (1) To test GPS timing receiver synchronization capabilities on a moving platform, and to perform an intercontinental synchronization via GPS between participating international timing laboratories in Europe and in the United States. (2) To evaluate the performance of cesium portable clocks in the field.

  18. A Consistent Geodetic Reference System for GPS (Global Positioning System).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-27

    reliable and accurate Operational Control System (OCS) is a prerequisite for successful Global Positioning System ( GPS ) navigation performance. The OCS...DDOR Doubly differenced (between station pair and Navstar pair) phase data GPS Global Positioning System MIT Massachusetts Institute of Technology...FWft SOTR4as-2 A Consistent Geodetic Reference System for GPS A. S. LIU Systems and Computer Engineering Division Engineering Group The Aerospace

  19. NAVSTAR/GPS satellite selection for sequential receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noe, P. S.; Parsiani, H.

    1979-01-01

    Derivation of a satellite in-view procedure and two satellite selection procedures are obtained and comparisons to previous procedures are presented. Two suboptimal satellite selection procedures - Quadrature System (QS) and Flexible Orthogonal System (FOS) - are compared to a suboptimal and optimum procedures, taking into account the execution time and Geometric Dilution of Precision (GDOP) of each.

  20. IMU/GPS System Provides Position and Attitude Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching Fang

    2006-01-01

    A special navigation system is being developed to provide high-quality information on the position and attitude of a moving platform (an aircraft or spacecraft), for use in pointing and stabilization of a hyperspectral remote-sensing system carried aboard the platform. The system also serves to enable synchronization and interpretation of readouts of all onboard sensors. The heart of the system is a commercially available unit, small enough to be held in one hand, that contains an integral combination of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) type, Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, a differential GPS subsystem, and ancillary data-processing subsystems. The system utilizes GPS carrier-phase measurements to generate time data plus highly accurate and continuous data on the position, attitude, rotation, and acceleration of the platform. Relative to prior navigation systems based on IMU and GPS subsystems, this system is smaller, is less expensive, and performs better. Optionally, the system can easily be connected to a laptop computer for demonstration and evaluation. In addition to airborne and spaceborne remote-sensing applications, there are numerous potential terrestrial sensing, measurement, and navigation applications in diverse endeavors that include forestry, environmental monitoring, agriculture, mining, and robotics.

  1. Navstar Global Positioning System (GPS) clock program: Present and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennant, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) program status are discussed and plans for ensuring the long term continuation of the program are presented. Performance of GPS clocks is presented in terms of on orbit data as portrayed by GPS master control station kalman filter processing. The GPS Clock reliability program is reviewed in depth and future plans fo the overall clock program are published.

  2. An integrated GPS attitude determination system for small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesley, Bruce Carl

    1995-07-01

    This dissertation develops attitude determination methods based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) for small satellites. A GPS attitude receiver is used in combination with other sensors planned for a small, three-axis stabilized satellite called JAWS AT. The other attitude sensors include fiber optic gyros and digital sun sensors. The development of integrated attitude determination systems contributes to critical national technological objectives identified for small spacecraft. A recent study by the National Research Council addresses key technologies for small satellite programs. One of their principal recommendations was that, 'GPS in various combinations with other guidance components can determine position and attitude very accurately, probably at significantly reduced weight and cost.' The report also identifies specific potential benefits of integrating OPS with other sensors on small spacecraft. 'Combining GPS and an inertial measurement unit (with gyroscopes, accelerometers, or trackers) offers major advantages by bounding errors of the inertial set, providing exceptionally good long-term references and thereby ensuring precise, on-board navigation and, with appropriate complimentary techniques, providing a higher level of redundancy and/or accuracy for position, velocity, and attitude.' This dissertation develops algorithms that result in improved accuracy and redundancy through the development of complimentary techniques for combining GPS measurements with gyroscopes and sun sensors.

  3. Three methods to retrieve slant total electron content measurements from ground-based GPS receivers and performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baocheng

    2016-07-01

    The high sampling rate along with the global coverage of ground-based receivers makes Global Positioning System (GPS) data particularly ideal for sensing the Earth's ionosphere. Retrieval of slant total electron content measurements (TECMs) constitutes a key first step toward extracting various ionospheric parameters from GPS data. Within the ionospheric community, the interpretation of TECM is widely recognized as the slant total electron content along the satellite receiver line of sight, biased by satellite and receiver differential code biases (DCBs). The Carrier-to-Code Leveling (CCL) has long been used as a geometry-free method for retrieving TECM, mainly because of its simplicity and effectiveness. In fact, however, the CCL has proven inaccurate as it may give rise to TECM very susceptible to so-called leveling errors. With the goal of attaining more accurate TECM retrieval, we report in this contribution two other methods than the CCL, namely, the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) and the Array-aided PPP (A-PPP). The PPP further exploits the International GPS Service (IGS) orbit and clock products and turns out to be a geometry-based method. The A-PPP is designed to retrieve TECM from an array of colocated receivers, taking advantage of the broadcast orbit and clock products. Moreover, A-PPP also takes into account the fact that the ionospheric effects measured from one satellite to all colocated receivers ought to be the same, thus leading to the estimability of interreceiver DCB. We perform a comparative study of the formal precision and the empirical accuracy of the TECM that are retrieved, respectively, by three methods from the same set of GPS data. Results of such a study can be used to assess the actual performance of the three methods. In addition, we check the temporal stability in A-PPP-derived interreceiver DCB estimates over time periods ranging from 1 to 3 days.

  4. Evaluation of Mobile Phone Interference With Aircraft GPS Navigation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, Scott; Oria, A. J.; Guckian, Paul; Nguyen, Truong X.

    2004-01-01

    This report compiles and analyzes tests that were conducted to measure cell phone spurious emissions in the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio frequency band that could affect the navigation system of an aircraft. The cell phone in question had, as reported to the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration), caused interference to several GPS receivers on-board a small single engine aircraft despite being compliant with data filed at the time with the FCC by the manufacturer. NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) and industry tests show that while there is an emission in the 1575 MHz GPS band due to a specific combination of amplifier output impedance and load impedance that induces instability in the power amplifier, these spurious emissions (i.e., not the intentional transmit signal) are similar to those measured on non-intentionally transmitting devices such as, for example, laptop computers. Additional testing on a wide sample of different commercial cell phones did not result in any emission in the 1575 MHz GPS Band above the noise floor of the measurement receiver.

  5. Space-qualified GPS receiver and MIMU for an autonomous on-board guidance and navigation package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garavelli, B.; Marradi, L.; Morgan, A.

    1995-12-01

    The interest for an integrated autonomous guidance and navigation control package, satisfying to different mission requirements with a common architecture, is becoming very attractive in the perspective to reduce cost mission and to provide significant benefits when measurements noise conditions may change during the mission and safety critical spacecraft operations are involved. In this paper Laben and Honeywell present an interesting approach to integrate an attitude GPS space receiver and a miniaturized inertial measurement unit (MIMU), to enhance the performances of both sensor systems. In traditional G&NC systems, based on Inertial Navigation Sensor (INS) Measurements, long term drift, affecting zero point stability of gyroscope and accelerometer, are integrated over time during the measurement process, resulting in an increasing attitude and navigation error. These errors can be reduced by periodic reset, shifting the problem to the need of on board accurate and precise absolute position and attitude references. A convenient way to overcome such limitation is here discussed making profit of Laben experience, matured as a company leader in on board data handling and space qualified GPS receiver systems, and by Honeywell as a world leader manufacturer of guidance and navigation packages. The approach would be a guideline for a novel scheme of G&NC architecture where a GPS receiver, performing both attitude and orbit determination, and a MIMU that includes three ring laser gyro and three accelerometers, are integrated in a common unit. In such a system, the measurements performed by the sensors are numerically filtered, removing high side frequency bandwidth noise components, to provide accurate and reliable input data for the attitude and navigation algorithms that will be executed by the embedded guidance computer. The results of such elaboration will be directly the actuation values to drive the space vehicle under both operative and non operative conditions

  6. Global Positioning Systems Directorate: GPS Update

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    29 APR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Global Positioning Systems Directorate: GPS Update...Partnership Council 2015 29 Apr 2015 Global Positioning System Directorate Brig Gen Bill Cooley Director, Global Positioning Systems Directorate...UNCLASSIFIED/APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE Global Positioning Systems Directorate Mission: Acquire, deliver and sustain reliable G PS capabilities

  7. Texas Instruments 4100 GPS (Global Positioning System) Positioning Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ). To meet...solutions as correct before accepting them. 9 II, BACKGROUND A. GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM GPS is a universal satellite poitioning system that is...ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS GPS = Global Positioning System NPS = Naval Postgraduate School Montcrey CA DMA Defense Mapping Agency NOAA = National Oceanic

  8. CASES: A Novel Low-Cost Ground-based Dual-Frequency GPS Software Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacke, B.; Crowley, G.; Reynolds, A.; Bust, G. S.; Kintner, P. M.; Psaiki, M.; Humphreys, T. E.; Powell, S.; O'Hanlon, B.

    2010-12-01

    GPS receivers can be used for monitoring space weather events such as TEC variations and scintillation. The new CASES GPS sensor developed by ASTRA, Cornell and UTAustin represents a revolutionary advance in dual frequency GPS space-weather monitoring. CASES is a paperback-novel-sized dual-frequency GPS software receiver with robust dual-frequency tracking performance, stand-alone capability, and complete software upgradability. This sensor measures and calculates TEC with a relative accuracy of a few 0.01 TECU at a cadence of up to 100 Hz. It measures amplitude and phase at up to 100 Hz on both L1 and L2, for up to 12 satellites in view. It calculates the scintillation severity indicators S4, τ0, and σφ at a cadence that is user defined. It is able to track through scintillation with {S4, τ0, amplitude} combinations as severe as {0.8, 0.8 seconds, 43 dB-Hz (nominal)} (i.e., commensurate with vigorous post-sunset equatorial scintillation) with a mean time between cycle slips greater than 240 seconds and with a mean time between frequency-unlock greater than 1 hour. Other capabilities and options include: Various data interface solutions; In-receiver and network-wide calibration of biases, and detection and mitigation of multipath; Network-wide automated remote configuration of receivers, quality control, re-processing, archiving and redistribution of data in real-time; Software products for data-processing and visualization. The low price of the sensor means that many more instruments can be purchased on a fixed budget, which will lead to new kinds of opportunities for monitoring and scientific study, including networked applications. Other uses for CASES receivers include geodetic and seismic monitoring, measurement of precipitable water vapor in the troposphere at meso-scale resolution, and educational outreach.

  9. Dynamic Accuracy of GPS Receivers for Use in Health Research: A Novel Method to Assess GPS Accuracy in Real-World Settings

    PubMed Central

    Schipperijn, Jasper; Kerr, Jacqueline; Duncan, Scott; Madsen, Thomas; Klinker, Charlotte Demant; Troelsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of portable global positioning system (GPS) receivers over the last 10 years has provided researchers with a means to objectively assess spatial position in free-living conditions. However, the use of GPS in free-living conditions is not without challenges and the aim of this study was to test the dynamic accuracy of a portable GPS device under real-world environmental conditions, for four modes of transport, and using three data collection intervals. We selected four routes on different bearings, passing through a variation of environmental conditions in the City of Copenhagen, Denmark, to test the dynamic accuracy of the Qstarz BT-Q1000XT GPS device. Each route consisted of a walk, bicycle, and vehicle lane in each direction. The actual width of each walking, cycling, and vehicle lane was digitized as accurately as possible using ultra-high-resolution aerial photographs as background. For each trip, we calculated the percentage that actually fell within the lane polygon, and within the 2.5, 5, and 10 m buffers respectively, as well as the mean and median error in meters. Our results showed that 49.6% of all ≈68,000 GPS points fell within 2.5 m of the expected location, 78.7% fell within 10 m and the median error was 2.9 m. The median error during walking trips was 3.9, 2.0 m for bicycle trips, 1.5 m for bus, and 0.5 m for car. The different area types showed considerable variation in the median error: 0.7 m in open areas, 2.6 m in half-open areas, and 5.2 m in urban canyons. The dynamic spatial accuracy of the tested device is not perfect, but we feel that it is within acceptable limits for larger population studies. Longer recording periods, for a larger population are likely to reduce the potentially negative effects of measurement inaccuracy. Furthermore, special care should be taken when the environment in which the study takes place could compromise the GPS signal. PMID:24653984

  10. Dynamic Accuracy of GPS Receivers for Use in Health Research: A Novel Method to Assess GPS Accuracy in Real-World Settings.

    PubMed

    Schipperijn, Jasper; Kerr, Jacqueline; Duncan, Scott; Madsen, Thomas; Klinker, Charlotte Demant; Troelsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of portable global positioning system (GPS) receivers over the last 10 years has provided researchers with a means to objectively assess spatial position in free-living conditions. However, the use of GPS in free-living conditions is not without challenges and the aim of this study was to test the dynamic accuracy of a portable GPS device under real-world environmental conditions, for four modes of transport, and using three data collection intervals. We selected four routes on different bearings, passing through a variation of environmental conditions in the City of Copenhagen, Denmark, to test the dynamic accuracy of the Qstarz BT-Q1000XT GPS device. Each route consisted of a walk, bicycle, and vehicle lane in each direction. The actual width of each walking, cycling, and vehicle lane was digitized as accurately as possible using ultra-high-resolution aerial photographs as background. For each trip, we calculated the percentage that actually fell within the lane polygon, and within the 2.5, 5, and 10 m buffers respectively, as well as the mean and median error in meters. Our results showed that 49.6% of all ≈68,000 GPS points fell within 2.5 m of the expected location, 78.7% fell within 10 m and the median error was 2.9 m. The median error during walking trips was 3.9, 2.0 m for bicycle trips, 1.5 m for bus, and 0.5 m for car. The different area types showed considerable variation in the median error: 0.7 m in open areas, 2.6 m in half-open areas, and 5.2 m in urban canyons. The dynamic spatial accuracy of the tested device is not perfect, but we feel that it is within acceptable limits for larger population studies. Longer recording periods, for a larger population are likely to reduce the potentially negative effects of measurement inaccuracy. Furthermore, special care should be taken when the environment in which the study takes place could compromise the GPS signal.

  11. Delay/Doppler-Mapping GPS-Reflection Remote-Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Stephen; Kroger, Peter; Franklin, Garth; LeBrecque, John; Lerma, Jesse; Lough, Michael; Marcin, Martin; Muellerschoen, Ronald; Spitzmesser, Donovan; Young, Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    A radio receiver system that features enhanced capabilities for remote sensing by use of reflected Global Positioning System (GPS) signals has been developed. This system was designed primarily for ocean altimetry, but can also be used for scatterometry and bistatic synthetic-aperture radar imaging. Moreover, it could readily be adapted to utilize navigation-satellite systems other than the GPS, including the Russian Global Navigation Satellite System GLONASS) and the proposed European Galileo system. This remote-sensing system offers both advantages and disadvantages over traditional radar altimeters: One advantage of GPS-reflection systems is that they cost less because there is no need to transmit signals. Another advantage is that there are more simultaneous measurement opportunities - one for each GPS satellite in view. The primary disadvantage is that in comparison with radar signals, GPS signals are weaker, necessitating larger antennas and/or longer observations. This GPS-reflection remote-sensing system was tested in aircraft and made to record and process both (1) signals coming directly from GPS satellites by means of an upward-looking antenna and (2) GPS signals reflected from the ground by means of a downward-looking antenna. In addition to performing conventional GPS processing, the system records raw signals for postprocessing as required.

  12. Evaluating the velocity accuracy of an integrated GPS/INS system: Flight test results. [Global positioning system/inertial navigation systems (GPS/INS)

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, T.E.; Wardlaw, R.

    1991-01-01

    Verifying the velocity accuracy of a GPS receiver or an integrated GPS/INS system in a dynamic environment is a difficult proposition when many of the commonly used reference systems have velocity uncertainities of the same order of magnitude or greater than the GPS system. The results of flight tests aboard an aircraft in which multiple reference systems simultaneously collected data to evaluate the accuracy of an integrated GPS/INS system are reported. Emphasis is placed on obtaining high accuracy estimates of the velocity error of the integrated system in order to verify that velocity accuracy is maintained during both linear and circular trajectories. Three different reference systems operating in parallel during flight tests are used to independently determine the position and velocity of an aircraft in flight. They are a transponder/interrogator ranging system, a laser tracker, and GPS carrier phase processing. Results obtained from these reference systems are compared against each other and against an integrated real time differential based GPS/INS system to arrive at a set of conclusions about the accuracy of the integrated system.

  13. L-Band Ionosphere Scintillations Observed by A Spaced GPS Receiver Array during Recent Active Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.; Pelgrum, W.; van Graas, F.; Gunawardena, S.; Charney, D.; Peng, S.; Triplett, J.; Vikram, P.; Vemuru, A.

    2010-12-01

    L-Band Ionosphere Scintillations Observed by A Spaced GPS Receiver Array during Recent Active Experiments at HAARP Jade Morton*, Wouter Pelgrum**, Sanjeev Gunawardena**, Frank van Graas**, Dan Charney*, Senlin Peng***, Jeff Triplett*, Ajay Vemuru** * Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Miami University ** Avionics Engineering Center, Ohio University *** Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech Ionosphere irregularities can cause scintillation of satellite-based radio communication, navigation, and surveillance signals. While these scintillation effects will impact the corresponding receiver and system performance, carefully recovered signal parameters serve as a means of studying the background state and dynamics of the ionosphere. In this presentation, we will describe our recent effort in establishing a unique spaced GNSS receiver array at HAARP, Alaska to collect GPS and GLONASS satellite signals at various stages of the GNSS receiver processing. Preliminary receiver processing results as well as additional on-site diagnostic instrumentation measurements obtained from two active heating experiment campaigns will be presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our experimental data collection system in providing insightful details of ionosphere responses to active perturbations.

  14. Interferometric Determination of GPS (Global Positioning System) Satellite Orbits.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-23

    Global Positioning System ,’ GPS interferometrv...INTRODUCTION If the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System ( GPS ) is to be useful for crustal motion monitoring, the orbits of the GPS satellites 7will need to be... Global Position . * ing System , April 15-19, 1985, Rockville, MD 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on rev’erse side if necessary and Identity by block

  15. A research on SLAM aided INS/GPS navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Menglong; Cui, Pingyuan

    2007-11-01

    Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) aided INS/GPS navigation system is a landmark based terrain aided autonomous integrated system that has the capability for online map building and simultaneously utilizing the generated map to bind the errors in the Inertial Navigation System (INS) when GPS is not available. If GPS information is available, the SLAM integrated system builds a landmark-based map using an INS/GPS solution. If GPS is not available, the previously newly generated map is used to constrain the INS errors. The SLAM augmented INS/GPS system shows two capabilities of landmark tracking and mapping using GPS information and more importantly, aiding the INS under GPS denied situation. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by computer simulation.

  16. Software for a GPS-Reflection Remote-Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    A special-purpose software Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver designed for remote sensing with reflected GPS signals is described in Delay/Doppler-Mapping GPS-Reflection Remote-Sensing System (NPO-30385), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The input accepted by this program comprises raw (open-loop) digitized GPS signals sampled at a rate of about 20 MHz. The program processes the data samples to perform the following functions: detection of signals; tracking of phases and delays; mapping of delay, Doppler, and delay/Doppler waveforms; dual-frequency processing; coherent integrations as short as 125 s; decoding of navigation messages; and precise time tagging of observable quantities. The software can perform these functions on all detectable satellite signals without dead time. Open-loop data collected over water, land, or ice and processed by this software can be further processed to extract geophysical information. Possible examples include mean sea height, wind speed and direction, and significant wave height (for observations over the ocean); bistatic-radar terrain images and measures of soil moisture and biomass (for observations over land); and estimates of ice age, thickness, and surface density (for observations over ice).

  17. Position, Navigation, and Timing: GPS Scientific Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilan, Ruth E.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development and deployment of the Global Positioning System (GPS). This presentation also includes measuring space and time, GPS as a tool for science, development of high precision JPL GPS receivers, and technology and applications developments.

  18. Robust nonstationary jammer mitigation for GPS receivers with instantaneous frequency error tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ben; Zhang, Yimin D.; Qin, Si; Amin, Moeness G.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a nonstationary jammer suppression method for GPS receivers when the signals are sparsely sampled. Missing data samples induce noise-like artifacts in the time-frequency (TF) distribution and ambiguity function of the received signals, which lead to reduced capability and degraded performance in jammer signature estimation and excision. In the proposed method, a data-dependent TF kernel is utilized to mitigate the artifacts and sparse reconstruction methods are then applied to obtain instantaneous frequency (IF) estimation of the jammers. In addition, an error tolerance of the IF estimate is applied is applied to achieve robust jammer suppression performance in the presence of IF estimation inaccuracy.

  19. A Very-Short-Baseline Time Transfer Experiment Using Two Geodetic-Quality GPS Receivers and Carrier Phase Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    recently purchased Ashtech 212-T receiver and an ol&r AUen Osborne Associates (AOA) TTR- 4P receiver. Data collected from these geodetic-quality GPS...commercial software. In this paper the results of a very-shorkbaseline common-clock experiment between NPL’s Ashtech Z12-T and AOA TTR- 4P geodetic...8217 performance. 2 GEODETIC GPS HARDWARE AT NPL NPL possesses two geodetic quality GPS receivers, an Ashtech Z12-T and an AOrZ TTR- 4P . The hardware

  20. Solar System Modeler: A Distributed, Virtual Environment for Space Visualization and GPS Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary E.

    1996-12-01

    The Solar System Modeler (SM) extends the Space Modeler developed in 1994. It provides a virtual environment enabling an explorer to dynamically investigate near Earth satellites, deep space probes, planets, moons, and other celestial phenomena. The explorer navigates the virtual environment via mouse selected options from menu panels while wearing a tracked, head mounted display (HMD). Alternatively, a monitor may replace the HMD and keyboard controls replace head tracking. The SM's functionality is extended by the ability to broadcast simulated GPS satellite transmissions in compliance with Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) protocol standards. The transmissions include information found in true GPS broadcasts that is required for a receiver to determine its location. The Virtual GPS Receiver (VGPSR) receives the GPS transmissions from the SM and computes the receiver's position with a realistic error based on numerous variables simulating those encountered in the real GPS system. The VGPSR is designed as a plug-in module for simulations requiring virtual navigation. The receiver's client application provides the VGPSR with the simulation time and the true position of the receiver. In return, the application receives a GPS indicated position.

  1. The First Experiment with VLBI-GPS Hybrid System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Younghee; Kondo, Tetsuro; Gotoh, Tadahiro; Amagai, Jun; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Sekido, Mamoru; Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Sasao, Tetsuo; Cho, Jungho; Kim, Tuhwan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce our GPS-VLBI hybrid system and show the results of the first experiment which is now under way. In this hybrid system, GPS signals are captured by a normal GPS antenna, down-converted to IF signals, and then sampled by the VLBI sampler VSSP32 developed by NICT. The sampled GPS data are recorded and correlated in the same way as VLBI observation data. The correlator outputs are the group delay and the delay rate. Since the whole system uses the same frequency standard, many sources of systematic errors are common between the VLBI system and the GPS system. In this hybrid system, the GPS antenna can be regarded as an additional VLBI antenna having multiple beams towards GPS satellites. Therefore, we expect that this approach will provide enough data to improve zenith delay estimates and geodetic results.

  2. The Evolution of Global Positioning System (GPS) Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Sameer; Moore, Kevin B.

    2002-01-01

    Describes technological advances in the Global Positioning System (GPS), which is also known as the NAVSTAR GPS satellite constellation program developed in 1937, and changes in the nature of our world by GPS in the areas of agriculture, health, military, transportation, environment, wildlife biology, surveying and mapping, space applications, and…

  3. Multipath effects in a Global Positioning Satellite system receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Malcolm W.

    1992-01-01

    This study, as a part of a large continuing investigation being conducted by the Communications Systems Branch of the Information and Electronic Systems Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center, was undertaken to explore the multipath response characteristics of a particular Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) receiver which was available in the laboratory at the beginning and throughout the entirety of the study, and to develop a suitable regime of experimental procedure which can be applied to other state-of-the-art GPS receivers in the larger investigation.

  4. Airborne Antenna System for Minimum-Cycle-Slip GPS Reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    A system that includes a Global Positioning System (GPS) antenna and associated apparatus for keeping the antenna aimed upward has been developed for use aboard a remote-sensing-survey airplane. The purpose served by the system is to enable minimum- cycle-slip reception of GPS signals used in precise computation of the trajectory of the airplane, without having to restrict the airplane to maneuvers that increase the flight time needed to perform a survey. Cycle slip signifies loss of continuous track of the phase of a signal. Minimum-cycle-slip reception is desirable because maintaining constant track of the phase of the carrier signal from each available GPS satellite is necessary for surveying to centimeter or subcentimeter precision. Even a loss of signal for as short a time as a nanosecond can cause cycle slip. Cycle slips degrade the quality and precision of survey data acquired during a flight. The two principal causes of cycle slip are weakness of signals and multipath propagation. Heretofore, it has been standard practice to mount a GPS antenna rigidly on top of an airplane, and the radiation pattern of the antenna is typically hemispherical, so that all GPS satellites above the horizon are viewed by the antenna during level flight. When the airplane must be banked for a turn or other maneuver, the reception hemisphere becomes correspondingly tilted; hence, the antenna no longer views satellites that may still be above the Earth horizon but are now below the equatorial plane of the tilted reception hemisphere. Moreover, part of the reception hemisphere (typically, on the inside of a turn) becomes pointed toward ground, with a consequent increase in received noise and, therefore, degradation of GPS measurements. To minimize the likelihood of loss of signal and cycle slip, bank angles of remote-sensing survey airplanes have generally been limited to 10 or less, resulting in skidding or slipping uncoordinated turns. An airplane must be banked in order to make

  5. GPS meteorology - Remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevis, Michael; Businger, Steven; Herring, Thomas A.; Rocken, Christian; Anthes, Richard A.; Ware, Randolph H.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new approach to remote sensing of water vapor based on the Global Positioning System (GPS). Geodesists and geophysicists have devised methods for estimating the extent to which signals propagating from GPS satellites to ground-based GPS receivers are delayed by atmospheric water vapor. This delay is parameterized in terms of a time-varying zenith wet delay (ZWD) which is retrieved by stochastic filtering of the GPS data. Given surface temperature and pressure readings at the GPS receiver, the retrieved ZWD can be transformed with very little additional uncertainty into an estimate of the integrated water vapor (IWV) overlying that receiver. Networks of continuously operating GPS receivers are being constructed by geodesists, geophysicists, and government and military agencies, in order to implement a wide range of positioning capabilities. These emerging GPS networks offer the possibility of observing the horizontal distribution of IWV or, equivalently, precipitate water with unprecedented coverage and a temporal resolution of the order of 10 min. These measurements could be utilized in operational weather forecasting and in fundamental research into atmospheric storm systems, the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric chemistry, and global climate change.

  6. Studying Convective Events Over Southern Arizona by Using Ground GPS Receivers and Cloud to Ground Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orduño, A. M.; Sosa, C. M.; Jacobo, R. A.

    2013-05-01

    Over the last decades, Global Position System (GPS) satellites have been used for in various fields of the Earth Sciences. In particular, "GPS Meteorology" was born in the attempt to retrieve water vapor, specifically column-integrated water vapor or, precipitable water vapor (PWV), that results from the noise induced by the atmosphere in the GPS signal. Monitoring PWV with GPS is relatively inexpensive, works under all weather conditions, and has a high time resolution which complements traditional techniques such as radiosondes and satellite-based retrievals. The North American Monsoon (NAM) is a seasonal system that affects the southwestern of United States and northwestern Mexico. Atmospheric Water Vapor is transported from the Gulf of California, Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico to the continental areas and this contribute to the genesis of convective systems that develop over this region. In many cases, these systems are characterized by relatively short lifetimes, a great amount of precipitation accompanied with lightning making it difficult to study with radiosondes, given their limited time resolution (operationally twice a day). On the other hand, GOES satellite has better time resolution (one hour), but does not provide water vapor in cloudy conditions, precisely when the data are needed. This makes GPS a great tool to study deep atmospheric convection over during the NAM. During the monsoon season 2002 and 2003, we noted that local GPS and the radiosondes launched in Tucson, Arizona showed, for some cases, a significant discrepancy in their PWV estimation. In determining the causes of these discrepancies we discovered that the GPS was detecting convective events in its vicinity that the radiosondes could not detect, a strength that had not considered before. Convective activity in Southern Arizona often produces gust fronts that result in dramatic changes of temperature and humidity. These gust fronts also generate a shift in wind direction and

  7. The NAVSTAR GPS (Global Positioning System) System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    Block IIR satellites is the autonomous navigation of GPS satellites utilizing crosslink ranging. The Block II satellites have crosslink Lommunications...capability, but no ranging. The Block HIR satellites will be modified to enable crosslink ranging on the same crosslink frequency and, by processing the... crosslink range measurements, the CPS navigation message can be generated onboard the satellite without daily upload from the ground. Analysis has

  8. First Observations of Equatorial TEC and Scintillation With Multiple Dual-Frequency Software-Defined GPS Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hanlon, B.; Kintner, P. M.; de Paula, E. R.

    2009-05-01

    A dual-frequency software-defined GPS receiver has been developed and used for monitoring total electron content (TEC) and observing equatorial ionospheric scintillation. The Cornell University GPS Receiver Implemented on a DSP (GRID) utilizes the GPS L1 C/A and L2 C signals to measure TEC and observe scintillation. The GRID receiver measured TEC and GPS signal amplitude and phase at 10 Hz. Also employed were two similar GPS digital storage receivers (non-real-time) that made the same measurements at 50 Hz. These receivers were arranged in a linear array and utilized in January, 2009 in Natal, Brazil (magnetic latitude 2.42°) to make these observations. Mild scintillation of the L1 C/A and L2 C signals was observed. TEC measurements agreed well with those taken by a collocated GPSV 4004B Scintillation/TEC Monitor. We demonstrate the use of multiple receivers to measure drifts and report on the first fast (10Hz-50Hz) multiple receiver TEC measurements in the equatorial ionosphere.

  9. The simulation and analysis of navigation performance for integrated GPS/inertial navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jixiang; Zhang, Gengsheng

    This paper discusses the navigation performance of an integrated GPS/inertial navigation system (INS) according to the principle of the Kalman filter, the concept of the GDOP, and the results of simulation tests. The accuracies of position and velocity (especially the former) of the integrated system are much better than those of the point solution of the GPS receiver. This comes from the function of Kalman filter which utilizes all the measurement data of the past up to the update time and combines the information from both GPS and INS.

  10. First Results of Field Absolute Calibration of the GPS Receiver Antenna at Wuhan University

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhigang; Zhao, Qile; Chen, Guo; Wang, Guangxing; Dai, Zhiqiang; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    GNSS receiver antenna phase center variations (PCVs), which arise from the non-spherical phase response of GNSS signals have to be well corrected for high-precision GNSS applications. Without using a precise antenna phase center correction (PCC) model, the estimated position of a station monument will lead to a bias of up to several centimeters. The Chinese large-scale research project “Crustal Movement Observation Network of China” (CMONOC), which requires high-precision positions in a comprehensive GPS observational network motived establishment of a set of absolute field calibrations of the GPS receiver antenna located at Wuhan University. In this paper the calibration facilities are firstly introduced and then the multipath elimination and PCV estimation strategies currently used are elaborated. The validation of estimated PCV values of test antenna are finally conducted, compared with the International GNSS Service (IGS) type values. Examples of TRM57971.00 NONE antenna calibrations from our calibration facility demonstrate that the derived PCVs and IGS type mean values agree at the 1 mm level. PMID:26580616

  11. First Results of Field Absolute Calibration of the GPS Receiver Antenna at Wuhan University.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhigang; Zhao, Qile; Chen, Guo; Wang, Guangxing; Dai, Zhiqiang; Li, Tao

    2015-11-13

    GNSS receiver antenna phase center variations (PCVs), which arise from the non-spherical phase response of GNSS signals have to be well corrected for high-precision GNSS applications. Without using a precise antenna phase center correction (PCC) model, the estimated position of a station monument will lead to a bias of up to several centimeters. The Chinese large-scale research project "Crustal Movement Observation Network of China" (CMONOC), which requires high-precision positions in a comprehensive GPS observational network motived establishment of a set of absolute field calibrations of the GPS receiver antenna located at Wuhan University. In this paper the calibration facilities are firstly introduced and then the multipath elimination and PCV estimation strategies currently used are elaborated. The validation of estimated PCV values of test antenna are finally conducted, compared with the International GNSS Service (IGS) type values. Examples of TRM57971.00 NONE antenna calibrations from our calibration facility demonstrate that the derived PCVs and IGS type mean values agree at the 1 mm level.

  12. Receiver clock stability - An important aid in the GPS integrity problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBurney, Paul W.; Brown, R. Grover

    It is well known that the stability of the GPS receiver clock can be used to help 'coast' through periods of high GDOP. A somewhat analogous situation applies when the receiver is attempting to detect slow or incipient satellite failures. The clock, through its stability, provides an additional measurement which slowly degrades with time, but nevertheless provides the needed redundancy for failure detection. The geometric circumstances giving rise to the need for clock coasting are more complicated for failure detection than in the simple navigation problem. This is discussed in the paper. Also, a Kalman filter failure detection scheme which automatically accomplishes the needed clock coasting is presented. Finally, results of Monte Carlo simulations demonstrating the effectiveness of the scheme in both detecting and isolating the errant satellite are given in the paper.

  13. A Novel Method for Precise Onboard Real-Time Orbit Determination with a Standalone GPS Receiver

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuhong; Gong, Xuewen; Sang, Jizhang; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing systems require accurate, autonomous and real-time orbit determinations (RTOD) for geo-referencing. Onboard Global Positioning System (GPS) has widely been used to undertake such tasks. In this paper, a novel RTOD method achieving decimeter precision using GPS carrier phases, required by China’s HY2A and ZY3 missions, is presented. A key to the algorithm success is the introduction of a new parameter, termed pseudo-ambiguity. This parameter combines the phase ambiguity, the orbit, and clock offset errors of the GPS broadcast ephemeris together to absorb a large part of the combined error. Based on the analysis of the characteristics of the orbit and clock offset errors, the pseudo-ambiguity can be modeled as a random walk, and estimated in an extended Kalman filter. Experiments of processing real data from HY2A and ZY3, simulating onboard operational scenarios of these two missions, are performed using the developed software SATODS. Results have demonstrated that the position and velocity accuracy (3D RMS) of 0.2–0.4 m and 0.2–0.4 mm/s, respectively, are achieved using dual-frequency carrier phases for HY2A, and slightly worse results for ZY3. These results show it is feasible to obtain orbit accuracy at decimeter level of 3–5 dm for position and 0.3–0.5 mm/s for velocity with this RTOD method. PMID:26690149

  14. A Novel Method for Precise Onboard Real-Time Orbit Determination with a Standalone GPS Receiver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuhong; Gong, Xuewen; Sang, Jizhang; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-12-04

    Satellite remote sensing systems require accurate, autonomous and real-time orbit determinations (RTOD) for geo-referencing. Onboard Global Positioning System (GPS) has widely been used to undertake such tasks. In this paper, a novel RTOD method achieving decimeter precision using GPS carrier phases, required by China's HY2A and ZY3 missions, is presented. A key to the algorithm success is the introduction of a new parameter, termed pseudo-ambiguity. This parameter combines the phase ambiguity, the orbit, and clock offset errors of the GPS broadcast ephemeris together to absorb a large part of the combined error. Based on the analysis of the characteristics of the orbit and clock offset errors, the pseudo-ambiguity can be modeled as a random walk, and estimated in an extended Kalman filter. Experiments of processing real data from HY2A and ZY3, simulating onboard operational scenarios of these two missions, are performed using the developed software SATODS. Results have demonstrated that the position and velocity accuracy (3D RMS) of 0.2-0.4 m and 0.2-0.4 mm/s, respectively, are achieved using dual-frequency carrier phases for HY2A, and slightly worse results for ZY3. These results show it is feasible to obtain orbit accuracy at decimeter level of 3-5 dm for position and 0.3-0.5 mm/s for velocity with this RTOD method.

  15. System and method for generating attitude determinations using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Clark E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A GPS attitude receiver for determining the attitude of a moving vehicle in conjunction with a first, a second, a third, and a fourth antenna mounted to the moving vehicle. Each of the antennas receives a plurality of GPS signals that each include a carrier component. For each of the carrier components of the received GPS signals there is an integer ambiguity associated with the first and fourth antennas, an integer ambiguity associated with second and fourth antennas, and an integer ambiguity associated with the third and fourth antennas. The GPS attitude receiver measures phase values for the carrier components of the GPS signals received from each of the antennas at a plurality of measurement epochs during an initialization period and at a measurement epoch after the initialization period. In response to the phase values measured at the measurement epochs during the initialization period, the GPS attitude receiver computes integer ambiguity resolution values representing resolution of the integer ambiguities. Then, in response to the computed integer ambiguity resolution values and the phase value measured at the measurement epoch after the initialization period, it computes values defining the attitude of the moving vehicle at the measurement epoch after the initialization period.

  16. Autonomous navigation system based on GPS and magnetometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Julie, Thienel K. (Inventor); Richard, Harman R. (Inventor); Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention is drawn to an autonomous navigation system using Global Positioning System (GPS) and magnetometers for low Earth orbit satellites. As a magnetometer is reliable and always provides information on spacecraft attitude, rate, and orbit, the magnetometer-GPS configuration solves GPS initialization problem, decreasing the convergence time for navigation estimate and improving the overall accuracy. Eventually the magnetometer-GPS configuration enables the system to avoid costly and inherently less reliable gyro for rate estimation. Being autonomous, this invention would provide for black-box spacecraft navigation, producing attitude, orbit, and rate estimates without any ground input with high accuracy and reliability.

  17. Flight evaluation of differential GPS aided inertial navigation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnally, B. David; Paielli, Russell A.; Bach, Ralph E., Jr.; Warner, David N., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Algorithms are described for integration of Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) data with Inertial Navigation System (INS) data to provide an integrated DGPS/INS navigation system. The objective is to establish the benefits that can be achieved through various levels of integration of DGPS with INS for precision navigation. An eight state Kalman filter integration was implemented in real-time on a twin turbo-prop transport aircraft to evaluate system performance during terminal approach and landing operations. A fully integrated DGPS/INS system is also presented which models accelerometer and rate-gyro measurement errors plus position, velocity, and attitude errors. The fully integrated system was implemented off-line using range-domain (seventeen-state) and position domain (fifteen-state) Kalman filters. Both filter integration approaches were evaluated using data collected during the flight test. Flight-test data consisted of measurements from a 5 channel Precision Code GPS receiver, a strap-down Inertial Navigation Unit (INU), and GPS satellite differential range corrections from a ground reference station. The aircraft was laser tracked to determine its true position. Results indicate that there is no significant improvement in positioning accuracy with the higher levels of DGPS/INS integration. All three systems provided high-frequency (e.g., 20 Hz) estimates of position and velocity. The fully integrated system provided estimates of inertial sensor errors which may be used to improve INS navigation accuracy should GPS become unavailable, and improved estimates of acceleration, attitude, and body rates which can be used for guidance and control. Precision Code DGPS/INS positioning accuracy (root-mean-square) was 1.0 m cross-track and 3.0 m vertical. (This AGARDograph was sponsored by the Guidance and Control Panel.)

  18. GPS-Aided Tsunami Early Detection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. T.; Bar-Sever, Y. E.; Liu, Z.; Khachikyan, R.

    2015-12-01

    Most tsunami fatalities occur in near-field communities of earthquakes at offshore faults. Tsunami early warning is key for reducing the number of fatalities. Unfortunately, an earthquake's magnitude often does not gauge the resulting tsunami power. Here we show that real-time GPS stations along coastlines are able to detect seafloor motions due to big earthquakes, and that the detected seafloor displacements are able to determine tsunami energy and scales instantaneously for early warnings. Our method focuses on estimating tsunami energy directly from seafloor motions because a tsunami's potential or scale, no matter how it is defined, has to be proportional to the tsunami energy. Since seafloor motions are the only source of a tsunami, their estimation directly relates to the mechanism that generates tsunamis; therefore, it is a proper way of identifying earthquakes that are capable of triggering tsunamis, while being able to discriminate those particular earthquakes from false alarms. Examples of detecting the tsunami energy scales for the 2004 Sumatra M9.1 earthquake, the 2005 Nias M8.7 earthquake, the 2010 M8.8 Chilean earthquake, and the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake will be presented. The development of the Indo-Pacific GPS-Aided Tsunami Early Detection (GATED) system will be reported.

  19. Rip current monitoring using GPS buoy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, DongSeob; Kim, InHo; Kang, DongSoo

    2014-05-01

    The occurrence of rip current in the Haeundae beach, which is one of the most famous beaches in South Korea, has been threatening beach-goers security in summer season annually. Many coastal scientists have been investigating rip currents by using field observations and measurements, laboratory measurements and wave tank experiments, and computer and numerical modeling. Rip current velocity is intermittent and may rapidly increase within minutes due to larger incoming wave groups or nearshore circulation instabilities. It is important to understand that changes in rip current velocity occur in response to changes in incoming wave height and period as well as changes in water level. GPS buoys have been used to acquire sea level change data, atmospheric parameters and other oceanic variables in sea for the purposes of vertical datum determination, tide correction, radar altimeter calibration, ocean environment and marine pollution monitoring. Therefore, we adopted GPS buoy system for an experiment which is to investigate rip current velocity; it is sporadic and may quickly upsurge within minutes due to larger arriving wave groups or nearshore flow uncertainties. In this study, for high accurate positioning of buy equipment, a Satellite Based Argumentation System DGPS data logger was deployed to investigate within floating object, and it can be acquired three-dimensional coordinate or geodetic position of buoy with continuous NMEA-0183 protocol during 24 hours. The wave height measured by in-situ hydrometer in a cross-shore array clearly increased before and after occurrence of rip current, and wave period also was lengthened around an event. These results show that wave height and period correlate reasonably well with long-shore current interaction in the Haeundae beach. Additionally, current meter data and GPS buoy data showed that rip current velocities, about 0.2 m/s, may become dangerously strong under specific conditions. Acknowledgement This research was

  20. On "GPS weeknumber rollover".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongqing

    1998-12-01

    The relation between GPS system time and weeknumber is introduced, and it is explained that the limited number of (10 bits) used in the GPS navigation message causes the problem of GPS weeknumber rollover which is similar to that the millennium problem will occur when the year number becomes 00 from 99. The GPS weeknumber has the maximum of 1023 so that it will rollover from 1023 to 0 at the midnight of August 21 - 22, 1999. The GPS users should check if the receivers can work correctly once the "rollover" occurs. If the equipments or softwares for the GPS receiver are not perfect. The receiver will interpret the new week 0 as January 6, 1980, and some receivers may display wrong information or wrong locating results, even stop tracking any satellite. The GPS users should contact the manufacturer of the GPS receiver to determine if the GPS receiver will be affected by the GPS weeknumber rollover. It should be noted that the problem of time rollover often occurs for timing service.

  1. A Low Cost GPS System for Real-Time Tracking of Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markgraf, M.; Montenbruck, O.; Hassenpflug, F.; Turner, P.; Bull, B.; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development as well as the on-ground and the in-flight evaluation of a low cost Global Positioning System (GPS) system for real-time tracking of sounding rockets. The flight unit comprises a modified ORION GPS receiver and a newly designed switchable antenna system composed of a helical antenna in the rocket tip and a dual-blade antenna combination attached to the body of the service module. Aside from the flight hardware a PC based terminal program has been developed to monitor the GPS data and graphically displays the rocket's path during the flight. In addition an Instantaneous Impact Point (IIP) prediction is performed based on the received position and velocity information. In preparation for ESA's Maxus-4 mission, a sounding rocket test flight was carried out at Esrange, Kiruna, on 19 Feb. 2001 to validate existing ground facilities and range safety installations. Due to the absence of a dedicated scientific payload, the flight offered the opportunity to test multiple GPS receivers and assess their performance for the tracking of sounding rockets. In addition to the ORION receiver, an Ashtech G12 HDMA receiver and a BAE (Canadian Marconi) Allstar receiver, both connected to a wrap-around antenna, have been flown on the same rocket as part of an independent experiment provided by the Goddard Space Flight Center. This allows an in-depth verification and trade-off of different receiver and antenna concepts.

  2. GPS Measurement Of Attitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinardo, S. J.; Hushbeck, E. L.; Meehan, T. K.; Munson, T. N.; Purcell, G. H.; Srinivasan, J. M.; Young, L. E.; Yunck, T. P.

    1992-01-01

    Signals transmitted by satellites of Global Positioning System (GPS) measure orientation of baseline on ship, aircraft, or other vehicle with accuracy. Two GPS antennas and receivers placed at well separated points on platform. Receivers measure positions of ends of baseline as functions of time. Output processor computes vector difference between two positions and determines orientation of baseline. Combined with conventional GPS data, orientation data allows more precise navigation and mapping and enhances calculations related to performance and control of vehicle.

  3. Locating The Geocenter From GPS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigue, Yvonne; Lichten, Stephen M.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Heflin, Michael B.; Malla, Rajendra P.

    1994-01-01

    Report presents analysis of Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements taken during 3-week geodetic experiment in early 1991. Involved constellation of 15 GPS satellites operational at that time, plus 21 GPS receiving stations at widely distributed sites, all but 4 of which in Northern Hemisphere. Analysis consisted principally of estimation of location of center of mass of Earth relative to GPS receiving stations. As part of analysis, GPS estimates of geocenter compared with estimates obtained by satellite laser ranging (SLR).

  4. Receiver Clock Modelling for GPS-only Gravity Field Recovery from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orliac, E.; Jaeggi, A.; Dach, R.; Weinbach, U.; Schoen, S.

    2012-04-01

    Previous results from the authors [1, 2] show that for stations connected to highly stable clocks (H-Maser), kinematic Precise Point Positioning (PPP) solutions for the height component can be highly improved. A reduction of up to 70% of the standard deviation of the kinematic position could be observed if the receiver clock is modelled with a second order polynomial instead of estimating independent epoch-wise clock corrections. Although those initial results are very promising, the applicability of such an approach is rather limited since very stable clocks are hardly portable. The only "truly" kinematic objects carrying a GPS receiver connected to a stable clock are the two GRACE satellites. In this paper we investigate the impact of the deterministic modelling of the receiver clocks in the determination of kinematic positions for the two GRACE satellites. Solutions from both contributing institutions, namely the Astronomical Institute of University of Bern and the Institut für Erdmessung of Leibniz Universität Hannover are considered. Comparisons with standard kinematic and reduced-dynamic orbit solutions will be provided and technical aspects discussed. Finally, based on one month of data, gravity fields from all kinematic solutions are derived and compared. [1] Orliac, E., R. Dach, D. Voithenleitner, U. Hugentobler, K. Wang, M. Rothacher, and D. Svehla (2011). Clock Modeling for GNSS Applications, AGU Fall Meeting 2011, San Francisco, USA, December 5-9, 2011. [2] Weinbach, U., and S. Schön (2011). GNSS receiver clock modeling when using high-precision oscillators and its impact on PPP, J. Adv. Space Res., 47(2):229-238 DOI: 10.1016/j.asr.2010.06.031.

  5. Measuring snow liquid water content with low-cost GPS receivers.

    PubMed

    Koch, Franziska; Prasch, Monika; Schmid, Lino; Schweizer, Jürg; Mauser, Wolfram

    2014-11-06

    The amount of liquid water in snow characterizes the wetness of a snowpack. Its temporal evolution plays an important role for wet-snow avalanche prediction, as well as the onset of meltwater release and water availability estimations within a river basin. However, it is still a challenge and a not yet satisfyingly solved issue to measure the liquid water content (LWC) in snow with conventional in situ and remote sensing techniques. We propose a new approach based on the attenuation of microwave radiation in the L-band emitted by the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). For this purpose, we performed a continuous low-cost GPS measurement experiment at the Weissfluhjoch test site in Switzerland, during the snow melt period in 2013. As a measure of signal strength, we analyzed the carrier-to-noise power density ratio (C/N0) and developed a procedure to normalize these data. The bulk volumetric LWC was determined based on assumptions for attenuation, reflection and refraction of radiation in wet snow. The onset of melt, as well as daily melt-freeze cycles were clearly detected. The temporal evolution of the LWC was closely related to the meteorological and snow-hydrological data. Due to its non-destructive setup, its cost-efficiency and global availability, this approach has the potential to be implemented in distributed sensor networks for avalanche prediction or basin-wide melt onset measurements.

  6. Measuring Snow Liquid Water Content with Low-Cost GPS Receivers

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Franziska; Prasch, Monika; Schmid, Lino; Schweizer, Jürg; Mauser, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    The amount of liquid water in snow characterizes the wetness of a snowpack. Its temporal evolution plays an important role for wet-snow avalanche prediction, as well as the onset of meltwater release and water availability estimations within a river basin. However, it is still a challenge and a not yet satisfyingly solved issue to measure the liquid water content (LWC) in snow with conventional in situ and remote sensing techniques. We propose a new approach based on the attenuation of microwave radiation in the L-band emitted by the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). For this purpose, we performed a continuous low-cost GPS measurement experiment at the Weissfluhjoch test site in Switzerland, during the snow melt period in 2013. As a measure of signal strength, we analyzed the carrier-to-noise power density ratio (C/N0) and developed a procedure to normalize these data. The bulk volumetric LWC was determined based on assumptions for attenuation, reflection and refraction of radiation in wet snow. The onset of melt, as well as daily melt-freeze cycles were clearly detected. The temporal evolution of the LWC was closely related to the meteorological and snow-hydrological data. Due to its non-destructive setup, its cost-efficiency and global availability, this approach has the potential to be implemented in distributed sensor networks for avalanche prediction or basin-wide melt onset measurements. PMID:25384007

  7. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    from the SV Bus, specifically the Scalable Power Regulation Unit and is being amplified by the solar arrays which act as highly efficient antennas. To...Military Operations in Urban Terrain; Defense-Wide Mission Support; Air Mobility; and Space Launch Orbital Support. For military users, the GPS III...Service: The GPS III program will provide O&S for on- orbit support through the Launch and On- Orbit Support contract. For Space Vehicle (SV)01 and

  8. FPGA-based real-time embedded system for RISS/GPS integrated navigation.

    PubMed

    Abdelfatah, Walid Farid; Georgy, Jacques; Iqbal, Umar; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2012-01-01

    Navigation algorithms integrating measurements from multi-sensor systems overcome the problems that arise from using GPS navigation systems in standalone mode. Algorithms which integrate the data from 2D low-cost reduced inertial sensor system (RISS), consisting of a gyroscope and an odometer or wheel encoders, along with a GPS receiver via a Kalman filter has proved to be worthy in providing a consistent and more reliable navigation solution compared to standalone GPS receivers. It has been also shown to be beneficial, especially in GPS-denied environments such as urban canyons and tunnels. The main objective of this paper is to narrow the idea-to-implementation gap that follows the algorithm development by realizing a low-cost real-time embedded navigation system capable of computing the data-fused positioning solution. The role of the developed system is to synchronize the measurements from the three sensors, relative to the pulse per second signal generated from the GPS, after which the navigation algorithm is applied to the synchronized measurements to compute the navigation solution in real-time. Employing a customizable soft-core processor on an FPGA in the kernel of the navigation system, provided the flexibility for communicating with the various sensors and the computation capability required by the Kalman filter integration algorithm.

  9. FPGA-Based Real-Time Embedded System for RISS/GPS Integrated Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Abdelfatah, Walid Farid; Georgy, Jacques; Iqbal, Umar; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2012-01-01

    Navigation algorithms integrating measurements from multi-sensor systems overcome the problems that arise from using GPS navigation systems in standalone mode. Algorithms which integrate the data from 2D low-cost reduced inertial sensor system (RISS), consisting of a gyroscope and an odometer or wheel encoders, along with a GPS receiver via a Kalman filter has proved to be worthy in providing a consistent and more reliable navigation solution compared to standalone GPS receivers. It has been also shown to be beneficial, especially in GPS-denied environments such as urban canyons and tunnels. The main objective of this paper is to narrow the idea-to-implementation gap that follows the algorithm development by realizing a low-cost real-time embedded navigation system capable of computing the data-fused positioning solution. The role of the developed system is to synchronize the measurements from the three sensors, relative to the pulse per second signal generated from the GPS, after which the navigation algorithm is applied to the synchronized measurements to compute the navigation solution in real-time. Employing a customizable soft-core processor on an FPGA in the kernel of the navigation system, provided the flexibility for communicating with the various sensors and the computation capability required by the Kalman filter integration algorithm. PMID:22368460

  10. Environmental applications of GPS

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, S.A.; Zueck, D.

    1999-07-01

    The use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) has revolutionized air travel, ocean navigation, land navigation, and the collection of environmental data. Although a basic civilian GPS receiver can be purchased for as little as $100, the receiver is only the tip of a 12 billion dollar iceberg. This paper will discuss the history and basic operation of the Global Positioning System, a satellite-based precision positioning and timing service developed and operated by the Department of Defense. It will also describe the accuracy limitations of the civil GPS service and how accuracy can be enhanced by the use of differential GPS (DGPS), using either the free National Differential GPS system, or commercial differential monitor stations. Finally, the paper will discuss the future accuracy upgrades of civil GPS as a result of recent federal policy decisions.

  11. Constraints on Snow Accumulation and Firn Density in Greenland Using GPS Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, K. M.; Wahr, J. M.; Kuipers Munneke, P.

    2014-12-01

    Data from three continuously-operating GPS sites and located on the interior of the Greenland ice sheet are analyzed. In each case, the GPS antenna has been placed on a pole that is set in the firn layer above the ice. Traditionally these kinds of GPS installations are used as base stations or to estimate the local horizontal speed and direction of the ice sheet. However, these data are also sensitive to the vertical displacement of the pole as it moves through the firn layer. A new method developed to measure snow depth variations with reflected GPS signals is applied to these GPS data from Greenland. This method provides a constraint on the vertical distance between the GPS antenna and the surface snow layer. The vertical positions and snow surface heights are then used to assess output from surface accumulation and firn densification models, showing agreement better than 10% at the sites with the longest records. Comparisons between the GPS reflection method and in situ snow sensors at the Dye 2 site show excellent agreement, capturing the dramatic changes observed in Greenland during the 2012 summer melt season. The GPS vertical measurements and snow surface layer estimates can help validate surface elevation results obtained using satellite altimetry.

  12. Accurate aircraft wind measurements using the global positioning system (GPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dobosy, R.J.; Crawford, T.L., McMillen, R.T., Dumas, E.J.

    1996-11-01

    High accuracy measurements of the spatial distribution of wind speed are required in the study of turbulent exchange between the atmosphere and the earth. The use of a differential global positioning system (GPS) to determine the sensor velocity vector component of wind speed is discussed in this paper. The results of noise and rocking testing are summarized, and fluxes obtained from the GPS-based methods are compared to those measured from systems on towers and airplanes. The GPS-based methods provided usable measurements that compared well with tower and aircraft data at a significantly lower cost. 21 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. A navigation algorithm for single channel low-cost GPS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsiani, H.; Noe, P. S.; Rhyne, V. T.; Painter, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    A sequential navigation algorithm for a navigator using the Global Positioning System satellites is developed and tested for both noise-free and noisy system models. Data from a six-hour flight from California to Hawaii (C5A aircraft) simulates a true user to test the accuracy of the user's position for a sequential navigation system. For error reduction in the user's position in the sequential navigation system (considering 100 m as a maximum average error tolerated by any low-cost GPS user) an analysis of error sources in the sequential system has led to the use of range-ephemeris rate to translate ranges to a common point in time and to use velocity aiding at the time of a satellite disappearance. To reduce the user's position and velocity errors in a noisy navigation system an 'alpha-beta' two-pole filter is implemented whose optimum alpha is obtained experimentally. A user's position error of 73 m at noise range error of 30.48 (1sigma) is achieved.

  14. Assessing the role of GPs in Nordic health care systems.

    PubMed

    Quaye, Randolph K

    2016-05-03

    Purpose This paper examines the changing role of general practitioners (GPs) in Nordic countries of Sweden, Norway and Denmark. It aims to explore the "gate keeping" role of GPs in the face of current changes in the health care delivery systems in these countries. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected from existing literature, interviews with GPs, hospital specialists and representatives of Danish regions and Norwegian Medical Association. Findings The paper contends that in all these changes, the position of the GPs in the medical division of labor has been strengthened, and patients now have increased and broadened access to choice. Research limitations/implications Health care cost and high cancer mortality rates have forced Nordic countries of Sweden, Norway and Denmark to rethink their health care systems. Several attempts have been made to reduce health care cost through market reform and by strenghtening the position of GPs. The evidence suggests that in Norway and Denmark, right incentives are in place to achieve this goal. Sweden is not far behind. The paper has limitations of a small sample size and an exclusive focus on GPs. Practical implications Anecdotal evidence suggests that physicians are becoming extremely unhappy. Understanding the changing status of primary care physicians will yield valuable information for assessing the effectiveness of Nordic health care delivery systems. Social implications This study has wider implications of how GPs see their role as potential gatekeepers in the Nordic health care systems. The role of GPs is changing as a result of recent health care reforms. Originality/value This paper contends that in Norway and Denmark, right incentives are in place to strengthen the position of GPs.

  15. Crop Dusting Using GPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers and GPS-based swath guidance systems are used on agricultural aircraft for remote sensing, airplane guidance, and to support variable-rate aerial application of crop inputs such as insecticides, cotton growth regulators, and defoliants. Agricultural aircraf...

  16. Integration Of GPS And GLONASS Systems In Geodetic Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciuk, Kamil

    2015-12-01

    The article shows the results of satellites measurements elaborations using GPS & GLONASS signals. The aim of this article is to define the influence of adding GLONASS signals on position determination accuracy. It especially concerns areas with big horizon coverages. Object of the study were analysis of DOP coefficients, code and RTK solutions, and usage of satellite techniques in levelling. The performed studies and analysis show that integrated GPS-GLONASS satellite measurements provide possibility to achieve better results than measurements using single navigation satellite system (GPS).

  17. A statistical characterization of the Galileo-to-GPS inter-system bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioia, Ciro; Borio, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    Global navigation satellite system operates using independent time scales and thus inter-system time offsets have to be determined to enable multi-constellation navigation solutions. GPS/Galileo inter-system bias and drift are evaluated here using different types of receivers: two mass market and two professional receivers. Moreover, three different approaches are considered for the inter-system bias determination: in the first one, the broadcast Galileo to GPS time offset is used to align GPS and Galileo time scales. In the second, the inter-system bias is included in the multi-constellation navigation solution and is estimated using the measurements available. Finally, an enhanced algorithm using constraints on the inter-system bias time evolution is proposed. The inter-system bias estimates obtained with the different approaches are analysed and their stability is experimentally evaluated using the Allan deviation. The impact of the inter-system bias on the position velocity time solution is also considered and the performance of the approaches analysed is evaluated in terms of standard deviation and mean errors for both horizontal and vertical components. From the experiments, it emerges that the inter-system bias is very stable and that the use of constraints, modelling the GPS/Galileo inter-system bias behaviour, significantly improves the performance of multi-constellation navigation.

  18. Observations of conjugate MSTIDs using networks of GPS receivers in the American sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valladares, C. E.; Sheehan, R.

    2016-09-01

    This study has used total electron content (TEC) values from an extended network of GPS receivers and a highly developed processing to characterize the conjugacy of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) over the American continent. It was found that midlatitude nighttime MSTIDs, also named electrobuoyancy waves, map into the opposite hemisphere but the amplitude of the TEC disturbance in the Southern Hemisphere is between 8 and 13% of the amplitude in the original hemisphere. The periods of the MSTIDs vary between 50 and 65 min. MSTID dynamics is presented for two days: 20 August 2012 and 17 June 2012. On the first day, MSTIDs entered into the American sector shortly before 4 UT, last for 3 h, drifted at an average speed of 200 m/s, and dissipated in the Caribbean region. In the Northern Hemisphere, the MSTIDs were directed southwestward (SW) and 60° from south. In the Southern Hemisphere, they moved northwestward (NW) or 60° from north. The MSTID velocity changed through the night from 300 m/s to 150 m/s, but the propagation direction did not vary. On 17 June 2012 a series of wide MSTIDs were seen traveling across the Caribbean region that exited through the western coast of Central America. These MSTIDs last for 5 h. Number density measured with the DMSP-F15 and DMSP-F17 satellites confirm the notion that the MSTIDs consist of rising and falling sheets of plasma density driven by electric fields likely set by a Perkins-type instability. These observations support the notion that gravity waves can seed and boost the growth of the nighttime MSTIDs.

  19. Airborne Pseudolites in a Global Positioning System (GPS) Degraded Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    measurement and the resulting equation is presented 10 Figure 2.2: Double Difference GPS Measurement Scenario. as ∇∆ρAB1,2 = ∆ρA1,2 −∆ρB1,2 (2.9) = ρA1...among these three techniques is to use a pulsing scheme. This reduces the interference approxi- mately 10 dB [13] and allows the GPS receiver to track...the air density contributes roughly 90% of the delay, wet air density, which is much difficult to predict, accounts for only 10 % [3]. Typically, the

  20. Ionospheric total-electron-content estimation for single-frequency Global-positioning-system receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The ionosphere delays transmissions from the Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as those from other satellite systems. At the GPS frequencies (L-Band), this delay is directly proportional to the total ionospheric electron content (TEC) along the line-of-sight to the satellite. Classified receivers have access to 2 frequencies to allow them to measure this delay through the difference in the ionospheric effect at the 2 frequencies, but commercial, single-frequency receivers have had no direct method for estimating the ionospheric delay; they have had to rely on a TEC prediction. Two methods are described for single-frequency GPS receivers to estimate the ionospheric TEC directly. These methods take advantage of the dispersive nature of the ionosphere at L-Band frequencies, which causes a phase advance of the carrier that is opposite to the group delay of the GPS code and data.

  1. Single-frequency, dual-GNSS versus dual-frequency, single-GNSS: a low-cost and high-grade receivers GPS-BDS RTK analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odolinski, Robert; Teunissen, Peter J. G.

    2016-11-01

    The concept of single-frequency, dual-system (SF-DS) real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning has become feasible since, for instance, the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) has become operational in the Asia-Pacific region. The goal of the present contribution is to investigate the single-epoch RTK performance of such a dual-system and compare it to a dual-frequency, single-system (DF-SS). As the SF-DS we investigate the L1 GPS + B1 BDS model, and for DF-SS we take L1, L2 GPS and B1, B2 BDS, respectively. Two different locations in the Asia-Pacific region are analysed with varying visibility of the BDS constellation, namely Perth in Australia and Dunedin in New Zealand. To emphasize the benefits of such a model we also look into using low-cost ublox single-frequency receivers and compare such SF-DS RTK performance to that of a DF-SS, based on much more expensive survey-grade receivers. In this contribution a formal and empirical analysis is given. It will be shown that with the SF-DS higher elevation cut-off angles than the conventional 10° or 15° can be used. The experiment with low-cost receivers for the SF-DS reveals (for the first time) that it has the potential to achieve comparable ambiguity resolution performance to that of a DF-SS (L1, L2 GPS), based on the survey-grade receivers.

  2. A modified cadastral survey system based on GPS/PDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqing; Wang, Qing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2009-12-01

    Due to disadvantages of complex working procedure, long field survey and low efficiency of the traditional cadastral survey methods exist, a modified system based on GPS(Global Position System) /PDA(Personal Digital Assist) combined with TS(Total Station) is proposed. The system emphasizes the design of TS free setting station for detail survey without GPS, to realize simultaneously processing control survey and detail survey. The system also applies digital drafting method based on PDA instead of cartographical sketching, to realize fully-digitalized cadastral survey. The application in Beijing shows that the modified cadastral survey system based on GPS/PDA performs high efficiency, and the accuracy of this system can meet the requirement of 1:500 large scale cadastral survey.

  3. GPS aiding of ocean current determination. [Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohan, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    The navigational accuracy of an oceangoing vessel using conventional GPS p-code data is examined. The GPS signal is transmitted over two carrier frequencies in the L-band at 1575.42 and 1227.6 MHz. Achievable navigational uncertainties of differenced positional estimates are presented as a function of the parameters of the problem, with particular attention given to the effect of sea-state, user equivalent range error, uncompensated antenna motion, varying delay intervals, and reduced data rate examined in the unaided mode. The unmodeled errors resulting from satellite ephemeris uncertainties are shown to be negligible for the GPS-NDS (Navigation Development) satellites. Requirements are met in relatively calm seas, but accuracy degradation by a factor of at least 2 must be anticipated in heavier sea states. The aided mode of operation is examined, and it is shown that requirements can be met by using an inertial measurement unit (IMU) to aid the GPS receiver operation. Since the use of an IMU would mean higher costs, direct Doppler from the GPS satellites is presented as a viable alternative.

  4. Applications of a hand-held GPS receiver in South American rain forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baksh, Michael

    1991-01-01

    A hand-held Global Positioning System receiver was used to determine the precise locations of villages, houses, gardens, and other cultural and environmental features in poorly mapped South American rain forests. The Magellan NAV 1000 unit profides extremely accurate latitude and longitude information, but determination of altitude is problematical. Overall, the receiver effectively allows anthropologists to obtain essential locational data useful for categorizing land uses, mapping tribal boundaries, and other applications in regions where environmental conditions are harsh and/or accessibility is difficult.

  5. Error Analysis System for Spacecraft Navigation Using the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, S. H.; Hart, R. C.; Hartman, K. R.; Tomcsik, T. L.; Searl, J. E.; Bernstein, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is currently developing improved space-navigation filtering algorithms to use the Global Positioning System (GPS) for autonomous real-time onboard orbit determination. In connection with a GPS technology demonstration on the Small Satellite Technology Initiative (SSTI)/Lewis spacecraft, FDD analysts and programmers have teamed with the GSFC Guidance, Navigation, and Control Branch to develop the GPS Enhanced Orbit Determination Experiment (GEODE) system. The GEODE system consists of a Kalman filter operating as a navigation tool for estimating the position, velocity, and additional states required to accurately navigate the orbiting Lewis spacecraft by using astrodynamic modeling and GPS measurements from the receiver. A parallel effort at the FDD is the development of a GPS Error Analysis System (GEAS) that will be used to analyze and improve navigation filtering algorithms during development phases and during in-flight calibration. For GEAS, the Kalman filter theory is extended to estimate the errors in position, velocity, and other error states of interest. The estimation of errors in physical variables at regular intervals will allow the time, cause, and effect of navigation system weaknesses to be identified. In addition, by modeling a sufficient set of navigation system errors, a system failure that causes an observed error anomaly can be traced and accounted for. The GEAS software is formulated using Object Oriented Design (OOD) techniques implemented in the C++ programming language on a Sun SPARC workstation. The Phase 1 of this effort is the development of a basic system to be used to evaluate navigation algorithms implemented in the GEODE system. This paper presents the GEAS mathematical methodology, systems and operations concepts, and software design and implementation. Results from the use of the basic system to evaluate

  6. A GPS based fawn saving system using relative distance and angle determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascher, A.; Eberhardt, M.; Lehner, M.; Biebl, E.

    2016-09-01

    Active UHF RFID systems are often used for identifying, tracking and locating objects. In the present publication a GPS- based localization system for saving fawns during pasture mowing was introduced and tested. Fawns were first found by a UAV before mowing began. They were then tagged with small active RFID transponders, and an appropriate reader was installed on a mowing machine. Conventional direction-of-arrival approaches require a large antenna array with multiple elements and a corresponding coherent receiver, which introduces a large degree of complexity on the reader-side. Instead, our transponders were equipped with a small GPS module, allowing a transponder to determine its own position on request from the reader. A UHF link was used to transmit the location to a machine- mounted reader, where a second GPS receiver was installed. Using information from this second position and a machine- mounted magnetometer for determining the relative north direction of a vehicle, relative distance, and angle between GPS receivers can be calculated. The accuracy and reliability of this novel method were tested under realistic operating conditions, considering critical factors such as the height of grass, the lying position of a fawn, humidity and geographical area.

  7. Inter-system biases estimation in multi-GNSS relative positioning with GPS and Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deprez, Cecile; Warnant, Rene

    2016-04-01

    The recent increase in the number of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) opens new perspectives in the field of high precision positioning. Particularly, the European Galileo program has experienced major progress in 2015 with the launch of 6 satellites belonging to the new Full Operational Capability (FOC) generation. Associated with the ongoing GPS modernization, many more frequencies and satellites are now available. Therefore, multi-GNSS relative positioning based on GPS and Galileo overlapping frequencies should entail better accuracy and reliability in position estimations. However, the differences between satellite systems induce inter-system biases (ISBs) inside the multi-GNSS equations of observation. Once these biases estimated and removed from the model, a solution involving a unique pivot satellite for the two considered constellations can be obtained. Such an approach implies that the addition of even one single Galileo satellite to the GPS-only model will strengthen it. The combined use of L1 and L5 from GPS with E1 and E5a from Galileo in zero baseline double differences (ZB DD) based on a unique pivot satellite is employed to resolve ISBs. This model removes all the satellite- and receiver-dependant error sources by differentiating and the zero baseline configuration allows atmospheric and multipath effects elimination. An analysis of the long-term stability of ISBs is conducted on various pairs of receivers over large time spans. The possible influence of temperature variations inside the receivers over ISB values is also investigated. Our study is based on the 5 multi-GNSS receivers (2 Septentrio PolaRx4, 1 Septentrio PolaRxS and 2 Trimble NetR9) installed on the roof of our building in Liege. The estimated ISBs are then used as corrections in the multi-GNSS observation model and the resulting accuracy of multi-GNSS positioning is compared to GPS and Galileo standalone solutions.

  8. Three-Dimensional Geodetic Control by Interferometry with GPS (Global Positioning System): Processing of GPS Phase Observables.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-23

    8217 geodetic networks; three, dimensional geodesy, satellite geodesy, NAVSTAR Global Positioning System,’ GPS , interferometry 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse...8217 - - .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . -t INTRODUCTION GPS interferometry is a method by which three-dimensional relative-position vectors between observing stations can be

  9. Development of Soil Compaction Analysis Software (SCAN) Integrating a Low Cost GPS Receiver and Compactometer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jinsang; Yun, Hongsik; Kim, Juhyong; Suh, Yongcheol; Hong, Sungnam; Lee, Dongha

    2012-01-01

    A software for soil compaction analysis (SCAN) has been developed for evaluating the compaction states using the data from the GPS as well as a compactometer attached on the roller. The SCAN is distinguished from other previous software for intelligent compaction (IC) in that it can use the results from various types of GPS positioning methods, and it also has an optimal structure for remotely managing the large amounts of data gathered from numerous rollers. For this, several methods were developed: (1) improving the accuracy of low cost GPS receiver’s positioning results; (2) modeling the trajectory of a moving roller using a GPS receiver’s results and linking it with the data from the compactometer; and (3) extracting the information regarding the compaction states of the ground from the modeled trajectory, using spatial analysis methods. The SCAN was verified throughout various field compaction tests, and it has been confirmed that it can be a very effective tool in evaluating field compaction states. PMID:22736955

  10. GPS water level measurements for Indonesia's Tsunami Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, T.; Pandoe, W.; Mudita, I.; Roemer, S.; Illigner, J.; Zech, C.; Galas, R.

    2011-03-01

    On Boxing Day 2004, a severe tsunami was generated by a strong earthquake in Northern Sumatra causing a large number of casualties. At this time, neither an offshore buoy network was in place to measure tsunami waves, nor a system to disseminate tsunami warnings to local governmental entities. Since then, buoys have been developed by Indonesia and Germany, complemented by NOAA's Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) buoys, and have been moored offshore Sumatra and Java. The suite of sensors for offshore tsunami detection in Indonesia has been advanced by adding GPS technology for water level measurements. The usage of GPS buoys in tsunami warning systems is a relatively new approach. The concept of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) (Rudloff et al., 2009) combines GPS technology and ocean bottom pressure (OBP) measurements. Especially for near-field installations where the seismic noise may deteriorate the OBP data, GPS-derived sea level heights provide additional information. The GPS buoy technology is precise enough to detect medium to large tsunamis of amplitudes larger than 10 cm. The analysis presented here suggests that for about 68% of the time, tsunamis larger than 5 cm may be detectable.

  11. Investigation of GPS/IMU Positioning System for Mining Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Ken L. Stratton

    2006-09-13

    The objective of this project is to investigate the applicability of a combined Global Positioning System and Inertial Measurement Unit (GPS/IMU) for information based displays on earthmoving machines and for automated earthmoving machines in the future. This technology has the potential of allowing an information-based product like Caterpillar's Computer Aided Earthmoving System (CAES) to operate in areas with satellite shading. Satellite shading is an issue in open pit mining because machines are routinely required to operate close to high walls, which reduces significantly the amount of the visible sky to the GPS antenna mounted on the machine. An inertial measurement unit is a product, which provides data for the calculation of position based on sensing accelerations and rotation rates of the machine's rigid body. When this information is coupled with GPS it results in a positioning system that can maintain positioning capability during time periods of shading.

  12. Optimal Preprocessing Of GPS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sien-Chong; Melbourne, William G.

    1994-01-01

    Improved technique for preprocessing data from Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver reduces processing time and number of data to be stored. Technique optimal in sense it maintains strength of data. Also sometimes increases ability to resolve ambiguities in numbers of cycles of received GPS carrier signals.

  13. Time and frequency transfer system using GNSS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia-Lun; Huang, Shi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Shu

    2014-12-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) time and frequency transfer is one of the most useful ways for the comparison of remote clocks, and the comparison results are very important for the calculation of International Atomic Time and UTC (Coordinated Universal Time). For the timing laboratories, it is necessary to calibrate and periodically evaluate their time transfer system to ensure the accuracy and long-term stability of their time and frequency comparison results. Once the calibration is achieved, it can be used as a standard for traceable time and frequency measurements. In this paper, we demonstrate Global Navigation Satellite System receiver calibration campaign between the National Time and Frequency Standard Laboratory of Telecommunication Laboratories in Taiwan and the Measurement Standards Laboratory in New Zealand. Two calibration strategies, receiver calibration and the link calibration, are adopted in this work. The receiver calibration is used for evaluating the performance of the proposed system in domestic traceability network in Taiwan. The link calibration is used for minimizing the total uncertainty budget in calculating UTC. Experimental results indicate that the expanded time and frequency uncertainty of the proposed system (with a coverage factor of k = 2) are less than 25 ns and 1.1 × 10-13, respectively, after 1 day of averaging. The accuracy of GPS time link is reported to be better than 2 ns in long-baseline link (10,000 km) in Asia-Pacific Zone.

  14. Results of an Internet-Based Dual-Frequency Global Differential GPS System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muellerschoen, R.; Bertiger, W.; Lough, M.

    2000-01-01

    Observables from a global network of 18 GPS receivers are returned in real-time to JPL over the open Internet. 30 - 40 cm RSS global GPS orbits and precise dual-frequency GPS clocks are computed in real-time with JPL's Real Time Gipsy (RTG) software.

  15. Receiver System Analysis and Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    True Top-Down Design Methodology .................................. 5 Figure 4. Generic 16- QAM direct-conversion receiver...ADC 16- QAM decoder Figure 4. Generic 16- QAM direct-conversion receiver Complex digitally generated signals defy traditional spreadsheet...Intercept Point Three QAM Quadrature Amplitude Modulation SNR Signal-to-Noise Ratio USAF USR VCO United States Air Force Upsampling Ratio Voltage Controlled Oscillator

  16. Study on GPS attitude determination system aided INS using adaptive Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Hongwei; Jin, Zhihua; Tian, Weifeng

    2005-10-01

    A marine INS/GPS (inertial navigation system/global positioning system) adaptive navigation system is presented in this paper. The GPS with two antennae providing vessel attitude is selected as the auxiliary system to fuse with INS. The Kalman filter is the most frequently used algorithm in the integrated navigation system, which is capable of estimating INS errors online based on the measured errors between INS and GPS. The conventional Kalman filter (CKF) assumes that the statistics of the noise of each sensor are given. As long as the noise distributions do not change, the Kalman filter will give the optimal estimation. However, the GPS receiver will be disturbed easily and thus temporally changing measurement noise will join into the outputs of GPS, which will lead to performance degradation of the Kalman filter. Many researchers introduce a fuzzy logic control method into innovation-based adaptive estimation Kalman filtering (IAE-AKF) algorithm, and accordingly propose various adaptive Kalman filters. However, how to design the fuzzy logic controller is a very complicated problem, which is still without a convincing solution. A novel IAE-AKF is proposed herein, which is based on the maximum likelihood criterion for the proper computation of the filter innovation covariance and hence of the filter gain. The approach is direct and simple without having to establish fuzzy inference rules. After having deduced the proposed IAE-AKF algorithm theoretically in detail, the approach is tested in the developed INS/GPS integrated marine navigation system. Real field test results show that the adaptive Kalman filter outperforms the CKF with higher accuracy and robustness. It is demonstrated that this proposed approach is a valid solution for the unknown changing measurement noise existing in the Kalman filter.

  17. International GPS (Global Positioning System) Service for Geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumberge, J. F. (Editor); Liu, R. (Editor); Neilan, R. E. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The International GPS (Global Positioning System) Service for Geodynamics (IGS) began formal operation on January 1, 1994. This first annual report is divided into sections, which mirror different aspects of the service. Section (1) contains general information, including the history of the IGS, its organization, and the global network of GPS tracking sites; (2) contains information on the Central Bureau Information System; (3) describes the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS); (4) details collecting and distributing IGS data in Data Center reports; (6) describes how the IGS Analysis Centers generate their products; (7) contains miscellaneous contributions from other organizations that share common interests with the IGS.

  18. High accuracy autonomous navigation using the global positioning system (GPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Son H.; Hart, Roger C.; Shoan, Wendy C.; Wood, Terri; Long, Anne C.; Oza, Dipak H.; Lee, Taesul

    1997-01-01

    The application of global positioning system (GPS) technology to the improvement of the accuracy and economy of spacecraft navigation, is reported. High-accuracy autonomous navigation algorithms are currently being qualified in conjunction with the GPS attitude determination flyer (GADFLY) experiment for the small satellite technology initiative Lewis spacecraft. Preflight performance assessments indicated that these algorithms are able to provide a real time total position accuracy of better than 10 m and a velocity accuracy of better than 0.01 m/s, with selective availability at typical levels. It is expected that the position accuracy will be increased to 2 m if corrections are provided by the GPS wide area augmentation system.

  19. Towards the Implementation of GPS-based Tsunami Early Warning System Using Ionospheric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. M.; Komjathy, A.; Meng, X.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Mannucci, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Natural hazards and solid Earth events, such as earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions are actual sources that may trigger acoustic and gravity waves resulting in traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) in the upper atmosphere. Trans-ionospheric radio wave measurements sense the total electron content (TEC) along the signal propagation path. In this research, we introduce a novel GPS-based detection and estimation technique for remote sensing of atmospheric wave-induced TIDs including space weather phenomena induced by major natural hazard events, using TEC time series collected from worldwide ground-based dual-frequency GNSS receiver networks. We will demonstrate the ability of using ground-based dual-frequency GPS measures to detect and monitor tsunami wave propagations from previous great earthquake and tsunami events including: 2011 Tohoku and 2010 Chile earthquakes and tsunamis. Two major TIDs with different propagation speeds and wavelengths were identified through analysis of the GPS remote sensing observations. Dominant physical characteristics of atmospheric wave-induced TIDs are found to be associated with specific tsunami propagations and oceanic Rayleigh waves. We compared GPS-based observations, corresponding model simulations and other geophysical measurements. Our results lead to a better understanding of the tsunami-induced ionosphere responses. In addition, we investigate ionospheric signatures caused by the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake and tsunami using the GPS-based method. Based on current distribution of Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) GPS stations, the simulated results indicate that tsunami-induced TIDs may be detected about 60 minutes prior to tsunamis arriving at the US west coast. It is expected that this GPS-based technology becomes an integral part of future early-warning systems.

  20. Satellite emission radio interferometric earth surveying series - GPS geodetic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    A concept called SERIES (satellite emissions radio interferometric earth surveying) which makes use of GPS (global positioning system) radio transmissions without any satellite modifications, is described. Through the use of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and its calibration methods, 0.5 to 3 cm three dimensional baseline accuracy can be achieved over distances of 2 to 200 km respectively, with only 2 hours of on-site data acquisition. Attention is given to such areas as: the radio flux equivalent of GPS transmissions, synthesized delay precision, transmission and frequency subsystem requirements, tropospheric and ionospheric errors. Applications covered include geodesy and seismic tectonics.

  1. Design and implementation of a GPS-aided inertial navigation system for a helicopter UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastelan, David R.

    Helicopter unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) benefit from vertical takeoff and landing, hover, low-speed, and cruising flight capabilities. This versatility has the expense of nonlinear, unstable, and underactuated system dynamics. These challenges and numerous potential applications make the helicopter UAV an interesting testbed for nonlinear control. A platform for such development has been established in the Applied Nonlinear Controls Lab (ANCL). A miniature helicopter was augmented with a manual/autonomous takeover system and the ANCL Avionics. This payload contains a global positioning system (GPS) receiver, inertial sensors, and communications and computing hardware. Allan variance analysis of inertial sensor data enabled the derivation of a GPS-aided inertial navigation system that was implemented on the ANCL Avionics. This extended Kalman filter (EKF)-based algorithm estimates vehicle position, velocity, and attitude necessary for system identification tasks and control system feedback. Performance validation of this algorithm was demonstrated in simulation and in experimental ground and flight tests.

  2. Receiver DCB estimation and GPS vTEC study at a low latitude station in the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Ramendra; Kumar, Sushil; Jayachandran, P. T.

    2016-11-01

    The statistical estimation of receiver differential code bias (DCB) of the GSV4004B receiver at a low latitude station, Suva (lat. 18.15°S, long. 178.45°E, Geomag. Lat. 21.07°S), Fiji, and the subsequent behaviour of vTEC, are presented. By means of least squares linear regression fitting technique, the receiver DCB was determined using the GPS vTEC data recorded during the year 2010, CODE TEC and IRI-2012 model for 2010. To substantiate the results, minimization of the standard deviation (SD) method was also used for GPS vTEC data. The overall monthly DCB was estimated to be in the range of 62.6 TECU. The vTEC after removing the resultant monthly DCB was consistent with other low latitude observations. The GPS vTEC 2010 data after eliminating the resultant DCB were lower in comparison to Faraday rotation vTEC measurements at Suva during 1984 primarily due to higher solar activity during 1984 as compared to 2010. Seasonally, vTEC was maximum during summer and minimum during winter. The winter showed least vTEC variability whereas equinox showed the largest daytime variability. The geomagnetic disturbances effect showed that both vTEC and its variability were higher on magnetically disturbed days as compared to quiet days with maximum variability in the daytime. Two geomagnetic storms of moderate strengths with main phases in the local daytime showed long duration (∼52 h) increase in vTEC by 33-67% which can be accounted by changes in E×B drifts due to prompt penetration of storm-time auroral electric field in the daytime and disturbance dynamo electric field in the nighttime to low latitudes.

  3. A study of El Niño-Southern oscillation impacts to the South China Sea region using ground-based GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suparta, Wayan; Iskandar, Ahmad; Singh Jit Singh, Mandeep; Alauddin Mohd Ali, Mohd; Yatim, Baharudin; Tangang, Fredolin

    2013-04-01

    We observe an ENSO activity by using ground-based GPS receiver as an effort to study the effects of global warming and climate change in the tropical region. The precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from Global Positioning System (GPS) meteorology in line with the sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTa) is used to indicate their response on ENSO activities. The PWV data used in this study was taken from the station at Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu (UMSK) over 2011, together with NTUS station (in the Singapore), PIMO (in Philippines) and BAKO (in Indonesia) are also compared. The relationship between PWV and SSTa at all stations on weekly basis exhibited modest with correlation coefficients between -0.30 and -0.78 significantly at the 99% confidence level. The negative correlation indicates that during a La Niña phase, the PWV is increased when the sea surface temperatures getting cold causes warm air mass in the central Pacific moved to west Pacific. The increased of PWV causes the GPS signals will be getting slower.

  4. Inertial/GPS Integrated Geolocation System for Detection and Recovery of Buried Munitions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    magnetic and electro- magnetic detection devices. The principal geolocation system was assumed to be based on inertial measurement units (IMUs) integrated...receiver; 6) Trimble Zephyr Geodetic II GPS vii antenna ; 7) laptop computer, including PCMCI card connecting the !MUs and the decoding software...where the precision goals are 1 cm and 10 cm for three-dimensional positioning of magnetic and electro- magnetic detection devices. The principal

  5. 77 FR 13350 - Certain Automotive GPS Navigation Systems, Components Thereof, and Products Containing Same...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Automotive GPS Navigation Systems, Components Thereof, and Products Containing Same... importation of certain automotive GPS navigation systems, components thereof, and products containing the...

  6. Performance analysis of a GPS Interferometric attitude determination system for a gravity gradient stabilized spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, John C.

    1995-05-01

    The performance of an unaided attitude determination system based on GPS interferometry is examined using linear covariance analysis. The modelled system includes four GPS antennae onboard a gravity gradient stabilized spacecraft, specifically the Air Force's RADCAL satellite. The principal error sources are identified and modelled. The optimal system's sensitivities to these error sources are examined through an error budget and by varying system parameters. The effects of two satellite selection algorithms, Geometric and Attitude Dilution of Precision (GDOP and ADOP, respectively) are examined. The attitude performance of two optimal-suboptimal filters is also presented. Based on this analysis, the limiting factors in attitude accuracy are the knowledge of the relative antenna locations, the electrical path lengths from the antennae to the receiver, and the multipath environment. The performance of the system is found to be fairly insensitive to torque errors, orbital inclination, and the two satellite geometry figures-of-merit tested.

  7. Time Stability and Electrical Delay Comparison of Dual-Frequency GPS Receivers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    CNES proposed an evaluation and a calibration of three types of these time receivers, Ashtech Z12-T, Septentrio PolaRx2, and Dicom GTR50, in using...Septentrio PolaRx2, Dicom GTR50, or TTS03. The usual approach to evaluate or calibrate a receiver consists of working on natural reception, i.e. using a...characteristics. Seven receivers, two Ashtech Z12-T receivers, two Septentrio PolaRx2 receivers, and three Dicom GTR50 receivers were investigated

  8. A System to Produce Precise Global GPS Network Solutions for all Geodetic GPS Stations in the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C. W.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed an end-to-end system that automatically seeks and routinely retrieves geodetic GPS data from ~5000 stations (currently) around the globe, reduces the data into unique, daily global network solutions, and produces high precision time series for station coordinates ready for time-series analysis, geophysical modeling and interpretation. Moreover, “carrier range” data are produced for all stations, enabling epoch-by-epoch tracking of individual station motions by precise point positioning for investigation of sub-daily processes, such as post-seismic after-slip and ocean tidal loading. Solutions are computed in a global reference frame aligned to ITRF, and optionally in user-specified continental-scale reference frames that can filter out common-mode signals to enhance regional strain anomalies. We describe the elements of this system, the underlying signal processing theory, the products, operational statistics, and scientific applications of our system. The system is fundamentally based on precise point positioning using JPL's GIPSY OASIS II software, coupled with ambiguity resolution and a global network adjustment of ~300,000 parameters per day using our newly developed Ambizap3 software. The system is designed to easily and efficiently absorb stations that deliver data very late, by recycling prior computations in the network adjustment, such that the resulting network solution is identical to starting from scratch. Thus, it becomes possible to trawl continuously the Internet for late arriving data, or for newly discovered data, and seamlessly update all GPS station time series using the new information content. As new stations are added to the processing archive, automated e-mail requests are made to H.-G. Scherneck's server at Chalmers University to compute ocean loading coefficients used by the station motion model. Rinex file headers are parsed and compared with alias tables in order to infer the correct receiver type and antenna

  9. Detection of VHF lightning from GPS orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Satellite-based VHF' lightning detection is characterized at GPS orbit by using a VHF receiver system recently launched on the GPS SVN 54 satellite. Collected lightning triggers consist of Narrow Bipolar Events (80%) and strong negative return strokes (20%). The results are used to evaluate the performance of a future GPS-satellite-based VHF global lightning monitor.

  10. 76 FR 27744 - Eighty-Fifth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... 159 meeting: Global Positioning System (GPS). SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS). DATES: The meeting...), notice is hereby given for a Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS) meeting. The...

  11. 77 FR 56254 - 89th Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 89th Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS... Notice of RTCA Special Committee 159, RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS... Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS). DATES: The meeting will be held October 5,...

  12. Airborne Supplemental Navigation Equipment Using The Global Positioning System (GPS) Precise Positioning Service (PPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-30

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) Precise Positioning ...The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) Precise Positioning Service (PPS) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...EQUIPMENT USING THE GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM ( GPS ) / PRECISE POSITIONING SERVICE (PPS) DISTRIBUTION: SMC/CZ (3 cys); AFFSA; NAWCAD; ESC/GA; SPAWAR Code

  13. Airborne Supplemental Navigation Equipment Using the Global Positioning System (GPS)/Precise Positioning Service (PPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-13

    GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM ( GPS ) I PRECISE POSITIONING SERVICE (PPS) MSO RELEASE AUTHORIZED BY: ttl~ .. J ,M~·., Configurat!fJ...Equipment Using The Global Positioning System ( GPS )/ Precise Positioning Service (PPS) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...EQUIPMENT USING THE GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM ( GPS ) / PRECISE POSITIONING SERVICE (PPS) DISTRIBUTION: SMC/ GP (5

  14. Investigation and evaluation of shuttle/GPS navigation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsen, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    Iterative procedures were used to analyze the performance of two preliminary shuttle/GPS navigation system configurations: an early OFT experimental system and a more sophisticated system which consolidates several separate navigation functions thus permitting net cost savings from decreased shuttle avionics weight and power consumption, and from reduced ground data processing. The GPS system can provide on-orbit navigation accuracy an order of magnitude better than the baseline system, with very adequate link margins. The worst-case link margin is 4.3 dB. This link margin accounts for shuttle RF circuit losses which were minimized under the constraints of program schedule and environmental limitations. Implicit in the link analyses are the location trade-offs for preamplifiers and antennas.

  15. IRNSS/NavIC and GPS: a single- and dual-system L5 analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaminpardaz, S.; Teunissen, P. J. G.; Nadarajah, N.

    2017-02-01

    The Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS) has recently (May 2016) become fully operational. In this contribution, for the fully operational IRNSS as a stand-alone system and also in combination with GPS, we provide a first assessment of L5 integer ambiguity resolution and positioning performance. While our empirical analyses are based on the data collected by two JAVAD receivers at Curtin University, Perth, Australia, our formal analyses are carried out for various onshore locations within the IRNSS service area. We study the noise characteristics (carrier-to-noise density, measurement precision, time correlation), the integer ambiguity resolution performance (success rates and ambiguity dilution of precision), and the positioning performance (ambiguity float and ambiguity fixed). The results show that our empirical outcomes are consistent with their formal counterparts and that the GPS L5-data have a lower noise level than that of IRNSS L5-data, particularly in case of the code data. The underlying model in our assessments varies from stand-alone IRNSS (L5) to IRNSS + GPS (L5), from unconstrained to height-constrained and from kinematic to static. Significant improvements in ambiguity resolution and positioning performance are achievable upon integrating L5-data of IRNSS with GPS.

  16. System architecture study of an orbital GPS user terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. P.; Neily, C. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The generic RF and applications processing requirements for a GPS orbital navigator are considered. A line of demarcation between dedicated analog hardware, and software/processor implementation, maximizing the latter is discussed. A modular approach to R/PA design which permits several varieties of receiver to be constructed from basic components is described. It is a basic conclusion that software signal processing of the output of the baseband correlator is the best choice of transition from analog to digital signal processing. High performance sets requiring multiple channels are developed from a generic design by replicating the RF processing segment, and modifying the applications software to provide enhanced state propagation and estimation.

  17. The GPS Space Service Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F. H.; Moreau, M. C.; Dahle-Melsaether, M. E.; Petrofski, W. P.; Stanton, B. J.; Thomason, S.; Harris, G. A.; Sena, R. P.; Temple, L. Parker, III

    2006-01-01

    Prior to the advent of artificial satellites, the concept of navigating in space and the desire to understand and validate the laws of planetary and satellite motion dates back centuries. At the initiation of orbital flight in 1957, space navigation was dominated by inertial and groundbased tracking methods, underpinned by the laws of planetary motion. It was early in the 1980s that GPS was first explored as a system useful for refining the position, velocity, and timing (PVT) of other spacecraft equipped with GPS receivers. As a result, an entirely new GPS utility was developed beyond its original purpose of providing PVT services for land, maritime, and air applications. Spacecraft both above and below the GPS constellation now receive the GPS signals, including the signals that spill over the limb of the Earth. The use of radionavigation satellite services for space navigation in High Earth Orbits is in fact a capability unique to GPS. Support to GPS space applications is being studied and planned as an important improvement to GPS. This paper discusses the formalization of PVT services in space as part of an overall GPS improvement effort. It describes the GPS Space Service Volume (SSV) and compares it to the Terrestrial Service Volume (TSV). It also discusses SSV coverage with the current GPS constellation, coverage characteristics as a function of altitude, expected power levels, and coverage figures of merit.

  18. The Utility and Validity of Kinematic GPS Positioning for the Geosar Airborne Terrain Mapping Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Adam; Hensley, Scott; Chapin, Elaine; Kroger, Peter; Hussain, Mushtaq; Allred, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    GeoSAR is an airborne, interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) system for terrain mapping, currently under development by a consortium including NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., a California mapping sciences company, and the California Department of Conservation (CaIDOC), with funding provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Topographic Engineering Center (TEC) and the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). IFSAR data processing requires high-accuracy platform position and attitude knowledge. On 9 GeoSAR, these are provided by one or two Honeywell Embedded GPS Inertial Navigation Units (EGI) and an Ashtech Z12 GPS receiver. The EGIs provide real-time high-accuracy attitude and moderate-accuracy position data, while the Ashtech data, post-processed differentially with data from a nearby ground station using Ashtech PNAV software, provide high-accuracy differential GPS positions. These data are optimally combined using a Kalman filter within the GeoSAR motion measurement software, and the resultant position and orientation information are used to process the dual frequency (X-band and P-band) radar data to generate high-accuracy, high -resolution terrain imagery and digital elevation models (DEMs). GeoSAR requirements specify sub-meter level planimetric and vertical accuracies for the resultant DEMS. To achieve this, platform positioning errors well below one meter are needed. The goal of GeoSAR is to obtain 25 cm or better 3-D positions from the GPS systems on board the aircraft. By imaging a set of known point target corner-cube reflectors, the GeoSAR system can be calibrated. This calibration process yields the true position of the aircraft with an uncertainty of 20- 50 cm. This process thus allows an independent assessment of the accuracy of our GPS-based positioning systems. We will present an overview of the GeoSAR motion measurement system, focusing on the use of GPS and the blending of position data from the

  19. The International GPS Service (IGS) as a Continuous Reference System for Precise GPS Positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilan, Ruth; Heflin, Michael; Watkins, Michael; Zumberge, James

    1996-01-01

    The International GPS Service for Geodynamics (IGS) is an organization which operates under the auspices of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and has been operational since January 1994. The primary objective of the IGS is to provide precise GPS data and data products to support geodetic and geophysical research activities.

  20. A GPS-based Real-time Road Traffic Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanti, Kamal Kumar

    In recent years, monitoring systems are astonishingly inclined towards ever more automatic; reliably interconnected, distributed and autonomous operation. Specifically, the measurement, logging, data processing and interpretation activities may be carried out by separate units at different locations in near real-time. The recent evolution of mobile communication devices and communication technologies has fostered a growing interest in the GIS & GPS-based location-aware systems and services. This paper describes a real-time road traffic monitoring system based on integrated mobile field devices (GPS/GSM/IOs) working in tandem with advanced GIS-based application software providing on-the-fly authentications for real-time monitoring and security enhancement. The described system is developed as a fully automated, continuous, real-time monitoring system that employs GPS sensors and Ethernet and/or serial port communication techniques are used to transfer data between GPS receivers at target points and a central processing computer. The data can be processed locally or remotely based on the requirements of client’s satisfaction. Due to the modular architecture of the system, other sensor types may be supported with minimal effort. Data on the distributed network & measurements are transmitted via cellular SIM cards to a Control Unit, which provides for post-processing and network management. The Control Unit may be remotely accessed via an Internet connection. The new system will not only provide more consistent data about the road traffic conditions but also will provide methods for integrating with other Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). For communication between the mobile device and central monitoring service GSM technology is used. The resulting system is characterized by autonomy, reliability and a high degree of automation.

  1. Novel closed-loop approaches for precise relative navigation of widely separated GPS receivers in LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancredi, U.; Renga, A.; Grassi, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the relative navigation of a formation of two spacecrafts separated by hundreds of kilometers based on processing dual-frequency differential carrier-phase GPS measurements. Specific requirements of the considered application are high relative positioning accuracy and real-time on board implementation. These can be conflicting requirements. Indeed, if on one hand high accuracy can be achieved by exploiting the integer nature of double-difference carrier-phase ambiguities, on the other hand the presence of large ephemeris errors and differential ionospheric delays makes the integer ambiguities determination challenging. Closed-loop schemes, which update the relative position estimates of a dynamic filter with feedback from integer ambiguities fixing algorithms, are customarily employed in these cases. This paper further elaborates such approaches, proposing novel closed loop techniques aimed at overcoming some of the limitations of traditional algorithms. They extend techniques developed for spaceborne long baseline relative positioning by making use of an on-the-fly ambiguity resolution technique especially developed for the applications of interest. Such techniques blend together ionospheric delay compensation techniques, nonlinear models of relative spacecraft dynamics, and partial integer validation techniques. The approaches are validated using flight data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Performance is compared to that of the traditional closed-loop scheme analyzing the capability of each scheme to maximize the percentage of correctly fixed integer ambiguities as well as the relative positioning accuracy. Results show that the proposed approach substantially improves performance of the traditional approaches. More specifically, centimeter-level root-mean square relative positioning is feasible for spacecraft separations of more than 260 km, and an integer ambiguity fixing performance as high as 98% is

  2. Integration of the B-52G Offensive Avionics System (OAS) with the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, A. L.; Pluntze, S. C.

    Integration of the B-52G OAS with the GPS has been accomplished by modification of existing OAS software. GPS derived position and velocity data are used to enhance the quality of the OAS inertial and dead reckoning navigation systems. The engineering design and the software development process used to implement this design are presented.

  3. Accuracy of a low-cost global positioning system receiver for estimating grade during outdoor walking.

    PubMed

    de Müllenheim, Pierre-Yves; Chaudru, Ségolène; Gernigon, Marie; Mahé, Guillaume; Bickert, Sandrine; Prioux, Jacques; Noury-Desvaux, Bénédicte; Le Faucheur, Alexis

    2016-09-21

    The aim of this study was to assess, for the first time, the accuracy of a low-cost global positioning system (GPS) receiver for estimating grade during outdoor walking. Thirty subjects completed outdoor walks (2.0, 3.5 and 5.0 km · h(-1)) in three randomized conditions: 1/level walking on a 0.0% grade; 2/graded (uphill and downhill) walking on a 3.4% grade; and 3/on a 10.4% grade. Subjects were equipped with a GPS receiver (DG100, GlobalSat Technology Corp., Taiwan; ~US$75). The GPS receiver was set to record at 1 Hz and its antenna was placed on the right shoulder. Grade was calculated from GPS speed and altitude data (grade  =  altitude variation/travelled distance  ×  100). Two methods were used for the grade calculation: one using uncorrected altitude data given by the GPS receiver and another one using corrected altitude data obtained using map projection software (CartoExploreur, version 3.11.0, build 2.6.6.22, Bayo Ltd, Appoigny, France, ~US$35). Linear regression of GPS-estimated versus actual grade with R (2) coefficients, bias with 95% limits of agreement (±95% LoA), and typical error of the estimate with 95% confidence interval (TEE (95% CI)) were computed to assess the accuracy of the GPS receiver. 444 walking periods were performed. Using uncorrected altitude data, we obtained: R (2)  =  0.88 (p  <  0.001), bias  =  0.0  ±  6.6%, TEE between 1.9 (1.7-2.2)% and 4.2 (3.6-4.9)% according to the grade level. Using corrected altitude data, we obtained: R (2)  =  0.98 (p  <  0.001), bias  =  0.2  ±  1.9%, TEE between 0.2 (0.2-0.3)% and 1.0 (0.9-1.2)% according to the grade level. The low-cost GPS receiver used was weakly accurate for estimating grade during outdoor walking when using uncorrected altitude data. However, the accuracy was greatly improved when using corrected altitude data. This study supports the potential interest of using GPS for estimating energy

  4. Development of a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami, sea waves, ocean bottom crustal deformation and atmospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Teruyuki; Terada, Yukihiro; Nagai, Toshihiko; Koshimura, Shun'ichi

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami for over 12 years. The idea was that a buoy equipped with a GPS antenna and placed offshore may be an effective way of monitoring tsunami before its arrival to the coast and to give warning to the coastal residents. The key technology for the system is real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS technology. We have successfully developed the system; we have detected tsunamis of about 10cm in height for three large earthquakes, namely, the 23 June 2001 Peru earthquake (Mw8.4), the 26 September 2003 Tokachi earthquake (Mw8.3) and the 5 September 2004 earthquake (Mw7.4). The developed GPS buoy system is also capable of monitoring sea waves that are mainly caused by winds. Only the difference between tsunami and sea waves is their frequency range and can be segregated each other by a simple filtering technique. Given the success of GPS buoy experiments, the system has been adopted as a part of the Nationwide Ocean Wave information system for Port and HArborS (NOWPHAS) by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism of Japan. They have established more than eight GPS buoys along the Japanese coasts and the system has been operated by the Port and Airport Research Institute. As a future scope, we are now planning to implement some other additional facilities for the GPS buoy system. The first application is a so-called GPS/Acoustic system for monitoring ocean bottom crustal deformation. The system requires acoustic waves to detect ocean bottom reference position, which is the geometrical center of an array of transponders, by measuring distances between a position at the sea surface (vessel) and ocean bottom equipments to return the received sonic wave. The position of the vessel is measured using GPS. The system was first proposed by a research group at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in early 1980's. The system was extensively developed by Japanese researchers and is now capable of detecting ocean

  5. Remote Clock Calibration Via GPS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    cesium clocks and a Global Positioning System ( GPS ) receiver. The f i rs t purpose was t o ca l ibra te t h e propagation delays and timing... positions in t h e vicinity of each t r ansmi t t e r could be obtained f rom survey markers in the a r e a or determined by t h e GPS receiver a...t any desired location. While t h e GPS receiver was used to obtain positions f o r t h e LORAN par t of t h e experiment, i t was also

  6. Multi buoy system observation for GPS/A seafloor positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukaiyama, H.; Ikuta, R.; Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Watanabe, T.; Chiba, H.; Sayanagi, K.

    2014-12-01

    We are developing a method for observation of seafloor crustal deformation using kinematic GPS and acoustic ranging system. The system measures seafloor crustal deformation by determining position of benchmarks on the seafloor using a vessel which link-up GPS and acoustic signals. Acoustic ranging is used to measure distance between the vessel and the seafloor benchmarks. And kinematic GPS is used to locate the moving vessel every 0.2 seconds. Now we have deployed 4 seafloor benchmark units at Suruga Bay and 4 units at Kumano Basin both off-pacific coast Japan. At each survey site, three seafloor transponders are settled to define a benchmark unit. In this system, each measurement takes about ten hours and both sound speed structure and the benchmark unit positions were determined simultaneously for the each measurement using a tomographic technique. This tomographic technique was adopted based on assumption that the sound speed structure is horizontally layered and changes only in time, not in space. However, when sound speed structure has a heterogeneity, the assumption of a horizontal layering causes systematic error in the determination of seafloor benchmarks(Ikuta et al 2009AGU). So we are developing a new system using multi-buoy. Multi-buoy plays the role of vessel. Conducting observation using the buoys, we can estimate spatial variation of sound speed structures as a sloped structure every moment. With the single vessel system, we solve a kind of average sound speed over the different paths to the three seafloor transponders. Using the multi-buoy system, they can detect the lateral variation as difference of the average sound speeds obtained by different buoys, which improve the accuracy of the benchmark locations. In November 2013, Observation of seafloor crustal deformation using the buoys was held in Suruga Bay. In this study, we report the result of estimations of heterogeneous sound speed structures.

  7. Receiver System: Lessons Learned From Solar Two

    SciTech Connect

    LITWIN, ROBERT Z.; PACHECO, JAMES E.

    2002-03-01

    The Boeing Company fabricated the Solar Two receiver as a subcontractor for the Solar Two project. The receiver absorbed sunlight reflected from the heliostat field. A molten-nitrate-salt heat transfer fluid was pumped from a storage tank at grade level, heated from 290 to 565 C by the receiver mounted on top of a tower, then flowed back down into another storage tank. To make electricity, the hot salt was pumped through a steam generator to produce steam that powered a conventional Rankine steam turbine/generator. This evaluation identifies the most significant Solar Two receiver system lessons learned from the Mechanical Design, Instrumentation and Control, Panel Fabrication, Site Construction, Receiver System Operation, and Management from the perspective of the receiver designer/manufacturer. The lessons learned on the receiver system described here consist of two parts: the Problem and one or more identified Solutions. The appendix summarizes an inspection of the advanced receiver panel developed by Boeing that was installed and operated in the Solar Two receiver.

  8. Receiver System: Lessons Learned from Solar Two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, R. Z.

    2002-03-01

    The Boeing Company fabricated the Solar Two receiver as a subcontractor for the Solar Two project. The receiver absorbed sunlight reflected from the heliostat field. A molten-nitrate-salt heat transfer fluid was pumped from a storage tank at grade level, heated from 290 to 565DGC by the receiver mounted on top of a tower, then flowed back down into another storage tank. To make electricity, the hot salt was pumped through a steam generator to produce steam that powered a conventional Rankine steam turbine/generator. This evaluation identifies the most significant Solar Two receiver system lessons learned from the Mechanical Design, Instrumentation and Control, Panel Fabrication, Site Construction, Receiver System Operation, and Management from the perspective of the receiver designer/manufacturer. The lessons learned on the receiver system described here consist of two parts: the Problem and one or more identified Solutions. The appendix summarizes an inspection of the advanced receiver panel developed by Boeing that was installed and operated in the Solar Two receiver.

  9. A Micromechanical INS/GPS System for Small Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbour, N.; Brand, T.; Haley, R.; Socha, M.; Stoll, J.; Ward, P.; Weinberg, M.

    1995-01-01

    The cost and complexity of large satellite space missions continue to escalate. To reduce costs, more attention is being directed toward small lightweight satellites where future demand is expected to grow dramatically. Specifically, micromechanical inertial systems and microstrip global positioning system (GPS) antennas incorporating flip-chip bonding, application specific integrated circuits (ASIC) and MCM technologies will be required. Traditional microsatellite pointing systems do not employ active control. Many systems allow the satellite to point coarsely using gravity gradient, then attempt to maintain the image on the focal plane with fast-steering mirrors. Draper's approach is to actively control the line of sight pointing by utilizing on-board attitude determination with micromechanical inertial sensors and reaction wheel control actuators. Draper has developed commercial and tactical-grade micromechanical inertial sensors, The small size, low weight, and low cost of these gyroscopes and accelerometers enable systems previously impractical because of size and cost. Evolving micromechanical inertial sensors can be applied to closed-loop, active control of small satellites for micro-radian precision-pointing missions. An inertial reference feedback control loop can be used to determine attitude and line of sight jitter to provide error information to the controller for correction. At low frequencies, the error signal is provided by GPS. At higher frequencies, feedback is provided by the micromechanical gyros. This blending of sensors provides wide-band sensing from dc to operational frequencies. First order simulation has shown that the performance of existing micromechanical gyros, with integrated GPS, is feasible for a pointing mission of 10 micro-radians of jitter stability and approximately 1 milli-radian absolute error, for a satellite with 1 meter antenna separation. Improved performance micromechanical sensors currently under development will be

  10. Optimization of Passive Coherent Receiver System Placement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    the transmitter location. The difference between mono and bistatic radars is depicted in Figure 1. This change in antenna placement can help negate...requirements of traditional mono -static radar systems. Although there are benefits associated with the use of these NMR systems, additional challenges arise...applications of mono -static radar systems since the received signal is expected to return to the receiver from the same direction the originating signal

  11. Directional Receiver for Biomimetic Sonar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarato, Francesco; Andrews, Heather; Windmill, James F.; Jackson, Joseph; Gachagan, Anthony

    An ultrasonic localization method for a sonar system equipped with an emitter and two directional receivers and inspired by bat echolocation uses knowledge of the beam pattern of the receivers to estimate target orientation. Rousettus leschenaultii's left ear constitutes the model for the design of the optimal receiver for this sonar system and 3D printing was used to fabricate receiver structures comprising of two truncated cones with an elliptical external perimeter and a parabolic flare rate in the upper part. Measurements show one receiver has a predominant lobe in the same region and with similar attenuation values as the bat ear model. The final sonar system is to be mounted on vehicular and aerial robots which require remote control for motion and sensors for estimation of each robot's location.

  12. The QuakeSim System for GPS Time Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granat, R. A.; Gao, X.; Pierce, M.; Wang, J.

    2010-12-01

    We present a system for analysis of GPS time series data available to geosciences users through a web services / web portal interface. The system provides two time series analysis methods, one based on hidden Markov model (HMM) segmentation, the other based on covariance descriptor analysis (CDA). In addition, it provides data pre-processing routines that perform spike noise removal, linear de-trending, sum-of-sines removal, and common mode removal using probabilistic principle components analysis (PPCA). These components can be composed by the user into the desired series of processing steps for analysis through an intuitive graphical interface. The system is accessed through a web portal that allows both micro-scale (individual station) and macro-scale (whole network) exploration of data sets and analysis results via Google Maps. Users can focus in on or scroll through particular spatial or temporal time windows, or observe dynamic behavior by created movies that display the system state. Analysis results can be exported to KML format for easy combination with other sources of data, such as fault databases and InSAR interferograms. GPS solutions for California member stations of the plate boundary observatory from both the SOPAC and JPL gipsy context groups are automatically imported into the system as that data becomes available. We show the results of the methods as applied to these data sets for an assortment of case studies, and show how the system can be used to analyze both seismic and aseismic signals.

  13. GPS Synchronized Disciplined Rubidium Frequency Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    GPS SYNCHRONIZED DISCIPLINED RUBIDIUM FREQUENCY STANDARD D. Earl Fossler TRAK Systems Div. of TRAK Microwave Tampa, Florida Abstract A...disciplined rubidium freqllency standard steered by the corrected 1 PPS output from a GPS timing receiver or other stable 1 PPS source can provide a low...used for many timing applications, disciplined rubidium frcqucncy standards arc rtot, in wide use. GPS timing receivers have bcen used for several

  14. Differential NAVSTAR GPS (Global Positioning System) Design Concept for Harbor/Harbor Entrance Marine Navigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    AD-A141 665 DIFFERENTIAL NAYSTAR GPS ( GLOBAL POSIT [ONING SYSTEM ) / DESIGN CONCEPT FOR H..(U) TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS CENTER 7 ’ CAMBRIDGE MA J VILCANS...5-3 viii 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 BACKGROUND The NAVSTAR Global Positioning System ( GPS ) is a satellite... system which will provide global continuous navigation and position location service when it becomes operational. The NAVSTAR GPS program has been in

  15. A precise GPS-based time and frequency system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnabb, Jack; Fossler, Earl

    1993-01-01

    An approach to implementing a compact, highly reliable and precise Master Time and Frequency subsystem usable in a variety of applications is described. These applications include, among others, Satellite Ground Terminals, Range Timing Stations, Communications Terminals, and Power Station Timing subsystems. All time and frequency output signals are locked to Universal Time via the GPS Satellite system. The system provides for continued output of precise signals in the event of GPS signal interruption from antenna or lead-in breakage or other causes. Cost/performance tradeoffs affecting system accuracy over the short, medium, and long term are discussed. A unique approach to redundant system design provides an architecture with the reliability advantage of triple-redundant majority voting and the cost advantages of dual-redundant elements. The system can be configured to output a variety of precise time and frequency signals and the design can be tailored to output as few, or as many, types and quantities of signals as are required by the application.

  16. A Low Cost Automated Monitoring System for Landslides Using Dual Frequency GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, H.; Edwards, S.

    2006-12-01

    Landslides are an existing and permanent threat to societies across the globe, generating financial and human losses whenever and wherever they occur. Drawing together the strands of science that provide increased understanding of landslide triggers through accurate modelling is therefore vital for the development of mitigation and management strategies. Together with climatic and geomorphological data a key input here is information on the precise location and timing of landslide events. However, the detailed monitoring of landslides and precursor movements is generally limited to episodic campaigns where limiting factors include equipment and mobilisation costs, time constraints and spatial resolution. This research has developed a geodetic tool of benefit to scientists involved in the development of closely coupled models that seek to explain trigger mechanisms such as rainfall duration and intensity and changes in groundwater pressure to actual real land movements. A fully automated low cost dual frequency GPS station for the continuous in-situ monitoring of landslide sites has been developed. System configuration combines a dual frequency GPS receiver, PC board with a GPRS modem and power supply to deliver 24hr/365day operation capability. Individual components have been chosen to provide the highest accuracies while minimising power consumption resulting in a system around half that of equivalent commercial systems. Measurement point-costs can be further reduced through the use of antenna switching and multi antenna arrays. Continuous data is delivered via mobile phone uplink and processed automatically using geodetic software. The developed system has been extensively tested on a purpose built platform capable of simulating ground movements. Co-mounted antennas have allowed direct comparisons with more expensive geodetic GPS receivers. The system is capable of delivering precise 3D coordinates with a 9 mm rms. The system can be up-scaled resulting in the

  17. Precise GPS orbits for geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has become, in recent years, the main space-based system for surveying and navigation in many military, commercial, cadastral, mapping, and scientific applications. Better receivers, interferometric techniques (DGPS), and advances in post-processing methods have made possible to position fixed or moving receivers with sub-decimeter accuracies in a global reference frame. Improved methods for obtaining the orbits of the GPS satellites have played a major role in these achievements; this paper gives a personal view of the main developments in GPS orbit determination.

  18. GPS - A PostScript-Like Language for System Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Configuration Windows The mods stack class generally has a config function which when called will generate a configuration file and thca pop open a NeWS window...AD-A234 253 AL-TR-90-085 AD: Final Report GPS - A PostScript-like Language for the period for System Simulation-March 1990 to October 1990 January...1991 Author: Argonne National Laboratory H.K. Geyer 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60437-4841 A PP, 0 ’iiAP. O 199A1 ,.. : Approved for Public

  19. Evaluation of a Mobile Phone for Aircraft GPS Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of spurious emissions from a mobile phone are conducted in a reverberation chamber for the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio frequency band. This phone model was previously determined to have caused interference to several aircraft GPS receivers. Interference path loss (IPL) factors are applied to the emission data, and the outcome compared against GPS receiver susceptibility. The resulting negative safety margins indicate there are risks to aircraft GPS systems. The maximum emission level from the phone is also shown to be comparable with some laptop computer's emissions, implying that laptop computers can provide similar risks to aircraft GPS receivers.

  20. A Canadian Pilot Project for a GPS-Augmented Tsunami Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragert, H.; Schmidt, M.; Wang, K.; Bock, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Whether a tsunami has been generated from a large earthquake immediately offshore cannot be determined within a crucial time window from seismic or tide gauge data alone. Geological and geodetic data show that coseismic motions of the Earth's surface even hundreds of kilometers from the fault can be used to determine the nature of the rupture and whether the earthquake is tsunamigenic. High-rate (1 sps or greater), totally autonomous GPS stations located along the coast can provide on-line streamed data that can be analyzed in real time to provide an update of relative positions to an accuracy of 1-2 cm horizontally and 3-5 cm vertically with a latency of a few seconds. Regional ground displacements along the coast at the time of a major offshore earthquake could therefore point to the certainty of a tsunami within less than a minute. The Geological Survey of Canada is currently setting up a prototype network to facilitate real-time positioning along the coast of the Canadian segment of the Cascadia subduction zone. The aim is to evaluate the realizability and effectiveness of automatically determining major vertical and horizontal motion at coastal versus inland GPS stations that would unambiguously and rapidly indicate tsunami generation. A network of GPS receivers purchased by the Canadian Hydrographic Service is currently being deployed at geodetic quality installations with continuous on-line communications. As part of this system, we are implementing real-time GPS technology previously applied to seismic (Bock et al., 2004; Langbein and Bock, 2004; Yamagiwa et al., 2004) and volcanic (Mattia et al., 2004) monitoring applications. The target date to have a prototype system operating is December 2005. It is hoped that this relatively low cost technique can become a mainstream tool of tsunami warning systems worldwide.

  1. Spaceborne GPS Current Status and Future Visions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Hartman, Kate; Lightsey, E. Glenn

    1998-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS), developed by the Department of Defense, is quickly revolutionizing the architecture of future spacecraft and spacecraft systems. Significant savings in spacecraft life cycle cost, in power, and in mass can be realized by exploiting Global Positioning System (GPS) technology in spaceborne vehicles. These savings are realized because GPS is a systems sensor-it combines the ability to sense space vehicle trajectory, attitude, time, and relative ranging between vehicles into one package. As a result, a reduced spacecraft sensor complement can be employed on spacecraft and significant reductions in space vehicle operations cost can be realized through enhanced on- board autonomy. This paper provides an overview of the current status of spaceborne GPS, a description of spaceborne GPS receivers available now and in the near future, a description of the 1997-1999 GPS flight experiments and the spaceborne GPS team's vision for the future.

  2. On Fast Post-Processing of Global Positioning System Simulator Truth Data and Receiver Measurements and Solutions Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Post-processing of data, related to a GPS receiver test in a GPS simulator and test facility, is an important step towards qualifying a receiver for space flight. Although the GPS simulator provides all the parameters needed to analyze a simulation, as well as excellent analysis tools on the simulator workstation, post-processing is not a GPS simulator or receiver function alone, and it must be planned as a separate pre-flight test program requirement. A GPS simulator is a critical resource, and it is desirable to move off the pertinent test data from the simulator as soon as a test is completed. The receiver and simulator databases are used to extract the test data files for postprocessing. These files are then usually moved from the simulator and receiver systems to a personal computer (PC) platform, where post-processing is done typically using PC-based commercial software languages and tools. Because of commercial software systems generality their functions are notoriously slow and more than often are the bottleneck even for short duration simulator-based tests. There is a need to do post-processing faster and within an hour after test completion, including all required operations on the simulator and receiver to prepare and move off the post-processing files. This is especially significant in order to use the previous test feedback for the next simulation setup or to run near back-to-back simulation scenarios. Solving the post-processing timing problem is critical for a pre-flight test program success. Towards this goal an approach was developed that allows to speed-up post-processing by an order of a magnitude. It is based on improving the post-processing bottleneck function algorithm using a priory information that is specific to a GPS simulation application and using only the necessary volume of truth data. The presented postprocessing scheme was used in support of a few successful space flight missions carrying GPS receivers.

  3. Altimetry Using GPS-Reflection/Occultation Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardellach, Estel; DeLaTorre, Manuel; Hajj, George A.; Ao, Chi

    2008-01-01

    A Global Positioning System (GPS)- reflection/occultation interferometry was examined as a means of altimetry of water and ice surfaces in polar regions. In GPS-reflection/occultation interferometry, a GPS receiver aboard a satellite in a low orbit around the Earth is used to determine the temporally varying carrier- phase delay between (1) one component of a signal from a GPS transmitter propagating directly through the atmosphere just as the GPS transmitter falls below the horizon and (2) another component of the same signal, propagating along a slightly different path, reflected at glancing incidence upon the water or ice surface.

  4. 77 FR 12106 - 88th Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 88th Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning System (GPS... RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning System (GPS). SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of the 88th meeting of RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning System...

  5. 76 FR 50808 - Airborne Supplemental Navigation Equipment Using the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... standard for GPS sensors not augmented by satellite-based or ground- based systems (i.e., TSO-C129a Class B and Class C). The FAA has also published two GPS TSOs augmented by the satellite-based augmentation system (TSO-C145c, Airborne Navigation Sensors Using the Global Positioning System Augmented by...

  6. 78 FR 68861 - Certain Navigation Products, Including GPS Devices, Navigation and Display Systems, Radar Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ..., Navigational Aids, Mapping Systems and Related Software; Institution of Investigation Pursuant to 19 U.S.C... and display systems, radar systems, navigational aids, mapping systems and related software by reason... products, including GPS devices, navigation and display systems, radar systems, navigational aids,...

  7. Spaceborne GPS: Current Status and Future Visions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Hartman, Kate; Lightsey, E. Glenn

    1998-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS), developed by the Department of Defense is quickly revolutionizing the architecture of future spacecraft and spacecraft systems. Significant savings in spacecraft life cycle cost, in power, and in mass can be realized by exploiting GPS technology in spaceborne vehicles. These savings are realized because GPS is a systems sensor--it combines the ability to sense space vehicle trajectory, attitude, time, and relative ranging between vehicles into one package. As a result, a reduced spacecraft sensor complement can be employed and significant reductions in space vehicle operations cost can be realized through enhanced on-board autonomy. This paper provides an overview of the current status of spaceborne GPS, a description of spaceborne GPS receivers available now and in the near future, a description of the 1997-2000 GPS flight experiments, and the spaceborne GPS team's vision for the future.

  8. TOPEX orbit determination using GPS signals plus a sidetone ranging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, P. L.; Larden, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The GPS orbit determination was studied to see how well the radial coordinate for altimeter satellites such as TOPEX could be found by on board measurements of GPS signals, including the reconstructed carrier phase. The inclusion on altimeter satellites of an additional high accuracy tracking system is recommended. It is suggested that a sidetone ranging system is used in conjunction with TRANET 2 beacons.

  9. The magnitude and direction movement in Thailand based on Global Positioning System (GPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamrus, Uthen; Deng, Hui

    2016-10-01

    In this research, we applied the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) with Global Positioning System (GPS) to create new geodetic network, which is referred to ITRF2000. GPS observation data in 2010 and 2012 were used for network adjustment by Least Square Method (Minimally Constrained Adjustment and Fully Constrained Adjustment), then adjusted coordinates were used to determine updated magnitude and direction.

  10. Field testing a global positioning system (GPS) collar on a Japanese monkey: reliability of automatic GPS positioning in a Japanese forest.

    PubMed

    Sprague, David S; Kabaya, Hajime; Hagihara, Ko

    2004-04-01

    A global positioning system (GPS) collar recorded the locations of an adult female Japanese macaque over a 9-day period in a habitat with mixed suburban and rural land-uses in Chiba Prefecture, Japan. The GPS device acquired positions even in forested areas. The GPS data located the female mostly in forested areas, although the female had ranged through a habitat with inter-mingled fields, orchards, quarries, and residential areas. However, the GPS position acquisition rate was low compared to studies carried out on North American mammals. The GPS fixed a position in 20% of positioning attempts. When the collared female was tracked by radio-telemetry, almost all failures of the GPS to fix a position occurred in forest.

  11. GPS Status and Modernization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-10

    11 GPS IIA • 12 GPS IIR • 7 GPS IIR-M • 4 additional satellites in residual status • 1 additional IIR-M waiting to be set healthy • Global GPS ...AEP) Next Generation Control Segment (OCX) Legacy Control System 7 GPS Modernization – Ground • Architecture Evolution Plan (AEP) • Transitioned in 2007...Modern distributed system replaced 1970’s mainframes • Increased capacity for monitoring of GPS signals • Increased worldwide commanding

  12. Alternative Timing Networks with GPS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    receiving stations has been investigated. The xnethods of llsirlg tht: Global P~s i t~ iun- ing System ( GPS ) for transferring time in previolis work has...planes established by the positions of the other stations used to range to six SV’s. Tn this coordinate system the number of observations (24) will...ALTERNATIVE TIMING NETWORKS WITH GPS G.P. Landis, S. Stebbins, and ILL. Heard Naval ltesearch Laboratory Washington, D.C. and H.F. Pliegel The

  13. Development of a Fully Automated, GPS Based Monitoring System for Disaster Prevention and Emergency Preparedness: PPMS+RT

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Jason; Kim, Don; Chrzanowski, Adam; Szostak-Chrzanowski, Anna

    2007-01-01

    The increasing number of structural collapses, slope failures and other natural disasters has lead to a demand for new sensors, sensor integration techniques and data processing strategies for deformation monitoring systems. In order to meet extraordinary accuracy requirements for displacement detection in recent deformation monitoring projects, research has been devoted to integrating Global Positioning System (GPS) as a monitoring sensor. Although GPS has been used for monitoring purposes worldwide, certain environments pose challenges where conventional processing techniques cannot provide the required accuracy with sufficient update frequency. Described is the development of a fully automated, continuous, real-time monitoring system that employs GPS sensors and pseudolite technology to meet these requirements in such environments. Ethernet and/or serial port communication techniques are used to transfer data between GPS receivers at target points and a central processing computer. The data can be processed locally or remotely based upon client needs. A test was conducted that illustrated a 10 mm displacement was remotely detected at a target point using the designed system. This information could then be used to signal an alarm if conditions are deemed to be unsafe.

  14. A Tightly-Coupled GPS/INS/UWB Cooperative Positioning Sensors System Supported by V2I Communication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Gao, Yang; Li, Zengke; Meng, Xiaolin; Hancock, Craig M

    2016-06-27

    This paper investigates a tightly-coupled Global Position System (GPS)/Ultra-Wideband (UWB)/Inertial Navigation System (INS) cooperative positioning scheme using a Robust Kalman Filter (RKF) supported by V2I communication. The scheme proposes a method that uses range measurements of UWB units transmitted among the terminals as augmentation inputs of the observations. The UWB range inputs are used to reform the GPS observation equations that consist of pseudo-range and Doppler measurements and the updated observation equation is processed in a tightly-coupled GPS/UWB/INS integrated positioning equation using an adaptive Robust Kalman Filter. The result of the trial conducted on the roof of the Nottingham Geospatial Institute (NGI) at the University of Nottingham shows that the integrated solution provides better accuracy and improves the availability of the system in GPS denied environments. RKF can eliminate the effects of gross errors. Additionally, the internal and external reliabilities of the system are enhanced when the UWB observables received from the moving terminals are involved in the positioning algorithm.

  15. A Tightly-Coupled GPS/INS/UWB Cooperative Positioning Sensors System Supported by V2I Communication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Gao, Yang; Li, Zengke; Meng, Xiaolin; Hancock, Craig M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates a tightly-coupled Global Position System (GPS)/Ultra-Wideband (UWB)/Inertial Navigation System (INS) cooperative positioning scheme using a Robust Kalman Filter (RKF) supported by V2I communication. The scheme proposes a method that uses range measurements of UWB units transmitted among the terminals as augmentation inputs of the observations. The UWB range inputs are used to reform the GPS observation equations that consist of pseudo-range and Doppler measurements and the updated observation equation is processed in a tightly-coupled GPS/UWB/INS integrated positioning equation using an adaptive Robust Kalman Filter. The result of the trial conducted on the roof of the Nottingham Geospatial Institute (NGI) at the University of Nottingham shows that the integrated solution provides better accuracy and improves the availability of the system in GPS denied environments. RKF can eliminate the effects of gross errors. Additionally, the internal and external reliabilities of the system are enhanced when the UWB observables received from the moving terminals are involved in the positioning algorithm. PMID:27355947

  16. Performance analysis of a GPS Interferometric attitude determination system for a gravity gradient stabilized spacecraft. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, John C.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of an unaided attitude determination system based on GPS interferometry is examined using linear covariance analysis. The modelled system includes four GPS antennae onboard a gravity gradient stabilized spacecraft, specifically the Air Force's RADCAL satellite. The principal error sources are identified and modelled. The optimal system's sensitivities to these error sources are examined through an error budget and by varying system parameters. The effects of two satellite selection algorithms, Geometric and Attitude Dilution of Precision (GDOP and ADOP, respectively) are examined. The attitude performance of two optimal-suboptimal filters is also presented. Based on this analysis, the limiting factors in attitude accuracy are the knowledge of the relative antenna locations, the electrical path lengths from the antennae to the receiver, and the multipath environment. The performance of the system is found to be fairly insensitive to torque errors, orbital inclination, and the two satellite geometry figures-of-merit tested.

  17. Feedback from GPS Timing Users: Relayed Observations from 2 SOPS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-12-01

    military systems that utilize one-way synchronization via GPS . 29 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for...supports the common perception that many receiver systems don’t sample the GPS navigation message’s subframe 1 health information nearly as often as...most commonly reported problem involved a miscalculation of the GPS -UTC(USN0) correction term. In many cases, several receiver systems would mis-tag

  18. Autonomous reconfigurable GPS/INS navigation and pointing system for rendezvous and docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upadhyay, Triveni N.; Cotterill, Stephen; Deaton, A. Wayne

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an integrated navigation and pointing system software development effort sponsored by the NASA MSFC through a SBIR Phase 2 Program. The integrated Global Positioning System (GPS)/Inertial Navigation System (INS) implements an autonomous navigation filter that is reconfigurable in real-time to accommodate mission contingencies. An onboard expert system monitors the spacecraft status and reconfigures the navigation filter accordingly, to optimize the system performance. The navigation filter is a multi-mode Kalman filter to estimate the spacecraft position, velocity, and attitude. Three different GPS-based attitude determination techniques, namely, velocity vector matching, attitude vector matching, and interferometric processing, are implemented to encompass different mission contingencies. The integrated GPS/INS navigation filter will use any of these techniques depending on the mission phase and the state of the sensors. The first technique, velocity vector matching, uses the GPS velocity measurement to estimate the INS velocity errors and exploits the correlation between INS velocity and attitude errors to estimate the attitude. The second technique, attitude vector matching, uses INS gyro measurements and GPS carrier phase (integrated Doppler) measurements during a spacecraft rotation maneuver to determine the attitude. Both of these techniques require only one GPS antenna onboard to determine the spacecraft attitude. The third technique, interferometric processing, requires use of multiple GPS antennae. In order to determine 3-axis body attitude, three GPS antennae (2 no-coplanor baselines) are required.

  19. Definition study of land/sea civil user navigational location monitoring systems for NAVSTAR GPS: User requirements and systems concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devito, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    A low-cost GPS civil-user mobile terminal whose purchase cost is substantially an order of magnitude less than estimates for the military counterpart is considered with focus on ground station requirements for position monitoring of civil users requiring this capability and the civil user navigation and location-monitoring requirements. Existing survey literature was examined to ascertain the potential users of a low-cost NAVSTAR receiver and to estimate their number, function, and accuracy requirements. System concepts are defined for low cost user equipments for in-situ navigation and the retransmission of low data rate positioning data via a geostationary satellite to a central computing facility.

  20. Integrated GPS/DR Vehicle Navigation System Based on Sequential and Square Root Kalman Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzoghby, MOSTAFA; Arif, USMAN; Li, FU; Zhi Yu, Xi

    2017-03-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) has become part of many applications in life. In mountainous terrains and around buildings, GPS reception is compromised. In dense urban canyons, signals bounce off the buildings creating multipath reception and provide erroneous measurements. To overcome GPS bandwidth and signal fading problems, Navigation solutions are built on GPS measurements fused with inertial sensors to provide dead reckoning (DR) based position solution. Solution for land vehicle Navigation System using GPS, inertial sensor and odometer is presented. The sensors fusion is performed based on conventional, sequential (SKF) and square root Kalman (SRKF) filters. SRKF based on Cheolesky factorization for covariance matrix P. Simulations are performed on real data, with precisely known covariance’s to simulate mathematical stability, performance and processing time required by each method on a high end microprocessor. The results demonstrate integrated system using SRKF has better performance in stability and estimation accuracy than conventional and sequential filter.

  1. Overcoming urban GPS navigation challenges through the use of MEMS inertial sensors and proper verification of navigation system performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinande, Eric T.

    This research proposes several means to overcome challenges in the urban environment to ground vehicle global positioning system (GPS) receiver navigation performance through the integration of external sensor information. The effects of narrowband radio frequency interference and signal attenuation, both common in the urban environment, are examined with respect to receiver signal tracking processes. Low-cost microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) inertial sensors, suitable for the consumer market, are the focus of receiver augmentation as they provide an independent measure of motion and are independent of vehicle systems. A method for estimating the mounting angles of an inertial sensor cluster utilizing typical urban driving maneuvers is developed and is able to provide angular measurements within two degrees of truth. The integration of GPS and MEMS inertial sensors is developed utilizing a full state navigation filter. Appropriate statistical methods are developed to evaluate the urban environment navigation improvement due to the addition of MEMS inertial sensors. A receiver evaluation metric that combines accuracy, availability, and maximum error measurements is presented and evaluated over several drive tests. Following a description of proper drive test techniques, record and playback systems are evaluated as the optimal way of testing multiple receivers and/or integrated navigation systems in the urban environment as they simplify vehicle testing requirements.

  2. Modular Software for Spacecraft Navigation Using the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, S. H.; Hartman, K. R.; Weidow, D. A.; Berry, D. L.; Oza, D. H.; Long, A. C.; Joyce, E.; Steger, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Dynamics and Mission Operations Divisions have jointly investigated the feasibility of engineering modular Global Positioning SYSTEM (GPS) navigation software to support both real time flight and ground postprocessing configurations. The goals of this effort are to define standard GPS data interfaces and to engineer standard, reusable navigation software components that can be used to build a broad range of GPS navigation support applications. The paper discusses the GPS modular software (GMOD) system and operations concepts, major requirements, candidate software architecture, feasibility assessment and recommended software interface standards. In additon, ongoing efforts to broaden the scope of the initial study and to develop modular software to support autonomous navigation using GPS are addressed,

  3. Geomagnetic storms, super-storms, and their impacts on GPS-based navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafyeva, E.; Yasyukevich, Yu.; Maksikov, A.; Zhivetiev, I.

    2014-07-01

    Using data of GPS receivers located worldwide, we analyze the quality of GPS performance during four geomagnetic storms of different intensity: two super-storms and two intense storms. We show that during super-storms the density of GPS Losses-of-Lock (LoL) increases up to 0.25% at L1 frequency and up to 3% at L2 frequency, and up to 0.15% (at L1) and 1% (at L2) during less intense storms. Also, depending on the intensity of the storm time ionospheric disturbances, the total number of total electron content (TEC) slips can exceed from 4 to 40 times the quiet time level. Both GPS LoL and TEC slips occur during abrupt changes of SYM-H index of geomagnetic activity, i.e., during the main phase of geomagnetic storms and during development of ionospheric storms. The main contribution in the total number of GPS LoL was found to be done by GPS sites located at low and high latitudes, whereas the area of numerous TEC slips seemed to mostly correspond to the boundary of the auroral oval, i.e., region with intensive ionospheric irregularities. Our global maps of TEC slips show where the regions with intense irregularities of electron density occur during geomagnetic storms and will let us in future predict appearance of GPS errors for geomagnetically disturbed conditions.

  4. GPS instrumentation performance as an ICBM guidance system evaluator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkley, R. L., Jr.; Hietzke, W. H.

    GPS performance on two Minuteman III flight tests is analyzed. It is shown how data of this quality can provide superior evaluation of total guidance error and can be used to identify inflight guidance anomalies. The GPS data on these flights exhibit short-term accuracy equal to the predicted levels. Typically, random errors on the order of 2 ft and .01 ft/sec (for a one-second average) are obtained. This makes possible a direct observation of PIGA magnetic sensitivity effects during the PBV period by an external sensor. The absolute accuracy is less easily evaluated owing to a lack of suitable standard. The GPS is found to be clearly more accurate than the radars that also tracked the missile, and the post-fit residuals are found to be consistent with a high level of total accuracy. It is concluded that the total accuracy is consistent with the predicted GPS performance.

  5. Optimal Preprocessing Of GPS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sien-Chong; Melbourne, William G.

    1994-01-01

    Improved technique for preprocessing data from Global Positioning System receiver reduces processing time and number of data to be stored. Optimal in sense that it maintains strength of data. Also increases ability to resolve ambiguities in numbers of cycles of received GPS carrier signals.

  6. Wireless GPS system for module fiber quality mapping: System improvement and field testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wireless GPS system for module-level fiber quality mapping has been developed at Texas A&M University. In its complete form, it includes subsystems for harvesters, boll buggies, and module builders. The system was field tested on a producer's farm near Plains, Texas, in 2006. The field test identi...

  7. Wireless GPS system for module-level fiber quality mapping: System improvement and field testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wireless GPS system for module-level fiber quality mapping has been developed at Texas A&M University. In its complete form, it includes subsystems for harvesters, boll buggies, and module builders. The system was field tested on a producer’s farm near Plains, Texas, in 2006. The field test identi...

  8. Compensating For GPS Ephemeris Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiun-Tsong

    1992-01-01

    Method of computing position of user station receiving signals from Global Positioning System (GPS) of navigational satellites compensates for most of GPS ephemeris error. Present method enables user station to reduce error in its computed position substantially. User station must have access to two or more reference stations at precisely known positions several hundred kilometers apart and must be in neighborhood of reference stations. Based on fact that when GPS data used to compute baseline between reference station and user station, vector error in computed baseline is proportional ephemeris error and length of baseline.

  9. Instructional Geocaching: An Analysis of GPS Receivers as Tools for Technology Integration into a Middle School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayben, Robert Edwin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the instructional use of GPS through instructional geocaching activities engages students and promotes achievement in a middle school social studies classroom. The impact of instructional geocaching on addressing the needs of students with various learning styles was also examined. In addition, the…

  10. Monitoring mobility in older adults using global positioning system (GPS) watches and accelerometers: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Webber, Sandra C; Porter, Michelle M

    2009-10-01

    This exploratory study examined the feasibility of using Garmin global positioning system (GPS) watches and ActiGraph accelerometers to monitor walking and other aspects of community mobility in older adults. After accuracy at slow walking speeds was initially determined, 20 older adults (74.4 +/- 4.2 yr) wore the devices for 1 day. Steps, distances, and speeds (on foot and in vehicle) were determined. GPS data acquisition varied from 43 min to over 12 hr, with 55% of participants having more than 8 hr between initial and final data-collection points. When GPS data were acquired without interruptions, detailed mobility information was obtained regarding the timing, distances covered, and speeds reached during trips away from home. Although GPS and accelerometry technology offer promise for monitoring community mobility patterns, new GPS solutions are required that allow for data collection over an extended period of time between indoor and outdoor environments.

  11. GPS/INS Sensor Fusion Using GPS Wind up Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Walton R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of stabilizing an inertial navigation system (INS), includes the steps of: receiving data from an inertial navigation system; and receiving a finite number of carrier phase observables using at least one GPS receiver from a plurality of GPS satellites; calculating a phase wind up correction; correcting at least one of the finite number of carrier phase observables using the phase wind up correction; and calculating a corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position using the corrected at least one of the finite number of carrier phase observables; and performing a step selected from the steps consisting of recording, reporting, or providing the corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position to another process that uses the corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position. A GPS stabilized inertial navigation system apparatus is also described.

  12. Tracking the movement of Hawaiian volcanoes; Global Positioning System (GPS) measurement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorak, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    At some well-studied volcanoes, surface movements of at least several centimeters take place out to distances of about 10 km from the summit of the volcano. Widespread deformation of this type is relatively easy to monitor, because the necessary survey stations can be placed at favorable sites some distance from the summit of the volcano. Examples of deformation of this type include Kilauea and Mauna Loa in Hawaii, Krafla in Iceland, Long Valley in California, Camp Flegrei in Italy, and Sakurajima in Japan. In contrast, surface movement at some other volcanoes, usually volcanoes with steep slopes, is restricted to places within about 1 km of their summits. Examples of this class of volcanoes include Mount St. Helens in Washington, Etna in Italy, and Tangkuban Parahu in Indonesia. Local movement on remote, rugged volcanoes of this type is difficult to observe using conventional methods of measuring ground movement, which generally require a clear line-of-sight between points of interest. However, a revolutionary new technique, called the Global Positional System (GPS), provides a very efficient, alternative method of making such measurements. GPS, which uses satellites and ground-based receivers to accurately record slight crustal movements, is rapidly becoming the method of choice to measure deformation at volcanoes. 

  13. Automatic monitoring system for high-steep slope in open-pit mine based on GPS and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chunmei; Li, Xianfu; Qin, Sunwei; Qiu, Dandan; Wu, Yanlin; Xiao, Yun; Zhou, Jian

    2008-12-01

    Recently, GPS has been more and more applicative in open pit mine slope safety monitoring. Daye Iron Mine open pit high-steep slope automatic monitoring system mainly consists of three modules, namely, GPS data processing module, monitoring and warning module, emergency plans module. According to the rock mass structural feature and the side slope stability evaluation, it is arranged altogether to seven GPS distortion monitoring points on the sharp of Fault F9 at Daye iron Mine, adopted the combination of monofrequent static GPS receiver and data-transmission radio to carry on the observation, the data processing mainly uses three transect interpolation method to solve the questions of discontinuity and Effectiveness in the data succession. According to the displacement monitoring data from 1990 to 1996 of Daye Iron Mine East Open Pit Shizi mountain Landslide A2, researching the displacement criterion, rate criterion, acceleration criterion, creep curve tangent angle criterion etc of landslide failure, the result shows that the landslide A2 is the lapse type crag nature landslide whose movement in three phases, namely creep stage, accelerated phase, destruction stage. It is different of the failure criterion in different stages and different position that is at the rear, central, front margin of the landslide. It has important guiding significance to put forward the comprehensive failure criterion of seven new-settled monitoring points combining the slope deformation destruction and macroscopic evidence.

  14. A Real Time Differential GPS Tracking System for NASA Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads to several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including: chemical makeup and physical processes taking place in the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices to be used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in these more expensive missions. Typically around thirty of these rockets are launched each year, from established ranges at Wallops Island, Virginia; Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska; White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico and from a number of ranges outside the United States. Many times launches are conducted from temporary launch ranges in remote parts of the world requiring considerable expense to transport and operate tracking radars. In order to support these missions, an inverse differential GPS system has been developed. The flight system consists of a small, inexpensive receiver, a preamplifier and a wrap-around antenna. A rugged, compact, portable ground station extracts GPS data from the raw payload telemetry stream, performs a real time differential solution and graphically displays the rocket's path relative to a predicted trajectory plot. In addition to generating a real time navigation solution, the system has been used for payload recovery, timing, data timetagging, precise tracking of multiple payloads and slaving of optical tracking systems for over the horizon acquisition. This paper discusses, in detail, the flight and ground hardware, as well as data processing and operational aspects of the system, and provides evidence of the system accuracy.

  15. Method and apparatus for relative navigation using reflected GPS signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Ian R. (Inventor); Boegner, Jr., Gregory J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system to passively navigate an orbiting moving body towards an orbiting target using reflected GPS signals. A pair of antennas is employed to receive both direct signals from a plurality of GPS satellites and a second antenna to receive GPS signals reflected off an orbiting target. The direct and reflected signals are processed and compared to determine the relative distance and position of the orbiting moving body relative to the orbiting target.

  16. Gravity field error analysis - Applications of Global Positioning System receivers and gradiometers on low orbiting platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrama, Ernst J. O.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver as a tracking facility and a gradiometer as a separate instrument on a low-orbiting platform offers a unique tool to map the earth's gravitational field with unprecedented accuracies. The former technique allows determination of the spacecraft's ephemeris at any epoch to within 3-10 cm, the latter permits the measurement of the tensor of second order derivatives of the gravity field to within 0.01 to 0.0001 Eotvos units depending on the type of gradiometer. First, a variety of error sources in gradiometry where emphasis is placed on the rotational problem pursuing as well a static as a dynamic approach is described. Next, an analytical technique is described and applied for an error analysis of gravity field parameters from gradiometer and GPS observation types. Results are discussed for various configurations proposed on Topex/Poseidon, Gravity Probe-B, and Aristoteles, indicating that GPS only solutions may be computed up to degree and order 35, 55, and 85, respectively, whereas a combined GPS/gradiometer experiment on Aristoteles may result in an acceptable solution up to degree and order 240.

  17. Gravity field error analysis - Applications of Global Positioning System receivers and gradiometers on low orbiting platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrama, Ernst J. O.

    1991-11-01

    The concept of a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver as a tracking facility and a gradiometer as a separate instrument on a low-orbiting platform offers a unique tool to map the earth's gravitational field with unprecedented accuracies. The former technique allows determination of the spacecraft's ephemeris at any epoch to within 3-10 cm, the latter permits the measurement of the tensor of second order derivatives of the gravity field to within 0.01 to 0.0001 Eotvos units depending on the type of gradiometer. First, a variety of error sources in gradiometry where emphasis is placed on the rotational problem pursuing as well a static as a dynamic approach is described. Next, an analytical technique is described and applied for an error analysis of gravity field parameters from gradiometer and GPS observation types. Results are discussed for various configurations proposed on Topex/Poseidon, Gravity Probe-B, and Aristoteles, indicating that GPS only solutions may be computed up to degree and order 35, 55, and 85, respectively, whereas a combined GPS/gradiometer experiment on Aristoteles may result in an acceptable solution up to degree and order 240.

  18. The future of GPS-based electric power system measurements, operation and control

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D.T.; Wilson, R.E.; Martin, K.E.; Litzenberger, W.H.; Hauer, J.F.; Overholt, P.N.; Sobajic, D.J.

    1998-11-01

    Much of modern society is powered by inexpensive and reliable electricity delivered by a complex and elaborate electric power network. Electrical utilities are currently using the Global Positioning System-NAVSTAR (GPS) timekeeping to improve the network`s reliability. Currently, GPS synchronizes the clocks on dynamic recorders and aids in post-mortem analysis of network disturbances. Two major projects have demonstrated the use of GPS-synchronized power system measurements. In 1992, the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI) sponsored Phase Measurements Project used a commercially available Phasor Measurements Unit (PMU) to collect GPS-synchronized measurements for analyzing power system problems. In 1995, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) under DOE`s and EPRI`s sponsorship launched the Wide Area Measurements (WAMS) project. WAMS demonstrated GPS-synchronized measurements over a large area of their power networks and demonstrated the networking of GPS-based measurement systems in BPA and WAPA. The phasor measurement technology has also been used to conduct dynamic power system tests. During these tests, a large dynamic resistor was inserted to simulate a small power system disturbance.

  19. Enhancing Positioning Accuracy in Urban Terrain by Fusing Data from a GPS Receiver, Inertial Sensors, Stereo-Camera and Digital Maps for Pedestrian Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Przemyslaw, Baranski; Pawel, Strumillo

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents an algorithm for estimating a pedestrian location in an urban environment. The algorithm is based on the particle filter and uses different data sources: a GPS receiver, inertial sensors, probability maps and a stereo camera. Inertial sensors are used to estimate a relative displacement of a pedestrian. A gyroscope estimates a change in the heading direction. An accelerometer is used to count a pedestrian's steps and their lengths. The so-called probability maps help to limit GPS inaccuracy by imposing constraints on pedestrian kinematics, e.g., it is assumed that a pedestrian cannot cross buildings, fences etc. This limits position inaccuracy to ca. 10 m. Incorporation of depth estimates derived from a stereo camera that are compared to the 3D model of an environment has enabled further reduction of positioning errors. As a result, for 90% of the time, the algorithm is able to estimate a pedestrian location with an error smaller than 2 m, compared to an error of 6.5 m for a navigation based solely on GPS. PMID:22969321

  20. An Integrated Navigation System using GPS Carrier Phase for Real-Time Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Fellerhoff, J. Rick; Kim, Theodore J.; Kohler, Stewart M.

    1999-06-24

    A Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires accu- rate measurement of the motion of the imaging plat- form to produce well-focused images with minimal absolute position error. The motion measurement (MoMeas) system consists of a inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a P-code GPS receiver that outputs corrected ephemeris, L1 & L2 pseudoranges, and L1 & L2 carrier phase measurements. The unknown initial carrier phase biases to the GPS satellites are modeled as states in an extended Kalman filter and the resulting integrated navigation solution has po- sition errors that change slowly with time. Position error drifts less than 1- cm/sec have been measured from the SAR imagery for various length apertures.

  1. The Nuclear Detonation Detection System on the GPS satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Higbie, P.R.; Blocker, N.K.

    1993-07-27

    This article begins with a historical perspective of satellite usage in monitoring nuclear detonations. Current capabilities of the 24 GPS satellites in detecting the light, gamma rays, x-rays and neutrons from a nuclear explosion are described. In particular, an optical radiometer developed at Sandia National Laboratories is characterized. Operational information and calibration procedures are emphasized.

  2. GPS Radio Occultation as Part of the Global Observing System for Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannucci, Anthony J.; Ao, C. O.; Iijima, B. A.; Wilson, B. D.; Yunck, T. P.; Kursinski, E. R.

    2008-01-01

    Topics include: The Measurement (Physical retrievals based on time standards), GPS Retrieval Products, Retrievals and Radiances: CLARREO Mission, GPS RO and AIRS, GPS RO and Microwave, GPS RO and Radiosondes, GPS/GNSS Science, and Conclusions.

  3. Solar receiver performance of point focusing collector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y. C.; Wen, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    The solar receiver performance of cavity receivers and external receivers used in dispersed solar power systems was evaluated for the temperature range 300-1300 C. Several parameters of receiver and concentrator are examined. It was found that cavity receivers are generally more efficient than external receivers, especially at high temperatures which require a large heat transfer area. The effects of variation in the ratio of receiver area to aperture area are considered.

  4. GPS Metric Tracking Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    As Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) applications become more prevalent for land- and air-based vehicles, GPS applications for space vehicles will also increase. The Applied Technology Directorate of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has developed a lightweight, low-cost GPS Metric Tracking Unit (GMTU), the first of two steps in developing a lightweight, low-cost Space-Based Tracking and Command Subsystem (STACS) designed to meet Range Safety's link margin and latency requirements for vehicle command and telemetry data. The goals of STACS are to improve Range Safety operations and expand tracking capabilities for space vehicles. STACS will track the vehicle, receive commands, and send telemetry data through the space-based asset, which will dramatically reduce dependence on ground-based assets. The other step was the Low-Cost Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Transceiver (LCT2), developed by the Wallops Flight Facility (WFF), which allows the vehicle to communicate with a geosynchronous relay satellite. Although the GMTU and LCT2 were independently implemented and tested, the design collaboration of KSC and WFF engineers allowed GMTU and LCT2 to be integrated into one enclosure, leading to the final STACS. In operation, GMTU needs only a radio frequency (RF) input from a GPS antenna and outputs position and velocity data to the vehicle through a serial or pulse code modulation (PCM) interface. GMTU includes one commercial GPS receiver board and a custom board, the Command and Telemetry Processor (CTP) developed by KSC. The CTP design is based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) with embedded processors to support GPS functions.

  5. Intercontinental time and frequency transfer using a global positioning system timing receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    The DSN has a requirement to maintain knowledge of the frequency offset between DSN stations with 3 x 10 to the minus 13th power and time offset within 10 microseconds. It is further anticipated that in the 1987-1990 era the requirement for knowledge of time offset between DSN stations will be less than 10 nanoseconds. JPL is using the Global Positioning System (GPS) Space Vehicles, as a development project, to transfer time and frequency over intercontinental distances between stations of the DSN and between the DSN and other agencies. JPL has installed GPS timing receivers at its tracking station near Barstow, California, and at its tracking station near Madrid, Spain. The details of the experiment and the data are reported. There is a discussion of the ultimate capabilities of these techniques for meeting the functional requirements of the DSN.

  6. BDS/GPS Dual Systems Positioning Based on the Modified SR-UKF Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kong, JaeHyok; Mao, Xuchu; Li, Shaoyuan

    2016-05-03

    The Global Navigation Satellite System can provide all-day three-dimensional position and speed information. Currently, only using the single navigation system cannot satisfy the requirements of the system's reliability and integrity. In order to improve the reliability and stability of the satellite navigation system, the positioning method by BDS and GPS navigation system is presented, the measurement model and the state model are described. Furthermore, the modified square-root Unscented Kalman Filter (SR-UKF) algorithm is employed in BDS and GPS conditions, and analysis of single system/multi-system positioning has been carried out, respectively. The experimental results are compared with the traditional estimation results, which show that the proposed method can perform highly-precise positioning. Especially when the number of satellites is not adequate enough, the proposed method combine BDS and GPS systems to achieve a higher positioning precision.

  7. Receiver Design, Performance Analysis, and Evaluation for Space-Borne Laser Altimeters and Space-to-Space Laser Ranging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Frederic M.; Sun, Xiaoli; Field, Christopher T.

    1996-01-01

    This progress report consists of two separate reports. The first one describes our work on the use of variable gain amplifiers to increase the receiver dynamic range of space borne laser altimeters such as NASA's Geoscience Laser Altimeter Systems (GLAS). The requirement of the receiver dynamic range was first calculated. A breadboard variable gain amplifier circuit was made and the performance was fully characterized. The circuit will also be tested in flight on board the Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA-02) next year. The second report describes our research on the master clock oscillator frequency calibration for space borne laser altimeter systems using global positioning system (GPS) receivers.

  8. Application of GPS tracking techniques to orbit determination for TDRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, B. J.; Lichten, S. M.; Malla, R. P.; Wu, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate two fundamentally different approaches to TDRS orbit determination utilizing Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and GPS-related techniques. In the first, a GPS flight receiver is deployed on the TDRSS spacecraft. The TDRS ephemerides are determined using direct ranging to the GPS spacecraft, and no ground network is required. In the second approach, the TDRSS spacecraft broadcast a suitable beacon signal, permitting the simultaneous tracking of GPS and TDRSS satellites from a small ground network. Both strategies can be designed to meet future operational requirements for TDRS-2 orbit determination.

  9. BDS/GPS Dual Systems Positioning Based on the Modified SR-UKF Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kong, JaeHyok; Mao, Xuchu; Li, Shaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite System can provide all-day three-dimensional position and speed information. Currently, only using the single navigation system cannot satisfy the requirements of the system’s reliability and integrity. In order to improve the reliability and stability of the satellite navigation system, the positioning method by BDS and GPS navigation system is presented, the measurement model and the state model are described. Furthermore, the modified square-root Unscented Kalman Filter (SR-UKF) algorithm is employed in BDS and GPS conditions, and analysis of single system/multi-system positioning has been carried out, respectively. The experimental results are compared with the traditional estimation results, which show that the proposed method can perform highly-precise positioning. Especially when the number of satellites is not adequate enough, the proposed method combine BDS and GPS systems to achieve a higher positioning precision. PMID:27153068

  10. On Fast Post-Processing of Global Positioning System Simulator Truth Data and Receiver Measurements and Solutions Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Post-Processing of data related to a Global Positioning System (GPS) simulation is an important activity in qualification of a GPS receiver for space flight. Because a GPS simulator is a critical resource it is desirable to move off the pertinent simulation data from the simulator as soon as a test is completed. The simulator data files are usually moved to a Personal Computer (PC), where the post-processing of the receiver logged measurements and solutions data and simulated data is performed. Typically post-processing is accomplished using PC-based commercial software languages and tools. Because of commercial software systems generality their general-purpose functions are notoriously slow and more than often are the bottleneck problem even for short duration experiments. For example, it may take 8 hours to post-process data from a 6-hour simulation. There is a need to do post-processing faster, especially in order to use the previous test results as feedback for a next simulation setup. This paper demonstrates that a fast software linear interpolation algorithm is applicable to a large class of engineering problems, like GPS simulation data post-processing, where computational time is a critical resource and is one of the most important considerations. An approach is developed that allows to speed-up post-processing by an order of magnitude. It is based on improving the post-processing bottleneck interpolation algorithm using apriori information that is specific to the GPS simulation application. The presented post-processing scheme was used in support of a few successful space flight missions carrying GPS receivers. A future approach to solving the post-processing performance problem using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology is described.

  11. The need for GPS standardization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Wlodzimierz W.; Petit, Gerard; Thomas, Claudine

    1992-01-01

    A desirable and necessary step for improvement of the accuracy of Global Positioning System (GPS) time comparisons is the establishment of common GPS standards. For this reason, the CCDS proposed the creation of a special group of experts with the objective of recommending procedures and models for operational time transfer by GPS common-view method. Since the announcement of the implementation of Selective Availability at the end of last spring, action has become much more urgent and this CCDS Group on GPS Time Transfer Standards has now been set up. It operates under the auspices of the permanent CCDS Working Group on TAI and works in close cooperation with the Sub-Committee on Time of the Civil GPS Service Interface Committee (CGSIC). Taking as an example the implementation of SA during the first week of July 1991, this paper illustrates the need to develop urgently at least two standardized procedures in GPS receiver software: monitoring GPS tracks with a common time scale and retaining broadcast ephemeris parameters throughout the duration of a track. Other matters requiring action are the adoption of common models for atmospheric delay, a common approach to hardware design and agreement about short-term data processing. Several examples of such deficiencies in standardization are presented.

  12. Precise orbit determination for NASA's earth observing system using GPS (Global Positioning System)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B. G.

    1988-01-01

    An application of a precision orbit determination technique for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) using the Global Positioning System (GPS) is described. This technique allows the geometric information from measurements of GPS carrier phase and P-code pseudo-range to be exploited while minimizing requirements for precision dynamical modeling. The method combines geometric and dynamic information to determine the spacecraft trajectory; the weight on the dynamic information is controlled by adjusting fictitious spacecraft accelerations in three dimensions which are treated as first order exponentially time correlated stochastic processes. By varying the time correlation and uncertainty of the stochastic accelerations, the technique can range from purely geometric to purely dynamic. Performance estimates for this technique as applied to the orbit geometry planned for the EOS platforms indicate that decimeter accuracies for EOS orbit position may be obtainable. The sensitivity of the predicted orbit uncertainties to model errors for station locations, nongravitational platform accelerations, and Earth gravity is also presented.

  13. Investigation of the GPS Block IIR Time Keeping System (TKS) Anomalies Caused by the Voltage-Controlled Crystal Oscillator (VCXO)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-12-01

    91st Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting INVESTIGATION OF THE GPS BLOCK IIR TIME KEEPING SYSTEM (TKS) ANOMALIES CAUSED BY THE...1999 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1999 to 00-00-1999 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Investigation of the GPS Block IIR Time Keeping System (TKS...II-R Time Keeping System ;’ Proceeding of the 30* Annual PTI’I Meeting, Reston, Virginia, USA. 121 A. Baker, “ GPS Block IIR Time Standard Assembly

  14. A summary of the GPS system performance for STARS Mission 3

    SciTech Connect

    Creel, E.E.

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes the performance of the GPS system on the most recent flight of the STARS missile, STARS Mission 3 (M3). This mission was conducted under the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization`s (BMDO`s) Consolidated Targets Program. The United States Army Space and Strategic Defense Command (USASSDC) is the executing agent for this mission and the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is the vehicle developer and integrator. The M3 flight, dually designated as the MSX Dedicated Targets II (MDT-II) mission occurred on August 31, 1996. This mission was conducted for the specific purpose of providing targets for viewing by the MSX satellite. STARS M3 was the first STARS flight to use GPS-derived data for missile guidance, and proved to be instrumental in the procurement of a wealth of experimental data which is still undergoing analysis by numerous scientific agencies within the BMDO complex. GPS accuracy was required for this mission because of the prescribed targeting requirements for the MDT-II payload deliveries with respect to the MSX satellite flight path. During the flight test real time GPS-derived state vector data was also used to generate pointing angles for various down range sensors involved in the experiment. Background information describing the STARS missile, GPS subsystem architecture, and the GPS Kalman filter design is presented first, followed by a discussion of the telemetry data records obtained from this flight with interpretations and conclusions.

  15. Global Positioning System (GPS) Precipitable Water in Forecasting Lightning at Spaceport Canaveral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehrer, Kristen C.; Graf, Brian; Roeder, William

    2006-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of precipitable water (PW) from Global Positioning System (GPS) in lightning prediction. Additional independent verification of an earlier model is performed. This earlier model used binary logistic regression with the following four predictor variables optimally selected from a candidate list of 23 candidate predictors: the current precipitable water value for a given time of the day, the change in GPS-PW over the past 9 hours, the KIndex, and the electric field mill value. This earlier model was not optimized for any specific forecast interval, but showed promise for 6 hour and 1.5 hour forecasts. Two new models were developed and verified. These new models were optimized for two operationally significant forecast intervals. The first model was optimized for the 0.5 hour lightning advisories issued by the 45th Weather Squadron. An additional 1.5 hours was allowed for sensor dwell, communication, calculation, analysis, and advisory decision by the forecaster. Therefore the 0.5 hour advisory model became a 2 hour forecast model for lightning within the 45th Weather Squadron advisory areas. The second model was optimized for major ground processing operations supported by the 45th Weather Squadron, which can require lightning forecasts with a lead-time of up to 7.5 hours. Using the same 1.5 lag as in the other new model, this became a 9 hour forecast model for lightning within 37 km (20 NM)) of the 45th Weather Squadron advisory areas. The two new models were built using binary logistic regression from a list of 26 candidate predictor variables: the current GPS-PW value, the change of GPS-PW over 0.5 hour increments from 0.5 to 12 hours, and the K-index. The new 2 hour model found the following for predictors to be statistically significant, listed in decreasing order of contribution to the forecast: the 0.5 hour change in GPS-PW, the 7.5 hour change in GPS-PW, the current GPS-PW value, and the KIndex. The new 9 hour forecast model found

  16. Travel patterns during pregnancy: comparison between Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking and questionnaire data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal exposures to traffic-related air pollution have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Exposures to traffic-related air pollutants are strongly influenced by time spent near traffic. However, little is known about women’s travel activities during pregnancy and whether questionnaire-based data can provide reliable information on travel patterns during pregnancy. Objectives Examine women’s in-vehicle travel behavior during pregnancy and examine the difference in travel data collected by questionnaire and global positioning system (GPS) and their potential for exposure error. Methods We measured work-related travel patterns in 56 pregnant women using a questionnaire and one-week GPS tracking three times during pregnancy (<20 weeks, 20–30 weeks, and >30 weeks of gestation). We compared self-reported activities with GPS-derived trip distance and duration, and examined potentially influential factors that may contribute to differences. We also described in-vehicle travel behavior by pregnancy periods and influences of demographic and personal factors on daily travel times. Finally, we estimated personal exposure to particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PB-PAH) and examined the magnitude of exposure misclassification using self-reported vs. GPS travel data. Results Subjects overestimated both trip duration and trip distance compared to the GPS data. We observed moderately high correlations between self-reported and GPS-recorded travel distance (home to work trips: r = 0.88; work to home trips: r = 0.80). Better agreement was observed between the GPS and the self-reported travel time for home to work trips (r = 0.77) than work to home trips (r = 0.64). The subjects on average spent 69 and 93 minutes traveling in vehicles daily based on the GPS and self-reported data, respectively. Longer daily travel time was observed among participants in early pregnancy, and during certain pregnancy periods in women with

  17. New approach for processing data provided by an INS/GPS system onboard a vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrascu, Ana; Serbanescu, Ionut; Tamas, Razvan D.; Danisor, Alin; Caruntu, George; Ticu, Ionela

    2016-12-01

    Due to the technology development, navigation systems are widely used in ground vehicle applications such as position prediction, safety of life, etc. It is known that a hybrid navigation system consisting of a GPS and inertial navigation system (INS) can provide a more accurate position prediction. By applying a Method of Moments (MoM) approach on the acquired data with INS/GPS we can extract both the coordinate and important information concerning safety of life. This kind of system will be cost effective and can also be used as a black box on boats, cars, submersible ships and even on small aircrafts.

  18. Supporting EarthScope Cyber-Infrastructure with a Modern GPS Science Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, F. H.; Bock, Y.; Kedar, S.; Jamason, P.; Fang, P.; Dong, D.; Owen, S. E.; Prawirodirjo, L.; Squibb, M.

    2008-12-01

    Building on NASA's investment in the measurement of crustal deformation from continuous GPS, we are developing and implementing a Science Data System (SDS) that will provide mature, long-term Earth Science Data Records (ESDR's). This effort supports NASA's Earth Surface and Interiors (ESI) focus area and provide NASA's component to the EarthScope PBO. This multi-year development is sponsored by NASA's Making Earth System data records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program. The SDS integrates the generation of ESDRs with data analysis and exploration, product generation, and modeling tools based on daily GPS data that include GPS networks in western North America and a component of NASA's Global GPS Network (GGN) for terrestrial reference frame definition. The system is expandable to multiple regional and global networks. The SDS builds upon mature data production, exploration, and analysis algorithms developed under NASA's REASoN, ACCESS, and SENH programs. This SDS provides access to positions, time series, velocity fields, and strain measurements derived from continuous GPS data obtained at tracking stations in both the Plate Boundary Observatory and other regional Western North America GPS networks, dating back to 1995. The SDS leverages the IT and Web Services developments carried out under the SCIGN/REASoN and ACCESS projects, which have streamlined access to data products for researchers and modelers, and which have created a prototype an on-the-fly interactive research environment through a modern data portal, GPS Explorer. This IT system has been designed using modern IT tools and principles in order to be extensible to any geographic location, scale, natural hazard, and combination of geophysical sensor and related data. We have built upon open GIS standards, particularly those of the OGC, and have used the principles of Web Service-based Service Oriented Architectures to provide scalability and extensibility to new services and capabilities.

  19. Wakeshield WSF-02 GPS Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, B. E.; Abusali, P. A. M.; Schroeder, Christine; Tapley, Byron; Exner, Michael; Mccloskey, rick; Carpenter, Russell; Cooke, Michael; Mcdonald, samantha; Combs, Nick; Duncan, Courtney; Dunn, Charles; Meehan, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Shuttle mission STS-69 was launched on September 7, 1995, 10:09 CDT, carrying the Wake Shield Facility (WSF-02). The WSF-02 spacecraft included a set of payloads provided by the Texas Space Grant Consortium, known as TexasSat. One of the TexasSat payloads was a GPS TurboRogue receiver loaned by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. On September 11, the WSF-02 was unberthed from the Endeavour payload bay using the remote manipulator system. The GPS receiver was powered on prior to release and the WSF-02 remained in free-flight for three days before being retrieved on September 14. All WSF-02 GPS data, which includes dual frequency pseudorange and carrier phase, were stored in an on-board recorder for post-flight analysis, but "snap- shots" of data were transmitted for 2-3 minutes at intervals of several hours, when permitted by the telemetry band- widdl The GPS experiment goals were: (1) an evaluation of precision orbit determination in a low altitude environment (400 km) where perturbations due to atmospheric drag and the Earth's gravity field are more pronounced than for higher altitude satellites with high precision orbit requirements, such as TOPEX/POSEIDON; (2) an assessment of relative positioning using the WSF GPS receiver and the Endeavour Collins receiver; and (3) determination of atmospheric temperature profiles using GPS signals passing through the atmosphere. Analysis of snap-shot telemetry data indicate that 24 hours of continuous data were stored on board, which includes high rate (50 Hz) data for atmosphere temperature profiles. Examination of the limited number of real-time navigation solutions show that at least 7 GPS satellites were tracked simultaneously and the on-board clock corrections were at the microsec level, as expected. Furthermore, a dynamical consistency test provided a further validation of the on-board navigation solutions. Complete analysis will be conducted in post-flight using the data recorded on-board.

  20. Performance analysis of an integrated GPS/inertial attitude determination system. M.S. Thesis - MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Wendy I.

    1994-01-01

    The performance of an integrated GPS/inertial attitude determination system is investigated using a linear covariance analysis. The principles of GPS interferometry are reviewed, and the major error sources of both interferometers and gyroscopes are discussed and modeled. A new figure of merit, attitude dilution of precision (ADOP), is defined for two possible GPS attitude determination methods, namely single difference and double difference interferometry. Based on this figure of merit, a satellite selection scheme is proposed. The performance of the integrated GPS/inertial attitude determination system is determined using a linear covariance analysis. Based on this analysis, it is concluded that the baseline errors (i.e., knowledge of the GPS interferometer baseline relative to the vehicle coordinate system) are the limiting factor in system performance. By reducing baseline errors, it should be possible to use lower quality gyroscopes without significantly reducing performance. For the cases considered, single difference interferometry is only marginally better than double difference interferometry. Finally, the performance of the system is found to be relatively insensitive to the satellite selection technique.

  1. Application of GPS attitude determination to gravity gradient stabilized spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightsey, E. G.; Cohen, Clark E.; Parkinson, Bradford W.

    1993-01-01

    Recent advances in the Global Positioning System (GPS) technology have initiated a new era in aerospace navigation and control. GPS receivers have become increasingly compact and affordable, and new developments have made attitude determination using subcentimeter positioning among two or more antennas feasible for real-time applications. GPS-based attitude control systems will become highly portable packages which provide time, navigation, and attitude information of sufficient accuracy for many aerospace needs. A typical spacecraft application of GPS attitude determination is a gravity gradient stabilized satellite in low Earth orbit that employs a GPS receiver and four body mounted patch antennas. The coupled, linearized equations of motion enable complete position and attitude information to be extracted from only two antennas. A discussion of the various error sources for spaceborne GPS attitude measurement systems is included. Attitude determination of better than 0.3 degrees is possible for 1 meter antenna separation. Suggestions are provided to improve the accuracy of the attitude solution.

  2. GPS Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangrass, Frank

    1992-01-01

    This semi-annual progress report provides an overview of the work performed during the first six months of Grant NAG 1 1423, titled 'GPS Interferometry'. The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a satellite-based positioning and timing system. Through the use of interferometric processing techniques, it is feasible to obtain sub-decimeter position accuracies for an aircraft in flight. The proposed duration of this Grant is three years. During the first year of the Grant, the efforts are focussed on two topics: (1) continued development of GPS Interferometry core technology; and (2) rapid technology demonstration of GPS interferometry through the design and implementation of a flight reference/autoland system. Multipath error has been the emphasis of the continued development of GPS Interferometry core technology. The results have been documented in a Doctoral Dissertation and a conference paper. The design and implementation of the flight reference/autoland system is nearing completion. The remainder of this progress report summarizes the architecture of this system.

  3. Development of a GPS-aided motion measurement, pointing, and stabilization system for a Synthetic Aperture Radar. [Global Positioning System (GPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Fellerhoff, J.R.; Kohler, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    An advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Motion Compensation System has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The system includes a miniaturized high accuracy ring laser gyro inertial measurement unit, a three axis gimbal pointing and stabilization assembly, a differential Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation aiding system, and a pilot guidance system. The system provides several improvements over previous SNL motion compensation systems and is capable of antenna stabilization to less than 0.01 degrees RMS and absolute position measurement to less than 5.0 meters RMS. These accuracies have been demonstrated in recent flight testing aboard a DHC-6-300 Twin Otter'' aircraft.

  4. Phase Correction for GPS Antenna with Nonunique Phase Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Dobbins, Justin

    2005-01-01

    A method of determining the position and attitude of a body equipped with a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver includes an accounting for the location of the nonunique phase center of a distributed or wraparound GPS antenna. The method applies, more specifically, to the case in which (1) the GPS receiver utilizes measurements of the phases of GPS carrier signals in its position and attitude computations and (2) the body is axisymmetric (e.g., spherical or round cylindrical) and wrapped at its equator with a single- or multiple-element antenna, the radiation pattern of which is also axisymmetric with the same axis of symmetry as that of the body.

  5. Waste receiving and processing plant control system; system design description

    SciTech Connect

    LANE, M.P.

    1999-02-24

    The Plant Control System (PCS) is a heterogeneous computer system composed of numerous sub-systems. The PCS represents every major computer system that is used to support operation of the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility. This document, the System Design Description (PCS SDD), includes several chapters and appendices. Each chapter is devoted to a separate PCS sub-system. Typically, each chapter includes an overview description of the system, a list of associated documents related to operation of that system, and a detailed description of relevant system features. Each appendice provides configuration information for selected PCS sub-systems. The appendices are designed as separate sections to assist in maintaining this document due to frequent changes in system configurations. This document is intended to serve as the primary reference for configuration of PCS computer systems. The use of this document is further described in the WRAP System Configuration Management Plan, WMH-350, Section 4.1.

  6. Advancing Technology: GPS and GIS Outreach Training for Agricultural Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Allison; Arnold, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    The use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and Global Information Systems (GIS) has made significant impacts on agricultural production practices. However, constant changes in the technologies require continuing educational updates. The outreach program described here introduces the operation, use, and applications of GPS receivers and GIS…

  7. Effects of earthquake ground motion on tracking characteristics of new Global Navigation Satellite System receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Henry T.; Blume, Frederick; Prantner, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    We use a shake table capable of large (7 G) three-dimensional accelerations with large payloads to simulate ground motion reconstructed from acceleration data collected during the February 2010 Mw = 8.8 Maule, Chile, earthquake. The tracking performance of five modern geodetic GNSS receiver and antenna combinations was investigated while undergoing simulated seismic shaking at three two levels of amplification. Individual system performance was characterized by the number of tracked GNSS observations. The L1 and L2 GPS signal tracking was significantly impacted for the majority of the receiver models during simulations with maximum accelerations of 4 G, and the tracking performance for all of the tested receiver types was significantly impaired during the 7 G simulations. Results show improved tracking when only the antenna was shaken suggesting that vibration-induced oscillator phase noise may contribute significantly to tracking degradation during shaking.

  8. A review of GPS-based tracking techniques for TDRS orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, B. J.; Lichten, S. M.; Malla, R. P.; Wu, S.-C.

    1993-01-01

    This article evaluates two fundamentally different approaches to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) orbit determination utilizing Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and GPS-related techniques. In the first, a GPS flight receiver is deployed on the TDRS. The TDRS ephemerides are determined using direct ranging to the GPS spacecraft, and no ground network is required. In the second approach, the TDRS's broadcast a suitable beacon signal, permitting the simultaneous tracking of GPS and Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System satellites by ground receivers. Both strategies can be designed to meet future operational requirements for TDRS-II orbit determination.

  9. Using Evolutionary Computation on GPS Position Correction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    More and more devices are equipped with global positioning system (GPS). However, those handheld devices with consumer-grade GPS receivers usually have low accuracy in positioning. A position correction algorithm is therefore useful in this case. In this paper, we proposed an evolutionary computation based technique to generate a correction function by two GPS receivers and a known reference location. Locating one GPS receiver on the known location and combining its longitude and latitude information and exact poisoning information, the proposed technique is capable of evolving a correction function by such. The proposed technique can be implemented and executed on handheld devices without hardware reconfiguration. Experiments are conducted to demonstrate performance of the proposed technique. Positioning error could be significantly reduced from the order of 10 m to the order of 1 m. PMID:24578657

  10. MicroBlaze implementation of GPS/INS integrated system on Virtex-6 FPGA.

    PubMed

    Bhogadi, Lokeswara Rao; Gottapu, Sasi Bhushana Rao; Konala, Vvs Reddy

    2015-01-01

    The emphasis of this paper is on MicroBlaze implementation of GPS/INS integrated system on Virtex-6 field programmable gate array (FPGA). Issues related to accuracy of position, resource usage of FPGA in terms of slices, DSP48, block random access memory, computation time, latency and power consumption are presented. An improved design of a loosely coupled GPS/INS integrated system is described in this paper. The inertial navigation solution and Kalman filter computations are provided by the MicroBlaze on Virtex-6 FPGA. The real time processed navigation solutions are updated with a rate of 100 Hz.

  11. 76 FR 67019 - Eighty-Seventh: RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ...--Working Group 2C, GPS/Inertial November 15--Working Group 2, GPS/WAAS November 16--Working Group 2, GPS...-2A) GPS/Inertial (WG-2C) GPS/Precision Landing Guidance (WG-4) GPS/Airport Surface Surveillance...

  12. Study of Lever-Arm Effect Using Embedded Photogrammetry and On-Board GPS Receiver on Uav for Metrological Mapping Purpose and Proposal of a Free Ground Measurements Calibration Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daakir, M.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.; Bosser, P.; Pichard, F.; Thom, C.; Rabot, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) on-board photogrammetry knows a significant growth due to the democratization of using drones in the civilian sector. Also, due to changes in regulations laws governing the rules of inclusion of a UAV in the airspace which become suitable for the development of professional activities. Fields of application of photogrammetry are diverse, for instance: architecture, geology, archaeology, mapping, industrial metrology, etc. Our research concerns the latter area. Vinci-Construction- Terrassement is a private company specialized in public earthworks that uses UAVs for metrology applications. This article deals with maximum accuracy one can achieve with a coupled camera and GPS receiver system for direct-georeferencing of Digital Surface Models (DSMs) without relying on Ground Control Points (GCPs) measurements. This article focuses specially on the lever-arm calibration part. This proposed calibration method is based on two steps: a first step involves the proper calibration for each sensor, i.e. to determine the position of the optical center of the camera and the GPS antenna phase center in a local coordinate system relative to the sensor. A second step concerns a 3d modeling of the UAV with embedded sensors through a photogrammetric acquisition. Processing this acquisition allows to determine the value of the lever-arm offset without using GCPs.

  13. [Design and implementation of GpsOne remote heart disease first-aid system].

    PubMed

    Lin, Hua

    2008-09-01

    This paper introduces how to develop a novel remote heart disease first-aid system with N-tier architecture. The system applies GpsOne communication technology and professional ECG signal collection technology to the embedded SCM. It can provide an accurate location of the patient and his essential ECG details for remote heart disease first-aid.

  14. Autonomous Navigation of the SSTI/Lewis Spacecraft Using the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, R. C.; Long, A. C.; Lee, T.

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) is pursuing the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) technology to improve the accuracy and economy of spacecraft navigation. High-accuracy autonomous navigation algorithms are being flight qualified in conjunction with GSFC's GPS Attitude Determination Flyer (GADFLY) experiment on the Small Satellite Technology Initiative (SSTI) Lewis spacecraft, which is scheduled for launch in 1997. Preflight performance assessments indicate that these algorithms can provide a real-time total position accuracy of better than 10 meters (1 sigma) and velocity accuracy of better than 0.01 meter per second (1 sigma), with selective availability at typical levels. This accuracy is projected to improve to the 2-meter level if corrections to be provided by the GPS Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) are included.

  15. Use of global positioning system (GPS) technology to map cross country pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, J.P.

    1998-12-31

    Using Global Positioning System (GPS) to map pipelines could improve public safety, emergency response, protection of the environment, and reduce operational, regulatory, and asset integrity costs. Sub-meter to meter-level GPS accuracy can be a low-cost mapping technique to capture far more data than traditional meets-and-bound surveys. This paper will address some of the steps in determining what equipment, process, data dictionary, and data collection techniques would best fit the user`s application. Discussion will include the step-increase in costs for accuracy, equipment options, overall survey costs, data collection processes, and benefits of implementing a cost-effective mapping program using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology.

  16. Robust GPS autonomous signal quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndili, Awele Nnaemeka

    The Global Positioning System (GPS), introduced by the U.S. Department of Defense in 1973, provides unprecedented world-wide navigation capabilities through a constellation of 24 satellites in global orbit, each emitting a low-power radio-frequency signal for ranging. GPS receivers track these transmitted signals, computing position to within 30 meters from range measurements made to four satellites. GPS has a wide range of applications, including aircraft, marine and land vehicle navigation. Each application places demands on GPS for various levels of accuracy, integrity, system availability and continuity of service. Radio frequency interference (RFI), which results from natural sources such as TV/FM harmonics, radar or Mobile Satellite Systems (MSS), presents a challenge in the use of GPS, by posing a threat to the accuracy, integrity and availability of the GPS navigation solution. In order to use GPS for integrity-sensitive applications, it is therefore necessary to monitor the quality of the received signal, with the objective of promptly detecting the presence of RFI, and thus provide a timely warning of degradation of system accuracy. This presents a challenge, since the myriad kinds of RFI affect the GPS receiver in different ways. What is required then, is a robust method of detecting GPS accuracy degradation, which is effective regardless of the origin of the threat. This dissertation presents a new method of robust signal quality monitoring for GPS. Algorithms for receiver autonomous interference detection and integrity monitoring are demonstrated. Candidate test statistics are derived from fundamental receiver measurements of in-phase and quadrature correlation outputs, and the gain of the Active Gain Controller (AGC). Performance of selected test statistics are evaluated in the presence of RFI: broadband interference, pulsed and non-pulsed interference, coherent CW at different frequencies; and non-RFI: GPS signal fading due to physical blockage and

  17. Estimating Baselines From Constrained Data On GPS Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindqwister, Ulf J.; Lichten, Stephen M.; Blewitt, Geoffrey I.

    1991-01-01

    Method of processing measurements of signals received at terrestrial stations from satellites in Global Positioning System (GPS) increases precision of estimates of both orbits of GPS satellites and locations of stations, computed from measurement and orbital data. Involves network of fiducial GPS stations collocated with very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI) stations, for which independent VLBI determinations of baselines available. Locations of stations used to establish baselines for geodesy. Potential applications include measurements of seismic and volcanic displacements and movements of tectonic plates.

  18. GPS as an orbit determination subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennessey, Richard; Roberts, Pat; Knight, Robin; Vanvolkinburg, Bart

    1995-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers as a primary source of tracking data for low-Earth orbit satellites. GPS data is an alternative to using range, azimuth, elevation, and range-rate (RAER) data from the Air Force Satellite Control Network antennas, the Space Ground Link System (SGLS). This evaluation is applicable to missions such as Skipper, a joint U.S. and Russian atmosphere research mission, that will rely on a GPS receiver as a primary tracking data source. The Detachment 2, Space and Missile Systems Center's Test Support Complex (TSC) conducted the evaluation based on receiver data from the Space Test Experiment Platform Mission O (STEP-O) and Advanced Photovoltaic and Electronics Experiments (APEX) satellites. The TSC performed orbit reconstruction and prediction on the STEP-0 and APEX vehicles using GPS receiver navigation solution data, SGLS RAER data, and SGLS anglesonly (azimuth and elevation) data. For the STEP-O case, the navigation solution based orbits proved to be more accurate than SGLS RAER based orbits. For the APEX case, navigation solution based orbits proved to be less accurate than SGLS RAER based orbits for orbit prediction, and results for orbit reconstruction were inconclusive due to the lack of a precise truth orbit. After evaluating several different GPS data processing methods, the TSC concluded that using GPS navigation solution data is a viable alternative to using SGLS RAER data.

  19. The Promise of GPS in Atmospheric Monitoring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Businger, Steven; Chiswell, Steven R.; Bevis, Michael; Duan, Jingping; Anthes, Richard A.; Rocken, Christian; Ware, Randolph H.; Exner, Michael; Vanhove, T.; Solheim, Fredrick S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of applications of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for active measurement of the Earth's atmosphere. Microwave radio signals transmitted by GPS satellites are delayed (refracted) by the atmosphere as they propagate to Earth-based GPS receivers or GPS receivers carried on low Earth orbit satellites.The delay in GPS signals reaching Earth-based receivers due to the presence of water vapor is nearly proportional to the quantity of water vapor integrated along the signal path. Measurement of atmospheric water vapor by Earth-based GPS receivers was demonstrated during the GPS/STORM field project to be comparable and in some respects superior to measurements by ground-based water vapor radiometers. Increased spatial and temporal resolution of the water vapor distribution provided by the GPS/STORM network proved useful in monitoring the moisture-flux convergence along a dryline and the decrease in integrated water vapor associated with the passage of a midtropospheric cold front, both of which triggered severe weather over the area during the course of the experiment.Given the rapid growth in regional networks of continuously operating Earth-based GPS receivers currently being implemented, an opportunity exists to observe the distribution of water vapor with increased spatial and temporal coverage, which could prove valuable in a range of operational and research applications in the atmospheric sciences.The first space-based GPS receiver designed for sensing the Earth's atmosphere was launched in April 1995. Phase measurements of GPS signals as they are occluded by the atmosphere provide refractivity profiles (see the companion article by Ware et al. on page 19 of this issue). Water vapor limits the accuracy of temperature recovery below the tropopause because of uncertainty in the water vapor distribution. The sensitivity of atmospheric refractivity to water vapor pressure, however, means that refractivity profiles can in principle

  20. Jammers in the commercial world of GPS

    SciTech Connect

    Wollschlager, B.

    1994-12-31

    The military world of electronic countermeasures is an enviromnent where receivers are designed to perform in a high level of interference or jamming. The electronic battlefield is full of radio frequency interference, both intentional and unintentional, which disrupts communications, fools radar, overloads guidance systems, and in general causes havoc with sensitive electronic systems such as GPS receivers. The commercial radio world is also becoming more electronically hazardous. The FCC has adopted certain emission standards which attempt to control how much ``noise`` electronic devices give off; however, these standards are much less stringent than their military counterparts. For GPS signals with typical power levels of {minus}125 dBm the interfering signals can pose a large in-band or near-band problem. Because the spread spectrum signal exists below thermal noise, any in-band noise also poses a large challenge to GPS reception. Harmonics from a cellular phone, a UHF radio, or a personal computer can cause a GPS receiver to be unable to navigate. Recognition of this problem is causing filter performance profiles such as ARINC 743A and others to become popular for GPS receiver interference rejection. This paper is based on Rockwell`s experience on Navstar GPS programs such as PLGR.

  1. Operational Use of GPS Navigation for Space Shuttle Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Propst, Carolyn A.

    2008-01-01

    The STS-118 flight of the Space Shuttle Endeavour was the first shuttle mission flown with three Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers in place of the three legacy Tactical Air Navigation (TACAN) units. This marked the conclusion of a 15 year effort involving procurement, missionization, integration, and flight testing of a GPS receiver and a parallel effort to formulate and implement shuttle computer software changes to support GPS. The use of GPS data from a single receiver in parallel with TACAN during entry was successfully demonstrated by the orbiters Discovery and Atlantis during four shuttle missions in 2006 and 2007. This provided the confidence needed before flying the first all GPS, no TACAN flight with Endeavour. A significant number of lessons were learned concerning the integration of a software intensive navigation unit into a legacy avionics system. These lessons have been taken into consideration during vehicle design by other flight programs, including the vehicle that will replace the Space Shuttle, Orion.

  2. Real-time ultrasound-guided PCNL using a novel SonixGPS needle tracking system.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Long, Qingzhi; Chen, Xingfa; He, Dalin; Dalin, He; He, Hui

    2014-08-01

    SonixGPS is a successful ultrasound guidance position system. It helps to improve accuracy in performing complex puncture operations. This study firstly used SonixGPS to perform kidney calyx access in PCNL to investigate its effectiveness and safety. This was a prospectively randomized controlled study performed from September 2011 to October 2012. A total of 97 patients were prospectively randomized into two groups using random number generated from SAS software. 47 Patients were enrolled in conventional ultrasound-guided (US-guided) group and 50 patients were classified into SonixGPS-guided group. Nine patients were lost during follow-up. Hence, a total of 88 patients were qualified and analyzed. Preoperative examinations included urine analysis, urine culture, kidney function, coagulation profile and routine analysis of blood. Ultrasonography was used to evaluate the degree of hydronephrosis. The intraoperative findings, including blood loss, operating time, time to successful puncture, the number of attempts for successful puncture and hospital stay were recorded. The stone clearance rate and complications were analyzed. The present study showed no significant difference between the two groups in terms of demographic data, preoperative markers, stone clearance rate and the stone composition. However, the time to successful puncture, the number of trials for successful puncture, operating time and hospital length of stay were significantly decreased in the SonixGPS-guided group. Furthermore, the hemoglobin decrease was also obviously lower in the SonixGPS group than that in conventional US-guided group. SonixGPS needle tacking system guided PCNL is safe and effective in treating upper urinary tract stones. This novel technology makes puncturing more accuracy and can significantly decrease the incidence of relative hemorrhage and accelerate recovery.

  3. GPS Control Segment Improvements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    Systems Center GPS Control Segment Improvements Mr. Tim McIntyre GPS Product Support Manager GPS Ops Support and Sustainment Division Peterson...hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...DATE 29 APR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GPS Control Segment Improvements 5a. CONTRACT

  4. Tractor-mounted, GPS-based spot fumigation system manages Prunus replant disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our research goal was to use recent advances in global positioning system (GPS) and computer technology to apply just the right amount of fumigant where it is most needed (i.e., in a small target treatment zone in and around each tree replanting site) to control Prunus replant disease (PRD). We deve...

  5. Real-Time GPS Monitoring of Atomic Frequency Standards in the Canadian Active Control System (CACS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    orbit predictions and RTACP coordinates in a least-squares adjustment to determine satellite and station clock offsets with respect to a virtual ... reference clock (VRC). The VRC is maintained us a weighted mean of RTACP long-term clock models. The VRC is related to the mean GPS system time using a long

  6. GPS code phase variations (CPV) for GNSS receiver antennas and their effect on geodetic parameters and ambiguity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersten, Tobias; Schön, Steffen

    2016-12-01

    Precise navigation and geodetic coordinate determination rely on accurate GNSS signal reception. Thus, the receiver antenna properties play a crucial role in the GNSS error budget. For carrier phase observations, a spherical radiation pattern represents an ideal receiver antenna behaviour. Deviations are known as phase centre corrections. Due to synergy of carrier and code phase, similar effects on the code exist named code phase variations (CPV). They are mainly attributed to electromagnetic interactions of several active and passive elements of the receiver antenna. Consequently, a calibration and estimation strategy is necessary to determine the shape and magnitudes of the CPV. Such a concept was proposed, implemented and tested at the Institut für Erdmessung. The applied methodology and the obtained results are reported and discussed in this paper. We show that the azimuthal and elevation-dependent CPV can reach maximum magnitudes of 0.2-0.3 m for geodetic antennas and up to maximum values of 1.8 m for small navigation antennas. The obtained values are validated by dedicated tests in the observation and coordinate domain. As a result, CPV are identified to be antenna- related properties that are independent from location and time of calibration. Even for geodetic antennas when forming linear combinations the CPV effect can be amplified to values of 0.4-0.6 m. Thus, a significant fractional of the Melbourne-Wübbena linear combination. A case study highlights that incorrect ambiguity resolution can occur due to neglecting CPV corrections. The impact on the coordinates which may reach up to the dm level is illustrated.

  7. Investigations of the Nature and Behavior of Plasma Density Disturbances That May Impact GPS and Other Transionospheric Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    maintained and enhanced in association with the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ). In addition to a classic riometer and a GPS Total...Electron Content (TEC) sensor previously operating at the HAARP site, NWRA also operates a set of Transit receivers for measurements of TEC and...scintillation at VHF and UHF, supplementing the receiver at HAARP with a receiver north of the site and an additional receiver installed south of the HAARP site.

  8. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor... Corporation approval of the electronic system as a condition to the electronic transmission and reception...

  9. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor... Corporation approval of the electronic system as a condition to the electronic transmission and reception...

  10. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor... Corporation approval of the electronic system as a condition to the electronic transmission and reception...

  11. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor... Corporation approval of the electronic system as a condition to the electronic transmission and reception...

  12. Road safety alerting system with radar and GPS cooperation in a VANET environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, Amilcare Francesco; Sottile, Cesare; De Rango, Floriano; Voznak, Miroslav

    2014-05-01

    New applications in wireless environments are increasing and keeping even more interests from the developer companies and researchers. In particular, in these last few years the government and institutional organization for road safety spent a lot of resources and money to promote Vehicular Ad-Hoc Network (VANET) technology, also car manufactures are giving a lot of contributions on this field as well. In our paper, we propose an innovative system to increase road safety, matching the requests of the market allowing a cooperation between on-board devices. The vehicles are equipped with On Board Unit (OBU) and On Board Radar Unit (OBRU), which can spread alerting messages around the network regarding warning and dangerous situations exploiting IEEE802.llp standard. Vehicles move along roads observing the environment, traffic and road conditions, and vehicles parameters as well. These information can be elaborated and shared between neighbors, Road Side Unit (RSU)s and, of course, with Internet, allowing inter-system communications exploiting an Road Traffic Manager (RTM). Radar systems task it the detection of the environment in order to increase the knowledge of current conditions of the roads, for example it is important to identify obstacles, road accidents, dangerous situations and so on. Once detected exploiting onboard devices, such as Global Position System (GPS) receiver it is possible to know the exact location of the caught event and after a data elaboration the information is spread along the network. Once the drivers are advised, they can make some precautionary actions such as reduction of traveling speed or modification of current road path. In this work the routing algorithms, which have the main goal to rapidly disseminate information, are also been investigated.

  13. Demonstration of the fiducial concept using data from the March 1985 GPS field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. M.; Thornton, C. L.; Stephens, S. A.; Wu, S. C.; Lichten, S. M.; Border, J. S.; Sovers, O. J.; Dixon, T. H.; Williams, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    The first field test of NASA's Global Positioning System (GPS) Geodetic Program took place in March of 1985. The principal objective of this test was the demonstration of the feasibility of the fiducial station approach to precise GPS-based geodesy and orbit determination. Other objectives included an assessment of the performance of the several GPS receiver types involved in these field tests and the testing of the GIPSY software for GPS data analysis. In this article, the GIPSY (GPS Inferred Positioning System) software system is described and baseline solutions are examined for consistency with independent measurements made using very long baseline interferometry.

  14. 75 FR 28318 - Eighty-Second Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... include: Specific Working Group Sessions Tuesday, June 8th All Day, Working Group 2C, GPS/Inertial, Colson...). GPS/GLONASS (WG-2A). GPS/Inertial (WG-2C). GPS/Precision Landing Guidance (WG-4). GPS/Airport...

  15. Towards GPS Surface Reflection Remote Sensing of Sea Ice Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, A.; Maslanik, J. A.; Zavorotny, V. U.; Axelrad, P.; Katzberg, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the research to extend the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reflections, received by airborne instruments, to cryospheric remote sensing. The characteristics of the GPS signals and equipment afford the possibility of new measurements not possible with existing radar and passive microwave systems. In particular, the GPS receiving systems are small and light-weight, and as such are particularly well suited to be deployed on small aircraft or satellite platforms with minimal impact. Our preliminary models and experimental results indicate that reflected GPS signals have potential to provide information on the presence and condition of sea and fresh-water ice as well as the freeze/thaw state of frozen ground. In this paper we show results from aircraft experiments over the ice pack near Barrow, Alaska suggesting correlation between forward scattered GPS returns and RADARSAT backscattered signals.

  16. Evaluation of advanced sodium receiver losses during operation of the IEA/SSPS central receiver system

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona, R.; Rosa, F.; Jacobs, H.; Sanchez, M.

    1989-02-01

    This article presents the measurements and experiments conducted on the external receiver: the so-called Advanced Sodium Receiver (ASR) of the Small Solar Power Systems (SSPS) Project of the International Energy Agency (IEA) in southern Spain. The basis of this experiment was to provide loss measurements for later use in determining receiver performance. The tests to evaluate thermal losses consisted in operating the receiver with the doors open and circulating the sodium in normal and reverse flow without providing any incident power from the heliostat field (flux-off technique). In this way, total thermal losses are calculated as the energy lost by the sodium. Radiative losses have been calculated based on theoretical calculations and some results have been compared with infrared thermography measurements. Conductive losses are small and have been estimated by flux-off experiments with the receiver doors closed. Convective losses were evaluated subtracting radiative and conductive losses from the total thermal losses. Optical losses were assessed using absorptance measurements of the receiver coating. A simplified analytical model has been developed to calculate losses and ASR efficiency during operation. In spite of the method's simplicity, the results are very similar to those found by other investigators, verified simulation programs and test results.

  17. GPS Moving Vehicle Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oaks, O. J.; Reid, Wilson; Wright, James; Duffey, Christopher; Williams, Charles; Warren, Hugh; Zeh, Tom; Buisson, James

    1996-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in the development of timing systems for remote locations, had a technical requirement for a Y code (SA/AS) Global Positioning System (GPS) precise time transfer receiver (TTR) which could be used both in a stationary mode or mobile mode. A contract was awarded to the Stanford Telecommunication Corporation (STEL) to build such a device. The Eastern Range (ER) als had a requirement for such a receiver and entered into the contract with NRL for the procurement of additional receivers. The Moving Vehicle Experiment (MVE) described in this paper is the first in situ test of the STEL Model 5401C Time Transfer System in both stationary and mobile operations. The primary objective of the MVE was to test the timing accuracy of the newly developed GPS TTR aboard a moving vessel. To accomplish this objective, a joint experiment was performed with personnel from NRL and the er at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) test range at Andros Island. Results and discussion of the test are presented in this paper.

  18. Comparison of global positioning system (GPS) tracking and parent-report diaries to characterize children's time-location patterns.

    PubMed

    Elgethun, Kai; Yost, Michael G; Fitzpatrick, Cole T E; Nyerges, Timothy L; Fenske, Richard A

    2007-03-01

    Respondent error, low resolution, and study participant burden are known limitations of diary timelines used in exposure studies such as the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS). Recent advances in global positioning system (GPS) technology have produced tracking devices sufficiently portable, functional and affordable to utilize in exposure assessment science. In this study, a differentially corrected GPS (dGPS) tracking device was compared to the NHEXAS diary timeline. The study also explored how GPS can be used to evaluate and improve such diary timelines by determining which location categories and which respondents are least likely to record "correct" time-location responses. A total of 31 children ages 3-5 years old wore a dGPS device for all waking hours on a weekend day while their parents completed the NHEXAS diary timeline to document the child's time-location pattern. Parents misclassified child time-location approximately 48% of the time using the NHEXAS timeline in comparison to dGPS. Overall concordance between methods was marginal (kappa=0.33-0.35). The dGPS device found that on average, children spent 76% of the 24-h study period in the home. The diary underestimated time the child spent in the home by 17%, while overestimating time spent inside other locations, outside at home, outside in other locations, and time spent in transit. Diary data for time spent outside at home and time in transit had the lowest response concordance with dGPS. The diaries of stay-at-home mothers and mothers working unskilled labor jobs had lower concordance with dGPS than did those of the other participants. The ability of dGPS tracking to collect continuous rather than categorical (ordinal) data was also demonstrated. It is concluded that automated GPS tracking measurements can improve the quality and collection efficiency of time-location data in exposure assessment studies, albeit for small cohorts.

  19. Precision GPS ephemerides and baselines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The required knowledge of the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite position accuracy can vary depending on a particular application. Application to relative positioning of receiver locations on the ground to infer Earth's tectonic plate motion requires the most accurate knowledge of the GPS satellite orbits. Research directed towards improving and evaluating the accuracy of GPS satellite orbits was conducted at the University of Texas Center for Space Research (CSR). Understanding and modeling the forces acting on the satellites was a major focus of the research. Other aspects of orbit determination, such as the reference frame, time system, measurement modeling, and parameterization, were also investigated. Gravitational forces were modeled by truncated versions of extant gravity fields such as, Goddard Earth Model (GEM-L2), GEM-T1, TEG-2, and third body perturbations due to the Sun and Moon. Nongravitational forces considered were the solar radiation pressure, and perturbations due to thermal venting and thermal imbalance. At the GPS satellite orbit accuracy level required for crustal dynamic applications, models for the nongravitational perturbation play a critical role, since the gravitational forces are well understood and are modeled adequately for GPS satellite orbits.

  20. Geodetic GPS interferometer design work at the Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysinski, Z.; Vorbrich, K. K.

    1985-10-01

    The feasibility and potential accuracy of employing GPS signals and mobile receivers as a very long base interferometry (VLBI) network for precision geodesy is explored. The primary listening devices would be large radio telescopes tuned to both quasars and GPS spacecraft. The mobile units would densify the receiver network, particularly for the GPS signals. Numerical models are defined for the SNR, expected errors, and bandwidth synthesis to lower the SNR. A block diagram is provided for a mobile receiver which would treat the GPS signals as white noise. Finally, software features are considered which would be necessary for simulating the system and establishing effective operational and data processing procedures.

  1. IRI-vTEC versus GPS-vTEC for Nigerian SCINDA GPS stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoh, Daniel; McKinnell, Lee-Anne; Cilliers, Pierre; Okere, Bonaventure; Okonkwo, Chinelo; Rabiu, Babatunde

    2015-04-01

    Following the recent proliferation of dual-frequency GPS (Global Positioning System) receiver systems across the African continent, there is a growing number of papers that compare vertical Total Electron Content (vTEC) values derived from the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model with those obtained from the GPS receiver measurements. In this work we report an investigation of IRI-vTEC versus GPS-vTEC comparisons for three Nigerian SCINDAGPS stations (Nsukka, Ilorin, and Lagos) for which data are available in the year 2012, and present a further review of the differences/similarities observed between them. Since a major interest in this work is to use the GPS measurements to improve the predictions of the IRI model for the region, we present a detailed regression analysis of differences between the two sources in a manner that will benefit this application.

  2. Sensible heat receiver for solar dynamic space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Gaier, James R.; Petrefski, Chris

    1991-01-01

    A sensible heat receiver considered in this study uses a vapor grown carbon fiber-carbon (VGCF/C) composite as the thermal storage media and was designed for a 7 kW Brayton engine. The proposed heat receiver stores the required energy to power the system during eclipse in the VGCF/C composite. The heat receiver thermal analysis was conducted through the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer and Fluid Integrator (SINDA) software package. The sensible heat receiver compares well with other latent and advanced sensible heat receivers analyzed in other studies while avoiding the problems associated with latent heat storage salts and liquid metal heat pipes. The concept also satisfies the design requirements for a 7 kW Brayton engine system. The weight and size of the system can be optimized by changes in geometry and technology advances for this new material.

  3. Sensible heat receiver for solar dynamic space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Gaier, James R.; Petrefski, Chris

    1991-01-01

    A sensible heat receiver is considered which uses a vapor grown carbon fiber-carbon (VGCF/C) composite as the thermal storage medium and which was designed for a 7-kW Brayton engine. This heat receiver stores the required energy to power the system during eclipse in the VGCF/C composite. The heat receiver thermal analysis was conducted through the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer and Fluid Integrator (SINDA) software package. The sensible heat receiver compares well with other latent and advanced sensible heat receivers analyzed in other studies, while avoiding the problems associated with latent heat storage salts and liquid metal heat pipes. The concept also satisfies the design requirements for a 7-kW Brayton engine system. The weight and size of the system can be optimized by changes in geometry and technology advances for this new material.

  4. Design of cold chain logistics remote monitoring system based on ZigBee and GPS location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Xiaoping; Shao, Heling

    2017-03-01

    This paper designed a remote monitoring system based on Bee Zig wireless sensor network and GPS positioning, according to the characteristics of cold chain logistics. The system consisted of the ZigBee network, gateway and monitoring center. ZigBee network temperature acquisition modules and GPS positioning acquisition module were responsible for data collection, and then send the data to the host computer through the GPRS network and Internet to realize remote monitoring of vehicle with functions of login permissions, temperature display, latitude and longitude display, historical data, real-time alarm and so on. Experiments showed that the system is stable, reliable and effective to realize the real-time remote monitoring of the vehicle in the process of cold chain transport.

  5. Automated time activity classification based on global positioning system (GPS) tracking data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Air pollution epidemiological studies are increasingly using global positioning system (GPS) to collect time-location data because they offer continuous tracking, high temporal resolution, and minimum reporting burden for participants. However, substantial uncertainties in the processing and classifying of raw GPS data create challenges for reliably characterizing time activity patterns. We developed and evaluated models to classify people's major time activity patterns from continuous GPS tracking data. Methods We developed and evaluated two automated models to classify major time activity patterns (i.e., indoor, outdoor static, outdoor walking, and in-vehicle travel) based on GPS time activity data collected under free living conditions for 47 participants (N = 131 person-days) from the Harbor Communities Time Location Study (HCTLS) in 2008 and supplemental GPS data collected from three UC-Irvine research staff (N = 21 person-days) in 2010. Time activity patterns used for model development were manually classified by research staff using information from participant GPS recordings, activity logs, and follow-up interviews. We evaluated two models: (a) a rule-based model that developed user-defined rules based on time, speed, and spatial location, and (b) a random forest decision tree model. Results Indoor, outdoor static, outdoor walking and in-vehicle travel activities accounted for 82.7%, 6.1%, 3.2% and 7.2% of manually-classified time activities in the HCTLS dataset, respectively. The rule-based model classified indoor and in-vehicle travel periods reasonably well (Indoor: sensitivity > 91%, specificity > 80%, and precision > 96%; in-vehicle travel: sensitivity > 71%, specificity > 99%, and precision > 88%), but the performance was moderate for outdoor static and outdoor walking predictions. No striking differences in performance were observed between the rule-based and the random forest models. The random forest model was fast and easy to execute

  6. An Investigation of Multipath Effects on the GPS System During Auto-Rendezvous and Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richie, James E.; Forest, Francis W.

    1995-01-01

    The proposed use of a Cargo Transport Vehicle (CTV) to carry hardware to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) during the construction phase of the SSF project requires remote maneuvering of the CTV. The CTV is not a manned vehicle. Obtaining the relative positions of the CTV and SSF for remote auto-rendezvous and capture (AR&C) scenarios will rely heavily on the Global Positioning System (GPS). The GPS system is expected to guide the CTV up to a distance of 100 to 300 meters from the SSF. At some point within this range, an optical docking system will take over the remote guidance for capture. During any remote guidance by GPS it is possible that significant multipath signals may be caused by large objects in the vicinity of the module being remotely guided. This could alter the position obtained by the GPS system from the actual position. Due to the nature of the GPS signals, it has been estimated that if the difference in distance between the Line of Sight (LOS) path and the multipath is greater than 300 meters, the GPS system is capable of discriminating between the direct signal and the reflected (or multipath) signal. However, if the path difference is less than 300 meters, one must be concerned. This report details the work accomplished by the Electromagnetic Simulations Laboratory at Marquette University over the period December 1993 to May 1995. This work is an investigation of the strength and phase of a multipath signal arriving at the CTV relative to the direct or line of sight (LOS) signal. The signal originates at a GPS satellite in half geo-stationary orbit and takes two paths to the CTV: (1) the direct or LOS path from the GPS satellite to the CTV; and (2) a scattered path from the GPS satellite to the SSF module and then to the CTV. The scattering from a cylinder has been computed using the physical optics approximation for the current. No other approximations or assumptions have been made including no assumptions regarding the far field or Fresnel field

  7. A Self-Tuning Kalman Filter for Autonomous Navigation Using the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Son H.

    1999-01-01

    Most navigation systems currently operated by NASA are ground-based, and require extensive support to produce accurate results. Recently developed systems that use Kalman filter and GPS (Global Positioning Systems) data for orbit determination greatly reduce dependency on ground support, and have potential to provide significant economies for NASA spacecraft navigation. These systems, however, still rely on manual tuning from analysts. A sophisticated neuro-fuzzy component fully integrated with the flight navigation system can perform the self-tuning capability for the Kalman filter and help the navigation system recover from estimation errors in real time.

  8. System for Isolation Testing of RF Transmitters and Receivers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-03

    one such software defined radio is the open source GNU radio platform utilizing the Universal Software Radio Peripheral. [0019] The advantages of...to a system that can perform isolation testing of a radio frequency (RF) transmitter or an RF receiver. (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004...Currently, the testing and diagnosing of a faulty radio frequency (RF) transmission and receiving systems requires that the system be taken out of the

  9. GPS and GPRS Based Telemonitoring System for Emergency Patient Transportation.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, K; Sarma, A D; Sravan, J; Malini, M; Venkateswarlu, G

    2013-01-01

    Telemonitoring during the golden hour of patient transportation helps to improve medical care. Presently there are different physiological data acquisition and transmission systems using cellular network and radio communication links. Location monitoring systems and video transmission systems are also commercially available. The emergency patient transportation systems uniquely require transmission of data pertaining to the patient, vehicle, time of the call, physiological signals (like ECG, blood pressure, a body temperature, and blood oxygen saturation), location information, a snap shot of the patient, and voice. These requirements are presently met by using separate communication systems for voice, physiological data, and location that result in a lot of inconvenience to the technicians, maintenance related issues, in addition to being expensive. This paper presents design, development, and implementation of such a telemonitoring system for emergency patient transportation employing ARM 9 processor module. This system is found to be very useful for the emergency patient transportation being undertaken by organizations like the Emergency Management Research Institute (EMRI).

  10. Precise estimation of tropospheric path delays with GPS techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    Tropospheric path delays are a major source of error in deep space tracking. However, the tropospheric-induced delay at tracking sites can be calibrated using measurements of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. A series of experiments has demonstrated the high sensitivity of GPS to tropospheric delays. A variety of tests and comparisons indicates that current accuracy of the GPS zenith tropospheric delay estimates is better than 1-cm root-mean-square over many hours, sampled continuously at intervals of six minutes. These results are consistent with expectations from covariance analyses. The covariance analyses also indicate that by the mid-1990s, when the GPS constellation is complete and the Deep Space Network is equipped with advanced GPS receivers, zenith tropospheric delay accuracy with GPS will improve further to 0.5 cm or better.

  11. Determination of locational error associated with global positioning system (GPS) radio collars in relation to vegetation and topography in north-central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.R.

    1997-02-01

    In 1996, a study was initiated to assess seasonal habitat use and movement patterns of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) using global positioning system (GPS) radio collars. As part of this study, the authors attempted to assess the accuracies of GPS (non-differentially corrected) positions under various vegetation canopies and terrain conditions with the use of a GPS ``test`` collar. The test collar was activated every twenty minutes to obtain a position location and continuously uplinked to Argos satellites to transfer position data files. They used a Telonics, Inc. uplink receiver to intercept the transmission and view the results of the collar in real time. They placed the collar on a stand equivalent to the neck height of an adult elk and then placed the stand within three different treatment categories: (1) topographical influence (canyon and mesa tops), (2) canopy influence (open and closed canopy), and (3) vegetation type influence (ponderosa pine and pinion pine-juniper). The collar was kept at each location for one hour (usually obtaining three fixes). In addition, the authors used a hand-held GPS to obtain a position of the test collar at the same time and location.

  12. Low cost airborne microwave landing system receiver, task 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. B.; Vancleave, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Work performed on the low cost airborne Microwave Landing System (MLS) receiver is summarized. A detailed description of the prototype low cost MLS receiver is presented. This detail includes block diagrams, schematics, board assembly drawings, photographs of subassemblies, mechanical construction, parts lists, and microprocessor software. Test procedures are described and results are presented.

  13. The REFSAT approach to low-cost GPS terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sennott, J. W.; Choudhury, A. K.; Taylor, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    A concept utilizing a geostationary reference satellite (REFSAT) that broadcasts navigation aiding signals to low cost civil user terminals which employ the constellation of 24 NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites for position determination is described. The signal acquisition, tracking and position fixing properties of such low cost, dual channel, L-band, civil user receiver designed to receive both GPS navigation and REFSAT navigation aiding signals is presented. REFSAT reduces the cost of user equipment.

  14. A Simple Method to Improve Autonomous GPS Positioning for Tractors

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Gil, Jaime; Alonso-Garcia, Sergio; Gómez-Gil, Francisco Javier; Stombaugh, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Error is always present in the GPS guidance of a tractor along a desired trajectory. One way to reduce GPS guidance error is by improving the tractor positioning. The most commonly used ways to do this are either by employing more precise GPS receivers and differential corrections or by employing GPS together with some other local positioning systems such as electronic compasses or Inertial Navigation Systems (INS). However, both are complex and expensive solutions. In contrast, this article presents a simple and low cost method to improve tractor positioning when only a GPS receiver is used as the positioning sensor. The method is based on placing the GPS receiver ahead of the tractor, and on applying kinematic laws of tractor movement, or a geometric approximation, to obtain the midpoint position and orientation of the tractor rear axle more precisely. This precision improvement is produced by the fusion of the GPS data with tractor kinematic control laws. Our results reveal that the proposed method effectively reduces the guidance GPS error along a straight trajectory. PMID:22163917

  15. A simple method to improve autonomous GPS positioning for tractors.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gil, Jaime; Alonso-Garcia, Sergio; Gómez-Gil, Francisco Javier; Stombaugh, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Error is always present in the GPS guidance of a tractor along a desired trajectory. One way to reduce GPS guidance error is by improving the tractor positioning. The most commonly used ways to do this are either by employing more precise GPS receivers and differential corrections or by employing GPS together with some other local positioning systems such as electronic compasses or Inertial Navigation Systems (INS). However, both are complex and expensive solutions. In contrast, this article presents a simple and low cost method to improve tractor positioning when only a GPS receiver is used as the positioning sensor. The method is based on placing the GPS receiver ahead of the tractor, and on applying kinematic laws of tractor movement, or a geometric approximation, to obtain the midpoint position and orientation of the tractor rear axle more precisely. This precision improvement is produced by the fusion of the GPS data with tractor kinematic control laws. Our results reveal that the proposed method effectively reduces the guidance GPS error along a straight trajectory.

  16. Recent GPS Results at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Behrend, Dirk; Imfeld, Hans L.; /SLAC

    2005-08-17

    The Alignment Engineering Group (AEG) makes use of GPS technology for fulfilling part of its above ground surveying tasks at SLAC since early 2002. A base station (SLAC M40) has been set up at a central location of the SLAC campus serving both as master station for real-time kinematic (RTK) operations and as datum point for local GPS campaigns. The Leica RS500 system is running continuously and the GPS data are collected both externally (logging PC) and internally (receiver flashcard). The external logging is facilitated by a serial to Ethernet converter and an Ethernet connection at the station. Internal logging (ring buffer) is done for data security purposes. The weatherproof boxes for the instrumentation are excellent shelters against rain and wind, but do heat up considerably in sun light. Whereas the GPS receiver showed no problems, the Pacific Crest PDL 35 radio shut down several times due to overheating disrupting the RTK operations. In order to prevent heat-induced shutdowns, a protection against direct sun exposure (shading) and a constant air circulation system (ventilation) were installed. As no further shutdowns have occurred so far, it appears that the two measures successfully mended the heat problem.

  17. A Self-Tuning Kalman Filter for Autonomous Navigation using the Global Positioning System (GPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, S. H.

    1999-01-01

    Most navigation systems currently operated by NASA are ground-based, and require extensive support to produce accurate results. Recently developed systems that use Kalman filter and GPS data for orbit determination greatly reduce dependency on ground support, and have potential to provide significant economies for NASA spacecraft navigation. These systems, however, still rely on manual tuning from analysts. A sophisticated neuro-fuzzy component fully integrated with the flight navigation system can perform the self-tuning capability for the Kalman filter and help the navigation system recover from estimation errors in real time.

  18. GPS (Global Positioning System) User Equipment Evaluation Techniques Using a Rotor Mounted Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    MEASUREMENT PROCEDURE 5 6. RECOMMENDATIONS 6 REFERENCES 8 LIST OF FIGURES 1. Rotor induced Kalman filtr arror in reported position 9 2. Grid representing...centre will depend on Kalman filter characteristics and will tend to increase with rotor speed. GPS system noise was observed to obey Rayleigh...delayed difference measurement of reported diameter of antenna path to an accuracy of better than 0.5 m over 30 min. This method of Kalman error

  19. The March 1985 demonstration of the fiducial network concept for GPS geodesy: A preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. M.; Thornton, C. L.; Dixon, T. H.; Vegos, C. J.; Young, L. E.; Yunck, T. P.

    1986-01-01

    The first field tests in preparation for the NASA Global Positioning System (GPS) Caribbean Initiative were conducted in late March and Early April of 1985. The GPS receivers were located at the POLARIS Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) stations at Westford, Massachusetts; Richmond, Florida; and Ft. Davis, Texas; and at the Mojave, Owens Valley, and Hat Creek VLBI stations in California. Other mobile receivers were placed near Mammoth Lakes, California; Pt. Mugu, California; Austin, Texas; and Dahlgren, Virginia. These sites were equipped with a combination of GPS receiver types, including SERIES-X, TI-4100 and AFGL dual frequency receivers. The principal objectives of these tests were the demonstration of the fiducial network concept for precise GPS geodesy, the performance assessment of the participating GPS receiver types, and to conduct the first in a series of experiments to monitor ground deformation in the Mammoth Lakes-Long Valley caldera region in California. Other objectives included the testing of the water vapor radiometers for the calibration of GPS data, the development of efficient procedures for planning and coordinating GPS field exercise, the establishment of institutional interfaces for future cooperating ventures, the testing of the GPS Data Analysis Software (GIPSY, for GPS Inferred Positioning SYstem), and the establishment of a set of calibration baselines in California. Preliminary reports of the success of the field tests, including receiver performance and data quality, and on the status of the data analysis software are given.

  20. Initial Verification of the GPS-LEO Occultation Technique of Mapping the Atmosphere with the GPS-MET Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, G. A.; Kursinski, E. R.; Bertiger, W. I.; Leroy, S. S.; Romans, L. J.; Schofield, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    The radio occultation technique was first used to observe Earth's atmosphere in April 1995 when a high performance Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver was placed into a low-Earth orbit. When a signal from the GPS travels through the ionosphere and the neutral atmosphere, and is received by a low-Earth orbiter (LEO) satellite, occultation data is generated. How that data is analyzed is presented.

  1. GPS and GPRS Based Telemonitoring System for Emergency Patient Transportation

    PubMed Central

    Satyanarayana, K.; Sarma, A. D.; Sravan, J.; Malini, M.; Venkateswarlu, G.

    2013-01-01

    Telemonitoring during the golden hour of patient transportation helps to improve medical care. Presently there are different physiological data acquisition and transmission systems using cellular network and radio communication links. Location monitoring systems and video transmission systems are also commercially available. The emergency patient transportation systems uniquely require transmission of data pertaining to the patient, vehicle, time of the call, physiological signals (like ECG, blood pressure, a body temperature, and blood oxygen saturation), location information, a snap shot of the patient, and voice. These requirements are presently met by using separate communication systems for voice, physiological data, and location that result in a lot of inconvenience to the technicians, maintenance related issues, in addition to being expensive. This paper presents design, development, and implementation of such a telemonitoring system for emergency patient transportation employing ARM 9 processor module. This system is found to be very useful for the emergency patient transportation being undertaken by organizations like the Emergency Management Research Institute (EMRI). PMID:27019844

  2. An integrated GPS-FID system for airborne gas detection of pipeline right-of-ways

    SciTech Connect

    Gehue, H.L.; Sommer, P.

    1996-12-31

    Pipeline integrity, safety and environmental concerns are of prime importance in the Canadian natural gas industry. Terramatic Technology Inc. (TTI) has developed an integrated GPS/FID gas detection system known as TTI-AirTrac{trademark} for use in airborne gas detection (AGD) along pipeline right-of-ways. The Flame Ionization Detector (FID), which has traditionally been used to monitor air quality for gas plants and refineries, has been integrated with the Global Positioning System (GPS) via a 486 DX2-50 computer and specialized open architecture data acquisition software. The purpose of this technology marriage is to be able to continuously monitor air quality during airborne pipeline inspection. Event tagging from visual surveillance is used to determine an explanation of any delta line deviations (DLD). These deviations are an indication of hydrocarbon gases present in the plume that the aircraft has passed through. The role of the GPS system is to provide mapping information and coordinate data for ground inspections. The ground based inspection using a handheld multi gas detector will confirm whether or not a leak exists.

  3. On principles, methods and recent advances in studies towards a GPS-based control system for geodesy and geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delikaraoglou, Demitris

    1989-01-01

    Although Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) and Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) are becoming increasingly important tools for geodynamic studies, their future role may well be fulfilled by using alternative techniques such as those utilizing the signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS). GPS, without the full implementation of the system, already offers a favorable combination of cost and accuracy and has consistently demonstrated the capability to provide high precision densification control in the regional and local areas of the VLBI and SLR networks. This report reviews VLBI and SLR vis-a-vis GPS and outlines the capabilities and limitations of each technique and how their complementary application can be of benefit to geodetic and geodynamic operations. It demonstrates, albeit with a limited data set, that dual-frequency GPS observations and interferometric type analysis techniques make possible the modelling of the GPS orbits for several days with an accuracy of a few meters. The use of VLBI or SLR sites as fiducial stations together with refinements in the orbit determination procedures can greatly reduce the systematic errors in the GPS satellite orbits used to compute the positions of non-fiducial locations. In general, repeatability and comparison with VLBI of the GPS determined locations are of the order of between 2 parts in 10 to the 7th power and 5 parts in 10 to the 8th power for baseline lengths less than 2000 km. This report is mainly a synthesis of problems, assumptions, methods and recent advances in the studies towards the establishment of a GPS-based system for geodesy and geodynamics and is one phase in the continuing effort for the development of such a system. To some, including the author, it seems reasonable to expect within the next few years that more evidence will show GPS to be as a powerful and reliable a tool as mobile VLBI and SLR are today, but largely more economical.

  4. 75 FR 2581 - Eighty-First Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... include: Specific Working Group Sessions Tuesday, February 2nd All Day, Working Group 2C, GPS/Inertial.../3rd Civil Frequency (WG-1). GPS/WAAS (WG-2). GPS/GLONASS (WG-2A). GPS/Inertial (WG-2C)....

  5. Hybrid sodium heat pipe receivers for dish/Stirling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Laing, D.; Reusch, M.

    1997-12-31

    The design of a hybrid solar/gas heat pipe receiver for the SBP 9 kW dish/Stirling system using a United Stirling AB V160 Stirling engine and the results of on-sun testing in alternative and parallel mode will be reported. The receiver is designed to transfer a thermal power of 35 kW. The heat pipe operates at around 800 C, working fluid is sodium. Operational options are solar-only, gas augmented and gas-only mode. Also the design of a second generation hybrid heat pipe receiver currently developed under a EU-funded project, based on the experience gained with the first hybrid receiver, will be reported. This receiver is designed for the improved SPB/L. and C.-10 kW dish/Stirling system with the reworked SOLO V161 Stirling engine.

  6. 80. Survivable lowfrequency communications system receiver, teletypewriter set, radio, teleprinter, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. Survivable low-frequency communications system receiver, teletypewriter set, radio, teleprinter, south side - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  7. 9. Water Purification System and Instrument Air Receiver Tank, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Water Purification System and Instrument Air Receiver Tank, view to the south. The water purification system is visible in the right foreground of the photograph and the instrument air receiver tank is visible in the right background of the photograph. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  8. Scintillation Effects on Space Shuttle GPS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Kramer, Leonard

    2001-01-01

    Irregularities in ionospheric electron density result in variation in amplitude and phase of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals, or scintillation. GPS receivers tracking scintillated signals may lose carrier phase or frequency lock in the case of phase sc intillation. Amplitude scintillation can cause "enhancement" or "fading" of GPS signals and result in loss of lock. Scintillation can occur over the equatorial and polar regions and is a function of location, time of day, season, and solar and geomagnetic activity. Mid latitude regions are affected only very rarely, resulting from highly disturbed auroral events. In the spring of 1998, due to increasing concern about scintillation of GPS signals during the upcoming solar maximum, the Space Shuttle Program began to assess the impact of scintillation on Collins Miniaturized Airborne GPS Receiver (MAGR) units that are to replace Tactical Air Control and Navigation (TACAN) units on the Space Shuttle orbiters. The Shuttle Program must determine if scintillation effects pose a threat to safety of flight and mission success or require procedural and flight rule changes. Flight controllers in Mission Control must understand scintillation effects on GPS to properly diagnose "off nominal" GPS receiver performance. GPS data from recent Space Shuttle missions indicate that the signals tracked by the Shuttle MAGR manifest scintillation. Scintillation is observed as anomalous noise in velocity measurements lasting for up to 20 minutes on Shuttle orbit passes and are not accounted for in the error budget of the MAGR accuracy parameters. These events are typically coincident with latitude and local time occurrence of previously identified equatorial spread F within about 20 degrees of the magnetic equator. The geographic and seasonal history of these events from ground-based observations and a simple theoretical model, which have potential for predicting events for operational purposes, are reviewed.

  9. Integrated Inertial/gps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, Paul; Vangraas, Frank

    1990-01-01

    The presence of failures in navigation sensors can cause the determination of an erroneous aircraft state estimate, which includes position, attitude, and their derivatives. Aircraft flight control systems rely on sensor inputs to determine the aircraft state. In the case of integrated Inertial/NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS), sensor failures could occur in the on-board inertial sensors or in the GPS measurements. The synergistic use of both GPS and the Inertial Navigation System (INS) allows for highly reliable fault detection and isolation of sensor failures. Integrated Inertial/GPS is a promising technology for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) and the return and landing of a manned space vehicle.

  10. USNO GPS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putkovich, K.

    1981-01-01

    Initial test results indicated that the Global Positioning System/Time Transfer Unit (GPS/TTU) performed well within the + or - 100 nanosecond range required by the original system specification. Subsequent testing involved the verification of GPS time at the master control site via portable clocks and the acquisition and tracking of as many passes of the space vehicles currently in operation as possible. A description and discussion of the testing, system modifications, test results obtained, and an evaluation of both GPS and the GPS/TTU are presented.

  11. 78 FR 13396 - 90th Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ...., Working Group 2, GPS/SBAS, A4A Room. 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m., Working Group 4, Precision Landing Guidance, GPS/GBAS, MacIntosh-NBAA Room and Colson Board Room. March 14 Working Group 4, Precision Landing Guidance.../3nd Civil Frequency (WG-1). GPS/WAAS (WG-2). GPS/GLONASS (WG-2A). GPS/Inertial (WG-2C)....

  12. The Spring 1985 high precision baseline test of the JPL GPS-based geodetic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John M.; Thornton, Catherine L.; Stephens, Scott A.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Lichten, Stephen M.; Sovers, Ojars J.; Kroger, Peter M.; Skrumeda, Lisa L.; Border, James S.; Neilan, Ruth E.

    1987-01-01

    The Spring 1985 High Precision Baseline Test (HPBT) was conducted. The HPBT was designed to meet a number of objectives. Foremost among these was the demonstration of a level of accuracy of 1 to 2:10 to the 7th power, or better, for baselines ranging in length up to several hundred kilometers. These objectives were all met with a high degree of success, with respect to the demonstration of system accuracy in particular. The results from six baselines ranging in length from 70 to 729 km were examined for repeatability and, in the case of three baselines, were compared to results from colocated VLBI systems. Repeatability was found to be 5:10 to the 8th power (RMS) for the north baseline coordinate, independent of baseline length, while for the east coordinate RMS repeatability was found to be larger than this by factors of 2 to 4. The GPS-based results were found to be in agreement with those from colocated VLBI measurements, when corrected for the physical separations of the VLBI and CPG antennas, at the level of 1 to 2:10 to the 7th power in all coordinates, independent of baseline length. The results for baseline repeatability are consistent with the current GPA error budget, but the GPS-VLBI intercomparisons disagree at a somewhat larger level than expected. It is hypothesized that these differences may result from errors in the local survey measurements used to correct for the separations of the GPS and VLBI antenna reference centers.

  13. Design and flight test of a differential GPS/inertial navigation system for approach/landing guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallot, Lawrence; Snyder, Scott; Schipper, Brian; Parker, Nigel; Spitzer, Cary

    1991-01-01

    NASA-Langley has conducted a flight test program evaluating a differential GPS/inertial navigation system's (DGPS/INS) utility as an approach/landing aid. The DGPS/INS airborne and ground components are based on off-the-shelf transport aircraft avionics, namely a global positioning/inertial reference unit (GPIRU) and two GPS sensor units (GPSSUs). Systematic GPS errors are measured by the ground GPSSU and transmitted to the aircraft GPIRU, allowing the errors to be eliminated or greatly reduced in the airborne equipment. Over 120 landings were flown; 36 of these were fully automatic DGPS/INS landings.

  14. COSMIC Payload in NCAR-NASPO GPS Satellite System for Severe Weather Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai-Chen, C.

    Severe weather, such as cyclones, heavy rainfall, outburst of cold air, etc., results in great disaster all the world. It is the mission for the scientists to design a warning system, to predict the severe weather systems and to reduce the damage of the society. In Taiwan, National Satellite Project Office (NSPO) initiated ROCSAT-3 program at 1997. She scheduled the Phase I conceptual design to determine the mission for observation weather system. Cooperating with National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR), NSPO involved an international cooperation research and operation program to build a 32 GPS satellites system. NCAR will offer 24 GPS satellites. The total expanse will be US 100 millions. NSPO also provide US 80 millions for launching and system engineering operation. And NCAR will be responsible for Payload Control Center and Fiducial Network. The cooperative program contract has been signed by Taiwan National Science Council, Taipei Economic Cultural Office of United States and American Institute in Taiwan. One of the payload is COSMIC, Constellation Observation System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate. It is a GPS meteorology instrument system. The system will observe the weather information, e. g. electron density profiles, horizontal and vertical TEC and CFT scintillation and communication outage maps. The mission is to obtain the weather data such as vertical temperature profiles, water vapor distribution and pressure distribution over the world for global weather forecasting, especially during the severe weather period. The COSMIC Conference held on November, 1998. The export license was also issued by Department of Commerce of Unites States at November, 1998. Recently, NSPO begun to train their scientists to investigate the system. Scientists simulate the observation data to combine the existing routine satellite infrared cloud maps, radar echo and synoptic weather analysis for severe weather forecasting. It is hopeful to provide more accurate

  15. CASA Central and South America GPS geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, James; Dixon, Timothy; Neilan, Ruth

    In January 1988, scientists from over 25 organizations in 13 countries and territories cooperated in the largest Global Positioning System (GPS) campaign in the world to date (Table 1) [Neilan et al., 1988]. From January 18 to February 5, 1988, 43 GPS receivers collected about 590 station-days of data in American Samoa, Australia, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Sweden, United States, West Germany, and Venezuela. The experiment was entitled CASA UNO, an acronym for Central and South America—and “uno” is Spanish for “one,” designating first-epoch measurements. The CASA UNO experiment was the first civilian effort at implementing an extended GPS satellite-tracking network and established the first major GPS network in the northern Andean margin and the western Caribbean.

  16. Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume III. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    The overall, long term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumpton, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains appendices to the conceptual design and systems analysis studies gien in Volume II, Books 1 and 2. (WHK)

  17. Autonomous Integrated Receive System (AIRS) requirements definition. Volume 4: Functional specification for the prototype Automated Integrated Receive System (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chie, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The functional requirements for the performance, design, and testing for the prototype Automated Integrated Receive System (AIRS) to be demonstrated for the TDRSS S-Band Single Access Return Link are presented.

  18. ProSEDS Telemetry System Utilization of GPS Position Data for Transmitter Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Paul; Sims, Herb

    2000-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center will launch the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) space experiment in late 2000. ProSEDS will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether propulsion system and will utilize a conducting wire tether to generate limited spacecraft power. This paper will provide an overview of the ProSEDS mission and will discuss the design, development and test of the spacecraft telemetry system which utilizes a custom designed GPS subsystem to determine spacecraft position relative to ground station location and to control transmitter on/off cycling based on spacecraft state vector and ground station visibility.

  19. Absolute Positioning by Collecting Global Positioning System (GPS) Data Along Short Baselines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    BASELINES BY BRUCE R . HERMANN AND ALAN G. EVANS STRATEGIC AND SPACE SYSTEMS DEPARTMENT SEPTEMBER 1993 DTI I . ELECT’ ]0CT 22 1993 Approved for public release...NSWCDD/TR-93/309 ABSOLUTE POSITIONING BY COLLECTING GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS) DATA ALONG SHORT BASELINES BY BRUCE R . HERMANN AND ALAN G. EVANS...Branch; Mr. T. Sims, Head, Space Sciences Branch; and Mr. J. Sloop, Head, Space and Surface Systems Division. ,- o" Fo, .. ,, ,Approved by: B~y. ’ " - R

  20. Optical receivers for wide band data transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovar, Branko

    1988-04-01

    Optical receiver designs for digital fiber data transmission systems operating with Gbit/s data rates in the 800 to 1500 nm wavelength region have been investigated. The tradeoffs between conflicting receiver design requirements are considered in detail. The state-of-the-art performance of photodetectors and low-noise amplifiers is discussed. Also, present receiver performance data, such as sensitivity, dynamic range, bit rate and bit pattern dependencies as a function of the bit rate in the 0.01-8 Gbit/s data range are summarized and reviewed.

  1. A new analytical method for the classification of time-location data obtained from the global positioning system (GPS).

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyun; Lee, Kiyoung; Yang, Wonho; Yu, Seung Do

    2012-08-01

    Although the global positioning system (GPS) has been suggested as an alternative way to determine time-location patterns, its use has been limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new analytical method of classifying time-location data obtained by GPS. A field technician carried a GPS device while simulating various scripted activities and recorded all movements by the second in an activity diary. The GPS device recorded geological data once every 15 s. The daily monitoring was repeated 18 times. The time-location data obtained by the GPS were compared with the activity diary to determine selection criteria for the classification of the GPS data. The GPS data were classified into four microenvironments (residential indoors, other indoors, transit, and walking outdoors); the selection criteria used were used number of satellites (used-NSAT), speed, and distance from residence. The GPS data were classified as indoors when the used-NSAT was below 9. Data classified as indoors were further classified as residential indoors when the distance from the residence was less than 40 m; otherwise, they were classified as other indoors. Data classified as outdoors were further classified as being in transit when the speed exceeded 2.5 m s(-1); otherwise, they were classified as walking outdoors. The average simple percentage agreement between the time-location classifications and the activity diary was 84.3 ± 12.4%, and the kappa coefficient was 0.71. The average differences between the time diary and the GPS results were 1.6 ± 2.3 h for the time spent in residential indoors, 0.9 ± 1.7 h for the time spent in other indoors, 0.4 ± 0.4 h for the time spent in transit, and 0.8 ± 0.5 h for the time spent walking outdoors. This method can be used to determine time-activity patterns in exposure-science studies.

  2. Sound broadcasting satellite systems for individual reception by mobile receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Y. H.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of a multi-channel sound broadcasting satellite system for operation in a band between 0.5 and 2.0 GHz is investigated. Considered are sound broadcasting satellite systems that provide conventional FM sound broadcasting for individual receivers in a wide geographical area. Comparative weight estimation of sound broadcasting satellites is carried out for various sizes of coverage area and spacecraft antenna, and for different carrier frequencies in the band from 0.5 to 2.0 GHz. It is concluded that relatively light (1200 to about 1500 lbs) spacecraft are feasible, even with low-cost portable or mobile receiving systems.

  3. Operational GPS Imaging System at Multiple Scales for Earth Science and Monitoring of Geohazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewitt, Geoffrey; Hammond, William; Kreemer, Corné

    2016-04-01

    Toward scientific targets that range from slow deep Earth processes to geohazard rapid response, our operational GPS data analysis system produces smooth, yet detailed maps of 3-dimensional land motion with respect to our Earth's center of mass at multiple spatio-temporal scales with various latencies. "GPS Imaging" is implemented operationally as a back-end processor to our GPS data processing facility, which uses JPL's GIPSY OASIS II software to produce positions from 14,000 GPS stations in ITRF every 5 minutes, with coordinate precision that gradually improves as latency increases upward from 1 hour to 2 weeks. Our GPS Imaging system then applies sophisticated signal processing and image filtering techniques to generate images of land motion covering our Earth's continents with high levels of robustness, accuracy, spatial resolution, and temporal resolution. Techniques employed by our GPS Imaging system include: (1) similarity transformation of polyhedron coordinates to ITRF with optional common-mode filtering to enhance local transient signal to noise ratio, (2) a comprehensive database of ~100,000 potential step events based on earthquake catalogs and equipment logs, (3) an automatic, robust, and accurate non-parametric estimator of station velocity that is insensitive to prevalent step discontinuities, outliers, seasonality, and heteroscedasticity; (4) a realistic estimator of velocity error bars based on subsampling statistics; (5) image processing to create a map of land motion that is based on median spatial filtering on the Delauney triangulation, which is effective at despeckling the data while faithfully preserving edge features; (6) a velocity time series estimator to assist identification of transient behavior, such as unloading caused by drought, and (7) a method of integrating InSAR and GPS for fine-scale seamless imaging in ITRF. Our system is being used to address three main scientific focus areas, including (1) deep Earth processes, (2

  4. Ionospheric Profiling using GPS/MET Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, George; Romans, Larry

    1996-01-01

    A report on ionospheric profiling using GPS and MET data is presented. A description of the GPS occultation technique, some examples of GPS/MET data products, the data processing system and a preliminary validation of ionospheric profiles is discussed.

  5. A Comparison between Different Error Modeling of MEMS Applied to GPS/INS Integrated Systems

    PubMed Central

    Quinchia, Alex G.; Falco, Gianluca; Falletti, Emanuela; Dovis, Fabio; Ferrer, Carles

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the development of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) have made possible the fabrication of cheap and small dimension accelerometers and gyroscopes, which are being used in many applications where the global positioning system (GPS) and the inertial navigation system (INS) integration is carried out, i.e., identifying track defects, terrestrial and pedestrian navigation, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), stabilization of many platforms, etc. Although these MEMS sensors are low-cost, they present different errors, which degrade the accuracy of the navigation systems in a short period of time. Therefore, a suitable modeling of these errors is necessary in order to minimize them and, consequently, improve the system performance. In this work, the most used techniques currently to analyze the stochastic errors that affect these sensors are shown and compared: we examine in detail the autocorrelation, the Allan variance (AV) and the power spectral density (PSD) techniques. Subsequently, an analysis and modeling of the inertial sensors, which combines autoregressive (AR) filters and wavelet de-noising, is also achieved. Since a low-cost INS (MEMS grade) presents error sources with short-term (high-frequency) and long-term (low-frequency) components, we introduce a method that compensates for these error terms by doing a complete analysis of Allan variance, wavelet de-nosing and the selection of the level of decomposition for a suitable combination between these techniques. Eventually, in order to assess the stochastic models obtained with these techniques, the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) of a loosely-coupled GPS/INS integration strategy is augmented with different states. Results show a comparison between the proposed method and the traditional sensor error models under GPS signal blockages using real data collected in urban roadways. PMID:23887084

  6. Methodologies for automating the collection and processing of GPS-GIS information for transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bingyan

    All transportation departments have large amounts of data and information that are needed for planning and operation of their systems. This information can be textual, graphical or spatial in nature. Spatial information is generally in the form of maps and these maps are increasingly being stored and processed as digital GIS files that can be linked to other types of information generally referred to as attribute information. In the NYSDOT database, there are many kinds of features for which information must be maintained. For example, there are about 22,500 bridges within the New York State road systems. The current spatial location for these bridges may not have the level of accuracy that would be desired by today's standards and that can be achieved with new spatial measuring techniques. Although the updating of bridge locations and the location of other features can be done using new techniques such as GPS, if this is done manually it presents a forbidding task. The main objective of this study is to find a way to automatically collect feature location data using GPS equipment and to automate the transfer of this information into archival databases. Among the objectives of this dissertation are: how to automatically download information from the DOT database; how to collect field data following a uniform procedure; how to convert the surveying results into Arc/View shape files and how to update the DOT feature location map information using field data. The end goal is to develop feasible methodologies to automate updating of mapping information using GPS by creating a systems design for the process and to create the scripts and programming needed to make this system work. This has been accomplished and is demonstrated in a sample program. Details of the Automated Acquisition System are described in this dissertation.

  7. A comparison between different error modeling of MEMS applied to GPS/INS integrated systems.

    PubMed

    Quinchia, Alex G; Falco, Gianluca; Falletti, Emanuela; Dovis, Fabio; Ferrer, Carles

    2013-07-24

    Advances in the development of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) have made possible the fabrication of cheap and small dimension accelerometers and gyroscopes, which are being used in many applications where the global positioning system (GPS) and the inertial navigation system (INS) integration is carried out, i.e., identifying track defects, terrestrial and pedestrian navigation, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), stabilization of many platforms, etc. Although these MEMS sensors are low-cost, they present different errors, which degrade the accuracy of the navigation systems in a short period of time. Therefore, a suitable modeling of these errors is necessary in order to minimize them and, consequently, improve the system performance. In this work, the most used techniques currently to analyze the stochastic errors that affect these sensors are shown and compared: we examine in detail the autocorrelation, the Allan variance (AV) and the power spectral density (PSD) techniques. Subsequently, an analysis and modeling of the inertial sensors, which combines autoregressive (AR) filters and wavelet de-noising, is also achieved. Since a low-cost INS (MEMS grade) presents error sources with short-term (high-frequency) and long-term (low-frequency) components, we introduce a method that compensates for these error terms by doing a complete analysis of Allan variance, wavelet de-nosing and the selection of the level of decomposition for a suitable combination between these techniques. Eventually, in order to assess the stochastic models obtained with these techniques, the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) of a loosely-coupled GPS/INS integration strategy is augmented with different states. Results show a comparison between the proposed method and the traditional sensor error models under GPS signal blockages using real data collected in urban roadways.

  8. Rapid, Precise, and Economical Analysis of Data from the Southern California Integrated GPS Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumberge, J. F.; Muellerschoen, R. J.; Watkins, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    The number of permanently operating precision Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers in the Southern California Integrated GPS Network has increased dramatically in the past year to several dozen. This number is expected to increase to hundreds within a few years. A prototype system to process all of these data, accurately, rapidly, and economically, has been in operation since May 1995.

  9. SDR implementation of the receiver of adaptive communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarzynski, Jacek; Darmetko, Marcin; Kozlowski, Sebastian; Kurek, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents software implementation of a receiver forming a part of an adaptive communication system. The system is intended for communication with a satellite placed in a low Earth orbit (LEO). The ability of adaptation is believed to increase the total amount of data transmitted from the satellite to the ground station. Depending on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the received signal, adaptive transmission is realized using different transmission modes, i.e., different modulation schemes (BPSK, QPSK, 8-PSK, and 16-APSK) and different convolutional code rates (1/2, 2/3, 3/4, 5/6, and 7/8). The receiver consists of a software-defined radio (SDR) module (National Instruments USRP-2920) and a multithread reception software running on Windows operating system. In order to increase the speed of signal processing, the software takes advantage of single instruction multiple data instructions supported by x86 processor architecture.

  10. Observability analysis of a MEMS INS/GPS integration system with gyroscope G-sensitivity errors.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chen; Hu, Xiaoping; He, Xiaofeng; Tang, Kanghua; Luo, Bing

    2014-08-28

    Gyroscopes based on micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technology suffer in high-dynamic applications due to obvious g-sensitivity errors. These errors can induce large biases in the gyroscope, which can directly affect the accuracy of attitude estimation in the integration of the inertial navigation system (INS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS). The observability determines the existence of solutions for compensating them. In this paper, we investigate the observability of the INS/GPS system with consideration of the g-sensitivity errors. In terms of two types of g-sensitivity coefficients matrix, we add them as estimated states to the Kalman filter and analyze the observability of three or nine elements of the coefficient matrix respectively. A global observable condition of the system is presented and validated. Experimental results indicate that all the estimated states, which include position, velocity, attitude, gyro and accelerometer bias, and g-sensitivity coefficients, could be made observable by maneuvering based on the conditions. Compared with the integration system without compensation for the g-sensitivity errors, the attitude accuracy is raised obviously.

  11. Observability Analysis of a MEMS INS/GPS Integration System with Gyroscope G-Sensitivity Errors

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chen; Hu, Xiaoping; He, Xiaofeng; Tang, Kanghua; Luo, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Gyroscopes based on micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technology suffer in high-dynamic applications due to obvious g-sensitivity errors. These errors can induce large biases in the gyroscope, which can directly affect the accuracy of attitude estimation in the integration of the inertial navigation system (INS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS). The observability determines the existence of solutions for compensating them. In this paper, we investigate the observability of the INS/GPS system with consideration of the g-sensitivity errors. In terms of two types of g-sensitivity coefficients matrix, we add them as estimated states to the Kalman filter and analyze the observability of three or nine elements of the coefficient matrix respectively. A global observable condition of the system is presented and validated. Experimental results indicate that all the estimated states, which include position, velocity, attitude, gyro and accelerometer bias, and g-sensitivity coefficients, could be made observable by maneuvering based on the conditions. Compared with the integration system without compensation for the g-sensitivity errors, the attitude accuracy is raised obviously. PMID:25171122

  12. A pilot study using global positioning systems (GPS) devices and surveys to ascertain older adults' travel patterns.

    PubMed

    Yen, Irene H; Leung, Cindy W; Lan, Mars; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Kayekjian, Karen C; Duru, O Kenrik

    2015-04-01

    Some studies indicate that older adults lead active lives and travel to many destinations including those not in their immediate residential neighborhoods. We used global positioning system (GPS) devices to track the travel patterns of 40 older adults (mean age: 69) in San Francisco and Los Angeles. Study participants wore the GPS devices for 7 days in fall 2010 and winter 2011. We collected survey responses concurrently about travel patterns. GPS data showed a mean of four trips/day, and a mean trip distance of 7.6 km. Survey data indicated that older adults commonly made trips for four activities (e.g., volunteering, work, visiting friends) at least once each week. Older adults regularly travel outside their residential neighborhoods. GPS can document the mode of travel, the path of travel, and the destinations. Surveys can document the purpose of the travel and the impressions or experiences in the specific locations.

  13. Theory of cellwise optimization for solar central receiver system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipps, F. W.

    1985-05-01

    Cost effective optimization of the solar central receiver system is primarily concerned with the distribution of heliostats in the collector field, including the boundaries of the field. The cellwise optimization procedure determines the optimum cell usage and heliostat spacing parameters for each cell in the collector field. Spacing parameters determine the heliostat density and neighborhood structure uniformly in each cell. Consequently, the cellwise approach ignores heliostat mismatch at cell boundaries. Ignoring the cell boundary problem permits an easy solution for the optimum in terms of appropriately defined annual average data. Insolation, receiver interception, shading and blocking, cosine effects, and the cost parameters combine to control the optimum. Many trade offs are represented. Outputs include the receiver flux density distribution for design time, coefficients for an actual layout, the optimum boundary and various performance and cost estimates for the optimum field. It is also possible to optimize receiver size and tower height by a repeated application of the field optimization procedure.

  14. GPS-aided inertial technology and navigation-based photogrammetry for aerial mapping the San Andreas fault system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanchez, Richard D.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.

    2004-01-01

    Aerial mapping of the San Andreas Fault System can be realized more efficiently and rapidly without ground control and conventional aerotriangulation. This is achieved by the direct geopositioning of the exterior orientation of a digital imaging sensor by use of an integrated Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver and an Inertial Navigation System (INS). A crucial issue to this particular type of aerial mapping is the accuracy, scale, consistency, and speed achievable by such a system. To address these questions, an Applanix Digital Sensor System (DSS) was used to examine its potential for near real-time mapping. Large segments of vegetation along the San Andreas and Cucamonga faults near the foothills of the San Bernardino and San Gabriel Mountains were burned to the ground in the California wildfires of October-November 2003. A 175 km corridor through what once was a thickly vegetated and hidden fault surface was chosen for this study. Both faults pose a major hazard to the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area and a near real-time mapping system could provide information vital to a post-disaster response.

  15. Indoor/Outdoor Seamless Positioning Using Lighting Tags and GPS Cellular Phones for Personal Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namie, Hiromune; Morishita, Hisashi

    The authors focused on the development of an indoor positioning system which is easy to use, portable and available for everyone. This system is capable of providing the correct position anywhere indoors, including onboard ships, and was invented in order to evaluate the availability of GPS indoors. Although the performance of GPS is superior outdoors, there has been considerable research regarding indoor GPS involving sensitive GPS, pseudolites (GPS pseudo satellite), RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification) tags, and wireless LAN .However, the positioning rate and the precision are not high enough for general use, which is the reason why these technologies have not yet spread to personal navigation systems. In this regard, the authors attempted to implement an indoor positioning system using cellular phones with built-in GPS and infrared light data communication functionality, which are widely used in Japan. GPS is becoming increasingly popular, where GPGGS sentences of the NMEA outputted from the GPS receiver provide spatiotemporal information including latitude, longitude, altitude, and time or ECEF xyz coordinates. As GPS applications grow rapidly, spatiotemporal data becomes key to the ubiquitous outdoor and indoor seamless positioning services at least for the entire area of Japan, as well as to becoming familiar with satellite positioning systems (e.g. GPS). Furthermore, the authors are also working on the idea of using PDAs (Personal Digital Assistants), as cellular phones with built-in GPS and PDA functionality are also becoming increasingly popular.

  16. High temperature helical tubular receiver for concentrating solar power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Nazmul

    In the field of conventional cleaner power generation technology, concentrating solar power systems have introduced remarkable opportunity. In a solar power tower, solar energy concentrated by the heliostats at a single point produces very high temperature. Falling solid particles or heat transfer fluid passing through that high temperature region absorbs heat to generate electricity. Increasing the residence time will result in more heat gain and increase efficiency. A novel design of solar receiver for both fluid and solid particle is approached in this paper which can increase residence time resulting in higher temperature gain in one cycle compared to conventional receivers. The helical tubular solar receiver placed at the focused sunlight region meets the higher outlet temperature and efficiency. A vertical tubular receiver is modeled and analyzed for single phase flow with molten salt as heat transfer fluid and alloy625 as heat transfer material. The result is compared to a journal paper of similar numerical and experimental setup for validating our modeling. New types of helical tubular solar receivers are modeled and analyzed with heat transfer fluid turbulent flow in single phase, and granular particle and air plug flow in multiphase to observe the temperature rise in one cyclic operation. The Discrete Ordinate radiation model is used for numerical analysis with simulation software Ansys Fluent 15.0. The Eulerian granular multiphase model is used for multiphase flow. Applying the same modeling parameters and boundary conditions, the results of vertical and helical receivers are compared. With a helical receiver, higher temperature gain of heat transfer fluid is achieved in one cycle for both single phase and multiphase flow compared to the vertical receiver. Performance is also observed by varying dimension of helical receiver.

  17. An Experimental GPS (Global Positioning System) Navigation Receiver for General Aviation: Design and Measured Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-27

    feet. 8 2.4 Assumptions lbe following assumptions were made for the development and testing of the CPS T and I Equipment: a. The " stellits will...When Changed 210 NSW OBS Data 1/ sec 220 NSW Displayed Waypoint Data 1/sec 230 NSW Clock Status Sent to CDUI Startup 400 ADU RAS Data 1/eec 410 IADU

  18. GPS=A Good Candidate for Data Assimilation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, P.; Joiner, J.; Kursinski, R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) enables positioning anywhere about our planet. The microwave signals sent by the 24 transmitters are sensitive to the atmosphere. Using the radio occultation technique, it is possible to perform soundings, with a Low Earth Orbiter (700 km) GPS receiver. The insensitiveness to clouds and aerosols, the relatively high vertical resolution (1.5 km), the self-calibration and stability of the GPS make it a priori a potentially good observing system candidate for data assimilation. A low-computing cost simple method to retrieve both temperature and humidity will be presented. Comparisons with radiosonde show the capability of the GPS to resolve the tropopause. Options for using GPS for data assimilation and remaining issues will be discussed.

  19. Constraints on the mechanics of the Southern San Andreas fault system from GPS velocity and stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. W.; Hardebeck, J. L.; Anderson, G.

    2003-12-01

    We use Global Positioning System (GPS) derived velocities and stress-orientations to study the distribution of long-term slip on the system of faults comprising the southern California plate boundary region. Of particular interest is how slip is partitioned over multiple earthquake cycles between the San Andreas Fault (SAF), the San Jacinto Fault (SJF) and the Eastern California Shear Zone. Some prior paleoseismologic and geodetic work places the majority of slip on the SAF. Other studies, however, find that the SJF accommodates about half of the slip in the south, implying half as much slip on the San Bernardino segment of the SAF. Two new data sets are used to further constrain the mechanics of the SAF. The first is the Southern California Earthquake Center's geodetic velocity field version 3 (Shen et al., 2003), which includes much improved coverage over prior models. The second is a regional map of stress field orientations at seismogenic depths, as determined from an inversion of earthquake focal mechanisms. While GPS data has been used in similar studies, this is the first application of stress field observations to this problem. We construct a simplified version of the southern California fault system, and model the surface velocities using a block model with elastic strain accumulation, following Meade et al. (2002). Additionally, we model the stress orientations at seismogenic depths, assuming that the stress field results from the loading of active faults. An inversion for fault slip rates is performed to simultaneously fit the GPS and stress observations. The model fit to the data is good in general, indicating that a simple mechanical model can capture both observed interseismic strain and stress accumulation. We evaluate the sensitivity of the slip rate solutions to the different datasets and identify "anomalous" fault segments with stresses that deviate from our simple loading model.

  20. Research in Geodesy Based Upon Radio Interferometric Observations of GPS (Global Positioning System) Satellites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-31

    meters or less, could be determined by GPS interferometry with centimeter-level accuracy. Although one commercial GPS interferometry instrument had already...Association of Geodesy, Symposium d, August 15-27, 1983. ... --- I Pato I I approximately 845-km long baseline with our own GPS - interferometry determination...a 37-Station Network Measured by GPS Interferometry " (abstract), AGU Chapman Conference on Vertical Crustal Motion: Measurement and Modeling, 1984

  1. Solar central receiver reformer system for ammonia plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-07-01

    Details of the conceptual design, economic analysis, and development plan for a solar central receiver system for retrofitting the Valley Nitrogen Producers, Inc., El Centro, California 600 ST/SD Ammonia Plant are presented. The retrofit system consists of a solar central receiver reformer (SCRR) operating in parallel with the existing fossil fired reformer. Steam and hydrocarbon react in the catalyst filled tubes of the inner cavity receiver to form a hydrogen rich mixture which is the syngas feed for the ammonia production. The SCRR system displaces natural gas presently used in the fossil reformer combustion chamber. The solar reformer retrofit system characteristics and its interface with the existing plant are simple, incorporating state of the art components with proven technology. A northfield composed of one thousand forty second generation heliostats provides solar energy to the receiver which is positioned on top of a 90 meter high steel tower. The overall economics of this system can provide over 20% discount cash flow rate of return with proper investment and market conditions.

  2. The application of NAVSTAR Differential GPS to civil helicopter operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beser, J.; Parkinson, B. W.

    1981-01-01

    Principles concerning the operation of the NAVSTAR Global Positioning Systems (GPS) are discussed. Selective availability issues concerning NAVSTAR GPS and differential GPS concepts are analyzed. Civil support and market potential for differential GPS are outlined. It is concluded that differential GPS provides a variation on the baseline GPS system, and gives an assured, uninterrupted level of accuracy for the civilian community.

  3. An improvement of the GPS buoy system for detecting tsunami at far offshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Terada, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kawaguchi, K.; Koshimura, S.; Matsushita, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a GPS buoy system for detecting a tsunami before its arrival at coasts and thereby mitigating tsunami disaster. The system was first deployed in 1997 for a short period in the Sagami bay, south of Tokyo, for basic experiments, and then deployed off Ofunato city, northeastern part of Japan, for the period 2001-2004. The system was then established at about 13km south of Cape Muroto, southwestern part of Japan, since 2004. Five tsunamis of about 10cm have been observed in these systems, including 2001 Peru earthquake (Mw8.3), 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (Mw8.3), 2004 Off Kii Peninsula earthquake (Mw7.4), 2010 Chile earthquake (Mw8.8), and 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw9.0). These experiments clearly showed that GPS buoy is capable of detecting tsunami with a few centimeter accuracy and can be monitored in near real time by applying an appropriate filter, real-time data transmission using radio and dissemination of obtained records of sea surface height changes through internet. Considering that the system is a powerful tool to monitor sea surface variations due to wind as well as tsunami, the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism implemented the system in a part of the Nationwide Ocean Wave information network for Ports and HArbourS (NOWPHAS) system and deployed the system at 15 sites along the coasts around the Japanese Islands. The system detected the tsunami due to the 11th March 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake with higher than 6m of tsunami height at the site Off South Iwate (Kamaishi). The Japan Meteorological Agency that was monitoring the record updated the level of the tsunami warning to the greatest value due to the result. Currently, the GPS buoy system uses a RTK-GPS which requires a land base for obtaining precise location of the buoy by a baseline analysis. This algorithm limits the distance of the buoy to, at most, 20km from the coast as the accuracy of positioning gets much worse as the baseline distance becomes longer

  4. First results from an airborne GPS radio occultation system for atmospheric profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, J. S.; Murphy, B. J.; Muradyan, P.; Nievinski, F. G.; Larson, K. M.; Garrison, J. L.; Wang, K.-N.

    2014-03-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) from low Earth-orbiting satellites has increased the quantity of high-vertical resolution atmospheric profiles, especially over oceans, and has significantly improved global weather forecasting. A new system, the Global Navigation Satellite Systems Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS), has been developed for RO sounding from aircraft. GISMOS also provides high-vertical resolution profiles that are insensitive to clouds and precipitation, and in addition, provides greater control on the sampling location, useful for targeted regional studies. The feasibility of the system is demonstrated with a flight carried out during development of an Atlantic tropical storm. The data have been evaluated through a comparison with dropsonde data. The new airborne RO system will effectively increase by more than 50% the number of profiles available for studying the evolution of tropical storms during this campaign and could potentially be deployed on commercial aircraft in the future.

  5. 78 FR 57672 - 91st Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159, Global Positioning Systems (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... meeting of Special Committee 159. The agenda will include the following: Working Group Sessions October 7 Working Group 2C, GPS/Inertial, ARINC & A4A Rooms October 8 Working Group 2, GPS/WAAS, McIntosh-NBAA Room and Colson Board Room October 9 Working Group 2, GPS/WAAS, ARINC & A4A Rooms, Afternoon, 1:00...

  6. 75 FR 61818 - Eighty-Third Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS).

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... include: ] Specific Working Group Sessions Monday, October 25 All Day, Working Group 2C, GPS/Inertial, MacIntosh-NBAA Room and Hilton-ATA Room. Tuesday, October 26 All Day, Working Group 2, GPS/WAAS, Colton Board Room. Wednesday, October 27 All Day, Working Group 2, GPS/WAAS, Colson Board Room. All...

  7. Comparative Performance Assessment For Central Receiver CPV Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasich, John B.; Thomas, Ian; Verlinden, Pierre J.; Lewandowski, Allan; Heartag, Wolfgang; Wright, Mark

    2011-12-01

    A Central receiver Concentrating PV (C2PV) system has the potential to be the optimum solar energy generation system for utility scale because it combines the high efficiency of CPV with the low cost of a heliostat collector. Due to the off axis nature of a heliostat central receiver concentrator a cosine efficiency loss is incurred and, unlike `normal' tracking CPV lens and dish systems, the optical performance varies with time and site latitude. To investigate the optical performance of a C2PV system a ray trace model has been developed and the performance of a representative C2PV system is modelled throughout the year and at different site latitudes. The cosine loss and latitude dependence are put into perspective by calculating the annual average optical efficiency and testing its sensitivity to variations in site latitude. These values are then used to estimate a system performance by applying efficiencies for solar cell, balance of system and operational factors. This system efficiency is finally compared to published data for `normal' tracking CPV dish and lens systems. Modelled annual average AC system efficiency for the C2PV system was calculated to be 21% at 40° latitude and 19% at 15° latitude. These annual average AC system efficiencies are shown to be similar to those reported for typical dish and lens CPV systems when they are adjusted to use a total collector area baseline.

  8. Estimating the ionospheric refraction effect on interferometric GPS - Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J.; Cloppenburg, H.; Lohmar, F. J.

    A method is presented of realistically estimating the effects of missing ionospheric calibration on GPS determined baselines. The method is based on the experience gained with ionospheric path delays derived from Naval Navigation Satellite System Doppler observations. At present, short baseline determinations with the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) in the interferometric or phase differencing mode suffer from lack of ionospheric calibration if only one of the two GPS-frequency bands can be used. The proposed method is expected to permit the use of low-cost clear/acquisition-code receivers for centimeter-accuracy baseline determinations.

  9. Multi-user satellite communications system using an innovative compressive receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staples, Edward J.

    1992-01-01

    There is a need for an onboard simultaneous multi-channel demodulation system for a satellite communications system. Studies indicate that Convolve Multiply Convolve (CMC) filtering with surface acoustic wave (SAW) dispersive delay lines will eliminate the necessity of onboard satellite channelized filters of complex fourier transform processors. The reason for choosing the CMC technique is its ability to perform Fourier transformations in a shorter time with less space and power consumption than digital Fourier transform processors. Each ground terminal in this multi-users communications system is remotely located and operates independently; hence, a method of synchronizing the transmission of these users is presented which utilizes the existing Global Positioning System (GPS) system. Each ground user is equipped with a low cost ground terminal that has a synchronization subsystem attached to it. The system design of an onboard Multi-channel Receiver and Demodulator utilizes Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK) as the modulation technique. This technique provides the best figure of merit, i.e., the lowest transmitter power requirement per communication channel.

  10. ERDA's central receiver solar thermal power system studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lippy, L. J.; Heaton, T. R.

    1977-01-01

    The utilization of solar energy for electrical power production was studied. Efforts underway on the central receiver solar thermal power system are presented. Preliminary designs are included of pilot plant utilizing large numbers of heliostats in a collector field. Safety hazards are also discussed, as well as the most beneficial location of such a plant within the United States.

  11. Robust Real-Time Wide-Area Differential GPS Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, Thomas P. (Inventor); Bertiger, William I. (Inventor); Lichten, Stephen M. (Inventor); Mannucci, Anthony J. (Inventor); Muellerschoen, Ronald J. (Inventor); Wu, Sien-Chong (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and a device for providing superior differential GPS positioning data. The system includes a group of GPS receiving ground stations covering a wide area of the Earth's surface. Unlike other differential GPS systems wherein the known position of each ground station is used to geometrically compute an ephemeris for each GPS satellite. the present system utilizes real-time computation of satellite orbits based on GPS data received from fixed ground stations through a Kalman-type filter/smoother whose output adjusts a real-time orbital model. ne orbital model produces and outputs orbital corrections allowing satellite ephemerides to be known with considerable greater accuracy than from die GPS system broadcasts. The modeled orbits are propagated ahead in time and differenced with actual pseudorange data to compute clock offsets at rapid intervals to compensate for SA clock dither. The orbital and dock calculations are based on dual frequency GPS data which allow computation of estimated signal delay at each ionospheric point. These delay data are used in real-time to construct and update an ionospheric shell map of total electron content which is output as part of the orbital correction data. thereby allowing single frequency users to estimate ionospheric delay with an accuracy approaching that of dual frequency users.

  12. Non-GPS navigation with the personal dead-reckoning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda, Lauro; Borenstein, Johann

    2007-04-01

    This paper introduces a positioning system for walking persons, called "Personal Dead-reckoning" (PDR) system. The PDR system does not require GPS, beacons, or landmarks. The system is therefore useful in GPS-denied environments, such as inside buildings, tunnels, or dense forests. Potential users of the system are military and security personnel as well as emergency responders. The PDR system uses a small 6-DOF inertial measurement unit (IMU) attached to the user's boot. The IMU provides rate-of-rotation and acceleration measurements that are used in real-time to estimate the location of the user relative to a known starting point. In order to reduce the most significant errors of this IMU-based system-caused by the bias drift of the accelerometers-we implemented a technique known as "Zero Velocity Update" (ZUPT). With the ZUPT technique and related signal processing algorithms, typical errors of our system are about 2% of distance traveled. This typical PDR system error is largely independent of the gait or speed of the user. When walking continuously for several minutes, the error increases gradually beyond 2%. The PDR system works in both 2-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D environments, although errors in Z-direction are usually larger than 2% of distance traveled. Earlier versions of our system used an impractically large IMU. In the most recent version we implemented a much smaller IMU. This paper discussed specific problems of this small IMU, our measures for eliminating these problems, and our first experimental results with the small IMU under different conditions.

  13. GPS Modernization Update

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Navigation Satellite System ( GNSS ) performance Spectrum Allocation and Sharing Initiatives Fully support the allocation and sharing of spectrum through...reallocation or sharing with IMT • Various US agencies and international GNSS providers share this interest to help protect GPS International Spectrum...domestically, internationally and with Industry to simultaneously protect GNSS services and release spectrum for mobile services GPS Summary

  14. Airborne Digital Sensor System and GPS-aided inertial technology for direct geopositioning in rough terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanchez, Richard D.

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution airborne digital cameras with onboard data collection based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) and inertial navigation systems (INS) technology may offer a real-time means to gather accurate topographic map information by reducing ground control and eliminating aerial triangulation. Past evaluations of this integrated system over relatively flat terrain have proven successful. The author uses Emerge Digital Sensor System (DSS) combined with Applanix Corporation?s Position and Orientation Solutions for Direct Georeferencing to examine the positional mapping accuracy in rough terrain. The positional accuracy documented in this study did not meet large-scale mapping requirements owing to an apparent system mechanical failure. Nonetheless, the findings yield important information on a new approach for mapping in Antarctica and other remote or inaccessible areas of the world.

  15. The Inter- and Intra-Unit Variability of a Low-Cost GPS Data Logger/Receiver to Study Human Outdoor Walking in View of Health and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Pierre; Noury-Desvaux, Bénédicte; Gernigon, Marie; Mahé, Guillaume; Sauvaget, Thomas; Leftheriotis, Georges; Le Faucheur, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The present study evaluates the intra- and inter-unit variability of the GlobalSat® DG100 GPS data logger/receiver (DG100) when estimating outdoor walking distances and speeds. Methods Two experiments were performed using healthy subjects walking on a 400 m outdoor synthetic track. The two experiments consisted of two different outdoor prescribed walking protocols with distances ranging from 50 to 400 m. Experiment 1 examined the intra-unit variability of the DG100 (test-retest reproducibility) when estimating walking distances. Experiment 2 examined the inter-unit variability of four DG100 devices (unit to unit variability) when estimating walking distances and speeds. Results The coefficient of variation [95% confidence interval], for the reliability of estimating walking distances, was 2.8 [2.5–3.2] %. The inter-unit variability among the four DG100 units tested ranged from 2.8 [2.5–3.2] % to 3.9 [3.5–4.4] % when estimating distances and from 2.7 [2.4–3.0] % to 3.8 [3.4–4.2] % when estimating speeds. Conclusion The present study indicates that the DG100, an economical and convenient GPS data logger/receiver, can be reliably used to study human outdoor walking activities in unobstructed conditions. This device let facilitate the use of GPS in studies of health and disease. PMID:22363623

  16. LIDAR and Ins Fusion in Periods of GPS Outages for Mobile Laser Scanning Mapping Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, I.; Filin, S.

    2011-09-01

    Mobile laser scanning systems are becoming an increasingly popular means to obtain 3D coverage on a large scale. To perform the mapping, the exact position of the vehicle must be known throughout the trajectory. Exact position is achieved via integration of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Inertial Navigation Systems (INS). Yet, in urban environments, cases of complete or even partial GPS outages may occur leaving the navigation solution to rely only on the INS. The INS navigation solution degrades with time as the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) measurements contains noise, which permeates into the navigation equations. Degradation of the position determination leads to loss of data in such segments. To circumvent such drift and its effects, we propose fusing INS with lidar data by using building edges. This detection of edges is then translated into position data, which is used as an aiding to the INS. It thereby enables the determination of the vehicle position with a satisfactory level accuracy, sufficient to perform the laser-scanning based mapping in those outage periods.

  17. An assessment on hydrogen production using central receiver solar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgen, C.; Bilgen, E.

    An assessment is presented on hydrogen production using a dedicated central receiver solar system concept coupled to two types of hydrogen producing processes, electrolysis and thermochemical. The study on solar electrolytic hydrogen was carried out using solar electricity and four different electrolytic technologies, namely, industrial unipolar 1980 and 1983 technologies, industrial bipolar and solid polymer electrolyte technology. The thermochemical process was the sulphur/iodine cycle, which is being developed by General Atomic Co. Systems, which is capable of producing about one-million GJ hydrogen per year, was developed at the conceptual level, and site specific computations were carried out. A general mathematical model was developed to predict the optical and thermal performance of the central receiver system coupled directly to the chemical plant. Cost models were developed for each subsystem based on the database published in the literature. Levelized and delevelized costs of solar hydrogen were then computed.

  18. Note: optical receiver system for 152-channel magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Mok; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong

    2014-11-01

    An optical receiver system composing 13 serial data restore/synchronizer modules and a single module combiner converted optical 32-bit serial data into 32-bit synchronous parallel data for a computer to acquire 152-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals. A serial data restore/synchronizer module identified 32-bit channel-voltage bits from 48-bit streaming serial data, and then consecutively reproduced 13 times of 32-bit serial data, acting in a synchronous clock. After selecting a single among 13 reproduced data in each module, a module combiner converted it into 32-bit parallel data, which were carried to 32-port digital input board in a computer. When the receiver system together with optical transmitters were applied to 152-channel superconducting quantum interference device sensors, this MEG system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz at a sample rate of 1 kSample/s per channel.

  19. Note: Optical receiver system for 152-channel magnetoencephalography

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Mok; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong

    2014-11-15

    An optical receiver system composing 13 serial data restore/synchronizer modules and a single module combiner converted optical 32-bit serial data into 32-bit synchronous parallel data for a computer to acquire 152-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals. A serial data restore/synchronizer module identified 32-bit channel-voltage bits from 48-bit streaming serial data, and then consecutively reproduced 13 times of 32-bit serial data, acting in a synchronous clock. After selecting a single among 13 reproduced data in each module, a module combiner converted it into 32-bit parallel data, which were carried to 32-port digital input board in a computer. When the receiver system together with optical transmitters were applied to 152-channel superconducting quantum interference device sensors, this MEG system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz at a sample rate of 1 kSample/s per channel.

  20. Time determination for spacecraft users of the Navstar Global Positioning System /GPS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenchik, T. J.; Fang, B. T.

    1977-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation is performed by time measurements. A description is presented of a two body model of spacecraft motion. Orbit determination is the process of inferring the position, velocity, and clock offset of the user from measurements made of the user motion in the Newtonian coordinate system. To illustrate the effect of clock errors and the accuracy with which the user spacecraft time and orbit may be determined, a low-earth-orbit spacecraft (Seasat) as tracked by six Phase I GPS space vehicles is considered. The obtained results indicate that in the absence of unmodeled dynamic parameter errors clock biases may be determined to the nanosecond level. There is, however, a high correlation between the clock bias and the uncertainty in the gravitational parameter GM, i.e., the product of the universal gravitational constant and the total mass of the earth. It is, therefore, not possible to determine clock bias to better than 25 nanosecond accuracy in the presence of a gravitational error of one part per million.

  1. Tropospheric corrections to GPS measurements using locally measured meteorological parameters compared with general tropospheric corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchner, D.; Lentz, C.; Ressler, H.

    1994-01-01

    At the Technical University Graz (TUG), Austria, the Global Positioning System (GPS) has been used for time transfer purposes since the early 80's and from that time on local meteorological parameters have been recorded together with each measurement (satellite track). The paper compares the tropospheric corrections (delays) obtained from models usually employed in GPS receivers and those using locally measured meteorological parameters.

  2. GPS Data Analysis for Earth Orientation at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumberge, J.; Webb, F.; Lindqwister, U.; Lichten, S.; Jefferson, D.; Ibanez-Meier, R.; Heflin, M.; Freedman, A.; Blewitt, G.

    1994-01-01

    Beginning June 1992 and continuing indefinitely as part of our contribution to FLINN (Fiducial Laboratories for an International Natural Science Network), DOSE (NASA's Dynamics of the Solid Earth Program), and the IGS (International GPS Geodynamics Service), analysts at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) have routinely been reducing data from a globally-distributed network of Rogue Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers.

  3. A software radio approach to global navigation satellite system receiver design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akos, Dennis Matthew

    1997-12-01

    The software radio has been described as the most significant evolution in receiver design since the development of the superheterodyne concept in 1918. The software radio design philosophy is to position an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) as close to the antenna as possible and then process the samples using a combination of software and a programmable microprocessor. There are a number of important advantages to be gained through full exploitation of the software radio concept. The most notable include: (1) The removal of analog signal processing components and their associated nonlinear, temperature-based, and age-based performance characteristics. (2) A single antenna/front-end configuration can be used to receive and demodulate a variety of radio frequency (RF) transmissions. (3) The software radio provides the ultimate simulation/testing environment. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) are the latest and most complex radionavigation systems in widespread use. The United States' Global Positioning System (GPS) and, to a lesser extent, the Russian Global Orbiting Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) are being targeted for use as next generation aviation navigation systems. As a result, it is critical that a GNSS achieve the reliability and integrity necessary for use within the aerospace system. The receiver design is a key element in achieving the high standards required. This work presents the complete development of a GNSS software radio. A GNSS receiver front end has been constructed, based on the software radio design goals, and has been evaluated against the traditional design. Trade-offs associated with each implementation are presented along with experimental results. Novel bandpass sampling front end designs have been proposed, implemented and tested for the processing of multiple GNSS transmissions. Finally, every aspect of GNSS signal processing has been implemented in software from the necessary spread spectrum acquisition algorithms to

  4. INS/GPS/LiDAR Integrated Navigation System for Urban and Indoor Environments Using Hybrid Scan Matching Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Shifei; Atia, Mohamed M; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-09-15

    This paper takes advantage of the complementary characteristics of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to provide periodic corrections to Inertial Navigation System (INS) alternatively in different environmental conditions. In open sky, where GPS signals are available and LiDAR measurements are sparse, GPS is integrated with INS. Meanwhile, in confined outdoor environments and indoors, where GPS is unreliable or unavailable and LiDAR measurements are rich, LiDAR replaces GPS to integrate with INS. This paper also proposes an innovative hybrid scan matching algorithm that combines the feature-based scan matching method and Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based scan matching method. The algorithm can work and transit between two modes depending on the number of matched line features over two scans, thus achieving efficiency and robustness concurrently. Two integration schemes of INS and LiDAR with hybrid scan matching algorithm are implemented and compared. Real experiments are performed on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for both outdoor and indoor environments. Experimental results show that the multi-sensor integrated system can remain sub-meter navigation accuracy during the whole trajectory.

  5. INS/GPS/LiDAR Integrated Navigation System for Urban and Indoor Environments Using Hybrid Scan Matching Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Shifei; Atia, Mohamed M.; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-01-01

    This paper takes advantage of the complementary characteristics of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to provide periodic corrections to Inertial Navigation System (INS) alternatively in different environmental conditions. In open sky, where GPS signals are available and LiDAR measurements are sparse, GPS is integrated with INS. Meanwhile, in confined outdoor environments and indoors, where GPS is unreliable or unavailable and LiDAR measurements are rich, LiDAR replaces GPS to integrate with INS. This paper also proposes an innovative hybrid scan matching algorithm that combines the feature-based scan matching method and Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based scan matching method. The algorithm can work and transit between two modes depending on the number of matched line features over two scans, thus achieving efficiency and robustness concurrently. Two integration schemes of INS and LiDAR with hybrid scan matching algorithm are implemented and compared. Real experiments are performed on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for both outdoor and indoor environments. Experimental results show that the multi-sensor integrated system can remain sub-meter navigation accuracy during the whole trajectory. PMID:26389906

  6. Progress on GPS standardization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, C.

    1993-01-01

    It has been clear for some time that a desirable and necessary step for improvement of the accuracy of GPS time comparisons is to establish GPS standards which may be adopted by receiver designers and users. For this reason, a formal body, the CCDS Group on GPS Time Transfer Standards (CGGTTS), was created in 1991. It operates under the auspices of the permanent CCDS Working Group on TAI, with the objective of recommending procedures and models for operational time transfer by the GPS common-view method. It works in close cooperation with the Subcommittee on Time of the Civil GPS Service Interface Committee. The members of the CGGTTS have met in December 1991 and in June 1992. Following these two formal meetings, a number of decisions were taken for unifying the treatment of GPS short-term data and for standardizing the format of GPS data files. A formal CGGTTS Recommendation is now being written concerning these points. This paper relates on the work carried out by the CGGTTS.

  7. Analyzing radio interferometric positioning systems with undersampling receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinotsuka, Marie; Wang, Yiyin; Ma, Xiaoli; Zhou, G. Tong

    2015-12-01

    Radio interferometric positioning systems are developed for localization in wireless sensor networks (WSNs), and they have the potential to yield highly accurate location information at low computational cost and implementation complexity. In the radio interferometric positioning system (RIPS), two transmitters transmit sinusoidal signals at slightly different frequencies, and two receivers pass the received signals through square-law devices to produce low-frequency differential signals. However, a squaring operation increases the noise power, leading to performance loss. To avoid this problem, a receiver for the RIPS using undersampling techniques (RIPS-u) has been proposed. In this paper, we investigate the performance of the RIPS with a square-law device (RIPS-sq) and the performance of the RIPS-u through theoretical and experimental analyses. Specifically, we compute Cramér-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) of the range and location estimates in both systems and show that the RIPS-u has lower CRLBs than the RIPS-sq. Furthermore, we have carried out experimental tests by implementing both systems on National Instruments (NI) Universal Software Radio Peripherals (USRPs). From both the theoretical and experimental results, the effectiveness of the RIPS-u over the RIPS-sq is confirmed.

  8. Automatic Identification System modular receiver for academic purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, F.; Molina, N.; Tichavska, M.; Araña, V.

    2016-07-01

    The Automatic Identification System (AIS) standard is encompassed within the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS), in force since 1999. The GMDSS is a set of procedures, equipment, and communication protocols designed with the aim of increasing the safety of sea crossings, facilitating navigation, and the rescue of vessels in danger. The use of this system not only is increasingly attractive to security issues but also potentially creates intelligence products throughout the added-value information that this network can transmit from ships on real time (identification, position, course, speed, dimensions, flag, among others). Within the marine electronics market, commercial receivers implement this standard and allow users to access vessel-broadcasted information if in the range of coverage. In addition to satellite services, users may request actionable information from private or public AIS terrestrial networks where real-time feed or historical data can be accessed from its nodes. This paper describes the configuration of an AIS receiver based on a modular design. This modular design facilitates the evaluation of specific modules and also a better understanding of the standard and the possibility of changing hardware modules to improve the performance of the prototype. Thus, the aim of this paper is to describe the system's specifications, its main hardware components, and to present educational didactics on the setup and use of a modular and terrestrial AIS receiver. The latter is for academic purposes and in undergraduate studies such as electrical engineering, telecommunications, and maritime studies.

  9. A 200kW central receiver CPV system

    SciTech Connect

    Lasich, John Thomas, Ian Hertaeg, Wolfgang; Shirley, David; Faragher, Neil; Erenstrom, Neil; Carter, Sam; Cox, Brian; Zuo, Xinyi

    2015-09-28

    Raygen Resources has recently completed a Central Receiver CPV (CSPV) pilot plant in Central Victoria, Australia. The system is under final commissioning and initial operation is expected in late April 2015. The pilot demonstrates a full scale CSPV repeatable unit in a form that is representative of a commercial product and provides a test bed to prove out performance and reliability of the CSPV technology. Extensive testing of the system key components: dense array module, wireless solar powered heliostat and control system has been performed in the laboratory and on sun. Results from this key component testing are presented herein.

  10. A 200kW central receiver CPV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasich, John; Thomas, Ian; Hertaeg, Wolfgang; Shirley, David; Faragher, Neil; Erenstrom, Neil; Carter, Sam; Cox, Brian; Zuo, Xinyi

    2015-09-01

    Raygen Resources has recently completed a Central Receiver CPV (CSPV) pilot plant in Central Victoria, Australia. The system is under final commissioning and initial operation is expected in late April 2015. The pilot demonstrates a full scale CSPV repeatable unit in a form that is representative of a commercial product and provides a test bed to prove out performance and reliability of the CSPV technology. Extensive testing of the system key components: dense array module, wireless solar powered heliostat and control system has been performed in the laboratory and on sun. Results from this key component testing are presented herein.

  11. Dual RF Astrodynamic GPS Orbital Navigator Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanipe, David B.; Provence, Robert Steve; Straube, Timothy M.; Reed, Helen; Bishop, Robert; Lightsey, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Dual RF Astrodynamic GPS Orbital Navigator Satellite (DRAGONSat) will demonstrate autonomous rendezvous and docking (ARD) in low Earth orbit (LEO) and gather flight data with a global positioning system (GPS) receiver strictly designed for space applications. ARD is the capability of two independent spacecraft to rendezvous in orbit and dock without crew intervention. DRAGONSat consists of two picosatellites (one built by the University of Texas and one built by Texas A and M University) and the Space Shuttle Payload Launcher (SSPL); this project will ultimately demonstrate ARD in LEO.

  12. Sea Ice Remote Sensing Using Surface Reflected GPS Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, Attila; Maslanik, James; Zavorotny, Valery U.; Axelrad, Penina; Katzberg, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a new research effort to extend the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reflections, received by airborne instruments, to cryospheric remote sensing. Our experimental results indicate that reflected GPS signals have potential to provide information on the presence and condition of sea and freshwater ice as well as the freeze/thaw state of frozen ground. In this paper we show results from aircraft experiments over the ice pack near Barrow, Alaska indicating correlation between forward-scattered GPS returns and RADARSAT backscattered measurements.

  13. Influence of Ephemeris Error on GPS Single Point Positioning Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihua, Ma; Wang, Meng

    2013-09-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) user makes use of the navigation message transmitted from GPS satellites to achieve its location. Because the receiver uses the satellite's location in position calculations, an ephemeris error, a difference between the expected and actual orbital position of a GPS satellite, reduces user accuracy. The influence extent is decided by the precision of broadcast ephemeris from the control station upload. Simulation analysis with the Yuma almanac show that maximum positioning error exists in the case where the ephemeris error is along the line-of-sight (LOS) direction. Meanwhile, the error is dependent on the relationship between the observer and spatial constellation at some time period.

  14. Single Cell Analysis of a Bacterial Sender-Receiver System

    PubMed Central

    Mückl, Andrea; Kapsner, Korbinian; Gerland, Ulrich; Simmel, Friedrich C.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring gene expression dynamics on the single cell level provides important information on cellular heterogeneity and stochasticity, and potentially allows for more accurate quantitation of gene expression processes. We here study bacterial senders and receivers genetically engineered with components of the quorum sensing system derived from Aliivibrio fischeri on the single cell level using microfluidics-based bacterial chemostats and fluorescence video microscopy. We track large numbers of bacteria over extended periods of time, which allows us to determine bacterial lineages and filter out subpopulations within a heterogeneous population. We quantitatively determine the dynamic gene expression response of receiver bacteria to varying amounts of the quorum sensing inducer N-3-oxo-C6-homoserine lactone (AHL). From this we construct AHL response curves and characterize gene expression dynamics of whole bacterial populations by investigating the statistical distribution of gene expression activity over time. The bacteria are found to display heterogeneous induction behavior within the population. We therefore also characterize gene expression in a homogeneous bacterial subpopulation by focusing on single cell trajectories derived only from bacteria with similar induction behavior. The response at the single cell level is found to be more cooperative than that obtained for the heterogeneous total population. For the analysis of systems containing both AHL senders and receiver cells, we utilize the receiver cells as ‘bacterial sensors’ for AHL. Based on a simple gene expression model and the response curves obtained in receiver-only experiments, the effective AHL concentration established by the senders and their ‘sending power’ is determined. PMID:26808777

  15. GLORI (GLObal navigation satellite system Reflectometry Instrument): A New Airborne GNSS-R receiver for land surface applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motte, Erwan; Zribi, Mehrez; Fanise, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    GLORI (GLObal navigation satellite system Reflectometry Instrument) is a new receiver dedicated to the airborne measurement of surface parameters such as soil moisture and biomass above ground and sea state (wave height and direction) above oceans. The instrument is based on the PARIS concept [Martin-Neira, 1993] using both the direct and surface-reflected L-band signals from the GPS constellation as a multistatic radar source. The receiver is based on one up-looking and one down-looking dual polarization hemispherical active antennas feeding a low-cost 4-channel SDR direct down-conversion receiver tuned to the GPS L1 frequency. The raw measurements are sampled at 16.368MHz and stored as 2-bit, IQ binary files. In post-processing, GPS acquisition and tracking are performed on the direct up-looking signal while the down-looking signal is processed blindly using tracking parameters from the direct signal. The obtained direct and reflected code-correlation waveforms are the basic observables for geophysical parameters inversion. The instrument was designed to be installed aboard the ATR42 experimental aircraft from the French SAFIRE fleet as a permanent payload. The long term goal of the project is to provide real-time continuous surface information for every flight performed. The aircraft records attitude information through its Inertial Measurement Unit and a commercial GPS receiver records additional information such as estimated doppler and code phase, receiver location, satellites azimuth and elevation. A series of test flights were performed over both the Toulouse and Gulf of Lion (Mediterranean Sea) regions during the period 17-21 Nov 2014 together with the KuROS radar [Hauser et al., 2014]. Using processing methods from the literature [Egido et al., 2014], preliminary results demonstrate the instrument sensitivity to both ground and ocean surface parameters estimation. A dedicated scientific flight campaign is planned at the end of second quarter 2015 with

  16. Towards evaluating the intensity of convective systems by using GPS radio occultation profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Steiner, Andrea K.; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2015-04-01

    Deep convective systems, also more casually often just called storms, are destructive weather phenomena causing every year many deaths, injuries and damages and accounting for major economic losses in several countries. The number and intensity of such phenomena increased over the last decades in some areas of the globe, including Europe. Damages are mostly caused by strong winds and heavy rain and these parameters are strongly connected to the structure of the storm. Convection over land is usually stronger and deeper than over the ocean and some convective systems, known as supercells, also develop tornadoes through processes which are still mostly unclear. The intensity forecast and monitoring of convective systems is one of the major challenges for meteorology because in-situ measurements during extreme events are too sparse or not reliable and most ongoing satellite missions do not provide suitable time/space coverage. With this study we propose a new method for detecting the convection intensity in terms of rain rate and surface wind speed by using meteorological surface measurements in combination with atmospheric profiles from Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation observations, which are available in essentially all weather conditions and with global coverage. The analysis of models indicated a relationship between the cloud top altitude and the intensity of a storm. We thus use GPS radio occultation bending angle profiles for detecting the storm's cloud top altitude and we correlate this value to the rain rate and wind speed measured by meteorological station networks in two different regions, the WegenerNet climate station network (South-Eastern Styria, Austria) and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site (ARM, Southern Great Plains, USA), respectively. The results show a good correlation between the cloud top altitude and the maximum rain rate in the monitored areas, while this is not found for maximum wind speed. We conclude from this

  17. Optimal on-airport monitoring of the integrity of GPS-based landing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Gang

    2004-11-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a satellite-based radio navigation system. The Local Area Augmentation System (LAAS) is a version of Differential GPS (DGPS) designed to reliably support aircraft precision approaches. The Integrity Monitor Testbed (IMT) is a prototype of the LAAS Ground Facility (LGF) that is used to evaluate whether the LGF can meet system integrity requirements. To insure high integrity, the IMT has a variety of monitors to detect all possible failures. It also contains a failure-handling logic, known as Executive Monitoring (EXM), to exclude faulty measurements and recover once the failure disappears. Spatial ionospheric gradients are major threats to the LAAS. One focus of this thesis is exploring methods to quickly detect ionospheric gradients given the required low probability of false alarms. The first part of the thesis introduces GPS, LAAS, and the IMT and explains the algorithms and functionalities of IMT integrity monitors in detail. It then analyzes the failure responses of the integrity monitors under the most general measurement failure model. This analysis not only qualitatively maps the integrity monitors into the entire failure space, but also provides a tool to quantitatively compare the performance of different integrity monitors. In addition, the analysis examines the limitations of the existing monitors in detecting small but hazardous ionospheric gradients. The divergence Cumulative Sum (CUSUM) method is then derived and assessed. It can reduce the time required to detect marginal ionospheric gradients by about 30%. With the divergence CUSUM method implemented in the IMT, system integrity and performance are greatly improved. Different monitors can respond to the same failures. The last part of this thesis shows that the combination of these different monitors can detect certain failures more quickly than any individual monitor. This idea leads to a new method, called failure-specific testing, which can significantly

  18. Evaluation of GPS Coverage for the X-33 Michael-6 Trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundberg, John B.

    1998-01-01

    The onboard navigational system for the X-33 test flights will be based on the use of measurements collected from the Embedded Global Positioning System (GPS)/INS system. Some of the factors which will affect the quality of the GPS contribution to the navigational solution will be the number of pseudorange measurements collected at any instant in time, the distribution of the GPS satellites within the field of view, and the inherent noise level of the GPS receiver. The distribution of GPS satellites within the field of view of the receiver's antenna will depend on the receiver's position, the time of day, pointing direction of the antenna, and the effective cone angle of the antenna. The number of pseudorange measurements collected will depend upon these factors as well as the time required to lock onto a GPS satellite signal once the GPS satellite comes into the field of view of the antenna and the number of available receiver channels. The objective of this study is to evaluate the GPS coverage resulting from the proposed antenna pointing directions, the proposed antenna cone angles, and the effects due to the time of day for the X-33 Michael-6 trajectory from launch at Edwards AFB, California, to the start of the Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM) phase on approach to Michael AAF, Utah.

  19. Snow Depth with GPS: Case Study from Minnesota 2010-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilich, A. L.; Slater, A. G.; Larson, K. M.

    2011-12-01

    Although originally designed to enable accurate positioning and time transfer, the Global Positioning System (GPS) has also proved useful for remote sensing applications. In this study, GPS signals are used to measure snow depth via GPS interferometric reflectometry (GPS-IR). In GPS-IR, a GPS antenna receives the desired direct signal as well as an indirect signal which reflects off of the ground or snow surface. These two signals interfere, and the composite signal recorded by the GPS receiver can be post-processed to yield the distance between the antenna and the reflecting surface, that is, distance to the snow surface. We present the results of a new snow depth product for the state of Minnesota over the winter of 2010-2011. Although single-station examples of GPS snow depth measurements can be found in the literature, this is one of the first studies to compute GPS snow depth over a large regional-scale network. We chose Minnesota because the state Department of Transportation runs a network of continuously operating reference stations (CORS) with many desired characteristics: freely available data, good GPS station distribution with good proximity to COOP weather stations, GPS stations located adjacent to farm fields with few sky obstructions, and receiver models known to have sufficient data quality for GPS-IR. GPS-IR with CORS has many advantages over traditional snow depth measurements. First, because we leverage existing CORS, no new equipment installations are required and data are freely available via the Internet. Second, GPS-IR with CORS measures a large area, approximately 100 m2 around the station and 20 m2 per satellite. We present snow depth results for over 30 GPS stations distributed across the state. We compare the GPS-IR snow depth product to COOP observations and SNODAS modeled estimates. GPS-IR snow depth is one of the few independent data sources available for assessment of SNODAS. Ideally snow depth via GPS-IR will be available for

  20. Novel Calibration System with Sparse Wires for CMB Polarization Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, O.; Nguyen, H.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A.

    2012-06-01

    A curl competent (also known as B-modes) in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization is a smoking gun signature of the inflationary universe. To achieve better sensitivity to this faint signal, CMB polarization experiments aim to maximize the number of detector elements, resulting in a large focal plane receiver. Detector calibration of the polarization response becomes essential. It is extremely useful to be able to calibrate "simultaneously" all detectors on the large focal plane. We developed a novel calibration system that rotates a large "sparse" grid of metal wires, in front of and fully covering the field of view of the focal plane receiver. Polarized radiation is created via the reflection of ambient temperature photons from the wire surface. Since the detector has a finite beam size, the observed signal is convolved with the beam property. The intensity of the of the calibrator is reasonable (a few Kelvin or less) compared to sky temperature for typical observing conditions (˜10 K). The system played a successful role for receiver calibration of QUIET, a CMB polarization experiment located in the Atacama desert in Chile. The successful performance revealed that this system is applicable to other experiments based on different technologies, e.g. TES bolometers.

  1. Novel calibration system with sparse wires for CMB polarization receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, O.; Nguyen, H.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A. /Chicago U., KICP

    2011-07-01

    B-modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization is a smoking gun signature of the inflationary universe. To achieve better sensitivity to this faint signal, CMB polarization experiments aim to maximize the number of detector elements, resulting in a large focal plane receiver. Detector calibration of the polarization response becomes essential. It is extremely useful to be able to calibrate 'simultaneously' all detectors on the large focal plane. We developed a novel calibration system that rotates a large 'sparse' grid of metal wires, in front of and fully covering the field of view of the focal plane receiver. Polarized radiation is created via the reflection of ambient temperature from the wire surface. Since the detector has a finite beam size, the observed signal is smeared according to the beam property. The resulting smeared polarized radiation has a reasonable intensity (a few Kelvin or less) compared to the sky temperature ({approx}10 K observing condition). The system played a successful role for receiver calibration of QUIET, a CMB polarization experiment located in the Atacama desert in Chile. The successful performance revealed that this system is applicable to other experiments based on different technologies, e.g. TES bolometers.

  2. Application of new GPS aircraft control/display system to topographic mapping of the Greenland ice cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    A new PC-based GPS flight management display system (GFMS) was developed for Greenland ice cap mapping during the NASA Greenland Ice Sheet mapping experiment, when a total of nine flights were made over four different flight tracks, of which two coincided with ground tracks of the ERS altimeter satellite. In this system, the GFMS inputs the GPS position data to a PC, which generates aircraft automatic pilot steering commands and a cockpit display. The display includes (1) the course deviation indicators for cross-track error and altitude, (2) the flight plan and waypoint map overlay oriented to the aircraft, and (3) various other mission-pertinent numerical data.

  3. Modeling and Analysis of Gated, Pulsed RFI and Its Effect on GPS Receivers: Analysis of Average Cycle Slip Rate and Average Bit Error Probability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    remaining TTC − τobs seconds. will not significantly degrade the performance of a GNSS receiver as compared to ambient opera- tion. The scatterometer system...34Assessment of radio frequency interference relevant to the GNSS L5/E5A frequency band," RTCA Report DO-292, RTCA, Washington D.C., 2004. [4] Anon...34Assessment of radio frequency interference relevant to the GNSS L1 frequency band," RTCA Report DO-235B, RTCA, Washington D.C., 2008. [5] Anon., "Methodology

  4. Systems and Methods for Locating a Target in a GPS-Denied Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdock, Ronald G. (Inventor); Mackay, John D. (Inventor); Cummins, Douglas A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A system for locating an object in a GPS-denied environment includes first and second stationary nodes of a network and an object out of synchronization with a common time base of the network. The system includes one or more processors that are configured to estimate distances between the first stationary node and the object and a distance between the second stationary node and the object by comparing time-stamps of messages relayed between the object and the nodes. A position of the object can then be trilaterated using a location of each of the first and second stationary nodes and the measured distances between the object and each of the first and second stationary nodes.

  5. Concurrent validity and test-retest reliability of a global positioning system (GPS) and timing gates to assess sprint performance variables.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Mark; Worsfold, Paul; Twist, Craig; Lamb, Kevin

    2011-12-01

    There has been no previous investigation of the concurrent validity and reliability of the current 5 Hz global positioning system (GPS) to assess sprinting speed or the reliability of integrated GPS-accelerometer technology. In the present study, we wished to determine: (1) the concurrent validity and reliability of a GPS and timing gates to measure sprinting speed or distance, and (2) the reliability of proper accelerations recorded via GPS-accelerometer integration. Nineteen elite youth rugby league players performed two over-ground sprints and were simultaneously assessed using GPS and timing gates. The GPS measurements systematically underestimated both distance and timing gate speed. The GPS measurements were reliable for all variables of distance and speed (coefficient of variation [CV] = 1.62% to 2.3%), particularly peak speed (95% limits of agreement [LOA] = 0.00 ± 0.8 km · h(-1); CV = 0.78%). Timing gates were more reliable (CV = 1% to 1.54%) than equivalent GPS measurements. Accelerometer measurements were least reliable (CV = 4.69% to 5.16%), particularly for the frequency of proper accelerations (95% LOA = 1.00 ± 5.43; CV = 14.12%). Timing gates and GPS were found to reliably assess speed and distance, although the validity of the GPS remains questionable. The error found in accelerometer measurements indicates the limits of this device for detecting changes in performance.

  6. chroGPS, a global chromatin positioning system for the functional analysis and visualization of the epigenome.

    PubMed

    Font-Burgada, Joan; Reina, Oscar; Rossell, David; Azorín, Fernando

    2014-02-01

    Development of tools to jointly visualize the genome and the epigenome remains a challenge. chroGPS is a computational approach that addresses this question. chroGPS uses multidimensional scaling techniques to represent similarity between epigenetic factors, or between genetic elements on the basis of their epigenetic state, in 2D/3D reference maps. We emphasize biological interpretability, statistical robustness, integration of genetic and epigenetic data from heterogeneous sources, and computational feasibility. Although chroGPS is a general methodology to create reference maps and study the epigenetic state of any class of genetic element or genomic region, we focus on two specific kinds of maps: chroGPS(factors), which visualizes functional similarities between epigenetic factors, and chroGPS(genes), which describes the epigenetic state of genes and integrates gene expression and other functional data. We use data from the modENCODE project on the genomic distribution of a large collection of epigenetic factors in Drosophila, a model system extensively used to study genome organization and function. Our results show that the maps allow straightforward visualization of relationships between factors and elements, capturing relevant information about their functional properties that helps to interpret epigenetic information in a functional context and derive testable hypotheses.

  7. Physical applications of GPS geodesy: a review.

    PubMed

    Bock, Yehuda; Melgar, Diego

    2016-10-01

    Geodesy, the oldest science, has become an important discipline in the geosciences, in large part by enhancing Global Positioning System (GPS) capabilities over the last 35 years well beyond the satellite constellation's original design. The ability of GPS geodesy to estimate 3D positions with millimeter-level precision with respect to a global terrestrial reference frame has contributed to significant advances in geophysics, seismology, atmospheric science, hydrology, and natural hazard science. Monitoring the changes in the positions or trajectories of GPS instruments on the Earth's land and water surfaces, in the atmosphere, or in space, is important for both theory and applications, from an improved understanding of tectonic and magmatic processes to developing systems for mitigating the impact of natural hazards on society and the environment. Besides accurate positioning, all disturbances in the propagation of the transmitted GPS radio signals from satellite to receiver are mined for information, from troposphere and ionosphere delays for weather, climate, and natural hazard applications, to disturbances in the signals due to multipath reflections from the solid ground, water, and ice for environmental applications. We review the relevant concepts of geodetic theory, data analysis, and physical modeling for a myriad of processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales, and discuss the extensive global infrastructure that has been built to support GPS geodesy consisting of thousands of continuously operating stations. We also discuss the integration of heterogeneous and complementary data sets from geodesy, seismology, and geology, focusing on crustal deformation applications and early warning systems for natural hazards.

  8. Robust spacecraft attitude determination using global positioning system receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Jared Dale

    This dissertation presents the development of a new algorithm for processing GPS signals to compute attitude solutions. This new algorithm utilizes an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) with a quaternion state to combine signal to noise ratio (SNR) and differential carrier phase measurements. Attitude solutions can be obtained from these two measurement sources if multiple antennas are utilized which have non-aligned boresight vectors. The algorithm achieves improved integer resolution and accuracy for the carrier phase approach, and is able to perform on on-orbit antenna gain pattern calibration to aid the SNR approach. The developed algorithm is tested using both hardware in the loop space simulations and actual rooftop data. These tests are used to adjust the filter parameters and algorithm logic to achieve good performance. Testing is undertaken that demonstrates the accuracy and speed of the integer resolution process. Comparisons between rooftop and simulation results demonstrate that simulations accurately represent anticipated orbit conditions. These comparisons further show that the non-aligned antenna boresight vectors introduce little or no errors to the double difference carrier phase measurements. A trade study is conducted to assess the impact of the SNR measurements on the overall solution accuracy once the more accurate carrier phase measurements become available. The final version of the algorithm demonstrates solution accuracies of less than 0.5 degrees RMS in all three angles of rotation during rooftop tests, and accuracies on the order of 0.1 RMS in multipath-free orbit simulations. The developed and tested algorithm is then ported from its original code into a flight ready version available in NASA GEONS software. The versatility of the basic algorithm design is explored by creating a new system that incorporates magnetometer data with SNR and carrier phase measurements. The addition of the magnetometer measurements is shown to improve the integer

  9. System Model for MEMS based Laser Ultrasonic Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.

    2002-01-01

    A need has been identified for more advanced nondestructive Evaluation technologies for assuring the integrity of airframe structures, wiring, etc. Laser ultrasonic inspection instruments have been shown to detect flaws in structures. However, these instruments are generally too bulky to be used in the confined spaces that are typical of aerospace vehicles. Microsystems technology is one key to reducing the size of current instruments and enabling increased inspection coverage in areas that were previously inaccessible due to instrument size and weight. This paper investigates the system modeling of a Micro OptoElectroMechanical System (MOEMS) based laser ultrasonic receiver. The system model is constructed in software using MATLAB s dynamical simulator, Simulink. The optical components are modeled using geometrical matrix methods and include some image processing. The system model includes a test bench which simulates input stimuli and models the behavior of the material under test.

  10. Application of neural networks to South African GPS TEC modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habarulema, John Bosco; McKinnell, Lee-Anne; Cilliers, Pierre J.; Opperman, Ben D. L.

    2009-06-01

    The propagation of radio signals in the Earth's atmosphere is dominantly affected by the ionosphere due to its dispersive nature. Global Positioning System (GPS) data provides relevant information that leads to the derivation of total electron content (TEC) which can be considered as the ionosphere's measure of ionisation. This paper presents part of a feasibility study for the development of a Neural Network (NN) based model for the prediction of South African GPS derived TEC. The South African GPS receiver network is operated and maintained by the Chief Directorate Surveys and Mapping (CDSM) in Cape Town, South Africa. Vertical total electron content (VTEC) was calculated for four GPS receiver stations using the Adjusted Spherical Harmonic (ASHA) model. Factors that influence TEC were then identified and used to derive input parameters for the NN. The well established factors used are seasonal variation, diurnal variation, solar activity and magnetic activity. Comparison of diurnal predicted TEC values from both the NN model and the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2001) with GPS TEC revealed that the IRI provides more accurate predictions than the NN model during the spring equinoxes. However, on average the NN model predicts GPS TEC more accurately than the IRI model over the GPS locations considered within South Africa.

  11. Microbial community structure of a freshwater system receiving wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Hladilek, Matthew D; Gaines, Karen F; Novak, James M; Collard, David A; Johnson, Daniel B; Canam, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Despite our dependency on treatment facilities to condition wastewater for eventual release to the environment, our knowledge regarding the effects of treated water on the local watershed is extremely limited. Responses of lotic systems to the treated wastewater effluent have been traditionally investigated by examining the benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages and community structure; however, these studies do not address the microbial diversity of the water systems. In the present study, planktonic and benthic bacterial community structure were examined at 14 sites (from 60 m upstream to 12,100 m downstream) and at two time points along an aquatic system receiving treated effluent from the Charleston Wastewater Treatment Plant (Charleston, IL). Total bacterial DNA was isolated and 16S rRNA sequences were analyzed using a metagenomics platform. The community structure in planktonic bacterial communities was significantly correlated with dissolved oxygen concentration. Benthic bacterial communities were not correlated with water quality but did have a significant geographic structuring. A local restructuring effect was observed in both planktonic and benthic communities near the treated wastewater effluent, which was characterized by an increase in abundance of sphingobacteria. Sites further downstream from the wastewater facility appeared to be less influenced by the effluent. Overall, the present study demonstrated the utility of targeted high-throughput sequencing as a tool to assess the effects of treated wastewater effluent on a receiving water system, and highlighted the potential for this technology to be used for routine monitoring by wastewater facilities.

  12. Combustion system for hybrid solar fossil fuel receiver

    DOEpatents

    Mehos, Mark S.; Anselmo, Kenneth M.; Moreno, James B.; Andraka, Charles E.; Rawlinson, K. Scott; Corey, John; Bohn, Mark S.

    2004-05-25

    A combustion system for a hybrid solar receiver comprises a pre-mixer which combines air and fuel to form an air-fuel mixture. The mixture is introduced tangentially into a cooling jacket. A burner plenum is fluidically connected to the cooling jacket such that the burner plenum and the cooling jacket are arranged in thermal contact with one another. The air-fuel mixture flows through the cooling jacket cooling the burner plenum to reduce pre-ignition of the air-fuel mixture in the burner plenum. A combustion chamber is operatively associated with and open to the burner plenum to receive the air-fuel mixture from the burner plenum. An igniter is operatively positioned in the combustion chamber to combust the air-fuel mixture, releasing heat. A recuperator is operatively associated with the burner plenum and the combustion chamber and pre-heats the air-fuel mixture in the burner plenum with heat from the combustion chamber. A heat-exchanger is operatively associated and in thermal contact with the combustion chamber. The heat-exchanger provides heat for the hybrid solar receiver.

  13. Present-day crustal deformation along the Magallanes-Fagnano Fault System in Tierra del Fuego from repeated GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, L.; Perdomo, R.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Del Cogliano, D.; Fritsche, M.; Richter, A.; Dietrich, R.

    2011-03-01

    The present-day deformation of the earth crust in the Argentine part of Tierra del Fuego main island (southernmost South America) is here investigated based on repeated geodetic GPS observations. The island is traversed by the active transform boundary between the South American and Scotia tectonic plates, represented by the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system. Since 1993 a regional network comprising to date 29 GPS sites has been observed almost every year. The complete set of accumulated observations was processed using the Bernese GPS software and state-of-the-art processing strategies and models. The utilization of homogeneous GPS products resulting from a reprocessing of the global IGS network warrants a stable realization of a global reference frame. For each GPS site 3-D positions and linear velocities with error estimates were obtained. A strain analysis of the horizontal velocity components revealed the zones of major deformation activity. A 30-km-wide deformation belt centred on the main trace of the fault system was identified. This belt is bordered to the north (South America) and south (Scotia) by geodynamically stable zones, which move horizontally with a relative average velocity of 4.4 ± 0.6 (east) and -0.3 ± 0.4 (north) mm a-1. Within the deformation belt a maximum strain rate in the order of 0.25 μstrain per year has been detected. A pronounced change in the deformation style from transtension (east) to transpression (west) is observed. The area of predominating shortening of the crust coincides with a local rotation minimum and relative uplift. Throughout the period covered by the GPS observations the displacements and deformations occurred to be linear with time.

  14. Response of Global Navigation Satellite System receivers to known shaking between 0.2 and 20 Hertz

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, John; Evans, John R.; Blume, Fredrick; Johanson, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Similar to Wang and others (2012), we also examined the GPS displacement records using standard spectral techniques. However, we extended their work by evaluating several models of GNSS receivers using a variety of input frequencies. Because our shake table was limited on acceleration and displacement, we did not attempt to duplicate the high shaking associated with high magnitude earthquakes. However, because our shake table could measure the table displacement, we could directly compare the measured GPS displacements with the true displacements.

  15. Global Positioning System (GPS) Determination of Motions, Neotectonics, and Seismic Risk in Trinidad and Tobago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, A. B.; Weber, J. C.; Schmalzle, G. M.

    2008-12-01

    The twin island nation of Trinidad and Tobago is located in the actively deforming Caribbean-South American (Ca-SA) plate boundary zone. Recent GPS (Global Positioning System) studies have accurately determined the relative plate motion between the Caribbean plate and South American plates: ~east-west, dextral motion at 20 mm/yr. Earthquakes do not clearly mark many of the active faults in Trinidad. A low-precision triangulation-to-GPS comparison at 23 sites and paleoseismology showed that significant strike-slip faulting is probably occurring on the Central Range Fault (CRF). The lack of recent seismic activity on the CRF may indicate that it is elastically locked and storing motion. We study Trinidad's neotectonics using new GPS data from 19 high-stability campaign sites that were built and measured in 2005, then measured again in 2007; for a few additional sites we have data that go back from 2007 to 1994. These new data will allow us to test and refine the previous lower-precision geodetic results to better quantify the rate of slip across the CRF and its mechanical behavior. We compiled, and then processed the data using GIPSY/OASIS II (Release 5.0) software at the University of Miami RSMAS Geodesy Lab. We find that, in a South American reference frame, sites north of the CRF move at about 20 (±1-5) mm/yr; sites south of the CRF are stationary (±1-8 mm/yr). Tobago site velocities are slightly oblique to overall Caribbean plate motion due to a major (Magnitude 6.7) earthquake that occurred off Tobago's south coast in 1997. Our new results support the hypotheses that the CRF is the principal active strike-slip fault in Trinidad (i.e., is the current Ca-SA plate boundary). We are fitting locked fault (elastic dislocation half-space) models to the data which will allow us to look more closely at the mechanical behavior of the CRF to further test whether it is locked or creeping to help evaluate its seismic risk.

  16. GPS-Like Phasing Control of the Space Solar Power System Transmission Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Psiaki, Mark L.

    2003-01-01

    The problem of phasing of the Space Solar Power System's transmission array has been addressed by developing a GPS-like radio navigation system. The goal of this system is to provide power transmission phasing control for each node of the array that causes the power signals to add constructively at the ground reception station. The phasing control system operates in a distributed manner, which makes it practical to implement. A leader node and two radio navigation beacons are used to control the power transmission phasing of multiple follower nodes. The necessary one-way communications to the follower nodes are implemented using the RF beacon signals. The phasing control system uses differential carrier phase relative navigation/timing techniques. A special feature of the system is an integer ambiguity resolution procedure that periodically resolves carrier phase cycle count ambiguities via encoding of pseudo-random number codes on the power transmission signals. The system is capable of achieving phasing accuracies on the order of 3 mm down to 0.4 mm depending on whether the radio navigation beacons operate in the L or C bands.

  17. Measuring Orientation Of The Earth With GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Adam P.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses feasibility of using Global Positioning System (GPS) to resolve short-term fluctuations (days or hours) in locations of points on crust of Earth to within centimeters or millimeters. With full constellation of satellites and ground receiving stations, system provides rapid (within 12 hours) determinations of variations in orientation. Measurements used to enhance precision of spacecraft navigation and in geophysical and meteorological studies of daily exchanges of angular momentum among fluid core, crust and mantle, oceans, and atmosphere.

  18. Aiding GPS With Additional Satellite Navigation Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    10 FDMA Frequency Division Multiple Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 GBCC Ground Based Control Complex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11...Precision Service (HPS), which is like PPS in GPS. GLONASS uses Frequency Division Multiple Access ( FDMA ) unlike the CDMA used in GPS. Every GLONASS...GLONASS uses FDMA , its receiver design is more costly compared to GPS. The GLONASS user segment is small and located primarily in Russia. There are

  19. Processing GPS Occultation Data To Characterize Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, George; Kursinski, Emil; Leroy, Stephen; Lijima, Byron; de la Torre Juarez, Manuel; Romans, Larry; Ao, Chi

    2005-01-01

    GOAS [Global Positioning System (GPS) Occultation Analysis System] is a computer program that accepts signal-occultation data from GPS receivers aboard low-Earth-orbiting satellites and processes the data to characterize the terrestrial atmosphere and, in somewhat less comprehensive fashion, the ionosphere. GOAS is very robust and can be run in an unattended semi-operational processing mode. It features sophisticated retrieval algorithms that utilize the amplitudes and phases of the GPS signals. It incorporates a module that, using an assumed atmospheric refractivity profile, simulates the effects of the retrieval processing system, including the GPS receiver. GOAS utilizes the GIPSY software for precise determination of orbits as needed for calibration. The GOAS output for the Earth s troposphere and mid-to-lower stratosphere consists of high-resolution (<1 km) profiles of density, temperature, pressure, atmospheric refractivity, bending angles of signals, and water-vapor content versus altitude from the Earth s surface to an altitude of 30 km. The GOAS output for the ionosphere consists of electron-density profiles from an altitude of about 50 km to the altitude of a satellite, plus parameters related to the rapidly varying structure of the electron density, particularly in the E layer of the ionosphere.

  20. Seafloor crustal movement observed off Miyagi after the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake using GPS-Acoustic observation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Y.; Kido, M.; Ito, Y.; Ohta, Y.; Hino, R.; Fujimoto, H.

    2012-12-01

    Large interplate earthquake repeatedly occurred in Japan Trench. Recently, the detail crustal deformation revealed by the nation-wide inland GPS network called as GEONET by GSI. However, the maximum displacement region for interplate earthquake is mainly located offshore region. Based on this background, we has been developed a GPS-Acoustic observation (GPS-A) system for the seafloor crustal deformation monitoring. A major earthquake struck in Japan Trench on March 11, 2011, named as the "2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake" (here after 2011 Tohoku earthquake). Kido et al (2011) investigated the coseismic seafloor deformation by the GPS-A system. They reported the 15 and 31m coseismic displacements in GJT4, and GJT3, respectively. Both sites moved toward ESE direction, which is opposite direction of the plate subduction. These results suggested the heterogeneity of the coseismic slip distribution in the plate interface [e.g. Iinuma et al. 2012]. After such large earthquake, the large postseismic deformation is also expected which may be caused by the afterslip for short (~several year) time period. The spatial coverage of the GPS/A sites is still not enough because of we have only two sites in and around the focal area. For more detail information for the postseismic deformation, we has been deployed one more GPS/A site (GJT1) from 2011 May. We observed 4 times for the GJT3 for postseismic deformation in 2011 April, August, October, and 2012 July. As the result of 3 campaigns, we obtained 1.2 m displacement toward the ENE direction in GJT3. It is clearly larger than the displacement expected from the postseismic slip inferred from inland GEONET time series (Ozawa et al., 2012). It suggests that the estimated postseismic slip based on the inland GPS data may underestimate the actual postseismic slip amount in the offshore region. Iinuma et al. (this meeting) constructed a postseismic slip distribution using onshore and seafloor displacement (GPS

  1. Evaluating home range techniques: use of Global Positioning System (GPS) collar data from chacma baboons.

    PubMed

    Pebsworth, Paula A; Morgan, Hanna R; Huffman, Michael A

    2012-10-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) collars have revolutionized the field of spatial ecology, but to date, few primate studies have used them. We fitted a free-ranging, semi-habituated, juvenile male chacma baboon (Papio hamadryas ursinus) with an automatic self-releasing GPS collar and tracked his movements for 359 days. The collar captured 4254 fixes out of 5719 programmed opportunities, a 74.4 % acquisition rate, suggesting that the collar effectively tracked this baboon in a variety of habitat types. Of the data points captured, 73.7 % were three-dimensional fixes, and of these fixes, 66.9 % were highly accurate, having a dilution of precision of less than four. We calculated home range using three protocols with three estimation methods: minimum convex polygon, fixed kernel-density estimation (KDE), and fixed r local convex hull. Using all data points and the 95 % contour, these methods created home range estimations ranging from 10.8 to 23.1 km(2) for this baboon troop. Our results indicate that the KDE output using all data locations most accurately represented our data set, as it created a continuous home range boundary that excluded unused areas and outlying, potentially exploratory data points while including all seven sleeping sites and a movement corridor. However, home range estimations generated from KDE varied from 15.4 to 18.8 km(2) depending on the smoothing parameter used. Our results demonstrated that the ad hoc smoothing parameter selection technique was a better method for our data set than either the least squares cross-validation or biased cross-validation techniques. Our results demonstrate the need for primatologists to develop a standardized reporting method which documents the tool, screening protocol, and smoothing parameter used in the creation of home range estimations in order to make comparisons that are meaningful.

  2. Boeing Satellite Television Airplane Receiving System (STARS) performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vertatschitsch, Edward J.; Fitzsimmons, George W.

    1995-01-01

    Boeing Defense and Space Group is developing a Satellite Television Airplane Receiving System (STARS) capable of delivering Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS) television to an aircraft in-flight. This enables a new service for commercial airplanes that will make use of existing and future DBS systems. The home entertainment satellites, along with STARS, provide a new mobile satellite communication application. This paper will provide a brief background of the antenna issues associated with STARS for commercial airplanes and then describe the innovative Boeing phased-array solution to these problems. The paper then provides a link budget of the STARS using the Hughes DBS as an example, but the system will work with all of the proposed DBS satellites in the 12.2-12.7 GHz band. It concludes with operational performance calculations of the STARS system, supported by measured test data of an operational 16-element subarray. Although this system is being developed for commercial airplanes, it is well suited for a wide variety of mobile military and other commercial communications systems in air, on land and at sea. The applications include sending high quality video for the digital battlefield and large volumes of data on the information superhighway at rates in excess of 350 Mbps.

  3. Integrated navigation of aerial robot for GPS and GPS-denied environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Min, Hongkyu; Wada, Tetsuya; Nonami, Kenzo

    2016-09-01

    In this study, novel robust navigation system for aerial robot in GPS and GPS- denied environments is proposed. Generally, the aerial robot uses position and velocity information from Global Positioning System (GPS) for guidance and control. However, GPS could not be used in several environments, for example, GPS has huge error near buildings and trees, indoor, and so on. In such GPS-denied environment, Laser Detection and Ranging (LIDER) sensor based navigation system have generally been used. However, LIDER sensor also has an weakness, and it could not be used in the open outdoor environment where GPS could be used. Therefore, it is desired to develop the integrated navigation system which is seamlessly applied to GPS and GPS-denied environments. In this paper, the integrated navigation system for aerial robot using GPS and LIDER is developed. The navigation system is designed based on Extended Kalman Filter, and the effectiveness of the developed system is verified by numerical simulation and experiment.

  4. Single-Frequency GPS Relative Navigation in a High Ionosphere Orbital Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, Patrick R.; Naasz, Bo J.

    2007-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) provides a convenient source for space vehicle relative navigation measurements, especially for low Earth orbit formation flying and autonomous rendezvous mission concepts. For single-frequency GPS receivers, ionospheric path delay can be a significant error source if not properly mitigated. In particular, ionospheric effects are known to cause significant radial position error bias and add dramatically to relative state estimation error if the onboard navigation software does not force the use of measurements from common or shared GPS space vehicles. Results from GPS navigation simulations are presented for a pair of space vehicles flying in formation and using GPS pseudorange measurements to perform absolute and relative orbit determination. With careful measurement selection techniques relative state estimation accuracy to less than 20 cm with standard GPS pseudorange processing and less than 10 cm with single-differenced pseudorange processing is shown.

  5. Developing a Fundamental Model for an Integrated GPS/INS State Estimation System with Kalman Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    This work will demonstrate the integration of sensor and system dynamic data and their appropriate models using an optimal filter to create a robust, adaptable, easily reconfigurable state (motion) estimation system. This state estimation system will clearly show the application of fundamental modeling and filtering techniques. These techniques are presented at a general, first principles level, that can easily be adapted to specific applications. An example of such an application is demonstrated through the development of an integrated GPS/INS navigation system. This system acquires both global position data and inertial body data, to provide optimal estimates of current position and attitude states. The optimal states are estimated using a Kalman filter. The state estimation system will include appropriate error models for the measurement hardware. The results of this work will lead to the development of a "black-box" state estimation system that supplies current motion information (position and attitude states) that can be used to carry out guidance and control strategies. This black-box state estimation system is developed independent of the vehicle dynamics and therefore is directly applicable to a variety of vehicles. Issues in system modeling and application of Kalman filtering techniques are investigated and presented. These issues include linearized models of equations of state, models of the measurement sensors, and appropriate application and parameter setting (tuning) of the Kalman filter. The general model and subsequent algorithm is developed in Matlab for numerical testing. The results of this system are demonstrated through application to data from the X-33 Michael's 9A8 mission and are presented in plots and simple animations.

  6. Airborne Navigation Sensors Using The Global Positioning System (GPS) / Precise Positioning Service (PPS) for Area Navigation (RNAV) in Required Navigation Performance (RNP) Airspace; RNP-20 RNAV Through RNP-0.3 RNAV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-11

    GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM ( GPS ) I PRECISE POSITIONING SERVICE (PPS) FOR AREA NAVIGATION (RNA...Navigation Sensors Using The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) / Precise Positioning Service (PPS) For Area Navigation (RNAV) In Required Navigation...Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Subject: MSO-C145, AIRBORNE NAVIGATION SENSORS USING THE GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM ( GPS

  7. Piezolectric transmitting and receiving systems for purposes of echosonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lypacewicz, Grazyna

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze piezoelectric transmitting and receiving systems mainly from the standpoint of application in the echosonographic instruments being developed in the Ultrasound Laboratory of the Institute of fundamental Technology Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences. Our own research was preceded by a discussion of equivalent circuits of piezoelectric transducers mentioned in references. The equivalent circuit was expanded to include electric parameters (compensation circuit, cables, feed conductors, resistances -shunting resistances, those of the transmitter and receiver) as well as mechanical and dielectric losses (according to Carlson and Brown). Both acoustic and electric parameters as well as relative values have been introduced to investigate the influence of individual parameters on the circuit performance. A fast Fourier transform and matrix calculation have been used to calculate the driving point function, transfer function, acoustic and electric pulses. It has been demonstrated that head parameters (compensation circuit, the thickness of the acoustic fitting layers) should be optimized for electric resonance frequency, which is a function of the conjugation factor K(sub t). the admittance curve has been shown to become symmetric, while its value is reduced to a minimum for optimal fitting layer thickness (lambda(sub e)/4). This led to the development of a method of layer thickness optimization in the course of polishing via the measurement of electric admittance.

  8. GPS Control Segment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    AND MISSILE SYSTEMS CENTER • Provides GPS Ill SV command and control • NAV capability equivalent to GPS IIF (legacy and modern signals) - No L 1 ...Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions...information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number 1 . REPORT DATE 29 APR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00

  9. Communications Satellite Receiver Systems for Public Schools: A Technical Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Designed to aid school districts contemplating use of some of the telecommunications services now available by satellite, this document contains information on home satellite receiving dishes (Television Receive-Only--TVROs), which can receive radio signals carrying television, sound, and data. This information includes: some factors involved in…

  10. TIDs over Tucuman by GPS radio interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Victor

    This paper presents some results investigating the new possibilities of radio interferometry of Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs) that are based on exploiting standard measurements of transionospheric radio signal characteristics and coordinate-time measurements using dual-frequency multichannel receivers of the Global Positioning System (GPS). We consider some methods of reconstructing TID characteristics, which were used in classical radio interferometry and can be useful when processing GPS data. Let us consider an interferometer that consist of three receivers, installed at vertexes of triangle on Tucuman (26°49' 00" S ;65°13' 00" W) with sides oriented to the north and east. A Statistical Angle-of-arrival and Doppler Method for GPS radio interferometry is proposed for determining the characteristics of the TIDs dynamics by measuring variations of GPS phase derivatives with respect to time and spatial coordinates. These data are used to calculate corresponding values of the velocity vector, in view of a correction for satellite motions based on the current information available regarding the angular coordinates of the satellites. Our findings show that : a) We learnt that Gravity Waves (GW) can be measured with a system of 3 closely located GPS receivers, b) It is possible to detect the angle of arrival, velocity, and period of the GWs, c) Attention has to be paid to cases when there are TEC depletions as they can be mistaken by GWs, d) To avoid a false detection is possible to use a spectral analysis that will help us differentiate between perturbations that are moving with different velocities.

  11. Operational aspects of CASA UNO '88-The first large scale international GPS geodetic network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilan, Ruth E.; Dixon, T. H.; Meehan, Thomas K.; Melbourne, William G.; Scheid, John A.; Kellogg, J. N.; Stowell, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    For three weeks, from January 18 to February 5, 1988, scientists and engineers from 13 countries and 30 international agencies and institutions cooperated in the most extensive GPS (Global Positioning System) field campaign, and the largest geodynamics experiment, in the world to date. This collaborative eperiment concentrated GPS receivers in Central and South America. The predicted rates of motions are on the order of 5-10 cm/yr. Global coverage of GPS observations spanned 220 deg of longitude and 125 deg of latitude using a total of 43 GPS receivers. The experiment was the first civilian effort at implementing an extended international GPS satellite tracking network. Covariance analyses incorporating the extended tracking network predicted significant improvement in precise orbit determination, allowing accurate long-baseline geodesy in the science areas.

  12. 76 FR 33022 - Eighty-Sixth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 159: Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... Group ] 7, Antenna (GPS Antenna), Colson Board Room. Plenary Session--See Agenda Below Friday, June 17.../Antennas (WG-7). Review of EUROCAE Activities. ADS-B GAP Analysis Ad Hoc--Report. Assignment/Review...

  13. GPS compound eye attitude and navigation sensor and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, David A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a GPS system for navigation and attitude determination, comprising a sensor array including a convex hemispherical mounting structure having a plurality of mounting surfaces, and a plurality of antennas mounted to the mounting surfaces for receiving signals from space vehicles of a GPS constellation. The present invention also includes a receiver for collecting the signals and making navigation and attitude determinations. In an alternate embodiment the present invention may include two opposing convex hemispherical mounting structures, each of the mounting structures having a plurality of mounting surfaces, and a plurality of antennas mounted to the mounting surfaces.

  14. Anti-Jam GPS Antennas for Wearable Dismounted Soldier Navigation Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    textile- integrated embodiments and externally mounted/removable embodiments. Early measured results for a variety of textile- integrated carbon ...nanotube thread antennas are presented in order to explore the feasibility of applying bulk carbon nanotube materials to wearable anti-jam GPS antenna...designs. 15. SUBJECT TERMS antenna, wearable, anti-jam, GPS, carbon nanotube, radio frequency 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  15. Saved by Iridium? An Alternative to GPS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-17

    It receives its name from the Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei .51 The €20 billion European Union project launched the first two satellites on 21...98Grewal, Weill, and Andrews, Global Positioning System, Inertial Navigation, and Integration, 239. 99Goodreads, “ Galileo Galilei ...completes-high-integrity-gps-program-milestones-.html 39 Goodreads. “ Galileo Galilei quotes.” http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/ 14190

  16. Transmitter-receiver system for time average fourier telescopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pava, Diego Fernando

    Time Average Fourier Telescopy (TAFT) has been proposed as a means for obtaining high-resolution, diffraction-limited images over large distances through ground-level horizontal-path atmospheric turbulence. Image data is collected in the spatial-frequency, or Fourier, domain by means of Fourier Telescopy; an inverse twodimensional Fourier transform yields the actual image. TAFT requires active illumination of the distant object by moving interference fringe patterns. Light reflected from the object is collected by a "light-buckt" detector, and the resulting electrical signal is digitized and subjected to a series of signal processing operations, including an all-critical averaging of the amplitude and phase of a number of narrow-band signals. This dissertation reports on the formulation and analysis of a transmitter-receiver system appropriate for the illumination, signal detection, and signal processing required for successful application of the TAFT concept. The analysis assumes a Kolmogorov model for the atmospheric turbulence, that the object is rough on the scale of the optical wavelength of the illumination pattern, and that the object is not changing with time during the image-formation interval. An important original contribution of this work is the development of design principles for spatio-temporal non-redundant arrays of active sources for object illumination. Spatial non-redundancy has received considerable attention in connection with the arrays of antennas used in radio astronomy. The work reported here explores different alternatives and suggests the use of two-dimensional cyclic difference sets, which favor low frequencies in the spatial frequency domain. The temporal nonredundancy condition requires that all active sources oscillate at a different optical frequency and that the frequency difference between any two sources be unique. A novel algorithm for generating the array, based on optimized perfect cyclic difference sets, is described

  17. Optimization Algorithm for Kalman Filter Exploiting the Numerical Characteristics of SINS/GPS Integrated Navigation Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaoxing; Xu, Shike; Wang, Duhu; Zhang, Aiwu

    2015-11-11

    Aiming at addressing the problem of high computational cost of the traditional Kalman filter in SINS/GPS, a practical optimization algorithm with offline-derivation and parallel processing methods based on the numerical characteristics of the system is presented in this paper. The algorithm exploits the sparseness and/or symmetry of matrices to simplify the computational procedure. Thus plenty of invalid operations can be avoided by offline derivation using a block matrix technique. For enhanced efficiency, a new parallel computational mechanism is established by subdividing and restructuring calculation processes after analyzing the extracted "useful" data. As a result, the algorithm saves about 90% of the CPU processing time and 66% of the memory usage needed in a classical Kalman filter. Meanwhile, the method as a numerical approach needs no precise-loss transformation/approximation of system modules and the accuracy suffers little in comparison with the filter before computational optimization. Furthermore, since no complicated matrix theories are needed, the algorithm can be easily transplanted into other modified filters as a secondary optimization method to achieve further efficiency.

  18. Optimization Algorithm for Kalman Filter Exploiting the Numerical Characteristics of SINS/GPS Integrated Navigation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaoxing; Xu, Shike; Wang, Duhu; Zhang, Aiwu

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at addressing the problem of high computational cost of the traditional Kalman filter in SINS/GPS, a practical optimization algorithm with offline-derivation and parallel processing methods based on the numerical characteristics of the system is presented in this paper. The algorithm exploits the sparseness and/or symmetry of matrices to simplify the computational procedure. Thus plenty of invalid operations can be avoided by offline derivation using a block matrix technique. For enhanced efficiency, a new parallel computational mechanism is established by subdividing and restructuring calculation processes after analyzing the extracted “useful” data. As a result, the algorithm saves about 90% of the CPU processing time and 66% of the memory usage needed in a classical Kalman filter. Meanwhile, the method as a numerical approach needs no precise-loss transformation/approximation of system modules and the accuracy suffers little in comparison with the filter before computational optimization. Furthermore, since no complicated matrix theories are needed, the algorithm can be easily transplanted into other modified filters as a secondary optimization method to achieve further efficiency. PMID:26569247

  19. Ionospheric Data Assimilation with GPS data: Slant versus Vertical TEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldt, J. A.; Moldwin, M.; Mannucci, A. J.; Ridley, A. J.; Komjathy, A.; Wilson, B. D.; Stephens, P.; Butala, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    There are a number of Global Positioning System (GPS) total electron content (TEC) data sets widely used in the ionospheric community including the MIT Madrigal and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) database. Understanding the differences of the datasets are important for empirical and physics-based modeling efforts especially those involving ionospheric data assimilation. For this study, we are comparing the Madrigal database's World Wide GPS receiver network with JPL processed GPS data from nearly 200 stations. We will investigate two data assimilation models using these data: University of Michigan's Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (GITM) and the JPL Global Assimilative Ionospheric Model (GAIM). The Madrigal data product provides gridded vertical total electron content (VTEC) based on data from a worldwide network of GPS receivers, in an easily accessible format without the need to process individual line of sight measurements. JPL uses raw data (RINEX files) from each GPS receiver to produce slant TEC (STEC) output between each receiver and satellite line of sight. Interfrequency biases at JPL are estimated using a model-assisted global mapping approach. We compare the Madrigal and JPL TEC data products to analyze differences in their ionospheric and bias estimation algorithms. This study will also compare data assimilation results using with VTEC and STEC.

  20. Potential radio frequency interference with the GPS L5 band for radio occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, A. M.; Akos, D. M.; Lo, S.

    2014-05-01

    New Radio Occultation (RO) receivers are planned to utilize the newly implemented Global Positioning System (GPS) L5 signal centered at 1176.45 MHz. Since there are currently no operational GPS L5 receivers used for space-based RO applications, the interference environment is unclear. Distance Measuring Equipment (DME) and Tactical Air Navigation (TACAN) stations share the same frequency band as the GPS L5 signal. DME/TACAN signals have been identified to be a means of interference for any GPS L5 receiver. This study focuses on implementing a Systems Tools Kit (STK) simulation to gain insight into the power received by a RO satellite in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) from a DME/TACAN transmission. In order to confirm the validity of utilizing STK for communication purposes, a theoretical scenario was recreated as a simulation and the results were confirmed. Once the method was validated, STK was used to output a received power level aboard a RO satellite from a DME/TACAN station as well as a tool to predict the number of interfering DME/TACAN stations at any point in time. Taking a conservative approach, the signal power received was much greater than the typical power level received by a RO satellite from a GPS satellite transmission. This relatively high received power along with a high number of interfering DME/TACAN stations as an RO satellite passes over North America or Western Europe indicate that DME/TACAN interference may conflict with RO receivers.